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Sample records for average current rf

  1. Low frequency rf current drive

    Hershkowitz, N.

    1992-01-01

    An unshielded antenna for rf heating has been developed and tested during this report period. In addition to design specifications being given, some experimental results are presented utilizing: (1) an unprotected Faraday shield, (2) insulating guard limiters, (3) unshielded antenna experiments, (4) method for detecting small rf driven currents, (5) rf fast wave current drive experiments, (6) alfven wave interactions with electrons, and (7) machine conditioning, impurity generation and density control

  2. RF current drive and plasma fluctuations

    Peysson, Yves; Decker, Joan; Morini, L; Coda, S

    2011-01-01

    The role played by electron density fluctuations near the plasma edge on rf current drive in tokamaks is assessed quantitatively. For this purpose, a general framework for incorporating density fluctuations in existing modelling tools has been developed. It is valid when rf power absorption takes place far from the fluctuating region of the plasma. The ray-tracing formalism is modified in order to take into account time-dependent perturbations of the density, while the Fokker–Planck solver remains unchanged. The evolution of the electron distribution function in time and space under the competing effects of collisions and quasilinear diffusion by rf waves is determined consistently with the time scale of fluctuations described as a statistical process. Using the ray-tracing code C3PO and the 3D linearized relativistic bounce-averaged Fokker–Planck solver LUKE, the effect of electron density fluctuations on the current driven by the lower hybrid (LH) and the electron cyclotron (EC) waves is estimated quantitatively. A thin fluctuating layer characterized by electron drift wave turbulence at the plasma edge is considered. The effect of fluctuations on the LH wave propagation is equivalent to a random scattering process with a broadening of the poloidal mode spectrum proportional to the level of the perturbation. However, in the multipass regime, the LH current density profile remains sensitive to the ray chaotic behaviour, which is not averaged by fluctuations. The effect of large amplitude fluctuations on the EC driven current is found to be similar to an anomalous radial transport of the fast electrons. The resulting lower current drive efficiency and broader current profile are in better agreement with experimental observations. Finally, applied to the ITER ELMy H-mode regime, the model predicts a significant broadening of the EC driven current density profile with the fluctuation level, which can make the stabilization of neoclassical tearing mode potentially

  3. Eighth CW and High Average Power RF Workshop

    2014-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the next Continuous Wave and High Average RF Power Workshop, CWRF2014, to take place at Hotel NH Trieste, Trieste, Italy from 13 to 16 May, 2014. This is the eighth in the CWRF workshop series and will be hosted by Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A. (www.elettra.eu). CWRF2014 will provide an opportunity for designers and users of CW and high average power RF systems to meet and interact in a convivial environment to share experiences and ideas on applications which utilize high-power klystrons, gridded tubes, combined solid-state architectures, high-voltage power supplies, high-voltage modulators, high-power combiners, circulators, cavities, power couplers and tuners. New ideas for high-power RF system upgrades and novel ways of RF power generation and distribution will also be discussed. CWRF2014 sessions will start on Tuesday morning and will conclude on Friday lunchtime. A visit to Elettra and FERMI will be organized during the workshop. ORGANIZING COMMITTEE (OC): Al...

  4. Design of an L-band normally conducting RF gun cavity for high peak and average RF power

    Paramonov, V., E-mail: paramono@inr.ru [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, 60-th October Anniversary prospect 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Philipp, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Rybakov, I.; Skassyrskaya, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, 60-th October Anniversary prospect 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Stephan, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)

    2017-05-11

    To provide high quality electron bunches for linear accelerators used in free electron lasers and particle colliders, RF gun cavities operate with extreme electric fields, resulting in a high pulsed RF power. The main L-band superconducting linacs of such facilities also require a long RF pulse length, resulting in a high average dissipated RF power in the gun cavity. The newly developed cavity based on the proven advantages of the existing DESY RF gun cavities, underwent significant changes. The shape of the cells is optimized to reduce the maximal surface electric field and RF loss power. Furthermore, the cavity is equipped with an RF probe to measure the field amplitude and phase. The elaborated cooling circuit design results in a lower temperature rise on the cavity RF surface and permits higher dissipated RF power. The paper presents the main solutions and results of the cavity design.

  5. Rf system modeling for the high average power FEL at CEBAF

    Merminga, L.; Fugitt, J.; Neil, G.; Simrock, S.

    1995-01-01

    High beam loading and energy recovery compounded by use of superconducting cavities, which requires tight control of microphonic noise, place stringent constraints on the linac rf system design of the proposed high average power FEL at CEBAF. Longitudinal dynamics imposes off-crest operation, which in turn implies a large tuning angle to minimize power requirements. Amplitude and phase stability requirements are consistent with demonstrated performance at CEBAF. A numerical model of the CEBAF rf control system is presented and the response of the system is examined under large parameter variations, microphonic noise, and beam current fluctuations. Studies of the transient behavior lead to a plausible startup and recovery scenario

  6. Synergy in RF Current Drive

    Dumont, R.J.; Giruzzi, G.

    2005-01-01

    Auxiliary methods for efficient non-inductive current drive in tokamaks generally involve the interaction of externally driven waves with superthermal electrons. Among the possible schemes, Lower Hybrid (LH) and Electron Cyclotron (EC) current drive have been so far the most successful. An interesting aspect of their combined use is the fact that since they involve possibly overlapping domains in velocity and configuration spaces, a synergy between them is expected for appropriate parameters. The signature of this effect, significant improvement of the EC current drive efficiency, results from a favorable interplay of the quasilinear diffusions induced by both waves. Recently, improvements of the EC current drive efficiency in the range of 2-4 have been measured in fully non-inductive discharges in the Tore Supra tokamak, providing the first clear evidence of this effect in steady-state conditions. We present here the experimental aspects of these discharges. The associated kinetic modeling and current state of understanding of the LH-EC synergy phenomenon are also discussed. (authors)

  7. Synergy in RF Current Drive

    Dumont, R.J.; Giruzzi, G.

    2005-01-01

    Auxiliary methods for efficient non-inductive current drive in tokamaks generally involve the interaction of externally driven waves with superthermal electrons. Among the possible schemes, Lower Hybrid (LH) and Electron Cyclotron (EC) current drive have been so far the most successful. An interesting aspect of their combined use is the fact that since they involve possibly overlapping domains in velocity and configuration spaces, a synergy between them is expected for appropriate parameters. The signature of this effect, significant improvement of the EC current drive efficiency, results from a favorable interplay of the quasilinear diffusions induced by both waves. Recently, improvements of the EC current drive efficiency in the range of 2-4 have been measured in fully non-inductive discharges in the Tore Supra tokamak, providing the first clear evidence of this effect in steady-state conditions. We present here the experimental aspects of these discharges. The associated kinetic modeling and current state of understanding of the LH-EC synergy phenomenon are also discussed

  8. Neoclassical effects on RF current drive in tokamaks

    Yoshioka, K.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Neoclassical effects on RF current drive which arise because of the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field in tokamak devices are analysed. A bounce averaged 2-D Fokker-Planck equation is derived from the drift kinetic equation and is solved numerically. The model features current drive due to a strong RF wave field. The efficiency of current drive by electron cyclotron waves is significantly reduced when the waves are absorbed at the low magnetic field side of a given flux surface, whereas the efficiency remains at the same level as in the homogeneous ideal plasma when the waves are absorbed at the high field side. The efficiency of current drive by fast waves (compressional Alfven waves) with low phase velocity (vsub(parallel)/vsub(th)<1) is significantly degraded by neoclassical effects, no matter where the wave is absorbed, and the applicability of this wave seems, therefore, to be doubtful. (author)

  9. Selfconsistent RF driven and bootstrap currents

    Peysson, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This important problem selfconsistent calculations of the bootstrap current with RF, taking into account possible synergistic effects, is addressed for the case of lower hybrid (LH) and electron cyclotron (EC) current drive by numerically solving the electron drift kinetic equation. Calculations are performed using a new, fast, and fully implicit code which solves the 3-D relativistic Fokker-Planck equation with quasilinear diffusion. These calculations take into account the perturbations to the electron distribution due to radial drifts induced by magnetic field gradient and curvature. While the synergism between bootstrap and LH-driven current does not seem to exceed 15%, it can reach 30-40% with the EC-driven current for some plasma parameters. In addition, considerable current can be generated by judiciously using ECCD with the Okhawa effect. This is in contrast to the usual ECCD which tries to avoid it. A detailed analysis of the numerical results is presented using a simplified analytical model which incorporates the underlying physical processes. (author)

  10. Measurement technology of RF interference current in high current system

    Zhao, Zhihua; Li, Jianxuan; Zhang, Xiangming; Zhang, Lei

    2018-06-01

    Current probe is a detection method commonly used in electromagnetic compatibility. With the development of power electronics technology, the power level of power conversion devices is constantly increasing, and the power current of the electric energy conversion device in the electromagnetic launch system can reach 10kA. Current probe conventionally used in EMC (electromagnetic compatibility) detection cannot meet the test requirements on high current system due to the magnetic saturation problem. The conventional high current sensor is also not suitable for the RF (Radio Frequency) interference current measurement in high current power device due to the high noise level in the output of active amplifier. In this paper, a passive flexible current probe based on Rogowski coil and matching resistance is proposed that can withstand high current and has low noise level, to solve the measurement problems of interference current in high current power converter. And both differential mode and common mode current detection can be easily carried out with the proposed probe because of the probe's flexible structure.

  11. Suppression of magnetic islands by rf-driven currents

    Reiman, A.H.

    1982-06-01

    The quasilinear theory for the saturation of nonlinear tearing modes is modified to include rf driven currents. It is shown that the presence of lower hybrid driven currents can strongly suppress the growth of magnetic islands

  12. Research on DC-RF superconducting photocathode injector for high average power FELs

    Zhao Kui; Hao Jiankui; Hu Yanle; Zhang Baocheng; Quan Shengwen; Chen Jiaer; Zhuang Jiejia

    2001-01-01

    To obtain high average current electron beams for a high average power Free Electron Laser (FEL), a DC-RF superconducting injector is designed. It consists of a DC extraction gap, a 1+((1)/(2)) superconducting cavity and a coaxial input system. The DC gap, which takes the form of a Pierce configuration, is connected to the 1+((1)/(2)) superconducting cavity. The photocathode is attached to the negative electrode of the DC gap. The anode forms the bottom of the ((1)/(2)) cavity. Simulations are made to model the beam dynamics of the electron beams extracted by the DC gap and accelerated by the superconducting cavity. High quality electron beams with emittance lower than 3 π-mm-mrad can be obtained. The optimization of experiments with the DC gap, as well as the design of experiments with the coaxial coupler have all been completed. An optimized 1+((1)/(2)) superconducting cavity is in the process of being studied and manufactured

  13. On the evaluation of currents in a tokamak plasma during combined Ohmic and RF current drive

    Eckhartt, D.

    1986-09-01

    By taking into account the rf-generated enhancement of the plasma electric conductivity (as formulated by Fisch in the limit of weak dc electric fields) a relation is derived between the ratio of rf to Ohmically driven currents and other plasma parameters to be measured before and after the rf onset under the condition of constant net plasma current. (author)

  14. Electromagnetic considerations for RF current density imaging [MRI technique].

    Scott, G C; Joy, M G; Armstrong, R L; Henkelman, R M

    1995-01-01

    Radio frequency current density imaging (RF-CDI) is a recent MRI technique that can image a Larmor frequency current density component parallel to B(0). Because the feasibility of the technique was demonstrated only for homogeneous media, the authors' goal here is to clarify the electromagnetic assumptions and field theory to allow imaging RF currents in heterogeneous media. The complete RF field and current density imaging problem is posed. General solutions are given for measuring lab frame magnetic fields from the rotating frame magnetic field measurements. For the general case of elliptically polarized fields, in which current and magnetic field components are not in phase, one can obtain a modified single rotation approximation. Sufficient information exists to image the amplitude and phase of the RF current density parallel to B(0) if the partial derivative in the B(0) direction of the RF magnetic field (amplitude and phase) parallel to B(0) is much smaller than the corresponding current density component. The heterogeneous extension was verified by imaging conduction and displacement currents in a phantom containing saline and pure water compartments. Finally, the issues required to image eddy currents are presented. Eddy currents within a sample will distort both the transmitter coil reference system, and create measurable rotating frame magnetic fields. However, a three-dimensional electro-magnetic analysis will be required to determine how the reference system distortion affects computed eddy current images.

  15. RF current generation near the ion cyclotron frequency

    Watkins, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment has been conducted to measure unipolar currents driven by directional radio frequency waves in a cylindrical plasma mirror machine near the ion cyclotron frequency. The directional waves were launched using a four phase helical coupler which allowed the selection of both azimuthal mode number (m = +1) and direction of wave propagation. Plasma diagnostics include electron density measurements (4 mm microwave interferometer), electron temperature measurements (floating double probe), wave amplitude and coupling measurements (magnetic probes). RF power measurements (RF voltage and current probes) and RF driven plasma current measurements (Rogowski loops and current transformers). End electrodes provided a necessary external return path and an alternate method for measuring the current. Theoretical work includes an analytic approximation to the nonlinear problem of a particle in a traveling wave and computer simulations that extend this result. Nonlinear particle drifts other than trapping were found both with and without the presence of particle collisions

  16. Path-sum calculations for rf current drive

    Belo, Jorge H.; Bizarro, Joao P.S.; Rodrigues, Paulo

    2001-01-01

    Path sums and Gaussian short-time propagators are used to solve two-dimensional Fokker-Planck models of lower-hybrid (LH) and electron-cyclotron (EC) current drive (CD), and are shown to be well suited to the two limiting situations where the rf quasilinear diffusion coefficient is either relatively small, D rf ≅0.1, or very large, D rf →∞, the latter case enabling a special treatment. Results are given for both LHCD and ECCD in the small D rf case, whereas the limiting situation is illustrated only for ECCD. To check the accuracy of path-sum calculations, comparisons with finite difference solutions are provided

  17. Current-phase relations and noise in rf biased SQUIDS

    Jackel, L.D.; Clark, T.D.; Buhrman, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was made of the effect of the weak link current-phase relation on noise in rf biased SQUIDs. Non-sinusoidal current-phase relations were observed in various weak links, and these non-sinusoidal relations were correlated with significantly increased intrinsic noise in the SQUID ring. The current-phase relation was also found to affect the amplitude of the rf SQUID ring dissipation. The result of an rf SQUID system noise analysis shows that, due to increased intrinsic noise and reduced ring dissipation, the minimum attainable noise for a SQUID ring having a very non-sinusoidal current-phase relation is considerably greater than for a ring with a sinusoidal relation

  18. RF current distribution and topology of RF sheath potentials in front of ICRF antennae

    Colas, L.; Heuraux, S.; Bremond, S.; Bosia, G.

    2005-01-01

    The 2D (radial/poloidal) spatial topology of RF-induced convective cells developing radially in front of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antennae is investigated, in relation to the spatial distribution of RF currents over the metallic structure of the antenna. This is done via a Green's function, determined from the ICRF wave coupling equations, and well-suited to open field lines extending toroidally far away on both sides of the antenna. Using such formalism, combined with a full-wave calculation using the 3D antenna code ICANT (Pecoul S. et al 2000 Comput. Phys. Commun. 146 166-87), two classes of convective cells are analysed. The first one appears in front of phased arrays of straps, and depending on the strap phasing, its topology is interpreted using the poloidal profiles of either the RF current or the RF voltage of the strip line theory. The other class of convective cells is specific to antenna box corners and is evidenced for the first time. Based on such analysis, general design rules are worked out in order to reduce the RF-sheath potentials, which generalize those proposed in the earlier literature, and concrete antenna design options are tested numerically. The merits of aligning all strap centres on the same (tilted) flux tube, and of reducing the antenna box toroidal conductivity in its lower and upper parts, are discussed

  19. rf beam-current, -phase, and -position monitors

    Young, L.

    1984-01-01

    A prototype rf beam monitor has been tested on the Racetrack Microtron's (RTM) 100 kV injector beam line at the National Bureau of Standards (NBS). This beam monitor is capable of measuring the current, the relative phase, and the position of the beam. The beam is bunched at 2380 MHz for acceleration by the linac in the injector beam line. This train of beam bunches passing through the beam monitor cavities excites the cavities at this resonance frequency of 2380 MHz. Probes in the cavities couple some of the beam-excited rf power out of the cavities. This rf power can be amplified if necessary and then analyzed by a double balanced mixer (DBM). The DBM can also be used as a phase detector. The effective shunt impedance of the cavities was measured with the CW beam. For the position monitor cavity, the shunt impedance is proportional to the displacement from the axis. The measured response of the prototype rf beam current monitor setup is a linear function of beam current. Response of the rf beam-position monitor is also shown

  20. RF Current Drive in Internal Transport Barrier

    Peysson, Y.; Basiuk, V.; Huysmans, G. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA-Cadarache, 13 - St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Decker, J.; Bers, A.; Ram, A.K. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The current drive problem in regimes with internal transport barrier is addressed using a fast solver of the electron drift kinetic equation which may be used for arbitrary tokamak plasma magnetic equilibrium and any type of electron radio-frequency wave. Parametric studies are performed for the Lower Hybrid and Electron Cyclotron waves. (authors)

  1. Effect of discrete RF spectrum on fast wave current drive

    Okazaki, Takashi; Yoshioka, Ken; Sugihara, Masayoshi

    1987-08-01

    Effect of discrete RF spectrum has been studied for the fast wave current drive with the ion cyclotron range of frequency. Driven current and power densities decrease in this spectrum than in the continuous spectrum. However, there is a possibility to have the mechanism which allows electrons outside the resonance region to interact with the fast wave, taking into account the electron trapping by discrete RF spectrum. In the case of neglecting the electron trapping effect, driven current and power densities decrease up to 0.6 - 0.8 of those which are obtained for the continuous spectrum for the FER (Fusion Experimental Reactor). However, their driven current and power densities can be almost doubled in their magnitude for the discrete spectrum by taking into account the trapping effect. (author)

  2. Rf Gun with High-Current Density Field Emission Cathode

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-01-01

    High current-density field emission from an array of carbon nanotubes, with field-emission-transistor control, and with secondary electron channel multiplication in a ceramic facing structure, have been combined in a cold cathode for rf guns and diode guns. Electrodynamic and space-charge flow simulations were conducted to specify the cathode configuration and range of emission current density from the field emission cold cathode. Design of this cathode has been made for installation and testing in an existing S-band 2-1/2 cell rf gun. With emission control and modulation, and with current density in the range of 0.1-1 kA/cm2, this cathode could provide performance and long-life not enjoyed by other currently-available cathodes

  3. A thermodynamical analysis of rf current drive with fast electrons

    Bizarro, João P. S., E-mail: bizarro@ipfn.tecnico.ulisboa.pt [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2015-08-15

    The problem of rf current drive (CD) by pushing fast electrons with high-parallel-phase-velocity waves, such as lower-hybrid (LH) or electron-cyclotron (EC) waves, is revisited using the first and second laws, the former to retrieve the well-known one-dimensional (1D) steady-state CD efficiency, and the latter to calculate a lower bound for the rate of entropy production when approaching steady state. The laws of thermodynamics are written in a form that explicitly takes care of frictional dissipation and are thus applied to a population of fast electrons evolving under the influence of a dc electric field, rf waves, and collisions while in contact with a thermal, Maxwellian reservoir with a well-defined temperature. Besides the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics, there is recourse to basic elements of kinetic theory only, being assumed a residual dc electric field and a strong rf drive, capable of sustaining in the resonant region, where waves interact with electrons, a raised fast-electron tail distribution, which becomes an essentially flat plateau in the case of the 1D theory for LHCD. Within the 1D model, particularly suited for LHCD as it solely retains fast-electron dynamics in velocity space parallel to the ambient magnetic field, an H theorem for rf CD is also derived, which is written in different forms, and additional physics is recovered, such as the synergy between the dc and rf power sources, including the rf-induced hot conductivity, as well as the equation for electron-bulk heating. As much as possible 1D results are extended to 2D, to account for ECCD by also considering fast-electron velocity-space dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, which leads to a detailed discussion on how the definition of an rf-induced conductivity may depend on whether one works at constant rf current or power. Moreover, working out the collisional dissipated power and entropy-production rate written in terms of the fast-electron distribution, it

  4. Quantum decay of metastable current states in rf squids

    Dmitrenko, I.M.; Khlus, V.A.; Tsoj, C.M.; Shnyrkov, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    Quantum decay of metastable current states in a rf SQUID superconducting ring of a hysteresis mode are considered. Point contacts are used as a Josephson weak link. The first derivative of rf IVC, dVsub(T)/dIsub(RF), is measured which gives the dependence of the density of decay probability on the amplitude of magnetic flux oscillations in the ring. The temperature dependence of probability distribution width between 4.2 and 0.5 K suggests that for most of high-ohmic contacts Nb-Nb, Nb-Ag-Nb the quantum mechanisms of decay become dominant beginning with the temperature of about 2 K. The experimental parameters of distribution of decay probability in the quantum limit are compared to those calculated by the theory of macroscopic quantum tunneling in the limit of high and low dissipation. The experimental values of probability density distribution width and characteristic quantum temperature are higher than the theoretical ones, the fact can be attributed to the deviation of current-phase relation of contact from a sinusoidal one. Besides, some contacts seem to correspond to the case of an intermediate value of dissipation. As the frequency of rf oscillations varies from 30 to 6 MHz, the distribution width remains unchanged in accordance with the theory of quantum tunneling decay of metastable current state in the ring in the limit of high damping. At low temperatures (T approximately 0.5 K), and rather small damping coefficient, the density of probability displays anomalous peaks when the amplitude of rf oscillations is lower considerably than the critical vaiue of magnetic flux in the ring

  5. Perspectives on setting limits for RF contact currents: a commentary.

    Tell, Richard A; Tell, Christopher A

    2018-01-15

    Limits for exposure to radiofrequency (RF) contact currents are specified in the two dominant RF safety standards and guidelines developed by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). These limits are intended to prevent RF burns when contacting RF energized objects caused by high local tissue current densities. We explain what contact currents are and review some history of the relevant limits with an emphasis on so-called "touch" contacts, i.e., contact between a person and a contact current source during touch via a very small contact area. Contact current limits were originally set on the basis of controlling the specific absorption rate resulting from the current flowing through regions of small conductive cross section within the body, such as the wrist or ankle. More recently, contact currents have been based on thresholds of perceived heating. In the latest standard from the IEEE developed for NATO, contact currents have been based on two research studies in which thresholds for perception of thermal warmth or thermal pain have been measured. Importantly, these studies maximized conductive contact between the subject and the contact current source. This factor was found to dominate the response to heating wherein high resistance contact, such as from dry skin, can result in local heating many times that from a highly conductive contact. Other factors such as electrode size and shape, frequency of the current and the physical force associated with contact are found to introduce uncertainty in threshold values when comparing data across multiple studies. Relying on studies in which the contact current is minimized for a given threshold does not result in conservative protection limits. Future efforts to develop limits on contact currents should include consideration of (1) the basis for the limits (perception, pain, tissue damage); (2) understanding of the

  6. Application of RF Superconductivity to High-Current Linac

    Chan, K.C.D.

    1998-01-01

    In 1997, the authors initiated a development program in Los Alamos for high-current superconducting proton-linac technology to build prototypes components of this linac to demonstrate the feasibility. The authors are building 700-MHz niobium cavities with elliptical shapes, as well as power couplers to transfer high RF power to these cavities. The cavities and power couplers will be integrated in cryostats as linac cryomodules. In this paper, they describe the linac design and the status of the development program

  7. Impact of electron trapping on RF current drive in tokamaks

    Giruzzi, G.; Engelmann, F.

    1987-01-01

    The impact of the presence of trapped electrons on noninductive current drive by RF waves in tokamak plasmas is investigated. The appropriate response function, allowing to express the current drive efficiency J/P by a simple analytical formula, has been derived. The approach displays the reasons for the degradation of the current drive efficiency away from the plasma axis in the case of methods relying on the diffusion of electrons in the velocity component perpendicular to the confining magnetic field. It is shown that this degradation is appreciable even for large resonant parallel velocities. (author) [pt

  8. Dynamic modelling of tearing mode stabilization by RF current drive

    Giruzzi, G.; Zabiego, M.; Gianakon, T.A.; Garbet, X.; Bernabei, S.

    1998-01-01

    The theory of tearing mode stabilization in toroidal plasmas by RF-driven currents that are modulated in phase with the island rotation is investigated. A time scale analysis of the phenomena involved indicates that transient effects, such as finite time response of the driven currents, island rotation during the power pulses, and the inductive response of the plasma, are intrinsically important. A dynamic model of such effects is developed, based on a 3-D Fokker-Planck code coupled to both the electric field diffusion and the island evolution equations. Extensive applications to both Electron Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid current drive in ITER are presented. (author)

  9. Combined RF current drive and bootstrap current in tokamaks

    Schultz, S. D.; Bers, A.; Ram, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    By calculating radio frequency current drive (RFCD) and the bootstrap current in a consistent kinetic manner, we find synergistic effects in the total noninductive current density in tokamaks [1]. We include quasilinear diffusion in the Drift Kinetic Equation (DKE) in order to generalize neoclassical theory to highly non-Maxwellian electron distributions due to RFCD. The parallel plasma current is evaluated numerically with the help of the FASTEP Fokker-Planck code [2]. Current drive efficiency is found to be significantly affected by neoclassical effects, even in cases where only circulating electrons interact with the waves. Predictions of the current drive efficiency are made for lower hybrid and electron cyclotron wave current drive scenarios in the presence of bootstrap current

  10. Beam physics design strategy for a high-current rf linac

    Reiser, M. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The high average beam power of an rf linac system for transmutation of nuclear waste puts very stringent requirements on beam quality and beam control. Fractional beam losses along the accelerator must be kept at extremely low levels to assure {open_quotes}hands-on{close_quotes} maintenance. Hence, halo formation and large-amplitude tails in the particle distribution due to beam mismatch and equipartitioning effects must be avoided. This implies that the beam should ideally be in near-perfect thermal equilibrium from injection to full energy - in contrast to existing rf linacs in which the transverse temperature, T {sub {perpendicular}}, is higher than the longitudinal temperature, T{sub {parallel}}. The physics and parameter scaling for such a system will be reviewed using the results of recent work on high-intensity bunched beams. A design strategy for a high-current rf linac with equilibrated beam will be proposed.

  11. Crane RF accelerator for high current radiation damage studies

    Whitham, K.; Anamkath, H.; Evans, K.; Lyons, S.; Palmer, D.; Miller, R.; Treas, P.; Zante, T.

    1992-01-01

    An electron accelerator was designed and built for the Naval Weapons Support Center for transient radiation effects on electronics experiments and testing. The Crane L Band RF Electron Linac was designed to provide high currents over a wide range of pulse widths and energies. The energy extends to 60 MeV and pulse widths vary from a few ns to 10 μsec. Beam currents range from 20 amps in the short pulse case to 1.5 amps in the long pulse case. This paper describes the linac, its architecture, the e-gun and pulser, waveguides, klystrons and modulator, vacuum system, beam transport, and control systems. fig., tab

  12. RF current drive in a toroidal plasna in the banana regime

    Belikov, V.S.; Kolesnichenko, Ya.I.; Plotnik, I.S.

    1982-01-01

    The use of travelling waves for the steady-state current drive in an axisymmetric toroidal plasma in the banana regime is studied. The treatment is based on a quasi-linear equation for the electron distribution function averaged over the period of the particle motion along the small azimuth of the torus. It is show that the trapped electrons do not absorb the energy of the monochromatic (over frequency) RF field and thus only the circulating electrons contribute to the driving current and to the absorbed RF power. The current and the absorbed power are calculated by using the electron distribution function obtained for the case of narrow wave packet, both the toroidal magnetic field and the distortion of the electron distribution over transverse velocities being taken into consideration. The significant role of the barely carculating electrons is revealed. It is pointed out that the toroidal satellite resonances can affect the RF current drive by spreading and splitting the region of the wave-marticle interaction

  13. High-Average, High-Peak Current Injector Design

    Biedron, S G; Virgo, M

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing interest in high-average-power (>100 kW), um-range FELs. These machines require high peak current (~1 kA), modest transverse emittance, and beam energies of ~100 MeV. High average currents (~1 A) place additional constraints on the design of the injector. We present a design for an injector intended to produce the required peak currents at the injector, eliminating the need for magnetic compression within the linac. This reduces the potential for beam quality degradation due to CSR and space charge effects within magnetic chicanes.

  14. RF high voltage performance of RF transmission line components on the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) system

    Ferguson, S.W.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Phelps, D.A.; Ponce, D.; Baity, F.W.; Barber, G.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of the high voltage rf components of the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive System (FWCD) have been evaluated under various conditions of insulator configuration, insulator material, insulating gas and gas pressure. The insulator materials that have been investigated are alumina, steatite, pyrex, quartz, and teflon. The results of this evaluation are discussed in this paper. Additionally a rf high potter was developed to aid in the evaluation of rf high voltage components. The high potter consists of a 50 Ω, 1/4 wavelength cavity with a variable position short and a 50 ohm matched tap at one end of the cavity. With this configuration rf voltages were generated in excess of 100 kVp in the frequency range 30 to 60 MHz

  15. RF high voltage performance of RF transmission line components on the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) System

    Ferguson, S.W.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Phelps, D.A.; Ponce, D.; Baity, F.W.; Barber, G.

    1995-12-01

    The performance of the high voltage rf components of the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive System (FWCD) have been evaluated under various conditions of insulator configuration, insulator material, insulating gas and gas pressure. The insulator materials that have been investigated are alumina, steatite, pyrex, quartz, and teflon. The results of this evaluation are discussed in this paper. Additionally a rf high potter was developed to aid in the evaluation of rf high voltage components. The high potter consists of a 50 Ω, 1/4 wavelength cavity with a variable position short and a 50 ohm matched tap at one end of the cavity. With this configuration rf voltages were generated in excess of 100 kVp in the frequency range 30 to 60 MHz

  16. RF generated currents in a magnetized plasma using a slow wave structure

    Poole, B.R.; Cheo, B.R.; Kuo, S.P.; Tang, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    The generation of a dc current in a plasma by using RF waves is of importance for the operation of steadystate toroidal devices. An experimental investigation in the use of unidirectional, low frequency RF waves to drive currents has been made. Instead of using a natural plasma wave a slow wave guiding structure is used along the entire length of the plasma. When the RF wave is injected an increase in ionization and T/sub e/, and hence the background current is observed. However, the change depends on wave direction: The +k/sub z/ excitation yields a much larger electron current compared with the -k/sub z/ excitation indicating a net wave driven current. The measured modification in electron density and T/sub e/ is independent of wave direction. The current with a standing wave excitation generally falls at the average of the travelling wave (+ or - k/sub z/) driven currents. The net wave driven current is proportional to the feed power at approx. = 10 mA/kW. No saturation of the current is observed with feed powers up to 1 kW. Since the exciting structure is only 1 wavelength long, its k/sub z/ spectrum is relatively broad and hence no sharp resonances are observed as various plasma parameters and B/sub O/ are changed. There is no measurable difference between the power absorbed by the load resistors and the input power to the slow wave structure. Thus the current is driven by the wave field exclamation E exclamation 2 rather than the power absorbed in the plasma. The theoretical background and the physical mechanism is presented

  17. Characterization of a klystrode as a RF source for high-average-power accelerators

    Rees, D.; Keffeler, D.; Roybal, W.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    The klystrode is a relatively new type of RF source that has demonstrated dc-to-RF conversion efficiencies in excess of 70% and a control characteristic uniquely different from those for klystron amplifiers. The different control characteristic allows the klystrode to achieve this high conversion efficiency while still providing a control margin for regulation of the accelerator cavity fields. The authors present test data from a 267-MHz, 250-kW, continuous-wave (CW) klystrode amplifier and contrast this data with conventional klystron performance, emphasizing the strengths and weaknesses of the klystrode technology for accelerator applications. They present test results describing that limitation for the 250-kW, CW klystrode and extrapolate the data to other frequencies. A summary of the operating regime explains the clear advantages of the klystrode technology over the klystron technology

  18. Kinetic theory of rf current drive and helicity injection

    Mett, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Current drive and helicity injection by plasma waves are examined with the use of kinetic theory. The Vlasov equation yields a general current drive formula that contains resonant and nonresonant (ponderomotivelike) contributions. Standard quasilinear current drive is described by the former, while helicity current drive may be contained in the latter. Since direct analytical comparison of the sizes of the two terms is, in general, difficult, a new approach is taken. Solution of the drift-kinetic equation shows that the standard Landau damping/transit time magnetic pumping quasilinear diffusion coefficient is the only contribution to steady-state current drive to leading order in ε=ρ L /l, where ρ L is the Larmor radius and l is the inhomogeneity scale length. All nonresonant contributions, including the helicity, appear at higher order, after averages are taken over a flux surface, over azimuth, and over time. Consequently, at wave frequencies well below the electron cyclotron frequency, a wave helicity flux perpendicular to the magnetic field does not influence the parallel motion of electrons to leading order and therefore will not drive a significant current. Any current associated with a wave helicity flux is then either ion current (and thus inefficient) or electron current stemming from effects not included in the drift-kinetic treatment, such as cyclotron, collisional, or nonlinear (i.e., not quasilinear)

  19. Sedimentological regimes for turbidity currents: Depth-averaged theory

    Halsey, Thomas C.; Kumar, Amit; Perillo, Mauricio M.

    2017-07-01

    Turbidity currents are one of the most significant means by which sediment is moved from the continents into the deep ocean; their properties are interesting both as elements of the global sediment cycle and due to their role in contributing to the formation of deep water oil and gas reservoirs. One of the simplest models of the dynamics of turbidity current flow was introduced three decades ago, and is based on depth-averaging of the fluid mechanical equations governing the turbulent gravity-driven flow of relatively dilute turbidity currents. We examine the sedimentological regimes of a simplified version of this model, focusing on the role of the Richardson number Ri [dimensionless inertia] and Rouse number Ro [dimensionless sedimentation velocity] in determining whether a current is net depositional or net erosional. We find that for large Rouse numbers, the currents are strongly net depositional due to the disappearance of local equilibria between erosion and deposition. At lower Rouse numbers, the Richardson number also plays a role in determining the degree of erosion versus deposition. The currents become more erosive at lower values of the product Ro × Ri, due to the effect of clear water entrainment. At higher values of this product, the turbulence becomes insufficient to maintain the sediment in suspension, as first pointed out by Knapp and Bagnold. We speculate on the potential for two-layer solutions in this insufficiently turbulent regime, which would comprise substantial bedload flow with an overlying turbidity current.

  20. Radiation induced currents in MRI RF coils: application to linac/MRI integration

    Burke, B.; Fallone, B. G.; Rathee, S.

    2010-02-01

    The integration of medical linear accelerators (linac) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems is advancing the current state of image-guided radiotherapy. The MRI in these integrated units will provide real-time, accurate tumor locations for radiotherapy treatment, thus decreasing geometric margins around tumors and reducing normal tissue damage. In the real-time operation of these integrated systems, the radiofrequency (RF) coils of MRI will be irradiated with radiation pulses from the linac. The effect of pulsed radiation on MRI radio frequency (RF) coils is not known and must be studied. The instantaneous radiation induced current (RIC) in two different MRI RF coils were measured and presented. The frequency spectra of the induced currents were calculated. Some basic characterization of the RIC was also done: isolation of the RF coil component responsible for RIC, dependence of RIC on dose rate, and effect of wax buildup placed on coil on RIC. Both the time and frequency characteristics of the RIC were seen to vary with the MRI RF coil used. The copper windings of the RF coils were isolated as the main source of RIC. A linear dependence on dose rate was seen. The RIC was decreased with wax buildup, suggesting an electronic disequilibrium as the cause of RIC. This study shows a measurable RIC present in MRI RF coils. This unwanted current could be possibly detrimental to the signal to noise ratio in MRI and produce image artifacts.

  1. Design of ITER-FEAT RF heating and current drive systems

    Bosia, G.; Kobayashi, N.; Ioki, K.; Bibet, P.; Koch, R.; Chavan, R.; Tran, M.Q.; Takahashi, K.; Kuzikov, S.; Vdovin, V.

    2001-01-01

    Three radio frequency (RF) heating and current drive (H and CD) systems are being designed for ITER-FEAT: an electron cyclotron (EC), an ion cyclotron (IC) and a lower hybrid (LH) System. The launchers of the RF systems use four ITER equatorial ports and are fully interchangeable. They feature equal power outputs (20 MW/port), similar neutron shielding performance, and identical interfaces with the other machine components. An outline of the design is given in the paper. (author)

  2. Dark Current and Multipacting in the Photocathode RF Guns at PITZ

    Hui-Han, Jang; Flöttmann, Klaus; Grabosch, H J; Hartrott, Michael; Krasilnikov, Mikhail; Michelato, Paolo; Miltchev, Velizar; Monaco, Laura; Oppelt, Anne; Petrosyan, Bagrat; Riemann, S; Roensch, Juliane; Schreiber, Siegfried; Sertore, Daniele; Staykov, Lazar; Stephan, Frank

    2005-01-01

    For photocathode rf guns, the amount of dark current depends on the cavity surface and the photocathodes. Smooth conditioning reduces the amount of dark current. Mechanical damages of the cathodes induce high dark current and chemical pollution changes emission properties of the cathode. Multipacting in the gun cavity changes the surface status of the cathodes and sometimes makes the gun operation impossible due to vacuum interlocks. In this paper, dark current and multipacting features of the rf gun are presented including experimental and simulation studies.

  3. Confinement improvement with rf poloidal current drive in the reversed-field pinch

    Hokin, S.; Sarff, J.; Sovinec, C.; Uchimoto, E.

    1994-01-01

    External control of the current profile in a reversed-field pinch (RFP), by means such as rf poloidal current drive, may have beneficial effects well beyond the direct reduction of Ohmic input power due to auxiliary heating. Reduction of magnetic turbulence associated with the dynamo, which drives poloidal current in a conventional RFP, may allow operation at lower density and higher electron temperature, for which rf current drive becomes efficient and the RFP operates in a more favorable regime on the nτ vs T diagram. Projected parameters for RFX at 2 MA axe studied as a concrete example. If rf current drive allows RFX to operate with β = 10% (plasma energy/magnetic energy) at low density (3 x 10 19 m -3 ) with classical resistivity (i.e. without dynamo-enhanced power input), 40 ms energy confinement times and 3 keV temperatures will result, matching the performance of tokamaks of similar size

  4. An investigation of r.f. travelling wave current drive using the model

    Bertram, W.K.

    1988-01-01

    Previous experimental investigations in the use of travelling r.f. waves to drive steady toroidal currents in a toroidal plasma have shown that I t , the amount of current driven, is strongly dependent on the ratio of the static toroidal magnetic field B z , to the strength of the r.f. magnetic field B ω . This dependence is characterised by an initial increase and subsequent decrease of I t when B t /B ω increases. It is shown that this observed behaviour is entirely consistent with the behaviour predicted by the current drive model. Results from numerical computations using the model show good quantitative agreement with the published experimental results

  5. Measurement of toroidal plasma current in RF heated helical plasmas

    Besshou, Sakae

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the measurement of toroidal plasma current by a semiflexible Rogowski coil in a helical vacuum chamber. A Rogowski coil measures the toroidal plasma current with a resolution of 0.1 kA, frequency range of up to 1 kHz and sensitivity of 6.5 x 10 -9 V · s/A. We measured the spontaneous toroidal plasma current (from -1.2 to +1.2 kA) under electron cyclotron resonance heating at 0.94 T toroidal field in the Heliotron-E device. We found that the measured direction of toroidal plasma current changes its sign as in the predicted behavior of a neoclassical diffusion-driven bootstrap current, depending on the horizontal position of the plasma column. We explain the observed plasma currents in terms of the compound phenomenon of an ohmic current and a neoclassical diffusion-driven current. The magnitude of the neoclassical current component is smaller than the value predicted by a collisionless neoclassical theory. (author)

  6. Current sustaining by RF travelling field in a collisional toroidal plasma

    Fukuda, Masaji; Matsuura, Kiyokata.

    1977-06-01

    The relation between the current generation by RF travelling field and the accompanied power absorption is studied in a collisional toroidal plasma, parameters being phase velocity and filling gas pressure or electron collision frequency. It is observed at a low magnetic field that the current is proportional to the plasma conductivity and an effective electromotive force, which is a new concept introduced on the basis of fluid model; the electromotive force is proportional to the absorbed RF power and inversely proportional to the plasma density and the phase velocity of the travelling field. (auth.)

  7. Current sustaining by RF travelling field in a collisional toroidal plasma

    Fukuda, Masaji; Matsuura, Kiyokata

    1978-01-01

    The relation between the current generated by RF travelling field and the absorbed power is studied in a collisional toroidal plasma, parameters being phase velocity and filling gap pressure or electron collision frequency. It is observed at a low magnetic field that the current is proportional to the plasma conductivity and an effective electromotive force, which is a new concept introduced on the basis of fluid model; the electromotive force is proportional to the absorbed RF power and inversely proportional to the plasma density and the phase velocity of the travelling field. (author)

  8. RF Rectification on LAPD and NSTX: the relationship between rectified currents and potentials

    Perkins, R. J.; Carter, T.; Caughman, J. B.; van Compernolle, B.; Gekelman, W.; Hosea, J. C.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kramer, G. J.; Lau, C.; Martin, E. H.; Pribyl, P.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Vincena, S.

    2017-10-01

    RF rectification is a sheath phenomenon important in the fusion community for impurity injection, hot spot formation on plasma-facing components, modifications of the scrape-off layer, and as a far-field sink of wave power. The latter is of particular concern for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX), where a substantial fraction of the fast-wave power is lost to the divertor along scrape-off layer field lines. To assess the relationship between rectified currents and rectified voltages, detailed experiments have been performed on the Large Plasma Device (LAPD). An electron current is measured flowing out of the antenna and into the limiters, consistent with RF rectification with a higher RF potential at the antenna. The scaling of this current with RF power will be presented. The limiters are also floated to inhibit this DC current; the impact of this change on plasma-potential and wave-field measurements will be shown. Comparison to data from divertor probes in NSTX will be made. These experiments on a flexible mid-sized experiment will provide insight and guidance into the effects of ICRF on the edge plasma in larger fusion experiments. Funded by the DOE OFES (DE-FC02-07ER54918 and DE-AC02-09CH11466), NSF (NSF- PHY 1036140), and the Univ. of California (12-LR- 237124).

  9. An optically coupled system for quantitative monitoring of MRI-induced RF currents into long conductors.

    Zanchi, Marta G; Venook, Ross; Pauly, John M; Scott, Greig C

    2010-01-01

    The currents induced in long conductors such as guidewires by the radio-frequency (RF) field in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are responsible for potentially dangerous heating of surrounding media, such as tissue. This paper presents an optically coupled system with the potential to quantitatively measure the RF currents induced on these conductors. The system uses a self shielded toroid transducer and active circuitry to modulate a high speed light-emitting-diode transmitter. Plastic fiber guides the light to a photodiode receiver and transimpedance amplifier. System validation included a series of experiments with bare wires that compared wire tip heating by fluoroptic thermometers with the RF current sensor response. Validations were performed on a custom whole body 64 MHz birdcage test platform and on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. With this system, a variety of phenomena were demonstrated including cable trap current attenuation, lossy dielectric Q-spoiling and even transverse electromagnetic wave node patterns. This system should find applications in studies of MRI RF safety for interventional devices such as pacemaker leads, and guidewires. In particular, variations of this device could potentially act as a realtime safety monitor during MRI guided interventions.

  10. Theory and experiments on RF plasma heating, current drive and profile control in TORE SUPRA

    Moreau, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the main experimental and theoretical achievements related to the study of RF heating and non-inductive current drive and particularly phenomena related to the current density profile control and the potentiality of producing stationary enhanced performance regimes: description of the Lower Hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Resonant Frequency (ICRF) systems; long pulse coupling performance of the RF systems; observation of the transition to the so-called ''stationary LHEP regime'' in which the (flat) central current density and (peaked) electron temperature profiles are fully decoupled; experiments on ICRF sawtooth stabilization with the combined effect of LHCD modifying the current density profile; diffusion of fast electrons generated by LH waves; ramp-up experiments in which the LH power provided a significant part of the resistive poloidal flux and flux consumption scaling; theory of spectral wave diffusion and multipass absorption; fast wave current drive modelling with the Alcyon full wave code; a reflector LH antenna concept. 18 figs., 48 refs

  11. Hearthfire design base for the high current low velocity rf linac

    Burke, R.J.; Khoe, T.K.; Kustom, R.L.; Martin, R.L.; Moretti, A.

    1977-01-01

    The particle beam parameters needed for inertial fusion can be achieved with conventional accelerator technology if heavy ion machines attain the level of performance of the most intense high energy proton machines. Many of the problems posed by this goal pertain to the low energy portions of the accelerator system. In particular, the implied particle current in the rf linac is 10 3 --10 4 times the values achieved with existing heavy ion machines. Much of this discrepancy is simply attributable to the great differences between the design considerations relevant to accelerators for fusion and those which have determined the performance of the existing machines. The basic concept chosen at Argonne National Laboratory is cavities containing single drift tubes mounted on lambda/4 supports. Such structures pose the least problem for the beam transport system, and one cavity is placed between adjacent quadrupole magnets. The average voltage gain of the first cells of the low velocity section is moderate; and, although probably acceptable and improved by the end of the 10 MV section, the low initial gain adds to the motivation provided by the transport problem to increase the preinjector voltage substantially above 750 kV

  12. Implications of ITER requirements on R and D of RF heating and current drive systems

    Bosia, G.

    2002-01-01

    A strategic, rather than auxiliary role is assigned to H and CD systems in ITER-FEAT, as all operation phases are driven and controlled by heating and current drive (H and CD) systems. RF systems (Electron Cyclotron, Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid), planned to contribute for ∼60% of ITER auxiliary power (72 MW), still require different level of pre-industrial technology development to operate in ITER at the required level of efficiency and religiosite. In this paper, RF H and CD systems technical and operational issues are reviewed and future R and D actions at CEA-Cadarache discussed, with the aim of providing a demonstration of all RF H and CD systems, within the current ITER construction time scale. The need and the economical advantage of an early on- and off- plasma design validation program for ITER-like RF devices (such as launcher and/or power sources), is also discussed with the aim of identifying and resolving operational issues. (author)

  13. U.S.-Japan workshop on 'RF heating and current drive in confinement systems tokamaks'

    1992-01-01

    The workshop was attended by 8 US scientists and 30 Japanese scientists. The agenda was divided into 2 1/2 days of presentation, 1/2 day group discussions and 1/2 day summary session. There were 10 papers on rf physics, technologies and applications; 6 papers on new concepts, helicity injection and transport; and 6 papers on heating/current drive and scrape-off-layer/divertor conditions. The wide range of topics discussed is an indication of the impressive growth, both in depth and breadth, of the US-Japan workshop in RF Heating and Current Drive. It also benefitted by being combined with the new current drive concepts workshops and the active participation of JAERI scientists. (J.P.N.)

  14. Current transmission and nonlinear effects in un-gated thermionic cathode RF guns

    Edelen, J. P. [Fermilab; Harris, J. R. [Air Force Weapons Lab

    2017-05-03

    Un-gated thermionic cathode RF guns are well known as a robust source of electrons for many accelerator applications. These sources are in principle scalable to high currents without degradation of the transverse emittance due to control grids but they are also known for being limited by back-bombardment. While back-bombardment presents a significant limitation, there is still a lack of general understanding on how emission over the whole RF period will affect the nature of the beams produced from these guns. In order to improve our understanding of how these guns can be used in general we develop analytical models that predict the transmission efficiency as a function of the design parameters, study how bunch compression and emission enhancement caused by Schottky barrier lowering affect the output current profile in the gun, and study the onset of space-charge limited effects and the resultant virtual cathode formation leading to a modulation in the output current distribution.

  15. High voltage power supplies for ITER RF heating and current drive systems

    Gassmann, T.; Arambhadiya, B.; Beaumont, B.; Baruah, U.K.; Bonicelli, T.; Darbos, C.; Purohit, D.; Decamps, H.; Albajar, F.; Gandini, F.; Henderson, M.; Kazarian, F.; Lamalle, P.U.; Omori, T.; Parmar, D.; Patel, A.; Rathi, D.; Singh, N.P.

    2011-01-01

    The RF heating and current drive (H and CD) systems to be installed for the ITER fusion machine are the electron cyclotron (EC), ion cyclotron (IC) and, although not in the first phase of the project, lower hybrid (LH). These systems require high voltage, high current power supplies (HVPS) in CW operation. These HVPS should deliver around 50 MW electrical power to each of the RF H and CD systems with stringent requirements in terms of accuracy, voltage ripple, response time, turn off time and fault energy. The PSM (Pulse Step Modulation) technology has demonstrated over the past 20 years its ability to fulfill these requirements in many industrial facilities and other fusion reactors and has therefore been chosen as reference design for the IC and EC HVPS systems. This paper describes the technical specifications, including interfaces, the resulting constraints on the design, the conceptual design proposed for ITER EC and IC HVPS systems and the current status.

  16. Inductive current startup in large tokamaks with expanding minor radius and rf assist

    Borowski, S.K.

    1984-02-01

    Auxiliary rf heating of electrons before and during the current-rise phase of a large tokamak, such as the Fusion Engineering Device (R = 4.8 m, a = 1.3 m, sigma = 1.6, B/sub T/ = 3.62 T), is examined as a means of reducing both the initiation loop voltage and resistive flux expenditure during startup. Prior to current initiation, 1 to 2 MW of electron cyclotron resonance heating power at approx. 90 GHz is used to create a small volume of high conductivity plasma (T/sub e/ approx. = 100 eV, n/sub e/ approx. = 10 19 m -3 ) near the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) region. This plasma conditioning permits a small radius (a 0 approx. = 0.2 to 0.4 m) current channel to be established with a relatively low initial loop voltage (less than or equal to 25 V as opposed to approx. 100 V without rf assist). During the subsequent plasma expansion and current ramp phase, a combination of rf heating (up to 5 MW) and current profile control leads to a substantial savings in volt-seconds by: (1) minimizing the resistive flux consumption; and (2) maintaining the internal flux at or near the flat profile limit

  17. A differential low-voltage high gain current-mode integrated RF receiver front-end

    Wang Chunhua; Ma Minglin; Sun Jingru; Du Sichun; Guo Xiaorong; He Haizhen, E-mail: wch1227164@sina.com [School of Information Science and Technology, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2011-02-15

    A differential low-voltage high gain current-mode integrated RF front end for an 802.11b WLAN is proposed. It contains a differential transconductance low noise amplifier (G{sub m}-LNA) and a differential current-mode down converted mixer. The single terminal of the G{sub m}-LNA contains just one MOS transistor, two capacitors and two inductors. The gate-source shunt capacitors, C{sub x1} and C{sub x2}, can not only reduce the effects of gate-source C{sub gs} on resonance frequency and input-matching impedance, but they also enable the gate inductance L{sub g1,2} to be selected at a very small value. The current-mode mixer is composed of four switched current mirrors. Adjusting the ratio of the drain channel sizes of the switched current mirrors can increase the gain of the mixer and accordingly increase the gain of RF receiver front-end. The RF front-end operates under 1 V supply voltage. The receiver RFIC was fabricated using a chartered 0.18 {mu}m CMOS process. The integrated RF receiver front-end has a measured power conversion gain of 17.48 dB and an input referred third-order intercept point (IIP3) of -7.02 dBm. The total noise figure is 4.5 dB and the power is only 14 mW by post-simulations. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  18. Inductive current startup in large tokamaks with expanding minor radius and RF assist

    Borowski, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    Auxiliary RF heating of electrons before and during the current rise phase of a large tokamak, such as the Fusion Engineering Device, is examined as a means of reducing both the initiation loop voltage and resistive flux expenditure during startup. Prior to current initiation, 1 to 2 MW of electron cyclotron resonance heating power at approx.90 GHz is used to create a small volume of high conductivity plasma (T/sub e/ approx. = 100 eV, n/sub e/ approx. = 10 19 m -3 ) near the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) region. This plasma conditioning permits a small radius (a 0 approx.< 0.4 m) current channel to be established with a relatively low initial loop voltage (approx.< 25 V as opposed to approx.100 V without RF assist). During the subsequent plasma expansion and current ramp phase, additional RF power is introduced to reduce volt-second consumption due to plasma resistance. To study the preheating phase, a near classical particle and energy transport model is developed to estimate the electron heating efficiency in a currentless toroidal plasma. The model assumes that preferential electron heating at the UHR leads to the formation of an ambipolar sheath potential between the neutral plasma and the conducting vacuum vessel and limiter

  19. Progress on the high-current 704 MHz superconducting RF cavity at BNL

    Xu, W.; Astefanous, C.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2012-01-01

    The 704 MHz high current superconducting cavity has been designed with consideration of both performance of fundamental mode and damping of higher order modes. A copper prototype cavity was fabricated by AES and delivered to BNL. RF measurements were carried out on this prototype cavity, including fundamental pass-band and HOM spectrum measurements, HOM studies using bead-pull setup, prototyping of antenna-type HOM couplers. The measurements show that the cavity has very good damping for the higher-order modes, which was one of the main goals for the high current cavity design. 3D cavity models were simulated with Omega3P code developed by SLAC to compare with the measurements. The paper describes the cavity design, RF measurement setups and results for the copper prototype. The progress with the niobium cavity fabrication will also be described.

  20. Comparison between numerical and analytical results on the required rf current for stabilizing neoclassical tearing modes

    Wang, Xiaojing; Yu, Qingquan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Sizheng; Wang, Xiaoguang; Wu, Bin

    2018-04-01

    Numerical studies on the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) by electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) have been carried out based on reduced MHD equations, focusing on the amount of the required driven current for mode stabilization and the comparison with analytical results. The dependence of the minimum driven current required for NTM stabilization on some parameters, including the bootstrap current density, radial width of the driven current, radial deviation of the driven current from the resonant surface, and the island width when applying ECCD, are studied. By fitting the numerical results, simple expressions for these dependences are obtained. Analysis based on the modified Rutherford equation (MRE) has also been carried out, and the corresponding results have the same trend as numerical ones, while a quantitative difference between them exists. This difference becomes smaller when the applied radio frequency (rf) current is smaller.

  1. Implications of ITER requirements on R and D of RF heating and current drive systems

    Bosia, G.; Agarici, G.; Beaumont, B.

    2003-01-01

    Heating and Current Drive (H and CD) systems have an essential role in ITER-FEAT operation, as all phases of ITER operation are driven and controlled by the auxiliary power flow. The RF (Electron Cyclotron and Ion Cyclotron) systems, planned to contribute for ∼ 60% of the total auxiliary power (72 MW), with Lower Hybrid used for the specialised function of current drive in the extended performance phase (20 MW), are at different level of technology development. All systems, need a significant development in order to meet ITER operation requirements In this paper these requirements are reviewed and CEA proposals for the development of the Ion cyclotron system presented. (author)

  2. High RF power test of a CFC antenna module for lower hybrid current drive

    Maebara, S.; Seki, M.; Ikeda, Y.; Kiyono, K.; Suganuma, K.; Imai, T.; Goniche, M.; Bibet, Ph.; Brossaud, J.; Cano, V.; Kazarian-Vibert, F.; Froissard, P.; Rey, G.

    1998-01-01

    A mock-up of a 3.7 GHz Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) antenna module was fabricated from Carbon Fibre Composite (CFC) for the development of heat resistive low Z front facing the plasma. This 2 divided waveguide module is made from CFC plates and rods which are Cu-plated to reduce the RF losses. The withstand-voltage, the RF properties and the outgassing rates for long pulses and high RF power were tested at the Lower Hybrid test bed facility of Cadarache. A reference module made from Dispersion Strengthened Copper (DSC) was also fabricated. After the short pulse conditioning, long pulses with a power density ranging between 50 and 150 MW/m 2 were performed with no breakdowns on the CFC module. It was also checked that the highest power density, up to 150 MW/m 2 , could be transmitted when the waveguides are filled with H2 at a pressure of 5 x 10 -2 Pa. During a long pulse, the power reflection coefficient remains low in the 0.8-1.3 % range and no significant change in the reflection coefficient is measured after the thermal cycling provided by the long pulse operation. From thermocouple measurements, RF losses of the copper coated CFC and the DSC modules were compared. No significant differences were measured. From pressure measurements, it was found that the outgassing rate of Cu-plated CFC is about 6-7 times larger than of DSC at 300 deg.C. It is concluded that a CFC module is an attractive candidate for the hardening of the tip of the LHCD antenna. (author)

  3. Sparking limits, cavity loading, and beam breakup instability associated with high-current rf linacs

    Faehl, R.J.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    The limitations on high-current rf linacs due to gap sparking, cavity loading, and the beam breakup instability are studied. It appears possible to achieve cavity accelerating gradients as high as 35 MV/m without sparking. Furthermore, a linear analysis, as well as self-consistent particle simulations of a multipulsed 10 kA beam, indicated that only a negligible small fraction of energy is radiated into nonfundamental cavity modes. Finally, the beam breakup instability is analyzed and found to be able to magnify initial radial perturbations by a factor of no more than about 20 during the beam transit time through a 1 GeV accelerator

  4. Characterization of Radiation Induced Current in RF coils of Linac-MR Systems

    Burke, Benjamin Lester

    Real-time MR imaging of the cancer patients undergoing external beam radiation treatment represents the next generation in image guided radiotherapy. However, the radio frequency (RF) coil of the MRI is exposed to the pulsed radiation of the linear accelerator in the systems where a medical linear accelerator is integrated with the MRI. This thesis is primarily concerned with the instantaneous effect of pulsed radiation on the RF coils, in particular the Radiation Induced Current (RIC). The RIC results from the charge imbalance created by the ejection of Compton electrons from the thin conductors of the RF coils during the pulsed irradiation. This work spans the initial observations of the RIC in real coils, a detailed characterization of the RIC and finally its impact on the MR image. The first part presented the measurements of the instantaneous RIC in two different MRI RF coils. Some basic characterization of the RIC included the isolation of the RF coil component responsible for RIC, the dependence of RIC on linear accelerator dose rate, and the effect of placing wax buildup on the coil to reduce RIC. The copper windings of the RF coils were isolated as the main source of RIC. A linear dependence of the RIC amplitude on dose rate was observed. The RIC was decreased with wax buildup, suggesting an electronic disequilibrium as the cause of RIC. In the second part, a buildup method of RIC removal in planar conductors is tested, a Monte Carlo method of RIC calculation in metal conductors is presented and validated, and the Monte Carlo method is used to examine the effects of magnetic fields on both planar conductor and practical cylindrical coil geometries. The buildup method of RIC removal is effective in planar geometries and in cylindrical coil geometries when the coil conductor is in direct contact with the patient. The presence of air gap between the coil and patient makes this method of RIC removal less effective although placing buildup still reduces the RIC

  5. The production of high poloidal tokamak equilibria in Versator II by means of RF current drive

    Luckhardt, S.C.; Chen, K.-I.; Kesner, J.; Kirkwood, R.; Lane, B.; Porkolab, M.; Squire, J.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments on the Versator II device have been carried out in a regime of low plasma current with the aim of reaching high poloidal beta, β p . Lower-Hybrid RF current drive is used to produce an energetic electron population which carries the plasma current and pressure. In this mode of operation, plasmas with εβ p approaching unity appear attainable. Data from equilibrium magnetic analysis, hard x-ray, and density profiles display an outward magnetic axis shift in agreement with equilibrium theory, and further indicate that q(O) is in the range of 4-6. PEST code modeling of these experiments suggests that some of these plasmas may be near or beyond the transition to the second stability region for ballooning modes. (author)

  6. Non-inductive current drive and RF heating in SST-1 tokamak

    2000-01-01

    Steady state superconducting tokamak (SST-1) machine is being developed for 1000 sec operation at different operating parameters. Radio Frequency (RF) and neutral beam injection (NBI) methods are planned in SST-1 for noninductive current drive and heating. In this paper, we describe the non-inductive current drive and RF heating methods that are being developed for this purpose. SST-1 is a large aspect ratio tokamak configured to run double-null divertor plasmas with significant elongation (κ = 1.7-1.9) and triangularity (δ = 0.4-0.7). SST-1 has a major radius of 1.1 in and minor radius of 0.2 m. Circular and shaped plasma experiments would be conducted at 1.5 and 3 T toroidal magnetic field in three different phases with I p = 110 kA and 220 kA. Two main factors have been considered during the development of auxiliary systems, namely, high heat flux (1 MW/m 2 ) incident on the plasma facing antennae components and fast feedback for constant power input due to small energy confinement time (∼ 10 ms). (author)

  7. Reconstruction of the time-averaged sheath potential profile in an argon RF plasma using the ion energy distribution

    Fivaz, M.; Brunner, S.; Schwarzenbach, W.; Howling, A.A.; Hollenstein, C.

    1994-10-01

    Charge-exchange collisions and radio-frequency excitation combine to give peaks in the ion energy distribution measured at the ground electrode of an argon plasma in a capacitive reactor. These peaks are used as a diagnostic to reconstruct the profile of the time-averaged potential in the sheath. Particle-In-Cell simulations show that the method is accurate. The method is applied to investigate the sheath thickness as a function of excitation frequency at constant plasma power. The time-averaged potential is found to be parabolic in both experimental measurements and numerical simulation. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 15 refs

  8. Design and Preparation of RF System for the Lower Hybrid Fast Wave Heating and Current Drive Research on VEST

    Kim, Sun Ho; Jeong, Seung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Woo; Lee, Byung Je [Kwang Woon University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Jong Gab; Lee, Hyun Young; Hwang, Yong Seok [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Continuous current drive is one of the key issues for tokamak to be a commercial fusion reactor. As a part of new and efficient current drive concept research by using a Lower Hybrid Fast Wave (LHFW), the experimental study is planned on Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST) and a RF system is being developed in collaboration with Kwang Woon University (KWU), Korea Accelerator Plasma Research Association (KAPRA) and Seoul National University (SNU). The LHFW RF system includes UHF band klystron, inter-digital antenna, RF diagnostics and power transmission sub components such as circulator, DC breaker, vacuum feed-thru. The design and preparation status of the RF system will be presented in the meeting in detail. A RF system has been designed and prepared for the experimental study of efficient current drive by using Lower Hybrid Fast Wave. Overall LHFW RF system including diagnostics is designed to deliver about 10 kW in UHF band. And the key hardware components including klystron and antenna are being prepared and designed through the collaboration with KWU, KAPRA and SNU.

  9. ANALYTICAL MODELING OF ELECTRON BACK-BOMBARDMENT INDUCED CURRENT INCREASE IN UN-GATED THERMIONIC CATHODE RF GUNS

    Edelen, J. P. [Fermilab; Sun, Y. [Argonne; Harris, J. R. [AFRL, NM; Lewellen, J. W. [Los Alamos Natl. Lab.

    2016-09-28

    In this paper we derive analytical expressions for the output current of an un-gated thermionic cathode RF gun in the presence of back-bombardment heating. We provide a brief overview of back-bombardment theory and discuss comparisons between the analytical back-bombardment predictions and simulation models. We then derive an expression for the output current as a function of the RF repetition rate and discuss relationships between back-bombardment, fieldenhancement, and output current. We discuss in detail the relevant approximations and then provide predictions about how the output current should vary as a function of repetition rate for some given system configurations.

  10. RF-assisted current startup in the fusion engineering device (FED)

    Borowski, S.K.; Peng, Y-K.M.; Kammash, T.

    1982-01-01

    Auxiliary rf heating of electrons before and during the current rise phase in FED is examined as a means of reducing both the initiation loop voltage and resistive flux expenditure during startup. Prior to current initiation 1 to 2 MW of electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) power at --90 GHz is used to create a small volume of high conductivity plasma (Tsub(e) asymptoticaly equals 100 eV, nsub(e) asymptoticaly equals 10 13 cm 3 ) near the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) region. This plasma conditioning permits a small radius (asub(o) asymptoticaly equals 0.2 - 0.4 m) current channel to be established with a relatively low initial loop voltage (<=25 V). During the subsequent plasma expansion and current ramp phase, additional rf power is introduced to reduce volt-second consumption due to plasma resistance. A near classical particle and energy transport model has been developed to estimate the efficiency of electron heating in a currentless, toroidal plasma. The model assumes that MHD instabilities are absent due to the presence of an ambipolar sheath potential and a conducting limiter and vacuum vessel which ''short-circuits'' the vertical charge separation. Preferential electron heating at the UHR leads to the formation of an ambipolar electric field (Esub( a m b)) at the conducting vessel and limiter, which introduces an effective rotational transform via poloidal E vectorsub( a m b) x B vector drift. This drift improves particle confinement and enables the plasma to neutralize itself. The benefits of this effective electrostatic confinement are tempered; however, by the possibility of significant secondary electron emission from the limiters and vessel wall. Reasonable good agreement has been found between our theoretical estimates and the measurements made during ECR preheating experiments on the ISX-B tokamak. This agreement provides some confidence in the preheating power estimates obtained for the FED. (author)

  11. RF generator interlock by plasma grid bias current - An alternate to Hα interlock

    Bandyopadhyay, M.; Gahlaut, A.; Yadav, R. K.; Pandya, K.; Tyagi, H.; Vupugalla, M.; Bhuyan, M.; Bhagora, J.; Chakraborty, A.

    2017-08-01

    ROBIN is inductively coupled plasma (ICP) based negative hydrogen ion source, operated with a 100kW, 1MHz Tetrode based RF generator (RFG). Inductive plasma ignition by the RFG in ROBIN is associated with electron seeding by a hot filament and a gas puff. RFG is triggered by the control system to deliver power just at the peak pressure of the gas puff. Once plasma is ignited due to proper impedance matching, a bright light, dominated by Hα (˜656nm wavelength) radiation is available inside RF driver which is used as a feedback signal to the RFG to continue its operation. If impedance matching is not correct, plasma is not produced due to lack of power coupling and bright light is not available. During such condition, reflected RF power may damage the RFG. Therefore, to protect the RFG, it needs to be switched off automatically within 200ms by the control system in such cases. This plasma light based RFG interlock is adopted from BATMAN ion source. However, in case of vacuum immersed RF ion source in reactor grade NBI system, such plasma light based interlock may not be feasible due to lack of adequate optical fiber interfaces. In reactor grade NBI system, neutron and gamma radiations have impact on materials which may lead to frequent maintenance and machine down time. The present demonstration of RFG interlock by Bias Current (BC) in ROBIN testbed gives an alternate option in this regard. In ROBIN, a bias plate (BP) is placed in the plasma chamber near the plasma grid (PG). BP is electrically connected to the plasma chamber wall of the ion source and PG is isolated from the wall. A high current ˜85 A direct current (DC) power supply of voltage in the range of 0 - 33V is connected between the PG and the BP in such a way that PG can be biased positively with respect to the BP or plasma chamber. This arrangement is actually made to absorb electrons and correspondingly reduce co-extracted electron current during beam extraction. However, in case of normal plasma

  12. High current electron beam acceleration in dielectric-filled RF cavities

    Faehl, R.J.; Keinigs, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    The acceleration of charged particles in radio frequency (RF) cavities is a widely used mode in high energy accelerators. Advantages include very high accelerating gradients and very stable phase control. A traditional limitation for such acceleration has been their use for intense, high current beam generation. This constraint arises from the inability to store a large amount of electromagnetic energy in the cavity and from loading effects of the beam on the cavity. The authors have studied a simple modification to transcend these limitations. Following Humphries and Huang, they have conducted analytic and numerical investigations of RF accelerator cavities in which a high dielectric constant material, such as water, replaces most of the cavity volume. This raises the stored energy in a cavity of given dimensions by a factor var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 . For a water fill, var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 ∼ 80, depending on the frequency. This introduction of high dielectric constant material into the cavity reduces the resonant frequencies by a factor of (var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 ) 1/2 . This reduced operating frequency mans that existing high efficiency power supplies, at lower frequencies, can be used for an accelerator

  13. RF heating and current drive on NSTX with high harmonic fast waves

    Ryan, P.M.; Swain, D.W.; Rosenberg, A.L.

    2003-01-01

    NSTX is a small aspect ratio tokamak (R = 0.85 m, a = 0.65 m). The High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) system is a 30 MHz, 12-element array capable of launching both symmetric and directional wave spectra for plasma heating and non-inductive current drive. It has delivered up to 6 MW for short pulses and has routinely operated at ∼3 MW for 100-400 ms pulses. Results include strong, centrally-peaked electron heating in both D and He plasmas for both high and low phase velocity spectra. H-modes were obtained with application of HHFW power alone, with stored energy doubling after the L-H transition. Beta poloidal as large as unity has been obtained with significant fractions (0.4) of bootstrap current. Differences in the loop voltage are observed depending on whether the array is phased to drive current in the co- or counter-current directions. A fast ion tail with energies extending up to 140 keV has been observed when HHFW interacts with 80 keV neutral beams; neutron rate and lost ion measurements, as well as modeling, indicate significant power absorption by the fast ions. Radial rf power deposition and driven current profiles have been calculated with ray tracing and kinetic full-wave codes and compared with measurements. (author)

  14. Enhancing the sensitivity of mid-IR quantum cascade laser-based cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy using RF current perturbation.

    Manfred, Katherine M; Kirkbride, James M R; Ciaffoni, Luca; Peverall, Robert; Ritchie, Grant A D

    2014-12-15

    The sensitivity of mid-IR quantum cascade laser (QCL) off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), often limited by cavity mode structure and diffraction losses, was enhanced by applying a broadband RF noise to the laser current. A pump-probe measurement demonstrated that the addition of bandwidth-limited white noise effectively increased the laser linewidth, thereby reducing mode structure associated with CEAS. The broadband noise source offers a more sensitive, more robust alternative to applying single-frequency noise to the laser. Analysis of CEAS measurements of a CO(2) absorption feature at 1890  cm(-1) averaged over 100 ms yielded a minimum detectable absorption of 5.5×10(-3)  Hz(-1/2) in the presence of broadband RF perturbation, nearly a tenfold improvement over the unperturbed regime. The short acquisition time makes this technique suitable for breath applications requiring breath-by-breath gas concentration information.

  15. Depth-averaged instantaneous currents in a tidally dominated shelf sea from glider observations

    Merckelbach, Lucas

    2016-12-01

    Ocean gliders have become ubiquitous observation platforms in the ocean in recent years. They are also increasingly used in coastal environments. The coastal observatory system COSYNA has pioneered the use of gliders in the North Sea, a shallow tidally energetic shelf sea. For operational reasons, the gliders operated in the North Sea are programmed to resurface every 3-5 h. The glider's dead-reckoning algorithm yields depth-averaged currents, averaged in time over each subsurface interval. Under operational conditions these averaged currents are a poor approximation of the instantaneous tidal current. In this work an algorithm is developed that estimates the instantaneous current (tidal and residual) from glider observations only. The algorithm uses a first-order Butterworth low pass filter to estimate the residual current component, and a Kalman filter based on the linear shallow water equations for the tidal component. A comparison of data from a glider experiment with current data from an acoustic Doppler current profilers deployed nearby shows that the standard deviations for the east and north current components are better than 7 cm s-1 in near-real-time mode and improve to better than 6 cm s-1 in delayed mode, where the filters can be run forward and backward. In the near-real-time mode the algorithm provides estimates of the currents that the glider is expected to encounter during its next few dives. Combined with a behavioural and dynamic model of the glider, this yields predicted trajectories, the information of which is incorporated in warning messages issued to ships by the (German) authorities. In delayed mode the algorithm produces useful estimates of the depth-averaged currents, which can be used in (process-based) analyses in case no other source of measured current information is available.

  16. Time Dependent Quantum Efficiency and Dark Current Measurements in an RF Photocathode Injector with a High Quantum Efficiency Cathode

    Fliller, Raymond P; Hartung, Walter

    2005-01-01

    A system was developed at INFN Milano for preparing cesium telluride photo-cathodes and transferring them into an RF gun under ultra-high vacuum. This system has been in use at the Fermilab NICADD Photo-Injector Laboratory (FNPL) since 1997. A similar load-lock system is used at the TeSLA Test Facility at DESY-Hamburg. Two 1.625-cell high duty cycle RF guns have been fabricated for the project. Studies of the photo-emission and field emission ("dark current") behavior of both RF guns have been carried out. Unexpected phenomena were observed in one of the RF guns. In situ changes in the cathode's quantum efficiency and dark current with time were seen during operation of the photo-injector. These changes were correlated with the magnetostatic field at the cathode.* In addition, multipacting is observed in the RF guns under certain conditions. Recent measurements indicate a correlation between multipacting, anomalous photo-emission behavior, and anomalous field emission behavior. Results will be presented.

  17. Hysteretic current-voltage characteristics in RF-sputtered nanocrystalline TiO2 thin films

    Villafuerte, Manuel; Juarez, Gabriel; Heluani, Silvia P. de; Comedi, David

    2007-01-01

    We have measured the current-voltage characteristics at room temperature of a nanocrystalline TiO 2 thin film fabricated by reactive RF-sputtering deposition and sandwiched between ITO (indium-tin-oxide)-buffered glass substrate and an indium top electrode. The I-V characteristics are ohmic for low voltages and become non-linear, hysteretic and asymmetric as the voltage is increased. The system is shown to be well represented by two distinct resistance states in the non-ohmic region. Current transient evolutions were also measured for constant voltage excitations. The resistance is stable in time for voltages in the ohmic regime. In contrast, for voltages in the non-ohmic regime, the resistance has a small variation for a short period of time (order of tens seconds) and then increases with time. For those transients, long characteristic times (on the order of tens of minutes up to hours) were found. The behavior of the system is discussed on the basis of experimental results reported in the literature for similar systems and existing models for electric-field induced resistive switching

  18. An Optically-Coupled System for Quantitative Monitoring of MRI-Induced RF Currents into Long Conductors

    Zanchi, Marta G.; Venook, Ross; Pauly, John M.; Scott, Greig C.

    2010-01-01

    The currents induced in long conductors such as guidewires by the radio frequency (RF) field in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are responsible for potentially dangerous heating of surrounding media, such as tissue. This paper presents an optically-coupled system with the potential to quantitatively measure the RF currents induced on these conductors. The system uses a self shielded toroid transducer and active circuitry to modulate a high speed LED transmitter. Plastic fiber guides the light to a photodiode receiver and transimpedance amplifier. System validation included a series of experiments with bare wires that compared wire tip heating by fluoroptic thermometers with the RF current sensor response. Validations were performed on a custom whole body 64 MHz birdcage test platform and on a 1.5T MRI scanner. With this system, a variety of phenomena were demonstrated including cable trap current attenuation, lossy dielectric Q-spoiling and even transverse electromagnetic wave node patterns. This system should find applications in studies of MRI RF safety for interventional devices such as pacemaker leads, and guidewires. In particular, variations of this device could potentially act as a realtime safety monitor during MRI guided interventions. PMID:19758855

  19. Development of a high average current polarized electron source with long cathode operational lifetime

    C. K. Sinclair; P. A. Adderley; B. M. Dunham; J. C. Hansknecht; P. Hartmann; M. Poelker; J. S. Price; P. M. Rutt; W. J. Schneider; M. Steigerwald

    2007-02-01

    Substantially more than half of the electromagnetic nuclear physics experiments conducted at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Laboratory) require highly polarized electron beams, often at high average current. Spin-polarized electrons are produced by photoemission from various GaAs-based semiconductor photocathodes, using circularly polarized laser light with photon energy slightly larger than the semiconductor band gap. The photocathodes are prepared by activation of the clean semiconductor surface to negative electron affinity using cesium and oxidation. Historically, in many laboratories worldwide, these photocathodes have had short operational lifetimes at high average current, and have often deteriorated fairly quickly in ultrahigh vacuum even without electron beam delivery. At Jefferson Lab, we have developed a polarized electron source in which the photocathodes degrade exceptionally slowly without electron emission, and in which ion back bombardment is the predominant mechanism limiting the operational lifetime of the cathodes during electron emission. We have reproducibly obtained cathode 1/e dark lifetimes over two years, and 1/e charge density and charge lifetimes during electron beam delivery of over 2?105???C/cm2 and 200 C, respectively. This source is able to support uninterrupted high average current polarized beam delivery to three experimental halls simultaneously for many months at a time. Many of the techniques we report here are directly applicable to the development of GaAs photoemission electron guns to deliver high average current, high brightness unpolarized beams.

  20. RF and feedback systems

    Boussard, D.

    1994-01-01

    The radiofrequency system of the Tau Charm Factory accelerating 10 11 particles per bunch and a circulating current of 0.5 A is presented. In order to produce the very short bunches required, the RF system of TCF must provide a large RF voltage (8 MV) at a frequency in the neighbourhood of 400-500 MHz. It appears very attractive to produce the high voltage required with superconducting cavities, for which wall losses are negligible. A comparison between the sc RF system proposed and a possible copper system run at an average 1 MV/m, shows the clear advantage of sc cavities for TCF. (R.P.). 2 figs,. 1 tab

  1. Predictive Trailing-Edge Modulation Average Current Control in DC-DC Converters

    LASCU, D.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates predictive digital average current control (PDACC in dc/dc converters using trailing-edge modulation (TEM. The study is focused on the recurrence duty cycle equation and then stability analysis is performed. It is demonstrated that average current control using trailing-edge modulation is stable on the whole range of the duty cycle and thus design problems are highly reduced. The analysis is carried out in a general manner, independent of converter topology and therefore the results can then be easily applied for a certain converter (buck, boost, buck-boost, etc.. The theoretical considerations are confirmed for a boost converter first using the MATLAB program based on state-space equations and finally with the CASPOC circuit simulation package.

  2. 2D potential structures induced by RF sheaths coupled with transverse currents in front of ICRH antenna

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2004-01-01

    Sheaths are space charge regions at the plasma-wall. They are induced by the differential inertia between ions and electrons, and without external perturbation, they create a floating potential between the neutral plasma and the walls. In Tokamaks, these sheaths are locally enhanced by the RF (radiofrequency) electric field generated by the ICRF (ion cyclotron resonance frequency) antennas used to heat magnetic fusion plasmas at very high temperature. RF sheaths are located at the connection points of magnetic field lines to the wall, or to the bumpers which protect the antenna or to any part of the antenna structure. The asymmetric behaviour of these oscillating sheaths rectifies RF potentials in the plasma in front of antenna, to finally create nonlinearly a DC potential which can be much higher than the floating potential. We study specifically how the space-time distribution of these RF and DC rectified potentials is modified when nearby flux tubes are allowed to exchange perpendicular polarization current. To simulate that, a 2-dimensional (2D) fluid code has been implemented to compute the 2D RF potential map in a plane perpendicular to magnetic lines, and within the flute approximation the whole 3-dimensional potential map is deduced. In simulation, we consider a homogeneous transverse conductivity and use a 'test' potential map having, in absence of transverse currents, a Gaussian shape characterized by its width r 0 and its amplitude φ 0 . As a function of these 2 parameters (normalized respectively to a characteristic length for transverse transport and to the local temperature), we can estimate the peaking and the smoothing of the potential structure in the presence of polarization current. So, we are able to determine, for typical plasmas, the amplitude of DC potential peaks, particularly on antenna's corners, where hot spots appear during a shot. In Tore-supra conditions near antenna corners, potential structures that are shorter than 1 centimeter are

  3. 2D potential structures induced by RF sheaths coupled with transverse currents in front of ICRH antenna

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2004-01-01

    Sheaths are space charge regions at the plasma-wall. They are induced by the differential inertia between ions and electrons, and without external perturbation, they create a floating potential between the neutral plasma and the walls. In tokamaks, these sheaths are locally enhanced by the RF (radiofrequency) electric field generated by the ICRF (ion cyclotron resonance frequency) antennas used to heat magnetic fusion plasmas at very high temperature. RF sheaths are located at the connection points of magnetic field lines to the wall, or to the bumpers which protect the antenna or to any part of the antenna structure. The asymmetric behaviour of these oscillating sheaths rectifies RF potentials in the plasma in front of antenna, to finally create nonlinearly a DC potential which can be much higher than the floating potential. We study specifically how the space-time distribution of these RF and DC rectified potentials is modified when nearby flux tubes are allowed to exchange perpendicular polarization current. To simulate that, a 2D (2-dimensional) fluid code has been implemented to compute the 2D RF potential map in a plane perpendicular to magnetic lines, and within the flute approximation the whole 3-dimensional potential map is deduced. In simulation, we consider a homogeneous transverse conductivity and use a 'test' potential map having, in absence of transverse currents, a Gaussian shape characterized by its width r0 and its amplitude φ 0 . As a function of these 2 parameters (normalized respectively to a characteristic length for transverse transport and to the local temperature), we can estimate the peaking and the smoothing of the potential structure in the presence of polarization current. So, we are able to determine, for typical plasmas, the amplitude of DC potential peaks, particularly on antenna's corners, where hot spots appear during a shot. In typical Tore Supra conditions near antenna corners potential structures less than centimetric are

  4. Development of a high average current polarized electron source with long cathode operational lifetime

    C. K. Sinclair

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Substantially more than half of the electromagnetic nuclear physics experiments conducted at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Laboratory require highly polarized electron beams, often at high average current. Spin-polarized electrons are produced by photoemission from various GaAs-based semiconductor photocathodes, using circularly polarized laser light with photon energy slightly larger than the semiconductor band gap. The photocathodes are prepared by activation of the clean semiconductor surface to negative electron affinity using cesium and oxidation. Historically, in many laboratories worldwide, these photocathodes have had short operational lifetimes at high average current, and have often deteriorated fairly quickly in ultrahigh vacuum even without electron beam delivery. At Jefferson Lab, we have developed a polarized electron source in which the photocathodes degrade exceptionally slowly without electron emission, and in which ion back bombardment is the predominant mechanism limiting the operational lifetime of the cathodes during electron emission. We have reproducibly obtained cathode 1/e dark lifetimes over two years, and 1/e charge density and charge lifetimes during electron beam delivery of over 2×10^{5}   C/cm^{2} and 200 C, respectively. This source is able to support uninterrupted high average current polarized beam delivery to three experimental halls simultaneously for many months at a time. Many of the techniques we report here are directly applicable to the development of GaAs photoemission electron guns to deliver high average current, high brightness unpolarized beams.

  5. Averaged currents induced by alpha particles in an InSb compound semiconductor detector

    Kanno, Ikuo; Hishiki, Shigeomi; Kogetsu, Yoshitaka; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Katagiri, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    Very fast pulses due to alpha particle incidence were observed by an undoped-type InSb Schottky detector. This InSb detector was operated without applying bias voltage and its depletion layer thickness was less than the range of alpha particles. The averaged current induced by alpha particles was analyzed as a function of operating temperature and was shown to be proportional to the Hall mobility of InSb. (author)

  6. Unified Subharmonic Oscillation Conditions for Peak or Average Current Mode Control

    Fang, Chung-Chieh

    2013-01-01

    This paper is an extension of the author's recent research in which only buck converters were analyzed. Similar analysis can be equally applied to other types of converters. In this paper, a unified model is proposed for buck, boost, and buck-boost converters under peak or average current mode control to predict the occurrence of subharmonic oscillation. Based on the unified model, the associated stability conditions are derived in closed forms. The same stability condition can be applied to ...

  7. Lower hybrid current drive and heating experiments at the 1 MW rf power level on Alcator C

    Porkolab, M.; Lloyd, B.; Schuss, J.J.

    1983-07-01

    Lower hybrid current drive experiments were carried out in the density range 1.0 x 10 13 less than or equal to anti n(cm -3 ) less than or equal to 1.0 x 10 14 , at magnetic fields 6.0 less than or equal to B(T) less than or equal to 10. Using one 16 waveguide array, plasma currents of 150 to 200 kA have been driven by rf powers up to 600 kW for times greater than 100 msec at anti n/sub e/ up to 5 x 10 13 cm -3 . With two arrays at anti n/sub e/ approx. = 4.3 x 10 13 cm -3 at B/sub T/ = 10 T, plasma currents of 160 kA have been maintained by the rf power for 300 msec with zero loop voltage and constant internal inductance

  8. Electric Fields near RF Heating and Current Drive Antennas in Tore Supra Measured with Dynamic Stark Effect Spectroscopy*

    Klepper, C. C.; Martin, E. H.; Isler, R. C.; Colas, L.; Hillairet, J.; Marandet, Y.; Lotte, Ph.; Colledani, G.; Martin, V.; Hillis, D. L.; Harris, J. H.; Saoutic, B.

    2011-10-01

    Computational models of the interaction between RF waves and the scrape-off layer plasma near ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) and lower hybrid current drive launch antennas are continuously improving. These models mainly predict the RF electric fields produced in the SOL and, therefore, the best measurement for verification of these models would be a direct measurement of these electric fields. Both types of launch antennas are used on Tore Supra and are designed for high power (up to 4MW/antenna) and long pulse (> > 25s) operation. Direct, non-intrusive measurement of the RF electric fields in the vicinity of these structures is achieved by fitting spectral profiles of deuterium Balmer-alpha and Balmer-beta to a model that includes the dynamic, external-field Stark effect, as well as Zeeman splitting and Doppler broadening mechanisms. The measurements are compared to the mentioned, near-field region, RF antenna models. *Work supported in part by the US DOE under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC.

  9. Design and RF test result of High Power Hybrid Combiner for Helicon Wave Current Drive in KSTAR Plasmas

    Park, S. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Wi, H. H.; Wang, S. J.; Kwak, J. G. [NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    200 kW RF power will be injected to plasmas through the traveling wave antenna after combining four klystrons output powers using three hybrid combiners. Each klystron produces 60 kW output at the frequency of 500 MHz. RF power combiners commonly used to divide or combine output powers for various rf and microwave applications. It is divided into several types according to the design type such as Wilkinson combiner, radial and quadrature hybrid combiner. We designed high power hybrid combiners using 6-1/8 inch coaxial line. The power combiner has many advantages such as high isolation, low insertion loss and high power handling capability. In this paper design and rf test results of high power combiners will be described. High power combiners using three coaxial hybrid couplers will be utilized for effectively combining of 500 MHz, 200 kW output powers generated by four klystrons. We have designed, fabricated, and tested a 6-1/8 inch coaxial hybrid combiners at 500 MHz for efficiently off-axis Helicon wave current drive in KSTAR. Simulation and test results of high power coaxial hybrid combiners are good agreement.

  10. Optimization of L-shaped tunneling field-effect transistor for ambipolar current suppression and Analog/RF performance enhancement

    Li, Cong; Zhao, Xiaolong; Zhuang, Yiqi; Yan, Zhirui; Guo, Jiaming; Han, Ru

    2018-03-01

    L-shaped tunneling field-effect transistor (LTFET) has larger tunnel area than planar TFET, which leads to enhanced on-current ION . However, LTFET suffers from severe ambipolar behavior, which needs to be further optimized for low power and high-frequency applications. In this paper, both hetero-gate-dielectric (HGD) and lightly doped drain (LDD) structures are introduced into LTFET for suppression of ambipolarity and improvement of analog/RF performance of LTFET. Current-voltage characteristics, the variation of energy band diagrams, distribution of band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) generation and distribution of electric field are analyzed for our proposed HGD-LDD-LTFET. In addition, the effect of LDD on the ambipolar behavior of LTFET is investigated, the length and doping concentration of LDD is also optimized for better suppression of ambipolar current. Finally, analog/RF performance of HGD-LDD-LTFET are studied in terms of gate-source capacitance, gate-drain capacitance, cut-off frequency, and gain bandwidth production. TCAD simulation results show that HGD-LDD-LTFET not only drastically suppresses ambipolar current but also improves analog/RF performance compared with conventional LTFET.

  11. Record high-average current from a high-brightness photoinjector

    Dunham, Bruce; Barley, John; Bartnik, Adam; Bazarov, Ivan; Cultrera, Luca; Dobbins, John; Hoffstaetter, Georg; Johnson, Brent; Kaplan, Roger; Karkare, Siddharth; Kostroun, Vaclav; Li Yulin; Liepe, Matthias; Liu Xianghong; Loehl, Florian; Maxson, Jared; Quigley, Peter; Reilly, John; Rice, David; Sabol, Daniel [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); and others

    2013-01-21

    High-power, high-brightness electron beams are of interest for many applications, especially as drivers for free electron lasers and energy recovery linac light sources. For these particular applications, photoemission injectors are used in most cases, and the initial beam brightness from the injector sets a limit on the quality of the light generated at the end of the accelerator. At Cornell University, we have built such a high-power injector using a DC photoemission gun followed by a superconducting accelerating module. Recent results will be presented demonstrating record setting performance up to 65 mA average current with beam energies of 4-5 MeV.

  12. Excitation of surface waves and electrostatic fields by a RF (radiofrequency systems) wave in a plasma sheath with current

    Gutierrez Tapia, C.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown in a one-dimensional model that when a current in a plasma sheath is present, the excitation of surface waves and electrostatic fields by a RF wave is possible in the sheath. This phenomena depends strongly on the joint action of Miller's and driven forces. It is also shown that the action of these forces are carried out at different characteristic times when the wave front travels through the plasma sheath. The influence of the current, in the steady limit, is taken into account by a small functional variation of the density perturbations and generated electrostatic field. (Author)

  13. Econometric modelling of Serbian current account determinants: Jackknife Model Averaging approach

    Petrović Predrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to model Serbian current account determinants for the period Q1 2002 - Q4 2012. Taking into account the majority of relevant determinants, using the Jackknife Model Averaging approach, 48 different models have been estimated, where 1254 equations needed to be estimated and averaged for each of the models. The results of selected representative models indicate moderate persistence of the CA and positive influence of: fiscal balance, oil trade balance, terms of trade, relative income and real effective exchange rates, where we should emphasise: (i a rather strong influence of relative income, (ii the fact that the worsening of oil trade balance results in worsening of other components (probably non-oil trade balance of CA and (iii that the positive influence of terms of trade reveals functionality of the Harberger-Laursen-Metzler effect in Serbia. On the other hand, negative influence is evident in case of: relative economic growth, gross fixed capital formation, net foreign assets and trade openness. What particularly stands out is the strong effect of relative economic growth that, most likely, reveals high citizens' future income growth expectations, which has negative impact on the CA.

  14. Dst and a map of average equivalent ring current: 1958-2007

    Love, J. J.

    2008-12-01

    A new Dst index construction is made using the original hourly magnetic-observatory data collected over the years 1958-2007; stations: Hermanus South Africa, Kakioka Japan, Honolulu Hawaii, and San Juan Puerto Rico. The construction method we use is generally consistent with the algorithm defined by Sugiura (1964), and which forms the basis for the standard Kyoto Dst index. This involves corrections for observatory baseline shifts, subtraction of the main-field secular variation, and subtraction of specific harmonics that approximate the solar-quiet (Sq) variation. Fourier analysis of the observatory data reveals the nature of Sq: it consists primarily of periodic variation driven by the Earth's rotation, the Moon's orbit, the Earth's orbit, and, to some extent, the solar cycle. Cross coupling of the harmonics associated with each of the external periodic driving forces results in a seemingly complicated Sq time series that is sometimes considered to be relatively random and unpredictable, but which is, in fact, well described in terms of Fourier series. Working in the frequency domain, Sq can be filtered out, and, upon return to the time domain, the local disturbance time series (Dist) for each observatory can be recovered. After averaging the local disturbance time series from each observatory, the global magnetic disturbance time series Dst is obtained. Analysis of this new Dst index is compared with that produced by Kyoto, and various biases and differences are discussed. The combination of the Dist and Dst time series can be used to explore the local-time/universal-time symmetry of an equivalent ring current. Individual magnetic storms can have a complicated disturbance field that is asymmetrical in longitude, presumably due to partial ring currents. Using 50 years of data we map the average local-time magnetic disturbance, finding that it is very nearly proportional to Dst. To our surprise, the primary asymmetry in mean magnetic disturbance is not between

  15. Design of the RF system for Alfven wave heating and current drive in a TCA/BR tokamak

    Ruchko, L.; Andrade, M.L.; Ozono, E.; Galvao, R.M.O.; Degaspari, F.T.; Nascimento, I.C.

    1995-01-01

    The advanced RF system for Alfven wave plasma heating and current drive in TCA/BR tokamak is presented. The antenna system is capable of exciting the standing and travelling wave M = -1,N = 1,N =-4,-6 with single helicity and thus provides the possibility to improve Alfven wave plasma heating efficiency in TCA/BR tokamak and to increase input power level up to P ≅ 1 MW, without the uncontrolled density rise which was encountered in previous TCA (Switzerland) experiments. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  16. Non-destructive testing (NDT) of metal cracks using a high Tc rf-SQUID and eddy current method

    Lu, D.F.; Fan, C.; Ruan, J.Z. [Midwest Superconductivity Inc., Lawrence, KS (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    A SQUID is the most sensitive device to detect change in magnetic field. A non-destructive testing (NDT) device using high temperature SQUIDs and eddy current method will be much more sensitive than those currently used eddy current systems, yet much cheaper than one with low temperature SQUIDs. In this paper, we present our study of such a NDT device using a high temperature superconducting rf-SQUID as a gradiometer sensor. The result clearly demonstrates the expected sensitivity of the system, and indicates the feasibility of building a portable HTS SQUID NDT device with the help from cryocooler industry. Such a NDT device will have a significant impact on metal corrosion or crack detection technology.

  17. Non-destructive testing (NDT) of metal cracks using a high Tc rf-SQUID and eddy current method

    Lu, D.F.; Fan, C.; Ruan, J.Z.

    1994-01-01

    A SQUID is the most sensitive device to detect change in magnetic field. A non-destructive testing (NDT) device using high temperature SQUIDs and eddy current method will be much more sensitive than those currently used eddy current systems, yet much cheaper than one with low temperature SQUIDs. In this paper, we present our study of such a NDT device using a high temperature superconducting rf-SQUID as a gradiometer sensor. The result clearly demonstrates the expected sensitivity of the system, and indicates the feasibility of building a portable HTS SQUID NDT device with the help from cryocooler industry. Such a NDT device will have a significant impact on metal corrosion or crack detection technology

  18. An adaptive mesh refinement approach for average current nodal expansion method in 2-D rectangular geometry

    Poursalehi, N.; Zolfaghari, A.; Minuchehr, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new adaptive h-refinement approach has been developed for a class of nodal method. ► The resulting system of nodal equations is more amenable to efficient numerical solution. ► The benefit of the approach is reducing computational efforts relative to the uniform fine mesh modeling. ► Spatially adaptive approach greatly enhances the accuracy of the solution. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to develop a spatially adaptive coarse mesh strategy that progressively refines the nodes in appropriate regions of domain to solve the neutron balance equation by zeroth order nodal expansion method. A flux gradient based a posteriori estimation scheme has been utilized for checking the approximate solutions for various nodes. The relative surface net leakage of nodes has been considered as an assessment criterion. In this approach, the core module is called in by adaptive mesh generator to determine gradients of node surfaces flux to explore the possibility of node refinements in appropriate regions and directions of the problem. The benefit of the approach is reducing computational efforts relative to the uniform fine mesh modeling. For this purpose, a computer program ANRNE-2D, Adaptive Node Refinement Nodal Expansion, has been developed to solve neutron diffusion equation using average current nodal expansion method for 2D rectangular geometries. Implementing the adaptive algorithm confirms its superiority in enhancing the accuracy of the solution without using fine nodes throughout the domain and increasing the number of unknown solution. Some well-known benchmarks have been investigated and improvements are reported

  19. 基于DLL的RF CMOS振荡器中电荷泵电流源失配%Current Mismatches in Charge Pumps of DLL-Based RF CMOS Oscillators

    2001-01-01

    研究了电荷泵中电流源失配造成的假频分量,推导出了一个用于计算假频分量的公式.提供了两个数表用于直观了解参数改变时假频变化情况.最后对设计基于DLL的RF CMOS振荡器提供了一些参考方法.%A research on the spurious tones due to the current mismatch in charge pumps of DLL (Delay Locked Loop) -based RF CMOS oscillators is performed. An equation for strength evaluation of the spurious tones is derived. Two tables are provided to make it obvious to understand for the characteristics of spurious tones changing with related parameters. Some suggestions are given for the design of a DLL-based RF CMOS oscillators.

  20. Minimum beam-energy spread of a high-current rf linac

    Chan, K.C.D.; Fraser, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Energy spread is an important parameter of an electron linac and, usually, is determined by the time dependence of the external rf accelerating field. By using a combination of fundamental and higher harmonic frequencies, the accelerating field can be maintained approximately constant over a beam bunch with the resultant energy spread approximately zero. This technique is no longer adequate when the longitudinal wake field of the beam bunch is taken into account. The wake-field variation along the bunch length introduces an energy spread that cannot be exactly compensated for with the use of fundamental and higher harmonic frequencies. The achievable minimum energy spread including the wake-field effect is therefore limited. In this paper, we report the minimum energy spreads achievable using the fundamental and third-harmonic frequencies, calculated using a least-squares algorithm, for some typical structures in use at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The dependence of these results on bunch shape, bunch charge, and structure frequency is discussed. Also included are discussions of schemes for implementing the third-harmonic frequency and their effectiveness

  1. Low frequency RF current drive. Final report, January 1, 1988 - May 31, 1997

    Hershkowitz, N.

    1999-01-01

    This report starts with a summary of research done on the Phaedrus Tandom Mirror concept and how this research led to the design and construction of the Phaedrus-T Tokamak. Next it gives a more detailed description of the results from the last four years of research, which include the following areas: (1) first experimental demonstration of AWCD (Alfven Wave Current Drive); (2) current drive location and loop voltage response; (3) trapping and current drive efficiency; and (4) reflectometry

  2. Review of experiments on current drive in tokamaks by means of RF waves

    Hooke, W.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental results on lower hybrid current drive in tokamak plasmas are reviewed. Pulse lengths of 3.5 seconds and currents above 400 kA have been generated at plasma densities such that the wave frequency is greater than about twice the lower hybrid frequency. Current drive ceases above a critical density, nsub(c). However, nsub(c) increases with wave frequency. So that for f = 4.6 GHz current drive has been seen at n-barsub(e) approx.= 10 14 cm -3 and a density limit has yet to be established. Evidence for a collisional scaling law for current-drive efficiency is summarized. Detailed measurements of bremsstrahlung x-rays show a distribution which is qualitatively similar to that predicted by quasilinear theory. Microwave emission at frequencies less than the plasma frequency may shed light on the current-drive mechanism. Applications of current drive including plasma and current start-up and transformer recharging are discussed. (author)

  3. Improved power simulation of AlGaN/GaN HEMT at class-AB operation via an RF drain—source current correction method

    Pongthavornkamol Tiwat; Pang Lei; Yuan Ting-Ting; Liu Xin-Yu

    2014-01-01

    A new modified Angelov current—voltage characteristic model equation is proposed to improve the drain—source current (I ds ) simulation of an AlGaN/GaN-based (gallium nitride) high electron mobility transistor (AlGaN/GaN-based HEMT) at high power operation. Since an accurate radio frequency (RF) current simulation is critical for a correct power simulation of the device, in this paper we propose a method of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) nonlinear large-signal model extraction with a supplemental modeling of RF drain—source current as a function of RF input power. The improved results of simulated output power, gain, and power added efficiency (PAE) at class-AB quiescent bias of V gs = −3.5 V, V ds = 30 V with a frequency of 9.6 GHz are presented. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  4. Depth averaged wave-current interaction in the multi bank morphology of the southern North Sea

    Komijani, Homayoon; Osuna, Pedro; Ocampo Torres, Francisco; Monbaliu, Jaak

    2017-04-01

    The effects of wind induced waves on the barotropic mean flow during a storm event in the southern North Sea are investigated. The well known radiation stress gradient theory of Longuet-Higgins and Stewart (1962, 1964) together with the influence of waves through the Stokes drift (Hasselmann, 1971 and Garret, 1976) are incorporated in the RANS equation system of the COHERENS circulation model (Luyten et al., 2005) following the methodology worked out by Bennis et al. (2011) . The SWAN spectral wave model (version 40.91, http://www.swan.tudelft.nl/) is used to provide the wave information. This allows us to take into account the dissipative terms of wave momentum flux to the mean flow such as depth induced wave breaking and bottom friction as well as the conservative terms of wave effects such as the vortex-force and wave induced pressure gradient. The resulting coupled COHERENS-SWAN model has been validated using the well known planar beach test case proposed by Haas and Warner (2009) in depth averaged mode. For the application in the southern North Sea, a series of nested grids using COHERENS (circulation model) and WAM cycle 4.5.3 (spectral wave model applied to the North Sea shelf area, Monbaliu et al. 2000; Günther, H. and A. Behrens, personal communications, May 2012) is set up to provide the hydrodynamic and wave boundary conditions for the COHERENS-SWAN two way coupled wave-current model for the Belgian coastal zone model. The improvements obtained in hindcasting the circulation processes in the Belgian coastal area during a storm event will be highlighted. But also difficulties faced in the coupling of the models and in the simulation of a real case storm will be discussed. In particular, some of the approaches for dealing with the numerical instabilities due to multi bank morphology of the southern North Sea will be addressed. References : Bennis, A.-C., F. Ardhuin, and F. Dumas (2011). "On the coupling of wave and three-dimensional circulation models

  5. Calculation of the self-consistent current distribution and coupling of an RF antenna array

    Ballico, M.; Puri, S.

    1993-10-01

    A self-consistent calculation of the antenna current distribution and fields in an axisymmetric cylindrical geometry for the ICRH antenna-plasma coupling problem is presented. Several features distinguish this calculation from other codes presently available. 1. Variational form: The formulation of the self consistent antenna current problem in a variational form allows good convergence and stability of the algorithm. 2. Multiple straps: Allows modelling of (a) the current distribution across the width of the strap (by dividing it up into sub straps) (b) side limiters and septum (c) antenna cross-coupling. 3. Analytic calculation of the antenna field and calculation of the antenna self-consistent current distribution, (given the surface impedance matrix) gives rapid calculation. 4. Framed for parallel computation on several different parallel architectures (as well as serial) gives a large speed improvement to the user. Results are presented for both Alfven wave heating and current drive antenna arrays, showing the optimal coupling to be achieved for toroidal mode numbers 8< n<10 for typical ASDEX upgrade plasmas. Simulations of the ASDEX upgrade antenna show the importance of the current distribution across the antenna and of image currents flowing in the side limiters, and an analysis of a proposed asymmetric ITER antenna is presented. (orig.)

  6. Choice of initial operating parameters for high average current linear accelerators

    Batchelor, K.

    1976-01-01

    Recent emphasis on alternative energy sources together with the need for intense neutron sources for testing of materials for CTR has resulted in renewed interest in high current (approximately 100 mA) c.w. proton and deuteron linear accelerators. In desinging an accelerator for such high currents, it is evident that beam losses in the machine must be minimized, which implies well matched beams, and that adequate acceptance under severe space charge conditions must be met. An investigation is presented of the input parameters to an Alvarez type drift-tube accelerator resulting from such factors. The analysis indicates that an accelerator operating at a frequency of 50 MHz is capable of accepting deuteron currents of about 0.4 amperes and proton currents of about 1.2 amperes. These values depend critically on the assumed values of beam emittance and on the ability to properly ''match'' this to the linac acceptance

  7. On the generation of steady currents in a plasma cylinder using RF waves

    Hugrass, W.N.

    1980-10-01

    The generation of a steady current in a resistive plasma cylinder by means of a travelling wave magnetic field has been studied using the resistive MHD equations. The nonlinear initial-boundary value problem has been solved using a semi-Lagrangian two dimensional algorithm. The numerical code has been used to simulate the Synchromak experiment of Nagoya University. Hollow d.c. current profiles, similar to the experimental data, have been obtained. A simple analytical argument, of a more general nature, shows that classical resistive diffusion cannot lead to a more uniform current distribution

  8. Analysis and Design of Improved Weighted Average Current Control Strategy for LCL-Type Grid-Connected Inverters

    Han, Yang; Li, Zipeng; Yang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    The LCL grid-connected inverter has the ability to attenuate the high-frequency current harmonics. However, the inherent resonance of the LCL filter affects the system stability significantly. To damp the resonance effect, the dual-loop current control can be used to stabilize the system. The grid...... Control Strategy for LCL-Type Grid-Connected Inverters. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/313734269_Analysis_and_Design_of_Improved_Weighted_Average_Current_Control_Strategy_for_LCL-Type_Grid-Connected_Inverters [accessed Apr 20, 2017]....... current plus capacitor current feedback system is widely used for its better transient response and high robustness against the grid impedance variations. While the weighted average current (WAC) feedback scheme is capable to provide a wider bandwidth at higher frequencies but show poor stability...

  9. Choice of initial operating parameters for high average current linear accelerators

    Batchelor, K.

    1976-01-01

    In designing an accelerator for high currents it is evident that beam losses in the machine must be minimized, which implies well matched beams, and that adequate acceptance under severe space charge conditions must be met. This paper investigates the input parameters to an Alvarez type drift-tube accelerator resulting from such factors

  10. Development of RF-linac and storage ring system for high-current experiments at GSI

    Hofmann, I.

    1986-08-01

    The heavy ion facility under construction at GSI is suitable for the generation of high-current beams. It consists of a new high-current injector into the Unilac and a synchrotron and storage ring. We discuss the capability of this system to produce short pulses of heavy ions with a specific energy of the order of 0.1 MJ/g. Under these conditions the system allows to perform a first generation of heavy ion driven target experiments and to test most of the critical issues of a large scale heavy ion fusion driver facility. (orig.)

  11. Assessment of quasi-linear effect of RF power spectrum for enabling lower hybrid current drive in reactor plasmas

    Cesario, Roberto; Cardinali, Alessandro; Castaldo, Carmine; Amicucci, Luca; Ceccuzzi, Silvio; Galli, Alessandro; Napoli, Francesco; Panaccione, Luigi; Santini, Franco; Schettini, Giuseppe; Tuccillo, Angelo Antonio

    2017-10-01

    The main research on the energy from thermonuclear fusion uses deuterium plasmas magnetically trapped in toroidal devices. To suppress the turbulent eddies that impair thermal insulation and pressure tight of the plasma, current drive (CD) is necessary, but tools envisaged so far are unable accomplishing this task while efficiently and flexibly matching the natural current profiles self-generated at large radii of the plasma column [1-5]. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) [6] can satisfy this important need of a reactor [1], but the LHCD system has been unexpectedly mothballed on JET. The problematic extrapolation of the LHCD tool at reactor graded high values of, respectively, density and temperatures of plasma has been now solved. The high density problem is solved by the FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) method [7], and solution of the high temperature one is presented here. Model results based on quasi-linear (QL) theory evidence the capability, w.r.t linear theory, of suitable operating parameters of reducing the wave damping in hot reactor plasmas. Namely, using higher RF power densities [8], or a narrower antenna power spectrum in refractive index [9,10], the obstacle for LHCD represented by too high temperature of reactor plasmas should be overcome. The former method cannot be used for routinely, safe antenna operations, Thus, only the latter key is really exploitable in a reactor. The proposed solutions are ultimately necessary for viability of an economic reactor.

  12. Implications of rf current drive theory for next step steady-state tokamak design

    Schultz, J.H.

    1985-06-01

    Two missions have been identified for a next-step tokamak experiment in the United States. The more ambitious Mission II device would be a superconducting tokamak, capable of doing long-pulse ignition demonstrations, and hopefully capable of also being able to achieve steady-state burn. A few interesting lines of approach have been identified, using a combination of logical design criteria and parametric system scans [SC85]. These include: (1) TIBER: A point-design suggested by Lawrence Livermore, that proposes a machine with the capability of demonstrating ignition, high beta (10%) and high Q (=10), using high frequency, fast-wave current drive. The TIBER topology uses moderate aspect ratio and high triangularity to achieve high beta. (2) JET Scale-up. (3) Magic5: It is argued here that an aspect ratio of 5 is a magic number for a good steady-state current drive experiment. A moderately-sized machine that achieves ignition and is capable of high Q, using either fast wave or slow wave current drive is described. (4) ET-II: The concept of a highly elongated tokamak (ET) was first proposed as a low-cost approach to Mission I, because of the possibility of achieving ohmic ignition with low-stress copper magnets. We propose that its best application is really for commercial tokamaks, using fast-wave current drive, and suggest a Mission II experiment that would be prototypical of such a reactor

  13. Average current is better than peak current as therapeutic dosage for biphasic waveforms in a ventricular fibrillation pig model of cardiac arrest.

    Chen, Bihua; Yu, Tao; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Quan, Weilun; Li, Yongqin

    2014-10-01

    Defibrillation current has been shown to be a clinically more relevant dosing unit than energy. However, the effects of average and peak current in determining shock outcome are still undetermined. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between average current, peak current and defibrillation success when different biphasic waveforms were employed. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was electrically induced in 22 domestic male pigs. Animals were then randomized to receive defibrillation using one of two different biphasic waveforms. A grouped up-and-down defibrillation threshold-testing protocol was used to maintain the average success rate of 50% in the neighborhood. In 14 animals (Study A), defibrillations were accomplished with either biphasic truncated exponential (BTE) or rectilinear biphasic waveforms. In eight animals (Study B), shocks were delivered using two BTE waveforms that had identical peak current but different waveform durations. Both average and peak currents were associated with defibrillation success when BTE and rectilinear waveforms were investigated. However, when pathway impedance was less than 90Ω for the BTE waveform, bivariate correlation coefficient was 0.36 (p=0.001) for the average current, but only 0.21 (p=0.06) for the peak current in Study A. In Study B, a high defibrillation success (67.9% vs. 38.8%, pcurrent (14.9±2.1A vs. 13.5±1.7A, pcurrent unchanged. In this porcine model of VF, average current was better than peak current to be an adequate parameter to describe the therapeutic dosage when biphasic defibrillation waveforms were used. The institutional protocol number: P0805. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. RF heating and current drive on NSTX with high harmonic fast waves

    Ryan, P.M.

    2002-01-01

    NSTX is a small aspect ratio tokamak with a large dielectric constant (50-100); under these conditions high harmonic fast waves (HHFW) will readily damp on electrons via Landau damping and TTMP. The HHFW system is a 30 MHz, 12-element array capable of launching both symmetric and directional wave spectra for plasma heating and non-inductive current drive. It has delivered up to 6 MW for short pulses and has routinely operated at ∼3-4 MW for 100-200 ms pulses. Results include strong, centrally-peaked electron heating in both D and He plasmas, for both high and low phase velocity spectra. H-modes were obtained with application of HHFW power alone, with stored energy doubling after the L-H transition. Beta poloidal as large as unity has been obtained with large fractions (0.4) of bootstrap current. A fast ion tail with energies extending up to 140 keV has been observed when HHFW interacts with 80 keV neutral beams; neutron rate and lost ion measurements, as well as modeling, indicate significant power absorption by the fast ions. Radial power deposition profiles are being calculated with ray tracing and kinetic full-wave codes and benchmarked against measurements. (author)

  15. Overview of superconducting RF technology and its application to high-current linacs

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.

    1994-01-01

    Superconducting linacs may be a viable option for high-current applications such as copious neutron production like that needed for transmutation of radioactive waste. These linacs must run reliably for many years and allow easy routine maintenance. superconducting cavities operate efficiently with high cw gradients, properties which help to reduce operating and capital costs. However, cost effectiveness is not the sole consideration in these applications. For example, beam impingement must be essentially eliminated to prevent unsafe radioactivation of the accelerating structures, and thus large apertures are needed through which to pass the beam. Because of their high efficiency, superconducting cavities can be designed with very large bore apertures, thereby reducing the effect of beam impingement

  16. Multi-species counter-current diffusion model for etching depleted uranium oxide in NF3, RF glow discharge

    Saber, H.H.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Results of recent experiments investigating the decontamination of depleted UO 2 using NF 3 gas, RF gloss discharge, showed that etching rate decreased monotonically with immersion time to the end point. In addition to the formation of non-volatile reaction products on UO 2 surface, the accumulation of UF 6 in the sheath contributed to the decrease in etch rate with immersion time. To investigate the latter, a transient, multi-species, counter-current diffusion model for UO 2 etching is developed. Model results indicated that, depending on gas pressure and absorbed power, the diffusion coefficient of F in the sheath decreased at the end point by ∼15%. At 17.0 Pa and 200 W, the mole fraction of F at UO 2 surface decreased rapidly with immersion time to 61% and 86% of its initial value, after one and two characteristic etch time, respectively, it became almost zero at the end point, reached after 4--5 characteristic etch times

  17. High-Bandwidth, High-Efficiency Envelope Tracking Power Supply for 40W RF Power Amplifier Using Paralleled Bandpass Current Sources

    Høyerby, Mikkel Christian Wendelboe; Andersen, Michael Andreas E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a high-performance power conversion scheme for power supply applications that require very high output voltage slew rates (dV/dt). The concept is to parallel 2 switching bandpass current sources, each optimized for its passband frequency space and the expected load current....... The principle is demonstrated with a power supply, designed for supplying a 40 W linear RF power amplifier for efficient amplification of a 16-QAM modulated data stream...

  18. RF power diagnostics and control on the DIII-D, 4 MW 30--120 MHz fast wave current drive system (FWCD)

    Ferguson, S.W.; Allen, J.C.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Harris, T.E.

    1995-10-01

    The Fast Wave Current Drive System uses three 2 MW transmitters to drive three antennas inside the DIII-D vacuum vessel. This paper describes the diagnostics for this system. The diagnostics associated with the General Atomics Fast Wave Current Drive System allow the system tuning to be analyzed and modified on a between shot basis. The transmitters can be exactly tuned to match the plasma with only one tuning shot into the plasma. This facilitates maximum rf power utilization

  19. Silicon tunnel FET with average subthreshold slope of 55 mV/dec at low drain currents

    Narimani, K.; Glass, S.; Bernardy, P.; von den Driesch, N.; Zhao, Q. T.; Mantl, S.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper we present a silicon tunnel FET based on line-tunneling to achieve better subthreshold performance. The fabricated device shows an on-current of Ion = 2.55 × 10-7 A/μm at Vds = Von = Vgs - Voff = -0.5 V for an Ioff = 1 nA/μm and an average SS of 55 mV/dec over two orders of magnitude of Id. Furthermore, the analog figures of merit have been calculated and show that the transconductance efficiency gm/Id beats the MOSFET performance at low currents.

  20. RTS noise and dark current white defects reduction using selective averaging based on a multi-aperture system.

    Zhang, Bo; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Takasawa, Taishi; Seo, Min Woong; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2014-01-16

    In extremely low-light conditions, random telegraph signal (RTS) noise and dark current white defects become visible. In this paper, a multi-aperture imaging system and selective averaging method which removes the RTS noise and the dark current white defects by minimizing the synthetic sensor noise at every pixel is proposed. In the multi-aperture imaging system, a very small synthetic F-number which is much smaller than 1.0 is achieved by increasing optical gain with multiple lenses. It is verified by simulation that the effective noise normalized by optical gain in the peak of noise histogram is reduced from 1.38e⁻ to 0.48 e⁻ in a 3 × 3-aperture system using low-noise CMOS image sensors based on folding-integration and cyclic column ADCs. In the experiment, a prototype 3 × 3-aperture camera, where each aperture has 200 × 200 pixels and an imaging lens with a focal length of 3.0 mm and F-number of 3.0, is developed. Under a low-light condition, in which the maximum average signal is 11e⁻ per aperture, the RTS and dark current white defects are removed and the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) of the image is increased by 6.3 dB.

  1. Vegetable and Fruit Intakes of On-Reserve First Nations Schoolchildren Compared to Canadian Averages and Current Recommendations

    Ian D. Martin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated, in on-reserve First Nations (FN youth in Ontario, Canada, the following: (a the intakes of vegetable and fruit, “other” foods and relevant nutrients as compared to current recommendations and national averages, (b current prevalence rates of overweight and obesity and (c the relationship between latitude and dietary intakes. Twenty-four-hour diet recalls were collected via the Waterloo Web-Based Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (WEB-Q (n = 443. Heights and weights of participants were self reported using measured values and Body Mass Index was categorized using the International Obesity Task Force cutoffs. Food group and nutrient intakes were compared to current standards, Southern Ontario Food Behaviour data and the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2, using descriptive statistics. Mean vegetable and fruit, fibre and folate intakes were less than current recommendations. Girls aged 14–18 years had mean intakes of vitamin A below current recommendations for this sub-group; for all sub-groups, mean intakes of vegetables and fruit were below Canadian averages. All sub-groups also had intakes of all nutrients and food groups investigated that were less than those observed in non-FN youth from Southern Ontario, with the exception of “other” foods in boys 12–18 years. Prevalence rates of overweight and obesity were 31.8% and 19.6%, respectively, exceeding rates in the general population. Dietary intakes did not vary consistently by latitude (n = 248, as revealed by ANOVA. This study provided a unique investigation of the dietary intakes of on-reserve FN youth in Ontario and revealed poor intakes of vegetables and fruit and related nutrients and high intakes of “other” foods. Prevalence rates of overweight and obesity exceed those of the general population.

  2. Vegetable and Fruit Intakes of On-Reserve First Nations Schoolchildren Compared to Canadian Averages and Current Recommendations

    Gates, Allison; Hanning, Rhona M.; Gates, Michelle; Skinner, Kelly; Martin, Ian D.; Tsuji, Leonard J. S.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated, in on-reserve First Nations (FN) youth in Ontario, Canada, the following: (a) the intakes of vegetable and fruit, “other” foods and relevant nutrients as compared to current recommendations and national averages, (b) current prevalence rates of overweight and obesity and (c) the relationship between latitude and dietary intakes. Twenty-four-hour diet recalls were collected via the Waterloo Web-Based Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (WEB-Q) (n = 443). Heights and weights of participants were self reported using measured values and Body Mass Index was categorized using the International Obesity Task Force cutoffs. Food group and nutrient intakes were compared to current standards, Southern Ontario Food Behaviour data and the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2, using descriptive statistics. Mean vegetable and fruit, fibre and folate intakes were less than current recommendations. Girls aged 14–18 years had mean intakes of vitamin A below current recommendations for this sub-group; for all sub-groups, mean intakes of vegetables and fruit were below Canadian averages. All sub-groups also had intakes of all nutrients and food groups investigated that were less than those observed in non-FN youth from Southern Ontario, with the exception of “other” foods in boys 12–18 years. Prevalence rates of overweight and obesity were 31.8% and 19.6%, respectively, exceeding rates in the general population. Dietary intakes did not vary consistently by latitude (n = 248), as revealed by ANOVA. This study provided a unique investigation of the dietary intakes of on-reserve FN youth in Ontario and revealed poor intakes of vegetables and fruit and related nutrients and high intakes of “other” foods. Prevalence rates of overweight and obesity exceed those of the general population. PMID:22690200

  3. Practical RF system design

    Egan, William F

    2003-01-01

    he ultimate practical resource for today's RF system design professionals Radio frequency components and circuits form the backbone of today's mobile and satellite communications networks. Consequently, both practicing and aspiring industry professionals need to be able to solve ever more complex problems of RF design. Blending theoretical rigor with a wealth of practical expertise, Practical RF System Design addresses a variety of complex, real-world problems that system engineers are likely to encounter in today's burgeoning communications industry with solutions that are not easily available in the existing literature. The author, an expert in the field of RF module and system design, provides powerful techniques for analyzing real RF systems, with emphasis on some that are currently not well understood. Combining theoretical results and models with examples, he challenges readers to address such practical issues as: * How standing wave ratio affects system gain * How noise on a local oscillator will affec...

  4. High power rf amplifiers for accelerator applications: The large orbit gyrotron and the high current, space charge enhanced relativistic klystron

    Stringfield, R.M.; Fazio, M.V.; Rickel, D.G.; Kwan, T.J.T.; Peratt, A.L.; Kinross-Wright, J.; Van Haaften, F.W.; Hoeberling, R.F.; Faehl, R.; Carlsten, B.; Destler, W.W.; Warner, L.B.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos is investigating a number of high power microwave (HPM) sources for their potential to power advanced accelerators. Included in this investigation are the large orbit gyrotron amplifier and oscillator (LOG) and the relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA). LOG amplifier development is newly underway. Electron beam power levels of 3 GW, 70 ns duration, are planned, with anticipated conversion efficiencies into RF on the order of 20 percent. Ongoing investigations on this device include experimental improvement of the electron beam optics (to allow injection of a suitable fraction of the electron beam born in the gun into the amplifier structure), and computational studies of resonator design and RF extraction. Recent RKA studies have operated at electron beam powers into the device of 1.35 GW in microsecond duration pulses. The device has yielded modulated electron beam power approaching 300 MW using 3-5 kW of RF input drive. RF powers extracted into waveguide have been up to 70 MW, suggesting that more power is available from the device than has been converted to-date in the extractor

  5. Design of a low-power 433/915-MHz RF front-end with a current-reuse common-gate LNA

    Jing Yiou; Lu Huaxiang

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a wideband RF front-end with novel current-reuse wide band low noise amplifier (LNA), current-reuse V—I converter, active double balanced mixer and transimpedance amplifier for short range device (SRD) applications. With the proposed current-reuse LNA, the DC consumption of the front-end reduces considerably while maintaining sufficient performance needed by SRD devices. The RF front-end was fabricated in 0.18 μm RFCMOS process and occupies a silicon area of just 0.11 mm 2 . Operating in 433 MHz band, the measurement results show the RF front-end achieves a conversion gain of 29.7 dB, a double side band noise figure of 9.7 dB, an input referenced third intercept point of −24.9 dBm with only 1.44 mA power consumption from 1.8 V supply. Compared to other reported front-ends, it has an advantage in power consumption. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  6. RF transport

    Choroba, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the techniques of transport of high-power radiofrequency (RF) power from a RF power source to the cavities of an accelerator. Since the theory of electromagnetic waves in waveguides and of waveguide components is very well explained in a number of excellent text books it will limit itself on special waveguide distributions and on a number of, although not complete list of, special problems which sometimes occur in RF power transportation systems. (author)

  7. RF radiation safety handbook

    Kitchen, Ronald.

    1993-01-01

    Radio frequency radiation can be dangerous in a number of ways. Hazards include electromagnetic compatibility and interference, electro-explosive vapours and devices, and direct effects on the human body. This book is a general introduction to the sources and nature of RF radiation. It describes the ways in which our current knowledge, based on relevant safety standards, can be used to safeguard people from any harmful effects of RF radiation. The book is designed for people responsible for, or concerned with, safety. This target audience will primarily be radio engineers, but includes those skilled in other disciplines including medicine, chemistry or mechanical engineering. The book covers the problems of RF safety management, including the use of measuring instruments and methods, and a review of current safety standards. The implications for RF design engineers are also examined. (Author)

  8. RF MEMS

    At the bare die level the insertion loss, return loss and the isolation ... ing and packaging of a silicon on glass based RF MEMS switch fabricated using DRIE. ..... follows the power law based on the asperity deformation model given by Pattona & ... Surface mount style RF packages (SMX series 580465) from Startedge Corp.

  9. Microbunching and RF Compression

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-01-01

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  10. Onset of chaos and dc current-voltage characteristics of rf-driven Josephson junctions in the low-frequency regime

    Chi, C.C.; Vanneste, C.

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive picture of the dc current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of rf-driven Josephson junctions in the low-frequency regime is presented. The boundary of the low-frequency regime is roughly defined by the junction characteristic frequency for overdamped junctions, and by the inverse of the junction damping time for underdamped junctions. An adiabatic model valid for the low-frequency regime is used to describe the overall shapes of the I-V curves, which is in good agreement with both the numerical simulations and the experimental results. For underdamped junctions, the Shapiro steps are the prominent features on the I-V curves if the rf frequency is sufficiently below the boundary. As the rf frequency is increased towards the boundary, large negatively-going tails on top of the Shapiro steps are observed both experimentally and numerically. Numerical simulations using the resistively- and capacitively-shunted-junction model (RCSJ model) reveal that the negatively-going tail is a signature of the low-frequency boundary of the junction chaotic regime. With use of the adiabatic model and the existence of plasma oscillations for underdamped junctions, the onset of chaos and its effect on the Shapiro steps can be fully explained. The high-frequency limit of the adiabatic model and the chaotic behavior of the Josephson junctions beyond the low-frequency regime are also briefly discussed

  11. Observation of Repetition-Rate Dependent Emission From an Un-Gated Thermionic Cathode Rf Gun

    Edelen, J. P.; Sun, Y.; Harris, J.R.; Lewellen, J.W.

    2017-06-02

    Recent work at Fermilab in collaboration with the Advanced Photon Source and members of other national labs, designed an experiment to study the relationship between the RF repetition rate and the average current per RF pulse. While existing models anticipate a direct relationship between these two parameters we observed an inverse relationship. We believe this is a result of damage to the barium coating on the cathode surface caused by a change in back-bombardment power that is unaccounted for in the existing theories. These observations shed new light on the challenges and fundamental limitations associated with scaling an ungated thermionic cathode RF gun to high average current.

  12. Experimental assessment of blade tip immersion depth from free surface on average power and thrust coefficients of marine current turbine

    Lust, Ethan; Flack, Karen; Luznik, Luksa

    2014-11-01

    Results from an experimental study on the effects of marine current turbine immersion depth from the free surface are presented. Measurements are performed with a 1/25 scale (diameter D = 0.8m) two bladed horizontal axis turbine towed in the large towing tank at the U.S. Naval Academy. Thrust and torque are measured using a dynamometer, mounted in line with the turbine shaft. Shaft rotation speed and blade position are measured using a shaft position indexing system. The tip speed ratio (TSR) is adjusted using a hysteresis brake which is attached to the output shaft. Two optical wave height sensors are used to measure the free surface elevation. The turbine is towed at 1.68 m/s, resulting in a 70% chord based Rec = 4 × 105. An Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) is installed one turbine diameter upstream of the turbine rotation plane to characterize the inflow turbulence. Measurements are obtained at four relative blade tip immersion depths of z/D = 0.5, 0.4, 0.3, and 0.2 at a TSR value of 7 to identify the depth where free surface effects impact overall turbine performance. The overall average power and thrust coefficient are presented and compared to previously conducted baseline tests. The influence of wake expansion blockage on the turbine performance due to presence of the free surface at these immersion depths will also be discussed.

  13. RF system considerations for large high-duty-factor linacs

    Lynch, M.T.; Ziomek, C.D.; Tallerico, P.J.; Regan, A.H.; Eaton, L.; Lawrence, G.

    1994-01-01

    RF systems are often a major cost item for linacs, but this is especially true for large high-duty-factor linacs (up to and including CW) such as the Accelerator for Production of Tritium (APT) or the Accelerator for Transmutation of nuclear Waste (ATW). In addition, the high energy and high average beam current of these machines (approximately 1 GeV, 100--200 mA) leads to a need for excellent control of the accelerating fields in order to minimize the possibility of beam loss in the accelerator and the resulting activation. This paper will address the key considerations and limitations in the design of the RF system. These considerations impact the design of both the high power RF components and the RF controls. As might be expected, the two concerns sometimes lead to conflicting design requirements. For example minimum RF operating costs lead to a desire for operation near saturation of the high power RF generators in order to maximize the operating efficiency. Optimal control of the RF fields leads to a desire for maximum overdrive capability in those same generators in order to respond quickly to disturbances of the accelerator fields

  14. RF superconductivity at CEBAF

    1990-01-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is a 4 GeV continuous beam electron accelerator being constructed to perform nuclear physics research. Construction began in February 1987 and initial operation is scheduled for February 1994. The present report describes its prototyping, problems/solutions, further development, facilities, design status, production and upgrade potential. The accelerator is 1.4 km in circumference, and has a race-track shape. It is of the recirculated linear accelerator type, and employs a total of five passes. Two linacs on opposite sides of the race-track each provide 400 MeV per pass. Beams of various energies are transported by separated arcs at each end of the straight sections to provide the recirculation. There are 4 recirculation arcs at the injector end, and 5 arcs at the other end. The full energy beam is routed by an RF separator to between one and three end stations, as desired, on a bucket-by-bucket basis. The average output beam current is 200 microamperes. Acceleration is provided by 338 superconducting cavities, which are arranged in pairs, each of which is enclosed in a helium vessel and suspended inside a vacuum jacket without ends. (N.K.)

  15. Analysis of eddy currents in the walls of the ferrite tuned RF cavity for the TRIUMF Kaon factory booster synchrotron

    Enchevich, I.B.; Barnes, M.J.; Poirier, R.L.

    1991-05-01

    In the perpendicular biased ferrite tuned cavity of the proposed TRIUMF Kaon Factory Booster Synchrotron, magnetizing flux passes through the cavity walls. If special care is not taken to minimize eddy current loss in the walls, the dissipated power would be excessive and the magnetic fields set up by the eddy currents would disturb the magnetic field being applied. By electrically isolating the cooling structure from the cavity walls and introducing slots in the walls it is possible to bring to an acceptable level both the power loss and the maximal temperatures. Based on the measurements, an analytical model - essentially 3D - was derived and the eddy currents were predicted using the circuit analysis program PSpice. The calculated surface current and power distribution agree with measurements. PSpice can now be used to determine the effect of design changes on the eddy current and power distribution. (Author) 7 refs., 5 figs

  16. High-brightness rf linear accelerators

    Jameson, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The issue of high brightness and its ramifications in linacs driven by radio-frequency fields is discussed. A history of the RF linacs is reviewed briefly. Some current applications are then examined that are driving progress in RF linacs. The physics affecting the brightness of RF linacs is then discussed, followed by the economic feasibility of higher brightness machines

  17. RF transformer

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  18. RF gun using laser-triggered photocathode

    Akiyama, H.; Otake, Y.; Naito, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yoshioka, M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF gun using laser-triggered photocathode has many advantages as an injector of the linear colliders since it can generate a low emittance and high current pulsed beam. The experimental facility for the RF gun, such as an RF system, a laser system and a photocathode have been fabricated to study the fundamental characteristics. The dynamics of the RF gun has also studied by the 1D sheet beam model. (author)

  19. Control for the Three-Phase Four-Wire Four-Leg APF Based on SVPWM and Average Current Method

    Xiangshun Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel control method is proposed for the three-phase four-wire four-leg active power filter (APF to realize the accurate and real-time compensation of harmonic of power system, which combines space vector pulse width modulation (SVPWM with triangle modulation strategy. Firstly, the basic principle of the APF is briefly described. Then the harmonic and reactive currents are derived by the instantaneous reactive power theory. Finally simulation and experiment are built to verify the validity and effectiveness of the proposed method. The simulation results show that the response time for compensation is about 0.025 sec and the total harmonic distortion (THD of the source current of phase A is reduced from 33.38% before compensation to 3.05% with APF.

  20. Development and contribution of rf heating and current drive systems to long pulse, high performance experiments in JT-60U

    Moriyama, Shinichi; Seki, Masami; Terakado, Masayuki; Shimono, Mitsugu; Ide, Shunsuke; Isayama, Akihiko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Fujii, Tsuneyuki

    2005-01-01

    To contribute to high performance long pulse (∼65 s) experiments in JT-60U, the target of the electron cyclotron (EC) operation in long pulse is 0.6 MW for 30 s with four gyrotrons, though 10 MJ (2.8 MW and 3.6 s) was achieved in high power operation before 2003. One of the critical issues for the long pulse operation is detuning due to decay in beam current of the gyrotron. This decay comes from the cathode cooling by continuous electron emission. As a countermeasure for this issue, active adjustments for the heater current and anode voltage during the pulse have successfully extended the duration of a good oscillation condition for the gyrotron. As a result, 0.4 MW for 16 s with one gyrotron to the dummy load and for 8.7 s to the plasma have been achieved up to now

  1. Japanese contributions to IAEA INTOR workshop, phase two A, part 2, chapter IV: RF heating and current drive

    Sugihara, Masayoshi; Kimura, Haruyuki; Okazaki, Takashi

    1985-07-01

    This report corresponds to Chapter IV of Japanese contribution report to IAEA INTOR Workshop, phase Two A, Part 2. Data base assessments of plasma heating and launcher system design for Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) wave, for Lower Hybrid Range of Frequency (LHRF) wave, and for Electron Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ECRF) wave are made. Assessments of current drive by LHRF, and of start-up assist and profile control by ECRF are also made. R and D programmes both physics and technology for each of the waves are specified. Applications of these waves to INTOR are examined. (author)

  2. Eastern Gulf of Mexico, February 1996 to June 1997 Average Ocean Currents, Geographic NAD83, MMS (1999) [ocean_currents_egom_AVG_MMS_1997

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is one data set of a data package consisting of thirteen point data sets that have as attributes the direction and velocity of ocean currents in the 'eastern'...

  3. Western Gulf of Mexico, June 1993 to June 1994 Average Ocean Currents, Geographic NAD83, MMS (1999) [ocean_currents_wgom_AVG_MMS_1994

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is one data set of a data package consisting of thirteen point data sets that have as attributes the direction and velocity of ocean currents in the western...

  4. State Averages

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of a variety of averages for each state or territory as well as the national average, including each quality measure, staffing, fine amount and number of...

  5. User's guide for SLWDN9, a code for calculating flux-surfaced-averaging of alpha densities, currents, and heating in non-circular tokamaks

    Hively, L.M.; Miley, G.M.

    1980-03-01

    The code calculates flux-surfaced-averaged values of alpha density, current, and electron/ion heating profiles in realistic, non-circular tokamak plasmas. The code is written in FORTRAN and execute on the CRAY-1 machine at the Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center

  6. Effect of the quasiparticle-pair interference current on thermal fluctuations in weakly coupled superconductors and on the operation of rf-biased SQUIDs

    Falco, C.M.

    1974-01-01

    Careful studies of the effect of thermal fluctuations on the I-V characteristics of two different types of weakly coupled superconductors were made. Measurements on externally shunted, oxide-barrier tunnel junctions were found to be in complete quantitative agreement with a theory due to Ambegaokar and Halperin in the limit of β/sub c/ identical with 2eI/sub c/C/sigma 0 2 h much less than 1 where the theory is valid. Similar measurements in the region of β/sub c/ approximately equal to 1 were found to be in qualitative agreement with a theory due to Kurkijarvi and Ambegaokar. Assuming the Ambegaokar and Halperin theory is applicable, measurements on Notarys-Nercereau normal metal underlay weak links indicate the presence of a phase-dependent conductivity predicted by B. D. Josephson in 1962. The magnitude of this conductivity was found to be in agreement with that predicted by theory, however, the sign of the conductivity was found to be in disagreement. A study of the operating characteristics of rf-biased thin-film superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) has also been made and a set of performance parameters developed to optimize the behavior of these devices. The behavior of these SQUIDs has been compared with a theory due to Hansma in order to look for the effect of the phase-dependent quasiparticle-pair interference current. The me []surements were found to be qualitatively different than predicted by Hansma's theory. (Diss. Abstr. Int., B)

  7. Analytic analysis on asymmetrical micro arcing in high plasma potential RF plasma systems

    Yin, Y; McKenzie, D R; Bilek, M M M

    2006-01-01

    We report experimental and analytical results on asymmetrical micro arcing in a RF (radio frequency) plasma. Micro arcing, resulting from high plasma potential, in RF plasma was found to occur only on the grounded electrode for a variety of electrode and surface configurations. The analytic derivation was based on a simple RF time-dependent Child-Langmuir sheath model and electric current continuity. We found that the minimum potential difference in one RF period across the grounded electrode sheath depends on the area ratio of the grounded electrode to the powered electrode. As the area ratio increases, the minimum potential difference across a sheath increases for the grounded electrode but not for the RF powered electrode. We showed that discharge time in micro arcing is more than 100 RF periods; thus the presence of a continuous high electric field in one RF cycle results in micro arcing on the grounded electrode. However, the minimum potential difference in one RF period across the powered electrode sheath is always small so that it prevents micro arcing occurring even though the average sheath voltage can be large. This simple analytic model is consistent with particle-in-cell simulation results

  8. RF SYSTEM FOR THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING

    BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRODOWSKI, J.; DELONG, J.; METH, M.; SMITH, K.; ZALTSMAN, A.

    2001-01-01

    During accumulation the RF beam current in the spallation neutron source ring rises from 0 to 50 amperes. A clean, 250 nanosecond gap is needed for the extraction kicker risetime. Large momentum spread and small peak current are needed to prevent instabilities and stopband related losses. A robust RF system meeting these requirements has been designed

  9. Simulation of RF power and multi-cusp magnetic field requirement for H{sup −} ion sources

    Pathak, Manish [Ion Source Lab., Proton Linac & Superconducting Cavities Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Senecha, V.K., E-mail: kumarvsen@gmail.com [Ion Source Lab., Proton Linac & Superconducting Cavities Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Kumar, Rajnish; Ghodke, Dharmraj V. [Ion Source Lab., Proton Linac & Superconducting Cavities Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India)

    2016-12-01

    A computer simulation study for multi-cusp RF based H{sup −} ion source has been carried out using energy and particle balance equation for inductively coupled uniformly dense plasma considering sheath formation near the boundary wall of the plasma chamber for RF ion source used as high current injector for 1 Gev H{sup −} Linac project for SNS applications. The average reaction rates for different reactions responsible for H{sup −} ion production and destruction have been considered in the simulation model. The RF power requirement for the caesium free H{sup -} ion source for a maximum possible H{sup −} ion beam current has been derived by evaluating the required current and RF voltage fed to the coil antenna using transformer model for Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP). Different parameters of RF based H{sup −} ion source like excited hydrogen molecular density, H{sup −} ion density, RF voltage and current of RF antenna have been calculated through simulations in the presence and absence of multicusp magnetic field to distinctly observe the effect of multicusp field. The RF power evaluated for different H{sup −} ion current values have been compared with the experimental reported results showing reasonably good agreement considering the fact that some RF power will be reflected from the plasma medium. The results obtained have helped in understanding the optimum field strength and field free regions suitable for volume emission based H{sup −} ion sources. The compact RF ion source exhibits nearly 6 times better efficiency compare to large diameter ion source.

  10. Motor current signature analysis for gearbox condition monitoring under transient speeds using wavelet analysis and dual-level time synchronous averaging

    Bravo-Imaz, Inaki; Davari Ardakani, Hossein; Liu, Zongchang; García-Arribas, Alfredo; Arnaiz, Aitor; Lee, Jay

    2017-09-01

    This paper focuses on analyzing motor current signature for fault diagnosis of gearboxes operating under transient speed regimes. Two different strategies are evaluated, extensively tested and compared to analyze the motor current signature in order to implement a condition monitoring system for gearboxes in industrial machinery. A specially designed test bench is used, thoroughly monitored to fully characterize the experiments, in which gears in different health status are tested. The measured signals are analyzed using discrete wavelet decomposition, in different decomposition levels using a range of mother wavelets. Moreover, a dual-level time synchronous averaging analysis is performed on the same signal to compare the performance of the two methods. From both analyses, the relevant features of the signals are extracted and cataloged using a self-organizing map, which allows for an easy detection and classification of the diverse health states of the gears. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of both methods for diagnosing gearbox faults. A slightly better performance was observed for dual-level time synchronous averaging method. Based on the obtained results, the proposed methods can used as effective and reliable condition monitoring procedures for gearbox condition monitoring using only motor current signature.

  11. Initial Beam Dynamics Simulations of a High-Average-Current Field-Emission Electron Source in a Superconducting RadioFrequency Gun

    Mohsen, O. [Northern Illinois U.; Gonin, I. [Fermilab; Kephart, R. [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, T. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [Northern Illinois U.; Solyak, N. [Fermilab; Thangaraj, J. C. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2018-01-05

    High-power electron beams are sought-after tools in support to a wide array of societal applications. This paper investigates the production of high-power electron beams by combining a high-current field-emission electron source to a superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity. We especially carry out beam-dynamics simulations that demonstrate the viability of the scheme to form $\\sim$ 300 kW average-power electron beam using a 1+1/2-cell SRF gun.

  12. A conceptual design of the RF system for the NSP high intensity proton accelerator at JAERI

    Chishiro, Etsuji; Kusano, Joichi; Mizumoto, Motoharu; Touchi, Yutaka; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Takado, Hiroshi; Sawada, Junichi

    1999-03-01

    JAERI has been proposing the Neutron Science Project which aims at exploring the fields of basic science and nuclear technology using a high power spallation neutron source. The neutron source will be driven by a high intensity linear accelerator with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average beam current of 5.33 mA and beam power of 8 MW. The RF system for the accelerator consists of a high-energy accelerator part and a low energy accelerator part. The maximum RF power requirements at the high and low energy accelerator parts are 25 MW and 8.3 MW, respectively. In this report, we describe the conceptual design of the RF system. In the low energy accelerator part, we estimated the requirement for the high-power amplifier tube and made the basis design for RF components. In the high energy accelerator part, we studied the effect of tuning errors, Lorentz forces and microphonics in the superconducting cavity. We calculated the klystron efficiency and supply power in the arrangement of where one klystron distributes the RF power to four cavities. We also considered an IOT RF system. Finally, we describe the electrical capacity and quantity of cooling water in the RF system. (author)

  13. A high-power rf linear accelerator for FELS [free-electron lasers

    Sheffield, R.L.; Watson, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a high average current rf linear accelerator suitable for driving short-wavelength free-electron lasers (FEL). It is concluded that the design of a room-temperature rf linear acelerator that can meet the stringent requirements of a high-power short-wavelength FEL appears possible. The accelerator requires the use of an advanced photoelectric injector that is under development; the accelerator components, however, do not require appreciable development. At these large beam currents, low-frequency, large-bore room-temperature cavities can be highly efficient and give all specified performance with minimal risk. 20 refs

  14. rf experiments on PLT

    Hosea, J.; Wilson, J.R.; Hooke, W.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of rf experiments are being conducted on PLT in order to explore rf techniques which could improve tokamak performance parameters. Of special importance are the studies of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) heating, lower hybrid MHD stabilization and electron heating, down-shifted electron cyclotron heating, and fast wave current drive. Ion Bernstein wave heating results at modest power indicate that the particle confinement time could be enhanced relative to that for fast wave heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and neutral beam heating. At these power levels a conclusive determination of energy confinement scaling with power cannot yet be given. Central sawtooth and m = 1 MHD stabilization is being obtained with centrally peaked lower hybrid (LH) current drive and the central electron temperature is peaking to values (approx.5 keV) well outside the bounds of ''profile consistency.'' In this case the electron energy confinement is apparently increased relative to the ohmic value. The production of relativistic electrons via heating at the down-shifted electron cyclotron (EC) frequency is found to be consistent with theoretical predictions and lends support to the use of this method for heating in relatively high magnetic field devices

  15. Pulsed rf systems for large storage rings

    Wilson, P.B.

    1979-03-01

    The possibility is considered that by using a pulsed rf system a substantial reduction can be made in the rf power requirement for the next generation of large storage rings. For a ring with a sufficiently large circumference, the time between bunch passages, T/sub b/, can exceed the cavity filling time, T/sub f/. As the ratio T/sub b//T/sub f/ increases, it is clear that at some point the average power requirement can be reduced by pulsing the rf to the cavities. In this mode of operation, the rf power is turned on a filling time or so before the arrival of a bunch and is switched off again at the time of bunch passage. There is no rf energy in the accelerating structure, and hence no power dissipation, for most of the period between bunches

  16. Emittance growth in rf linacs

    Jameson, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    As the space-charge limit is approached, the current that can be accelerated in an rf linac and the output emittance that can be expected are discussed. The role of the envelope equations to estimate limits is outlined. The results of numerical experiments to explore general properties of emittance growth are given

  17. Bunch Compression Stability Dependence on RF Parameters

    Limberg, T

    2005-01-01

    In present designs for FEL's with high electron peak currents and short bunch lengths, higher harmonic RF systems are often used to optimize the final longitudinal charge distributions. This opens degrees of freedom for the choice of RF phases and amplitudes to achieve the necessary peak current with a reasonable longitudinal bunch shape. It had been found empirically that different working points result in different tolerances for phases and amplitudes. We give an analytical expression for the sensitivity of the compression factor on phase and amplitude jitter for a bunch compression scheme involving two RF systems and two magnetic chicanes as well numerical results for the case of the European XFEL.

  18. High power RF oscillator with Marx generators

    Murase, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Izumi

    1980-01-01

    A method to maintain RF oscillation by using many Marx generators was proposed and studied experimentally. Many charging circuits were connected to an oscillator circuit, and successive pulsed charging was made. This successive charging amplified and maintained the RF oscillation. The use of vacuum gaps and high power silicon diodes improved the characteristics of RF current cut-off of the circuit. The efficiency of the pulsed charging from Marx generators to a condenser was theoretically investigated. The theoretical result showed the maximum efficiency of 0.98. The practical efficiency obtained by using a proposed circuit with a high power oscillator was in the range 0.50 to 0.56. The obtained effective output power of the RF pulses was 11 MW. The maximum holding time of the RF pulses was about 21 microsecond. (Kato, T.)

  19. Experimental study on the effects of surface gravity waves of different wavelengths on the phase averaged performance characteristics of marine current turbine

    Luznik, L.; Lust, E.; Flack, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    There are few studies describing the interaction between marine current turbines and an overlying surface gravity wave field. In this work we present an experimental study on the effects of surface gravity waves of different wavelengths on the wave phase averaged performance characteristics of a marine current turbine model. Measurements are performed with a 1/25 scale (diameter D=0.8m) two bladed horizontal axis turbine towed in the large (116m long) towing tank at the U.S. Naval Academy equipped with a dual-flap, servo-controlled wave maker. Three regular waves with wavelengths of 15.8, 8.8 and 3.9m with wave heights adjusted such that all waveforms have the same energy input per unit width are produced by the wave maker and model turbine is towed into the waves at constant carriage speed of 1.68 m/s. This representing the case of waves travelling in the same direction as the mean current. Thrust and torque developed by the model turbine are measured using a dynamometer mounted in line with the turbine shaft. Shaft rotation speed and blade position are measured using in in-house designed shaft position indexing system. The tip speed ratio (TSR) is adjusted using a hysteresis brake which is attached to the output shaft. Free surface elevation and wave parameters are measured with two optical wave height sensors, one located in the turbine rotor plane and other one diameter upstream of the rotor. All instruments are synchronized in time and data is sampled at a rate of 700 Hz. All measured quantities are conditionally sampled as a function of the measured surface elevation and transformed to wave phase space using the Hilbert Transform. Phenomena observed in earlier experiments with the same turbine such as phase lag in the torque signal and an increase in thrust due to Stokes drift are examined and presented with the present data as well as spectral analysis of the torque and thrust data.

  20. Development of high current electron beam generator

    Lee, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Sun Kook [and others

    1997-05-01

    A high-current electron beam generator has been developed. The energy and the average current of the electron beam are 2 MeV and 50 mA, respectively. The electron beam generator is composed of an electron gun, RF acceleration cavities, a 260-kW RF generator, electron beam optics components, and control system, etc. The electron beam generator will be used for the development of a millimeter-wave free-electron laser and a high average power infrared free-electron laser. The machine will also be used as a user facility in nuclear industry, environment industry, semiconductor industry, chemical industry, etc. (author). 15 tabs., 85 figs.

  1. Development of high current electron beam generator

    Lee, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Sun Kook

    1997-05-01

    A high-current electron beam generator has been developed. The energy and the average current of the electron beam are 2 MeV and 50 mA, respectively. The electron beam generator is composed of an electron gun, RF acceleration cavities, a 260-kW RF generator, electron beam optics components, and control system, etc. The electron beam generator will be used for the development of a millimeter-wave free-electron laser and a high average power infrared free-electron laser. The machine will also be used as a user facility in nuclear industry, environment industry, semiconductor industry, chemical industry, etc. (author). 15 tabs., 85 figs

  2. RF feedback for KEKB

    Ezura, Eizi; Yoshimoto, Shin-ichi; Akai, Kazunori [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the present status of the RF feedback development for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB). A preliminary experiment concerning the RF feedback using a parallel comb-filter was performed through a choke-mode cavity and a klystron. The RF feedback has been tested using the beam of the TRISTAN Main Ring, and has proved to be effective in damping the beam instability. (author)

  3. RF guns: a review

    Travier, C.

    1990-06-01

    Free Electron Lasers and future linear colliders require very bright electron beams. Conventional injectors made of DC guns and RF bunchers have intrinsic limitations. The recently proposed RF guns have already proven their capability to produce bright beams. The necessary effort to improve further these performances and to gain reliability is now undertaken by many laboratories. More than twenty RF gun projects both thermionic and laser-driven are reviewed. Their specific characteristics are outlined and their nominal performances are given

  4. The LHC Low Level RF

    Baudrenghien, Philippe; Molendijk, John Cornelis; Olsen, Ragnar; Rohlev, Anton; Rossi, Vittorio; Stellfeld, Donat; Valuch, Daniel; Wehrle, Urs

    2006-01-01

    The LHC RF consists of eight 400 MHz superconducting cavities per ring, with each cavity independently powered by a 300 kW klystron, via a circulator. The challenge for the Low Level is to cope with very high beam current (more than 1 A RF component) and achieve excellent beam lifetime (emittance growth time in excess of 25 hours). Each cavity has an associated Cavity Controller rack consisting of two VME crates which implement high gain RF Feedback, a Tuner Loop with a new algorithm, a Klystron Ripple Loop and a Conditioning system. In addition each ring has a Beam Control system (four VME crates) which includes a Frequency Program, Phase Loop, Radial Loop and Synchronization Loop. A Longitudinal Damper (dipole and quadrupole mode) acting via the 400 MHz cavities is included to reduce emittance blow-up due to filamentation from phase and energy errors at injection. Finally an RF Synchronization system implements the bunch into bucket transfer from the SPS into each LHC ring. When fully installed in 2007, the...

  5. Langmuir probe measurements in a time-fluctuating-highly ionized non-equilibrium cutting arc: Analysis of the electron retarding part of the time-averaged current-voltage characteristic of the probe

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Kelly, H.

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the application of Langmuir probe diagnostics to the measurement of the electron temperature in a time-fluctuating-highly ionized, non-equilibrium cutting arc. The electron retarding part of the time-averaged current-voltage characteristic of the probe was analysed, assuming that the standard exponential expression describing the electron current to the probe in collision-free plasmas can be applied under the investigated conditions. A procedure is described which allows the determination of the errors introduced in time-averaged probe data due to small-amplitude plasma fluctuations. It was found that the experimental points can be gathered into two well defined groups allowing defining two quite different averaged electron temperature values. In the low-current region the averaged characteristic was not significantly disturbed by the fluctuations and can reliably be used to obtain the actual value of the averaged electron temperature. In particular, an averaged electron temperature of 0.98 ± 0.07 eV (= 11400 ± 800 K) was found for the central core of the arc (30 A) at 3.5 mm downstream from the nozzle exit. This average included not only a time-average over the time fluctuations but also a spatial-average along the probe collecting length. The fitting of the high-current region of the characteristic using such electron temperature value together with the corrections given by the fluctuation analysis showed a relevant departure of local thermal equilibrium in the arc core

  6. Langmuir probe measurements in a time-fluctuating-highly ionized non-equilibrium cutting arc: Analysis of the electron retarding part of the time-averaged current-voltage characteristic of the probe

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B. [Grupo de Descargas Eléctricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecánica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600) Santa Fe (Argentina); Kelly, H. [Grupo de Descargas Eléctricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecánica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600) Santa Fe (Argentina); Instituto de Física del Plasma (CONICET), Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA) Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-12-15

    This work describes the application of Langmuir probe diagnostics to the measurement of the electron temperature in a time-fluctuating-highly ionized, non-equilibrium cutting arc. The electron retarding part of the time-averaged current-voltage characteristic of the probe was analysed, assuming that the standard exponential expression describing the electron current to the probe in collision-free plasmas can be applied under the investigated conditions. A procedure is described which allows the determination of the errors introduced in time-averaged probe data due to small-amplitude plasma fluctuations. It was found that the experimental points can be gathered into two well defined groups allowing defining two quite different averaged electron temperature values. In the low-current region the averaged characteristic was not significantly disturbed by the fluctuations and can reliably be used to obtain the actual value of the averaged electron temperature. In particular, an averaged electron temperature of 0.98 ± 0.07 eV (= 11400 ± 800 K) was found for the central core of the arc (30 A) at 3.5 mm downstream from the nozzle exit. This average included not only a time-average over the time fluctuations but also a spatial-average along the probe collecting length. The fitting of the high-current region of the characteristic using such electron temperature value together with the corrections given by the fluctuation analysis showed a relevant departure of local thermal equilibrium in the arc core.

  7. Langmuir probe measurements in a time-fluctuating-highly ionized non-equilibrium cutting arc: analysis of the electron retarding part of the time-averaged current-voltage characteristic of the probe.

    Prevosto, L; Kelly, H; Mancinelli, B

    2013-12-01

    This work describes the application of Langmuir probe diagnostics to the measurement of the electron temperature in a time-fluctuating-highly ionized, non-equilibrium cutting arc. The electron retarding part of the time-averaged current-voltage characteristic of the probe was analysed, assuming that the standard exponential expression describing the electron current to the probe in collision-free plasmas can be applied under the investigated conditions. A procedure is described which allows the determination of the errors introduced in time-averaged probe data due to small-amplitude plasma fluctuations. It was found that the experimental points can be gathered into two well defined groups allowing defining two quite different averaged electron temperature values. In the low-current region the averaged characteristic was not significantly disturbed by the fluctuations and can reliably be used to obtain the actual value of the averaged electron temperature. In particular, an averaged electron temperature of 0.98 ± 0.07 eV (= 11400 ± 800 K) was found for the central core of the arc (30 A) at 3.5 mm downstream from the nozzle exit. This average included not only a time-average over the time fluctuations but also a spatial-average along the probe collecting length. The fitting of the high-current region of the characteristic using such electron temperature value together with the corrections given by the fluctuation analysis showed a relevant departure of local thermal equilibrium in the arc core.

  8. New developments in RF power sources

    Miller, R.H.

    1994-06-01

    The most challenging rf source requirements for high-energy accelerators presently being studied or designed come from the various electron-positron linear collider studies. All of these studies except TESLA (the superconducting entry in the field) have specified rf sources with much higher peak powers than any existing tubes at comparable high frequencies. While circular machines do not, in general, require high peak power, the very high luminosity electron-positron rings presently being designed as B factories require prodigious total average rf power. In this age of energy conservation, this puts a high priority on high efficiency for the rf sources. Both modulating anodes and depressed collectors are being investigated in the quest for high efficiency at varying output powers

  9. The Bohm criterion for rf discharges

    Meijer, P.M.; Goedheer, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    The well-known dc Bohm criterion is extended to rf discharges. Both low- (ω rf much-lt ω pi ) and high-(ω pi much-lt ω rf ) frequency regimes are considered. For low frequencies, the dc Bohm criterion holds. This criterion states that the initial energy of the ions entering the sheath must exceed a limit in order to obtain a stable sheath. For high frequencies, a modified limit is derived, which is somewhat lower than that of the dc Bohm criterion. The resulting ion current density in a high-frequency sheath is only a few percent lower than that for the dc case

  10. Spatial structure of monthly rainfall measurements average over 25 years and trends of the hourly variability of a current rainy day in Rwanda.

    Nduwayezu, Emmanuel; Kanevski, Mikhail; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2013-04-01

    Climate plays a vital role in a wide range of socio-economic activities of most nations particularly of developing countries. Climate (rainfall) plays a central role in agriculture which is the main stay of the Rwandan economy and community livelihood and activities. The majority of the Rwandan population (81,1% in 2010) relies on rain fed agriculture for their livelihoods, and the impacts of variability in climate patterns are already being felt. Climate-related events like heavy rainfall or too little rainfall are becoming more frequent and are impacting on human wellbeing.The torrential rainfall that occurs every year in Rwanda could disturb the circulation for many days, damages houses, infrastructures and causes heavy economic losses and deaths. Four rainfall seasons have been identified, corresponding to the four thermal Earth ones in the south hemisphere: the normal season (summer), the rainy season (autumn), the dry season (winter) and the normo-rainy season (spring). Globally, the spatial rainfall decreasing from West to East, especially in October (spring) and February (summer) suggests an «Atlantic monsoon influence» while the homogeneous spatial rainfall distribution suggests an «Inter-tropical front» mechanism. What is the hourly variability in this mountainous area? Is there any correlation with the identified zones of the monthly average series (from 1965 to 1990 established by the Rwandan meteorological services)? Where could we have hazards with several consecutive rainy days (using forecasted datas from the Norwegian Meteorological Institute)? Spatio-temporal analysis allows for identifying and explaining large-scale anomalies which are useful for understanding hydrological characteristics and subsequently predicting these hydrological events. The objective of our current research (Rainfall variability) is to proceed to an evaluation of the potential rainfall risk by applying advanced geospatial modelling tools in Rwanda: geostatistical

  11. Average age at death in infancy and infant mortality level: Reconsidering the Coale-Demeny formulas at current levels of low mortality

    Evgeny M. Andreev

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The long-term historical decline in infant mortality has been accompanied by increasing concentration of infant deaths at the earliest stages of infancy. In the mid-1960s Coale and Demeny developed formulas describing the dependency of the average age of death in infancy on the level of infant mortality, based on data obtained up to that time. Objective: In the more developed countries a steady rise in average age of infant death began in the mid-1960s. This paper documents this phenomenon and offers alternative formulas for calculation of the average age of death, taking into account the new mortality trends. Methods: Standard statistical methodologies and a specially developed method are applied to the linked individual birth and infant death datasets available from the US National Center for Health Statistics and the initial (raw numbers of deaths from the Human Mortality Database. Results: It is demonstrated that the trend of decline in the average age of infant death becomes interrupted when the infant mortality rate attains a level around 10 per 1000, and modifications of the Coale-Demeny formulas for practical application to contemporary low levels of mortality are offered. Conclusions: The average age of death in infancy is an important characteristic of infant mortality, although it does not influence the magnitude of life expectancy. That the increase in average age of death in infancy is connected with medical advances is proposed as a possible explanation.

  12. Rf power sources

    Allen, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, the author reports on RF power sources for accelerator applications. The approach will be with particular customers in mind. These customers are high energy physicists who use accelerators as experimental tools in the study of the nucleus of the atom, and synchrotron light sources derived from electron or positron storage rings. The author pays close attention to electron- positron linear accelerators since the RF sources have always defined what is possible to achieve with these accelerators. Circular machines, cyclotrons, synchrotrons, etc. have usually not been limited by the RF power available and the machine builders have usually had their RF power source requirements met off the shelf. The main challenge for the RF scientist has been then in the areas of controls. An interesting example of this is in the Conceptual Design Report of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) where the RF system is described in six pages of text in a 700-page report. Also, the cost of that RF system is about one-third of a percent of the project's total cost. The RF system is well within the state of the art and no new power sources need to be developed. All the intellectual effort of the system designer would be devoted to the feedback systems necessary to stabilize beams during storage and acceleration, with the main engineering challenges (and costs) being in the superconducting magnet lattice

  13. RF Energy Compressor

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1980-02-01

    The RF Energy Compressor, REC described here, transforms cw rf into periodic pulses using an energy storage cavity, ESC, whose charging is controlled by 180 0 bi-phase modulation, PSK, and external Q switching, βs. Compression efficiency, C/sub e/, of 100% can be approached at any compression factor C/sub f/

  14. Dynamical behavior of RF-biased Josephson junctions (I)

    Zi-Dan, Wang; Xi-Xian, Yao

    1985-09-01

    A lot of numerical investigation of equations of RF-biased Josephson junctions is carried out, in which the interference term is included in current-phase relation. Chaotic behavior, sequence of period-doubling bifurcations, inverse sequence of chaotic band and intermittent chaos are found separately in various parameter regions. The convergent factor delta n of 2/sup /P sequence and the ratio Phi(k)/Phi(k+1) are calculated, where Phi(k) is the average height of the peaks corresponding to 2/sup k/P in the power spectrum. We also study the symmetry possessed by period solutions and its relation to the nature of approach to chaos.

  15. Normal Conducting RF Cavity for MICE

    Li, D.; DeMello, A.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Summers, D.

    2010-01-01

    Normal conducting RF cavities must be used for the cooling section of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), currently under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. Eight 201-MHz cavities are needed for the MICE cooling section; fabrication of the first five cavities is complete. We report the cavity fabrication status including cavity design, fabrication techniques and preliminary low power RF measurements.

  16. PEP-II RF System Operation and Performance

    McIntosh, P.

    2005-01-01

    The Low Energy Ring (LER) and High Energy Ring (HER) RF systems have operated now on PEP-II since July 1998 and have assisted in breaking all design luminosity records back in June 2001. Luminosity on PEP-II has steadily increased since then as a consequence of larger e+ and e- beam currents being accumulated. This has meant that the RF systems have inevitably been driven harder, not only to achieve these higher stored beam currents, but also to reliably keep the beams circulating whilst at the same time minimizing the number of aborts due to RF system faults. This paper details the current PEP-II RF system configurations for both rings, as well as future upgrade plans spanning the next 3-5 years. Limitations of the current RF system configurations are presented, highlighting improvement projects which will target specific areas within the RF systems to ensure that adequate operating overheads are maintained and reliable operation is assured. The Low Energy Ring (LER) and High Energy Ring (HER) RF systems have operated now on PEP-II since July 1998 and have assisted in breaking all design luminosity records back in June 2001. Luminosity on PEP-II has steadily increased since then as a consequence of larger e+ and e- beam currents being accumulated. This has meant that the RF systems have inevitably been driven harder, not only to achieve these higher stored beam currents, but also to reliably keep the beams circulating whilst at the same time minimizing the number of aborts due to RF system faults. This paper details the current PEP-II RF system configurations for both rings, as well as future upgrade plans spanning the next 3-5 years. Limitations of the current RF system configurations are presented, highlighting improvement projects which will target specific areas within the RF systems to ensure that adequate operating overheads are maintained and reliable operation is assured

  17. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  18. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-07

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  19. Characteristic performance of radio-frequency(RF) plasma heating using inverter RF power supplies

    Imai, Takahiro; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Takamura, Shuichi; Sawada, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Norifumi

    2000-01-01

    High heat flux plasma are produced by high powe (∼14 kW) ICRF heating using inverter power supplies in the linear divertor simulator NAGDIS-II. The power flow of radiated rf power is investigated by a calorimetric method. Conventional power calculation using antenna voltage and current gives that about 70% of the rf power is radiated into the plasma. But increase of the heat load at the target and anode is about 10% of the rf power. Through this experiment, we find that about half of the rf power is lost at the antenna surface through the formation of rf induced sheath. And about 30% of the power is lost into the vacuum vessel through the charge exchange and elastic collision of ions with neutrals. (author)

  20. RF system developments for CW and/or long pulse linacs

    Lynch, M.

    1998-01-01

    High Power Proton Linacs are under development or proposed for development at Los Alamos and elsewhere. By current standards these linacs all require very large amounts of RF power. The Accelerator for Production of Tritium (APT) is a CW accelerator with an output current and energy of 100 mA and 1,700 MeV, respectively. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), in its ultimate configuration, is a pulsed accelerator with an average output power of 4 MW of beam. Other accelerators such as those that address transmutation and upgrades to LANSCE have similar requirements. For these high average power applications, the RF systems represent approximately half of the total cost of the linac and are thus key elements in the design and configuration of the accelerator. Los Alamos is fortunate to be actively working on both APT and SNS. For these programs the author is pursuing a number of component developments which are aimed at one or more of the key issues for large RF systems: technical performance, capital cost, reliability, and operating efficiency. This paper briefly describes some of the linac applications and then provides updates on the key RF developments being pursued

  1. Versatile rf controller

    Howard, D.

    1985-05-01

    The low level rf system developed for the new Bevatron local injector provides precise control and regulation of the rf phase and amplitude for three 200 MHz linac cavities. The main features of the system are: extensive use of inexpensive, off-the-shelf components, ease of maintenance, and adaptability to a wide range of operation frequencies. The system utilizes separate function, easily removed rf printed circuit cards interconnected via the edge connectors. Control and monitoring are available both locally and through the computer. This paper will describe these features as well as the few component changes that would be required to adapt the techniques to other operating frequencies. 2 refs

  2. Pregnant women models analyzed for RF exposure and temperature increase in 3T RF shimmed birdcages.

    Murbach, Manuel; Neufeld, Esra; Samaras, Theodoros; Córcoles, Juan; Robb, Fraser J; Kainz, Wolfgang; Kuster, Niels

    2017-05-01

    MRI is increasingly used to scan pregnant patients. We investigated the effect of 3 Tesla (T) two-port radiofrequency (RF) shimming in anatomical pregnant women models. RF shimming improves B 1 + uniformity, but may at the same time significantly alter the induced current distribution and result in large changes in both the level and location of the absorbed RF energy. In this study, we evaluated the electrothermal exposure of pregnant women in the third, seventh, and ninth month of gestation at various imaging landmarks in RF body coils, including modes with RF shimming. Although RF shimmed configurations may lower the local RF exposure for the mother, they can increase the thermal load on the fetus. In worst-case configurations, whole-body exposure and local peak temperatures-up to 40.8°C-are equal in fetus and mother. Two-port RF shimming can significantly increase the fetal exposure in pregnant women, requiring further research to derive a very robust safety management. For the time being, restriction to the CP mode, which reduces fetal SAR exposure compared with linear-horizontal polarization modes, may be advisable. Results from this study do not support scanning pregnant patients above the normal operating mode. Magn Reson Med 77:2048-2056, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Rheumatoid factor (RF)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003548.htm Rheumatoid factor (RF) To use the sharing features on this ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  4. Rf power sources

    Allen, M.A.

    1988-05-01

    This paper covers RF power sources for accelerator applications. The approach has been with particular customers in mind. These customers are high energy physicists who use accelerators as experimental tools in the study of the nucleus of the atom, and synchrotron light sources derived from electron or positron storage rings. This paper is confined to electron-positron linear accelerators since the RF sources have always defined what is possible to achieve with these accelerators. 11 refs., 13 figs

  5. RF Measurement Concepts

    Caspers, F

    2014-01-01

    For the characterization of components, systems and signals in the radiofrequency (RF) and microwave ranges, several dedicated instruments are in use. In this article the fundamentals of the RF signal techniques are discussed. The key element in these front ends is the Schottky diode which can be used either as a RF mixer or as a single sampler. The spectrum analyser has become an absolutely indispensable tool for RF signal analysis. Here the front end is the RF mixer as the RF section of modern spectrum analyses has a ra ther complex architecture. The reasons for this complexity and certain working principles as well as limitations are discussed. In addition, an overview of the development of scalar and vector signal analysers is given. For the determination of the noise temperature of a one-port and the noise figure of a two-port, basic concepts and relations are shown as well as a brief discussion of commonly used noise-measurement techniques. In a further part of this article the operating principles of n...

  6. Resistivity effects in non-inductive RF current drive via helicity injection by Alfven waves: the case of conventional and small aspect ratio Tokamaks

    Bruma, C.; Cuperman, S.; Komoshvili, K.

    1996-01-01

    Supplementary non-inductive current drive and heating are necessary to bring Tokamak plasmas into the ignition regime. The resonant excitation of shear Alfven waves (SAW) - in the continuum range (CR) or/and in the discrete global Alfven eigenmode spectrum (GAE's) - represents one potential, suitable method for this purpose. Within the framework of ideal MHD, the current drive (CD) via helicity injection in Tokamak plasmas has been considered by Cuperman et al (1996) and Komoshvili et al. (1996). This work is concerned with the investigation of the non-ideal resistive MHD effects on both the excitation of SAW's (CR's and GAE's) and the generation of non-inductive current drive via helicity injection in Tokamak plasmas. The research covers Tokamak aspect ratios ranging between large value cases (R/a = 10) and the very tight value case (R/ a = 1.2). (authors)

  7. The CEBAF RF Separator System Upgrade

    Hovater, J.; Mark Augustine; Al Guerra; Richard Nelson; Robert Terrell; Mark Wissmann

    2004-01-01

    The CEBAF accelerator uses RF deflecting cavities operating at the third sub-harmonic (499 MHz) of the accelerating frequency (1497 MHz) to ''kick'' the electron beam to the experimental halls. The cavities operate in a TEM dipole mode incorporating mode enhancing rods to increase the cavity's transverse shunt impedance [1]. As the accelerators energy has increased from 4 GeV to 6 GeV the RF system, specifically the 1 kW solid-state amplifiers, have become problematic, operating in saturation because of the increased beam energy demands. Two years ago we began a study to look into replacement for the RF amplifiers and decided to use a commercial broadcast Inductive Output Tube (IOT) capable of 30 kW. The new RF system uses one IOT amplifier on multiple cavities as opposed to one amplifier per cavity as was originally used. In addition, the new RF system supports a proposed 12 GeV energy upgrade to CEBAF. We are currently halfway through the upgrade with three IOTs in operation and the remaining one nearly installed. This paper reports on the new RF system and the IOT performance

  8. Superconducting RF activities at Cornell University

    Kirchgessner, J.; Moffat, D.; Padamsee, H.; Rubin, D.; Sears, J.; Shu, Q.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper outlines the RF superconductivity research and development work that has taken place at Cornell Laboratory of Nuclear Studies over the past years. The work that has been performed since the last RF superconductivity workshop is emphasized together with a discussion of the direction of future efforts. Past work is summarized first, focusing on research and development activities in the area of RF superconductivity. Superconducting TeV linear collider is then discussed focusing on the application of superconducting RF to a future TeV linear collider. Linear collider structure development is then described centering on the development of a simpler (thereby cheaper) structure for a TeV linear collider. B-factory with superconducting RF is outlined focusing on the formulation of a conceptual design for a B-factory. B-factory structure development is discussed in relation to the advancement in the capability of SC cavities to carry beam currents of several amperes necessary for a high luminosity storage ring. High gradients are discussed as the key to the realization of a high energy superconducting linac or a superconducting RF B-factory. (N.K.)

  9. Energy-efficient operation of a booster RF system for Taiwan light source operated in top-up mode

    Yeh, Meng-Shu; Wang, Chaoen; Chang, Lung-Hai; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Yu, Tsung-Chi; Lin, Ming-Chyuan; Chen, Ling-Jhen; Yang, Tz-Te; Chang, Mei-Hsia; Lin, Yu-Han; Tsai, Ming-Hsun; Lo, Chih-Hung; Liu, Zong-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary light sources operate in a top-up mode to maintain their photon intensity quasi-constant so as to improve significantly the thermal stability of the photon beam and to maximize ultimately the average photon flux at a designed maximum operational beam current. Operating in a top-up mode requires frequent beam injection from the synchrotron booster to the storage ring of the light source, but the injection intervals occupy only a tiny portion of the operational time of the integrated machine. To maintain a high operational reliability, the booster RF system practically operates necessarily under injection conditions around the clock and consumes full electric power whether during top-up injection or not. How to decrease the power consumption of the booster RF system during its stand-by time but not to sacrifice the reliability and availability of the RF system is obviously of fundamental interest for routine operation of the light source in a top-up mode. Here, an energy-efficient operation of a booster RF system adaptive to top-up operation of a light source is proposed that has been developed, realized and integrated into the booster RF system of the Taiwan Light Source (TLS), and routinely operated since the end of year 2008. The klystron cathode current and RF gap voltage of the booster's accelerating RF cavity are both periodically modulated to adapt the injection rhythm during top-up operation, which results in decreased consumption of electric power of the booster RF system by more than 78%. The impact on the reliability and availability of the booster RF system has been carefully monitored during the past five operational years, delivering more than 5000 h scheduled user beam time per year. The booster RF system retains its excellent reliability and availability as previously. Neither a decrease of the service time nor an induced reliability issue from the klystron or any high-power high-voltage component of the transmitter has been

  10. Pulsed rf superconductivity program at SLAC

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1984-08-01

    Recent tests performed at SLAC on superconducting TM 010 caavities using short rf pulses (less than or equal to 2.5 μs) have established that at the cavity surface magnetic fields can be reached in the vicinity of the theoretical critical fields without an appreciable increase in average losses. Tests on niobium and lead cavities are reported. The pulse method seems to be best suited to study peak field properties of superconductors in the microwave band, without the limitations imposed by defects. The short pulses also seem to be more effective in decreasing the causes of field emission by rf processing. Applications of the pulsed rf superconductivity to high-gradient linear accelerators are also possible

  11. The RF Design of an HOM Polarized RF Gun for the ILC

    Wang, J.W.; Clendenin, J.E.; Colby, E.R.; Miller, R.A.; Lewellen, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    The ILC requires a polarized electron beam. While a highly polarized beam can be produced by a GaAs-type cathode in a DC gun of the type currently in use at SLAC, JLAB and elsewhere, the ILC injector system can be simplified and made more efficient if a GaAs-type cathode can be combined with a low emittance RF gun. Since this type of cathode is known to be extremely sensitive to vacuum contamination including back bombardment by electrons and ions, any successful polarized RF gun must have a significantly improved operating vacuum compared to existing RF guns. We present a new RF design for an L-Band normal conducting (NC) RF gun for the ILC polarized electron source. This design incorporates a higher order mode (HOM) structure, whose chief virtue in this application is an improved conductance for vacuum pumping on the cathode. Computer simulation models have been used to optimize the RF parameters with two principal goals: first to minimize the required RF power; second to reduce the peak surface field relative to the field at the cathode in order to suppress field emitted electron bombardment. The beam properties have been simulated initially using PARMELA. Vacuum and other practical issues for implementing this design are discussed

  12. The elbe accelerator facility starts operation with the superconducting rf gun

    Xiang, R; Buettig, H; Janssen, D; Justus, M; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Murcek, P; Schneider, C; Schurig, R; Staufenbiel, F; Teichert, J; Kamps, T; Rudolph, J; Schenk, M; Klemz, G; Will, I

    2010-01-01

    As the first superconducting rf photo-injector (SRF gun) in practice, the FZD 3+1/2 cell SRF gun is successfully connected to the superconducting linac ELBE. This setting will improve the beam quality for ELBE users. It is the first example for an accelerator facility fully based on superconducting RF technology. For high average power FEL and ERL sources, the combination of SRF linac and SRF gun provides a new chance to produce beams of high average current and low emittance with relative low power consumption. The main parameters achieved from the present SRF gun are the final electron energy of 3 MeV, 16 μA average current, and rms transverse normalized emittances of 3 mm mrad at 77 pC bunch charge. A modified 3+1/2 cell niobium cavity has been fabricated and tested, which will increase the rf gradient in the gun and thus better the beam parameters further. In this paper the status of the integration of the SRF gun with the ELBE linac will be presented, and the latest results of the beam experiments will ...

  13. Electron Source based on Superconducting RF

    Xin, Tianmu

    High-bunch-charge photoemission electron-sources operating in a Continuous Wave (CW) mode can provide high peak current as well as the high average current which are required for many advanced applications of accelerators facilities, for example, electron coolers for hadron beams, electron-ion colliders, and Free-Electron Lasers (FELs). Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) has many advantages over other electron-injector technologies, especially when it is working in CW mode as it offers higher repetition rate. An 112 MHz SRF electron photo-injector (gun) was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to produce high-brightness and high-bunch-charge bunches for electron cooling experiments. The gun utilizes a Quarter-Wave Resonator (QWR) geometry for a compact structure and improved electron beam dynamics. The detailed RF design of the cavity, fundamental coupler and cathode stalk are presented in this work. A GPU accelerated code was written to improve the speed of simulation of multipacting, an important hurdle the SRF structure has to overcome in various locations. The injector utilizes high Quantum Efficiency (QE) multi-alkali photocathodes (K2CsSb) for generating electrons. The cathode fabrication system and procedure are also included in the thesis. Beam dynamic simulation of the injector was done with the code ASTRA. To find the optimized parameters of the cavities and beam optics, the author wrote a genetic algorithm Python script to search for the best solution in this high-dimensional parameter space. The gun was successfully commissioned and produced world record bunch charge and average current in an SRF photo-injector.

  14. The FELIX RF system

    Manintveld, P.; Delmee, P.F.M.; Geer, C.A.J. van der; Meddens, B.J.H.; Meer, A.F.G. van der; Amersfoort, P.W. van

    1992-01-01

    The performance of the RF system for the Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments (FELIX) is discussed. The RF system provides the input power for a triode gun (1 GHz, 100 W), a prebuncher (1 GHz, 10 kW), a buncher (3 GHz, 20 MW), and two linacs (3 GHz, 8 MW each). The pulse length in the system is 20 μs. The required electron beam stability imposes the following demands on the RF system: a phase stability better than 0.3 deg for the 1 GHz signals and better than 1 deg for the 3 GHz signals; the amplitude stability has to be better than 1% for the 1 GHz and better than 0.2% for the 3 GHz signals. (author) 3 refs.; 6 figs

  15. The system of RF beam control for electron gun

    Barnyakov, A.M.; Levichev, A.E.; Chernousov, Yu.D.; Ivannikov, V.I.; Shebolaev, I.V.

    2015-01-01

    The system of RF control of three-electrode electron gun current is described. It consists of a source of microwave signal, coaxial line, coaxial RF switch and RF antenna lead. The system allows one to get the electron beam in the form of bunches with the frequency of the accelerating section to achieve the capture of particles in the acceleration mode close to 100%. The results of calculation and analysis of the elements of the system are presented. Characteristics of the devices are obtained experimentally. The results of using RF control in three-electrode electron gun at electron linear accelerator are described

  16. RF pulse compression in the NLC test accelerator at SLAC

    Lavine, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), the authors are designing a Next Linear Collider (NLC) with linacs powered by X-band klystrons with rf pulse compression. The design of the linac rf system is based on X-band prototypes which have been tested at high power, and on a systems-integration test - the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) - which is currently under construction at SLAC. This paper discusses some of the systems implications of rf pulse compression, and the use of pulse compression in the NLCTA, both for peak power multiplication and for controlling, by rf phase modulation, intra-pulse variations in the linac beam energy

  17. Rf system considerations for a large hadron collider

    Raka, E.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, we shall discuss how we arrive at a particular choice of voltage and frequency; the type of acceleration structure that would be suitable for obtaining the required voltage and resonant impedance; static beam loading including a simplified beam stability criterion involving the beam current and total rf system shunt impedance; the basic principle of rf phase and frequency control loops; and the effect of rf noise and its interaction with these loops. Finally, we shall consider the need for and design of rf systems to damp independently coherent oscillations of individual bunches or groups of bunches. 30 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Phase calibration strategies for synchrotron RF signals

    Andreev, Aleksandr [TEMF, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Klingbeil, Harald [TEMF, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Lens, Dieter [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    For the FAIR facility that is currently under construction, the beam quality requirements impose several demands on the low-level RF (LLRF) systems. For example the phase error of the gap voltage of a specific RF cavity must be less than 1 . The RF reference signals for the FAIR synchrotron RF cavity systems are generated by direct digital synthesis modules (DDS) mounted in one crate called Group-DDS. In order to allow performing various multi-harmonic operations, each DDS unit operates at a certain mode defined by the harmonic number that can be changed during the operation. Since the DDS modules generate reference RF signals for different LLRF systems, the precise calibration of units to compensate the different phase response is of importance. The currently used calibration procedure is done with a fixed harmonic number for each module and uses the DDS module configured to the highest harmonic number as a reference. If the harmonic number of the DDS module is changed, one then has to repeat the calibration for the new values. Therefore, a new calibration method with respect to the absolute phases of DDS modules is under development and will be presented.

  19. ISR RF cavities

    1983-01-01

    In each ISR ring the radiofrequency cavities were installed in one 9 m long straight section. The RF system of the ISR had the main purpose to stack buckets of particles (most of the time protons)coming from the CPS and also to accelerate the stacked beam. The installed RF power per ring was 18 kW giving a peak accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The system had a very fine regulation feature allowing to lower the voltage down to 75 V in a smooth and well controlled fashion.

  20. Conventional RF system design

    Puglisi, M.

    1994-01-01

    The design of a conventional RF system is always complex and must fit the needs of the particular machine for which it is planned. It follows that many different design criteria should be considered and analyzed, thus exceeding the narrow limits of a lecture. For this reason only the fundamental components of an RF system, including the generators, are considered in this short seminar. The most common formulas are simply presented in the text, while their derivations are shown in the appendices to facilitate, if desired, a more advanced level of understanding. (orig.)

  1. Correlates of the MMPI-2-RF in a College Setting

    Forbey, Johnathan D.; Lee, Tayla T. C.; Handel, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined empirical correlates of scores on Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; A. Tellegen & Y. S. Ben-Porath, 2008; Y. S. Ben-Porath & A. Tellegen, 2008) scales in a college setting. The MMPI-2-RF and six criterion measures (assessing anger, assertiveness, sex roles, cognitive…

  2. RF Processing Experience with the GTF Prototype RF Gun

    Schmerge, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. A total of five different metal cathodes (4 Cu and 1 Mg) have been installed on the GTF gun. The rf processing history with the different cathodes will be presented including peak field achieved at the cathode. The LCLS gun is intended to operate at 120 MV/m and fields up to 140 MV/m have been achieved in the GTF gun. After installing a new cathode the number of rf pulses required to reach 120 MV/m is approximately 5-10 million. Total emitted dark current and Fowler Nordheim plots are also shown over the life of the cathode. The GTF photo-injector gun is an S-band standing-wave structure, with two resonant cavities and an intervening thick washer (Figure 1). The flat, back wall of the first cavity is a copper plate that serves as photocathode when illuminated with ultraviolet light from a pulsed, high-power laser. RF power enters the gun through an iris on the outer wall of the second cavity, and is coupled to the first through the axial opening of the washer. The first cavity is often referred to as a half cell, because its full-cell length has been truncated by the cathode plate and the second cavity is called the full cell. The gun is designed to operate in a π mode, with the peak field on axis in each cell approximately equal. The maximum in the half cell occurs at the cathode, and in the full cell near the center of the cavity. The field profile and tuning procedures are discussed in a separate tech note (1).

  3. Synchronization of RF fields of Indus 2 RF cavities for proper injection and acceleration of beam

    Tiwari, Nitesh; Bagduwal, Pritam S.; Lad, M.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    Indus-2 is a synchrotron light source with designed parameters of 2.5 GeV, 300 mA beam current. Four RF cavities fed from four RF power stations have been used for beam acceleration from 550 MeV to 2.5 GeV and synchrotron loss compensation. Particle should reach the RF cavity at the proper phase for proper acceptance of the beam in ring. At injection if the phase is not proper the acceptance efficiency reduces and the maximum stored current in the ring also gets limited. Equal contribution from four cavities at every value of current and energy level is very important. Improper phase will cause the imbalance of the power among different station hence will limit maximum stored current and reduce life time of the stored beam. Phase optimization was done in two-step, first at injection to have better injection rate and the stations were operated at the sufficient power for control loops to operate. Then at 2 GeV and 2.5 GeV energy so that beam extracts equal power from all four RF stations. Phase synchronization of all four cavities from injection to 2.5 GeV has already been done at 50 mA stored beam current. If phases of RF fields inside four RF cavities is not proper then beam will not see the total RF voltage as summation of all four cavity gap voltages, hence it is a very important parameter to be optimized and maintained during operation. (author)

  4. High gradient RF breakdown study

    Laurent, L.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Scheitrum, G.; Hanna, S.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.

    1998-01-01

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and UC Davis have been investigating high gradient RF breakdown and its effects on pulse shortening in high energy microwave devices. RF breakdown is a critical issue in the development of high power microwave sources and next generation linear accelerators since it limits the output power of microwave sources and the accelerating gradient of linacs. The motivation of this research is to find methods to increase the breakdown threshold level in X-band structures by reducing dark current. Emphasis is focused on improved materials, surface finish, and cleanliness. The test platform for this research is a traveling wave resonant ring. A 30 MW klystron is employed to provide up to 300 MW of traveling wave power in the ring to trigger breakdown in the cavity. Five TM 01 cavities have previously been tested, each with a different combination of surface polish and/or coating. The onset of breakdown was extended up to 250 MV/m with a TiN surface finish, as compared to 210 MV/m for uncoated OFE copper. Although the TiN coating was helpful in depressing the field emission, the lowest dark current was obtained with a 1 microinch surface finish, single-point diamond-turned cavity

  5. The TESLA RF System

    Choroba, S.

    2003-01-01

    The TESLA project proposed by the TESLA collaboration in 2001 is a 500 to 800GeV e+/e- linear collider with integrated free electron laser facility. The accelerator is based on superconducting cavity technology. Approximately 20000 superconducting cavities operated at 1.3GHz with a gradient of 23.4MV/m or 35MV/m will be required to achieve the energy of 500GeV or 800GeV respectively. For 500GeV ∼600 RF stations each generating 10MW of RF power at 1.3GHz at a pulse duration of 1.37ms and a repetition rate of 5 or 10Hz are required. The original TESLA design was modified in 2002 and now includes a dedicated 20GeV electron accelerator in a separate tunnel for free electron laser application. The TESLA XFEL will provide XFEL radiation of unprecedented peak brilliance and full transverse coherence in the wavelength range of 0.1 to 6.4nm at a pulse duration of 100fs. The technology of both accelerators, the TESLA linear collider and the XFEL, will be identical, however the number of superconducting cavities and RF stations for the XFEL will be reduced to 936 and 26 respectively. This paper describes the layout of the entire RF system of the TESLA linear collider and the TESLA XFEL and gives an overview of its various subsystems and components

  6. Remote RF Battery Charging

    Visser, H.J.; Pop, V.; Op het Veld, J.H.G.; Vullers, R.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The design of a remote RF battery charger is discussed through the analysis and design of the subsystems of a rectenna (rectifying antenna): antenna, rectifying circuit and loaded DC-to-DC voltage (buck-boost) converter. Optimum system power generation performance is obtained by adopting a system

  7. Beyond the RF photogun

    Luiten, O.J.; Rozenzweig, J.; Travish, G.

    2003-01-01

    Laser-triggered switching of MV DC voltages enables acceleration gradients an order of magnitude higher than in state-of-the-art RF photoguns. In this way ultra-short, high-brightness electron bunches may be generated without the use of magnetic compression. The evolution of the bunch during the

  8. AC/RF Superconductivity

    Ciovati, G [Jefferson Lab (United States)

    2014-07-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  9. AC/RF Superconductivity

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  10. Development of L-band pillbox RF window

    Takeuchi, Y.; Fukuda, S.; Hisamatsu, H.; Saito, Y.; Takahashi, A.

    1994-01-01

    A pillbox RF output window was developed for the L-band pulsed klystron for the Japanese Hadron Project (JHP) 1-GeV proton linac. The window was designed to withstand a peak RF power of 6 MW, where the pulse width is 600 μsec and the repetition rate is 50 Hz. A high power model was fabricated using an alumina ceramic which has a low loss tangent of 2.5x10 -5 . A high power test was successfully performed up to a 113 kW RF average power with a 4 MW peak power, a 565 μsec pulse width and a 50 Hz repetition rate. By extrapolating the data of this high power test, the temperature rise of the ceramic is estimated low enough at the full RF power of 6 MW. Thus this RF window is expected to satisfy the specifications of the L-band Klystron. (author)

  11. Local Multi-Channel RF Surface Coil versus Body RF Coil Transmission for Cardiac Magnetic Resonance at 3 Tesla: Which Configuration Is Winning the Game?

    Weinberger, Oliver; Winter, Lukas; Dieringer, Matthias A; Els, Antje; Oezerdem, Celal; Rieger, Jan; Kuehne, Andre; Cassara, Antonino M; Pfeiffer, Harald; Wetterling, Friedrich; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency of cardiac MR at 3 Tesla using local four-channel RF coil transmission and benchmark it against large volume body RF coil excitation. Electromagnetic field simulations are conducted to detail RF power deposition, transmission field uniformity and efficiency for local and body RF coil transmission. For both excitation regimes transmission field maps are acquired in a human torso phantom. For each transmission regime flip angle distributions and blood-myocardium contrast are examined in a volunteer study of 12 subjects. The feasibility of the local transceiver RF coil array for cardiac chamber quantification at 3 Tesla is demonstrated. Our simulations and experiments demonstrate that cardiac MR at 3 Tesla using four-channel surface RF coil transmission is competitive versus current clinical CMR practice of large volume body RF coil transmission. The efficiency advantage of the 4TX/4RX setup facilitates shorter repetition times governed by local SAR limits versus body RF coil transmission at whole-body SAR limit. No statistically significant difference was found for cardiac chamber quantification derived with body RF coil versus four-channel surface RF coil transmission. Our simulation also show that the body RF coil exceeds local SAR limits by a factor of ~2 when driven at maximum applicable input power to reach the whole-body SAR limit. Pursuing local surface RF coil arrays for transmission in cardiac MR is a conceptually appealing alternative to body RF coil transmission, especially for patients with implants.

  12. Lasers for RF guns: Proceedings

    Srinivasan-Rao, T.

    1994-01-01

    In the past decade, laser driven RF guns have matured from a device under development to a proven source for high brightness and low emittance electron beams. The reliability of the electron beam from these sources is dictated by the laser system that drives it. In addition, capabilities of the laser systems play a vital role in the design of the electron source for future machines such as the TESLA and NLC. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for discussing the design criteria for the laser systems so that the reliability of the existing sources could be improved and the future machines could be serviced. The Workshop brought together experts in RF Guns, accelerators, and lasers, from both the commercial and academic community. Most of the presentations, discussions and conclusions at the workshop are included in these proceedings. The contents are divided into three sections, Section I contains the invited talks that outline the requirements of the RF Guns and the capabilities of the laser systems to meet these requirements. Section II includes most of the papers presented in the poster session. These papers describe various laser systems used with electron guns, schemes to modify the laser beam profile to optimize the electron bunch, and computer simulations of electron trajectories. Section III contains the summaries of the working groups. As the summary section indicates, with sufficient feed back systems, the electron gun could be made to operate reliably with minimum downtime, using commercial lasers currently available. The design of laser systems for future colliders depend critically on the choice of the cathode m the gun and its efficiency. Tentative designs of laser systems for the TESLA test facility and LCLS had been drawn assuming a copper cathode. Using a more efficient cathode will ease the energy requirement of the laser and simplify the design. The individual papers have been cataloged separately elsewhere

  13. Performance of the Brookhaven photocathode rf gun

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Fernow, R.C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.; Ingold, G.; Kirk, H.G.; Leung, K.P.; Malone, R.; Pogorelsky, I.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Rogers, J.; Tsang, T.; Sheehan, J.; Ulc, S.; Woodle, M.; Xie, J.; Zhang, R.S.; Lin, L.Y.; McDonald, K.T.; Russell, D.P.; Hung, C.M.; Wang, X.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) uses a photocathode rf gun to provide a high-brightness electron beam intended for FEL and laser-acceleration experiments. The rf gun consists of 1 1/2 cells driven at 2856 MHz in π-mode with a maximum cathode field of 100 MV/m. To achieve long lifetimes, the photocathode development concentrates on robust metals such as copper, yttrium and samarium. We illuminate these cathodes with a 10-ps, frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG laser. We describe the initial operation of the gun, including measurements of transverse and longitudinal emittance, quantum efficiencies, and peak current. The results are compared to models

  14. Operation of the APS rf gun

    Lewellen, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) has a thermionic-cathode rf gun system capable of providing beam to the APS linac. The gun system consists of a 1.6-cell thermionic-cathode rf gun, a fast kicker for beam current control, and an alpha magnet for bunch compression and injection into the APS linac line. This system is intended for use both as an injector for positron creation, and as a first beam source for the Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) project [1]. The first measured performance characteristics of the gun are presented.

  15. rf driven multicusp H- ion source

    Leung, K.N.; DeVries, G.J.; DiVergilio, W.F.; Hamm, R.W.; Hauck, C.A.; Kunkel, W.B.; McDonald, D.S.; Williams, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    An rf driven multicusp source capable of generating 1-ms H - beam pulses with a repetition rate as high as 150 Hz has been developed. This source can be operated with a filament or other types of starter. There is almost no lifetime limitation and a clean plasma can be maintained for a long period of operation. It is demonstrated that rf power as high as 25 kW could be coupled inductively to the plasma via a glass-coated copper-coil antenna. The extracted H - current density achieved is about 200 mA/cm 2

  16. RF and dc desensitized electroexplosive device

    Krainiak, John W.; Speaks, Paul D.; Cornett, Michael S.

    1989-07-01

    This patent application relates to electroexplosive devices (EEDs) such as detonators, blasting caps and squibs, in particular to a method and device for desensitizing EEDs to electromagnetic radiation and electrostatic charges with the added ability to desensitize the device to essentially dc currents. An insensitive electroexplosive device to electrically ignite explosive is disclosed. This device is inherently immune to radio frequency (RF) radiation, and also provides protection against dc or very low frequency RF induced by arcing. A central feature is use of zeners and capacitors to form a reactively balanced bridge circuit. When constructed in semiconductor form, as described in this application, the device is capable of incorporation in small caliber ordnance.

  17. A design and performance analysis tool for superconducting RF systems

    Schilcher, T.; Simrock, S.N.; Merminga, L.; Wang, D.X.

    1997-01-01

    Superconducting rf systems are usually operated with continuous rf power or with rf pulse lengths exceeding 1 ms to maximize the overall wall plug power efficiency. Typical examples are CEBAF at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) and the TESLA Test Facility at DESY. The long pulses allow for effective application of feedback to stabilize the accelerating field in presence of microphonics, Lorentz force detuning, and fluctuations of the beam current. In this paper the authors describe a set of tools to be used with MATLAB and SIMULINK, which allow to analyze the quality of field regulation for a given design. The tools include models for the cavities, the rf power source, the beam, sources of field perturbations, and the rf feedback system. The rf control relevant electrical and mechanical characteristics of the cavity are described in form of time-varying state space models. The power source is modeled as a current generator and includes saturation characteristics and noise.An arbitrary time structure can be imposed on the beam current to reflect a macro-pulse structure and bunch charge fluctuations. For rf feedback several schemes can be selected: Traditional amplitude and phase control as well as I/Q control. The choices for the feedback controller include analog or digital approaches and various choices of frequency response. Feed forward can be added to further suppress repetitive errors. The results of a performance analysis of the CEBAF and the TESLA Linac rf system using these tools are presented

  18. Status of RF superconductivity at Argonne

    Shepard, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    Development of a superconducting slow-wave structures began at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1971, and led to the first superconducting heavy-ion linac (ATLAS - the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System). The Physics Division at ANL has continued to develop superconducting RF technology for accelerating heavy-ions, with the result that the linac has been in an almost continuous process of upgrade and expansion. In 1987, the Engineering Physics Division at ANL began developing of superconducting RF components for the acceleration of high-brightness proton and deuterium beams. The two divisions collaborate in work on several applications of RF superconductivity, and also in work to develop the technology generally. The present report briefly describes major features of the superconducting heavy-ion linac (very-low-velocity superconducting linac, positive ion injector), proton accelerating structures (superconducting resonant cavities for acceleration of high-current proton and deuteron beams, RF properties of oxide superconductors), and future work. Both divisions expect to continue a variety of studies, frequently in collaboration, to advance the basic technology of RF superconductivity. (N.K.)

  19. Radiofrequency (RF) radiation measurement for diathermy machine

    Rozaimah Abdul Rahim; Roha Tukimin; Mohd Amirul Nizam; Ahmad Fadzli; Mohd Azizi

    2010-01-01

    Full-text: Diathermy machine is one of medical device that use widely in hospital and clinic. During the diathermy treatment, high radiofrequency (RF) currents (shortwave and microwave) are used to heat deep muscular tissues through electromagnetic energy to body tissues. The heat increases blood flow, relieve pain and speeding up recovery. The stray RF radiation from the machine can exposes to unintended tissue of the patient, to the operator (physical therapist) and also can cause electromagnetic interference (EMI) effect to medical devices around the machine. The main objective of this study is to establish a database of the RF radiation exposure levels experienced by the operator and patient during the treatments. RF radiation (electric and magnetic field) produced by the diathermy machines were measured using special RF survey meters. The finding of this study confirms that radiation levels on the surface and near the applicator of the diathermy machine much more elevated due to the much closer distance to the source and they exceeding the occupational and general public exposure limit. The results also shows the field strengths drop very significantly when the distance of measurement increase. (author)

  20. RF Electron Gun with Driven Plasma Cathode

    Khodak, Igor

    2005-01-01

    It's known that RF guns with plasma cathodes based on solid-state dielectrics are able to generate an intense electron beam. In this paper we describe results of experimental investigation of the single cavity S-band RF gun with driven plasma cathode. The experimental sample of the cathode based on ferroelectric ceramics has been designed. Special design of the cathode permits to separate spatially processes of plasma development and electron acceleration. It has been obtained at RF gun output electron beam with particle energy ~500 keV, pulse current of 4 A and pulse duration of 80 ns. Results of experimental study of beam parameters are referred in. The gun is purposed to be applied as the intense electron beam source for electron linacs.

  1. Modeling and simulation of Indus-2 RF feedback control system

    Sharma, D.; Bagduwal, P.S.; Tiwari, N.; Lad, M.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2012-01-01

    Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source has four RF stations along with their feedback control systems. For higher beam energy and current operation amplitude and phase feedback control systems of Indus-2 are being upgraded. To understand the behaviour of amplitude and phase control loop under different operating conditions, modelling and simulation of RF feedback control system is done. RF cavity baseband I/Q model has been created due to its close correspondence with actual implementation and better computational efficiency which makes the simulation faster. Correspondence between cavity baseband and RF model is confirmed by comparing their simulation results. Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback control system simulation is done using the same cavity baseband I/Q model. Error signals are intentionally generated and response of the closed loop system is observed. Simulation will help us in optimizing parameters of upgraded LLRF system for higher beam energy and current operation. (author)

  2. Barrier rf systems in synchrotrons

    Bhat, Chandra M.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, many interesting applications of the barrier RF system in hadron synchrotrons have been realized. A remarkable example of this is the development of longitudinal momentum mining and implementation at the Fermilab Recycler for extraction of low emittance pbars for the Tevatron shots. At Fermilab, we have barrier RF systems in four different rings. In the case of Recycler Ring, all of the rf manipulations are carried out using a barrier RF system. Here, the author reviews various uses of barrier rf systems in particle accelerators including some new schemes for producing intense proton beam and possible new applications

  3. Measurements of loop antenna loading in RF heating experiments on the KT-5C tokamak

    Zhai Kan; Deng Bihe; Wen Yizhi; Wan Shude; Liu Wandong; Yu Wen; Yu Changxun

    1997-01-01

    A new method to measure the loop antenna loadings in the RF wave heating experiments (IBWH at reasonable RF power with relatively low frequency) on the KT-5C device is presented. The method is characterized by determining the RF current ratio only, so it eases the needs of instruments and simplifies the requirements for calibration and data processing in the experiments

  4. Racetrack microtron rf system

    Tallerico, P.J.; Keffeler, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The rf system for the National Bureau of Standards (NBS)/Los Alamos cw racetrack microtron is described. The low-power portion consists of five 75-W amplifers that drive two input ports in each of two chopper deflection cavities and one port in the prebuncher cavity. A single 500-kW klystron drives four separate 2380-MHz cavity sections: the two main accelerator sections, a capture section, and a preaccelerator section. The phases and amplitudes in all cavities are controlled by electronic or electromechanical controls. The 1-MW klystron power supply and crowbar system were purchased as a unit; several modifications are described that improve power-supply performance. The entire rf system has been tested and shipped to the NBS, and the chopper-buncher system has been operated with beam at the NBS. 5 refs., 2 figs

  5. RF Gun Optimization Study

    Alicia Hofler; Pavel Evtushenko

    2007-01-01

    Injector gun design is an iterative process where the designer optimizes a few nonlinearly interdependent beam parameters to achieve the required beam quality for a particle accelerator. Few tools exist to automate the optimization process and thoroughly explore the parameter space. The challenging beam requirements of new accelerator applications such as light sources and electron cooling devices drive the development of RF and SRF photo injectors. A genetic algorithm (GA) has been successfully used to optimize DC photo injector designs at Cornell University [1] and Jefferson Lab [2]. We propose to apply GA techniques to the design of RF and SRF gun injectors. In this paper, we report on the initial phase of the study where we model and optimize a system that has been benchmarked with beam measurements and simulation

  6. Performance analysis of switching based hybrid FSO/RF transmission

    Usman, Muneer

    2014-09-01

    Hybrid free space optical (FSO)/ radio frequency (RF) systems have emerged as a promising solution for high data rate wireless back haul.We present and analyze a switching based transmission scheme for hybrid FSO/RF system. Specifically, either FSO or RF link will be active at a certain time instance, with FSO link enjoying a higher priority. Analytical expressions have been obtained for the outage probability, average bit error rate and ergodic capacity for the resulting system. Numerical examples are presented to compare the performance of the hybrid scheme with FSO only scenario.

  7. Performance analysis of switching based hybrid FSO/RF transmission

    Usman, Muneer; Yang, Hongchuan; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid free space optical (FSO)/ radio frequency (RF) systems have emerged as a promising solution for high data rate wireless back haul.We present and analyze a switching based transmission scheme for hybrid FSO/RF system. Specifically, either FSO or RF link will be active at a certain time instance, with FSO link enjoying a higher priority. Analytical expressions have been obtained for the outage probability, average bit error rate and ergodic capacity for the resulting system. Numerical examples are presented to compare the performance of the hybrid scheme with FSO only scenario.

  8. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  9. Pulsed rf operation analysis

    Puglisi, M.; Cornacchia, M.

    1981-01-01

    The need for a very low final amplifier output impedance, always associated with class A operation, requires a very large power waste in the final tube. The recently suggested pulsed rf operation, while saving a large amount of power, increases the inherent final amplifier non linearity. A method is presented for avoiding the large signal non linear analysis and it is shown how each component of the beam induced voltage depends upon all the beam harmonics via some coupling coefficients which are evaluated

  10. RF pulse compression development

    Farkas, Z.D.; Weaver, J.N.

    1987-10-01

    The body of this paper discusses the theory and some rules for designing a multistage Binary Energy Compressor (BEC) including its response to nonstandard phase coding, describes some proof-of-principle experiments with a couple of low power BECs, presents the design parameters for some sample linear collider rf systems that could possibly use a BEC to advantage and outlines in the conclusion some planned R and D efforts. 8 refs., 26 figs., 4 tabs

  11. RF Pulsed Heating

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  12. Microwave and RF engineering

    Sorrentino, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    An essential text for both students and professionals, combining detailed theory with clear practical guidance This outstanding book explores a large spectrum of topics within microwave and radio frequency (RF) engineering, encompassing electromagnetic theory, microwave circuits and components. It provides thorough descriptions of the most common microwave test instruments and advises on semiconductor device modelling. With examples taken from the authors' own experience, this book also covers:network and signal theory;electronic technology with guided electromagnetic pr

  13. Fundamental Study of a Combined Hyperthermia System with RF Capacitive Heating and Interstitial Heating

    Saitoh, Yoshiaki; Hori, Junichi; 斉藤, 義明; 堀, 潤一

    2001-01-01

    Interstitial RF heating with an inserted electrode allows the heating position selection in a subject, but the narrow heating region is problematic. This study elucidates development of new interstitial RF heating methods, combining with external RF heating using paired electrodes, heating the subject broadly in advance in order to selectively extend the heating region. Two kinds of heating system were developed by controlling a differential mode and a common mode of RF currents. Heating expe...

  14. On the distribution of plasma parameters in RF glow discharge

    Ning Cheng; Liu Zuli; Liu Donghui; Han Caiyuan.

    1993-01-01

    A self-consistent numerical model based on the two-fluid equations for describing the transport of charged particles in the RF glow discharge is presented. For a plasma generator filled with low-pressure air and parallel-plate electrodes, the model is numerical solved. The space-time distribution of parameters and the spatial distribution of some time-averaged parameters in plasma, which show the physical picture of the RF glow discharge, are obtained

  15. RF Design of the LCLS Gun

    Limborg-Deprey, C.

    2010-01-01

    Final dimensions for the LCLS RF gun are described. This gun, referred to as the LCLS gun, is a modified version of the UCLA/BNL/SLAC 1.6 cell S-Band RF gun (1), referred to as the prototype gun. The changes include a larger mode separation (15 MHz for the LCLS gun vs. 3.5 MHz for the prototype gun), a larger radius at the iris between the 2 cells, a reduced surface field on the curvature of the iris between the two cells, Z power coupling, increased cooling channels for operation at 120 Hz, dual rf feed, deformation tuning of the full cell, and field probes in both cells. Temporal shaping of the klystron pulse, to reduce the average power dissipated in the gun, has also been adopted. By increasing the mode separation, the amplitude of the 0-mode electric field on the cathode decreases from 10% of the peak on axis field for the prototype gun to less than 3% for the LCLS gun for the steady state fields. Beam performance is improved as shown by the PARMELA simulations. The gun should be designed to accept a future load lock system. Modifications follow the recommendations of our RF review committee (2). Files and reference documents are compiled in Section IV.

  16. High power rf component testing for the NLC

    Vlieks, A.E.; Fowkes, W.R.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.

    1998-09-01

    In the Next Linear Collider (NLC), the high power rf components must be capable of handling peak rf power levels in excess of 600 MW. In the current view of the NLC, even the rectangular waveguide components must transmit at least 300 MW rf power. At this power level, peak rf fields can greatly exceed 100 MV/m. The authors present recent results of high power tests performed at the Accelerator Structure Test Area (ASTA) at SLAC. These tests are designed to investigate the rf breakdown limits of several new components potentially useful for the NLC. In particular, the authors tested a new TE 01 --TE 10 circular to rectangular wrap-around mode converter, a modified (internal fin) Magic Tee hybrid, and an upgraded flower petal mode converter

  17. Review of tearing mode stabilization by RF power in tokamaks

    Giruzzi, G.; Zabiego, M.; Zohm, H.

    1999-01-01

    Control of tearing modes by means of heating and current drive inside the magnetic islands is one of the most important applications of RF power in tokamak reactors. The theoretical basis of this concept is reviewed, focusing on aspects related to RF-plasma interaction. Applications to the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes in ITER by Electron Cyclotron Current Drive are presented to illustrate the basic physical dependences. The most significant experimental results and prospects for future applications are also discussed

  18. Rf and space-charge induced emittances in laser-driven rf guns

    Kim, Kwang-Je; Chen, Yu-Jiuan.

    1988-10-01

    Laser-driven rf electron guns are potential sources of high-current, low-emittance, short bunch-length electron beams, which are required for many advanced accelerator applications, such as free-electron lasers and injectors for high-energy machines. In such guns the design of which was pioneered at Los Alamos National Laboratory and which is currently being developed at several other laboratories, a high-power laser beam illuminates a photo-cathode surface placed on an end wall of an rf cavity. The main advantages of this type of gun are that the time structure of the electron beam is controlled by the laser, eliminating the need for bunchers, and that the electric field in rf cavities can be made very strong, so that the effects due to space-charge repulsion can be minimized. In this paper, we present an approximate but simple analysis for the transverse and longitudinal emittances in rf guns that takes into account both the time variation of the rf field and the space-charge effect. The results are compared and found to agree well with those from simulation. 7 refs., 6 figs

  19. Alternative RF coupling configurations for H− ion sources

    Briefi, S.; Fantz, U.; Gutmann, P.

    2015-01-01

    RF heated sources for negative hydrogen ions both for fusion and accelerators require very high RF powers in order to achieve the required H − current what poses high demands on the RF generators and the RF circuit. Therefore it is highly desirable to improve the RF efficiency of the sources. This could be achieved by applying different RF coupling concepts than the currently used inductive coupling via a helical antenna, namely Helicon coupling or coupling via a planar ICP antenna enhanced with ferrites. In order to investigate the feasibility of these concepts, two small laboratory experiments have been set up. The PlanICE experiment, where the enhanced inductive coupling is going to be investigated, is currently under assembly. At the CHARLIE experiment systematic measurements concerning Helicon coupling in hydrogen and deuterium are carried out. The investigations show that a prominent feature of Helicon discharges occurs: the so-called low-field peak. This is a local improvement of the coupling efficiency at a magnetic field strength of a few mT which results in an increased electron density and dissociation degree. The full Helicon mode has not been achieved yet due to the limited available RF power and magnetic field strength but it might be sufficient for the application of the coupling concept to ion sources to operate the discharge in the low-field-peak region

  20. Development and advances in conventional high power RF systems

    Wilson, P.B.

    1995-06-01

    The development of rf systems capable of producing high peak power (hundreds of megawatts) at relatively short pulse lengths (0.1--5 microseconds) is currently being driven mainly by the requirements of future high energy linear colliders, although there may be applications to industrial, medical and research linacs as well. The production of high peak power rf typically involves four basic elements: a power supply to convert ac from the ''wall plug'' to dc; a modulator, or some sort of switching element, to produce pulsed dc power; an rf source to convert the pulsed dc to pulsed rf power; and possibly an rf pulse compression system to further enhance the peak rf power. Each element in this rf chain from wall plug to accelerating structure must perform with high efficiency in a linear collider application, such that the overall system efficiency is 30% or more. Basic design concepts are discussed for klystrons, modulators and rf pulse compression systems, and their present design status is summarized for applications to proposed linear colliders

  1. RF linacs for FELs

    Schwettman, H.A.

    1992-01-01

    There are twenty rf linac-driven Free Electron Lasers (FELs) existing or under construction throughout the world and proposals for several more. A number of these FELs have recently been established as facilities to produce coherent optical beams for materials and biomedical research. Both short pulse low duty factor and long pulse high duty factor linac-driven FELs will be discussed. Accelerator issues that influence the performance of an FEL as a scientific instrument will be indicated. (Author) 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  2. RF impedance measurement calibration

    Matthews, P.J.; Song, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    The intent of this note is not to explain all of the available calibration methods in detail. Instead, we will focus on the calibration methods of interest for RF impedance coupling measurements and attempt to explain: (1). The standards and measurements necessary for the various calibration techniques. (2). The advantages and disadvantages of each technique. (3). The mathematical manipulations that need to be applied to the measured standards and devices. (4). An outline of the steps needed for writing a calibration routine that operated from a remote computer. For further details of the various techniques presented in this note, the reader should consult the references

  3. Results of the SLAC LCLS Gun High-Power RF Tests

    Dowell, D.H.; Jongewaard, E.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Schmerge, J.F.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; Wang, J.; Lewandowski, J.; Vlieks, A.

    2007-01-01

    The beam quality and operational requirements for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) currently being constructed at SLAC are exceptional, requiring the design of a new RF photocathode gun for the electron source. Based on operational experience at SLAC's GTF and SDL and ATF at BNL as well as other laboratories, the 1.6cell s-band (2856MHz) gun was chosen to be the best electron source for the LCLS, however a significant redesign was necessary to achieve the challenging parameters. Detailed 3-D analysis and design was used to produce near-perfect rotationally symmetric rf fields to achieve the emittance requirement. In addition, the thermo-mechanical design allows the gun to operate at 120Hz and a 140MV/m cathode field, or to an average power dissipation of 4kW. Both average and pulsed heating issues are addressed in the LCLS gun design. The first LCLS gun is now fabricated and has been operated with high-power RF. The results of these high-power tests are presented and discussed

  4. Sources of Emittance in RF Photocathode Injectors

    Dowell, David [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-12-11

    Advances in electron beam technology have been central to creating the current generation of x-ray free electron lasers and ultra-fast electron microscopes. These once exotic devices have become essential tools for basic research and applied science. One important beam technology for both is the electron source which, for many of these instruments, is the photocathode RF gun. The invention of the photocathode gun and the concepts of emittance compensation and beam matching in the presence of space charge and RF forces have made these high-quality beams possible. Achieving even brighter beams requires a taking a finer resolution view of the electron dynamics near the cathode during photoemission and the initial acceleration of the beam. In addition, the high brightness beam is more sensitive to degradation by the optical aberrations of the gun’s RF and magnetic lenses. This paper discusses these topics including the beam properties due to fundamental photoemission physics, space charge effects close to the cathode, and optical distortions introduced by the RF and solenoid fields. Analytic relations for these phenomena are derived and compared with numerical simulations.

  5. Neutron resonance averaging

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs

  6. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  7. Accurate modeling of complete functional RF blocks: CHAMELEON RF

    Janssen, H.H.J.M.; Niehof, J.; Schilders, W.H.A.; Ciuprina, G.; Ioan, D.

    2007-01-01

    Next-generation nano-scale RF-IC designs have an unprecedented complexity and performance that will inevitably lead to costly re-spins and loss of market opportunities. In order to cope with this, the aim of the European Framework 6 CHAMELEON RF project is to develop methodologies and prototype

  8. The Spallation Neutron Source RF Reference System

    Piller, Maurice; Crofford, Mark; Doolittle, Lawrence; Ma, Hengjie

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) RF Reference System includes the master oscillator (MO), local oscillator(LO) distribution, and Reference RF distribution systems. Coherent low noise Reference RF signals provide the ability to control the phase relationships between the fields in the front-end and linear accelerator (linac) RF cavity structures. The SNS RF Reference System requirements, implementation details, and performance are discussed.

  9. Design and manufacture of the RF power supply and RF transmission line for SANAEM project Prometheus

    Turemen, G.; Ogur, S.; Ahiska, F.; Yasatekin, B.; Cicek, E.; Ozbey, A.; Kilic, I.; Unel, G.; Alacakir, A.

    2017-08-01

    A 1-5 MeV proton beamline is being built by the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority in collaboration with a number of graduate students from different universities. The primary goal of the project, is to acquire the design ability and manufacturing capability of all the components locally. SPP will be an accelerator and beam diagnostics test facility and it will also serve the detector development community with its low beam current. This paper discusses the design and construction of the RF power supply and the RF transmission line components such as its waveguide converters and its circulator. Additionally low and high power RF test results are presented to compare the performances of the locally produced components to the commercially available ones.

  10. The RF voltage dependence of the electron sheath heating in low pressure capacitively coupled rf discharges

    Buddemeier, U.; Kortshagen, U.; Pukropski, I.

    1995-01-01

    In low pressure capacitively coupled RF discharges two competitive electron heating mechanisms have been discussed for some time now. At low pressures the stochastic sheath heating and for somewhat higher pressures the Joule heating in the bulk plasma have been proposed. When the pressure is increased at constant RF current density a transition from concave electron distribution functions (EDF) with a pronounced cold electron group to convex EDFs with a missing strong population of cold electrons is found. This transition was interpreted as the transition from dominant stochastic to dominant Joule heating. However, a different interpretation has been given by Kaganovich and Tsendin, who attributed the concave shaped EDFs to the spatially inhomogeneous RF field in combination with the nonlocality of the EDF

  11. RF assisted switching in magnetic Josephson junctions

    Caruso, R.; Massarotti, D.; Bolginov, V. V.; Ben Hamida, A.; Karelina, L. N.; Miano, A.; Vernik, I. V.; Tafuri, F.; Ryazanov, V. V.; Mukhanov, O. A.; Pepe, G. P.

    2018-04-01

    We test the effect of an external RF field on the switching processes of magnetic Josephson junctions (MJJs) suitable for the realization of fast, scalable cryogenic memories compatible with Single Flux Quantum logic. We show that the combined application of microwaves and magnetic field pulses can improve the performances of the device, increasing the separation between the critical current levels corresponding to logical "0" and "1." The enhancement of the current level separation can be as high as 80% using an optimal set of parameters. We demonstrate that external RF fields can be used as an additional tool to manipulate the memory states, and we expect that this approach may lead to the development of new methods of selecting MJJs and manipulating their states in memory arrays for various applications.

  12. Study of RF system of Hefei storage ring under injection

    Xu Hongliang; Wang Lin; Li Yongjun; Huang Guirong; Zhang Pengfei; Li Weimin; Liu Zuping; He Duohui

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the beam loading effect of RF system and the conditions of Robinson instability are analyzed in detail. By the study of the injection beam intensity limit dependent on detune angle and visible detune angle, it is found that the storage ring can be injected to more than 300 mA current intensity to attain the design target of phase II project in the lower energy injection situation of Hefei Storage Ring if a certain power is feed in the RF cavity and a certain tuning angle of the RF cavity is set

  13. Plasma rotation and rf heating in DIII-D

    DeGrassie, J.S.; Baker, D.R.; Burrell, K.H.

    1999-05-01

    In a variety of discharge conditions on DIII-D it is observed that rf electron heating reduces the toroidal rotation speed and core ion temperature. The rf heating can be with either fast wave or electron cyclotron heating and this effect is insensitive to the details of the launched toroidal wavenumber spectrum. To date all target discharges have rotation first established with co-directed neutral beam injection. A possible cause is enhanced ion momentum and thermal diffusivity due to electron heating effectively creating greater anomalous viscosity. Another is that a counter directed toroidal force is applied to the bulk plasma via rf driven radial current

  14. RF power harvesting: a review on designing methodologies and applications

    Tran, Le-Giang; Cha, Hyouk-Kyu; Park, Woo-Tae

    2017-12-01

    Wireless power transmission was conceptualized nearly a century ago. Certain achievements made to date have made power harvesting a reality, capable of providing alternative sources of energy. This review provides a summ ary of radio frequency (RF) power harvesting technologies in order to serve as a guide for the design of RF energy harvesting units. Since energy harvesting circuits are designed to operate with relatively small voltages and currents, they rely on state-of-the-art electrical technology for obtaining high efficiency. Thus, comprehensive analysis and discussions of various designs and their tradeoffs are included. Finally, recent applications of RF power harvesting are outlined.

  15. A Metamaterial-Inspired Approach to RF Energy Harvesting

    Fowler, Clayton; Zhou, Jiangfeng

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate an RF energy harvesting rectenna design based on a metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA). With the embedded Schottky diodes, the rectenna converts captured RF energy to DC currents. The Fabry-Perot cavity resonance of the MPA greatly improves the amount of energy captured and hence improves the rectification efficiency. Furthermore, the FP resonance exhibits a high Q-factor and significantly increases the voltage across the Schottky diodes. This leads to a factor of 16 improvement of RF-DC conversion efficiency at ambient intensity level.

  16. Design and modeling of a 17 GHz photocathode RF gun

    Lin, C.L.; Chen, S.C.; Wurtele, J.S.; Temkin, R.; Danly, B.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of a high-frequency (17 GHz), high accelerating gradient (250 MV/m) photocathode RF gun is studied with the particle-in-cell code MAGIC. For the parameter regime of interest, i.e. bunch charge smaller than 1 nC and bunch length shorter than 2 ps, space-charge forces and finite bunch length effects are less significant in determining the beam quality than nonlinear RF forces are. The cavity geometry, RF phase for photoemission, cathode size, and current density are being optimized to obtain high quality beams. Preliminary results are presented

  17. 1.5 MW RF Load for ITER

    Ives, Robert Lawrence; Marsden, David; Collins, George; Karimov, Rasul; Mizuhara, Max; Neilson, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. developed a 1.5 MW RF load for the ITER fusion research facility currently under construction in France. This program leveraged technology developed in two previous SBIR programs that successfully developed high power RF loads for fusion research applications. This program specifically focused on modifications required by revised technical performance, materials, and assembly specification for ITER. This program implemented an innovative approach to actively distribute the RF power inside the load to avoid excessive heating or arcing associated with constructive interference. The new design implemented materials and assembly changes required to meet specifications. Critical components were built and successfully tested during the program.

  18. Plasma rotation and rf heating in DIII-D

    Grassie, J. S. de; Baker, D. R.; Burrell, K. H.; Greenfield, C. M.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Luce, T. C.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Rice, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    In a variety of discharge conditions on DIII-D it is observed that rf electron heating reduces the toroidal rotation speed and core ion temperature. The rf heating can be with either fast wave or electron cyclotron heating and this effect is insensitive to the details of the launched toroidal wavenumber spectrum. To date all target discharges have rotation first established with co-directed neutral beam injection. A possible cause is enhanced ion momentum and thermal diffusivity due to electron heating effectively creating greater anomalous viscosity. Another is that a counter directed toroidal force is applied to the bulk plasma via rf driven radial current. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics

  19. 1.5 MW RF Load for ITER

    Ives, Robert Lawrence [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); Marsden, David [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); Collins, George [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); Karimov, Rasul [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); Mizuhara, Max [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); Neilson, Jeffrey [Lexam Research, Redwood City, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. developed a 1.5 MW RF load for the ITER fusion research facility currently under construction in France. This program leveraged technology developed in two previous SBIR programs that successfully developed high power RF loads for fusion research applications. This program specifically focused on modifications required by revised technical performance, materials, and assembly specification for ITER. This program implemented an innovative approach to actively distribute the RF power inside the load to avoid excessive heating or arcing associated with constructive interference. The new design implemented materials and assembly changes required to meet specifications. Critical components were built and successfully tested during the program.

  20. Conductivity of rf-heated plasma

    Fisch, N.J.

    1984-05-01

    The electron velocity distribution of rf-heated plasma may be so far from Maxwellian that Spitzer conductivity no longer holds. A new conductivity for such plasmas is derived and the result can be put in a remarkably general form. The new expression should be of great practical value in examining schemes for current ramp-up in tokamaks by means of lower-hybrid or other waves

  1. Applications of neutral beam and rf technologies

    Haselton, H.H.

    1987-04-01

    This presentation provides an update on the applications of neutral beams and radiofrequency (rf) power in the fusion program; highlights of the ion cyclotron heating (ICH) experiments now in progress, as well as the neutral beam experiments; and heating requirements of future devices and some of the available options. Some remarks on current drive are presented because this area of technology is one that is being considered for future devices

  2. Circuit design for RF transceivers

    Leenaerts, Domine; Vaucher, Cicero S

    2007-01-01

    Second edition of this successful 2001 RF Circuit Design book, has been updated, latest technology reviews have been added as well as several actual case studies. Due to the authors being active in industry as well as academia, this should prove to be an essential guide on RF Transceiver Design for students and engineers.

  3. RF-Station control crate

    Beuzekom, M.G. van; Es, J.T. van.

    1992-01-01

    This report gives a description of the electronic control-system for the RF-station of AmPS. The electronics form the connection between the computer-system and the hardware of the RF-station. Only the elements of the systems which are not described in the other NIKHEF-reports are here discussed in detail. (author). 7 figs

  4. Modulator considerations for the SNS RF system

    Tallerico, P.J.; Reass, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an intense neutron source for neutron scattering experiments. The project is in the research stage, with construction funding beginning next year. The SNS is comprised of an ion source, a 1,000 MeV, H - linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, a neutron producing target, and experimental area to utilize the scattering of the neutrons. The linear accelerator is RF driven, and the peak beam current is 27 mA and the beam duty factor is 5.84%. The peak RF power required is 104 MW, and the H - beam pulse length is 0.97 ms at a 60 Hz repetition rate. The RF pulses must be about 0.1 ms longer than the beam pulses, due to the Q of the accelerating cavities, and the time required to establish control of the cavity fields. The modulators for the klystrons in this accelerator are discussed in this paper. The SNS is designed to be expandable, so the beam power can be doubled or even quadrupled in the future. One of the double-power options is to double the beam pulse length and duty factor. The authors are specifying the klystrons to operate in this twice-duty-factor mode, and the modulator also should be expandable to 2 ms pulses at 60 Hz. Due to the long pulse length and low RF frequency of 805 MHz, the klystron power is specified at 2.5 MW peak, and the RF system will have 56 klystrons at 805 MHz, and three 1.25 MW peak power klystrons at 402.5 MHz for the low energy portion of the accelerator. The low frequency modulators are conventional floating-deck modulation anode control systems

  5. Investigation of MIM Diodes for RF Applications

    Khan, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    zero bias condition as well as the possibility of realizing them through printing makes them attractive for (Radio Frequency) RF applications. However, MIM diodes have not been explored much for RF applications. One reason preventing their widespread RF

  6. Refurbishments of RF systems

    Baelde, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes the activities of the R.F. System group during the years 1995-1996 in the frame of the refurbishment of the control system at GANIL accelerator. Modifications concerning the following sub-assemblies are mentioned: 1. voltage standards; 2. link card between the step by step motor control and the local control systems; 3. polarization system; 4. computer software for different operations. Also reported is the installation of ECR 4 source for the CO2. In this period the R2 Regrouping system has been installed, tested and put into operation. Several problems concerning the mechanical installation of the coupling loop and other problems related to the electronics operation were solved. The results obtained with the THI machine are presented

  7. Beam induced RF heating

    Salvant, B; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Baglin, V; Barnes, M J; Bartmann, W; Baudrenghien, P; Berrig, O; Bracco, C; Bravin, E; Bregliozzi, G; Bruce, R; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cattenoz, G; Caspers, F; Claudet, S; Day, H; Garlasche, M; Gentini, L; Goddard, B; Grudiev, A; Henrist, B; Jones, R; Kononenko, O; Lanza, G; Lari, L; Mastoridis, T; Mertens, V; Métral, E; Mounet, N; Muller, J E; Nosych, A A; Nougaret, J L; Persichelli, S; Piguiet, A M; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Rumolo, G; Salvachua, B; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Shaposhnikova, E; Tavian, L; Timmins, M; Uythoven, J; Vidal, A; Wenninger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    After the 2011 run, actions were put in place during the 2011/2012 winter stop to limit beam induced radio frequency (RF) heating of LHC components. However, some components could not be changed during this short stop and continued to represent a limitation throughout 2012. In addition, the stored beam intensity increased in 2012 and the temperature of certain components became critical. In this contribution, the beam induced heating limitations for 2012 and the expected beam induced heating limitations for the restart after the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) will be compiled. The expected consequences of running with 25 ns or 50 ns bunch spacing will be detailed, as well as the consequences of running with shorter bunch length. Finally, actions on hardware or beam parameters to monitor and mitigate the impact of beam induced heating to LHC operation after LS1 will be discussed.

  8. DOE planning workshop on rf theory and computations

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the two-day workshop-meeting was to review the status of rf heating in magnetic fusion plasmas and to determine the outstanding problems in this area. The term rf heating was understood to encompass not only bulk plasma heating by externally applied electromagnetic power but also current generation in toroidal plasmas and generation of thermal barriers in tandem mirror plasmas

  9. Measured performance of the GTA rf systems

    Denney, P.M.; Jachim, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of the RF systems on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The RF system architecture is briefly described. Among the RF performance results presented are RF field flatness and stability, amplitude and phase control resolution, and control system bandwidth and stability. The rejection by the RF systems of beam-induced disturbances, such as transients and noise, are analyzed. The observed responses are also compared to computer-based simulations of the RF systems for validation

  10. Design of RF system for CYCIAE-230 superconducting cyclotron

    Yin, Zhiguo, E-mail: bitbearAT@hotmail.com; Ji, Bin; Fu, Xiaoliang; Cao, Xuelong; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tinajue

    2017-05-11

    The CYCIAE230 is a low-current, compact superconducting cyclotron designed for proton therapy. The Radio Frequency system consists of four RF cavities and applies second harmonic to accelerate beams. The driving power for the cavity system is estimated to be approximately 150 kW. The LLRF controller is a self-made device developed and tested at low power using a small-scale cavity model. In this paper, the resonator systems of an S.C. cyclotron in history are reviewed. Contrary to those RF systems, the cavities of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron connect two opposite dees. Two high-power RF windows are included in the system. Each window carries approximately 75 kW RF power from the driver to the cavities. Thus, the RF system for the CY-CIAE230 cyclotron is operated in driven push–pull mode. The two-way amplifier-coupler-cavity systems are operated with approximately the same amount of RF power but 180° out of phase compared with each other. The design, as well as the technical advantage and limitations of this operating mode, of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron RF system is analyzed.

  11. Design of RF system for CYCIAE-230 superconducting cyclotron

    Yin, Zhiguo; Ji, Bin; Fu, Xiaoliang; Cao, Xuelong; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tinajue

    2017-05-01

    The CYCIAE230 is a low-current, compact superconducting cyclotron designed for proton therapy. The Radio Frequency system consists of four RF cavities and applies second harmonic to accelerate beams. The driving power for the cavity system is estimated to be approximately 150 kW. The LLRF controller is a self-made device developed and tested at low power using a small-scale cavity model. In this paper, the resonator systems of an S.C. cyclotron in history are reviewed. Contrary to those RF systems, the cavities of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron connect two opposite dees. Two high-power RF windows are included in the system. Each window carries approximately 75 kW RF power from the driver to the cavities. Thus, the RF system for the CY-CIAE230 cyclotron is operated in driven push-pull mode. The two-way amplifier-coupler-cavity systems are operated with approximately the same amount of RF power but 180° out of phase compared with each other. The design, as well as the technical advantage and limitations of this operating mode, of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron RF system is analyzed.

  12. SQIF Arrays as RF Sensors (Briefing Charts)

    Yukon, Stanford P

    2007-01-01

    ... (Superconducting Quantum Interference Filter) arrays may be employed as sensitive RF sensors. RF SQIF arrays fabricated with high Tc Josephson junctions can be cooled with small Sterling microcoolers...

  13. B factory rf system design issues

    Zisman, M.S.

    1992-06-01

    We discuss the issues of relevance to the design of a B factory RF system. First, the general parameter regime is outlined, and the reasons behind certain commonly made choices are indicated. This regime involves high beam currents, and many relatively short bunches. Next, the physics difficulties associated with coupled-bunch instabilities are described briefly. We then describe in general terms the alternative approaches taken by various B factory designers, the motivation for these choices, and the technical issues raised by them. Technical solutions have been proposed for both the room-temperature and the superconducting RF scenarios, and considerable R ampersand D is being carried out worldwide to confirm and optimize these solutions

  14. B factory RF system design issues

    Zisman, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the issues of relevance to the design of a B factory RF system. First, the general parameter regime is outlined, and the reasons behind certain commonly made choices are indicated. This regime involves high beam currents, and many relatively short bunches. Next, the physics difficulties associated with coupled-bunch instabilities are described briefly. We then describe in general terms the alternative approaches taken by various B factory designers, the motivation for these choices, and the technical issues raised by them. Technical solutions have been proposed for both the room-temperature and the superconducting RF scenarios, and considerable R ampersand D is being carried out worldwide to confirm and optimize these solutions

  15. Four-way rf beam separator

    Neil, V.K.

    1982-01-01

    A method for separating a continuous beam of relativistic particles into four pulsed beams is investigated theoretically. The separation is periodic with period 2π/#betta# so that each of the four beams consists of current pulses of duration π/#betta#. The separation is accomplished by a series of rf cavities in the beam line. The cavities operate in the TM 110 and have frequencies, #betta#, 3#betta#, 5#betta#, 7#betta#, etc. The transverse momentum imparted to the beam particles results in a time-dependent displacement of the beam centroid at a position downstream of the cavity array. The mathematical limitations imposed by truncating a Fourier series are discussed, and an expression derived for the necessary phase and amplitude of each cavity. The rf induced by the beam in the cavities is treated in detail, and does not appear to be a serious problem

  16. Workgroup report: base stations and wireless networks-radiofrequency (RF) exposures and health consequences.

    Valberg, Peter A; van Deventer, T Emilie; Repacholi, Michael H

    2007-03-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) waves have long been used for different types of information exchange via the air waves--wireless Morse code, radio, television, and wireless telephone (i.e., construction and operation of telephones or telephone systems). Increasingly larger numbers of people rely on mobile telephone technology, and health concerns about the associated RF exposure have been raised, particularly because the mobile phone handset operates in close proximity to the human body, and also because large numbers of base station antennas are required to provide widespread availability of service to large populations. The World Health Organization convened an expert workshop to discuss the current state of cellular-telephone health issues, and this article brings together several of the key points that were addressed. The possibility of RF health effects has been investigated in epidemiology studies of cellular telephone users and workers in RF occupations, in experiments with animals exposed to cell-phone RF, and via biophysical consideration of cell-phone RF electric-field intensity and the effect of RF modulation schemes. As summarized here, these separate avenues of scientific investigation provide little support for adverse health effects arising from RF exposure at levels below current international standards. Moreover, radio and television broadcast waves have exposed populations to RF for > 50 years with little evidence of deleterious health consequences. Despite unavoidable uncertainty, current scientific data are consistent with the conclusion that public exposures to permissible RF levels from mobile telephone and base stations are not likely to adversely affect human health.

  17. Workgroup Report: Base Stations and Wireless Networks—Radiofrequency (RF) Exposures and Health Consequences

    Valberg, Peter A.; van Deventer, T. Emilie; Repacholi, Michael H.

    2007-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) waves have long been used for different types of information exchange via the airwaves—wireless Morse code, radio, television, and wireless telephony (i.e., construction and operation of telephones or telephonic systems). Increasingly larger numbers of people rely on mobile telephone technology, and health concerns about the associated RF exposure have been raised, particularly because the mobile phone handset operates in close proximity to the human body, and also because large numbers of base station antennas are required to provide widespread availability of service to large populations. The World Health Organization convened an expert workshop to discuss the current state of cellular-telephone health issues, and this article brings together several of the key points that were addressed. The possibility of RF health effects has been investigated in epidemiology studies of cellular telephone users and workers in RF occupations, in experiments with animals exposed to cell-phone RF, and via biophysical consideration of cell-phone RF electric-field intensity and the effect of RF modulation schemes. As summarized here, these separate avenues of scientific investigation provide little support for adverse health effects arising from RF exposure at levels below current international standards. Moreover, radio and television broadcast waves have exposed populations to RF for > 50 years with little evidence of deleterious health consequences. Despite unavoidable uncertainty, current scientific data are consistent with the conclusion that public exposures to permissible RF levels from mobile telephony and base stations are not likely to adversely affect human health. PMID:17431492

  18. SPEAR 2 RF SYSTEM LOADS

    2002-01-01

    The design and performance of higher order mode (HOM) dampers for the SPEAR 2 RF system is presented. The SPEAR beam had experienced occasional periods of instability due to transverse oscillations which were driven by HOMs in the RF cavities. A substantial fraction of this RF energy was coupled out of the cavity into the waveguide connecting the cavity to the klystron. This waveguide was modified by adding a stub of smaller cross section, terminated by a ferrite tile load, to the system. Design considerations of the load, and its effect on HOMs and beam stability will be discussed

  19. Rf-to-dc power converters for wireless powering

    Ouda, Mahmoud Hamdy

    2016-12-01

    Various examples are provided related to radio frequency (RF) to direct current (DC) power conversion. In one example, a RF-to-DC converter includes a fully cross-coupled rectification circuit including a pair of forward rectifying transistors and a feedback circuit configured to provide feedback bias signals to gates of the pair of forward rectifying transistors via feedback branch elements. In another example, a method includes receiving a radio frequency (RF) signal; rectifying the RF signal via a fully cross-coupled rectification circuit including a pair of forward rectifying transistors; and providing a DC output voltage from an output connection of the fully cross-coupled rectification circuit, where gating of the pair of forward rectifying transistors is controlled by feedback bias signals provided to gates of the pair of forward rectifying transistors via feedback branch elements.

  20. RF extraction issues in the relativistic klystron amplifiers

    Serlin, Victor; Friedman, Moshe; Lampe, Martin; Hubbard, Richard F.

    1994-05-01

    Relativistic klystron amplifiers (RKAs) were successfully operated at NRL in several frequency regimes and power levels. In particular, an L-band RKA was optimized for high- power rf extraction into the atmosphere and an S-band RKA was operated, both in a two-beam and a single-beam configuration. At L-band the rf extraction at maximum power levels (>= 15 GW) was hindered by pulse shortening and poor repeatability. Preliminary investigation showed electron emission in the radiating horn, due to very high voltages associated with the multi-gigawatt rf power levels. This electron current constituted an electric load in parallel with the radiating antenna, and precipitated the rf pulse collapse. At S-band the peak extracted power reached 1.7 GW with power efficiency approximately 50%. However, pulse shortening limited the duration to approximately 50 nanoseconds. The new triaxial RKA promises to solve many of the existing problems.

  1. A NEW THERMIONIC RF ELECTRON GUN FOR SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCES

    Kutsaev, Sergey; Agustsson, R.; Hartzell, J; Murokh, A.; Nassiri, A.; Savin, E.; Smirnov, A.V.; Smirnov, A. Yu; Sun, Y.; Verma, A; Waldschmidt, Geoff; Zholents, A.

    2017-06-02

    A thermionic RF gun is a compact and efficient source of electrons used in many practical applications. RadiaBeam Systems and the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory collaborate in developing of a reliable and robust thermionic RF gun for synchrotron light sources which would offer substantial improvements over existing thermionic RF guns and allow stable operation with up to 1A of beam peak current at a 100 Hz pulse repetition rate and a 1.5 μs RF pulse length. In this paper, we discuss the electromagnetic and engineering design of the cavity and report the progress towards high power tests of the cathode assembly of the new gun.

  2. RF pulse compression in the NLC test accelerator at SLAC

    Lavine, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), we are designing a Next Linear Collider (NLC) with linacs powered by X-band klystrons with rf pulse compression. The design of the linac rf system is based on X-band prototypes which have been tested at high power, and on a systems-integration test---the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA)---which is currently under construction at SLAC. This paper discusses some of the systems implications of rf pulse compression, and the use of pulse compression in the NLCTA, both for peak power multiplication and for controlling, by rf phase modulation, intra-pulse variations in the linac beam energy. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  3. LEDA RF distribution system design and component test results

    Roybal, W.T.; Rees, D.E.; Borchert, H.L.; McCarthy, M.; Toole, L.

    1998-01-01

    The 350 MHz and 700 MHz RF distribution systems for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) have been designed and are currently being installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Since 350 MHz is a familiar frequency used at other accelerator facilities, most of the major high-power components were available. The 700 MHz, 1.0 MW, CW RF delivery system designed for LEDA is a new development. Therefore, high-power circulators, waterloads, phase shifters, switches, and harmonic filters had to be designed and built for this applications. The final Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) RF distribution systems design will be based on much of the same technology as the LEDA systems and will have many of the RF components tested for LEDA incorporated into the design. Low power and high-power tests performed on various components of these LEDA systems and their results are presented here

  4. Electron dynamics in RF sources with a laser controlled emission

    Khodak, I V; Metrochenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    Photoemission radiofrequency (RF) electron sources are sources of electron beams with extremely high brightness. Beam bunching processes in such devices are well studied in case when laser pulse duration is much lower of rf oscillation period.At the same time photoemission RF guns have some merits when operating in 'long-pulse' mode. In this case the laser pulse duration is much higher of rf oscillation period but much lower of rise time of oscillations in a gun cavity. Beam parameters at the gun output are compared for photoemission and thermoemission cathode applications. The paper presents results of a beam dynamics simulation in such guns with different resonance structures. Questions connected with defining of the current pulse peak value that can be obtained in such guns are discussed.

  5. Slice-selective RF pulses for in vivo B1+ inhomogeneity mitigation at 7 tesla using parallel RF excitation with a 16-element coil.

    Setsompop, Kawin; Alagappan, Vijayanand; Gagoski, Borjan; Witzel, Thomas; Polimeni, Jonathan; Potthast, Andreas; Hebrank, Franz; Fontius, Ulrich; Schmitt, Franz; Wald, Lawrence L; Adalsteinsson, Elfar

    2008-12-01

    Slice-selective RF waveforms that mitigate severe B1+ inhomogeneity at 7 Tesla using parallel excitation were designed and validated in a water phantom and human studies on six subjects using a 16-element degenerate stripline array coil driven with a butler matrix to utilize the eight most favorable birdcage modes. The parallel RF waveform design applied magnitude least-squares (MLS) criteria with an optimized k-space excitation trajectory to significantly improve profile uniformity compared to conventional least-squares (LS) designs. Parallel excitation RF pulses designed to excite a uniform in-plane flip angle (FA) with slice selection in the z-direction were demonstrated and compared with conventional sinc-pulse excitation and RF shimming. In all cases, the parallel RF excitation significantly mitigated the effects of inhomogeneous B1+ on the excitation FA. The optimized parallel RF pulses for human B1+ mitigation were only 67% longer than a conventional sinc-based excitation, but significantly outperformed RF shimming. For example the standard deviations (SDs) of the in-plane FA (averaged over six human studies) were 16.7% for conventional sinc excitation, 13.3% for RF shimming, and 7.6% for parallel excitation. This work demonstrates that excitations with parallel RF systems can provide slice selection with spatially uniform FAs at high field strengths with only a small pulse-duration penalty. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. The Development of the Electrically Controlled High Power RF Switch and Its Application to Active RF Pulse Compression Systems

    Guo, Jiquan [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2008-12-01

    In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

  7. Distribution of RF energy emitted by mobile phones in anatomical structures of the brain

    Cardis, E; Deltour, I; Moissonnier, M; Mann, S; Taki, M; Varsier, N; Wake, K; Wiart, J

    2008-01-01

    The rapid worldwide increase in mobile phone use in the last decade has generated considerable interest in possible carcinogenic effects of radio frequency (RF). Because exposure to RF from phones is localized, if a risk exists it is likely to be greatest for tumours in regions with greatest energy absorption. The objective of the current paper was to characterize the spatial distribution of RF energy in the brain, using results of measurements made in two laboratories on 110 phones used in Europe or Japan. Most (97-99% depending on frequency) appears to be absorbed in the brain hemisphere on the side where the phone is used, mainly (50-60%) in the temporal lobe. The average relative SAR is highest in the temporal lobe (6-15%, depending on frequency, of the spatial peak SAR in the most exposed region of the brain) and the cerebellum (2-10%) and decreases very rapidly with increasing depth, particularly at higher frequencies. The SAR distribution appears to be fairly similar across phone models, between older and newer phones and between phones with different antenna types and positions. Analyses of risk by location of tumour are therefore important for the interpretation of results of studies of brain tumours in relation to mobile phone use

  8. Beam self-excited rf cavity driver for a deflector or focusing system

    Wadlinger, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    A bunched beam from and accelerator can excite and power an rf cavity which then drives either a deflecting or focusing (including nonlinear focusing) rf cavity with and amplitude related to beam current. Rf power, generated when a bunched beam loses energy to an rf field when traversing an electric field that opposes the particle's motion, is used to drive a separate (or the same) cavity to either focus or deflect the beam. The deflected beam can be stopped by an apertures or directed to a different area of a target depending on beam current. The beam-generated rf power can drive a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) that can change the focusing properties of a beam channel as a function of beam current (space- charge force compensation or modifying the beam distribution on a target). An rf deflector can offset a beam to a downstream sextupole, effectively producing a position-dependent quadrupole field. The combination of rf deflector plus sextupole will produce a beam current dependent quadropole-focusing force. A static quadrupole magnet plus another rf deflector can place the beam back on the optic axis. This paper describes the concept, derives the appropriate equations for system analysis, and fives examples. A variation on this theme is to use the wake field generated in an rf cavity to cause growth in the beam emittance. The beam current would then be apertured by emittance defining slits

  9. Beam self-excited rf cavity driver for a deflector or focusing system

    Wadlinger, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    A bunched beam from an accelerator can excite and power an rf cavity which then drives either a deflecting or focusing (including nonlinear focusing) rf cavity with an amplitude related to beam current. Rf power, generated when a bunched beam loses energy to an rf field when traversing an electric field that opposes the particle's motion, is used to drive a separate (or the same) cavity to either focus or deflect the beam. The deflected beam can be stopped by an aperture or directed to a different area of a target depending on beam current. The beam-generated rf power can drive a radiofrequency quadrupole that can change the focusing properties of a beam channel as a function of beam current (space-charge-force compensation or modifying the beam distribution on a target). An rf deflector can offset a beam to a downstream sextupole, effectively producing a position-dependent quadrupole field. The combination of rf deflector plus sextupole will produce a beam current dependent quadrupole-focusing force. A static quadrupole magnet plus another rf deflector can place the beam back on the optic axis. This paper describes the concept, derives the appropriate equations for system analysis, and gives examples. A variation on this theme is to use the wake field generated in an rf cavity to cause growth in the beam emittance. The beam current would then be apertured by emittance defining slits. (author)

  10. Local Multi-Channel RF Surface Coil versus Body RF Coil Transmission for Cardiac Magnetic Resonance at 3 Tesla: Which Configuration Is Winning the Game?

    Oliver Weinberger

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency of cardiac MR at 3 Tesla using local four-channel RF coil transmission and benchmark it against large volume body RF coil excitation.Electromagnetic field simulations are conducted to detail RF power deposition, transmission field uniformity and efficiency for local and body RF coil transmission. For both excitation regimes transmission field maps are acquired in a human torso phantom. For each transmission regime flip angle distributions and blood-myocardium contrast are examined in a volunteer study of 12 subjects. The feasibility of the local transceiver RF coil array for cardiac chamber quantification at 3 Tesla is demonstrated.Our simulations and experiments demonstrate that cardiac MR at 3 Tesla using four-channel surface RF coil transmission is competitive versus current clinical CMR practice of large volume body RF coil transmission. The efficiency advantage of the 4TX/4RX setup facilitates shorter repetition times governed by local SAR limits versus body RF coil transmission at whole-body SAR limit. No statistically significant difference was found for cardiac chamber quantification derived with body RF coil versus four-channel surface RF coil transmission. Our simulation also show that the body RF coil exceeds local SAR limits by a factor of ~2 when driven at maximum applicable input power to reach the whole-body SAR limit.Pursuing local surface RF coil arrays for transmission in cardiac MR is a conceptually appealing alternative to body RF coil transmission, especially for patients with implants.

  11. Local Multi-Channel RF Surface Coil versus Body RF Coil Transmission for Cardiac Magnetic Resonance at 3 Tesla: Which Configuration Is Winning the Game?

    Winter, Lukas; Dieringer, Matthias A.; Els, Antje; Oezerdem, Celal; Rieger, Jan; Kuehne, Andre; Cassara, Antonino M.; Pfeiffer, Harald; Wetterling, Friedrich; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency of cardiac MR at 3 Tesla using local four-channel RF coil transmission and benchmark it against large volume body RF coil excitation. Methods Electromagnetic field simulations are conducted to detail RF power deposition, transmission field uniformity and efficiency for local and body RF coil transmission. For both excitation regimes transmission field maps are acquired in a human torso phantom. For each transmission regime flip angle distributions and blood-myocardium contrast are examined in a volunteer study of 12 subjects. The feasibility of the local transceiver RF coil array for cardiac chamber quantification at 3 Tesla is demonstrated. Results Our simulations and experiments demonstrate that cardiac MR at 3 Tesla using four-channel surface RF coil transmission is competitive versus current clinical CMR practice of large volume body RF coil transmission. The efficiency advantage of the 4TX/4RX setup facilitates shorter repetition times governed by local SAR limits versus body RF coil transmission at whole-body SAR limit. No statistically significant difference was found for cardiac chamber quantification derived with body RF coil versus four-channel surface RF coil transmission. Our simulation also show that the body RF coil exceeds local SAR limits by a factor of ~2 when driven at maximum applicable input power to reach the whole-body SAR limit. Conclusion Pursuing local surface RF coil arrays for transmission in cardiac MR is a conceptually appealing alternative to body RF coil transmission, especially for patients with implants. PMID:27598923

  12. Fluxon interaction with external rf radiation in Josephson junctions

    Kivshar, Yuri S.; Olsen, Ole H.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1993-01-01

    . It is shown that due to excitation of a standing linear wave by the driving force, the fluxon motion is strongly influenced by a periodic (averaged) potential similar to the Peierls-Nabarro potential in a discrete chain. This effective potential decreases in the direction of the boundary where the external rf...

  13. Production of H- ions by an RF driven multicusp source

    Leung, K.N.; Bachman, D.A.; McDonald, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    An RF driven H - source has been developed at LBL for use in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). To date, an H - current of ∼40 mA can be obtained from a 5.6-cm-diameter aperture with the source operated at a pressure of about 12 mTorr and 50 kW of RF power. Attempts have been made to enhance the H - beam current by introducing a small quantity of cesium vapor into the source chamber. It is found that the H - output current can be increased by a factor larger than three if some cesium is applied in the collar around the exit aperture

  14. Economic Evaluation of the Juvenile Drug Court/Reclaiming Futures (JDC/RF) Model.

    McCollister, Kathryn; Baumer, Pamela; Davis, Monica; Greene, Alison; Stevens, Sally; Dennis, Michael

    2018-07-01

    Juvenile drug court (JDC) programs are an increasingly popular option for rehabilitating juvenile offenders with substance problems, but research has found inconsistent evidence regarding their effectiveness and economic impact. While assessing client outcomes such as reduced substance use and delinquency is necessary to gauge program effectiveness, a more comprehensive understanding of program success and sustainability can be attained by examining program costs and economic benefits. As part of the National Cross-Site Evaluation of JDC and Reclaiming Futures (RF), an economic analysis of five JDC/RF programs was conducted from a multisystem and multiagency perspective. The study highlights the direct and indirect costs of JDC/RF and the savings generated from reduced health problems, illegal activity, and missed school days. Results include the average (per participant) cost of JDC/RF, the total economic benefits per JDC/RF participant, and the net savings of JDC/RF relative to standard JDC.

  15. Precision intercomparison of beam current monitors at CEBAF

    Kazimi, R.; Dunham, B.; Krafft, G.A.; Legg, R.; Liang, C.; Sinclair, C.; Mamosser, J.

    1995-01-01

    The CEBAF accelerator delivers a CW electron beam at fundamental 1497 MHz, with average beam current up to 200 μA. Accurate, stable nonintercepting beam current monitors are required for: setup/control, monitoring of beam current and beam losses for machine protection and personnel safety, and providing beam current information to experimental users. Fundamental frequency stainless steel RF cavities have been chosen for these beam current monitors. This paper reports on precision intercomparison between two such RF cavities, an Unser monitor, and two Faraday cups, all located in the injector area. At the low beam energy in the injector, it is straightforward to verify the high efficiency of the Faraday cups, and the Unser monitor included a wire through it to permit an absolute calibration. The cavity intensity monitors have proven capable of stable, high precision monitoring of the beam current

  16. Water cooling of RF structures

    Battersby, G.; Zach, M.

    1994-06-01

    We present computer codes for heat transfer in water cooled rf cavities. RF parameters obtained by SUPERFISH or analytically are operated on by a set of codes using PLOTDATA, a command-driven program developed and distributed by TRIUMF [1]. Emphasis is on practical solutions with designer's interactive input during the computations. Results presented in summary printouts and graphs include the temperature, flow, and pressure data. (authors). 4 refs., 4 figs

  17. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  18. On Averaging Rotations

    Gramkow, Claus

    1999-01-01

    In this article two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very offten the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belo...... approximations to the Riemannian metric, and that the subsequent corrections are inherient in the least squares estimation. Keywords: averaging rotations, Riemannian metric, matrix, quaternion......In this article two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very offten the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong...

  19. Superconducting rf activities at Cornell University

    Padamsee, H.; Hakimi, M.; Kirchgessner, J.

    1988-01-01

    Development of rf superconductivity for high energy accelerators has been a robust activity at the Cornell Laboratory of Nuclear Studies (LNS) for many years. In order to realize the potential of rf superconductivity, a two-pronged approach has been followed. On the one hand accelerator applications were selected where the existing state-of-the art of superconducting rf is competitive with alternate technologies, then LNS engaged in a program to design, construct and test suitable superconducting cavities, culminating in a full system test in an operating accelerator. On the second front the discovery and invention of ideas, techniques and materials required to make superconducting rf devices approach the ideal in performance has been aggressively pursued. Starting with the development of superconducting cavities for high energy electron synchrotrons, the technology was extended to high energy e + e - storage rings. The LE5 cavity design has now been adopted for use in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). When completed, this project will be one of the largest applications of SRF technology, using 440 LE5 modules[4]. In the last two years, the cavity design and the technology have been transferred to industry and CEBAF. Cornell has tested the early industrial prototypes and cavity pairs. LNS has developed, in collaboration with CEBAF, designs and procedures for cavity pair and cryomodule assembly and testing. Advanced research for future electron accelerators is badly needed if particle physicists hope to expand the energy frontier. Superconducting cavity technology continues to offer attractive opportunities for further advances in achievable voltage at reasonable cost for future accelerators. For Nb, the full potential implies an order of magnitude increase over current capabilities. 20 references, 11 figures

  20. Wireless RF communication in biomedical applications

    Jones, Inke; Ricciardi, Lucas; Hall, Leonard; Hansen, Hedley; Varadan, Vijay; Bertram, Chris; Maddocks, Simon; Enderling, Stefan; Saint, David; Al-Sarawi, Said; Abbott, Derek

    2008-02-01

    This paper focuses on wireless transcutaneous RF communication in biomedical applications. It discusses current technology, restrictions and applications and also illustrates possible future developments. It focuses on the application in biotelemetry where the system consists of a transmitter and a receiver with a transmission link in between. The transmitted information can either be a biopotential or a nonelectric value like arterial pressure, respiration, body temperature or pH value. In this paper the use of radio-frequency (RF) communication and identification for those applications is described. Basically, radio-frequency identification or RFID is a technology that is analogous to the working principle of magnetic barcode systems. Unlike magnetic barcodes, passive RFID can be used in extreme climatic conditions—also the tags do not need to be within close proximity of the reader. Our proposed solution is to exploit an exciting new development in making circuits on polymers without the need for battery power. This solution exploits the principle of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device on a polymer substrate. The SAW device is a set of interdigitated conducting fingers on the polymer substrate. If an appropriate RF signal is sent to the device, the fingers act as microantennas that pick up the signal, and this energy is then converted into acoustic waves that travel across the surface of the polymer substrate. Being a flexible polymer, the acoustic waves cause stresses that can either contract or stretch the material. In our case we mainly focus on an RF controllable microvalve that could ultimately be used for fertility control.

  1. Wireless RF communication in biomedical applications

    Jones, Inke; Ricciardi, Lucas; Hall, Leonard; Enderling, Stefan; Saint, David; Al-Sarawi, Said; Abbott, Derek; Hansen, Hedley; Varadan, Vijay; Bertram, Chris; Maddocks, Simon

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on wireless transcutaneous RF communication in biomedical applications. It discusses current technology, restrictions and applications and also illustrates possible future developments. It focuses on the application in biotelemetry where the system consists of a transmitter and a receiver with a transmission link in between. The transmitted information can either be a biopotential or a nonelectric value like arterial pressure, respiration, body temperature or pH value. In this paper the use of radio-frequency (RF) communication and identification for those applications is described. Basically, radio-frequency identification or RFID is a technology that is analogous to the working principle of magnetic barcode systems. Unlike magnetic barcodes, passive RFID can be used in extreme climatic conditions—also the tags do not need to be within close proximity of the reader. Our proposed solution is to exploit an exciting new development in making circuits on polymers without the need for battery power. This solution exploits the principle of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device on a polymer substrate. The SAW device is a set of interdigitated conducting fingers on the polymer substrate. If an appropriate RF signal is sent to the device, the fingers act as microantennas that pick up the signal, and this energy is then converted into acoustic waves that travel across the surface of the polymer substrate. Being a flexible polymer, the acoustic waves cause stresses that can either contract or stretch the material. In our case we mainly focus on an RF controllable microvalve that could ultimately be used for fertility control

  2. Averaged RMHD equations

    Ichiguchi, Katsuji

    1998-01-01

    A new reduced set of resistive MHD equations is derived by averaging the full MHD equations on specified flux coordinates, which is consistent with 3D equilibria. It is confirmed that the total energy is conserved and the linearized equations for ideal modes are self-adjoint. (author)

  3. Determining average yarding distance.

    Roger H. Twito; Charles N. Mann

    1979-01-01

    Emphasis on environmental and esthetic quality in timber harvesting has brought about increased use of complex boundaries of cutting units and a consequent need for a rapid and accurate method of determining the average yarding distance and area of these units. These values, needed for evaluation of road and landing locations in planning timber harvests, are easily and...

  4. Average Revisited in Context

    Watson, Jane; Chick, Helen

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the responses of 247 middle school students to items requiring the concept of average in three different contexts: a city's weather reported in maximum daily temperature, the number of children in a family, and the price of houses. The mixed but overall disappointing performance on the six items in the three contexts indicates…

  5. Averaging operations on matrices

    2014-07-03

    Jul 3, 2014 ... Role of Positive Definite Matrices. • Diffusion Tensor Imaging: 3 × 3 pd matrices model water flow at each voxel of brain scan. • Elasticity: 6 × 6 pd matrices model stress tensors. • Machine Learning: n × n pd matrices occur as kernel matrices. Tanvi Jain. Averaging operations on matrices ...

  6. Average-energy games

    Patricia Bouyer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-player quantitative zero-sum games provide a natural framework to synthesize controllers with performance guarantees for reactive systems within an uncontrollable environment. Classical settings include mean-payoff games, where the objective is to optimize the long-run average gain per action, and energy games, where the system has to avoid running out of energy. We study average-energy games, where the goal is to optimize the long-run average of the accumulated energy. We show that this objective arises naturally in several applications, and that it yields interesting connections with previous concepts in the literature. We prove that deciding the winner in such games is in NP inter coNP and at least as hard as solving mean-payoff games, and we establish that memoryless strategies suffice to win. We also consider the case where the system has to minimize the average-energy while maintaining the accumulated energy within predefined bounds at all times: this corresponds to operating with a finite-capacity storage for energy. We give results for one-player and two-player games, and establish complexity bounds and memory requirements.

  7. High power testing of a 17 GHz photocathode RF gun

    Chen, S.C.; Danly, B.G.; Gonichon, J.

    1995-01-01

    The physics and technological issues involved in high gradient particle acceleration at high microwave (RF) frequencies are under study at MIT. The 17 GHz photocathode RF gun has a 1 1/2 cell (π mode) room temperature cooper cavity. High power tests have been conducted at 5-10 MW levels with 100 ns pulses. A maximum surface electric field of 250 MV/m was achieved. This corresponds to an average on-axis gradient of 150 MeV/m. The gradient was also verified by a preliminary electron beam energy measurement. Even high gradients are expected in our next cavity design

  8. Developments and directions in 200 MHz very high power RF at LAMPF

    Cliff, R.; Bush, E.D.; DeHaven, R.A.; Harris, H.W.; Parsons, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), is a linear particle accelerator a half-mile long. It produces an 800 million electron- volt hydrogen-ion beam at an average current of more than one milliamp. The first RF section of the accelerator consists of four Alvarez drift-tube structures. Each of these structures is excited by an amplifier module at a frequency of 201.25 MHz. These amplifiers operate at a duty of 13 percent or more and at peak pulsed power levels of about 2.5 million watts. The second RF accelerator section consists of forty-four side-coupled-cavity structures. Each of these is excited by an amplifier module at a frequency of 805 MHz. These amplifiers operate at a duty of up to 12 percent and at peak pulsed power levels of about 1.2 million watts. The relatively high average beam current in the accelerator places a heavy demand upon components in the RF systems. The 201-MHz modules have always required a large share of maintenance efforts. In recent years, the four 201.25 MHz modules have been responsible for more than twice as much accelerator down-time as have the forty-four 805 MHz modules. This paper reviews recent, ongoing, and planned improvements in the 201-MHz systems. The Burle Industries 7835 super power triode is used in the final power amplifiers of each of the 201-MHz modules. This tube has been modified for operation at LAMPF by the addition of Penning ion vacuum''pumps.'' This has enabled more effective tube conditioning and restarting. A calorimetry system of high accuracy is in development to monitor tube plate-power dissipation

  9. Sensing RF signals with the optical wideband converter

    Valley, George C.; Sefler, George A.; Shaw, T. J.

    2013-01-01

    The optical wideband converter (OWC) is a system for measuring properties of RF signals in the GHz band without use of high speed electronics. In the OWC the RF signal is modulated on a repetitively pulsed optical field with a large wavelength chirp, the optical field is diffracted onto a spatial light modulator (SLM) whose pixels are modulated with a pseudo-random bit sequences (PRBSs), and finally the optical field is directed to a photodiode and the resulting current integrated for each PRBS. When the number of PRBSs and measurements equals the number of SLM pixels, the RF signal can be obtained in principle by multiplying the measurement vector by the inverse of the square matrix given by the PRBSs and the properties of the optics. When the number of measurements is smaller than the number of pixels, a compressive sensing (CS) measurement can be performed, and sparse RF signals can be obtained using one of the standard CS recovery algorithms such as the penalized l1 norm (also known as basis pursuit) or one of the variants of matching pursuit. Accurate reconstruction of RF signals requires good calibration of the OWC. In this paper, we present results using the OWC for RF signals consisting of 2 sinusoids recovered using 3 techniques (matrix inversion, basis pursuit, and matching pursuit). We compare results obtained with orthogonal matching pursuit with nonlinear least squares to basis pursuit with an over-complete dictionary.

  10. High power RF systems for the BNL ERL project

    Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

    2011-03-28

    The Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) project, now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, requires two high power RF systems. The first RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting electron gun. The RF power from this system is used to drive nearly half an Ampere of beam current to 2 MeV. There is no provision to recover any of this energy so the minimum amplifier power is 1 MW. It consists of 1 MW CW klystron, transmitter and power supplies, 1 MW circulator, 1 MW dummy load and a two-way power splitter. The second RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting cavity. The system accelerates the beam to 54.7 MeV and recovers this energy. It will provide up to 50 kW of CW RF power to the cavity. It consists of 50 kW transmitter, circulator, and dummy load. This paper describes the two high power RF systems and presents the test data for both.

  11. On Averaging Rotations

    Gramkow, Claus

    2001-01-01

    In this paper two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very often the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong ...... approximations to the Riemannian metric, and that the subsequent corrections are inherent in the least squares estimation.......In this paper two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very often the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong...

  12. Optimization of an RF driven H- ion source

    Leung, K.N.; DiVergilio, W.F.; Hauck, C.A.; Kunkel, W.B.; McDonald, D.S.

    1991-04-01

    A radio-frequency driven multicusp source has recently been developed to generate volume-produced H - ion beams with extracted current density higher than 200 mA/cm 2 . We have improved the output power of the rf generator and the insulation coating of the antenna coil. We have also optimized the antenna positions and geometry and the filter magnetic field for high power pulsed operation. A total H - current of 30 mA can be obtained with a 5.4-mm-diam extraction aperture and with an rf input power of 50 kW. 4 refs., 5 figs

  13. Plasma diagnosis of RF discharge by using impedance measurement

    Huang Jianjun; Teuner, D.

    2001-01-01

    It is presented that the method known from network analysis with home-made probe and experimental setup to measure current, voltage and phase angle of RF discharge in He gas more accurately. The sheath thickness and the real and imaginary parts of the plasma impedance were obtained by using the equivalent circuit model and taking account stray capacitances of the set-up. In addition, making use of Godyak's RF discharge simple model, the electron density in the discharge was calculated at different pressure and current density

  14. PUBLIC EXPOSURE TO MULTIPLE RF SOURCES IN GHANA.

    Deatanyah, P; Abavare, E K K; Menyeh, A; Amoako, J K

    2018-03-16

    This paper describes an effort to respond to the suggestion in World Health Organization (WHO) research agenda to better quantify potential exposure levels from a range of radiofrequency (RF) sources at 200 public access locations in Ghana. Wide-band measurements were performed-with a spectrum analyser and a log-periodic antenna using three-point spatial averaging method. The overall results represented a maximum of 0.19% of the ICNIRP reference levels for public exposure. These results were generally lower than found in some previous but were 58% (2.0 dB) greater, than found in similar work conducted in the USA. Major contributing sources of RF fields were identified to be FM broadcast and mobile base station sites. Three locations with the greatest measured RF fields could represent potential areas for epidemiological studies.

  15. HOM Coupler Optimisation for the Superconducting RF Cavities in ESS

    Ainsworth, R; Calaga, R

    2012-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) will be the world’s most powerful next generation neutron source. It consists of a linear accelerator, target, and instruments for neutron experiments. The linac is designed to accelerate protons to a final energy of 2.5 GeV, with an average design beam power of 5 MW, for collision with a target used to produce a high neutron flux. A section of the linac will contain Superconducting RF (SCRF) cavities designed at 704 MHz. Beam induced HOMs in these cavities may drive the beam unstable and increase the cryogenic load, therefore HOM couplers are installed to provide sufficient damping. Previous studies have shown that these couplers are susceptible to multipacting, a resonant process which can absorb RF power and lead to heating effects. This paper will show how a coupler suffering from multipacting has been redesigned to limit this effect. Optimisation of the RF damping is also discussed.

  16. Comparative Studies of High-Gradient Rf and Dc Breakdowns

    Kovermann, Jan Wilhelm; Wuensch, Walter

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC project is based on normal-conducting high-gradient accelerating structures with an average accelerating gradient of 100 MV/m. The maximum achievable gradient in these structures is limited by the breakdown phenomenon. The physics of breakdowns is not yet fully understood quantitatively. A full knowledge could have strong impact on the design, material choice and construction of rf structures. Therefore, understanding breakdowns has great importance to reaching a gradient of 100MV/m with an acceptable breakdown probability. This thesis addresses the physics underlying the breakdown effect, focusing on a comparison of breakdowns in rf structures and in a dc spark setup. The dc system is simpler, easier to benchmark against simulations, with a faster turnaround time, but the relationship to rf breakdown must be established. To do so, an experimental approach based on optical diagnostics and electrical measurements methods was made. Following an introduction into the CLIC project, a general theoretical ...

  17. rf streak camera based ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction.

    Musumeci, P; Moody, J T; Scoby, C M; Gutierrez, M S; Tran, T

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the possibility of using a rf streak camera to time resolve in a single shot structural changes at the sub-100 fs time scale via relativistic electron diffraction. We experimentally tested this novel concept at the UCLA Pegasus rf photoinjector. Time-resolved diffraction patterns from thin Al foil are recorded. Averaging over 50 shots is required in order to get statistics sufficient to uncover a variation in time of the diffraction patterns. In the absence of an external pump laser, this is explained as due to the energy chirp on the beam out of the electron gun. With further improvements to the electron source, rf streak camera based ultrafast electron diffraction has the potential to yield truly single shot measurements of ultrafast processes.

  18. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  19. RF Group Annual Report 2011

    Angoletta, M E; Betz, M; Brunner, O; Baudrenghien, P; Calaga, R; Caspers, F; Ciapala, E; Chambrillon, J; Damerau, H; Doebert, S; Federmann, S; Findlay, A; Gerigk, F; Hancock, S; Höfle, W; Jensen, E; Junginger, T; Liao, K; McMonagle, G; Montesinos, E; Mastoridis, T; Paoluzzi, M; Riddone, G; Rossi, C; Schirm, K; Schwerg, N; Shaposhnikova, E; Syratchev, I; Valuch, D; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Völlinger, C; Vretenar, M; Wuensch, W

    2012-01-01

    The highest priority for the RF group in 2011 was to contribute to a successful physics run of the LHC. This comprises operation of the superconducting 400 MHz accelerating system (ACS) and the transverse damper (ADT) of the LHC itself, but also all the individual links of the injector chain upstream of the LHC – Linac2, the PSB, the PS and the SPS – don’t forget that it is RF in all these accelerators that truly accelerates! A large variety of RF systems had to operate reliably, often near their limit. New tricks had to be found and implemented to go beyond limits; not to forget the equally demanding operation with Pb ions using in addition Linac3 and LEIR. But also other physics users required the full attention of the RF group: CNGS required in 2011 beams with very short, intense bunches, AD required reliable deceleration and cooling of anti-protons, Isolde the post-acceleration of radioactive isotopes in Rex, just to name a few. In addition to the supply of beams for physics, the RF group has a num...

  20. RK-TBA prototype RF source

    Houck, T.; Anderson, D.; Giordano, G.

    1996-01-01

    A prototype rf power source based on the Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept is being constructed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to study physics, engineering, and costing issues. The prototype is described and compared to a full scale design appropriate for driving the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Specific details of the induction core tests and pulsed power system are presented. The 1-MeV, 1.2-kA induction gun currently under construction is also described in detail

  1. Optical fibers and RF a natural combination

    Romeiser, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    The optical fiber industry has experienced a period of consolidation and reorganization and is now poised for a new surge in growth. To take advantage of that growth, and to respond to the demand to use fiber more efficiently, designers need a better understanding of fiber optics. Taking the approach that optical fibers are an extension of RF-based communications, the author explains basic optical concepts, applications, and systems; the nature and performance characteristics of optical fibers; and optical sources, connectors and splices. Subsequent chapters explore current applications of fib

  2. Rf system specifications for a linear accelerator

    Young, A.; Eaton, L.E.

    1992-01-01

    A linear accelerator contains many systems; however, the most complex and costly is the RF system. The goal of an RF system is usually simply stated as maintaining the phase and amplitude of the RF signal within a given tolerance to accelerate the charged particle beam. An RF system that drives a linear accelerator needs a complete system specification, which should contain specifications for all the subsystems (i.e., high-power RF, low-level RF, RF generation/distribution, and automation control). This paper defines a format for the specifications of these subsystems and discusses each RF subsystem independently to provide a comprehensive understanding of the function of each subsystem. This paper concludes with an example of a specification spreadsheet allowing one to input the specifications of a subsystem. Thus, some fundamental parameters (i.e., the cost and size) of the RF system can be determined

  3. Influences of the RF power ratio on the optical and electrical properties of GZO thin films by DC coupled RF magnetron sputtering at room temperature

    Peng, Shou [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Float Glass, Bengbu 233018 (China); Bengbu Design & Research Institute for Glass Industry, Bengbu 233018 (China); Yao, Tingting, E-mail: yaott0815@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Float Glass, Bengbu 233018 (China); Bengbu Design & Research Institute for Glass Industry, Bengbu 233018 (China); Yang, Yong; Zhang, Kuanxiang; Jiang, Jiwen; Jin, Kewu; Li, Gang; Cao, Xin; Xu, Genbao; Wang, Yun [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Float Glass, Bengbu 233018 (China); Bengbu Design & Research Institute for Glass Industry, Bengbu 233018 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Ga-doped zinc oxide (GZO) thin films were deposited by closed field unbalanced DC coupled RF magnetron sputtering system at room temperature. The RF sputtering power ratio was adjusted from 0% to 100%. The crystal structure, surface morphology, transmittance and electrical resistivity of GZO films mainly influenced by RF sputtering power ratio were investigated by X-ray diffractometer, scanning electronic microscope, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer and Hall effect measurement. The research results indicate that the increasing RF power ratio can effectively reduce the discharge voltage of system and increase the ionizing rate of particles. Meanwhile, the higher RF power ratio can increase the carrier mobility in GZO thin film and improve the optical and electrical properties of GZO thin film significantly. Within the optimal discharge voltage window, the film deposits at 80% RF power ratio exhibits the lowest resistivity of 2.6×10{sup −4} Ω cm. We obtain the GZO film with the best average optical transmittance is approximately 84% in the visible wavelength. With the increasing RF power ratio, the densification of GZO film is enhanced. The densification of GZO film is decrease when the RF power ratio is 100%.

  4. The LANSCE 805 MHZ RF System History and Status

    Lynch, Michael; Tallerico, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linear accelerator runs at 201.25 MHz for acceleration to 100 MeV. The remainder of the acceleration to 800 MeV is at 805 MHz. This is done with 44 accelerator cavity stages driven by 805 MHz klystrons. Each klystron has a peak power capability of 1.25 MeV. Originally, 97 klystrons were purchased, which was 70 from Varian/CPI and 27 from Litton. The 44 RF systems are laid out in sectors with either 6 or 7 klystrons per sector. The klystrons in each sector are powered from a common HV sytem. The current arrangement uses the Varian/CPI klystrons in 6 of the 7 sectors and Litton klystrons in the remaining sector. With that arrangement there are 38 CPI klystrons installed and 1 spare klystron per sector and 6 Litton klystrons installed in the final sector with 2 spares. The current average life of all of the operating and spare klystrons (52 total) is >112,000 filament hours and >93,000 HV hours. That is three times the typical klystron lifetime today f...

  5. A theoretical model of the application of RF energy to the airway wall and its experimental validation

    Brown Robert H

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bronchial thermoplasty is a novel technique designed to reduce an airway's ability to contract by reducing the amount of airway smooth muscle through controlled heating of the airway wall. This method has been examined in animal models and as a treatment for asthma in human subjects. At the present time, there has been little research published about how radiofrequency (RF energy and heat is transferred to the airways of the lung during bronchial thermoplasty procedures. In this manuscript we describe a computational, theoretical model of the delivery of RF energy to the airway wall. Methods An electro-thermal finite-element-analysis model was designed to simulate the delivery of temperature controlled RF energy to airway walls of the in vivo lung. The model includes predictions of heat generation due to RF joule heating and transfer of heat within an airway wall due to thermal conduction. To implement the model, we use known physical characteristics and dimensions of the airway and lung tissues. The model predictions were tested with measurements of temperature, impedance, energy, and power in an experimental canine model. Results Model predictions of electrode temperature, voltage, and current, along with tissue impedance and delivered energy were compared to experiment measurements and were within ± 5% of experimental averages taken over 157 sample activations. The experimental results show remarkable agreement with the model predictions, and thus validate the use of this model to predict the heat generation and transfer within the airway wall following bronchial thermoplasty. Conclusions The model also demonstrated the importance of evaporation as a loss term that affected both electrical measurements and heat distribution. The model predictions showed excellent agreement with the empirical results, and thus support using the model to develop the next generation of devices for bronchial thermoplasty. Our results suggest

  6. On the performance of hybrid RF and RF/FSO dual-hop transmission systems

    Ansari, Imran Shafique

    2013-10-01

    In this work, we present the performance analysis of a dual-branch transmission system composed of a direct radio frequency (RF) link and a dual-hop relay composed of asymmetric RF and free-space optical (FSO) links. The FSO link accounts for pointing errors and both types of detection techniques (i.e. intensity modulation/direct detection (IM/DD) as well as heterodyne detection). The performance is evaluated under the assumption of selection combining (SC) diversity scheme. RF links are modeled by Rayleigh fading distribution whereas the FSO link is modeled by a unified Gamma-Gamma fading distribution. Specifically, we derive new exact closed-form expressions for the cumulative distribution function, probability density function, moment generating function, and moments of the end-to-end signal-to-noise ratio of such systems in terms of the Meijer\\'s G function. We then capitalize on these results to offer new exact closed-form expressions for the outage probability, higher-order amount of fading, average error rate for binary and M-ary modulation schemes, and ergodic capacity, all in terms of Meijer\\'s G functions. © 2013 IEEE.

  7. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    Kang, Yoon W; Campisi, Isidoro E; Champion, Mark; Crofford, Mark; Davis, Kirk; Drury, Michael A; Fuja, Ray E; Gurd, Pamela; Kasemir, Kay-Uwe; McCarthy, Michael P; Powers, Tom; Shajedul Hasan, S M; Stirbet, Mircea; Stout, Daniel; Tang, Johnny Y; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V; Wezensky, Mark

    2005-01-01

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavitites have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducti...

  8. Klystron equalization for RF feedback

    Corredoura, P.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of colliding beam storage rings support higher luminosities by significantly increasing the number of bunches and decreasing the spacing between respective bunches. The heavy beam loading requires large RF cavity detuning which drives several lower coupled bunch modes very strongly. One technique which has proven to be very successful in reducing the coupled bunch mode driving impedance is RF feedback around the klystron-cavity combination. The gain and bandwidth of the feedback loop is limited by the group delay around the feedback loop. Existing klystrons on the world market have not been optimized for this application and contribute a large portion of the total loop group delay. This paper describes a technique to reduce klystron group delay by adding an equalizing filter to the klystron RF drive. Such a filter was built and tested on a 500 kill klystron as part of the on going PEP-II R ampersand D effort here at SLAC

  9. Higher order mode damping in Kaon factory RF cavities

    Enegren, T.; Poirier, R.; Griffin, J.; Walling, L.; Thiessen, H.A.; Smythe, W.R.

    1989-05-01

    Proposed designs for Kaon factory accelerators require that the rf cavities support beam currents on the order of several amperes. The beam current has Fourier components at all multiples of the rf frequency. Empty rf buckets produce additional components at all multiples of the revolution frequency. If a Fourier component of the beam coincides with the resonant frequency of a higher order mode of the cavity, which is inevitable if the cavity has a large frequency swing, significant excitation of this mode can occur. The induced voltage may then excite coupled bunch mode instabilities. Effective means are required to damp higher order modes without significantly affecting the fundamental mode. A mode damping scheme based on coupled transmission lines has been investigated and is report

  10. Average is Over

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2018-02-01

    The popular perception of statistical distributions is depicted by the iconic bell curve which comprises of a massive bulk of 'middle-class' values, and two thin tails - one of small left-wing values, and one of large right-wing values. The shape of the bell curve is unimodal, and its peak represents both the mode and the mean. Thomas Friedman, the famous New York Times columnist, recently asserted that we have entered a human era in which "Average is Over" . In this paper we present mathematical models for the phenomenon that Friedman highlighted. While the models are derived via different modeling approaches, they share a common foundation. Inherent tipping points cause the models to phase-shift from a 'normal' bell-shape statistical behavior to an 'anomalous' statistical behavior: the unimodal shape changes to an unbounded monotone shape, the mode vanishes, and the mean diverges. Hence: (i) there is an explosion of small values; (ii) large values become super-large; (iii) 'middle-class' values are wiped out, leaving an infinite rift between the small and the super large values; and (iv) "Average is Over" indeed.

  11. Improving the beam quality of rf guns by correction of rf and space-charge effects

    Serafini, L.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we describe two possible strategies to attain ultra-low emittance electron beam generation by laser-driven RF guns. The first one is based on the exploitation of multi-mode resonant cavities to neutralize the emittance degradation induced by RF effects. Accelerating cigar-like (long and thin) electron bunches in multi-mode operated RF guns the space charge induced emittance is strongly decreased at the same time: high charged bunches, as typically requested by future TeV e - e + colliders, can be delivered by the gun at a quite low transverse emittance and good behaviour in the longitudinal phase space, so that they can be magnetically compressed to reach higher peak currents. The second strategy consists in using disk-like electron bunches, produced by very short laser pulses illuminating the photocathode. By means of an analytical study a new regime has been found, where the normalized transverse emittance scales like the inverse of the peak current, provided that the laser pulse intensity distribution is properly shaped in the transverse direction. Preliminary numerical simulations confirm the analytical predictions and show that the minimum emittance achievable is set up, in this new regime, by the wake-field interaction between the bunch and the cathode metallic wall

  12. RF Loads for Energy Recovery

    Federmann, S; Caspers, F

    2012-01-01

    Different conceptional designs for RF high power loads are presented. One concept implies the use of solid state rectifier modules for direct RF to DC conversion with efficiencies beyond 80%. In addition, robust metallic low-Q resonant structures, capable of operating at high temperatures (>150 ◦C) are discussed. Another design deals with a very high temperature (up to 800 ◦C) air cooled load using a ceramic foam block inside a metal enclosure. This porous ceramic block is the microwave absorber and is not brazed to the metallic enclosure.

  13. rf reference line for PEP

    Schwarz, H.D.; Weaver, J.N.

    1979-03-01

    A rf phase reference line in 6 segments around the 2200 meter circumference PEP storage ring is described. Each segment of the reference line is phase stabilized by its own independent feedback system, which uses an amplitude modulated reflection from the end of each line. The modulation is kept small and decoupled from the next segment to avoid crosstalk and significant modulation of the rf drive signal. An error evaluation of the system is made. The technical implementation and prototype performance are described. Prototype tests indicate that the phase error around the ring can be held below 1 degree with this relatively simple system

  14. rf reference line for PEP

    Schwarz, H.D.; Weaver, J.N.

    1979-03-01

    A rf phase reference line in 6 segments around the 2200 meter circumference PEP storage ring is described. Each segment of the reference line is phase stabilized by its own independent feedback system, which uses an amplitude modulated reflection from the end of each line. The modulation is kept small and decoupled from the next segment to avoid crosstalk and significant modulation of the rf drive signal. An error evaluation of the system is made. The technical implementation and prototype performance are described. Prototype tests indicate that the phase error around the ring can be held below 1 degree with this relatively simple system.

  15. Protocol Design and Performance Analysis of Multiuser Mixed RF and Hybrid FSO/RF Relaying With Buffers

    Al-Eryani, Yasser F.

    2018-03-07

    In this paper, a multiuser mixed radio frequency (RF) and hybrid free-space optical (FSO)/RF system is considered, where multiple mobile users transmit their data to an intermediate decode-and-forward relay node through RF links using a virtual multiple-input multipleoutput (MIMO) system, and the relay node forwards the multiplexed data of all users through a FSO link that is supported by a RF MIMO backup system to the destination. The relay node is equipped with a buffer in the physical layer for temporal storage of the users\\' data until the best channel conditions at the relay-destination link aremet. For this communication setup, we first propose a transmission protocol that achieves a multiplexing gain through a virtual MIMO system. After that, we derive closed-form expressions for the end-to-end outage probability, asymptotic outage probability, average symbol error rate, and the ergodic capacity when considering the delay-tolerant (finite buffer size) scenario. The results show that buffering in the physical layer provides a significant enhancement to the system performance (outage, error rate, and ergodic capacity). It is also found that pointing error and severe weather turbulence conditions become more tolerable with the existence of the relay\\'s buffer and RF backup link (in the second hop). In addition, the proposed virtual MIMO scheme shows a significant performance enhancement at a high number of receiving antennas, which introduces potential lowcomplexity diversity gain-based massive MIMO schemes.

  16. Protocol Design and Performance Analysis of Multiuser Mixed RF and Hybrid FSO/RF Relaying With Buffers

    Al-Eryani, Yasser F.; Salhab, Anas; Zummo, Salam A.; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a multiuser mixed radio frequency (RF) and hybrid free-space optical (FSO)/RF system is considered, where multiple mobile users transmit their data to an intermediate decode-and-forward relay node through RF links using a virtual multiple-input multipleoutput (MIMO) system, and the relay node forwards the multiplexed data of all users through a FSO link that is supported by a RF MIMO backup system to the destination. The relay node is equipped with a buffer in the physical layer for temporal storage of the users' data until the best channel conditions at the relay-destination link aremet. For this communication setup, we first propose a transmission protocol that achieves a multiplexing gain through a virtual MIMO system. After that, we derive closed-form expressions for the end-to-end outage probability, asymptotic outage probability, average symbol error rate, and the ergodic capacity when considering the delay-tolerant (finite buffer size) scenario. The results show that buffering in the physical layer provides a significant enhancement to the system performance (outage, error rate, and ergodic capacity). It is also found that pointing error and severe weather turbulence conditions become more tolerable with the existence of the relay's buffer and RF backup link (in the second hop). In addition, the proposed virtual MIMO scheme shows a significant performance enhancement at a high number of receiving antennas, which introduces potential lowcomplexity diversity gain-based massive MIMO schemes.

  17. Recent developments in the application of rf superconductivity to high-brightness and high-gradient ion beam accelerators

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Nichols, G.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1991-01-01

    A development program is underway to apply rf superconductivity to the design of continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high- brightness ion beams. Since the last workshop, considerable progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically toward this application. Recent tests of niobium resonators for ion acceleration have yielded average accelerating gradients as high as 18 MV/m. In an experiment with a radio-frequency quadrupole geometry, niobium was found to sustain cw peak surface electric fields as high as 128 MV/m over large (10 cm 2 ) surface areas. Theoretical studies of beam impingement and cumulative beam breakup have also yielded encouraging results. Consequently, a section of superconducting resonators and focusing elements has been designed for tests with high-current deuteron beams. In addition, considerable data pertaining to the rf properties of high-T c superconductors has been collected at rf-field amplitudes and frequencies of interest in connection with accelerator operation. This paper summarizes the recent progress and identifies current and future work in the areas of accelerator technology and superconducting materials which will build upon it

  18. Dual material gate doping-less tunnel FET with hetero gate dielectric for enhancement of analog/RF performance

    Anand, Sunny; Sarin, R. K.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, charge-plasma-based tunnel FET is proposed by employing dual material gate with hetero gate dielectric technique and it is named hetero-dielectric dual material gate doping-less TFET (HD_DMG_DLTFET). It is compared with conventional doping-less TFET (DLTFET) and dual material gate doping-less TFET (DMG_DLTFET) on the basis of analog and RF performance. The HD_DMG_DLTFET provides better ON state current ({I}\\text{ON}=94 μ \\text{A}/μ \\text{m}), {I}\\text{ON}/{I}\\text{OFF}(≈ 1.36× {10}13), \\text{point} (≈ 3\\text{mV}/\\text{dec}) and average subthreshold slope (\\text{AV}-\\text{SS}=40.40 \\text{mV}/\\text{dec}). The proposed device offers low total gate capacitance (C gg) along with higher drive current. However, with a better transconductance (g m) and cut-off frequency (f T), the HD_DMG_DLTFET can be a good candidate for RF circuitry. The early voltage (V EA) and output conductance (g d) are also moderate for the proposed device with comparison to other devices and therefore can be a candidate for analog devices. From all these simulation results and their study, it is observed that HD_DMG_DLTFET has improved analog/RF performance compared to DLTFET and DMG_DLTFET.

  19. Numerical simulation study on new RF system of Hefei storage ring

    Xu Hongliang; Wang Lin; Huang Guirong; Zhang Pengfei; Li Weimin; Liu Zuping; He Duohui

    2005-01-01

    The two injection ways of new RF system of Hefei storage ring were discussed. In the process of both large detuning injection and tuning injection, the variation of tuning angle and visual detuning angle with beam current intensity was analyzed. The calculation results show that the two injection ways are manipulable for new RF system in phase II project of Hefei storage ring. (author)

  20. RF capacitance-voltage characterization of MOSFETs with high-leakage dielectric

    Schmitz, Jurriaan; Cubaynes, F.N; Cubaynes, F.N.; Havens, R.J.; de Kort, R.; Scholten, A.J.; Tiemeijer, L.F.

    2003-01-01

    We present a MOS Capacitance-Voltage measurement methodology that, contrary to present methods, is highly robust against gate leakage current densities up to 1000 A/cm/sup 2/. The methodology features specially designed RF test structures and RF measurement frequencies. It allows MOS parameter

  1. Measures to alleviate the back bombardment effect of thermionic rf electron gun

    Huang, Y.; Xie, J.

    1991-01-01

    Thermionic rf electron gun finds application as a high brightness electron source for rf linacs. However, cathode heating from back-bombardment effect causes a ramp in the macro-pulse beam current and limit the usable pulse width. Three methods: ring cathode, magnetic deflection and laser assisted heating are studied in theory and in experiment. The results of these studies are reported

  2. Average nuclear surface properties

    Groote, H. von.

    1979-01-01

    The definition of the nuclear surface energy is discussed for semi-infinite matter. This definition is extended also for the case that there is a neutron gas instead of vacuum on the one side of the plane surface. The calculations were performed with the Thomas-Fermi Model of Syler and Blanchard. The parameters of the interaction of this model were determined by a least squares fit to experimental masses. The quality of this fit is discussed with respect to nuclear masses and density distributions. The average surface properties were calculated for different particle asymmetry of the nucleon-matter ranging from symmetry beyond the neutron-drip line until the system no longer can maintain the surface boundary and becomes homogeneous. The results of the calculations are incorporated in the nuclear Droplet Model which then was fitted to experimental masses. (orig.)

  3. Americans' Average Radiation Exposure

    2000-01-01

    We live with radiation every day. We receive radiation exposures from cosmic rays, from outer space, from radon gas, and from other naturally radioactive elements in the earth. This is called natural background radiation. It includes the radiation we get from plants, animals, and from our own bodies. We also are exposed to man-made sources of radiation, including medical and dental treatments, television sets and emission from coal-fired power plants. Generally, radiation exposures from man-made sources are only a fraction of those received from natural sources. One exception is high exposures used by doctors to treat cancer patients. Each year in the United States, the average dose to people from natural and man-made radiation sources is about 360 millirem. A millirem is an extremely tiny amount of energy absorbed by tissues in the body

  4. RF Photoelectric injectors using needle cathodes

    Lewellen, J.W.; Brau, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Photocathode RF guns, in various configurations, are the injectors of choice for both current and future applications requiring high-brightness electron beams. Many of these applications, such as single-pass free-electron lasers, require beams with high brilliance but not necessarily high charge per bunch. Field-enhanced photoelectric emission has demonstrated electron-beam current density as high as 10 10 A/m 2 , with a quantum efficiency in the UV that approaches 10% at fields on the order of 10 10 V/m. Thus, the use of even a blunt needle holds promise for increasing cathode quantum efficiency without sacrificing robustness. We present an initial study on the use of needle cathodes in photoinjectors to enhance beam brightness while reducing beam charge. Benefits include lower drive-laser power requirements, easier multibunch operation, lower emittance, and lower beam degradation due to charge-dependent effects in the postinjector accelerator. These benefits result from a combination of a smaller cathode emission area, greatly enhanced RF field strength at the cathode, and the charge scaling of detrimental postinjector linac effects, e.g., transverse wakefields and CSR

  5. RF Photoelectric injectors using needle cathodes

    Lewellen, J. W.; Brau, C. A.

    2003-07-01

    Photocathode RF guns, in various configurations, are the injectors of choice for both current and future applications requiring high-brightness electron beams. Many of these applications, such as single-pass free-electron lasers, require beams with high brilliance but not necessarily high charge per bunch. Field-enhanced photoelectric emission has demonstrated electron-beam current density as high as 10 10 A/m 2, with a quantum efficiency in the UV that approaches 10% at fields on the order of 10 10 V/m. Thus, the use of even a blunt needle holds promise for increasing cathode quantum efficiency without sacrificing robustness. We present an initial study on the use of needle cathodes in photoinjectors to enhance beam brightness while reducing beam charge. Benefits include lower drive-laser power requirements, easier multibunch operation, lower emittance, and lower beam degradation due to charge-dependent effects in the postinjector accelerator. These benefits result from a combination of a smaller cathode emission area, greatly enhanced RF field strength at the cathode, and the charge scaling of detrimental postinjector linac effects, e.g., transverse wakefields and CSR.

  6. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  7. Field emission in RF cavities

    Bonin, B.

    1996-01-01

    Electron field emission limits the accelerating gradient in superconducting cavities. It is shown how and why it is an important problem. The phenomenology of field emission is then described, both in DC and RF regimes. Merits of a few plausible 'remedies' to field emission are discussed. (author)

  8. Modern technologies in rf superconductivity

    Lengeler, H.

    1994-01-01

    The development and application of superconducting rf cavities in particle accelerators is a fine example of advanced technology and of close cooperation with industry. This contribution examines the theoretical and present-day practical limitations of sc cavities and describes some advanced technologies needed for their large scale applications. (orig.)

  9. Broadband direct RF digitization receivers

    Jamin, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the trade-offs involved in designing direct RF digitization receivers for the radio frequency and digital signal processing domains.  A system-level framework is developed, quantifying the relevant impairments of the signal processing chain, through a comprehensive system-level analysis.  Special focus is given to noise analysis (thermal noise, quantization noise, saturation noise, signal-dependent noise), broadband non-linear distortion analysis, including the impact of the sampling strategy (low-pass, band-pass), analysis of time-interleaved ADC channel mismatches, sampling clock purity and digital channel selection. The system-level framework described is applied to the design of a cable multi-channel RF direct digitization receiver. An optimum RF signal conditioning, and some algorithms (automatic gain control loop, RF front-end amplitude equalization control loop) are used to relax the requirements of a 2.7GHz 11-bit ADC. A two-chip implementation is presented, using BiCMOS and 65nm...

  10. Introduction to RF linear accelerators

    Weiss, M.

    1994-01-01

    The basic features of RF linear accelerators are described. The concept of the 'loaded cavity', essential for the synchronism wave-particle, is introduced, and formulae describing the action of electromagnetic fields on the beam are given. The treatment of intense beams is mentioned, and various existing linear accelerators are presented as examples. (orig.)

  11. MOSFET Degradation Under RF Stress

    Sasse, G.T.; Kuper, F.G.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2008-01-01

    We report on the degradation of MOS transistors under RF stress. Hot-carrier degradation, negative-bias temperature instability, and gate dielectric breakdown are investigated. The findings are compared to established voltage- and field-driven models. The experimental results indicate that the

  12. Simulation of synchrotron motion with rf noise

    Leemann, B.T.; Forest, E.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    1986-08-01

    The theoretical formulation is described that is behind an algorithm for synchrotron phase-space tracking with rf noise and some preliminary simulation results of bunch diffusion under rf noise obtained by actual tracking

  13. High average power CW FELs [Free Electron Laser] for application to plasma heating: Designs and experiments

    Booske, J.H.; Granatstein, V.L.; Radack, D.J.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Bidwell, S.; Carmel, Y.; Destler, W.W.; Latham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Zhang, Z.X.

    1989-01-01

    A short period wiggler (period ∼ 1 cm), sheet beam FEL has been proposed as a low-cost source of high average power (1 MW) millimeter-wave radiation for plasma heating and space-based radar applications. Recent calculation and experiments have confirmed the feasibility of this concept in such critical areas as rf wall heating, intercepted beam (''body'') current, and high voltage (0.5 - 1 MV) sheet beam generation and propagation. Results of preliminary low-gain sheet beam FEL oscillator experiments using a field emission diode and pulse line accelerator have verified that lasing occurs at the predicted FEL frequency. Measured start oscillation currents also appear consistent with theoretical estimates. Finally, we consider the possibilities of using a short-period, superconducting planar wiggler for improved beam confinement, as well as access to the high gain, strong pump Compton regime with its potential for highly efficient FEL operation

  14. Summary of the 3rd workshop on high power RF-systems for accelerators

    Sigg, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this workshop was to bring together experts from the field of CW and high average power RF systems. The focus was on operational and reliability issues of high-power amplifiers using klystrons and tubes, large power supplies; as well as cavity design and low-level RF and feedback control systems. All these devices are used in synchrotron radiation facilities, high power linacs and collider rings, and cyclotrons. Furthermore, new technologies and their applications were introduced, amongst other: high power solid state amplifiers, IOT amplifiers, and high voltage power supplies employing solid state controllers/crowbars. Numerical methods for complete rf-field modeling of complex RF structures like cyclotrons were presented, as well as integrated RF-cavity designs (electro-magnetic fields and mechanical structure), using numerical methods. (author)

  15. RF induction plasma spheroidization of tungsten powders

    Gu Zhogntao; Ye Gaoying; Liu Chuandong; Tong Honghui

    2009-01-01

    Irregularly-shaped tungsten powders (average granular sizes of 512 μm) have been spheroidized by radio frequency (RF)induction plasma. The effects of feed rate, mode of material dispersion, particle size on spheroidization efficiency are investigated. Experimental results show that the spheroidization efficiency decreases rapidly when the feed rate increases to more than 95 g/min. Only 30% spheroidization efficiency is gained at the feed rate of 135.75 g/min. The spheroidization efficiency is also affected by the flow rate of carrier gas. When the flow rate of carrier gas is 0.12 m 3 /h, the dispersion effect is the best, and the spheroidization efficiency is almost 100%. The apparent density of tungsten powders increases a bit with the increase of spheroidization efficiency. And the particle size uniformity of spheroidized tungsten powders is in accordance with that of original powders. (authors)

  16. DKE: a fast numerical solver for the 3-D relativistic bounce-averaged electron drift kinetic equation

    Decker, J.; Peysson, Y

    2004-12-01

    A new original code for solving the 3-D relativistic and bounce-averaged electron drift kinetic equation is presented. It designed for the current drive problem in tokamak with an arbitrary magnetic equilibrium. This tool allows self-consistent calculations of the bootstrap current in presence of other external current sources. RF current drive for arbitrary type of waves may be used. Several moments of the electron distribution function are determined, like the exact and effective fractions of trapped electrons, the plasma current, absorbed RF power, runaway and magnetic ripple loss rates and non-thermal Bremsstrahlung. Advanced numerical techniques have been used to make it the first fully implicit (reverse time) 3-D solver, particularly well designed for implementation in a chain of code for realistic current drive calculations in high {beta}{sub p} plasmas. All the details of the physics background and the numerical scheme are presented, as well a some examples to illustrate main code capabilities. Several important numerical points are addressed concerning code stability and potential numerical and physical limitations. (authors)

  17. DKE: a fast numerical solver for the 3-D relativistic bounce-averaged electron drift kinetic equation

    Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.

    2004-12-01

    A new original code for solving the 3-D relativistic and bounce-averaged electron drift kinetic equation is presented. It designed for the current drive problem in tokamak with an arbitrary magnetic equilibrium. This tool allows self-consistent calculations of the bootstrap current in presence of other external current sources. RF current drive for arbitrary type of waves may be used. Several moments of the electron distribution function are determined, like the exact and effective fractions of trapped electrons, the plasma current, absorbed RF power, runaway and magnetic ripple loss rates and non-thermal Bremsstrahlung. Advanced numerical techniques have been used to make it the first fully implicit (reverse time) 3-D solver, particularly well designed for implementation in a chain of code for realistic current drive calculations in high β p plasmas. All the details of the physics background and the numerical scheme are presented, as well a some examples to illustrate main code capabilities. Several important numerical points are addressed concerning code stability and potential numerical and physical limitations. (authors)

  18. Numerical simulation of a split cavity oscillator and rf conversion

    Lemke, R.W.

    1991-07-01

    We have conducted an extensive investigation of the split cavity oscillator (SCO) using particle-in-cell simulation. The goal of this work is to test and optimize an inverse diode rf convertor for use with a cylindrical SCO, while simultaneously determining factors that control rf extraction efficiency. We present results from simulations of several configurations including the SCO with inverse diode extractor, the SCO in conjunction with post-acceleration and inverse diode extraction, and the SCO, using electron beams with a variety of currents, voltages, and radii. 7 refs., 8 figs

  19. The MuCool Test Area and RF Program

    Torun, Y.; Huang, D.; Norem, J.; Palmer, Robert B.; Stratakis, Diktys; Bross, A.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Moretti, A.; Yonehara, K.; Li, D.

    2010-01-01

    The MuCool RF Program focuses on the study of normal conducting RF structures operating in high magnetic field for applications in muon ionization cooling for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders. Here we give an overview of the program, which includes a description of the test facility and its capabilities, the current test program, and the status of a cavity that can be rotated in the magnetic field, which allows for a detailed study of the maximum stable operating gradient vs. magnetic field strength and angle.

  20. Low-level RF control system issues for an ADTT accelerator

    Ziomek, C.D.; Regan, A.H.; Lynch, M.T.; Bowling, P.S.

    1994-01-01

    The RF control system for a charged-particle accelerator must maintain the correct amplitude and phase of RF field inside the accelerator cavity in the presence of perturbations, noises, and time varying system components. For an accelerator with heavy beam-loading, fluctuations in the beam current cause large perturbations to the RF field amplitude and phase that must be corrected by the RF control system. The ADTT applications require a high-current, heavily beam-loaded, continuous-wave (CW) accelerator. Additional concerns created by the CW operation include system start-up, beam interruption, and fault recovery. Also, the RF control system for an ADTT facility must include sophisticated automation to reduce the operator interaction and support. This paper describes an RF control system design that addresses these various issues by evaluation a combination of feedback and feed forward control techniques. Experience from the high-current Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is drawn upon for this RF control system design. Comprehensive computer modeling with the Matrix x software has been used to predict the performance of this RF control system

  1. Review of pulsed rf power generation

    Lavine, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    I am going to talk about pulsed high-power rf generation for normal-conducting electron and positron linacs suitable for applications to high-energy physics in the Next Linear Collider, or NLC. The talk will cover some basic rf system design issues, klystrons and other microwave power sources, rf pulse-compression devices, and test facilities for system-integration studies

  2. Discussion of high brightness rf linear accelerators

    Jameson, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamental aspects of high-brightness rf linacs are outlined, showing the breadth and complexity of the technology and indicating that synergism with advancements in other areas is important. Areas of technology reviewed include ion sources, injectors, rf accelerator structures, beam dynamics, rf power, and automatic control

  3. RF phase distribution systems at the SLC

    Jobe, R.K.; Schwarz, H.D.

    1989-04-01

    Modern large linear accelerators require RF distribution systems with minimal phase drifts and errors. Through the use of existing RF coaxial waveguides, and additional installation of phase reference cables and monitoring equipment, stable RF distribution for the SLC has been achieved. This paper discusses the design and performance of SLAC systems, and some design considerations for future colliders. 6 refs., 4 figs

  4. Linear collider RF: Introduction and summary

    Palmer, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    The relation of acceleration gradient with RF frequency is examined, and approximate general RF power requirements are derived. Considerations of efficiency and cost are discussed. RF Sources, presented at the conference, are reviewed. Overall efficiencies of the linear collider proposals are compared. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  5. Topological quantization of ensemble averages

    Prodan, Emil

    2009-01-01

    We define the current of a quantum observable and, under well-defined conditions, we connect its ensemble average to the index of a Fredholm operator. The present work builds on a formalism developed by Kellendonk and Schulz-Baldes (2004 J. Funct. Anal. 209 388) to study the quantization of edge currents for continuous magnetic Schroedinger operators. The generalization given here may be a useful tool to scientists looking for novel manifestations of the topological quantization. As a new application, we show that the differential conductance of atomic wires is given by the index of a certain operator. We also comment on how the formalism can be used to probe the existence of edge states

  6. RF linear accelerators

    Wangler, Thomas P

    2008-01-01

    Thomas P. Wangler received his B.S. degree in physics from Michigan State University, and his Ph.D. degree in physics and astronomy from the University of Wisconsin. After postdoctoral appointments at the University of Wisconsin and Brookhaven National Laboratory, he joined the staff of Argonne National Laboratory in 1966, working in the fields of experimental high-energy physics and accelerator physics. He joined the Accelerator Technology Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1979, where he specialized in high-current beam physics and linear accelerator design and technology. In 2007

  7. RF Breakdown in Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Nantista, C.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.

    2006-01-01

    Operating accelerating gradient in normal conducting accelerating structures is often limited by rf breakdown. The limit depends on multiple parameters, including input rf power, rf circuit, cavity shape and material. Experimental and theoretical study of the effects of these parameters on the breakdown limit in full scale structures is difficult and costly. We use 11.4 GHz single-cell traveling wave and standing wave accelerating structures for experiments and modeling of rf breakdown behavior. These test structures are designed so that the electromagnetic fields in one cell mimic the fields in prototype multicell structures for the X-band linear collider. Fields elsewhere in the test structures are significantly lower than that of the single cell. The setup uses matched mode converters that launch the circular TM 01 mode into short test structures. The test structures are connected to the mode launchers with vacuum rf flanges. This setup allows economic testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn-around time. Simple 2D geometry of the test structures simplifies modeling of the breakdown currents and their thermal effects

  8. An Automated 476 MHz RF Cavity Processing Facility at SLAC

    McIntosh, P; Schwarz, H

    2003-01-01

    The 476 MHz accelerating cavities currently used at SLAC are those installed on the PEP-II B-Factory collider accelerator. They are designed to operate at a maximum accelerating voltage of 1 MV and are routinely utilized on PEP-II at voltages up to 750 kV. During the summer of 2003, SPEAR3 will undergo a substantial upgrade, part of which will be to replace the existing 358.54 MHz RF system with essentially a PEP-II high energy ring (HER) RF station operating at 476.3 MHz and 3.2 MV (or 800 kV/cavity). Prior to installation, cavity RF processing is required to prepare them for use. A dedicated high power test facility is employed at SLAC to provide the capability of conditioning each cavity up to the required accelerating voltage. An automated LabVIEW based interface controls and monitors various cavity and test stand parameters, increasing the RF fields accordingly such that stable operation is finally achieved. This paper describes the high power RF cavity processing facility, highlighting the features of t...

  9. Report of the workshop on rf heating in mirror systems

    Price, R.E.; Woo, J.T.

    1980-08-01

    This report is prepared from the proceedings of the Workshop on RF Heating in Magnetic Mirror Systems held at DOE Headquarters in Washington, DC, on March 10-12, 1980. The workshop was organized into four consecutive half-day sessions of prepared talks and one half-day discussion. The first session on tandem mirror concepts and program plans served to identify the opportunities for the application of rf power and the specific approaches that are being pursued. A summary of the ideas presented in this session is given. The following sessions of the workshop were devoted to an exposition of current theoretical and experimental knowledge on the interaction of rf power with magnetically confined, dense, high temperature plasmas at frequencies near the electron cyclotron resonance, lower hybrid resonance and ion cyclotron resonance (including magnetosonic) ranges. The conclusions from these proceedings are presented

  10. Multiband RF circuits and techniques for wireless transmitters

    Chen, Wenhua; Ghannouchi, Fadhel M

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces systematic design methods for passive and active RF circuits and techniques, including state-of-the-art digital enhancement techniques. As the very first book dedicated to multiband RF circuits and techniques, this work provides an overview of the evolution of transmitter architecture and discusses current digital predistortion techniques. Readers will find a collection of novel research ideas and new architectures in concurrent multiband power dividers, power amplifiers and related digital enhancement techniques. This book will be of great interest to academic researchers, R&D engineers, wireless transmitter and protocol designers, as well as graduate students who wish to learn the core architectures, principles and methods of multiband RF circuits and techniques. .

  11. Control system analysis for the perturbed linear accelerator rf system

    Sung Il Kwon

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the modeling problem of the linear accelerator RF system in SNS. Klystrons are modeled as linear parameter varying systems. The effect of the high voltage power supply ripple on the klystron output voltage and the output phase is modeled as an additive disturbance. The cavity is modeled as a linear system and the beam current is modeled as the exogenous disturbance. The output uncertainty of the low level RF system which results from the uncertainties in the RF components and cabling is modeled as multiplicative uncertainty. Also, the feedback loop uncertainty and digital signal processing signal conditioning subsystem uncertainties are lumped together and are modeled as multiplicative uncertainty. Finally, the time delays in the loop are modeled as a lumped time delay. For the perturbed open loop system, the closed loop system performance, and stability are analyzed with the PI feedback controller.

  12. Overview and status of RF systems for the SSC Linac

    Mynk, J.; Grippe, J.; Cutler, R.I.; Rodriguez, R.

    1993-05-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Linear Accelerator (Linac) produces a 600-MeV, 35-μs, H-beam at a 10-Hz repetition rate. The beam is accelerated by a series of RF cavities. These consist of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), two bunchers, and four Drift Tube Linac (DTL) tanks at 427.617 MHz, and two bunchers, nine side-coupled Linac modules, and an energy compressor at 1282.851 MHz. The RFQ amplifier and the low-frequency buncher cavity amplifiers use gridded tubes, while the other cavities use klystron amplifier systems. The RF control system consists of a reference line and cavity feedback and feedforward loops for each amplifier. The RF amplifier system for each of these accelerator cavities is described, and the current status of each system is presented

  13. Klystron 'efficiency loop' for the ALS storage ring RF system

    Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Julian, Jim; Baptiste, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    The recent energy crisis in California has led us to investigate the high power RF systems at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to decrease the energy consumption and power costs. We found the Storage Ring Klystron Power Amplifier system operating as designed but with significant power waste. A simple proportional-integrator (PI) analog loop, which controls the klystron collector beam current, as a function of the output RF power, has been designed and installed. The design considerations, besides efficiency improvement, were to interface to the existing system without major expense. They were to also avoid the klystron cathode power supply filter's resonance in the loop's dynamics, and prevent a conflict with the existing Cavity RF Amplitude Loop dynamics. This efficiency loop will allow us to save up to 700 MW-hours of electrical energy per year and increase the lifetime of the klystron

  14. New fat suppression RF pulse with shorter duration

    Yamaguchi, Kojiro; Ukai, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    The fat suppression radio frequency pulse currently employed for MRI, which selectively saturates the frequency of the fat, has the narrow-band frequency characteristics. Therefore, the application duration for the pulse employed tends to be prolonged. In the present study, we designed a new fat suppression radiofrequency (RF) pulse using the Laguerre function in order to shorten the duration for fat suppression RF pulse and conducted an evaluation with the clinical equipment. The length of the RF pulse that we created allowed to reduce the duration by 47.3% compared with that employed for the clinical equipment. In addition, in the MR imaging evaluation, the new pulse was confirmed to have the fat suppression effect equivalent to that employed for the clinical equipment. (author)

  15. Evaluation of RF properties by orifice design for IFMIF RFQ

    Maebara, Sunao; Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    2005-03-01

    Orifices for the IFMIF RFQ have been designed and fabricated, and RF properties have been evaluated by a network analyzer. The designed orifices were installed into a vacuum port of the 1.1m-long RFQ mock-up module, and the resonant frequency and the phase difference between cavities were measured for a quadrupole operation mode of TE 210 . It was found that the RF properties are not affected on condition that slit direction with the same direction of current flow at the RFQ wall. Orifice conductance from 0.22 to 0.25 m 3 /sec by nitrogen conversion at room temperature was designed, and an ultimate pressure level of 5x10 -7 [Pa] was evaluated for the 4.1m-long central module for the IFMIF RFQ. It was concluded that the designed orifices are effective for RF properties and vacuum conductance in the IFMIF RFQ. (author)

  16. CONTROL SYSTEM ANALYSIS FOR THE PERTURBED LINEAR ACCELERATOR RF SYSTEM

    SUNG-IL KWON; AMY H. REGAN

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the modeling problem of the linear accelerator RF system in SNS. Klystrons are modeled as linear parameter varying systems. The effect of the high voltage power supply ripple on the klystron output voltage and the output phase is modeled as an additive disturbance. The cavity is modeled as a linear system and the beam current is modeled as the exogenous disturbance. The output uncertainty of the low level RF system which results from the uncertainties in the RF components and cabling is modeled as multiplicative uncertainty. Also, the feedback loop uncertainty and digital signal processing signal conditioning subsystem uncertainties are lumped together and are modeled as multiplicative uncertainty. Finally, the time delays in the loop are modeled as a lumped time delay. For the perturbed open loop system, the closed loop system performance, and stability are analyzed with the PI feedback controller

  17. An offset tone based gain stabilization technique for mixed-signal RF measurement systems

    Joshi, Gopal, E-mail: gjos@barc.gov.in [BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Motiwala, Paresh D.; Randale, G.D.; Singh, Pitamber [BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Agarwal, Vivek; Kumar, Girish [IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2015-09-21

    This paper describes a gain stabilization technique for a RF signal measurement system. A sinusoidal signal of known amplitude, phase and close enough in frequency is added to the main, to be measured RF signal at the input of the analog section. The system stabilizes this offset tone in the digital domain, as it is sampled at the output of the analog section. This process generates a correction factor needed to stabilize the magnitude of the gain of the analog section for the main RF signal. With the help of a simple calibration procedure, the absolute amplitude of the main RF signal can be measured. The technique is especially suited for a system that processes signals around a single frequency, employs direct signal conversion into the digital domain, and processes subsequent steps in an FPGA. The inherent parallel signal processing in an FPGA-based implementation allows a real time stabilization of the gain. The effectiveness of the technique is derived from the fact, that the gain stabilization stamped to the main RF signal measurement branch requires only a few components in the system to be inherently stable. A test setup, along with experimental results is presented from the field of RF instrumentation for particle accelerators. Due to the availability of a phase synchronized RF reference signal in these systems, the measured phase difference between the main RF and the RF reference is also stabilized using this technique. A scheme of the signal processing is presented, where a moving average filter has been used to filter out not only the unwanted frequencies, but also to separate the main RF signal from the offset tone signal. This is achieved by a suitable choice of sampling and offset tone frequencies. The presented signal processing scheme is suitable to a variety of RF measurement applications.

  18. RF source for proton linear accelerator in Kyoto University

    Iwashita, Yoshihisa

    1987-01-01

    Construction of a 433 MHz, 7 MeV proton linear accelerator is currently underway in Kyoto University under a three-year plan starting in 1986. The ion source, power source for it, RFQ main unit, WR2100 waveguide and a set of klystrons for RFQ were installed last year, or the first year of the plan, and the power source for the klystrons for RFQ, a set of klystrons for STL, DTL main unit, etc., are planned to be installed this year. Operation has not started yet because of the absence of the power source for the klystrons. Thus this report is focused on the considerations made in selecting the acceleration frequency of 433 MHz, specifications of the klystrons and the structure of the power sources for them. Based on considerations of the efficiency and cost of the accelerating tubes and RF sources to be used, the acceleration frequencies of 433.33 MHz and 1,300 MHz were adopted. The klystron selected is Litton L5773, which has a peak power output of 1.25 Mw, average power output of 75 kW, maximum pulse width of 2,000 μS and duty of 6 percent, and it consists of four cavities. The structure and characteristics of a klystron are also described. (Nogami, K.)

  19. rf impedance of the accelerating beam gap and its significance to the TRIUMF rf system

    Poirier, R.

    1979-03-01

    The rf system at TRIUMF is now operating with the highest Q, the lowest rf leakage into the beam gap, the best voltage stability, and the lowest resonator strongback temperatures ever measured since it was first put into operation. This paper describes the calculation of the rf impedance of the beam gap and its correlation to the rf problems encountered, which eventually led to modifications to the flux guides and resonator tips to accomplish the improved operation of the rf system

  20. An investigation of the DC and RF performance of InP DHBTs transferred to RF CMOS wafer substrate

    Ren, Kun; Zheng, Jiachen; Lu, Haiyan; Liu, Jun; Wu, Lishu; Zhou, Wenyong; Cheng, Wei

    2018-05-01

    This paper investigated the DC and RF performance of the InP double heterojunction bipolar transistors (DHBTs) transferred to RF CMOS wafer substrate. The measurement results show that the maximum values of the DC current gain of a substrate transferred device had one emitter finger, of 0.8 μm in width and 5 μm in length, are changed unobviously, while the cut-off frequency and the maximum oscillation frequency are decreased from 220 to 171 GHz and from 204 to 154 GHz, respectively. In order to have a detailed insight on the degradation of the RF performance, small-signal models for the InP DHBT before and after substrate transferred are presented and comparably extracted. The extracted results show that the degradation of the RF performance of the device transferred to RF CMOS wafer substrate are mainly caused by the additional introduced substrate parasitics and the increase of the capacitive parasitics induced by the substrate transfer process itself. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61331006) and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province (No. Y14F010017).

  1. The RF power system for the SNS linac

    Tallerico, P.J.; Reass, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    The initial goal of the SNS project is to produce a 1 MW average beam of protons with short pulse lengths onto a neutron-producing target. The objective of the SNS RF system is to generate 117 MW peak of pulsed 805 MHz microwave power with an accelerated beam pulse length of 1.04 ms at a 60 Hz repetition rate. The power system must be upgradeable in peak power to deliver 2 MW average power to the neutron target. The RF system also requires about 3 MW peak of RF power at 402.5 MHz, but that system is not discussed here. The design challenge is to produce an RF system at minimum cost, that is very reliable and economical to operate. The combination of long pulses and high repetition rates make conventional solutions, such as the pulse transformer and transmission line method, very expensive. The klystron, with a modulating anode, and 1.5 MW of peak output power is the baseline RF amplifier, an 56 are required in the baseline design. The authors discuss four power system configurations that are the candidates for the design. The baseline design is a floating-deck modulating anode system. A second power system being investigated is the fast-pulsed power supply, that can be turned on and off with a rise time of under 0.1 ms. This could eliminate the need for a modulator, and drastically reduce the energy storage requirements. A third idea is to use a pulse transformer with a series IGBT switch and a bouncer circuit on the primary side, as was done for the TESLA modulator. A fourth method is to use a series IGBT switch at high voltage, and not use a pulse transformer. The authors discuss the advantages and problems of these four types of power systems, but they emphasize the first two

  2. High power RF systems for LEHIPA of ADS

    Pande, Manjiri; Shrotriya, Sandip; Sharma, Sonal; Rao, B.V.R.; Mishra, J.K.; Patel, Niranjan; Gupta, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide accelerator driven sub-critical system (ADS) has generated a huge interest for various reasons. In India, as a part of accelerator driven sub-critical system (ADS) program, a normal conducting, low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA) of energy 20 MeV and beam current of 30 mA is being developed in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC). LEHIPA comprises of Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source (50 KeV), Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator (3 MeV) and Drift tube Linac (DTL) 1 and 2 (10 MeV and 20 MeV respectively). As per the accelerator physics design, RFQ requires nearly 530 kW RF power while each of DTL need 900 kW. Each accelerating cavity will be driven by a one- megawatt (CW) klystron based high power RF (HPRF) system at 352.21 MHz. Three such RF systems will be developed. The RF system has been designed around five cavity klystron tube TH2089F (Thales make) capable of delivering 1 MW continuous wave power at 352.21 MHz. The klystron has a gain of 40 dB and efficiency around 62 %. Each of the RF system comprises of a low power solid state driver (∼ 100 W), klystron tube, harmonic filter, directional coupler, Y-junction circulator (AFT make), RF load and WR2300 wave guide based RF transmission line each of 1 MW capacity. It also includes other subsystems like bias supplies (high voltage (HV) and low voltage (LV)), HV interface system, interlock and protection circuits, dedicated low conductivity water-cooling, pulsing circuitry/mechanisms etc. WR 2300 based RF transmission line transmits and feeds the RE power from klystron source to respective accelerating cavity. This transmission line starts from second port of the circulator and consists of straight sections, full height to half height transition, magic Tee, termination load at the centre of magic tee, half height sections, directional couplers and RE windows. For X-ray shielding, klystron will be housed in a lead (3 mm) based shielded cage. This system set up has a

  3. Effect of RF power and substrate temperature on physical properties of Zr0.8Sn0.2TiO4 films by RF magnetron sputtering

    Hsu Cheng-Shing; Huang Cheng-Liang

    2001-01-01

    Physical properties of rf-sputtered crystalline (Zr 0.8 Sn 0.2 )TiO 4 (ZST) thin films deposited on n-type Si(100) substrates at different rf powers and substrate temperatures have been investigated. The structural and morphological characteristics analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were found to be sensitive to deposition conditions, such as rf power from 300 W to 400 W and substrate temperature (400degC, 450degC). Highly oriented ZST (111) and (002) perpendicular to the substrate surface were identified at a rf power of 400 W and a substrate temperature of 450degC. The selected-area diffraction pattern showed that the deposited films exhibited a polycrystalline microstructure. The grain size as well as the deposition rate of the film increased with the increase in both the rf power and the substrate temperature. The leakage current decreased with increasing rf power and substrate temperature. As rf power = 400 W and substrate temperature = 450degC, a leakage current of 7.2x10 -11 A was obtained at 1 V. (author)

  4. Stochastic cooling with a double rf system

    Wei, Jie.

    1992-01-01

    Stochastic cooling for a bunched beam of hadrons stored in an accelerator with a double rf system of two different frequencies has been investigated. The double rf system broadens the spread in synchrotron-oscillation frequency of the particles when they mostly oscillate near the center of the rf bucket. Compared with the ease of a single rf system, the reduction rates of the bunch dimensions are significantly increased. When the rf voltage is raised, the reduction rate, instead of decreasing linearly, now is independent of the ratio of the bunch area to the bucket area. On the other hand, the spread in synchrotron-oscillation frequency becomes small with the double rf system, if the longitudinal oscillation amplitudes of the particles are comparable to the dimension of the rf bucket. Consequently, stochastic cooling is less effective when the bunch area is close to the bucket area

  5. R&D activities on RF contacts for the ITER ion cyclotron resonance heating launcher

    Hillairet, Julien, E-mail: julien.hillairet@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Argouarch, Arnaud [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bamber, Rob [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Beaumont, Bertrand [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Bernard, Jean-Michel; Delaplanche, Jean-Marc [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Durodié, Frédéric [Laboratory for Plasmas Physics, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Lamalle, Philippe [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Lombard, Gilles [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Nicholls, Keith; Shannon, Mark [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Vulliez, Karl [Maestral Laboratory, Technetics Group, Pierrelatte (France); Cantone, Vincent; Hatchressian, Jean-Claude; Larroque, Sébastien; Lebourg, Philippe; Martinez, André; Mollard, Patrick; Mouyon, David; Pagano, Marco [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); and others

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • CEA have developed a dedicated test-bed for testing RF contact in ITER relevant conditions (vacuum, temperature, RF current). • A prototype of RF contacts have been designed and manufactured, with copper lamellas brazed on a titanium holder. • This RF contact prototype failed at RF current larger than 1.8 kA. • Extensive R&D is foreseen with new RF contact designs. - Abstract: Embedded RF contacts are integrated within the ITER ICRH launcher to allow assembling, sliding and to lower the thermo-mechanical stress. They have to withstand a peak RF current up to 2.5 kA at 55 MHz in steady-state conditions, in the vacuum environment of the machine. The contacts have to sustain a temperature up to 250 °C during several days in baking operations and have to be reliable during the whole life of the launcher without degradation. The RF contacts are critical components for the launcher performance and intensive R&D is therefore required, since no RF contacts have so far been qualified at these specifications. In order to test and validate the anticipated RF contacts in operational conditions, CEA has prepared a test platform consisting of a steady-state vacuum pumped RF resonator. In collaboration with ITER Organization and the CYCLE consortium (CYclotron CLuster for Europe), an R&D program has been conducted to develop RF contacts that meet the ITER ICRH launcher specifications. A design proposed by CYCLE consortium, using brazed lamellas supported by a spring to improve thermal exchange efficiency while guaranteeing high contact force, was tested successfully in the T-resonator up to 1.7 kA during 1200 s, but failed for larger current values due to a degradation of the contacts. Details concerning the manufacturing of the brazed contacts on its titanium holder, the RF tests results performed on the resonator and the non-destructive tests analysis of the contacts are given in this paper.

  6. Superconductors for pulsed rf accelerators

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1985-04-01

    The choice of superconducting materials for accelerator rf cavities has been determined in the past only in part by basic properties of the superconductors, such as the critical field, and to a larger extent by criteria which include fabrication processes, surface conditions, heat transfer capabilities and so on. For cw operated cavities the trend has been toward choosing materials with higher critical temperatures and lower surface resistance, from Lead to Niobium, from Niobium to Nb 3 Sn. This trend has been dictated by the specific needs of storage ring cw system and by the relatively low fields which could be reached without breakdown. The work performed at SLAC on superconducting cavities using microsecond long high power rf pulses has shown that in Pb, Nb, and Nb 3 Sn fields close to the critical magnetic fields can be reached without magnetic breakdown

  7. Lower-hybrid heating and current drive on PLT

    Hooke, W.; Bernabei, S.; Boyd, D.

    1983-02-01

    Steady currents up to 165 kA for 3.5 seconds and 420 kA for 0.3 seconds have been maintained by 800 MHz lower hybrid waves. For line-averaged densities up to 7 x 10 12 cm - 3 the current is maintained with no input power from the ohmic heating transformer. The waves are launched with an array of six waveguides. Measurements of X rays and electron cyclotron radiation show that the rf power produces and maintains a suprathermal tail of electrons apparently independent of the number of fast electrons in the plasma prior to turning on the rf power. Measurements of current-drive efficiency and the electron tail provide direct evidence for a resonant wave-particle interaction. The radial profile of the rf-sustained current inferred from x-ray measurements is peaked in the center of the plasma and appears to obey the same q-value restraints as the inductively driven ohmic heating current. Current drive is observed to be accompanied always by radiation at frequencies greater than or equal to #betta#/sub ce/ and less than or equal to #betta#/sub pe/. The connection between this radiation and the current-drive mechanism is under study

  8. A wearable RF sensor on fabric substrate for pulmonary edema monitoring

    Tayyab, Muhammad; Sharawi, Mohammad S.; Shamim, Atif

    2017-01-01

    We propose a radio frequency (RF) sensor built on a fabric textile substrate for pulmonary edema monitoring. The 37-port RF sensor is designed and optimized to operate at 60 MHz with a low input power of 1 mW. By applying the least squares (LS) method, an equation was obtained for dielectric constant estimation using the transmission coefficient of each RF sensor port. The simulated errors are estimated for normal lung, edema and emphysema infected lung cases using a human chest model with an average error of 0.57%. Inkjet printing of the proposed design is then discussed.

  9. A wearable RF sensor on fabric substrate for pulmonary edema monitoring

    Tayyab, Muhammad

    2017-11-30

    We propose a radio frequency (RF) sensor built on a fabric textile substrate for pulmonary edema monitoring. The 37-port RF sensor is designed and optimized to operate at 60 MHz with a low input power of 1 mW. By applying the least squares (LS) method, an equation was obtained for dielectric constant estimation using the transmission coefficient of each RF sensor port. The simulated errors are estimated for normal lung, edema and emphysema infected lung cases using a human chest model with an average error of 0.57%. Inkjet printing of the proposed design is then discussed.

  10. Rf System for the NLCTA

    Wang, J.W.; Adolphsen, C.; Eichner, J.; Fuller, R.W.; Gold, S.L.; Hanna, S.M.; Hoag, H.A.; Holmes, S.G.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, Theodore L.; Loewen, R.J.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.D.; Pope, R.; Rifkin, J.; Ruth, R.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, Z.; Yeremian, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an X-Band RF system for the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator. The RF system consists of a 90 MeV injector and a 540 MeV linac. The main components of the injector are two low-Q single-cavity prebunchers and two 0.9-m-long detuned accelerator sections. The linac system consists of six 1.8-m-long detuned and damped detuned accelerator sections powered in pairs. The rf power generation, compression, delivery, distribution and measurement systems consist of klystrons, SLEDII energy compression systems, rectangular waveguides, magic-T's, and directional couplers. The phase and amplitude for each prebuncher is adjusted via a magic-T type phase shifter/attenuator. Correct phasing between the two 0.9 m accelerator sections is obtained by properly aligning the sections and adjusting two squeeze type phase shifters. Bunch phase and bunch length can be monitored with special microwave cavities and measurement systems. The design, fabrication, microwave measurement, calibration, and operation of the sub-systems and their components are briefly presented.

  11. Low jitter RF distribution system

    Wilcox, Russell; Doolittle, Lawrence; Huang, Gang

    2012-09-18

    A timing signal distribution system includes an optical frequency stabilized laser signal amplitude modulated at an rf frequency. A transmitter box transmits a first portion of the laser signal and receive a modified optical signal, and outputs a second portion of the laser signal and a portion of the modified optical signal. A first optical fiber carries the first laser signal portion and the modified optical signal, and a second optical fiber carries the second portion of the laser signal and the returned modified optical signal. A receiver box receives the first laser signal portion, shifts the frequency of the first laser signal portion outputs the modified optical signal, and outputs an electrical signal on the basis of the laser signal. A detector at the end of the second optical fiber outputs a signal based on the modified optical signal. An optical delay sensing circuit outputs a data signal based on the detected modified optical signal. An rf phase detect and correct signal circuit outputs a signal corresponding to a phase stabilized rf signal based on the data signal and the frequency received from the receiver box.

  12. Oak Ridge rf Test Facility

    Gardner, W.L.; Hoffman, D.J.; McCurdy, H.C.; McManamy, T.J.; Moeller, J.A.; Ryan, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    The rf Test Facility (RFTF) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a national facility for the testing and evaluation of steady-state, high-power (approx.1.0-MW) ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) systems and components. The facility consists of a vacuum vessel and two fully tested superconducting development magnets from the ELMO Bumpy Torus Proof-of-Principle (EBT-P) program. These are arranged as a simple mirror with a mirror ratio of 4.8. The axial centerline distance between magnet throat centers is 112 cm. The vacuum vessel cavity has a large port (74 by 163 cm) and a test volume adequate for testing prototypic launchers for Doublet III-D (DIII-D), Tore Supra, and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Attached to the internal vessel walls are water-cooled panels for removing the injected rf power. The magnets are capable of generating a steady-state field of approx.3 T on axis in the magnet throats. Steady-state plasmas are generated in the facility by cyclotron resonance breakdown using a dedicated 200-kW, 28-GHz gyrotron. Available rf sources cover a frequency range of 2 to 200 MHz at 1.5 kW and 3 to 18 MHz at 200 kW, with several sources at intermediate parameters. Available in July 1986 will be a >1.0-MW, cw source spanning 40 to 80 MHz. 5 figs

  13. Resonance properties of the biological objects in the RF field

    Cocherova, E; Kupec, P; Stofanik, V

    2011-01-01

    Irradiation of people with electromagnetic fields emitted from miscellaneous devices working in the radio-frequency (RF) range may have influence, for example may affect brain processes. The question of health impact of RF electromagnetic fields on population is still not closed. This article is devoted to an investigation of resonance phenomena of RF field absorption in the models of whole human body and body parts (a head) of different size and shape. The values of specific absorption rate (SAR) are evaluated for models of the different shapes: spherical, cylindrical, realistic shape and for different size of the model, that represents the case of new-born, child and adult person. In the RF frequency region, absorption depends nonlinearly on frequency. Under certain conditions (E-polarization), absorption reaches maximum at frequency, that is called r esonance frequency . The whole body absorption and the resonance frequency depends on many further parameters, that are not comprehensively clarified. The simulation results showed the dependence of the whole-body average SAR and resonance frequency on the body dimensions, as well as the influence of the body shape.

  14. Rf breakdown studies in room temperature electron linac structures

    Loew, G.A.; Wang, J.W.

    1988-05-01

    This paper is an overall review of studies carried out by the authors and some of their colleagues on RF breakdown, Field Emission and RF processing in room temperature electron linac structure. The motivation behind this work is twofold: in a fundamental way, to contribute to the understanding of the RF breakdown phenomenon, and as an application, to determine the maximum electric field gradient that can be obtained and used safely in future e/sup +-/ linear colliders. Indeed, the next generation of these machines will have to reach into the TeV (10 12 eV) energy range, and the accelerating gradient will be to be of the crucial parameters affecting their design, construction and cost. For a specified total energy, the gradient sets the accelerator length, and once the RF structure, frequency and pulse repetition rate are selected, it also determines the peak and average power consumption. These three quantities are at the heart of the ultimate realizability and cost of these accelerators. 24 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Microscopic investigation of RF surfaces of 3 GHz niobium accelerator cavities following RF processing

    Graber, J.; Barnes, P.; Flynn, T.; Kirchgessner, J.; Knobloch, J.; Moffat, D.; Muller, H.; Padamsee, H.; Sears, J.

    1993-01-01

    RF processing of Superconducting accelerating cavities is achieved through a change in the electron field emission (FE) characteristics of the RF surface. The authors have examined the RF surfaces of several single-cell 3 GHz cavities, following RF processing, in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The RF processing sessions included both High Peak Power (P ≤ 50 kW) pulsed processing, and low power (≤ 20 W) continuous wave processing. The experimental apparatus also included a thermometer array on the cavity outer wall, allowing temperature maps to characterize the emission before and after RF processing gains. Multiple sites have been located in cavities which showed improvements in cavity behavior due to RF processing. Several SEM-located sites can be correlated with changes in thermometer signals, indicating a direct relationship between the surface site and emission reduction due to RF processing. Information gained from the SEM investigations and thermometry are used to enhance the theoretical model of RF processing

  16. Linearization and efficiency enhancement techniques for silicon power amplifiers from RF to mmW

    Kerhervé, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an overview of current efficiency enhancement and linearization techniques for silicon power amplifier designs. It examines the latest state of the art technologies and design techniques to address challenges for RF cellular mobile, base stations, and RF and mmW WLAN applications. Coverage includes material on current silicon (CMOS, SiGe) RF and mmW power amplifier designs, focusing on advantages and disadvantages compared with traditional GaAs implementations. With this book you will learn: The principles of linearization and efficiency improvement techniquesThe arch

  17. Performance of an rf beam monitor on the NBS-Los Alamos racetrack microtron

    Young, L.M.; Cutler, R.I.

    1985-01-01

    A prototype rf beam-position, current, and phase monitor has been used on the 100-keV injector beamline of the racetrack microtron (RTM) where performance was measured with the chopped and bunched beam. This monitor works with both a pulsed beam and a cw beam. The pulsed beam consists of beam pulses with a FWHM of 40 ns. The rf beam monitor was tested with beam currents from approx. 50 to 600 μA. The rf beam monitor will be described and its performance will be reported. 6 refs., 5 figs

  18. RF Noise Generation in High-Pressure Short-Arc DC Xenon Lamps

    Minayeva, Olga; Doughty, Douglas

    2007-10-01

    Continuous direct current xenon arcs will generate RF noise under certain circumstance, which can lead to excessive electro- magnetic interference in systems that use these arcs as light sources. Phenomenological observations are presented for xenon arcs having arc gaps ˜1 mm, cold fill pressures of ˜2.5 MPa, and currents up to 30 amps. Using a loop antenna in the vicinity of an operating lamp, it is observed that as the current to the arc is lowered there is a reproducible threshold at which the RF noise generation begins. This threshold is accompanied by a small abrupt drop in voltage (˜0.2 volts). The RF emission appears in pulses ˜150 nsec wide separated by ˜300 nec - the pulse interval decreases with decreasing current. The properties of the RF emission as a function of arc parameters (such as pressure, arc gap, electrode design) will be discussed and a semi-quantitative model presented.

  19. Multi-step capacitor discharges as an RF generator

    Hotta, Eiki; Yamamoto, Shunji; Ishii, Shozo; Hayashi, Izumi

    1979-01-01

    A variety of methods have been developed for large output radio frequency (RF) generators to heat and stabilize high temperature plasma. As the generators for this purpose, capacitor discharge, cable discharge, and oscillation with electronic tubes are considered. Here, a new RF generator is reported, which utilizes capacitor discharge to extract heavy current, and solves the difficulty of short duration by employing multistep discharges. The authors solved the problem of frequency decrease in capacitor discharge by cutting off the unnecessary capacitors reasonably from the load circuit, using the additional circuit for shunting current and vacuum gap switches. The vacuum gap switches and the trigger system are described together with the RF generator manufactured. The generator was fabricated to be rather compact for its large output and simple in circuitry as compared with conventional oscillator systems. The shortcomings are frequency variation and the improper phase of switching the next step in to cause instability, when the load change occurs. It would be difficult to operate the generator in a RF range of more than about 10 MHz due to jitter of the vacuum gap switches and others. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  20. On the performance of hybrid RF and RF/FSO fixed gain dual-hop transmission systems

    Ansari, Imran Shafique

    2013-04-01

    In this work, we present the performance analysis of a dual-branch transmission system composed of a direct radio frequency (RF) link and a dual-hop relay composed of asymmetric RF and free-space optical (FSO) links and compare it without having a direct RF path to see the effects of diversity on our system. The FSO link accounts for pointing errors and both types of detection techniques (i.e. indirect modulation/direct detection (IM/DD) as well as heterodyne detection). The performance is evaluated under the assumption of selection combining diversity scheme. RF links are modeled by Rayleigh fading distribution whereas the FSO link is modeled by a unified Gamma-Gamma fading distribution. Specifically, we derive new exact closed-form expressions for the cumulative distribution function, probability density function, moment generating function, and moments of the end-to-end signal-to-noise ratio of these systems in terms of the Meijer\\'s G function. We then capitalize on these results to offer new exact closed-form expressions for the outage probability, higher-order amount of fading, average error rate for binary and M-ary modulation schemes, and ergodic capacity, all in terms of Meijer\\'s G functions. All our new analytical results are also verified via computer-based Monte-Carlo simulations. © 2013 IEEE.

  1. Study on the RF power necessary to ignite plasma for the ICP test facility at HUST

    Yue, Haikun [School of Electronic Information and Communications, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Li, Dong; Wang, Chenre; Li, Xiaofei; Chen, Dezhi; Liu, Kaifeng; Zhou, Chi; Pan, Ruimin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2015-10-15

    An Radio-Frequency (RF) Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) ion source test facility has been successfully developed at Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST). As part of a study on hydrogen plasma, the influence of three main operation parameters on the RF power necessary to ignite plasma was investigated. At 6 Pa, the RF power necessary to ignite plasma influenced little by the filament heating current from 5 A to 9 A. The RF power necessary to ignite plasma increased rapidly with the operation pressure decreasing from 8 Pa to 4 Pa. The RF power necessary to ignite plasma decreased with the number of coil turns from 6 to 10. During the experiments, plasma was produced with the electron density of the order of 10{sup 16}m{sup -3} and the electron temperature of around 4 eV. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Measurements of RF-induced sol modifications in Tore Supra tokamak

    Kubic, Martin; Gunn, James P.; Colas, Laurent; Heuraux, Stephane; Faudot, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Since spring 2011, one of the three ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas in the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak is equipped with a new type of Faraday screen (FS). Results from Radio Frequency (RF) simulations of the new Faraday screen suggest the innovative structure with cantilevered bars and 'shark tooth' openings significantly changes the current flow pattern on the front of the antenna which in turn reduces the RF potential and RF electrical field in particular parallel to the magnetic field lines which contributes to generating RF sheaths. Effects of the new FS operation on RF-induced scrape-off layer (SOL) modifications are studied for different plasma and antenna configurations - scans of strap power ratio imbalance, phasing, injected power and SOL density. (authors)

  3. Diagnostics of ballistic electrons in a dc/rf hybrid capacitively coupled discharge

    Xu Lin; Chen, Lee; Funk, Merritt; Ranjan, Alok; Hummel, Mike; Bravenec, Ron; Sundararajan, Radha; Economou, Demetre J.; Donnelly, Vincent M.

    2008-01-01

    The energy distribution of ballistic electrons in a dc/rf hybrid parallel-plate capacitively coupled plasma reactor was measured. Ballistic electrons originated as secondaries produced by ion and electron bombardment of the electrodes. The energy distribution of ballistic electrons peaked at the value of the negative bias applied to the dc electrode. As that bias became more negative, the ballistic electron current on the rf substrate electrode increased dramatically. The ion current on the dc electrode also increased

  4. rf SQUID system as tunable flux qubit

    Ruggiero, B. [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy)]. E-mail: b.ruggiero@cib.na.cnr.it; Granata, C. [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Vettoliere, A. [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Rombetto, S. [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Russo, R. [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Russo, M. [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Corato, V. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Seconda Universita di Napoli, I-81031 Aversa (Italy); Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Silvestrini, P. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Seconda Universita di Napoli, I-81031 Aversa (Italy); Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy)

    2006-08-21

    We present a fully integrated rf SQUID-based system as flux qubit with a high control of the flux transfer function of the superconducting transformer modulating the coupling between the flux qubit and the readout system. The control of the system is possible by including into the superconducting flux transformer a vertical two-Josephson-junctions interferometer (VJI) in which the Josephson current is precisely modulated from a maximum to zero by a transversal magnetic field parallel to the flux transformer plane. The proposed system can be also used in a more general configuration to control the off-diagonal terms in the Hamiltonian of the flux qubit and to turn on and off the coupling between two or more qubits.

  5. Microwave and RF vacuum electronic power sources

    Carter, Richard G

    2018-01-01

    Do you design and build vacuum electron devices, or work with the systems that use them? Quickly develop a solid understanding of how these devices work with this authoritative guide, written by an author with over fifty years of experience in the field. Rigorous in its approach, it focuses on the theory and design of commercially significant types of gridded, linear-beam, crossed-field and fast-wave tubes. Essential components such as waveguides, resonators, slow-wave structures, electron guns, beams, magnets and collectors are also covered, as well as the integration and reliable operation of devices in microwave and RF systems. Complex mathematical analysis is kept to a minimum, and Mathcad worksheets supporting the book online aid understanding of key concepts and connect the theory with practice. Including coverage of primary sources and current research trends, this is essential reading for researchers, practitioners and graduate students working on vacuum electron devices.

  6. Integration of the PHIN RF Gun into the CLIC Test Facility

    Döbert, Steffen

    2006-01-01

    CERN is a collaborator within the European PHIN project, a joint research activity for Photo injectors within the CARE program. A deliverable of this project is an rf Gun equipped with high quantum efficiency Cs2Te cathodes and a laser to produce the nominal beam for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3). The nominal beam for CTF3 has an average current of 3.5 A, 1.5 GHz bunch repetition frequency and a pulse length of 1.5 ìs (2332 bunches) with quite tight stability requirements. In addition a phase shift of 180 deg is needed after each train of 140 ns for the special CLIC combination scheme. This rf Gun will be tested at CERN in fall 2006 and shall be integrated as a new injector into the CTF3 linac, replacing the existing injector consisting of a thermionic gun and a subharmonic bunching system. The paper studies the optimal integration into the machine trying to optimize transverse and longitudinal phase space of the beam while respecting the numerous constraints of the existing accelerator. The presented scheme...

  7. A two-dimensional (2D) analytical subthreshold swing and transconductance model of underlap dual-material double-gate (DMDG) MOSFET for analog/RF applications

    Narendar, Vadthiya; Rai, Saurabh; Tiwari, Siddharth; Mishra, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    The double-gate (DG) metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) are the choice of technology in sub -100 nm regime of leading microelectronics industry. To enhance the analog and RF performance of DG MOSFET, an underlap dual-material (DM) DG MOSFET device structure has been considered because, it has the advantages of both underlap as well as that of dual-material gate (DMG). A 2D analytical surface potential, subthreshold current, subthreshold swing as well as transconductance modelling of underlap DMDG MOSFET has been done by solving the Poisson's equation. It has also been found that, numerically simulated data approves the analytically modelled data with commendable accuracy. As underlap length (Lun) increases, a substantial reduction of subthreshold current due to enhanced gate control over channel regime is observed. DMG structure facilitates to improve the average velocity of carriers which leads to superior drive current of the device. The underlap DMDG MOSFET device structure demonstrates an ameliorated subthreshold characteristic. The analog figure of merits (FOMs) such as transconductance (gm), transconductance generation factor (TGF), output conductance (gd), early voltage (VEA), intrinsic gain (AV) and RF FOMs namely cut-off frequency (fT), gain frequency product (GFP), transconductance frequency product (TFP) and gain transconductance frequency product (GTFP) have been evaluated. The aforesaid analysis revels that, the device is best suited for communication related Analog/RF applications.

  8. RF-sheath assessment of ICRF antenna geometry for long pulses

    Colas, L.; Bremond, S.

    2003-01-01

    Monitoring powered ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) antennas in magnetic fusion devices has revealed localized modifications of the plasma edge in the antenna shadow, most of them probably related to an enhanced polarization of the scrape-off layer (SOL) through radio-frequency (RF) sheath rectification. Although tolerable on present short RF pulses, sheaths should be minimized, as they may hinder proper operation of steady-state antennas and other subsystems connected magnetically to them, such as lower hybrid grills. As a first step towards mitigating RF sheaths in the design of future antennas, the present paper analyses the spatial structure of sheath potential maps in their vicinity, in relation with the 3D topology of RF near fields and the geometry of antenna front faces. Various combinations of poloidal radiating straps are first considered, and results are confronted to those inferred from transmission line theory. The dependence of sheath potentials on RF voltages or RF currents is studied. The role of RF near-field symmetries along tilted field lines is stressed to interpret such effects as that of strap phasing. A generalization of the 'dipole effect' is proposed. With similar arguments, the behavior of Faraday screen corners, where hot spots concentrate on Tore-Supra (TS), is then studied. The merits of aligning the antenna structure with the tilted magnetic field are thus discussed. The effect of switching from TS (high RF voltage near corners) to ITER-like electrical configurations of the straps (high voltage near equatorial plane) is also analyzed. (authors)

  9. RF Breakdown Studies Using a 1.3 GHZ Test Cell

    Sah, R.; Johnson, R.P.; Neubauer, M.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Yonehara, K.; Byrd, J.; Li, D.; BastaniNejad, M.

    2009-01-01

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Recent studies have shown that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas without the need for long conditioning times, because the dense gas can dramatically reduce dark currents and multipacting. In this project we use this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry found in evacuated cavities to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. A 1.3-GHz RF test cell with replaceable electrodes (e.g. Mo, Cu, Be, W, and Nb) and pressure barrier capable of operating both at high pressure and in vacuum has been designed and built, and preliminary testing has been completed. A series of detailed experiments is planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. At the same time, computer simulations of the RF Breakdown process will be carried out to help develop a consistent physics model of RF Breakdown. In order to study the effect of the radiofrequency on RF Breakdown, a second test cell will be designed, fabricated, and tested at a lower frequency, most likely 402.5 MHz.

  10. Compact rf polarizer and its application to pulse compression systems

    Matthew Franzi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method of reducing the footprint and increasing the efficiency of the modern multi-MW rf pulse compressor. This system utilizes a high power rf polarizer to couple two circular waveguide modes in quadrature to a single resonant cavity in order to replicate the response of a traditional two cavity configuration using a 4-port hybrid. The 11.424 GHz, high-Q, spherical cavity has a 5.875 cm radius and is fed by the circularly polarized signal to simultaneously excite the degenerate TE_{114} modes. The overcoupled spherical cavity has a Q_{0} of 9.4×10^{4} and coupling factor (β of 7.69 thus providing a loaded quality factor Q_{L} of 1.06×10^{4} with a fill time of 150 ns. Cold tests of the polarizer demonstrated good agreement with the numerical design, showing transmission of -0.05  dB and reflection back to the input rectangular WR 90 waveguide less than -40  dB over a 100 MHz bandwidth. This novel rf pulse compressor was tested at SLAC using XL-4 Klystron that provided rf power up to 32 MW and generated peak output power of 205 MW and an average of 135 MW over the discharged signal. A general network analysis of the polarizer is discussed as well as the design and high power test of the rf pulse compressor.

  11. RF and microwave microelectronics packaging II

    Sturdivant, Rick

    2017-01-01

    Reviews RF, microwave, and microelectronics assembly process, quality control, and failure analysis Bridges the gap between low cost commercial and hi-res RF/Microwave packaging technologies Engages in an in-depth discussion of challenges in packaging and assembly of advanced high-power amplifiers This book presents the latest developments in packaging for high-frequency electronics. It is a companion volume to “RF and Microwave Microelectronics Packaging” (2010) and covers the latest developments in thermal management, electrical/RF/thermal-mechanical designs and simulations, packaging and processing methods, and other RF and microwave packaging topics. Chapters provide detailed coverage of phased arrays, T/R modules, 3D transitions, high thermal conductivity materials, carbon nanotubes and graphene advanced materials, and chip size packaging for RF MEMS. It appeals to practicing engineers in the electronic packaging and high-frequency electronics domain, and to academic researchers interested in underst...

  12. rf power dependence of subharmonic voltage spectra of two-dimensional Josephson-junction arrays

    Hebboul, S.E.; Garland, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    We have measured the rf-bias-current dependence of the ν/2 subharmonic spectral response of planar 300x300 Nb-Au-Nb proximity-coupled Josephson-junction arrays. The ν/2 subharmonic voltage spectrum was examined at two rf-bias frequencies, ν/ν c ∼1.4, 2.0 (ν c ∼120 MHz), and in applied magnetic fields corresponding to f=0,1/2 flux quantum per plaquette. The measurements were compared to analytical predictions for an rf-biased asymmetric superconducting quantum interference device with non-negligble loop inductance and large rf-bias-current amplitudes, based on the resistively shunted Josephson-junction model. Reasonable agreement was found between experiment and theory, suggesting that a possible origin for the observed subharmonic behavior in arrays involves an interplay between array plaquette inductances and junction critical-current variations

  13. On the frequency scalings of RF guns

    Lin, L.C.; Chen, S.C.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    A frequency scaling law for RF guns is derived from the normalized Vlasov-Maxwell equations. It shows that higher frequency RF guns can generate higher brightness beams under the assumption that the accelerating gradient and all beam and structure parameters are scaled with the RF frequency. Numerical simulation results using MAGIC confirm the scaling law. A discussion of the range of applicability of the law is presented. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  14. Analog techniques in CEBAF's RF control system

    Hovater, C.; Fugitt, J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in high-speed analog technology have progressed into the areas of traditional RF technology. Diode related devices are being replaced by analog IC's in the CEBAF RF control system. Complex phase modulators and attenuators have been successfully tested at 70 MHz. They have three advantages over existing technology: lower cost, less temperature sensitivity, and more linearity. RF signal conditioning components and how to implement the new analog IC's will be covered in this paper. 4 refs., 5 figs

  15. Analog techniques in CEBAF'S RF control system

    Hovater, C.; Fugitt, J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in high-speed analog technology have progressed into the areas of traditional rf technology. Diode-related devices are being replaced by analog IC's in the CEBAF rf control system. Complex phase modulators and attenuators have been successfully tested at 70 MHz. They have three advantages over existing technology: lower cost, less temperature sensitivity, and more linearity. Rf signal conditioning components and how to implement the new analog IC's will be covered in this paper. 4 refs., 5 figs

  16. Review of the Hatfield and Dawson RF assessment for Bechtel

    Kane, Ron J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-10-05

    The construction project at the Russell City Energy Center (RCEC) in Hayward, CA encountered a complication due to RF induction into the construction cranes resulting from operation of the two AM broadcast systems located immediately south of the site. The consulting firm Hatfield and Dawson was contacted by Bechtel for the assessment and mitigation of the induced currents and voltages and their recommendations were implemented by Bechtel. The staff at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was subsequently asked to review the analysis of the Hatfield and Dawson work, provide an independent assessment and offer further mitigation comments. LLNL has examined the work by Hatfield and Dawson, the numerical analyses of both agrees and correlates well with local field measurements. The mitigation efforts follow the OSHA rules and have been adapted to further reduce the possibility of worker injury through specialized training, daily task planning and specific assignments to workers to minimize exposure of all to the induced RF currents. LLNL further recommends that Bechtel formalize the RF training to provide additional value to the individual workers as well as for Bechtel to maintain documentation so that future work could make use of experienced workers. There is a possibility that the RF energy will couple into the actuator and sensors as the facility is built out. The operation of the two transmitters could introduce interference formed from the interaction of the signals in nonlinear circuit responses producing intermodulation distortion. The result is interference at unexpected frequencies, some of which can be low and not filtered out of the sensors unless specifically identified. Future testing is planned for evaluating the likelihood for RF interference issues.

  17. RF front-end world class designs

    Love, Janine

    2009-01-01

    All the design and development inspiration and direction a harware engineer needs in one blockbuster book! Janine Love site editor for RF Design Line,columnist, and author has selected the very best RF design material from the Newnes portfolio and has compiled it into this volume. The result is a book covering the gamut of RF front end design from antenna and filter design fundamentals to optimized layout techniques with a strong pragmatic emphasis. In addition to specific design techniques and practices, this book also discusses various approaches to solving RF front end design problems and h

  18. High power RF transmission line component development

    Hong, B. G.; Hwang, C. K.; Bae, Y. D.; Yoon, J. S.; Wang, S. J.; Gu, S. H.; Yang, J. R.; Hahm, Y. S.; Oh, G. S.; Lee, J. R.; Lee, W. I.; Park, S. H.; Kang, M. S.; Oh, S. H.; Lee, W.I.

    1999-12-01

    We developed the liquid stub and phase shifter which are the key high RF power transmission line components. They show reliable operation characteristics and increased insulation capability, and reduced the size by using liquid (silicon oil, dielectric constant ε=2.72) instead of gas for insulating dielectric material. They do not have finger stock for the electric contact so the local temperature rise due to irregular contact and RF breakdown due to scratch in conductor are prevented. They can be utilized in broadcasting, radar facility which require high RF power transmission. Moreover, they are key components in RF heating system for fusion reactor. (author)

  19. High power RF transmission line component development

    Hong, B. G.; Hwang, C. K.; Bae, Y. D.; Yoon, J. S.; Wang, S. J.; Gu, S. H.; Yang, J. R.; Hahm, Y. S.; Oh, G. S.; Lee, J. R.; Lee, W. I.; Park, S. H.; Kang, M. S.; Oh, S. H.; Lee, W.I

    1999-12-01

    We developed the liquid stub and phase shifter which are the key high RF power transmission line components. They show reliable operation characteristics and increased insulation capability, and reduced the size by using liquid (silicon oil, dielectric constant {epsilon}=2.72) instead of gas for insulating dielectric material. They do not have finger stock for the electric contact so the local temperature rise due to irregular contact and RF breakdown due to scratch in conductor are prevented. They can be utilized in broadcasting, radar facility which require high RF power transmission. Moreover, they are key components in RF heating system for fusion reactor. (author)

  20. On Secrecy Performance of Mixed RF-FSO Systems

    Lei, Hongjiang; Dai, Zhijun; Ansari, Imran Shafique; Park, Kihong; pan, Gaofeng; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we study the secrecy performance of a mixed radio frequency-free space optical (RF-FSO) transmission systems. All RF links experience Nakagami-m fading and the FSO link experiences the Gamma-Gamma fading. The effect of pointing error and two types of detection techniques (i.e., heterodyne detection and intensity modulation with direct detection) are considered. We derive closed-form expressions for lower bound of the secrecy outage probability (SOP) and exact average secrecy capacity (ASC). Furthermore, by utilizing the expansion of Meijer's G-function, asymptotic results for SOP and ASC are derived when the electrical signal-to-noise ratio of the FSO link tends to infinity. Numerical and Monte-Carlo simulation results are provided to verify the accuracy of our proposed results.

  1. A compact rf driven H- ion source for linac injection

    Rymer, J.P.; Engeman, G.A.; Hamm, R.W.; Potter, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    A compact rf driven H - ion source has been developed for use as an injector for the AccSys radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linacs. A multicusp magnetic bucket geometry developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory confines the plasma created by an antenna driven by 35 kW (peak) of pulsed rf power at 1.8 MHz. A three electrode system is used to extract and accelerate the H - beam, which is then focused into the RFQ by an einzel lens. Permanent magnets in the extraction region sweep electrons onto the second electrode at energies up to half of the full acceleration voltage. A fast pulsed valve allows the hydrogen gas supply to be pulsed, thus minimizing the average gas flow rate into the system. The design features and performance data from the prototype are discussed

  2. Radiofrequency radiation exposure from RF-generating plant

    Wright, J.M.; Bell, K.M.

    2000-01-01

    As part of an intervention to assist industry improve the control of risks associated with the use of RF-generating plant, exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) was assessed in 30 workplaces. Information about the workplace, work practices and knowledge about RFR and its control was also collected. The study found that: 1. For 72% of operators and 35% of bystanders, the spatially averaged exposure exceeded the exposure limits. These figures approximately halved when the duty cycle was applied; 2. Assessment of RFR levels was not common; 3. Task rotation was used to limit exposure of operators; 4. Access was not controlled to areas where RFR sources were used; 5. There was lack of knowledge about RF shielding practices in industry; 6. Nearly 50% of workplaces did not maintain the plant regularly; and 7. There had been no health surveillance on any plant operators in any of the workplaces in the study. Copyright (2000) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  3. On Secrecy Performance of Mixed RF-FSO Systems

    Lei, Hongjiang

    2017-07-05

    In this work, we study the secrecy performance of a mixed radio frequency-free space optical (RF-FSO) transmission systems. All RF links experience Nakagami-m fading and the FSO link experiences the Gamma-Gamma fading. The effect of pointing error and two types of detection techniques (i.e., heterodyne detection and intensity modulation with direct detection) are considered. We derive closed-form expressions for lower bound of the secrecy outage probability (SOP) and exact average secrecy capacity (ASC). Furthermore, by utilizing the expansion of Meijer\\'s G-function, asymptotic results for SOP and ASC are derived when the electrical signal-to-noise ratio of the FSO link tends to infinity. Numerical and Monte-Carlo simulation results are provided to verify the accuracy of our proposed results.

  4. RF Power Generation in LHC

    Brunner, O C; Valuch, D

    2003-01-01

    The counter-rotating proton beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be captured and then accelerated to their final energies of 2 x 7 TeV by two identical 400 MHz RF systems. The RF power source required for each beam comprises eight 300 kW klystrons. The output power of each klystron is fed via a circulator and a waveguide line to the input coupler of a single-cell super-conducting (SC) cavity. Four klystrons are powered by a 100 kV, 40A AC/DC power converter, previously used for the operation of the LEP klystrons. A five-gap thyratron crowbar protects the four klystrons in each of these units. The technical specification and measured performance of the various high-power elements are discussed. These include the 400MHz/300kW klystrons with emphasis on their group delay and the three-port circulators, which have to cope with peak reflected power levels up to twice the simultaneously applied incident power of 300 kW. In addition, a novel ferrite loaded waveguide absorber, used as termination for port No...

  5. SPS RF System Amplifier plant

    1977-01-01

    The picture shows a 2 MW, 200 MHz amplifier plant with feeder lines. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X.

  6. The RF system of FELI

    Morii, Y.; Miyauchi, Y.; Koga, A.; Abe, H.; Keishi, T.; Bessho, I.; Tomimasu, T.

    1994-01-01

    FELI (Free Electron Laser Research Institute, Inc.) is constructing a Free Electron Laser facility covering from 20 μm (infra red region) to 0.35 μm (ultra violet region), using an S-band linac. The building will be completed in November 1993 and installation of the linac will start in December 1993. The linac consists of a thermoionic 0.5ns-pulse triggered gun, a 714 MHz SHB (subharmonic buncher), a 2856 MHz standing wave type buncher, and 7 ETL (Electrotechnical Laboratory) type accelerating sections. An RF system of the linac for FELs is required of long pulse duration and high stability. S-band klystrons (TOSHIBA E3729) are operated in three pulse operation modes (pulse width and peak RF power); 24 μs - 24 MW, 12.5 μs - 34 MW, 0.5 μs - 70 MW. Each klystron modulator has the PFN consisting of 4 parallel networks of 24 capacitors and 24 inductors, and it has a line switch of an optical thyristor stack. These equipments are manufactured now, and an S-band klystron and modulator will be combined to test their performance at the works of NISSIN ELECTRIC Co. in October 1993. (author)

  7. Direct RF modulation transmitter, sampling clock frequency setting method for direct RF modulation transmitter

    Fukuda, Shuichi; Nauta, Bram

    2013-01-01

    PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide a direct RF modulation transmitter capable of satisfying a radiation level regulation even without providing a SAW filter. SOLUTION: A direct RF modulation transmitter includes: digital/RF converters 105, 106 to which an I digital baseband signal, a Q digital

  8. Direct RF modulation transmitter, sampling clock frequency setting method for direct RF modulation transmitter

    Fukuda, Shuichi; Nauta, Bram

    2014-01-01

    PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide a direct RF modulation transmitter capable of satisfying a radiation level regulation even without providing a SAW filter. SOLUTION: A direct RF modulation transmitter includes: digital/RF converters 105, 106 to which an I digital baseband signal, a Q digital

  9. Simulations of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell emittance compensated photocathode RF gun low energy beam line

    Palmer, D.T.; Miller, R.H.; Winick, H.

    1995-01-01

    A dedicated low energy (2 to 10 MeV) experimental beam line is now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratories Accelerator Test Facility (BNL/ATF) for photocathode RF gun testing and photoemission experiments. The design of the experimental line, using the 1.6 cell photocathode RF gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA RF gun collaboration is presented. Detailed beam dynamics simulations were performed for the 1.6 cell RF gun injector using a solenoidal emittance compensation technique. An experimental program for testing the 1.6 cell RF gun is presented. This program includes beam loading caused by dark current, higher order mode field measurements, integrated and slice emittance measurements using a pepper-pot and RF kicker cavity

  10. Cost-effective hybrid RF/FSO backhaul solution for next generation wireless systems

    Dahrouj, Hayssam

    2015-10-28

    The rapid pace of demand for mobile data services and the limited supply of capacity in the current wireless access networks infrastructure are leading network operators to increase the density of base station deployments to improve network performance. This densification, made possible by small-cell deployment, also brings a novel set of challenges, specifically related to the cost of ownership, in which backhaul is of primary concern. This article proposes a cost-effective hybrid RF/free-space optical (FSO) solution to combine the advantages of RF backhauls (low cost, NLOS applications) and FSO backhauls (high-rate, low latency). To first illustrate the cost advantages of the RF backhaul solution, the first part of this article presents a business case of NLOS wireless RF backhaul, which has a low cost of ownership as compared to other backhaul candidates. RF backhaul, however, is limited by latency problems. On the other side, an FSO solution, which offers better latency and higher data rate than RF backhauls, remains sensitive to weather and nature conditions (e.g., rain, fog). To combine RF and FSO advantages, the second part of this article proposes a lowcost hybrid RF/FSO solution, wherein base stations are connected to each other using either optical fiber or hybrid RF/FSO links. This part addresses the problem of minimizing the cost of backhaul planning under reliability, connectivity, and data rate constraints, and proposes choosing the appropriate cost-effective backhaul connection between BSs (i.e., either OF or hybrid RF/FSO) using graph theory techniques.

  11. HOM Dampers or not in Superconducting RF Proton Linacs

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Circular machines are plagued by Coupled Bunch Instabilities, driven by impedance peaks, irrespectively of their frequency relation to machine lines; hence all cavity Higher Order Modes are possible drivers. This is the fundamental reason that all superconducting RF cavities in circular machines are equipped with HOM dampers. This raises the question if HOM damping would not be imperative also in high current proton linacs where a mechanism akin to CBI might exist. To clarify this question we have simulated the longitudinal bunched beam dynamics in linacs, allowing bunch-to-bunch variations in time-of-arrival. Simulations were executed for a generic proton linac with properties close to SNS or the planned SPL at CERN. It was found that for monopole HOMs with high Qext large beam scatter or even beam loss cannot be excluded. Therefore omitting HOM dampers on superconducting RF cavities in high current proton linacs, even pulsed ones, is a very risky decision.

  12. HOM Dampers or not in SUPERCONDUCTING RF Proton Linacs

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Circular machines are plagued by Coupled Bunch Instabilities, driven by impedance peaks, irrespectively of their frequency relation to machine lines; hence all cavity Higher Order Modes are possible drivers. This is the fundamental reason that all superconducting RF cavities in circular machines are equipped with HOM dampers. This raises the question if HOM damping would not be imperative also in high current proton linacs where a mechanism akin to CBI might exist. To clarify this question we have simulated the longitudinal bunched beam dynamics in linacs, allowing bunch-to-bunch variations in time-of-arrival. Simulations were executed for a generic proton linac with properties close to SNS or the planned SPL at CERN. It was found that for monopole HOMs with high Qext large beam scatter or even beam loss cannot be excluded. Therefore omitting HOM dampers on superconducting RF cavities in high current proton linacs, even pulsed ones, is a very risky decision.

  13. Optimization of RF Compressor in the SPARX Injector

    Ronsivalle, Concetta; Ferrario, Massimo; Serafini, Luca; Spataro, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    The SPARX photoinjector consists in a rf gun injecting into three SLAC accelerating sections, the first one operating in the RF compressor configuration in order to achieve higher peak current. A systematic study based on PARMELA simulations has been done in order to optimize the parameters that influence the compression also in view of the application of this system as injector of the so called SPARXINO 3-5 nm FEL test facility. The results of computations show that peak currents at the injector exit up to kA level are achievable with a good control of the transverse and longitudinal emittance by means of a short SW section operating at 11424 MHz placed before the first accelerating section. Some working points in different compression regimes suitable for FEL experiments have been selected. The stability of these points and the sensitivity to various types of random errors are discussed.

  14. The difference between alternative averages

    James Vaupel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Demographers have long been interested in how compositional change, e.g., change in age structure, affects population averages. OBJECTIVE We want to deepen understanding of how compositional change affects population averages. RESULTS The difference between two averages of a variable, calculated using alternative weighting functions, equals the covariance between the variable and the ratio of the weighting functions, divided by the average of the ratio. We compare weighted and unweighted averages and also provide examples of use of the relationship in analyses of fertility and mortality. COMMENTS Other uses of covariances in formal demography are worth exploring.

  15. Study of luminous spots observed on metallic surfaces subjected to high RF fields

    Junquera, T.; Maissa, S.; Fouaidy, M.; Le Goff, A.; Bonin, B.; Luong, M.; Safa, H.; Tan, J.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of high gradient superconducting RF cavities for electron accelerators is mainly limited by field emission. Major improvements have been recently obtained using different surface conditioning techniques confirming the involvement of metallic particles in field emission enhancement. Results obtained with an optical apparatus attached to an RF copper cavity equipped with a removable sample which is subjected to high RF fields are presented. Stable light spots are observed on the sample surface and their intensities and optical spectra are measured as a function of the surface electric field. The total emitted current is simultaneously measured by an isolated hollow electrode facing the sample. (K.A.)

  16. OPAL: prediction of MoRF regions in intrinsically disordered protein sequences.

    Sharma, Ronesh; Raicar, Gaurav; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Patil, Ashwini; Sharma, Alok

    2018-06-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins lack stable 3-dimensional structure and play a crucial role in performing various biological functions. Key to their biological function are the molecular recognition features (MoRFs) located within long disordered regions. Computationally identifying these MoRFs from disordered protein sequences is a challenging task. In this study, we present a new MoRF predictor, OPAL, to identify MoRFs in disordered protein sequences. OPAL utilizes two independent sources of information computed using different component predictors. The scores are processed and combined using common averaging method. The first score is computed using a component MoRF predictor which utilizes composition and sequence similarity of MoRF and non-MoRF regions to detect MoRFs. The second score is calculated using half-sphere exposure (HSE), solvent accessible surface area (ASA) and backbone angle information of the disordered protein sequence, using information from the amino acid properties of flanks surrounding the MoRFs to distinguish MoRF and non-MoRF residues. OPAL is evaluated using test sets that were previously used to evaluate MoRF predictors, MoRFpred, MoRFchibi and MoRFchibi-web. The results demonstrate that OPAL outperforms all the available MoRF predictors and is the most accurate predictor available for MoRF prediction. It is available at http://www.alok-ai-lab.com/tools/opal/. ashwini@hgc.jp or alok.sharma@griffith.edu.au. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  17. On the performance of hybrid line of sight RF and RF-FSO fixed gain dual-hop transmission systems

    Zedini, Emna

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we carry out a unified performance analysis of a dual-branch transmission system composed of a direct radio-frequency (RF) link and a dual-hop fixed gain relay over the asymmetric links composed of both RF and unified free-space optics (FSO) under the effect of pointing errors. RF links are modeled by the Nakagami-m fading channel and the FSO link by the Gamma-Gamma fading channel subject to both types of detection techniques (i.e. heterodyne detection and intensity modulation with direct detection (IM/DD)). Selection combining (SC) and maximum ratio combining (MRC) diversity schemes are investigated. More specifically, for the SC method, we derive new unified closed-form expressions for the cumulative distribution function (CDF), the probability density function (PDF), the moment generating function (MGF), the moments, the outage probability (OP), the average bit-error rate (BER) of a variety of binary modulations, and the ergodic capacity for end-to-end signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Additionally, using the MGF-based approach, the evaluation of the OP, the average BER, and the ergodic capacity for the MRC diversity technique can be performed based entirely on the knowledge of the MGF of the output SNR without ever having to compute its statistics (i.e. PDF and CDF). By implementing SC or MRC diversity techniques, we demonstrate a better performance of our system relative to the traditional RF path only. Also, our analysis illustrates MRC as the optimum combing method. All the analytical results are verified via computer-based Monte-Carlo simulations.

  18. Photoemission starting of induction rf-driven multicusp ion sources

    Pickard, D.S.; Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Ponce, D.M.; Young, A.T.

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that pulsed and continuous wave, rf-driven hydrogen discharges can be started with photoemission. The extracted H - current from a photoemission-started plasma has been investigated and does not differ significantly from that of a filament-started plasma. The minimum pressure for photoemissive starting was found to be higher than that of filament starting, 17 mTorr compared to 7 mTorr, respectively, in this particular configuration. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  19. Record productions establish RF-driven sources as the standard for generating high-duty-factor, high-current H- beams for accelerators (Winner of the ICIS 2017 Brightness Award)

    Stockli, Martin P.; Welton, Robert F.; Han, Baoxi

    2018-05-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source operates reliably at 1.2 MW and will gradually ramp to 1.4 MW. This paper briefly recalls some of the struggles when the unprecedented project was started and ramped to 1 MW over a 3½ year period. This was challenging, especially for the H- ion source and the low-energy beam transport system, which make up the H- injector. It took several more years to push the H- injector to the 1.4 MW requirements, and even longer to reach close to 100% injector availability. An additional breakthrough was the carefully staged, successful extension of the H- source service cycle so that disruptive source changes became rare events. More than 7 A.h of extracted H- ions have been demonstrated with a single source without maintenance, more than twice the single-source quantity of ions produced by any other high-current H- accelerator facility. Achieving the 1.4 MW requirements with close to 100% availability and record-breaking source service cycles were the basis for the 2017 Brightness Award.

  20. The experience with JET's combined dc/Rf glow discharge cleaning (GDC) system

    Pearce, R.J.H.; Andrew, P.; Bryan, S.

    1996-01-01

    The JET Tokamak was fitted with four new electrodes of novel design, each powered from individual computer controlled dc and RF supplies. Details of enhancements and problems from 15 months experience with the system are outlined. Experiments were performed to assess the effect of RF on the glow discharge characteristics, and to establish stable glow at low pressure and high voltage. JET combined RF/dc glow discharge cleaning (GDC) had no significant advantages over pure dc GDC, provided highly stable dc current control was obtained. In fact, the mechanically weak electrode inductor spiral required to allow RF posed a distinct disadvantage. The electrodes were converted to simple plates, following damage caused by halo currents during Tokamak plasma disruptions. The performance of these electrodes was assessed. Future developments in the JET GDC system are outlined. (Author)

  1. 17th International Conference on RF Superconductivity

    Laxdal, Robert E.; Schaa, Volker R.W.

    2015-01-01

    RF superconductivity is the key technology of accelerators for particle physics, nuclear physics and light sources. SRF 2015 covered the latest advances in the science, technology, and applications of superconducting RF. There was also an industrial exhibit during the conference with the key vendors in the community available to discuss their capabilities and products.

  2. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the 70...

  3. 47 CFR 90.1335 - RF safety.

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 90.1335 Section 90.1335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1335 RF safety...

  4. 47 CFR 95.1125 - RF safety.

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 95.1125 Section 95.1125 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1125 RF safety. Portable devices...

  5. 47 CFR 27.52 - RF safety.

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 27.52 Section 27.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.52 RF safety. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to the...

  6. Bevalac injector final stage RF amplifier upgrades

    Howard, D.; Calvert, J.; Dwinell, R.; Lax, J.; Lindner, A.; Richter, R.; Ridgeway, W.

    1991-01-01

    With the assistance of the DOE In-house Energy Management Program, the Bevalac injector final stage RF amplifier systems have been successfully upgraded to reduce energy consumption and operating costs. This recently completed project removed the energy-inefficient plate voltage modulator circuits that were used in conjunction with the final stage RF amplifiers. Construction, design, and operating parameters are described in detail

  7. Plasma edge cooling during RF heating

    Suckewer, S.; Hawryluk, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    A new approach to prevent the influx of high-Z impurities into the core of a tokamak discharge by using RF power to modify the edge plasma temperature profile is presented. This concept is based on spectroscopic measurements on PLT during ohmic heating and ATC during RF heating. A one dimensional impurity transport model is used to interpret the ATC results

  8. Comparative Analysis of Carbon Plasma in Arc and RF Reactors

    Todorovic-Markovic, B.; Markovic, Z.; Mohai, I.; Szepvolgyi, J.

    2004-01-01

    Results on studies of molecular spectra emitted in the initial stages of fullerene formation during the processing of graphite powder in induction RF reactor and evaporation of graphite electrodes in arc reactor are presented in this paper. It was found that C2 radicals were dominant molecular species in both plasmas. C2 radicals have an important role in the process of fullerene synthesis. The rotational-vibrational temperatures of C2 and CN species were calculated by fitting the experimental spectra to the simulated ones. The results of optical emission study of C2 radicals generated in carbon arc plasma have shown that rotational temperature of C2 species depends on carbon concentration and current intensity significantly. The optical emission study of induction RF plasma and SEM analysis of graphite powder before and after plasma treatment have shown that evaporation of the processed graphite powder depends on feed rate and composition of gas phase significantly. Based on the obtained results, it was concluded that in the plasma region CN radicals could be formed by the reaction of C2 species with atomic nitrogen at smaller loads. At larger feed rate of graphite powder, CN species were produced by surface reaction of the hot carbon particles with nitrogen atoms. The presence of nitrogen in induction RF plasma reduces the fullerene yield significantly. The fullerene yield obtained in two different reactors was: 13% in arc reactor and 4.1% in induction RF reactor. However, the fullerene production rate was higher in induction RF reactor-6.4 g/h versus 1.7 g/h in arc reactor

  9. Exposure Metrics for RF Epidemiology: Cellular Phone Handsets (invited paper)

    Balzano, Q.

    1999-01-01

    The parameters are described that characterise the exposure of the users of cellular phones. The parameters are distinguished in two classes: the human and the cell phone parameters. Among the human parameters the following are discussed: size and shape of head and neck, manner of holding the phone (left vs. right, finger tips vs. palm contact) and phone position on the face of the user. The cell phone parameters causing the largest exposure variations are: antenna geometry (size, shape, extended or retracted) and matching conditions; operating RF power level; proximity of tissue to RF currents on metal parts, channel access method (analogue, pulsed, CDMA). The large variability of the RF exposure is further expanded by the variety (ever increasing) of phone models available to users who may change service frequently or sporadically. After a brief discussion of possible dose definitions and the uncertainty of the 'user' of a cell phone for a specific call, the paper analyses the critical exposure parameters that should be investigated to characterise statistically the RF exposure of the subjects of an epidemiological study. The improved exposure assessment of the users of cellular phones requires the cooperation of network operators and equipment manufacturers. The statistics of the most critical parameters, those with variability greater than 10:1, can be collected by modifying the software and hardware of the cell phone equipment. The paper suggests base station software modifications and the introduction of cell phone 'dosemeter' devices that record some of the critical exposure parameters. A certain number of these 'dosemeters' should be distributed among subscribers to determine the statistical variations of the RF exposure from cell phones. The paper concludes by recommending a pilot dosimetric study independent from any epidemiological study. (author)

  10. Continued development of modeling tools and theory for RF heating

    1998-01-01

    Mission Research Corporation (MRC) is pleased to present the Department of Energy (DOE) with its renewal proposal to the Continued Development of Modeling Tools and Theory for RF Heating program. The objective of the program is to continue and extend the earlier work done by the proposed principal investigator in the field of modeling (Radio Frequency) RF heating experiments in the large tokamak fusion experiments, particularly the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) device located at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). An integral part of this work is the investigation and, in some cases, resolution of theoretical issues which pertain to accurate modeling. MRC is nearing the successful completion of the specified tasks of the Continued Development of Modeling Tools and Theory for RF Heating project. The following tasks are either completed or nearing completion. (1) Anisotropic temperature and rotation upgrades; (2) Modeling for relativistic ECRH; (3) Further documentation of SHOOT and SPRUCE. As a result of the progress achieved under this project, MRC has been urged to continue this effort. Specifically, during the performance of this project two topics were identified by PPPL personnel as new applications of the existing RF modeling tools. These two topics concern (a) future fast-wave current drive experiments on the large tokamaks including TFTR and (c) the interpretation of existing and future RF probe data from TFTR. To address each of these topics requires some modification or enhancement of the existing modeling tools, and the first topic requires resolution of certain theoretical issues to produce self-consistent results. This work falls within the scope of the original project and is more suited to the project's renewal than to the initiation of a new project

  11. Progress of the ''batman'' RF source for negative hydrogen ions

    Frank, P.; Heinemann, B.; Kraus, W.; Probst, F.; Speth, E.; Vollmer, O.; Bucalossi, J.; Trainham, R.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of a collaboration between CEA Cadarache and IPP Garching is to investigate the ability of an rf source to produce negative-ion current densities compatible with ITER NBI requirements (20 mA/cm 2 D-). A standard PlNI-size rf source developed for ASDEX-Upgrade and a three-grid extraction system form the basis of BATMAN (Bavarian Test Machine for Negative Ions). In the case of a pure hydrogen plasma a current density of 5.5 mA/cm 2 at elevated pressure (2.4 Pa) can be reached. Adding small amounts of argon ( 2 . In the low pressure range (0.7 Pa) the negative ion yield is strongly reduced, but with an admixture of argon and a cesium injection the current density is higher approx. by a factor 8 (4 mA/cm 2 ) compared to the pure hydrogen discharge. The negative ion yield shows a saturation with increasing rf power. (author)

  12. Industrial Applications of High Average Power FELS

    Shinn, Michelle D

    2005-01-01

    The use of lasers for material processing continues to expand, and the annual sales of such lasers exceeds $1 B (US). Large scale (many m2) processing of materials require the economical production of laser powers of the tens of kilowatts, and therefore are not yet commercial processes, although they have been demonstrated. The development of FELs based on superconducting RF (SRF) linac technology provides a scaleable path to laser outputs above 50 kW in the IR, rendering these applications economically viable, since the cost/photon drops as the output power increases. This approach also enables high average power ~ 1 kW output in the UV spectrum. Such FELs will provide quasi-cw (PRFs in the tens of MHz), of ultrafast (pulsewidth ~ 1 ps) output with very high beam quality. This talk will provide an overview of applications tests by our facility's users such as pulsed laser deposition, laser ablation, and laser surface modification, as well as present plans that will be tested with our upgraded FELs. These upg...

  13. Tunable Q-Factor RF Cavity

    Balcazar, Mario D. [Fermilab; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Kazakevitch, Gregory [Fermilab

    2018-01-01

    Intense neutrino beam is a unique probe for researching beyond the standard model. Fermilab is the main institution to produce the most powerful and widespectrum neutrino beam. From that respective, a radiation robust beam diagnostic system is a critical element in order to maintain the quality of the neutrino beam. Within this context, a novel radiation-resistive beam profile monitor based on a gasfilled RF cavity is proposed. The goal of this measurement is to study a tunable Qfactor RF cavity to determine the accuracy of the RF signal as a function of the quality factor. Specifically, measurement error of the Q-factor in the RF calibration is investigated. Then, the RF system will be improved to minimize signal error.

  14. RF power generation for future linear colliders

    Fowkes, W.R.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Farkas, Z.D.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Koontz, R.F.; Kroll, N.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Miller, R.H.; Pearson, C.; Spalek, G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    The next linear collider will require 200 MW of rf power per meter of linac structure at relatively high frequency to produce an accelerating gradient of about 100 MV/m. The higher frequencies result in a higher breakdown threshold in the accelerating structure hence permit higher accelerating gradients per meter of linac. The lower frequencies have the advantage that high peak power rf sources can be realized. 11.42 GHz appears to be a good compromise and the effort at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is being concentrated on rf sources operating at this frequency. The filling time of the accelerating structure for each rf feed is expected to be about 80 ns. Under serious consideration at SLAC is a conventional klystron followed by a multistage rf pulse compression system, and the Crossed-Field Amplifier. These are discussed in this paper

  15. Electron runaway in rf discharges

    Chen, F.F.

    1992-10-01

    The critical electric field is computed as a function of pressure and starting energy for electrons to run away to high energies in moderate pressure discharges. The runaway conditions depend critically on the shape of the elastic cross section vs. energy curve. Computations are made for H, H 2 , and He gases, and it is shown that runaway occurs much more readily in atomic hydrogen than in the other gases. The values of the runaway fields are larger than would normally occur in dc discharges, where large voltages would lead to arc formation. However, in rf discharges such electric fields can be sustained over times long compared to electron transit times but short compared to ion transit times. (author)

  16. Design of rf conditioner cavities

    Govil, R.; Rimmer, R.A.; Sessler, A.; Kirk, H.G.

    1992-06-01

    Theoretical studies are made of radio frequency structures which can be used to condition electron beams so as to greatly reduce the stringent emittance requirements for successful lasing in a free-electron laser. The basic strategy of conditioning calls for modulating an electron beam in the transverse dimension, by a periodic focusing channel, while it traverses a series of rf cavities, each operating in a TM 210 mode. In this paper, we analyze the cavities both analytically and numerically (using MAFIA simulations). We find that when cylindrical symmetry is broken the coupling impedance can be greatly enhanced. We present results showing various performance characteristics as a function of cavity parameters, as well as possible designs for conditioning cavities

  17. Femtosecond precision measurement of laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun

    Shi, Libing; Zhao, Lingrong; Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao

    2017-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun with femtosecond precision. In this experiment four laser pulses with equal separation are used to produce electron bunch trains; then the laser–rf phase jitter is obtained by measuring the variations of the electron bunch spacing with an rf deflector. Furthermore, we show that when the gun and the deflector are powered by the same rf source, it is possible to obtain the laser–rf phase jitter in the gun through measurement of the beam–rf phase jitter in the deflector. Based on these measurements, we propose an effective time-stamping method that may be applied in MeV ultrafast electron diffraction facilities to enhance the temporal resolution.

  18. Femtosecond precision measurement of laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun

    Shi, Libing; Zhao, Lingrong; Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao, E-mail: dxiang@sjtu.edu.cn

    2017-03-21

    We report on the measurement of the laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun with femtosecond precision. In this experiment four laser pulses with equal separation are used to produce electron bunch trains; then the laser–rf phase jitter is obtained by measuring the variations of the electron bunch spacing with an rf deflector. Furthermore, we show that when the gun and the deflector are powered by the same rf source, it is possible to obtain the laser–rf phase jitter in the gun through measurement of the beam–rf phase jitter in the deflector. Based on these measurements, we propose an effective time-stamping method that may be applied in MeV ultrafast electron diffraction facilities to enhance the temporal resolution.

  19. Non-insulated smooth motion, micro-needles RF fractional treatment for wrinkle reduction and lifting of the lower face: International study.

    Gold, Michael; Taylor, Mark; Rothaus, Kenneth; Tanaka, Yohei

    2016-10-01

    Skin aging occurs through both intrinsic and extrinsic processes. Fractional radiofrequency (RF) with a microneedling array is the newest form of fractional therapy to be useful in treating aging skin. The current study utilized a noninsulated fractional RF microneedling system. This multicenter clinical trial saw 49 patients complete 3 monthly treatments with the new fractional RF microneedling treatments and be followed for 3 months following their last treatment. Pain during treatment was recorded as well as overall improvement using a GAIS scale. Adverse events were also noted. Forty-nine patients completed all of the treatments and follow-ups. Mild to moderate erythema were reported immediately after treatment which lasted up to 12 hours after the treatment. Pain, as measured on a 1-10 VAS, was noted to 4, on average. The average Fitzpatrick's wrinkle scale score at baseline was 5.04 ± 1.22, 1 month after 3 treatments 3.829 ± 1.69 and 3 months after 3 treatments 3.5 ± 1.66. These results are statistically highly significant (correlated T-test, P skin tightening and skin lifting were also observed. No unusual adverse events were noted throughout the course of the study. This multicenter study showed significant wrinkle reduction, skin tightening, and lifting of the mid and lower face with the noninsulated fractional RF microneedling system. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:727-733, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Experimental investigation of heating phenomena in linac mechanical interfaces due to RF field penetration

    Fazio, M.V.; Reid, D.W.; Potter, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    In a high duty-factor, high-current, drift-tube linear accelerator, a critical interface exists between the drift-tube stem and the tank wall. This interface must provide vacuum integrity and RF continuity, while simultaneously allowing alignment flexibility. Because of past difficulties with RF heating of vacuum bellows and RF joints encountered by others, a paucity of available information, and the high reliability requirement for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) accelerator, a program was initiated to study the problem. Because RF heating is the common failure mode, an attempt was made to find a correlation between the drift-tube-stem/linac-tank interface geometry and RF field penetration from the tank into the interface region. Experiments were performed at 80 MHz on an RF structure designed to simulate the conditions to which a drift-tube stem and vacuum bellows are exposed in a drift-tube linac. Additional testing was performed on a 367-MHz model of the FMIT prototype drift-tube linac. Experimental results, and a method to predict excessive RF heating, is presented. An experimentally tested solution to the problem is discussed

  1. Convex optimization of MRI exposure for mitigation of RF-heating from active medical implants

    Córcoles, Juan; Zastrow, Earl; Kuster, Niels

    2015-09-01

    Local RF-heating of elongated medical implants during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may pose a significant health risk to patients. The actual patient risk depends on various parameters including RF magnetic field strength and frequency, MR coil design, patient’s anatomy, posture, and imaging position, implant location, RF coupling efficiency of the implant, and the bio-physiological responses associated with the induced local heating. We present three constrained convex optimization strategies that incorporate the implant’s RF-heating characteristics, for the reduction of local heating of medical implants during MRI. The study emphasizes the complementary performances of the different formulations. The analysis demonstrates that RF-induced heating of elongated metallic medical implants can be carefully controlled and balanced against MRI quality. A reduction of heating of up to 25 dB can be achieved at the cost of reduced uniformity in the magnitude of the B1+ field of less than 5%. The current formulations incorporate a priori knowledge of clinically-specific parameters, which is assumed to be available. Before these techniques can be applied practically in the broader clinical context, further investigations are needed to determine whether reduced access to a priori knowledge regarding, e.g. the patient’s anatomy, implant routing, RF-transmitter, and RF-implant coupling, can be accepted within reasonable levels of uncertainty.

  2. RF power source for the compact linear collider test facility (CTF3)

    McMonagle, G; Brown, Peter; Carron, G; Hanni, R; Mourier, J; Rossat, G; Syratchev, I V; Tanner, L; Thorndahl, L

    2004-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility will test and demonstrate many vital components of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider). This paper describes the pulsed RF power source at 2998.55 MHz for the drive-beam accelerator (DBA), which produces a beam with an energy of 150 MeV and a current of 3.5 Amps. Where possible, existing equipment from the LEP preinjector, especially the modulators and klystrons, is being used and upgraded to achieve this goal. A high power RF pulse compression system is used at the output of each klystron, which requires sophisticated RF phase programming on the low level side to achieve the required RF pulse. In addition to the 3 GHz system two pulsed RF sources operating at 1.5 GHz are being built. The first is a wide-band, low power, travelling wave tube (TWT) for the subharmonic buncher (SHB) system that produces a train of "phase coded" subpulses as part of the injector scheme. The second is a high power narrow band system to produce 20 MW RF power to the 1.5 GHz RF deflectors in the delay loop situate...

  3. RF compensation of single Langmuir probe in low density helicon plasma

    Ghosh, Soumen, E-mail: soumen@ipr.res.in; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K.; Ghosh, Joydeep; Bora, Dhiraj

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Appropriate density and temperature measurement with Langmuir probe in RF Eenvironment. • Necessity of large auxiliary electrode for RF compensation at low densities (∼10{sup 16} m{sup −3}). • Measured two temperature electrons in low pressure helicon antenna produced RF plasma. • Tail electrons are localized only at off-axis in our cylindrical plasma system. - Abstract: Interpretations of Single Langmuir probe measurements in electrode-less radio frequency (RF) plasmas are noteworthy tricky and require adequate compensation of RF. Conventional RF compensation technique is limited only at high density (>10{sup 17} m{sup −3}) RF plasmas. RF compensation of single Langmuir probe at low density RF plasmas (∼10{sup 16} m{sup −3}) is presented in this paper. In RF driven plasmas, where the RF voltage is high (∼50 V) and density is in the range (∼10{sup 16} m{sup −3}), the primary RF compensation condition (Z{sub ck} > >Z{sub sh}) is very difficult to fulfill, because of high sheath impedance (Z{sub sh}) at 13.56 MHz and the construction limitation of a self-resonant tiny chock (Z{sub ck}) with very high impedance. Introducing a large auxiliary electrode (A{sub x}), (A{sub x} >>> A{sub p}), close to the small Langmuir probe (A{sub p}) tip, connected in parallel with probe via a coupling capacitor (C{sub cp}), significantly reduces the effective sheath impedance (Z{sub sh}) and allows probe bias to follow the RF oscillation. Dimensional requirements of the auxiliary electrode and the role of suitable coupling capacitor are discussed in this paper. Observations show proper compensation leads to estimation of more positive floating potentials and lower electron temperatures compared to uncompensated probe. The electron energy probability function (EEPF) is also obtained by double differentiating the collected current with respect to the applied bias voltage using an active analog circuit.

  4. A survey of the urban radiofrequency (RF) environment

    Tell, Richard A.; Kavet, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In 1980, Tell and Mantiply published a study of radiofrequency (RF) fields measured across 15 major metropolitan areas in the USA. They required a van fully equipped with instrumentation and computing capability for their measurements. This study aimed to assess whether and how hand-held instrumentation available today would facilitate and enhance the efficiency of large-scale surveys of ambient RF fields. In addition, the data would provide a suggestion as to how the profile of ambient RF fields has changed with respect to frequency content and magnitude. Not unexpectedly, the relative power densities were orders of magnitude lower than the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) maximum permissible exposure (MPE) for the general public, with a maximum time-averaged value across the VHF-FM-UHF-cellular bands of 0.12 % of the MPE (AM's contribution was negligible). In both the 1980 and the present study, the power density in the FM band was a major contributor to overall power density, but over time, power densities in the VHF and UHF band decreased and increased, respectively. From the perspective of absolute power density, the wideband values in the 1980 study, this study and any number of assessments conducted in European nations are not generally different from one another. (authors)

  5. Langmuir probe studies on a RF ion source for NBI

    McNeely, P.; Heineman, B.; Kraus, W.; Riedl, R.; Speth, E.; Vollmer, O.

    2001-01-01

    IPP Garching has been developing a RF ion source for H - production. In order to improve the data quality a new scanning probe system with passive RF compensation has been installed on the Type VI ion source on the BATMAN test stand. Using this probe, measurements have been carried out to study changes to the plasma parameters (electron density, electron temperature, and plasma potential) due to variation in the source operating conditions. The data were collected at a source pressure of 0.5 Pa and with 60±5 kW applied RF power. Presented are some of the results of these measurements, focusing on the effect of: argon seeding, addition of Cs to the source, and the newly added Faraday screen. The electron density behaves in a fashion that agrees with the theory of ambipolar diffusion. Typically there is little change to the average electron energy observed regardless of which effect is considered. The plasma potential shows the most significant changes with external source conditions, both in value for all cases and shape when the Faraday screen was added

  6. Simple Theory of Thermal Fatigue Caused by RF Pulse Heating

    Kuzikov, S

    2004-01-01

    The projects of electron-positron linear colliders imply that accelerating structures and other RF components will undergo action of extremely high RF fields. Except for breakdown threat there is an effect of the damage due to multi-pulse mechanical stress caused by Ohmic heating of the skin layer. A new theory of the thermal fatigue is considered. The theory is based on consideration of the quasi-elastic interaction between neighbor grains of metal due to the expansion of the thermal skin-layer. The developed theory predicts a total number of the RF pulses needed for surface degradation in dependence on temperature rise, pulse duration, and average temperature. The unknown coefficients in the final formula were found, using experimental data obtained at 11.4 GHz for the copper. In order to study the thermal fatigue at higher frequencies and to compare experimental and theoretical results, the experimental investigation of degradation of the copper cavity exposed to 30 GHz radiation is carried out now, basing...

  7. EXCESS RF POWER REQUIRED FOR RF CONTROL OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) LINAC, A PULSED HIGH-INTENSITY SUPERCONDUCTING PROTON ACCELERATOR

    Lynch, M.; Kwon, S.

    2001-01-01

    A high-intensity proton linac, such as that being planned for the SNS, requires accurate RF control of cavity fields for the entire pulse in order to avoid beam spill. The current design requirement for the SNS is RF field stability within ±0.5% and ±0.5 o [1]. This RF control capability is achieved by the control electronics using the excess RF power to correct disturbances. To minimize the initial capital costs, the RF system is designed with 'just enough' RF power. All the usual disturbances exist, such as beam noise, klystron/HVPS noise, coupler imperfections, transport losses, turn-on and turn-off transients, etc. As a superconducting linac, there are added disturbances of large magnitude, including Lorentz detuning and microphonics. The effects of these disturbances and the power required to correct them are estimated, and the result shows that the highest power systems in the SNS have just enough margin, with little or no excess margin

  8. Association of acute adverse effects with high local SAR induced in the brain from prolonged RF head and neck hyperthermia

    Adibzadeh, F; Verhaart, R F; Rijnen, Z; Franckena, M; Van Rhoon, G C; Paulides, M M; Verduijn, G M; Fortunati, V

    2015-01-01

    To provide an adequate level of protection for humans from exposure to radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) and to assure that any adverse health effects are avoided. The basic restrictions in terms of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) were prescribed by IEEE and ICNIRP. An example of a therapeutic application of non-ionizing EMF is hyperthermia (HT), in which intense RF energy is focused at a target region. Deep HT in the head and neck (H and N) region involves inducing energy at 434 MHz for 60 min on target. Still, stray exposure of the brain is considerable, but to date only very limited side-effects were observed. The objective of this study is to investigate the stringency of the current basic restrictions by relating the induced EM dose in the brain of patients treated with deep head and neck (H and N) HT to the scored acute health effects. We performed a simulation study to calculate the induced peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (psSAR 10g ) in the brains of 16 selected H and N patients who received the highest SAR exposure in the brain, i.e. who had the minimum brain-target distance and received high forwarded power during treatment. The results show that the maximum induced SAR in the brain of the patients can exceed the current basic restrictions (IEEE and ICNIRP) on psSAR 10g for occupational environments by 14 times. Even considering the high local SAR in the brain, evaluation of acute effects by the common toxicity criteria (CTC) scores revealed no indication of a serious acute neurological effect. In addition, this study provides pioneering quantitative human data on the association between maximum brain SAR level and acute adverse effects when brains are exposed to prolonged RF EMF. (paper)

  9. Status of Tristan superconducting RF program

    Noguchi, S.; Akai, K.; Arinaga, M.

    1988-01-01

    The TRISTAN accelerator complex consists of an injector linac system, an accumulation ring (AR) and a main colliding beam ring (MR). The injector linac system is composed of a 2.5 GeV main linac, a 200 MeV high current (10 A) linac for positron generation and a 250 MeV positron preaccelerator. These linacs are now operated with a pulse width of 2 nsec and a repetition rate of 20 pps, which is raised to 50 pps in the near future. The TRISTAN AR is used as a beam accumulator and energy booster for the TRISTAN MR, and additionally it can be operated as an electron-positron collider and as a storage ring for the synchrotron radiation research. The electron (positron) beam of 50 mA (10 mA) peak current is injected from the main linac. The accumulation rate of positrons is now typically 5 mA/min. There are 8 RF cavity sections in two long straight sections, of which 6 sections are occupied by 11 cell APS cavities and 2 sections are used for the beam test of the superconducting cavities. The TRISTAN MR was designed so that it could achieve as high energy as possible for its size, therefore it has very long straight sections for RF cavities. The normal conducting cavities, which are 9-cell APS type and have a shunt impedance of 22.5 M Omega/m, are distributed to 3 straight sections. The remaining straight section named NIKKO division, is allotted to the superconducting cavities. MR accelerated the first electron beam to 25.5 GeV on 24th of October 1986. The energy upgrading program was approved in 1986 and the construction of 32 5-cell superconducting cavities and a 4.5 KW helium refrigerator system started. It is expected that the accelerating field and the Q value are better than 5 MV/m and 1 x 10 9 , respectively. 8 references, 13 figures, 4 tables

  10. A large-area RF source for negative hydrogen ions

    Frank, P.; Feist, J. H.; Kraus, W.; Speth, E.; Heinemann, B.; Probst, F.; Trainham, R.; Jacquot, C.

    1998-01-01

    In a collaboration with CEA Cadarache, IPP is presently developing an rf source, in which the production of negative ions (H - /D - ) is being investigated. It utilizes PINI-size rf sources with an external antenna and for the first step a small size extraction system with 48 cm 2 net extraction area. First results from BATMAN (Bavarian T lowbar est Machine for N lowbar egative Ions) show (without Cs) a linear dependence of the negative ion yield with rf power, without any sign of saturation. At elevated pressure (1.6 Pa) a current density of 4.5 mA/cm 2 H - (without Cs) has been found so far. At medium pressure (0.6 Pa) the current density is lower by approx. a factor of 5, but preliminary results with Cesium injection show a relative increase by almost the same factor in this pressure range. Langmuir probe measurements indicate an electron temperature T e >2 eV close to the plasma grid with a moderate magnetic filter (700 Gcm). Attempts to improve the performance by using different magnetic configurations and different wall materials are under way

  11. Revisiting the Anomalous rf Field Penetration into a Warm Plasma

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Polomarov, Oleg V.; Theodosiou, Constantine E.

    2005-01-01

    Radio-frequency [rf] waves do not penetrate into a plasma and are damped within it. The electric field of the wave and plasma current are concentrated near the plasma boundary in a skin layer. Electrons can transport the plasma current away from the skin layer due to their thermal motion. As a result, the width of the skin layer increases when electron temperature effects are taken into account. This phenomenon is called anomalous skin effect. The anomalous penetration of the rf electric field occurs not only for transversely propagating to the plasma boundary wave (inductively coupled plasmas) but also for the wave propagating along the plasma boundary (capacitively coupled plasmas). Such anomalous penetration of the rf field modifies the structure of the capacitive sheath. Recent advances in the nonlinear, non-local theory of the capacitive sheath are reported. It is shown that separating the electric field profile into exponential and non-exponential parts yields an efficient qualitative and quantitative description of the anomalous skin effect in both inductively and capacitively coupled plasma

  12. RF sheaths for arbitrary B field angles

    D'Ippolito, Daniel; Myra, James

    2014-10-01

    RF sheaths occur in tokamaks when ICRF waves encounter conducting boundaries and accelerate electrons out of the plasma. Sheath effects reduce the efficiency of ICRF heating, cause RF-specific impurity influxes from the edge plasma, and increase the plasma-facing component damage. The rf sheath potential is sensitive to the angle between the B field and the wall, the ion mobility and the ion magnetization. Here, we obtain a numerical solution of the non-neutral rf sheath and magnetic pre-sheath equations (for arbitrary values of these parameters) and attempt to infer the parametric dependences of the Child-Langmuir law. This extends previous work on the magnetized, immobile ion regime. An important question is how the rf sheath voltage distributes itself between sheath and pre-sheath for various B field angles. This will show how generally previous estimates of the rf sheath voltage and capacitance were reasonable, and to improve the RF sheath BC. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FC02-05ER54823 and DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  13. Design of RF Systems for the RTD Mission VASIMR

    Baity, F.W.; Barber, G.C.; Carter, M.D.; Chang-Diaz, F.R.; Goulding, R.H.; McCaskill, G.E.; Sparks, D.O.; Squire, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The first flight test of the variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket (VASIMR) is tentatively scheduled for the Radiation and Technology Demonstration (RTD) in 2003. This mission to map the radiation environment out to several earth radii will employ both a Hall thruster and a VASIMR during its six months duration, beginning from low earth orbit. The mission will be powered by a solar array providing 12 kW of direct current electricity at 50 V. The VASIMR utilizes radiofrequency (RF) power both to generate a high-density plasma in a helicon source and to accelerate the plasma ions to high velocity by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). The VASIMR concept is being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in collaboration with national laboratories and universities. Prototype plasma sources, RF amplifiers, and antennas are being developed in the experimental facilities of the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL)

  14. Numerical simulation of the RF ion source RIG-10

    Arzt, T.

    1988-01-01

    A two-dimensional model for the numerical simulation of the inductively coupled radio-frequency (RF) ion source RIG-10 is presented. Due to the ambipolar characteristics of a discharge operating with hydrogen gas, the model consists of an equation for the space charge imbalance, Poisson's equation for the self-consistent presheath potential and the ion momentum transport equation. For a relatively broad range of operation and design parameters, the model allows the reproduction and prediction of the RF discharge behaviour in a systematic way and, hence, computes the 2D distribution of the ion current density within the source. By implementing relevant discharge physics, the model can provide an appropriate tool for ion source design with respect to an application in the field of neutral beam injection. (author)

  15. Low Level RF Control System of J-PARC Synchrotrons

    Tamura, Fumihiko; Ezura, Eizi; Hara, Keigo; Nomura, Masahiro; Ohmori, Chihiro; Schnase, Alexander; Takagi, Akira; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Yoshii, Masahito

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept and the design of the low level RF (LLRF) control system of the J-PARC synchrotrons. The J-PARC synchrotrons are the rapid cycling 3-GeV synchrotron (RCS) and the 50-GeV main ring (MR) which require very precise and stable LLRF control systems to accelerate the ultra-high proton beam current. The LLRF system of the synchrotron is a full-digital system based on the direct digital synthesis (DDS). The functions of the system are (1) the multi-harmonic RF generation for the acceleration and the longitudinal bunch shaping, (2) the feedbacks for stabilizing the beam, (3) the feedforward for compensating the heavy beam loading, and (4) other miscellaneous functions such as the synchronization and chopper timing. The LLRF system of the RCS is now under construction. We present the details of the system. Also, we show preliminary results of performance tests of the control modules.

  16. RF Plasma modeling of the Linac4 H− ion source

    Mattei, S; Hatayama, A; Lettry, J; Kawamura, Y; Yasumoto, M; Schmitzer, C

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the modelling of the ICP RF-plasma in the Linac4 H− ion source currently being constructed at CERN. A self-consistent model of the plasma dynamics with the RF electromagnetic field has been developed by a PIC-MCC method. In this paper, the model is applied to the analysis of a low density plasma discharge initiation, with particular interest on the effect of the external magnetic field on the plasma properties, such as wall loss, electron density and electron energy. The use of a multi-cusp magnetic field effectively limits the wall losses, particularly in the radial direction. Preliminary results however indicate that a reduced heating efficiency results in such a configuration. The effect is possibly due to trapping of electrons in the multi-cusp magnetic field, preventing their continuous acceleration in the azimuthal direction.

  17. RF emittance in a low energy electron linear accelerator

    Sanaye Hajari, Sh.; Haghtalab, S.; Shaker, H.; Kelisani, M. Dayyani

    2018-04-01

    Transverse beam dynamics of an 8 MeV low current (10 mA) S-band traveling wave electron linear accelerator has been studied and optimized. The main issue is to limit the beam emittance, mainly induced by the transverse RF forces. The linac is being constructed at Institute for Research in Fundamental Science (IPM), Tehran Iran Labeled as Iran's First Linac, nearly all components of this accelerator are designed and constructed within the country. This paper discusses the RF coupler induced field asymmetry and the corresponding emittance at different focusing levels, introduces a detailed beam dynamics design of a solenoid focusing channel aiming to reduce the emittance growth and studies the solenoid misalignment tolerances. In addition it has been demonstrated that a prebuncher cavity with appropriate parameters can help improving the beam quality in the transverse plane.

  18. Recent development on RF-driven multicusp H- ion sources

    Leung, K.N.; De Vries, G.J.; Kunkel, W.B.; Perkins, L.T.; Pickard, D.S.; Saadatmand, K.; Wengrow, A.B.; Williams, M.D.

    1996-06-01

    The radio-frequency (rf) driven multicusp source was originally developed for use in the Superconducting Super Collider injector. The source routinely provided 35 keV, 30 mA of beam at 0.1% duty factor. By using a new cesium dispensing system, beam current in excess of 100 mA and e/H - ∼1 have been observed. For pulse mode operation, the rf discharge can be started by means of a xenon flash lamp. Extracted electrons in the beam can be efficiently removed by employing a permanent magnet insert structure. Chopping of the H - beam can be accomplished by applying a pulsed positive voltage on the plasma electrode

  19. Design and Calibration of an RF Actuator for Low-Level RF Systems

    Geng, Zheqiao; Hong, Bo

    2016-02-01

    X-ray free electron laser (FEL) machines like the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC require high-quality electron beams to generate X-ray lasers for various experiments. Digital low-level RF (LLRF) systems are widely used to control the high-power RF klystrons to provide a highly stable RF field in accelerator structures for beam acceleration. Feedback and feedforward controllers are implemented in LLRF systems to stabilize or adjust the phase and amplitude of the RF field. To achieve the RF stability and the accuracy of the phase and amplitude adjustment, low-noise and highly linear RF actuators are required. Aiming for the upgrade of the S-band Linac at SLAC, an RF actuator is designed with an I/Qmodulator driven by two digital-to-analog converters (DAC) for the digital LLRF systems. A direct upconversion scheme is selected for RF actuation, and an on-line calibration algorithm is developed to compensate the RF reference leakage and the imbalance errors in the I/Q modulator, which may cause significant phase and amplitude actuation errors. This paper presents the requirements on the RF actuator, the design of the hardware, the calibration algorithm, and the implementation in firmware and software and the test results at LCLS.

  20. How to average logarithmic retrievals?

    B. Funke

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Calculation of mean trace gas contributions from profiles obtained by retrievals of the logarithm of the abundance rather than retrievals of the abundance itself are prone to biases. By means of a system simulator, biases of linear versus logarithmic averaging were evaluated for both maximum likelihood and maximum a priori retrievals, for various signal to noise ratios and atmospheric variabilities. These biases can easily reach ten percent or more. As a rule of thumb we found for maximum likelihood retrievals that linear averaging better represents the true mean value in cases of large local natural variability and high signal to noise ratios, while for small local natural variability logarithmic averaging often is superior. In the case of maximum a posteriori retrievals, the mean is dominated by the a priori information used in the retrievals and the method of averaging is of minor concern. For larger natural variabilities, the appropriateness of the one or the other method of averaging depends on the particular case because the various biasing mechanisms partly compensate in an unpredictable manner. This complication arises mainly because of the fact that in logarithmic retrievals the weight of the prior information depends on abundance of the gas itself. No simple rule was found on which kind of averaging is superior, and instead of suggesting simple recipes we cannot do much more than to create awareness of the traps related with averaging of mixing ratios obtained from logarithmic retrievals.

  1. RF Control System Upgrade at CAMD

    Suller, Victor P; Jines, Paul; Launey, Daren

    2005-01-01

    A description is given of the new control system for the RF system of the CAMD light source. The new design being implemented brings all RF signals into the data acquisition system via a modular, custom made, RF detector and renders the amplitude and tune control loops in the VME computer. On line calculations ensure monitoring of proper operation and display the information to the user in an efficient way. In addition, an advanced load impedance monitoring diagnostic has been implemented, being displayed as a Smith Chart, which is based on the system used at the SRS in Daresbury, England.

  2. Multi-level RF identification system

    Steele, Kerry D.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2004-07-20

    A radio frequency identification system having a radio frequency transceiver for generating a continuous wave RF interrogation signal that impinges upon an RF identification tag. An oscillation circuit in the RF identification tag modulates the interrogation signal with a subcarrier of a predetermined frequency and modulates the frequency-modulated signal back to the transmitting interrogator. The interrogator recovers and analyzes the subcarrier signal and determines its frequency. The interrogator generates an output indicative of the frequency of the subcarrier frequency, thereby identifying the responding RFID tag as one of a "class" of RFID tags configured to respond with a subcarrier signal of a predetermined frequency.

  3. RF engineering basic concepts: S-parameters

    Caspers, F

    2011-01-01

    The concept of describing RF circuits in terms of waves is discussed and the S-matrix and related matrices are defined. The signal flow graph (SFG) is introduced as a graphical means to visualize how waves propagate in an RF network. The properties of the most relevant passive RF devices (hybrids, couplers, non-reciprocal elements, etc.) are delineated and the corresponding S-parameters are given. For microwave integrated circuits (MICs) planar transmission lines such as the microstrip line have become very important.

  4. rf coupler technology for fusion applications

    Hoffman, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Radio frequency (rf) oscillations at critical frequencies have successfully provided a means to convey power to fusion plasmas due to the electrical-magnetic properties of the plasma. While large rf systems to couple power to the plasma have been designed, built, and tested, the main link to the plasma, the coupler, is still in an evolutionary stage of development. Design and fabrication of optimal antennas for fusion applications are complicated by incomplete characterizations of the harsh plasma environment and of coupling mechanisms. A brief description of rf coupler technology required for plasma conditions is presented along with an assessment of the status and goals of coupler development

  5. Practical guide to RF-MEMS

    Iannacci, Jacopo

    2013-01-01

    Closes the gap between hardcore-theoretical and purely experimental RF-MEMS books. The book covers, from a practical viewpoint, the most critical steps that have to be taken in order to develop novel RF-MEMS device concepts. Prototypical RF-MEMS devices, both including lumped components and complex networks, are presented at the beginning of the book as reference examples, and these are then discussed from different perspectives with regard to design, simulation, packaging, testing, and post-fabrication modeling. Theoretical concepts are introduced when necessary to complement the practical

  6. Longitudinal beam dynamics with rf noise

    Shih, H.J.; Ellison, J.A.; Cogburn, R.; Newberger, B.S.

    1993-06-01

    The Dome-Krinsky-Wang (DKW) diffusion-inaction theory for rf-noise-induced emittance dilution is reviewed and related to recent work on the approximation of stochastic processes by Markov processes. An accurate and efficient numerical procedure is developed to integrate the diffusion equation of the DKW theory. Tracking simulations are undertaken to check the validity of the theory in the parameter range of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and to provide additional information. The study of effects of rf noise is applied to two problems of interest at the SSC: (1) determination of noise tolerance levels in the rf system, and (2) feasibility of beam extraction using crystal channeling

  7. Lagrangian averaging with geodesic mean.

    Oliver, Marcel

    2017-11-01

    This paper revisits the derivation of the Lagrangian averaged Euler (LAE), or Euler- α equations in the light of an intrinsic definition of the averaged flow map as the geodesic mean on the volume-preserving diffeomorphism group. Under the additional assumption that first-order fluctuations are statistically isotropic and transported by the mean flow as a vector field, averaging of the kinetic energy Lagrangian of an ideal fluid yields the LAE Lagrangian. The derivation presented here assumes a Euclidean spatial domain without boundaries.

  8. Expanding Current Research Capabilities for Investigating RF/Microwave Bioeffects

    Chatterjee, Indira

    2004-01-01

    ...) signal generator, a high power broadband amplifier, a broadband horn antenna, high power cables, and a high-end computer that is interfaced with the signal generator and amplifier via a LabVIEW program...

  9. RF-MEMS for high-performance and widely reconfigurable passive components – A review with focus on future telecommunications, Internet of Things (IoT and 5G applications

    Jacopo Iannacci

    2017-10-01

    This work frames the current state of RF-MEMS market exploitation, analysing the main reasons impairing in past years the proper employment of Microsystem technology based RF passive components. Moreover, highlights on further expansion of RF-MEMS solutions in mobile and telecommunication systems will be briefly provided and discussed.

  10. Look at energy compression as an assist for high power rf production

    Birx, D.L.; Farkas, Z.D.; Wilson, P.B.

    1984-01-01

    The desire to construct electron linacs of higher and higher energies, coupled with the realities of available funding and real estate, has forced machine designers to reassess the limitations in both accelerator gradient (MeV/m) and energy. The gradients achieved in current radio-frequency (RF) linacs are sometimes set by electrical breakdown in the accelerating structure, but are in most cases determined by the RF power level available to drive the linac. In this paper we will not discuss RF power sources in general, but rather take a brief look at several energy compression schemes which might be of service in helping to make better use of the sources we employ. We will, however, diverge for a bit and discuss what the RF power requirements are. 12 references, 21 figures, 3 tables

  11. Spin transfer driven resonant expulsion of a magnetic vortex core for efficient rf detector

    S. Menshawy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Spin transfer magnetization dynamics have led to considerable advances in Spintronics, including opportunities for new nanoscale radiofrequency devices. Among the new functionalities is the radiofrequency (rf detection using the spin diode rectification effect in spin torque nano-oscillators (STNOs. In this study, we focus on a new phenomenon, the resonant expulsion of a magnetic vortex in STNOs. This effect is observed when the excitation vortex radius, due to spin torques associated to rf currents, becomes larger than the actual radius of the STNO. This vortex expulsion is leading to a sharp variation of the voltage at the resonant frequency. Here we show that the detected frequency can be tuned by different parameters; furthermore, a simultaneous detection of different rf signals can be achieved by real time measurements with several STNOs having different diameters. This result constitutes a first proof-of-principle towards the development of a new kind of nanoscale rf threshold detector.

  12. Sequential modelling of ICRF wave near RF fields and asymptotic RF sheaths description for AUG ICRF antennas

    Jacquot Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A sequence of simulations is performed with RAPLICASOL and SSWICH to compare two AUG ICRF antennas. RAPLICASOL outputs have been used as input to SSWICH-SW for the AUG ICRF antennas. Using parallel electric field maps and the scattering matrix produced by RAPLICASOL, SSWICH-SW, reduced to its asymptotic part, is able to produce a 2D radial/poloidal map of the DC plasma potential accounting for the antenna input settings (total power, power balance, phasing. Two models of antennas are compared: 2-strap antenna vs 3-strap antenna. The 2D DC potential structures are correlated to structures of the parallel electric field map for different phasing and power balance. The overall DC plasma potential on the 3-strap antenna is lower due to better global RF currents compensation. Spatial proximity between regions of high RF electric field and regions where high DC plasma potentials are observed is an important factor for sheath rectification.

  13. MEASUREMENT OF HIGH Q RF CAVITY IMPEDANCE WITH BEAM

    Limborg, Cecile

    2003-01-01

    An inexpensive method to measure, with beam, the Rs and Q of narrow-band high order resonances in RF cavities was developed on SPEAR. The two main results of this study are: (1) an improved operational stability of SPEAR; and (2) the decision to keep the present cavities for the proposed SPEAR upgrade. SPEAR3 will be run initially at 200 mA, twice the present current. Just beyond the current threshold, and before step loss, there is a regime in which the beam performs large amplitude, low frequency oscillations. Detailed measurements were performed to characterize the frequency, amplitude, growth and damping time of these relaxation oscillations

  14. Investigation and reduction of excess low-frequency noise in rf superconducting quantum interference devices

    Mueck, M.; Heiden, C.; Clarke, J.

    1994-01-01

    A detailed study has been made of the low-frequency excess noise of rf superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), fabricated from thin niobium films and operated at 4.2 K, with rf bias frequencies of 0.15, 1.7, and 3 GHz. When the SQUIDs were operated in an open-loop configuration in the absence of low-frequency flux modulation, the demodulated rf voltage exhibited a substantial level 1/f noise, which was essentially independent of the rf bias frequency. As the rf bias frequency was increased, the crossover frequency at which the 1/f noise power was equal to the white noise power moved to higher frequencies, because of the reduction in white noise. On the other hand, when the SQUID was flux modulated at 50 kHz and operated in a flux locked loop, no 1/f noise was observed at frequencies above 0.5 Hz. A detailed description of how the combination of rf bias and flux modulation removes 1/f noise due to critical current fluctuations is given. Thus, the results demonstrate that the 1/f noise observed in these SQUIDs is generated by critical current fluctuations, rather than by the hopping of flux vortices in the niobium films

  15. Noninductive current drive in tokamaks

    Uckan, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    Various current drive mechanisms may be grouped into four classes: (1) injection of energetic particle beams; (2) launching of rf waves; (3) hybrid schemes, which are combinations of various rf schemes (rf plus beams, rf and/or beam plus ohmic heating, etc.); and (4) other schemes, some of which are specific to reactor plasma conditions requiring the presence of alpha particle or intense synchrotron radiation. Particle injection schemes include current drive by neutral beams and relativistic electron beams. The rf schemes include current drive by the lower hybrid (LH) waves, the electron waves, the waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies, etc. Only a few of these approaches, however, have been tested experimentally, with the broadest data base available for LH waves. Included in this report are (1) efficiency criteria for current drive, (2) current drive by neutral beam injection, (3) LH current drive, (4) electron cyclotron current drive, (5) current drive by ion cyclotron waves - minority species heating, and (6) current drive by other schemes (such as hybrids and low frequency waves)

  16. Averaging in spherically symmetric cosmology

    Coley, A. A.; Pelavas, N.

    2007-01-01

    The averaging problem in cosmology is of fundamental importance. When applied to study cosmological evolution, the theory of macroscopic gravity (MG) can be regarded as a long-distance modification of general relativity. In the MG approach to the averaging problem in cosmology, the Einstein field equations on cosmological scales are modified by appropriate gravitational correlation terms. We study the averaging problem within the class of spherically symmetric cosmological models. That is, we shall take the microscopic equations and effect the averaging procedure to determine the precise form of the correlation tensor in this case. In particular, by working in volume-preserving coordinates, we calculate the form of the correlation tensor under some reasonable assumptions on the form for the inhomogeneous gravitational field and matter distribution. We find that the correlation tensor in a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) background must be of the form of a spatial curvature. Inhomogeneities and spatial averaging, through this spatial curvature correction term, can have a very significant dynamical effect on the dynamics of the Universe and cosmological observations; in particular, we discuss whether spatial averaging might lead to a more conservative explanation of the observed acceleration of the Universe (without the introduction of exotic dark matter fields). We also find that the correlation tensor for a non-FLRW background can be interpreted as the sum of a spatial curvature and an anisotropic fluid. This may lead to interesting effects of averaging on astrophysical scales. We also discuss the results of averaging an inhomogeneous Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi solution as well as calculations of linear perturbations (that is, the backreaction) in an FLRW background, which support the main conclusions of the analysis

  17. TESLA superconducting RF cavity development

    Koepke, K.

    1995-01-01

    The TESLA collaboration has made steady progress since its first official meeting at Cornell in 1990. The infrastructure necessary to assemble and test superconducting rf cavities has been installed at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY. 5-cell, 1.3 GHz cavities have been fabricated and have reached accelerating fields of 25 MV/m. Full sized 9-cell copper cavities of TESLA geometry have been measured to verify the higher order modes present and to evaluate HOM coupling designs. The design of the TESLA 9-cell cavity has been finalized and industry has started delivery. Two prototype 9-cell niobium cavities in their first tests have reached accelerating fields of 10 MV/m and 15 MV/m in a vertical dewar after high peak power (HPP) conditioning. The first 12 m TESLA cryomodule that will house 8 9-cell cavities is scheduled to be delivered in Spring 1995. A design report for the TTF is in progress. The TTF test linac is scheduled to be commissioned in 1996/1997. (orig.)

  18. KSTAR RF heating system development

    Kwak, J. G.; Kim, S. K.; Hwang, C. K. (and others)

    2007-10-15

    Design, high-voltage test, and installation of 6 MW ICRF heating system for KSTAR is completed. The antenna demonstrated satisfactory standoff at high voltages up to 41 kV for 300 sec. The result indicates good power handling capabilities of the antenna as high as 10 MW/m2. This power density is equivalent to RF power coupling of 6 MW into a 4 {omega}/m target plasma, and is typical of advanced tokamak heating scenarios. In addition, vacuum feed through, DC break, and liquid stub developed for 300 sec operation are installed, as well as a 2 MW, 30-60MHz transmitter. The transmitter successfully produced output powers of 600 kW continuously, 1.5{approx}1.8 MW for 300 sec, and 2 MW for 100 msec or shorter pulses. A realtime control system based on DSP and EPICS is developed, installed, and tested on the ICRF system. Initial results from feasibility study indicate that the present antenna and the transmission lines could allow load-resilient operation on KSTAR. Until the KSTAR tokamak start to produce plasmas in 2008, however, hands-on operational experiences are obtained from participating in ICRF heating experiments at ASDEX and DIII-D tokamaks arranged through international cooperation.

  19. The CEBAF RF separator system

    Hovater, C.; Arnold, G.; Fugitt, J.; Harwood, L.; Kazimi, R.; Lahti, G.; Mammosser, J.; Nelson, R.; Piller, C.; Turlington, L.

    1996-01-01

    The 4 GeV CEBAF accelerator at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) is arranged in a five-pass racetrack configuration, with two superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) linacs joined by independent magnetic transport arcs. The 1497 MHz continuous electron beam is composed of three interlaced variable-intensity 499 MHz beams that can be independently directed from any of the five passes to any of the three experimental halls. Beam extraction is made possible by a system of nine warm sub-harmonic separator cavities capable of delivering a 100 urad kick to any pass at a maximum machine energy of 6 GeV. Each separator cavity is a half-wavelength, two cell design with a high transverse shunt impedance and a small transverse dimension. The cavities are powered by 1 kW solid state amplifiers operating at 499 MHz. Cavity phase and gradient control are provided through a modified version of the same control module used for the CEBAF SRF cavity controls. The system has recently been tested while delivering beam to Hall C. In this paper we present a description of the RF separator system and recent test results with beam. (author)

  20. Averaging models: parameters estimation with the R-Average procedure

    S. Noventa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Functional Measurement approach, proposed within the theoretical framework of Information Integration Theory (Anderson, 1981, 1982, can be a useful multi-attribute analysis tool. Compared to the majority of statistical models, the averaging model can account for interaction effects without adding complexity. The R-Average method (Vidotto & Vicentini, 2007 can be used to estimate the parameters of these models. By the use of multiple information criteria in the model selection procedure, R-Average allows for the identification of the best subset of parameters that account for the data. After a review of the general method, we present an implementation of the procedure in the framework of R-project, followed by some experiments using a Monte Carlo method.