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Sample records for availability modulates carbon

  1. Variation in soil moisture and N availability modulates carbon and water exchange in a California grassland experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St. Clair, S.B.; Sudderth, E.; Fischer, M.L.; Torn, M.S.; Stuart, S.; Salve, R.; Eggett, D.; Ackerly, D.

    2009-03-15

    Variability in the magnitude and timing of precipitation is predicted to change under future climate scenarios. The primary objective of this study was to understand how variation in precipitation patterns consisting of soil moisture pulses mixed with intermittent dry down events influence ecosystem gas fluxes. We characterized the effects of precipitation amount and timing, N availability, and plant community composition on whole ecosystem and leaf gas exchange in a California annual grassland mesocosm study system that allowed precise control of soil moisture conditions. Ecosystem CO2 and fluxes increased significantly with greater precipitation and were positively correlated with soil moisture. A repeated 10 day dry down period following 11 days of variable precipitation inputs strongly depressed net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) across a range of season precipitation totals, and plant community types. Ecosystem respiration (Re), evapotranspiration (ET) and leaf level photosynthesis (Amax) showed greatest sensitivity to dry down periods in low precipitation plots. Nitrogen additions significantly increased NEE, Re and Amax, particularly as water availability was increased. These results demonstrate that N availability and intermittent periods of soil moisture deficit (across a wide range of cumulative season precipitation totals) strongly modulate ecosystem gas exchange.

  2. Granular Activated Carbon Performance Capability and Availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    Kinetics of Activated Carbon Adsorption Journal of Water Polution 47(4) Aoril 1975 Control Federation 4-t9 Wnitna) G Aoalied Polarography for...proposed models for kinetics of adsorption of pink water organics by activated carbon. Both models are basically similar in nature and propose that...include formulation of a complete model of the pink water system based upon existing data. This model would then serve to reduce the amount of

  3. The heliospheric modulation of cosmic ray boron and carbon

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    M. S. Potgieter

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The observed boron to carbon ratio (B/C at Earth provides a good measure of the overall secondary to primary ratio of galactic cosmic rays. This makes B/C an important constraint and test for the validity and general applicability of theoretical and numerical models of galactic propagation and heliospheric modulation. For this purpose, the modulation of boron and carbon in the heliosphere must be understood in greater detail. The latest approach to heliospheric modulation, using a numerical model containing a termination shock, a heliosheath and particle drifts, is used to the study the modulation of the two species. This model also includes a more comprehensive set of diffusion coefficients. From this and previous work follows that the model is compatible with a variety of observations, for seven species, i.e. protons, anti-protons, electrons, positrons, helium, boron, and carbon, with the same set of parameters for both solar magnetic polarity cycles. Despite the rather flat interstellar spectrum for carbon below 100MeV/nuc, the modulated spectra at 1AU look very similar for boron and carbon, caused by adiabatic energy losses, implying that the carbon modulation should have a much larger radial gradient in the outer heliosphere below ~200-500MeV/nuc than boron. Significant modulation can be caused by the heliosheath but it is strongly dependent on energy and on the field polarity, with almost no effect at high energies to the largest effect at low energies. The solar wind termination shock has an important effect on the B to C ratio in the heliosphere, although small at Earth, during the A<0 cycle, with E<~600MeV/nuc, but it seems less significant for the A>0 cycle and with increasing tilt angles. Drift models produce different spectra for consecutive solar minimum conditions which may account for the modulation level differences between observations around 100MeV/nuc compared to around 500MeV/nuc. All factors taken into account

  4. Aridity modulates N availability in arid and semiarid Mediterranean grasslands.

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    Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo

    Full Text Available While much is known about the factors that control each component of the terrestrial nitrogen (N cycle, it is less clear how these factors affect total N availability, the sum of organic and inorganic forms potentially available to microorganisms and plants. This is particularly true for N-poor ecosystems such as drylands, which are highly sensitive to climate change and desertification processes that can lead to the loss of soil nutrients such as N. We evaluated how different climatic, abiotic, plant and nutrient related factors correlate with N availability in semiarid Stipa tenacissima grasslands along a broad aridity gradient from Spain to Tunisia. Aridity had the strongest relationship with N availability, suggesting the importance of abiotic controls on the N cycle in drylands. Aridity appeared to modulate the effects of pH, plant cover and organic C (OC on N availability. Our results suggest that N transformation rates, which are largely driven by variations in soil moisture, are not the direct drivers of N availability in the studied grasslands. Rather, the strong relationship between aridity and N availability could be driven by indirect effects that operate over long time scales (decades to millennia, including both biotic (e.g. plant cover and abiotic (e.g. soil OC and pH. If these factors are in fact more important than short-term effects of precipitation on N transformation rates, then we might expect to observe a lagged decrease in N availability in response to increasing aridity. Nevertheless, our results suggest that the increase in aridity predicted with ongoing climate change will reduce N availability in the Mediterranean basin, impacting plant nutrient uptake and net primary production in semiarid grasslands throughout this region.

  5. Genotype and ancestry modulate brain's DAT availability in healthy humans.

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    Elena Shumay

    Full Text Available The dopamine transporter (DAT is a principal regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission and its gene (the SLC6A3 is a strong biological candidate gene for various behavioral- and neurological disorders. Intense investigation of the link between the SLC6A3 polymorphisms and behavioral phenotypes yielded inconsistent and even contradictory results. Reliance on objective brain phenotype measures, for example, those afforded by brain imaging, might critically improve detection of DAT genotype-phenotype association. Here, we tested the relationship between the DAT brain availability and the SLC6A3 genotypes using an aggregate sample of 95 healthy participants of several imaging studies. These studies employed positron emission tomography (PET with [¹¹C]cocaine wherein the DAT availability was estimated as Bmax/Kd; while the genotype values were obtained on two repeat polymorphisms--3-UTR- and intron 8--VNTRs. The main findings are the following: 1 both polymorphisms analyzed as single genetic markers and in combination (haplotype modulate DAT density in midbrain; 2 ethnic background and age influence the strength of these associations; and 3 age-related changes in DAT availability differ in the 3-UTR and intron 8--genotype groups.

  6. Future productivity and carbon storage limited by terrestrial nutrient availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieder, William R.; Cleveland, Cory C.; Smith, W. Kolby; Todd-Brown, Katherine

    2015-06-01

    The size of the terrestrial sink remains uncertain. This uncertainty presents a challenge for projecting future climate-carbon cycle feedbacks. Terrestrial carbon storage is dependent on the availability of nitrogen for plant growth, and nitrogen limitation is increasingly included in global models. Widespread phosphorus limitation in terrestrial ecosystems may also strongly regulate the global carbon cycle, but explicit considerations of phosphorus limitation in global models are uncommon. Here we use global state-of-the-art coupled carbon-climate model projections of terrestrial net primary productivity and carbon storage from 1860-2100 estimates of annual new nutrient inputs from deposition, nitrogen fixation, and weathering; and estimates of carbon allocation and stoichiometry to evaluate how simulated CO2 fertilization effects could be constrained by nutrient availability. We find that the nutrients required for the projected increases in net primary productivity greatly exceed estimated nutrient supply rates, suggesting that projected productivity increases may be unrealistically high. Accounting for nitrogen and nitrogen-phosphorus limitation lowers projected end-of-century estimates of net primary productivity by 19% and 25%, respectively, and turns the land surface into a net source of CO2 by 2100. We conclude that potential effects of nutrient limitation must be considered in estimates of the terrestrial carbon sink strength through the twenty-first century.

  7. Analysis on Availability of the Carbon Element in Alcohol Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭素荣; 蒋大和; 寇刘秀; 陆雍森

    2006-01-01

    According to the concept of circular economy, the mass integration of alcohol production was investigated though the analysis of the carbon element contained in raw material cassava. Through the mass integration, the distillage wastewater turned into carbon resource and produced a great deal of by-product biogas while its chemical oxygen demand (COD) was reduced from 50000 mg/L to not more than 300 mg/L, the local secondary effluent standards, and other by-products such as CO2 (liquidized) and fusel oil were recovered. In the way, the consumption of raw material was only 2.2 tons cassava to produce 1 ton alcohol (96%, ψ) in the case study, much lower than the average level 2.92 t/t in China. The carbon element balance for production of alcohol was made through testing the concentrations of the carbon element of all mass flows. The results showed that the mass integration helped the availability of the carbon element increased from 44.74% to 64.75%.

  8. Marine microalgae growth and carbon partitioning as a function of nutrient availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Tomásia; Fernandes, Igor; Andrade, Carlos A P; Cordeiro, Nereida

    2016-08-01

    To understand in which way the structural differences of three marine microalgae (Nannochloropsis gaditana, Rhodomonas marina and Isochrysis sp.) affect their carbon partitioning, growth and applicability; a stoichiometric imbalance was imposed by steady carbon and other nutrients variation. Towards high nutrients concentrations/low carbon availability a decrease of 12-51% in C/N microalgae ratio was observed and maximum cell densities were achieved. Moreover, linear correlation between the nutrient input and microalgae protein content were observed. The macromolecular ratios pointed that carbohydrate was the main contributor for the C/N decrement. Although lipid content in R. marina remained constant throughout the experiment, a rise of 37-107% in N. gaditana and Isochrysis sp. was verified. Lipid fractions revealed high percentages of glycolipids in all microalgae (57-73% of total lipids). The present study shows an easy way to understand and modulate microalgae carbon partitioning relying on the field of application.

  9. Reminder: Bike safety – e-learning module still available!

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    The “Safe bike riding” e-learning module offered by the Safety Training Section of the HSE Unit is designed for anyone who uses a bike on the CERN site.   The course, which takes around 10 minutes to complete, can be accessed via the SIR application. It presents safety information, such as the road traffic rules, and practical advice, such as the appropriate safety equipment to wear and to have fitted to your bike. Regarding the rules, we would like to remind you that CERN's Safety Code A7 applies to cyclists as well as motorists.  The training module was created by the accident prevention service of the HSE Unit after it was noticed that the number of occupational accidents involving cyclists had been constantly increasing since 2008, with a rise from about 20 in 2009 to about 50 in 2013. Since its launch in September 2013, the course has been taken by more than 670 people. It can be completed at any time, in either English or French. The Safety T...

  10. Modulation of Carbon Nanotube Metal Contacts in Gaseous Hydrogen Environment

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    A. R. Usgaocar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs, contacted by electrodeposited Pd0.59Ni0.41 alloys, are characterised using electrical measurements and Raman spectroscopy. The high workfunctions of Nickel and Palladium form an ohmic contact with the CNT valence band, but the contact properties change on Hydrogen exposure due to a reduction in the PdNi workfunction and the realignment of the PdNi Fermi level with the CNT band structure. A PdNi contacted semiconducting CNT exhibited significantly lower currents after Hydrogen exposure while a metallic CNT exhibited a small current increase. The semiconducting and metallic natures of the CNTs are confirmed by their Raman spectra. This study demonstrates a technique for modulating the PdNi-CNT contact and differentiating between semiconducting and metallic CNTs via contact modulation. It also provides experimental evidence of the theoretical allocation of features in the CNT Raman spectra.

  11. Photochemical Control of Organic Carbon Availability to Coastal Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W. L.; Reader, H. E.; Powers, L. C.

    2010-12-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is the fraction of dissolved organic matter that absorbs solar radiation. In terrestrially influenced locations high concentrations of CDOM help to shield the biological community from harmful UV radiation. Although CDOM is largely biologically refractory in nature, photochemistry has the potential to transform biologically refractory carbon into more biolabile forms. Studies suggest that in marine systems, the effect of UVR on carbon availability and subsequent bacterial production varies widely, ranging from a +200% increase to a -75% decrease (Mopper and Kieber, 2002). Evidence suggests that the largely negative or “no-effect” samples are from oligotrophic waters and that terrestrially influenced samples experience a more positive effect on the biolability of carbon after irradiation. To quantify the effects of photochemistry on the biolability of DOC in a terrestrially influenced system, a quarterly sampling effort was undertaken at three estuarine locations off the coast of Georgia, USA for a total of 14 apparent quantum yield (AQY) determinations. Large expanses of salt marsh on the coast of Georgia, create a large non-point source of DOC to the coastal ocean. Sapelo Sound, the northernmost sampling site, is dominated by offshore waters and receives little to no freshwater input throughout the year. Altamaha Sound, the southernmost sampling site, is strongly influenced by the Altamaha River, which drains the largest watershed in the state of Georgia. Doboy Sound, situated between these two sites, is largely marine dominated but is influenced by fresh water during periods of high river flow. Each sample was 0.2um filter-sterilized before irradiation in a Suntest Solar Simulator; using optical filters to create 7 distinct radiance spectra in 15 samples for determination of AQY spectra for release of biolabile DOC. Irradiated samples were consequently inoculated with the natural microbial community concentrated

  12. Experiments with the newly available carbon beams at ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    Garcia borge, M J; Koester, U H; Koldste, G T

    2002-01-01

    Recent target-ions-source developments at ISOLDE providing significantly increased yields for carbon isotopes, open up for new and intriguing experiments. We propose to exploit this in two different ways. In particular we wish to do an elastic resonance scattering experiment of $^{9}$C on a proton target to gain information on the particle unbound system $^{10}$N. Furthermore we wish to perform decay experiments of the neutron-rich carbon isotopes, with special focus on $^{17-19}$C but also including a test to see whether the even more neutron-rich isotopes $^{20,22}$C are accessible at ISOLDE.

  13. Effect of Temperature on Power Output from Different Commercially available Photovoltaic Modules

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    P K Dash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic (PV modules are rated at standard test condition (STC i.e. at irradiance of 1000 W/m2 , temperature at 25 0C and solar spectrum of Air Mass 1.5G. The actual output from the PV module in the field varies from its rated output due to change in ambient environmental conditions from the STC. The reduction in output due to temperature is determined by temperature coefficient which varies with the different types of solar module technologies. In this study, temperature coefficient of different types of commercially available solar modules is evaluated. The testing has been carried out at PV test facility of Solar Energy Centre, New Delhi. The modules are selected randomly from various manufactures. It is found that the average temperature coefficient of power for mono-crystalline, multi-crystalline and CdTe based modules are -0.446 %/°C, -0.387 %/°C and -0.172 %/°C respectively. In case of amorphous silicon module, only one sample is measured and the temperature coefficient is -0.234 %/°C. This study shows that the temperature coefficient for mono crystalline silicon module is higher than the other types of solar modules. This study provides an understanding on the variation in energy generation due to temperature correction between different cell technologies.

  14. Mirage effect from thermally modulated transparent carbon nanotube sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliev, Ali E; Baughman, Ray H [Alan G MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States); Gartstein, Yuri N, E-mail: Ali.Aliev@utdallas.edu [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States)

    2011-10-28

    The single-beam mirage effect, also known as photothermal deflection, is studied using a free-standing, highly aligned carbon nanotube aerogel sheet as the heat source. The extremely low thermal capacitance and high heat transfer ability of these transparent forest-drawn carbon nanotube sheets enables high frequency modulation of sheet temperature over an enormous temperature range, thereby providing a sharp, rapidly changing gradient of refractive index in the surrounding liquid or gas. The advantages of temperature modulation using carbon nanotube sheets are multiple: in inert gases the temperature can reach > 2500 K; the obtained frequency range for photothermal modulation is {approx} 100 kHz in gases and over 100 Hz in high refractive index liquids; and the heat source is transparent for optical and acoustical waves. Unlike for conventional heat sources for photothermal deflection, the intensity and phase of the thermally modulated beam component linearly depends upon the beam-to-sheet separation over a wide range of distances. This aspect enables convenient measurements of accurate values for thermal diffusivity and the temperature dependence of refractive index for both liquids and gases. The remarkable performance of nanotube sheets suggests possible applications as photo-deflectors and for switchable invisibility cloaks, and provides useful insights into their use as thermoacoustic projectors and sonar. Visibility cloaking is demonstrated in a liquid.

  15. A study of the global heliospheric modulation of galactic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngobeni, M. D.; Potgieter, M. S.

    2014-06-01

    Observations of galactic Carbon in the heliosphere provide a useful tool with which a comprehensive description of the global modulation of cosmic rays both inside and outside off the solar wind termination shock (TS) can be made. This is, in part, because galactic Carbon is not contaminated by anomalous cosmic rays as is the case for oxygen, helium and hydrogen. However, this kind of study requires that there should be reasonable compatibility of model solutions to spacecraft and earthbound observations. In this study, the well-established two-dimensional model that contains a TS, a heliosheath, as well as shock re-acceleration of galactic cosmic rays and particle drifts, is used first to study modulation from solar minimum to moderate maximum activity at Earth. This model can handle any global heliospheric geometry of both the TS and heliopause (HP) positions. Second, the model is applied to study the contribution of drifts and the enhancement of polar perpendicular diffusion in the heliosheath to the total modulation in the heliosphere as a function of energy for both polarity cycles of the magnetic field during solar minimum conditions. This modeling is done with a new heliopause spectrum (HPS, usually referred to as the local interstellar spectrum) at kinetic energy E nuc. This HPS is derived from observations made by the Voyager 1 spacecraft of galactic Carbon at a radial distance of ∼122 AU from the Sun. We find that: (1) The model gives realistic modulation for both magnetic polarity cycles of the Sun, from Earth to beyond the TS, and that the level of modulation at Earth between the recent solar minimum and the previous moderate maximum condition exceed that between the HP and Earth in the recent solar minimum. (2) Neglecting drifts in the heliosheath along the Voyager heliolatitude is a reasonable assumption, but in the equatorial plane of the heliosphere drifts are important for heliosheath modulation in the A nuc is found to be significantly higher

  16. Differential priming of soil carbon driven by soil depth and root impacts on carbon availability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Graaff, Marie-Anne; Jastrow, Julie D.; Gillette, Shay; Johns, Aislinn; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2013-11-15

    Enhanced root-exudate inputs can stimulate decomposition of soil carbon (C) by priming soil microbial activity, but the mechanisms controlling the magnitude and direction of the priming effect remain poorly understood. With this study we evaluated how differences in soil C availability affect the impact of simulated root exudate inputs on priming. We conducted a 60-day laboratory incubation with soils collected (60 cm depth) from under six switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) cultivars. Differences in specific root length (SRL) among cultivars were expected to result in small differences in soil C inputs and thereby create small differences in the availability of recent labile soil C; whereas soil depth was expected to create large overall differences in soil C availability. Soil cores from under each cultivar (roots removed) were divided into depth increments of 0–10, 20–30, and 40–60 cm and incubated with addition of either: (1) water or (2) 13C-labeled synthetic root exudates (0.7 mg C/g soil). We measured CO2 respiration throughout the experiment. The natural difference in 13C signature between C3 soils and C4 plants was used to quantify cultivar-induced differences in soil C availability. Amendment with 13C-labeled synthetic root-exudate enabled evaluation of SOC priming. Our experiment produced three main results: (1) switchgrass cultivars differentially influenced soil C availability across the soil profile; (2) small differences in soil C availability derived from recent root C inputs did not affect the impact of exudate-C additions on priming; but (3) priming was greater in soils from shallow depths (relatively high total soil C and high ratio of labile-to-stable C) compared to soils from deep depths (relatively low total soil C and low ratio of labile-to-stable C). These findings suggest that the magnitude of the priming effect is affected, in part, by the ratio of root exudate C inputs to total soil C and that the impact of changes in exudate inputs on

  17. Modulation of Candida albicans Biofilm by Different Carbon Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemmaraju, Suma C; Pruthi, Parul A; Prasad, R; Pruthi, Vikas

    2016-06-01

    In the present investigation, the role of carbon sources (glucose, lactate, sucrose, and arabinose) on Candida albicans biofilm development and virulence factors was studied on polystyrene microtiter plates. Besides this, structural changes in cell wall component β-glucan in presence of different carbon sources have also been highlighted. Biofilm formation was analyzed by XTT (2,3-bis[2-Methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide) reduction assay. Glucose-grown cells exhibited the highest metabolic activity during adhesion among all carbon sources tested (p roughness measurements by atomic force microscopy. Exposure to lactate induced hyphal structures with the highest proteinase activity while arabinose-grown cells formed pseudohyphal structures possessing the highest phospholipase activity. Structural changes in β-glucan characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy displayed characteristic band of β-glucan at 892 cm(-1) in all carbon sources tested. The β(1→6) to β(1→3) glucan ratio calculated as per the band area of the peak was less in lactate (1.15) as compared to glucose (1.73), sucrose (1.62), and arabinose (2.85). These results signify that carbon sources influence C. albicans biofilm development and modulate virulence factors and structural organization of cell wall component β-glucan.

  18. EFFECT OF CARBON AVAILABILITY ON MICROBIAL ACTIVITIES IN Calamagrostis angustifolia SOIL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiao-Feng; SONG Chang-Chun; SONG Xia; YANG Huai-Hui

    2004-01-01

    Carbon availability varies very much along soil profile and decreases from topsoil to subsoil. The effect of carbon availability index (CAI) on microbial activities in Calamagrostis angustifolia soil in the Sanjiang Plain in the Northeast China was measured. Based on the proposal about CAI and microbial respiration from Parkinson and Coleman (1999), the results showed that carbon availability limits the microbial activities in topsoil, root layer soil and subsoil initially, whereas it does not limit the microbial activity after 1.5 h incubation for recovery from the disturbance in physical, chemical and biology structure resulting from sampling, then after 5h incubation carbon availability limits mi-crobial activity again after the labile carbon was mineralized. At the same time the soil organic matter affects the carbon availability significantly when it is lower than 10%, but little when the soil organic matter is higher than 10%. The microbial biomass carbon is linearly related to carbon availability in the Calamagrostis angustifolia soil. When the CAI is lower than 0.85, the β-glucosidase activity increases along with CAI, but decreases when CAI is larger than 0.85.

  19. Photosynthesis in estuarine intertidal microphytobenthos is limited by inorganic carbon availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Sónia; Cartaxana, Paulo; Máguas, Cristina; Marques da Silva, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    The effects of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) availability on photosynthesis were studied in two estuarine intertidal microphytobenthos (MPB) communities and in the model diatom species Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Kinetics of DIC acquisition, measured with a liquid-phase oxygen electrode, showed higher K(1/2)(DIC) (0.31 mM) and Vm (7.78 nmol min(-1) µg (Chl a)(-1)) for MPB suspensions than for P. tricornutum (K(1/2)(DIC) = 0.23 mM; Vm = 4.64 nmol min(-1) µg (Chl a)(-1)), suggesting the predominance of species with lower affinity for DIC and higher photosynthetic capacity in the MPB. The net photosynthetic rate of the MPB suspensions reached saturation at a DIC concentration of 1-1.5 mM. This range was lower than the concentrations found in the interstitial water of the top 5-mm sediment layer, suggesting no limitation of photosynthesis by DIC in the MPB communities. Accordingly, carbon isotope discrimination revealed a moderate activity of CO2-concentrating mechanisms in the MPB. However, addition of NaHCO3 to intact MPB biofilms caused a significant increase in the relative maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (rETR max) measured by imaging pulse-amplitude modulated chlorophyll a fluorescence. These results suggest local depletion of DIC at the photic layer of the sediment (the first few hundred µm), where MPB cells accumulate during diurnal low tides. This work provides the first direct experimental evidence of DIC limitation of photosynthesis in highly productive intertidal MPB communities.

  20. Carbon stable isotope analysis of cereal remains as a way to reconstruct water availability: preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    Flohr, Pascal; Muldner, Gundula; Jenkins, Emma

    2011-01-01

    Reconstructing past water availability, both as rainfall and irrigation, is important to answer questions about the way society reacts to climate and its changes and the role of irrigation in the development of social complexity. Carbon stable isotope analysis of archaeobotanical remains is a potentially valuable method for reconstructing water availability. To further define the relationship between water availability and plant carbon isotope composition and to set up baseline values for the...

  1. How Does Host Carbon Concentration Modulate the Lifestyle of Postharvest Pathogens during Colonization?

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    Dov B. Prusky

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Postharvest pathogens can penetrate fruit by breaching the cuticle or directly through wounds, remain quiescent and they show disease symptoms only long after infection. During ripening and senescence, the fruit undergo physiological processes accompanied by a decline in antifungal compounds, which allows the pathogen to activate a mechanism of secretion of small effector molecules that modulate host environmental pH. This results in the transcript activation of fungal genes under their optimal pH conditions, enabling the fungus to use a specific group of pathogenicity factors at each particular pH. New research suggests that carbon availability in the environment of the activating pathogen is a key factor triggering the production and secretion of small pH-modulating molecules: ammonia and organic acid. Ammonia is secreted under limited carbon and gluconic acid under excess carbon. This mini review describes our most recent knowledge on the mechanism of activation of the biosynthesis and secretion of fungal molecules that modulate the host pH, and their contribution to the transition from quiescence to necrotrophic lifestyle by the postharvest pathogens.

  2. Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus modulates its membrane lipids in response to hydrogen and nutrient availability

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    Marcos Yukio Yoshinaga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus strain ∆H is a model hydrogenotrophic methanogen, for which extensive biochemical information, including the complete genome sequence, is available. Nevertheless, at the cell membrane lipid level, little is known about the responses of this archaeon to environmental stimuli. In this study, the lipid composition of M. thermautotrophicus was characterized to verify how this archaeon modulates its cell membrane components during growth phases and in response to hydrogen depletion and nutrient limitation (potassium and phosphate. As opposed to the higher abundance of phospholipids in the stationary phase of control experiments, cell membranes under nutrient and energy stress were dominated by glycolipids that likely provided a more effective barrier against ion leakage. We also identified particular lipid regulatory mechanisms in M. thermautotrophicus, which included the accumulation of polyprenols under hydrogen-limited conditions and an increased content of sodiated adducts of lipids in nutrient-limited cells. These findings suggest that M. thermautotrophicus intensely modulates its cell membrane lipid composition to cope with energy and nutrient availability in dynamic environments.

  3. Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus modulates its membrane lipids in response to hydrogen and nutrient availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Marcos Y.; Gagen, Emma J.; Wörmer, Lars; Broda, Nadine K.; Meador, Travis B.; Wendt, Jenny; Thomm, Michael; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus strain ΔH is a model hydrogenotrophic methanogen, for which extensive biochemical information, including the complete genome sequence, is available. Nevertheless, at the cell membrane lipid level, little is known about the responses of this archaeon to environmental stimuli. In this study, the lipid composition of M. thermautotrophicus was characterized to verify how this archaeon modulates its cell membrane components during growth phases and in response to hydrogen depletion and nutrient limitation (potassium and phosphate). As opposed to the higher abundance of phospholipids in the stationary phase of control experiments, cell membranes under nutrient, and energy stress were dominated by glycolipids that likely provided a more effective barrier against ion leakage. We also identified particular lipid regulatory mechanisms in M. thermautotrophicus, which included the accumulation of polyprenols under hydrogen-limited conditions and an increased content of sodiated adducts of lipids in nutrient-limited cells. These findings suggest that M. thermautotrophicus intensely modulates its cell membrane lipid composition to cope with energy and nutrient availability in dynamic environments. PMID:25657645

  4. CARBON-FIBRE-REINFORCED POLYMER PARTS EFFECT ON SPACECRAFT OPTOELECTRONIC MODULE LENS SCATTERING

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    S. S. Kolasha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spacecraft optoelectronic modules traditionally have aluminum alloy or titanium alloy casing which substantial weight increases fuel consumption required to put them into orbit and, consequently, total cost of the project. Carbon fiber reinforced polymer based composite constructive materials is an efficient solution that allows reducing weight and dimensions of large optoelectronic modules 1,5–3 times and the coefficient of linear thermal expansion 15–20 times if compared with metals. Optical characteristic is a crucial feature of carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer that determines composite material interaction with electromagnetic emission within the optical range. This work was intended to develop a method to evaluate Carbon fiber reinforced polymer optoelectronic modules casing effect on lens scattering by computer simulation with Zemax application software package. Degrees of scattered, reflected and absorbed radiant flux effect on imaging quality are described here. The work included experimental study in order to determine bidirectional reflectance distribution function by goniometric method for LUP-0.1 carbon fabric check test pieces of EDT-69U epoxy binder with EPOFLEX-0.4 glue layer and 5056-3.5-23-A aluminium honeycomb filler. The scattered emission was registered within a hemisphere above the check test piece surface. Optical detection direction was determined with zenith (0º < θ < 90º and azimuth (0º < φ < 180º angles with 10° increment. The check test piece surface was proved to scatter emission within a narrow angle range (approximately 20° with clear directivity. Carbon fiber reinforced polymers was found to feature integrated reflectance coefficient 3 to 4 times greater than special coatings do. 

  5. Image Intensifier Modules For Use With Commercially Available Solid State Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Howard; Tyler, Al; Lake, Donald W.

    1989-04-01

    A modular approach to design has contributed greatly to the success of the family of machine vision video equipment produced by EG&G Reticon during the past several years. Internal modularity allows high-performance area (matrix) and line scan cameras to be assembled with two or three electronic subassemblies with very low labor costs, and permits camera control and interface circuitry to be realized by assemblages of various modules suiting the needs of specific applications. Product modularity benefits equipment users in several ways. Modular matrix and line scan cameras are available in identical enclosures (Fig. 1), which allows enclosure components to be purchased in volume for economies of scale and allows field replacement or exchange of cameras within a customer-designed system to be easily accomplished. The cameras are optically aligned (boresighted) at final test; modularity permits optical adjustments to be made with the same precise test equipment for all camera varieties. The modular cameras contain two, or sometimes three, hybrid microelectronic packages (Fig. 2). These rugged and reliable "submodules" perform all of the electronic operations internal to the camera except for the job of image acquisition performed by the monolithic image sensor. Heat produced by electrical power dissipation in the electronic modules is conducted through low resistance paths to the camera case by the metal plates, which results in a thermally efficient and environmentally tolerant camera with low manufacturing costs. A modular approach has also been followed in design of the camera control, video processor, and computer interface accessory called the Formatter (Fig. 3). This unit can be attached directly onto either a line scan or matrix modular camera to form a self-contained units, or connected via a cable to retain the advantages inherent to a small, light weight, and rugged image sensing component. Available modules permit the bus-structured Formatter to be

  6. Genotype and ancestry modulate brain's DAT availability in healthy humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumay, E.; Shumay, E.; Chen, J.; Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.

    2011-08-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a principal regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission and its gene (the SLC6A3) is a strong biological candidate gene for various behavioral- and neurological disorders. Intense investigation of the link between the SLC6A3 polymorphisms and behavioral phenotypes yielded inconsistent and even contradictory results. Reliance on objective brain phenotype measures, for example, those afforded by brain imaging, might critically improve detection of DAT genotype-phenotype association. Here, we tested the relationship between the DAT brain availability and the SLC6A3 genotypes using an aggregate sample of 95 healthy participants of several imaging studies. These studies employed positron emission tomography (PET) with [{sup 11}C] cocaine wherein the DAT availability was estimated as Bmax/Kd; while the genotype values were obtained on two repeat polymorphisms - 3-UTR- and intron 8- VNTRs. The main findings are the following: (1) both polymorphisms analyzed as single genetic markers and in combination (haplotype) modulate DAT density in midbrain; (2) ethnic background and age influence the strength of these associations; and (3) age-related changes in DAT availability differ in the 3-UTR and intron8 - genotype groups.

  7. Simultaneous alignment and micropatterning of carbon nanotubes using modulated magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Tsuda and Yoshio Sakka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report simultaneous alignment and micropatterning of carbon nanotubes (CNTs using a high magnetic field. It is important to prepare well-dispersed CNTs for alignment and patterning because CNT aggregation obstructs alignment. In magnetic field, highly anisotropic CNTs rotate in the direction stabilized in energy. Owing to their diamagnetic nature, CNTs suspended in a liquid medium are trapped in a weak magnetic field generated by a field modulator; meanwhile, they align to the applied strong magnetic field. The alignment has been achieved not only in polymers but also in ceramic and silicone composites.

  8. Modulation of Soil Particle Size and Nutrient Availability in the Maize Rhizosheath

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Wei; LI Xue-Xian; LI Chun-Jian

    2011-01-01

    Root exudates,microorganism colonization and soil aggregates together form the rhizosheath,a special cylinder of micro-ecosystem adhering to the root surface.To study how the rhizosheath affects soil structure and nutrient distribution,we analyzed the impact of maize rhizosheath on soil particle size and nutrient availability in pot and field experiments.The results showed that there was a significant size decrease of soil particles in the rhizosheath.Meanwhile,the soil mineral nitrogen in the rhizosheath was significantly higher than that in the rhizosphere or bulk soil at tasseling and maturity stages of maize.The contents of Fe and Mn were also differentially altered in the rhizosheath.Rhizosheath development,indicated by a dry weight ratio of rhizosheath soil to the root,was relatively independent of root development during the whole experimental period.The formation of maize rhizosheath contributed to the modulation of soil particle size and nutrient availability.The subtle local changes of soil physical and chemical properties may have profound influence on soil formation,rhizospheric ecosystem initiation,and mineral nutrient mobilization over the long history of plant evolution and domestication.

  9. How Does Host Carbon Concentration Modulate the Lifestyle of Postharvest Pathogens during Colonization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusky, Dov B.; Bi, Fangcheng; Moral, Juan; Barad, Shiri

    2016-01-01

    Postharvest pathogens can penetrate fruit by breaching the cuticle or directly through wounds, and they show disease symptoms only long after infection. During ripening and senescence, the fruit undergo physiological processes accompanied by a decline in antifungal compounds, which allows the pathogen to activate a mechanism of secretion of small effector molecules that modulate host environmental pH. These result in the activation of genes under their optimal pH conditions, enabling the fungus to use a specific group of pathogenicity factors at each particular pH. New research suggests that carbon availability in the environment is a key factor triggering the production and secretion of small pH-modulating molecules: ammonia and organic acids. Ammonia is secreted under limited carbon and gluconic acid under excess carbon. This mini review describes our most recent knowledge of the mechanism of activation of pH-secreted molecules and their contribution to colonization by postharvest pathogens to facilitate the transition from quiescence to necrotrophic lifestyle. PMID:27635125

  10. The fabrication of porous N-doped carbon from widely available urea formaldehyde resin for carbon dioxide adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Du, Zhenyu; Song, Hao; Wang, Chuangye; Subhan, Fazle; Xing, Wei; Yan, Zifeng

    2014-02-15

    N-doped carbon material constitutes abundant of micropores and basic nitrogen species that have potential implementation for CO2 capture. In this paper, porous carbon material with high nitrogen content was simply fabricated by carbonizing low cost and widely available urea formaldehyde resin, and then followed by KOH activation. CO2 capture experiment showed high adsorption capacity of 3.21 mmol g(-1) at 25 °C under 1 atm for UFCA-2-600. XRD, SEM, XPS and FT-IR analysis confirmed that a graphitic-like structure was retained even after high temperature carbonization and strong base activation. Textural property analysis revealed that narrow micropores, especially below 0.8 nm, were effective for CO2 adsorption by physical adsorption mechanism. Chemical evolved investigation revealed that graphitic-like embedded basic nitrogen groups are generated from bridged and terminal amines of urea formaldehyde resin from thermal carbonization and KOH activation treatment, which is responsible for the enrichment of CO2 capacity by chemical adsorption mechanism. The relationship between CO2 adsorption capacity and pore size or basic N species was also studied, which turned out that both of them played crucial role by physical and chemical adsorption mechanism, respectively.

  11. Bandgap modulation of carbon nanotubes by encapsulated metallofullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jhinhwan; Kim, H.; Kahng, S.-J.; Kim, G.; Son, Y.-W.; Ihm, J.; Kato, H.; Wang, Z. W.; Okazaki, T.; Shinohara, H.; Kuk, Young

    2002-02-01

    Motivated by the technical and economic difficulties in further miniaturizing silicon-based transistors with the present fabrication technologies, there is a strong effort to develop alternative electronic devices, based, for example, on single molecules. Recently, carbon nanotubes have been successfully used for nanometre-sized devices such as diodes, transistors, and random access memory cells. Such nanotube devices are usually very long compared to silicon-based transistors. Here we report a method for dividing a semiconductor nanotube into multiple quantum dots with lengths of about 10nm by inserting Gd@C82 endohedral fullerenes. The spatial modulation of the nanotube electronic bandgap is observed with a low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscope. We find that a bandgap of ~0.5eV is narrowed down to ~0.1eV at sites where endohedral metallofullerenes are inserted. This change in bandgap can be explained by local elastic strain and charge transfer at metallofullerene sites. This technique for fabricating an array of quantum dots could be used for nano-electronics and nano-optoelectronics.

  12. Carbon monoxide and iron modulate plasmatic coagulation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Vance G; Pretorius, Etheresia; Bester, Janette; Jacobsen, Wayne K; Boyle, Patrick K; Reinhard, Joao P

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a significant source of morbidity and mortality for millions of people worldwide, and multiple potential etiologies have been postulated to contribute to AD. Among these, spontaneous cerebral emboli and increased cerebral and circulating heme oxygenase (Hmox) activity in AD patients are of particular interest, as two of the products of Hmox activity, carbon monoxide (CO) and iron enhance plasmatic coagulation and modify the ultrastructure of thrombi. We hypothesized that patients afflicted with AD would have coagulation kinetics modulated by CO and iron. Using viscoelastic assessments of coagulation, it was determined with a small cohort (n=11) of AD patients that all had enhancement of coagulation by CO, iron, or both. In a complementary fashion, it was determined that a separate cohort (n=12) of AD patients had thrombi with ultrastructural features consistent with iron and CO exposure as assessed with scanning electron microscopy. Further, when stratified by normal or abnormally increased serum ferritin concentrations (which can be increased by Hmox), the AD patients with abnormal ferritin concentrations had significantly thinner fibrin fiber diameters, not unlike that noted when normal plasma is mixed with iron or CO. In sum, AD patients were noted to have plasmatic coagulation kinetic and thrombus ultrastructural changes consistent with exposure to CO and iron. Future investigation of CO and iron in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is warranted.

  13. Estimation of fluoride levels in various commercially available carbonated soft drinks in Chandigarh city, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Bansal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fluoride has a preventive action on dental caries. However, Excessive ingestion of fluoride from different sources can lead to the development of dental fluorosis. Aim: To estimate fluoride levels in various commercially available carbonated soft drinks available in Chandigarh city. Materials and Methods: Twelve different brands of commercially available soft drinks were purchased from three different places and divided into three groups. Fluoride levels were estimated using fluoride test strips Quantofix 37211 Fluka; Sigma-Aldrich. Results: Fluoride levels ranged from 0.12 to 0.42 mg/dl F with the maximum level in Thumbs up and least in Diet Pepsi. Conclusion: The levels of fluoride varied in various carbonated soft drinks analyzed. This could contribute significantly to the total fluoride intake from all sources and thus be an important risk factor for the development of dental fluorosis.

  14. Verification and Validation of the New Dynamic Mooring Modules Available in FAST v8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Fabian F.; Andersen, Morten Thøtt; Robertson, Amy N.

    2016-01-01

    The open-source, aero-hydro-servo-elastic wind turbine simulation software FAST v8 (created by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory) was recently coupled to two newly developed mooring dynamics modules: MoorDyn and FEAMooring. MoorDyn is a lumped-mass-based mooring dynamics module developed...

  15. Verification and Validation of the New Dynamic Mooring Modules Available in FAST v8: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Fabian; Robertson, Amy; Jonkman, Jason; Andersen, Morten T.

    2016-08-01

    The open-source aero-hydro-servo-elastic wind turbine simulation software, FAST v8, was recently coupled to two newly developed mooring dynamics modules: MoorDyn and FEAMooring. MoorDyn is a lumped-mass-based mooring dynamics module developed by the University of Maine, and FEAMooring is a finite-element-based mooring dynamics module developed by Texas A&M University. This paper summarizes the work performed to verify and validate these modules against other mooring models and measured test data to assess their reliability and accuracy. The quality of the fairlead load predictions by the open-source mooring modules MoorDyn and FEAMooring appear to be largely equivalent to what is predicted by the commercial tool OrcaFlex. Both mooring dynamic model predictions agree well with the experimental data, considering the given limitations in the accuracy of the platform hydrodynamic load calculation and the quality of the measurement data.

  16. Verification and Validation of the New Dynamic Mooring Modules Available in FAST v8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Fabian F.; Andersen, Morten T.; Robertson, Amy N.; Jonkman, Jason M.

    2016-07-01

    The open-source aero-hydro-servo-elastic wind turbine simulation software, FAST v8, was recently coupled to two newly developed mooring dynamics modules: MoorDyn and FEAMooring. MoorDyn is a lumped-mass-based mooring dynamics module developed by the University of Maine, and FEAMooring is a finite-element-based mooring dynamics module developed by Texas A&M University. This paper summarizes the work performed to verify and validate these modules against other mooring models and measured test data to assess their reliability and accuracy. The quality of the fairlead load predictions by the open-source mooring modules MoorDyn and FEAMooring appear to be largely equivalent to what is predicted by the commercial tool OrcaFlex. Both mooring dynamic model predictions agree well with the experimental data, considering the given limitations in the accuracy of the platform hydrodynamic load calculation and the quality of the measurement data.

  17. Emotional Availability Modulates Electrophysiological Correlates of Executive Functions in Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Hassloff, Henriette; Zwönitzer, Annabel; Künster, Anne K; Mayer, Carmen; Ziegenhain, Ute; Kiefer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Executive functions (EFs) - a set of cognitive control abilities - mediate resilience to stress and are associated with academic achievement and health throughout life. They are crucially linked to prefrontal cortex function as well as to other cortical and subcortical brain functions, which are maturing throughout childhood at different rates. Recent behavioral research suggested that children's EFs were related to parenting quality and child attachment security, but the neural correlates of these associations are unknown. With this study we tested in 4- to 6-year-old healthy children (N = 27) how emotional availability (EA) of the mother-child-interaction was associated with behavioral and electrophysiological correlates of response inhibition (a core EF) in a Go/Nogo task, using event-related potential recordings (ERPs), and with behavioral performance in a Delay of Gratification (DoG) and a Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders task (HTKS). Our data showed that the Go/Nogo task modulated children's ERP components resembling adult electrophysiological indices of response inhibition - the N2 and P3/LPC ERPs-, but the children's N2 and P3/LPC ERPs showed longer latencies. Higher maternal autonomy-fostering behavior and greater child responsiveness were significantly associated with smaller children's N2 Go/Nogo effects at fronto-central and parietal sites and with greater Go/Nogo effects in the N2 time window at occipital sites, over and above children's age and intelligence. Additionally, greater maternal sensitivity and a higher dyadic EA quality of the mother-child-interaction went along with greater occipital Go/Nogo effects in the N2 time window, but this effect clearly diminished when we controlled for children's age and intelligence. Higher maternal autonomy-support was also positively associated with better HTKS performance, and higher dyadic EA quality went along with higher HTKS and DoG scores. However, no significant associations were found between EA variables and

  18. Water availability limits tree productivity, carbon stocks, and carbon residence time in mature forests across the western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Logan T.; Law, Beverly E.; Hudiburg, Tara W.

    2017-01-01

    Water availability constrains the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems and is projected to change in many parts of the world over the coming century. We quantified the response of tree net primary productivity (NPP), live biomass (BIO), and mean carbon residence time (CRT = BIO / NPP) to spatial variation in water availability in the western US. We used forest inventory measurements from 1953 mature stands (> 100 years) in Washington, Oregon, and California (WAORCA) along with satellite and climate data sets covering the western US. We summarized forest structure and function in both domains along a 400 cm yr-1 hydrologic gradient, quantified with a climate moisture index (CMI) based on the difference between precipitation and reference evapotranspiration summed over the water year (October-September) and then averaged annually from 1985 to 2014 (CMIwy). Median NPP, BIO, and CRT computed at 10 cm yr-1 intervals along the CMIwy gradient increased monotonically with increasing CMIwy across both WAORCA (rs = 0.93-0.96, p changes over the western US, though these data sets tended to plateau in the wettest areas, suggesting that additional efforts are needed to better quantify NPP and BIO from satellites in high-productivity, high-biomass forests. Our results illustrate that long-term average water availability is a key environmental constraint on tree productivity, carbon storage, and carbon residence time in mature forests across the western US, underscoring the need to assess potential ecosystem response to projected warming and drying over the coming century.

  19. Delineation of Magnesium-rich Ultramafic Rocks Available for Mineral Carbon Sequestration in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krevor, S.C.; Graves, C.R.; Van Gosen, B. S.; McCafferty, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    The 2005 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage suggested that a major gap in mineral carbon sequestration is locating the magnesium-silicate bedrock available to sequester CO2. It is generally known that silicate minerals with high concentrations of magnesium are suitable for mineral carbonation. However, no assessment has been made covering the entire United States detailing their geographical distribution and extent, or evaluating their potential for use in mineral carbonation. Researchers at Columbia University and the U.S. Geological Survey have developed a digital geologic database of ultramafic rocks in the continental United States. Data were compiled from varied-scale geologic maps of magnesium-silicate ultramafic rocks. These rock types are potentially suitable as source material for mineral carbon-dioxide sequestration. The focus of the national-scale map is entirely on suitable ultramafic rock types, which typically consist primarily of olivine and serpentine minerals. By combining the map with digital datasets that show non-mineable lands (such as urban areas and National Parks), estimates on potential depth of a surface mine, and the predicted reactivities of the mineral deposits, one can begin to estimate the capacity for CO2 mineral sequestration within the United States. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Assessment on the availability of nitrogen fertilization in improving carbon sequestration potential of China's cropland soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fei; Wang, Xiao-Ke; Han, Bing; Ouyang, Zhi-Yun; Duan, Xiao-Nan; Zheng, Hua

    2008-10-01

    With reference to the situation of nitrogen fertilization in 2003 and the recommendations from agricultural experts on fertilization to different crops, two scenarios, namely, 'current situation' and 'fertilization as recommended', were set for estimating the current and potential carbon sequestration of China's cropland soil under nitrogen fertilization. After collecting and analyzing the typical data from the long-term agricultural experiment stations all over China, and based on the recent studies of soil organic matter and nutrient dynamics, we plotted China into four agricultural regions, and estimated the carbon sequestration rate and potential of cropland soil under the two scenarios in each province of China. Meanwhile, with the data concerning fossil fuel consumption for fertilizer production and nitrogen fertilization, the greenhouse gas leakage caused by nitrogen fertilizer production and application was estimated with the help of the parameters given by domestic studies and IPCC. We further proposed that the available carbon sequestration potential of cropland soil could be taken as the criterion of the validity and availability of carbon sequestration measures. The results showed that the application of synthetic nitrogen fertilizer could bring about a carbon sequestration potential of 21.9 Tg C x a(-1) in current situation, and 30.2 Tg C x a(-1) with fertilization as recommended. However, under the two scenarios, the greenhouse gas leakage caused by fertilizer production and application would reach 72.9 Tg C x a(-1) and 91.4 Tg C x a(-1), and thus, the actual available carbon sequestration potential would be -51.0 Tg C x a(-1) and -61.1 Tg C x a(-1), respectively. The situation was even worse under the 'fertilization as recommended' scenario, because the increase in the amount of nitrogen fertilization would lead to 10. 1 Tg C x a(-1) or more net greenhouse gas emission. All these results indicated that the application of synthetic nitrogen fertilizer

  1. Plant allocation of carbon to defense as a function of herbivory, light and nutrient availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Donald L.; Ju, Shu; Liu, Rongsong; Bryant, John P.; Gourley, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    We use modeling to determine the optimal relative plant carbon allocations between foliage, fine roots, anti-herbivore defense, and reproduction to maximize reproductive output. The model treats these plant components and the herbivore compartment as variables. Herbivory is assumed to be purely folivory. Key external factors include nutrient availability, degree of shading, and intensity of herbivory. Three alternative functional responses are used for herbivory, two of which are variations on donor-dependent herbivore (models 1a and 1b) and one of which is a Lotka–Volterra type of interaction (model 2). All three were modified to include the negative effect of chemical defenses on the herbivore. Analysis showed that, for all three models, two stable equilibria could occur, which differs from most common functional responses when no plant defense component is included. Optimal strategies of carbon allocation were defined as the maximum biomass of reproductive propagules produced per unit time, and found to vary with changes in external factors. Increased intensity of herbivory always led to an increase in the fractional allocation of carbon to defense. Decreases in available limiting nutrient generally led to increasing importance of defense. Decreases in available light had little effect on defense but led to increased allocation to foliage. Decreases in limiting nutrient and available light led to decreases in allocation to reproduction in models 1a and 1b but not model 2. Increases in allocation to plant defense were usually accompanied by shifts in carbon allocation away from fine roots, possibly because higher plant defense reduced the loss of nutrients to herbivory.

  2. 40 Gb/s Pulse Generation Using Gain Switching of a Commercially Available Laser Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Jesper; Hanberg, Jesper; Franck, Thorkild

    1999-01-01

    , and a photodiode for optical power monitoring.The RF input port was connected to the driver circuit using a coplanar microwave probe. A DC bias and a large signal modulation at 10 GHz was applied to the module to generate chirped pulses. A linear as well as a non-linear soliton compression was used with optical...... to ease RF connection. The laser die is connected to a gold plated AlN microwave substrate that also acts as a heat spreader. The microwave substrate contains an impedance matching resistor for the RF signal as well as a bias-T for the DC bias. 50 ohm Flexguide technology is used for the interconnection...... between the microwave substrate and the RF feed-through in the wall of the module. The module is build as a 14 pin butterfly package with the RF feed-through designed as a coplanar 50 ohm impedance port. Included in the module are a built-in optical isolator, a thermistor, a thermo-electric cooler...

  3. Carbon availability affects diurnally controlled processes and cell morphology of Cyanothece 51142.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Stöckel

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photoautotrophs notable for their ability to utilize atmospheric CO2 as the major source of carbon. The prospect of using cyanobacteria to convert solar energy and high concentrations of CO2 efficiently into biomass and renewable energy sources has sparked substantial interest in using flue gas from coal-burning power plants as a source of inorganic carbon. However, in order to guide further advances in this area, a better understanding of the metabolic changes that occur under conditions of high CO2 is needed. To determine the effect of high CO2 on cell physiology and growth, we analyzed the global transcriptional changes in the unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece 51142 grown in 8% CO2-enriched air. We found a concerted response of genes related to photosynthesis, carbon metabolism, respiration, nitrogen fixation, ribosome biosynthesis, and the synthesis of nucleotides and structural cell wall polysaccharides. The overall response to 8% CO2 in Cyanothece 51142 involves different strategies, to compensate for the high C/N ratio during both phases of the diurnal cycle. Our analyses show that high CO2 conditions trigger the production of carbon-rich compounds and stimulate processes such as respiration and nitrogen fixation. In addition, we observed that high levels of CO2 affect fundamental cellular processes such as cell growth and dramatically alter the intracellular morphology. This study provides novel insights on how diurnal and developmental rhythms are integrated to facilitate adaptation to high CO2 in Cyanothece 51142.

  4. Monodispersed calcium carbonate nanoparticles modulate local pH and inhibit tumor growth in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Avik; Raliya, Ramesh; Tian, Limei; Akers, Walter; Ippolito, Joseph E.; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Biswas, Pratim; Achilefu, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    The acidic extracellular environment of tumors potentiates their aggressiveness and metastasis, but few methods exist to selectively modulate the extracellular pH (pHe) environment of tumors. Transient flushing of biological systems with alkaline fluids or proton pump inhibitors is impractical and nonselective. Here we report a nanoparticles-based strategy to intentionally modulate the pHe in tumors. Biochemical simulations indicate that the dissolution of calcium carbonate nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) in vivo increases pH asymptotically to 7.4. We developed two independent facile methods to synthesize monodisperse non-doped vaterite nano-CaCO3 with distinct size range between 20 and 300 nm. Using murine models of cancer, we demonstrate that the selective accumulation of nano-CaCO3 in tumors increases tumor pH over time. The associated induction of tumor growth stasis is putatively interpreted as a pHe increase. This study establishes an approach to prepare nano-CaCO3 over a wide particle size range, a formulation that stabilizes the nanomaterials in aqueous solutions, and a pH-sensitive nano-platform capable of modulating the acidic environment of cancer for potential therapeutic benefits.The acidic extracellular environment of tumors potentiates their aggressiveness and metastasis, but few methods exist to selectively modulate the extracellular pH (pHe) environment of tumors. Transient flushing of biological systems with alkaline fluids or proton pump inhibitors is impractical and nonselective. Here we report a nanoparticles-based strategy to intentionally modulate the pHe in tumors. Biochemical simulations indicate that the dissolution of calcium carbonate nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) in vivo increases pH asymptotically to 7.4. We developed two independent facile methods to synthesize monodisperse non-doped vaterite nano-CaCO3 with distinct size range between 20 and 300 nm. Using murine models of cancer, we demonstrate that the selective accumulation of nano-CaCO3

  5. A central role for carbon-overflow pathways in the modulation of bacterial cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinai Chittezham Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Similar to developmental programs in eukaryotes, the death of a subpopulation of cells is thought to benefit bacterial biofilm development. However mechanisms that mediate a tight control over cell death are not clearly understood at the population level. Here we reveal that CidR dependent pyruvate oxidase (CidC and α-acetolactate synthase/decarboxylase (AlsSD overflow metabolic pathways, which are active during staphylococcal biofilm development, modulate cell death to achieve optimal biofilm biomass. Whereas acetate derived from CidC activity potentiates cell death in cells by a mechanism dependent on intracellular acidification and respiratory inhibition, AlsSD activity effectively counters CidC action by diverting carbon flux towards neutral rather than acidic byproducts and consuming intracellular protons in the process. Furthermore, the physiological features that accompany metabolic activation of cell death bears remarkable similarities to hallmarks of eukaryotic programmed cell death, including the generation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage. Finally, we demonstrate that the metabolic modulation of cell death not only affects biofilm development but also biofilm-dependent disease outcomes. Given the ubiquity of such carbon overflow pathways in diverse bacterial species, we propose that the metabolic control of cell death may be a fundamental feature of prokaryotic development.

  6. Dimensionality of carbon nanomaterial impacting on the modulation of amyloid peptide assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Zhu, Z.; Bortolini, C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Amari, A.; Zhang, H. X.; Liu, L.; Dong, M. D.

    2016-07-01

    A wide variety of inorganic nanomaterials have been exploited so far for their great potential for biological applications. Some of these materials could be valid candidates to modulate the assembly of amyloid peptides, which is relevant to amyloid-related diseases. In this work, we reveal that a carbon nanomaterial can indeed modulate the assembly of amyloid peptides and, additionally, we show that this modulating effect is closely related to the dimensionality of the nanomaterials.

  7. Dimensionality of carbon nanomaterial impacting on the modulation of amyloid peptide assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, J.; Zhu, Z.; Bortolini, C.;

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of inorganic nanomaterials have been exploited so far for their great potential for biological applications. Some of these materials could be valid candidates to modulate the assembly of amyloid peptides, which is relevant to amyloid-related diseases. In this work, we reveal...... that a carbon nanomaterial can indeed modulate the assembly of amyloid peptides and, additionally, we show that this modulating effect is closely related to the dimensionality of the nanomaterials....

  8. Investigation on Maximum Available Reach for Different Modulation Formats in WDM-PON Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatska, I.; Bobrovs, V.; Spolitis, S.; Gavars, P.; Ivanovs, G.; Parts, R.

    2016-08-01

    Considering the growing demand for broadband of access networks, in the present paper we investigate various modulation formats as a way of increasing the performance of optical transmission systems. Non-return-to-zero (NRZ) on-off keying, return-to-zero (RZ) OOK, carrier suppressed RZ (CSRZ) OOK, duobinary (DB), NRZ differential phase shift keying (NRZDPSK), RZ-DPSK and CSRZ-DPSK formats are compared using the maximal achievable reach with bit error rate less than 10-9 as a criterion. Simulations are performed by using OptSim software tool. It is shown that using the transmission system without dispersion compensation the best results are shown by duobinary and CSRZ-OOK modulation formats, but with the system using dispersion compensating fiber (DCF) the longest transmission distance is achieved by RZ-DPSK modulation format. By investigating the influence of channel spacing for best-performed modulation formats, network reach decrease for transmission systems with DCF fiber has been observed due to channel crosstalk.

  9. An exceptional kinetic quantum sieving separation effect of hydrogen isotopes on commercially available carbon molecular sieves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yanlong; Cai, Jinjun; Li, Liangjun; Yang, Menglong; Zhao, Xuebo

    2014-08-14

    The quantum sieving effect of H2/D2 at 77 K on commercially available carbon molecular sieves (1.5GN-H and 3KT-172) was studied. An exceptional reverse kinetic quantum effect is observed on 1.5GN-H where D2 diffuses much faster than H2 with a ratio of up to 5.83 at low pressure, and the difference is still very evident even as the pressure increases up to 1 bar. D2 also diffuses faster than H2 on 3KT-172 with a ratio of up to 1.86. However, the reverse kinetic sieving disappears in a polymer-based carbon (PC). The present kinetic quantum sieving effect of H2 and D2 at 77 K on 1.5GN-H is the highest to date.

  10. 78 FR 28205 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Lake Charles Carbon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Lake Charles Carbon Capture and... Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project Draft ] Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0464D... the Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, which would be constructed and operated...

  11. Carbon monoxide: from toxin to endogenous modulator of cardiovascular functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Johnson

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is a pollutant commonly recognized for its toxicological attributes, including CNS and cardiovascular effects. But CO is also formed endogenously in mammalian tissues. Endogenously formed CO normally arises from heme degradation in a reaction catalyzed by heme oxygenase. While inhibitors of endogenous CO production can raise arterial pressure, heme loading can enhance CO production and lead to vasodepression. Both central and peripheral tissues possess heme oxygenases and generate CO from heme, but the inability of heme substrate to cross the blood brain barrier suggests the CNS heme-heme oxygenase-CO system may be independent of the periphery. In the CNS, CO apparently acts in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS promoting changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission and lowering blood pressure. At the periphery, the heme-heme oxygenase-CO system can affect cardiovascular functions in a two-fold manner; specifically: 1 heme-derived CO generated within vascular smooth muscle (VSM can promote vasodilation, but 2 its actions on the endothelium apparently can promote vasoconstriction. Thus, it seems reasonable that the CNS-, VSM- and endothelial-dependent actions of the heme-heme oxygenase-CO system may all affect cardiac output and vascular resistance, and subsequently blood pressure.

  12. Development of a CO2 Sequestration Module by Integrating Mineral Activation and Aqueous Carbonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Alexander; Parvana Aksoy; John Andresen; Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Harold Schobert

    2006-08-14

    Mineral carbonation is a promising concept for permanent CO{sub 2} sequestration due to the vast natural abundance of the raw materials and the permanent storage of CO{sub 2} in solid form as carbonates. The sequestration of CO{sub 2} through the employment of magnesium silicates--olivine and serpentine--is beyond the proof of concept stage. For the work done in this project, serpentine was chosen as the feedstock mineral due to its abundance and availability. Although the reactivity of olivine is greater than that of serpentine, physical and chemical treatments have been shown to increase greatly the reactivity of serpentine. The primary drawback to mineral carbonation is reaction kinetics. To accelerate the carbonation, aqueous processes are preferred, where the minerals are first dissolved in solution. In aqueous carbonation, the key step is the dissolution rate of the mineral, where the mineral dissolution reaction is likely to be surface-controlled. The relatively low reactivity of serpentine has warranted research into physical and chemical treatments that have been shown to greatly increase its reactivity. The use of sulfuric acid as an accelerating medium for the removal of magnesium from serpentine has been investigated. To accelerate the dissolution process, the mineral can be ground to very fine particle size, <37 {micro}m, but this is a very energy-intensive process. Previous work in our laboratory showed that chemical surface activation helps to dissolve magnesium from the serpentine (of particle size {approx} 100 {micro}m) and that the carbonation reaction can be conducted under mild conditions (20 C and 4.6 MPa) compared to previous studies that required >185 C, >13 MPa, and <37 {micro}m particle size. This work also showed that over 70% of the magnesium can be extracted at ambient temperature, leaving an amorphous silica with surface area of about 330 m{sup 2}/g. The overall objective of this research program is to optimize the active carbonation

  13. Potassium nutrition and water availability affect phloem transport of photosynthetic carbon in eucalypt trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epron, Daniel; Cabral, Osvaldo; Laclau, Jean-Paul; Dannoura, Masako; Packer, Ana Paula; Plain, Caroline; Battie-Laclau, Patricia; Moreira, Marcelo; Trivelin, Paulo; Bouillet, Jean-Pierre; Gérant, Dominique; Nouvellon, Yann

    2015-04-01

    Potassium fertilisation strongly affects growth and carbon partitioning of eucalypt on tropical soil that are strongly weathered. In addition, potassium fertilization could be of great interest in mitigating the adverse consequences of drought in planted forests, as foliar K concentrations influence osmotic adjustment, stomatal regulation and phloem loading. Phloem is the main pathway for transferring photosynthate from source leaves to sink organs, thus controlling growth partitioning among the different tree compartments. But little is known about the effect of potassium nutrition on phloem transport of photosynthetic carbon and on the interaction between K nutrition and water availability. In situ 13C pulse labelling was conducted on tropical eucalypt trees (Eucalyptus grandis L.) grown in a trial plantation with plots in which 37% of throughfall were excluded (about 500 mm/yr) using home-made transparent gutters (-W) or not (+W) and plots that received 0.45 mol K m-2 applied as KCl three months after planting (+K) or not (-K). Three trees were labelled in each of the four treatments (+K+W, +K-W, -K+W and -K-W). Trees were labelled for one hour by injecting pure 13CO2 in a 27 m3 whole crown chamber. We estimated the velocity of carbon transfer in the trunk by comparing time lags between the uptake of 13CO2 and its recovery in trunk CO2 efflux recorded by off axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Research) in two chambers per tree, one just under the crown and one at the base of the trunk. We analyzed the dynamics of the label recovered in the foliage and in the phloem sap by analysing carbon isotope composition of bulk leaf organic matter and phloem extracts using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The velocity of carbon transfer in the trunk and the initial rate 13C disappearance from the foliage were much higher in +K trees than in -K trees with no significant effect of rainfall. The volumetric flow of phloem, roughly estimated by multiplying

  14. Landscape configuration modulates carbon storage in seagrass sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricart, Aurora M.; Pérez, Marta; Romero, Javier

    2017-02-01

    Climate change has increased interest in seagrass systems as natural carbon sinks and recent studies have estimated the carbon stocks associated with seagrass meadows. However, the factors that affect their variability remain poorly understood. This paper assesses how landscape-level attributes (patch size and matrix composition) influence carbon storage in seagrass sediments. We quantified the organic carbon (Corg) content and other geochemical properties (δ13C and particle size) in surface sediments of continuous Posidonia oceanica meadows, patchy meadows interspersed with rocky-algal reefs and patchy meadows on sedimentary bottoms. We also took samples of potential carbon sources for isotopic composition determination. Our results indicate that the continuous meadows accumulated larger amounts of Corg than patchy meadows, whether embedded in a rock or sand matrix. The Corg from continuous meadows was also more 13C enriched, which suggests that a high proportion of the carbon was derived from plant material (autochthonous sources); in contrast in patchy meadows (especially in a sand matrix), lower δ13C values indicated a higher contribution from allochthonous sources (mainly suspended particulate organic matter, SPOM). These findings suggest that the sediment of continuous meadows stores more Corg in than that of patchy meadows. This is probably due to the increased contribution from seagrass leaves, which are much more refractory than SPOM. In general, certain landscape configurations, and especially patchiness, appear to reduce the carbon storage capacity of seagrasses. Since the current decline of seagrass is leading to habitat fragmentation, our results increase the argument for the promotion of effective measures to preserve the integrity of these natural carbon sinks.

  15. Interrelated modules in cyanobacterial photosynthesis: the carbon-concentrating mechanism, photorespiration, and light perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Beronda L; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2016-05-01

    Here we consider the cyanobacterial carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) and photorespiration in the context of the regulation of light harvesting, using a conceptual framework borrowed from engineering: modularity. Broadly speaking, biological 'modules' are semi-autonomous functional units such as protein domains, operons, metabolic pathways, and (sub)cellular compartments. They are increasingly recognized as units of both evolution and engineering. Modules may be connected by metabolites, such as NADPH, ATP, and 2PG. While the Calvin-Benson-Bassham Cycle and photorespiratory salvage pathways can be considered as metabolic modules, the carboxysome, the core of the cyanobacterial CCM, is both a structural and a metabolic module. In photosynthetic organisms, which use light cues to adapt to the external environment and which tune the photosystems to provide the ATP and reducing power for carbon fixation, light-regulated modules are critical. The primary enzyme of carbon fixation, RuBisCO, uses CO2 as a substrate, which is accumulated via the CCM. However RuBisCO also has a secondary reaction in which it utilizes O2, a by-product of the photochemical modules, which leads to photorespiration. A complete understanding of the interplay among CCM and photorespiration is predicated on uncovering their connections to the light reactions and the regulatory factors and pathways that tune these modules to external cues. We probe this connection by investigating light inputs into the CCM and photorespiratory pathways in the chromatically acclimating cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon.

  16. Next Generation Fast RF Interlock Module and ATCA Adapter for ILC High Availability RF Test Station Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, R

    2009-10-17

    High availability interlocks and controls are required for the ILC (International Linear Collider) L-Band high power RF stations. A new F3 (Fast Fault Finder) VME module has been developed to process both fast and slow interlocks using FPGA logic to detect the interlock trip excursions. This combination eliminates the need for separate PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) control of slow interlocks. Modules are chained together to accommodate as many inputs as needed. In the next phase of development the F3's will be ported to the new industry standard ATCA (Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture) crate (shelf) via a specially designed VME adapter module with IPMI (Intelligent Platform Management Interface). The goal is to demonstrate auto-failover and hot-swap for future partially redundant systems.

  17. Carbon Allocation in Mojave Desert Plant-Soil Systems as Affected by Nitrogen and Water Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verburg, P. S.; Kapitzke, S. E.

    2008-12-01

    Changes in atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition due to increased urbanization and precipitation due to climate change are likely to affect carbon (C) allocation in plants and soils in arid ecosystems in the Southwestern United States where net primary production is often limited by N and water availability. We conducted a greenhouse study to determine the effects of N and water availability on one year old creosote (Larrea tridentata) plants, the dominant shrub in the Mojave Desert. In our greenhouse study we employed two N levels (0 and 40 kg ha-1) and two soil moisture levels (7% and 15%). We grew creosote seedlings in PVC columns filled with topsoil from the Mojave Global Change Facility at the Nevada Test Site. The columns were covered and sealed at the base of the plant to separate the above- from belowground plant compartment. Plants were distributed over two growth chambers receiving ambient light while day/night temperatures were set at 25° C/15° C. In one chamber plants were labeled once a week with 13C-enriched CO2 while a second chamber acted as an unlabeled control. Throughout the six month study we measured soil CO2 concentrations, respired CO2 as well as their isotopic signatures. At the end of the study plants were harvested and we measured plant above- and belowground biomass and isotopic composition of the vegetation. In addition, we measured isotopic composition of soil organic and inorganic C. Increased N availability stimulated stem weight and decreased total C losses through soil respiration. Other plant and soil parameters including isotopic composition were not affected by changes in N availability. Increased soil moisture stimulated plant biomass mainly due to an increase in leaf weight while root biomass tended to decrease. Soil CO2 concentrations increased with increasing water availability despite a reduction in root biomass. The isotopic data showed that net new C uptake increased mostly in leaves, soil organic matter and soil

  18. Property and Shape Modulation of Carbon Fibers Using Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaker, Jonny J; Anthony, David B; Tang, Guang; Shamsuddin, Siti-Ros; Kalinka, Gerhard; Weinrich, Malte; Abdolvand, Amin; Shaffer, Milo S P; Bismarck, Alexander

    2016-06-29

    An exciting challenge is to create unduloid-reinforcing fibers with tailored dimensions to produce synthetic composites with improved toughness and increased ductility. Continuous carbon fibers, the state-of-the-art reinforcement for structural composites, were modified via controlled laser irradiation to result in expanded outwardly tapered regions, as well as fibers with Q-tip (cotton-bud) end shapes. A pulsed laser treatment was used to introduce damage at the single carbon fiber level, creating expanded regions at predetermined points along the lengths of continuous carbon fibers, while maintaining much of their stiffness. The range of produced shapes was quantified and correlated to single fiber tensile properties. Mapped Raman spectroscopy was used to elucidate the local compositional and structural changes. Irradiation conditions were adjusted to create a swollen weakened region, such that fiber failure occurred in the laser treated region producing two fiber ends with outwardly tapered ends. Loading the tapered fibers allows for viscoelastic energy dissipation during fiber pull-out by enhanced friction as the fibers plough through a matrix. In these tapered fibers, diameters were locally increased up to 53%, forming outward taper angles of up to 1.8°. The tensile strength and strain to failure of the modified fibers were significantly reduced, by 75% and 55%, respectively, ensuring localization of the break in the expanded region; however, the fiber stiffness was only reduced by 17%. Using harsher irradiation conditions, carbon fibers were completely cut, resulting in cotton-bud fiber end shapes. Single fiber pull-out tests performed using these fibers revealed a 6.75-fold increase in work of pull-out compared to pristine carbon fibers. Controlled laser irradiation is a route to modify the shape of continuous carbon fibers along their lengths, as well as to cut them into controlled lengths leaving tapered or cotton-bud shapes.

  19. Preliminary studies of PQS PET detector module for dose verification of carbon beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.-I.; An, S. Jung; Lee, C. Y.; Jo, W. J.; Min, E.; Lee, K.; Kim, Y.; Joung, J.; Chung, Y. H.

    2014-05-01

    PET imaging can be used to verify dose distributions of therapeutic particle beams such as carbon ion beams. The purpose of this study was to develop a PET detector module which was designed for an in-beam PET scanner geometry integrated into a carbon beam therapy system, and to evaluate its feasibility as a monitoring system of patient dose distribution. A C-shaped PET geometry was proposed to avoid blockage of the carbon beam by the detector modules. The proposed PET system consisted of 14 detector modules forming a bore with 30.2 cm inner diameter for brain imaging. Each detector module is composed of a 9 × 9 array of 4.0 mm × 4.0 mm × 20.0 mm LYSO crystal module optically coupled with four 29 mm diameter PMTs using Photomultiplier-quadrant-sharing (PQS) technique. Because the crystal pixel was identified based upon the distribution of scintillation lights of four PMTs, the design of the reflector between crystal elements should be well optimized. The optical design of reflectors was optimized using DETECT2000, a Monte Carlo code for light photon transport. A laser-cut reflector set was developed using the Enhanced Specular Reflector (ESR, 3M Co.) mirror-film with a high reflectance of 98% and a thickness of 0.064 mm. All 81 crystal elements of detector module were identified. Our result demonstrates that the C-shaped PET system is under development and we present the first reconstructed image.

  20. Influence of carbon sources on nutrient removal in A(2)/O-MBRs: Availability assessment of internal carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rongle; Fan, Yaobo; Wei, Yuansong; Wang, Yawei; Luo, Nan; Yang, Min; Yuan, Xing; Yu, Rong

    2016-10-01

    Both internal carbon source and some external carbon sources were used to improve the nutrient removal in Anaerobic-Anoxic-Oxic-Membrane Bioreactor (A(2)/O-MBRs), and their technical and cost analysis was investigated. The experimental results showed that the nutrient removals were improved by all the carbon source additions. The total nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiency were higher in the experiments with external carbon source additions than that with internal carbon source addition. It was found that pathways of nitrogen and phosphorus transform were different dependent on different carbon source additions by the mass balance analysis. With external carbon source addition, the simultaneous nitrification and denitrification occurred in aerobic zone, and the P-uptake in aerobic phase was evident. Therefore, with addition of C-MHP (internal carbon source produced from sludge pretreatment by microwave-H2O2 process), the denitrification and phosphorus-uptake in anoxic zone was notable. Cost analysis showed that the unit nitrogen removal costs were 57.13CNY/kg N of C-acetate addition and 54.48CNY/kgN of C-MHP addition, respectively. The results indicated that the C-MHP has a good technical and economic feasibility to substitute external carbon sources partially for nutrient removal.

  1. Optimal Plant Carbon Allocation Implies a Biological Control on Nitrogen Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, I. C.; Stocker, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    The degree to which nitrogen availability limits the terrestrial C sink under rising CO2 is a key uncertainty in carbon cycle and climate change projections. Results from ecosystem manipulation studies and meta-analyses suggest that plant C allocation to roots adjusts dynamically under varying degrees of nitrogen availability and other soil fertility parameters. In addition, the ratio of biomass production to GPP appears to decline under nutrient scarcity. This reflects increasing plant C exudation into the soil (Cex) with decreasing nutrient availability. Cex is consumed by an array of soil organisms and may imply an improvement of nutrient availability to the plant. Thus, N availability is under biological control, but incurs a C cost. In spite of clear observational support, this concept is left unaccounted for in Earth system models. We develop a model for the coupled cycles of C and N in terrestrial ecosystems to explore optimal plant C allocation under rising CO2 and its implications for the ecosystem C balance. The model follows a balanced growth approach, accounting for the trade-offs between leaf versus root growth and Cex in balancing C fixation and N uptake. We assume that Cex is proportional to root mass, and that the ratio of N uptake (Nup) to Cex is proportional to inorganic N concentration in the soil solution. We further assume that Cex is consumed by N2-fixing processes if the ratio of Nup:Cex falls below the inverse of the C cost of N2-fixation. Our analysis thereby accounts for the feedbacks between ecosystem C and N cycling and stoichiometry. We address the question of how the plant C economy will adjust under rising atmospheric CO2 and what this implies for the ecosystem C balance and the degree of N limitation.

  2. Evaluation of nutrient index using organic carbon, available P and available K concentrations as a measure of soil fertility in Varahi River basin, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ravikumar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Varahi River basin is in the midst of Udupi district in the western part of Karnataka state, covering parts of Kundapura and Udupi taluks in Udupi District, Karnataka, India. Spatial distributions for twenty physical and chemical properties were examined in the soil samples of selected agricultural fields in 28 different locations in Varahi River basin. The present study revealed that there is not much variation in soil fertility status of soils developed on various landforms in the area as the soils were having low to medium in organic carbon (0.06 to 1.20 % and available nitrogen (6.27 to 25.09 Kg/ha content; low to medium in available P (2.24 to 94.08 Kg/ha and deficient to doubtful in available K (20.10 - 412.3 Kg/ha contents. The soils of Varahi River basin were characterized as low-medium-low (LML category based on the nutrient index calculated w.r.t. available organic carbon, available P and available K. Further, Sodium Absorption Ratio (SAR and Exchangeable Sodium Percentage (ESP indicated that the soils were excellent for irrigation.

  3. Modulation in Ocean Primary Production due to Variability of Photosynthetically Available Radiation under Different Atmospheric Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhumita Tripathy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate of photosynthesis primarily depends on nutrients and photosynthetically available radiation (PAR at sea surface. Several ship cruises were carried out to measure optical, biological, and atmospheric parameters in the Arabian Sea and their variability were studied. An analytical nonspectral photosynthesis-irradiance model was used to estimate euphotic primary production (EuPP to study its variability during cruise periods. PAR was estimated using COART model using in situ measured aerosol optical depth (AOD to compare with in situ measured PAR. In order to understand the variability of PAR under different types of aerosol and different aerosol loading, a simulation study was carried out using COART model. EuPP was estimated for various PAR values under different aerosol loading and cloud coverage conditions. Sensitivity analysis showed that for maritime, maritime polluted, and desert aerosols, the ratio PAR/PAR0AOD has attenuated to about 11–25%, whereas it has attenuated to 44% for urban aerosol type. PAR/PARclear  sky was reduced by ~57% for high aerosol loading and for overcast sky. The decrease in EuPP under various aerosol loading and cloud coverage was observed to depend on the photoadaptation parameter. EuPP/EuPPclear  sky was reduced by 38% for maximum maritime aerosol loading and for overcast sky.

  4. Carbon nanotube coated fiber Bragg grating for photomechanical optic modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivananju, B N; Suri, Ashish; Asokan, Sundarrajan; Misra, Abha

    2013-09-01

    We have demonstrated novel concept of utilizing the photomechanical actuation in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to tune and reversibly switch the Bragg wavelength. When fiber Bragg grating coated with CNTs (CNT-FBG) is exposed externally to a wide range of optical wavelengths, e.g., ultraviolet to infrared (0.2-200 μm), a strain is induced in the CNTs which alters the grating pitch and refractive index in the CNT-FBG system resulting in a shift in the Bragg wavelength. This novel approach will find applications in telecommunication, sensors and actuators, and also for real time monitoring of the photomechanical actuation in nanoscale materials.

  5. Availability, usage, and threats to freshwater resources on low carbonate islands in Micronesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboroši, Danko; Jenson, John W.; Sánchez Collazo, Maricruz; Zega, Mojca

    2010-05-01

    Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) is an insular nation in the western Pacific. It consists of 4 high volcanic islands and 37 low carbonate units, mostly coral atolls. The high islands are relatively large, and are developing socioeconomic centers of the country, whereas low islands are small and remote outposts of traditional subsistence lifestyle. The latter are inhabited by a fifth of the nation's population of 107,000 people. Total land area of a typical low island is a fraction of a km2, yet may be home to hundreds of people, creating some of the highest population densities in the Pacific. The resultant extreme pressures on natural resources are exacerbated by severe weather hazards, especially typhoons and unusually high tides which have recently flooded some islands in entirety, damaging homes and food sources. Freshwater resources are particularly sensitive. Crowded low islands have some of the world's most unfavorable relationships between population density and freshwater availability. As there are no communal or municipal facilities and government operated infrastructure, people have only two sources of water available for consumption: rainwater and groundwater. Rain is captured by individual households' thatch or corrugated iron roofs and transferred by gutters to concrete or fiberglass tanks. It is used for drinking, cooking, and dishwashing, and depending on availability, for laundry and showering. Such arrangement are highly unreliable, because they depend on sufficient rainfall and islanders' ability to capture and store it. Some communities have actually run out of water in the past, as a result of prolonged droughts or typhoons' damage to the catchment systems. In addition, tropical climate and pervasive organic matter and microorganisms make the tanks' maintenance difficult, because even most conscientious cleaning cannot ensure that stored water remains potable. Stomach problems and more serious health complications are common. Groundwater

  6. Assessing groundwater availability in a folded carbonate aquifer through the development of a numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Salvo, Cristina; Romano, Emanuele; Guyennon, Nicolas; Bruna Petrangeli, Anna; Preziosi, Elisabetta

    2015-04-01

    The study of aquifer systems from a quantitative point of view is fundamental for adopting water management plans aiming at preserving water resources and reducing environmental risks related to groundwater level and discharge changes. This is also what the European Union Water Framework Directive (WFD, 2000/60/EC) states, holding the development of numerical models as a key aspect for groundwater management. The objective of this research is to i) define a methodology for modeling a complex hydrogeological structure in a structurally folded carbonate area and ii) estimate the concurrent effects of exploitation and climate changes on groundwater availability through the implementation of a 3D groundwater flow model. This study concerns the Monte Coscerno karst aquifer located in the Apennine chain in Central Italy in the Nera River Valley.This aquifer, is planned to be exploited in the near future for water supply. Negative trends of precipitation in Central Italy have been reported in relation to global climate changes, which are expected to affect the availability of recharge to carbonate aquifers throughout the region . A great concern is the combined impact of climate change and groundwater exploitation, hence scenarios are needed taking into account the effect of possible temperature and precipitation trends on recharge rates. Following a previous experience with model conceptualization and long-term simulation of groundwater flow, an integrated three-dimensional groundwater model has been developed for the Monte Coscerno aquifer. In a previous paper (Preziosi et al 2014) the spatial distribution of recharge to this aquifer was estimated through the Thornthwaite Mather model at a daily time step using as inputs past precipitation and temperature values (1951-2013) as well as soil and landscape properties. In this paper the numerical model development is described. On the basis of well logs from private consulting companies and literature cross sections the

  7. Soil resource availability impacts microbial response to organic carbon and inorganic nitrogen inputs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei-jian; W.ZHU; S.HU

    2005-01-01

    Impacts of newly added organic carbon (C) and inorganic nitrogen (N) on the microbial utilization of soil organic matter are important in determining the future C balance of terrestrial ecosystems. We examined microbial responses to cellulose and ammonium nitrate additions in three soils with very different C and N availability. These soils included an organic soil( 14.2% total organic C, with extremely high extractable N and low labile C), a forest soi1(4.7% total organic C, with high labile C and extremely low extractable N),and a grassland soil (1.6% total organic C, with low extractable N and labile C). While cellulose addition alone significantly enhanced microbial respiration and biomass C and N in the organic and grassland soils, it accelerated only the microbial respiration in the highly-N limited forest soil. These results indicated that when N was not limited, C addition enhanced soil respiration by stimulating both microbial growth and their metabolic activity. New C inputs lead to elevated C release in all three soils, and the magnitude of the enhancement was higher in the organic and grassland soils than the forest soil. The addition of cellulose plus N to the forest and grassland soils initially increased the microbial biomass and respiration rates, but decreased the rates as time progressed. Compared to cellulose addition alone,cellulose plus N additions increased the total C-released in the grassland soil, but not in the forest soil. The enhancement of total Creleased induced by C and N addition was less than 50% of the added-C in the forest soil after 96 d of incubation, in contrast to 87.5%and 89.0% in the organic and grassland soils. These results indicate that indigenous soil C and N availability substantially impacts the allocation of organic C for microbial biomass growth and/or respiration, potentially regulating the turnover rates of the new organic C inputs.

  8. TOR Signaling Promotes Accumulation of BZR1 to Balance Growth with Carbon Availability in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; Zhu, Jia-Ying; Roh, Jeehee; Marchive, Chloé; Kim, Seong-Ki; Meyer, Christian; Sun, Yu; Wang, Wenfei; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2016-07-25

    For maintenance of cellular homeostasis, the actions of growth-promoting hormones must be attenuated when nutrient and energy become limiting. The molecular mechanisms that coordinate hormone-dependent growth responses with nutrient availability remain poorly understood in plants [1, 2]. The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase is an evolutionarily conserved master regulator that integrates nutrient and energy signaling to regulate growth and homeostasis in both animals and plants [3-7]. Here, we show that sugar signaling through TOR controls the accumulation of the brassinosteroid (BR)-signaling transcription factor BZR1, which is essential for growth promotion by multiple hormonal and environmental signals [8-11]. Starvation, caused by shifting of light-grown Arabidopsis seedlings into darkness, as well as inhibition of TOR by inducible RNAi, led to plant growth arrest and reduced expression of BR-responsive genes. The growth arrest caused by TOR inactivation was partially recovered by BR treatment and the gain-of-function mutation bzr1-1D, which causes accumulation of active forms of BZR1 [12]. Exogenous sugar promoted BZR1 accumulation and seedling growth, but such sugar effects were largely abolished by inactivation of TOR, whereas the effect of TOR inactivation on BZR1 degradation is abolished by inhibition of autophagy and by the bzr1-1D mutation. These results indicate that cellular starvation leads sequentially to TOR inactivation, autophagy, and BZR1 degradation. Such regulation of BZR1 accumulation by glucose-TOR signaling allows carbon availability to control the growth promotion hormonal programs, ensuring supply-demand balance in plant growth.

  9. A regenerable carbon dioxide removal and oxygen recovery system for the Japanese experiment module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuji, K.; Hirao, M.; Satoh, S.

    The Japanese Space Station Program is now under Phase B study by the National Space Development Agency of Japan in participation with the U.S. Space Station Program. A Japanese Space Station participation will be a dedicated pressurized module to be attached to the U.S. Space Station, and is called Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Astronaut scientists will conduct various experimental operations there. Thus an environment control and life support system is required. Regenerable carbon dioxide removal and collection technique as well as oxygen recovery technique has been studied and investigated for several years. A regenerable carbon dioxide removal subsystem using steam desorbed solid amine and an oxygen recovery subsystem using Sabatier methane cracking have a good possibility for the application to the Japanese Experiment Module. Basic performance characteristics of the carbon dioxide removal and oxygen recovery subsystem are presented according to the results of a fundamental performance test program. The trace contaminant removal process is also investigated and discussed. The solvent recovery plant for the regeneration of various industrial solvents, such as hydrocarbons, alcohols and so on, utilizes the multi-bed solvent adsorption and steam desorption process, which is very similar to the carbon dioxide removal subsystem. Therefore, to develop essential components including adsorption tank (bed), condensor, process controller and energy saving system, the technology obtained from the experience to construct solvent recovery plant can be easily and effectively applicable to the carbon dioxide removal subsystem. The energy saving efficiency is evaluated for blower power reduction, steam reduction and waste heat utilization technique. According to the above background, the entire environment control and life support system for the Japanese Experiment Module including the carbon dioxide removal and oxygen recovery subsystem is evaluated and proposed.

  10. Modulation of the major paths of carbon in photorespiratory mutants of synechocystis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Huege

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies using transcript and metabolite profiles of wild-type and gene deletion mutants revealed that photorespiratory pathways are essential for the growth of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under atmospheric conditions. Pool size changes of primary metabolites, such as glycine and glycolate, indicated a link to photorespiration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The (13C labelling kinetics of primary metabolites were analysed in photoautotrophically grown cultures of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS to demonstrate the link with photorespiration. Cells pre-acclimated to high CO(2 (5%, HC or limited CO(2 (0.035%, LC conditions were pulse-labelled under very high (2% w/w (13C-NaHCO(3 (VHC conditions followed by treatment with ambient (12C at HC and LC conditions, respectively. The (13C enrichment, relative changes in pool size, and (13C flux of selected metabolites were evaluated. We demonstrate two major paths of CO(2 assimilation via Rubisco in Synechocystis, i.e., from 3PGA via PEP to aspartate, malate and citrate or, to a lesser extent, from 3PGA via glucose-6-phosphate to sucrose. The results reveal evidence of carbon channelling from 3PGA to the PEP pool. Furthermore, (13C labelling of glycolate was observed under conditions thought to suppress photorespiration. Using the glycolate-accumulating ΔglcD1 mutant, we demonstrate enhanced (13C partitioning into the glycolate pool under conditions favouring photorespiration and enhanced (13C partitioning into the glycine pool of the glycine-accumulating ΔgcvT mutant. Under LC conditions, the photorespiratory mutants ΔglcD1 and ΔgcvT showed enhanced activity of the additional carbon-fixing PEP carboxylase pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: With our approach of non-steady-state (13C labelling and analysis of metabolite pool sizes with respective (13C enrichments, we identify the use and modulation of major pathways of carbon assimilation in

  11. Modulation of apoptotic pathways of macrophages by surface-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanqin Jiang

    Full Text Available Biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs often involve improving their hydrophilicity and dispersion in biological media by modifying them through noncovalent or covalent functionalization. However, the potential adverse effects of surface-functionalized CNTs have not been well characterized. In this study, we functionalized multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs via carboxylation, to produce MWCNTs-COOH, and via poly (ethylene glycol linking, to produce MWCNTs-PEG. We used these functionalized MWCNTs to study the effect of surface functionalization on MWCNTs-induced toxicity to macrophages, and elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action. Our results revealed that MWCNTs-PEG were less cytotoxic and were associated with less apoptotic cell death of macrophages than MWCNTs-COOH. Additionally, MWCNTs-PEG induced less generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS involving less activation of NADPH oxidase compared with MWCNTs-COOH, as evidenced by membrane translocation of p47(phox and p67(phox in macrophages. The less cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of MWCNTs-PEG compared with MWCNTs-COOH resulted from the lower cellular uptake of MWCNTs-PEG, which resulted in less activation of oxidative stress-responsive pathways, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK and nuclear factor (NF-κB. These results demonstrate that surface functionalization of CNTs may alter ROS-mediated cytotoxic and apoptotic response by modulating apoptotic signaling pathways. Our study thus provides new insights into the molecular basis for the surface properties affecting CNTs toxicity.

  12. Comparison of ORNL Low Cost Carbon Fiber with Commercially Available Industrial Grade Carbon Fiber in Pultrusion Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Jr, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McCay, Jeff A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jackson, Connie D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Composite Applications Group LLC in collaboration with Heil Trailer International partnered in a project to design and develop solutions for light weighting of aluminum dry bulk tank trailers. The project approach was to utilize pultruded composite sections in place of aluminum components to reduce weight thereby saving energy through more efficient transport. Low cost carbon fiber was evaluated as a potential cost saving option that could enhance weight savings at reduced cost versus current commercial material.

  13. High RF power test of a lower hybrid module mock-up in carbon fiber composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goniche, M.; Bibet, P.; Brossaud, J.; Cano, V.; Froissard, P.; Kazarian, F.; Rey, G. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Maebara, S.; Kiyono, K.; Seki, M.; Suganuma, K.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Fusion Facility

    1999-02-01

    A mock-up module of a Lower Hybrid Current Drive antenna module of a Carbon Fiber Composite (CFC) was fabricated for the development of heat resistive front facing the plasma. This module is made from CFC plates and rods which are copper coated to reduce the RF losses. The withstand-voltage, the RF properties and outgassing rates for long pulses and high RF power were tested at the Lower Hybrid test bed facility of Cadarache. After the short pulse conditioning, long pulses with a power density ranging between 50 and 150 MW/m{sup 2} were performed with no breakdowns. During these tests, the module temperaturewas increasing from 100-200 deg. C to 400-500 deg. C. It was also checked that high power density, up to 150 MW/m{sup 2}, could be transmitted when the waveguides are filled with H{sub 2} at a pressure of 5 x 10{sup -2} Pa. No significant change in the reflection coefficient is measured after the long pulse operation. During a long pulse, the power reflection increases during the pulse typically from 0.8% to 1.3%. It is concluded that the outgassing rate of Cu-plated CFC is about 6 times larger than of Dispersion Strengthened Copper (DSC) module at the module temperature of 300 deg. C. No significant increase of the global outgassing of the CFC module was measured after hydrogen pre-filling. After the test, visual inspection revealed that peeling of the copper coating occurred at one end of the module only on a very small area (0.2 cm{sup 2}). It is assessed that a CFC module is an attractive candidate for the hardening of the tip of the LHCD antenna. (authors)

  14. Nitrogenase expression in estuarine bacterioplankton influenced by organic carbon and availability of oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severin, Ina; Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Moisander, Pia H.;

    2015-01-01

    of carbon and inhibition by oxygen constrain N fixation by diazotrophs in coastal seawater. The goal was to test whether by alleviating these constraints an increased overlap between nitrogenase (nifH)-gene- carrying and -expressing organisms could be achieved. We incubated water from a eutrophic but N......-limited fjord in Denmark under high carbon/low oxygen conditions and determined bacterial growth and production, diazotrophic community composition (Illumina nifH amplicon sequencing), and nifH gene abundance and expression (quantitative PCR (qPCR) and quantitative Reverse Transcriptase PCR (q...

  15. Polyol synthesis in Aspergillus niger : influence of oxygen availability, carbon and nitrogen sources on the metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diano, Audrey; Bekker-Jensen, S; Dynesen, Jens Østergaard

    2006-01-01

    Polyol production has been studied in Aspergillus niger under different conditions. Fermentations have been run using high concentration of glucose or xylose as carbon source and ammonium or nitrate as nitrogen source. The growth of biomass, as freely dispersed hyphae, led to an increase of medium...

  16. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heath, Garvin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sandor, Debra [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Steward, Darlene [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Vimmerstedt, Laura [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Warner, Ethan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Webster, Karen W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The petroleum-based transportation fuel system is complex and highly developed, in contrast to the nascent low-petroleum, low-carbon alternative fuel system. This report examines how expansion of the low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure could contribute to deep reductions in petroleum use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions across the U.S. transportation sector. Three low-carbon scenarios, each using a different combination of low-carbon fuels, were developed to explore infrastructure expansion trends consistent with a study goal of reducing transportation sector GHG emissions to 80% less than 2005 levels by 2050.These scenarios were compared to a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario and were evaluated with respect to four criteria: fuel cost estimates, resource availability, fuel production capacity expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion.

  17. A national survey of the availability of intensity-modulated radiation therapy and stereotactic radiosurgery in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlDuhaiby Eman Z

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The timely and appropriate adoption of new radiation therapy (RT technologies is a challenge both in terms of providing of optimal patient care and managing health care resources. Relatively little is known regarding the rate at which new RT technologies are adopted in different jurisdictions, and the barriers to implementation of these technologies. Methods Surveys were sent to all radiation oncology department heads in Canada regarding the availability of RT equipment from 2006 to 2010. Data were collected concerning the availability and use of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS, and the obstacles to implementation of these technologies. Results IMRT was available in 37% of responding centers in 2006, increasing to 87% in 2010. In 2010, 72% of centers reported that IMRT was available for all patients who might benefit, and 37% indicated that they used IMRT for "virtually all" head and neck patients. SRS availability increased from 26% in 2006 to 42.5% in 2010. Eighty-two percent of centers reported that patients had access to SRS either directly or by referral. The main barriers for IMRT implementation included the need to train or hire treatment planning staff, whereas barriers to SRS implementation mostly included the need to purchase and/or upgrade existing planning software and equipment. Conclusions The survey showed a growing adoption of IMRT and SRS in Canada, although the latter was available in less than half of responding centers. Barriers to implementation differed for IMRT compared to SRS. Enhancing human resources is an important consideration in the implementation of new RT technologies, due to the multidisciplinary nature of the planning and treatment process.

  18. Environmental modulation of microcystin and β-N-methylamino-L-alanine as a function of nitrogen availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, L L; Downing, S; Phelan, R R; Downing, T G

    2014-09-01

    The most significant modulators of the cyanotoxins microcystin and β-N-methylamino-L-alanine in laboratory cyanobacterial cultures are the concentration of growth-medium combined nitrogen and nitrogen uptake rate. The lack of field studies that support these observations led us to investigate the cellular content of these cyanotoxins in cyanobacterial bloom material isolated from a freshwater impoundment and to compare these to the combined nitrogen availability. We established that these toxins typically occur in an inverse relationship in nature and that their presence is mainly dependent on the environmental combined nitrogen concentration, with cellular microcystin present at exogenous combined nitrogen concentrations of 29 μM and higher and cellular BMAA correlating negatively with exogenous nitrogen at concentrations below 40 μM. Furthermore, opposing nutrient and light gradients that form in dense cyanobacterial blooms may result in both microcystin and BMAA being present at a single sampling site.

  19. Thermococcus kodakarensis modulates its polar membrane lipids and elemental composition according to growth stage and phosphate availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis B. Meador

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We observed significant changes in the elemental and intact polar lipid (IPL composition of the archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis (KOD1 in response to growth stage and phosphorus supply. Reducing the amount of organic supplements and phosphate in growth media resulted in significant decreases in cell size and cellular quotas of carbon (C, nitrogen (N, and phosphorus (P, which coincided with significant increases in cellular IPL quota and IPLs comprising multiple P atoms and hexose moieties. Relatively more cellular P was stored as IPLs in P-limited cells (2-8% compared to control cells (< 0.8%. We also identified a specific IPL biomarker containing a phosphatidyl-N-acetylhexoseamine headgroup that was relatively enriched during rapid cell division. These observations serve as empirical evidence of IPL adaptations in Archaea that will help to interpret the distribution of these biomarkers in natural systems. The reported cell quotas of C, N, and P represent the first such data for a specific archaeon and suggest that thermophiles are C-rich compared to the cell carbon-to-volume relationship reported for planktonic bacteria.

  20. [Response of black soil organic carbon, nitrogen and its availability to longterm fertilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kun; Hu, Rong-Gui; Zhang, Wen-Ju; Zhou, Bao-Ku; Xu, Ming-Gang; Zhang, Jing-Ye; Xia, Ping-Ping

    2013-02-01

    Based on the long-term fertilization experiments, effects of various fertilization practices on the soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) in the surface (0-20 cm) and subsurface (20-40 cm) black soil in northeast China were studied. Results showed that, compared with the CK, long-term application of organic manure, especially the combination of mineral fertilizers and organic manure significantly increased the organic SOC and TN in the surface soil. Application of mineral fertilizers plus organic manure with conventional (NPM) and high application (N2P2M2) rate increased SOC significantly by 24. 6% and 25.1% , and TN by 29.5% and 32.8%, respectively. However, there was no significant difference among the treatments for SOC and TN at the subsurface. Compared with the CK (CKh), mineral fertilizer plus organic manure (NPM and N2P2M2) did not only increase the soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) and nitrogen (SMBN) , dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DN), but also significantly increased the ratio of SMBC and DOC to SOC, SMBN and TN to TN. Application of the NPM and N2P2M2 increased the value of SMBC/SOC by 0.36 to 0.59 and SMBN/TN by 1.21 to 1.95 percentage points, respectively. The value of DOC/SOC and DN/TN ranged from 0.53% to 0.72% and 1.41% to 1.78%, respectively. This result indicated that SMBC, SMBN, DOC, DN and SMBC/ SOC, SMBN/TN, DOC/SOC, DN/TN were more sensitive than SOC and TN to long-term fertilization in the soil profile, and were better indicators for the impact of long-term fertilization soil fertility. The concluded that the application of manure especially manure plus mineral fertilizers can increase soil nutrients activity in the surface and subsurface black soil, acting as a helpful practice to improve soil fertility and the ability of nutrient supply, while it may cause potential environment pollution on carbon and nitrogen loss in the agroecosystem.

  1. Light Intensity and Carbon Dioxide Availability Impact Antioxidant Activity in Green Onions (Allium fistulosumm L)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Lanfang; Bisbee, Patricia; Pare, Paul

    The prospect of long-duration manned space missions poses many challenges, including the development of a sustainable life support system and effective methods of space-radiation protection. To mitigate the risk of increased space-radiation, functional foods rich in antioxidant properties such as green onions are of particular interest. However it has yet to be established whether antioxidant properties can be preserved or enhanced in space environment where carbon dioxide, lighting intensity, gravity and pressure differ from which plants have acclimated to on earth. In this study, green onions (Allium fistulosumm L. cultivar Kinka) rich in antioxidant flavonoids are used as a model system to investigate variations in antioxidant capacity with plants grown under varying light intensities and CO2 concentrations. The antioxidant potential is determined using both radical cation scavenging and oxygen radical absorbance assays. For all light intensities assayed, antioxidant potential in water extract of green onions per gram biomass declined with CO2 increases up to 1200 ppm, and then leveled off with further CO2 increase to 4000 ppm. This inverse carbon dioxide versus antioxidant activity correlation suggests lower accumulation rates for water soluble antioxidant compounds compared to total biomass under increasing CO2 concentrations. The effect of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration on antioxidant activity of ethanol extracts were light intensity dependent. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of traditional plant antioxidants including vitamin C and the major onion flavonoid quercetin.

  2. Carbon availability triggers fungal nitrogen uptake and transport in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellbaum, Carl R; Gachomo, Emma W; Beesetty, Yugandhar; Choudhari, Sulbha; Strahan, Gary D; Pfeffer, Philip E; Kiers, E Toby; Bücking, Heike

    2012-02-14

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, formed between the majority of land plants and ubiquitous soil fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota, is responsible for massive nutrient transfer and global carbon sequestration. AM fungi take up nutrients from the soil and exchange them against photosynthetically fixed carbon (C) from the host. Recent studies have demonstrated that reciprocal reward strategies by plant and fungal partners guarantee a "fair trade" of phosphorus against C between partners [Kiers ET, et al. (2011) Science 333:880-882], but whether a similar reward mechanism also controls nitrogen (N) flux in the AM symbiosis is not known. Using mycorrhizal root organ cultures, we manipulated the C supply to the host and fungus and followed the uptake and transport of N sources in the AM symbiosis, the enzymatic activities of arginase and urease, and fungal gene expression in the extraradical and intraradical mycelium. We found that the C supply of the host plant triggers the uptake and transport of N in the symbiosis, and that the increase in N transport is orchestrated by changes in fungal gene expression. N transport in the symbiosis is stimulated only when the C is delivered by the host across the mycorrhizal interface, not when C is supplied directly to the fungal extraradical mycelium in the form of acetate. These findings support the importance of C flux from the root to the fungus as a key trigger for N uptake and transport and provide insight into the N transport regulation in the AM symbiosis.

  3. INTEGRATED CARBONATION: A NOVEL CONCEPT TO DEVELOP A CO2 SEQUESTRATION MODULE FOR VISION 21 POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Matthew E. Kuchta

    2003-07-01

    in terms of increasing the surface area (330 vs. 17m{sup 2}/g). The steam activated serpentine had a 73% conversion to magnesite at 155 C and 1850 psig after 1 hour reaction, while under the same operating conditions, the parent sample only had 8% conversion. However, heat treatment is very energy intensive, and therefore, this steam activation route was not further considered. For the chemical activation, the most effective acid used was sulfuric acid, that resulted in surface areas of over 330 m{sup 2}/g, and more than 70% of the magnesium was dissolved from the serpentine (100{micro}m), and therefore, made available for carbonation. As a consequence, the subsequent carbonation reaction could be conducted at ambient temperatures (20 C) and low pressures (600psi) and it was possible to achieve 73% conversion after only 3 hours. This is indeed a significant improvement over previous studies that required temperatures over 185 C and very high pressures of around 1950 psig. Finally, this project has been awarded a Phase II, where the active carbonation process developed during this Phase I will be optimized in order to design a CO{sub 2} sequestration module.

  4. An Alternative Method to Compute the Bit Error Probability of Modulation Schemes Subject to Nakagami-[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] Fading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Wamberto J. L.; Lopes, Waslon T. A.; Madeiro, Francisco; Alencar, Marcelo S.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents an alternative method for determining exact expressions for the bit error probability (BEP) of modulation schemes subject to Nakagami-[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] fading. In this method, the Nakagami-[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] fading channel is seen as an additive noise channel whose noise is modeled as the ratio between Gaussian and Nakagami-[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] random variables. The method consists of using the cumulative density function of the resulting noise to obtain closed-form expressions for the BEP of modulation schemes subject to Nakagami-[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] fading. In particular, the proposed method is used to obtain closed-form expressions for the BEP of [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]-ary quadrature amplitude modulation ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]-QAM), [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]-ary pulse amplitude modulation ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]-PAM), and rectangular quadrature amplitude modulation ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]-QAM) under Nakagami-[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] fading. The main contribution of this paper is to show that this alternative method can be used to reduce the computational complexity for detecting signals in the presence of fading.

  5. Reciprocal allosteric modulation of carbon monoxide and warfarin binding to ferrous human serum heme-albumin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Bocedi

    Full Text Available Human serum albumin (HSA, the most abundant protein in human plasma, could be considered as a prototypic monomeric allosteric protein, since the ligand-dependent conformational adaptability of HSA spreads beyond the immediate proximity of the binding site(s. As a matter of fact, HSA is a major transport protein in the bloodstream and the regulation of the functional allosteric interrelationships between the different binding sites represents a fundamental information for the knowledge of its transport function. Here, kinetics and thermodynamics of the allosteric modulation: (i of carbon monoxide (CO binding to ferrous human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe(II by warfarin (WF, and (ii of WF binding to HSA-heme-Fe(II by CO are reported. All data were obtained at pH 7.0 and 25°C. Kinetics of CO and WF binding to the FA1 and FA7 sites of HSA-heme-Fe(II, respectively, follows a multi-exponential behavior (with the same relative percentage for the two ligands. This can be accounted for by the existence of multiple conformations and/or heme-protein axial coordination forms of HSA-heme-Fe(II. The HSA-heme-Fe(II populations have been characterized by resonance Raman spectroscopy, indicating the coexistence of different species characterized by four-, five- and six-coordination of the heme-Fe atom. As a whole, these results suggest that: (i upon CO binding a conformational change of HSA-heme-Fe(II takes place (likely reflecting the displacement of an endogenous ligand by CO, and (ii CO and/or WF binding brings about a ligand-dependent variation of the HSA-heme-Fe(II population distribution of the various coordinating species. The detailed thermodynamic and kinetic analysis here reported allows a quantitative description of the mutual allosteric effect of CO and WF binding to HSA-heme-Fe(II.

  6. Benefit-cost analysis of commercially available activated carbon filters for indoor ozone removal in single-family homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, J R; Darling, E; Morrison, G; Siegel, J; Corsi, R L

    2016-06-01

    This study involved the development of a model for evaluating the potential costs and benefits of ozone control by activated carbon filtration in single-family homes. The modeling effort included the prediction of indoor ozone with and without activated carbon filtration in the HVAC system. As one application, the model was used to predict benefit-to-cost ratios for single-family homes in 12 American cities in five different climate zones. Health benefits were evaluated using disability-adjusted life-years and included city-specific age demographics for each simulation. Costs of commercially available activated carbon filters included capital cost differences when compared to conventional HVAC filters of similar particle removal efficiency, energy penalties due to additional pressure drop, and regional utility rates. The average indoor ozone removal effectiveness ranged from 4 to 20% across the 12 target cities and was largely limited by HVAC system operation time. For the parameters selected in this study, the mean predicted benefit-to-cost ratios for 1-inch filters were >1.0 in 10 of the 12 cities. The benefits of residential activated carbon filters were greatest in cities with high seasonal ozone and HVAC usage, suggesting the importance of targeting such conditions for activated carbon filter applications.

  7. Non-linear response of soil carbon gas (CO2, CH4) flux to oxygen availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnicol, G.; Silver, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    Soil oxygen (O2) concentration can impact soil carbon (C) fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), and is an important chemical gradient across the terrestrial-aquatic interface that drives large differences in ecosystem C storage. Few studies have established quantitative relationships between gas-phase O2 concentration and soil C fluxes in controlled settings. Though standard Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics would predict a highly non-linear relationship between O2 concentration and microbial consumption, existing studies have imposed coarse changes in O2 concentration that necessarily prevent detection of non-linearity. We report on the results of laboratory incubations designed to explore the short-term sensitivity of soil C emissions to a wide range of gas-phase O2 concentrations. Organic-rich soil was collected from a drained peatland and subjected to seven O2 concentration treatments ranging from 0.03 % - 20 % O2. We compared the fit of the observed C flux response to O2 concentration to linear, log-linear, and Michaelis-Menten functions using MSE and residual fits as performance metrics. We found that both CO2 and CH4 emissions were highly sensitive to O2 concentration, with emission rates increasing and decreasing, respectively, at higher O2. Net CH4 emission rates were attenuated at higher O2 concentrations most likely due to stimulation of gross CH4 consumption. A log-linear or Michaelis-Menten model better fit data than a linear model by both performance metrics, demonstrating, empirically, a non-linear relationship between O2 concentration and soil CO2 and CH4 fluxes. Our results suggest high O2 sensitivity of C-rich soils at the terrestrial-aquatic interface and show that the microbial response to soil redox chemistry must be measured over a biophysically meaningful range of conditions to derive relationships that accurately predict soil C fluxes.

  8. Environmental Topology and Water Availability Modulates the Catalytic Activity of β-Galactosidase Entrapped in a Nanosporous Silicate Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, M Ines; Velasco, Manuel I; Acosta, Rodolfo H; Perillo, María A

    2016-11-04

    In the present work we studied the catalytic activity of E. coli β-Gal confined in a nanoporous silicate matrix (Eβ-Gal) at different times after the beginning of the sol-gel polymerization process. Enzyme kinetic experiments with two substrates (ONPG and PNPG) that differed in the rate-limiting steps of the reaction mechanism for their β-Gal-catalyzed hydrolysis, measurements of transverse relaxation times (T2) of water protons through (1)H-NMR, and scanning electron microscopy analysis of the gel nanostructure, were performed. In conjunction, results provided evidence that water availability is crucial for the modulation observed in the catalytic activity of β-Gal as long as water participate in the rate limiting step of the reaction (only with ONPG). In this case, a biphasic rate vs. substrate concentration was obtained exhibiting one phase with catalytic rate constant (kcA), similar to that observed in solution, and another phase with a higher and aging-dependent catalytic rate constant (kcB). More structured water populations (lower T2) correlates with higher catalytic rate constants (kcB). The T2-kcB negative correlation observed along the aging of gels within the 15-days period assayed reinforces the coupling between water structure and the hydrolysis catalysis inside gels.

  9. Effect of the on/off Cycling Modulation Time Ratio of C2H2/SF6 Flows on the Formation of Geometrically Controlled Carbon Coils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Chul Jeon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon coils could be synthesized using C2H2/H2 as source gases and SF6 as an incorporated additive gas under thermal chemical vapor deposition system. Nickel catalyst layer deposition and then hydrogen plasma pretreatment were performed prior to the carbon coils deposition reaction. To obtain the geometrically controlled carbon coils, the cycling on/off modulation process for C2H2/SF6 flows was introduced during the initial reaction. According to the different reaction processes, the different cycling on/off ratio and the different cycling numbers for C2H2/SF6 flows were carried out. The characteristics (formation density, morphology, and geometry of the deposited carbon coils on the substrate were investigated. Microsized coils as well as nanosized coils could be existed under the higher growing/etching time ratio (180/30 s condition. On the other hand, the formation of nanosized coils could be mainly observed under the lower growing/etching time ratio (30/180 s condition. With increasing the numbers of cycles, the diameters of carbon nanofilaments composed the coils decreased. The enhanced etching ability by the fluorine species was considered the main cause to control the geometry of carbon coils according to the growing/etching time ratio of the cycling on/off modulation process for C2H2/SF6 flows.

  10. Performance and Stability of Supercapacitor Modules based on Porous Carbon Electrodes in Hybrid Powertrain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Xuan; XIE Changjun; ZOU Yaohui; QUAN Shuhai; PIOTR Bujlo; SHEN Di

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid power sources have attracted much attention in the electric vehicle area. Particularly, electric-electric hybrid powertrain system consisting of supercapacitor modules and lithium-ion batteries has been widely applied because of the high power density of supercapacitors. In this study, we design a hybrid powertrain system containing two porous carbon electrode-based supercapacitor modules in parallel and one lithium ion battery pack. With the construction of the testing station, the performance and stability of the used supercapacitor modules are investigated in correlation with the structure of the supercapacitor and the nature of the electrode materials applied. It has been shown that the responding time for voltage vibration from 20 V to 48.5 V during charging or discharging process decreases from about 490 s to 94 s with the increase in applied current from 20 A to 100 A. The capacitance of the capacitor modules is nearly independent on the applied current. With the designed setup, the energy efficiency can reach as high as 0.99. The results described here provide a guidance for material selection of supercapacitors and optimized controlling strategy for hybrid power system applied in electric vehicles.

  11. Physiology and gene expression profiles of Dekkera bruxellensis in response to carbon and nitrogen availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros Pita, Will; Silva, Denise Castro; Simões, Diogo Ardaillon; Passoth, Volkmar; de Morais, Marcos Antonio

    2013-11-01

    The assimilation of nitrate, a nitrogenous compound, was previously described as an important factor favoring Dekkera bruxellensis in the competition with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the industrial sugarcane substrate. In this substrate, nitrogen sources are limited and diverse, and a recent report showed that amino acids enable D. bruxellensis to grow anaerobically. Thus, understanding the regulation of nitrogen metabolism is one fundamental aspect to comprehend the competiveness of D. bruxellensis in the fermentation environment. In the present study, we evaluated the physiological and transcriptional profiles of D. bruxellensis in response to different carbon and nitrogen supplies to determine their influence on growth, sugar consumption, and ethanol production. Besides, the expression of genes coding for nitrogen permeases and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of glutamate and energetic metabolism were investigated under these conditions. Our data revealed that genes related to nitrogen uptake in D. bruxellensis are under the control of nitrogen catabolite repression. Moreover, we provide indications that glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamate synthase may switch roles as the major pathway for glutamate biosynthesis in D. bruxellensis. Finally, our data showed that in nonoptimal growth conditions, D. bruxellensis leans toward the respiratory metabolism. The results presented herein show that D. bruxellensis and S. cerevisiae share similar regulation of GDH–GOGAT pathway, while D. bruxellensis converts less glucose to ethanol than S. cerevisiae do when nitrogen is limited. The consequence of this particularity to the industrial process is discussed.

  12. Seasonal Variability of Tropical Wetland CH4 emissions: the role of the methanogen-available carbon pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Reay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a dynamic methanogen-available carbon model (DMCM to quantify the role of the methanogen-available carbon pool in determining the spatial and temporal variability of tropical wetland CH4 emissions over seasonal timescales. We fit DMCM parameters to satellite observations of CH4 columns from SCIAMACHY CH4 and equivalent water height (EWH from GRACE. Over the Amazon river basin we find substantial seasonal variability of this carbon pool (coefficient of variation = 28 ± 22% and a rapid decay constant (φ = 0.017 day−1, in agreement with available laboratory measurements, suggesting that plant litter is likely the prominent methanogen carbon source over this region. Using the DMCM we derive global CH4 emissions for 2003–2009, and determine the resulting seasonal variability of atmospheric CH4 on a global scale using the GEOS-Chem atmospheric chemistry and transport model. First, we estimate tropical emissions amount to 111.1 Tg CH4 yr−1 of which 24% is emitted from Amazon wetlands. We estimate that annual tropical wetland emissions have increased by 3.4 Tg CH4 yr−1 between 2003 and 2009. Second, we find that the model is able to reproduce the observed seasonal lag between CH4 concentrations peaking 1–3 months before peak EWH values. We also find that our estimates of CH4 emissions substantially improve the comparison between the model and observed CH4 surface concentrations (r = 0.9. We anticipate that these new insights from the DMCM represent a fundamental step in parameterising tropical wetland CH4 emissions and quantifying the seasonal variability and future trends of tropical CH4 emissions.

  13. Impacts of vinasse and methods of sugarcane harvesting on the availability of K and carbon stock of an Argisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudinei Alberto Cardin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Soils of tropical regions are more weathered and in need of conservation managements to maintain and improve the quality of its components. The objective of this study was to evaluate the availability of K, the organic matter content and the stock of total carbon of an Argisol after vinasse application and manual and mechanized harvesting of burnt and raw sugarcane, in western São Paulo.The data collection was done in the 2012/2013 harvest, in a bioenergy company in Presidente Prudente/SP. The research was arranged out following a split-plot scheme in a 5x5 factorial design, characterized by four management systems: without vinasse application and harvest without burning; with vinasse application and harvest without burning; with vinasse application and harvest after burning; without vinasse application and harvest after burning; plus native forest, and five soil sampling depths (0-10 10-20, 20-30, 30-40, 40-50 cm, with four replications. In each treatment, the K content in the soil and accumulated in the remaining dry biomass in the area, the levels of organic matter, organic carbon and soil carbon stock were determined. The mean values were compared by Tukey test. The vinasse application associated with the harvest without burning increased the K content in soil layers up to 40 cm deep. The managements without vinasse application and manual harvest after burning, and without vinasse application with mechanical harvesting without burning did not increase the levels of organic matter, organic carbon and stock of total soil organic carbon, while the vinasse application and harvest after burning and without burning increased the levels of these attributes in the depth of 0-10 cm.

  14. Control of Seed Germination and Plant Development by Carbon and Nitrogen Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuna, Daniel; Prieto, Pilar; Aguilar, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the molecular basis of the influence of external carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio and other abiotic factors on phytohormones regulation during seed germination and plant developmental processes, and the identification of elements that participate in this response is essential to understand plant nutrient perception and signaling. Sugars (sucrose, glucose) and nitrate not only act as nutrients but also as signaling molecules in plant development. A connection between changes in auxin transport and nitrate signal transduction has been reported in Arabidopsis thaliana through the NRT1.1, a nitrate sensor and transporter that also functions as a repressor of lateral root growth under low concentrations of nitrate by promoting auxin transport. Nitrate inhibits the elongation of lateral roots, but this effect is significantly reduced in abscisic acid (ABA)-insensitive mutants, what suggests that ABA might mediate the inhibition of lateral root elongation by nitrate. Gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis has been also related to nitrate level in seed germination and its requirement is determined by embryonic ABA. These mechanisms connect nutrients and hormones signaling during seed germination and plant development. Thus, the genetic identification of the molecular components involved in nutrients-dependent pathways would help to elucidate the potential crosstalk between nutrients, nitric oxide (NO) and phytohormones (ABA, auxins and GAs) in seed germination and plant development. In this review we focus on changes in C and N levels and how they control seed germination and plant developmental processes through the interaction with other plant growth regulators, such as phytohormones. PMID:26635847

  15. Arogenate dehydratase isoenzymes profoundly and differentially modulate carbon flux into lignins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corea, Oliver R A; Ki, Chanyoung; Cardenas, Claudia L; Kim, Sung-Jin; Brewer, Sarah E; Patten, Ann M; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2012-03-30

    How carbon flux differentially occurs in vascular plants following photosynthesis for protein formation, phenylpropanoid metabolism (i.e. lignins), and other metabolic processes is not well understood. Our previous discovery/deduction that a six-membered arogenate dehydratase (ADT1-6) gene family encodes the final step in Phe biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana raised the fascinating question whether individual ADT isoenzymes (or combinations thereof) differentially modulated carbon flux to lignins, proteins, etc. If so, unlike all other lignin pathway manipulations that target cell wall/cytosolic processes, this would be the first example of a plastid (chloroplast)-associated metabolic process influencing cell wall formation. Homozygous T-DNA insertion lines were thus obtained for five of the six ADTs and used to generate double, triple, and quadruple knockouts (KOs) in different combinations. The various mutants so obtained gave phenotypes with profound but distinct reductions in lignin amounts, encompassing a range spanning from near wild type levels to reductions of up to ∼68%. In the various KOs, there were also marked changes in guaiacyl:syringyl ratios ranging from ∼3:1 to 1:1, respectively; these changes were attributed to differential carbon flux into vascular bundles versus that into fiber cells. Laser microscope dissection/pyrolysis GC/MS, histochemical staining/lignin analyses, and pADT::GUS localization indicated that ADT5 preferentially affects carbon flux into the vascular bundles, whereas the adt3456 knock-out additionally greatly reduced carbon flux into fiber cells. This plastid-localized metabolic step can thus profoundly differentially affect carbon flux into lignins in distinct anatomical regions and provides incisive new insight into different factors affecting guaiacyl:syringyl ratios and lignin primary structure.

  16. Elevated CO2 and nitrogen availability have interactive effects on canopy carbon gain in rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anten, N.P.R.; Hirose, T.; Onoda, Y.; Kinugasa, T.; Kim, H.Y.; Okada, M.; Kobayashi, K.

    2004-01-01

    Here we analysed the effects of CO2 (C-a) elevation and nitrogen availability on canopy structure, leaf area index (LAI) and canopy photosynthesis of rice (Oryza sativa). Rice was grown at ambient and elevated C-a (c. 200 mumol mol(-1) above ambient, using the free-air CO2 enrichment, FACE) and at t

  17. Compost impacts on dissolved organic carbon and available nitrogen and phosphorus in turfgrass soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Alan L; Provin, Tony L; Hons, Frank M; Zuberer, David A; White, Richard H

    2008-01-01

    Compost application to turfgrass soils may increase dissolved organic C (DOC) levels which affects nutrient dynamics in soil. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of compost source and application rate on soil organic C (SOC), DOC, NO(3), and available P during 29 months after a one-time application to St. Augustinegrass [Stenotaphrum secundatum (Walt.) Kuntze] turf. Compost sources had variable composition, yet resulted in few differences in SOC, DOC, and NO(3) after applied to soil. Available NO(3) rapidly decreased after compost application and was unaffected by compost source and application rate. Available P increased after compost application and exhibited cyclical seasonal patterns related to DOC. Compost application decreased soil pH relative to unamended soil, but pH increased during the course of the study due to irrigation with sodic water. Increasing the compost application rate increased SOC by 3 months, and levels remained fairly stable to 29 months. In contrast, DOC continued to increase from 3 to 29 months after application, suggesting that compost mineralization and growth of St. Augustinegrass contributed to seasonal dynamics. Dissolved organic C was 75%, 78%, and 101% greater 29 months after application of 0, 80, and 160 Mg compostha(-1), respectively, than before application. Impacts of composts on soil properties indicated that most significant effects occurred within a few months of application. Seasonal variability of SOC, DOC, and available P was likely related to St. Augustinegrass growth stages as well as precipitation, as declines occurred after precipitation events.

  18. Effects of Acoustic Modulation and Mixed Fuel on Flame Synthesis of Carbon Nanomaterials in an Atmospheric Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chieh Hu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, methane–ethylene jet diffusion flames modulated by acoustic excitation in an atmospheric environment were used to investigate the effects of acoustic excitation frequency and mixed fuel on nanomaterial formation. Acoustic output power was maintained at a constant value of 10 W, while the acoustic excitation frequency was varied (f = 0–90 Hz. The results show that the flame could not be stabilized on the port when the ethylene volume concentration (ΩE was less than 40% at f = 10 Hz, or when ΩE = 0% (i.e., pure methane at f = 90 Hz. The reason for this is that the flame had a low intensity and was extinguished by the entrained air due to acoustic modulation. Without acoustic excitation (f = 0 Hz, the flame was comprised of a single-layer structure for all values of ΩE, and almost no carbon nanomaterials were synthesized. However, with acoustic excitation, a double-layer flame structure was generated for frequencies close to both the natural flickering frequency and the acoustically resonant frequency. This double-layer flame structure provided a favorable flame environment for the fabrication of carbon nanomaterials. Consequently, the synthesis of carbon nano-onions was significantly enhanced by acoustic excitation near both the natural flickering frequency and the acoustically resonant frequency. At f = 20 Hz (near the natural flickering frequency for 0% ≤ ΩE ≤ 100%, a quantity of carbon nano-onions (CNOs piled like bunches of grapes was obtained as a result of improved mixing of the fuel with ambient air. High-density CNOs were also produced at f = 70 Hz (close to the acoustically resonant frequency for 40% ≤ ΩE ≤ 100%. Furthermore, carbon nanotubes (CNTs were synthesized only at 80 Hz for ΩE = 0%. The suitable temperature range for the synthesis of CNTs was slightly higher than that for the formation of CNOs (about 600 °C for CNTs; 510–600 °C for CNOs.

  19. Effect of light and nutrient availability on the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by Caribbean turf algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Benjamin; den Haan, Joost; Visser, Petra M; Vermeij, Mark J A; van Duyl, Fleur C

    2016-03-22

    Turf algae increasingly dominate benthic communities on coral reefs. Given their abundance and high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release rates, turf algae are considered important contributors to the DOC pool on modern reefs. The release of photosynthetically fixed carbon as DOC generally, but not always, increases with increased light availability. Nutrient availability was proposed as an additional factor to explain these conflicting observations. To address this proposed but untested hypothesis, we documented the interactive contributions of light and nutrient availability on the release of DOC by turf algae. DOC release rates and oxygen production were quantified in incubation experiments at two light levels (full and reduced light) and two nutrient treatments (natural seawater and enriched seawater). In natural seawater, DOC release at full light was four times higher than at reduced light. When nutrients were added, DOC release rates at both light levels were similar to the natural seawater treatment at full light. Our results therefore show that low light in combination with low nutrient availability reduces the release of DOC by turf algae and that light and nutrient availability interactively determine DOC release rates by this important component of Caribbean reef communities.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A CO2 SEQUESTRATION MODULE BY INTEGRATING MINERAL ACTIVATION AND AQUEOUS CARBONATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; George Alexander

    2004-11-15

    Mineral carbonation is a promising concept for permanent CO{sub 2} sequestration due to the vast natural abundance of the raw minerals, the permanent storage of CO{sub 2} in solid form as carbonates, and the overall reaction being exothermic. However, the primary drawback to mineral carbonation is the reaction kinetics. To accelerate the reaction, aqueous carbonation processes are preferred, where the minerals are firstly dissolved in solution. In aqueous carbonation, the key step is the dissolution rate of the mineral, where the mineral dissolution reaction is likely to be surface controlled. In order to accelerate the dissolution process, the serpentine can be ground to very fine particle size (<37 {micro}m), but this is a very energy intensive process. Alternatively, magnesium could be chemically extracted in aqueous solution. Phase I showed that chemical surface activation helps to dissolve the magnesium from the serpentine minerals (particle size {approx}100 {micro}m), and furthermore, the carbonation reaction can be conducted under mild conditions (20 C and 650 psig) compared to previous studies that required >185 C, >1850 psig and <37 {micro}m particle size. Phase I also showed that over 70% of the magnesium can be extracted at ambient temperature leaving amorphous SiO{sub 2} with surface areas {approx} 330m{sup 2}/g. The overall objective of Phase 2 of this research program is to optimize the active carbonation process developed in Phase I in order to design an integrated CO{sub 2} sequestration module. During the current reporting period, Task 1 ''Mineral activation'' was initiated and focused on a parametric study to optimize the operation conditions for the mineral activation, where serpentine and sulfuric acid were reacted, as following the results from Phase 1. Several experimental factors were outlined as having a potential influence on the mineral activation. This study has focused to date on the effects of varying the acid

  1. Stable Isotope Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Using Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Lovato, K.

    2014-12-01

    Seepage from enhanced oil recovery, carbon storage, and natural gas sites can emit trace gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen sulfide. Trace gas emission at these locations demonstrate unique light stable isotope signatures that provide information to enable source identification of the material. Light stable isotope detection through surface monitoring, offers the ability to distinguish between trace gases emitted from sources such as, biological (fertilizers and wastes), mineral (coal or seams), or liquid organic systems (oil and gas reservoirs). To make light stable isotope measurements, we employ the ultra-sensitive technique, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS). FMS is an absorption technique with sensitivity enhancements approximately 100-1000x more than standard absorption spectroscopy with the advantage of providing stable isotope signature information. We have developed an integrated in situ (point source) system that measures carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen sulfide with isotopic resolution and enhanced sensitivity. The in situ instrument involves the continuous collection of air and records the stable isotope ratio for the gas being detected. We have included in-line flask collection points to obtain gas samples for validation of isotopic concentrations using our in-house isotope ratio mass spectroscopy (IRMS). We present calibration curves for each species addressed above to demonstrate the sensitivity and accuracy of the system. We also show field deployment data demonstrating the capabilities of the system in making live dynamic measurements from an active source.

  2. Modulation of Central Carbon Metabolism by Acetylation of Isocitrate Lyase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Jing; Wang, Yihong; Yu, Heguo; Qian, Xiaoyan; Wang, Honghai; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Xuelian

    2017-01-01

    Several enzymes involved in central carbon metabolism such as isocitrate lyase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase are key determinants of pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). In this study, we found that lysine acetylation plays an important role in the modulation of central carbon metabolism in M. tb. Mutant of M. tb defective in sirtuin deacetylase exhibited improved growth in fatty acid-containing media. Global analysis of lysine acetylome of M. tb identified three acetylated lysine residues (K322, K331, and K392) of isocitrate lyase (ICL1). Using a genetically encoding system, we demonstrated that acetylation of K392 increased the enzyme activity of ICL1, whereas acetylation of K322 decreased its activity. Antibodies that specifically recognized acetyllysine at 392 and 322 of ICL1 were used to monitor the levels of ICL1 acetylation in M. tb cultures. The physiological significance of ICL1 acetylation was demonstrated by the observation that M. tb altered the levels of acetylated K392 in response to changes of carbon sources, and that acetylation of K392 affected the abundance of ICL1 protein. Our study has uncovered another regulatory mechanism of ICL1. PMID:28322251

  3. Are variations in heterotrophic soil respiration related to changes in substrate availability and microbial biomass carbon in the subtropical forests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui; Chen, Xiaomei; Xiao, Guoliang; Guenet, Bertrand; Vicca, Sara; Shen, Weijun

    2015-12-01

    Soil temperature and moisture are widely-recognized controlling factors on heterotrophic soil respiration (Rh), although they often explain only a portion of Rh variability. How other soil physicochemical and microbial properties may contribute to Rh variability has been less studied. We conducted field measurements on Rh half-monthly and associated soil properties monthly for two years in four subtropical forests of southern China to assess influences of carbon availability and microbial properties on Rh. Rh in coniferous forest was significantly lower than that in the other three broadleaf species-dominated forests and exhibited obvious seasonal variations in the four forests (P carbon (DOC) were significantly important to Rh variations, but the effect of DOC content on Rh was confounded with temperature, as revealed by partial mantel test. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC) was significantly related to Rh variations across forests during the warm season (P = 0.043). Our results suggest that DOC and MBC may be important when predicting Rh under some conditions, and highlight the complexity by mutual effects of them with environmental factors on Rh variations.

  4. The effect of carbon monoxide integrating nitric oxide through auxin signal in Arabidopsis to modulate iron deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming eYang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO and nitric oxide (NO are essential modulators that regulate the plant response to iron deficiency (-Fe. Auxin is a phytohormone that plays important roles in plant growth and development. We report here that in Arabidopsis –Fe enhanced heme oxygenase-dependent CO generation and auxin transport through redistribution of PIN1 protein, which subsequently increased NO accumulation; NO signaling regulated the activity of ferric chelate reductase (FCR and the expression of Fe-uptake genes including basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (FIT and the ferric reduction oxidase 2 (FRO2. Over-expression of HY1 encoding heme oxygenase, or treatment with CO donor enhanced basipetal auxin transport, FCR activity, and the expressions of FIT and FRO2 under –Fe. Such effects were compromised in the mutant aux1-7 impaired in auxin transport or in the mutant noa1 or nia1/nia2 defective in NO biosynthesis. -Fe failed to promote auxin transport and FCR activity in hy1 mutant; such inability was reversed in the double mutant of hy1/yucca1 with elevated auxin production, or in hy1/cue1 mutant with NO over-accumulation. Taken together, our results suggest that CO modulates NO signaling through auxin to cope with Fe deficiency in Arabidopsis.

  5. Pulsed ytterbium-doped fibre laser with a combined modulator based on single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudyakov, D. V.; Borodkin, A. A.; Lobach, A. S.; Vartapetov, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes an all-normal-dispersion pulsed ytterbium-doped fibre ring laser mode-locked by a nonlinear combined modulator based on single-wall carbon nanotubes. We have demonstrated 1.7-ps pulse generation at 1.04 μm with a repetition rate of 35.6 MHz. At the laser output, the pulses were compressed to 180 fs. We have examined an intracavity nonlinear modulator which utilises nonlinear polarisation ellipse rotation in conjunction with a saturable absorber in the form of a polymer-matrix composite film containing single-wall carbon nanotubes.

  6. Pulsed ytterbium-doped fibre laser with a combined modulator based on single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khudyakov, D V; Borodkin, A A; Vartapetov, S K [Physics Instrumentation Center, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Lobach, A S [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-30

    This paper describes an all-normal-dispersion pulsed ytterbium-doped fibre ring laser mode-locked by a nonlinear combined modulator based on single-wall carbon nanotubes. We have demonstrated 1.7-ps pulse generation at 1.04 μm with a repetition rate of 35.6 MHz. At the laser output, the pulses were compressed to 180 fs. We have examined an intracavity nonlinear modulator which utilises nonlinear polarisation ellipse rotation in conjunction with a saturable absorber in the form of a polymer-matrix composite film containing single-wall carbon nanotubes. (lasers)

  7. The active microbial diversity drives ecosystem multifunctionality and is physiologically related to carbon availability in Mediterranean semi-arid soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastida, Felipe; Torres, Irene F; Moreno, José L; Baldrian, Petr; Ondoño, Sara; Ruiz-Navarro, Antonio; Hernández, Teresa; Richnow, Hans H; Starke, Robert; García, Carlos; Jehmlich, Nico

    2016-09-01

    Biogeochemical processes and ecosystemic functions are mostly driven by soil microbial communities. However, most methods focus on evaluating the total microbial community and fail to discriminate its active fraction which is linked to soil functionality. Precisely, the activity of the microbial community is strongly limited by the availability of organic carbon (C) in soils under arid and semi-arid climate. Here, we provide a complementary genomic and metaproteomic approach to investigate the relationships between the diversity of the total community, the active diversity and ecosystem functionality across a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) gradient in southeast Spain. DOC correlated with the ecosystem multifunctionality index composed by soil respiration, enzyme activities (urease, alkaline phosphatase and β-glucosidase) and microbial biomass (phospholipid fatty acids, PLFA). This study highlights that the active diversity (determined by metaprotoemics) but not the diversity of the whole microbial community (evaluated by amplicon gene sequencing) is related to the availability of organic C and it is also connected to the ecosystem multifunctionality index. We reveal that DOC shapes the activities of bacterial and fungal populations in Mediterranean semi-arid soils and determines the compartmentalization of functional niches. For instance, Rhizobales thrived at high-DOC sites probably fuelled by metabolism of one-C compounds. Moreover, the analysis of proteins involved in the transport and metabolism of carbohydrates revealed that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota occupied different nutritional niches. The functional mechanisms for niche specialization were not constant across the DOC gradient.

  8. Microbial community structure and functional metabolic diversity are associated with organic carbon availability in an agricultural soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Juan; LI Yan-ting; YANG Xiang-dong; ZHANG Jian-jun; LIN Zhi-an; ZHAO Bing-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of soil environmental characteristics governing soil microbial community structure and activity may improve our understanding of biogeochemical processes and soil quality. The impact of soil environmental characteristics especialy organic carbon availability after 15-yr different organic and inorganic fertilizer inputs on soil bacterial community structure and functional metabolic diversity of soil microbial communities were evaluated in a 15-yr fertilizer experiment in Chang-ping County, Beijing, China. The experiment was a wheat-maize rotation system which was established in 1991 including four different fertilizer treatments. These treatments included: a non-amended control (CK), a commonly used application rate of inorganic fertilizer treatment (NPK); a commonly used application rate of inorganic fertilizer with swine manure in-corporated treatment (NPKM), and a commonly used application rate of inorganic fertilizer with maize straw incorporated treatment (NPKS). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the 16S rRNA gene was used to determine the bacterial community structure and single carbon source utilization proifles were determined to characterize the microbial community functional metabolic diversity of different fertilizer treatments using Biolog Eco plates. The results indicated that long-term fertilized treatments signiifcantly increased soil bacterial community structure compared to CK. The use of inorganic fertilizer with organic amendments incorporated for long term (NPKM, NPKS) signiifcantly promoted soil bacterial structure than the application of inorganic fertilizer only (NPK), and NPKM treatment was the most important driver for in-creases in the soil microbial community richness (S) and structural diversity (H). Overal utilization of carbon sources by soil microbial communities (average wel color development, AWCD) and microbial substrate utilization diversity and evenness indices (H’ and E) indicated that long

  9. The role of alternative oxidase in modulating carbon use efficiency and growth during macronutrient stress in tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieger, Stephen M; Kristensen, Brian K; Robson, Christine A; Amirsadeghi, Sasan; Eng, Edward W Y; Abdel-Mesih, Amal; Møller, Ian M; Vanlerberghe, Greg C

    2005-06-01

    When wild-type (wt) tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Petit Havana SR1) cells are grown under macronutrient (P or N) limitation, they induce large amounts of alternative oxidase (AOX), which constitutes a non-energy-conserving branch of the respiratory electron transport chain. To investigate the significance of AOX induction, wt cells were compared with transgenic (AS8) cells lacking AOX. Under nutrient limitation, growth of wt cell cultures was dramatically reduced and carbon use efficiency (g cell dry weight gain g(-1) sugar consumed) decreased by 42-63%. However, the growth of AS8 was only moderately reduced by the nutrient deficiencies and carbon use efficiency values remained the same as under nutrient-sufficient conditions. As a result, the nutrient limitations more severely compromised the tissue nutrient status (P or N) of AS8 than wt cells. Northern analyses and a comparison of the mitochondrial protein profiles of wt and AS8 cells indicated that the lack of AOX in AS8 under P limitation was associated with increased levels of proteins commonly associated with oxidative stress and/or stress injury. Also, the level of electron transport chain components was consistently reduced in AS8 while tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes did not show a universal trend in abundance in comparison to the wt. Alternatively, the lack of AOX in AS8 cells under N limitation resulted in enhanced carbohydrate accumulation. It is concluded that AOX respiration provides an important general mechanism by which plant cells can modulate their growth in response to nutrient availability and that AOX also has nutrient-specific roles in maintaining cellular redox and carbon balance.

  10. Environmental benefits of using magnesium carbonate minerals as new wildfire retardants instead of commercially available, phosphate-based compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liodakis, S; Tsoukala, M

    2010-10-01

    A serial batch leaching experiment has been carried out to evaluate the release of elements from the ash of Pinus halepensis needles burned under two test conditions-with and without treatment of the forest species with the carbonate minerals (huntite and hydromagnesite) in aqueous solution (pH 6). The ash (before and after leaching) and leachates were analyzed using atomic absorption spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Compared with data from samples treated with the commercially available, phosphate-based fire retardant diammonium phosphate (DAP), we found that use of huntite or hydromagnesite was much more successful in obstructing the release of the toxic elements present in the ash, probably because of the alkaline conditions resulting from decomposition of the minerals during burning. In contrast, DAP tended to be more able to facilitate the extraction of some toxic metals (e.g., Zn, Cu, Mn), probably because of the acidic conditions resulting from its decomposition to phosphoric acid. Data from this study thus lend strong support to the use of magnesium carbonate minerals as new wildfire retardants, because they were shown to be more friendly to the environment (e.g., soil, ground, and underground water streams) than those currently in use (e.g., phosphate or sulfate salt type).

  11. Thermococcus kodakarensis modulates its polar membrane lipids and elemental composition according to growth stage and phosphate availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Travis B.; Gagen, Emma J.; Loscar, Michael E.; Goldhammer, Tobias; Yoshinaga, Marcos Y.; Wendt, Jenny; Thomm, Michael; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2014-01-01

    We observed significant changes in the elemental and intact polar lipid (IPL) composition of the archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis (KOD1) in response to growth stage and phosphorus supply. Reducing the amount of organic supplements and phosphate in growth media resulted in significant decreases in cell size and cellular quotas of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P), which coincided with significant increases in cellular IPL quota and IPLs comprising multiple P atoms and hexose moieties. Relatively more cellular P was stored as IPLs in P-limited cells (2–8%) compared to control cells (<0.8%). We also identified a specific IPL biomarker containing a phosphatidyl-N-acetylhexoseamine headgroup that was relatively enriched during rapid cell division. These observations serve as empirical evidence of IPL adaptations in Archaea that will help to interpret the distribution of these biomarkers in natural systems. The reported cell quotas of C, N, and P represent the first such data for a specific archaeon and suggest that thermophiles are C-rich compared to the cell carbon-to-volume relationship reported for planktonic bacteria. PMID:24523718

  12. Effects of drought on leaf carbon source and growth of European beech are modulated by soil type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Feng; Arend, Matthias; Yang, Wen-Juan; Schaub, Marcus; Ni, Yan-Yan; Gessler, Arthur; Jiang, Ze-Ping; Rigling, Andreas; Li, Mai-He

    2017-02-01

    Drought potentially affects carbon balance and growth of trees, but little is known to what extent soil plays a role in the trade-off between carbon gain and growth investment. In the present study, we analyzed leaf non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) as an indicator of the balance of photosynthetic carbon gain and carbon use, as well as growth of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) saplings, which were grown on two different soil types (calcareous and acidic) in model ecosystems and subjected to a severe summer drought. Our results showed that drought led in general to increased total NSC concentrations and to decreased growth rate, and drought reduced shoot and stem growth of plants in acidic soil rather than in calcareous soil. This result indicated that soil type modulated the carbon trade-off between net leaf carbon gain and carbon investment to growth. In drought-stressed trees, leaf starch concentration and growth correlated negatively whereas soluble sugar:starch ratio and growth correlated positively, which may contribute to a better understanding of growth regulation under drought conditions. Our results emphasize the role of soil in determining the trade-off between the balance of carbon gain and carbon use on the leaf level and growth under stress (e.g. drought).

  13. Production of dissolved organic carbon by Arctic plankton communities: Responses to elevated carbon dioxide and the availability of light and nutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, Alex J.; Daniels, Chris J.; Esposito, Mario; Humphreys, Matthew P.; Mitchell, Elaine; Ribas-Ribas, Mariana; Russell, Benjamin C.; Stinchcombe, Mark C.; Tynan, Eithne; Richier, Sophie

    2016-05-01

    The extracellular release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by phytoplankton is a potentially important source of labile organic carbon for bacterioplankton in pelagic ecosystems. In the context of increasing seawater partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2), via the oceanic absorption of elevated atmospheric CO2 (ocean acidification), several previous studies have reported increases to the relative amount of carbon fixed into particulates, via primary production (PP), and dissolved phases (DOC). During the summer of 2012 we measured DOC production by phytoplankton communities in the Nordic seas of the Arctic Ocean (Greenland, Norwegian and Barents Sea) from both in situ sampling and during three bioassay experiments where pCO2 levels (targets ~550 μatm, ~750 μatm, ~1000 μatm) were elevated relative to ambient conditions. Measurements of DOC production and PP came from 24 h incubations and therefore represent net DOC production rates, where an unknown portion of the DOC released has potentially been utilised by heterotrophic organisms. Production of DOC (net pDOC) by in situ communities varied from 0.09 to 0.64 mmol C m-3 d-1 (average 0.25 mmol C m-3 d-1), with comparative rates in two of the experimental bioassays (0.04-1.23 mmol C m-3 d-1) and increasing dramatically in the third (up to 5.88 mmol C m-3 d-1). When expressed as a fraction of total carbon fixation (i.e., PP plus pDOC), percentage extracellular release (PER) was 14% on average (range 2-46%) for in situ measurements, with PER in the three bioassays having a very similar range (2-50%). A marked increase in pDOC (and PER) was only observed in one of the bioassays where nutrient levels (nitrate, silicic acid) dropped dramatically relative to starting (ambient) concentrations; no pCO2 treatment effect on pDOC (or PER) was evident across the three experiments. Examination of in situ net pDOC (and PER) found significant correlations with decreasing silicic acid and increasing euphotic zone depth, indicating that

  14. Anti-TNF-Mediated Modulation of Prohepcidin Improves Iron Availability in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, in an IL-6-Mediated Fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, Flaminia; Duca, Lorena; Pisani, Laura Francesca; Rigolini, Roberta; Spina, Luisa; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Munizio, Nadia; Costa, Elena; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Vecchi, Maurizio; Pastorelli, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Background. Anaemia is common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), frequently resulting from a combination of iron deficiency and of anaemia of chronic disease (ACD). ACD is characterized by macrophage iron retention induced by proinflammatory cytokines. Hepcidin is the master inducer of iron accumulation during ACD, and its production is mainly regulated by IL-6 and the novel erythroid hormone erythroferrone (ERFE). This study evaluates whether anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies therapy modurates hepcidin production and the levels of its main regulators, leading to a restoration of iron homeostasis. Methods. Sera were collected from 21 IBD patients, before each anti-TNF administration, for the first 6 weeks of therapy. Prohepcidin, erythropoietin, erythroferrone, C reactive protein, interleukin-6, iron markers, and haemoglobin levels were measured and clinical activity indexes were evaluated. Results. Serum prohepcidin, IL-6, CRP, and ferritin were significantly reduced after 6-week treatment; an increase in serum iron and total transferrin was observed. No changes in the EPO-ERFE axis were found. Remarkably, haemoglobin was significantly increased. Conclusions. Anti-TNF therapy improves iron metabolism and, subsequently, anaemia in IBD. This effect appears to be related to the modulation of the cytokine network and specifically IL-6 leading to a relevant decrease of hepcidin, a master regulator of ACD.

  15. Anti-TNF-Mediated Modulation of Prohepcidin Improves Iron Availability in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, in an IL-6-Mediated Fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duca, Lorena; Rigolini, Roberta; Spina, Luisa; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Munizio, Nadia; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2017-01-01

    Background. Anaemia is common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), frequently resulting from a combination of iron deficiency and of anaemia of chronic disease (ACD). ACD is characterized by macrophage iron retention induced by proinflammatory cytokines. Hepcidin is the master inducer of iron accumulation during ACD, and its production is mainly regulated by IL-6 and the novel erythroid hormone erythroferrone (ERFE). This study evaluates whether anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies therapy modurates hepcidin production and the levels of its main regulators, leading to a restoration of iron homeostasis. Methods. Sera were collected from 21 IBD patients, before each anti-TNF administration, for the first 6 weeks of therapy. Prohepcidin, erythropoietin, erythroferrone, C reactive protein, interleukin-6, iron markers, and haemoglobin levels were measured and clinical activity indexes were evaluated. Results. Serum prohepcidin, IL-6, CRP, and ferritin were significantly reduced after 6-week treatment; an increase in serum iron and total transferrin was observed. No changes in the EPO-ERFE axis were found. Remarkably, haemoglobin was significantly increased. Conclusions. Anti-TNF therapy improves iron metabolism and, subsequently, anaemia in IBD. This effect appears to be related to the modulation of the cytokine network and specifically IL-6 leading to a relevant decrease of hepcidin, a master regulator of ACD. PMID:28191453

  16. Carbon translocation from symbiont to host depends on irradiance and food availability in the tropical coral Stylophora pistillata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, P.; Grover, R.; Maguer, J. F.; Hoogenboom, M.; Ferrier-Pagès, C.

    2014-03-01

    Reef-building corals live in symbiosis with dinoflagellates that translocate a large proportion of their photosynthetically fixed carbon compounds to their coral host for its own metabolism. The carbon budget and translocation rate, however, vary depending on environmental conditions, coral host species, and symbiont clade. To quantify variability in carbon translocation in response to environmental conditions, this study assessed the effect of two different irradiance levels (120 and 250 μmol photons m-2 s-1) and feeding regimes (fed with Artemia salina nauplii and unfed) on the carbon budget of the tropical coral Stylophora pistillata. For this purpose, H13CO3 --enriched seawater was used to trace the conversion of photosynthetic carbon into symbiont and coral biomass and excrete particulate organic carbon. Results showed that carbon translocation (ca. 78 %) and utilization were similar under both irradiance levels for unfed colonies. In contrast, carbon utilization by fed colonies was dependent on the growth irradiance. Under low irradiance, heterotrophy was accompanied by lower carbon translocation (71 %), higher host and symbiont biomass, and higher calcification rates. Under high irradiance, heterotrophy was accompanied by higher rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and carbon translocation (90 %) as well as higher host biomass. Hence, levels of resource sharing within coral-dinoflagellate symbioses depend critically on environmental conditions.

  17. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle modulated turn-on fluorescent probes for histidine detection and its imaging in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Tingbi; Nie, Zhou; Miao, Zhuang; Liu, Yang; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle (N-CNP) modulated turn-on fluorescent probes were developed for rapid and selective detection of histidine. The as synthesized N-CNPs exhibited high fluorescence quantum yield and excellent biocompatibility. The fluorescence of N-CNPs can be quenched selectively by Cu(ii) ions with high efficiency, and restored by the addition of histidine owing to the competitive binding of Cu(ii) ions and histidine that removes Cu(ii) ions from the surface of the N-CNPs. Under the optimal conditions, a linear relationship between the increased fluorescence intensity of N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion conjugates and the concentration of histidine was established in the range from 0.5 to 60 μM. The detection limit was as low as 150 nM (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). In addition, the as-prepared N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion nanoprobes showed excellent biocompatibility and were applied for a histidine imaging assay in living cells, which presented great potential in the bio-labeling assay and clinical diagnostic applications.In this work, nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle (N-CNP) modulated turn-on fluorescent probes were developed for rapid and selective detection of histidine. The as synthesized N-CNPs exhibited high fluorescence quantum yield and excellent biocompatibility. The fluorescence of N-CNPs can be quenched selectively by Cu(ii) ions with high efficiency, and restored by the addition of histidine owing to the competitive binding of Cu(ii) ions and histidine that removes Cu(ii) ions from the surface of the N-CNPs. Under the optimal conditions, a linear relationship between the increased fluorescence intensity of N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion conjugates and the concentration of histidine was established in the range from 0.5 to 60 μM. The detection limit was as low as 150 nM (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). In addition, the as-prepared N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion nanoprobes showed excellent biocompatibility and were applied for a histidine imaging assay in living cells, which

  18. Carbon monoxide: an endogenous modulator of sinusoidal tone in the perfused rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, M; Goda, N; Sano, T; Kashiwagi, S; Egawa, T; Shinoda, Y; Ishimura, Y

    1995-11-01

    Heme oxygenase is a heme-oxidizing enzyme which generates biliverdin and carbon monoxide (CO). The present study was designed to elucidate whether CO endogenously produced by this enzyme serves as an active vasorelaxant in the hepatic microcirculation. Microvasculature of the isolated perfused rat liver was visualized by dual-color digital microfluorography to alternately monitor sinusoidal lining and fat-storing Ito cells. In the control liver, the CO flux in the venous effluent ranged at 0.7 nmol/min per gram of liver. Administration of a heme oxygenase inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (1 microM) eliminated the baseline CO generation, and the vascular resistance exhibited a 30% elevation concurrent with discrete patterns of constriction in sinusoids and reduction of the sinusoidal perfusion velocity. The major sites of the constriction corresponded to local sinusoidal segments colocalized with Ito cell which were identified by imaging their vitamin A autofluorescence. The increase in the vascular resistance and sinusoidal constriction were attenuated significantly by adding CO (1 microM) or a cGMP analogue 8-bromo-cGMP (1 microM) in the perfusate. From these findings, we propose that CO can function as an endogenous modulator of hepatic sinusoidal perfusion through a relaxing mechanism involving Ito cells.

  19. Multifunctional carbon nanotube/bioceramics modulate the directional growth and activity of osteoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, D; Oliveira, F J; Ferro, M; Gomes, P S; Fernandes, M H; Lopes, M A; Silval, R F

    2014-05-01

    Biomaterials can still be reinvented to become simple and universal bone regeneration solutions. Following this roadmap, a bone graft of carbon nanotube (CNT)/glass/hydroxyapatite (HA) with controlled CNT agglomeration state was designed with multifunctionalities able to stimulate the bone cell phenotype. The preparation route, the mechanical and electrical behavior and the in vitro profiles of degradation and osteocompatibility were described. A non-destructive dynamic route was found to have a higher influence than the Diels-Alder functionalization one on controlling the CNT agglomerate state in the ceramic-matrix composite. Biologically safe CNT agglomerates, with diameter sizes below 3 microm homogenously distributed, were obtained in non-functionalized and functionalized composites. Yet, the lowest CNT damage and the highest mechanical and electrical properties were found for the non-functionalized materials. Even though that these composites present higher degradation rate at pH:3 than the ceramic matrix, the CNT agglomerates are released with safe diameter sizes. Also, non-functionalized composites allowed cellular adhesion and modulated the orientation of the cell growth, with a proliferation/differentiation relationship favoring osteoblastic functional activity. Findings offer further contributions for bone tissue engineering by showing that multifunctional bone grafts with high electroconductivity, and integrating CNT agglomerates with maximized interfacing area, allow the in situ control of bone cell functions.

  20. Effect of light and nutrient availability on the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by Caribbean turf algae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, B.; den Haan, J.; Visser, P.M.; Vermeij, M.J.A.; van Duyl, F.C.

    2016-01-01

    Turf algae increasingly dominate benthic communities on coral reefs. Given their abundance and high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release rates, turf algae are considered important contributors to the DOC pool on modern reefs. The release of photosynthetically fixed carbon as DOC generally, but not

  1. Comparison of in vitro and in vivo tests for determination of availability of calcium from calcium carbonate tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, S J; Pluhator, M M

    1992-10-01

    In vitro tests of calcium (Ca) availability and the oral Ca load test were conducted on eight brands of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) tablets (products A-H) each providing 500 mg Ca. Data were collected over three experiments with nine to 11 healthy premenopausal women testing two to four products. Subjects followed a low Ca diet (less than 10 mmol/day). On test mornings, fasting subjects collected baseline urine for 2 hours (-2 to 0 hours), then ingested the tablet with water. Urine was collected from 0 to 2 hours and 2 to 4 hours; for products E-H, urine was collected for an additional 2 hours (4 to 6 hours). Blood was sampled at hours 0, 4 and 6 during testing of products E and F. Three in vitro tests were run: the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) dissolution test, USP disintegration test, and a disintegration test using vinegar. Ca excretion rose significantly at hours 2 to 4 (p less than 0.05) compared to baseline for seven products. Ca excretion either fell or remained constant between hours 4 and 6. Serum Ca rose and serum parathyroid hormone fell at hour 4, compared to fasting values, suggesting that 4 hours represents peak response time. In vivo availability, measured as the incremental increase in Ca excretion (mmol/mmol creatinine) in hours 2 to 4 compared to baseline, did not correlate significantly with results of the USP dissolution test but did with results of either the USP disintegration test or the vinegar test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Environmental regulation of carbon isotope composition and crassulacean acid metabolism in three plant communities along a water availability gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricalde, M Fernanda; Andrade, José Luis; Durán, Rafael; Dupuy, Juan Manuel; Simá, J Luis; Us-Santamaría, Roberth; Santiago, Louis S

    2010-12-01

    Expression of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is characterized by extreme variability within and between taxa and its sensitivity to environmental variation. In this study, we determined seasonal fluctuations in CAM photosynthesis with measurements of nocturnal tissue acidification and carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)C) of bulk tissue and extracted sugars in three plant communities along a precipitation gradient (500, 700, and 1,000 mm year(-1)) on the Yucatan Peninsula. We also related the degree of CAM to light habitat and relative abundance of species in the three sites. For all species, the greatest tissue acid accumulation occurred during the rainy season. In the 500 mm site, tissue acidification was greater for the species growing at 30% of daily total photon flux density (PFD) than species growing at 80% PFD. Whereas in the two wetter sites, the species growing at 80% total PFD had greater tissue acidification. All species had values of bulk tissue δ(13)C less negative than -20‰, indicating strong CAM activity. The bulk tissue δ(13)C values in plants from the 500 mm site were 2‰ less negative than in plants from the wetter sites, and the only species growing in the three communities, Acanthocereus tetragonus (Cactaceae), showed a significant negative relationship between both bulk tissue and sugar δ(13)C values and annual rainfall, consistent with greater CO(2) assimilation through the CAM pathway with decreasing water availability. Overall, variation in the use of CAM photosynthesis was related to water and light availability and CAM appeared to be more ecologically important in the tropical dry forests than in the coastal dune.

  3. pH and Temperature Modulated Aggregation of Hydrophilic Gold Nanorods with Perylene Dyes and Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    biomedical applications, e.g. biological imaging, sensing and cancer therapy, and drug delivery .9 It is established that the prerequisites for...while CNTs were used for drug delivery .19 Here the co-assembled structures of MSA-GNR with PDI, and MSA-GNR with CNT-COOH were built. The resulting co...Article pH and Temperature Modulated Aggregation of Hydrophilic Gold Nanorods with Perylene Dyes and Carbon Nanotubes Chenming Xue, Ozgul Birel, Yuhua Xue

  4. Enhanced growth of halophyte plants in biochar-amended coastal soil: roles of nutrient availability and rhizosphere microbial modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hao; Wang, Xiao; Chen, Lei; Wang, Zhenyu; Xia, Yang; Zhang, Yipeng; Wang, Hefang; Luo, Xianxiang; Xing, Baoshan

    2017-03-27

    Soil health is essential and irreplaceable for plant growth and global food production, which has been threatened by climate change and soil degradation. Degraded coastal soils are urgently required to reclaim using new sustainable technologies. Interest in applying biochar to improve soil health and promote crop yield has rapidly increased because of its multiple benefits. However, effects of biochar addition on the saline-sodic coastal soil health and halophyte growth were poorly understood. Response of two halophytes, Sesbania (Sesbania cannabina) and Seashore mallow (Kosteletzkya virginica), to the individual or co-application of biochar and inorganic fertilizer into a coastal soil was investigated using a 52-day pot experiment. The biochar alone or co-application stimulated the plant growth (germination, root development, biomass), primarily attributed to the enhanced nutrients availability from the biochar-improved soil health. Additionally, the promoted microbial activities and bacterial community shift towards the beneficial taxa (e.g., Pseudomonas and Bacillus) in the rhizosphere also contributed to the enhanced plant growth and biomass. Our findings showed the promising significance because biochar added at an optimal level (≤5%) could be a feasible option to reclaim the degraded coastal soil, enhance plant growth and production, and increase soil health and food security.

  5. Three-source-partitioning of soil carbon pools and fluxes and priming effects induced by carbohydrates of different availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagodatskaya, E.; Khomyakov, N.; Myachina, O.; Blagodatsky, S.; Kuzyakov, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is not uniform and includes: 1) fresh input of plant-derived organics, i.e. root exudates and rhizodeposits, 2) partially decomposed plant residues and 3) old humus material. The partitioning of these three carbon sources in soil C pools (microbial biomass and dissolved organic matter) and quantification of their contributions in soil CO2 ?uxes is a current challenge in soil science aiming to reveal the C pathways and drivers in terrestrial ecosystems. We applied uniformly labeled 14C-cellulose and 14C-glucose (as low and easily available substrates, respectively) in Ap of loamy Haplic Luvisol developed under C3 vegetation. Miscanthus x giganteus (Greef et Deu) - a perennial C4 plant - was grown for 12 years before the experiment with glucose/cellulose addition. Natural differences in the abundance of 13C between C4 and C3 plants were used to distinguish between old SOC (> 12 years) and recent Miscanthus-derived C (< 12 years). This enabled us to estimate mechanisms and sources of priming effects (PE) during decomposition of applied substrates with varying availability. The real and apparent priming effects were distinguished by partitioning of microbial C for substrate-C and SOM-derived C. Microbial specific growth rates and activity of hydrolytic enzymes were determined to reveal the mechanisms of real PEs. Both short-term apparent and long-term real PEs were induces by glucose, while the cellulose input caused only real PE. Remarkably, the shift to the domination of slow-growing microorganisms was observed during real PEs independently of substrate quality. This is the first direct confirmation of the hypothesized presumable contribution of K-strategists to real priming. 2.5-3 times increase in beta-glucosidase and phosphatase activity coupled with real PE in soil treated with glucose indicated that strong limitation and microbial starvation after glucose consumption caused the PE. Contrary to that the 75% increase in cellobiohydrolase

  6. Soil carbon, after 3 years, under short-rotation woody crops grown under varying nutrient and water availability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Felipe G. [USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, Forestry Sciences Laboratory, 3041 Cornwallis Road, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Coleman, Mark [USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, Savannah River Institute, P.O. Box 700, New Ellenton, SC 29809 (United States); Garten, Charles T. Jr.; Luxmoore, Robert J.; Wullschleger, Stan D. [Environmenal Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 38731 (United States); Stanturf, John A. [USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, Forestry Sciences Laboratory, 320 Green Street, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Trettin, Carl [USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, Center for Forested Wetlands Research, 2730 Savannah Highway, Charleston, SC 29414 (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Soil carbon contents were measured on a short-rotation woody crop study located on the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site outside Aiken, SC. This study included fertilization and irrigation treatments on five tree genotypes (sweetgum, loblolly pine, sycamore and two eastern cottonwood clones). Prior to study installation, the previous pine stand was harvested and the remaining slash and stumps were pulverized and incorporated 30 cm into the soil. One year after harvest soil carbon levels were consistent with pre-harvest levels but dropped in the third year below pre-harvest levels. Tillage increased soil carbon contents, after three years, as compared with adjacent plots that were not part of the study but where harvested, but not tilled, at the same time. When the soil response to the individual treatments for each genotype was examined, one cottonwood clone (ST66), when irrigated and fertilized, had higher total soil carbon and mineral associated carbon in the upper 30 cm compared with the other tree genotypes. This suggests that root development in ST66 may have been stimulated by the irrigation plus fertilization treatment. (author)

  7. Soil carbon after three years under short rotation woody crops grown under varying nutrient and water availability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Felipe G. [USDA Forest Service; Coleman, Mark [USDA Forest Service; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Luxmoore, Robert J [ORNL; Stanturf, J. A. [USDA Forest Service; Trettin, Carl [USDA Forest Service; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Soil carbon contents were measured on a short-rotation woody crop study located on the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site outside Aiken, SC. This study included fertilization and irrigation treatments on five tree genotypes (sweetgum, loblolly pine, sycamore and two eastern cottonwood clones). Prior to study installation, the previous pine stand was harvested and the remaining slash and stumps were pulverized and incorporated 30 cm into the soil. One year after harvest soil carbon levels were consistent with pre-harvest levels but dropped in the third year below pre-harvest levels. Tillage increased soil carbon contents, after three years, as compared with adjacent plots that were not part of the study but where harvested, but not tilled, at the same time. When the soil response to the individual treatments for each genotype was examined, one cottonwood clone (ST66), when irrigated and fertilized, had higher total soil carbon and mineral associated carbon in the upper 30 cm compared with the other tree genotypes. This suggests that root development in ST66 may have been stimulated by the irrigation plus fertilization treatment.

  8. Effect of Carbon and Nitrogen Availability on Metabolism of Amino Acids in Germinating Spores of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Hai-Ru; JIANG Dong-Hua; ZHANG Ping-Hua

    2011-01-01

    The effects of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) sources on N utilization and biosynthesis of amino acids were examined in the germinating spores of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus intraradices Schenck & Smith after exposure to various N substrates,CO2,glucose,and/or root exudates.The N uptake and de novo biosynthesis of amino acids were analyzed using stable isotopic labeling with mass spectrometric detection.High-performance liquid chromatography-based analysis was used to measure amino acid levels.In the absence of exogenous N sources and in the presence of 25 mL L-1 CO2,the germinating AM fungal spores utilized internal N storage as well as C skeletons derived from the degradation of storage lipids to biosynthesize the free amino acids,in which serine and glycine were produced predominantly.The concentrations of internal amino acids increased gradually as the germination time increased from 0 to 1 or 2 weeks.However,asparagine and glutamine declined to the low levels; both degraded to provide the biosynthesis of other amino acids with C and N donors.The availability of exogenous inorganic N (ammonium and nitrate) and organic N (urea,arginine,and glutamine) to the AM fungal spores using only CO2 for germination generated more than 5 times more internal free amino acids than those in the absence of exogenous N.A supply of exogenous nitrate to the AM fungal spores with only CO2 gave rise to more than 10 times more asparagine than that without exogenous N.In contrast,the extra supply of exogenous glucose to the AM fungal spores generated a significant enhancement in the uptake of exogenous N sources,with more than 3 times more free amino acids being produced than those supplied with only exogenous CO2.Meanwhile,arginine was the most abundant free amino acid produced and it was incorporated into the proteins of AM fungal spores to serve as an N storage compound.

  9. Root carbon inputs to the rhizosphere stimulate extracellular enzyme activity and increase nitrogen availability in temperate forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, E. R.; Phillips, R.; Dragoni, D.; Drake, J. E.; Finzi, A. C.

    2011-12-01

    The mobilization of nitrogen (N) from soil organic matter in temperate forest soils is controlled by the microbial production and activity of extracellular enzymes. The exudation of carbon (C) by tree roots into the rhizosphere may subsidize the microbial production of extracellular enzymes in the rhizosphere and increase the access of roots to N. The objective of this research was to investigate whether rates of root exudation and the resulting stimulation of extracellular enzyme activity in the rhizosphere (i.e., rhizosphere effect) differs between tree species that form associations with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) or arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. This research was conducted at two temperate forest sites, the Harvard Forest (HF) in Central MA and the Morgan Monroe State Forest (MMSF) in Southern IN. At the HF, we measured rates of root exudation and the rhizosphere effects on enzyme activity, N cycling, and C mineralization in AM and ECM soils. At the MMSF, we recently girdled AM and ECM dominated plots to examine the impact of severing belowground C allocation on rhizosphere processes. At both sites, the rhizosphere effect on proteolytic, chitinolytic and ligninolytic enzyme activities was greater in ECM soils than in AM soils. In particular, higher rates of proteolytic enzyme activity increased the availability of amino acid-N in ECM rhizospheres relative to the bulk soils. Further, this stimulation of enzyme activity was directly correlated with higher rates of C mineralization in the rhizosphere than in the bulk soil. Although not significantly different between species, root exudation of C comprised 3-10% of annual gross primary production at the HF. At the MMSF, experimental girdling led to a larger decline in soil respiration and enzyme activity in ECM plots than in AM plots. In both ECM and AM soils, however, girdling resulted in equivalent rates of enzyme activity in rhizosphere and corresponding bulk soils. The results of this study contribute to the

  10. Spatial variability of soil carbon, pH, available phosphorous and potassium in organic farm located in Mediterranean Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogunović, Igor; Pereira, Paulo; Šeput, Miranda

    2016-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC), pH, available phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) are some of the most important factors to soil fertility. These soil parameters are highly variable in space and time, with implications to crop production. The aim of this work is study the spatial variability of SOC, pH, P and K in an organic farm located in river Rasa valley (Croatia). A regular grid (100 x 100 m) was designed and 182 samples were collected on Silty Clay Loam soil. P, K and SOC showed moderate heterogeneity with coefficient of variation (CV) of 21.6%, 32.8% and 51.9%, respectively. Soil pH record low spatial variability with CV of 1.5%. Soil pH, P and SOC did not follow normal distribution. Only after a Box-Cox transformation, data respected the normality requirements. Directional exponential models were the best fitted and used to describe spatial autocorrelation. Soil pH, P and SOC showed strong spatial dependence with nugget to sill ratio with 13.78%, 0.00% and 20.29%, respectively. Only K recorded moderate spatial dependence. Semivariogram ranges indicate that future sampling interval could be 150 - 200 m in order to reduce sampling costs. Fourteen different interpolation models for mapping soil properties were tested. The method with lowest Root Mean Square Error was the most appropriated to map the variable. The results showed that radial basis function models (Spline with Tension and Completely Regularized Spline) for P and K were the best predictors, while Thin Plate Spline and inverse distance weighting models were the least accurate. The best interpolator for pH and SOC was the local polynomial with the power of 1, while the least accurate were Thin Plate Spline. According to soil nutrient maps investigated area record very rich supply with K while P supply was insufficient on largest part of area. Soil pH maps showed mostly neutral reaction while individual parts of alkaline soil indicate the possibility of penetration of seawater and salt accumulation in the

  11. Modulation of the expression of mimivirus-encoded translation-related genes in response to nutrient availability during Acanthamoeba castellanii infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena eSilva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of giant virus genomes is intriguing, especially the presence of genes encoding components of the protein translation machinery such as transfer RNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetases; these features are uncommon among other viruses. Although orthologs of these genes are codified by their hosts, one can hypothesize that having these translation-related genes might represent a gain of fitness during infection. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of translation-related genes by mimivirus during infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii under different nutritional conditions. In silico analysis of amino acid usage revealed remarkable differences between the mimivirus isolates and the A. castellanii host. Relative expression analysis by quantitative PCR revealed that mimivirus was able to modulate the expression of eight viral translation-related genes according to the amoebal growth condition, with a higher induction of gene expression under starvation. Some mimivirus isolates presented differences in translation-related gene expression; notably, polymorphisms in the promoter regions correlated with these differences. Two mimivirus isolates did not encode the tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase in their genomes, which may be linked with low conservation pressure based on amino acid usage analysis. Taken together, our data suggest that mimivirus can modulate the expression of translation-related genes in response to nutrient availability in the host cell, allowing the mimivirus to adapt to different hosts growing under different nutritional conditions.

  12. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, M. W.; Heath, G.; Sandor, D.; Steward, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Warner, E.; Webster, K. W.

    2013-04-01

    Achieving the Department of Energy target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 depends on transportation-related strategies combining technology innovation, market adoption, and changes in consumer behavior. This study examines expanding low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure to achieve deep GHG emissions reductions, with an emphasis on fuel production facilities and retail components serving light-duty vehicles. Three distinct low-carbon fuel supply scenarios are examined: Portfolio: Successful deployment of a range of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies; Combustion: Market dominance by hybridized internal combustion engine vehicles fueled by advanced biofuels and natural gas; Electrification: Market dominance by electric drive vehicles in the LDV sector, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles, that are fueled by low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. A range of possible low-carbon fuel demand outcomes are explored in terms of the scale and scope of infrastructure expansion requirements and evaluated based on fuel costs, energy resource utilization, fuel production infrastructure expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion for LDVs. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored transportation-related strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence.

  13. Competitive interactions between methane- and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria modulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in paddy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zheng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pure culture studies have demonstrated that methanotrophs and ammonia oxidizers can both carry out the oxidation of methane and ammonia. However, the expected interactions resulting from these similarities are poorly understood, especially in complex, natural environments. Using DNA-based stable isotope probing and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA and pmoA genes, we report on biogeochemical and molecular evidence for growth stimulation of methanotrophic communities by ammonium fertilization, and that methane modulates nitrogen cycling by competitive inhibition of nitrifying communities in a rice paddy soil. Pairwise comparison between microcosms amended with CH4, CH4+Urea, and Urea indicated that urea fertilization stimulated methane oxidation activity by 6-fold during a 19 day incubation period, while ammonia oxidation activity was significantly inhibited in the presence of CH4. Pyrosequencing of the total 16S rRNA genes revealed that urea amendment resulted in rapid growth of Methylosarcina-like type Ia MOB, and nitrifying communities appeared to be suppressed by methane. High-throughput sequencing of the 13C-labeled DNA further revealed that methane amendment resulted in clear growth of Methylosarcina-related MOB while methane plus urea led to equal increase in Methylosarcina and Methylobacter-related MOB, indicating the differential growth requirements of representatives of these genera. Strikingly, type Ib MOB did not respond to methane nor to urea. Increase in 13C-assimilation by microorganisms related to methanol oxidizers clearly indicated carbon transfer from methane oxidation to other soil microbes, which was enhanced by urea addition. The active growth of type Ia methanotrops was significantly stimulated by urea amendment, and the pronounced growth of methanol-oxidizing bacteria occurred in CH4-treated microcosms only upon urea amendment. Methane addition inhibited the growth of Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas in urea-amended microcosms, in

  14. The redox-sensing regulator Rex modulates central carbon metabolism, stress tolerance response and biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob P Bitoun

    Full Text Available The Rex repressor has been implicated in regulation of central carbon and energy metabolism in gram-positive bacteria. We have previously shown that Streptococcus mutans, the primary causative agent of dental caries, alters its transcriptome upon Rex-deficiency and renders S. mutans to have increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, aberrations in glucan production, and poor biofilm formation. In this study, we showed that rex in S. mutans is co-transcribed as an operon with downstream guaA, encoding a putative glutamine amidotransferase. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that recombinant Rex bound promoters of target genes avidly and specifically, including those down-regulated in response to Rex-deficiency, and that the ability of recombinant Rex to bind to selected promoters was modulated by NADH and NAD(+. Results suggest that Rex in S. mutans can function as an activator in response to intracellular NADH/NAD(+ level, although the exact binding site for activator Rex remains unclear. Consistent with a role in oxidative stress tolerance, hydrogen peroxide challenge assays showed that the Rex-deficient mutant, TW239, and the Rex/GuaA double mutant, JB314, were more susceptible to hydrogen peroxide killing than the wildtype, UA159. Relative to UA159, JB314 displayed major defects in biofilm formation, with a decrease of more than 50-fold in biomass after 48-hours. Collectively, these results further suggest that Rex in S. mutans regulates fermentation pathways, oxidative stress tolerance, and biofilm formation in response to intracellular NADH/NAD(+ level. Current effort is being directed to further investigation of the role of GuaA in S. mutans cellular physiology.

  15. Impacts of organic carbon availability and recipient bacteria characteristics on the potential for TOL plasmid genetic bioaugmentation in soil slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuma, Kaoru; Holzem, Ryan M; Gunsch, Claudia K

    2012-09-01

    The effectiveness of genetic bioaugmentation relies on efficient plasmid transfer between donor and recipient cells as well as the plasmid's phenotype in the recipient cell. In the present study, the effects of varying organic carbon substrates, initial recipient-to-donor cell density ratios, and mixtures of known recipient bacterial strains on the conjugation and function of a TOL plasmid were tested in sterile soil slurry batch reactors. The presence of soil organic carbon was sufficient in ensuring TOL plasmid transconjugant occurrence (up to 2.1±0.5%) for most recipient strains in soil slurry batch mating experiments. The addition of glucose had limited effects on transconjugant occurrence; however, glucose amendment increased the specific toluene degradation rates of some Enterobacteriaceae transconjugants in soil slurry. Initial cell density ratios and mixtures of recipient strains had smaller impacts on plasmid conjugation and resulting phenotype functionality. These observations suggest that genetic bioaugmentation may be improved by minimal altering of environmental conditions.

  16. Environmental regulation of carbon isotope composition and crassulacean acid metabolism in three plant communities along a water availability gradient

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Expression of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is characterized by extreme variability within and between taxa and its sensitivity to environmental variation. In this study, we determined seasonal fluctuations in CAM photosynthesis with measurements of nocturnal tissue acidification and carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of bulk tissue and extracted sugars in three plant communities along a precipitation gradient (500, 700, and 1,000 mm year−1) on the Yucatan Peninsula. We also related the ...

  17. Ion-modulated nonlinear electronic transport in carbon nanotube bundle/RbAg4I5 thin film composite nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia-Lin; Zhang, Wei; Wei, Jinquan; Gu, Bingfu

    2014-01-01

    We have explored the ion-modulated electronic transport properties of mixed ionic-electronic conductor (MIEC) composite nanostructures made of superionic conductor RbAg4I5 films and carbon nanotube (CNT) bundle spiderwebs. Our experimental and theoretical studies indicate that the formation of ion-electron bound states (IEBSs) leads to strong ion-electron interference effect and interesting electronic transport of CNT, such as nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and novel temperature dependence of the current. With increasing temperature, the hybrid nanostructures show rich phases with different dependence of current on temperature, which is related to the structural phase transition of RbAg4I5 and the transition of dissociation of IEBSs. The ion-modulation of the electric conductivity in such MIEC composite nanostructures with great tunability has been used to design new ionic-electronic composite nano-devices with function like field effect transistor.

  18. EOS7C Version 1.0: TOUGH2 Module for Carbon Dioxide or Nitrogen in Natural Gas (Methane) Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Moridis, George J.; Spycher, Nicholas; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-01-01

    EOS7C is a TOUGH2 module for multicomponent gas mixtures in the systems methanecarbon dioxide (CH4-CO2) or methane-nitrogen (CH4-N2) with or without an aqueous phase and H2O vapor. EOS7C uses a cubic equation of state and an accurate solubility formulation along with a multiphase Darcy s Law to model flow and transport of gas and aqueous phase mixtures over a wide range of pressures and temperatures appropriate to subsurface geologic carbon sequestration sites and natural gas reservoirs....

  19. Separations of corticosteroids using electrochemically modulated liquid chromatography: Selectivity enhancements at a porous graphitic carbon stationary phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, E.Y.; Porter, M.D. [Ames Lab., IA (United States)]|[Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-02-15

    Electrochemically modulated liquid chromatography has been applied to the separation of a mixture of structurally similar corticosteroids (i.e., prednisone, prednisolone, cortisone, and hydrocortisone) using a porous graphitic carbon stationary phase. Changes in the voltage applied to the column markedly affected the efficiency as well as the elution order of the separation, with the mixture fully resolved at large negative values of applied potential. Mechanistic aspects in terms of the influence of changes in the applied voltage on the extent of the interactions between these analytes and the stationary phase are briefly discussed. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Behavioral effects and central nervous system levels of the broadly available κ-agonist hallucinogen salvinorin A are affected by P-glycoprotein modulation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butelman, Eduardo R; Caspers, Michael; Lovell, Kimberly M; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2012-06-01

    Active blood-brain barrier mechanisms, such as the major efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (mdr1), modulate the in vivo/central nervous system (CNS) effects of many pharmacological agents, whether they are used for nonmedical reasons or in pharmacotherapy. The powerful, widely available hallucinogen salvinorin A (from the plant Salvia divinorum) is a high-efficacy, selective κ-opioid agonist and displays fast-onset behavioral effects (e.g., within 1 min of administration) and relatively short duration of action. In vitro studies suggest that salvinorin A may be a P-glycoprotein substrate; thus, the functional status of P-glycoprotein may influence the behavioral effects of salvinorin A or its residence in CNS after parenteral administration. We therefore studied whether a competing P-glycoprotein substrate (the clinically available agent loperamide; 0.032-0.32 mg/kg) or a selective P-glycoprotein blocker, tariquidar (0.32-3.2 mg/kg) could enhance unconditioned behavioral effects (ptosis and facial relaxation, known to be caused by κ-agonists in nonhuman primates) of salvinorin A, as well as its entry and residence in the CNS, as measured by cerebrospinal fluid sampling. Pretreatment with either loperamide or tariquidar dose-dependently enhanced salvinorin A-induced ptosis, but not facial relaxation. In a control study, loperamide and tariquidar were inactive when given as a pretreatment to ((+)-(5α,7α,8β)-N-methyl-N-[7-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-1-oxaspiro[4.5]dec-8-yl]-benzeneacetamide (U69,593), a κ-agonist known to be a very poor P-glycoprotein substrate. Furthermore, pretreatment with tariquidar (3.2 mg/kg) also enhanced peak levels of salvinorin A in cerebrospinal fluid after intravenous administration. These are the first studies in vivo showing the sensitivity of salvinorin A effects to modulation by the P-glycoprotein transporter, a major functional component of the blood-brain barrier.

  1. Electrical Transport and Channel Length Modulation in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    vulnerability assessment; contamination, thermal and structural control; lubrication and surface phenomena. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for...vapor detection," Nano Letters, 3, pp. 929-933, Jul 2003. 3. V. Sazonova, et ai, "A tunable carbon nanotube electromechanical oscillator," Nature, 431...symmetric SWCNT-based CMOS devices and scaling," Acs Nano , 3, pp. 3781-3787, Nov 2009. 33. A. D. Franklin, et al, "Sub-10 nm carbon nanotube

  2. Atmospheric phenanthrene pollution modulates carbon allocation in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desalme, Dorine, E-mail: dorine.desalme@univ-fcomte.fr [Universite de Franche-Comte, CNRS, UMR 6249, Chrono-environnement, BP 71427, F-25211 Montbeliard Cedex (France); Binet, Philippe [Universite de Franche-Comte, CNRS, UMR 6249, Chrono-environnement, BP 71427, F-25211 Montbeliard Cedex (France); Epron, Daniel [Nancy Universite, UMR 1137, Ecologie et Ecophysiologie Forestieres, Faculte des Sciences, BP 70239, F- 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); INRA, UMR 1137, Ecologie et Ecophysiologie Forestieres, Centre INRA de Nancy, F- 54280 Champenoux (France); Bernard, Nadine; Gilbert, Daniel; Toussaint, Marie-Laure [Universite de Franche-Comte, CNRS, UMR 6249, Chrono-environnement, BP 71427, F-25211 Montbeliard Cedex (France); Plain, Caroline [Nancy Universite, UMR 1137, Ecologie et Ecophysiologie Forestieres, Faculte des Sciences, BP 70239, F- 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); INRA, UMR 1137, Ecologie et Ecophysiologie Forestieres, Centre INRA de Nancy, F- 54280 Champenoux (France); Chiapusio, Genevieve, E-mail: genevieve.chiapusio@univ-fcomte.fr [Universite de Franche-Comte, CNRS, UMR 6249, Chrono-environnement, BP 71427, F-25211 Montbeliard Cedex (France)

    2011-10-15

    The influence of atmospheric phenanthrene (PHE) exposure (160 {mu}g m{sup -3}) during one month on carbon allocation in clover was investigated by integrative (plant growth analysis) and instantaneous {sup 13}CO{sub 2} pulse-labelling approaches. PHE exposure diminished plant growth parameters (relative growth rate and net assimilation rate) and disturbed photosynthesis (carbon assimilation rate and chlorophyll content), leading to a 25% decrease in clover biomass. The root-shoot ratio was significantly enhanced (from 0.32 to 0.44). Photosynthates were identically allocated to leaves while less allocated to stems and roots. PHE exposure had a significant overall effect on the {sup 13}C partitioning among clover organs as more carbon was retained in leaves at the expense of roots and stems. The findings indicate that PHE decreases root exudation or transfer to symbionts and in leaves, retains carbon in a non-structural form diverting photosynthates away from growth and respiration (emergence of an additional C loss process). - Highlights: > Atmospheric PHE decreased growth, biomass partitioning and C allocation in clover. > C allocation was modified in favor of leaves but at the expense of roots and stems. > In roots, a decreased carbon exudation or allocation to symbionts was proposed. > In leaves, carbon was retained in a non-structural form as secondary metabolites. > BVOC emission was suggested as another loss process than respiration and exudation. - Exposure of clover to atmospheric PHE affected not only its growth, but also biomass partitioning and C allocation among its organs.

  3. SU-E-T-755: Timing Characteristics of Proton and Carbon Ion Treatments Using a Synchrotron and Modulated Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, J [Fudan university Shanghai Cancer center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Li, Y; Huang, Z; Deng, Y [Shanghai Proton and Heavy Ion Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Sun, L [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Moyers, M [Shanghai Proton and Heavy Ion Center, Colton, CA (China); Hsi, W [Shanghai Proton and Heavy Ion Center, Shanghai (China); Wu, X [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The time required to deliver a treatment impacts not only the number of patients that can be treated each day but also the accuracy of delivery due to potential movements of patient tissues. Both macroscopic and microscopic timing characteristics of a beam delivery system were studied to examine their impacts on patient treatments. Methods: 35 patients were treated during a clinical trial to demonstrate safety and efficacy of a Siemens Iontris system prior to receiving approval from the Chinese Food and Drug Administration. The system has a variable cycle time and can provide proton beams from 48 to 221 MeV/n and carbon ions from 86 to 430 MeV/n. A modulated scanning beam delivery technique is used where the beam remains stationary at each spot aiming location and is not turned off while the spot quickly moves from one aiming location to the next. The treatment log files for 28 of the trial patients were analyzed to determine several timing characteristics. Results: The average portal time per target dose was 172.5 s/Gy for protons and 150.7 s/Gy for carbon ions. The maximum delivery time for any portal was less than 300 s. The average dwell time per spot was 12 ms for protons and 3.0 ms for carbon ions. The number of aiming positions per energy layer varied from 1 to 258 for protons and 1 to 621 for carbon ions. The average spill time and cycle time per energy layer were 1.20 and 2.68 s for protons and 0.95 and 4.73 s for carbon ions respectively. For 3 of the patients, the beam was gated on and off to reduce the effects of respiration. Conclusion: For a typical target volume of 153 cc as used in this clinical trial, the portal delivery times were acceptable.

  4. An Assessment of the Commercial Availability of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies as of June 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, James J.; Davidson, Casie L.; Dahowski, Robert T.

    2009-06-26

    Currently, there is considerable confusion within parts of the carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technical and regulatory communities regarding the maturity and commercial readiness of the technologies needed to capture, transport, inject, monitor and verify the efficacy of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in deep, geologic formations. The purpose of this technical report is to address this confusion by discussing the state of CCS technological readiness in terms of existing commercial deployments of CO2 capture systems, CO2 transportation pipelines, CO2 injection systems and measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) systems for CO2 injected into deep geologic structures. To date, CO2 has been captured from both natural gas and coal fired commercial power generating facilities, gasification facilities and other industrial processes. Transportation via pipelines and injection of CO2 into the deep subsurface are well established commercial practices with more than 35 years of industrial experience. There are also a wide variety of MMV technologies that have been employed to understand the fate of CO2 injected into the deep subsurface. The four existing end-to-end commercial CCS projects – Sleipner, Snøhvit, In Salah and Weyburn – are using a broad range of these technologies, and prove that, at a high level, geologic CO2 storage technologies are mature and capable of deploying at commercial scales. Whether wide scale deployment of CCS is currently or will soon be a cost-effective means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions is largely a function of climate policies which have yet to be enacted and the public’s willingness to incur costs to avoid dangerous anthropogenic interference with the Earth’s climate. There are significant benefits to be had by continuing to improve through research, development, and demonstration suite of existing CCS technologies. Nonetheless, it is clear that most of the core technologies required to address capture, transport

  5. Characterization of carbon dioxide transfer in a hollow fiber membrane module as a solution for gas-liquid transfer in microgravity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farges, Berangere; Duchez, David; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; Cornet, Jean-F.

    hollow fibre membrane module. The consistency of the proposed method, based on a gas and liquid phase balances CO and a carbon relation of conservation enables a very accurate determination of the kL 2 value as a main limiting step of the whole process. Considering then the wide range of different analytical tools available for the total inorganic carbon measurement in liquid samples, it could be envisaged in the future to prefer the procedure developed in this paper instead of using O classical kL 2 determination methods in the perspective of any accurate characterisation of gas-liquid mass transfer process (affected or not by reduced gravity).

  6. Chlorobaculum tepidum Modulates Amino Acid Composition in Response to Energy Availability, as Revealed by a Systematic Exploration of the Energy Landscape of Phototrophic Sulfur Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Amalie T; Lee, Kelvin H; Hanson, Thomas E

    2016-11-01

    Microbial sulfur metabolism, particularly the formation and consumption of insoluble elemental sulfur (S(0)), is an important biogeochemical engine that has been harnessed for applications ranging from bioleaching and biomining to remediation of waste streams. Chlorobaculum tepidum, a low-light-adapted photoautolithotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, oxidizes multiple sulfur species and displays a preference for more reduced electron donors: sulfide > S(0) > thiosulfate. To understand this preference in the context of light energy availability, an "energy landscape" of phototrophic sulfur oxidation was constructed by varying electron donor identity, light flux, and culture duration. Biomass and cellular parameters of C. tepidum cultures grown across this landscape were analyzed. From these data, a correction factor for colorimetric protein assays was developed, enabling more accurate biomass measurements for C. tepidum, as well as other organisms. C. tepidum's bulk amino acid composition correlated with energy landscape parameters, including a tendency toward less energetically expensive amino acids under reduced light flux. This correlation, paired with an observation of increased cell size and storage carbon production under electron-rich growth conditions, suggests that C. tepidum has evolved to cope with changing energy availability by tuning its proteome for energetic efficiency and storing compounds for leaner times.

  7. Hydrophobic End-Modulated Amino-Acid-Based Neutral Hydrogelators: Structure-Specific Inclusion of Carbon Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Pritam; Mandal, Deep; Brahmachari, Sayanti; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-04-04

    Hydrophobic end-modulated l-phenylalanine-containing triethylene glycol monomethyl ether tagged neutral hydrogelators (1-4) are developed. Investigations determine the gelators' structure-dependent inclusion of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) in the self-assembled fibrillar network (SAFIN). The gelators (1, 3, and 4) can immobilize water and aqueous buffer (pH 3-7) with a minimum gelator concentration of 10-15 mg mL(-1). The hydrophobic parts of the gelators are varied from a long chain (C-16) to an extended aromatic pyrenyl moiety, and their abilities to integrate 1 D and 2 D allotropes of carbon (i.e., single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphene oxide (GO), respectively) within the gel are investigated. Gelator 1, containing a long alkyl chain (C-16), can include SWNTs, whereas the pyrene-containing 4 can include both SWNTs and GO. Gelator 3 fails to incorporate SWNTs or GO owing to its slow rate of gelation and possibly a mismatch between the aggregated structure and CNMs. The involvement of various forces in self-aggregated gelation and physicochemical changes occurring through CNM inclusion are examined by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The distinctive pattern of self-assembly of gelators 1 and 4 through J- and H-type aggregation might facilitate the structure-specific CNM inclusion. Inclusion of SWNTs/GO within the hydrogel matrix results in a reinforcement in mechanical stiffness of the composites compared with that of the native hydrogels.

  8. The physiological response of two green calcifying algae from the Great Barrier Reef towards high dissolved inorganic and organic carbon (DIC and DOC availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Wilhelm Meyer

    Full Text Available Increasing dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC concentrations associated with ocean acidification can affect marine calcifiers, but local factors, such as high dissolved organic carbon (DOC concentrations through sewage and algal blooms, may interact with this global factor. For calcifying green algae of the genus Halimeda, a key tropical carbonate producer that often occurs in coral reefs, no studies on these interactions have been reported. These data are however urgently needed to understand future carbonate production. Thus, we investigated the independent and combined effects of DIC (pCO2 402 μatm/ pHtot 8.0 and 996 μatm/ pHtot 7.7 and DOC (added as glucose in 0 and 294 μmol L-1 on growth, calcification and photosynthesis of H. macroloba and H. opuntia from the Great Barrier Reef in an incubation experiment over 16 days. High DIC concentrations significantly reduced dark calcification of H. opuntia by 130 % and led to net dissolution, but did not affect H. macroloba. High DOC concentrations significantly reduced daily oxygen production of H. opuntia and H. macroloba by 78 % and 43 %, respectively, and significantly reduced dark calcification of H. opuntia by 70%. Combined high DIC and DOC did not show any interactive effects for both algae, but revealed additive effects for H. opuntia where the combination of both factors reduced dark calcification by 162 % compared to controls. Such species-specific differences in treatment responses indicate H. opuntia is more susceptible to a combination of high DIC and DOC than H. macroloba. From an ecological perspective, results further suggest a reduction of primary production for Halimeda-dominated benthic reef communities under high DOC concentrations and additional decreases of carbonate accretion under elevated DIC concentrations, where H. opuntia dominates the benthic community. This may reduce biogenic carbonate sedimentation rates and hence the buffering capacity against further ocean

  9. Influence of CH4 and H2S availability on symbiont distribution, carbon assimilation and transfer in the dual symbiotic vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Santos

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available High densities of mussels of the genus Bathymodiolus are present at hydrothermal vents of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It was previously proposed that the chemistry at vent sites would affect their sulphide- and methane-oxidizing endosymbionts' abundance. In this study, we confirmed the latter assumption using fluorescence in situ hybridization on Bathymodiolus azoricus specimens maintained in a controlled laboratory environment at atmospheric pressure with one, both or none of the chemical substrates. A high level of symbiosis plasticity was observed, methane-oxidizers occupying between 4 and 39% of total bacterial area and both symbionts developing according to the presence or absence of their substrates. Using H13CO3− in the presence of sulphide, or 13CH4, we monitored carbon assimilation by the endosymbionts and its translocation to symbiont-free mussel tissues. Carbon was incorporated from methane and sulphide-oxidized inorganic carbon at rates 3 to 10 times slower in the host muscle tissue than in the symbiont-containing gill tissue. Both symbionts thus contribute actively to B. azoricus nutrition and adapt to the availability of their substrates. Further experiments with varying substrate concentrations using the same set-up should provide useful tools to study and even model the effects of changes in hydrothermal fluids on B. azoricus' chemosynthetic nutrition.

  10. Modulation of snow reflectance and snowmelt from Central Asian glaciers by anthropogenic black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, Julia; Flanner, Mark; Kang, Shichang; Sprenger, Michael; Zhang, Qianggong; Guo, Junming; Li, Yang; Schwikowski, Margit; Farinotti, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Deposited mineral dust and black carbon are known to reduce the albedo of snow and enhance melt. Here we estimate the contribution of anthropogenic black carbon (BC) to snowmelt in glacier accumulation zones of Central Asia based on in-situ measurements and modelling. Source apportionment suggests that more than 94% of the BC is emitted from mostly regional anthropogenic sources while the remaining contribution comes from natural biomass burning. Even though the annual deposition flux of mineral dust can be up to 20 times higher than that of BC, we find that anthropogenic BC causes the majority (60% on average) of snow darkening. This leads to summer snowmelt rate increases of up to 6.3% (7 cm a‑1) on glaciers in three different mountain environments in Kyrgyzstan, based on albedo reduction and snowmelt models.

  11. The role of continents in modulating the whole Earth carbon and oxygen cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    That Earth owes its oxygenated atmosphere to its presently unique claim on life is clear, but how its atmosphere evolved from an initially oxygen-free state remains unresolved. Here, we show that continents underwent a transformation from mafic to felsic compositions at about 2.7-2.5 Ga. We show that the generation of large amounts of felsic magmas requires hydrous parental magmas, which can only be generated by introduction of water into the mantle source of the hydrous parents. This suggests that this compositional shift in crust marked a switch from stagnant lid to a mobile lid (plate tectonics) convective regime. This compositional transformation resulted in a decrease in the oxidative weathering efficiency of the Earth's surface, which allowed atmospheric O2 to rise rapidly to a new steady state after ~2 Ga. Over the next billion years, steady accumulation of carbon deposited on continental shelves resulted in a gradual increase in the total CO2 inputs into the ocean and atmosphere system as metamorphic and magmatically induced degassing of the growing continental carbon reservoir amplified that from the mantle. Because oxygen production is formed by net organic carbon burial, which scales with total CO2 production, the increasing CO2 inputs to the ocean and atmosphere results in increasing O2 production. This causes slow build-up of atmospheric O2 until a threshold is reached at which atmospheric O2 levels run away, culminating in the oxygenated atmospheric conditions of the Phanerozoic. A two-step rise in atmospheric O2 is thus a necessary consequence of plate tectonics, continent formation and the growth of a crustal carbon reservoir. A provocative prediction of this work is that atmospheric CO2 concentrations may not have been as high in the Archean and Proterozoic as seems required to compensate for the faint young sun.

  12. Charge Modulation in Graphitic Carbon Nitride as a Switchable Approach to High-Capacity Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xin; Kou, Liangzhi; Tahini, Hassan A; Smith, Sean C

    2015-11-01

    Electrical charging of graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets (g-C4 N3 and g-C3 N4 ) is proposed as a strategy for high-capacity and electrocatalytically switchable hydrogen storage. Using first-principle calculations, we found that the adsorption energy of H2 molecules on graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets is dramatically enhanced by injecting extra electrons into the adsorbent. At full hydrogen coverage, the negatively charged graphitic carbon nitride achieves storage capacities up to 6-7 wt %. In contrast to other hydrogen storage approaches, the storage/release occurs spontaneously once extra electrons are introduced or removed, and these processes can be simply controlled by switching on/off the charging voltage. Therefore, this approach promises both facile reversibility and tunable kinetics without the need of specific catalysts. Importantly, g-C4 N3 has good electrical conductivity and high electron mobility, which can be a very good candidate for electron injection/release. These predictions may prove to be instrumental in searching for a new class of high-capacity hydrogen storage materials.

  13. Ammonium hydroxide modulated synthesis of high-quality fluorescent carbon dots for white LEDs with excellent color rendering properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengda; Zhu, Zhifeng; Chang, Yajing; Wang, Hui; Yuan, Nan; Li, Guopeng; Yu, Dabin; Jiang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    A novel type of aqueous fluorescent carbon dot (CD) was synthesized using citric acid as the only carbon source via an ammonium hydroxide modulated method, providing a blue color gamut. The amino group is considered to be the key factor in the high fluorescence of CDs and a model is established to investigate the mechanism of fluorescence. In addition, white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) are fabricated by utilizing the prepared CDs and rare earth luminescent materials (SrSi2O2N2:Eu and Sr2Si5N8:Eu) as color conversion layers and UV-LED chips as the excitation light source. The WLEDs produce bright white light with attractive color rendering properties including a color rendering index of up to 95.1, a CIE coordinate of (0.33, 0.37), and a T c of 5447 K under a 100 mA driven current, indicating that the CDs are promising in the field of optoelectronic devices.

  14. Effects of High Dissolved Inorganic and Organic Carbon Availability on the Physiology of the Hard Coral Acropora millepora from the Great Barrier Reef.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich W Meyer

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are facing major global and local threats due to climate change-induced increases in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and because of land-derived increases in organic and inorganic nutrients. Recent research revealed that high availability of labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC negatively affects scleractinian corals. Studies on the interplay of these factors, however, are lacking, but urgently needed to understand coral reef functioning under present and near future conditions. This experimental study investigated the individual and combined effects of ambient and high DIC (pCO2 403 μatm/ pHTotal 8.2 and 996 μatm/pHTotal 7.8 and DOC (added as Glucose 0 and 294 μmol L-1, background DOC concentration of 83 μmol L-1 availability on the physiology (net and gross photosynthesis, respiration, dark and light calcification, and growth of the scleractinian coral Acropora millepora (Ehrenberg, 1834 from the Great Barrier Reef over a 16 day interval. High DIC availability did not affect photosynthesis, respiration and light calcification, but significantly reduced dark calcification and growth by 50 and 23%, respectively. High DOC availability reduced net and gross photosynthesis by 51% and 39%, respectively, but did not affect respiration. DOC addition did not influence calcification, but significantly increased growth by 42%. Combination of high DIC and high DOC availability did not affect photosynthesis, light calcification, respiration or growth, but significantly decreased dark calcification when compared to both controls and DIC treatments. On the ecosystem level, high DIC concentrations may lead to reduced accretion and growth of reefs dominated by Acropora that under elevated DOC concentrations will likely exhibit reduced primary production rates, ultimately leading to loss of hard substrate and reef erosion. It is therefore important to consider the potential impacts of elevated DOC and DIC simultaneously to assess real world

  15. Effects of High Dissolved Inorganic and Organic Carbon Availability on the Physiology of the Hard Coral Acropora millepora from the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Friedrich W; Vogel, Nikolas; Diele, Karen; Kunzmann, Andreas; Uthicke, Sven; Wild, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Coral reefs are facing major global and local threats due to climate change-induced increases in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and because of land-derived increases in organic and inorganic nutrients. Recent research revealed that high availability of labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC) negatively affects scleractinian corals. Studies on the interplay of these factors, however, are lacking, but urgently needed to understand coral reef functioning under present and near future conditions. This experimental study investigated the individual and combined effects of ambient and high DIC (pCO2 403 μatm/ pHTotal 8.2 and 996 μatm/pHTotal 7.8) and DOC (added as Glucose 0 and 294 μmol L-1, background DOC concentration of 83 μmol L-1) availability on the physiology (net and gross photosynthesis, respiration, dark and light calcification, and growth) of the scleractinian coral Acropora millepora (Ehrenberg, 1834) from the Great Barrier Reef over a 16 day interval. High DIC availability did not affect photosynthesis, respiration and light calcification, but significantly reduced dark calcification and growth by 50 and 23%, respectively. High DOC availability reduced net and gross photosynthesis by 51% and 39%, respectively, but did not affect respiration. DOC addition did not influence calcification, but significantly increased growth by 42%. Combination of high DIC and high DOC availability did not affect photosynthesis, light calcification, respiration or growth, but significantly decreased dark calcification when compared to both controls and DIC treatments. On the ecosystem level, high DIC concentrations may lead to reduced accretion and growth of reefs dominated by Acropora that under elevated DOC concentrations will likely exhibit reduced primary production rates, ultimately leading to loss of hard substrate and reef erosion. It is therefore important to consider the potential impacts of elevated DOC and DIC simultaneously to assess real world scenarios, as

  16. Enhancing Carbon Fixation by Metabolic Engineering: A Model System of Complex Network Modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Gregory Stephanopoulos

    2008-04-10

    In the first two years of this research we focused on the development of a DNA microarray for transcriptional studies in the photosynthetic organism Synechocystis and the elucidation of the metabolic pathway for biopolymer synthesis in this organism. In addition we also advanced the molecular biological tools for metabolic engineering of biopolymer synthesis in Synechocystis and initiated a series of physiological studies for the elucidation of the carbon fixing pathways and basic central carbon metabolism of these organisms. During the last two-year period we focused our attention on the continuation and completion of the last task, namely, the development of tools for basic investigations of the physiology of these cells through, primarily, the determination of their metabolic fluxes. The reason for this decision lies in the importance of fluxes as key indicators of physiology and the high level of information content they carry in terms of identifying rate limiting steps in a metabolic pathway. While flux determination is a well-advanced subject for heterotrophic organisms, for the case of autotrophic bacteria, like Synechocystis, some special challenges had to be overcome. These challenges stem mostly from the fact that if one uses {sup 13}C labeled CO{sub 2} for flux determination, the {sup 13}C label will mark, at steady state, all carbon atoms of all cellular metabolites, thus eliminating the necessary differentiation required for flux determination. This peculiarity of autotrophic organisms makes it imperative to carry out flux determination under transient conditions, something that had not been accomplished before. We are pleased to report that we have solved this problem and we are now able to determine fluxes in photosynthetic organisms from stable isotope labeling experiments followed by measurements of label enrichment in cellular metabolites using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. We have conducted extensive simulations to test the method and

  17. Selectivity modulation in the consecutive hydrogenation of benzaldehyde via functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonghua Zhou; Jing Liu; Xingyun Li; Xiulian Pan; Xinhe Bao

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogenation of benzaldehyde is a typical consecutive reaction,since the intermediate benzyl alcohol is apt to be further hydrogenated.Here we demonstrate that the selectivity of benzyl alcohol can be tuned via functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs),which are used as the support of Pd.With the original CNTs,the selectivity of benzyl alcohol is 88% at a 100% conversion of benzaldehyde.With introduction of oxygen-containing groups onto CNTs,it drops to 27%.In contrast,doping CNTs with N atoms,the selectivity reaches 96% under the same reaction conditions.The kinetic study shows that hydrogenation of benzyl alcohol is significantly suppressed,which can be attributed to weakened adsorption of benzyl alcohol.This is most likely related to the modified electronic structure of Pd species via interaction with functionalized CNTs,as shown by XPS characterization.

  18. Modulating supramolecular binding of carbon dioxide in a redox-active porous metal-organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhenzhong; Godfrey, Harry G. W.; da Silva, Ivan; Cheng, Yongqiang; Savage, Mathew; Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J. L.; Teat, Simon J.; Gagnon, Kevin J.; Frogley, Mark D.; Manuel, Pascal; Rudić, Svemir; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; Easun, Timothy L.; Yang, Sihai; Schröder, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds dominate many chemical and biological processes, and chemical modification enables control and modulation of host–guest systems. Here we report a targeted modification of hydrogen bonding and its effect on guest binding in redox-active materials. MFM-300(VIII) {[VIII2(OH)2(L)], LH4=biphenyl-3,3′,5,5′-tetracarboxylic acid} can be oxidized to isostructural MFM-300(VIV), [VIV2O2(L)], in which deprotonation of the bridging hydroxyl groups occurs. MFM-300(VIII) shows the second highest CO2 uptake capacity in metal-organic framework materials at 298 K and 1 bar (6.0 mmol g−1) and involves hydrogen bonding between the OH group of the host and the O-donor of CO2, which binds in an end-on manner, =1.863(1) Å. In contrast, CO2-loaded MFM-300(VIV) shows CO2 bound side-on to the oxy group and sandwiched between two phenyl groups involving a unique ···c.g.phenyl interaction [3.069(2), 3.146(3) Å]. The macroscopic packing of CO2 in the pores is directly influenced by these primary binding sites. PMID:28194014

  19. Modulating supramolecular binding of carbon dioxide in a redox-active porous metal-organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhenzhong; Godfrey, Harry G. W.; da Silva, Ivan; Cheng, Yongqiang; Savage, Mathew; Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J. L.; Teat, Simon J.; Gagnon, Kevin J.; Frogley, Mark D.; Manuel, Pascal; Rudić, Svemir; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; Easun, Timothy L.; Yang, Sihai; Schröder, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen bonds dominate many chemical and biological processes, and chemical modification enables control and modulation of host-guest systems. Here we report a targeted modification of hydrogen bonding and its effect on guest binding in redox-active materials. MFM-300(VIII) {[VIII2(OH)2(L)], LH4=biphenyl-3,3',5,5'-tetracarboxylic acid} can be oxidized to isostructural MFM-300(VIV), [VIV2O2(L)], in which deprotonation of the bridging hydroxyl groups occurs. MFM-300(VIII) shows the second highest CO2 uptake capacity in metal-organic framework materials at 298 K and 1 bar (6.0 mmol g-1) and involves hydrogen bonding between the OH group of the host and the O-donor of CO2, which binds in an end-on manner, =1.863(1) Å. In contrast, CO2-loaded MFM-300(VIV) shows CO2 bound side-on to the oxy group and sandwiched between two phenyl groups involving a unique ...c.g.phenyl interaction [3.069(2), 3.146(3) Å]. The macroscopic packing of CO2 in the pores is directly influenced by these primary binding sites.

  20. -Regular Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areej M. Abduldaim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduced and studied -regular modules as a generalization of -regular rings to modules as well as regular modules (in the sense of Fieldhouse. An -module is called -regular if for each and , there exist and a positive integer such that . The notion of -pure submodules was introduced to generalize pure submodules and proved that an -module is -regular if and only if every submodule of is -pure iff   is a -regular -module for each maximal ideal of . Many characterizations and properties of -regular modules were given. An -module is -regular iff is a -regular ring for each iff is a -regular ring for finitely generated module . If is a -regular module, then .

  1. Nitric oxide modulates hypoxic pulmonary smooth muscle cell proliferation and apoptosis by regulating carbon monoxide pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-fei WANG; Hong TIAN; Chao-shu TANG; Hong-fang JIN; Jun-bao DU

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To explore the role of carbon monoxide (CO) in the regulation of hypoxic pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation and apoptosis by nitric oxide (NO). Methods: PASMC of Wistar rats was cultured in vitro in the presence of a NO donor, sodium nitroprusside, or an inhibitor of heme oxygenase (HO), zinc protoporphyrin-IX, or under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions.Nitrite and carboxyhemoglobin in PASMC medium were detected with spectrophotometry. The proliferating and apoptotic percentage of PASMC was measured by flow cytometry. The expression of HO-1 mRNA in PASMC was analyzed by fluorescent real-time quantitative PCR, and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen and caspase-3 were examined by immunocytochemical analysis. Results: The results showed that hypoxia suppressed NO generation from PASMC, which promoted hypoxic PASMC proliferation and induced apoptosis. Meanwhile, hy-poxia induced HO-1 expression in PASMC and promoted CO production from PASMC, which inhibited PASMC proliferation and regulated PASMC apoptosis. NO upregulated the expression of HO-1 mRNA in hypoxic PASMC; NO also inhib-ited proliferation and promoted apoptosis of hypoxic PASMC, possibly by regu-lating the production of CO. Conclusion: The results indicated that CO could inhibit proliferation and regulate apoptosis of PASMC, and NO inhibited prolifera-tion and promoted apoptosis of hypoxic PASMC, possibly by regulating the pro-duction of CO.

  2. Adsorbed plasma proteins modulate the effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on neutrophils in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, Irina I; Mikhalchik, Elena V; Barinov, Nikolay A; Kostevich, Valeria A; Smolina, Natalia V; Klinov, Dmitry V; Sokolov, Alexey V

    2016-08-01

    Proteins adsorbed on a surface may affect the interaction of this surface with cells. Here, we studied the binding of human serum albumin (HSA), fibrinogen (FBG) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) to PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (PEG-SWCNTs) and evaluated the impact of PEG-SWCNT treated by these proteins on neutrophils in whole blood samples. Measurements of adsorption parameters revealed tight binding of proteins to PEG-SWCNTs. AFM was employed to directly observe protein binding to sidewalls of PEG-SWCNTs. Fluorescein-labeled IgG was used to ascertain the stability of PEG-SWCNT-IgG complexes in plasma. In blood samples, all plasma proteins mitigated damage of neutrophils observed just after blood exposure to PEG-SWCNTs, while only treatment of PEG-SWCNTs with IgG resulted in dose- and time-dependent enhancement of CNT-induced neutrophil activation and in potentiation of oxidative stress. Our study demonstrates the ability of adsorbed plasma proteins to influence neutrophil response caused by PEG-SWCNTs in whole blood.

  3. Climate Change and Future U.S. Electricity Infrastructure: the Nexus between Water Availability, Land Suitability, and Low-Carbon Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, J.; Halter, T.; Hejazi, M. I.; Jensen, E.; Liu, L.; Olson, J.; Patel, P.; Vernon, C. R.; Voisin, N.; Zuljevic, N.

    2014-12-01

    Integrated assessment models project the future electricity generation mix under different policy, technology, and socioeconomic scenarios, but they do not directly address site-specific factors such as interconnection costs, population density, land use restrictions, air quality, NIMBY concerns, or water availability that might affect the feasibility of achieving the technology mix. Moreover, since these factors can change over time due to climate, policy, socioeconomics, and so on, it is important to examine the dynamic feasibility of integrated assessment scenarios "on the ground." This paper explores insights from coupling an integrated assessment model (GCAM-USA) with a geospatial power plant siting model (the Capacity Expansion Regional Feasibility model, CERF) within a larger multi-model framework that includes regional climate, hydrologic, and water management modeling. GCAM-USA is a dynamic-recursive market equilibrium model simulating the impact of carbon policies on global and national markets for energy commodities and other goods; one of its outputs is the electricity generation mix and expansion at the state-level. It also simulates water demands from all sectors that are downscaled as input to the water management modeling. CERF simulates siting decisions by dynamically representing suitable areas for different generation technologies with geospatial analyses (informed by technology-specific siting criteria, such as required mean streamflow per the Clean Water Act), and then choosing siting locations to minimize interconnection costs (to electric transmission and gas pipelines). CERF results are compared across three scenarios simulated by GCAM-USA: 1) a non-mitigation scenario (RCP8.5) in which conventional fossil-fueled technologies prevail, 2) a mitigation scenario (RCP4.5) in which the carbon price causes a shift toward nuclear, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS), and renewables, and 3) a repeat of scenario (2) in which CCS technologies are

  4. Electrostatic contribution from solvent in modulating single-walled carbon nanotube association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Patel, Sandeep, E-mail: sapatel@udel.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2014-09-21

    We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to compute the potential of mean force (PMF) between two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes solvated in pure nonpolarizable SPC/E and polarizable TIP4P-FQ water, at various temperatures. In general, the reversible work required to bring two nanotubes from a dissociated state (free energy reference) to contact state (free energy minimum) is more favorable and less temperature-dependent in TIP4P-FQ than in SPC/E water models. In contrast, molecular properties and behavior of water such as the spatially-resolved water number density (intertube, intratube, or outer regions), for TIP4P-FQ are more sensitive to temperature than SPC/E. Decomposition of the solvent-induced PMF into different spatial regions suggests that TIP4P-FQ has stronger temperature dependence; the opposing destabilizing/stabilizing contributions from intertube water and more distal water balance each other and suppress the temperature dependence of total association free energy. Further investigation of hydrogen bonding network in intertube water reveals that TIP4P-FQ retains fewer hydrogen bonds than SPC/E, which correlates with the lower water number density in this region. This reduction of hydrogen bonds affects the intertube water dipoles. As the intertube volume decreases, TIP4P-FQ dipole moment approaches the gas phase value; the distribution of dipole magnitude also becomes narrower due to less average polarization/perturbation from other water molecules. Our results imply that the reduction of water under confinement may seem trivial, but underlying effects to structure and free energetics are non-negligible.

  5. Seed priming improves chilling tolerance in chickpea by modulating germination metabolism, trehalose accumulation and carbon assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Hussain, Mubshar; Nawaz, Ahmad; Lee, Dong-Jin; Alghamdi, Salem S; Siddique, Kadambot H M

    2017-02-01

    Chilling stress is one of the major abiotic stresses affecting chickpea productivity worldwide. This study evaluated the potential role of seed priming in improving resistance to chilling stress in chickpea (cv. Punjab, 2008). The priming treatments involved soaking seeds of chickpea cultivar Punjab 2008 in either water for 8 h (on-farm priming), aerated water (hydropriming) for 18 h, or CaCl2 solution (ψs -1.25 MPa; osmopriming) for 18 h. Primed and untreated seeds were grown either at 18/15 °C (control) or 13/10 °C (chilling stress). Chilling stress suppressed the growth of chickpea while seed priming mitigated the adverse effects of chilling stress by improving stand establishment, growth, water relations, photosynthesis, α-amylase activity, sugar metabolism, antioxidant enzyme activity, membrane stability, and leaf accumulation of proline, nitrogen, potassium and soluble phenolics. Seed priming also improved the performance of chickpea under optimal (control) conditions. The overall order of improvement in resistance to chilling by using seed priming was osmopriming > hydropriming > on-farm priming. Osmopriming improved seedling dry weight, specific leaf area, leaf CO2 net assimilation rate, maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII, α-amylase activity, trehalose content and leaf relative water content by 10, 22, 17, 20, 73, 48 and 7%, respectively, relative to the non-primed control under chilling stress. Under optimal temperature conditions, the corresponding values were 30, 32, 16, 10, 83, 75 and 5%, respectively. Sugar metabolism, especially trehalose content, was strongly linked with stand establishment, photosynthesis, antioxidant potential (under chilling stress) and plant biomass. Overall, seed priming improved chickpea performance under both optimal temperature conditions and chilling stress through better germination metabolism and the accumulation of trehalose, which protected from oxidative damage and helped to maintain carbon

  6. Modulating cell adhesion dynamics on carbon nanotube monolayer engineered with extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ning; Wong, Chee C; Gong, Ying X; Tan, Samuel C W; Chan, Vincent; Liao, Kin

    2010-04-01

    Although it has been demonstrated that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may have potentials for tissue engineering applications because of their unparalleled physical properties, little has been known on the cell adhesion mechanisms on model CNT monolayer pertaining to the design of novel cell therapeutics device. In this study, the adhesion dynamics of primary porcine esophageal fibroblasts (PEFs) on CNT monolayer were elucidated with confocal reflectance interference contrast microscopy (C-RICM) integrating with phase contrast microscopy. Moreover, CNT monolayer (CNT-ML) was functionalized with two typical extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins including collagen type I (COL) and fibronectin (FN) in order to promote its biocompatibility. First, it is shown by atomic force microscopy that the topographical features of CNT-ML were dependent on the types of immobilized ECM protein. Second, significant time lag in adhesion contact evolution (around 10 min) for PEFs was found on both CNT-ML and CNT-COL compared to the negligible time lag on CNT-FN. It was found that adhesion energy of PEFs on the CNT-COL and CNT-FN surfaces reached steady state at 60 and 30 min after cell seeding compared to 70 min on CNT-ML surface. At steady state, the adhesion energy of PEFs on the CNT-COL and CNT-FN surfaces was about twice as much than that on the CNT-ML surface. Moreover, immobilization of collagen or fibronectin on CNT monolayer led to an increase in seeding efficiency and proliferation rate of PEFs. Scanning electron microscopy and immunostaining together demonstrated that PEFs displayed an elongated morphology and highly polarized actin network on both CNT-COL and CNT-FN surfaces, whereas PEFs displayed nonuniform cell morphology and actin organization on the CNT-ML surface. Overall, our results demonstrated that the biophysical responses and biological behavior of PEFs on unmodified or functionalized CNT monolayer were different. Functionalization of CNT through extracellular matrix

  7. Effects of Available Carbon on Water Soluble Carbon and Water Soluble Nitrogen during Composting of Food Wastes%易利用碳的添加对厨余堆肥水溶性碳氮的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨延梅

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The physicochemical properties of water soluble carbon and water soluble nitrogen during the composting of food wastes with different available carbon were investigated. [ Method ] The static aerobic process was used in a food waste composting experiment. The ventilation was 0. 03 mV( kg · h). Dry mass ratio of food wastes to available carbon was different. Three kinds of ratio (defined as T0, T1 and T2) were used and they were 1. 0=0,1. 0:0. 2 and 1. 0:0.5. [Result] At the beginning, more available carbon addition, the amount of water soluble carbon in each experimentation was higher, the acid period of condensate water was longer, the amount of CO2-C emission was lower from mixture and loss of carbon in the way of organic acids micromolecule was bigger. After the composting, the ratio of soluble nitrogen became higher, and in this part of nitrogen, organic nitrogen was more, soluble ammonia nitrogen was less. [ Conclusion] From reducing ammonia volatilization, maintaining appropriate efficiency and none biological toxicity considerations, experimentation T1 with a little available carbon addition was better in the process of composting.%[目的]探讨易利用碳(蔗糖)的添加对厨余垃圾堆肥水溶性碳氮等理化性质的影响.[方法]堆肥化试验采用静态好氧工艺,通风量为0.03m3/(kg·h).堆肥设3个处理,其对应的厨余与易利用碳的干基比分别为1.0∶0、1.0∶0.2和1.0∶0.5.[结果]易利用碳加入量越多,堆体初始水溶性碳的值越高,堆肥冷凝水pH的酸化期越长,厨余混合物CO2-C的释放率越低,堆肥小分子有机酸等形式的碳损失越剧烈.易利用碳加入量越多,堆制后堆肥氮的可溶态比例越高,并且其堆肥水溶性氮中的有机氮比例越高,水溶性氨氮的比例越小.[结论]从减少堆肥氨挥发、维持适宜的堆肥效率、堆肥无生物毒性等方面考虑,少量添加易利用碳的堆肥过程较理想.

  8. Effect of gas phase composition cycling on/off modulation numbers of C2H2/SF6 flows on the formation of geometrically controlled carbon coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eum, Jun-Ho; Jeon, Young-Chul; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2012-07-01

    Carbon coils can be synthesized using C2H2/H2 as source gases and SF6 as an incorporated additive gas under a thermal chemical vapor deposition system. In this study, nickel catalyst layer deposition and then hydrogen plasma pretreatment were performed prior to the carbon coils deposition reaction. To obtain geometrically controlled carbon coils, source gases and SF6 were manipulated as the cycling on/off modulation numbers of C2H2/SF6 flows. The cycling numbers were varied according to the different reaction processes. The increased cycling numbers could develop the wave-like nano-sized carbon coils. By further increasing the cycling numbers, however, the nanostructured carbon coils seemed to deteriorate. As a result, the maximum formation of geometrically controlled carbon coils was achieved by adjusting the cycling numbers. The enhanced etching capability of the fluorine-related species in SF6 additive gas was considered for the main objective of controlling the geometry of carbon coils.

  9. Competitive interactions between methane- and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria modulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in paddy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.; Huang, R.; Wang, B. Z.; Bodelier, P. L. E.; Jia, Z. J.

    2014-06-01

    Pure culture studies have demonstrated that methanotrophs and ammonia oxidizers can both carry out the oxidation of methane and ammonia. However, the expected interactions resulting from these similarities are poorly understood, especially in complex, natural environments. Using DNA-based stable isotope probing and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA and functional genes, we report on biogeochemical and molecular evidence for growth stimulation of methanotrophic communities by ammonium fertilization, and that methane modulates nitrogen cycling by competitive inhibition of nitrifying communities in a rice paddy soil. Pairwise comparison between microcosms amended with CH4, CH4+Urea, and Urea indicated that urea fertilization stimulated methane oxidation activity 6-fold during a 19-day incubation period, while ammonia oxidation activity was significantly suppressed in the presence of CH4. Pyrosequencing of the total 16S rRNA genes revealed that urea amendment resulted in rapid growth of Methylosarcina-like MOB, and nitrifying communities appeared to be partially inhibited by methane. High-throughput sequencing of the 13C-labeled DNA further revealed that methane amendment resulted in clear growth of Methylosarcina-related MOB while methane plus urea led to an equal increase in Methylosarcina and Methylobacter-related type Ia MOB, indicating the differential growth requirements of representatives of these genera. An increase in 13C assimilation by microorganisms related to methanol oxidizers clearly indicated carbon transfer from methane oxidation to other soil microbes, which was enhanced by urea addition. The active growth of type Ia methanotrops was significantly stimulated by urea amendment, and the pronounced growth of methanol-oxidizing bacteria occurred in CH4-treated microcosms only upon urea amendment. Methane addition partially inhibited the growth of Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas in urea-amended microcosms, as well as growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. These

  10. Electroporative interleukin-10 gene transfer ameliorates carbon tetrachloride-induced murine liver fibrosis by MMP and TIMP modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-ying CHOU; Cheng-nan LU; Tsung-hsing LEE; Chia-ling WU; Kung-sheng HUNG; Allan M CONCEJERO; Bruno JAWAN; Cheng-haung WANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim:Liver fibrosis represents a process of healing and scarring in response to chronic liver injury.Effective therapies for liver fibrosis are lacking.Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a cytokine that downregulates pro-inflammatory responses and has a modulatory effect on hepatic fibrogenesis.The aim of this study was to investigate whether electroporative IL-10 gene therapy has an hepatic fibrolytic effect on mice.Methods:Hepatic fibrosis was induced by administering carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) for 10 weeks in mice.The human IL-10 expression plasmid was delivered via electroporation after hepatic fibrosis was established.Histopathology,reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) ,immunoblotting,and gelatin zymography were used to investigate the possible mechanisms of action of IL-10.Results:Human IL-10 gene therapy reversed CCl4-induced liver fibrosis in mice.RT-PCR revealed that IL-10 gene therapy attenuated liver TGF-β1,collagen αl,fibronectin,and cell adhesion molecule mRNA upregulation.Following gene transfer,both the activation of α-smooth muscle actin and cyclooxygenase-2 were significantly attenuated.Furthermore.IL-10 significantly inhibited matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP) activation after CCl4 intoxication.Conclusions:We demonstrated that IL-10 gene therapy attenuated CCl4-induced liver fibrosis in mice.IL-10 prevented upregulated fibrogenic and pro-inflammatory gene responses.Its collagenolytic effect may be attributed to MMP and TIMP modulation.IL-10 gene therapy may be an effective therapeutic modality against liver fibrosis with potential clinical use.

  11. [Not Available].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J J; Paumard, J L; Milin, D; Levoir, P; Fontaine, J C

    1988-11-01

    A low-cost digital acquisition unit for a CARY-210 spectrophotometer has been designed and constructed. The data-flow is controlled by a 6809 microprocessor driving four parallel interface adapters. Two RS232-C serial links are provided for communication with a terminal and a mass storage unit. The acquired data are processed by a personal computer. Included are several software modules, based on powerful signal-processing algorithms, which are highly useful in kinetic studies.

  12. Preliminary characterization of carbon dioxide transfer in a hollow fiber membrane module as a possible solution for gas-liquid transfer in microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farges, Bérangère; Duchez, David; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; Cornet, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    In microgravity, one of the major challenge encountered in biological life support systems (BLSS) is the gas-liquid transfer with, for instance, the necessity to provide CO2 (carbon source, pH control) and to recover the evolved O2 in photobioreactors used as atmosphere bioregenerative systems.This paper describes first the development of a system enabling the accurate characterization of the mass transfer limiting step for a PTFE membrane module used as a possible efficient solution to the microgravity gas-liquid transfer. This original technical apparatus, together with a technical assessment of membrane permeability to different gases, is associated with a balance model, determining thus completely the CO2 mass transfer problem between phases. First results are given and discussed for the CO2 mass transfer coefficient kLCO obtained in case of absorption experiments at pH 8 using the hollow fiber membrane module. The consistency of the proposed method, based on a gas and liquid phase balances verifying carbon conservation enables a very accurate determination of the kLCO value as a main limiting step of the whole process. Nevertheless, further experiments are still needed to demonstrate that the proposed method could serve in the future as reference method for mass transfer coefficient determination if using membrane modules for BLSS in reduced or microgravity conditions.

  13. The influence of phosphorus availability and Laccaria bicolor symbiosis on phosphate acquisition, antioxidant enzyme activity, and rhizospheric carbon flux in Populus tremuloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Shalaka; Naik, Dhiraj; Cumming, Jonathan R

    2014-07-01

    Many forest tree species are dependent on their symbiotic interaction with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi for phosphorus (P) uptake from forest soils where P availability is often limited. The ECM fungal association benefits the host plant under P limitation through enhanced soil exploration and increased P acquisition by mycorrhizas. To study the P starvation response (PSR) and its modification by ECM fungi in Populus tremuloides, a comparison was made between nonmycorrhizal (NM) and mycorrhizal with Laccaria bicolor (Myc) seedlings grown under different concentrations of phosphate (Pi) in sand culture. Although differences in growth between NM and Myc plants were small, Myc plants were more effective at acquiring P from low Pi treatments, with significantly lower k m values for root and leaf P accumulation. Pi limitation significantly increased the activity of catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, and guaiacol-dependent peroxidase in leaves and roots to greater extents in NM than Myc P. tremuloides. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity also increased in NM plants under P limitation, but was unchanged in Myc plants. Formate, citrate, malonate, lactate, malate, and oxalate and total organic carbon exudation by roots was stimulated by P limitation to a greater extent in NM than Myc plants. Colonization by L. bicolor reduced the solution Pi concentration thresholds where PSR physiological changes occurred, indicating that enhanced Pi acquisition by P. tremuloides colonized by L. bicolor altered host P homeostasis and plant stress responses to P limitation. Understanding these plant-symbiont interactions facilitates the selection of more P-efficient forest trees and strategies for tree plantation production on marginal soils.

  14. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy with TPF followed by radioimmunotherapy with Cetuximab and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in combination with a carbon ion boost for locally advanced tumours of the oro-, hypopharynx and larynx - TPF-C-HIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavtratzas Athanasios

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term locoregional control in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN remains challenging. While recent years have seen various approaches to improve outcome by intensification of treatment schedules through introduction of novel induction and combination chemotherapy regimen and altered fractionation regimen, patient tolerance to higher treatment intensities is limited by accompanying side-effects. Combined radioimmunotherapy with cetuximab as well as modern radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and carbon ion therapy (C12 are able to limit toxicity while maintaining treatment effects. In order to achieve maximum efficacy with yet acceptable toxicity, this sequential phase II trial combines induction chemotherapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-FU (TPF followed by radioimmunotherapy with cetuximab as IMRT plus carbon ion boost. We expect this approach to result in increased cure rates with yet manageable accompanying toxicity. Methods/design The TPF-C-HIT trial is a prospective, mono-centric, open-label, non-randomized phase II trial evaluating efficacy and toxicity of the combined treatment with IMRT/carbon ion boost and weekly cetuximab in 50 patients with histologically proven locally advanced SCCHN following TPF induction chemotherapy. Patients receive 24 GyE carbon ions (8 fractions and 50 Gy IMRT (2.0 Gy/fraction in combination with weekly cetuximab throughout radiotherapy. Primary endpoint is locoregional control at 12 months, secondary endpoints are disease-free survival, progression-free survival, overall survival, acute and late radiation effects as well as any adverse events of the treatment as well as quality of life (QoL analyses. Discussion The primary objective of TPF-C-HIT is to evaluate efficacy and toxicity of cetuximab in combination with combined IMRT/carbon ion therapy following TPF induction in locally advanced SCCHN. Trial Registration

  15. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rohini Devi

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several industrial and biomedical applications. The multidirectional carbon-carbon product technology is versatile and offers design flexibility. This paper describes the multidirectional preform and carbon-carbon process technology and research and development activities within the country. Carbon-carbon product experience at DRDL has also been discussed. Development of carbon-carbon brake discs process technology using the liquid impregnation process is described. Further the test results on material characterisation, thermal, mechanical and tribological properties are presented.

  16. The physiological response of two green calcifying algae from the Great Barrier Reef towards high dissolved inorganic and organic carbon (DIC and DOC) availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Friedrich Wilhelm; Vogel, Nikolas; Teichberg, Mirta; Uthicke, Sven; Wild, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Increasing dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations associated with ocean acidification can affect marine calcifiers, but local factors, such as high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations through sewage and algal blooms, may interact with this global factor. For calcifying green algae of the genus Halimeda, a key tropical carbonate producer that often occurs in coral reefs, no studies on these interactions have been reported. These data are however urgently needed to understand future carbonate production. Thus, we investigated the independent and combined effects of DIC (pCO2 402 μatm/ pHtot 8.0 and 996 μatm/ pHtot 7.7) and DOC (added as glucose in 0 and 294 μmol L-1) on growth, calcification and photosynthesis of H. macroloba and H. opuntia from the Great Barrier Reef in an incubation experiment over 16 days. High DIC concentrations significantly reduced dark calcification of H. opuntia by 130 % and led to net dissolution, but did not affect H. macroloba. High DOC concentrations significantly reduced daily oxygen production of H. opuntia and H. macroloba by 78 % and 43 %, respectively, and significantly reduced dark calcification of H. opuntia by 70%. Combined high DIC and DOC did not show any interactive effects for both algae, but revealed additive effects for H. opuntia where the combination of both factors reduced dark calcification by 162 % compared to controls. Such species-specific differences in treatment responses indicate H. opuntia is more susceptible to a combination of high DIC and DOC than H. macroloba. From an ecological perspective, results further suggest a reduction of primary production for Halimeda-dominated benthic reef communities under high DOC concentrations and additional decreases of carbonate accretion under elevated DIC concentrations, where H. opuntia dominates the benthic community. This may reduce biogenic carbonate sedimentation rates and hence the buffering capacity against further ocean acidification.

  17. EOS7C Version 1.0: TOUGH2 Module for Carbon Dioxide or Nitrogen inNatural Gas (Methane) Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Moridis,George J.; Spycher, Nicholas; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-06-29

    EOS7C is a TOUGH2 module for multicomponent gas mixtures in the systems methane carbon dioxide (CH4-CO2) or methane-nitrogen (CH4-N2) with or without an aqueous phase and H2O vapor. EOS7C uses a cubic equation of state and an accurate solubility formulation along with a multiphase Darcy s Law to model flow and transport of gas and aqueous phase mixtures over a wide range of pressures and temperatures appropriate to subsurface geologic carbon sequestration sites and natural gas reservoirs. EOS7C models supercritical CO2 and subcritical CO2 as a non-condensible gas, hence EOS7C does not model the transition to liquid or solid CO2 conditions. The components modeled in EOS7C are water, brine, non-condensible gas, gas tracer, methane, and optional heat. The non-condensible gas (NCG) can be selected by the user to be CO2 or N2. The real gas properties module has options for Peng-Robinson, Redlich-Kwong, or Soave-Redlich-Kwong equations of state to calculate gas mixture density, enthalpy departure, and viscosity. Partitioning of the NCG and CH4 between the aqueous and gas phases is calculated using a very accurate chemical equilibrium approach. Transport of the gaseous and dissolved components is by advection and Fickian molecular diffusion. We present instructions for use and example problems to demonstrate the accuracy and practical application of EOS7C.

  18. [Not Available].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-25

    Archersstar Sudha Bhuchar, right, launches a video on breast screening for women from ethnic minorities, sponsored by the NHS. The video is available in six languages. Ms Bhuchar is pictured with programme co-ordinator Julietta Patrick.

  19. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 17 – 21.11.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium – niveau 2 : 18 – 21.11.03 (4 jours) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition – Part 1 : WEB Applications : 20 & ...

  20. Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Places available The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses : Introduction à Outlook : 19.8.2004 (1 journée) Outlook (short course I) : E-mail : 31.8.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (short course II) : Calendar, Tasks and Notes : 31.8.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Instructor-led WBTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications : 7.9.2004 (morning) Outlook (short course III) : Meetings and Delegation : 7.9.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Introduction ...

  1. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps & Pitfalls:  16 - 19.7.02 (4 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval Tel.74924 monique.duval@cern.ch

  2. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The JAVA Programming Language Level 1 :9 & 10.1.2004 (2 days) The JAVA Programming Language Level 2 : 11 to 13.1.2004 (3 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 16 - 18.2.2004 (3 days - free of charge) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004...

  3. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses : EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 23.10.03 (half day) The EDMS-MTF in practice (free of charge) :  28 -  30.10.03 (6 half-day sessions) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1 : 3, 4, 12, 13.11.03 (4 days) LabVIEW TestStand ver. 3 : 4 & 5.11.03 (2 days) Introduction to Pspice : 4.11.03 p.m. (half-day) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programm...

  4. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval Tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1 : WEB Applications : 20 & 21.11.03(2 days) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.11.03 (2 jours) Oracle 8i : SQL : 3 - 5.12.03 (3 days) Oracle 8i : Programming with PL/SQL : 8 - 10.12.03 (3 days) The JAVA Programming Language - leve...

  5. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The JAVA Programming Language Level 1 : 9 & 10.1.2004 (2 days) The JAVA Programming Language Level 2 : 11 to 13.1.2004 (3 days) LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004 (3 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 ( 6 X 4-hour sessions) LabVIEW Basics 1 : 22 - 24.3.20...

  6. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval Tel. 74924technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: MATLAB Fundamentals and Programming Techniques (ML01) : 2 & 3.12.03 (2 days) Oracle 8i : SQL : 3 - 5.12.03 (3 days) The EDMS MTF in practice : 5.12.03 (afternoon, free of charge) Modeling Dynamic Systems with Simulink (SL01) : 8 & 9.12.03 (2 days) Signal Processing with MATLAB (SG01) : 11 & 12.12.03 (2 days) The JAVA Programming Language - l...

  7. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: MATLAB Fundamentals and Programming Techniques (ML01) :2 & 3.12.03 (2 days) Oracle 8i : SQL : 3 - 5.12.03 (3 days) The EDMS MTF in practice : 5.12.03 (afternoon, free of charge) Modeling Dynamic Systems with Simulink (SL01) : 8 & 9.12.03 (2 days) Signal Processing with MATLAB (SG01) : 11 & ...

  8. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche (cours gratuit) : 13.08.2002 (matin) Introduction to the CERN Enginnering Data Management System :  27.8.02  (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced Users :  28.8.02  (1 day) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval Tel.74924 monique.duval@cern.ch    

  9. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to Databases :  3 - 4.7.01 (2 days) The JAVA programming language Level 2 : 4 - 6.7.01 (3 days) Enterprise JavaBeans :  9 - 11.7.01 (3 days) Design Patterns :  10 - 12.7.01 (3 days) C++ for Particle Physicists :  23 - 27.7.01 (6 3-hour lectures) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  10. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to Perl 5 : 2 - 3.7.01 (2 days) Introduction to Databases :  3 - 4.7.01 (2 days) JAVA programming language Level 2 : 4 - 6.7.01 (3 days) Enterprise JavaBeans :  9 - 11.7.01 (3 days) Design Patterns :  10 - 12.7.01 (3 days) C++ for Particle Physicists :  23 - 27.7.01 (6 3-hour lectures) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  11. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps & Pitfalls:  16 - 19.7.02 (4 days) Frontpage 2000 - level 1 :  22 - 23.7.02  (2 days) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 24.7.02 (après-midi) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche (cours gratuit) : 13.08.2002 (matin) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval Tel.74924 monique.duval@cern.ch

  12. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: December 2002   PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.12.02  (2 jours) PCAD PCB - Débutants :  9 - 11.12.02  (3 jours) FrontPage 2000 - level 1:  9 & 10.12.02  (2 days) Introduction à la CAO Cadence (cours gratuit) :  10 & 11.12.02  (2 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval Tel.74924 monique.duval@cern.ch

  13. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Conception de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 11.6.03 (matin) EXCEL 2000 - level 1 : 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) Introduction to PVSS : 16.6.03 (p.m.) Basic PVSS : 17 - 19.6.03 (3 days) Réalisation de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 17.6.03 (matin) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 20.6.03 (1 day) Programmation automate Schneider : Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium - 2ème niveau : 24 - 27.6.03 (4 jours) - audience : toute personne qui veux maitriser la mise en uvre et la programmation des fonctions spécialisées d'un automate TSX Premium - objectifs : maitriser la mise en uvre et la programmation des fonctions spécialisées d'un automate TSX Premium Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6.03 - 4, 5 & 7.11.03 (session de 3 jours) ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. If you wish to participate in one of these courses, pl...

  14. PLACES AVAILABLES

    CERN Multimedia

    Enseignement Technique; Tél. 74924; monique.duval@cern.ch

    2000-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView hands-on : 13.11.00 (4 hours) LabView Basics 1 : 14 ­ 16.11.00 (3 days) Nouveautés de WORD : 19 et 20.10.00 (2 jours) ACCESS 1er niveau : 30 ­ 31.10.00 (2 jours) Advanced C programming : 2 ­ 3.11.00 (2 days) Introduction à PowerPoint : 6.11.00 (1 journée) C++ for Particle Physicists : 20 ­ 24.11.00 (12 hours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an “application for training” form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  15. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction à la CAO CADENCE : 20 & 21.2.02 (2 jours) LabView Basics 1 :  4 - 6.3.02  (3 days) Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur de CADENCE : 6 & 7.3.02 (2 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Clean Room :  7.3.2002  (1 day) LabView Base 2 : 11 & 12.3.02 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists :  11 - 15.3.2002  (6 * 3 hour lectures) LabView Advanced :  13 - 15.3.02 (3 days) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD :   AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisiona...

  16. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PVSS basics :  18 - 22.2.02 (5 days) Introduction à la CAO CADENCE : 20 & 21.2.02 (2 jours) LabView Basics 1 :  4 - 6.3.02  (3 days) Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur de CADENCE : 6 & 7.3.02 (2 jours) LabView Base 2 : 11 & 12.3.02 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists :  11 - 15.3.2002  (6 * 3 hour lectures) LabView Advanced :  13 - 15.3.02 (3 days) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD :   AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO...

  17. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74460

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView Base 1 : 27-29.3.01 (3 jours) Contract Follow-up : 9.4.01 (3 heures) Introduction à PowerPoint : 24.4.01 (1 journée) Publier sur le Web : 25-27.4.01 (3 demi-journées) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 15-16.5.01 (5 jours) LabView Base 2 : 27-29.3.01 (2 jours) Hands-on Object-oriented Analysis, Design & Programming with C++ :  23-27.4.01 (5 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  18. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Habilitation électrique : recyclage HT/BT : 11 - 15.3.2002  (2 * 2 heures) PVSS Basics :  8 - 12.4.02  (5 days) ELEC-2002 : Spring Term :  9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30.4.02 (7 * 2.5 hours) LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW Basics 2 : 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD :   AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applica...

  19. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel 74924

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 - 25.1.02 (4 jours) MS-Project 2000 : 24 & 25.01.02 (2 jours) Introduction au PC et à Windows 2000 au CERN : 29 - 30.1.02 (2 jours) LabView Base 1 : 4 - 6.2.02 (3 jours) LabView DAQ (E) : 7 & 8.02.02 (2 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design & Programming with Java : 11 - 13.02.02 (3 days) C++ for Particle Physicists : 11 - 15.3.2002 (6 * 3 hour lectures) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD : AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO ...

  20. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users :  13.6.02  (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Local Administrators :  18.6.02  (1 day) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 24 - 25.6.02 (2 jours) Frontpage 2000 - niveau 2 : 25 - 26.6.02 (2 jours) Object-oriented Analysis and Design :  2 - 5.7.02  (4 days) C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps & Pitfalls :  16 - 19.7.02  (4 days) C++ for Particle Physicists :  22 - 26.7.02  (6 * 3 hour lectures) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of the...

  1. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: November 2002   Java Programming Language level 1 :  28 & 29.11.02  (2 days) December 2002   LabVIEW - DSC (English) :  2 - 3.12.02  (2 days) FileMaker (Français) :  2 - 5.12.02  (4 jours) PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.12.02  (2 jours) PCAD PCB - Débutants :  9 - 11.12.02  (3 jours) FrontPage 2000 - level 1:  9 & 10.12.02  (2 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training M...

  2. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: November 2002   Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++:  19 - 21.11.02  (3 days)  December 2002   LabVIEW - DSC (English) :  2 - 3.12.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  2 & 3.12.02  (2 jours) FileMaker (Français) :  2 - 5.12.02  (4 jours) PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.12.02  (2 jours) PCAD PCB - Débutants :  9 - 11.12.02  (3 jours) FrontPage 2000 - level 1:  9 & 10.12.02  (2 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisiona...

  3. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Utilisation du simulateur Simplorer : 30.5 - 1.6.01 (3 jours) JAVA programming language level 1: 11-12.6.01 (2 days) LabView hands-on F ou E : 11.6.01 (1/2 journée) Comprehensive VHDL for EPLD/FPGA Design : 11 - 15.6.01 (5 days) Introduction au Langage C : 13 - 15.6.01 (3 jours) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.6.01 (3 jours) Habilitation électrique : superviseurs : 2 sessions d'une demi-journée les 12 et 19.6.01 Migration de LabVIEW 5 vers LabVIEW 6i Migration from LabVIEW 5 to LabVIEW 6I :  15.6.01 (1/2 journée/half-day) Introduction to Perl 5 : 2 - 3.7.01 (2 days) JAVA programming language level 2 : 4 - 6.7.01 (3 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from ...

  4. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    Places are available in the following courses: Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming: 11-13.08.2003 (3 days) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS): 26.08.2003 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Engineers: 27.08.2003 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche : 4.09.2003 (une demi-journée) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1: 4, 5, 15, 16.09.2003 (2 x 2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack : 17, 18, 25, 26.09.2003 et 2, 3.10.2003 (3 x 2 journées, français) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 23, 24, 30.09.2003 et 1.10.2003 (2 x 2 journées) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS): 23.09.2003 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Local Administrators: 24-25.09.2003 (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 8 et 10.10.2003 (2 journées) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom: 23.10.2003 (half day, p.m.) ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availabili...

  5. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming: 11-13.08.2003(3 days) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS): 26.08.2003 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Engineers: 27.08.2003 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche : 4.09.2003 (une demi-journée) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1: 4, 5, 15, 16.09.2003 (2 x 2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack : 17, 18, 25, 26.09.2003 et 2, 3.10.2003 (3 x 2 journées, français) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 23, 24, 30.09.2003 et 1.10.2003 (2 x 2 journées) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS): 23.09.2003 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Local Administrators: 24-25.09.2003 (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 8 et 10.10.2003 (2 journées) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom: 23.10.2003 (half day, p.m.) ** The number of places available may vary. Please ch...

  6. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView Hands-on (bilingue/bilingual - gratuit/free of charge) : 13.9.02 (a.m.) LabView DAQ Hands-on (bilingue/bilingual - gratuit/free of charge) : 13.9.02 (p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 19, 20, 26, 27.9.02 (4 jours) LabView Base 1 : 23 - 25.9.02 (3 jours) LabView DAQ (E) : 26 - 27.9.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 30.9, 1, 2, 9, 10, 11.10.02 (6 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 10.10.02 (half-day, p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 14 - 15.10.02 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1 : 17, 18, 24, 25.10.02 (4 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Of...

  7. Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the contamination in an energy modulated carbon ion beam for hadron therapy delivered by cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morone, M Cristina; Calabretta, Luciano; Cuttone, Giacomo; Fiorini, Francesca

    2008-11-07

    Protons and carbon ion beams for hadron therapy can be delivered by cyclotrons with a fixed energy. In order to treat patients, an energy degrader along the beam line will be used to match the particle range with the target depth. Fragmentation reactions of carbon ions inside the degrader material could introduce a small amount of unwanted contaminants to the beam, giving additional dose to the patient out of the target volume. A simulation study using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code has been carried out by considering three different materials as the degrader. Two situations have been studied: a realistic one, lowering the carbon beam energy from 300 MeV/n to 220 MeV/n, corresponding to a range of 10 cm in water, and the worst possible case, lowering the carbon energy to 50 MeV/n, corresponding to the millimeter range. The main component of the contaminant is represented by alpha particles and protons, with a typical momentum after the degrader greater than that of the primary beam, and can be eliminated by the action of a momentum analyzing system and slits, and by a second thin absorber. The residual component of fragments reaching the patient is negligible with respect to the fragment quantity generated by the primary beam inside the patient before arriving at the end of the target volume.

  8. Influence of Phenobarbital and Carbon tetrachloride on the Modulation of Tissue Retention Profile of Hexachlorocyclohexane in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The study was designed to investigate the role of hepatic metabolic activity on body burden of HCH residue. Male albino rats were orally administered 0, 5, and 10 mg/kg HCH for 90 days, followed by either sodium phenobarbital or carbon tetrachloride treatment for 0, 15 and 30 days after withdrawal of their respective HCH administration. The liver weight was significantly increased at 30 days after the administration of phenobarbital and carbon tetrachloride in both 5 mg and 10 mg/kg HCH withdrawal groups when compared to control. HCH residue was maximun in fat followed by adrenal>thymus>liver>kidney>spleen>testes>brain>plasma. Carbon tetrachloride caused an accumul-ation of HCH residues in the liver 15 and 30 days after administration of both doses of HCH. Phenobarbital did not show significant variation in HCH residues in hepatic tissue. Phenobarbital treatment caused significant induction of hepatic RED, APD, AHH, GST and QR activities. Significant decreases in activities were observed by carbon tetrachloride when compared to animals treated with HCH alone. The overall results clearly suggest the role of P450 protein on the body burden of HCH residues.

  9. [Not Available].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Clinton K; Bennett, Jason W

    2009-01-01

    Malaria's global impact is expansive and includes the extremes of the healthcare system ranging from international travelers returning to nonendemic regions with tertiary referral medical care to residents in hyperendemic regions without access to medical care. Implementation of prompt and accurate diagnosis is needed to curb the expanding global impact of malaria associated with ever-increasing antimalarial drug resistance. Traditionally, malaria is diagnosed using clinical criteria and/or light microscopy even though both strategies are clearly inadequate in many healthcare settings. Hand held immunochromatographic rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have been recognized as an ideal alternative method for diagnosing malaria. Numerous malaria RDTs have been developed and are widely available; however, an assortment of issues related to these products have become apparent. This review provides a summary of RDT including effectiveness and strategies to select the ideal RDT in varying healthcare settings.

  10. [Not Available].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Elodie; de Lara, Manuel Tunon

    2013-01-01

    Pholcodine is an opioid that has been widely used worldwide since 1950 for the treatment of non-productive cough in children and adults. The results of early preclinical studies but also those of recent clinical trials have shown the antitussive efficacy of pholcodine to be superior to that of codeine, of longer duration, and with an equivalent or safer toxicity profile. Also, there is no risk of addiction. Concern had been raised over a possible cross-sensitisation with neuromuscular blocking agents. While a recent assessment of the available data by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has confirmed the favourable risk-benefit ratio of pholcodine, further studies are needed to clear this point.

  11. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Nouveautés d'EXCEL : 5.11.01 (1/2 journée) Introduction a Windows 2000 au CERN : 6.11.01 (1/2 journée) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) Design Patterns :  7 - 8.11.01 (2 days) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (3 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 12 - 14.11.01 (1/2 journée) Introduction to Windows 2000 at CERN :  14.11.01  (half-day) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Contract Follow-up (F) : 26.11.01 (1/2 journée) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design :  27 - 30.11.2001  (4 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++ :  11 - 13.12.2...

  12. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days, free of charge) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 23.10.03 (half day, free of charge) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1 : 3, 4, 12, 13.11.03 (4 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 10 & 11.11.03 (2 jours) ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 17, 18, 24, 25.11 & 1, 2.12.03 (6 days) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.11.03 (2 jours) MAGNE-03 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 25 - 27.11.03 (3 jours) ...

  13. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.5.03 (2 jours) PIPES-2003 : Pratique du sertissage de tubes métalliques et multicouches : 21.5.03 (1 jour) Introduction à la CAO Cadence : de la saisie de schéma Concept-HDL au PCB : 20 & 22.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 5, 6, 12, 13, 26, 27.6.03 (6 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.6.03 (2 jours) Conception de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 11.6.03 (matin) EXCEL 2000 - level 1 : 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) PowerPoint 2000 (F) : 17 & 18.6.03 (2 jours) Réalisation de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 17.6.03 (matin) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 2 : 19 & 20.6.03 (2 jours) LabView DSC (langue à décider/language to be defined) : 19 & 20.6.03 EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.6.03 (2 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training: Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic...

  14. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1: 20 & 21.5.03 (2 jours) PIPES-2003 : Pratique du sertissage de tubes métalliques et multicouches: 21.5.03 (1 jour) Introduction à la CAO Cadence: de la saisie de schéma Concept-HDL au PCB : 20 & 22.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E): 5, 6, 12, 13, 26, 27.6.03 (6 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1: 10 & 11.6.03 (2 jours) Conception de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence: 11.6.03 (matin) EXCEL 2000 - level 1: 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) Introduction to PVSS: 16.6.03 (half-day, pm) Basic PVSS: 17 - 19.6.03 (3 days) Réalisation de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence: 17.6.03 (matin) LabView DSC (language to be defined): 19 & 20.6.03 PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial: 20.6.03 (1 day) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2: 24 & 25.6.03 (2 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training: Introduction to STEP7: 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming: 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic Net Network: 26 & 27.6.03 (2 days) These courses will be given...

  15. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 3 et 4.10.01 (2 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 3 - 4.10.2001 (2 jours) Introduction à Outlook : 5.10.01 (1 journée) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.10.01 (6 lectures) Cadence Board Design tools : Upgrading to release 14 : 3 1-day sessions on 9, 10 & 11.10.01 MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) LabView Base 2 : 18 & 19.10.01 (2 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Programming TSX Premium 1 :  19 - 23.11.01  (5 days) Introd...

  16. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Contract Follow-up (F) : 30.10.01 (1/2 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) Nouveautés d'EXCEL : 5.11.01 (1/2 journée) Introduction a Windows 2000 au CERN : 6.11.01 (1/2 journée) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (2 jours) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Programming TSX Premium 1 :  19 - 23.11.01  (5 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) The Java programming language Level 2:  26 - 28.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Autocad Migration support courses: a detail...

  17. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) LabView Base 2 : 18 & 19.10.01 (2 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) Contract Follow-up (F) : 30.10.01 (1/2 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (2 jours) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Programming TSX Premium 1 :  19 - 23.11.01  (5 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) The Java programming language Level 2:  26 - 28.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 ...

  18. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Cadence Board Design tools : Upgrading to release 14 :  3 1-day sessions on 9, 10 & 11.10.01 MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) LabView Base 2 : 18 & 19.10.01 (2 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) Contract Follow-up (F) :  30.10.01 (1/2 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Programming TSX Premium 1 :  19 - 23.11.01  (5 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) The Java programming language Level 2:  26 - 28.11.01 (...

  19. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 2 sessions de _ journée les 24 et 25.9.01 PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 3 et 4.10.01 (2 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 3 - 4.10.2001 (2 jours) Introduction à Outlook : 5.10.01 (1 journée) Frontpage 2000 - niveau 1 : 8 et 9.10.01 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.10.01 (6 lectures) MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 15 - 19.10.01 (5 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01 (5 jours) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2...

  20. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PIPES-2003 - Pratique du Sertissage de tubes métalliques et multicouches : 26.8.03 (stage pratique) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Engineers : 27.8.03 (1 day, free of charge) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche : 4.9.03 (une demi-journée, séminaire gratuit) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Local Administrators : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days, free of charge) Siemens SIMATIC Training : Programmation STEP7 - niveau 1 : 29 - 2.10.03 (4 jours) - ouverture des inscriptions fin août Programmation STEP7 - niveau 2 : 13 - 17.10.03 (5 jours) - ouverture des inscriptions fin août Réseau Simatic Net : 22 & 23.10.03 (2 jours) - ouverture des inscriptions fin août CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 23.20.03 (half day, free of charge) These courses will be given in French or Englis...

  1. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PIPES-2003 - Pratique du sertissage de tubes métalliques et multicouches :26.8.03(stage pratique) The CERN EDMS for Engineers (free of charge) : 27.8.03 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche (séminaire gratuit) : 4.9.03(une demi-journée) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators (free of charge) : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium (cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 23.10.03 (half day) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 23, 24, 30, 31.10 & 12, 13.11.03 (6 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2...

  2. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Enseignement Technique; Tél. 74924; Technical Training; Monique Duval; Tel. 74924

    2000-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : Premiers pas avec votre PC 12 - 15.9.00 (4 demi-journées) WORD 20, 21 et 26, 27.9.2000 (4 jours) JAVA programming level 1 25 - 26.9.2000 (2 days) Gaz inflammables 1 26.9.2000 (1 journée) Advanced aspects of PERL 5 6.10.2000 (1 day) Initiation au WWW 10 - 12.10.00 (3 demi-journées) WORD : importer et manipuler des images 16.10.2000 (1 journée) FileMaker 17, 18 et 24, 25.10.00 (4 jours) Nouveautés de WORD 19 et 20.10.2000 (2 jours) ACCESS 1er niveau 30 - 31.10.00 (2 jours)Introduction à PowerPoint 6.11.00 (1 journée)Nouveautés d’EXCEL 7.11.2000(4 demi-journées)Excel 13, 14 et 20, 21.11.00 (4 jours) LabView hands-on 13.11.2000(4 hours)LabView Basics 1 14 - 16.11.2000 (3 days) MS-Project 1er niveau 14-17.11.00 (4 demi-journées) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply elec...

  3. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom (free course, registration required): 11.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, ) LabView Basics 2 : 10 - 11.4.03 (3 days) DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03 (6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Réseau Simatic Net /Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6....

  4. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom (free course, registration required): 11.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, ) LabView Basics 2 : 10 - 11.4.03 (3 days) DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03(6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Réseau Simatic Net /Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6...

  5. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following courses : DISP-2003 - Spring I Term : Introduction to Digital Signal Processing : 20, 27.2, 6, 13, 20, 27.3, 3.4.03 (7 X 2-hour lectures) AXEL-2003 - Introduction to Accelerators : 24 - 28.2.03 (10 X 1-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 24, 25.2 & 3, 4.3.03 (4 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 25.2.03 (1/2 journée) LabView base 2/LabView Basics 2 : 10 & 11.3.03 (2 jours/2 days) langue à définir/Language to be decided C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 - 14.3.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half day, afternoon) Basic PVSS : 11 - 13.3.03 (3 days) LabView avancé /LabView Advanced : 12 - 14.3.03 (3 jours/3days) Langue à définir/language to be decided AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 17, 18, 24 & 25.3.03 (6 jours) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 14.3.03 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, free course, regis...

  6. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following courses : C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 - 14.3.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half day, afternoon) Basic PVSS : 11 - 13.3.03 (3 days) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 14.3.03 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, free course, registration required) LabView base 1/LabView Basics 1 : 9 - 11.4.03 (3 jours/3 days) Langue à définir/language to be decided DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03 (6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 11 & 12.3.03 / 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16...

  7. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half-day, afternoon) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, free course, registration required) LabView Basics 1 : 9 - 11.4.03 (3 days) Language to be decided. DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures). AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03 (6 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training: Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité: Etre TSO au CERN : 3 sessions sont programmées pour 2003 : 25, 26 & 28.3.03 - 24, 25 & 27.6.03 - 4, 5 & 7.11.03 (sessions de 3 jours) ** The number o...

  8. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following courses : Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 25.2.03 (1/2 journée) LabView base 2/LabView Basics 2 : 10 & 11.3.03 (2 jours/2 days) langue à définir/Language to be decided C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 - 14.3.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half day, afternoon) Basic PVSS : 11 - 13.3.03 (3 days) LabView avancé /LabView Advanced : 12 - 14.3.03 (3 jours/3days) Langue à définir/Language to be decided AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 17, 18, 24 & 25.3.03 (6 jours) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 14.3.03 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, free course, registration required) LabView base 1/LabView Basics 1 : 9 - 11.4.03 (3 jours/3 days) Langue à définir/Language to be decided DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (...

  9. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following courses : WorldFIP 2003 pour utilisateurs : 11-14.2.03 (4 jours) DISP-2003 ? Spring I Term : Introduction to Digital Signal Processing : 20, 27.2, 6, 13, 20, 27.3, 3.4.03 (7 X 2-hour lectures) AXEL-2003 - Introduction to Accelerators : 24-28.2.03 (10 X 1-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 24, 25.2 & 3, 4.3.03 (4 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 25.2.03 (1/2 journée) LabView base 2/LabView Basics 2 : 10 & 11.3.03 (2 jours/2 days) langue à définir/Language to be decided C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 ? 14.3.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half day, afternoon) Basic PVSS : 11 - 13.3.03 (3 days) LabView avancé /LabView Advanced : 12 - 14.3.03 (3 jours/3days) Langue à définir/language to be decided AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 17, 18, 24 & 25.3.03 (6 jours) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 14.3.03 (1 day) MAGNE-03 - Magnetism for Technical Ele...

  10. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom (free course, registration required) : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon) LabView base 1/LabView Basics 1 (Langue à définir/ language to be decided) : 9 - 11.4.03 (3 jours/3 days) DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03(6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Réseau Simatic Net /Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : 3 sessions sont programmées pour 2003 : 25...

  11. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom (free course, registration required): 11.4.03 (half-day, afternoon) LabView Basics 2 : 10 - 11.4.03 (3 days) DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03(6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Réseau Simatic Net /Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6.03 - 4, 5 & 7....

  12. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView DAQ  (F) : 7 & 8.2.02 (2 jours) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design & Programming with Java :  11 - 13.02.02 (3 days) PVSS basics :  18 - 22.2.02 (5 days) Introduction à Windows 2000 : 18.2.02 (1 demi-journée) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System :  20.2.02 (1 day) Introduction à la CAO CADENCE : 20 & 21.2.02 (2 jours) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users :  21.2.02  (1 day) LabView Basics 1 :  4 - 6.3.02  (3 days) Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur de CADENCE : 6 & 7.3.02 (2 jours) LabView Base 2 : 11 & 12.3.02 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists :  11 - 15.3.2002  (6 * 3 hour lectures) LabView Advanced :  13 - 15.3.02 (3 days) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD :   AutoCAD : Mise à...

  13. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) CLEAN 2002 : working in a cleanroom:  24.4.02  (half-day, pm) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 : 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) Cotations selon les normes GPS de l'ISO : 29 - 30.4.02 (2 jours) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System:  7.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 2: 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 13-14, 17, 21, 27-28.5.02 (6 jours) WorldFIP - Généralités : 14.5.2002 (1/2 journée) WorldFIP - Développer avec MicroFIP HANDLER : 14.5 - après-midi, 15.5.02 - matin (1 jour) WorldFIP - FullFIP FDM : FIP Device Manager (F) : 15.5 - après-midi, 16.5.02 - matin (1 jour) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 22 & 23.5.02 (2 jours)...

  14. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users : 16.4.02  (1 day) Migration from AutoCAD 14 towards AutoCAD Mechanical6 PowerPack:  17 - 19.4 and 2 &3.5.02  (5 days) AutoCAD - niveau 1 : 22, 23, 29, 30.4 et 6, 7.5.02 (6 jours) LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) CLEAN 2002 : working in a cleanroom:  24.4.02  (half-day, pm) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 : 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) Cotations selon les normes GPS de l'ISO : 29 - 30.4.02 (2 jours) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System:  7.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 2: 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 13-14, 17, 21, 27-28.5.02 (6 jours) WorldFIP - Généralités : 14.5.2002 (1/2 journée) WorldFIP - Développer avec Micr...

  15. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction au PC et à Windows 2000 au CERN : 29 - 30.1.02 (2 jours) LabView Base 1 : 4 - 6.2.02 (3 jours) LabView DAQ  (F) : 7 & 8.2.02 (2 jours) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design & Programming with Java :  11 - 13.02.02 (3 days) PVSS basics :  18 - 22.2.02 (5 days) Introduction à Windows 2000 : 18.2.02 (1 demi-journée) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System :  20.2.02 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users :  21.2.02  (1 day) C++ for Particle Physicists :  11 - 15.3.2002  (6 * 3 hour lectures) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD : AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electr...

  16. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: C++ for Particle Physicists :  11 - 15.3.2002  (6 * 3 hour lectures) Programming the Web for Control Applications : 11, 12, 18, 19.3.2002  (4 * 2 hour lectures) Habilitation électrique : recyclage HT/BT (Français) : 13 - 14.3.2002 (2 * 2 heures) Introduction à la CAO CADENCE : 19 & 20.3.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW Basics 2 : 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD :   AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fil...

  17. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabVIEW - Basics 1 :  10 - 12.12.01 (3 days) Introduction to XML :  12 & 13.12.01 (2 days) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 : 12 & 14.12.01 (2 jours) LabVIEW - Basics 2 :  13 - 14.12.01 (2 days) Habilitation électrique : superviseurs : 17.12.2001 (1/2 journée) MS-Project 2000 : 10 & 11.01.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.1.02 (2 jours) Sécurité dans les installations cryogéniques: 15-17.1.2002 (2 demi-journées) C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps and Pitfalls :  15 - 18.1.2002  (4 days) ELEC-2002 Winter Term: Readout and system electronics for Physics  15.1.2002 - 7.2.2002 (8 half- days) Nouveautés de WORD 2000 : 18.1.02 (1/2 journée) LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 -...

  18. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 - 25.1.02 (4 jours) MS-Project 2000 : 22, 24 & 25.01.02 (3 jours) Introduction au PC et à Windows 2000 au CERN : 29 - 30.1.02 (2 jours) LabView Base 1 : 4 - 6.2.02 (3 jours) LabView DAQ  (E) :  7 & 8.02.02 (2 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design & Programming with Java :  11 - 13.02.02 (3 days) PVSS basics :  11 - 15.2.02 (5 days) Introduction à Windows 2000 : 18.2.02 (1 demi-journée) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System :  20.2.02 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users :  21.2.02  (1 day) C++ for Particle Physicists :  11 - 15.3.2002  (6 * 3 hour lectures) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD : AutoCAD : Mise à...

  19. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel.74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Habilitation électrique : superviseurs : 5.12.01 (1/2 journée) LabVIEW - Basics 1 :  10 - 12.12.01 (3 days) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 : 12 & 14.12.01 (2 jours) LabVIEW - Basics 2 :  13 - 14.12.01 (2 days) Habilitation électrique : superviseurs : 17.12.2001 (1/2 journée) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.1.02 (2 jours) Sécurité dans les installations cryogéniques: 15-17.1.2002 (2 demi-journées) C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps and Pitfalls :  15 - 18.1.2002  (4 days) ELEC-2002 Winter Term: Readout and system electronics for Physics  15.1.2002 - 7.2.2002 (8 half- days) Nouveautés de WORD 2000 : 18.1.02 (1/2 journée) LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 - 25.1.02 (4 jours) Frontpage...

  20. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Enseignement Technique; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: MS-Project 2000 : 10 & 11.01.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.1.02 (2 jours) Sécurité dans les installations cryogéniques: 15-17.1.2002 (2 demi-journées) C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps and Pitfalls :  15 - 18.1.2002  (4 days) ELEC-2002 Winter Term: Readout and system electronics for Physics  15.1.2002 - 7.2.2002 (8 half- days) Nouveautés de WORD 2000 : 18.1.02 (1/2 journée) LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 - 25.1.02 (4 jours) MS-Project 2000 : 24 & 25.01.02 (2 jours) Introduction au PC et à Windows 2000 au CERN : 29 - 30.1.02 (2 jours) LabView Base 1 : 4 - 6.2.02 (3 jours) LabView DAQ  (E) :  7 & 8.02.02 (2 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design & Programming with Java :&nbs...

  1. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PVSS Basics :  8 - 12.4.02  (5 days) AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 : 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) ELEC-2002 : Spring Term :  9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30.4.02 (7 * 2.5 hours) Object-Oriented Analysis & Design: 16 - 19.4.02  (4 days) Migration from AutoCAD 14 towards AutoCAD Mechanical6 PowerPack:  17 - 19.4 and 2 &3.5.02  (5 days) LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW Basics 2 : 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 22 & 23.5.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW Basics 1:  3 - 5.6.02  (3 days) LabVIEW DAQ (E):  6 & 7.6.02  (2 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that...

  2. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique DUVAL

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView Basics 1 :  4 - 6.3.02  (3 days) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Clean Room :  7.3.2002  (half day) LabView Base 2 : 11 & 12.3.02 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists :  11 - 15.3.2002  (6 * 3 hour lectures) Programming the Web for Control Applications : 11, 12, 18, 19.3.2002  (4 * 2 hour lectures) Habilitation électrique : recyclage HT/BT (Français) : 13 - 14.3.2002 (2 * 2 heures) LabView Advanced :  13 - 15.3.02 (3 days) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) :  20.3.2002  (1 day) The CERN (EDMS) for Advanced Users :  21.3.2002  (1 day) LabVIEW DSC : 25 - 26.4.2002 (2 jours) LabVIEW DAQ : 15 - 16.5.2002 (2 jours) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD :   AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé ...

  3. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (3 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 12 - 14.11.01 (1/2 journée) Introduction to Windows 2000 at CERN :  14.11.01  (half-day) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Sécurité dans les installations cryogéniques : 21 - 22.11.2001 (2 demi-journées) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Contract Follow-up (F) : 26.11.01 (1/2 journée) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design :  27 - 30.11.2001  (4 days) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System :  30.11.2001 (1 day) Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC): Introduction (bilingual) :  3.12.01 (half-day) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System : 07.12.2001...

  4. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: October 2002   Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System (free of charge):  29.10.2002  (1 day) The CERN EDMS for Advanced users (free of charge):  30.10.2002  (1 day) November 2002   LabView hands-on (bilingue/bilingual): 5.11.02 (matin/morning) LabView DAQ hands-on (bilingue/bilingual):  5.11.02  (après-midi afternoon) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 au CERN :  6 & 7.11.02  (2 jours) Oracle 8i : Access the Database with Java:  7 & 8.11.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  7 & 8.11.02  (2 jours) Introduction to PVSS (free of charge):  11.11.2002 pm  (1/2 day) Basic PVSS:  12 - 14.11.02  (3 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 :  12 & 13.11.02  (2 jours) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom (English, free ...

  5. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Contract Follow-up (F) : 30.10.01 (1/2 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) Nouveautés d'Excel 2000 : 5.11.01 (1/2 journée) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 6.11.01 (1/2 journée) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.11.01 (2 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (2 jours) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) LabVIEW - DAQ : 15 - 16.11.01 (2 jours) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design :  27 - 30.11.2001 (4 days) Hands...

  6. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: ELEC-2002 : Spring Term :  9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30.4.02 (7 * 2.5 hours) Object-Oriented Analysis & Design: 16 - 19.4.02  (4 days) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users:  16.4.02  (1 day) Migration from AutoCAD 14 towards AutoCAD Mechanical6 PowerPack:  17 - 19.4 and 2 &3.5.02  (5 days) AutoCAD - niveau 1 : 22, 23, 29, 30.4 et 6, 7.5.02 (6 jours) LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) CLEAN 2002 : working in a cleanroom:  24.4.02  (half-day, pm) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 : 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW Basics 2 : 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 22 & 23.5.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW Basics 1:  3 - 5.6.02&a...

  7. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: ELEC-2002 : Spring Term :  9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30.4.02 (7 * 2.5 hours) Object-Oriented Analysis & Design: 16 - 19.4.02  (4 days) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users:  16.4.02  (1 day) Migration from AutoCAD 14 towards AutoCAD Mechanical6 PowerPack:  17 - 19.4 and 2 &3.5.02  (5 days) AutoCAD - niveau 1 : 22, 23, 29, 30.4 et 6, 7.5.02 (6 jours) LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) CLEAN 2002 : working in a cleanroom:  24.4.02  (half-day, pm) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 : 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) Cotations selon les normes GPS de l'ISO : 29 - 30.4.02 (2 jours) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System:  7.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 2 : 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 13-...

  8. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Contract Follow-up (F) : 26.11.01 (1/2 journée) Habilitation électrique : électriciens network : 27 - 29.11.2001 (3 jours) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design :  27 - 30.11.2001  (4 days) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System :  30.11.2001 (1 day) Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC): Introduction (bilingual) :  3.12.01 (half-day) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System : 07.12.2001 (1 day) LabVIEW - Basics 1 :  10 - 12.12.01 (3 days) LabVIEW - Basics 2 :  13 - 14.12.01 (2 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.1.02 (2 jours) C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps and Pitfalls :  15 - 18.1.2002  (4 days) Nouveautés de WORD 2000 : 18.1.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker P...

  9. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Traininf; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC): Introduction (bilingual) :  3.12.01 (half-day) Habilitation électrique : superviseurs : 5.12.01 (1/2 journée) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System : 07.12.2001 (1 day) LabVIEW - Basics 1 :  10 - 12.12.01 (3 days) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 : 12 & 14.12.01 (2 jours) LabVIEW - Basics 2 :  13 - 14.12.01 (2 days) Habilitation électrique : superviseurs : 17.12.2001 (1/2 journée) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.1.02 (2 jours) C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps and Pitfalls :  15 - 18.1.2002  (4 days) Nouveautés de WORD 2000 : 18.1.02 (1/2 journée) LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 - 25.1.02 (4 jours) Introduction au PC et à Windows 2000 au CERN : 29 - 30.1....

  10. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView hands-on (bilingue/bilingual): 5.11.02 (matin/morning) LabView DAQ hands-on (bilingue/bilingual):  5.11.02  (après-midi afternoon) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 au CERN:  6 & 7.11.02  (2 jours) Oracle 8i : Access the Database with Java:  7 & 8.11.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2:  7 & 8.11.02  (2 jours) Introduction to PVSS (free of charge):  11.11.2002 pm  (1/2 day) Basic PVSS:  12 - 14.11.02  (3 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1:  12 & 13.11.02  (2 jours) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom (English, free of charge):  13.11.2002  (afternoon) LabView Base 1 :  13 - 15.11.02  (3 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  14, 15, 21, 22.11.2002  (4 days) LabVIEW - Advanced:  18 - 20.11.02  (3 days) Auto...

  11. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11.02  (6 jours) Introduction à ANSYS 21 - 25.10.02  (5 jours/days) HREF-2002: Helium Refrigeration Techniques (English-French, bilingual) :  21 - 25.10.2002  (7 half days) LabVIEW Basics 1 (English):  21 - 23.10.02  (3 days) LabVIEW Basics 2 (English):  24 & 25.10.02  (2 days) Oracle 8i : Access the Database with Java:  7 & 8.11.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  7 & 8.11.02  (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  14, 15, 21, 22.11.02  (4 days) LabVIEW - Advanced (English) :  18 - 20.11.2002  (3 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 :  19, 20, 25, 26.11.02 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Designer: First Class:&...

  12. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to Oracle 8i : SQL and PL/SQL:  7 - 11.10.02  (5 days) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge):  10.10.02  (half-day, p.m.) LabView Hands-on (bilingue/bilingual) : 10.10.02 (matin/morning) LabView DAQ Hands-on (bilingue/bilingual)  10.10.02 (après-midi /afternoon) Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) Introduction to DesignSpace:  17.10.02  (1 day) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11.02  (6 jours) Introduction à ANSYS/Introduction to ANSYS (langue à définir suivant demande/ Language to be chosen according to demand):  21 - 25.10.02  (5 jours/days) HREF-2002: Helium Refrigeration Techniques (English-French, bilingual) :  21 - 25.10.2002  (7 half days) HREF-2002: Techniques de la...

  13. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView Base 1 :  23 - 25.9.02  (3 jours) Object-Oriented Analysis & Design using UML:  25 - 27.9.02  (3 days) LabView DAQ (E):  26 - 27.9.02  (2 days) Introduction to Oracle 8i : SQL and PL/SQL:  7 - 11.10.02  (5 days) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge):  10.10.02  (half-day, p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  14 - 15.10.02  (2 jours) Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) Introduction to DesignSpace:  17.10.02  (1 day) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  17, 18, 24, 25.10.02  (4 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11.02  (6 jours) Introduction à ANSYS/Introduction to ANSYS (langue à définir suivant demande/ Language to be chosen according to demand):...

  14. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to Oracle 8i : SQL and PL/SQL:  7 - 11.10.02  (5 days) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge):  10.10.02  (half-day, p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  14 - 15.10.02  (2 jours) Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) Introduction to DesignSpace:  17.10.02  (1 day) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  17, 18, 24, 25.10.02  (4 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11.02  (6 jours) Introduction à ANSYS/Introduction to ANSYS (langue à définir suivant demande/ Language to be chosen according to demand):  21 - 25.10.02  (5 jours/days) HREF-2002: Helium Refrigeration Techniques (English-French, bilingual) :  21 - 25.10.2002  (7 half days) HREF-2002: Techniques de la Réfri...

  15. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: November 2002   LabView hands-on (bilingue/bilingual): 5.11.02 (matin/morning) LabView DAQ hands-on (bilingue/bilingual):  5.11.02  (après-midi afternoon) PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.11.02  (2 jours) PCAD PCB - Débutants :  9 - 11.11.02  (3 jours) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 au CERN :  6 & 7.11.02  (2 jours) Oracle 8i : Access the Database with Java :  7 & 8.11.02  (2 days) Introduction to PVSS (free of charge):  11.11.2002 pm  (1/2 day) Basic PVSS:  12 - 14.11.02  (3 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 :  12 & 13.11.02  (2 jours) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom (English, free of charge):  13.11.2002  (afternoon) LabView Base 1 :  13 - 15.11.02  (3 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 :  14, 15, 21, 22.11.02  (4 jours) LabVIEW - Advanced:  18 - 20.11.02  (3 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++ :  19 - 21.11.02  (3 days)  LabVIEW - Basics 2:  21 - 22.11.02 ...

  16. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans:  18 - 20.9.02  (3 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 :  19, 20, 26, 27.9.02  (4 jours) LabView Base 1 :  23 - 25.9.02  (3 jours) Object-Oriented Analysis & Design using UML:  25 - 27.9.02  (3 days) LabView DAQ (E):  26 - 27.9.02  (2 days) Introduction to Oracle 8i : SQL and PL/SQL:  7 - 11.10.02  (5 days) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge):  10.10.02  (half-day, p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  14 - 15.10.02  (2 jours) Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) Introduction to DesignSpace:  17.10.02  (1 day) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  17, 18, 24, 25.10.02  (4 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11....

  17. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: November 2002   Introduction to PVSS (free of charge): 11.11.02  (afternoon) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 :  12 & 13.11.02  (2 jours) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom (English, free of charge):  13.11.2002  (afternoon) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 :  14, 15, 21, 22.11.02  (4 jours) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++:  19 - 21.11.02  (3 days)  EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 :  25 & 26.11.02  (2 jours) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 :  27 & 28.11.02  (2 jours) December 2002   LabVIEW - DSC (English) :  2 - 3.12.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  2 & 3.12.02  (2 jours) FileMaker (Français) :  2 - 5.12.02  (4 jours) PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.12.02 ...

  18. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 2 sessions de _ journée les 24 et 25.9.01 PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) PowerPoint 2000 : 1 et 2.10.01 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 3 et 4.10.01 (2 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 3 - 4.10.2001 (2 jours) PCAD Schémas - débutants : 4 - 5.10.01 (2 jours) Introduction à Outlook : 5.10.01 (1 journée) Frontpage 2000 - niveau 1 : 8 et 9.10.01 (2 jours) PCAD PCB - débutants : 8 - 10.10.01 (3 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.10.01 (6 3-hour lectures) MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) LabView Basics 1 :  15 - 17.10.01  (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 15 - 19.10.01 (5 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01...

  19. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PVSS Basics : 20 - 24.8.01 (5 days) PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) PCAD Schémas - débutants : 4 - 5.10.01 (2 jours) PCAD PCB - débutants : 8 - 10.10.01 (3 jours) Programming TSX Premium 1: 15 - 19.10.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01 (5 jours) Programming TSX Premium 2: 19 - 23.11.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) The following LabView courses will be given in either English or French according to demand LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 10 - 12.9.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - DAQ / LabVIEW - DAQ : 13 - 14.9.01 (2 jours / 2 days) LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 15 - 17.10.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - Base 2 / LabVIEW - Basics 2 : 18 - 19.10.01 (2 jours / 2 days) LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - DAQ / LabVIEW - DAQ : 15 - 16.11.01 (2 jours / 2...

  20. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 3 - 4.10.2001 (2 jours) PCAD Schémas - débutants : 4 - 5.10.01 (2 jours) PCAD PCB - débutants : 8 - 10.10.01 (3 jours) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 15 - 19.10.01 (5 jours) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01 (5 jours) Programming TSX Premium 2: 19 - 23.11.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Autocad Migration support courses: a detailed calendar will be published shortly for this series of sessions which will start on 15.10.2001. Registration is already open AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) The following LabView courses will be given in either English or French according to demand LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 10 - 12.9.01 (3 jours / 3 days)...

  1. PLACES AVAILABLES

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PVSS Basics : 20 - 24.8.01 (5 days) PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) PCAD Schémas - débutants : 4 - 5.10.01 (2 jours) PCAD PCB - débutants : 8 - 10.10.01 (3 jours) Programming TSX Premium 1: 15 - 19.10.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01 (5 jours) Programming TSX Premium 2: 19 - 23.11.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) The following LabView courses will be given in either English or French according to demand LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 10 - 12.9.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - DAQ / LabVIEW - DAQ : 13 - 14.9.01 (2 jours / 2 days) LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 15 - 17.10.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - Base 2 / LabVIEW - Basics 2 : 18 - 19.10.01 (2 jours / 2 days) LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - DAQ / LabVIEW - DAQ : 15 - 16.11.01 (2 jours / 2...

  2. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.6.03 (2 jours) Conception de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 11.6.03 (matin) EXCEL 2000 - level 1 : 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) Introduction to PVSS : 16.6.03 (p.m.) Basic PVSS : 17 - 19.6.03 (3 days) Réalisation de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 17.6.03 (matin) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 20.6.03 (1 day) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.6.03 (2 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Simatic Net Network : 26 & 27.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Programmation automate Schneider : Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium - 1er niveau : 10 - 13.6.03 (4 jours) - audience : toute personne qui veux maitriser la msie en uvre et la programmation d'un automate TSX Premium - objectifs : maitriser la mise en uvre et la programmation d'un autom...

  3. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) Programmation de pilotes périphériques : 5 - 8.5.03 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) LabView DAQ (language to be defined) : 8 & 9.5.03 AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.0 (6 jours) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.6.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - level 1 : 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) PowerPoint 2000 (F) : 17 & 18.6.03 (2 jours) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 2 : 19 & 20.6.03 (2 jours) LabView DSC (langue à décider/language to be defined) : 19 & 20.6.03 EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.6.03 (2 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic Net Network : 26 & 27.6.03 ...

  4. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) LabView DAQ (language to be defined) : 8 & 9.5.03 AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03 (6 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours) LabView DSC (language to be defined) : 19 & 20.6.03 Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 (sessions of 2 days) These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6.03 - 4, 5 & 7.11.03 (session de 3 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description ...

  5. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche (séminaire gratuit) : 4.9.03 (une demi-journée) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators (free of charge) : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium (cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 23.10.03 (half day) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 23, 24, 30, 31.10 & 12, 13.11.03 (6 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 10 & 11.11.03 (2 jours)...

  6. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days, free of charge) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium (cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 23.10.03 (half day, free of charge) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1 : 3, 4, 12, 13.11.03 (4 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 10 & 11.11.03 (2 jours) ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 17, 18, 24, 25.11 & 1, 2.12.03 (6...

  7. Places available **

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following course : Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System : 28.1.03 (1 day) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 24, 25.2 et 3, 4.3.03 (4 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 27 & 28.2.03 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 - 14.3.03 (6 X 3 hour lectures) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 17, 18, 24 & 25.3.03 (6 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom : 25.3.03 (half-day, afternoon, free course, registration required) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 11 & 12.3.03 / 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Réseau Simatic Net /Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 Ces cours seront donnés en français ou anglais en fonction des demandes / These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. * Etant do...

  8. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators (free of charge) : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium (cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 23.10.03 (half day) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 23, 24, 30, 31.10 & 12, 13.11.03 (6 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 10 & 11.11.03 (2 jours) ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20...

  9. Adjustable hydrazine modulation of single-wall carbon nanotube network field effect transistors from p-type to n-type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ruixuan; Xie, Dan; Xu, Jianlong; Sun, Yilin; Sun, MengXing; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Xian

    2016-11-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network field effect transistors (FETs), which show decent p-type electronic properties, have been fabricated. The use of hydrazine as an aqueous solution and a strong n-type dopant for the SWCNTs is demonstrated in this paper. The electrical properties are obviously tuned by hydrazine treatment at different concentrations on the surface of the SWCNT network FETs. The transport behavior of SWCNTs can be modulated from p-type to n-type, demonstrating the controllable and adjustable doping effect of hydrazine. With a higher concentration of hydrazine, more electrons can be transferred from the hydrazine molecules to the SWCNT network films, thus resulting in a change of threshold voltage, carrier mobility and on-current. By cleaning the device, the hydrazine doping effects vanish, which indicates that the doping effects of hydrazine are reversible. Through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization, the doping effects of hydrazine have also been studied.

  10. Effects of light and nutrient availability on the growth, allocation, carbon/nitrogen balance, phenolic chemistry, and resistance to herbivory of two freshwater macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Greg; Lodge, David M

    2003-09-01

    Phenotypic responses of Potamogeton amplifolius and Nuphar advena to different light (7% and 35% of surface irradiance) and nutrient environments were assessed with field manipulation experiments. Higher light and nutrient availability enhanced the growth of P. amplifolius by 154% and 255%, respectively. Additionally, biomass was allocated differently depending on the resource: high light availability resulted in a higher root/shoot ratio, whereas high nutrient availability resulted in a lower root/shoot ratio. Low light availability and high nutrient availability increased the nitrogen content of leaf tissue by 53% and 40% respectively, resulting in a 37% and 31% decrease in the C/N ratio. Root nitrogen content was also increased by low light and high nutrient availability, by 50% (P=0.0807) and 77% respectively, resulting in a 20% and 40% decrease in root C/N ratio. Leaf phenolics were significantly increased 72% by high light and 31% by high nutrient availability, but root phenolic concentrations were not altered significantly. None of these changes in tissue constituents resulted in altered palatability to crayfish. N. advena was killed by the same high nutrient treatment that stimulated growth in P. amplifolius, preventing assessment of phenotypic responses to nutrient availability. However, high light availability increased overall growth by 24%, but this was mainly due to increased growth of the rhizome (increased 100%), resulting in a higher root/shoot ratio. High light tended to increase the production of floating leaves (P=0.09) and significantly decreased the production of submersed leaves. High light availability decreased the nitrogen content by 15% and 25% and increased the phenolic concentration by 88% and 255% in floating and submersed leaves, respectively. These differences in leaf traits did not result in detectable differences in damage by herbivores.

  11. Modulation of Protein Fouling and Interfacial Properties at Carbon Surfaces via Immobilization of Glycans Using Aryldiazonium Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Federico; Angione, M. Daniela; Behan, James A.; Cullen, Ronan J.; Duff, Thomas; Vasconcelos, Joana M.; Scanlan, Eoin M.; Colavita, Paula E.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon materials and nanomaterials are of great interest for biological applications such as implantable devices and nanoparticle vectors, however, to realize their potential it is critical to control formation and composition of the protein corona in biological media. In this work, protein adsorption studies were carried out at carbon surfaces functionalized with aryldiazonium layers bearing mono- and di-saccharide glycosides. Surface IR reflectance absorption spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance were used to study adsorption of albumin, lysozyme and fibrinogen. Protein adsorption was found to decrease by 30–90% with respect to bare carbon surfaces; notably, enhanced rejection was observed in the case of the tested di-saccharide vs. simple mono-saccharides for near-physiological protein concentration values. ζ-potential measurements revealed that aryldiazonium chemistry results in the immobilization of phenylglycosides without a change in surface charge density, which is known to be important for protein adsorption. Multisolvent contact angle measurements were used to calculate surface free energy and acid-base polar components of bare and modified surfaces based on the van Oss-Chaudhury-Good model: results indicate that protein resistance in these phenylglycoside layers correlates positively with wetting behavior and Lewis basicity. PMID:27108562

  12. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    CERN Technical Training: Open Courses (April - June 2007) The following course sessions are currently scheduled in the framework of the CERN Technical Training Programme 2007:   AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 (course in French): 25.4.- 26.4.2007 & 2.5. - 3.5.2007 (4 days in 2 modules, 5 places available) AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 (course in French): 27.6.- 28.6.2007 & 3.7. - 4.7.2007 (4 days in 2 modules, 5 places available) AutoCAD Mechanical 2006 (course in French) 21.6.-22.6.2007 (2 days, 8 places available) * NEW COURSE* Automate de securite S7 (course in French) 14.5.-16.5.2007 (3 days, 4 places available) * NEW COURSE* Automate de securite S7 (course in French): 9.5.-11.5.2007 (3 days, 4 places available) JCOP - Joint PVSS-JCOP Frameswork (course in English): 21.5.-25.5.2007 (5 days, 12 places available) JCOP - Finite State Machines in the JCOP Frameswork (course in English): 12.6.-14.6.2007 (3 days, 12 places available) LabVIEW Basics 1 (in English): 2.-4.5.2007 (3 days, 7 places ...

  13. Effect of P Availability on Temporal Dynamics of Carbon Allocation and Glomus intraradices High-Affinity P Transporter Gene Induction in Arbuscular Mycorrhiza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Pål Axel; Hansson, Maria C.; Burleigh, Stephen H.

    2006-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi depend on a C supply from the plant host and simultaneously provide phosphorus to the colonized plant. We therefore evaluated the influence of external P on C allocation in monoxenic Daucus carota-Glomus intraradices cultures in an AM symbiosis. Fungal hyphae proliferated from a solid minimal medium containing colonized roots into a C-free liquid minimal medium with high or low P availability. Roots and hyphae were harvested periodically, and the flow of C from roots to fungus was measured by isotope labeling. We also measured induction of a G. intraradices high-affinity P transporter to estimate fungal P demand. The prevailing hypothesis is that high P availability reduces mycorrhizal fungal growth, but we found that C flow to the fungus was initially highest at the high P level. Only at later harvests, after 100 days of in vitro culture, were C flow and fungal growth limited at high P availability. Thus, AM fungi can benefit initially from P-enriched environments in terms of plant C allocation. As expected, the P transporter induction was significantly greater at low P availability and greatest in very young mycelia. We found no direct link between C flow to the fungus and the P transporter transcription level, which indicates that a good C supply is not essential for induction of the high-affinity P transporter. We describe a mechanism by which P regulates symbiotic C allocation, and we discuss how this mechanism may have evolved in a competitive environment. PMID:16751522

  14. Interglacials, Milankovitch Cycles, Solar Activity, and Carbon Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The existing understanding of interglacial periods is that they are initiated by Milankovitch cycles enhanced by rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. During interglacials, global temperature is also believed to be primarily controlled by carbon dioxide concentrations, modulated by internal processes such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the North Atlantic Oscillation. Recent work challenges the fundamental basis of these conceptions.

  15. Modulation of energy/electron transfer in gold nanoclusters by single walled carbon nanotubes and further consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tarasankar; Maity, Arnab; Mondal, Somen; Purkayastha, Pradipta

    2015-04-01

    Semiconductor or metallic character in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is developed because of their chirality and diameter. Depending upon the extent of these characters in a particular sample of SWCNT, various electronic and mechanical applications are formulated. In this work we used protein protected red emitting gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) to enhance the metallic character in SWCNTs through electron transfer induced by photonic excitation. The AuNCs have been synthesized following a known protocol that generates Au+ protected Au0 clusters. Normal and carboxylic acid functionalized SWCNTs were obtained commercially for usage in the experiments. The non-functionalized SWCNTs facilitate intersystem electron transfer while the functionalized ones defer the phenomenon, which, in turn, affects the metallic character in the nanotubes. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy prove the dynamics and electrochemistry supports the intersystem electron transfer process.

  16. Temperature-responsive polymer/carbon nanotube hybrids: smart conductive nanocomposite films for modulating the bioelectrocatalysis of NADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Liu, Yang; Lu, Jin; Zhou, Jianhua; Li, Jinghong

    2012-03-19

    A temperature-sensitive polymer/carbon nanotube interface with switchable bioelectrocatalytic capability was fabricated by self-assembly of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT-g-PNIPAm) onto the PNIPAm-modified substrate. Electron microscopy and electrochemical measurements revealed that these fairly thick (>6 μm) and highly porous nanocomposite films exhibited high conductivity and electrocatalytic activity. The morphological transitions in both the tethered PNIPAm chains on a substrate and those polymers wrapping around the MWNT surface resulted in the opening, closing, or tuning of its permeability, and simultaneously an electron-transfer process took place through the channels formed in the nanostructure in response to temperature change. By combining the good electron-transfer and electrochemical catalysis capabilities, the large surface area, and good biocompatibility of MWNTs with the responsive features of PNIPAm, reversible temperature-controlled bioelectrocatalysis of 1,4-dihydro-β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide with improved sensitivity has been demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. The mechanism behind this approach was studied by Raman spectroscopy, in situ attenuated total reflection FTIR spectroscopy, and contact angle measurements. The results also suggested that the synergetic or cooperative interactions of PNIPAm with MWNTs gave rise not only to an increase in surface wettability, but also to the enhancement of the interfacial thermoresponsive behavior. This bioelectrocatalytic "smart" system has potential applications in the design of biosensors and biofuel cells with externally controlled activity. Furthermore, this concept might be proposed for biomimetics, interfacial engineering, bioelectronic devices, and so forth.

  17. 3D Hierarchical Pt-Nitrogen-Doped-Graphene-Carbonized Commercially Available Sponge as a Superior Electrocatalyst for Low-Temperature Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Sui, Xu-Lei; Li, Jia-Long; Zhang, Jing-Jia; Zhang, Li-Mei; Wang, Zhen-Bo

    2016-06-29

    Three-dimensional hierarchical nitrogen-doped graphene (3D-NG) frameworks were successfully fabricated through a feasible solution dip-coating method with commercially available sponges as the initial backbone. A spongy template can help hinder the graphene plates restacking in the period of the annealing process. The Pt/3D-NG catalyst was synthesized employing a polyol reduction process. The resultant Pt/3D-NG exhibits 2.3 times higher activity for methanol electro-oxidation along with the improvement in stability as compared with Pt/G owing to their favorable features including large specific surface area, high pore volume, high N doping level, and the homogeneous dispersion of Pt nanoparticles. Besides, Pt/3D-NG also presents high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance in acid media when compared with Pt/3D-G and Pt/G. This work raises a valid solution for the fabrication of 3D functional freestanding graphene-based composites for a variety of applications in fuel cell catalysis, energy storage, and conversion.

  18. Antitumor properties and modulation of antioxidant enzymes' activity by Aloe vera leaf active principles isolated via supercritical carbon dioxide extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shemy, H A; Aboul-Soud, M A M; Nassr-Allah, A A; Aboul-Enein, K M; Kabash, A; Yagi, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential anticancer properties and modulatory effect of selected Aloe vera (A. vera) active principles on antioxidant enzyme activities. Thus, three anthraquinones (Namely: aloesin, aloe-emodin and barbaloin) were extracted from A. vera leaves by supercritical fluid extraction and subsequently purified by high performance liquid chromatography. Additionally, the N-terminal octapeptide derived from verectin, a biologically active 14 kDa glycoprotein present in A. vera, was also tested. In vivo, active principles exhibited significant prolongation of the life span of tumor-transplanted animals in the following order: barbaloin> octapeptide> aloesin > aloe-emodin. A. vera active principles exhibited significant inhibition on Ehrlich ascite carcinoma cell (EACC) number, when compared to positive control group, in the following order: barbaloin> aloe-emodin > octapeptide > aloesin. Moreover, in trypan blue cell viability assay, active principles showed a significant concentration-dependent cytotoxicity against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphocytes leukemia (ALL) cancerous cells. Furthermore, in MTT cell viability test, aloe-emodin was found to be active against two human colon cancer cell lines (i.e. DLD-1 and HT2), with IC(50) values of 8.94 and 10.78 microM, respectively. Treatments of human AML leukemic cells with active principles (100 microg ml(-1)) resulted in varying intensities of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, hallmark of cells undergoing apoptosis, in the following order: aloe-emodin> aloesin> barbaloin> octapeptide. Intererstingly, treatment of EACC tumors with active principles resulted in a significant elevation activity of key antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GST, tGPx, and LDH). Our data suggest that the tested A. vera compounds may exert their chemo-preventive effect through modulating antioxidant and detoxification enzyme activity levels, as they are one of the indicators of tumorigenesis. These

  19. COSMIC: A Regimen of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Plus Dose-Escalated, Raster-Scanned Carbon Ion Boost for Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors: Results of the Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Alexandra D., E-mail: alexdjensen@gmx.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Nikoghosyan, Anna V.; Lossner, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, Thomas; Jäkel, Oliver [Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Centre, Heidelberg (Germany); Münter, Marc W.; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dose-escalated carbon ion (C12) therapy in adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) and other malignant salivary gland tumors (MSGTs) of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: COSMIC (combined treatment of malignant salivary gland tumors with intensity modulated radiation therapy and carbon ions) is a prospective phase 2 trial of 24 Gy(RBE) C12 followed by 50 Gy IMRT in patients with pathologically confirmed MSGT. The primary endpoint is mucositis Common Terminology Criteria grade 3; the secondary endpoints are locoregional control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3; treatment response was scored according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1. Results: Between July 2010 and August 2011, 54 patients were accrued, and 53 were available for evaluation. The median follow-up time was 42 months; patients with microscopically incomplete resections (R1, n=20), gross residual disease (R2, n=17), and inoperable disease (n=16) were included. Eighty-nine percent of patients had ACC, and 57% had T4 tumors. The most common primary sites were paranasal sinus (34%), submandibular gland, and palate. At the completion of radiation therapy, 26% of patients experienced grade 3 mucositis, and 20 patients reported adverse events of the ear (38%). The most common observed late effects were grade 1 xerostomia (49%), hearing impairment (25%, 2% ipsilateral hearing loss), and adverse events of the eye (20%), but no visual impairment or loss of vision. Grade 1 central nervous system necrosis occurred in 6%, and 1 grade 4 ICA hemorrhage without neurologic sequelae. The best response was 54% (complete response/partial remission). At 3 years, the LC, PFS, and OS were 81.9%, 57.9%, and 78.4%, respectively. No difference was found regarding resection status. The

  20. Thermal conductivity of carbon doped GeTe thin films in amorphous and crystalline state measured by modulated photo thermal radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusiak, Andrzej; Battaglia, Jean-Luc; Noé, Pierre; Sousa, Véronique; Fillot, F.

    2016-09-01

    The thermal conductivity and thermal boundary resistance of GeTe and carbon doped GeTe thin films, designed for phase change memory (PCM) applications, were investigated by modulated photo thermal radiometry. It was found that C doping has no significant effect on the thermal conductivity of these chalcogenides in amorphous state. The thermal boundary resistance between the amorphous films and SiO2 substrate is also not affected by C doping. The films were then crystallized by an annealing at 450°C as confirmed by optical reflectivity analysis. The thermal conductivity of non-doped GeTe significantly increases after crystallization annealing. But, surprisingly the thermal conductivity of the crystallized C doped GeTe was found to be similar from that of the amorphous state and independent of C concentration. As for the amorphous phase, C doping does not affect the thermal boundary resistance between the crystalline GeTe films and SiO2 substrate. This behaviour is discussed thanks to XRD and FTIR analysis. In particular, XRD shows a decrease of crystalline grain size in crystalline films as C concentration is increased. FTIR analysis of the film before and after crystallization evidenced that this evolution could be attributed to the disappearing of Ge-C bonds and migration of C atoms out of the GeTe phase upon crystallization, limiting then the growth of GeTe crystallites in C-doped films.

  1. The Protective Effects of the Supercritical-Carbon Dioxide Fluid Extract of Chrysanthemum indicum against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice via Modulating Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Li Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The supercritical-carbon dioxide fluid extract of Chrysanthemum indicum Linné. (CFE has been demonstrated to be effective in suppressing inflammation. The aim of this study is to investigate the preventive action and underlying mechanisms of CFE on acute lung injury (ALI induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS in mice. ALI was induced by intratracheal instillation of LPS into lung, and dexamethasone was used as a positive control. Results revealed that pretreatment with CFE abated LPS-induced lung histopathologic changes, reduced the wet/dry ratio and proinflammatory cytokines productions (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, inhibited inflammatory cells migrations and protein leakages, suppressed the levels of MPO and MDA, and upregulated the abilities of antioxidative enzymes (SOD, CAT, and GPx. Furthermore, the pretreatment with CFE downregulated the activations of NF-κB and the expressions of TLR4/MyD88. These results suggested that CFE exerted potential protective effects against LPS-induced ALI in mice and was a potential therapeutic drug for ALI. Its mechanisms were at least partially associated with the modulations of TLR4 signaling pathways.

  2. A structure-function relationship for the optical modulation of phenyl boronic acid-grafted, polyethylene glycol-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Bin; McNicholas, Thomas P; Zhang, Jingqing; Hilmer, Andrew J; Jin, Zhong; Reuel, Nigel F; Kim, Jong-Ho; Yum, Kyungsuk; Strano, Michael S

    2012-10-24

    Phenyl boronic acids (PBA) are important binding ligands to pendant diols useful for saccharide recognition. The aromatic ring can also function to anchor an otherwise hydrophilic polymer backbone to the surface of hydrophobic graphene or carbon nanotube. In this work, we demonstrate both functions using a homologous series of seven phenyl boronic acids conjugated to a polyethylene glycol, eight-membered, branched polymer (PPEG8) that allows aqueous dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and quenching of the near-infrared fluorescence in response to saccharide binding. We compare the 2-carboxyphenylboronic acid (2CPBA); 3-carboxy- (3CPBA) and 4-carboxy- (4CPBA) phenylboronic acids; N-(4-phenylboronic)succinamic acid (4SCPBA); 5-bromo-3-carboxy- (5B3CPBA), 3-carboxy-5-fluoro- (5F3CPBA), and 3-carboxy-5-nitro- (5N3CPBA) phenylboronic acids, demonstrating a clear link between SWNT photoluminescence quantum yield and boronic acid structure. Surprisingly, quantum yield decreases systematically with both the location of the BA functionality and the inclusion of electron-withdrawing or -donating substituents on the phenyl ring. For three structural isomers (2CPBA, 3CPBA, and 4CPBA), the highest quantum yields were measured for para-substituted PBA (4CPBA), much higher than ortho- (2CPBA) and meta- (3CPBA) substituted PBA, indicating the first such dependence on molecular structure. Electron-withdrawing substituents such as nitro groups on the phenyl ring cause higher quantum yield, while electron-donating groups such as amides and alkyl groups cause a decrease. The solvatochromic shift of up to 10.3 meV was used for each case to estimate polymer surface coverage on an areal basis using a linear dielectric model. Saccharide recognition using the nIR photoluminescence of SWNT is demonstrated, including selectivity toward pentoses such as arabinose, ribose, and xylose to the exclusion of the expected fructose, which has a high selectivity on PBA due to the

  3. 利用电化学方法对高模量碳纤维表面处理的研究%The Research of Electrochemistry for Surface Treatment of High-module Carbon Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yan-hong; JIANG Yan-yan

    2008-01-01

    This paper used electrochemical synthesis to decorate the surface of high-module carbon fiber by PABA/BPA reaction system.Develop continual electrochemical synthesis process in this reaction system and research the effect of the reaction potential for carbon fiber performance.There is compound coat on surface of carbon fiber decorated by electrochemical synthesis shown from SEM image.From FTIR analysis,ester group exist in compound coat synthesized from PABA/BPA reaction system.As the result of interlaminar shear strength,PABA/BPA reaction system had good effect.The value of ILSS from 66.8MPa without surface decoration can be improved to 73.1MPa with surface treatment.

  4. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Computational Electromagnetics with the ELEKTRA Module of OPERA-3D : 27 & 28.4.2004 (2 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 3 - 5.5.2004 (3 days) LabVIEW Base 2 : 6 & 7.5.2004 (2 jours) Project Planning with MS-Project : 6 & 13.5.2004 (2 days) Word 2003 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.5.2004 (2 jours) Oracle 9i : SQL : 10 - 12.5.2004 (3...

  5. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: FrontPage XP - niveau 2 : 26 & 27.4.2004 (2 jours) The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 26 - 30.4.2004 (5 days) Computational Electromagnetics with the ELEKTRA Module of OPERA-3D : 27 & 28.4.2004 (2 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 3 - 5.5.2004 (3 days) LabVIEW Base 2 : 6 & 7.5.2004 (2 jours) Project Pla...

  6. A five way crossover human volunteer study to compare the pharmacokinetics of paracetamol following oral administration of two commercially available paracetamol tablets and three development tablets containing paracetamol in combination with sodium bicarbonate or calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattan, T; Hickman, R; Darby-Dowman, A; Hayward, M; Boyce, M; Warrington, S

    2000-05-01

    This report concerns a single dose randomized five way crossover study to compare the pharmacokinetics of paracetamol from two commercially available paracetamol (500 mg) tablets and three different development paracetamol (500 mg) tablet formulations containing either sodium bicarbonate (400 mg), sodium bicarbonate (630 mg) or calcium carbonate (375 mg). The results demonstrated that addition of sodium bicarbonate (630 mg) to paracetamol tablets, increased the rate of absorption of paracetamol relative to conventional paracetamol tablets and soluble paracetamol tablets. Addition of sodium bicarbonate (400 mg) to paracetamol tablets increased the absorption rate of paracetamol relative to conventional paracetamol tablets, but there was no difference in the rate of absorption compared to soluble paracetamol tablets. Inclusion of calcium carbonate (375 mg) to paracetamol tablets had no effect on absorption kinetics compared to the conventional paracetamol tablet. The faster absorption observed for the sodium bicarbonate formulations may be as a result of an increase in gastric emptying rate leading to faster transport of paracetamol to the small intestine where absorption takes place.

  7. On Matlis dualizing modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar E. Enochs

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider rings admitting a Matlis dualizing module E. We argue that if R admits two such dualizing modules, then a module is reflexive with respect to one if and only if it is reflexive with respect to the other. Using this fact we argue that the number (whether finite or infinite of distinct dualizing modules equals the number of distinct invertible (R,R-bimodules. We show by example that this number can be greater than one.

  8. Scenarios of organic amendment use to increase soil carbon stocks and nitrogen availability in cropped soils at the territory scale: spatial and temporal simulations with the NCSOIL/CERES-EGC crop model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noirot-Cosson, Paul-Emile; Vaudour, Emmanuelle; Aubry, Christine; Gilliot, Jean-Marc; Gabrielle, Benoît; Houot, Sabine

    2014-05-01

    The application of Exogenous Organic Matter (EOM) on cropped soils is a promising way to increase soil organic carbon and available nitrogen for crops while recycling organic agricultural and urban wastes. In peri-urban territories where the specialization of agriculture limits the resource in organic amendments since livestock farming is scarce, a better management of EOM land application from all origins at the territory scale could be thought to maximize their benefits. The objective was to predict the effect of various EOM types and uses on C and N fluxes and crop production for each homogeneous spatial unit of the territory, first step for the territorial optimization of EOM land application. The study area, located 30km west of Paris, covers 221km² and is mostly characterized by croplands. The effects of repeated EOM applications were studied using a mechanistic crop model: CERES-EGC accounting for soil characteristics, crop production systems, and climate. The whole territory was divided into homogeneous spatial units, each defined by soil and crop production system characteristics. Four different soil types were characterized, mapped and parameterized in the model. Kinetics of C and N mineralization during soil incubations were used to optimize soil organic matter characteristics and parameters in the sub-model NCSOIL of CERES-EGC. Crop production systems were defined and spatially inferred using the French land parcel identification system. Climatic data measured on the territory were used to make a 20 year-meteorological scenario. Based on these initial informations, crop yields and C and N fluxes were simulated for the actual crop productions and soil type combinations of the territory. Then, different scenarios of EOM uses were also simulated based on different EOM types, added quantities and frequencies of application within the crop successions respecting the 170kgN/ha/yr legal limit. All the parameters studied, crop yields, N outputs, carbon storage

  9. A metabolomic study in oats (Avena sativa) highlights a drought tolerance mechanism based upon salicylate signalling pathways and the modulation of carbon, antioxidant and photo-oxidative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, Javier; Heald, Jim; Kingston-Smith, Alison; Winters, Ana; Rubiales, Diego; Sanz, Mariluz; Mur, Luis A J; Prats, Elena

    2015-07-01

    Although a wealth of information is available on the induction of one or several drought-related responses in different species, little is known of how their timing, modulation and crucially integration influence drought tolerance. Based upon metabolomic changes in oat (Avena sativa L.), we have defined key processes involved in drought tolerance. During a time course of increasing water deficit, metabolites from leaf samples were profiled using direct infusion-electrospray mass spectroscopy (DI-ESI-MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) ESI-MS/MS and analysed using principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant function analysis (DFA). The involvement of metabolite pathways was confirmed through targeted assays of key metabolites and physiological experiments. We demonstrate an early accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) influencing stomatal opening, photorespiration and antioxidant defences before any change in the relative water content. These changes are likely to maintain plant water status, with any photoinhibitory effect being counteracted by an efficient antioxidant capacity, thereby representing an integrated mechanism of drought tolerance in oats. We also discuss these changes in relation to those engaged at later points, consequence of the different water status in susceptible and resistant genotypes.

  10. Divisible ℤ-modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futa Yuichi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we formalize the definition of divisible ℤ-module and its properties in the Mizar system [3]. We formally prove that any non-trivial divisible ℤ-modules are not finitely-generated.We introduce a divisible ℤ-module, equivalent to a vector space of a torsion-free ℤ-module with a coefficient ring ℚ. ℤ-modules are important for lattice problems, LLL (Lenstra, Lenstra and Lovász base reduction algorithm [15], cryptographic systems with lattices [16] and coding theory [8].

  11. In Vivo Loss of Function Screening Reveals Carbonic Anhydrase IX as a Key Modulator of Tumor Initiating Potential in Primary Pancreatic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabendu Pore

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Reprogramming of energy metabolism is one of the emerging hallmarks of cancer. Up-regulation of energy metabolism pathways fuels cell growth and division, a key characteristic of neoplastic disease, and can lead to dependency on specific metabolic pathways. Thus, targeting energy metabolism pathways might offer the opportunity for novel therapeutics. Here, we describe the application of a novel in vivo screening approach for the identification of genes involved in cancer metabolism using a patient-derived pancreatic xenograft model. Lentiviruses expressing short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs targeting 12 different cell surface protein transporters were separately transduced into the primary pancreatic tumor cells. Transduced cells were pooled and implanted into mice. Tumors were harvested at different times, and the frequency of each shRNA was determined as a measure of which ones prevented tumor growth. Several targets including carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX, monocarboxylate transporter 4, and anionic amino acid transporter light chain, xc- system (xCT were identified in these studies and shown to be required for tumor initiation and growth. Interestingly, CAIX was overexpressed in the tumor initiating cell population. CAIX expression alone correlated with a highly tumorigenic subpopulation of cells. Furthermore, CAIX expression was essential for tumor initiation because shRNA knockdown eliminated the ability of cells to grow in vivo. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first parallel in vivo assessment of multiple novel oncology target genes using a patient-derived pancreatic tumor model.

  12. Disponibilidade de nitrogênio pela oxidação do carbono lábil com permanganato de potássio Availability of nitrogen by the oxidation of the labile carbon with potassium permanganate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celsemy E. Maia

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a liberação do nitrogênio associado ao carbono lábil oxidado com KMnO4 333 mmol L-1 e verificar a capacidade supridora de nitrogênio pela sua correlação com o nitrogênio absorvido pelas plantas. O solo utilizado foi proveniente de um experimento com milho em um Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo, cultivado com milho desde 1984, cuja produtividade vem sendo avaliada em função das doses de 0 e 40 m³ ha-1 ano-1 de composto orgânico (palha de soja e feijão com esterco bovino combinadas com 0, 250 e 500 kg ha-1 ano-1 da fórmula 4-14-8 aplicados no plantio, e 0, 100 e 200 kg ha-1 ano-1 de sulfato de amônio em cobertura. Os resultados mostraram que o uso da matéria orgânica contribuiu para uma quantidade maior de nitrogênio solúvel em KMnO4 333 mmol L-1; o teor de nitrogênio solúvel em KMnO4 333 mmol L-1 foi superior ao obtido pelo método anaeróbico e se correlacionou significativamente com o carbono total, carbono lábil, nitrogênio total, teor de amônio e nitrato e com o nitrogênio biodisponível.The present work had the objective of evaluating the liberation of the nitrogen associated to the labile carbon oxidized with KMnO4 (333 mmol L-1 and to verify the supply capacity of nitrogen by its correlation with the nitrogen absorbed by the plants. The soil used belongs to a Cambic Yellow Red Podzol, cultivated with corn since 1984, and its productivity is being evaluated as a function of the doses of 0 and 40 m³ ha-1 year-1 of organic compost (beans and soybean straw with manure, combined with 0, 250 and 500 kg ha-1 year-1 of the formula 4-14-8 applied at planting and 0, 100 and 200 kg ha-1 year-1 of ammonium sulphate as top dressing. The results showed that the use of the organic material contributed to a higher amount of nitrogen soluble in KMnO4 (333 mmol L-1. The content of soluble nitrogen in KMnO4 (333 mmol L-1 was found to be superior than that obtained by the anaerobic method and

  13. Digitally Controlled High Availability Power Supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacNair, David; /SLAC

    2009-05-07

    This paper will report on the test results of a prototype 1320 watt power module for a high availability power supply. The module will allow parallel operation for N+1 redundancy with hot swap capability. The two quadrant output of each module allows pairs of modules to provide a 4 quadrant (bipolar) operation. Each module employs a novel 4 FET buck regulator arranged in a bridge configuration. Each side of the bridge alternately conducts through a small saturable ferrite that limits the reverse current in the FET body diode during turn off. This allows hard switching of the FETs with low switching losses. The module is designed with over-rated components to provide high reliability and better then 97% efficiency at full load. The modules use a Microchip DSP for control, monitoring, and fault detection. The switching FETS are driven by PWM modules in the DSP at 60 KHz. A Dual CAN bus interface provides for low cost redundant control paths. The DSP will also provide current sharing between modules, synchronized switching, and soft start up for hot swapping. The input and output of each module have low resistance FETs to allow hot swapping and isolation of faulted units.

  14. Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide, Ammonia, Formaldehyde, and Water Vapor on Regenerable Carbon Sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Serio, Michael A.; Wilburn, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of reversible sorbents for the combined carbon dioxide, moisture, and trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), and more specifically in the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The currently available life support systems use separate units for carbon dioxide, trace contaminants, and moisture control, and the long-term objective is to replace the above three modules with a single one. Furthermore, the current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is nonregenerable, and the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. In this study, several carbon sorbents were fabricated and tested for simultaneous carbon dioxide, ammonia, formaldehyde, and water sorption. Multiple adsorption/vacuum-regeneration cycles were demonstrated at room temperature, and also the enhancement of formaldehyde sorption by the presence of ammonia in the gas mixture.

  15. Nitrogen-induced surface area and conductivity modulation of carbon nanohorn and its function as an efficient metal-free oxygen reduction electrocatalyst for anion-exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unni, Sreekuttan M; Bhange, Siddheshwar N; Illathvalappil, Rajith; Mutneja, Nisha; Patil, Kasinath R; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2015-01-21

    Nitrogen-doped carbon morphologies have been proven to be better alternatives to Pt in polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. However, efficient modulation of the active sites by the simultaneous escalation of the porosity and nitrogen doping, without affecting the intrinsic electrical conductivity, still remains to be solved. Here, a simple strategy is reported to solve this issue by treating single-walled carbon nanohorn (SWCNH) with urea at 800 °C. The resulting nitrogen-doped carbon nanohorn shows a high surface area of 1836 m2 g(-1) along with an increased electron conductivity, which are the pre-requisites of an electrocatalyst. The nitrogen-doped nanohorn annealed at 800 °C (N-800) also shows a high oxygen reduction activity (ORR). Because of the high weight percentage of pyridinic nitrogen coordination in N-800, the present catalyst shows a clear 4-electron reduction pathway at only 50 mV overpotential and 16 mV negative shift in the half-wave potential for ORR compared to Pt/C along with a high fuel selectivity and electrochemical stability. More importantly, a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) based on N-800 provides a maximum power density of 30 mW cm(-2) under anion-exchange membrane fuel cell (AEMFC) testing conditions. Thus, with its remarkable set of physical and electrochemical properties, this material has the potential to perform as an efficient Pt-free electrode for AEMFCs.

  16. Directed network modules

    CERN Document Server

    Pálla, G; Farkas, I J; Pollner, P; Vicsek, T; Derenyi, Imre; Farkas, Illes J.; Palla, Gergely; Pollner, Peter; Vicsek, Tamas

    2007-01-01

    A search technique locating network modules, i.e., internally densely connected groups of nodes in directed networks is introduced by extending the Clique Percolation Method originally proposed for undirected networks. After giving a suitable definition for directed modules we investigate their percolation transition in the Erdos-Renyi graph both analytically and numerically. We also analyse four real-world directed networks, including Google's own webpages, an email network, a word association graph and the transcriptional regulatory network of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The obtained directed modules are validated by additional information available for the nodes. We find that directed modules of real-world graphs inherently overlap and the investigated networks can be classified into two major groups in terms of the overlaps between the modules. Accordingly, in the word-association network and among Google's webpages the overlaps are likely to contain in-hubs, whereas the modules in the email and t...

  17. The OSU1/QUA2/TSD2-encoded putative methyltransferase is a critical modulator of carbon and nitrogen nutrient balance response in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Gao

    Full Text Available The balance between carbon (C and nitrogen (N nutrients must be tightly coordinated so that cells can optimize their opportunity for metabolism, growth and development. However, the C and N nutrient balance perception and signaling mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of two allelic oversensitive to sugar 1 mutants (osu1-1, osu1-2 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using the cotyledon anthocyanin accumulation and root growth inhibition assays, we show that the osu1 mutants are more sensitive than wild-type to both of the imbalanced C/N conditions, high C/low N and low C/high N. However, under the balanced C/N conditions (low C/low N or high C/high N, the osu1 mutants have similar anthocyanin levels and root lengths as wild-type. Consistently, the genes encoding two MYB transcription factors (MYB75 and MYB90 and an Asn synthetase isoform (ASN1 are strongly up-regulated by the OSU1 mutation in response to high C/low N and low C/high N, respectively. Furthermore, the enhanced sensitivity of osu1-1 to high C/low N with respect to anthocyanin accumulation but not root growth inhibition can be suppressed by co-suppression of MYB75, indicating that MYB75 acts downstream of OSU1 in the high C/low N imbalance response. Map-based cloning reveals that OSU1 encodes a member of a large family of putative methyltransferases and is allelic to the recently reported QUA2/TSD2 locus identified in genetic screens for cell-adhesion-defective mutants. Accumulation of OSU1/QUA2/TSD2 transcript was not regulated by C and N balance, but the OSU1 promoter was slightly more active in the vascular system. Taken together, our results show that the OSU1/QUA2/TSD2-encoded putative methyltransferase is required for normal C/N nutrient balance response in plants.

  18. Experimental Studies on the Flammability and Fire Hazards of Photovoltaic Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yun Yang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Many of the photovoltaic (PV systems on buildings are of sufficiently high voltages, with potential to cause or promote fires. However, research about photovoltaic fires is insufficient. This paper focuses on the flammability and fire hazards of photovoltaic modules. Bench-scale experiments based on polycrystalline silicon PV modules have been conducted using a cone calorimeter. Several parameters including ignition time (tig, mass loss, heat release rate (HRR, carbon monoxide (CO and carbon dioxide (CO2 concentration, were investigated. The fire behaviours, fire hazards and toxicity of gases released by PV modules are assessed based on experimental results. The results show that PV modules under tests are inflammable with the critical heat flux of 26 kW/m2. This work will lead to better understanding on photovoltaic fires and how to help authorities determine the appropriate fire safety provisions for controlling photovoltaic fires.

  19. Modeling Water and Carbon Budgets in Current and Future Agricultural Land Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewniak, B.; Song, J.; Prell, J.; Kotamarthi, R.; Jacob, R.

    2008-12-01

    Biofuels are a key component of renewable energy mix proposed as a substitute to fossil fuels. Biofuels are suggested as both economical and having potential for reducing atmospheric emissions of carbon from the transportation sector, by building up soil carbon levels when planted on lands where these levels have been reduced by intensive tillage. The purpose of this research is to develop a carbon-nitrogen based crop module (CNC) for the community land model (CLM) and to improve the characterization of the below and above ground carbon sequestration for bioenergy crops. The CNC simulates planting, growing, maturing and harvesting stages for three major crops: maize, soybean and wheat. In addition, dynamic root module is implemented to simulate fine root distribution and development based on relative availability of soil water and nitrogen in the root zone. Coupled CLM-CNC models is used to study crop yields, geographic locations for bioenergy crop production and soil carbon changes. Bioenergy crop cultivation is based on current crop cultivation and future land use change dataset. Soil carbon change has been simulated based on carbon input to the soil from the leaf, stem and root, and carbon emission from soil carbon decomposition. Simulated water and carbon fluxes have been compared with field observations and soil carbon content has been examined under different harvest practices.

  20. Thermal and electrical energy yield analysis of a directly water cooled photovoltaic module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mtunzi Busiso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical energy of photovoltaic modules drops by 0.5% for each degree increase in temperature. Direct water cooling of photovoltaic modules was found to give improved electrical and thermal yield. A prototype was put in place to analyse the field data for a period of a year. The results showed an initial high performance ratio and electrical power output. The monthly energy saving efficiency of the directly water cooled module was found to be approximately 61%. The solar utilisation of the naturally cooled photovoltaic module was found to be 8.79% and for the directly water cooled module its solar utilisation was 47.93%. Implementation of such systems on households may reduce the load from the utility company, bring about huge savings on electricity bills and help in reducing carbon emissions.

  1. Modulating the direction of carbon flow in Escherichia coli to improve l-tryptophan production by inactivating the global regulator FruR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lina; Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2016-08-10

    The fructose repressor (FruR) affects carbon flux through the central metabolic pathways of Escherichia coli. In this study, l-tryptophan production in Escherichia coli FB-04 was improved by knocking out the fruR gene, thereby inactivating FruR. This fruR knockout strain, E. coli FB-04(ΔfruR), not only exhibited higher growth efficiency, it also showed substantially improved l-tryptophan production. l-tryptophan production by E. coli FB-04(ΔfruR) and l-tryptophan yield per glucose were increased by 62.5% and 52.4%, respectively, compared with the parent E. coli FB-04. Metabolomics analysis showed that the fruR knockout significantly enhances metabolic flow through glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and the TCA cycle, increasing levels of critical precursors and substrates for l-tryptophan biosynthesis. These results indicate that fruR deletion should enhance l-tryptophan production and improve the efficiency of carbon source utilization independent of genetic background.

  2. Availability growth modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, J.R.

    1998-12-01

    In reliability modeling, the term availability is used to represent the fraction of time that a process is operating successfully. Several different definitions have been proposed for different types of availability. One commonly used measure of availability is cumulative availability, which is defined as the ratio of the amount of time that a system is up and running to the total elapsed time. During the startup phase of a process, cumulative availability may be treated as a growth process. A procedure for modeling cumulative availability as a function of time is proposed. Estimates of other measures of availability are derived from the estimated cumulative availability function. The use of empirical Bayes techniques to improve the resulting estimates is also discussed.

  3. Carbon Nanoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory D. Cress

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Initiated by the first single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT transistors [1,2], and reinvigorated with the isolation of graphene [3], the field of carbon-based nanoscale electronic devices and components (Carbon Nanoelectronics for short has developed at a blistering pace [4]. Comprising a vast number of scientists and engineers that span materials science, physics, chemistry, and electronics, this field seeks to provide an evolutionary transition path to address the fundamental scaling limitations of silicon CMOS [5]. Concurrently, researchers are actively investigating the use of carbon nanomaterials in applications including back-end interconnects, high-speed optoelectronic applications [6], spin-transport [7], spin tunnel barrier [8], flexible electronics, and many more.

  4. Technical training - places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch Valeria Perez Reale, Learning Specialist, Technical Programme Coordinator (Tel.: 62424) Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel.: 74924) HR Department »Electronics design Next Session Duration Language Availability Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design 08-Oct-12 to 12-Oct-12 5 days English 3 places available Foundations of Electromagnetism and Magnet Design (EMAG) 14-Nov-12 to 27-Nov-12 6 days English 20 places available Impacts de la suppression du plomb (RoHS) en électronique 26-Oct-12 to 26-Oct-12 8 hours French 15 places available Introduction to VHDL 10-Oct-12 to 11-Oct-12 2 days English 7 places available LabVIEW Real Time and FPGA 13-Nov-12 to 16-Nov-12 5 days French 5 places available »Mechanical design Next Se...

  5. Available Energy and Exergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Gaggioli

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available

    An "available energy" is defined for every state of any system. The definition is independent of (a the concept of work. (b any reference environment, and (c the makeup of the system (e.g. "macro" or "micro. On the basis of this available energy, given any composite system, the contribution of each subsystem to the available energy -- that is, the exergy content of a subsystem -- is defined, as well as the instantaneous "dead state" of the composite and each subsystem.

    Some pedagogical, scientific and engineering implications are discussed.

  6. Proxmox high availability

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Simon MC

    2014-01-01

    If you want to know the secrets of virtualization and how to implement high availability on your services, this is the book for you. For those of you who are already using Proxmox, this book offers you the chance to build a high availability cluster with a distributed filesystem to further protect your system from failure.

  7. Available area isotherm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, JC; Wesselingh, JA

    2004-01-01

    A new isotherm is presented for adsorption of proteins, the available area isotherm. This isotherm has a steric basis, unlike the (steric) mass action model. The shape of the available area isotherm is determined only by geometric exclusion. With the new isotherm, experimental results can be fitted

  8. Technical training - Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch Valeria Perez Reale, Learning Specialist, Technical Programme Coordinator (Tel.: 62424) Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel.: 74924)   Electronics design Next Session Duration Language Availability Certified LabVIEW Associate Developer (CLAD) 06-Dec-12 to 06-Dec-12 1 hour English One more place available Compatibilité électromagnetique (CEM): Applications 23-Nov-12 to 23-Nov-12 3.5 hours English 3 places available Compatibilité électromagnétique (CEM): Introduction 23-Nov-12 to 23-Nov-12 3 hours English 43 places available Effets des Radiations sur les composants et systèmes électroniques 11-Dec-12 to 12-Dec-12 1 day 4 hours French 9 places available LabVIEW for beginners ...

  9. Response of Black Soil Organic Carbon, Nitrogen and Its Availability to Longterm Fertilization%黑土有机碳、氮及其活性对长期施肥的响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆坤; 胡荣桂; 张文菊; 周宝库; 徐明岗; 张敬业; 夏平平

    2013-01-01

    以长期定位试验为基础,研究不同长期施肥模式对中国东北黑土表层(0~20 cm)及亚表层(20~40 cm)土壤碳、氮的影响.结果表明,有机肥的施入显著提高了表层土壤有机碳(SOC)和全氮(TN)含量,其中以有机无机配施处理最为显著.与不施肥相比,常量和高量有机无机配施分别增加了表层SOC含量24.6%和25.1%,分别增加了表层土壤TN含量29.5%和32.8%,亚表层土壤SOC和TN含量对施肥无响应.尽管常量及高量有机无机配施分别增加了黑土0~ 40 cm土壤碳储量11.6%和7.6%、氮储量17.3%和12.7%,但各处理之间无显著差异,仅增加了黑土碳、氮储量的变异性.与不施肥相比,有机肥的施用不仅显著增加了表层和亚表层土壤微生物生物量碳、氮(SMBC、SMBN)及可溶性碳、氮(DOC、DN)的含量,且显著提高了这些组分在总有机碳、全氮中所占的比例.有机无机配施处理能使表层土壤SMBC/SOC、SMBN/TN值分别提高0.36~0.59和1.21 ~ 1.95个百分点,而DOC/SOC、DN/TN也分别达到0.53%~0.72%和1.41%~1.78%.土壤微生物生物量碳氮、可溶性碳氮及其在总有机碳、氮中所占的比例对于施肥的响应在土壤剖面上表现更为敏感,更能反映土壤肥力对于长期施肥的响应.有机肥的施入尤其是有机无机配施能显著提高黑土表层和亚表层土壤有机碳、氮活性,有利于提升土壤肥力和养分供应能力,但同时也导致了农田系统碳、氮的大量损失,容易引起潜在的环境污染.%Based on the long-term fertilization experiments, effects of various fertilization practices on the soil organic carbon ( SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) in the surface (0-20 cm) and subsurface (20-40 cm) black soil in northeast China were studied. Results showed that, compared with the CK, long-term application of organic manure, especially the combination of mineral fertilizers and organic manure significantly increased

  10. High availability IT services

    CERN Document Server

    Critchley, Terry

    2014-01-01

    This book starts with the basic premise that a service is comprised of the 3Ps-products, processes, and people. Moreover, these entities and their sub-entities interlink to support the services that end users require to run and support a business. This widens the scope of any availability design far beyond hardware and software. It also increases the potential for service failure for reasons beyond just hardware and software; the concept of logical outages. High Availability IT Services details the considerations for designing and running highly available ""services"" and not just the systems

  11. Carbon source-induced reprogramming of the cell wall proteome and secretome modulates the adherence and drug resistance of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ene, I.V.; Heilmann, C.J.; Sorgo, A.G.; Walker, L.A.; de Koster, C.G.; Munro, C.A.; Klis, F.M.; Brown, A.J.P.

    2012-01-01

    The major fungal pathogen Candida albicans can occupy diverse microenvironments in its human host. During colonization of the gastrointestinal or urogenital tracts, mucosal surfaces, bloodstream, and internal organs, C. albicans thrives in niches that differ with respect to available nutrients and l

  12. The influence of bubbles on the perception carbonation bite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Wise

    Full Text Available Although many people naively assume that the bite of carbonation is due to tactile stimulation of the oral cavity by bubbles, it has become increasingly clear that carbonation bite comes mainly from formation of carbonic acid in the oral mucosa. In Experiment 1, we asked whether bubbles were in fact required to perceive carbonation bite. Subjects rated oral pungency from several concentrations of carbonated water both at normal atmospheric pressure (at which bubbles could form and at 2.0 atmospheres pressure (at which bubbles did not form. Ratings of carbonation bite under the two pressure conditions were essentially identical, indicating that bubbles are not required for pungency. In Experiment 2, we created controlled streams of air bubbles around the tongue in mildly pungent CO2 solutions to determine how tactile stimulation from bubbles affects carbonation bite. Since innocuous sensations like light touch and cooling often suppress pain, we predicted that bubbles might reduce rated bite. Contrary to prediction, air bubbles flowing around the tongue significantly enhanced rated bite, without inducing perceived bite in blank (un-carbonated solutions. Accordingly, though bubbles are clearly not required for carbonation bite, they may well modulate perceived bite. More generally, the results show that innocuous tactile stimulation can enhance chemogenic pain. Possible physiological mechanisms are discussed.

  13. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework: 14 - 18.6.2004 (5 days) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 2 : 17 & 18.6.2004 (2 jours) MAGNE-04 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 6 au 8.7.2004 (3 jours) Technical Training Monique Duval - Tel.74924 technical.training@cern.ch

  14. Essentially finitely indecomposable QTAG-Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alveera Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A right module $M$ over an associative ring with unity is a $QTAG$-module if every finitely generated submodule of any homomorphic image of $M$ is a direct sum of uniserial modules. There are many fascinating results related to these modules and essentially indecomposable modules are extensively researched. Motivated by these modules we generalize them as essentially finitely indecomposable modules whose every direct decomposition $M=\\bigoplus\\limits_{k\\in I} M_k$ implies that there exists a positive integer $n$ such that $H_n(M_i=0$ for all $M_i$'s except for a finite number of $M_i$'s. Here we investigate these modules and their relationship with $HT$-modules. The cases when the modules are not $HT$-modules are especially highlighted.

  15. Joint universities accelerator school (JUAS) - Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    If you are a PhD student, fellow or staff member and are interested in following one or more specific modules à la carte at JUAS a limited number of places are still available on the Technologies & Applications course.   The course will be held at the European Scientific Institute in Archamps, France (Haute-Savoie) in February and March 2016.  

  16. Legume presence increases photosynthesis and N concentrations of co-occurring non-fixers but does not modulate their responsiveness to carbon dioxide enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tali D; Reich, Peter B; Tjoelker, Mark G

    2003-09-01

    Legumes, with the ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen (N), may help alleviate the N limitations thought to constrain plant community response to elevated concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)). To address this issue we assessed: (1) the effects of the presence of the perennial grassland N(2 )fixer, Lupinus perennis, on biomass accumulation and plant N concentrations of nine-species plots of differing plant composition; (2) leaf-level physiology of co-occurring non-fixing species (Achillea millefolium, Agropyron repens, Koeleria cristata) in these assemblages with and without Lupinus; (3) the effects of elevated CO(2) on Lupinus growth and symbiotic N(2) fixation in both monoculture and the nine-species assemblages; and (4) whether assemblages containing Lupinus exhibit larger physiological and growth responses to elevated CO(2 )than those without. This study was part of a long-term grassland field experiment (BioCON) that controls atmospheric CO(2) at current ambient and elevated (560 micromol mol(-1)) concentrations using free-air CO(2) enrichment. Nine-species plots with Lupinus had 32% higher whole plot plant N concentrations and 26% higher total plant N pools than those without Lupinus, based on both above and below ground measurements. Co-occurring non-fixer leaf N concentrations increased 22% and mass-based net photosynthetic rates increased 41% in plots containing Lupinus compared to those without. With CO(2) enrichment, Lupinus monocultures accumulated 32% more biomass and increased the proportion of N derived from fixation from 44% to 57%. In nine-species assemblages, Lupinus N derived from fixation increased similarly from 43% to 54%. Although Lupinus presence enhanced photosynthetic rates and leaf N concentrations of co-occurring non-fixers, and increased overall plant N pools, Lupinus presence did not facilitate stronger photosynthetic responses of non-fixing species or larger growth responses of overall plant communities to elevated CO(2

  17. Irreducible Specht modules are signed Young modules

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmer, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Recently Donkin defined signed Young modules as a simultaneous generalization of Young and twisted Young modules for the symmetric group. We show that in odd characteristic, if a Specht module $S^\\lambda$ is irreducible, then $S^\\lambda$ is a signed Young module. Thus the set of irreducible Specht modules coincides with the set of irreducible signed Young modules. This provides evidence for our conjecture that the signed Young modules are precisely the class of indecomposable self-dual module...

  18. Adsorption of Ammonia on Regenerable Carbon Sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Jesph E.; Serio, Michael A..; Wilburn, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of reversible sorbents for the combined carbon dioxide, moisture, and trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), and more specifically in the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The currently available life support systems use separate units for carbon dioxide, trace contaminants, and moisture control, and the long-term objective is to replace the above three modules with a single one. Data on sorption and desorption of ammonia, which is a major TC of concern, are presented in this paper. The current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is non-regenerable, and the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. In this study, several carbon sorbents were fabricated and tested for ammonia sorption. Ammonia-sorption capacity was related to carbon pore structure characteristics, and the temperature of oxidative carbon-surface treatment was optimized for enhanced ammonia-sorption performance.

  19. Technical training - Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 16.5.2006 (May-November course sessions) Technical Training: Places available The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Title Hours Date Language ACROBAT 7.0 : Utilisation de fichiers PDF 8 8.05.06 F WORD 2003 - niveau 2 : ECDL 16 22-23.05.06 23-24.05.06 F Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design 40 29.05-2.06.06 E C++ Programming Part 2 - Advanced C++ and its Traps and Pitfalls 32 30.05-2.06.06 E ACROBAT 7.0 : Utilisation de fichiers PDF 24 7-9.06.06 E AutoCAD Mechanical 2006 16 13-14.06.06 F CERN EDMS for Local Administrators 16 13-14.06.06 E LabVIEW Base 2 32 27.06-5.07.06 F C++ Programming Part 3 - Templates and the STL (Standard Template Library) 16 27-28.06.06 E C++ Programming Part 4 - Exceptions 8 29.06.06 E FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 16 29-...

  20. Mechanical models of amplitude and frequency modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellomonte, L; Guastella, I; Sperandeo-Mineo, R M [GRIAF - Research Group on Teaching/Learning Physics, DI.F.TE.R. -Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents some mechanical models for amplitude and frequency modulation. The equations governing both modulations are deduced alongside some necessary approximations. Computer simulations of the models are carried out by using available educational software. Amplitude modulation is achieved by using a system of two weakly coupled pendulums, whereas the frequency modulation is obtained by using a pendulum of variable length. Under suitable conditions (small oscillations, appropriate initial conditions, etc) both types of modulation result in significantly accurate and visualized simulations.

  1. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: PowerPoint 2003 (F) : 25.4.2005 (1 jour) WORD 2003 - niveau 1 : 2 & 3.5.2005 (2 jours) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.5.2005 (2 jours) ELEC-2005 - Summer Term: System electronics for physics - Issues : 10, 12, 17, 19, 24, 26 & 31.5.2005 (7 x 2h lectures) AutoCAD 2005 - niveau 1 : 11 & 12.5.2005 (2 days) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework: 24 - 26.5.2005 (3 days) The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework: 30.5 - 3.6.2005 (5 days) LabVIEW Migration 6 to 7: 14.6.2005 (1 day) Introduction to ANSYS: 21 - 24.6.2005 (4 days) ENSEIGNEMENT TECHNIQUE TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval 74924 technical.training@cern.ch

  2. Differential responses of sugar, organic acids and anthocyanins to source-sink modulation in Cabernet Sauvignon and Sangiovese grapevines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia eBobeica

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Grape berry composition mainly consists of primary and secondary metabolites. Both are sensitive to environment and viticultural management. As a consequence, climate change can affect berry composition and modify wine quality and typicity. Leaf removal techniques can impact berry composition by modulating the source-to-sink balance and, in turn, may mitigate some undesired effects due to climate change. The present study investigated the balance between technological maturity parameters such as sugars and organic acids, and phenolic maturity parameters such as anthocyanins in response to source-sink modulation. Sugar, organic acid, and anthocyanin profiles were compared under two contrasting carbon supply levels in berries of cv. Cabernet Sauvignon and Sangiovese collected at 9 and 14 developmental stages respectively. In addition, whole-canopy net carbon exchange rate was monitored for Sangiovese vines and a mathematic model was used to calculate the balance between carbon fixation and berry sugar accumulation. Carbon limitation affected neither berry size nor the concentration of organic acids at harvest. However, it significantly reduced the accumulation of sugars and total anthocyanins in both cultivars. Most interestingly, carbon limitation decreased total anthocyanin concentration by 84.3 % as compared to the non source-limited control, whereas it decreased sugar concentration only by 27.1 %. This suggests that carbon limitation led to a strong imbalance between sugars and anthocyanins. Moreover, carbon limitation affected anthocyanin profiles in a cultivar dependent manner. Mathematical analysis of carbon-balance indicated that berries used a higher proportion of fixed carbon for sugar accumulation under carbon limitation (76.9% than under carbon sufficiency (48%. Thus, under carbon limitation, the grape berry can manage the metabolic fate of carbon in such a way that sugar accumulation is maintained at the expense of secondary

  3. Energy availability in athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loucks, Anne B; Kiens, Bente; Wright, Hattie H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This review updates and complements the review of energy balance and body composition in the Proceedings of the 2003 IOC Consensus Conference on Sports Nutrition. It argues that the concept of energy availability is more useful than the concept of energy balance for managing the diets...... of athletes. It then summarizes recent reports of the existence, aetiologies, and clinical consequences of low energy availability in athletes. This is followed by a review of recent research on the failure of appetite to increase ad libitum energy intake in compensation for exercise energy expenditure...

  4. JUNOS High Availability

    CERN Document Server

    Sonderegger, James; Milne, Kieran; Palislamovic, Senad

    2009-01-01

    Whether your network is a complex carrier or just a few machines supporting a small enterprise, JUNOS High Availability will help you build reliable and resilient networks that include Juniper Networks devices. With this book's valuable advice on software upgrades, scalability, remote network monitoring and management, high-availability protocols such as VRRP, and more, you'll have your network uptime at the five, six, or even seven nines -- or 99.99999% of the time. Rather than focus on "greenfield" designs, the authors explain how to intelligently modify multi-vendor networks. You'll learn

  5. Energy availability in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Anne B; Kiens, Bente; Wright, Hattie H

    2011-01-01

    This review updates and complements the review of energy balance and body composition in the Proceedings of the 2003 IOC Consensus Conference on Sports Nutrition. It argues that the concept of energy availability is more useful than the concept of energy balance for managing the diets of athletes. It then summarizes recent reports of the existence, aetiologies, and clinical consequences of low energy availability in athletes. This is followed by a review of recent research on the failure of appetite to increase ad libitum energy intake in compensation for exercise energy expenditure. The review closes by summarizing the implications of this research for managing the diets of athletes.

  6. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 27.6.2006 (July-December course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Titre Heure Date Langue Manipulation des images 4 6.07.06 F Introduction to Databases and Database Design 16 11-12.07.06 E ACCESS 2003 - Level 1: ECDL 16 13-14.07.06 E-F Design Patterns 16 25-26.07.06 E CERN EDMS for Local Administrators 16 1-2.08.06 E ANSYS DesignModeler 16 29-30.08.06 F CERN EDMS - Introduction 8 5.09.06 E CERN EDMS MTF en pratique 4 6.09.06 F LabVIEW Basics 1 24 4-6.09.06 E ANSYS Workbench 32 12-15.09.06 F AutoCAD Mechanical 2006 16 12-13.09.06 F CERN EDMS for Engineers 8 12.09.06 E Software Engineering in the Small and the Large 16 12-13.09.06 E AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 32 14-21.09.06 F LabVIEW Basics 2 ...

  7. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 30.5.2006 (June-November course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Titre Heure Date Langue ACROBAT 7.0 : Utilisation de fichiers PDF 8 6.06.06 F Introduction à InDesign 16 7-8.06.06 F Python: Hands-on Introduction 24 7-9.06.06 E LabVIEW Base 2 16 22-23.06.06 F FileMaker - niveau 1 16 26-27.06.06 F C++ Programming Part 3 - Templates and the STL (Standard Template Library) 16 27-28.06.06 E C++ Programming Part 4 - Exceptions 8 29.06.06 E FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 16 29-30.06.06 F Manipulation des images 4 6.07.06 F Introduction to Databases and Database Design 16 11-12.07.06 E ACCESS 2003 - Level 1: ECDL 16 13-14.07.06 E-F Design Patterns 16 25-26.07.06 E Introduction à Dreamweaver MX 16 ...

  8. Technical training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 13.6.2006 (June-December course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Titre Heure Date Langue LabVIEW Base 2 16 22-23.06.06 F FileMaker - niveau 1 16 26-27.06.06 F C++ Programming Part 3 - Templates and the STL (Standard Template Library) 16 27-28.06.06 E C++ Programming Part 4 - Exceptions 8 29.06.06 E FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 16 29-30.06.06 F Manipulation des images 4 6.07.06 F Introduction to Databases and Database Design 16 11-12.07.06 E ACCESS 2003 - Level 1: ECDL 16 13-14.07.06 E-F Design Patterns 16 25-26.07.06 E Introduction à Dreamweaver MX 16 26-27.07.06 F ANSYS DesignModeler 16 29-30.08.06 F LabVIEW Basics 1 24 4-6.09.06 E ANSYS Workbench 32 12-15.09.06 F AutoCAD Mechanical 20...

  9. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 11.7.2006 (July-December course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Titre Heure Date Langue Design Patterns 16 25-26.07.06 E CERN EDMS for Local Administrators 16 1-2.08.06 E ANSYS DesignModeler 16 29-30.08.06 F CERN EDMS – Introduction 8 5.09.06 E CERN EDMS MTF en pratique 4 6.09.06 F LabVIEW Basics 1 24 4-6.09.06 E ANSYS Workbench 32 12-15.09.06 F AutoCAD Mechanical 2006 16 12-13.09.06 F CERN EDMS for Engineers 8 12.09.06 E Software Engineering in the Small and the Large 16 12-13.09.06 E LabVIEW Basics 2 16 14-15.09.06 E LabVIEW: Working efficiently with LabWIEW 8 8 18.09.06 E PCAD Schémas ? Introduction 16 21-22.09.06 F PCAD PCB - Introduction  24 27-29.09.06 F C++ for Particle Physicists ...

  10. TECHNICAL TRAINING: Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 12 - 14.11.03(3 days) ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 17 - 21.11.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium - niveau 2 : 18 - 21.11.03 (4 jours) Project Planning with MS-Project  (free of charg...

  11. TECHNICAL TRAINING: Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval Tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The EDMS-MTF in practice (free of charge) : 28 -  30.10.03 (6 half-day sessions) AutoCAD 2002 – Level 1 : 3, 4, 12, 13.11.03 (4 days) LabVIEW TestStand ver. 3 : 4 & 5.11.03 (2 days) Introduction to PSpice : 4.11.03 p.m. (half-day) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 12 – 14.11.03 (3 days) ACCESS ...

  12. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Oracle 9i : New features for developers : 14 - 16.6.2004 (3 days) The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework: 14 - 18.6.2004 (5 days) Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE : 15 & 16.6.2004 (2 jours) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 2 : 17 & 18.6.2004 (2 jours) MAGNE-04 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 6 au 8.7.2004 (3 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 13, 14, 23, 24.09.2004 (4 jours) ENSEIGNEMEN...

  13. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Joint PVSS JCOP Programming : 9 - 13.8.2004 (5 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming: 1 - 3.9.2004 (3 days - free course) Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE : 7 & 8.9.2004 (2 jours) Joint PVSS JCOP Programming : 13 - 17.9.2004 (5 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 13, 14, 23, 24.9.2004 (4 jours) Programmation STEP7 niveau 1 : 14-17.9.2004 (4...

  14. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 9 - 13.8.2004 (5 days) Introduction à Outlook : 19.8.2004 (1 jour) Outlook (Short Course I): E-mail: 31.8.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (Short Course II): Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 31.8.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Instructor-led WBTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications: 7.9.2004 (morning) Outlook (Short Course III): Meetings and Delegation: 7.9.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) I...

  15. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 9 - 13.8.2004 (5 days) Introduction à Outlook : 19.8.2004 (1 jour) Outlook (Short Course I): E-mail: 31.8.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (Short Course II): Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 31.8.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming: 1 - 3.9.2004 (3 days - free course) Instructor-led WBTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications: 7.9.20...

  16. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to the CERN EDMS : 22.6.2004 (1 day) The CERN EDMS for local administrators : 23 & 24.6.2004 (2 days) Compatibilité électromagnétique (CEM) - Introduction / Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) - Introduction: 7.7.2004 (morning) Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE : 7 & 8.9.2004 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 13, 14, 23, 24.9.2004 (4 jours) Programmation STEP...

  17. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming: 1 - 3.9.2004 (3 days - free course) Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE : 7 & 8.9.2004 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 13, 14, 23, 24.9.2004 (4 jours) Programmation STEP7 niveau 1 : 14-17.9.2004 (4 jours) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.9.2004 (2 jours) Word 2003 - niveau 2 : 27 & 28.9.2004 (2 jours) Introduction à Wind...

  18. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 13, 14, 23, 24.09.2004 (4 jours) Introduction to the CERN EDMS : 22.6.2004 (1 day) The CERN EDMS for local administrators : 23 & 24.6.2004 (2 days) MAGNE-04 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 6 - 8.7.2004 (3 jours) Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE : 7 & 8.9.2004 (2 jours) ENSEIGNEMENT TECHNIQUE TECHNICAL TRAINING...

  19. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Outlook (short course I) : E-mail : 31.8.2004 (2 hours, morning) Introduction à Outlook : Outlook (short course II) : Calendar, Tasks and Notes : 31.8.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Instructor-led WBTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications : 7.9.2004 (morning) Outlook (short course III) : Meetings and Delegation : 7.9.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur ...

  20. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 7.2.2006 (February-May course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Title Hours Date Language WORD 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo... Work with master document 3 27.02.06 E-F JAVA: Level 2 32 28.02-3.03.06 E Manipulation des images 4 28.02.06 F ACCESS 2003 - Level 2: ECDL AM5 16 2-3.03.06 E-F C++ for Particle Physicists 20 6-10.03.06 E PowerPoint 2003 8 9.03.06 F JCOP: Control System Integration using JCOP Tools 24 14-16.03.06 E EXCEL 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Pivot tables 3 20.03.06 E-F EXCEL 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo....Link cells, worksheets and workbooks 3 20.03.06 E-F JCOP: Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework 24 21-23.03.06 E Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML 24 21-23.03.06 E FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 16 27-28.03.06 F JCOP: Joint PVSS-JCOP Fram...

  1. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    DAvide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 25.7.2006 (August-December course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Titre Heure Date Langue CERN EDMS for Local Administrators 16 1-2.08.06 E ANSYS DesignModeler 16 29-30.08.06 F EXCEL 2003 - niveau 1 : ECDL 16 30-31.08.06 F OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course I) - E-mail 3 1.09.06 E/F OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes 3 1.09.06 E/F CERN EDMS - Introduction 8 5.09.06 E CERN EDMS MTF en pratique 4 6.09.06 F ANSYS Workbench 32 12-15.09.06 F CERN EDMS for Engineers 8 12.09.06 E Software Engineering in the Small and the Large 16 12-13.09.06 E LabVIEW Basics 2 16 14-15.09.06 E WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents 3 15.09.06 E/F EXCEL 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Wor...

  2. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 19.7.2006 (August-December course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Titre Heure Date Langue CERN EDMS for Local Administrators 16 1-2.08.06 E ANSYS DesignModeler 16 29-30.08.06 F OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course I) - E-mail 3 1.09.06 E/F OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes 3 1.09.06 E/F CERN EDMS - Introduction 8 5.09.06 E CERN EDMS MTF en pratique 4 6.09.06 F LabVIEW Basics 1 24 11-13.09.06 E ANSYS Workbench 32 12-15.09.06 F CERN EDMS for Engineers 8 12.09.06 E Software Engineering in the Small and the Large 16 12-13.09.06 E LabVIEW Basics 2 16 14-15.09.06 E EXCEL 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with formulae 3 15.09.06 E/F WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long docu...

  3. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 7.2.2006 (February-May course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Title Hours Date Language WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge 3 09-02-06 E-F ACCESS 2003 - Level 1: ECDL M5 16 13 to 14-02-06 E-F OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes 3 16-02-06 E-F WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents 3 16-02-06 E-F CERN EDMS - Introduction 8 21.02.06 E OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation 3 27-02-06 E-F WORD 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo... Work with master document 3 27-02-06 E-F JAVA: Level 2 32 28-02-06 to 03-03-06 E Manipulation des images 4 28.02.06 F ACCESS 2003 - Level 2: ECDL AM5 16 02 to 03-03-06 E-F FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 16 02 to 03-03-06 F C++ for Particle Physicists 20 06 to 10-03-06 E FileMaker - niv...

  4. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 7.2.2006 (February-May course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Title Hours Date Language WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge 3 13.03.06 E-F EXCEL 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Pivot tables 3 20.03.06 E-F EXCEL 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo....Link cells, worksheets and workbooks 3 20.03.06 E-F Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML 24 21-23.03.06 E EXCEL 2003 - niveau 1 16 22-23.03.06 F FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 16 27-28.03.06 F Oracle Forms Developer 10g: Move to the Web 16 27-28.03.06 E Oracle JDeveloper 10g: Build Applications with ADF 24 29-31.03.06 E ACCESS 2003 - Level 2: ECDL AM5 16 3-4.03.06 E-F JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: Web Applications 16 3-4.04.06 E JCOP: Control System Integration using JCOP Tools 24 4-6.04.06 E JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition...

  5. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 19, 20.4 et 3, 4.5.2004 (4 jours) Oracle 8i/9i - Develop Web-based Applications with PL/SQL : 19 & 20.4.2004 (2 days) Introduction to ANSYS : 20 - 23.4.2004 (4 days) LabVIEW Hands-on : 20.4.2004 (half-day, p.m.) FrontPage XP - niveau 2 : 26 & 27.4.2004 (2 jours) The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 26 -...

  6. Trends in availability management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, P.W.; McCandless, R.J.; Smith, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper explores future directions in the management of nuclear power plant availability. The issue is of great economic interest both to utilities and to their customers. Current trends are discussed, and some that appear to have promise in the future are identified.

  7. Technical Training: Places Available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval - Tel.74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Oracle 9i: SQL: 17 - 19.5.2004 (3 days) Word 2003 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.5.2004 (2 jours) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 1 : 27 & 28.5.2004 (2 jours) STEP7 Programming Level 1: 1 - 4.6.2004 (4 days) Oracle 9i : Programming with PL/SQL: 2 - 4.6.2004 (3 days) CST Microwave Studio: 3 & 4.6.2004 (2 days) Oracle 9i : New f...

  8. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval - Tel.74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Word 2003 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.5.2004 (2 jours) VisualEliteHDL : 25 & 26.5.2004 (2 days) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 1 : 27 & 28.5.2004 (2 jours) STEP7 Programming Level 1: 1 - 4.6.2004 (4 days) Oracle 9i : Programming with PL/SQL: 2 - 4.6.2004 (3 days) CST Microwave Studio: 3 & 4.6.2004 (2 days) Oracle 9...

  9. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 21.3.2006 (March-October course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Title Hours Date Language FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 16 27-28.03.06 F Oracle Forms Developer 10g: Move to the Web 16 27-28.03.06 E ACCESS 2003 - Level 2: ECDL AM5 16 3-4.03.06 E-F JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: Web Applications 16 3-4.04.06 E JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans 24 5-7.04.06 E AutoCAD Mechanical 2006 16 11-12.04.06 F FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 16 24-25.04.06 F C++ Programming Part 1 - Introduction to Object-Oriented Design and Programming 24 25-27.04.06 E AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 32 27.04-4.05.06 F Oracle: SQL 24 3-5.05.06 E EXCEL 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with formulae 3 4.05.06 (am) E-F EXCEL 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Format your worksheet for printing 3 4...

  10. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 21.3.2006 (March-October course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: find out the curren Hours Date Language ACROBAT 7.0 : Utilisation de fichiers PDF 8 8.05.06 F Project Planning with MS-Project 16 9.05-6.06.06 E STEP7: niveau 1 32 9-12.05.06 E-F Oracle: Programming with PL/SQL 24 10-12.05.06 E FileMaker - niveau 2 16 11-12.05.06 F LabVIEW Application Development 24 15-17.05.06 E LabVIEW Advanced Programming 16 18-19.05.06 E PERL 5: Advanced Aspects 8 18.05.06 E Technique du vide 16 18-19.05.06 F WORD 2003 - niveau 2 : ECDL 16 22-23.05.06 F Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE 16 23-24.05.06 F Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design 40 29.05-2.06.06 E C++ Programming Part 2 - Advanced C++ and its T...

  11. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 9.5.2006 (May-October course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: find out the curren Hours Date Language LabVIEW Application Development 24 15-17.05.06 E LabVIEW Advanced Programming 16 18-19.05.06 E PERL 5: Advanced Aspects 8 18.05.06 E Technique du vide 16 18-19.05.06 F FileMaker - niveau 2 16 11-12.05.06 F WORD 2003 - niveau 2 : ECDL 16 22-23.05.06 F Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE 16 23-24.05.06 F Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design 40 29.05-2.06.06 E C++ Programming Part 2 - Advanced C++ and its Traps and Pitfalls 32 30.05-2.06.06 E Python: Hands-on Introduction 24 7-9.06.06 E AutoCAD Mechanical 2006 16 13-14.06.06 F CERN EDMS for Local Administrators 16 13-14.06.06...

  12. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Project Planning with MS-Project :6 & 13.5.2004 (2 days) Word 2003 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.5.2004 (2 jours) Oracle 9i : SQL : 17 - 19.5.2004 (3 days) Word 2003 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.5.2004 (2 jours) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 1: 27 & 28.5.2004 (2 jours) STEP7 Programming Level 1 : 1 - 4.6.2004 (4 days) Oracle 9i : Programming with PL/SQL : 2 - 4.6.2...

  13. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 1.4.2004 (morning) FrontPage XP - niveau 1 : 5 & 6.4.2004 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 19, 20.4 et 3, 4.5.2004 (4 jours) Oracle 8i/9i - Develop Web-based Applications with PL/SQL : 19 & 20.4.2004 (2 days) Introduction to ANSYS : 20 - 23.4.2004 (4 day...

  14. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 19.2.2004 (morning) LabVIEW TestStand I (E) : 23 & 24.2.2004 (2 days) LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004 (3 jours) Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 26.2.2004 (morning) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Pa...

  15. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Instructor-led WBTechT study for Microsoft applications :12.2.2004 (morning) Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 19.2.2004 (morning) LabVIEW TestStand I (E) : 23 & 24.2.2004 (2 days) LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004 (3 jours) Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 19.2.2004 (morning) CLEAN-2002 ...

  16. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004(3 jours) Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 26.2.2004 (morning) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 (6 X 4-hour sessions) LabVIEW hands-on (E) : 16.3.2004 (afternoon) LabVIEW Basics 1 : 22 - 24.3.2004 ...

  17. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 (6 X 4-hour sessions) Introduction to the CERN EDMS : 9.3.2004 (1 day, free of charge) The EDMS MTF in Practice : 10.3.2004 (morning, free of charge) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon, free of charge) The CERN EDMS for Engineers : 11.3.2004 (1 day, free of charge) LabVIEW hands-on (E):...

  18. Technical Training: Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The JAVA Programming Language Level 1 : 9 & 10.1.2004 (2 days) LabVIEW TestStand I (E) : 23 & 24.2.2004 (2 days) LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004 (3 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 ( 6 X 4-hour sessions) LabVIEW hands-on (E) 16.3...

  19. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 (6 X 4-hour sessions) Introduction to the CERN EDMS : 9.3.2004 (1 day, free of charge) The EDMS MTF in Practice : 10.3.2004 (morning, free of charge) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon, free of charge) The CERN EDMS for Engineers : 11.3.2004 (1 day, free of charge) LabVIEW...

  20. Photovoltaic module reliability workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrig, L. (ed.)

    1990-01-01

    The paper and presentations compiled in this volume form the Proceedings of the fourth in a series of Workshops sponsored by Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI/DOE) under the general theme of photovoltaic module reliability during the period 1986--1990. The reliability Photo Voltaic (PV) modules/systems is exceedingly important along with the initial cost and efficiency of modules if the PV technology has to make a major impact in the power generation market, and for it to compete with the conventional electricity producing technologies. The reliability of photovoltaic modules has progressed significantly in the last few years as evidenced by warranties available on commercial modules of as long as 12 years. However, there is still need for substantial research and testing required to improve module field reliability to levels of 30 years or more. Several small groups of researchers are involved in this research, development, and monitoring activity around the world. In the US, PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in this field were brought together under SERI/DOE sponsorship to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this important field. The papers presented here reflect this effort.

  1. *-Modules, co-*-modules and cotilting modules over Noetherian rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪明义; 许永华

    1996-01-01

    Let R be a Noetherian ring. The projectivity and injectivity of modules over R are discussed. The concept of modules is introduced and the descriptions for co-*-modules over R are given. At last, cotilting modules over R are characterized by means of co-*-modules.

  2. Thruster Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, G.

    2015-09-01

    The thruster module described in this paper provides a low but controlled acceleration in a mission which would normally be labelled “microgravity”. The first mission was Cryofenix, where tanks containing liquid hydrogen were used in the experiment. The experiment utilizing the low acceleration is using liquids and requires a precise acceleration profile throughout the mission. Acceleration obtained by payload rotation is not feasible due to that the transversal forces required to change the acceleration will cause undesired liquid turbulence. In order to satisfy the experiment requirements a thruster module was developed by SSC for the Cryofenix mission funded by CNES. The Cryofenix mission had a payload weight of 380 kg and an apogee of about 260 km. The module produces a controlled thrust in flight direction by means of a cold gas system.

  3. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: ANSYS : Thermal Analysis : 22 - 24.9.2004 (3 days) LabVIEW Migration 6 à 7 : 23.9.2004 (one day) ANSYS : Advanced Topics : 27.9 - 1.10.2004 (5 days) Word 2003 - niveau 2 : 27 & 28.9.2004 (2 jours) LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 27 - 29.9.2004 (3 days) LabVIEW - Basics 2 : 30.9 & 1.10.2004 (2 days) Introduction à Windows XP au CERN : 4.10.2004 (matin) The EDMS MTF in practice : 4.10.2004 (afternoon) The CERN EDMS for Engineers : 6.10.2004 (1 day) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 7 & 8.10.04 (2 jours) Outlook (short course I) : E-mail : 22.10.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (short course II) : Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 22.10.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Instructor-led WTechT Study or Fo...

  4. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Programmation STEP7 niveau 1 : 14-17.9.2004 (4 jours) ANSYS : Thermal Analysis : 22 - 24.9.2004 (3 days) LabVIEW Migration 6 à 7 : 23.9.2004 (one day) ANSYS : Advanced Topics : 27.9 - 1.10.2004 (5 days) Word 2003 - niveau 2 : 27 & 28.9.2004 (2 jours) LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 27 - 29.9.2004 (3 days) MAGNE-04 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 28 - 30.9.2004 (3 jours) LabVIEW - Basics 2 : 30.9 & 1.10.2004 (2 days) Introduction à Windows XP au CERN : 4.10.2004 (matin) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 7 & 8.10.04 (2 jours) Outlook (short course I) : E-mail : 22.10.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (short course II) : Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 22.10.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Introduction à ANSYS : 23 - 26.11.2004 (4 jours) ENSEIGNEMENT TECHNIQUE TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval 74924...

  5. Technical training - Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    * Etant donné le délai d'impression du Bulletin, ces places peuvent ne plus être disponibles au moment de sa parution. Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour avoir la dernière mise à jour. ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following courses: Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming 12 – 14.11.03 (3 days) ACCESS 2000 – niveau 1 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists 17 – 21.11.03 (6 x 3-hour lectures) Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium – niveau 2  18 – 21.11.03 (4 jours) Planification de projet avec MS-Project/Project Planning with MS-Project (gratuit/free of charge – langue à définir/language to be defined) : 18 & 25.11.03 (2 jours/2 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition – Part 1 : WEB...

  6. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++ : 22 - 24.3.2005 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 2 : 4 & 5.4.2005 (2 jours) EMAG-2004 - Electromagnetic Design and Mathematical Optimization in Magnet Technology: 4- 14.4.2005 (8 x 3h) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 2 : 11 & 12.4.2005 (2 jours) LabVIEW Intermediate 1: 11 - 13.4.2005 (3 days) ACCESS 2003 - Level 2 - ECDL AM5: 13 & 14.4.2005 (2 days) LabVIEW Intermediate 2: 14 & 15.4.2005 (2 days) PowerPoint 2003 (F) : 18.4.2005 (1 jour) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 25 - 29.4.2005 (5 days) WORD 2003 - niveau 1 : 2 & 3.5.2005 (2 jours) ELEC-2005 - Summer Term: System electronics for physics - Issues : 10, 12, 17, 19, 24, 26 & 31.5.2005 (7 x 2h lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 11, 12, 18 & 19.5.2005 (4 jour...

  7. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: LabVIEW Migration 6 to 7: 14.6.2005 (1 day) IT3T/1 - Read your mail and more with Outlook 2003 : 14.6.2005 (IT Technical Training Tutorial, free of charge) IT3T/2 - Creating, managing and using distribution lists with Simba2 : 16.6.2005 (IT Technical Training Tutorial, free of charge) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 16 & 17.6.2005 (2 jours) size="2">(1journée) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming: 28 - 30.6.2005 (3 days) Introduction to ANSYS: 21 - 24.6.2005 (4 days) IT3T/3 - Working remotely with Windows XP: 28.6.2005 (IT Technical Training Tutorial, free of charge) IT3T/4 - Editing Websites with Frontpage 2003: 30.6.2005 (IT Technical Training Tutorial, free of charge) LabVIEW base 1 : 4 - 6.7.2005 (3 jours) LabVIEW Basics 2: AutoCorrect, Find/Replace) : 4.7.2005 (afternoon) WORD 2003 (Shor...

  8. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: LabVIEW Real-Time (F) : 7 - 9.6.2005 (3 jours) LabVIEW Migration 6 to 7: 14.6.2005 (1 day) IT3T/1 - Read your mail and more with Outlook 2003 : 14.6.2005 (IT Technical Training Tutorial, free of charge) IT3T/2 - Creating, managing and using distribution lists with Simba2 : 16.6.2005 (IT Technical Training Tutorial, free of charge) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 16 & 17.6.2005 (2 jours) Utilisation de fichiers PDF avec ACROBAT 6.0 : 20.6.2005 (1journée) Introduction to ANSYS: 21 - 24.6.2005 (4 days) IT3T/3 - Working remotely with Windows XP : 28.6.2005 (IT Technical Training Tutorial, free of charge) IT3T/4 - Editing Websites with Frontpage 2003 : 30.6.2005 (IT Technical Training Tutorial, free of charge) WORD 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with repetitive tasks /AutoText, AutoFormat, AutoC...

  9. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Joint PVSS JCOP Framework: 8 - 12.8.2005 (5 days) WORD 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with AutoTasks (AutoText, AutoFormat, AutoCorrect, Lists, Find/Replace): 25.8.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge: 25.8.2005 (afternoon) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with formulae: 26.8.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents: 26.8.2005 (afternoon) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 1 - 2.9.2005 (2 jours) Utilisation des fichiers PDF avec ACROBAT 7.0 : 5.9.2005 (1 jour) LabVIEW Basics 1 : 5 - 7.9.2005 (3 days, dates to be confirmed) Introduction à Windows XP au CERN : 12.9.2005 (1 demi-journée) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.9.2005 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2005 - niveau 1 : 22, 23, 28, 29.9.2005 (4 jours) MAGNE-05 - Magn&...

  10. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Joint PVSS JCOP Framework: 8 - 12.8.2005 (5 days) WORD 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with AutoTasks (AutoText, AutoFormat, AutoCorrect, Lists, Find/Replace): 25.8.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge: 25.8.2005 (afternoon) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with formulae: 26.8.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents: 26.8.2005 (afternoon) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 1 - 2.9.2005 (2 jours) Utilisation des fichiers PDF avec ACROBAT 7.0 : 5.9.2005 (1 jour) LabVIEW Basics 1 : 5 - 7.9.2005 (3 days, dates to be confirmed) Introduction à Windows XP au CERN : 12.9.2005 (1 demi-journée) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.9.2005 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2005 - niveau 1 : 22, 23, 28, 29.9.2005 (4 jours) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framew...

  11. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: WORD 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with AutoTasks (AutoText, AutoFormat, AutoCorrect, Lists, Find/Replace): 25.8.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge: 25.8.2005 (afternoon) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with formulae: 26.8.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents: 26.8.2005 (afternoon) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 1 - 2.9.2005 (2 jours) Utilisation des fichiers PDF avec ACROBAT 7.0 : 5.9.2005 (1 jour) LabVIEW base 1 : 5 - 7.9.2005 (3 jours) Introduction à Windows XP au CERN : 12.9.2005 (1 demi-journée) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.9.2005 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2005 - niveau 1 : 22, 23, 28, 29.9.2005 (4 jours) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework:  26 - 28.9.2005 (3 days) MAGNE-05 - Magnétisme pour l'électrotechniq...

  12. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: LabVIEW base 1 : 4 - 6.7.2005 (3 jours) LabVIEW Basics 2: 7 - 8.7.2005 (2 days) Utilisation des fichiers PDF avec ACROBAT 7.0 : 5.7.2005 (1 jour) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 6-7.7.2005 (2 jours) WORD 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with repetitive tasks /AutoText, AutoFormat, AutoCorrect, Find/Replace) : 4.7.2005 (afternoon) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge: 5.7.2005 (afternoon) WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents : 6.7.2005 (afternoon) OUTLOOK (Short Course I) - E-mail: 6.7.2005 (morning) OUTLOOK (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 7.7.2005 (morning) OUTLOOK (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation: 8.7.2005 (morning) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with formulae: 7.7.2005 (afternoon) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Format y...

  13. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: LabVIEW Real-Time (F) : 7 - 9.6.2005 (3 jours) LabVIEW Migration 6 to 7: 14.6.2005 (1 day) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 16 & 17.6.2005 (2 jours) Utilisation de fichiers PDF avec ACROBAT 6.0 : 20.6.2005 (1journée) Introduction to ANSYS: 21 - 24.6.2005 (4 days) WORD 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with repetitive tasks /AutoText, AutoFormat, AutoCorrect, Find/Replace) : 4.7.2005 (afternoon) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge: 5.7.2005 (afternoon) WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents : 6.7.2005 (afternoon) ACCESS 2003 - Level 2 - ECDL AM5: 5 - 8.7.2005 (4 mornings) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with formulae: 7.7.2005 (afternoon) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Format your worksheet for printing: 8.7.2005 (aftern...

  14. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming: 28 - 30.6.2005 (3 days) Introduction to ANSYS: 21 - 24.6.2005 (4 days) IT3T/3 - Working remotely with Windows XP: 28.6.2005 (IT Technical Training Tutorial, free of charge) IT3T/4 - Editing Websites with Frontpage 2003: 30.6.2005 (IT Technical Training Tutorial, free of charge) Utilisation des fichiers PDF avec ACROBAT 7.0 : 5.7.2005 (1 jour) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 6-7.7.2005 (2 jours) LabVIEW base 1 : 4 - 6.7.2005 (3 jours) LabVIEW Basics 2: 7 - 8.7.2005 (2 days) WORD 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with repetitive tasks /AutoText, AutoFormat, AutoCorrect, Find/Replace) : 4.7.2005 (afternoon) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge: 5.7.2005 (afternoon) WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo (4 mornings) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work ...

  15. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming: 28 - 30.6.2005 (3 days) Introduction to ANSYS: 28.6 - 1.7.2005 (4 days) IT3T/3 - Working remotely with Windows XP: 28.6.2005 (IT Technical Training Tutorial, free of charge) IT3T/4 - Editing Websites with Frontpage 2003: 30.6.2005 (IT Technical Training Tutorial, free of charge) LabVIEW base 1 : 4 - 6.7.2005 (3 jours) LabVIEW Basics 2: 7 - 8.7.2005 (2 days) Utilisation des fichiers PDF avec ACROBAT 7.0 : 5.7.2005 (1 jour) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 6-7.7.2005 (2 jours) WORD 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with repetitive tasks /AutoText, AutoFormat, AutoCorrect, Find/Replace) : 4.7.2005 (afternoon) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge: 5.7.2005 (afternoon) WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents : 6.7.2005 (afternoon) ACCES...

  16. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Instructor-led WBTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications : 7.9.2004 7.9.2004 Outlook (short course III) : Meetings and Delegation : 7.9.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE : 7 & 8.9.2004 (2 jours) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 13 - 17.9.2004 (5 days) Programmation STEP7 niveau 1 : 14-17.9.2004 (4 jours) ANSYS : Thermal Analysis : 22 - 24.9.2004 (3 days) LabVIEW Migration 6 à 7 : 23.9.2004 (one day) ANSYS : Advanced Topics : 27.9 - 1.10.2004 (5 days) Word 2003 - niveau 2 : 27 & 28.9.2004 (2 jours) LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 27 - 29.9.2004 (3 days) MAGNE-04 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 28 - 30.9.2004 (3 jours) LabVIEW - Basics 2 : 30.9 & 1.10.2004 (2 days) Introduction à Windows XP au CERN : 4.10.2004 (matin) ...

  17. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 9 - 13.8.2004 (5 days) Outlook (I): E-mail : 31.8.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (II): Calendar, Tasks and Notes : 31.8.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 1 - 3.9.2004 (3 days - free course) Instructor-led WBTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications : 7.9.2004 (morning) Outlook (III): Meetings and Delegation : 7.9.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE : 7 & 8.9.2004 (2 jours) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 13 - 17.9.2004 (5 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 13, 14, 23, 24.9.2004 (4 jours) Programmation STEP7 niveau 1 : 14 - 17.9.2004 (4 jours) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.9.2004 (2 jours) ANSYS: Thermal Analysis : 22 - 24.9.2004 (3 days) ANSYS: Advanced Topics : 27.9...

  18. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.5.2005 (2 jours) ELEC-2005 - Summer Term: System electronics for physics - Issues : 10, 12, 17, 19, 24, 26 & 31.5.2005 (7 x 2h lectures) AutoCAD 2005 - niveau 1 : 12, 13, 18, 19.5.2005 (4 jours) ACCESS 2003 - Level 1: ECDL M5 : 11 & 12.5.2005 (2 days) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML: 17 - 19.5.2005 (3 days) Synplify Pro Training: 18.5.2005 (1 day) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework: 24 - 26.5.2005 (3 days) The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework: 30.5 - 3.6.2005 (5 days) Introduction à la CAO CADENCE : 31.5 - 1.6.2005 (2 jours) LabVIEW Real-Time (F) : 7 - 9.6.2005 (3 jours) LabVIEW Migration 6 to 7: 14.6.2005 (1 day) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 16 & 17.6.2005 (2 jours) Utilisation de fichiers PDF avec ACROBAT 6.0 : 20.6.2005 (1journée) Intr...

  19. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.5.2005 (2 jours) ELEC-2005 - Summer Term: System electronics for physics - Issues : 10, 12, 17, 19, 24, 26 & 31.5.2005 (7 x 2h lectures) AutoCAD 2005 - niveau 1 : 11, 12, 18, 19.5.2005 (4 jours) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML: 17 - 19.5.2005 (3 days) Synplify Pro Training: 18.5.2005 (1 day) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework: 24 - 26.5.2005 (3 days) The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework: 30.5 - 3.6.2005 (5 days) Introduction à la CAO CADENCE : 31.5 - 1.6.2005 (2 jours) LabVIEW Real-Time (F) : 7 - 9.6.2005 (3 jours) LabVIEW Migration 6 to 7: 14.6.2005 (1 day) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 16 & 17.6.2005 (2 jours) Utilisation de fichiers PDF avec ACROBAT 6.0 : 20.6.2005 (1journée) Introductio...

  20. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: PowerPoint 2003 (F) : 25.4.2005 (1 jour) WORD 2003 - niveau 1 : 2 & 3.5.2005 (2 jours) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.5.2005 (2 jours) ANSYS Workbench (F) : 9 - 12.5.2005 (4 jours) ELEC-2005 - Summer Term: System electronics for physics - Issues : 10, 12, 17, 19, 24, 26 & 31.5.2005 (7 x 2h lectures) AutoCAD 2005 - niveau 1 : 11, 12, 18, 19.5.2005 (4 jours) ACCESS 2003 - Level 1: ECDL M5 : 11 & 12.5.2005 (2 days) La technique du vide : 12 & 13.5.2005 (2 jours) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework: 24 - 26.5.2005 (3 days) The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework: 30.5 - 3.6.2005 (5 days) LabVIEW Migration 6 to 7: 14.6.2005 (1 day) Introduction to ANSYS: 21 - 24.6.2005 (4 days) ENSEIGNEMENT TECHNIQUE TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval 74924 tech...

  1. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: LabVIEW Intermediate 1: 11 - 13.4.2005 (3 days) ACCESS 2003 - Level 2 - ECDL AM5: 13 & 14.4.2005 (2 days) LabVIEW Intermediate 2: 14 & 15.4.2005 (2 days) PowerPoint 2003 (F) : 25.4.2005 (1 jour) WORD 2003 - niveau 1 : 2 & 3.5.2005 (2 jours) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.5.2005 (2 jours) ANSYS Workbench (F) : 9 - 12.5.2005 (4 jours) ELEC-2005 - Summer Term: System electronics for physics - Issues : 10, 12, 17, 19, 24, 26 & 31.5.2005 (7 x 2h lectures) La technique du vide : 12 & 13.5.2005 (2 jours) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework: 24 - 26.5.2005 (3 days) The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework ; 30.5 - 3.6.2005 (5 days) LabVIEW Migration 6 to 7: 14.6.2005 (1 day) Introduction to ANSYS: 21 - 24.6.2005 (4 days) ENSEIGNEMENT ...

  2. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: WORD 2003 - niveau 1 : 2 & 3.5.2005 (2 jours) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.5.2005 (2 jours) ELEC-2005 - Summer Term: System electronics for physics - Issues : 10, 12, 17, 19, 24, 26 & 31.5.2005 (7 x 2h lectures) AutoCAD 2005 - niveau 1 : 11, 12, 18, 19.5.2005 (4 jours) ACCESS 2003 - Level 1: ECDL M5 : 11 & 12.5.2005 (2 days) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework: 24 - 26.5.2005 (3 days) The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework: 30.5 - 3.6.2005 (5 days) Introduction à la CAO CADENCE : 31.5 - 1.6.2005 (2 jours) Programmation STEP7 niveau 1 : 7 - 10.6.2005 (4 jours) LabVIEW Migration 6 to 7: 14.6.2005 (1 day) Introduction to ANSYS: 21 - 24.6.2005 (4 days) MAGNE-05 - Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 27 - 29.9.2005 (3 j...

  3. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Title Hours Date Language ACCESS 2003 - Level 2: ECDL AM5 16 19 to 20-01-06 E-F AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 32 19 to 25-01-06 F C++ Programming Advanced - Traps and Pitfalls 32 24 to 27-01-06 E STEP7 : Level 1 32 24 to 27-01-06 E LabVIEW Basics 2 16 26 to 27-01-06 E AutoCAD Mechanical 2006 16 30 to 31-01-06 F DIAdem : base 24 01 to 03-02-06 F FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 16 02 to 03-02-06 F ACROBAT 7.0 : Utilisation de fichiers PDF 8 06-02-06 F Manipulation des images 4 08-02-06 F OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course I) - E-mail 3 09-02-06 E-F WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge 3 09-02-06 E-F ACCESS 2003 - Level 1: ECDL M5 16 13 to 14-02-06 E-F JCOP: Control System Integration using JCOP Tools 24 14 to 16-02-06 E OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Note...

  4. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Title Hours Date Language AutoCAD Mechanical 2006 16 30 to 31-01-06 F DIAdem : base 24 01 to 03-02-06 F ACROBAT 7.0 : Utilisation de fichiers PDF 8 06-02-06 F Manipulation des images 4 08-02-06 F OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course I) - E-mail 3 09-02-06 E-F WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge 3 09-02-06 E-F ACCESS 2003 - Level 1: ECDL M5 16 13 to 14-02-06 E-F JCOP: Control System Integration using JCOP Tools 24 14 to 16-02-06 E OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes 3 16-02-06 E-F WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents 3 16-02-06 E-F FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 16 23 to 24-02-06 F OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation 3 27-02-06 E-F WORD 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo... Work with master document 3 27-02-06 E-F ...

  5. High availability using virtualization

    CERN Document Server

    Calzolari, Federico

    2009-01-01

    High availability has always been one of the main problems for a data center. Till now high availability was achieved by host per host redundancy, a highly expensive method in terms of hardware and human costs. A new approach to the problem can be offered by virtualization. Using virtualization, it is possible to achieve a redundancy system for all the services running on a data center. This new approach to high availability allows to share the running virtual machines over the servers up and running, by exploiting the features of the virtualization layer: start, stop and move virtual machines between physical hosts. The system (3RC) is based on a finite state machine with hysteresis, providing the possibility to restart each virtual machine over any physical host, or reinstall it from scratch. A complete infrastructure has been developed to install operating system and middleware in a few minutes. To virtualize the main servers of a data center, a new procedure has been developed to migrate physical to virtu...

  6. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: C++ for Particle Physicists : 15 - 19.11.2004 (6 X 3 hours sessions) Word 2003 - niveau 1 : 22 & 23.11.2004 (2 jours) Introduction à ANSYS : 23 - 26.11.2004 (4 jours) Project Planning with MS-Project : 25.11 & 2.12.2004 (2 days) Explicit Dynamics with ANSYS/LS-Dyna : 7 - 9.12.2004 (2 days) PCAD Schémas - Débutants : 9 & 10.12.2004 (2 jours) The JAVA Programming Language Level 1 : 11 & 12.1.2005 (2 days) Introduction to XML : 13 & 14.1.2005 (2 days) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle propre : 25.1.2005 (après-midi, cours gratuit) Compatibilité électromagnétique (CEM) : installation et remèdes : 25 - 27.1.2005 (3 jours) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Fr ...

  7. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Explicit Dynamics with ANSYS/LS-Dyna : 7 - 9.12.2004 (3 days) Introduction to PERL 5 : 8 & 9.12.2004 (2 days) PCAD Schémas - Débutants : 9 & 10.12.2004 (2 jours) Advanced aspects of PERL 5: 10.12.2004 (1 day) PCAD PCB – Débutants : 13 - 15.12.2004 (3 jours) The JAVA Programming Language Level 1 : 11 & 12.1.2005 (2 days) Introduction to XML : 13 & 14.1.2005 (2 days) Introduction to the CERN EDMS : 18.1.2005 (1 day - free course) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators : 19 & 20.1.2005 (2 days - free course) Programmation Unity-Pro pour utilisateurs de Schneider PL7-Pro : 24 - 28.1.2005 (8 demi-journées) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle propre : 25.1.2005 (après-midi, cours gratuit) Compatibilit&eac...

  8. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Introduction à ANSYS : 23 - 26.11.2004 (4 jours) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 23 - 26.11.2004 (4 jours) Project Planning with MS-Project : 25.11 & 2.12.2004 (2 days) Explicit Dynamics with ANSYS/LS-Dyna : 7 - 9.12.2004 (3 days) Introduction to PERL 5 : 8 & 9.12.2004 (2 days) PCAD Schémas - Débutants : 9 & 10.12.2004 (2 jours) The JAVA Programming Language Level 1 : 11 & 12.1.2005 (2 days) Introduction to XML : 13 & 14.1.2005 (2 days) Introduction to the CERN EDMS : 18.1.2005 (1 day - free course) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators : 19 & 20.1.2005 (2 days - free course) Programmation Unity-Pro pour utilisateurs de Schneider PL7-Pro : 24 - 28.1.2005 (8 demi-journées) CLEAN-2002 : Travaill...

  9. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The JAVA Programming Language Level 1: 11 & 12.1.2005 (2 days) Introduction to XML : 13 & 14.1.2005 (2 days) ELEC-2005.:Winter term: Introduction to electronics in HEP: 18, 20, 25, 27.1, 1 & 3.2.2005 (6 x 2h lectures) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators: 19 & 20.1.2005 (2 days - free course) Programmation Unity-Pro pour utilisateurs de Schneider PL7-Pro : 24 - 28.1.2005 (8 demi-journées) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle propre : 25.1.2005 (après-midi, cours gratuit) Compatibilité électromagnétique (CEM) : installation et remèdes : 25 - 27.1.2005 (3 jours) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework: 1 - 3.2.2005 (3 days - free course) The JAVA Programming Language Level 2: 7 - 9...

  10. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: FileMaker - niveau 1 : 23 - 26.11.2004 (4 jours) Explicit Dynamics with ANSYS/LS-Dyna : 7 - 9.12.2004 (3 days) Introduction to PERL 5 : 8 & 9.12.2004 (2 days) PCAD Schémas - Débutants : 9 & 10.12.2004 (2 jours) Advanced aspects of PERL 5: 10.12.2004 (1 day) PCAD PCB – Débutants : 13 - 15.12.2004 (3 jours) The JAVA Programming Language Level 1 : 11 & 12.1.2005 (2 days) Introduction to XML : 13 & 14.1.2005 (2 days) Introduction to the CERN EDMS : 18.1.2005 (1 day - free course) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators : 19 & 20.1.2005 (2 days - free course) Programmation Unity-Pro pour utilisateurs de Schneider PL7-Pro : 24 - 28.1.2005 (8 demi-journées) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle propre : 25.1.2005 ...

  11. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: FileMaker - niveau 1 : 18 & 19.10.2004 (2 jours) Outlook (short course I) : E-mail : 22.10.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (short course II) : Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 22.10.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Excel 2003 - niveau 1 : 4 & 5.11.2004 (2 jours) LabVIEW Intermediate I : 8 - 10.11.2004 (3 days) Instructor-led WTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications : 9.11.2004 (morning) Hands-On Object Oriented Design and Programming with C++ : 9 - 11.11.2004 (3 days) Outlook (Short Course III) : Meetings and Delegation : 9.11.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) LabVIEW Intermediate II : 11 & 12.11.2004 (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 11, 12, 18, 19.11.2004 (4 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 15 - 19.11.2004 (6 X 3 hours sessions) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 18 &a...

  12. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The JAVA Programming Language Level 1: 11 & 12.1.2005 (2 days) Introduction to XML : 13 & 14.1.2005 (2 days) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators: 19 & 20.1.2005 (2 days - free course) Programmation Unity-Pro pour utilisateurs de Schneider PL7-Pro : 24 - 28.1.2005 (8 demi-journées) LabVIEW base 1/basics 1 : 31.1 - 1.2.2005 (2 j size="2">LabVIEW base 2/basics 2 : 3 & 4.2.2005 (2 jours/2 days - langue à décider/language to be decided) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework: 1 - 3.2.2005 (3 days - free course) The JAVA Programming Language Level 2: 7 - 9.2.2005 (3 days) C++ Programming Advanced -Traps and Pitfalls: 8 - 11.2.2005 (4 days) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework: 14 - 18.2.2005 (5 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: ...

  13. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 3 - 7.10.2005 (5 days) Utilisation des fichiers PDF avec Acrobat 7.0 :   4.10.2005 (1 journée) LaTeX par la pratique :   4 - 6.10.2005 (3 matinées) PowerPoint 2003 (F) :  7.10.2005 (1 journée) FileMaker - niveau 1 :  20 - 21.10.2005 (2 jours) ACCESS 2003 - Level 1 - ECDL M5: 24 - 25.10.2005 (2 days) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework : 25 - 27.10.2005 (3 days) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Pivot tables: 26.10.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with AutoTasks: 26.10.2005 (afternoon) OUTLOOK (Short Course I) - E-mail: 2.11.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge: 2.11.2005 (afternoon) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 :  3 - 4.11.2005 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 : 3, 4, 9, 10.11.2005 (4 jours) Joint PVSS JCO...

  14. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Outlook (short course I) : E-mail : 22.10.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (short course II) : Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 22.10.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Excel 2003 - niveau 1 : 4 & 5.11.2004 (2 jours) LabVIEW Intermediate I : 8 - 10.11.2004 (3 days) Instructor-led WTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications : 9.11.2004 (morning) Hands-On Object Oriented Design and Programming with C++ : 9 - 11.11.2004 (3 days) Outlook (Short Course III) : Meetings and Delegation : 9.11.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) LabVIEW Intermediate II : 11 & 12.11.2004 (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 11, 12, 18, 19.11.2004 (4 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 15 - 19.11.2004 (6 X 3 hours sessions) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 18 & 19.11.2004 (2 jours) Word 2003 - niveau 1 : 22 &a...

  15. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: LabVIEW base 1/basics 1 : 31.1 - 2.2.2005 (3 jours/3 days - langue à décider/language to be decided) LabVIEW base 2/basics 2 : 3 & 4.2.2005 (2 jours/2 days - langue à décider/language to be decided) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework: 1 - 3.2.2005 (3 days - free course) The JAVA Programming Language Level 2: 7 - 9.2.2005 (3 days) C++ Programming Advanced -Traps and Pitfalls: 8 - 11.2.2005 (4 days) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework: 14 - 18.2.2005 (5 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: WEB Applications: 21 & 22.2.2005 (2 days) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 21 & 22.2.2005 (2 jours) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans: 23 - 25.2.2005 (3 days) ELEC-2005 - Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology...

  16. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators: 19 & 20.1.2005 (2 days - free course) Programmation Unity-Pro pour utilisateurs de Schneider PL7-Pro : 24 - 28.1.2005 (9 demi-journées) LabVIEW base 1/basics 1 : 31.1 - 2.2.2005 (3 jours/3 days - langue à décider/language to be decided) LabVIEW base 2/basics 2 : 3 & 4.2.2005 (2 jours/2 days - langue à décider/language to be decided) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework: 1 - 3.2.2005 (3 days - free course) The JAVA Programming Language Level 2: 7 - 9.2.2005 (3 days) C++ Programming Advanced -Traps and Pitfalls: 8 - 11.2.2005 (4 days) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework: 14 - 18.2.2005 (5 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: WEB Applications: 21 & 22.2.2005 (2 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans: 23 - 25.2.2005 (3 days) ELEC-2005 â...

  17. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: ACCESS 2003 - Level 1 - ECDL M5: 24 - 25.10.2005 (2 days) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework : 25 - 27.10.2005 (3 days) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Pivot tables: 26.10.2005 (morning) Introduction to the CERN EDMS: 2.11.2005 (1 day, free of charge) OUTLOOK (Short Course I) - E-mail: 2.11.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge: 2.11.2005 (afternoon) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 :  3 - 4.11.2005 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 : 3, 4, 9, 10.11.2005 (4 jours) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 7 - 11.11.2005 (5 days) The CERN EDMS for Engineers: 8.11.2005 (1 day, free of charge) The EDMS-MTF in practice: 9.11.2005 (morning, free of charge) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators: 15-16.11.2005 (2 days, free of charge) OUTLOOK (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes: ...

  18. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: FileMaker - niveau 1 :  20 - 21.10.2005 (2 jours) ACCESS 2003 - Level 1 - ECDL M5: 24 - 25.10.2005 (2 days) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework : 25 - 27.10.2005 (3 days) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Pivot tables: 26.10.2005 (morning) OUTLOOK (Short Course I) - E-mail: 2.11.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge: 2.11.2005 (afternoon) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 :  3 - 4.11.2005 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 : 3, 4, 9, 10.11.2005 (4 jours) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 7 - 11.11.2005 (5 days) OUTLOOK (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 16.11.2005 (morning) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 21 - 25.11.2005 (5 days) OUTLOOK (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation: 30.11.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents : ...

  19. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 5 - 6.12.2005 (2 jours) Introduction à ANSYS Classique : 6 - 9.12.2005 (4 jours) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Format your worksheet for printing: 7.12.2005 (morning) PCAD Schémas - Introduction : 8 - 9.12.2005 (2 jours) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework: 13 - 15.12.2005 (3 days) ACCESS 2003 - Level 2 - ECDL AM5: 14 - 15.12.2005 (2 days) PCAD PCB - Introduction : 14 - 16.12.2005 (3 jours) AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 : 19, 20, 24 & 25.1.2006 (4 jours) LabVIEW Basics I:  23 - 25.1.2006 (3 days) C++ Programming Advanced - Traps and Pitfalls: 24 - 27.1.2006 (4 days) STEP7 Programming Level 1: 24 - 27.1.2006 (4 days) LabVIEW Basics II:  26 - 27.1.2006 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 2006 : 30 - 31.1.2006 (2 jours; suite du cours AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1) Joint PVS...

  20. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 1 - 2.9.2005 (2 jours) Utilisation des fichiers PDF avec ACROBAT 7.0 : 5.9.2005 (1 jour) LabVIEW Basics 1:  5 â€" 7.9.2005 (3 days) Introduction à Windows XP au CERN : 12.9.2005 (1 demi-journée) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.9.2005 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2005 - niveau 1 : 22, 23, 28, 29.9.2005 (4 jours) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework:  26 - 28.9.2005 (3 days) MAGNE-05 - Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 27 - 29.9.2005 (3 jours) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 3 - 7.10.2005 (5 days) ACCESS 2003 - Level 1 - ECDL M5: 24 - 25.10.2005 (2 days) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Pivot tables: 26.10.2005 (morning) OUTLOOK (Short Course I) - E-mail: 2.11.2005 (morning) OUTLOOK (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 16.11.2005 (morning) OU...

  1. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Introduction to the CERN EDMS: 2.11.2005 (1 day, free of charge) OUTLOOK (Short Course I) - E-mail: 2.11.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge: 2.11.2005 (afternoon) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 :  3 - 4.11.2005 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 : 3, 4, 9, 10.11.2005 (4 jours) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 7 - 11.11.2005 (5 days) The CERN EDMS for Engineers: 8.11.2005 (1 day, free of charge) The EDMS-MTF in practice: 9.11.2005 (morning, free of charge) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators: 15-16.11.2005 (2 days, free of charge) OUTLOOK (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 16.11.2005 (morning) Hands-On Object Oriented Design and Programming with C++ : 16 - 18.11.2005 (3 days) The Java Programming Language Level 1: 21 - 23.11.2005 (3 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Prog...

  2. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: LabVIEW Intermediate I : 8 - 10.11.2004 (3 days) Instructor-led WTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications : 9.11.2004 (morning) Hands-On Object Oriented Design and Programming with C++ : 9 - 11.11.2004 (3 days) Outlook (Short Course III) : Meetings and Delegation : 9.11.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) LabVIEW Intermediate II : 11 & 12.11.2004 (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 11, 12, 18, 19.11.2004 (4 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 15 - 19.11.2004 (6 X 3 hours sessions) Word 2003 - niveau 1 : 22 & 23.11.2004 (2 jours) Introduction à ANSYS : 23 - 26.11.2004 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 - Travailler en salle propre : 23.11.2004 (après-midi, cours gratuit) Project Planning with MS-Project : 25.11 & 2.12.2004 (2 days) PCAD Sch&eac...

  3. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: ELEC-2005 Autumn Term - Electronics applications in HEP experiments: 8.11 - 8.12.2005 (10 x 2h lectures) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators: 15-16.11.2005 (2 days, free of charge) OUTLOOK (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 16.11.2005 (morning) Hands-On Object Oriented Design and Programming with C++ : 16 - 18.11.2005 (3 days) The CERN EDMS for Engineers: 17.11.2005 (1 day, free of charge) The Java Programming Language Level 1: 21 - 23.11.2005 (3 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming: 28 - 30.11.2005 (3 days) OUTLOOK (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation: 30.11.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents : 30.11.2005 (afternoon) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 5 - 6.12.2005 (2 jours) LabVIEW Application Development (Intermediate 1): 5 - 7.12.2005 (3 d...

  4. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: FileMaker - niveau 1 :  20 - 21.10.2005 (2 jours) ACCESS 2003 - Level 1 - ECDL M5: 24 - 25.10.2005 (2 days) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework : 25 - 27.10.2005 (3 days) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Pivot tables: 26.10.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with AutoTasks: 26.10.2005 (afternoon) OUTLOOK (Short Course I) - E-mail: 2.11.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge: 2.11.2005 (afternoon) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 :  3 - 4.11.2005 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 : 3, 4, 9, 10.11.2005 (4 jours) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 7 - 11.11.2005 (5 days) OUTLOOK (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 16.11.2005 (morning) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 21 - 25.11.2005 (5 days) OUTLOOK (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation: 30.11....

  5. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 7 - 11.11.2005 (5 days) ELEC-2005 Autumn Term - Electronics applications in HEP experiments: 8.11 - 8.12.2005 (10 x 2h lectures) The EDMS-MTF in practice: 9.11.2005 (morning, free of charge) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators: 15-16.11.2005 (2 days, free of charge) OUTLOOK (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 16.11.2005 (morning) Hands-On Object Oriented Design and Programming with C++ : 16 - 18.11.2005 (3 days) The CERN EDMS for Engineers: 17.11.2005 (1 day, free of charge) The Java Programming Language Level 1: 21 - 23.11.2005 (3 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming: 28 - 30.11.2005 (3 days) OUTLOOK (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation: 30.11.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents : 30.11.2005 (afternoon) Fron...

  6. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: OUTLOOK (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation: 30.11.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents: 30.11.2005 (afternoon) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 5 - 6.12.2005 (2 jours) Introduction à ANSYS Classique : 6 - 9.12.2005 (4 jours) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Format your worksheet for printing: 7.12.2005 (morning) AutoCAD - mise à jour d’AutoCAD 2002 à AutoCAD 2006 : 8.12.2005 (1 journée - pour les utilisateurs d’AutoCAD 2002) PCAD Schémas - Introduction : 8 - 9.12.2005 (2 jours) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework: 13 - 15.12.2005 (3 days) PCAD PCB - Introduction : 14 - 16.12.2005 (3 jours) ACCESS 2003 - Level 2 - ECDL AM5: 14 - 15.12.2005 (2 days) AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 : 19, 20, 24 & 25.1.2006 (4 jours) LabVIEW Basics I:  23 - 25.1.2006...

  7. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework:  26 - 28.9.2005 (3 days) WORD 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo... Work with master document: 28.9.2005 (morning) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 3 - 7.10.2005 (5 days) Introduction à Dreamweaver MX :  3 - 4.10.2005 (2 jours) Utilisation des fichiers PDF avec Acrobat 7.0 :   4.10.2005 (1 journée) LaTeX par la pratique :   4 - 6.10.2005 (3 matinées) PowerPoint 2003 (F) :  7.10.2005 (1 journée) FileMaker - niveau 1 :  20 - 21.10.2005 (2 jours) ACCESS 2003 - Level 1 - ECDL M5: 24 - 25.10.2005 (2 days) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Pivot tables: 26.10.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with AutoTasks: 26.10.2005 (afternoon) OUTLOOK (Short Course I) - E-mail: 2.11.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge: 2.11....

  8. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Utilisation des fichiers PDF avec ACROBAT 7.0 : 5.9.2005 (1 jour) LabVIEW Basics 1:  5 - 7.9.2005 (3 days) Introduction à Windows XP au CERN : 12.9.2005 (1 demi-journée) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.9.2005 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2005 - niveau 1 : 22, 23, 28, 29.9.2005 (4 jours) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework:  26 - 28.9.2005 (3 days) MAGNE-05 - Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 27 - 29.9.2005 (3 jours) WORD 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo... Work with master document: 28.9.2005 (morning) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 3 - 7.10.2005 (5 days) ACCESS 2003 - Level 1 - ECDL M5: 24 - 25.10.2005 (2 days) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Pivot tables: 26.10.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with AutoTasks: 26.10.2005 (afternoon) OUTLOOK (Short Course I) - E-mail: 2...

  9. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Introduction à Windows XP au CERN : 12.9.2005 (1 demi-journée) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.9.2005 (2 jours) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework:  26 - 28.9.2005 (3 days) MAGNE-05 - Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 27 - 29.9.2005 (3 jours) WORD 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo... Work with master document: 28.9.2005 (morning) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 3 - 7.10.2005 (5 days) Introduction à Dreamweaver MX :  3 - 4.10.2005 (2 jours) Utilisation des fichiers PDF avec Acrobat 7.0 :   4.10.2005 (1 journée) LaTeX par la pratique :   4 - 6.10.2005 (3 matinées) PowerPoint 2003 (F) :  7.10.2005 (1 journée) ACCESS 2003 - Level 1 - ECDL M5: 24 - 25.10.2005 (2 days) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Pivot tables: 26.10.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with Auto...

  10. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: The Java Programming Language Level 1: 21 - 23.11.2005 (3 days) OUTLOOK (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation: 30.11.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents : 30.11.2005 (afternoon) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 5 - 6.12.2005 (2 jours) Introduction à ANSYS Classique : 6 - 9.12.2005 (4 jours) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Format your worksheet for printing: 7.12.2005 (morning) PCAD Schémas - Introduction : 8 - 9.12.2005 (2 jours) ACCESS 2003 - Level 2 - ECDL AM5: 14 - 15.12.2005 (2 days) LabVIEW Basics I:  23 - 25.1.2006 (3 days) C++ Programming Advanced - Traps and Pitfalls: 24 - 27.1.2006 (4 days) LabVIEW Basics II:  26 - 27.1.2006 (2 days) Joint PVSS-JCOP Framework: 30.1 - 3.2.2006 (5 days, free of charge) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework : ...

  11. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: ELEC-2005 - Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics: 1 - 17.3.2005 (6 x 2.5-hour lectures) C++ for Particle Physicists: 7 - 11.3.2005 (6 x 3-hour lectures) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 14 - 18.3.2005 (5 days) Oracle 9i: SQL: 14 -16.3.2005 (3 days) AXEL-2005; Introduction to Particle Accelerators : 14- 18.3.2005 (10 x 1 h lectures) ACCESS 2003 - Level 1: ECDL M5: 15 - 16.3.2005 (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 15, 16, 21& 22.3.2005 (4 jours) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 21 & 22.3.2005 (2 jours) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++ : 22 - 24.3.2005 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 2 : 4 & 5.4.2005 (2 jours) Oracle 9i: Programming with PL/SQL: 4 - 6.4.2005 (3 days) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 2 : 11 & 12.4.2005 (2 jours) LabVIEW Intermedia...

  12. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: LabVIEW base 2/basics 2 : 3 & 4.2.2005 (2 jours/2 days - langue à décider/language to be decided) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework: 1 - 3.2.2005 (3 days - free course) The JAVA Programming Language Level 2: 7 - 9.2.2005 (3 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: WEB Applications: 21 & 22.2.2005 (2 days) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 21 & 22.2.2005 (2 jours) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans: 23 - 25.2.2005 (3 days) ELEC-2005 - Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics: 1 - 17.3.2005 (6 X 2.30-hours lectures) C++ for Particle Physicists: 7 - 11.3.2005 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 14 - 18.3.2005 (5 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 15, 16, 21& 22.3.2005 (4 jours) FrontPage 20...

  13. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: WEB Applications: 21 & 22.2.2005 (2 days) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 21 & 22.2.2005 (2 jours) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans: 23 - 25.2.2005 (3 days) Utilisation des fichiers PDF avec ACROBAT 6.0 : 1.3.2005 (1 journée) ELEC-2005 - Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics: 1 - 17.3.2005 (6 X 2.30-hours lectures) C++ for Particle Physicists: 7 - 11.3.2005 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 14 - 18.3.2005 (5 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 15, 16, 21& 22.3.2005 (4 jours) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 21 & 22.3.2005 (2 jours) FileMaker - niveau 2 : 4 & 5.4.2005 (2 jours) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 2 : 11 & 12.4.2005 (2 jours) LabVIEW intermediate 1: 11 - 13....

  14. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: WEB Applications: 21 & 22.2.2005 (2 days) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 21 & 22.2.2005 (2 jours) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans: 23 - 25.2.2005 (3 days) Utilisation des fichiers PDF avec ACROBAT 6.0 : 1.3.2005 (1 journée) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++ : 1 - 3.3.2005 (3 days) ELEC-2005 - Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics: 1 - 17.3.2005 (6 x 2.5-hour lectures) C++ for Particle Physicists: 7 - 11.3.2005 (6 x 3-hour lectures) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 14 - 18.3.2005 (5 days) ACCESS 2003 - Level 1 : 15 - 16.3.2005 (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 15, 16, 21& 22.3.2005 (4 jours) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 21 & 22.3.2005 (2 jours) FileMaker - ...

  15. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Utilisation des fichiers PDF avec ACROBAT 6.0 : 1.3.2005 (1 journée) ELEC-2005 - Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics: 1 - 17.3.2005 (6 x 2.5-hour lectures) C++ for Particle Physicists: 7 - 11.3.2005 (6 x 3-hour lectures) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 14 - 18.3.2005 (5 days) AXEL-2005; Introduction to Particle Accelerators : 14- 18.3.2005 (10 x 1 h lectures) ACCESS 2003 - Level 1: ECDL M5: 15 - 16.3.2005 (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 15, 16, 21& 22.3.2005 (4 jours) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 21 & 22.3.2005 (2 jours) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++ : 22 - 24.3.2005 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 2 : 4 & 5.4.2005 (2 jours) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 2 : 11 & 12.4.2005 (2 jours) LabVIEW Intermediate 1: 11 - 13.4.2005...

  16. TECHNICAL TRAINING: PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: LabVIEW Basics 1 : 22 - 24.3.2004 (3 days) Oracle 9i : New Features for Developers : 22 - 24.3.2004 (3 days) Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 1.4.2004 (morning) FrontPage XP - niveau 1 : 5 & 6.4.2004 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 19, 20.4 et 3, 4.5.2004 (4 jours) Oracle 8i/9i - Develop Web-based Applications with PL/SQL : 19 & 20.4.2004 (2 days) Introduction to ANSYS : 20 - 23.4.2004 (4 days) LabVIEW hands-on (E) : 20.4.2004 (afternoon, free of charge) FrontPage XP - niveau 2 : 26 & 27.4.2004 (2 jours) LabVIEW Base 2 : 6 & 7.5.2004 (2 jours) Word XP - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.5.2004 (2 jours) Word XP - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.5.2004 (2 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, pleas...

  17. Technical training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: LabVIEW Intermediate I : 8 - 10.11.2004 (3 days) Instructor-led WTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications : 9.11.2004 (morning) Outlook (Short Course III) : Meetings and Delegation : 9.11.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) LabVIEW Intermediate II : 11 & 12.11.2004 (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 11, 12, 18, 19.11.2004 (4 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 15 - 19.11.2004 (6 X 3 hours sessions) Word 2003 - niveau 1 : 22 & 23.11.2004 (2 jours) Introduction à ANSYS : 23 - 26.11.2004 (4 jours) Project Planning with MS-Project : 25.11 & 2.12.2004 (2 days) Introduction to PERL 5 : 8 & 9.12.2004 (2 days) Advanced aspects of PERL 5 : 10.12.2004 (1 day) The JAVA Programming Language Level 1 : 11 & 12.1.2005 (2 days) Introduction...

  18. Aligned natural inflation with modulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiwoon Choi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The weak gravity conjecture applied for the aligned natural inflation indicates that generically there can be a modulation of the inflaton potential, with a period determined by sub-Planckian axion scale. We study the oscillations in the primordial power spectrum induced by such modulation, and discuss the resulting observational constraints on the model.

  19. SILICA SURFACED CARBON FIBERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    carbon fibers . Several economical and simple processes were developed for obtaining research quantities of silica surfaced carbon filaments. Vat dipping processes were utilized to deposit an oxide such as silica onto the surface and into the micropores of available carbon or graphite base fibers. High performance composite materials were prepared with the surface treated carbon fibers and various resin matrices. The ablative characteristics of these composites were very promising and exhibited fewer limitations than either silica or...treated

  20. Signed Young Modules and Simple Specht Modules

    OpenAIRE

    Danz, Susanne; Lim, Kay Jin

    2015-01-01

    By a result of Hemmer, every simple Specht module of a finite symmetric group over a field of odd characteristic is a signed Young module. While Specht modules are parametrized by partitions, indecomposable signed Young modules are parametrized by certain pairs of partitions. The main result of this article establishes the signed Young module labels of simple Specht modules. Along the way we prove a number of results concerning indecomposable signed Young modules that are of independent inter...

  1. LHC Report: astounding availability

    CERN Multimedia

    Andrea Apollonio for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    The LHC is off to an excellent start in 2016, having already produced triple the luminosity of 2015. An important factor in the impressive performance so far this year is the unprecedented machine availability.   LHC integrated luminosity in 2011, 2012, 2015 and 2016 and the prediction of the 2016 performance foreseen at the start of the year. Following the 2015-2016 end of year shutdown, the LHC restarted beam operation in March 2016. Between the restart and the first technical stop (TS1) in June, the LHC's beam intensity was successively increased, achieving operation with 2040 bunches per beam. The technical stop on 7-8 June was shortened to maximise the time available for luminosity production for the LHC experiments before the summer conferences. Following the technical stop, operation resumed and quickly returned to the performance levels previously achieved. Since then, the LHC has been running steadily with up to 2076 bunches per beam. Since the technical stop, a...

  2. Personal development and communication courses – Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    There are places available in some personal development and communication courses taking place between February and June 2014.   For more information on the course, click on the course title to access the training catalogue. You can then sign-up online. For advice, you can contact: Erwin Mosselmans, tel. 74125, erwin.mosselmans@cern.ch Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144, nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tel.70896, Kerstin.fuhrmeister@cern.ch Personal Development & Communication Training Session dates Duration Language Availability Communicating Effectively 18 – 19 March & 15 – 16 April 2 English 2 Gestion de temps Module 1 – 10 February 2014 (am) Module 2 – 21 March 2014  (am) Module 3 – 5 May 2014 (am) 1.5 French 12 Managing time Module 1 – 10 February 2014 (pm) Module 2 – 21 March 2014  (pm) Module 3 – 5 May 2014 (pm) 1.5 ...

  3. Personal development and communication courses – Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    There are places available in some personal development and communication courses taking place between February and June 2014.   For more information on the course, click on the course title to access the training catalogue. You can then sign-up online. For advice, you can contact: Erwin Mosselmans, tel. 74125, erwin.mosselmans@cern.ch Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144, nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tel.70896, Kerstin.fuhrmeister@cern.ch Personal Development & Communication Training Session dates Duration Language Availability Communicating Effectively 18 – 19 March & 15 – 16 April 2 English 2 Gestion de temps Module 1 – 10 February 2014 (am) Module 2 – 21 March 2014  (am) Module 3 – 5 May 2014 (am) 1.5 French 12 Managing time Module 1 – 10 February 2014 (pm) Module 2 – 21 March 2014  (pm) Module 3 – 5 May 2014 (pm) 1.5...

  4. Carboxylated Capped Carbon Nanotubes Interacting with Nimesulide Molecules: Applied Electric Fields Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Machado de Menezes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions of carboxylated capped carbon nanotubes with nimesulide molecules under electric fields were investigated by ab initio simulations. Repulsive forces between the nimesulide molecules and the carboxyl group of the carbon nanotubes, except for the nimesulide radical configuration, were observed. To keep the original molecule in the pristine form, electric fields with different intensities were applied, where changes in the behavior of the interactions between the molecules were noticed. It was shown that the intensity of the interaction between the nimesulide and the hydrophilic carboxylated capped carbon nanotube can be modulated by the action of the external electric fields making promising systems for drug delivery applications.

  5. Memory Modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Our memories are not all created equally strong: Some experiences are well remembered while others are remembered poorly, if at all. Research on memory modulation investigates the neurobiological processes and systems that contribute to such differences in the strength of our memories. Extensive evi

  6. Glass Difractive Optical Elements (DOEs with complex modulation DLC thin film coated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Sparvoli

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We developed a complex (amplitude and phase modulation Diffractive Optical Element (DOE with four phase levels, which is based in a glass substrate coated with DLC (Diamond Like Carbon thin film as the amplitude modulator. The DLC film was deposited by magnetron reactive sputtering with a graphite target and methane gas in an optical glass surface. The glass and DLC film roughness were measured using non destructive methods, such as a high step meter, Atomic Force Microscopy and Diffuse Reflectance. Other properties, such as refractive index of both materials were measured. The DOEs were tested using 632.8 nm HeNe laser.

  7. Pain and modulation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaffarpoor M

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Pain is one of the most important and sometimes difficult problems, that patients and physicians are encountered. It may be clinically acute or chronic, acute pain has usually definite cause and favourable response to treatment. On the other hand there are difficulties in diagnosis and management of chronic pain. Peripheral and cranial nerves convey pain impulses toward central nervous system, and modulations take place at several levels. Diagnosis of different pains, including nociceptive, nerve trunk pain and deafferentation types is essential to acceptable management. In this article we review pain pathway, neurotransmitters and modulation.

  8. Availability by Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigo, Roberto

    -scale network of sensors that interact with the physical environment. CPSs are increasingly exploited in the realisation of critical infrastructure, from the power grid to healthcare, traffic control, and defence applications. Such systems are particularly prone to DoS attacks: in addition to classic......In computer security, a Denial-of-Service (DoS) attack aims at making a resource unavailable. DoS attacks to systems of public concern occur increasingly and have become infamous on the Internet, where they have targeted major corporations and institutions, thus reaching the general public....... There exist various practical techniques to face DoS attacks and mitigate their effects, yet we witness the successfulness of many. The need for a renewed investigation of availability gains in relevance when considering that our life is more and more dominated by Cyber-Physical Systems (CPSs), large...

  9. Available transmission capacity assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škokljev Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective power system operation requires the analysis of vast amounts of information. Power market activities expose power transmission networks to high-level power transactions that threaten normal, secure operation of the power system. When there are service requests for a specific sink/source pair in a transmission system, the transmission system operator (TSO must allocate the available transfer capacity (ATC. It is common that ATC has a single numerical value. Additionally, the ATC must be calculated for the base case configuration of the system, while generation dispatch and topology remain unchanged during the calculation. Posting ATC on the internet should benefit prospective users by aiding them in formulating their requests. However, a single numerical value of ATC offers little for prospect for analysis, planning, what-if combinations, etc. A symbolic approach to the power flow problem (DC power flow and ATC offers a numerical computation at the very end, whilst the calculation beforehand is performed by using symbols for the general topology of the electrical network. Qualitative analysis of the ATC using only qualitative values, such as increase, decrease or no change, offers some new insights into ATC evaluation, multiple transactions evaluation, value of counter-flows and their impact etc. Symbolic analysis in this paper is performed after the execution of the linear, symbolic DC power flow. As control variables, the mathematical model comprises linear security constraints, ATC, PTDFs and transactions. The aim is to perform an ATC sensitivity study on a five nodes/seven lines transmission network, used for zonal market activities tests. A relatively complicated environment with twenty possible bilateral transactions is observed.

  10. Carbon monoxide binding to the heme group at the dimeric interface modulates structure and copper accessibility in the Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase from Haemophilus ducreyi: in silico and in vitro evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillemi, Giovanni; De Santis, Serena; Falconi, Mattia; Mancini, Giordano; Migliorati, Valentina; Battistoni, Andrea; Pacello, Francesca; Desideri, Alessandro; D'Angelo, Paola

    2012-01-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been jointly applied to the study of the Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase from Haemophilus ducreyi (HdSOD) in interaction with the carbon monoxide molecule. The configurational flexibility of the Fe(II)-heme group, intercalated between the two subunits, has been sampled by MD simulations and included in the XANES data analysis without optimization in the structural parameter space. Our results provide an interpretation of the observed discrepancy in the Fe-heme distances as detected by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and the classical XANES analysis, in which the structural parameters are optimized in a unique structure. Moreover, binding of the CO molecule to the heme induces a long range effect on the Cu,Zn active site, as evidenced by both MD simulations and in vitro experiments. MD simulation of the CO bound system, in fact, highlighted a structural rearrangement of the protein-protein hydrogen bond network in the region of the Cu,Zn active site, correlated with an increase in water accessibility at short distance from the copper atom. In line, in vitro experiments evidenced an increase of copper accessibility to a chelating agent when the CO molecule binds to the heme group, as compared to a heme deprived HdSOD. Altogether, our results support the hypothesis that the HdSOD is a heme-sensor protein, in which binding to small gaseous molecules modulates the enzyme superoxide activity as an adaptive response to the bacterial environment.

  11. Carbon-Based Regenerable Sorbents for the Combined Carbon Dioxide and Ammonia Removal for the Primary Life Support System (PLSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Serio, Michael A.; Manthina, Venkata; Singh, Prabhakar; Chullen, Cinda

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of reversible sorbents for the combined carbon dioxide and trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). Since ammonia is the most important TC to be captured, data on TC sorption presented in this paper are limited to ammonia, with results relevant to other TCs to be reported at a later time. The currently available life support systems use separate units for carbon dioxide, trace contaminants, and moisture control, and the long-term objective is to replace the above three modules with a single one. Furthermore, the current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is non-regenerable, and the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using carbon sorbents for the reversible, concurrent sorption of carbon dioxide and ammonia. Several carbon sorbents were fabricated and tested, and multiple adsorption/vacuum-regeneration cycles were demonstrated at room temperature, and also a carbon surface conditioning technique that enhances the combined carbon dioxide and ammonia sorption without impairing sorbent regeneration.

  12. TICKETS ARE NOW AVAILABLE!

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Replay of the Rudra-Béjart Ballet for the CERN Staff on Tuesday 5 December 2000 at 8.00 pm sharp at the Geneva ARENA This private performance will be given for you. It will last longer than the original performance at CERN: 1 hour 20 instead of 35 minutes. I encourage you all to attend this performance-bring in great numbers yourselves, members of your family, and your friends. 2,020 places are available, for which tickets will be obtained from Monday 27 November at the Staff Association Secretariat, whom I sincerely thank for having kindly accepted to distribute the tickets. To regulate the distribution, a contribution of 5 francs will be asked for each ticket: this sum is symbolic, as I intend this ballet-representation foremost as a recognition by CERN of its gratitude to you. Luciano Maiani Director-General               Dancing,      &n...

  13. Technical training - Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch Valeria Perez Reale, Learning Specialist, Technical Programme Coordinator (Tel.: 62424) Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel.: 74924) HR Department Electronic Design Next Session Duration Language Availability Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design 08-Oct-12 to 12-Oct-12 5 days English 4 places Electrostatique / Protection ESD 28-Sep-12 to 28-Sep-12 3 hours French 25 places Impacts de la suppression du plomb (RoHS) en électronique 26-Oct-12 to 26-Oct-12 8 hours French 14 places Introduction to VHDL 10-Oct-12 to 11-Oct-12 2 days English 9 places LabVIEW Real Time and FPGA 13-Nov-12 to 16-Nov-12 5 days French 5 places LabVIEW for Experts 24-Sep-12 to 28-Sep-12 5 days English 6 places LabVIEW for beginners 15-Oct-12 to 17-...

  14. Technical Training - Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium :  6 - 10.10.2003  (7 demi-journées, cours en français avec support en anglais)  The Java Programming Language Level 1:  6 - 7.10.2003  (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans: 8 - 10.10.2003  (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 :  20 & 22.10.03  (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 :  20, 21, 27, 28.10.03  (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom: 23.10.03  (half day, free of charge) Plannification de projet avec MS-Project/ Project Scheduling with MS-Project : 2 sessions:  23.10 & 4.11.03  (2 jours/2 days and 18 &25.11.03 langue à définir/language to be defined) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  3, 4, 12, 13.11.03  (4 days) Introduction to Pspice:  4.11.03p.m.  (half-day) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  10 & 11.11.03  (2 jours) ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 :  13 & 14.11.03  (2 jours) A...

  15. On Functional Module Detection in Metabolic Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Koch

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Functional modules of metabolic networks are essential for understanding the metabolism of an organism as a whole. With the vast amount of experimental data and the construction of complex and large-scale, often genome-wide, models, the computer-aided identification of functional modules becomes more and more important. Since steady states play a key role in biology, many methods have been developed in that context, for example, elementary flux modes, extreme pathways, transition invariants and place invariants. Metabolic networks can be studied also from the point of view of graph theory, and algorithms for graph decomposition have been applied for the identification of functional modules. A prominent and currently intensively discussed field of methods in graph theory addresses the Q-modularity. In this paper, we recall known concepts of module detection based on the steady-state assumption, focusing on transition-invariants (elementary modes and their computation as minimal solutions of systems of Diophantine equations. We present the Fourier-Motzkin algorithm in detail. Afterwards, we introduce the Q-modularity as an example for a useful non-steady-state method and its application to metabolic networks. To illustrate and discuss the concepts of invariants and Q-modularity, we apply a part of the central carbon metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum as running example. The intention of the paper is to give a compact presentation of known steady-state concepts from a graph-theoretical viewpoint in the context of network decomposition and reduction and to introduce the application of Q-modularity to metabolic Petri net models.

  16. Nano-Carbons as Theranostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Liu, Xing-Jie Liang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano-carbons, including fullerenes, carbon nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and nano-diamonds, are an important class of nanostructures attracting tremendous interests in the past two decades. In this special issue, seven review articles and research reports are collected, to summarize and present the latest progress in the exploration of various nano-carbons for theranostic applications.

  17. Module Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    MODULES IN LIFE TEST CHAMBER (LEFT SIDE) 68 MODULE TRANSMIT TEMP CA1 54.8°C CB1 65.3°C CC1 70.5°C CD1 75.2°C CE1 68.5°C CA2 72.1°C CB2 ...NO. PA (Contractor) PA (MELTS) DRV (Contractor) DRV (MELTS) CA1 058 +11.0 VOLTS +10.3 VOLTS + 7.5 VOLTS + 3.64 VOLTS CB1 085 +11.0 VOLTS +10.13...CE1 032 +11.0 VOLTS + 7.02 VOLTS + 7.5 VOLTS + 4.23 VOLTS CA2 065 +11.0 VOLTS +11.03 VOLTS + 7.5 VOLTS + 7.53 VOLTS CB2 057 +11.0 VOLTS + 9.49

  18. Module descriptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincenti, Gordon; Klausen, Bodil; Kjær Jensen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    The Module Descriptor including a Teacher’s Guide explains and describes how to work innovatively and co-creatively with wicked problems and young people. The descriptor shows how interested educators and lecturers in Europe can copy the lessons of the Erasmus+ project HIP when teaching their own...... students how to include marginalized young people and practitioners in the education of future social workers and social educators....

  19. Disassembling iron availability to phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeala eShaked

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO2 drawdown in vast ocean regions. Yet a clear-cut definition of bioavailability remains elusive, with elements of iron speciation and kinetics, phytoplankton physiology, light, temperature and microbial interactions, to name a few, all intricately intertwined into this concept. Here, in a synthesis of published and new data, we attempt to disassemble the complex concept of iron bioavailability to phytoplankton by individually exploring some of its facets. We distinguish between the fundamentals of bioavailability - the acquisition of Fe-substrate by phytoplankton - and added levels of complexity involving interactions among organisms, iron and ecosystem processes. We first examine how phytoplankton acquire free and organically-bound iron, drawing attention to the pervasiveness of the reductive uptake pathway in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Turning to acquisition rates, we propose to view the availability of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton as spectrum rather than an absolute all or nothing. We then demonstrate the use of uptake rate constants to make comparisons across different studies, organisms, Fe compounds and environments, and for gauging the contribution of various Fe substrates to phytoplankton growth in situ. Last, we describe the influence of aquatic microorganisms on iron chemistry and fate by way of organic complexation and bio-mediated redox transformations and examine the bioavailability of these bio-modified Fe species.

  20. Photovoltaic concentrator module improvements study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, S.L.; Kerschen, K.A. (Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States)); Hutchison, G. (Solar Kinetics, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Nowlan, M.J. (Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States))

    1991-08-01

    This report presents results of a project to design and fabricate an improved photovoltaic concentrator module. Using previous work as a baseline, this study conducted analyses and testing to select major module components and design features. The lens parquet and concentrator solar cell were selected from the highest performing, available components. A single 185X point-focus module was fabricated by the project team and tested at Sandia. Major module characteristics include a 6 by 4 compression-molded acrylic lens parquet (0.737 m{sup 2} area), twenty-four 0.2 ohms-cm, FZ, p-Si solar cells (1.56 cm{sup 2} area) soldered to ceramic substrates and copper heat spreaders, and an aluminized steel housing with corrugated bottom. This project marked the first attempt to use prismatic covers on solar cells in a high-concentration, point-focus application. Cells with 15 percent metallization were obtained, but problems with the fabrication and placement of prismatic covers on these cells lead to the decision not to use covers in the prototype module. Cell assembly fabrication, module fabrication, and module optical design activities are presented here. Test results are also presented for bare cells, cell assemblies, and module. At operating conditions of 981 watts/m{sup 2} DNI and an estimated cell temperature of 65{degrees}C, the module demonstrated an efficiency of 13.9 percent prior to stressed environmental exposure. 12 refs., 56 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Photovoltaic module and module arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Lenox, Carl J. S.; Culligan, Matthew; Danning, Matt

    2012-07-17

    A photovoltaic (PV) module including a PV device and a frame. The PV device has a PV laminate defining a perimeter and a major plane. The frame is assembled to and encases the laminate perimeter, and includes leading, trailing, and side frame members, and an arm that forms a support face opposite the laminate. The support face is adapted for placement against a horizontal installation surface, to support and orient the laminate in a non-parallel or tilted arrangement. Upon final assembly, the laminate and the frame combine to define a unitary structure. The frame can orient the laminate at an angle in the range of 3.degree.-7.degree. from horizontal, and can be entirely formed of a polymeric material. Optionally, the arm incorporates integral feature(s) that facilitate interconnection with corresponding features of a second, identically formed PV module.

  2. Disassembling iron availability to phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaked, Yeala; Lis, Hagar

    2012-01-01

    The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis, and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO(2) drawdown in vast ocean regions. Yet a clear-cut definition of bioavailability remains elusive, with elements of iron speciation and kinetics, phytoplankton physiology, light, temperature, and microbial interactions, to name a few, all intricately intertwined into this concept. Here, in a synthesis of published and new data, we attempt to disassemble the complex concept of iron bioavailability to phytoplankton by individually exploring some of its facets. We distinguish between the fundamentals of bioavailability - the acquisition of Fe-substrate by phytoplankton - and added levels of complexity involving interactions among organisms, iron, and ecosystem processes. We first examine how phytoplankton acquire free and organically bound iron, drawing attention to the pervasiveness of the reductive uptake pathway in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic autotrophs. Turning to acquisition rates, we propose to view the availability of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton as a spectrum rather than an absolute "all or nothing." We then demonstrate the use of uptake rate constants to make comparisons across different studies, organisms, Fe-compounds, and environments, and for gaging the contribution of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton growth in situ. Last, we describe the influence of aquatic microorganisms on iron chemistry and fate by way of organic complexation and bio-mediated redox transformations and examine the bioavailability of these bio-modified Fe species.

  3. of Banach modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anousheh Fatemeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Let A be a Banach algebra, E be a Banach A-bimodule and Δ E → A be a bounded Banach A-bimodule homomorphism. It is shown that under some mild conditions, the weakΔ''-amenability of E'' (as an A''-bimodule necessitates weak Δ-amenability of E (as an A-bimodule. Some examples of weak-amenable Banach modules are provided as well.

  4. Q-Switched Operation with Carbon-Based Saturable Absorbers in a Nd:YLF Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Weigand

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have numerically studied the influence of the absorption modulation depth of carbon-based saturable absorbers (graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs on the Q-switched regime of a diode-pumped Nd:YLF laser. A short-length cavity was used with an end mirror on which CNTs or mono- or bi-layer graphene were deposited, forming a saturable absorber mirror (SAM. Using a standard model, the generated energy per pulse was calculated, as well as the pulse duration and repetition rate. The results show that absorbers with higher modulation depths, i.e., graphene, deliver higher energy pulses at lower repetition rates. However, the pulse duration did not have a monotonic behavior and reaches a minimum for a given low value of the modulation depth typical of CNTs.

  5. Modulating the spin transport behaviors in ZBNCNRs by edge hydrogenation and position of BN chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ouyang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green’s function method, we study the spin transport behaviors in zigzag boron-nitrogen-carbon nanoribbons (ZBNCNRs by modulating the edge hydrogenation and the position of B-N nanoribbons (BNNRs chain. The different edge hydrogenations of the ZBNCNRs and the different position relationships of the BNNRs have been considered systematically. Our results show that the metallic, semimetallic and semiconductive properties of the ZBNCNRs can be modulated by the different edge hydrogenations and different position relationships of BN chains. And our proposaled ZBNCNRs devices act as perfect spin-filters with nearly 100% spin polarization. These effects would have potential applications for boron-nitrogen-carbon-based nanomaterials in spintronics nano-devices.

  6. Genetic and computational identification of a conserved bacterial metabolic module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara C Boutte

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We have experimentally and computationally defined a set of genes that form a conserved metabolic module in the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus and used this module to illustrate a schema for the propagation of pathway-level annotation across bacterial genera. Applying comprehensive forward and reverse genetic methods and genome-wide transcriptional analysis, we (1 confirmed the presence of genes involved in catabolism of the abundant environmental sugar myo-inositol, (2 defined an operon encoding an ABC-family myo-inositol transmembrane transporter, and (3 identified a novel myo-inositol regulator protein and cis-acting regulatory motif that control expression of genes in this metabolic module. Despite being encoded from non-contiguous loci on the C. crescentus chromosome, these myo-inositol catabolic enzymes and transporter proteins form a tightly linked functional group in a computationally inferred network of protein associations. Primary sequence comparison was not sufficient to confidently extend annotation of all components of this novel metabolic module to related bacterial genera. Consequently, we implemented the Graemlin multiple-network alignment algorithm to generate cross-species predictions of genes involved in myo-inositol transport and catabolism in other alpha-proteobacteria. Although the chromosomal organization of genes in this functional module varied between species, the upstream regions of genes in this aligned network were enriched for the same palindromic cis-regulatory motif identified experimentally in C. crescentus. Transposon disruption of the operon encoding the computationally predicted ABC myo-inositol transporter of Sinorhizobium meliloti abolished growth on myo-inositol as the sole carbon source, confirming our cross-genera functional prediction. Thus, we have defined regulatory, transport, and catabolic genes and a cis-acting regulatory sequence that form a conserved module required for myo

  7. The influence of rising CO2 availability on softwater vegetation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierenburg, P.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Many softwater lakes are found in boreal and temporal regions, and at higher altitudes in the (sub) tropics. These lakes contain oligotrophic water with low alkalinity and carbon availability. Therefore, the production of submerged macrophytes is thought to be often carbon limited. The mac

  8. ABOUT SOLIDWORKS COSTING MODULE FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin IANCU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paperwork is presented the SolidWorks analysis of costing, using Simulation Costing module. There are presented the settings that have to be done for such analysis and the results shown by this software module. The elements that are taken into account are specific to costing templates in SolidWorks, but can be adjusted for the specific costs of a given factory.

  9. Biological modulation of tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep, N. H.; Bird, D. K.

    2008-12-01

    Photosynthesis has had geologic consequences over the Earth's history. In addition to modifying Earth's atmosphere and ocean chemistry, it has also modulated tectonic processes through enhanced weathering and modification of the nature and composition of sedimentary rocks within fold mountain belts and convergent margins. Molecular biological studies indicate that bacterial photosynthesis evolved just once and that most bacterial clades descend from this photosynthetic common ancestor. Iron-based photosynthesis (ideally 4FeO + CO2 + H2O = 2Fe2O3 + CH2O) was the most bountiful anoxygenic niche on land. The back reaction provided energy to heterotrophic microbes and returned FeO to the photosynthetic microbes. Bacterial land colonists evolved into ecosystems that effectively weathered FeO-bearing minerals and volcanic glass. Clays, sands, and dissolved cations from the weathering process entered the ocean and formed our familiar classes sedimentary rocks: shales, sandstones, and carbonates. Marine photosynthesis caused organic carbon to accumulate in black shales. In contrast, non-photosynthetic ecosystems do not cause organic carbon to accumulate in shale. These evolutionary events occurred before 3.8 Ga as black shales are among the oldest rock types (Rosing and Frei, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 217, 237-244, 2004). Thick sedimentary sequences deformed into fold mountain belts. They remelted at depth to form granitic rocks (Rosing et al., Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol. 232, 99-11, 2006). Regions of outcropping low-FeO rocks including granites, quartzites, and some shales were a direct result. This dearth of FeO favored the evolution of oxic photosynthesis of cyanobacteria from photosynthetic soil bacteria. Black shales have an additional modulation effect on tectonics as they concentrate radioactive elements, particularly uranium (e.g. so that the surface heat flow varies by a factor of ca. 2). Thick sequences of black shales at continental rises of passive margins are

  10. Silicon optical modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham T. Reed

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the earliest research on optical circuits, dating back to the 1970s, there have been visions of an optical superchip (see for example1,2, containing a variety of integrated optical components to carry out light generation, modulation, manipulation, detection, and amplification (Fig. 1. The early work was associated with ferroelectric materials such as lithium niobate (LiNbO3, and III-V semiconductors such as gallium arsenide (GaAs and indium phosphide (InP based systems. LiNbO3 was interesting almost solely because of the fact that it possesses a large electro-optic coefficient3, enabling optical modulation via the Pockels effect. Alternatively, the III-V compounds were interesting because of the relative ease of laser fabrication and the prospect of optical and electronic integration.

  11. Silicon Optical Modulator Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon Thor LIM

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We developed a way of predicting and analyzing high speed optical modulator. Our research adopted a bottom-up approach to consider high-speed optical links using an eye diagram. Our method leverages on modular mapping of electrical characteristics to optical characteristics, while attaining the required accuracy necessary for device footprint approaching sub-micron scales where electrical data distribution varies drastically. We calculate for the bias dependent phase shift (2pi/mm and loss (dB/mm for the optical modulator based on the real and imaginary part of complex effective indices. Subsequently, combine effectively both the electrical and optical profiles to construct the optical eye diagram which is the essential gist of signal integrity of such devices.

  12. NEUROBIOLOGICAL MODULATORS OF ANXIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohale Deepak S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety can be a core symptom of various mental/ behavioral disorders such as major depressive disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, panic disorder, adaptive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, social withdrawal disorder, and various phobias. The neuroanatomic circuits that support fear and anxiety behavior are modulated by a variety of neurochemicals, these include the peptidergic neurotransmitters, Corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF, neuropeptide Y (NPY, and substance P, the monoaminergic transmitters, Norepinephrine (NE, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT, and dopamine (DA, and the amino acid transmitters, Gamma Aminobuteric Acid (GABA and glutamate and many more. These neurochemical systems subserve important adaptive functions in preparing the organism for responding to threat or stress, by increasing vigilance, modulating memory, mobilizing energy stores, and elevating cardiovascular function. Nevertheless, these biological responses to threat and stress can become maladaptive if they are chronically or inappropriately activated.

  13. Torsion Part of ℤ-module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futa Yuichi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we formalize in Mizar [7] the definition of “torsion part” of ℤ-module and its properties. We show ℤ-module generated by the field of rational numbers as an example of torsion-free non free ℤ-modules. We also formalize the rank-nullity theorem over finite-rank free ℤ-modules (previously formalized in [1]. ℤ-module is necessary for lattice problems, LLL (Lenstra, Lenstra and Lovász base reduction algorithm [23] and cryptographic systems with lattices [24].

  14. Carbon Dioxide Fountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seong-Joo; Ryu, Eun-Hee

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the development of a carbon dioxide fountain. The advantages of the carbon dioxide fountain are that it is odorless and uses consumer chemicals. This experiment also is a nice visual experiment that allows students to see evidence of a gaseous reagent being consumed when a pressure sensor is available. (Contains 3 figures.)…

  15. ATLAS SCT - Progress on the Silicon Modules

    CERN Multimedia

    Tyndel, M.

    The ATLAS SCT consists of 4088 silicon modules. Each module is made up of 4 silicon sensors with 1536 readout strips. Individual strips are connected to FE amplifiers, discriminators and pipelines on the module, i.e. there are 12 radiation hard ASICs, each containing 128 channels on the module. The sensors and the ASICs were developed for the ATLAS experiment and production is proceeding smoothly with over half the components delivered. The components of a module - 4 silicon sensors, a Cu/polyimide hybrid and pitch adaptor, and 12 ASICs - need to be carefully and precisely assembled onto a carbon and ceramic framework, which supports the module and removes the heat. Eleven production clusters are preparing to carry this out over the next two years. An important milestone for the barrel modules has been passed with the first cluster (KEK) now in production (~40 modules produced). A second cluster UK-B has qualified by producing five modules within specification (see below) and is about to start production. T...

  16. Influence of soil moisture-carbon cycle interactions on the terrestrial carbon cycle over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mystakidis, Stefanos; Davin, Edouard L.; Gruber, Nicolas; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2016-04-01

    Water availability is a crucial limiting factor for terrestrial ecosystems, but relatively few studies have quantitatively assessed the influence of soil moisture variability on the terrestrial carbon cycle. Here, we investigate the role of soil moisture variability and state in the contemporary terrestrial carbon cycle over Europe. For this we use a Regional Earth System Model (RESM) based on the COSMO-CLM Regional Climate Model, coupled to the Community Land Model version 4.0 (CLM4.0) and its carbon-nitrogen module. The simulation setup consists of a control simulation over the period 1979-2010 in which soil moisture is interactive and three sensitivity simulations in which soil moisture is prescribed to a mean, a very dry or a very wet seasonal cycle without inter-annual variability. The cumulative net biome productivity varies markedly between the different experiments ranging from a strong sink of up to 6PgC in the wet experiment to a source of up to 1.2PgC in the dry experiment. Changes in the land carbon uptake are driven by a combination of two factors: the direct impact of soil moisture on plant's carbon uptake (essentially in southern Europe) and an indirect effect through changes in temperature affecting ecosystem respiration (mainly in central and northern Europe). We find that removing temporal variations in soil moisture dampens interannual variations in terrestrial carbon fluxes (Gross Primary Productivity, respiration, Net Biome Productivity) by more than 50% over most of Europe. Moreover, the analysis reveals that on annual scale about two-thirds of central Europe and about 70% of southern Europe display statistically significant effect of drying and/or wetting on the terrestrial carbon budget and its components. Our findings confirm the crucial role of soil moisture in determining the magnitude and the inter-annual variability in land CO2 uptake which is a key contributor to the year-to-year variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  17. Convergent modeling of past soil organic carbon stocks but divergent projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Luo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil carbon models are important tool to understand soil carbon balance and project carbon stocks in terrestrial ecosystems, particularly under global change. The initialization and/or parameterization of soil carbon models can vary among studies even when the same model and dataset are used, causing potential uncertainties in projections. Although a few studies have assessed such uncertainties, it is yet unclear what these uncertainties are correlated with and how they change across varying environmental and management conditions. Here, applying a process-based biogeochemical model to 90 individual field experiments (ranging from 5 to 82 years of experimental duration across the Australian cereal-growing regions, we demonstrated that well-designed calibration procedures enabled the model to accurately simulate changes in measured carbon stocks, but did not guarantee convergent forward projections (100 years. Major causes of the projection uncertainty were due to insufficient understanding of how microbial processes and soil carbon composition change to modulate carbon turnover. For a given site, the uncertainty significantly increased with the magnitude of future carbon input and years of the projection. Across sites, the uncertainty correlated positively with temperature, but negatively with rainfall. On average, a 331% uncertainty in projected carbon sequestration ability can be inferred in Australian agricultural soils. This uncertainty would increase further if projections were made for future warming and drying conditions. Future improvement in soil carbon modeling should focus on how microbial community and its carbon use efficiency change in response to environmental changes, better quantification of composition of soil carbon and its change, and how the soil carbon composition will affect its turnover time.

  18. Module theory, extending modules and generalizations

    CERN Document Server

    Tercan, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    The main focus of this monograph is to offer a comprehensive presentation of known and new results on various generalizations of CS-modules and CS-rings. Extending (or CS) modules are generalizations of injective (and also semisimple or uniform) modules. While the theory of CS-modules is well documented in monographs and textbooks, results on generalized forms of the CS property as well as dual notions are far less present in the literature. With their work the authors provide a solid background to module theory, accessible to anyone familiar with basic abstract algebra. The focus of the book is on direct sums of CS-modules and classes of modules related to CS-modules, such as relative (injective) ejective modules, (quasi) continuous modules, and lifting modules. In particular, matrix CS-rings are studied and clear proofs of fundamental decomposition results on CS-modules over commutative domains are given, thus complementing existing monographs in this area. Open problems round out the work and establish the...

  19. Relative injectivity and CS-modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Ahmed Kamal

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we show that a direct decomposition of modules M⊕N, with N homologically independent to the injective hull of M, is a CS-module if and only if N is injective relative to M and both of M and N are CS-modules. As an application, we prove that a direct sum of a non-singular semisimple module and a quasi-continuous module with zero socle is quasi-continuous. This result is known for quasi-injective modules. But when we confine ourselves to CS-modules we need no conditions on their socles. Then we investigate direct sums of CS-modules which are pairwise relatively inective. We show that every finite direct sum of such modules is a CS-module. This result is known for quasi-continuous modules. For the case of infinite direct sums, one has to add an extra condition. Finally, we briefly discuss modules in which every two direct summands are relatively inective.

  20. Cofinitely weak supplemented modules

    OpenAIRE

    Alizade, Rafail; Büyükaşık, Engin

    2003-01-01

    We prove that a module M is cofinitely weak supplemented or briefly cws (i.e., every submodule N of M with M/N finitely generated, has a weak supplement) if and only if every maximal submodule has a weak supplement. If M is a cws-module then every M-generated module is a cws-module. Every module is cws if and only if the ring is semilocal. We study also modules, whose finitely generated submodules have weak supplements.

  1. High Speed Multiple Valued Logic Full Adder Using Carbon Nano Field Effect Transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Khatir

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available High speed Full-Adder (FA module is a critical element in designing high performance arithmeticcircuits. In this paper, we propose a new high speed multiple-valued logic FA module. The proposed FAis constructed by 14 transistors and 3 capacitors, using carbon nano-tube field effect transistor (CNFETtechnology. Furthermore, our proposed technique has been examined in different voltages (i.e., 0.65v and0.9v. The observed results reveal power consumption and power delay product (PDP improvementscompared to existing FA counterparts.

  2. On generalized extending modules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Qing-yi

    2007-01-01

    A module M is called generalized extending if for any submodule N of M, there is a direct summand K of M such that N≤K and K/N is singular. Any extending module and any singular module are generalized extending. Any homomorphic image of a generalized extending module is generalized extending. Any direct sum of a singular (uniform) module and a semi-simple module is generalized extending. A ring R is a right Co-H-ring ifand only ifall right R modules are generalized extending modules.

  3. Solar Module Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. El Amrani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important steps in the photovoltaic industry is the encapsulation of the solar cells. It consists to connect the cells in order to provide useful power for any application and also protect them from environmental damages which cause corrosion, and mechanical shocks. In this paper, we present the encapsulation process we have developed at Silicon Technology Unit (UDTS for monocrystalline silicon solar cells. We will focus particularly on the thermal treatment, the most critical step in the process, which decides on the quality and the reliability of the module. This thermal treatment is conducted in two steps: the lamination and the polymerization. Several tests of EVA reticulation have been necessary for setting technological parameters such as the level of vacuum, the pressure, the temperature, and the time. The quality of our process has been confirmed by the tests conducted on our modules at the European Laboratory of Joint Research Centre (JRC of ISPRA (Italy. The electrical characterization of the modules has showed that after the encapsulation the current has been improved by a factor of 4% to 6% and the power gain by a factor of 4% to 7%. This is mainly due to the fact of using a treated glass, which reduces the reflection of the light at a level as low as 8%.

  4. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with Non-Fire ...

  5. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business ... Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest Video View the blog Clues You Can ...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unites States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  7. Anaerobic Digestion Analysis. Training Module 5.120.2.77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with alkalinity, volatile acids and carbon dioxide determinations for an anaerobic sludge digester. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This module considers total and bicarbonate…

  8. High throughput electron transfer from carbon dots to chloroplast: a rationale of enhanced photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sourov; Pradhan, Saheli; Mitra, Shouvik; Patra, Prasun; Bhattacharya, Ankita; Pramanik, Panchanan; Goswami, Arunava

    2014-03-01

    A biocompatible amine functionalized fluorescent carbon dots were developed and isolated for gram scale applications. Such carbogenic quantum dots can strongly conjugate over the surface of the chloroplast and due to that strong interaction the former can easily transfer electrons towards the latter by assistance of absorbed light or photons. An exceptionally high electron transfer from carbon dots to the chloroplast can directly effect the whole chain electron transfer pathway in a light reaction of photosynthesis, where electron carriers play an important role in modulating the system. As a result, carbon dots can promote photosynthesis by modulating the electron transfer process as they are capable of fastening the conversion of light energy to the electrical energy and finally to the chemical energy as assimilatory power (ATP and NADPH).A biocompatible amine functionalized fluorescent carbon dots were developed and isolated for gram scale applications. Such carbogenic quantum dots can strongly conjugate over the surface of the chloroplast and due to that strong interaction the former can easily transfer electrons towards the latter by assistance of absorbed light or photons. An exceptionally high electron transfer from carbon dots to the chloroplast can directly effect the whole chain electron transfer pathway in a light reaction of photosynthesis, where electron carriers play an important role in modulating the system. As a result, carbon dots can promote photosynthesis by modulating the electron transfer process as they are capable of fastening the conversion of light energy to the electrical energy and finally to the chemical energy as assimilatory power (ATP and NADPH). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06079a

  9. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P. Tortorich

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  10. Disassembling Iron Availability to Phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis, and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO2 drawdow...

  11. Disassembling iron availability to phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO2 drawdown...

  12. Ballasted photovoltaic module and module arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt

    2011-11-29

    A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module and a ballast tray. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes an arm. The ballast tray is adapted for containing ballast and is removably associated with the PV module in a ballasting state where the tray is vertically under the PV laminate and vertically over the arm to impede overt displacement of the PV module. The PV module assembly can be installed to a flat commercial rooftop, with the PV module and the ballast tray both resting upon the rooftop. In some embodiments, the ballasting state includes corresponding surfaces of the arm and the tray being spaced from one another under normal (low or no wind) conditions, such that the frame is not continuously subjected to a weight of the tray.

  13. MPPA-SSI12 automated module facility for "liquid" carburizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syropyatov, V. Ya.

    2011-10-01

    An automated module facility of model MPPA-SSi12 for making controlled endothermic furnace atmospheres based on carbon-containing liquids is described. The facility is used for batching and feeding process liquids into carburizing shaft electric furnaces with automatic control of the carbon potential by changing the flow of added air.

  14. Interglacials, Milankovitch Cycles, and Carbon Dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, Gerald E

    2010-01-01

    The existing understanding of interglacial periods is that they are initiated by Milankovitch cycles enhanced by rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. During interglacials, global temperature is also believed to be primarily controlled by carbon dioxide concentrations, modulated by internal processes such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the North Atlantic Oscillation. Recent work challenges the fundamental basis of these conceptions.

  15. Microbially mediated carbon mineralization: Geoengineering a carbon-neutral mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; McCutcheon, J.; Harrison, A. L.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2013-12-01

    Ultramafic and mafic mine tailings are a potentially valuable feedstock for carbon mineralization, affording the mining industry an opportunity to completely offset their carbon emissions. Passive carbon mineralization has previously been documented at the abandoned Clinton Creek asbestos mine, and the active Diavik diamond mine and Mount Keith nickel mine, yet the majority of tailings remain unreacted. Examples of microbe-carbonate interactions at each mine suggest that biological pathways could be harnessed to promote carbon mineralization. In suitable environmental conditions, microbes can mediate geochemical processes to accelerate mineral dissolution, increase the supply of carbon dioxide (CO2), and induce carbonate precipitation, all of which may accelerate carbon mineralization. Tailings mineralogy and the availability of a CO2 point source are key considerations in designing tailings storage facilities (TSF) for optimizing carbon mineralization. We evaluate the efficacy of acceleration strategies including bioleaching, biologically induced carbonate precipitation, and heterotrophic oxidation of waste organics, as well as abiotic strategies including enhancing passive carbonation through modifying tailings management practices and use of CO2 point sources (Fig. 1). With the aim of developing carbon-neutral mines, implementation of carbon mineralization strategies into TSF design will be driven by economic incentives and public pressure for environmental sustainability in the mining industry. Figure 1. Schematic illustrating geoengineered scenarios for carbon mineralization of ultramafic mine tailings. Scenarios A and B are based on non-point and point sources of CO2, respectively.

  16. MI 4010 Thermoelectric Modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report covers the design justification, physical specification and characterization of the MI 4010 module . The purpose of the contract was to...demonstrate the capability to fabricate pieceparts, process into assemblies, and test thermoelectric modules equivalent to the module used in the Hand...Held Thermal Viewer. The completed modules were also subjected to limited demonstration tests of reliability and useful life.

  17. Module utilization committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmer, K.; Praver, G.

    1984-01-01

    Photovoltaic collector modules were declared surplus to the needs of the U.S. Dept. of Energy. The Module Utilization Committee was formed to make appropriate disposition of the surplus modules on a national basis and to act as a broker for requests for these modules originating outside of the National Photovoltaics Program.

  18. Trends in food availability, 1909-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Neal D

    2010-05-01

    The increase in childhood obesity mainly reflects increased energy intake. However, it is not clear which food categories are responsible for this increase. Food availability data, which are calculated from annual food production, imports, beginning stocks, subtracting exports, ending stocks, and nonfood uses, provide clues about which categories are the primary contributors. Data from 1909 to 2007 show increases in per capita availability of several product classes: added oils increased from 16.1 to 39.4 kg/y, meat increased from 56.3 to 91.2 kg/y, cheese increased from 1.7 to 14.9 kg/y, and frozen dairy products increased from 0.7 to 11.5 kg/y. From 1970 to 2007, per capita availability of sweeteners increased from 54.1 to 62.0 kg/y. Carbonated beverage availability has increased, partly at the expense of fluid milk. Flour and cereal availability decreased from 1909 until the late 1960s but rebounded thereafter. Availability of fruit, fruit juices, and vegetables has increased. We conclude that the major contributors to increased energy intake over the last century are oils, shortening, meat, cheese, and frozen desserts, with more recent increases in added sweeteners, fruit, fruit juices, and vegetables. These changes may have influenced the prevalence of childhood obesity.

  19. Buffering growth variation against water deficits through timely carbon usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent ePantin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Water stresses reduce plant growth but there is no consensus on whether carbon metabolism has any role in this reduction. Sugar starvation resulting from stomatal closure is often proposed as a cause of growth impairment under long-term or severe water deficits. However, growth decreases faster than photosynthesis in response to drought, leading to increased carbohydrate stores under short-term or moderate water deficits. Here, we addressed the question of the role of carbon availability on growth under moderate water deficits using two different systems. Firstly, we monitored the day/night pattern of leaf growth in Arabidopsis plants. We show that a moderate soil water deficit promotes leaf growth at night in mutants severely disrupted in their nighttime carbohydrate availability. This suggests that soil water deficit promotes carbon satiation. Secondly, we monitored the sub-hourly growth fluctuations of clementine fruits in response to daily, natural fluctuation in air water deficit, and at contrasting source-sink balance obtained by defoliation. We show that high carbohydrate levels obtained under favourable source-sink balance prevent excessive, hydraulic shrinkage of the fruit during days with high evaporative demand, most probably by modulating osmotic adjustment. Together, our results contribute to the view that growing organs under moderate soil or air water deficit are not carbon starved, but use soluble carbohydrate in excess to partly release a hydromechanical limitation of growth.

  20. APFO Historical Availability of Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The APFO Historical Availability ArcGIS Online web map provides an easy to use reference of what historical imagery is available by county from the Aerial...

  1. Module 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Douglas Clyde

    2013-01-01

    Reconciliation Action Plans are political instruments that are implemented in political contexts. Getting a good grasp of who the relevant stakeholders are is critical to their effectiveness. A discourse analysis is a method for identifying stakeholders, understanding where they are in conflict......, and identifying potential compromises among them. It investigates how facts, values and interests are linked together into coherent themes. These themes are drawn upon in various ways by different stakeholder groups as they express their understandings of the issues that the RAP must address. A discourse analysis...... always begins with in-depth qualitative interviews with stakeholders through which the themes are initially identified. Several more advanced methods are available, including quantitative ones that can be used to understand more complex discourses....

  2. Residuation Properties and Weakly Primary Elements in Lattice Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Manjarekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We obtain some elementary residuation properties in lattice modules and obtain a relation between a weakly primary element in a lattice module M and weakly prime element of a multiplicative lattice L.

  3. Carbon-carbon mirrors for exoatmospheric and space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumweide, Duane E.; Wonacott, Gary D.; Woida, Patrick M.; Woida, Rigel Q.; Shih, Wei

    2007-09-01

    The cost and leadtime associated with beryllium has forced the MDA and other defense agencies to look for alternative materials with similar structural and thermal properties. The use of carbon-carbon material, specifically in optical components has been demonstrated analytically in prior SBIR work at San Diego Composites. Carbon-carbon material was chosen for its low in-plane and through-thickness CTE (athermal design), high specific stiffness, near-zero coefficient of moisture expansion, availability of material (specifically c-c honeycomb for lightweight substrates), and compatibility with silicon monoxide (SiO) and silicon dioxide (SiO II) coatings. Subsequent development work has produced shaped carbon-carbon sandwich substrates which have been ground, polished, coated and figured using traditional optical processing. Further development has also been done on machined monolithic carbon-carbon mirror substrates which have also been processed using standard optical finishing techniques.

  4. Carbonized asphaltene-based carbon-carbon fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, George; Lula, James; Bowen, III, Daniel E.

    2016-12-27

    A method of making a carbon binder-reinforced carbon fiber composite is provided using carbonized asphaltenes as the carbon binder. Combinations of carbon fiber and asphaltenes are also provided, along with the resulting composites and articles of manufacture.

  5. ABOUT OPTIMIZATION FEATURE ON SOLIDWORKS SIMULATIONEXPRESS MODULE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin IANCU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are presented the analysis steps to be taken in SolidWorks for conducting a preliminary study of parts designed, using SimulationExpress module. There are presented the module features and the settings that have to be done for such analysis and the results shown after analysis

  6. Transformation and Availability of Various Forms of Zinc in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOUBANG-JI; MORUN-CANG

    1993-01-01

    The transformation and availability of various forms of Zn applied into a cinnamon soil and a carbonate meadow soil as well as the effects of fertillizer-P on them were studied by using the field experiment method and chemically sequential extraction procedure.Zn added into the soils was found to be rapidly transformed into the various forms. In the cinnamon soil,the amount of Zn transformed into the carbonate bound form was the highest,and the carbonate bound form was proven by the analyses of intensity factor and capacity factor to be the primary available Zn pool.But in the carbonate meadow soil,the Zn transformed was relatively homogeneously distributed in the various forms though the amount of Zn transformed into the Mn-oxide bound form was relatively high,and the organically bound,Mn-oxide bound and amorphous Fe-oxide,bound forms were found to be the main available Zn pool.Fertilizer-P took part in the regulation and control of available Zn in the soils to a certain degree.In the carbonate meadow soil,application of P fertilizer probably aggravated Zn deficiency at low Zn rate,while it was favorable to the storage of available Zn in the case of high Zn rate.

  7. Improving the Operational Stability of PBDTTTz-4 Polymer Solar Cells Modules by Electrode Modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roth, Bérenger; Benatto, Gisele Alves dos Reis; Corazza, Michael;

    2016-01-01

    PBDTTTz-4 is employed in the ambient manufacturing of fully Roll-to-Roll organic solar cell modules. Modules are manufactured using a novel silver nanowire electrode or a previously reported carbon electrode. The average PCE of carbon modules (3.07%) and AgNW modules (1.46%) shows that PBDTTTz-4...... is a good candidate for upscaling. Stability measurements following the ISOS standards are used to compare the lifetime of the different modules. In all tests but one, the carbon modules are less stable. The higher stability of AgNW is attributed to the removal of the PEDOT:PSS in the front electrode....... Finally during indoor light tests, a new degradation phenomenon is observed where bubbles are formed inside the modules contrary to previous reports of bubble formation by thermal expansion of trapped gas inside the barrier....

  8. LOSCAR: Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir Model v2.0.4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Zeebe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The LOSCAR model is designed to efficiently compute the partitioning of carbon between ocean, atmosphere, and sediments on time scales ranging from centuries to millions of years. While a variety of computationally inexpensive carbon cycle models are already available, many are missing a critical sediment component, which is indispensable for long-term integrations. One of LOSCAR's strengths is the coupling of ocean-atmosphere routines to a computationally efficient sediment module. This allows, for instance, adequate computation of CaCO3 dissolution, calcite compensation, and long-term carbon cycle fluxes, including weathering of carbonate and silicate rocks. The ocean component includes various biogeochemical tracers such as total carbon, alkalinity, phosphate, oxygen, and stable carbon isotopes. LOSCAR's configuration of ocean geometry is flexible and allows for easy switching between modern and paleo-versions. We have previously published applications of the model tackling future projections of ocean chemistry and weathering, pCO2 sensitivity to carbon cycle perturbations throughout the Cenozoic, and carbon/calcium cycling during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. The focus of the present contribution is the detailed description of the model including numerical architecture, processes and parameterizations, tuning, and examples of input and output. Typical CPU integration times of LOSCAR are of order seconds for several thousand model years on current standard desktop machines. The LOSCAR source code in C can be obtained from the author by sending a request to loscar.model@gmail.com.

  9. Solid State Marx Modulators for Emerging Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, M.A.; /SLAC

    2012-09-14

    Emerging linear accelerator applications increasingly push the boundaries of RF system performance and economics. The power modulator is an integral part of RF systems whose characteristics play a key role in the determining parameters such as efficiency, footprint, cost, stability, and availability. Particularly within the past decade, solid-state switch based modulators have become the standard in high-performance, high power modulators. One topology, the Marx modulator, has characteristics which make it particularly attractive for several emerging applications. This paper is an overview of the Marx topology, some recent developments, and a case study of how this architecture can be applied to a few proposed linear accelerators.

  10. Temperature Effect on Photovoltaic Modules Power Drop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qais Mohammed Aish

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine what type of photovoltaic solar module could best be used in a thermoelectric photovoltaic power generation. Changing in powers due to higher temperatures (25oC, 35oC, and 45oC have been done for three types of solar modules: monocrystalline , polycrystalline, and copper indium gallium (di selenide (CIGS. The Prova 200 solar panel analyzer is used for the professional testing of three solar modules at different ambient temperatures; 25oC, 35oC, and 45oC and solar radiation range 100-1000 W/m2. Copper indium gallium (di selenide module has the lowest power drop (with the average percentage power drop 0.38%/oC while monocrystalline module has the highest power drop (with the average percentage power drop 0.54%/oC, while polycrystalline module has a percentage power drop of 0.49%/oC.

  11. LHC Availability 2016: Proton Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Benjamin; Apollonio, Andrea; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    This document summarises the LHC machine availability for the period of Restart to Technical Stop 3 (TS3) in 2016. This covers the whole proton physics production period of 2016. This note has been produced and ratified by the Availability Working Group which has complied fault information for the period in question using the Accelerator Fault Tracker.

  12. Availability program: Phase I report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, S.L.; Dabiri, A.; Keeton, D.C.; Riemer, B.W.; Waganer, L.M.

    1985-05-01

    An Availability Working Group was formed within the Office of Fusion Energy in March 1984 to consider the establishment of an availability program for magnetic fusion. The scope of this program is defined to include the development of (1) a comprehensive data base, (2) empirical correlations, and (3) analytical methods for application to fusion facilities and devices. The long-term goal of the availability program is to develop a validated, integrated methodology that will provide (1) projections of plant availability and (2) input to design decisions on maintainability and system reliability requirements. The Phase I study group was commissioned to assess the status of work in progress that is relevant to the availability program. The scope of Phase I included surveys of existing data and data collection programs at operating fusion research facilities, the assessment of existing computer models to calculate system availability, and the review of methods to predict and correlate data on component failure and maintenance. The results of these investigations are reported to the Availability Working Group in this document.

  13. 2015 NAIP Partner Availability Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — Shows the available NAIP imagery which NAIP Partners can access. Either Quarter Quads (QQs), Compressed County Mosaics (CCMs) or data that has been physically mailed...

  14. Communication course – places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Please note that there are some places available in the following communication course starting in November. For more information on the course, click on the course title, this will bring you to the training catalogue. You can then sign-up on line. For advice, you can contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) or kerstin.fuhrmeister@cern.ch Course Next session Duration Language Availability Gestion de temps 22 November 3 days French 8 places  

  15. MongoDB high availability

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrabani, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    This book has a perfect balance of concepts and their practical implementation along with solutions to make a highly available MongoDB server with clear instructions and guidance. If you are using MongoDB in a production environment and need a solution to make a highly available MongoDB server, this book is ideal for you. Familiarity with MongoDB is expected so that you understand the content of this book.

  16. Joint Acoustic and Modulation Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Les Atlas

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a considerable evidence that our perception of sound uses important features which is related to underlying signal modulations. This topic has been studied extensively via perceptual experiments, yet there are few, if any, well-developed signal processing methods which capitalize on or model these effects. We begin by summarizing evidence of the importance of modulation representations from psychophysical, physiological, and other sources. The concept of a two-dimensional joint acoustic and modulation frequency representation is proposed. A simple single sinusoidal amplitude modulator of a sinusoidal carrier is then used to illustrate properties of an unconstrained and ideal joint representation. Added constraints are required to remove or reduce undesired interference terms and to provide invertibility. It is then noted that the constraints would also apply to more general and complex cases of broader modulation and carriers. Applications in single-channel speaker separation and in audio coding are used to illustrate the applicability of this joint representation. Other applications in signal analysis and filtering are suggested.

  17. Koszul differential graded modules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE JiWei; WU QuanShui

    2009-01-01

    The concept of Koszulity for differential graded (DG, for short) modules is introduced. It is shown that any bounded below DG module with bounded Ext-group to the trivial module over a Koszul DG algebra has a Koszul DG submodule (up to a shift and truncation), moreover such a DG module can be approximated by Koszul DG modules (Theorem 3.6). Let A be a Koszul DG algebra, and Dc (A) be the full triangulated subcategory of the derived category of DG A-modules generated by the object AA. If the trivial DG module kA lies in Dc(A), then the heart of the standard t-structure on Dc(A) is anti-equivalent to the category of finitely generated modules over some finite dimensional algebra. As a corollary, Dc(A) is equivalent to the bounded derived category of its heart as triangulated categories.

  18. Koszul differential graded modules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The concept of Koszulity for differential graded (DG, for short) modules is introduced. It is shown that any bounded below DG module with bounded Ext-group to the trivial module over a Koszul DG algebra has a Koszul DG submodule (up to a shift and truncation), moreover such a DG module can be approximated by Koszul DG modules (Theorem 3.6). Let A be a Koszul DG algebra, and Dc(A) be the full triangulated subcategory of the derived category of DG A-modules generated by the object AA. If the trivial DG module kA lies in Dc(A), then the heart of the standard t-structure on Dc(A) is anti-equivalent to the category of finitely generated modules over some finite dimensional algebra. As a corollary, Dc(A) is equivalent to the bounded derived category of its heart as triangulated categories.

  19. 不同惰性有机碳物料对土壤镉赋存形态和生物有效性的影响%Effects of Materials Containing Different Inert Organic Carbon on Cd Speciation and Bio-Availability in Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟令阳; 辛术贞; 苏德纯

    2011-01-01

    Pot experiments and soil incubation experiments were conducted under greenhouse conditions to investigate the effects of different organic carbon materials added into Cd-contaminated soil and Cd-amended soil on Cd speciation and bio-availability, and discussed the feasibility to improve soil Cd pollution as soil remediation agent. The results showed that soil pH reduced after three organic materials added. In Cd-contaminated soil, there were no significant differences in concentrations of NH4OAc- and DTPA-extractable Cd after three organic materials added into soil. But under the organic materials treatments in Cd -amended soil, the concentrations of NH4OAc - and DTPA -ex-tractable Cd decreased markedly, and the weathered coal addition reduced the most, rate of decline increasing with time. Content of light fraction organic matter in soil increased significantly after weathered coal and peat adding into soil and weathered coal had a stronger enrichment of soil Cd. Chemical forms of Cd in both soils were acid-extractable> reducible> oxidizable Cd. Acid-extractable Cd concentration had no significant change by adding organic material to Cd-contaminated soil, otherwise, reducible Cd concentration decreased obviously after adding peat and active carbon into soil and oxidizable Cd concentration reduced significantly under peat treatment. Acid-extractable Cd concentration decreased significantly after adding weathered coal into Cd-amended soil, but reducible Cd concentration increased obviously under active carbon treatment and oxidizable Cd concentration had no significant change under the three treatments. In Cd-contaminated soil, the three organic carbon materials had no obvious effect on maize growth but increased the Cd content of maize. Chinese cabbage biomass reduced significantly and Cd content increased obviously after weathered coal added into Cd-contaminated soil. In Cd-amended soil, there were no significant effect on Chinese cabbage and maize growth and Cd

  20. Strichartz estimates on $alpha$-modulation spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weichao Guo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we consider some dispersive equations, including Schrodinger equations, nonelliptic Schrodinger equations, and wave equations. We develop some Strichartz estimates in the frame of alpha-modulation spaces.