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Sample records for auxin-induced substrate perception

  1. Isolation and characterization of an auxin-inducible glutathione S-transferase gene of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kop, D.A.M. van der; Schuyer, M.; Scheres, B.J.G.; Zaal, B.J. van der; Hooykaas, P.J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Genes homologous to the auxin-inducible Nt103 glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene of tobacco, were isolated from a genomic library of Arabidopsis thaliana. We isolated a λ clone containing an auxin-inducible gene, At103-1a, and part of a constitutively expressed gene, At103-1b. The coding regions

  2. Galactose inhibits auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles by two mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, S. P.; Cleland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Galactose inhibits auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles by at least two mechanisms. First, it inhibits auxin-induced H(+)-excretion needed for the initiation of rapid elongation. Galactose cannot be doing so by directly interfering with the ATPase since fusicoccin-induced H(+)-excretion is not affected. Secondly, galactose inhibits long-term auxin-induced growth, even in an acidic (pH 4.5) solution. This may be due to an inhibition of cell wall synthesis. However, galactose does not reduce the capacity of walls to be loosened by H+, given exogenously or excreted in response to fusicoccin.

  3. Inhibition of auxin-induced ethylene production by lycoricidinol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Bin-G.; Lee, June-S.; Oh, Seung-Eun; Horiuchi, Yuko; Imaseki, Hidemasa.

    1984-01-01

    Lycoricidinol, a natural growth inhibitor isolated from bulbs of Lycoris radiata Herb. strongly suppressed auxin-induced ethylene production from the hypocotyl segments of etiolated mung bean (Vigna radiata Wilczek) seedlings. The inhibitor did not significantly inhibit ethylene formation from its immediate precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), during short-term (up to 4h) incubation. The ACC content in tissue treated with IAA was reduced by lycoricidinol in close parallel with the inhibition of ethylene production. Examination of radioactive metabolites in tissues labeled with 3,4- 14 C-methionine indicated that reduction of the ACC content was not due to any possible promotive effect of lycoricidinol on conjugation of ACC with malonate. Lycoricidinol showed no inhibitory effect on the activity of ACC synthase if applied in vitro, but it almost completely abolished the increase in the enzyme activity when applied in vivo during incubation of the tissue with IAA. Lycoricidinol also strongly inhibited incorporation of 14 C-leucine into protein in the tissue. The suppression of the enzyme induction and, in turn, that of ethylene production by lycoricidinol were interpreted as being due to the inhibition of protein synthesis. (author)

  4. Leaf expansion in Phaseolus: transient auxin-induced growth increase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Christopher P.

    2017-01-01

    Control of leaf expansion by auxin is not well understood. Evidence from short term exogenous applications and from treatment of excised tissues suggests auxin positively influences growth. Manipulations of endogenous leaf auxin content, however, suggests that, long-term, auxin suppresses leaf expansion. This study attempts to clarify the growth effects of auxin on unifoliate (primary) leaves of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) by reexamining the response to auxin treatment of both excised leaf strips and attached leaves. Leaf strips, incubated in culture conditions that promoted steady elongation for up to 48 h, treated with 10 μM NAA responded with an initial surge of elongation growth complete within 10 hours followed by insensitivity. A range of NAA concentrations from 0.1 μM to 300 μM induced increased strip elongation after 24 hours and 48 hours. Increased elongation and epinastic curvature of leaf strips was found specific to active auxins. Expanding attached unifoliates treated once with aqueous auxin α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) at 1.0 mM showed both an initial surge in growth lasting 4–6 hours followed by growth inhibition sustained at least as long as 24 hours post treatment. Auxin-induced inhibition of leaf expansion was associated with smaller epidermal cell area. Together the results suggest increasing leaf auxin first increases growth then slows growth through inhibition of cell expansion. Excised leaf strips, retain only the initial increased growth response to auxin and not the subsequent growth inhibition, either as a consequence of wounding or of isolation from the plant. PMID:29200506

  5. A chemical pollen suppressant inhibits auxin-induced growth in maize coleoptile sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesper, M.J.; Cross, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical inhibitors of pollen development having a phenylcinnoline carboxylate structure were found to inhibit IAA- and 1-NAA-induced growth in maize coleoptile sections. The inhibitor (100 μM) used in these experiments caused approx. 35% reduction in auxin-induced growth over the auxin concentration range of 0.3 to 100 μM. Growth inhibition was noted as a lengthening of the latent period and a decrease in the rate of an auxin-induced growth response. An acid growth response to pH 5 buffer in abraded sections was not impaired. The velocity of basipetal transport of [ 3 H]IAA through the coleoptile sections also was not inhibited by the compound, nor was uptake of [ 3 H]IAA. Similarly, the inhibitor does not appear to alter auxin-induced H + secretion. We suggest that the agent targets some other process necessary for auxin-dependent growth

  6. Auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles involves two mechanisms with different pH optima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Although rapid auxin-induced growth of coleoptile sections can persist for at least 18 hours, acid-induced growth lasts for a much shorter period of time. Three theories have been proposed to explain this difference in persistence. To distinguish between these theories, the pH dependence for auxin-induced growth of oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptiles has been determined early and late in the elongation process. Coleoptile sections from which the outer epidermis was removed to facilitate buffer entry were incubated, with or without 10 micromolar indoleacetic acid, in 20 millimolar buffers at pH 4.5 to 7.0 to maintain a fixed wall pH. During the first 1 to 2 hours after addition of auxin, elongation occurs by acid-induced extension (i.e. the pH optimum is Auxin causes no additional elongation because the buffers prevent further changes in wall pH. After 60 to 90 minutes, a second mechanism of auxin-induced growth, whose pH optimum is 5.5 to 6.0, predominates. It is proposed that rapid growth responses to changes in auxin concentration are mediated by auxin-induced changes in wall pH, whereas the prolonged, steady-state growth rate is controlled by a second, auxin-mediated process whose pH optimum is less acidic.

  7. Auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles involves two mechanisms with different pH optima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Although rapid auxin-induced growth of coleoptile sections can persist for at least 18 hours, acid-induced growth lasts for a much shorter period of time. Three theories have been proposed to explain this difference in persistence. To distinguish between these theories, the pH dependence for auxin-induced growth of oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptiles has been determined early and late in the elongation process. Coleoptile sections from which the outer epidermis was removed to facilitate buffer entry were incubated, with or without 10 micromolar indoleacetic acid, in 20 millimolar buffers at pH 4.5 to 7.0 to maintain a fixed wall pH. During the first 1 to 2 hours after addition of auxin, elongation occurs by acid-induced extension (i.e. the pH optimum is <5 and the elongation varies inversely with the solution pH). Auxin causes no additional elongation because the buffers prevent further changes in wall pH. After 60 to 90 minutes, a second mechanism of auxin-induced growth, whose pH optimum is 5.5 to 6.0, predominates. It is proposed that rapid growth responses to changes in auxin concentration are mediated by auxin-induced changes in wall pH, whereas the prolonged, steady-state growth rate is controlled by a second, auxin-mediated process whose pH optimum is less acidic.

  8. Auxin-induced modifications of cell wall polysaccharides in cat coleoptile segments. Effect of galactose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, R.; Masuda, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Galactose inhibits auxin-induced cell elongation in oat coleoptile segments. Cell elongation induced by exogenously applied auxin is controlled by factors such as auxin uptake, cell wall loosening, osmotic concentration of sap and hydraulic conductivity. However, galactose does not have any effect on these factors. The results discussed in this paper led to the conclusion that galactose does not affect cell wall loosening which controls rapid growth, but inhibits cell wall synthesis which is required to maintain long-term growth

  9. Selection of Arabidopsis mutants overexpressing genes driven by the promoter of an auxin-inducible glutathione S-transferase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kop, D.A.M. van der; Schuyer, M.; Pinas, J.E.; Zaal, B.J. van der; Hooykaas, P.J.J.

    1999-01-01

    Transgenic arabidopsis plants were isolated that contained a T-DNA construct in which the promoter of an auxin-inducible glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene from tobacco was fused to the kanamycin resistance (nptII) as well as to the β-glucuronidase (gusA) reporter gene. Subsequently, seeds were

  10. Exogenous auxin-induced NO synthesis is nitrate reductase-associated in Arabidopsis thaliana root primordia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Bartha, Bernadett; Erdei, László

    2008-06-16

    Nitric oxide (NO) functions in various physiological and developmental processes in plants. However, the source of this signaling molecule in the diversity of plant responses is not well understood. It is known that NO mediates auxin-induced adventitious and lateral root (LR) formation. In this paper, we provide genetic and pharmacological evidence that the production of NO is associated with the nitrate reductase (NR) enzyme during indole-3-butyric acid (IBA)-induced lateral root development in Arabidopsis thaliana L. NO production was detected using 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA) in the NR-deficient nia1, nia2 and Atnoa1 (former Atnos1) mutants of A. thaliana. An inhibitor for nitric oxide synthase (NOS) N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA) was applied. Our data clearly show that IBA increased LR frequency in the wild-type plant and the LR initials emitted intensive NO-dependent fluorescence of the triazol product of NO and DAF-2DA. Increased levels of NO were restricted only to the LR initials in contrast to primary root (PR) sections, where NO remained at the control level. The mutants had different NO levels in their control state (i.e. without IBA treatment): nia1, nia2 showed lower NO fluorescence than Atnoa1 or the wild-type plant. The role of NR in IBA-induced NO formation in the wild type was shown by the zero effects of the NOS inhibitors l-NMMA. Finally, it was clearly demonstrated that IBA was able to induce NO generation in both the wild-type and Atnoa1 plants, but failed to induce NO in the NR-deficient mutant. It is concluded that the IBA-induced NO production is nitrate reductase-associated during lateral root development in A. thaliana.

  11. Hydrogen Gas Is Involved in Auxin-Induced Lateral Root Formation by Modulating Nitric Oxide Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyu Cao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism of molecular hydrogen (H2 in bacteria and algae has been widely studied, and it has attracted increasing attention in the context of animals and plants. However, the role of endogenous H2 in lateral root (LR formation is still unclear. Here, our results showed that H2-induced lateral root formation is a universal event. Naphthalene-1-acetic acid (NAA; the auxin analog was able to trigger endogenous H2 production in tomato seedlings, and a contrasting response was observed in the presence of N-1-naphthyphthalamic acid (NPA, an auxin transport inhibitor. NPA-triggered the inhibition of H2 production and thereafter lateral root development was rescued by exogenously applied H2. Detection of endogenous nitric oxide (NO by the specific probe 4-amino-5-methylamino-2′,7′-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF-FM DA and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR analyses revealed that the NO level was increased in both NAA- and H2-treated tomato seedlings. Furthermore, NO production and thereafter LR formation induced by auxin and H2 were prevented by 2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO; a specific scavenger of NO and the inhibitor of nitrate reductase (NR; an important NO synthetic enzyme. Molecular evidence confirmed that some representative NO-targeted cell cycle regulatory genes were also induced by H2, but was impaired by the removal of endogenous NO. Genetic evidence suggested that in the presence of H2, Arabidopsis mutants nia2 (in particular and nia1 (two nitrate reductases (NR-defective mutants exhibited defects in lateral root length. Together, these results demonstrated that auxin-induced H2 production was associated with lateral root formation, at least partially via a NR-dependent NO synthesis.

  12. Gene expression profile of zeitlupe/lov kelch protein1 T-DNA insertion mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana: Downregulation of auxin-inducible genes in hypocotyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Aya; Takase, Tomoyuki; Kitaki, Hiroyuki; Miyazaki, Yuji; Kiyosue, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Elongation of hypocotyl cells has been studied as a model for elucidating the contribution of cellular expansion to plant organ growth. ZEITLUPE (ZTL) or LOV KELCH PROTEIN1 (LKP1) is a positive regulator of warmth-induced hypocotyl elongation under white light in Arabidopsis, although the molecular mechanisms by which it promotes hypocotyl cell elongation remain unknown. Microarray analysis showed that 134 genes were upregulated and 204 genes including 15 auxin-inducible genes were downregulated in the seedlings of 2 ztl T-DNA insertion mutants grown under warm conditions with continuous white light. Application of a polar auxin transport inhibitor, an auxin antagonist or an auxin biosynthesis inhibitor inhibited hypocotyl elongation of control seedlings to the level observed with the ztl mutant. Our data suggest the involvement of auxin and auxin-inducible genes in ZTL-mediated hypocotyl elongation.

  13. From perception to pleasure: music and its neural substrates.

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    Zatorre, Robert J; Salimpoor, Valorie N

    2013-06-18

    Music has existed in human societies since prehistory, perhaps because it allows expression and regulation of emotion and evokes pleasure. In this review, we present findings from cognitive neuroscience that bear on the question of how we get from perception of sound patterns to pleasurable responses. First, we identify some of the auditory cortical circuits that are responsible for encoding and storing tonal patterns and discuss evidence that cortical loops between auditory and frontal cortices are important for maintaining musical information in working memory and for the recognition of structural regularities in musical patterns, which then lead to expectancies. Second, we review evidence concerning the mesolimbic striatal system and its involvement in reward, motivation, and pleasure in other domains. Recent data indicate that this dopaminergic system mediates pleasure associated with music; specifically, reward value for music can be coded by activity levels in the nucleus accumbens, whose functional connectivity with auditory and frontal areas increases as a function of increasing musical reward. We propose that pleasure in music arises from interactions between cortical loops that enable predictions and expectancies to emerge from sound patterns and subcortical systems responsible for reward and valuation.

  14. Effect of benzyladenine (BA on auxin-induced stem elongation and thickening in tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L.

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    Marian Saniewski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that stem elongation in tulip is induced by the auxin produced in the leaves and gynoecium. Excision of the flower bud and all the leaves in an early stage of tulip growth resulted in almost total inhibition of stem growth, but the inhibition was completely recovered by the exogenous application of auxin to the place from which the flower bud had been removed. Hormonal control of stem thickening in tulip is much less known. Additional application of benzyladenine (BA to the tulip stem by soaking a cotton wick wrapped around all the internodes only slightly inhibited stem growth induced by IAA at a concentration of 0.1 and 2.0%, but substantially stimulated the thickening of all the internodes. The treatment of the tulip stem with benzyladenine enabled direct contact of the cytokinin with the epidermis, which is an important factor in stem elongation. The experiment conducted in field conditions also showed that BA only slightly inhibited the elongation of the fourth internode induced by IAA, but stimulated the thickening of that internode. IAA applied at a concentration of 2.0% stimulated ethylene production to a much higher extent than IAA at a concentration of 0.1%, and BA affected the auxin-induced ethylene production only to a small extent. Metabolic significance of these findings is discussed.

  15. The neural substrates of person perception: spontaneous use of financial and moral status knowledge.

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    Cloutier, J; Ambady, N; Meagher, T; Gabrieli, J D E

    2012-07-01

    The current study examines the effect of status information on the neural substrates of person perception. In an event-related fMRI experiment, participants were presented with photographs of faces preceded with information denoting either: low or high financial status (e.g., "earns $25,000" or "earns $350,000"), or low or high moral status (e.g., "is a tobacco executive" or "does cancer research"). Participants were asked to form an impression of the targets, but were not instructed to explicitly evaluate their social status. Building on previous brain-imaging investigations, regions of interest analyses were performed for brain regions expected to support either cognitive (i.e., intraparietal sulcus) or emotional (i.e., ventromedial prefrontal cortex) components of social status perception. Activation of the intraparietal sulcus was found to be sensitive to the financial status of individuals while activation of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex was sensitive to the moral status of individuals. The implications of these results towards uncovering the neural substrates of status perception and, more broadly, the extended network of brain regions involved in person perception are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Auxin-Induced Ethylene Triggers Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis and Growth Inhibition1

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    Hansen, Hauke; Grossmann, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    The growth-inhibiting effects of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) at high concentration and the synthetic auxins 7-chloro-3-methyl-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid (quinmerac), 2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid (dicamba), 4-amino-3,6,6-trichloropicolinic acid (picloram), and naphthalene acetic acid, were investigated in cleavers (Galium aparine). When plants were root treated with 0.5 mm IAA, shoot epinasty and inhibition of root and shoot growth developed during 24 h. Concomitantly, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase activity, and ACC and ethylene production were transiently stimulated in the shoot tissue within 2 h, followed by increases in immunoreactive (+)-abscisic acid (ABA) and its precursor xanthoxal (xanthoxin) after 5 h. After 24 h of treatment, levels of xanthoxal and ABA were elevated up to 2- and 24-fold, relative to control, respectively. In plants treated with IAA, 7-chloro-3-methyl-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid, naphthalene acetic acid, 2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid, and 4-amino-3,6,6-trichloropicolinic acid, levels of ethylene, ACC, and ABA increased in close correlation with inhibition of shoot growth. Aminoethoxyvinyl-glycine and cobalt ions, which inhibit ethylene synthesis, decreased ABA accumulation and growth inhibition, whereas the ethylene-releasing ethephon promoted ABA levels and growth inhibition. In accordance, tomato mutants defective in ethylene perception (never ripe) did not produce the xanthoxal and ABA increases and growth inhibition induced by auxins in wild-type plants. This suggests that auxin-stimulated ethylene triggers ABA accumulation and the consequent growth inhibition. Reduced catabolism most probably did not contribute to ABA increase, as indicated by immunoanalyses of ABA degradation and conjugation products in shoot tissue and by pulse experiments with [3H]-ABA in cell suspensions of G. aparine. In contrast, studies using inhibitors of ABA biosynthesis (fluridone, naproxen, and tungstate), ABA

  17. Cortical substrates of the effects of caffeine and time-on-task on perception of effort.

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    de Morree, Helma M; Klein, Christoph; Marcora, Samuele M

    2014-12-15

    Caffeine intake results in a decrease in perception of effort, but the cortical substrates of this perceptual effect of caffeine are unknown. The aim of this randomized counterbalanced double-blind crossover study was to investigate the effect of caffeine on the motor-related cortical potential (MRCP) and its relationship with rating of perceived effort (RPE). We also investigated whether MRCP is associated with the increase in RPE occurring over time during submaximal exercise. Twelve healthy female volunteers performed 100 intermittent isometric knee extensions at 61 ± 5% of their maximal torque 1.5 h after either caffeine (6 mg/kg) or placebo ingestion, while RPE, vastus lateralis electromyogram (EMG), and MRCP were recorded. RPE and MRCP amplitude at the vertex during the first contraction epoch (0-1 s) were significantly lower after caffeine ingestion compared with placebo (P time-on-task were found for EMG amplitude and submaximal force output variables. The covariation between MRCP and RPE across both caffeine and time-on-task (r10 = -0.335, P perception of effort arises from neurocognitive processing of corollary discharges from premotor and motor areas of the cortex. Caffeine seems to reduce perception of effort through a reduction in the activity of cortical premotor and motor areas necessary to produce a submaximal force, and time-on-task has the opposite effect. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  18. High miR156 Expression Is Required for Auxin-Induced Adventitious Root Formation via MxSPL26 Independent of PINs and ARFs in Malus xiaojinensis

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    Xiaozhao Xu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Adventitious root formation is essential for the vegetative propagation of perennial woody plants. During the juvenile-to-adult phase change mediated by the microRNA156 (miR156, the adventitious rooting ability decreases dramatically in many species, including apple rootstocks. However, the mechanism underlying how miR156 affects adventitious root formation is unclear. In the present study, we showed that in the presence of the synthetic auxin indole-3-butyric acid (IBA, semi-lignified leafy cuttings from juvenile phase (Mx-J and rejuvenated (Mx-R Malus xiaojinensis trees exhibited significantly higher expression of miR156, PIN-FORMED1 (PIN1, PIN10, and rootless concerning crown and seminal roots-like (RTCS-like genes, thus resulting in higher adventitious rooting ability than those from adult phase (Mx-A trees. However, the expression of SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE26 (SPL26 and some auxin response factor (ARF gene family members were substantially higher in Mx-A than in Mx-R cuttings. The expression of NbRTCS-like but not NbPINs and NbARFs varied with miR156 expression in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana plants transformed with 35S:MdMIR156a6 or 35S:MIM156 constructs. Overexpressing the miR156-resistant MxrSPL genes in tobacco confirmed the involvement of MxSPL20, MxSPL21&22, and MxSPL26 in adventitious root formation. Together, high expression of miR156 was necessary for auxin-induced adventitious root formation via MxSPL26, but independent of MxPINs and MxARFs expression in M. xiaojinensis leafy cuttings.

  19. Combining the auxin-inducible degradation system with CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing for the conditional depletion of endogenous Drosophila melanogaster proteins.

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    Bence, Melinda; Jankovics, Ferenc; Lukácsovich, Tamás; Erdélyi, Miklós

    2017-04-01

    Inducible protein degradation techniques have considerable advantages over classical genetic approaches, which generate loss-of-function phenotypes at the gene or mRNA level. The plant-derived auxin-inducible degradation system (AID) is a promising technique which enables the degradation of target proteins tagged with the AID motif in nonplant cells. Here, we present a detailed characterization of this method employed during the adult oogenesis of Drosophila. Furthermore, with the help of CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing, we improve the utility of the AID system in the conditional elimination of endogenously expressed proteins. We demonstrate that the AID system induces efficient and reversible protein depletion of maternally provided proteins both in the ovary and the early embryo. Moreover, the AID system provides a fine spatiotemporal control of protein degradation and allows for the generation of different levels of protein knockdown in a well-regulated manner. These features of the AID system enable the unraveling of the discrete phenotypes of genes with highly complex functions. We utilized this system to generate a conditional loss-of-function allele which allows for the specific degradation of the Vasa protein without affecting its alternative splice variant (solo) and the vasa intronic gene (vig). With the help of this special allele, we demonstrate that dramatic decrease of Vasa protein in the vitellarium does not influence the completion of oogenesis as well as the establishment of proper anteroposterior and dorsoventral polarity in the developing oocyte. Our study suggests that both the localization and the translation of gurken mRNA in the vitellarium is independent from Vasa. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  20. Substrates of metacognition on perception and metacognition on higher-order cognition relate to different subsystems of the mentalizing network.

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    Valk, Sofie L; Bernhardt, Boris C; Böckler, Anne; Kanske, Philipp; Singer, Tania

    2016-10-01

    Humans have the ability to reflect upon their perception, thoughts, and actions, known as metacognition (MC). The brain basis of MC is incompletely understood, and it is debated whether MC on different processes is subserved by common or divergent networks. We combined behavioral phenotyping with multi-modal neuroimaging to investigate whether structural substrates of individual differences in MC on higher-order cognition (MC-C) are dissociable from those underlying MC on perceptual accuracy (MC-P). Motivated by conceptual work suggesting a link between MC and cognitive perspective taking, we furthermore tested for overlaps between MC substrates and mentalizing networks. In a large sample of healthy adults, individual differences in MC-C and MC-P did not correlate. MRI-based cortical thickness mapping revealed a structural basis of this independence, by showing that individual differences in MC-P related to right prefrontal cortical thickness, while MC-C scores correlated with measures in lateral prefrontal, temporo-parietal, and posterior midline regions. Surface-based superficial white matter diffusivity analysis revealed substrates resembling those seen for cortical thickness, confirming the divergence of both MC faculties using an independent imaging marker. Despite their specificity, substrates of MC-C and MC-P fell clearly within networks known to participate in mentalizing, confirmed by task-based fMRI in the same subjects, previous meta-analytical findings, and ad-hoc Neurosynth-based meta-analyses. Our integrative multi-method approach indicates domain-specific substrates of MC; despite their divergence, these nevertheless likely rely on component processes mediated by circuits also involved in mentalizing. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3388-3399, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The Effect of Acute Rhodiola rosea Ingestion on Exercise Heart Rate, Substrate Utilisation, Mood State, and Perceptions of Exertion, Arousal, and Pleasure/Displeasure in Active Men

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    Michael J. Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the effect of acute Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea ingestion on substrate utilisation, mood state, RPE, and exercise affect. Ten males (mean age ± S.D. = 26 ± 6 years completed two 30-minute cycling trials at an intensity of 70% of V˙O2max⁡ following ingestion of either 3 mg·kg−1 body mass of R. rosea or placebo using a double-blind, crossover design. During exercise, heart rate and RPE were recorded. Participants completed measures of mood state and exercise affect before and after exercise. Expired air samples were taken during exercise to determine substrate utilisation. Repeated measures analysis of variance indicated that RPE was significantly lower at 30 minutes into exercise versus placebo (P=0.003. Perceptions of arousal (P=0.05 and pleasure were significantly higher after exercise with R. rosea compared to placebo (P=0.003. Mood state scores for vigor were also higher in R. rosea condition compared to placebo (P=0.008. There were no significant differences in energy expenditure, carbohydrate, or fat oxidation between conditions (P>0.05. Ingestion of R. rosea favourably influenced RPE and exercise affect without changes in energy expenditure or substrate utilization during 30-minute submaximal cycling performance.

  2. The Language, Tone and Prosody of Emotions: Neural Substrates and Dynamics of Spoken-Word Emotion Perception.

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    Liebenthal, Einat; Silbersweig, David A; Stern, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Rapid assessment of emotions is important for detecting and prioritizing salient input. Emotions are conveyed in spoken words via verbal and non-verbal channels that are mutually informative and unveil in parallel over time, but the neural dynamics and interactions of these processes are not well understood. In this paper, we review the literature on emotion perception in faces, written words, and voices, as a basis for understanding the functional organization of emotion perception in spoken words. The characteristics of visual and auditory routes to the amygdala-a subcortical center for emotion perception-are compared across these stimulus classes in terms of neural dynamics, hemispheric lateralization, and functionality. Converging results from neuroimaging, electrophysiological, and lesion studies suggest the existence of an afferent route to the amygdala and primary visual cortex for fast and subliminal processing of coarse emotional face cues. We suggest that a fast route to the amygdala may also function for brief non-verbal vocalizations (e.g., laugh, cry), in which emotional category is conveyed effectively by voice tone and intensity. However, emotional prosody which evolves on longer time scales and is conveyed by fine-grained spectral cues appears to be processed via a slower, indirect cortical route. For verbal emotional content, the bulk of current evidence, indicating predominant left lateralization of the amygdala response and timing of emotional effects attributable to speeded lexical access, is more consistent with an indirect cortical route to the amygdala. Top-down linguistic modulation may play an important role for prioritized perception of emotions in words. Understanding the neural dynamics and interactions of emotion and language perception is important for selecting potent stimuli and devising effective training and/or treatment approaches for the alleviation of emotional dysfunction across a range of neuropsychiatric states.

  3. Neuroanatomical substrates of action perception and understanding: an anatomic likelihood estimation meta-analysis of lesion-symptom mapping studies in brain injured patients.

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    Cosimo eUrgesi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Several neurophysiologic and neuroimaging studies suggested that motor and perceptual systems are tightly linked along a continuum rather than providing segregated mechanisms supporting different functions. Using correlational approaches, these studies demonstrated that action observation activates not only visual but also motor brain regions. On the other hand, brain stimulation and brain lesion evidence allows tackling the critical question of whether our action representations are necessary to perceive and understand others’ actions. In particular, recent neuropsychological studies have shown that patients with temporal, parietal and frontal lesions exhibit a number of possible deficits in the visual perception and the understanding of others’ actions. The specific anatomical substrates of such neuropsychological deficits however are still a matter of debate. Here we review the existing literature on this issue and perform an anatomic likelihood estimation meta-analysis of studies using lesion-symptom mapping methods on the causal relation between brain lesions and non-linguistic action perception and understanding deficits. The meta-analysis encompassed data from 361 patients tested in 11 studies and identified regions in the inferior frontal cortex, the inferior parietal cortex and the middle/superior temporal cortex, whose damage is consistently associated with poor performance in action perception and understanding tasks across studies. Interestingly, these areas correspond to the three nodes of the action observation network that are strongly activated in response to visual action perception in neuroimaging research and that have been targeted in previous brain stimulation studies. Thus, brain lesion mapping research provides converging causal evidence that premotor, parietal and temporal regions play a crucial role in action recognition and understanding.

  4. Offshore Substrate

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    California Department of Resources — This shapefile displays the distribution of substrate types from Pt. Arena to Pt. Sal in central/northern California. Originally this data consisted of seven paper...

  5. Acute effectiveness of a "fat-loss" product on substrate utilization, perception of hunger, mood state and rate of perceived exertion at rest and during exercise.

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    Alkhatib, Ahmad; Seijo, Marcos; Larumbe, Eneko; Naclerio, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Achieving fat-loss outcomes by ingesting multi-ingredient mixtures may be further enhanced during exercise. This study tested the acute thermogenic effectiveness of a commercially available multi-ingredient product (Shred-Matrix®), containing Green Tea Extract, Yerba Maté, Guarana Seed Extract, Anhydrous caffeine, Saw palmetto, Fo-Ti, Eleuthero root, Cayenne Pepper, and Yohimbine HCI, on fatty acid oxidation (FAO), perception of hunger, mood state and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) at rest and during 30 min of submaximal exercise. Following institutional ethical approval, twelve healthy recreationally active participants, five females and seven males, were randomized to perform two separate experimental ergometry cycling trials, and to ingest 1.5 g (3 × capsules) of either a multi-ingredient supplement (SHRED) or placebo (PL). Participants rested for 3 h, before performing a 30-min cycling exercise corresponding to their individually-determined intensity based on their maximal fat oxidation (Fatmax). Fatty acid oxidation (FAO) was determined at rest, 3 h before exercise (Pre1), immediately before exercise (Pre2) and during exercise (Post), using expired gasses and indirect calorimetry. Rate of perceived exertion (RPE) was measured every 3 min during the 30-min exercise. Additionally both mood state and perception of hunger were assessed at Pre1, Pre2 and Post exercise. A repeated measures ANOVA design and Cohen's d effect sizes were used to analyze potential differences between times and treatment conditions. FAO increased in SHRED from Pre1 to Pre2 [0.56 ± 0.26 to 0.96 ± 0.37, (p = 0.003, d =1.34)] but not in PL [0.67 ± 0.25 to 0.74 ± 0.19, (p = 0.334) d = 0.49], with no differences were found between conditions (p = 0.12, d = 0.49). However, Cohen's d = 0.77 revealed moderate effect size in favor of SHRED from Pre to Post exercise. RPE values were lower in SHRED compared to Pl (phunger were not different between conditions, with no interaction effects

  6. Cortical substrates for the perception of face actions: an fMRI study of the specificity of activation for seen speech and for meaningless lower-face acts (gurning).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R; MacSweeney, M; Surguladze, S; Calvert, G; McGuire, P; Suckling, J; Brammer, M J; David, A S

    2001-10-01

    Can the cortical substrates for the perception of face actions be distinguished when the superficial visual qualities of these actions are very similar? Two fMRI experiments are reported. Compared with watching the face at rest, observing silent speech was associated with bilateral activation in a number of temporal cortical regions, including the superior temporal sulcus (STS). Watching face movements of similar extent and duration, but which could not be construed as speech (gurning; Experiment 1b) was not associated with activation of superior temporal cortex to the same extent, especially in the left hemisphere. Instead, the peak focus of the largest cluster of activation was in the posterior part of the inferior temporal gyrus (right, BA 37). Observing silent speech, but not gurning faces, was also associated with bilateral activation of inferior frontal cortex (BA 44 and 45). In a second study, speechreading and observing gurning faces were compared within a single experiment, using stimuli which comprised the speaker's face and torso (and hence a much smaller image of the speaker's face and facial actions). There was again differential engagement of superior temporal cortex which followed the pattern of Experiment 1. These findings suggest that superior temporal gyrus and neighbouring regions are activated bilaterally when subjects view face actions--at different scales--that can be interpreted as speech. This circuitry is not accessed to the same extent by visually similar, but linguistically meaningless actions. However, some temporal regions, such as the posterior part of the right superior temporal sulcus, appear to be common processing sites for processing both seen speech and gurns.

  7. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Khiet [Mission Viejo, CA; Ward, Terence G [Redondo Beach, CA; Mann, Brooks S [Redondo Beach, CA; Yankoski, Edward P [Corona, CA; Smith, Gregory S [Woodland Hills, CA

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  8. Sensor Substrate Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Novel substrates, such as aerogels and porous, low density ceramics may increase the sensitivities of chemical reaction-based sensors for toxic vapors. These sensors...

  9. Coating of substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairns, J.A.; Nelson, R.L.; Woodhead, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The process is concerned with providing substrates with coatings obtainable from sols, for example to protect the substrate (such as in nuclear reactors or hydrocarbon cracking plant) or to provide a carrier for catalytically active material. Hitherto, coatings obtained from sols have had a high porosity and high surface area so that they have not been entirely satisfactory for the above applications. In the process described, dense, low-porosity coatings are provided by contacting the substrate with a sol of refractory material (e.g. CeO 2 or SiO 2 ) convertible to a gel of density at least 40% of the theoretical density of the refractory material, and converting the sol to the gel. Optionally, the gel may be converted to a ceramic coating by firing. (author)

  10. Robust plasmonic substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek; Tamulevicius, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Robustness is a key issue for the applications of plasmonic substrates such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, surface-enhanced spectroscopies, enhanced optical biosensing, optical and optoelectronic plasmonic nanosensors and others. A novel approach for the fabrication of robust plasmonic...... substrates is presented, which relies on the coverage of gold nanostructures with diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films of thicknesses 25, 55 and 105 nm. DLC thin films were grown by direct hydrocarbon ion beam deposition. In order to find the optimum balance between optical and mechanical properties...

  11. Multiple alternative substrate kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vernon E

    2015-11-01

    The specificity of enzymes for their respective substrates has been a focal point of enzyme kinetics since the initial characterization of metabolic chemistry. Various processes to quantify an enzyme's specificity using kinetics have been utilized over the decades. Fersht's definition of the ratio kcat/Km for two different substrates as the "specificity constant" (ref [7]), based on the premise that the important specificity existed when the substrates were competing in the same reaction, has become a consensus standard for enzymes obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The expansion of the theory for the determination of the relative specificity constants for a very large number of competing substrates, e.g. those present in a combinatorial library, in a single reaction mixture has been developed in this contribution. The ratio of kcat/Km for isotopologs has also become a standard in mechanistic enzymology where kinetic isotope effects have been measured by the development of internal competition experiments with extreme precision. This contribution extends the theory of kinetic isotope effects to internal competition between three isotopologs present at non-tracer concentrations in the same reaction mix. This article is part of a special issue titled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Acyl substrate preferences of an IAA-amido synthetase account for variations in grape (Vitis vinifera L.) berry ripening caused by different auxinic compounds indicating the importance of auxin conjugation in plant development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Christine; Boss, Paul K.; Davies, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Nine Gretchen Hagen (GH3) genes were identified in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) and six of these were predicted on the basis of protein sequence similarity to act as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-amido synthetases. The activity of these enzymes is thought to be important in controlling free IAA levels and one auxin-inducible grapevine GH3 protein, GH3-1, has previously been implicated in the berry ripening process. Ex planta assays showed that the expression of only one other GH3 gene, GH3-2, increased following the treatment of grape berries with auxinic compounds. One of these was the naturally occurring IAA and the other two were synthetic, α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) and benzothiazole-2-oxyacetic acid (BTOA). The determination of steady-state kinetic parameters for the recombinant GH3-1 and GH3-2 proteins revealed that both enzymes efficiently conjugated aspartic acid (Asp) to IAA and less well to NAA, while BTOA was a poor substrate. GH3-2 gene expression was induced by IAA treatment of pre-ripening berries with an associated increase in levels of IAA-Asp and a decrease in free IAA levels. This indicates that GH3-2 responded to excess auxin to maintain low levels of free IAA. Grape berry ripening was not affected by IAA application prior to veraison (ripening onset) but was considerably delayed by NAA and even more so by BTOA. The differential effects of the three auxinic compounds on berry ripening can therefore be explained by the induction and acyl substrate specificity of GH3-2. These results further indicate an important role for GH3 proteins in controlling auxin-related plant developmental processes. PMID:21543520

  13. The Perception of Depicted Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livio Dobrez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Everyone knows that you can read a galloping horse in a still image as galloping. This paper asks how it is that we perceive motion in pictures. It considers perception of real motion in point-light experiments and the perception of motion in stills via the work of various psychologists, in the course of which it raises theoretical questions about the nature of visual perception. It then offers a detailed examination of knowledge regarding neural substrates for both real and depicted motion perception. Finally, it combines psychological and neurophysiological perspectives with phenomenologically-oriented observation of pictures, discussing both frontoparallel motion and motion in depth (in particular the phenomenon of “looming” in terms of two kinds of depictions, the “narrative” and the “performative”. Examples are drawn from all kinds of pictures, but focus is on world rock art, whose time depth is especially amenable to the universalist approach adopted by the paper.

  14. Reentrant processing in intuitive perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phan Luu

    Full Text Available The process of perception requires not only the brain's receipt of sensory data but also the meaningful organization of that data in relation to the perceptual experience held in memory. Although it typically results in a conscious percept, the process of perception is not fully conscious. Research on the neural substrates of human visual perception has suggested that regions of limbic cortex, including the medial orbital frontal cortex (mOFC, may contribute to intuitive judgments about perceptual events, such as guessing whether an object might be present in a briefly presented fragmented drawing. Examining dense array measures of cortical electrical activity during a modified Waterloo Gestalt Closure Task, results show, as expected, that activity in medial orbital frontal electrical responses (about 250 ms was associated with intuitive judgments. Activity in the right temporal-parietal-occipital (TPO region was found to predict mOFC (approximately 150 ms activity and, in turn, was subsequently influenced by the mOFC at a later time (approximately 300 ms. The initial perception of gist or meaning of a visual stimulus in limbic networks may thus yield reentrant input to the visual areas to influence continued development of the percept. Before perception is completed, the initial representation of gist may support intuitive judgments about the ongoing perceptual process.

  15. Color differences and perceptive properties of prints made with microcapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raša Urbas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to establish whether addition on fragranced microcapsules influences on color values and perceptive properties of prints. For this purpose, three types of printing inks were used on two sets of the paper substrate. Color properties were measured by standard methods while perceptive properties were determined by subjective method. Research has shown that microcapsules cause small color differences while perceptive analyses gave very interesting results.

  16. PLZT capacitor on glass substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, M. Ray; Taylor, Ralph S.; Berlin, Carl W.; Wong, Celine W. K.; Ma, Beihai; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2016-01-05

    A lead-lanthanum-zirconium-titanate (PLZT) capacitor on a substrate formed of glass. The first metallization layer is deposited on a top side of the substrate to form a first electrode. The dielectric layer of PLZT is deposited over the first metallization layer. The second metallization layer deposited over the dielectric layer to form a second electrode. The glass substrate is advantageous as glass is compatible with an annealing process used to form the capacitor.

  17. SERS substrate and a method of providing a SERS substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Source: US2011116089A A substrate primarily for SERS determination, the substrate has a number of elongate elements with a density of at least 1x108 elongate elements per cm2 and having metal coated tips. When the elements may be made to lean toward each other, such as by providing a drop...

  18. Evidence for Substrate Influence on Artificial Substrate Invertebrate Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Iain D; Prestie, Kate S

    2017-08-01

    Cobble baskets are frequently used as a tool to measure differences in benthic macroinvertebrate communities between waterbodies; however, underlying differences in substrate type may influence the resultant colonization of baskets, misrepresenting communities. This study tests the hypothesis that cobble basket placement influences the resulting benthic macroinvertebrate community. Cobble basket arrays (n = 4) were deployed in Dog Lake, Saskatchewan, in 2011 (97 d) and 2012 (95 d) on cobble habitats and soft or sandy substrates ∼100 m apart. Baskets placed on cobble substrate had significantly higher Shannon-Weaver diversity relative to those placed on soft substrate in both years, and higher % EPT (Ephemeroptera Plecoptera Trichoptera) in 2011, but total density was not significantly different. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling revealed that the community was different between both treatments, characterized by higher densities of Gammarus lacustris Sars in baskets placed on soft sediment in both years, higher densities of Aeshna sp. and Mystacides sp. on cobble substrate in 2011, and higher densities of Helobdella stagnalis (L.) and Glossophinia complanata (L.) on cobble substrate in 2012. The results were consistent with the hypothesis that baskets placed on cobble substrate versus soft substrate will result in differing community colonization. The resulting recommendation for monitoring and assessment using cobble baskets in lakes is that baskets be placed on comparable substrate type when comparing between lakes, and that cobble beds be chosen as a more appropriate substrate for deployment, as the added habitat complexity of baskets on soft sediment may act as an attractant and not reflect the true community composition of that habitat. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Droplet dynamics on patterned substrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... on a substrate comprising hydrophobic and hydrophilic stripes can depend sensitively on the dynamical pathway by which the state is reached. We also consider a substrate covered with micron-scale posts and investigate how this can lead to superhydrophobic behaviour. Finally we model how a Namibian desert beetle ...

  20. Composite substrate for bipolar electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekkanat, Bora; Bolstad, James J.

    1992-12-22

    Substrates for electrode systems, particularly those to be used for bipolar electrodes in zinc-bromine batteries, are disclosed. The substrates preferably include carbon-black as a conductive filler in a polymeric matrix, with reinforcing materials such as glass fibers. Warpage of the zinc-bromine electrodes which was experienced in the prior art and which was believed to be caused by physical expansion of the electrodes due to bromine absorption by the carbon-black, is substantially eliminated when new substrate fabrication techniques are employed. In the pesent invention, substrates are prepared using a lamination process known as glass mat reinforced thermoplastics technology or, in an alternate embodiment, the substrate is made using a slurry process.

  1. Regulation of expression of an auxin-induced soybean sequence by cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, G.; Uhrhammer, N.; Guilfoyle, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    An auxin-regulated soybean sequence has been characterized and shown to be induced by the heavy metals cadmium, silver, and copper. Cadmium induces the accumulation of two size classes of mRNA: a 1-kilobase (kb) RNA class, which is the same size as the RNA class induced by auxin, silver, and copper, and a 1.4-kb RNA class. DNA sequences analysis of cDNA clones and a soybean genomic fragment has shown the presence of an intron in this gene. A restriction fragment probe isolated from the intron segment hybridizes specifically to the 1.4-kb mRNA. The transcription rate of this sequences is rapidly increased following exposure of soybean primary leaves to cadmium, as assayed by nuclear run-off transcription experiments. These results suggest that cadmium not only induces the transcription of a specific soybean sequences, but interferes with the processing of the precursor mRNA, resulting in the accumulation of the 1.4-kb mRNA precursor species

  2. The Acid Growth Theory of auxin-induced cell elongation is alive and well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayle, D. L.; Cleland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Plant cells elongate irreversibly only when load-bearing bonds in the walls are cleaved. Auxin causes the elongation of stem and coleoptile cells by promoting wall loosening via cleavage of these bonds. This process may be coupled with the intercalation of new cell wall polymers. Because the primary site of auxin action appears to be the plasma membrane or some intracellular site, and wall loosening is extracellular, there must be communication between the protoplast and the wall. Some "wall-loosening factor" must be exported from auxin-impacted cells, which sets into motion the wall loosening events. About 20 years ago, it was suggested that the wall-loosening factor is hydrogen ions. This idea and subsequent supporting data gave rise to the Acid Growth Theory, which states that when exposed to auxin, susceptible cells excrete protons into the wall (apoplast) at an enhanced rate, resulting in a decrease in apoplastic pH. The lowered wall pH then activates wall-loosening processes, the precise nature of which is unknown. Because exogenous acid causes a transient (1-4 h) increase in growth rate, auxin must also mediate events in addition to wall acidification for growth to continue for an extended period of time. These events may include osmoregulation, cell wall synthesis, and maintenance of the capacity of walls to undergo acid-induced wall loosening. At present, we do not know if these phenomena are tightly coupled to wall acidification or if they are the products of multiple independent signal transduction pathways.

  3. Rapid auxin-induced stimulation of cell wall synthesis in pea internodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, U.; Briggs, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of auxin (indole-3-acetic acid; IAA) on growth and incorporation of myo-[2- 3 H(N)] inositol ([ 3 H]Ins) into noncellulosic polysacchharides in the cell walls of third internode sections from red light-grown pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) was investigated. Intact section were incubated on [ 3 H]Ins for 4 hr to permit uptake of the tracer and then IAA was added. Growth started after a lag phase of 15 min under these conditions. The sections were removed from the tracer and separated into epidermis and cortical cylinder (cortex plus vascular tissue). In the epidermis, IAA-induced stimulation of [ 3 H]Ins incorporation started after a lag of 15 min. The amount of incorporation was 15% higher after 30 min and 24% higher after 2 hr than in the control. In the cortical cylinder, IAA-induced stimulation of [ 3 H]Ins incorporation started only ≅ 1 hr after adding IAA. The ionophore monensin (20 μM) inhibited the IAA-induced growth by 95%. Under these conditions, the IAA-induced stimulation of [ 3 H]Ins incorporation and the IAA-induced increase in in vivo extensibility of the sections was almost completely inhibited, although oxygen uptake was unaffected. The authors suggest that wall synthesis (as represented by [ 3 H]Ins incorporation) and wall loosening (increase in in vivo extensibility) are related processes. The results support the hypothesis that IAA induces growth by rapid simulation of cell wall synthesis in the growth-limiting epidermal cell layer

  4. Stimulation of auxin-induced elongation of cucumber hypocotyl sections by dihydroconiferyl alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Naoki; Shibata, Kozo; Kamisaka, Seiichiro

    1975-01-01

    The mechanism by which dihydroconiferyl alcohol (DCA) stimulates indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-induced elongation of cucumber hypocotyl sections was studied. Although DCA did not affect the uptake of IAA-5- 3 H by hypocotyl sections, the endogenous level of IAA-5- 3 H in DCA-treated sections was much higher than in DCA-untreated ones. IAA-5- 3 H in the incubation medium was degraded in the presence of hypocotyl sections, and this degradation of IAA was inhibited by DCA. An in vitro experiment with horseradish peroxidase revealed that DCA inhibited the IAA-degrading activity of the oxidase, as did caffeic acid and ferulic acid. These results suggested that DCA enhances IAA-induced cucumber hypocotyl elongation by acting as an antioxidant of IAA. (auth.)

  5. The Arabidopsis auxin-inducible gene ARGOS controls lateral organ size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuxin; Xie, Qi; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2003-09-01

    During plant development, the final size of an organ is regulated and determined by various developmental signals; however, the molecular mechanisms by which these signals are transduced and the mediators involved are largely unknown. Here, we show that ARGOS, a novel Arabidopsis gene that is highly induced by auxin, is involved in organ size control. Transgenic plants expressing sense or antisense ARGOS cDNA display enlarged or reduced aerial organs, respectively. The alteration in organ size is attributable mainly to changes in cell number and the duration of organ growth. Ectopic expression of ARGOS prolongs the expression of AINTEGUMENTA (ANT) and CycD3;1 as well as the neoplastic activity of leaf cells. Moreover, organ enlargement in plants overexpressing ARGOS can be blocked by the loss of function of ANT, implying that ARGOS functions upstream of ANT to affect the meristematic competence of organ cells. The induction of ARGOS by auxin is attenuated or abolished in auxin-resistant1 (axr1), and overexpression of ARGOS partially restores axr1 organ development. These results suggest that ARGOS may transduce auxin signals downstream of AXR1 to regulate cell proliferation and organ growth through ANT during organogenesis.

  6. Haptic Perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappers, A.M.L.; Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Hoffman, R.R.; Scerbo, M.W.; Parasuraman, R.; Szalma, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen a renewed interest in haptic perception fueled in part by the lack of fundamental knowledge that is necessary for the further development of haptic interfaces. In this chapter, a number of common methodologies for haptic psychophysical experiments are presented, such as

  7. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  8. Substrate noise coupling in RFICs

    CERN Document Server

    Helmy, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Substrate Noise Coupling in RFICs addresses substrate noise coupling in RF and mixed signal ICs when used in a system on chip (SoC) containing digital ICs as well. This trend of integrating RF, mixed signal ICs with large digital ICs is found in many of today's commercial ICs such as single chip Wi-Fi or Bluetooth solutions and is expected to grow rapidly in the future. The book reports modeling and simulation techniques for substrate noise coupling effects in RFICs and introduces isolation structures and design guides to mitigate such effects with the ultimate goal of enhancing the yield of R

  9. Coated substrate apparatus and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Zhenan; Diao, Ying; Mannsfeld, Stefan Christian Bernhardt; Tee, Chee-Keong; Becerril-Garcia, Hector A.; Zhou, Yan

    2018-01-09

    A coated substrate is formed with aligned objects such as small molecules, macromolecules and nanoscale particulates, such as inorganic, organic or inorganic/organic hybrid materials. In accordance with one or more embodiments, an apparatus or method involves an applicator having at least one surface patterned with protruded or indented features, and a coated substrate including a solution-based layer of objects having features and morphology attributes arranged as a function of the protruded or indented features.

  10. Substrate channeling in proline metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arentson, Benjamin W.; Sanyal, Nikhilesh; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    Proline metabolism is an important pathway that has relevance in several cellular functions such as redox balance, apoptosis, and cell survival. Results from different groups have indicated that substrate channeling of proline metabolic intermediates may be a critical mechanism. One intermediate is pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C), which upon hydrolysis opens to glutamic semialdehyde (GSA). Recent structural and kinetic evidence indicate substrate channeling of P5C/GSA occurs in the proline catabolic pathway between the proline dehydrogenase and P5C dehydrogenase active sites of bifunctional proline utilization A (PutA). Substrate channeling in PutA is proposed to facilitate the hydrolysis of P5C to GSA which is unfavorable at physiological pH. The second intermediate, gamma-glutamyl phosphate, is part of the proline biosynthetic pathway and is extremely labile. Substrate channeling of gamma-glutamyl phosphate is thought to be necessary to protect it from bulk solvent. Because of the unfavorable equilibrium of P5C/GSA and the reactivity of gamma-glutamyl phosphate, substrate channeling likely improves the efficiency of proline metabolism. Here, we outline general strategies for testing substrate channeling and review the evidence for channeling in proline metabolism. PMID:22201749

  11. Neural bases of accented speech perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti eAdank

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The recognition of unfamiliar regional and foreign accents represents a challenging task for the speech perception system (Adank, Evans, Stuart-Smith, & Scott, 2009; Floccia, Goslin, Girard, & Konopczynski, 2006. Despite the frequency with which we encounter such accents, the neural mechanisms supporting successful perception of accented speech are poorly understood. Nonetheless, candidate neural substrates involved in processing speech in challenging listening conditions, including accented speech, are beginning to be identified. This review will outline neural bases associated with perception of accented speech in the light of current models of speech perception, and compare these data to brain areas associated with processing other speech distortions. We will subsequently evaluate competing models of speech processing with regards to neural processing of accented speech. See Cristia et al. (2012 for an in-depth overview of behavioural aspects of accent processing.

  12. Mapping protease substrates using a biotinylated phage substrate library.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholle, M. D.; Kriplani, U.; Pabon, A.; Sishtla, K.; Glucksman, M. J.; Kay, B. K.; Biosciences Division; Chicago Medical School

    2005-05-05

    We describe a bacteriophage M13 substrate library encoding the AviTag (BirA substrate) and combinatorial heptamer peptides displayed at the N terminus of the mature form of capsid protein III. Phages are biotinylated efficiently (> or = 50%) when grown in E. coli cells coexpressing BirA, and such viral particles can be immobilized on a streptavidin-coated support and released by protease cleavage within the combinatorial peptide. We have used this library to map the specificity of human Factor Xa and a neuropeptidase, neurolysin (EC3.4.24.16). Validation by analysis of isolated peptide substrates has revealed that neurolysin recognizes the motif hydrophobic-X-Pro-Arg-hydrophobic, where Arg-hydrophobic is the scissile bond.

  13. Substrate curvature regulates cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiuxiu; Jiang, Yi

    2017-05-23

    Cell migration is essential in many aspects of biology. Many basic migration processes, including adhesion, membrane protrusion and tension, cytoskeletal polymerization, and contraction, have to act in concert to regulate cell migration. At the same time, substrate topography modulates these processes. In this work, we study how substrate curvature at micrometer scale regulates cell motility. We have developed a 3D mechanical model of single cell migration and simulated migration on curved substrates with different curvatures. The simulation results show that cell migration is more persistent on concave surfaces than on convex surfaces. We have further calculated analytically the cell shape and protrusion force for cells on curved substrates. We have shown that while cells spread out more on convex surfaces than on concave ones, the protrusion force magnitude in the direction of migration is larger on concave surfaces than on convex ones. These results offer a novel biomechanical explanation to substrate curvature regulation of cell migration: geometric constrains bias the direction of the protrusion force and facilitates persistent migration on concave surfaces.

  14. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-08-19

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  15. Methods of etching a substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosmo, J.J.; Gambino, R.J.; Harper, J.M.E.

    1979-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of etching a substrate. The substrate is located opposite a target electrode in a vacuum chamber, and the surface of the target electrode is bombarded with energetic particles of atomic dimensions. The target electrode is an intermetallic composition (compound, alloy or finely divided homogeneous mixture) of two metals A and B such that upon bombardment the electrode emits negative ions of metal B which have sufficient energy to produce etching of the substrate. Many target materials are exemplified. Typically the metal A has an electronegativity XA and metal B has an electronegativity XB such that Xb - Xa is greater than about 2.55 electron volts, with the exception of combinations of metals having a fractional ionicity Q less than about 0.314. The source of the energetic particles may be an ionised gas in the vacuum chamber. The apparatus and its mode of operation are described in detail. (U.K.)

  16. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2018-04-03

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  17. Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejerskov, Betina; Jarlstad Olesen, Morten T; Zelikin, Alexander N

    2017-01-01

    Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy (SMEPT) is a biomedical platform developed to perform a localized synthesis of drugs mediated by implantable biomaterials. This approach combines the benefits and at the same time offers to overcome the drawbacks for traditional pill-based drug administra......Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy (SMEPT) is a biomedical platform developed to perform a localized synthesis of drugs mediated by implantable biomaterials. This approach combines the benefits and at the same time offers to overcome the drawbacks for traditional pill-based drug...

  18. Phonon scattering in graphene over substrate steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sevincli, Haldun; Brandbyge, Mads

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the effect on phonon transport of substrate-induced bends in graphene. We consider bending induced by an abrupt kink in the substrate, and provide results for different step-heights and substrate interaction strengths. We find that individual substrate steps reduce thermal conductance...

  19. Droplet dynamics on patterned substrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tens of microns and it is important to understand how their spreading depends on the properties of the substrate onto which they are printed. Experimental work on such mesoscopic drops is difficult and expensive because of the length and time scales involved. Therefore there is a need for numerical modelling both to ...

  20. Neuronal substrate of eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Timofeeva, Elena; Calvez, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    Eating disorders are devastating and life-threatening psychiatric diseases. Although clinical and experimental investigations have significantly progressed in discovering the neuronal causes of eating disorders, the exact neuronal and molecular mechanisms of the development and maintenance of these pathologies are not fully understood. The complexity of the neuronal substrate of eating disorders hampers progress in revealing the precise mechanisms. The present re...

  1. Neurobiological Substrates of Tourette's Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leckman, James F.; Bloch, Michael H.; Smith, Megan E.; Larabi, Daouia; Hampson, Michelle

    Objective: This article reviews the available scientific literature concerning the neurobiological substrates of Tourette's disorder (TD). Methods: The electronic databases of PubMed, ScienceDirect, and PsycINFO were searched for relevant studies using relevant search terms. Results:

  2. Imparting Icephobicity with Substrate Flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutzius, Thomas; Vasileiou, Thomas; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2017-11-01

    Ice accumulation poses serious safety and performance issues for modern infrastructure. Rationally designed superhydrophobic surfaces have demonstrated potential as a passive means to mitigate ice accretion; however, further studies on solutions that reduce impalement and contact time for impacting supercooled droplets are urgently needed. Here we demonstrate the collaborative effect of substrate flexibility and surface texture on enhancing icephobicity and repelling viscous droplets. We first investigate the influence of increased viscosity on impalement resistance and droplet-substrate contact time. Then we examine the effect of droplet partial solidification on recoil by impacting supercooled water droplets onto surfaces containing ice nucleation promoters. We demonstrate a passive method for shedding partially solidified droplets that does not rely on the classic recoil mechanism. Using an energy-based model, we identify a previously unexplored mechanism whereby the substrate oscillation governs the rebound process by efficiently absorbing the droplet kinetic energy and rectifying it back, allowing for droplet recoil. This mechanism applies for a range of droplet viscosities and ice slurries, which do not rebound from rigid superhydrophobic substrates. Partial support of the Swiss National Science Foundation under Grant No. 162565 and the European Research Council under Advanced Grant No. 669908 (INTICE) is acknowledged.

  3. Sensor Technologies on Flexible Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    NASA Ames has developed sensor technologies on flexible substrates integrated into textiles for personalized environment monitoring and human performance evaluation. Current technologies include chemical sensing for gas leak and event monitoring and biological sensors for human health and performance monitoring. Targeted integration include next generation EVA suits and flexible habitats.

  4. PREFACE: Cell-substrate interactions Cell-substrate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardel, Margaret; Schwarz, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    One of the most striking achievements of evolution is the ability to build cellular systems that are both robust and dynamic. Taken by themselves, both properties are obvious requirements: robustness reflects the fact that cells are there to survive, and dynamics is required to adapt to changing environments. However, it is by no means trivial to understand how these two requirements can be implemented simultaneously in a physical system. The long and difficult quest to build adaptive materials is testimony to the inherent difficulty of this goal. Here materials science can learn a lot from nature, because cellular systems show that robustness and dynamics can be achieved in a synergetic fashion. For example, the capabilities of tissues to repair and regenerate are still unsurpassed in the world of synthetic materials. One of the most important aspects of the way biological cells adapt to their environment is their adhesive interaction with the substrate. Numerous aspects of the physiology of metazoan cells, including survival, proliferation, differentiation and migration, require the formation of adhesions to the cell substrate, typically an extracellular matrix protein. Adhesions guide these diverse processes both by mediating force transmission from the cell to the substrate and by controlling biochemical signaling pathways. While the study of cell-substrate adhesions is a mature field in cell biology, a quantitative biophysical understanding of how the interactions of the individual molecular components give rise to the rich dynamics and mechanical behaviors observed for cell-substrate adhesions has started to emerge only over the last decade or so. The recent growth of research activities on cell-substrate interactions was strongly driven by the introduction of new physical techniques for surface engineering into traditional cell biological work with cell culture. For example, microcontact printing of adhesive patterns was used to show that cell fate depends

  5. Consumer perceptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngapo, T. M.; Dransfield, E.; Martin, J. F.

    2004-01-01

    that there was no link between the negative images of production methods and their purchase behaviour. The groups were clearly confused and mistrusted the limited information available at the point of purchase. Careful consideration should be given to meat labelling, in particular taking account of the evident consumer......Consumer focus groups in France, England, Sweden and Denmark were used to obtain insights into the decision-making involved in the choice of fresh pork and attitudes towards today's pig production systems. Many positive perceptions of pork meat were evoked. Negative images of the production systems...... in use today were expressed, but rationalised in terms of consumer demands, market competition and by comparisons to previous systems of production. Knowledge of production systems appeared of little consequence in terms of any meat market potential as several groups freely remarked...

  6. Ketone Bodies as Brain Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Paula Sofia Valente da

    2015-01-01

    SILVA, Paula Sofia Valente da - Ketone Bodies as Brain Substrates. Coimbra : [s.n.], 2015. Dissertação de Mestrado em Bioquimica. Since their discovery as a marker for diabetic ketoacidosis, ketone bodies have become known for their therapeutic role as effective agents in refractory epilepsy and a diet specifically designed to increase ketone bodies’ levels in circulation has been often prescribed as treatment. In the classical ketogenic diet, intake of even small additional amounts of car...

  7. ON THE PERCEPTION OF PROBABLE THINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Perception is influenced both by the immediate pattern of sensory inputs and by memories acquired through prior experiences with the world. Throughout much of its illustrious history, however, study of the cellular basis of perception has focused on neuronal structures and events that underlie the detection and discrimination of sensory stimuli. Relatively little attention has been paid to the means by which memories interact with incoming sensory signals. Building upon recent neurophysiological/behavioral studies of the cortical substrates of visual associative memory, I propose a specific functional process by which stored information about the world supplements sensory inputs to yield neuronal signals that can account for visual perceptual experience. This perspective represents a significant shift in the way we think about the cellular bases of perception. PMID:22542178

  8. Substrate analogues for isoprenoid enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stremler, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Diphosphonate analogues of geranyl diphosphate, resistant to degradation by phosphatases, were found to be alternate substrates for the reaction with farnesyl diphosphate synthetase isolated from avian liver. The difluoromethane analogue was shown to be the better alternate substrate, in agreement with solvolysis results which indicate that the electronegativity of the difluoromethylene unit more closely approximates that of the normal bridging oxygen. The usefulness of the C/sub 10/ difluoro analogue, for detecting low levels of isoprenoid enzymes in the presence of high levels of phosphatase activity, was demonstrated with a cell-free preparation from lemon peel. A series of C/sub 5/ through C/sub 15/ homoallylic and allylic diphosphonates, as well as two 5'-nucleotide diphosphonates, was prepared in high overall yield using the activation-displacement sequence. Radiolabeled samples of several of the allylic diphosphonates were prepared with tritium located at C1. A series of geraniols, stereospecifically deuterated at C1, was prepared. The enantiomeric purities and absolute configurations were determined by derivatization as the mandelate esters for analysis by /sup 1/H NMR. The stereochemistry of the activation-displacement sequence was examined using C1-deuterated substrates.

  9. Perception and creativity

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Perception is a key to cognition because it provides basic information on which people construct mental representations of the world. It is also vital for creativity because the way people perceive things determines the way they think, reason, and solve problems. The role of perception in creative processes is reviewed according to such keywords as the creative organization of perception, physiognomic and allocentric perception, and visual thinking. Finally, the role of perception in art appr...

  10. Perception of radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenot, J.

    1992-01-01

    Perception of risks by people depends on many factors, either characterizing the individuals, or specific to the risk sources. The risk concept, which confuses the issue, is precised first. Second, the perception phenomenon is presented as an interactive process involving the individual, the hazard, and the social context. Third, dimensions of perception are listed and used to describe the perception of radiation risks. Finally, the relation between perception and attitude is clarified. (author) 50 refs

  11. Carbon Nanotube Patterning on a Metal Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A CNT electron source, a method of manufacturing a CNT electron source, and a solar cell utilizing a CNT patterned sculptured substrate are disclosed. Embodiments utilize a metal substrate which enables CNTs to be grown directly from the substrate. An inhibitor may be applied to the metal substrate to inhibit growth of CNTs from the metal substrate. The inhibitor may be precisely applied to the metal substrate in any pattern, thereby enabling the positioning of the CNT groupings to be more precisely controlled. The surface roughness of the metal substrate may be varied to control the density of the CNTs within each CNT grouping. Further, an absorber layer and an acceptor layer may be applied to the CNT electron source to form a solar cell, where a voltage potential may be generated between the acceptor layer and the metal substrate in response to sunlight exposure.

  12. Shared neural substrates of apraxia and aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Georg; Randerath, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    Apraxia is regularly associated with aphasia, but there is controversy whether their co-occurrence is the expression of a common basic deficit or results from anatomical proximity of their neural substrates. However, neither aphasia nor apraxia is an indivisible entity. Both diagnoses embrace diverse manifestations that may occur more or less independently from each other. Thus, the question whether apraxia is always accompanied by aphasia may lead to conflicting answers depending on which of their manifestations are considered. We used voxel based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM) for exploring communalities between lesion sites associated with aphasia and with apraxia. Linguistic impairment was assessed by the Aachen Aphasia Test (AAT) subtests naming, comprehension, repetition, written language, and Token Test. Apraxia was examined for imitation of meaningless hand and finger postures and for pantomime of tool use. There were two areas of overlap between aphasia and apraxia. Lesions in the anterior temporal lobe interfered with pantomime of tool use and with all linguistic tests. In the left inferior parietal lobe there was a large area where lesions were associated with defective imitation of hand postures and with poor scores on written language and the Token Test. Within this large area there were also two spots in supramarginal and angular gyrus where lesions were also associated with defective pantomime. We speculate that the coincidence of language impairment and defective pantomime after anterior temporal lesions is due to impaired access to semantic memory. The combination of defective imitation of hand postures with poor scores on Token Test and written language is not easily compatible with a crucial role of parietal regions for the conversion of concepts of intended actions into motor commands. It accords better with a role of left inferior parietal lobe regions for the categorical perception of spatial relationships. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  13. Verfahren zum Herstellen einer Beschichtung eines Substrats

    OpenAIRE

    Wilke, Martin; Töpper, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The method involves applying coating material (7) on surface (2) of recess (3) formed in substrate (1). A liquid auxiliary agent (6) is applied on substrate surface, such that recess is filled with auxiliary agent. The coating material is subsequently applied to auxiliary agent on substrate. A coating material portion in auxiliary agent is transported by coating material diffusion. The agent is subsequently separated from coating material, such that coating material on substrate surface is le...

  14. Förpackning av keramiska substrat

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Detta examensarbete handlar om forpackning av keramiska substrat. Canning ar det universella namnet pa forpackning av keramiska substrat. Keramiska substrat kan vara katalysatorer eller partikelfilter som anvands som ett efterbehandlingssystem i bensin och Diesel applikationer. Examensarbetet genomfordes hos Scania CV AB. I installationsprocessen sveps en keramisk fibermatta runt det keramiska substratet. Substratet inkapslas sedan med ett metalholje. Rapporten inleds med att beskriva olika i...

  15. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Indicators for suicide substrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jatinder

    The usual trend is to apply QSSA to a system with high substrate concentration. But, QSSA, i.e., steadiness in intermediate concentration, may even be achieved at high and even comparable enzyme-substrate ratio. Whether a system will attain a steady state depends not only on the high substrate concentration, but also on ...

  16. Method for coating substrates and mask holder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijkerk, Frederik; Yakshin, Andrey; Louis, Eric; Kessels, M.J.H.; Maas, Edward Lambertus Gerardus; Bruineman, Caspar

    2004-01-01

    When coating substrates it is frequently desired that the layer thickness should be a certain function of the position on the substrate to be coated. To control the layer thickness a mask is conventionally arranged between the coating particle source and the substrate. This leads to undesirable

  17. Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Fejerskov

    Full Text Available In this report, we detail Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (SMEPT as a novel approach in drug delivery which relies on enzyme-functionalized cell culture substrates to achieve a localized conversion of benign prodrug(s into active therapeutics with subsequent delivery to adhering cells or adjacent tissues. For proof-of-concept SMEPT, we use surface adhered micro-structured physical hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol, β-glucuronidase enzyme and glucuronide prodrugs. We demonstrate enzymatic activity mediated by the assembled hydrogel samples and illustrate arms of control over rate of release of model fluorescent cargo. SMEPT was not impaired by adhering cells and afforded facile time - and dose - dependent uptake of the in situ generated fluorescent cargo by hepatic cells, HepG2. With the use of a glucuronide derivative of an anticancer drug, SN-38, SMEPT afforded a decrease in cell viability to a level similar to that achieved using parent drug. Finally, dose response was achieved using SMEPT and administration of judiciously chosen concentration of SN-38 glucuronide prodrug thus revealing external control over drug delivery using drug eluting surface. We believe that this highly adaptable concept will find use in diverse biomedical applications, specifically surface mediated drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  18. Method For Producing Mechanically Flexible Silicon Substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-08-28

    A method for making a mechanically flexible silicon substrate is disclosed. In one embodiment, the method includes providing a silicon substrate. The method further includes forming a first etch stop layer in the silicon substrate and forming a second etch stop layer in the silicon substrate. The method also includes forming one or more trenches over the first etch stop layer and the second etch stop layer. The method further includes removing the silicon substrate between the first etch stop layer and the second etch stop layer.

  19. Substrate heater for thin film deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltyn, Steve R.

    1996-01-01

    A substrate heater for thin film deposition of metallic oxides upon a target substrate configured as a disk including means for supporting in a predetermined location a target substrate configured as a disk, means for rotating the target substrate within the support means, means for heating the target substrate within the support means, the heating means about the support means and including a pair of heating elements with one heater element situated on each side of the predetermined location for the target substrate, with one heater element defining an opening through which desired coating material can enter for thin film deposition and with the heating means including an opening slot through which the target substrate can be entered into the support means, and, optionally a means for thermal shielding of the heating means from surrounding environment is disclosed.

  20. Consumer perception of risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    ' in risk perception research covering structure, process, and the social dynamics of risk debates. After that I will present results from a recently completed research project. In this project, we specifically looked into consumers' perceptions of gene technology applied to brewing, and how...... these perceptions related to consumers' attitudes and choice behavior....

  1. Substrate and inhibitor studies on proteinase 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kam, C. M.; Kerrigan, J. E.; Dolman, K. M.; Goldschmeding, R.; von dem Borne, A. E.; Powers, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    Various amino acid and peptide thioesters were tested as substrates for human proteinase 3 and the best substrate is Boc-Ala-Ala-Nva-SBzl with a kcat/Km value of 1.0 x 10(6) M-1.s-1. Boc-Ala-Ala-AA-SBzl (AA = Val, Ala, or Met) are also good substrates with kcat/Km values of (1-4) x 10(5) M-1.s-1.

  2. Adhesion of rhodium films on metallic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marot, L.; Covarel, G.; Tuilier, M.-H.; Steiner, R.; Oelhafen, P.

    2008-01-01

    Rhodium coated metallic films were prepared by magnetron sputtering on metallic substrates. All films were elaborated in same conditions on copper, molybdenum and stainless steel. Adhesion strength tests were carried out by scratch test. The results reveal that the adhesion strength between the film and the substrate is influenced by the hardness of the substrate. Increase of deposition temperature improves the adhesion of the coating. In addition, pre-treatment of substrates by a filtered cathodic vacuum arc and the layer thickness have has some effects on the final adhesion strength

  3. Thin glass substrates for mobile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauch, Reiner H.; Wegener, Holger; Kruse, Anke; Hildebrand, Norbert

    2000-10-01

    Flat panel displays play an important role as the visual interface for today's electronic devices (Notebook computers, PDA's, pagers, mobile phones, etc.). Liquid Crystal Display's are dominating the market. While for higher resolution displays active matrix displays like Thin Film Transistor LCD's are used, portable devices are mainly using Super Twisted Nematic (STN) displays. Based on the application, STN displays for mobile applications require thinner glass substrates with improved surface quality at a lower cost. The requirements and trends for STN glass substrates are identified and discussed. Different glass manufacturing processes are used today for the manufacture of these substrates. Advantages and disadvantages of the different glass substrate types are presented and discussed.

  4. Dancing drops over vibrating substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcia, Rodica; Borcia, Ion Dan; Helbig, Markus; Meier, Martin; Egbers, Christoph; Bestehorn, Michael

    2017-04-01

    We study the motion of a liquid drop on a solid plate simultaneously submitted to horizontal and vertical harmonic vibrations. The investigation is done via a phase field model earlier developed for describing static and dynamic contact angles. The density field is nearly constant in every bulk region (ρ = 1 in the liquid phase, ρ ≈ 0 in the vapor phase) and varies continuously from one phase to the other with a rapid but smooth variation across the interfaces. Complicated explicit boundary conditions along the interface are avoided and captured implicitly by gradient terms of ρ in the hydrodynamic basic equations. The contact angle θ is controlled through the density at the solid substrate ρ S , a free parameter varying between 0 and 1 [R. Borcia, I.D. Borcia, M. Bestehorn, Phys. Rev. E 78, 066307 (2008)]. We emphasize the swaying and the spreading modes, earlier theoretically identified by Benilov and Billingham via a shallow-water model for drops climbing uphill along an inclined plane oscillating vertically [E.S. Benilov, J. Billingham, J. Fluid Mech. 674, 93 (2011)]. The numerical phase field simulations will be completed by experiments. Some ways to prevent the release of the dancing drops along a hydrophobic surface into the gas atmosphere are also discussed in this paper.

  5. AFM plough YBCO micro bridges: substrate effects

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Elkaseh, A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available AFM nanolithography was used as a novel cutting technique to define micro-size YBCO superconducting constrictions. Researchers studied the substrate effects on MgO and STO substrates and showed that the observed Shapiro steps from the bridges on STO...

  6. Substrate tolerant direct block copolymer nanolithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Tao; Wang, Zhongli; Schulte, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Block copolymer (BC) self-assembly constitutes a powerful platform for nanolithography. However, there is a need for a general approach to BC lithography that critically considers all the steps from substrate preparation to the final pattern transfer. We present a procedure that significantly...... plasma treatment enables formation of the oxidized PDMS hard mask, PS block removal and polymer or graphene substrate patterning....

  7. Designing specificity of protein-substrate interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coluzza, I.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    One of the key properties of biological molecules is that they can bind strongly to certain substrates yet interact only weakly with the very large number of other molecules that they encounter. Using a simple lattice model, we test several methods to design molecule-substrate binding specificity.

  8. Transformation kinetics of mixed polymeric substrates under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transformation kinetics of mixed polymeric substrates under transitory conditions by Aspergillus niger. ... Abstract. A mixture of polymeric substrates (simulating a complex wastewater) was transformed under sewer conditions and aerobiosis by Aspergillus niger in a tanks-in-series reactor at a hydraulic retention time of 14 h.

  9. Metal oxide nanorod arrays on monolithic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Pu-Xian; Guo, Yanbing; Ren, Zheng

    2018-01-02

    A metal oxide nanorod array structure according to embodiments disclosed herein includes a monolithic substrate having a surface and multiple channels, an interface layer bonded to the surface of the substrate, and a metal oxide nanorod array coupled to the substrate surface via the interface layer. The metal oxide can include ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide. The substrate can include a glass substrate, a plastic substrate, a silicon substrate, a ceramic monolith, and a stainless steel monolith. The ceramic can include cordierite, alumina, tin oxide, and titania. The nanorod array structure can include a perovskite shell, such as a lanthanum-based transition metal oxide, or a metal oxide shell, such as ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide, or a coating of metal particles, such as platinum, gold, palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium, over each metal oxide nanorod. Structures can be bonded to the surface of a substrate and resist erosion if exposed to high velocity flow rates.

  10. Cellulose Nanofiber Composite Substrates for Flexible Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald Sabo; Jung-Hun Seo; Zhenqiang Ma

    2012-01-01

    Flexible electronics have a large number of potential applications including malleable displays and wearable computers. The current research into high-speed, flexible electronic substrates employs the use of plastics for the flexible substrate, but these plastics typically have drawbacks, such as high thermal expansion coefficients. Transparent films made from...

  11. Microbial growth and substrate utilization kinetics | Okpokwasili ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbial growth on and utilization of environmental contaminants as substrates have been studied by many researchers. Most times, substrate utilization results in removal of chemical contaminant, increase in microbial biomass and subsequent biodegradation of the contaminant. These are all aimed at detoxification of the ...

  12. Alternative substrates for cultivating oyster mushrooms ( Pleurotus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wheat straw has generally been used as the main substrate for cultivating oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus); however, in South Africa it is becoming expensive for small-scale farmers to utilise. Therefore, the main objective of the study was to investigate the use of alternative, but suitable substrates for planting oyster ...

  13. Direct transfer of graphene onto flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Luiz Gustavo; Song, Yi; Zeng, Tingying; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Kong, Jing; Araujo, Paulo

    2014-03-01

    We explore the direct transfer via lamination of chemical vapor deposition graphene onto different flexible substrates. The transfer method investigated here is fast, simple, and does not require an intermediate transfer membrane, such as polymethylmethacrylate. Various substrates of general interest in research and industry were studied including polytetrafluoroethylene filter membranes, PVC, cellulose nitrate/cellulose acetate filter membranes, polycarbonate, paraffin, polyethylene terephthalate, paper, and cloth. By comparing the properties of these substrates, two critical factors to ensure a successful transfer on bare substrates were identified: the substrate's hydrophobicity and good contact between the substrate and graphene. For substrates that do not satisfy those requirements, polymethylmethacrylate can be used as a surface modifier or glue to ensure successful transfer. Our results can be applied to facilitate present processes and open up directions for applications of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene on flexible substrates. A broad range of applications of CVD graphene can be envisioned, including fabrication of graphene devices for opto/organic electronics, graphene membranes for gas/liquid separation, and ubiquitous electronics with graphene.

  14. Butyrate as preferred substrate for polyhydroxybutyrate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marang, Leonie; Jiang, Yang; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Kleerebezem, Robbert

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the suitability of butyrate as substrate for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production by microbial enrichment cultures was assessed. Two sequencing batch reactors were operated under feast-famine conditions: one fed with butyrate, and another with mixed acetate and butyrate. The obtained results were compared to previous results with acetate as sole substrate. In all three reactors Plasticicumulans acidivorans dominated the enrichment culture. The carbon uptake rate and PHA yield were significantly higher on butyrate than on acetate, resulting in a higher PHA production rate. When both substrates were available the bacteria strongly preferred the uptake of butyrate. Only after butyrate depletion acetate was taken up at a high rate. The molar substrate uptake rate remained the same, suggesting that substrate uptake is the rate-limiting step. The results show that for optimized waste-based PHA production the pre-fermentation process should be directed towards butyrate production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A signal-substrate match in the substrate-borne component of a multimodal courtship display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian O. ELIAS, Andrew C. MASON, Eileen A. HEBETS

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The environment can impose strong limitations on the efficacy of signal transmission. In particular, for vibratory communication, the signaling environment is often extremely heterogeneous at very small scales. Nevertheless, natural selection is expected to select for signals well-suited to effective transmission. Here, we test for substrate-dependent signal efficacy in the wolf spider Schizocosa stridulans Stratton 1991. We first explore the transmission characteristics of this important signaling modality by playing recorded substrate-borne signals through three different substrates (leaf litter, pine litter, and red clay and measuring the propagated signal. We found that the substrate-borne signal of S. stridulans attenuates the least on leaf litter, the substrate upon which the species is naturally found. Next, by assessing mating success with artificially muted and non-muted males across different signaling substrates (leaf litter, pine litter, and sand, we explored the relationship between substrate-borne signaling and substrate for mating success. We found that muted males were unsuccessful in obtaining copulations regardless of substrate, while mating success was dependent on the signaling substrate for non-muted males. For non-muted males, more males copulated on leaf litter than any other substrate. Taken together, these results confirm the importance of substrate-borne signaling in S. stridulans and suggest a match between signal properties and signal efficacy – leaf litter transmits the signal most effectively and males are most successful in obtaining copulations on leaf litter [Current Zoology 56 (3: 370–378, 2010].

  16. Psychobiology and Food Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, A.

    1985-01-01

    Psychobiology is a scientific discipline which encompasses the phenomena known to be important as regards nutrition and food consumption in space. Specifically, it includes those areas of biology which are clearly related to behavior, human subjective experience and problems of coping and adapting to stress. Taste and odor perception; perception (knowledge gaps); perception (needs); food preference and menu selection; and choosing of acceptable diets are discussed.

  17. Artificial perception and consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, H. John; Johnson, John L.

    2000-06-01

    Perception has both unconscious and conscious aspects. In all cases, however, what we perceive is a model of reality. By brain construction through evolution, we divide the world into two parts--our body and the outside world. But the process is the same in both cases. We perceive a construct usually governed by sensed data but always involving memory, goals, fears, expectations, etc. As a first step toward Artificial Perception in man-made systems, we examine perception in general here.

  18. Gestalt perception is associated with reduced parietal beta oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretskaya, Natalia; Bartels, Andreas

    2015-05-15

    The ability to perceive composite objects as a whole is fundamental for visual perception in a complex and cluttered natural environment. This ability may be mediated by increased communication between neural representations of distinct object elements, and has been linked to increased synchronization of oscillatory brain activity in the gamma band. Previous studies of perceptual grouping either guided attention between local and global aspects of a given stimulus or manipulated its physical properties to achieve grouped and ungrouped perceptual conditions. In contrast to those studies, we fully matched the physical properties underlying global and local percepts using a bistable stimulus that causes the viewer to perceive either local motion of multiple elements or global motion of two illusory shapes without any external change. To test the synchronization hypothesis we recorded brain activity with EEG, while human participants viewed the stimulus and reported changes in their perception. In contrast to previous findings we show that power of the beta-band was lower during perception of global Gestalt than during that of local elements. Source localization places these differences in the posterior parietal cortex, overlapping with a site previously associated with both attention and Gestalt perception. These findings reveal a role of parietal beta-band activity in internally, rather than externally or attention-driven processes of Gestalt perception. They also add to the growing evidence for shared neural substrates of attention and Gestalt perception, both being linked to parietal cortex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Direct transfer of graphene onto flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Luiz G. P.; Song, Yi; Zeng, Tingying; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Kong, Jing; Araujo, Paulo T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore the direct transfer via lamination of chemical vapor deposition graphene onto different flexible substrates. The transfer method investigated here is fast, simple, and does not require an intermediate transfer membrane, such as polymethylmethacrylate, which needs to be removed afterward. Various substrates of general interest in research and industry were studied in this work, including polytetrafluoroethylene filter membranes, PVC, cellulose nitrate/cellulose acetate filter membranes, polycarbonate, paraffin, polyethylene terephthalate, paper, and cloth. By comparing the properties of these substrates, two critical factors to ensure a successful transfer on bare substrates were identified: the substrate’s hydrophobicity and good contact between the substrate and graphene. For substrates that do not satisfy those requirements, polymethylmethacrylate can be used as a surface modifier or glue to ensure successful transfer. Our results can be applied to facilitate current processes and open up directions for applications of chemical vapor deposition graphene on flexible substrates. A broad range of applications can be envisioned, including fabrication of graphene devices for opto/organic electronics, graphene membranes for gas/liquid separation, and ubiquitous electronics with graphene. PMID:24127582

  20. Method of beryllium implantation in germanium substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagawa, S.; Baba, Y.; Kaneda, T.; Shirai, T.

    1983-01-01

    A semiconductor device is disclosed, as well as a method for manufacturing it in which ions of beryllium are implanted into a germanium substrate to form a layer containing p-type impurity material. There after the substrate is heated at a temperature in the range of 400 0 C. to 700 0 C. to diffuse the beryllium ions into the substrate so that the concentration of beryllium at the surface of the impurity layer is in the order of 10 17 cm- 3 or more. In one embodiment, a p-type channel stopper is formed locally in a p-type germanium substrate and an n-type active layer is formed in a region surrounded by, and isolated from, the channel stopper region. In another embodiment, a relatively shallow p-type active layer is formed at one part of an n-type germanium substrate and p-type guard ring regions are formed surrounding, and partly overlapping said p-type active layer. In a further embodiment, a p-type island region is formed at one part of an n-type germanium substrate, and an n-type region is formed within said p-type region. In these embodiments, the p-type channel stopper region, p-type guard ring regions and the p-type island region are all formed by implanting ions of beryllium into the germanium substrate

  1. The epidermis of the pea epicotyl is not a unique target tissue for auxin-induced growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayle, D. L.; Nowbar, S.; Cleland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that the epidermis of dicotyledonous stems is the primary site of auxin action in elongation growth. We show for pea (Pisum sativum L.) epicotyl sections that this hypothesis is incorrect. In buffer (pH 6.5), sections from which the outer cell layers were removed (peeled) elongated slowly and to the same extent as intact sections. Addition of 10 micromolar indoleacetic acid to this incubation medium caused peeled sections to grow to the same extent and with the same kinetics as auxin-treated nonpeeled sections. This indicates that both epidermis and cortical tissues have the ability to respond rapidly to auxin and that the epidermis is not the sole site of auxin action in dicotyledonous stems. Previous reports that peeled pea sections respond poorly to auxin may have resulted from an acid extension of these sections due to the use of distilled water as the incubation medium.

  2. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline S. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate affects the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of the tubes.

  3. Mass spectrometry-assisted protease substrate screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlüter, Hartmut; Rykl, Jana; Thiemann, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Since sequencing of the human genome was completed, more than 500 genes have been annotated as proteases. Exploring the physiological role of each protease requires the identification of their natural substrates. However, the endogenous substrates of many of the human proteases are as yet unknown....... Here we describe a new assay that addresses this problem. The assay, which easily can be automated, is based on the incubation of immobilized protein fractions, which may contain the natural substrate, with a defined protease. After concentrating the proteolytically released peptides by reversed...

  4. Haptic perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kosters, N.D.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2011-01-01

    The sensation of wetness is well-known but barely investigated. There are no specific wetness receptors in the skin, but the sensation is mediated by temperature and pressure perception. In our study, we have measured discrimination thresholds for the haptic perception of wetness of three di erent

  5. Principals' Perceptions of Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooms, Autumn K.; Kretovics, Mark A.; Smialek, Charles A.

    2007-01-01

    This study is an effort to examine principals' perceptions of workplace politics and its influence on their productivity and efficacy. A survey was used to explore the perceptions of current school administrators with regard to workplace politics. The instrument was disseminated to principals serving public schools in one Midwestern state in the…

  6. Studying Sensory Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerly, Spafford C.

    2001-01-01

    Explains the vestibular organ's role in balancing the body and stabilizing the visual world using the example of a hunter. Describes the relationship between sensory perception and learning. Recommends using optical illusions to illustrate the distinctions between external realities and internal perceptions. (Contains 13 references.) (YDS)

  7. Music Alters Visual Perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jolij, Jacob; Meurs, Maaike

    2011-01-01

    Background: Visual perception is not a passive process: in order to efficiently process visual input, the brain actively uses previous knowledge (e. g., memory) and expectations about what the world should look like. However, perception is not only influenced by previous knowledge. Especially the

  8. Perceptions of pork quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Lone; Grunert, Klaus G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with consumer perceptions of food quality before and after consuming the product, and with the relationship between quality perception and the actural physiological characteristics of the product. The paper is work in progress and with an investigation of how German consumers per...

  9. Flexible and foldable paper-substrate thermoelectric generator (teg)

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2017-08-24

    Flexible and foldable paper-substrate thermoelectric generators (TEGs) and methods for making the paper-substrate TEGs are disclosed. A method includes depositing a plurality of thermocouples in series on a paper substrate to create a paper-substrate TEG, wherein the plurality of thermocouples is deposited between two contact points of the paper-substrate TEG. The method may also include setting the power density and maximum achievable temperature gradient of the paper-substrate TEG by folding the paper-substrate TEG. A paper-substrate TEG apparatus may include a paper substrate and a plurality of thermocouples deposited in series on the paper substrate between two contact points of the paper-substrate TEG, wherein the power density and maximum achievable temperature gradient of the paper-substrate TEG is set by folding the paper-substrate TEG.

  10. Consumers' quality perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Anne C.; Grunert, Klaus G.; Bredahl, Lone

    2001-01-01

    is rapidly becoming a reality. On the other hand, still many consumers are in favour of local production, resulting in fierce competition between the multinational suppliers and the local producers of food. Under these market conditions, the importance of skills relating to hoe to study consumers' perception...... of quality and the ability of producers to react to changes in consumers' perception of quality may form the basis of market success or failure, independent of whether you are a local or multinational producer. This chapter deals with the analysis of consumers' quality perception. We will introduce a general...... framework, the Total Food Quality Model, which we believe is useful in understanding consumers perception of food quality. We will then illustrate applications of the model using two recent examples of the quality perception of meat and fish....

  11. Substrate curvature gradient drives rapid droplet motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Cunjing; Chen, Chao; Chuang, Yin-Chuan; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Yin, Yajun; Grey, Francois; Zheng, Quanshui

    2014-07-11

    Making small liquid droplets move spontaneously on solid surfaces is a key challenge in lab-on-chip and heat exchanger technologies. Here, we report that a substrate curvature gradient can accelerate micro- and nanodroplets to high speeds on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates. Experiments for microscale water droplets on tapered surfaces show a maximum speed of 0.42  m/s, 2 orders of magnitude higher than with a wettability gradient. We show that the total free energy and driving force exerted on a droplet are determined by the substrate curvature and substrate curvature gradient, respectively. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we predict nanoscale droplets moving spontaneously at over 100  m/s on tapered surfaces.

  12. Pressure-Sensitive Paint: Effect of Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Mark Kenneth; Yang, Leichao; Kontis, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    There are numerous ways in which pressure-sensitive paint can be applied to a surface. The choice of substrate and application method can greatly affect the results obtained. The current study examines the different methods of applying pressure-sensitive paint to a surface. One polymer-based and two porous substrates (anodized aluminum and thin-layer chromatography plates) are investigated and compared for luminescent output, pressure sensitivity, temperature sensitivity and photodegradation. Two luminophores [tris-Bathophenanthroline Ruthenium(II) Perchlorate and Platinum-tetrakis (pentafluorophenyl) Porphyrin] will also be compared in all three of the substrates. The results show the applicability of the different substrates and luminophores to different testing environments. PMID:22247685

  13. The substrate specificity of phospholipase A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenen, L.L.M. van; Haas, Gerard H. de

    1963-01-01

    Investigations on variously modified analogues of phospholipids elucidated the following substrate characteristics for phospholipase A (Crotalus adamanteus). 1. 1. Within the class of α-phosphoglycerides -isomers are readily hydrolysed, while -α-phospholipids appeared not to be attacked. 2.

  14. Transformation kinetics of mixed polymeric substrates under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bglucosidase and a-mannosidase were abundantly secreted in the growth medium. This research is the first report on mixed polymeric substrate biodegradation under sewer condition by A. niger, and could be considered as an open window on ...

  15. Biochemicalmethane potential (BMP) of solid organic substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raposo, F.; Fernández-Cegrí, V.; de la Rubia, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    and experimental conditions were investigated. The study was performed using four substrates: three positive control substrates (starch, cellulose and gelatine), and one raw biomassmaterial (mung bean) at two different inoculum to substrate ratios (ISR). RESULTS: The average methane yields for starch, cellulose......, gelatine and mung bean at ISR of 2 and 1 were 350 ± 33, 350 ± 29, 380 ± 42, 370 ± 36 and 370 ± 35 mL CH4 g−1 VSadded, respectively. The percentages of biotransformation of these substrates into methane were 85 ± 8, 85 ± 7, 88 ± 9, 85 ± 8 and 85 ± 8%, respectively. On the other hand, the first-order rate...

  16. Transferring substrates to the 26S proteasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Seeger, Michael; Gordon, Colin

    2003-01-01

    Ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation is not only involved in the recycling of amino acids from damaged or misfolded proteins but also represents an essential and deftly controlled mechanism for modulating the levels of key regulatory proteins. Chains of ubiquitin conjugated to a substrate...... protein specifically target it for degradation by the 26S proteasome, a huge multi-subunit protein complex found in all eukaryotic cells. Recent reports have clarified some of the molecular mechanisms involved in the transfer of ubiquitinated substrates from the ubiquitination machinery to the proteasome....... This novel substrate transportation step in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway seems to occur either directly or indirectly via certain substrate-recruiting proteins and appears to involve chaperones....

  17. Substrates and method for determining enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.E.; Bissell, E.R.

    1981-10-13

    A method is disclosed for determining the presence of an enzyme in a biological fluid, which includes the steps of contacting the fluid with a synthetic chromogenic substrate, which is an amino acid derivative of 7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin; incubating the substrate-containing fluid to effect enzymatic hydrolysis; and fluorometrically determining the presence of the free 7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin chromophore in the hydrolyzate. No Drawings

  18. Micromechanics of substrate-supported thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Han, Meidong; Wang, Shibin; Li, Lin-An; Xue, Xiuli

    2017-09-01

    The mechanical properties of metallic thin films deposited on a substrate play a crucial role in the performance of micro/nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) and flexible electronics. This article reviews ongoing study on the mechanics of substrate-supported thin films, with emphasis on the experimental characterization techniques, such as the rule of mixture and X-ray tensile testing. In particular, the determination of interfacial adhesion energy, film deformation, elastic properties and Bauschinger effect are discussed.

  19. Alternative substrates for higher mushrooms mycelia cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TETIANA KRUPODOROVA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of 29 species of higher mushroom mycelia on alternative substrates – wastes of Ukrainian oil-fat industry, has been investigated. The amount of mushroom mycelia obtaining on 12 investigated substrates varied significantly, from 1.0 g/L to 22.9 g/L on the 14th day of cultivation. The superficial cultivation adopted in this study allows for easy to choose appropriate medium (substrate for mycelia production. Alternative substrates (compared to glucose-peptone-yeast medium were selected for all studied species, from soybean cake – most suitable for the mycelial growth of 24 species, to walnut cake − suitable only for 2 species. The utilization of substrates has been evaluated by biological efficiency. The best index of biological efficiency varied from 19.0% to 41.6% depending on the mushroom species. It was established high biological efficiency of mycelia cultivation on substrates: wheat seed cake – Pleurotus djamor, Lyophyllum shimeji, Crinipellis schevczenkovi, Phellinus igniarius, Spongipellis litschaueri; oat seed cake – Ganoderma applanatum and G. lucidum; soybean cake – Hohenbuehelia myxotricha, Trametes versicolor, Morchella esculenta, Cordyceps sinensis, C. militaris, and Agrocybe aegerita; rape seed cake – Auriporia aurea; camelina seed cake – Fomes fomentarius. The cultivation of these species are perspective as a biotechnological process of agricultural wastes converted into mycelia, which could be used in different forms of products with therapeutic action: powder or tablets nutraceuticals or ingredients for functional foods.

  20. Manufacturing Process for OLED Integrated Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Cheng-Hung [Vitro Flat Glass LLC, Cheswick, PA (United States). Glass Technology Center

    2017-03-31

    The main objective of this project was to develop a low-cost integrated substrate for rigid OLED solid-state lighting produced at a manufacturing scale. The integrated substrates could include combinations of soda lime glass substrate, light extraction layer, and an anode layer (i.e., Transparent Conductive Oxide, TCO). Over the 3+ year course of the project, the scope of work was revised to focus on the development of a glass substrates with an internal light extraction (IEL) layer. A manufacturing-scale float glass on-line particle embedding process capable of producing an IEL glass substrate having a thickness of less than 1.7mm and an area larger than 500mm x 400mm was demonstrated. Substrates measuring 470mm x 370mm were used in the OLED manufacturing process for fabricating OLED lighting panels in single pixel devices as large as 120.5mm x 120.5mm. The measured light extraction efficiency (calculated as external quantum efficiency, EQE) for on-line produced IEL samples (>50%) met the project’s initial goal.

  1. Nanomechanics of hard films on compliant substrates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedy, Earl David, Jr. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Emerson, John Allen (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Bahr, David F. (Washington State University, Pullman, WA); Moody, Neville Reid; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Hales, Lucas (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN); Adams, David Price (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Yeager,John (Washington State University, Pullman, WA); Nyugen, Thao D. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Corona, Edmundo (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Kennedy, Marian S. (Clemson University, Clemson, SC); Cordill, Megan J. (Erich Schmid Institute, Leoben, Austria)

    2009-09-01

    Development of flexible thin film systems for biomedical, homeland security and environmental sensing applications has increased dramatically in recent years [1,2,3,4]. These systems typically combine traditional semiconductor technology with new flexible substrates, allowing for both the high electron mobility of semiconductors and the flexibility of polymers. The devices have the ability to be easily integrated into components and show promise for advanced design concepts, ranging from innovative microelectronics to MEMS and NEMS devices. These devices often contain layers of thin polymer, ceramic and metallic films where differing properties can lead to large residual stresses [5]. As long as the films remain substrate-bonded, they may deform far beyond their freestanding counterpart. Once debonded, substrate constraint disappears leading to film failure where compressive stresses can lead to wrinkling, delamination, and buckling [6,7,8] while tensile stresses can lead to film fracture and decohesion [9,10,11]. In all cases, performance depends on film adhesion. Experimentally it is difficult to measure adhesion. It is often studied using tape [12], pull off [13,14,15], and peel tests [16,17]. More recent techniques for measuring adhesion include scratch testing [18,19,20,21], four point bending [22,23,24], indentation [25,26,27], spontaneous blisters [28,29] and stressed overlayers [7,26,30,31,32,33]. Nevertheless, sample design and test techniques must be tailored for each system. There is a large body of elastic thin film fracture and elastic contact mechanics solutions for elastic films on rigid substrates in the published literature [5,7,34,35,36]. More recent work has extended these solutions to films on compliant substrates and show that increasing compliance markedly changes fracture energies compared with rigid elastic solution results [37,38]. However, the introduction of inelastic substrate response significantly complicates the problem [10,39,40]. As

  2. Embodied perception: A proposal to reconcile affordance and spatial perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canal Bruland, R.; van der Kamp, J.

    2015-01-01

    Proffitt's embodied approach to perception is deeply indebted to Gibson's ecological approach to visual perception, in particular the idea that the primary objects of perception are affordances or what the environment offers for action. Yet, rather than directly addressing affordance perception,

  3. Influence of the laser pre-quenched substrate on an electroplated chromium coating/steel substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuejun; Yan, Qian; Ma, Qian

    2017-05-01

    The chromium coatings were electroplated onto a laser pre-quenched steel substrate to improve the interfacial adhesion properties of chromium coating/steel substrate system. The influence of laser pre-treatment on the substrate, coating as well as interface was investigated by using microstructure characterization, hardness testing, tensile testing and finite element analysis. An apparent boundary line instead of an interlayer was identified between chromium coating/pre-quenched steel substrate. The Vickers hardness and yield strength of steel substrate were significantly improved after laser pre-quenching. The fracture toughness of chromium coating was increased by about 28.6% compared to the un-treated counterpart. The energy release rate for an interfacial crack in the chromium coating/laser-quenched substrate was smaller than that in the untreated specimen. These results may help understand the life prolongation mechanism for the laser pre-quenched chromium/coated steel parts.

  4. Perception of trigeminal mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiou, Renée-Pier; Lepore, Franco; Bryant, Bruce; Lundström, Johan N; Frasnelli, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminal system is a chemical sense allowing for the perception of chemosensory information in our environment. However, contrary to smell and taste, we lack a thorough understanding of the trigeminal processing of mixtures. We, therefore, investigated trigeminal perception using mixtures of 3 relatively receptor-specific agonists together with one control odor in different proportions to determine basic perceptual dimensions of trigeminal perception. We found that 4 main dimensions were linked to trigeminal perception: sensations of intensity, warmth, coldness, and pain. We subsequently investigated perception of binary mixtures of trigeminal stimuli by means of these 4 perceptual dimensions using different concentrations of a cooling stimulus (eucalyptol) mixed with a stimulus that evokes warmth perception (cinnamaldehyde). To determine if sensory interactions are mainly of central or peripheral origin, we presented stimuli in a physical "mixture" or as a "combination" presented separately to individual nostrils. Results showed that mixtures generally yielded higher ratings than combinations on the trigeminal dimensions "intensity," "warm," and "painful," whereas combinations yielded higher ratings than mixtures on the trigeminal dimension "cold." These results suggest dimension-specific interactions in the perception of trigeminal mixtures, which may be explained by particular interactions that may take place on peripheral or central levels. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Perception, Action, and Consciousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    What is the relationship between perception and action, between an organism and its environment, in explaining consciousness? These are issues at the heart of philosophy of mind and the cognitive sciences. This book explores the relationship between perception and action from a variety of interdi......What is the relationship between perception and action, between an organism and its environment, in explaining consciousness? These are issues at the heart of philosophy of mind and the cognitive sciences. This book explores the relationship between perception and action from a variety...... hypothesis The former champions the role of sensorimotor dynamics in perceptual awareness while the latter favours a functional dichotomy between perception and action. At least on the surface, these two approaches are in conflict. Where one emphasizes the interdependence of action and perception, the other...... suggests that action and perception are functionally distinct. The dialogue between these two approaches brings out wider theoretical issues underlying the research paradigm of cognitive sciences and philosophy of mind....

  6. Neural networks for perception human and machine perception

    CERN Document Server

    Wechsler, Harry

    1991-01-01

    Neural Networks for Perception, Volume 1: Human and Machine Perception focuses on models for understanding human perception in terms of distributed computation and examples of PDP models for machine perception. This book addresses both theoretical and practical issues related to the feasibility of both explaining human perception and implementing machine perception in terms of neural network models. The book is organized into two parts. The first part focuses on human perception. Topics on network model ofobject recognition in human vision, the self-organization of functional architecture in t

  7. When writing impairs reading: letter perception's susceptibility to motor interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Karin H; Gauthier, Isabel

    2009-08-01

    The effect of writing on the concurrent visual perception of letters was investigated in a series of studies using an interference paradigm. Participants drew shapes and letters while simultaneously visually identifying letters and shapes embedded in noise. Experiments 1-3 demonstrated that letter perception, but not the perception of shapes, was affected by motor interference. This suggests a strong link between the perception of letters and the neural substrates engaged during writing. The overlap both in category (letter vs. shape) and in the perceptual similarity of the features (straight vs. curvy) of the seen and drawn items determined the amount of interference. Experiment 4 demonstrated that intentional production of letters is not necessary for the interference to occur, because passive movement of the hand in the shape of letters also interfered with letter perception. When passive movements were used, however, only the category of the drawn items (letters vs. shapes), but not the perceptual similarity, had an influence, suggesting that motor representations for letters may selectively influence visual perception of letters through proprioceptive feedback, with an additional influence of perceptual similarity that depends on motor programs.

  8. Embodied Perception: A Proposal to Reconcile Affordance and Spatial Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Ca?al-Bruland, Rouwen; van der Kamp, John

    2015-01-01

    Proffitt's embodied approach to perception is deeply indebted to Gibson's ecological approach to visual perception, in particular the idea that the primary objects of perception are affordances or what the environment offers for action. Yet, rather than directly addressing affordance perception, most of the empirical work evaluating Proffitt's approach focuses on the perception of spatial properties of the environment. We propose that theoretical and empirical efforts should be directed towar...

  9. Atomically flat single terminated oxide substrate surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Yang, Chan-Ho; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Jeong, Yoon H.

    2017-05-01

    Scientific interest in atomically controlled layer-by-layer fabrication of transition metal oxide thin films and heterostructures has increased intensely in recent decades for basic physics reasons as well as for technological applications. This trend has to do, in part, with the coming post-Moore era, and functional oxide electronics could be regarded as a viable alternative for the current semiconductor electronics. Furthermore, the interface of transition metal oxides is exposing many new emergent phenomena and is increasingly becoming a playground for testing new ideas in condensed matter physics. To achieve high quality epitaxial thin films and heterostructures of transition metal oxides with atomically controlled interfaces, one critical requirement is the use of atomically flat single terminated oxide substrates since the atomic arrangements and the reaction chemistry of the topmost surface layer of substrates determine the growth and consequent properties of the overlying films. Achieving the atomically flat and chemically single terminated surface state of commercially available substrates, however, requires judicious efforts because the surface of as-received substrates is of chemically mixed nature and also often polar. In this review, we summarize the surface treatment procedures to accomplish atomically flat surfaces with single terminating layer for various metal oxide substrates. We particularly focus on the substrates with lattice constant ranging from 4.00 Å to 3.70 Å, as the lattice constant of most perovskite materials falls into this range. For materials outside the range, one can utilize the substrates to induce compressive or tensile strain on the films and explore new states not available in bulk. The substrates covered in this review, which have been chosen with commercial availability and, most importantly, experimental practicality as a criterion, are KTaO3, REScO3 (RE = Rare-earth elements), SrTiO3, La0.18Sr0.82Al0.59Ta0.41O3 (LSAT), Nd

  10. Multistructural biomimetic substrates for controlled cellular differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orza, Anamaria I; Kanarpardy, Ganesh K; Biris, Alexandru S; Mihu, Carmen; Soritau, Olga; Diudea, Mircea; Florea, Adrian; Matei, Horea; Balici, Stefana; Mudalige, Thilak

    2014-01-01

    Multidimensional scaffolds are considered to be ideal candidates for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering based on their potential to provide an excellent microenvironment and direct the fate of the cultured cells. More recently, the use of stem cells in medicine has opened a new technological opportunity for controlled tissue formation. However, the mechanism through which the substrate directs the differentiation of stem cells is still rather unclear. Data concerning its specific surface chemistry, topology, and its signaling ability need to be further understood and analyzed. In our study, atomic force microscopy was used to study the stiffness, roughness, and topology of the collagen (Coll) and metallized collagen (MC) substrates, proposed as an excellent substrate for regenerative medicine. The importance of signaling molecules was studied by constructing a new hybrid signaling substrate that contains both collagen and laminin extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The cellular response—such as attachment capability, proliferation and cardiac and neuronal phenotype expression on the metallized and non-metallized hybrid substrates (collagen + laminin)—was studied using MTT viability assay and immunohistochemistry studies. Our findings indicate that such hybrid materials could play an important role in the regeneration of complex tissues. (paper)

  11. Substrate morphology repetition in 'thick' polymer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietsch, Ullrich; Panzner, Tobias; Pfeiffer, Franz; Robinson, Ian K.

    2005-01-01

    Using Grazing-incidence small-angle scattering (GISAXS) technique we investigated the surface morphology of polymer films spin-coated on different silicon substrates. As substrates we used either technologically smooth silicon wafers or the same silicon wafer coated with thin aluminium or gold films which show a granular structure at the surface. Although the polymer thickness exceeds 300nm the GISAXS pattern of the film shows the same in-plane angle distribution Δ2Θ as the underlying substrate. Annealing the polymer films at a temperature above its glass transition temperature Δ2Θ changed from a broad to a narrow distribution as it is typically for films on pure silicon. The experiment can be interpreted by roughness replication and density fluctuation within the polymer film created while spin-coating at room temperature. Due to the low segment mobility there are density fluctuations which repeat the surface morphology of the substrate. Above the glass temperature the polymer density can be homogenized independently from the morphology of the substrate

  12. Radiolabelled substrates for angiotensin converting enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, A.Y.; Ryan, J.W.; Ryan, J.P.; Ryan, U.S.

    1986-01-01

    Six [3H]benzoyl-tripeptides were prepared and tested as substrates for angiotensin converting enzyme. Each was prepared first as its [4-iodo]-benzoyl-analog, and an atom of 3H per molecule was introduced by catalytic dehalogenation in 3H2-gas. Kinetic parameters were measured at 37 degrees C using as buffer 0.05 M Hepes, pH 8.0 containing 0.1 M NaCl and 0.6 M Na2SO4. When the substrates were used at concentrations far below their respective Km values, fractional rates of substrate utilization per unit time for constant enzyme concentration were direct function of respective second order rate constants (Kc/Km). Although absolute values of Kc/Km differed for human enzyme as opposed to rabbit enzyme, relative values of Kc/Km were virtually identical. Similarly, relative rates of substrates utilization during passage through lungs of anesthetized rats were similar to relative values of Kc/Km measured in vitro. Thus, there is now a range of ACE substrates usable, in vitro and in vivo, under conditions of first order enzyme kinetics, conditions under which values of V/Km and Ki can be measured directly

  13. Decoding P4-ATPase substrate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Bartholomew P; Graham, Todd R

    Cellular membranes display a diversity of functions that are conferred by the unique composition and organization of their proteins and lipids. One important aspect of lipid organization is the asymmetric distribution of phospholipids (PLs) across the plasma membrane. The unequal distribution of key PLs between the cytofacial and exofacial leaflets of the bilayer creates physical surface tension that can be used to bend the membrane; and like Ca 2+ , a chemical gradient that can be used to transduce biochemical signals. PL flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase (P4-ATPase) family are the principle transporters used to set and repair this PL gradient and the asymmetric organization of these membranes are encoded by the substrate specificity of these enzymes. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of P4-ATPase substrate specificity will help reveal their role in membrane organization and cell biology. Further, decoding the structural determinants of substrate specificity provides investigators the opportunity to mutationally tune this specificity to explore the role of particular PL substrates in P4-ATPase cellular functions. This work reviews the role of P4-ATPases in membrane biology, presents our current understanding of P4-ATPase substrate specificity, and discusses how these fundamental aspects of P4-ATPase enzymology may be used to enhance our knowledge of cellular membrane biology.

  14. Substrate-Directed Catalytic Selective Chemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawano, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2018-03-06

    The development of highly efficient reactions at only the desired position is one of the most important subjects in organic chemistry. Most of the reactions in current organic chemistry are reagent- or catalyst-controlled reactions, and the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reactions are determined by the inherent nature of the reagent or catalyst. In sharp contrast, substrate-directed reaction determines the selectivity of the reactions by the functional group on the substrate and can strictly distinguish sterically and electronically similar multiple reaction sites in the substrate. In this Perspective, three topics of substrate-directed reaction are mainly reviewed: (1) directing group-assisted epoxidation of alkenes, (2) ring-opening reactions of epoxides by various nucleophiles, and (3) catalytic peptide synthesis. Our newly developed synthetic methods with new ligands including hydroxamic acid derived ligands realized not only highly efficient reactions but also pinpointed reactions at the expected position, demonstrating the substrate-directed reaction as a powerful method to achieve the desired regio- and stereoselective functionalization of molecules from different viewpoints of reagent- or catalyst-controlled reactions.

  15. Colour perception in ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banaschewski, T.; Ruppert, S; Tannock, R.; Albrecht, B.; Becker, A.; Uebel, H.; Sergeant, J.A.; Rothenberger, A.

    2006-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with unexplained impairments on speeded naming of coloured stimuli. These deficits may reflect hypofunctioning retinal dopaminergic mechanisms impairing particularly blue-yellow colour discrimination. Colour perception and rapid colour

  16. Metacognition in Multisensory Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroy, Ophelia; Spence, Charles; Noppeney, Uta

    2016-10-01

    Metacognition - the ability to monitor one's own decisions and representations, their accuracy and uncertainty - is considered a hallmark of intelligent behavior. Little is known about metacognition in our natural multisensory environment. To form a coherent percept, the brain should integrate signals from a common cause but segregate those from independent causes. Multisensory perception thus relies on inferring the world's causal structure, raising new challenges for metacognition. We discuss the extent to which observers can monitor their uncertainties not only about their final integrated percept but also about the individual sensory signals and the world's causal structure. The latter causal metacognition highlights fundamental links between perception and other cognitive domains such as social and abstract reasoning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Multifunctionality is affected by interactions between green roof plant species, substrate depth, and substrate type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusza, Yann; Barot, Sébastien; Kraepiel, Yvan; Lata, Jean-Christophe; Abbadie, Luc; Raynaud, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    Green roofs provide ecosystem services through evapotranspiration and nutrient cycling that depend, among others, on plant species, substrate type, and substrate depth. However, no study has assessed thoroughly how interactions between these factors alter ecosystem functions and multifunctionality of green roofs. We simulated some green roof conditions in a pot experiment. We planted 20 plant species from 10 genera and five families (Asteraceae, Caryophyllaceae, Crassulaceae, Fabaceae, and Poaceae) on two substrate types (natural vs. artificial) and two substrate depths (10 cm vs. 30 cm). As indicators of major ecosystem functions, we measured aboveground and belowground biomasses, foliar nitrogen and carbon content, foliar transpiration, substrate water retention, and dissolved organic carbon and nitrates in leachates. Interactions between substrate type and depth strongly affected ecosystem functions. Biomass production was increased in the artificial substrate and deeper substrates, as was water retention in most cases. In contrast, dissolved organic carbon leaching was higher in the artificial substrates. Except for the Fabaceae species, nitrate leaching was reduced in deep, natural soils. The highest transpiration rates were associated with natural soils. All functions were modulated by plant families or species. Plant effects differed according to the observed function and the type and depth of the substrate. Fabaceae species grown on natural soils had the most noticeable patterns, allowing high biomass production and high water retention but also high nitrate leaching from deep pots. No single combination of factors enhanced simultaneously all studied ecosystem functions, highlighting that soil-plant interactions induce trade-offs between ecosystem functions. Substrate type and depth interactions are major drivers for green roof multifunctionality.

  18. Perception and Strategic Warning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-01

    N-i273-AF November 1979 PERCEPTION AND STRATEGIC WARNING Edmund Brunner, Jr. A Rand Note pepared for the Unid Statu Ar Fom IRand( A FO"WD PUSLIC...had, falsely or not, perceived a condition of strategic warning? Histories of crises and wars provide some useful evidence on such questions , but the...perception of strategic warning in their minds is not a completely open-or-shut question . There are hazards along the trail. IV. INFORMATION COLLECTION

  19. Perception, time of perception, perception of the time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barata, André

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available From a conceptual point of view, time is independent of its experience. That is: it can be given a conceptual description of time without any reference to terms related to the subjective consciousness of time. But concerning a phenomenology of that subjective experience of time, it can it be showed that such experience of time is, in itself, temporal. The very same terms employed in a conceptual description of time – terms like “change” and “duration”– are implied in the phenomenological description of every perception, including perception of time. This authorizes a characterization of subjective time experience as subjective time. At last, based on temporal nature of perception of time, I will suggest an explanation for our common experience of asymmetries subjective time and objective time.Desde un punto de vista conceptual, el tiempo es independiente respecto de la experiencia del tiempo. Es decir: puede darse una descripción conceptual del tiempo sin referencia ninguna a términos relacionados con la conciencia subjetiva del tiempo. Pero en lo concerniente a una fenomenología de esa experiencia subjetiva del tiempo, puede revelarse que tal experiencia de tiempo es, ella en sí misma, temporal? Los mismísimos términos empleados en una descripción conceptual del tiempo, como “cambio” y “duración”, están implicados en la descripción fenomenológica de toda percepción, incluida la percepción del tiempo. Esto autoriza una caracterización de la experiencia subjetiva del tiempo como tiempo subjetivo. Finalmente, sobre la base de la naturaleza temporal de la percepción del tiempo, sugeriré una explicación racional de nuestra experiencia común de asimetrías entre el tiempo subjetivo y el tiempo objetivo.

  20. Music alters visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolij, Jacob; Meurs, Maaike

    2011-04-21

    Visual perception is not a passive process: in order to efficiently process visual input, the brain actively uses previous knowledge (e.g., memory) and expectations about what the world should look like. However, perception is not only influenced by previous knowledge. Especially the perception of emotional stimuli is influenced by the emotional state of the observer. In other words, how we perceive the world does not only depend on what we know of the world, but also by how we feel. In this study, we further investigated the relation between mood and perception. We let observers do a difficult stimulus detection task, in which they had to detect schematic happy and sad faces embedded in noise. Mood was manipulated by means of music. We found that observers were more accurate in detecting faces congruent with their mood, corroborating earlier research. However, in trials in which no actual face was presented, observers made a significant number of false alarms. The content of these false alarms, or illusory percepts, was strongly influenced by the observers' mood. As illusory percepts are believed to reflect the content of internal representations that are employed by the brain during top-down processing of visual input, we conclude that top-down modulation of visual processing is not purely predictive in nature: mood, in this case manipulated by music, may also directly alter the way we perceive the world.

  1. Music alters visual perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Jolij

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual perception is not a passive process: in order to efficiently process visual input, the brain actively uses previous knowledge (e.g., memory and expectations about what the world should look like. However, perception is not only influenced by previous knowledge. Especially the perception of emotional stimuli is influenced by the emotional state of the observer. In other words, how we perceive the world does not only depend on what we know of the world, but also by how we feel. In this study, we further investigated the relation between mood and perception. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We let observers do a difficult stimulus detection task, in which they had to detect schematic happy and sad faces embedded in noise. Mood was manipulated by means of music. We found that observers were more accurate in detecting faces congruent with their mood, corroborating earlier research. However, in trials in which no actual face was presented, observers made a significant number of false alarms. The content of these false alarms, or illusory percepts, was strongly influenced by the observers' mood. CONCLUSIONS: As illusory percepts are believed to reflect the content of internal representations that are employed by the brain during top-down processing of visual input, we conclude that top-down modulation of visual processing is not purely predictive in nature: mood, in this case manipulated by music, may also directly alter the way we perceive the world.

  2. Rice Seedling Substrate Produced by Coal Gangue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHAO Yu-fei

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Peats are the mostly used material in making rice seedling substrate. However, mining peats could cause environmental problems. In order to reduce or replace peats in rice seedling substrate industry, this paper studied suitable way to configure rice seedling. The coal gangue was used to experiment cultivating rice. Four rice seeding experiments were carried out based on physical and chemical properties of materials attributes. The results showed:(1 Coal gangue was feasible for rice seedling; (2 The maximum adding amount of coal gangue was 80%(volume ratio though the coal gangue need to be activated; (3 In the case of no activated treatment only 38%(volume ratio of coal gangue could be added to the substrate.

  3. Plasma jet printing for flexible substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhiraman, Ram P.; Singh, Eric; Diaz-Cartagena, Diana C.; Koehne, Jessica; Meyyappan, M. [Center for Nanotechnology, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States); Nordlund, Dennis [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2016-03-21

    Recent interest in flexible electronics and wearable devices has created a demand for fast and highly repeatable printing processes suitable for device manufacturing. Robust printing technology is critical for the integration of sensors and other devices on flexible substrates such as paper and textile. An atmospheric pressure plasma-based printing process has been developed to deposit different types of nanomaterials on flexible substrates. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were deposited on paper to demonstrate site-selective deposition as well as direct printing without any type of patterning. Plasma-printed nanotubes were compared with non-plasma-printed samples under similar gas flow and other experimental conditions and found to be denser with higher conductivity. The utility of the nanotubes on the paper substrate as a biosensor and chemical sensor was demonstrated by the detection of dopamine, a neurotransmitter, and ammonia, respectively.

  4. Growth of lettuce seedlings in different substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milene Rodrigues Peres

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This research studied the growth of lettuce seedlings (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Veronica cultivated under greenhouse conditions, using polystyrene trays with 128 cells and three different commercial substrates: Golden Mix, Plantmax and Plugmix. The statistical design was in the form of randomized blocks, with eight (8 replications. Fifteen days after sowing the seeds, samples (five in total of plants were taken to evaluate the height, number of leaves, leaf area, leaf specific area, leaf specific weight, absolute and relative growth rates and net assimilation rates. The evaluated growth indexes showed that seedlings produced with the Plantmax and Plugmix substrates could be planted 25 days after sowing, since they have at least four definitive leaves. The Plantmax substrate showed, at the end of the evaluation, the best results in height, dry weight, leaf specific area, absolute growth rates and net assimilation rates.

  5. Substrate recognition by ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-02-01

    The ribonucleoprotein complex ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a site-specific endoribonuclease essential for the survival of the eukaryotic cell. RNase MRP closely resembles RNase P (a universal endoribonuclease responsible for the maturation of the 5' ends of tRNA) but recognizes distinct substrates including pre-rRNA and mRNA. Here we report the results of an in vitro selection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP substrates starting from a pool of random sequences. The results indicate that RNase MRP cleaves single-stranded RNA and is sensitive to sequences in the immediate vicinity of the cleavage site requiring a cytosine at the position +4 relative to the cleavage site. Structural implications of the differences in substrate recognition by RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  6. Anisotropic dewetting on stretched elastomeric substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, L; He, L H

    2008-08-01

    We study the instability of a very thin liquid film resting on a uniformly stretched soft elastomeric substrate driven by van der Waals forces. A linear stability analysis shows that the critical fluctuation wavelength in the tensile direction is larger than those in the other directions. The magnitudes of the critical wavelengths are adjustable in the sense that they depend on the principal stretch of the substrate. For example, when the principal stretch of the substrate varies from 1.0 (unstretched) to 3.0, the range of the critical wavelength in the tensile direction increases by 7.0% while that normal to the tensile direction decreases by 8.7%. Therefore, the phenomenon may find potential applications in creating tunable topographically patterned surfaces with nano- to microscale features.

  7. Michaelis constants of non-chromogenic substrates may be determined using chromogenic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, D.A.; Vassall, R.F.; Blake, R.C. II

    1987-05-01

    The object of these experiments was to demonstrate a means of determining the Michaelis constants (Km and Vmax) of a non-chromogenic substrate in a three-part experimental system containing a non-chromogenic substrate, the corresponding enzyme, and an appropriate chromogenic substrate. Two experimental systems were examined, one in which the enzyme activity was subject to product inhibition (alkaline phosphatase) and one in which the activity was not (..beta..-lactamase). In both systems, the initial experimental goal was to quantify the area defined by the entire kinetic trace (absorbance versus time) obtained with the chromogenic substrate in the absence or presence of the non-chromogenic substrate. The difference between these two areas was directly proportional to the concentration of the non-chromogenic substrate and inversely proportional to the Vmax of the non-chromogenic substrate. The value of Vmax thus obtained could then be used with the appropriate integrated Michaelis-Menten rate equation to extract the value of the Km for the non-chromogenic substrate. This method yielded values of kinetic constants that were in good agreement with those obtained directly and/or those available from the literature. It is anticipated that this method may be extended to enzymes with more complicated kinetic mechanisms.

  8. Integration substrate with a ultra-high-density capacitor and a through-substrate via

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klootwijk, J.H.; Roozeboom, F.; Ruigrok, J.J.M.; Reefman, D.

    2014-01-01

    An integration substrate for a system in package comprises a through-substrate via and a trench capacitor wherein with a trench filling that includes at least four electrically conductive capacitor-electrode layers in an alternating arrangement with dielectric layers. --The capacitor-electrode

  9. An Efficient and Accurate Method of Estimating Substrate Noise Coupling in Heavily Doped Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-24

    substrate resistances in large circuits,” in Proc. European Design and Test Conference, March 1996, pp. 560-565. [5] E. Charbon , R. Gharpurey, P. Miliozzi...and E. Charbon , “Substrate coupling: modeling, simulation and design perspectives,” in Proc. of Quality Electronic Design, March 2004, pp. 283-290. [8

  10. High alcohol production by solid substrate fermentation from starchy substrates using thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sree, N.K.; Sridhar, M.; Suresh, K.; Rao, L.V. [Department of Microbiology, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500007, Andhra Pradesh (India)

    1999-06-01

    Solid Substrate Fermentation system (SSF) was used to produce ethanol from various starchy substrates like sweet sorghum, sweet potato, wheat flour, rice starch, soluble starch and potato starch using thermotolerant yeast isolate (VS{sub 3}) by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process. Alcohol produced was estimated by gas chromatography after an incubation time of 96 hrs at 37 C and 42 C. More ethanol was produced from rice starch and sweet sorghum. The maximum amount of ethanol produced from these substrates using VS{sub 3} was 10 g/100 g and 3.5 g/100 g substrate (rice starch) and 8.2 g and 7.5 g/100 g substrate (sweet sorghum) at 37 C and 42 C respectively. (orig.) With 2 figs., 1 tab., 12 refs.

  11. Ferromagnetic film on a superconducting substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulaevskii, L. N.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2001-01-01

    We study the equilibrium domain structure and magnetic flux around a ferromagnetic film with perpendicular magnetization M{sub 0} on a superconducting (SC) substrate. At 4{pi}M{sub 0}substrate, l{sub N}/4{pi}{lambda}{sub L}>>1; {lambda}{sub L} being the London penetration length.

  12. Ferromagnetic film on a superconducting substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulaevskii, L. N.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2001-01-01

    We study the equilibrium domain structure and magnetic flux around a ferromagnetic film with perpendicular magnetization M 0 on a superconducting (SC) substrate. At 4πM 0 c1 the SC is in the Meissner state and the equilibrium domain width in the film, l, scales as (l/4πλ L )=(l N /4πλ L ) 2/3 with the domain width on a normal (nonsuperconducting) substrate, l N /4πλ L >>1; λ L being the London penetration length

  13. Substrate bias voltage and deposition temperature dependence on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... on Si (100) substrate. Deposition at higher substrate temperature causes the film to react with Si forming silicides at the film/Si substrate interface. Ti film undergoes a microstructural transition from hexagonal plate-like to round-shaped grains as the substrate temperature was raised from 300 to 50 °C during film deposition ...

  14. Interfacial biocatalysis on charged and immobilized substrates: the roles of enzyme and substrate surface charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Bob E; Kellis, James T; Cascão-Pereira, Luis G; Robertson, Channing R; Frank, Curtis W

    2011-01-04

    An enzyme charge ladder was used to examine the role of electrostatic interactions involved in biocatalysis at the solid-liquid interface. The reactive substrate consisted of an immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA) multilayer prepared using a layer-by-layer technique. The zeta potential of the BSA substrate and each enzyme variant was measured to determine the absolute charge in solution. Enzyme adsorption and the rate of substrate surface hydrolysis were monitored for the enzyme charge ladder series to provide information regarding the strength of the enzyme-substrate interaction and the rate of interfacial biocatalysis. First, each variant of the charge ladder was examined at pH 8 for various solution ionic strengths. We found that for positively charged variants the adsorption increased with the magnitude of the charge until the surface became saturated. For higher ionic strength solutions, a greater positive enzyme charge was required to induce adsorption. Interestingly, the maximum catalytic rate was not achieved at enzyme saturation but at an invariable intermediate level of adsorption for each ionic strength value. Furthermore, the maximum achievable reaction rate for the charge ladder was larger for higher ionic strength values. We propose that diffusion plays an important role in interfacial biocatalysis, and for strong enzyme-substrate interaction, the rate of diffusion is reduced, leading to a decrease in the overall reaction rate. We investigated the effect of substrate charge by varying the solution pH from 6.1 to 8.7 and by examining multiple ionic strength values for each pH. The same intermediate level of adsorption was found to maximize the overall reaction rate. However, the ionic strength response of the maximum achievable rate was clearly dependent on the pH of the experiment. We propose that this observation is not a direct effect of pH but is caused by the change in substrate surface charge induced by changing the pH. To prove this

  15. Inverter power module with distributed support for direct substrate cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David Harold [San Pedro, CA; Korich, Mark D [Chino Hills, CA; Ward, Terence G [Redondo Beach, CA; Mann, Brooks S [Redondo Beach, CA

    2012-08-21

    Systems and/or methods are provided for an inverter power module with distributed support for direct substrate cooling. An inverter module comprises a power electronic substrate. A first support frame is adapted to house the power electronic substrate and has a first region adapted to allow direct cooling of the power electronic substrate. A gasket is interposed between the power electronic substrate and the first support frame. The gasket is configured to provide a seal between the first region and the power electronic substrate. A second support frame is adapted to house the power electronic substrate and joined to the first support frame to form the seal.

  16. Hydrolysis kinetics of dissolved polymer substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, W.T.M.; Zeeman, G.; Lettinga, G.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the relation between the hydrolysis rate of dissolved polymer substrates and sludge concentration was investigated in two ways, viz. by laboratory experiments and by computer simulations. In the simulations, the hydrolysis of dissolved polymer components was regarded as a general

  17. Substrate conformal imprint lithography for nanophotonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuuren, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    The field of nano-photonics studies the interaction and control of light with dielectric, semiconductor and metal structures which are comparable in size or smaller than the vacuum wavelength of light. In this thesis we present Substrate Conformal Imprint Lithography (SCIL) as a novel wafer-scale

  18. A Spectral Emissivity Library of Spoil Substrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pivovarník, Marek; Pikl, Miroslav; Frouz, J.; Zemek, František; Kopačková, V.; Notesco, G.; Ben Dor, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2016) E-ISSN 2306-5729 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : post- mining sites * spectral emissivity * spectral library * spoil substrates Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7)

  19. Substrate radical intermediates in soluble methane monooxygenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Aimin; Jin Yi; Zhang Jingyan; Brazeau, Brian J.; Lipscomb, John D.

    2005-01-01

    EPR spin-trapping experiments were carried out using the three-component soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO). Spin-traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), α-4-pyridyl-1-oxide N-tert-butylnitrone (POBN), and nitrosobenzene (NOB) were used to investigate the possible formation of substrate radical intermediates during catalysis. In contrast to a previous report, the NADH-coupled oxidations of various substrates did not produce any trapped radical species when DMPO or POBN was present. However, radicals were detected by these traps when only the MMO reductase component and NADH were present. DMPO and POBN were found to be weak inhibitors of the MMO reaction. In contrast, NOB is a strong inhibitor for the MMO-catalyzed nitrobenzene oxidation reaction. When NOB was used as a spin-trap in the complete MMO system with or without substrate, EPR signals from an NOB radical were detected. We propose that a molecule of NOB acts simultaneously as a substrate and a spin-trap for MMO, yielding the long-lived radical and supporting a stepwise mechanism for MMO

  20. MIXED SUBSTRATES IN ENVIRONMENT AND BIOTECHNOLOGICAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Pirog

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The modern literature and own experimental data on the use of substrates’ mixtures for intensification of microbial synthesis technologies of practically valuable fermentation products (ethanol, lactic acid, butanediol, primary (amino acids, n-hydroxybenzoate, triglycerides and secondary (lovastatin, surfactants metabolites as well as for intensification of biodegradation of aromatic xenobiotics (benzene, cresols, phenols, toluene and pesticides (dimethoate are presented. Special attention is paid on the molecular mechanisms that were established in recent years and underlying the phenomenon catabolic repression in Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative (Pseudomonas, Escherichia coli bacteria and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and on the use of these data to develop technologies for utilization of plant biomass to produce industrially important metabolites. The survival strategies of heterotrophic microorganisms in natural oligotrophic environments are considered, including the simultaneous use of multiple substrates, allowing improved kinetic characteristics that give them a competitive advantage, also provided significant metabolic/physiological flexibility. The own experimental data on the use of mixtures of growth substrates for the intensification of surfactants’ synthesis of Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 are summarized. The dependence of the synthesis of surfactants in a mixture of energy excess (hexadecane and energy deficient (glycerol, ethanol substrates on the way of inoculum preparation, concentration of mono-substrates in the mixture, and their molar ratio were determined.

  1. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Bernard, Craig; Rodrigo, Rochelle M.; Keith, Austin J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-03-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system’s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard surfaces has been extensively studied, little work has been done on soft surfaces. Here, we investigate for the first time the influence of macroscale and nanoscale substrate modulus on whole animal adhesion on two different substrates (cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane) in air and find that across 5 orders of magnitude in macroscale modulus, there is no change in adhesion. On the nanoscale, however, gecko adhesion is shown to depend on substrate modulus. This suggests that low surface-layer modulus may inhibit the gecko adhesion system, independent of other influencing factors such as macroscale composite modulus and surface energy. Understanding the limits of gecko adhesion is vital for clarifying adhesive mechanisms and in the design of synthetic adhesives for soft substrates (including for biomedical applications and wearable electronics).

  2. Substrate reduction therapy for glycosphingolipid storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, R H; Platt, F M

    2001-03-01

    Substrate reduction therapy is a novel approach to treating glycosphingolipid (GSL) lysosomal storage disorders. These diseases are caused by mutations in the genes coding for enzymes involved in GSL catabolism and are characterised by the accumulation of GSL substrates within the lysosomes of cells. The aim of substrate reduction therapy is to inhibit the rate of synthesis of GSLs to levels where the residual activity of the mutant catabolic enzyme is sufficient to prevent pathological storage. In this review we discuss the development of N-butyldeoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ), an imino sugar that inhibits the ceramide-specific glucosyltransferase which catalyses the first committed step of GSL synthesis. This agent has been shown to slow accumulation of stored glycolipid in an in vitro model of Gaucher's disease and in knockout mouse models of Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases. Furthermore, administration of NB-DNJ to Sandhoff mice delays the onset of neurological disease and also slows its progression. We discuss safety and efficacy data from the clinical trial of substrate reduction with NB-DNJ which has been undertaken in patients with Type 1 Gaucher's disease. This trial provides a proof-of-principle for the use of this approach in a wide range of GSL lysosomal storage diseases.

  3. Buckling Behavior of Substrate Supported Graphene Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuijian Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The buckling of graphene sheets on substrates can significantly degrade their performance in materials and devices. Therefore, a systematic investigation on the buckling behavior of monolayer graphene sheet/substrate systems is carried out in this paper by both molecular mechanics simulations and theoretical analysis. From 70 simulation cases of simple-supported graphene sheets with different sizes under uniaxial compression, two different buckling modes are investigated and revealed to be dominated by the graphene size. Especially, for graphene sheets with length larger than 3 nm and width larger than 1.1 nm, the buckling mode depends only on the length/width ratio. Besides, it is revealed that the existence of graphene substrate can increase the critical buckling stress and strain to 4.39 N/m and 1.58%, respectively, which are about 10 times those for free-standing graphene sheets. Moreover, for graphene sheets with common size (longer than 20 nm, both theoretical and simulation results show that the critical buckling stress and strain are dominated only by the adhesive interactions with substrate and independent of the graphene size. Results in this work provide valuable insight and guidelines for the design and application of graphene-derived materials and nano-electromechanical systems.

  4. Buckling Behavior of Substrate Supported Graphene Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kuijian; Chen, Yuli; Pan, Fei; Wang, Shengtao; Ma, Yong; Liu, Qijun

    2016-01-07

    The buckling of graphene sheets on substrates can significantly degrade their performance in materials and devices. Therefore, a systematic investigation on the buckling behavior of monolayer graphene sheet/substrate systems is carried out in this paper by both molecular mechanics simulations and theoretical analysis. From 70 simulation cases of simple-supported graphene sheets with different sizes under uniaxial compression, two different buckling modes are investigated and revealed to be dominated by the graphene size. Especially, for graphene sheets with length larger than 3 nm and width larger than 1.1 nm, the buckling mode depends only on the length/width ratio. Besides, it is revealed that the existence of graphene substrate can increase the critical buckling stress and strain to 4.39 N/m and 1.58%, respectively, which are about 10 times those for free-standing graphene sheets. Moreover, for graphene sheets with common size (longer than 20 nm), both theoretical and simulation results show that the critical buckling stress and strain are dominated only by the adhesive interactions with substrate and independent of the graphene size. Results in this work provide valuable insight and guidelines for the design and application of graphene-derived materials and nano-electromechanical systems.

  5. Perception of Upright: Multisensory Convergence and the Role of Temporo-Parietal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmand, Amir; Winnick, Ariel

    2017-01-01

    We inherently maintain a stable perception of the world despite frequent changes in the head, eye, and body positions. Such “orientation constancy” is a prerequisite for coherent spatial perception and sensorimotor planning. As a multimodal sensory reference, perception of upright represents neural processes that subserve orientation constancy through integration of sensory information encoding the eye, head, and body positions. Although perception of upright is distinct from perception of body orientation, they share similar neural substrates within the cerebral cortical networks involved in perception of spatial orientation. These cortical networks, mainly within the temporo-parietal junction, are crucial for multisensory processing and integration that generate sensory reference frames for coherent perception of self-position and extrapersonal space transformations. In this review, we focus on these neural mechanisms and discuss (i) neurobehavioral aspects of orientation constancy, (ii) sensory models that address the neurophysiology underlying perception of upright, and (iii) the current evidence for the role of cerebral cortex in perception of upright and orientation constancy, including findings from the neurological disorders that affect cortical function. PMID:29118736

  6. Perception of Upright: Multisensory Convergence and the Role of Temporo-Parietal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Kheradmand

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We inherently maintain a stable perception of the world despite frequent changes in the head, eye, and body positions. Such “orientation constancy” is a prerequisite for coherent spatial perception and sensorimotor planning. As a multimodal sensory reference, perception of upright represents neural processes that subserve orientation constancy through integration of sensory information encoding the eye, head, and body positions. Although perception of upright is distinct from perception of body orientation, they share similar neural substrates within the cerebral cortical networks involved in perception of spatial orientation. These cortical networks, mainly within the temporo-parietal junction, are crucial for multisensory processing and integration that generate sensory reference frames for coherent perception of self-position and extrapersonal space transformations. In this review, we focus on these neural mechanisms and discuss (i neurobehavioral aspects of orientation constancy, (ii sensory models that address the neurophysiology underlying perception of upright, and (iii the current evidence for the role of cerebral cortex in perception of upright and orientation constancy, including findings from the neurological disorders that affect cortical function.

  7. Integrated Plastic Substrates for OLED Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaynor, Whitney

    2015-08-01

    OLED lighting has immense potential as aesthetically pleasing, energy-efficient general illumination. Unlike other light sources, such as incandescents, fluorescents, and inorganic LEDs, OLEDs naturally emit over a large-area surface. They are glare free, do not need to be shaded, and are cool to the touch, requiring no heatsink. The best efficiencies and lifetimes reported are on par with or better than current forms of illumination. However, the cost for OLED lighting remains high – so much so that these products are not market competitive and there is very low consumer demand. We believe that flexible, plastic-based devices will highlight the advantages of aesthetically-pleasing OLED lighting systems while paving the way for lowering both materials and manufacturing costs. These flexible devices require new development in substrate and support technology, which was the focus of the work reported here. The project team, led by Sinovia Technologies, has developed integrated plastic substrates to serve as supports for flexible OLED lighting. The substrates created in this project would enable large-area, flexible devices and are specified to perform three functions. They include a barrier to protect the OLED from moisture and oxygen-related degradation, a smooth, highly conductive transparent electrode to enable large-area device operation, and a light scattering layer to improve emission efficiency. Through the course of this project, integrated substrates were fabricated, characterized, evaluated for manufacturing feasibility and cost, and used in white OLED demonstrations to test their impact on flexible OLED lighting. Our integrated substrates meet or exceed the DOE specifications for barrier performance in water vapor and oxygen transport rates, as well as the transparency and conductivity of the anode film. We find that these integrated substrates can be manufactured in a completely roll-to-roll, high throughput process and have developed and demonstrated

  8. Seismic risk perception test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Camassi, Romano; Pino, Nicola Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    The perception of risks involves the process of collecting, selecting and interpreting signals about uncertain impacts of events, activities or technologies. In the natural sciences the term risk seems to be clearly defined, it means the probability distribution of adverse effects, but the everyday use of risk has different connotations (Renn, 2008). The two terms, hazards and risks, are often used interchangeably by the public. Knowledge, experience, values, attitudes and feelings all influence the thinking and judgement of people about the seriousness and acceptability of risks. Within the social sciences however the terminology of 'risk perception' has become the conventional standard (Slovic, 1987). The mental models and other psychological mechanisms which people use to judge risks (such as cognitive heuristics and risk images) are internalized through social and cultural learning and constantly moderated (reinforced, modified, amplified or attenuated) by media reports, peer influences and other communication processes (Morgan et al., 2001). Yet, a theory of risk perception that offers an integrative, as well as empirically valid, approach to understanding and explaining risk perception is still missing". To understand the perception of risk is necessary to consider several areas: social, psychological, cultural, and their interactions. Among the various research in an international context on the perception of natural hazards, it seemed promising the approach with the method of semantic differential (Osgood, C.E., Suci, G., & Tannenbaum, P. 1957, The measurement of meaning. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press). The test on seismic risk perception has been constructed by the method of the semantic differential. To compare opposite adjectives or terms has been used a Likert's scale to seven point. The test consists of an informative part and six sections respectively dedicated to: hazard; vulnerability (home and workplace); exposed value (with reference to

  9. Perception of risk from radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovic, P.

    1996-01-01

    Perceptions of risk from radiation have been studied systematically for about 20 years. This paper summarises the key findings and conclusions from this research with regard to the nature of risk perceptions, the impacts of these perceptions, and the need for communication about radiological hazards. Perhaps the most important generalisation from research in this area is that there is no uniform or consistent perception of radiation risks. Public perception and acceptance is determined by the context in which the radiation is used -and the very different reactions to different uses provide insight into the nature of perception and the determinants of acceptable risk. (author)

  10. Silvering substrates after CO2 snow cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Richard R.

    2005-09-01

    There have been some questions in the astronomical community concerning the quality of silver coatings deposited on substrates that have been cleaned with carbon dioxide snow. These questions center around the possible existence of carbonate ions left behind on the substrate by CO2. Such carbonate ions could react with deposited silver to produce insoluble silver carbonate, thereby reducing film adhesion and reflectivity. Carbonate ions could be produced from CO2 via the following mechanism. First, during CO2 snow cleaning, a small amount of moisture can condense on a surface. This is especially true if the jet of CO2 is allowed to dwell on one spot. CO2 gas can dissolve in this moisture, producing carbonic acid, which can undergo two acid dissociations to form carbonate ions. In reality, it is highly unlikely that charged carbonate ions will remain stable on a substrate for very long. As condensed water evaporates, Le Chatelier's principle will shift the equilibrium of the chain of reactions that produced carbonate back to CO2 gas. Furthermore, the hydration of CO2 reaction of CO2 with H20) is an extremely slow process, and the total dehydrogenation of carbonic acid is not favored. Living tissues that must carry out the equilibration of carbonic acid and CO2 use the enzyme carbonic anhydrase to speed up the reaction by a factor of one million. But no such enzymatic action is present on a clean mirror substrate. In short, the worst case analysis presented below shows that the ratio of silver atoms to carbonate radicals must be at least 500 million to one. The results of chemical tests presented here support this view. Furthermore, film lift-off tests, also presented in this report, show that silver film adhesion to fused silica substrates is actually enhanced by CO2 snow cleaning.

  11. Perception of nuclear risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenot, J.; Bonnefous, S.; Hubert, Ph.

    1996-01-01

    Many factors are involved in the perception of a risk by individuals. Some are individual related (psychology, knowledge, experience), others describe the social environment (culture, ideology), others at end precise the nature of the risk. The word risk has various meanings and is understood differently by the three main categories involved in risk management, that is engineers, administrators and lay public. Several models which describe the perception phenomenon are presented. The dimensions affecting perception are listed. Based on public opinion poll data, a risk taxonomy is proposed, perceived nuclear risks are compared with other risks, and results are given concerning trust in the information diffused and the credibility of those in charge of nuclear activities. (author)

  12. The perception of hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, A.F.

    1986-01-01

    The fourth chapter deals with the profusion of factors determining the differing assessment of hazards by our society. Subjective factors influencing risk perception comprise, among others, general knowledge and recognition of a hazard; the degree of voluntariness when taking the risk and its influencibility; the problem of large scale accidents; immediate and delayed results. Next to the objective and the subjective risks, the individual and the social or collective risks are assessed differently. The author dicusses in detail recent investigations into and study methods for the determination of risk perception, while eliminating systematic trends from subjective perception since common assessments are shared by whole groups of individuals time and again which allow a better understanding of today's handling of hazards. (HSCH) [de

  13. Brain mechanisms for simple perception and bistable perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Megan; Arteaga, Daniel; He, Biyu J

    2013-08-27

    When faced with ambiguous sensory inputs, subjective perception alternates between the different interpretations in a stochastic manner. Such multistable perception phenomena have intrigued scientists and laymen alike for over a century. Despite rigorous investigations, the underlying mechanisms of multistable perception remain elusive. Recent studies using multivariate pattern analysis revealed that activity patterns in posterior visual areas correlate with fluctuating percepts. However, increasing evidence suggests that vision--and perception at large--is an active inferential process involving hierarchical brain systems. We applied searchlight multivariate pattern analysis to functional magnetic resonance imaging signals across the human brain to decode perceptual content during bistable perception and simple unambiguous perception. Although perceptually reflective activity patterns during simple perception localized predominantly to posterior visual regions, bistable perception involved additionally many higher-order frontoparietal and temporal regions. Moreover, compared with simple perception, both top-down and bottom-up influences were dramatically enhanced during bistable perception. We further studied the intermittent presentation of ambiguous images--a condition that is known to elicit perceptual memory. Compared with continuous presentation, intermittent presentation recruited even more higher-order regions and was accompanied by further strengthened top-down influences but relatively weakened bottom-up influences. Taken together, these results strongly support an active top-down inferential process in perception.

  14. Thirst modulates a perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changizi, M A; Hall, W G

    2001-01-01

    Does thirst make you more likely to think you see water? Tales of thirsty desert travelers and oasis mirages are consistent with our intuitions that appetitive state can influence what we see in the world. Yet there has been surprisingly little scrutiny of this appetitive modulation of perception. We tested whether dehydrated subjects would be biased towards perceptions of transparency, a common property of water. We found that thirsty subjects have a greater tendency to perceive transparency in ambiguous stimuli, revealing an ecologically appropriate modulation of the visual system by a basic appetitive motive.

  15. Vision as subjective perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reppas, J.B.; Dale, A.; Sereno, M.; Tootell, R.

    1996-01-01

    The human brain is not very different of the monkey's one: at least, its visual cortex is organized as a similar scheme. Specialized areas in the movement analysis are found and others in the forms perception. In this work, the author tries to answer to the following questions: 1)why so many visual areas? What are exactly their role in vision? Thirteen years of experimentation have not allowed to answer to these questions. The cerebral NMR imaging gives the opportunity of understanding the subjective perception of the visual world. One step which is particularly described in this work is to know how the visual cortex reacts to the optical illusions. (O.M.)

  16. Multifunctional epitaxial systems on silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: ssingam@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Materials Science Division, Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Department of Physics, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Prater, John Thomas [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Materials Science Division, Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Narayan, Jagdish [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Multifunctional heterostructures can exhibit a wide range of functional properties, including colossal magneto-resistance, magnetocaloric, and multiferroic behavior, and can display interesting physical phenomena including spin and charge ordering and strong spin-orbit coupling. However, putting this functionality to work remains a challenge. To date, most of the work reported in the literature has dealt with heterostructures deposited onto closely lattice matched insulating substrates such as DyScO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3} (STO), or STO buffered Si(100) using concepts of lattice matching epitaxy (LME). However, strain in heterostructures grown by LME is typically not fully relaxed and the layers contain detrimental defects such as threading dislocations that can significantly degrade the physical properties of the films and adversely affect the device characteristics. In addition, most of the substrates are incompatible with existing CMOS-based technology, where Si (100) substrates dominate. This review discusses recent advances in the integration of multifunctional oxide and non-oxide materials onto silicon substrates. An alternative thin film growth approach, called “domain matching epitaxy,” is presented which identifies approaches for minimizing lattice strain and unwanted defects in large misfit systems (7%–25% and higher). This approach broadly allows for the integration of multifunctional materials onto silicon substrates, such that sensing, computation, and response functions can be combined to produce next generation “smart” devices. In general, pulsed laser deposition has been used to epitaxially grow these materials, although the concepts developed here can be extended to other deposition techniques, as well. It will be shown that TiN and yttria-stabilized zirconia template layers provide promising platforms for the integration of new functionality into silicon-based computer chips. This review paper reports on a number of thin

  17. Students' Perceptions of Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, Aytekin; Gazi, Zehra Altinay; Aksal, Fahriye Altinay

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a study that examined students' perceptions toward online practice and their developing attitudes toward the online learning process. The results indicated that both cultural background and personal qualities affect students' perceptions.

  18. Self-Assembled Local Artificial Substrates of GaAs on Si Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frigeri C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We propose a self-assembling procedure for the fabrication of GaAs islands by Droplet Epitaxy on silicon substrate. Controlling substrate temperature and amount of supplied gallium is possible to tune the base size of the islands from 70 up to 250 nm and the density from 107 to 109 cm−2. The islands show a standard deviation of base size distribution below 10% and their shape evolves changing the aspect ratio from 0.3 to 0.5 as size increases. Due to their characteristics, these islands are suitable to be used as local artificial substrates for the integration of III–V quantum nanostructures directly on silicon substrate.

  19. Carbon nanotube substrates and catalyzed hot stamp for polishing and patterning the substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhuang [Evanston, IL; Hauge, Robert H [Houston, TX; Schmidt, Howard K [Houston, TX; Kim, Myung Jong [Houston, TX; Kittrell, W Carter [Houston, TX

    2009-09-08

    The present invention is generally directed to catalyzed hot stamp methods for polishing and/or patterning carbon nanotube-containing substrates. In some embodiments, the substrate, as a carbon nanotube fiber end, is brought into contact with a hot stamp (typically at 200-800.degree. C.), and is kept in contact with the hot stamp until the morphology/patterns on the hot stamp have been transferred to the substrate. In some embodiments, the hot stamp is made of material comprising one or more transition metals (Fe, Ni, Co, Pt, Ag, Au, etc.), which can catalyze the etching reaction of carbon with H.sub.2, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2O, and/or O.sub.2. Such methods can (1) polish the carbon nanotube-containing substrate with a microscopically smooth finish, and/or (2) transfer pre-defined patterns from the hot stamp to the substrate. Such polished or patterned carbon nanotube substrates can find application as carbon nanotube electrodes, field emitters, and field emitter arrays for displays and electron sources.

  20. Antibacterial graphene oxide coatings on polymer substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiming; Wen, Jing; Gao, Yang; Li, Tianyang; Wang, Huifang; Yan, Hong; Niu, Baolong; Guo, Ruijie

    2018-04-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was thought to be a promising antibacterial material. In this work, graphene oxide coatings on polymer substrate were prepared and the antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus was investigated. It was demonstrated that the coatings exhibited stronger antibacterial activity against E. coli with thin membrane than S. aureus with thick membrane. Take into consideration the fact that the coatings presented smooth, sharp edges-free morphology and bonded parallelly to substrate, which was in mark contrast with their precursor GO nanosheets, oxidative stress mechanism was considered the main factor of antibacterial activity. The coatings, which are easy to recycle and have no inhalation risk, provide an alternative for application in antibacterial medical instruments.

  1. Microorganisms detection on substrates using QCL spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Jiménez, Amira C.; Ortiz-Rivera, William; Castro-Suarez, John R.; Ríos-Velázquez, Carlos; Vázquez-Ayala, Iris; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-05-01

    Recent investigations have focused on the improvement of rapid and accurate methods to develop spectroscopic markers of compounds constituting microorganisms that are considered biological threats. Quantum cascade lasers (QCL) systems have revolutionized many areas of research and development in defense and security applications, including his area of research. Infrared spectroscopy detection based on QCL was employed to acquire mid infrared (MIR) spectral signatures of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), Escherichia coli (Ec) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (Se), which were used as biological agent simulants of biothreats. The experiments were carried out in reflection mode on various substrates such as cardboard, glass, travel baggage, wood and stainless steel. Chemometrics statistical routines such as principal component analysis (PCA) regression and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the recorded MIR spectra. The results show that the infrared vibrational techniques investigated are useful for classification/detection of the target microorganisms on the types of substrates studied.

  2. Evaluation of substrates for butanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The production was evaluated of ethanol, acetone, and butanol from several different carbohydrate materials by five strains of Clostridia and two mixed cultures. The substrates, which were tested at concn ranging between 2.5 and 10% w/v, included pentoses, hexoses, disaccharides, and polysaccharides. The organisms used were Clostridium acetobutylicum strains NRRL B527 and NRRL B3179; Clostridium butylicum strains NRRL B592 and NRRL B593; and Clostridium pasteurianum strain NRRL B598. The mixed cultures contained all of these organisms. Mixed culture 1 contained in addition to the Clostridia, Klebsiella pneumoniae strain NRRL B427. Mixed culture 2 contained mixed culture 1 plus a yeast isolated from kefir culture. Where possible, maxima were found for the conversion of different substrates. 7 tables.

  3. Optical substrate materials for synchrotron radiation beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.; Paquin, R.A.

    1997-06-01

    The authors consider the materials choices available for making optical substrates for synchrotron radiation beam lines. They find that currently the optical surfaces can only be polished to the required finish in fused silica and other glasses, silicon, CVD silicon carbide, electroless nickel and 17-4 PH stainless steel. Substrates must therefore be made of one of these materials or of a metal that can be coated with electroless nickel. In the context of material choices for mirrors they explore the issues of dimensional stability, polishing, bending, cooling, and manufacturing strategy. They conclude that metals are best from an engineering and cost standpoint while the ceramics are best from a polishing standpoint. They then give discussions of specific materials as follows: silicon carbide, silicon, electroless nickel, Glidcop trademark, aluminum, precipitation-hardening stainless steel, mild steel, invar and superinvar. Finally they summarize conclusions and propose ideas for further research

  4. Optical substrate materials for synchrotron radiation beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howells, M.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Paquin, R.A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Optical Sciences Center

    1997-06-01

    The authors consider the materials choices available for making optical substrates for synchrotron radiation beam lines. They find that currently the optical surfaces can only be polished to the required finish in fused silica and other glasses, silicon, CVD silicon carbide, electroless nickel and 17-4 PH stainless steel. Substrates must therefore be made of one of these materials or of a metal that can be coated with electroless nickel. In the context of material choices for mirrors they explore the issues of dimensional stability, polishing, bending, cooling, and manufacturing strategy. They conclude that metals are best from an engineering and cost standpoint while the ceramics are best from a polishing standpoint. They then give discussions of specific materials as follows: silicon carbide, silicon, electroless nickel, Glidcop{trademark}, aluminum, precipitation-hardening stainless steel, mild steel, invar and superinvar. Finally they summarize conclusions and propose ideas for further research.

  5. A cellular glass substrate solar concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, R.; Bell, D.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a second generation point focusing solar concentration is discussed. The design is based on reflective gores fabricated of thin glass mirror bonded continuously to a contoured substrate of cellular glass. The concentrator aperture and structural stiffness was optimized for minimum concentrator cost given the performance requirement of delivering 56 kWth to a 22 cm diameter receiver aperture with a direct normal insolation of 845 watts sq m and an operating wind of 50 kmph. The reflective panel, support structure, drives, foundation and instrumentation and control subsystem designs, optimized for minimum cost, are summarized. The use of cellular glass as a reflective panel substrate material is shown to offer significant weight and cost advantages compared to existing technology materials.

  6. Are mirror neurons the basis of speech perception? Evidence from five cases with damage to the purported human mirror system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalsky, Corianne; Love, Tracy; Driscoll, David; Anderson, Steven W; Hickok, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of mirror neurons in macaque has led to a resurrection of motor theories of speech perception. Although the majority of lesion and functional imaging studies have associated perception with the temporal lobes, it has also been proposed that the 'human mirror system', which prominently includes Broca's area, is the neurophysiological substrate of speech perception. Although numerous studies have demonstrated a tight link between sensory and motor speech processes, few have directly assessed the critical prediction of mirror neuron theories of speech perception, namely that damage to the human mirror system should cause severe deficits in speech perception. The present study measured speech perception abilities of patients with lesions involving motor regions in the left posterior frontal lobe and/or inferior parietal lobule (i.e., the proposed human 'mirror system'). Performance was at or near ceiling in patients with fronto-parietal lesions. It is only when the lesion encroaches on auditory regions in the temporal lobe that perceptual deficits are evident. This suggests that 'mirror system' damage does not disrupt speech perception, but rather that auditory systems are the primary substrate for speech perception.

  7. Hydrogenation of biomass-derived substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John C.; Waidmann, Christopher R.

    2016-06-07

    The .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated ketone moiety of a substrate representative of non-food based biomass was hydrogenated to the corresponding saturated alcohol moiety using a composition including (1) a copper salt; (2) a phosphine; (3) a polar aprotic solvent such as acetonitrile, and (4) a compound suitable for providing hydrogen for the hydrogenation, such as a suitable silane material or a suitable siloxane material.

  8. Advanced organics for electronic substrates and packages

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, Andrew E

    1992-01-01

    Advanced Organics for Electronic Substrates and Packages provides information on packaging, which is one of the most technologically intensive activities in the electronics industry. The electronics packaging community has realized that while semiconductor devices continue to be improved upon for performance, cost, and reliability, it is the interconnection or packaging of these devices that will limit the performance of the systems. Technology must develop packaging for transistor chips, with high levels of performance and integration providing cooling, power, and interconnection, and yet pre

  9. Perceptions of Rape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Barbara J.; Remer, Rory

    Society does not view rape seriously. Few rape crimes are successfully prosecuted. Rape results in permanent alteration of the victim's life. Besides street rape there is no consensus on the definition of rape. This study attempts to gather people's perceptions of rape. Subjects (N=96) were approached randomly and accepted if they fit into desired…

  10. Teachers' Perceptions of Stutterers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Norman J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A questionnaire asking respondents to list adjectives describing 4 hypothetical stutterers (2 8 year olds and 2 adults) was completed by 103 elementary and secondary teachers. The majority of reported adjectives were negative stereotypical personality traits, indicating perceptions of stutterers similar to other groups including speech-language…

  11. Multisensory Flavor Perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piqueras-Fiszman, Betina; Spence, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Multisensory Flavor Perception: From Fundamental Neuroscience Through to the Marketplace provides state-of-the-art coverage of the latest insights from the rapidly-expanding world of multisensory flavor research. The book highlights the various types of crossmodal interactions, such as sound and

  12. Perception, Illusion, and Magic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Paul R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a psychology course in which magical illusions were used for teaching the principles of sensation and perception. Students read psychological, philosophical, historical, and magical literature on illusion, performed a magical illusion, and analyzed the illusion in terms of the psychological principles involved. (Author/KC)

  13. Directional loudness perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivonen, Ville Pekka

    developed. The research and modeling of loudness have mainly been concerned with the temporal and spectral aspects of sounds, while the spatial aspects have mostly been overlooked. This PhD thesis investigates the spatial aspects of loudness perception, namely, how does the direction from which a sound...

  14. Perception of Product Risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, A.R.H.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter provides several explanations for consumer risk perception. For frequently repeated behavior that is seemingly under their own control, consumers tend to be overly optimistic. This occurs in spite of the general tendency of consumers to be risk averse. Specific dimensions of different

  15. Perception of future goals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottsen, Christina L.; Berntsen, Dorthe

    The current study: a cross-cultural comparison between the Middle East and Scandinavia. Two societies that offer a unique opportunity to examine gender and cultural differences in perception of personal goals. Previous studies show that imagined future events are affected by memories of personal...

  16. Colour Perception in ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaschewski, Tobias; Ruppert, Sinje; Tannock, Rosemary; Albrecht, Bjorn; Becker, Andreas; Uebel, Henrik; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Rothenberger, Aribert

    2006-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with unexplained impairments on speeded naming of coloured stimuli. These deficits may reflect hypofunctioning retinal dopaminergic mechanisms impairing particularly blue-yellow colour discrimination. Colour perception and rapid colour naming ability were investigated in 14 children…

  17. Production, Perception and Attitude.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nerbonne, J.; Grondelaers, S.; Speelman, D.; Perea, M.-P.

    2011-01-01

    We briefly introduce the papers in this special issue of Dialectologia on production, perception and attitude. They are the result of a call for papers issued at an interdisciplinary workshop Leuven in 2009 organized by Dirk Geeraerts, Stef Grondelaers, Leen Impe and Dirk Speelman. The

  18. Tuning biphenyl dioxygenase for extended substrate specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruehlmann, F.; Chen, W. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    1999-06-05

    Highly substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are known to be very resistant to aerobic biodegradation, particularly the initial attack by biphenyl dioxygenase. Functional evolution of the substrate specificity of biphenyl dioxygenase was demonstrated by DNA shuffling and staggered extension process (StEP) of the bphA gene coding for the large subunit of biphenyl dioxygenase. Several variants with an extended substrate range for PCBs were selected. In contrast to the parental biphenyl dioxygenases from Burkholderia cepacia LB400 and Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707, which preferentially recognize either ortho-(LB400) or para-(KF707) substituted PCBs, several variants degraded both congeners to about the same extent. These variants also exhibited superior degradation capabilities toward several tetra- and pentachlorinated PCBs as well as commercial PCB mixtures, such as Aroclor 1242 or Aroclor 1254. Sequence analysis confirmed that most variants contained at least four to six template switches. All desired variants contained the Thr335Ala and Phe336lle substitutions confirming the importance of this critical region in substrate specificity. These results suggest that the block-exchange nature of gene shuffling between a diverse class of dioxygenases may be the most useful approach for breeding novel dioxygenases for PCB degradation in the desired direction.

  19. Substrate-induced strain in carbon nanodisks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osváth, Z.; Vértesy, Z.; Lábár, J.; Nemes-Incze, P.; Horváth, Z.E.; Biró, L.P.

    2014-01-01

    Graphitic nanodisks of typically 20–50 nm in thickness, produced by the so-called Kvaerner Carbon Black and Hydrogen Process were dispersed on gold substrate and investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and confocal Raman spectroscopy. The roughness of the gold surface was drastically changed by annealing at 400 °C. AFM measurements show that this change in the surface roughness induces changes also in the topography of the nanodisks, as they closely follow the corrugation of the gold substrate. This leads to strained nanodisks, which is confirmed also by confocal Raman microscopy. We found that the FE-SEM contrast obtained from the disks depends on the working distance used during the image acquisition by In-lens detection, a phenomenon which we explain by the decrease in the amount of electrons reaching the detector due to diffraction. This process may affect the image contrast in the case of other layered materials, like hexagonal boron nitride, and other planar hybrid nanostructures, too. - Highlights: • Bending of carbon nanodisks is induced by the roughness of the gold substrate. • Confocal Raman microscopy shows a compressive strain induced in the nanodisks. • The electron microscopy contrast of nanodisks depends on the working distance

  20. Marketing research of consumer perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodić Jelena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Perception involves the collection, processing and interpretation of information through sensory receptors and represents the reality of an individual. Collecting customer information is imperative for marketing, because consumers are in the focus of defining all its objectives, strategies and plans. The result of the perception depends on a number of factors and that is why people do not experience stimuli in the same way. A marketing research of consumer perceptions has been carried out in order to identify the habits and understand the behavior of consumers when choosing products with special emphasis on the influence of perception, stimuli from the environment and perceptions of risk in their decision. .

  1. Modeling substrate-bacteria-grazer interactions coupled to substrate transport in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajracharya, Bijendra M.; Lu, Chuanhe; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2014-05-01

    Models of microbial dynamics coupled to solute transport in aquifers typically require the introduction of a bacterial capacity term to prevent excessive microbial growth close to substrate-injection boundaries. The factors controlling this carrying capacity, however, are not fully understood. In this study, we propose that grazers or bacteriophages may control the density of bacterial biomass in continuously fed porous media. We conceptualize the flow-through porous medium as a series of retentostats, in which the dissolved substrate is advected with water flow whereas the biomasses of bacteria and grazers are considered essentially immobile. We first model a single retentostat with Monod kinetics of bacterial growth and a second-order grazing law, which shows that the system oscillates but approaches a stable steady state with nonzero concentrations of substrate, bacteria, and grazers. The steady state concentration of the bacteria biomass is independent of the substrate concentration in the inflow. When coupling several retentostats in a series to mimic a groundwater column, the steady state bacteria concentrations thus remain at a constant level over a significant travel distance. The one-dimensional reactive transport model also accounts for substrate dispersion and a random walk of grazers influenced by the bacteria concentration. These dispersive-diffusive terms affect the oscillations until steady state is reached, but hardly the steady state value itself. We conclude that grazing, or infection by bacteriophages, is a possible explanation of the maximum biomass concentration frequently needed in bioreactive transport models. Its value depends on parameters related to the grazers or bacteriophages and is independent of bacterial growth parameters or substrate concentration, provided that there is enough substrate to sustain bacteria and grazers.

  2. Insulin receptor substrate 1 is a substrate of the Pim protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jin H; Padi, Sathish K R; Luevano, Libia A; Minden, Mark D; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Hardiman, Gary; Ball, Lauren E; Warfel, Noel A; Kraft, Andrew S

    2016-04-12

    The Pim family of serine/threonine protein kinases (Pim 1, 2, and 3) contribute to cellular transformation by regulating glucose metabolism, protein synthesis, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Drugs targeting the Pim protein kinases are being tested in phase I/II clinical trials for the treatment of hematopoietic malignancies. The goal of these studies was to identify Pim substrate(s) that could help define the pathway regulated by these enzymes and potentially serve as a biomarker of Pim activity. To identify novel substrates, bioinformatics analysis was carried out to identify proteins containing a consensus Pim phosphorylation site. This analysis identified the insulin receptor substrate 1 and 2 (IRS1/2) as potential Pim substrates. Experiments were carried out in tissue culture, animals, and human samples from phase I trials to validate this observation and define the biologic readout of this phosphorylation. Our study demonstrates in both malignant and normal cells using either genetic or pharmacological inhibition of the Pim kinases or overexpression of this family of enzymes that human IRS1S1101 and IRS2S1149 are Pim substrates. In xenograft tumor experiments and in a human phase I clinical trial, a pan-Pim inhibitor administered in vivo to animals or humans decreased IRS1S1101 phosphorylation in tumor tissues. This phosphorylation was shown to have effects on the half-life of the IRS family of proteins, suggesting a role in insulin or IGF signaling. These results demonstrate that IRS1S1101 is a novel substrate for the Pim kinases and provide a novel marker for evaluation of Pim inhibitor therapy.

  3. Monte Carlo studies of effects of substrate size on water endash substrate interaction energy and water structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, J.X.; Marlow, W.H.; Lu, J.X.; Lucchese, R.R.

    1997-01-01

    Water on a planar substrate and on spherical substrates of radii r=10, 15, and 20 Angstrom are studied at temperatures of 200, 240, 270, and 290 K by Monte Carlo simulations. The average water endash water potential energies and the average water endash substrate interaction energies are obtained by use of the single point charge model for the water endash water interaction and the nonsingular van der Waals potential plus the Born-type repulsive potential for the water endash substrate interaction. Water structure and water endash substrate interaction energy are shown to be sensitive to substrate size. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  4. Surface control alloy substrates and methods of manufacture therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzemeier, Leslie G. (Mendon, MA); Li, Qi (Marlborough, MA); Rupich, Martin W. (Framingham, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Siegal, Edward J. (Malden, MA); Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans (Westborough, MA); Annavarapu, Suresh (Brookline, MA); Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-05-04

    Methods and articles for controlling the surface of an alloy substrate for deposition of an epitaxial layer. The invention includes the use of an intermediate layer to stabilize the substrate surface against oxidation for subsequent deposition of an epitaxial layer.

  5. Substrate-induced instability in gas microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.

    1992-12-01

    The results of a programme of research into substrate-induced gain instability in gas microstrip detectors are reported. Information has been collected on a wide range of substrates including many commonly available glasses and ceramics. A theoretical model of the gain instability is proposed. While we have not yet found an acceptable substrate for the construction of high flux detectors our experience points to electronically conductive glasses as the most promising source of a stable substrate. (Author)

  6. Component placement on flexible and/or strechable substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetse, M.M.; Schoo, H.F.M.

    2011-01-01

    According to one aspect, the invention provides a method of placement of a component on a stretchable substrate, comprising the steps of providing a base substrate having a stretchable substrate layer, providing a flexible foil comprising an integral arrangement (20) of a multiple of flexible foil

  7. Effect of Substrate on Biogas Yield | Adamu | Global Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biogas technology converts biological matter or biological waste (substrate) into energy and simultaneously helps to improve the quality of life and the environment. The effect of substrate on biogas yield was studied by using different substrate in laboratory scale experiment using water displacement method to monitor the ...

  8. Evaluation of Tea Wastes as an Alternative Substrate for Oyster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus sajor caju) is locally cultivated on sugarcane bagasse substrate. Due to decreasing supply of bagasse, there was an urgent need to identify alternative substrates. The aim of this study was to evaluate tea wastes as an alternative substrate for oyster mushroom cultivation. The first step was to ...

  9. Graphene-on-semiconductor substrates for analog electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max G.; Cavallo, Francesca; Rojas-Delgado, Richard

    2016-04-26

    Electrically conductive material structures, analog electronic devices incorporating the structures and methods for making the structures are provided. The structures include a layer of graphene on a semiconductor substrate. The graphene layer and the substrate are separated by an interfacial region that promotes transfer of charge carriers from the surface of the substrate to the graphene.

  10. Analysis of Rectangular Microstrip Antennas with Air Substrates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents an analysis of rectangular microstrip antennas with air substrates. The effect of the substrate thickness on the bandwidth and the efficiency are examined. An additional thin layer supporting the dielectric material is added to the air substrate in order to make the antenna mechanically rigid and easy to ...

  11. Color: Physics and Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Pupa

    Unless we are colorblind, as soon as we look at something, we know what color it is. Simple, isn't it? No, not really. The color we see is rarely just determined by the physical color, that is, the wavelength of visible light associated with that color. Other factors, such as the illuminating light, or the brightness surrounding a certain color, affect our perception of that color. Most striking, and useful, is understanding how the retina and the brain work together to interpret the color we see, and how they can be fooled by additive color mixing, which makes it possible to have color screens and displays. I will show the physical origin of all these phenomena and give live demos as I explain how they work. Bring your own eyes! For more information: (1) watch TED talk: ``Color: Physics and Perception'' and (2) read book: PUPA Gilbert and W Haeberli ``Physics in the Arts'', ISBN 9780123918789.

  12. Synesthesia and music perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Francisco F. Bragança

    Full Text Available The present review examined the cross-modal association of sensations and their relationship to musical perception. Initially, the study focuses on synesthesia, its definition, incidence, forms, and genetic and developmental factors. The theories of the neural basis of synesthesia were also addressed by comparing theories emphasizing the anatomical aspect against others reinforcing the importance of physiological processes. Secondly, cross-modal sensory associations, their role in perception, and relationship to synesthesia were analyzed. We propose the existence of a lower, unconscious degree of synesthesia in non-synesthetes. This latent synesthesia (without explicit sensory manifestations would be functional, aiding the construction of abstract associations between different perceptual fields. Musical meaning might be constructed largely by synesthetic processes, where the sensory associations from sound activate memories, images, and emotions.

  13. Understanding person perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Andrew W; Bruce, Vicki

    2011-11-01

    Bruce and Young's (1986) theoretical framework was actually a synthesis of ideas contributed by several people. Some of its insights have stood the test of time - especially the importance of using converging evidence from as wide a range of methods of enquiry as possible, and an emphasis on understanding the demands that are made by particular face perception tasks. But there were also areas where Bruce and Young failed to obey their own edicts (emotion recognition), and some topics they simply omitted (gaze perception). We discuss these, and then look at how the field has been transformed by computing developments, finishing with a few thoughts about where things may go over the next few (25?) years. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  14. Multisensory flavor perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Charles

    2015-03-26

    The perception of flavor is perhaps the most multisensory of our everyday experiences. The latest research by psychologists and cognitive neuroscientists increasingly reveals the complex multisensory interactions that give rise to the flavor experiences we all know and love, demonstrating how they rely on the integration of cues from all of the human senses. This Perspective explores the contributions of distinct senses to our perception of food and the growing realization that the same rules of multisensory integration that have been thoroughly explored in interactions between audition, vision, and touch may also explain the combination of the (admittedly harder to study) flavor senses. Academic advances are now spilling out into the real world, with chefs and food industry increasingly taking the latest scientific findings on board in their food design. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Multisensory Perception of Affect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice de Gelder

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Multisensory integration must stand out among the fields of research that have witnessed a most impressive explosion of interest this last decade. One of these new areas of multisensory research concerns emotion. Since our first exploration of this phenomenon (de Gelder et al., 1999 a number of studies have appeared and they have used a wide variety of behavioral, neuropsychological and neuroscientifc methods. The goal of this presentation is threefold. First, we review the research on audiovisual perception of emotional signals from the face and the voice followed by a report or more recent studies on integrating emotional information provided by the voice and whole body expressions. We will also include some recent work on multisensory music perception. In the next section we discuss some methodological and theoretical issues. Finally, we will discuss findings about abnormal affective audiovisual integration in schizophrenia and in autism.

  16. Speech perception as categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Lori L; Lotto, Andrew J

    2010-07-01

    Speech perception (SP) most commonly refers to the perceptual mapping from the highly variable acoustic speech signal to a linguistic representation, whether it be phonemes, diphones, syllables, or words. This is an example of categorization, in that potentially discriminable speech sounds are assigned to functionally equivalent classes. In this tutorial, we present some of the main challenges to our understanding of the categorization of speech sounds and the conceptualization of SP that has resulted from these challenges. We focus here on issues and experiments that define open research questions relevant to phoneme categorization, arguing that SP is best understood as perceptual categorization, a position that places SP in direct contact with research from other areas of perception and cognition.

  17. Public perceptions of risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Public perceptions of risk will probably always be unsatisfying to a scientist. Public perceptions are formed by the actions of institutions which have goals other than formation of an informed public opinion, such as the schools, the media, business and the government. In this environment, it seems unrealistic to expect public opinion to reflect scientific realities. The talk will focus on the media as an opinion-former and will discuss several non-nuclear issues as illustrations: plague in New Mexico, Toxic Shock Syndrome, and Injuries as a Public Health Problem. Ultimately however, we are confronted with two wonderfully complex matters: can risk be adequately expressed or measured in universally comprehensible or broadly acceptable terms; and the mysterious movements of the public and collective mind

  18. Macro algae as substrate for biogas production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Henrik; Sarker, Shiplu; Gautam, Dhan Prasad

    Algae as a substrate for biogas is superior to other crops since it has a much higher yield of biomass per unit area and since algae grows in the seawater there will be no competition with food production on agricultural lands. So far, the progress in treating different groups of algae as a source...... of energy is promising. In this study 5 different algae types were tested for biogas potential and two algae were subsequent used for co-digestion with manure. Green seaweed, Ulva lactuca and brown seaweed Laminaria digitata was co-digested with cattle manure at mesophilic and thermophilic condition...

  19. Thin film reactions on alloy semiconductor substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, D.A.

    1990-11-01

    The interactions between Pt and In{sub .53}Ga{sub .47}As have been studied. In{sub .53}Ga{sub .47}As substrates with 70nm Pt films were encapsulated in SiO{sub 2}, and annealed up to 600{degree}C in flowing forming gas. The composition and morphology of the reaction product phases were studied using x-ray diffraction, Auger depth profiling, and transmission electron microscopy. The reaction kinetics were examined with Rutherford Backscattering. Results show that Pt/In{sub .53}Ga{sub .47}As reacts to form many of the reaction products encountered in the Pt/GaAs and Pt/InP reactions: PtGa, Pt{sub 3}Ga, and PtAs{sub 2}. In addition, a ternary phase, Pt(In:Ga){sub 2}, develops, which is a solid solution between PtIn{sub 2} and PtGa{sub 2}. The amount of Ga in the ternary phase increases with annealing temperature, which causes a decrease in the lattice parameter of the phase. The reaction products show a tendency to form layered structures, especially for higher temperatures and longer annealing times. Unlike the binary case, the PtAs{sub 2}, phase is randomly oriented on the substrate, and is intermingle with a significant amount of Pt(In:Ga){sub 2}. Following Pt/In{sub .53}Ga{sub .47}As reactions, two orientation relationships between the Pt(In:Ga){sub 2} product phase and the substrate were observed, despite the large mismatch with the substrate ({approximately}8%). For many metal/compound semiconductor interactions, the reaction rate is diffusion limited, i.e. exhibits a parabolic dependence on time. An additional result of this study was the development of an In-rich layer beneath the reacted layer. The Auger depth profile showed a substantial increase in the sample at this layer. This is a significant result for the production of ohmic contacts, as the Schottky barrier height in this system lower for higher In concentrations. 216 refs.

  20. Molybdenum protective coatings adhesion to steel substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesman, A. I.; Postnikov, D. V.; Polonyankin, D. A.; Teplouhov, A. A.; Tyukin, A. V.; Tkachenko, E. A.

    2017-06-01

    Protection of the critical parts, components and assemblies from corrosion is an urgent engineering problem and many other industries. Protective coatings’ forming on surface of metal products is a promising way of corrosionprevention. The adhesion force is one of the main characteristics of coatings’ durability. The paper presents theoretical and experimental adhesion force assessment for coatings formed by molybdenum magnetron sputtering ontoa steel substrate. Validity and reliability of results obtained by simulation and sclerometry method allow applying the developed model for adhesion force evaluation in binary «steel-coating» systems.

  1. Protective amorphous carbon coatings on glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silins, Kaspars; Baránková, Hana; Bardos, Ladislav

    2017-11-01

    Thick amorphous carbon films were deposited by the Magnets-in-Motion (M-M) rf linear hollow cathode at varying acetylene contents in Ar in a hybrid PVD/PE-CVD process directly on glass substrates. The hollow cathode plates manufactured from graphite were used as the PVD target. The measurements show that the films can reach thickness of up to 50 μm at deposition rates of up to 2.5 μm/min. Scratch test measurements confirm that well adhering films several μm thick can be achieved at C2H2 contents of up to 0.5%.

  2. Ferromagnetic Film on a Superconducting Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Bulaevskii, L. N.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2000-01-01

    We study the equilibrium domain structure and magnetic flux around a ferromagnetic (FM) film with perpendicular magnetization M_0 on a superconducting (SC) substrate. At 4{\\pi}M_0> 1. Here \\lambda_L is the London penetration length. For 4{\\pi}M_0 > H_{c1} and l_{N} in excess of about 35 {\\lambda}_{L}, the domains are connected by SC vortices. We argue that pinning of vortices by magnetic domains in FM/SC multilayers can provide high critical currents.

  3. Ventricular tachycardia in ischemic heart disease substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olujimi A. Ajijola

    2014-01-01

    This review will discuss the central role of the ischemic heart disease substrate in the development MMVT. Electrophysiologic characterization of the post-infarct myocardium using bipolar electrogram amplitudes to delineate scar border zones will be reviewed. Functional electrogram determinants of reentrant circuits such as isolated late potentials will be discussed. Strategies for catheter ablation of reentrant ventricular tachycardia, including structural and functional targets will also be examined, as will the role of the epicardial mapping and ablation in the management of recurrent MMVT.

  4. The perception of probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallistel, C R; Krishan, Monika; Liu, Ye; Miller, Reilly; Latham, Peter E

    2014-01-01

    We present a computational model to explain the results from experiments in which subjects estimate the hidden probability parameter of a stepwise nonstationary Bernoulli process outcome by outcome. The model captures the following results qualitatively and quantitatively, with only 2 free parameters: (a) Subjects do not update their estimate after each outcome; they step from one estimate to another at irregular intervals. (b) The joint distribution of step widths and heights cannot be explained on the assumption that a threshold amount of change must be exceeded in order for them to indicate a change in their perception. (c) The mapping of observed probability to the median perceived probability is the identity function over the full range of probabilities. (d) Precision (how close estimates are to the best possible estimate) is good and constant over the full range. (e) Subjects quickly detect substantial changes in the hidden probability parameter. (f) The perceived probability sometimes changes dramatically from one observation to the next. (g) Subjects sometimes have second thoughts about a previous change perception, after observing further outcomes. (h) The frequency with which they perceive changes moves in the direction of the true frequency over sessions. (Explaining this finding requires 2 additional parametric assumptions.) The model treats the perception of the current probability as a by-product of the construction of a compact encoding of the experienced sequence in terms of its change points. It illustrates the why and the how of intermittent Bayesian belief updating and retrospective revision in simple perception. It suggests a reinterpretation of findings in the recent literature on the neurobiology of decision making. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Substrate Channel Flexibility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa MurB Accommodates Two Distinct Substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Wei Chen

    Full Text Available Biosynthesis of UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid in bacteria is a committed step towards peptidoglycan production. In an NADPH- and FAD-dependent reaction, the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-enolpyruvate reductase (MurB reduces UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-enolpyruvate to UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid. We determined the three-dimensional structures of the ternary complex of Pseudomonas aeruginosa MurB with FAD and NADP(+ in two crystal forms to resolutions of 2.2 and 2.1 Å, respectively, to investigate the structural basis of the first half-reaction, hydride transfer from NADPH to FAD. The nicotinamide ring of NADP(+ stacks against the si face of the isoalloxazine ring of FAD, suggesting an unusual mode of hydride transfer to flavin. Comparison with the structure of the Escherichia coli MurB complex with UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-enolpyruvate shows that both substrates share the binding site located between two lobes of the substrate-binding domain III, consistent with a ping pong mechanism with sequential substrate binding. The nicotinamide and the enolpyruvyl moieties are strikingly well-aligned upon superimposition, both positioned for hydride transfer to and from FAD. However, flexibility of the substrate channel allows the non-reactive parts of the two substrates to bind in different conformations. A potassium ion in the active site may assist in substrate orientation and binding. These structural models should help in structure-aided drug design against MurB, which is essential for cell wall biogenesis and hence bacterial survival.

  6. Enzyme-substrate complexes of allosteric citrate synthase: evidence for a novel intermediate in substrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, Harry W; Nguyen, Nham T; Gao, Yin; Donald, Lynda J; Maurus, Robert; Ayed, Ayeda; Bruneau, Brigitte; Brayer, Gary D

    2013-12-01

    The citrate synthase (CS) of Escherichia coli is an allosteric hexameric enzyme specifically inhibited by NADH. The crystal structure of wild type (WT) E. coli CS, determined by us previously, has no substrates bound, and part of the active site is in a highly mobile region that is shifted from the position needed for catalysis. The CS of Acetobacter aceti has a similar structure, but has been successfully crystallized with bound substrates: both oxaloacetic acid (OAA) and an analog of acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA). We engineered a variant of E. coli CS wherein five amino acids in the mobile region have been replaced by those in the A. aceti sequence. The purified enzyme shows unusual kinetics with a low affinity for both substrates. Although the crystal structure without ligands is very similar to that of the WT enzyme (except in the mutated region), complexes are formed with both substrates and the allosteric inhibitor NADH. The complex with OAA in the active site identifies a novel OAA-binding residue, Arg306, which has no functional counterpart in other known CS-OAA complexes. This structure may represent an intermediate in a multi-step substrate binding process where Arg306 changes roles from OAA binding to AcCoA binding. The second complex has the substrate analog, S-carboxymethyl-coenzyme A, in the allosteric NADH-binding site and the AcCoA site is not formed. Additional CS variants unable to bind adenylates at the allosteric site show that this second complex is not a factor in positive allosteric activation of AcCoA binding. © 2013.

  7. Novelty enhances visual perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Schomaker

    Full Text Available The effects of novelty on low-level visual perception were investigated in two experiments using a two-alternative forced-choice tilt detection task. A target, consisting of a Gabor patch, was preceded by a cue that was either a novel or a familiar fractal image. Participants had to indicate whether the Gabor stimulus was vertically oriented or slightly tilted. In the first experiment tilt angle was manipulated; in the second contrast of the Gabor patch was varied. In the first, we found that sensitivity was enhanced after a novel compared to a familiar cue, and in the second we found sensitivity to be enhanced for novel cues in later experimental blocks when participants became more and more familiarized with the familiar cue. These effects were not caused by a shift in the response criterion. This shows for the first time that novel stimuli affect low-level characteristics of perception. We suggest that novelty can elicit a transient attentional response, thereby enhancing perception.

  8. Novelty enhances visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomaker, Judith; Meeter, Martijn

    2012-01-01

    The effects of novelty on low-level visual perception were investigated in two experiments using a two-alternative forced-choice tilt detection task. A target, consisting of a Gabor patch, was preceded by a cue that was either a novel or a familiar fractal image. Participants had to indicate whether the Gabor stimulus was vertically oriented or slightly tilted. In the first experiment tilt angle was manipulated; in the second contrast of the Gabor patch was varied. In the first, we found that sensitivity was enhanced after a novel compared to a familiar cue, and in the second we found sensitivity to be enhanced for novel cues in later experimental blocks when participants became more and more familiarized with the familiar cue. These effects were not caused by a shift in the response criterion. This shows for the first time that novel stimuli affect low-level characteristics of perception. We suggest that novelty can elicit a transient attentional response, thereby enhancing perception.

  9. Computational evolutionary perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Donald D; Singh, Manish

    2012-01-01

    Marr proposed that human vision constructs "a true description of what is there". He argued that to understand human vision one must discover the features of the world it recovers and the constraints it uses in the process. Bayesian decision theory (BDT) is used in modem vision research as a probabilistic framework for understanding human vision along the lines laid out by Marr. Marr's contribution to vision research is substantial and justly influential. We propose, however, that evolution by natural selection does not, in general, favor perceptions that are true descriptions of the objective world. Instead, research with evolutionary games shows that perceptual systems tuned solely to fitness routinely outcompete those tuned to truth. Fitness functions depend not just on the true state of the world, but also on the organism, its state, and the type of action. Thus, fitness and truth are distinct. Natural selection depends only on expected fitness. It shapes perceptual systems to guide fitter behavior, not to estimate truth. To study perception in an evolutionary context, we introduce the framework of Computational Evolutionary Perception (CEP). We show that CEP subsumes BDT, and reinterprets BDT as evaluating expected fitness rather than estimating truth.

  10. An Analytical Model for Spectral Peak Frequency Prediction of Substrate Noise in CMOS Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Ming; Mikkelsen, Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an analytical model describing the generation of switching current noise in CMOS substrates. The model eliminates the need for SPICE simulations in existing methods by conducting a transient analysis on a generic CMOS inverter and approximating the switching current waveform us......- ing a Modified Raised Cosine (MORAC) equation. The proposed model is scalable, easy to implement and capable of predicting the spectral peak frequency of the substrate noise. The validation has been done via simulations and measurements. Good agreement has been found between the modeled...

  11. Logarithmic Slots Antennas Using Substrate Integrated Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahnavi Kachhia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents new generation of slotted antennas for satellite application where the loss can be compensated in terms of power or gain of antenna. First option is very crucial because it totally depends on size of satellite so we have proposed the high gain antenna creating number of rectangular, trapezoidal, and I shape slots in logarithm size in Substrate Integrated Waveguide (SIW structure. The structure consists of an array of various shape slots antenna designed to operate in C and X band applications. The basic structures have been designed over a RT duroid substrate with dielectric constant of 2.2 and with a thickness of 0.508 mm. Multiple slots array and shape of slot effects have been studied and analyzed using HFSS (High Frequency Structure Simulator. The designs have been supported with its return loss, gain plot, VSWR, and radiation pattern characteristics to validate multiband operation. All the proposed antennas give gain more than 9 dB and return loss better than −10 dB. However, the proposed structures have been very sensitive to their physical dimensions.

  12. Neural substrates of sublexical processing for spelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMarco, Andrew T; Wilson, Stephen M; Rising, Kindle; Rapcsak, Steven Z; Beeson, Pélagie M

    2017-01-01

    We used fMRI to examine the neural substrates of sublexical phoneme-grapheme conversion during spelling in a group of healthy young adults. Participants performed a writing-to-dictation task involving irregular words (e.g., choir), plausible nonwords (e.g., kroid), and a control task of drawing familiar geometric shapes (e.g., squares). Written production of both irregular words and nonwords engaged a left-hemisphere perisylvian network associated with reading/spelling and phonological processing skills. Effects of lexicality, manifested by increased activation during nonword relative to irregular word spelling, were noted in anterior perisylvian regions (posterior inferior frontal gyrus/operculum/precentral gyrus/insula), and in left ventral occipito-temporal cortex. In addition to enhanced neural responses within domain-specific components of the language network, the increased cognitive demands associated with spelling nonwords engaged domain-general frontoparietal cortical networks involved in selective attention and executive control. These results elucidate the neural substrates of sublexical processing during written language production and complement lesion-deficit correlation studies of phonological agraphia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Droplet evaporation on a soluble substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailleur, Alexandra; Pirat, Christophe; Colombani, Jean; CNES Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Stains left by evaporated droplets are ubiquitous in everyday life as well as in industrial processes. Whatever the composition of the evaporating liquid (colloidal suspensions, biological fluids...), the stains are mostly constituted by a deposit at the periphery of the dried drop, similar to a coffee stain (Deegan, 1997). All these studies have been carried with non-reacting solids. In this presentation, we focus on the behavior of a pure-water droplet evaporating on a soluble substrate which is more complex, since three phenomena are strongly interacting: the dissolution of the substrate, the diffusion/convection of the dissolved species into the drop and the evaporation of the liquid. NaCl and KCl single crystals have been chosen for this experimental study as they are fast-dissolving solids. We have observed that the dissolution induces a pinning of the triple line from the beginning of the evaporation, leading to a decrease of the contact angle in time. At the end of the evaporation, a peripheral deposit is always formed, proof of an outward flow inside the drop (coffee-ring effect). The authors would like to thank the CNES for the financial support.

  14. On the perception and operationalization of risk perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Ganzach

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We compare and critique two measures of risk perception. We suggest that a single question --- ``How risky is the situation?'' --- captures the concept of risk perception more accurately than the multiple-item measure used by Sitkin and Weingart (1995. In fact, this latter measure inadvertently captures notions of attractiveness or expected return, rather than risk perception. We further propose that the error underlying the construction of Sitkin and Weingart's measure is explained in terms of a top-down model of risk perception, in which perceived risk and perceived return are consequences, rather than determinants, of attractiveness. Two studies compare the validity of the two alternative measures.

  15. SOI MESFETs on high-resistivity, trap-rich substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehr, Payam; Zhang, Xiong; Lepkowski, William; Li, Chaojiang; Thornton, Trevor J.

    2018-04-01

    The DC and RF characteristics of metal-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MESFETs) on conventional CMOS silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates are compared to nominally identical devices on high-resistivity, trap-rich SOI substrates. While the DC transfer characteristics are statistically identical on either substrate, the maximum available gain at GHz frequencies is enhanced by ∼2 dB when using the trap-rich substrates, with maximum operating frequencies, fmax, that are approximately 5-10% higher. The increased fmax is explained by the reduced substrate conduction at GHz frequencies using a lumped-element, small-signal model.

  16. Snap-Through Instability of Graphene on Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Teng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We determine the graphene morphology regulated by substrates with herringbone and checkerboard surface corrugations. As the graphene–substrate interfacial bonding energy and the substrate surface roughness vary, the graphene morphology snaps between two distinct states: (1 closely conforming to the substrate and (2 remaining nearly flat on the substrate. Since the graphene morphology is strongly tied to the electronic properties of graphene, such a snap-through instability of graphene morphology can lead to desirable graphene electronic properties that could potentially enable graphene-based functional electronic components (e.g. nano-switches.

  17. Electrospinning onto Insulating Substrates by Controlling Surface Wettability and Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, WooSeok; Kim, Geon Hwee; Shin, Jung Hwal; Lim, Geunbae; An, Taechang

    2017-11-28

    We report a simple method for electrospinning polymers onto flexible, insulating substrates by controlling the wettability of the substrate surface. Water molecules were adsorbed onto the surface of a hydrophilic polymer substrate by increasing the local humidity around the substrate. The adsorbed water was used as the ground electrode for electrospinning. The electrospun fibers were deposited only onto hydrophilic areas of the substrate, allowing for patterning through wettability control. Direct writing of polymer fiber was also possible through near-field electrospinning onto a hydrophilic surface.

  18. Nemesia Root Hair Response to Paper Pulp Substrate for Micropropagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Labrousse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Agar substrates for in vitro culture are well adapted to plant micropropagation, but not to plant rooting and acclimatization. Conversely, paper-pulp-based substrates appear as potentially well adapted for in vitro culture and functional root production. To reinforce this hypothesis, this study compares in vitro development of nemesia on several substrates. Strong differences between nemesia roots growing in agar or in paper-pulp substrates were evidenced through scanning electron microscopy. Roots developed in agar have shorter hairs, larger rhizodermal cells, and less organized root caps than those growing on paper pulp. In conclusion, it should be noted that in this study, in vitro microporous substrates such as paper pulp lead to the production of similar root hairs to those found in greenhouse peat substrates. Consequently, if agar could be used for micropropagation, rooting, and plant acclimatization, enhancement could be achieved if rooting stage was performed on micro-porous substrates such as paper pulp.

  19. Surprisingly high substrate specificities observed in complex biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Kragelund, Caroline

    by selection for different specialized species. We hypothesized that bacteria growing in natural environment express strongly conserved substrate specificity which is independent on short-term (few hours) variations in growth conditions. In this study, biofilm from Aalborg wastewater treatment plant was used...... to investigate the cell-specific in situ substrate uptake pattern of different bacteria. Different substrates were tested by combination of Microautoradiography and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization. Conditions applied (different substrate concentrations, starvation, induction with specific substrates, multiple...... that bacteria living in natural environment, represented here by wastewater treatment plant microbial community, are strongly specialized in the uptake of organic substrates; fluctuating conditions, often encountered in natural environment, do not influence the profile of substrate uptake of these specialized...

  20. Nanostructured surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates for explosives detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Stenbaek; Olsen, Jesper Kenneth; Boisen, Anja

    2010-01-01

    Here we present a method for trace detection of explosives in the gas phase using novel surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy substrates. Novel substrates that produce an exceptionally large enhancement of the Raman effect were used to amplify the Raman signal of explosives...... molecules adsorbed onto the substrate. The substrates were fabricated in a cleanroom process which only requires two steps to produce well controlled nano-sized high aspect ratio metal pillars. These substrates had superior chemical sensing performance in addition to a more cost effective fabrication...... process compared to existing commercial substrates. Therefore it is believed that these novel substrates will be able to make SERS more applicable in mobile explosives detection systems to be deployed in for example landmine clearance actions....

  1. Fibroblast motility on substrates with different rigidities: modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracheva, Maria; Dokukina, Irina

    2009-03-01

    We develop a discrete model for cell locomotion on substrates with different rigidities and simulate experiments described in Lo, Wang, Dembo, Wang (2000) ``Cell movement is guided by the rigidity of the substrate'', Biophys. J. 79: 144-152. In these experiments fibroblasts were planted on a substrate with a step rigidity and showed preference for locomotion over stiffer side of the substrate when approaches the boundary between the soft and the stiff sides of the substrate. The model reproduces experimentally observed behavior of fibroblasts. In particular, we are able to show with our model how cell characteristics (such as cell length, shape, area and speed) change during cell crawling through the ``soft-stiff'' substrate boundary. Also, our model suggests the temporary increase of both cell speed and area in that very moment when cell leaves soft side of substrate.

  2. Chemometrics approach to substrate development, case: semisyntetic cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose; Hansen, Birgitte Vedel

    1998-01-01

    from food production facilities.The Chemometrics approach to substrate development is illustrated by the development of a semisyntetic cheese substrate. Growth, colour formation and mycotoxin production of 6 cheese related fungi were studied on 9 types of natural cheeses and 24 synthetic cheese...... substrates and compared using principal component analysis (PCA). The synthetic cheese substrates contained various amounts of Ca, K, Mg, Na, P, Fe, Cu, Zn, lactate, lactose and casein. In this manner a robust, well-defined and easy prepared laboratory cheese substrate was developed for Penicillium commune......, the most frequently occurring contaminant on semi-hard cheese. Growth experiments on the substrate were repeatable and reproducible. The substrate was also suitable for the starter P. camemberti. Mineral elements in cheese were shown to have strong effect on growth, mycotoxin production and colour...

  3. EcoRV catalysis with a pre-bent substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Daniel S.; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    Enzymes are deformable molecules which often adapt their conformation to the substrate's geometry. In the case of restriction enzymes acting on DNA, the substrate (DNA) is deformable also. While it is well established that external mechanical stress exerted on an enzyme modulates the enzymatic activity, the effect of mechanically stressing the substrate is less explored. Here we present the restriction enzyme EcoRV with a series of pre-bent DNA substrates and observe modulation of the overall speed of the enzymatic reaction by up to a factor 50. While in all cases the reaction is slowed down compared to the unstressed substrate, we observe peaks in the reaction rate as we vary the state of stress of the DNA substrate. Both bending moments and torsional moments on the DNA substrate affect the reaction rate.

  4. Pain perception in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janum, Susanne; Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Werner, Mads U

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to study the relationship between pain perception and cytokine release during systemic inflammation. We present a randomized crossover trial in healthy volunteers (n = 17) in 37 individual trials. Systemic inflammation was induced by an i.v. bolus of Escherichia coli LPS (2 ng/kg) on two...... in healthy human volunteers leads to reduction in pain pressure threshold and an increase in pain perception to heat stimuli, supporting a relationship between acute systemic inflammation and pain perception....

  5. COLOR PERCEPTION IN INTERIOR DESIGN

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZSAVAŞ, Nilay

    2016-01-01

    In this study, it is mentioned about color that is a keyfactor of interior architecture profession. Firstly, space perception, colorand space interaction, effects of space, color and user relationship is explainedexcept color theories and definitions. Within this scope these are scrutinizingboth perception of color in the space and material and lighting issues thathave a big role in perception. Recent searches, practice methods and evaluationwith examples play a part in this article. It is ai...

  6. Time Perception and Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Ceviz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Time perception is an ability which we use in every moment of daily life, that guides the formation and continuation of our behaviors and from an evolutionary perspective ensures survival. Internal clock models help us to understand time perception. Time perception is known to vary between individuals and particular situations. This variability is explained with the mechanisms which is associated with the processes related to attention, the speed of the internal clock and the memory unit. It is suggested that time perception is mainly associated with the activities of dopamine and acetylcholine. Some dopaminergic psychoactive substances like cocaine and amphetamine have all been shown to change time perception by increasing the speed of internal clock while on the other hand some antipsychotic drugs make an opposite change in time perception by descreasing the speed of the clock. Similarly, time perception is affected in some psychiatric disorders and an ethiopathological relationship between time perception disturbances and psychiatric disorders is suggested. In this article time perception changes in schizophrenia, attention deficit/hyperactivity syndrome, depression, anxiety disorders and personality disorders are briefly reviewed.

  7. Deposition of silver layer on different substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzemiński, J.; Kiełbasiński, K.; Szałapak, J.; Jakubowska, M.; MłoŻniak, A.; Zwierkowska, E.

    2015-09-01

    The hole process of producing continuous layer with silver nanoparticles is presented in this paper. First the ink preparation and then the spray process is shown and discussed. The silver layers were obtained on sodium glass substrate. Three different ink carriers were considered and the best one has been chosen. Spray coating process was carried out using special spray can. After obtaining sprayed layers the samples were sintered in several temperatures to investigate the lowest suitable sintering temperature. After that layers resistivity were measured. Then the silver layers were cracked to produce breakthrough fracture that was investigated by a scanning electron microscope. In this paper, the authors investigated the spray coating technique as an alternative to electroplating and other techniques, considering layer resistivity, thickness and production process.

  8. The structural neural substrate of subjective happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Wataru; Kochiyama, Takanori; Uono, Shota; Kubota, Yasutaka; Sawada, Reiko; Yoshimura, Sayaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2015-11-20

    Happiness is a subjective experience that is an ultimate goal for humans. Psychological studies have shown that subjective happiness can be measured reliably and consists of emotional and cognitive components. However, the neural substrates of subjective happiness remain unclear. To investigate this issue, we used structural magnetic resonance imaging and questionnaires that assessed subjective happiness, the intensity of positive and negative emotional experiences, and purpose in life. We found a positive relationship between the subjective happiness score and gray matter volume in the right precuneus. Moreover, the same region showed an association with the combined positive and negative emotional intensity and purpose in life scores. Our findings suggest that the precuneus mediates subjective happiness by integrating the emotional and cognitive components of happiness.

  9. Cell Proliferation on Planar and Curved Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Michelle; Chang, Ya Wen; Cruz, Ricardo; Fragkopoulos, Alexandros; Garcia, Andres; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    Aberrant epithelial collective cell growth is one of the major challenges to be addressed in order to treat diseases such as cancer and organ fibrosis. The conditions of the extracellular microenvironment, properties of the cells' cytoskeleton, and interfacial properties of the substratum (the surface in contact with epithelial cells) have a significant influence on the migratory behavior of epithelial cells, cell proliferation and migration. This work focuses on understanding the impact the substratum curvature has on cell behavior. We focus on cell proliferation first and study MDCK cells on both planar and curved hydrogel substrates. The curved hydrogels are based on polyacrylamide and have toroidal shape, with tube radius 200 um and an aspect ratio in the rage between 2 and 9. Proliferation is measured using the Click-it EDU assay (Invitrogen), which measures cells that are synthesizing DNA. Funding Source is Childrens Healthcare of Atlanta.

  10. Somatosensory Substrates of Flight Control in Bats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara L. Marshall

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Flight maneuvers require rapid sensory integration to generate adaptive motor output. Bats achieve remarkable agility with modified forelimbs that serve as airfoils while retaining capacity for object manipulation. Wing sensory inputs provide behaviorally relevant information to guide flight; however, components of wing sensory-motor circuits have not been analyzed. Here, we elucidate the organization of wing innervation in an insectivore, the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus. We demonstrate that wing sensory innervation differs from other vertebrate forelimbs, revealing a peripheral basis for the atypical topographic organization reported for bat somatosensory nuclei. Furthermore, the wing is innervated by an unusual complement of sensory neurons poised to report airflow and touch. Finally, we report that cortical neurons encode tactile and airflow inputs with sparse activity patterns. Together, our findings identify neural substrates of somatosensation in the bat wing and imply that evolutionary pressures giving rise to mammalian flight led to unusual sensorimotor projections.

  11. Vector assembly of colloids on monolayer substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingxiang; Yang, Shenyu; Tsang, Boyce; Tu, Mei; Granick, Steve

    2017-06-01

    The key to spontaneous and directed assembly is to encode the desired assembly information to building blocks in a programmable and efficient way. In computer graphics, raster graphics encodes images on a single-pixel level, conferring fine details at the expense of large file sizes, whereas vector graphics encrypts shape information into vectors that allow small file sizes and operational transformations. Here, we adapt this raster/vector concept to a 2D colloidal system and realize `vector assembly' by manipulating particles on a colloidal monolayer substrate with optical tweezers. In contrast to raster assembly that assigns optical tweezers to each particle, vector assembly requires a minimal number of optical tweezers that allow operations like chain elongation and shortening. This vector approach enables simple uniform particles to form a vast collection of colloidal arenes and colloidenes, the spontaneous dissociation of which is achieved with precision and stage-by-stage complexity by simply removing the optical tweezers.

  12. Micropatterned substrates for studying astrocytes in culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Lee

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of the physiological roles of astrocytes have ignited renewed interest in the functional significance of these glial cells in the central nervous system. Many of the newly discovered astrocytic functions were initially demonstrated and characterized in cell culture systems. We discuss the use of microculture techniques and micropatterning of cell-adhesive substrates in studies of astrocytic Ca2+ excitability and bidirectional neuron-astrocyte signaling. This culturing approach aims to reduce the level of complexity of the system by limiting the interacting partners and by controlling the localization of cells. It provides tight control over experimental conditions allowing detailed characterization of cellular functions and intercellular communication. Although such a reductionist approach yields some difference in observations between astrocytic properties in culture and in situ, general phenomena discovered in cell culture systems, however, have also been found in vivo.

  13. Substrate Integrated Evanescent Filters Employing Coaxial Stubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2015-01-01

    is designed, fabricated, and tested. The filter exhibits a transmission zero due to the implemented stubs. The problem of evanescent mode filter analysis is formulated in terms of conventional network concepts. This formulation is then used for modelling of the filters. Strategies to further miniaturization...... and small height of the waveguide. In this work, one of the realization methods of evanescent mode waveguides using a single layer substrate is considered. The method is based on the use of coaxial stubs as capacitive susceptances externally connected to a SIW. A microwave filter based on these principles...... of the microwave filter are discussed. The approach is useful in applications where a sharp roll-off at the upper stop-band is required....

  14. Pre-emptive perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodis-Wollner, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    How can an action to a target be selected without yet knowing what it is? Pre-emptive perception (PEP) is a framework which orders neuronal mechanisms in association with voluntary actions before an action is started and until it is completed. It is assumed that PEP serves the purpose of perception, but a conscious, perceptual identification of the goal is not obligatorily completed during the time period of PEP itself. The concept of PEP is that the brain pre-emptively optimizes an action plan to maximize eventual perception, even before being sure what the goal is. Experimental studies of voluntary saccadic eye movements are considered as prototypic activity within the framework of PEP. The core concept of pre-emption is that a particular saccade is selected while a large number of other possible actions are deselected. Pre-emptive computations include mechanisms associated with internal context and reward. Neurophysiological studies which show anatomically and functionally separate cortical and some subcortical neuronal groups in computing saccades are summarized. There is a potential relationship of PEP as a neurobiological framework and some philosophical concepts. Terms for processes between planning and action, such as intention, anticipation, and attention, are often incongruent in everyday language and in epistemology. It is proposed here that a scrutiny of these terms can be rigorously approached by temporal subdivision of PEP and conversely, clear definitions of these terms can lead to organized experimental designs of cognitive neurobiology. The temporal subdivision of PEP allows a critique of The Will in the definition of Schopenhauer and distinguishes it from the 'free will'.

  15. Music Perception in Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Hannah L; Clark, Camilla N; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Cohen, Miriam H; Slattery, Catherine F; Paterson, Ross W; Foulkes, Alexander J M; Schott, Jonathan M; Mummery, Catherine J; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2017-01-01

    Despite much recent interest in music and dementia, music perception has not been widely studied across dementia syndromes using an information processing approach. Here we addressed this issue in a cohort of 30 patients representing major dementia syndromes of typical Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 16), logopenic aphasia (LPA, an Alzheimer variant syndrome; n = 5), and progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA; n = 9) in relation to 19 healthy age-matched individuals. We designed a novel neuropsychological battery to assess perception of musical patterns in the dimensions of pitch and temporal information (requiring detection of notes that deviated from the established pattern based on local or global sequence features) and musical scene analysis (requiring detection of a familiar tune within polyphonic harmony). Performance on these tests was referenced to generic auditory (timbral) deviance detection and recognition of familiar tunes and adjusted for general auditory working memory performance. Relative to healthy controls, patients with AD and LPA had group-level deficits of global pitch (melody contour) processing while patients with PNFA as a group had deficits of local (interval) as well as global pitch processing. There was substantial individual variation within syndromic groups. Taking working memory performance into account, no specific deficits of musical temporal processing, timbre processing, musical scene analysis, or tune recognition were identified. The findings suggest that particular aspects of music perception such as pitch pattern analysis may open a window on the processing of information streams in major dementia syndromes. The potential selectivity of musical deficits for particular dementia syndromes and particular dimensions of processing warrants further systematic investigation.

  16. Visual perception is dependent on visuospatial working memory and thus on the posterior parietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisella, Laure

    2017-06-01

    Visual perception involves complex and active processes. We will start by explaining why visual perception is dependent on visuospatial working memory, especially the spatiotemporal integration of the perceived elements through the ocular exploration of visual scenes. Then we will present neuropsychology, transcranial magnetic stimulation and neuroimaging data yielding information on the specific role of the posterior parietal cortex of the right hemisphere in visuospatial working memory. Within the posterior parietal cortex, neuropsychology data also suggest that there might be dissociated neural substrates for deployment of attention (superior parietal lobules) and spatiotemporal integration (right inferior parietal lobule). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Perception of Citizen Insecurity

    OpenAIRE

    Pillhuamán Caña, Nelly; Ramos Ramírez, Julio; Vallenas Ochoa, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out in the district of San Juan de Miraflores having as main purpose to obtain reliable information about «perceptions of insecurity and victimization of citizens. The study is a quantitative, descriptive and transversal. The sample design is probabilistic, three-stage, where the final stage unit is the individual whose age is between 16 and 65. The results indicate that in the past six months, 35% of people have been victims of any unlawful act, being theft crime the m...

  18. [Perceptive deafness and AIDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, E M; Domínguez, L; Urpegui, A; Martínez, J; Jiménez, M; Bretos, S; Vallés, H

    1997-06-01

    We report a case of a 23 years old woman HIV positive for the past five years with a four year history of right perceptive hypoacusia evolution without tinitus, vertigo or any other otologic symptomatology. After reviewing her personal and family history and conducting imilar tonal audiometry, tympanometry bilateral, contralateral estapedial reflex, auditory evoked brain stem response and a bilateral nasal fiberendoscopy, we analyzed the evolution of her immunal deficiency and the treatments to which she has been submitted with the purpose of determining the risk factors that have coincided in this case to be able to establish some criteria to follow the auditive affect in HIV positive patients.

  19. Percept User Manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnes, Brian [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kennon, Stephen Ray [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This document is the main user guide for the Sierra/Percept capabilities including the mesh_adapt and mesh_transfer tools. Basic capabilities for uniform mesh refinement (UMR) and mesh transfers are discussed. Examples are used to provide illustration. Future versions of this manual will include more advanced features such as geometry and mesh smoothing. Additionally, all the options for the mesh_adapt code will be described in detail. Capabilities for local adaptivity in the context of offline adaptivity will also be included. This page intentionally left blank.

  20. Hazard perception in traffic. [previously knows as: Hazard perception.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    Hazard perception is an essential part of the driving task. There are clear indications that insufficient skills in perceiving hazards play an important role in the occurrence of crashes, especially those involving novice drivers. Proper hazard perception not only consists of scanning and perceiving

  1. Biomechanics of the endothelium substrate influences leukocyte transmigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    The effects of shear flow and cytokines on leukocyte transmigration are well understood. However, the effects of substrate stiffness on transmigration remain unexplored. We have developed an in vitro model that allows us to study leukocyte transmigration as a function of varying physiological substrate stiffness. Interestingly, leukocyte transmigration increased with increasing substrate stiffness below the endothelium. intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression, stiffness, cytoskeletal arrangement, morphology, and cell-substrate adhesion could not account for the dependence of transmigration on substrate stiffness. We also explored the role of cell contraction and observed that (1) neutrophil transmigration caused large hole formation in monolayers on stiff substrates. (2) Neutrophil transmigration on soft substrates was increased by decreasing cell-cell adhesion. (3) Inhibition of myosin light chain kinase normalized the effects of substrate stiffness by reducing cell contraction on stiff substrates. These results demonstrate that neutrophil transmigration is regulated by MLCK-mediated generation of gaps at cell borders through substrate stiffness-dependent endothelial cell contraction.

  2. GABA shapes the dynamics of bistable perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, A.M.; Knapen, T.; Scholte, H.S.; St. John-Saaltink, E.; Donner, T.H.; Lamme, V.A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Sometimes, perception fluctuates spontaneously between two distinct interpretations of a constant sensory input. These bistable perceptual phenomena provide a unique window into the neural mechanisms that create the contents of conscious perception. Models of bistable perception posit that mutual

  3. Autism: Tactile Perception and Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernon, E.; Pry, R.; Baghdadli, A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: For many years, and especially since Waynbaum and Wallon, psychology and psychopathology have dealt with cognitive perception, but have had little to do with the affective qualities of perception. Our aim was to study the influence of the sensory environment on people with autism. Method: Several experiments were carried out using…

  4. Distributed processing in bistable perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knapen, T.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    A very incisive way of studying visual awareness and the mechanisms that underlie it, it to use bistable perception. In bistable perception, an observer's perceptual state alternates between one interpretation and its mutually exclusive counterpart while the stimulus remains the same. This gives us

  5. Image perception and image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wackenheim, A.

    1987-01-01

    The author develops theoretical and practical models of image perception and image processing, based on phenomenology and structuralism and leading to original perception: fundamental for a positivistic approach of research work for the development of artificial intelligence that will be able in an automated system fo 'reading' X-ray pictures. (orig.) [de

  6. Radiological risk perception in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Arias, R.; Prades, A.; Meza, R.; Sola, R.

    1997-01-01

    How does society perceive radiation risks?. Is there any logic underlying those perceptions?.The article describes the results of a cross-cultural survey on radiological risk perception applied to a representative sample of the Spanish population. This study has been carried out in the framework of a research project subsidized by the European Union and the CSN. (Author) 16 refs

  7. Wildfire Perception and Community Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Jason S.; Matarrita-Cascante, David; Stedman, Richard C.; Luloff, A. E.

    2010-01-01

    Given increasing political and financial commitments to wildfire preparedness, risk policy demands that risk identification, assessment, and mitigation activities are balanced among diverse resident groups. Essential for this is the understanding of residents' perceptions of wildfire risks. This study compares wildfire-risk perceptions of…

  8. Metal plating removal from insulator substrate using pulsed arc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imasaka, K.; Gnapowski, S.; Akiyama, H.

    2014-06-01

    Removal technique of metal materials from a metal plating insulator substrate using a pulsed arc discharge was proposed and its fundamental characteristics were investigated. The metal plating substrate with three metal-layers structure (cupper, nickel and gold layers) is used as the sample substrate. Repetitive pulsed arc discharge plasma is generated using three types of electrode systems. Effects of the electrode systems on the metal plating removal from the insulator substrate were investigated. The metal plating was removed by the pulsed arc discharge between the electrode and substrate surface. A part of the gold layer, which is the topmost metal layer on the insulator substrate is vaporized and removed by the repetitive pulsed arc discharges.

  9. Experimental analysis of green roof substrate detention characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yio, Marcus H N; Stovin, Virginia; Werdin, Jörg; Vesuviano, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Green roofs may make an important contribution to urban stormwater management. Rainfall-runoff models are required to evaluate green roof responses to specific rainfall inputs. The roof's hydrological response is a function of its configuration, with the substrate - or growing media - providing both retention and detention of rainfall. The objective of the research described here is to quantify the detention effects due to green roof substrates, and to propose a suitable hydrological modelling approach. Laboratory results from experimental detention tests on green roof substrates are presented. It is shown that detention increases with substrate depth and as a result of increasing substrate organic content. Model structures based on reservoir routing are evaluated, and it is found that a one-parameter reservoir routing model coupled with a parameter that describes the delay to start of runoff best fits the observed data. Preliminary findings support the hypothesis that the reservoir routing parameter values can be defined from the substrate's physical characteristics.

  10. Vitreous carbon mask substrate for X-ray lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigeldinger, Georg [Livermore, CA; Skala, Dawn M [Fremont, CA; Griffiths, Stewart K [Livermore, CA; Talin, Albert Alec [Livermore, CA; Losey, Matthew W [Livermore, CA; Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter [Dublin, CA

    2009-10-27

    The present invention is directed to the use of vitreous carbon as a substrate material for providing masks for X-ray lithography. The new substrate also enables a small thickness of the mask absorber used to pattern the resist, and this enables improved mask accuracy. An alternative embodiment comprised the use of vitreous carbon as a LIGA substrate wherein the VC wafer blank is etched in a reactive ion plasma after which an X-ray resist is bonded. This surface treatment provides a surface enabling good adhesion of the X-ray photoresist and subsequent nucleation and adhesion of the electrodeposited metal for LIGA mold-making while the VC substrate practically eliminates secondary radiation effects that lead to delamination of the X-ray resist form the substrate, the loss of isolated resist features, and the formation of a resist layer adjacent to the substrate that is insoluble in the developer.

  11. Role of Cerebellum in Motion Perception and Vestibulo-ocular Reflex—Similarities and Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Palla, Antonella; Marti, Sarah; Olasagasti, Itsaso; Optican, Lance M.; Zee, David S.; Straumann, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    Vestibular velocity storage enhances the efficacy of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during relatively low-frequency head rotations. This function is modulated by GABA-mediated inhibitory cerebellar projections. Velocity storage also exists in perceptual pathway and has similar functional principles as VOR. However, it is not known whether the neural substrate for perception and VOR overlap. We propose two possibilities. First, there is the same velocity storage for both VOR and perception; second, there are nonoverlapping neural networks: one might be involved in perception and the other for the VOR. We investigated these possibilities by measuring VOR and perceptual responses in healthy human subjects during whole-body, constant-velocity rotation steps about all three dimensions (yaw, pitch, and roll) before and after 10 mg of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). 4-AP, a selective blocker of inward rectifier potassium conductance, can lead to increased synchronization and precision of Purkinje neuron discharge and possibly enhance the GABAergic action. Hence 4-AP could reduce the decay time constant of the perceived angular velocity and VOR. We found that 4-AP reduced the decay time constant, but the amount of reduction in the two processes, perception and VOR, was not the same, suggesting the possibility of nonoverlapping or partially overlapping neural substrates for VOR and perception. We also noted that, unlike the VOR, the perceived angular velocity gradually built up and plateau prior to decay. Hence, the perception pathway may have additional mechanism that changes the dynamics of perceived angular velocity beyond the velocity storage. 4-AP had no effects on the duration of build-up of perceived angular velocity, suggesting that the higher order processing of perception, beyond the velocity storage, might not occur under the influence of mechanism that could be influenced by 4-AP. PMID:22777507

  12. Role of cerebellum in motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex-similarities and disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Aasef G; Palla, Antonella; Marti, Sarah; Olasagasti, Itsaso; Optican, Lance M; Zee, David S; Straumann, Dominik

    2013-02-01

    Vestibular velocity storage enhances the efficacy of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during relatively low-frequency head rotations. This function is modulated by GABA-mediated inhibitory cerebellar projections. Velocity storage also exists in perceptual pathway and has similar functional principles as VOR. However, it is not known whether the neural substrate for perception and VOR overlap. We propose two possibilities. First, there is the same velocity storage for both VOR and perception; second, there are nonoverlapping neural networks: one might be involved in perception and the other for the VOR. We investigated these possibilities by measuring VOR and perceptual responses in healthy human subjects during whole-body, constant-velocity rotation steps about all three dimensions (yaw, pitch, and roll) before and after 10 mg of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). 4-AP, a selective blocker of inward rectifier potassium conductance, can lead to increased synchronization and precision of Purkinje neuron discharge and possibly enhance the GABAergic action. Hence 4-AP could reduce the decay time constant of the perceived angular velocity and VOR. We found that 4-AP reduced the decay time constant, but the amount of reduction in the two processes, perception and VOR, was not the same, suggesting the possibility of nonoverlapping or partially overlapping neural substrates for VOR and perception. We also noted that, unlike the VOR, the perceived angular velocity gradually built up and plateau prior to decay. Hence, the perception pathway may have additional mechanism that changes the dynamics of perceived angular velocity beyond the velocity storage. 4-AP had no effects on the duration of build-up of perceived angular velocity, suggesting that the higher order processing of perception, beyond the velocity storage, might not occur under the influence of mechanism that could be influenced by 4-AP.

  13. Effective-substrate theory for optical reflection from a layered substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, J. P.; Wang, X.; Fei, Y.Y.; Zhu, X.D.

    2009-01-01

    We show that reflection of a monochromatic light from a semi-infinite medium covered with a stack of layered media is equivalent to that from an effective “semi-infinite medium” characterized by two distinctive optical dielectric constants for the s-polarized and p-polarized components, respectively. Such an effective-substrate approach simplifies the analysis of ellipsometry measurements of a wide range of surface-bound processes including thin film growth and surface-bound reactions. PMID:19746189

  14. Substrate binding and specificity of rhomboid intramembrane protease revealed by substrate-peptide complex structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zoll, Sebastian; Stanchev, Stancho; Began, Jakub; Škerle, Jan; Lepšík, Martin; Peclinovská, Lucie; Majer, Pavel; Stříšovský, Kvido

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 20 (2014), s. 2408-2421 ISSN 0261-4189 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/1886; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11206; GA MŠk LO1302; GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : intramembrane protease * rhomboid family * rhomboid protease * structure * substrate recognition Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 10.434, year: 2014

  15. Polymer Substrates For Lightweight, Thin-Film Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Carol R.

    1993-01-01

    Substrates survive high deposition temperatures. High-temperature-resistant polymers candidate materials for use as substrates of lightweight, flexible, radiation-resistant solar photovoltaic cells. According to proposal, thin films of copper indium diselenide or cadmium telluride deposited on substrates to serve as active semiconductor layers of cells, parts of photovoltaic power arrays having exceptionally high power-to-weight ratios. Flexibility of cells exploited to make arrays rolled up for storage.

  16. Pd thin films on flexible substrate for hydrogen sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öztürk, Sadullah [Fatih Sultan Mehmet Vakıf University, Engineering Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Kılınç, Necmettin, E-mail: nkilinc@nigde.edu.tr [Nigde University, Mechatronics Engineering Department, 51245 Nigde (Turkey); Nigde University, Nanotechnology Application and Research Center, 51245 Nigde (Turkey)

    2016-07-25

    In this work, palladium (Pd) thin films were prepared via RF sputtering method with various thicknesses (6 nm, 20 nm and 60 nm) on both a flexible substrate and a hard substrate. Hydrogen (H{sub 2}) sensing properties of Pd films on flexible substrate have been investigated depending on temperatures (25–100 °C) and H{sub 2} concentrations (600 ppm – 10%). The effect of H{sub 2} on structural properties of the films was also studied. The films were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction. It is found that whole Pd films on hard substrate show permanent structural deformation after exposed to 10% H{sub 2} for 30 min. But, this H{sub 2} exposure does not causes any structural deformation for 6 nm Pd film on flexible substrate and 6 nm Pd film on flexible substrate shows reversible sensor response up to 10% H{sub 2} concentration without any structural deformation. On the other hand, Pd film sensors that have the thicknesses 20 nm and 60 nm on flexible substrate are irreversible for higher H{sub 2} concentration (>2%) with film deformation. The sensor response of 6 nm Pd film on flexible substrate increased with increasing H{sub 2} concentration up 4% and then saturated. The sensitivity of the film decreased with increasing operation temperature. - Highlights: • Pd thin films fabricated by RF sputtering on both flexible and hard substrates. • Structural deformation observed for films on hard substrate after exposing 10% H{sub 2}. • 6 nm Pd film on flexible substrate shows reversible sensor response up to 10% H{sub 2}. • H{sub 2} sensing properties of film on flexible substrate investigated depending on temperature and concentration. • The sensitivity of the film decreased with increasing operation temperature.

  17. Mogul-Patterned Elastomeric Substrate for Stretchable Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han-Byeol; Bae, Chan-Wool; Duy, Le Thai; Sohn, Il-Yung; Kim, Do-Il; Song, You-Joon; Kim, Youn-Jea; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2016-04-01

    A mogul-patterned stretchable substrate with multidirectional stretchability and minimal fracture of layers under high stretching is fabricated by double photolithography and soft lithography. Au layers and a reduced graphene oxide chemiresistor on a mogul-patterned poly(dimethylsiloxane) substrate are stable and durable under various stretching conditions. The newly designed mogul-patterned stretchable substrate shows great promise for stretchable electronics. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Layered graphene-mica substrates induce melting of DNA origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Nathaniel S.; Pham, Phi H. Q.; Crow, Daniel T.; Burke, Peter J.; Norton, Michael L.

    2018-04-01

    Monolayer graphene supported on mica substrates induce melting of cross-shaped DNA origami. This behavior can be contrasted with the case of origami on graphene on graphite, where an expansion or partially re-organized structure is observed. On mica, only well-formed structures are observed. Comparison of the morphological differences observed for these probes after adsorption on these substrates provides insights into the sensitivity of DNA based nanostructures to the properties of the graphene monolayer, as modified by its substrate.

  19. Metal substrates with nanometer scale surface roughness for flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Lam; Kim, Kisoo

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we present a novel way in fabricating a metal substrate with nanometer scale in surface roughness (Ra INVAR (Invariable alloy) one (20 cm × 20 cm, Ra = 1.40 nm) were demonstrated. The INVAR film was used as a substrate for fabricating organic light emitting diodes (OLED) and organic photovoltaic (OPV). The optical and electrical characteristics of OLEDs and OPVs using the INVAR were comparable to those using a conventional ITO glass substrate.

  20. Enhanced 3D fluorescence live cell imaging on nanoplasmonic substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gartia, Manas Ranjan [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hsiao, Austin; Logan Liu, G [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Sivaguru, Mayandi [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Chen Yi, E-mail: loganliu@illinois.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2011-09-07

    We have created a randomly distributed nanocone substrate on silicon coated with silver for surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence detection and 3D cell imaging. Optical characterization of the nanocone substrate showed it can support several plasmonic modes (in the 300-800 nm wavelength range) that can be coupled to a fluorophore on the surface of the substrate, which gives rise to the enhanced fluorescence. Spectral analysis suggests that a nanocone substrate can create more excitons and shorter lifetime in the model fluorophore Rhodamine 6G (R6G) due to plasmon resonance energy transfer from the nanocone substrate to the nearby fluorophore. We observed three-dimensional fluorescence enhancement on our substrate shown from the confocal fluorescence imaging of chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells grown on the substrate. The fluorescence intensity from the fluorophores bound on the cell membrane was amplified more than 100-fold as compared to that on a glass substrate. We believe that strong scattering within the nanostructured area coupled with random scattering inside the cell resulted in the observed three-dimensional enhancement in fluorescence with higher photostability on the substrate surface.

  1. Friction and shear strength at the nanowire-substrate interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong; Qin, Qingquan; Gu, Yi; Wang, Zhonglin

    2009-11-28

    The friction and shear strength of nanowire (NW)-substrate interfaces critically influences the electrical/mechanical performance and life time of NW-based nanodevices. Yet, very few reports on this subject are available in the literature because of the experimental challenges involved and, more specifically no studies have been reported to investigate the configuration of individual NW tip in contact with a substrate. In this letter, using a new experimental method, we report the friction measurement between a NW tip and a substrate for the first time. The measurement was based on NW buckling in situ inside a scanning electron microscope. The coefficients of friction between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were found to be 0.09-0.12 and 0.10-0.15, respectively. The adhesion between a NW and the substrate modified the true contact area, which affected the interfacial shear strength. Continuum mechanics calculation found that interfacial shear strengths between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were 134-139 MPa and 78.9-95.3 MPa, respectively. This method can be applied to measure friction parameters of other NW-substrate systems. Our results on interfacial friction and shear strength could have implication on the AFM three-point bending tests used for nanomechanical characterisation.

  2. Friction and Shear Strength at the Nanowire–Substrate Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Yi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The friction and shear strength of nanowire (NW–substrate interfaces critically influences the electrical/mechanical performance and life time of NW-based nanodevices. Yet, very few reports on this subject are available in the literature because of the experimental challenges involved and, more specifically no studies have been reported to investigate the configuration of individual NW tip in contact with a substrate. In this letter, using a new experimental method, we report the friction measurement between a NW tip and a substrate for the first time. The measurement was based on NW buckling in situ inside a scanning electron microscope. The coefficients of friction between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were found to be 0.09–0.12 and 0.10–0.15, respectively. The adhesion between a NW and the substrate modified the true contact area, which affected the interfacial shear strength. Continuum mechanics calculation found that interfacial shear strengths between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were 134–139 MPa and 78.9–95.3 MPa, respectively. This method can be applied to measure friction parameters of other NW–substrate systems. Our results on interfacial friction and shear strength could have implication on the AFM three-point bending tests used for nanomechanical characterisation.

  3. Sol-gel derived ceramic electrolyte films on porous substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueper, Timothy Walter [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-05-01

    A process for the deposition of sol-gel derived thin films on porous substrates has been developed; such films should be useful for solid oxide fuel cells and related applications. Yttria-stabilized zirconia films have been formed from metal alkoxide starting solutions. Dense films have been deposited on metal substrates and ceramic substrates, both dense and porous, through dip-coating and spin-coating techniques, followed by a heat treatment in air. X-ray diffraction has been used to determine the crystalline phases formed and the extent of reactions with various substrates which may be encountered in gas/gas devices. Surface coatings have been successfully applied to porous substrates through the control of substrate pore size and deposition parameters. Wetting of the substrate pores by the coating solution is discussed, and conditions are defined for which films can be deposited over the pores without filling the interiors of the pores. Shrinkage cracking was encountered in films thicker than a critical value, which depended on the sol-gel process parameters and on the substrate characteristics. Local discontinuities were also observed in films which were thinner than a critical value which depended on the substrate pore size. A theoretical discussion of cracking mechanisms is presented for both types of cracking, and the conditions necessary for successful thin formation are defined. The applicability of these film gas/gas devices is discussed.

  4. Substrate use and selection in sympatric intertidal hermit crab species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TURRA A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Coexisting hermit crabs may competitively interact for shells and microhabitats, mainly when shell availability is habitat-related. Three species of Clibanarius (C. antillensis, C. sclopetarius, and C. vittatus coexist in the intertidal region of Pernambuco Islet, Araçá Region, São Sebastião Channel, southeastern Brazil. This study evaluated crab preferences for four substrate types used by these species in nature (rocky shore, pebbles, sand, and mud in allopatric (single species and sympatric (three species treatments in simulations of high tide and low tide. The substrate preference of the three hermit crabs did not vary between low and high tide situations. At low tide the crabs either moved into holes in the highly complex rocky substrate or buried themselves in mud. Substrate selection may explain the patterns of substrate use in nature only for C. vittatus. Clibanarius antillensis and C. sclopetarius showed closer similarities in the pattern of substrate selection in the sympatric treatment with the substrate use in nature than in allopatric treatment, indicating a positive influence (dependence of the presence of one species on the presence of another. Use of sub-optimal substrates, mainly by C. antillensis, may be caused by other factors such as its low desiccation tolerances. If competition for space takes place among these species, it would be more intense between C. sclopetarius and C. vittatus given their higher overlap in substrate preference than between them and C. antillensis.

  5. Substrate use and selection in sympatric intertidal hermit crab species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. TURRA

    Full Text Available Coexisting hermit crabs may competitively interact for shells and microhabitats, mainly when shell availability is habitat-related. Three species of Clibanarius (C. antillensis, C. sclopetarius, and C. vittatus coexist in the intertidal region of Pernambuco Islet, Araçá Region, São Sebastião Channel, southeastern Brazil. This study evaluated crab preferences for four substrate types used by these species in nature (rocky shore, pebbles, sand, and mud in allopatric (single species and sympatric (three species treatments in simulations of high tide and low tide. The substrate preference of the three hermit crabs did not vary between low and high tide situations. At low tide the crabs either moved into holes in the highly complex rocky substrate or buried themselves in mud. Substrate selection may explain the patterns of substrate use in nature only for C. vittatus. Clibanarius antillensis and C. sclopetarius showed closer similarities in the pattern of substrate selection in the sympatric treatment with the substrate use in nature than in allopatric treatment, indicating a positive influence (dependence of the presence of one species on the presence of another. Use of sub-optimal substrates, mainly by C. antillensis, may be caused by other factors such as its low desiccation tolerances. If competition for space takes place among these species, it would be more intense between C. sclopetarius and C. vittatus given their higher overlap in substrate preference than between them and C. antillensis.

  6. The effect of mineral substrates on the crystallization of lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, W. L.; Paxton, T. E.; Rousseau, R. W.; Sambanis, A.

    1998-05-01

    The effects of exogenous mineral substrates on the induction time for nucleation, and on the number, morphology and purity of protein crystals were investigated in a series of experiments using chicken egg-white lysozyme (CEWL) as a model protein. CEWL was crystallized using the vapor-diffusion technique in the absence of substrates (control) and in the presence of mineral substrates exhibiting various degrees of crystalline lattice match to CEWL (experiments). Results indicate that mineral substrates with a close lattice match to CEWL had a greater influence on the induction time for nucleation and crystal properties.

  7. Composite single crystal silicon scan mirror substrates, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Single crystal silicon is a desirable mirror substrate for scan mirrors in space telescopes. As diameters of mirrors become larger, existing manufacturing...

  8. Determinants for Substrate Specificity of Protein Phosphatase 2A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Slupe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A- (PP2A- catalyzed dephosphorylation of target substrate proteins is widespread and critical for cellular function. PP2A is predominantly found as a heterotrimeric complex of a catalytic subunit (C, a scaffolding subunit (A, and one member of 4 families of regulatory subunits (B. Substrate specificity of the holoenzyme complex is determined by the subcellular locale the complex is confined to, selective incorporation of the B subunit, interactions with endogenous inhibitory proteins, and specific intermolecular interactions between PP2A and target substrates. Here, we discuss recent studies that have advanced our understanding of the molecular determinants for PP2A substrate specificity.

  9. Enhanced 3D fluorescence live cell imaging on nanoplasmonic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gartia, Manas Ranjan; Hsiao, Austin; Logan Liu, G; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Chen Yi

    2011-01-01

    We have created a randomly distributed nanocone substrate on silicon coated with silver for surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence detection and 3D cell imaging. Optical characterization of the nanocone substrate showed it can support several plasmonic modes (in the 300-800 nm wavelength range) that can be coupled to a fluorophore on the surface of the substrate, which gives rise to the enhanced fluorescence. Spectral analysis suggests that a nanocone substrate can create more excitons and shorter lifetime in the model fluorophore Rhodamine 6G (R6G) due to plasmon resonance energy transfer from the nanocone substrate to the nearby fluorophore. We observed three-dimensional fluorescence enhancement on our substrate shown from the confocal fluorescence imaging of chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells grown on the substrate. The fluorescence intensity from the fluorophores bound on the cell membrane was amplified more than 100-fold as compared to that on a glass substrate. We believe that strong scattering within the nanostructured area coupled with random scattering inside the cell resulted in the observed three-dimensional enhancement in fluorescence with higher photostability on the substrate surface.

  10. Substrate-induced bulk alignment of liquid crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhengping; Chakrabarti, A.; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1996-01-01

    The Gay-Berne model for liquid crystals in the presence of a substrate surface is studied using the hybrid Monte Carlo method. A simple non-mean-field substrate-molecule potential is proposed to describe the effects of rubbed polymer-coated substrates on the liquid crystals. Effects...... of the substrate surface on the bulk alignment of the liquid crystals are studied. It is found that the bulk pretilt angle is controlled by the surface through the orientation of the adsorbed liquid crystal monolayer. This is consistent with the results of recent experimental studies....

  11. Method for deposition of radioactive iodine on a substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGovern, J.J.; Olynyk, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The patent deals with a method for the production of a substrate containing I-125 for the preparation of radioisotopes for medical use. A certain area of a substrate surface is brought into contact with an Xe-125 gas that disintegrates into I-125, and is coated on the substrate surface until the deposition of an amount of appr. 1μCi. After determination of the exact amount of I-125 deposition, the substrate is split into pieces with fixed area of surface, where each piece consequently contains a fixed amount of I-125. 1 tab

  12. Mechanisms of Percept-Percept and Image-Percept Integration in Vision: Behavioral and Electrophysiological Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvit, Silvia; Eimer, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has shown that the detection of a visual target can be guided not only by the temporal integration of two percepts, but also by integrating a percept and an image held in working memory. Behavioral and event-related brain potential (ERP) measures were obtained in a target detection task that required temporal integration of 2…

  13. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of D-Galactose-6-Phosphate Isomerase Complexed with Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Kul; Pan, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    D-Galactose-6-phosphate isomerase from Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LacAB; EC 5.3.1.26), which is encoded by the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway gene cluster (lacABCD), catalyzes the isomerization of D-galactose-6-phosphate to D-tagatose-6-phosphate during lactose catabolism and is used to produce rare sugars as low-calorie natural sweeteners. The crystal structures of LacAB and its complex with D-tagatose-6-phosphate revealed that LacAB is a homotetramer of LacA and LacB subunits, with a structure similar to that of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi). Structurally, LacAB belongs to the RpiB/LacAB superfamily, having a Rossmann-like αβα sandwich fold as has been identified in pentose phosphate isomerase and hexose phosphate isomerase. In contrast to other family members, the LacB subunit also has a unique α7 helix in its C-terminus. One active site is distinctly located at the interface between LacA and LacB, whereas two active sites are present in RpiB. In the structure of the product complex, the phosphate group of D-tagatose-6-phosphate is bound to three arginine residues, including Arg-39, producing a different substrate orientation than that in RpiB, where the substrate binds at Asp-43. Due to the proximity of the Arg-134 residue and backbone Cα of the α6 helix in LacA to the last Asp-172 residue of LacB with a hydrogen bond, a six-carbon sugar-phosphate can bind in the larger pocket of LacAB, compared with RpiB. His-96 in the active site is important for ring opening and substrate orientation, and Cys-65 is essential for the isomerization activity of the enzyme. Two rare sugar substrates, D-psicose and D-ribulose, show optimal binding in the LacAB-substrate complex. These findings were supported by the results of LacA activity assays. PMID:24015281

  14. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of D-galactose-6-phosphate isomerase complexed with substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Suk Jung

    Full Text Available D-Galactose-6-phosphate isomerase from Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LacAB; EC 5.3.1.26, which is encoded by the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway gene cluster (lacABCD, catalyzes the isomerization of D-galactose-6-phosphate to D-tagatose-6-phosphate during lactose catabolism and is used to produce rare sugars as low-calorie natural sweeteners. The crystal structures of LacAB and its complex with D-tagatose-6-phosphate revealed that LacAB is a homotetramer of LacA and LacB subunits, with a structure similar to that of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi. Structurally, LacAB belongs to the RpiB/LacAB superfamily, having a Rossmann-like αβα sandwich fold as has been identified in pentose phosphate isomerase and hexose phosphate isomerase. In contrast to other family members, the LacB subunit also has a unique α7 helix in its C-terminus. One active site is distinctly located at the interface between LacA and LacB, whereas two active sites are present in RpiB. In the structure of the product complex, the phosphate group of D-tagatose-6-phosphate is bound to three arginine residues, including Arg-39, producing a different substrate orientation than that in RpiB, where the substrate binds at Asp-43. Due to the proximity of the Arg-134 residue and backbone Cα of the α6 helix in LacA to the last Asp-172 residue of LacB with a hydrogen bond, a six-carbon sugar-phosphate can bind in the larger pocket of LacAB, compared with RpiB. His-96 in the active site is important for ring opening and substrate orientation, and Cys-65 is essential for the isomerization activity of the enzyme. Two rare sugar substrates, D-psicose and D-ribulose, show optimal binding in the LacAB-substrate complex. These findings were supported by the results of LacA activity assays.

  15. The neural substrates of subjective time dilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Wittmann

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available An object moving towards an observer is subjectively perceived as longer in duration than the same object that is static or moving away. This 'time dilation effect' has been shown for a number of stimuli that differ from standard events along different feature dimensions (e.g. color, size, and dynamics. We performed an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, while subjects viewed a stream of five visual events, all of which were static and of identical duration except the fourth one, which was a deviant target consisting of either a looming or a receding disc. The duration of the target was systematically varied and participants judged whether the target was shorter or longer than all other events. A time dilation effect was observed only for looming targets. Relative to the static standards, the looming as well as the receding targets induced increased activation of the anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortices (the “core control network”. The decisive contrast between looming and receding targets representing the time dilation effect showed strong asymmetric activation and, specifically, activation of cortical midline structures (the “default network”. These results provide the first evidence that the illusion of temporal dilation is due to activation of areas that are important for cognitive control and subjective awareness. The involvement of midline structures in the temporal dilation illusion is interpreted as evidence that time perception is related to self-referential processing.

  16. Heat transfer simulation in solid substrate fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucedo-Castañeda, G; Gutiérrez-Rojas, M; Bacquet, G; Raimbault, M; Viniegra-González, G

    1990-04-05

    A mathematical model was developed and tested to simulate the generation and transfer of heat in solid substrate fermentation (SSF). The experimental studies were realized in a 1-L static bioreactor packed with cassava wet meal and inoculated with Aspergillus niger. A simplified pseudohomogeneous monodimensional dynamic model was used for the energy balance. Kinetic equations taking into account biomass formation (logistic), sugar consumption (with maintenance), and carbon dioxide formation were used. Model verification was achieved by comparison of calculated and experimental temperatures. Heat transfer was evaluated by the estimation of Biot and Peclet heat dimensionless numbers 5-10 and 2550-2750, respectively. It was shown that conduction through the fermentation fixed bed was the main heat transfer resistance. This model intends to reach a better understanding of transport phenomena in SSF, a fact which could be used to evaluate various alternatives for temperature control of SSF, i.e., changing air flow rates and increasing water content. Dimensionless numbers could be used as scale-up criteria of large fermentors, since in those ratios are described the operating conditions, geometry, and size of the bioreactor. It could lead to improved solid reactor systems. The model can be used as a basis for automatic control of SSF for the production of valuable metabolites in static fermentors.

  17. CVD diamond substrates for electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, H.

    1996-03-01

    In this study the applicability of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond as a material for heat spreaders was investigated. Economical evaluations on the production of heat spreaders were also performed. For the diamond synthesis the hot-filament and microwave method were used respectively. The deposition parameters were varied in a way that free standing diamond layers with a thickness of 80 to 750 microns and different qualities were obtained. The influence of the deposition parameters on the relevant film properties was investigated and discussed. With both the hot-filament and microwave method it was possible to deposit diamond layers having a thermal conductivity exceeding 1200 W/mK and therefore to reach the quality level for commercial uses. The electrical resistivity was greater than 10 12 Ωcm. The investigation of the optical properties was done by Raman-, IR- and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. Because of future applications of diamond-aluminium nitride composites as highly efficient heat spreaders diamond deposition an AIN was investigated. An improved substrate pretreatment prior to diamond deposition showed promising results for better performance of such composite heat spreaders. Both free standing layers and diamond-AIN composites could be cut by a CO2 Laser in Order to get an exact size geometry. A reduction of the diamond surface roughness was achieved by etching with manganese powder or cerium. (author)

  18. Polarimetric studies of polyethylene terephtalate flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stchakovsky, M.; Garcia-Caurel, E.; Warenghem, M.

    2008-12-01

    Polymer sheets are currently used worldwide in a wide range of applications. The manufacturing process of these sheets involves extruding machines that stretch the material in both lateral and longitudinal directions with respect to the machine direction, thus inducing birefringence. In most cases, the film obtained is optically biaxial. Polarimetric spectroscopy (Ellipsometry and Mueller Matrix) combined with conoscopic observation are the methods of choice to study these properties. In this work we report an analysis of commercially available polyethylene terephtalate (PET) films used as substrate for food packaging as well as for embedded electronic devices such as solar cells or flexible displays. Initial observation of these films through polarizing microscope in conoscopic mode reveals first the trace of optical axis plane with respect to the film surface and second, whether the optical axis is acute or not. This preliminary study allows optimal sample positioning for further polarimetric studies. The measurements and modelling are done in both reflection and transmission mode on several spectroscopic polarimetric setups from UV to NIR. The models give as a main result, the dielectric tensor of the film as well as its orientation with respect to the laboratory reference frame.

  19. The risk perception gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frech, E.

    1995-01-01

    Most members of the public view the risks of nuclear power as uniquely hazardous. A survey in 1993 found that Canadians rank nuclear waste as the eleventh highest risk to their health. The trouble is that the public are not simply misinformed; rather, they view risk as something different from the product of probability of occurrence of an event multiplied by the measure of its harmful consequences. Among the 30 to 40 factors that influence public perception of risk, or acceptance of technology, are some that the scientific and technical community has hitherto failed to heed. Many of these factors can in fact be accommodated in the design, development and public presentation of nuclear projects. Such an accommodation of the public's views would involve dealing with factors like voluntariness, controllability, reversibility, equity and fairness, benefits, and trust in institutions. 9 refs

  20. Perception in statistical graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderPlas, Susan Ruth

    There has been quite a bit of research on statistical graphics and visualization, generally focused on new types of graphics, new software to create graphics, interactivity, and usability studies. Our ability to interpret and use statistical graphics hinges on the interface between the graph itself and the brain that perceives and interprets it, and there is substantially less research on the interplay between graph, eye, brain, and mind than is sufficient to understand the nature of these relationships. The goal of the work presented here is to further explore the interplay between a static graph, the translation of that graph from paper to mental representation (the journey from eye to brain), and the mental processes that operate on that graph once it is transferred into memory (mind). Understanding the perception of statistical graphics should allow researchers to create more effective graphs which produce fewer distortions and viewer errors while reducing the cognitive load necessary to understand the information presented in the graph. Taken together, these experiments should lay a foundation for exploring the perception of statistical graphics. There has been considerable research into the accuracy of numerical judgments viewers make from graphs, and these studies are useful, but it is more effective to understand how errors in these judgments occur so that the root cause of the error can be addressed directly. Understanding how visual reasoning relates to the ability to make judgments from graphs allows us to tailor graphics to particular target audiences. In addition, understanding the hierarchy of salient features in statistical graphics allows us to clearly communicate the important message from data or statistical models by constructing graphics which are designed specifically for the perceptual system.

  1. Hydrological performance of dual-substrate-layer green roofs using porous inert substrates with high sorption capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoou; Tian, Yimei; Zhao, Xinhua; Peng, Chenrui

    2017-06-01

    Given that the common medium in existing green roofs is a single layer composed of organic and inorganic substrates, seven pilot-scale dual-substrate-layer extensive green roofs (G1-G7), which include nutrition and adsorption substrate layers, were constructed in this study. The effectiveness of porous inert substrates (activated charcoal, zeolite, pumice, lava, vermiculite and expanded perlite) used as the adsorption substrate for stormwater retention was investigated. A single-substrate-layer green roof (G8) was built for comparison with G1-G7. Despite the larger total rainfall depth (mm) of six types of simulated rains (43.2, 54.6, 76.2, 87.0, 85.2 and 86.4, respectively), the total percent retention of G1-G7 varied between 14% and 82% with an average of 43%, exhibiting better runoff-retaining capacity than G8 based on the maximum potential rainfall storage depth per unit height of adsorption substrate. Regression analysis showed that there was a logarithmic relationship between cumulative rainfall depth with non-zero runoff and stormwater retention for G1-G4 and a linear relationship for G5-G8. To enhance the water retention capacity and extend the service life of dual-substrate-layer extensive green roofs, the mixture of activated charcoal and/or pumice with expanded perlite and/or vermiculite is more suitable as the adsorption substrate than the mixture containing lava and/or zeolite.

  2. The neural substrates of impaired prosodic detection in schizophrenia and its sensorial antecedents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitman, David I; Hoptman, Matthew J; Foxe, John J; Saccente, Erica; Wylie, Glenn R; Nierenberg, Jay; Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Lim, Kelvin O; Javitt, Daniel C

    2007-03-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia show severe deficits in their ability to decode emotions based upon vocal inflection (affective prosody). This study examined neural substrates of prosodic dysfunction in schizophrenia with voxelwise analysis of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Affective prosodic performance was assessed in 19 patients with schizophrenia and 19 comparison subjects with the Voice Emotion Identification Task (VOICEID), along with measures of basic pitch perception and executive processing (Wisconsin Card Sorting Test). Diffusion tensor MRI fractional anisotropy valves were used for voxelwise correlation analyses. In a follow-up experiment, performance on a nonaffective prosodic perception task was assessed in an additional cohort of 24 patients and 17 comparison subjects. Patients showed significant deficits in VOICEID and Distorted Tunes Task performance. Impaired VOICEID performance correlated significantly with lower fractional anisotropy values within primary and secondary auditory pathways, orbitofrontal cortex, corpus callosum, and peri-amygdala white matter. Impaired Distorted Tunes Task performance also correlated with lower fractional anisotropy in auditory and amygdalar pathways but not prefrontal cortex. Wisconsin Card Sorting Test performance in schizophrenia correlated primarily with prefrontal fractional anisotropy. In the follow-up study, significant deficits were observed as well in nonaffective prosodic performance, along with significant intercorrelations among sensory, affective prosodic, and nonaffective measures. Schizophrenia is associated with both structural and functional disturbances at the level of primary auditory cortex. Such deficits contribute significantly to patients' inability to decode both emotional and semantic aspects of speech, highlighting the importance of sensorial abnormalities in social communicatory dysfunction in schizophrenia.

  3. Microbial growth with vapor-phase substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanzel, Joanna; Thullner, Martin; Harms, Hauke [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Wick, Lukas Y., E-mail: lukas.wick@ufz.de [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Limited information exists on influences of the diffusive transport of volatile organic contaminants (VOC) on bacterial activity in the unsaturated zone of the terrestrial subsurface. Diffusion of VOC in the vapor-phase is much more efficient than in water and results in effective VOC transport and high bioavailability despite restricted mobility of bacteria in the vadose zone. Since many bacteria tend to accumulate at solid-water, solid-air and air-water interfaces, such phase boundaries are of a special interest for VOC-biodegradation. In an attempt to evaluate microbial activity toward air-borne substrates, this study investigated the spatio-temporal interplay between growth of Pseudomonas putida (NAH7) on vapor-phase naphthalene (NAPH) and its repercussion on vapor-phase NAPH concentrations. Our data demonstrate that growth rates of strain PpG7 were inversely correlated to the distance from the source of vapor-phase NAPH. Despite the high gas phase diffusivity of NAPH, microbial growth was absent at distances above 5 cm from the source when sufficient biomass was located in between. This indicates a high efficiency of suspended bacteria to acquire vapor-phase compounds and influence headspace concentration gradients at the centimeter-scale. It further suggests a crucial role of microorganisms as biofilters for gas-phase VOC emanating from contaminated groundwater or soil. - Research highlights: > Suspended bacteria have a high efficiency to degrade vapor-phase naphthalene. > Bacteria influence NAPH vapor-phase concentration gradients at centimeter-scale. > Microbial growth on vapor-phase naphthalene is inversely correlated to its source. > Bacteria are good biofilters for gas-phase NAPH emanating from contaminated sites. - Suspended bacteria have a high efficiency to degrade vapor-phase naphthalene and effectively influence vapor-phase naphthalene concentration gradients at the centimeter scale.

  4. Substrate Effects in Wideband SiGe HBT Mixer Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Vidkjær, Jens; Krozer, Viktor

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the influence from substrate effects on the performance of wideband SiGe HBT mixer circuits is investigated. Equivalent circuit models including substrate networks are extracted from on-wafer test structures and compared with electromagnetic simulations. Electromagnetic simulations...

  5. Performance of baker's yeast produced using date syrup substrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Baker's yeast was produced from three selected baker's yeast strains using date syrup as a substrate at low and high flow rate compared to those produced using molasses substrates. Performance of the produced baker's yeasts on Arabic bread quality was investigated. Baking tests showed a positive relationship between ...

  6. Adhesion, growth, and matrix production by fibroblasts on laminin substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Höök, M; Rees, D A

    1983-01-01

    and laminin-coated substrates with the development of microfilament bundles and focal adhesions. Antibodies to laminin, but not fibronectin, will prevent or reverse fibroblast adhesion to laminin, whereas antibodies to fibronectin but not laminin will give similar results on fibronectin-coated substrates...

  7. An aluminum resist substrate for microfabrication by LIGA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, James J.; Boehme, Dale R.; Hauck, Cheryl A. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter; Hunter, Luke L.; Griffiths, Stewart K.; McLean, Dorrance E.; Aigeldinger, Georg; Hekmaty, Michelle A.; Hachman, John T.; Losey, Matthew W.; Skala, Dawn M.; Korellis, John S.; Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Lu, Wei-Yang

    2005-04-01

    Resist substrates used in the LIGA process must provide high initial bond strength between the substrate and resist, little degradation of the bond strength during x-ray exposure, acceptable undercut rates during development, and a surface enabling good electrodeposition of metals. Additionally, they should produce little fluorescence radiation and give small secondary doses in bright regions of the resist at the substrate interface. To develop a new substrate satisfying all these requirements, we have investigated secondary resist doses due to electrons and fluorescence, resist adhesion before exposure, loss of fine features during extended development, and the nucleation and adhesion of electrodeposits for various substrate materials. The result of these studies is a new anodized aluminum substrate and accompanying methods for resist bonding and electrodeposition. We demonstrate successful use of this substrate through all process steps and establish its capabilities via the fabrication of isolated resist features down to 6 {micro}m, feature aspect ratios up to 280 and electroformed nickel structures at heights of 190 to 1400 {micro}m. The minimum mask absorber thickness required for this new substrate ranges from 7 to 15 {micro}m depending on the resist thickness.

  8. Macroinvertebrate colonisation of artificial substrates in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benthic macroinvertebrate colonisation of artificial gravel and leaf litter substrates over periods of four to 40 days was examined in the Ogba River, Benin City, Nigeria. Of all the assemblages of organisms identified (398 individuals, 27 taxa) on different substrates, 38% occurred on gravel and 62% occurred on leaf litter.

  9. Substrate comprising a nanometer-scale projection array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yi; Zhu, Jia; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Connor, Stephen T; Yu, Zongfu; Fan, Shanhui; Burkhard, George

    2012-11-27

    A method for forming a substrate comprising nanometer-scale pillars or cones that project from the surface of the substrate is disclosed. The method enables control over physical characteristics of the projections including diameter, sidewall angle, and tip shape. The method further enables control over the arrangement of the projections including characteristics such as center-to-center spacing and separation distance.

  10. The Effect of Substrate Topography on Coating Cathodic Delamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erik Weinell, Claus; Sørensen, Per A.; Kiil, Søren

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the effect of steel substrate topography on coating cathodic delamination. The study showed that the surface preparation can be used to control and minimize the rate of cathodic delamination. The coating should have maximum wetting properties so that substrates with high...

  11. Use of Processed Biofuel Crops for Nursery Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) bark availability has decreased, causing shortages in inventory and increased prices for pine bark substrates. One potential alternative to pine bark is the use of biofuel or biomass crops that can be grown locally, harvested, and processed into a suitable substrate. Th...

  12. Constructed wetland using corncob charcoal substrate: pollutants removal and intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mao; Li, Boyuan; Xue, Yingwen; Wang, Hongyu; Yang, Kai

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using corncob charcoal substrate in constructed wetlands, four laboratory-scale vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCWs) were built. Effluent pollutant (chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH 4 + -N, total phosphorus (TP)) concentrations during the experiment were determined to reveal pollutant removal mechanisms and efficiencies at different stages. In the stable stage, a VFCW using clay ceramisite substrate under aeration attained higher COD (95.1%), and NH 4 + -N (95.1%) removal efficiencies than a VFCW using corncob charcoal substrate (91.5% COD, 91.3% NH 4 + -N) under aeration, but lower TP removal efficiency (clay ceramisite 32.0% and corncob charcoal 40.0%). The VFCW with raw corncob substrate showed stronger COD emissions (maximum concentration 3,108 mg/L) than the corncob charcoal substrate (COD was lower than influent). The VFCW using corncob charcoal substrate performed much better than the VFCW using clay ceramisite substrate under aeration when the C/N ratio was low (C/N = 1.5, TN removal efficiency 36.89%, 4.1% respectively). These results suggest that corncob charcoal is a potential substrate in VFCWs under aeration with a unique self -supplying carbon source property in the denitrification process.

  13. Development of the Enzyme-Substrate Interactions Concept Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Linenberger, Kimberly J.

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme function is central to student understanding of multiple topics within the biochemistry curriculum. In particular, students must understand how enzymes and substrates interact with one another. This manuscript describes the development of a 15-item Enzyme-Substrate Interactions Concept Inventory (ESICI) that measures student understanding…

  14. Dielectric constant of graphene-on-polarized substrate: A tight ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-06-24

    Jun 24, 2017 ... We report here a microscopic tight-binding theoretical study of the dynamic dielectric response of graphene-on-polarizable substrate with impurity. The Hamiltonian consists of first, second and third nearest neighbour electron hopping interactions besides doping and substrate-induced effects on graphene.

  15. Rapid colonisation of artificial substrates by macroinvertebrates in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Macroinvertebrate colonisation patterns on artificial substrates were investigated in a small reservoir in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Semi-closed 1 000 cm3 polythene netting cages filled with either brick, gravel, shredded plastic, or equal proportions of these three materials, were suspended above the benthic substrate.

  16. Structural characteristics of titanium coating on copper substrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    †Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, India ... Studies revealed that the ... a power plant. The heat generated during the process is con- ducted away by the water cooled copper substrate. Most of the applications which use Ti on Cu substrate demand that.

  17. Method for fabricating a substrate having spaced apart microcapillaries thereon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Eric E.

    1995-01-01

    Methods for manufacturing a self-supporting substrate having a plurality of spaced-apart needles (spikes or microcapillaries) projecting upwardly from a major surface of the substrate. In a preferred method, metal is deposited onto a porous membrane such that the metal extends into the pores, after which the membrane is dissolved.

  18. A structural classification of substrate-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berntsson, Ronnie P. -A.; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2010-01-01

    Substrate-binding proteins (SBP) are associated with a wide variety of protein complexes. The proteins are part of ATP-binding cassette transporters for substrate uptake, ion gradient driven transporters, DNA-binding proteins, as well as channels and receptors from both pro-and eukaryotes. A wealth

  19. Screening of natural substrates and optimization of operating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-02-18

    Feb 18, 2009 ... The present work aims at studying different natural substrates such as wheat flour and corn flour in comparison with synthetic pectin for the production of pectinase using. Aspergillus niger (MTCC: 281). The work involves optimizing various parameters like substrate concentration, pH, temperature, rpm, time ...

  20. Substrate inhibition kinetics of phenol degradation by binary mixed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Steady states of a continuous culture with an inhibitory substrate were used to estimate kinetic parameters under substrate limitation (chemo stat operation). Mixed cultures of an indigenous Pseudomonas fluorescence and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were grown in continuous culture on phenol as the sole source of carbon ...

  1. Modification of chitin as substrates for chitinase | Herdyastuti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enzymes are able to bind to their substrates specifically at the active site. The proximity and orientation of the substrates strongly increase the likelihood that productive E–S complexes will arise. Treated chitin (powder or flake) is more efficient than crystalline chitin. This is because the latter is less active due to its insolubility ...

  2. Substrate inhibition kinetics of phenol degradation by binary mixed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-05

    Nov 5, 2008 ... Steady states of a continuous culture with an inhibitory substrate were used to estimate kinetic parameters under substrate limitation (chemo stat operation). Mixed cultures of an indigenous. Pseudomonas fluorescence and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were grown in continuous culture on phenol as the sole ...

  3. Substrate affects growth and yield of shiitake mushroom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... from all of the trees with equal ratio or rice straw to determine growth and fruiting characteristics. Cultivation on Jackfruit resulted in significantly faster mycelial growth compared to other substrates. With respect to fructification, culture on Jackfruit produced the first pinhead (primordium) earlier compared to other substrates.

  4. Through-substrate via and redistribution layer with metal paste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozeboom, F.; Grunsven, E.C.E. van; Sanders, F.H.M.; Burghoorn, M.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    A semiconductor device and a method for manufacturing such semiconductor device for use in a stacked configuration of the semiconductor device are disclosed. The semiconductor device includes a substrate including at least part of an electronic circuit provided at a first side thereof. The substrate

  5. Microwave flexible transistors on cellulose nanofibrillated fiber substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung-Hun Seo; Tzu-Hsuan Chang; Jaeseong Lee; Ronald Sabo; Weidong Zhou; Zhiyong Cai; Shaoqin Gong; Zhenqiang Ma

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate microwave flexible thin-film transistors (TFTs) on biodegradable substrates towards potential green portable devices. The combination of cellulose nanofibrillated fiber (CNF) substrate, which is a biobased and biodegradable platform, with transferrable single crystalline Si nanomembrane (Si NM), enables the realization of truly...

  6. Effects of bamboo substrate and supplementary feed on growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    application as control (C), control and substrate installation (C + S) and, control and substrate with supplementary feeding (C + S + F) were randomly allotted to six earthen ponds each with an area of 100m2. Catfish fingerlings of mean weight 27.5g + 1.25 were stocked at the rate of 80 fish per 100m2. Water temperature, pH ...

  7. Silicon—a new substrate for GaN growth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Generally, GaN-based devices are grown on silicon carbide or sapphire substrates. But these sub- strates are costly and insulating in nature and also are not available in large diameter. Silicon can meet the requirements for a low cost and conducting substrate and will enable integration of optoelectronic or high.

  8. Global Identification of Peptidase Specificity by Multiplex Substrate Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Donoghue, Anthony J.; Eroy-Reveles, A. Alegra; Knudsen, Giselle M.; Ingram, Jessica; Zhou, Min; Statnekov, Jacob B.; Greninger, Alexander L.; Hostetter, Daniel R.; Qu, Gang; Maltby, David A.; Anderson, Marc O.; DeRisi, Joseph L.; McKerrow, James H.; Burlingame, Alma L.; Craik, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    A simple and rapid multiplex substrate profiling method has been developed to reveal the substrate specificity of any endo- or exo-peptidase using LC-MS/MS sequencing. A physicochemically diverse library of peptides was generated by incorporating all combinations of neighbor and near-neighbor amino acid pairs into decapeptide sequences that are flanked by unique dipeptides at each terminus. Addition of a panel of evolutionarily diverse peptidases to a mixture of these tetradecapeptides generated prime and non-prime site information and substrate specificity matched or expanded upon previous substrate motifs. This method biochemically confirmed the activity of the klassevirus 3C gene responsible for polypeptide processing and allowed Granzyme B substrates to be ranked by enzymatic turnover efficiency using label-free quantitation of precursor ion abundance. Furthermore, the proteolytic secretions from a parasitic flatworm larvae and a pancreatic cancer cell line were deconvoluted in a subtractive strategy using class-specific peptidase inhibitors. PMID:23023596

  9. Smart substrates: Making multi-chip modules smarter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunsch, T.F.; Treece, R.K.

    1995-05-01

    A novel multi-chip module (MCM) design and manufacturing methodology which utilizes active CMOS circuits in what is normally a passive substrate realizes the `smart substrate` for use in highly testable, high reliability MCMS. The active devices are used to test the bare substrate, diagnose assembly errors or integrated circuit (IC) failures that require rework, and improve the testability of the final MCM assembly. A static random access memory (SRAM) MCM has been designed and fabricated in Sandia Microelectronics Development Laboratory in order to demonstrate the technical feasibility of this concept and to examine design and manufacturing issues which will ultimately determine the economic viability of this approach. The smart substrate memory MCM represents a first in MCM packaging. At the time the first modules were fabricated, no other company or MCM vendor had incorporated active devices in the substrate to improve manufacturability and testability, and thereby improve MCM reliability and reduce cost.

  10. Influence of substrate elasticity on droplet impact dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Azar; Bahadur, Vaibhav; Shang, Wen; Zhu, Yun; Buckley, Donald; Dhinojwala, Ali; Sohal, Manohar

    2013-04-09

    Droplet impact dynamics is vital to the understanding of several phase-change and heat-transfer phenomena. This work examines the role of substrate elasticity on the spreading and retraction behavior of water droplets impacting flat and textured superhydrophobic substrates. Experiments reveal that droplet retraction on flat surfaces decreases with decreasing substrate elasticity. This trend is confirmed through a careful measurement of droplet impact dynamics on multiple PDMS surfaces with varying elastic moduli and comparison with impact dynamics on hard silicon surfaces. These findings reveal that surfaces tend to become more wettable upon droplet impact as the elastic modulus is decreased. First-order analyses are developed to explain this reduced retraction in terms of increased viscoelastic dissipation on soft substrates. Interestingly, superhydrophobic surfaces display substrate-elasticity-invariant impact dynamics. These findings are critical when designing polymeric surfaces for fluid-surface interaction applications.

  11. Agronomic behavior of gladiolus in organic substrates with wastewater reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ítalo Dourado Teixeira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the technical feasibility of effluent reuse and recycling of organic substrates in the production of gladiolus. We adopted a completely randomized design in a split-plot, and the plots three qualities water (river water with Hoagland’s solution; treated effluent in stabilization pond; treated effluent in stabilization pond and disinfected and the subplots organic substrates (pine bark, coir, bagasse, repeated five times. Were characterized physico-chemical water and each substrate, the beginning and end of two growing seasons. The variables evaluated were: number of tillers, plant height, total production; flower stem length, number of flowers, time to first harvest, total cycle time, fresh and dry mass of the area. The reuse of effluent resulted in agronomic performance equal or superior to that obtained by the use of nutrient solution and the substrate base bagasse promoted agronomic performance inferior to the other substrates evaluated.

  12. Detection of Biomarkers Using LSPR Substrate with Gold Nanoparticle Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Min Bae

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the biosensing platform, label-free detection technique provides advantages such as the short analysis time and the cost-effectiveness. In this study, we showed the feasibility of the LSPR substrate with gold nanoparticle array for detecting low density lipoprotein (LDL and high density lipoprotein (HDL without labeling. The LSPR substrate was fabricated through the lift-off process with the anodized alumina mask, and its LSPR phenomenon was observed by measuring the optical transmission of substrate. The antibodies were immobilized on the gold nanoparticle array via the chemical binding, in which the 11-MUA was used as the linker to bind the antibodies. The binding of antibodies was confirmed by observing the shift of LSPR peak of the substrate. Finally, with the LSPR substrates with the antibodies immobilized, the detection of LDL and HDL was investigated. As a result, LDL and HDL could be detected in the clinically available concentration range, respectively.

  13. SURFACE PREPARATION OF STEEL SUBSTRATES USING GRIT-BLASTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; D. J. Varacalle, Jr.; D. Deason; W. Rhodaberger; E. Sampson

    2005-05-01

    The primary purpose of grit blasting for thermal spray applications is to ensure a strong mechanical bond between the substrate and the coating by the enhanced roughening of the substrate material. This study presents statistically designed experiments that were accomplished to investigate the effect of abrasives on roughness for A36/1020 steel. The experiments were conducted using a Box statistical design of experiment (SDE) approach. Three grit blasting parameters and their effect on the resultant substrate roughness were investigated. These include blast media, blast pressure, and working distance. The substrates were characterized for roughness using surface profilometry. These attributes were correlated with the changes in operating parameters. Twin-Wire Electric Arc (TWEA) coatings of aluminum and zinc/aluminum were deposited on the grit-blasted substrates. These coatings were then tested for bond strength. Bond strength studies were conducted utilizing a portable adhesion tester following ASTM standard D4541.

  14. Visual perception and memory systems: from cortex to medial temporal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zafar U; Martín-Montañez, Elisa; Baxter, Mark G

    2011-05-01

    Visual perception and memory are the most important components of vision processing in the brain. It was thought that the perceptual aspect of a visual stimulus occurs in visual cortical areas and that this serves as the substrate for the formation of visual memory in a distinct part of the brain called the medial temporal lobe. However, current evidence indicates that there is no functional separation of areas. Entire visual cortical pathways and connecting medial temporal lobe are important for both perception and visual memory. Though some aspects of this view are debated, evidence from both sides will be explored here. In this review, we will discuss the anatomical and functional architecture of the entire system and the implications of these structures in visual perception and memory.

  15. Reassessing SERS enhancement factors: using thermodynamics to drive substrate design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guicheteau, J A; Tripathi, A; Emmons, E D; Christesen, S D; Fountain, Augustus W

    2017-12-04

    Over the past 40 years fundamental and application research into Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) has been explored by academia, industry, and government laboratories. To date however, SERS has achieved little commercial success as an analytical technique. Researchers are tackling a variety of paths to help break through the commercial barrier by addressing the reproducibility in both the SERS substrates and SERS signals as well as continuing to explore the underlying mechanisms. To this end, investigators use a variety of methodologies, typically studying strongly binding analytes such as aromatic thiols and azarenes, and report SERS enhancement factor calculations. However a drawback of the traditional SERS enhancement factor calculation is that it does not yield enough information to understand substrate reproducibility, application potential with another analyte, or the driving factors behind the molecule-metal interaction. Our work at the US Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center has focused on these questions and we have shown that thermodynamic principles play a key role in the SERS response and are an essential factor in future designs of substrates and applications. This work will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various experimental techniques used to report SERS enhancement with planar SERS substrates and present our alternative SERS enhancement value. We will report on three types of analysis scenarios that all yield different information concerning the effectiveness of the SERS substrate, practical application of the substrate, and finally the thermodynamic properties of the substrate. We believe that through this work a greater understanding for designing substrates will be achieved, one that is based on both thermodynamic and plasmonic properties as opposed to just plasmonic properties. This new understanding and potential change in substrate design will enable more applications for SERS based methodologies including targeting

  16. Investor Perceptions of Board Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Paul E.; Gramlich, Jeffrey D.; Miller, Brian P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides evidence that uncontested director elections provide informative polls of investor perceptions regarding board performance. We find that higher (lower) vote approval is associated with lower (higher) stock price reactions to subsequent announcements of management turnovers...

  17. Perception of Landscape Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Coy

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Complex landscape management instruments based on a dynamic, innovative land-conservation paradigm and spatial zoning to provide for graded intensity of protection and human use are being implemented in the newer generation of biosphere reserves and biosphere parks. The multifunctionality of these exemplary landscapes with sustainable development is a great challenge; it also offers considerable potential for conflict. This paper intends to demonstrate the extent to which multifunctionality has been realised in the alpine Großes Walsertal Biosphere Park, and how the local population perceive the quality of their park five years after it was created. Landscape management efforts in the Großes Walsertal were monitored by accompanying regional-economic and perceptional studies, resulting in a discussion of required future actions.Des instruments complexes de gestion du paysage, fondés sur un paradigme dynamique et innovant de conservation ainsi que sur un zonage de l’espace visant à réguler la protection du territoire et son utilisation par l’homme, ont été mis en œuvre dans la dernière génération de réserves de biosphère et de parcs. La multifonctionnalité de ces paysages exemplaires du développement durable constitue un défi majeur, mais représente également une importante source de conflits. L’objectif de cet article est de démontrer dans quelle mesure la notion de multifonctionnalité a été appliquée à la réserve de biosphère alpine de Grosse Walsertal et d’évaluer comment la population locale perçoit la qualité de son parc, cinq ans après sa création. Les efforts de gestion du paysage dans la réserve de Grosse Walsertal ont été évalués par des études économiques régionales et par des enquêtes de perception, à l’origine d’un débat sur les actions futures à mettre en place.

  18. Wildlife disease and risk perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisch-Kirkbride, Shauna L; Riley, Shawn J; Gore, Meredith L

    2013-10-01

    Risk perception has an important influence on wildlife management and is particularly relevant to issues that present health risks, such as those associated with wildlife disease management. Knowledge of risk perceptions is useful to wildlife health professionals in developing communication messages that enhance public understanding of wildlife disease risks and that aim to increase public support for disease management. To promote knowledge of public understanding of disease risks in the context of wildlife disease management, we used a self-administered questionnaire mailed to a stratified random sample (n = 901) across the continental United States to accomplish three objectives: 1) assess zoonotic disease risk perceptions; 2) identify sociodemographic and social psychologic factors underlying these risk perceptions; and 3) examine the relationship between risk perception and agreement with wildlife disease management practices. Diseases we assessed in the surveys were rabies, plague, and West Nile virus. Risk perception, as measured by an index consisting of severity, susceptibility, and dread, was greatest for rabies and West Nile virus disease (x = 2.62 and 2.59, respectively, on a scale of 1 to 4 and least for plague (x = 2.39). The four most important variables associated with disease risk perception were gender, education, prior exposure to the disease, and concern for health effects. We found that stronger risk perception was associated with greater agreement with wildlife disease management. We found particular concern for the vulnerability of wildlife to zoonotic disease and for protection of wildlife health, indicating that stakeholders may be receptive to messages emphasizing the potential harm to wildlife from disease and to messages promoting One Health (i.e., those that emphasize the interdependence of human, domestic animal, wildlife, and ecosystem health).

  19. The Perception of Subjective Surfaces,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    car- toons. text, and other "unnatural" images, figure perception draws heavily tupon the resources of natural perception. So far as early visual...teitl to stw !-eCt that inter-poL;itioiu o link, (li-J" imc- i10 mo dtimltiots v, not coin- piiiatm1oul1 \\Sound. 1 to t0i0. t111 i~tC (of stt 1 e1tLMC

  20. The Interface Theory of Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Donald D; Singh, Manish; Prakash, Chetan

    2015-12-01

    Perception is a product of evolution. Our perceptual systems, like our limbs and livers, have been shaped by natural selection. The effects of selection on perception can be studied using evolutionary games and genetic algorithms. To this end, we define and classify perceptual strategies and allow them to compete in evolutionary games in a variety of worlds with a variety of fitness functions. We find that veridical perceptions--strategies tuned to the true structure of the world--are routinely dominated by nonveridical strategies tuned to fitness. Veridical perceptions escape extinction only if fitness varies monotonically with truth. Thus, a perceptual strategy favored by selection is best thought of not as a window on truth but as akin to a windows interface of a PC. Just as the color and shape of an icon for a text file do not entail that the text file itself has a color or shape, so also our perceptions of space-time and objects do not entail (by the Invention of Space-Time Theorem) that objective reality has the structure of space-time and objects. An interface serves to guide useful actions, not to resemble truth. Indeed, an interface hides the truth; for someone editing a paper or photo, seeing transistors and firmware is an irrelevant hindrance. For the perceptions of H. sapiens, space-time is the desktop and physical objects are the icons. Our perceptions of space-time and objects have been shaped by natural selection to hide the truth and guide adaptive behaviors. Perception is an adaptive interface.

  1. Nurses' perceptions about child abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Saifan; Intima A Alrimawi; Ibrahim Bashaireh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the efforts to protect children around the world, child abuse and neglect remain serious and global problems. In Palestine, child abuse is hidden under the community culture, does not appear in the Ministry of Health official reports, and little is known about nurses’ perceptions towards this phenomenon. Objectives: To identify nurses’ perceptions about child abuse definition, whether they faced such cases during their work, and how they managed them. Methods: Data...

  2. Temporal nonlocality in bistable perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmanspacher, Harald; Filk, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    A novel conceptual framework for theoretical psychology is presented and illustrated for the example of bistable perception. A basic formal feature of this framework is the non-commutativity of operations acting on mental states. A corresponding model for the bistable perception of ambiguous stimuli, the Necker-Zeno model, is sketched and some empirical evidence for it so far is described. It is discussed how a temporal nonlocality of mental states, predicted by the model, can be understood and tested.

  3. The contribution of body composition, substrates and hormones to the variability in energy expenditure and substrate utilization in premenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, A.; Buemann, Benjamin; Christensen, N.J.

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-four-hour energy expenditure and substrate use were measured by indirect calorimetry in respiration chambers on a fixed physical program and related to body composition and plasma concentrations of various substrates and thermogenic hormones. Fifty premenopausal women with a wide range...

  4. Reliability Analysis of III-V Solar Cells Grown on Recycled GaAs Substrates and an Electroplated Nickel Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray-Hua Horng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study involved analyzing the reliability of two types of III-V solar cells: (1 III-V solar cells grown on new and recycled gallium arsenide (GaAs substrates and (2 the III-V solar cells transferred onto an electroplated nickel (Ni substrate as III-V thin-film solar cells by using a cross-shaped pattern epitaxial lift-off (CPELO process. The III-V solar cells were grown on new and recycled GaAs substrates to evaluate the reliability of the substrate. The recycled GaAs substrate was fabricated by using the CPELO process. The performance of the solar cells grown on the recycled GaAs substrate was affected by the uneven surface morphology of the recycled GaAs substrate, which caused the propagation of these dislocations into the subsequently grown active layer of the solar cell. The III-V solar cells were transferred onto an electroplated Ni substrate, which was also fabricated by using CPELO technology. The degradation of the III-V thin-film solar cell after conducting a thermal shock test could have been caused by microcracks or microvoids in the active layer or interface of the heterojunction, which resulted in the reduction of the external quantum efficiency response and the increase of recombination loss.

  5. Substrate Handbook for Biogas Production; Substrathandbok foer biogasproduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, My; Uldal, Martina (AnoxKaldnes AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-02-15

    Today, co-digestion plants in Sweden treat a broad range of different substrates, of which some have not previously been used for anaerobic digestion. The major part of this organic waste derives from households, restaurants, food industries and farms. When evaluating a new substrate as feed for anaerobic digestion, several different aspects need to be taken into consideration, such as anaerobic degradability, TS/VS content, nutrient composition and risk for mechanical problems. Consequently, there is a need for practical guidelines on how to evaluate new substrates as raw materials for biogas production, including not only gas yield but also what practical and microbiological problems that may arise when the specific substrate is treated together with other substrates in the plant. The aim with this handbook is to provide a basis on how to evaluate new substrates as feed for anaerobic digestion. The intention is that this material will save time and effort for the personnel at the plant when they come in contact with new types of waste. Also, the aim is to facilitate the process of identifying new substrates within the ABP-regulation (1774/2002) and what requirements are then demanded on handling. The work with the handbook has been divided in three different parts; (1) an extensive literature study and a compilation of the achieved results, (2) interviews with personnel at most of the Swedish co-digestion plants to identify substrates and problems of interest, and (3) lab tests of selected substrates. The lab tests included Bio Methane Potential (BMP) tests as well as a simple characterization of each substrate based on fat/protein/carbohydrate content. All data origins from anaerobic digestion within the mesophilic temperature range, but the results and discussion are applicable also for thermophilic anaerobic digestion. The result of this work is a written report together with an Excel file which are to be directly used by the biogas plants as a basis in the

  6. Comparison of filters: Inkjet printed on PEN substrate versus a laser-etched on LCP substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Arabi, Eyad A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, microstrip-based bandpass filters on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) and liquid crystal polymers (LCP) are presented to investigate the performance of filters on ultra-thin substrates. PEN (with a thickness of 120 μm) has been characterized and used for a filter for the first time. In addition to being low cost and transparent, it demonstrates comparable RF performance to LCP. The conductor losses are compared by fabricating filters with inkjet printed lines as well as laser etched copper clad LCP sheets. With 5 layers of inkjet printing, and a curing temperature below 200°C, a final silver thickness of 2 μm and conductivity of 9.6 × 106 S/m are achieved. The designs are investigated at two frequencies, 24 GHz as well as 5 GHz to assess their performance at high and low frequencies respectively. The 24 GHz inkjet printed filter shows an insertion loss of 2 dB, while the 5 GHz design gives an insertion loss of 8 dB. We find that thin substrates have a strong effect on the insertion loss of filters especially as the frequency is reduced. The same design, realized on LCP (thickness of 100 μm) through laser etching, demonstrates a very similar performance, thus verifying this finding. © 2014 European Microwave Association.

  7. Ventral aspect of the visual form pathway is not critical for the perception of biological motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilaie-Dotan, Sharon; Saygin, Ayse Pinar; Lorenzi, Lauren J.; Rees, Geraint; Behrmann, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the movements of those around us is fundamental for many daily activities, such as recognizing actions, detecting predators, and interacting with others socially. A key question concerns the neurobiological substrates underlying biological motion perception. Although the ventral “form” visual cortex is standardly activated by biologically moving stimuli, whether these activations are functionally critical for biological motion perception or are epiphenomenal remains unknown. To address this question, we examined whether focal damage to regions of the ventral visual cortex, resulting in significant deficits in form perception, adversely affects biological motion perception. Six patients with damage to the ventral cortex were tested with sensitive point-light display paradigms. All patients were able to recognize unmasked point-light displays and their perceptual thresholds were not significantly different from those of three different control groups, one of which comprised brain-damaged patients with spared ventral cortex (n > 50). Importantly, these six patients performed significantly better than patients with damage to regions critical for biological motion perception. To assess the necessary contribution of different regions in the ventral pathway to biological motion perception, we complement the behavioral findings with a fine-grained comparison between the lesion location and extent, and the cortical regions standardly implicated in biological motion processing. This analysis revealed that the ventral aspects of the form pathway (e.g., fusiform regions, ventral extrastriate body area) are not critical for biological motion perception. We hypothesize that the role of these ventral regions is to provide enhanced multiview/posture representations of the moving person rather than to represent biological motion perception per se. PMID:25583504

  8. Periphyton biomass on artificial substrates during the summer and winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altevir Signor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the periphyton production on artificial substrates considering it as a source of low cost live food for fish. Blades of artificial substrates such as wood, black plastic, acrylic, fiberglass, ceramics and glass (all with 144cm2 blades, 24 for each substrate were submerged 20.0cm below the water column for 35 days in the winter and 42 days in the summer. The blades were randomly installed in 200m3 pond and evaluated for the biomass production at different phases during the summer and winter. Four blades of each substrate were collected weekly, and the periphytic community was carefully scraped with a spatula and fixed in 4% formaldehyde. The periphytic biomass productivity was evaluated by artificial substrate area and per day. The results evidenced the characteristic periodicity in periphyton biomass production and a significant variability in the collect period and season in the different artificial substrates used. Ceramic and wood showed the best results in the summer while wood showed the best results in the winter. The priphyton biomass productions differ among periods, substrates and seasons. Wood and ceramics could be indicated for periphyton biomass production in either winter or summer.

  9. Substrates of Peltigera Lichens as a Potential Source of Cyanobionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, Catalina; Leiva, Diego; Carú, Margarita; Orlando, Julieta

    2017-10-01

    Photobiont availability is one of the main factors determining the success of the lichenization process. Although multiple sources of photobionts have been proposed, there is no substantial evidence confirming that the substrates on which lichens grow are one of them. In this work, we obtained cyanobacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences from the substrates underlying 186 terricolous Peltigera cyanolichens from localities in Southern Chile and maritime Antarctica and compared them with the sequences of the cyanobionts of these lichens, in order to determine if cyanobacteria potentially available for lichenization were present in the substrates. A phylogenetic analysis of the sequences showed that Nostoc phylotypes dominated the cyanobacterial communities of the substrates in all sites. Among them, an overlap was observed between the phylotypes of the lichen cyanobionts and those of the cyanobacteria present in their substrates, suggesting that they could be a possible source of lichen photobionts. Also, in most cases, higher Nostoc diversity was observed in the lichens than in the substrates from each site. A better understanding of cyanobacterial diversity in lichen substrates and their relatives in the lichens would bring insights into mycobiont selection and the distribution patterns of lichens, providing a background for hypothesis testing and theory development for future studies of the lichenization process.

  10. Electrostatic Suppression of the Leidenfrost State on Liquid Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Arjang; Ozkan, Onur; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2017-11-21

    An applied electric field can fundamentally eliminate the Leidenfrost effect (formation of a vapor layer at the solid-liquid interface at high temperatures). This study analyzes electrostatic suppression of the Leidenfrost state on liquid substrates. Electrostatic suppression on silicone oil and Wood's metal (liquid alloy) is studied via experimentation, high-speed imaging, and analyses. It is seen that the nature of electrostatic suppression can be drastically different from that on a solid substrate. First, the Leidenfrost droplet completely penetrates into the silicone oil substrate and converts to a thin film under an electric field. This is due to the existence of an electric field inside the substrate and the deformability of the silicone oil interface. A completely different type of suppression is observed for Wood's metal and solid substrates, which have low deformability and lack an electric field in the substrate. Second, the minimum voltage to trigger suppression is significantly lower on silicone oil when compared to Wood's metal and solid substrates. Fundamental differences between these transitions are analyzed, and a multiphysics analytical model is developed to predict the vapor layer thickness on deformable liquids. Overall, this study lays the foundation for further studies on electrostatic manipulation of the Leidenfrost state on liquids.

  11. Substrate independent approach for synthesis of graphene platelet networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashurin, A.; Fang, X.; Zemlyanov, D.; Keidar, M.

    2017-06-01

    Graphene platelet networks (GPNs) comprised of randomly oriented graphene flakes two to three atomic layers thick are synthesized using a novel plasma-based approach. The approach uses a substrate capable of withstanding synthesis temperatures around 800 °C, but is fully independent of the substrate material. The synthesis occurs directly on the substrate surface without the necessity of any additional steps. GPNs were synthesized on various substrate materials including silicon (Si), thermally oxidized Si (SiO2), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu), nickel-chromium (NiCr) alloy and alumina ceramics (Al2O3). The mismatch between the atomic structures of sp2 honeycomb carbon networks and the substrate material is fully eliminated shortly after the synthesis initiation, namely when about 100 nm thick deposits are formed on the substrate. GPN structures synthesized on a substrate at a temperature of about 800 °C are significantly more porous in comparison to the much denser packed amorphous carbon deposits synthesized at lower temperatures. The method proposed here can potentially revolutionize the area of electrochemical energy storage by offering a single-step direct approach for the manufacture of graphene-based electrodes for non-Faradaic supercapacitors. Mass production can be achieved using this method if a roll-to-roll system is utilized.

  12. Intracranial markers of conscious face perception in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Fabiano; van Kempen, Jochem; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Kovach, Christopher K; Oya, Hiroyuki; Howard, Matthew A; Adolphs, Ralph; Tsuchiya, Naotsugu

    2017-11-15

    Investigations of the neural basis of consciousness have greatly benefited from protocols that involve the presentation of stimuli at perceptual threshold, enabling the assessment of the patterns of brain activity that correlate with conscious perception, independently of any changes in sensory input. However, the comparison between perceived and unperceived trials would be expected to reveal not only the core neural substrate of a particular conscious perception, but also aspects of brain activity that facilitate, hinder or tend to follow conscious perception. We take a step towards the resolution of these confounds by combining an analysis of neural responses observed during the presentation of faces partially masked by Continuous Flash Suppression, and those responses observed during the unmasked presentation of faces and other images in the same subjects. We employed multidimensional classifiers to decode physical properties of stimuli or perceptual states from spectrotemporal representations of electrocorticographic signals (1071 channels in 5 subjects). Neural activity in certain face responsive areas located in both the fusiform gyrus and in the lateral-temporal/inferior-parietal cortex discriminated seen vs. unseen faces in the masked paradigm and upright faces vs. other categories in the unmasked paradigm. However, only the former discriminated upright vs. inverted faces in the unmasked paradigm. Our results suggest a prominent role for the fusiform gyrus in the configural perception of faces, and possibly other objects that are holistically processed. More generally, we advocate comparative analysis of neural recordings obtained during different, but related, experimental protocols as a promising direction towards elucidating the functional specificities of the patterns of neural activation that accompany our conscious experiences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Visual perception and imagery: a new molecular hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bókkon, I

    2009-05-01

    Here, we put forward a redox molecular hypothesis about the natural biophysical substrate of visual perception and visual imagery. This hypothesis is based on the redox and bioluminescent processes of neuronal cells in retinotopically organized cytochrome oxidase-rich visual areas. Our hypothesis is in line with the functional roles of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in living cells that are not part of haphazard process, but rather a very strict mechanism used in signaling pathways. We point out that there is a direct relationship between neuronal activity and the biophoton emission process in the brain. Electrical and biochemical processes in the brain represent sensory information from the external world. During encoding or retrieval of information, electrical signals of neurons can be converted into synchronized biophoton signals by bioluminescent radical and non-radical processes. Therefore, information in the brain appears not only as an electrical (chemical) signal but also as a regulated biophoton (weak optical) signal inside neurons. During visual perception, the topological distribution of photon stimuli on the retina is represented by electrical neuronal activity in retinotopically organized visual areas. These retinotopic electrical signals in visual neurons can be converted into synchronized biophoton signals by radical and non-radical processes in retinotopically organized mitochondria-rich areas. As a result, regulated bioluminescent biophotons can create intrinsic pictures (depictive representation) in retinotopically organized cytochrome oxidase-rich visual areas during visual imagery and visual perception. The long-term visual memory is interpreted as epigenetic information regulated by free radicals and redox processes. This hypothesis does not claim to solve the secret of consciousness, but proposes that the evolution of higher levels of complexity made the intrinsic picture representation of the external visual world possible by regulated

  14. Protein kinase substrate identification on functional protein arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Fang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decade, kinases have emerged as attractive therapeutic targets for a number of different diseases, and numerous high throughput screening efforts in the pharmaceutical community are directed towards discovery of compounds that regulate kinase function. The emerging utility of systems biology approaches has necessitated the development of multiplex tools suitable for proteomic-scale experiments to replace lower throughput technologies such as mass spectroscopy for the study of protein phosphorylation. Recently, a new approach for identifying substrates of protein kinases has applied the miniaturized format of functional protein arrays to characterize phosphorylation for thousands of candidate protein substrates in a single experiment. This method involves the addition of protein kinases in solution to arrays of immobilized proteins to identify substrates using highly sensitive radioactive detection and hit identification algorithms. Results To date, the factors required for optimal performance of protein array-based kinase substrate identification have not been described. In the current study, we have carried out a detailed characterization of the protein array-based method for kinase substrate identification, including an examination of the effects of time, buffer compositions, and protein concentration on the results. The protein array approach was compared to standard solution-based assays for assessing substrate phosphorylation, and a correlation of greater than 80% was observed. The results presented here demonstrate how novel substrates for protein kinases can be quickly identified from arrays containing thousands of human proteins to provide new clues to protein kinase function. In addition, a pooling-deconvolution strategy was developed and applied that enhances characterization of specific kinase-substrate relationships and decreases reagent consumption. Conclusion Functional protein microarrays are an

  15. Method of Forming Textured Silicon Substrate by Maskless Cryogenic Etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor); Homyk, Andrew P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a textured substrate comprising a base comprising silicon, the base having a plurality of needle like structures depending away from the base, wherein at least one of the needle like structures has a depth of greater than or equal to about 50 micrometers determined perpendicular to the base, and wherein at least one of the needle like structures has a width of less than or equal to about 50 micrometers determined parallel to the base. An anode and a lithium ion battery comprising the textured substrate, and a method of producing the textured substrate are also disclosed.

  16. Kinetic study of an alcoholic fermentation, using honey like substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Jose Angel; Castano, Hader Ivan; Arias Mario

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes a kinetic study of an alcoholic fermentation using honey like substrate; for this effect they were carried out nine fermentations in discontinuous process with a volume, of 10 L, following the behavior of the substrate concentrations, biomass and product in the time. It was evaluated the convenience of factors like the agitation and the addition of nutritious, also, it was observed the effect of the initial concentrations of substrate and inoculate and the type of honey looking for the best conditions of the process for the obtaining of an alcoholic drink

  17. Identification of lysine acetyltransferase substrates using bioorthogonal chemical proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammel, Markus; Hang, Howard C

    2013-01-01

    Bioorthogonal chemical proteomics is a valuable method to identify enzyme-specific substrates, a challenging task by traditional biochemical standards. The addition of recombinant enzyme and alkynyl chemical reporter to complex protein mixtures, such as cell lysates, allows the detection and identification of modified substrates. Proteins that have been modified with the chemical reporter can be selectively labeled with fluorescent dyes for detection or affinity tags for biochemical enrichment and subsequent identification by mass spectrometry. Here, we describe the detection and identification of substrates of the lysine acetyltransferase p300 in nuclear extracts using the chemical reporter 4-pentynoyl-CoA.

  18. Influence of substrate surfaces on the growth of organic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, A.; Salvan, G.; Kampen, T. U.; Hoyer, W.; Zahn, D. R. T.

    2003-05-01

    3,4,9,10-Perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) films were grown by organic molecular beam deposition (OMBD) under UHV conditions on hydrogen terminated Si(1 0 0) and sulphur passivated GaAs(1 0 0) surfaces. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), Raman spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are employed to study the influence of substrate surfaces on the structural properties of the organic films. Both phases of PTCDA, α- and β-polymorphs, are found to grow on both substrates. The substrate surfaces determine the preferential growth of α- and β-phases of PTCDA crystals at room temperature.

  19. Investigation of (111 wafers and comparison with (100 substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bahari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  In the last decade, Si(100 has been used as a suitable substrate in field effect transistors. Some issues such as leakage current and tunneling current through the ultrathin films have been increased with shrinking the electronic devices – particularly, field effect transistors – to nanoscale, which is threatening more use of Si(100. We have thus demonstrated a series of experiments to grow ultrathin films on both Si(100 and Si(111 substrates and studied their nanostructural properties to see the possibility of replacing Si(100 with Si(111. The obtained results indicate that Si(111 substrate with silicon nitride film on top is desirable.

  20. Reel-to-reel substrate tape polishing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvamanickam, Venkat; Gardner, Michael T.; Judd, Raymond D.; Weloth, Martin; Qiao, Yunfei

    2005-06-21

    Disclosed is a reel-to-reel single-pass mechanical polishing system (100) suitable for polishing long lengths of metal substrate tape (124) used in the manufacture of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) coated tape, including multiple instantiations of a polishing station (114) in combination with a subsequent rinsing station (116) arranged along the axis of the metal substrate tape (124) that is translating between a payout spool (110a) and a take-up spool (110b). The metal substrate tape obtains a surface smoothness that is suitable for the subsequent deposition of a buffer layer.

  1. Microstructure in electrodeposited copper layers; the role of the substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anette Alsted; Jensen, Jens Dahl; Horsewell, Andy

    2001-01-01

    The microstructures of Cu layers, ranging in thickness from 3 to 12 microns, were investigated. The layers were electrodeposited from an acidic copper electrolyte onto two distinct substrate materials important for the micro-components industry: an Au layer with a pronounced lll-texture, and a nano...... stongly on the crystallographic texture in the substrate. The Cu crystallites inherited the lll-orientation of the Au substrate, whilst no preferred crystallographic orientation was observed in the Cu crystallites on the nano-crystalline Ni-P substate. For Cu layers thicker than 3 microns a lll...

  2. Substrate-enhanced superconductivity in Li-decorated graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the role of the substrate for the strength of the electron-phonon coupling in Li-decorated graphene. We find that the interaction with a h-BN substrate leads to a significant enhancement from to , which corresponds to a 25% increase of the transition temperature from to . The superconducting gaps amount to 1.56 meV (suspended) and 1.98 meV (supported). These findings open up a new route to enhanced superconducting transition temperatures in graphene-based materials by substrate engineering. © 2013 EPLA.

  3. Cell In Situ Zymography: Imaging Enzyme-Substrate Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Aastha; Rani, Vibha

    2017-01-01

    Zymography has long been used for the detection of substrate-specific enzyme activity. In situ zymography (ISZ), an adaptation from the conventional substrate zymography, is a widely employed technique useful for the detection, localization, and estimation of enzyme-substrate interactions in tissues. Here, we describe a protocol to detect 'in position' matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in cells utilizing H9c2 cardiomyoblasts as a model. This technique is primarily adopted from the method used for histological sections and is termed as 'Cell in situ Zymography'. It is a simple, sensitive, and quantifiable methodology to assess the functional activity of an enzyme 'on site/in position' in cell culture.

  4. Microgravimetric Studies of Selenium Electrodeposition Onto Different Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalik R.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of selenium electrodeposition from sulfuric acid solution on different substrates was studied with the electrochemical techniques. The cyclic voltammetry was combined with the quartz crystal microbalance technique to analyze selenium deposition process. The electrochemical reduction of selenous acid on gold, silver and copper electrodes was investigated. It was found that reduction of selenous acid is a very complex process and it strongly depends from the applied substrate. The voltammetric measurements indicate the range of potentials in which the process of reduction of selenous acids on the applied substrate is possible. Additionally, the microgravimetric data confirm the deposition of selenium and they reveal the mechanism of the deposition process.

  5. Skeletal muscle substrate metabolism during exercise: methodological considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; González-Alonso, J; Sacchetti, M

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present article is to evaluate critically the various methods employed in studies designed to quantify precisely skeletal muscle substrate utilization during exercise. In general, the pattern of substrate utilization during exercise can be described well from O2 uptake measurements...... substrates. There are several methodological concerns to be aware of when studying the metabolic response to exercise in human subjects. These concerns include: (1) the muscle mass involved in the exercise is largely unknown (bicycle or treadmill). Moreover, whether the muscle sample obtained from a limb...

  6. Carbon Nanotube Microarrays Grown on Nanoflake Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Howard K.; Hauge, Robert H.; Pint, Cary; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-01-01

    This innovation consists of a new composition of matter where single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are grown in aligned arrays from nanostructured flakes that are coated in Fe catalyst. This method of growth of aligned SWNTs, which can yield well over 400 percent SWNT mass per unit substrate mass, exceeds current yields for entangled SWNT growth. In addition, processing can be performed with minimal wet etching treatments, leaving aligned SWNTs with superior properties over those that exist in entangled mats. The alignment of the nanotubes is similar to that achieved in vertically aligned nanotubes, which are called "carpets. " Because these flakes are grown in a state where they are airborne in a reactor, these flakes, after growing SWNTs, are termed "flying carpets. " These flakes are created in a roll-to-roll evaporator system, where three subsequent evaporations are performed on a 100-ft (approx. =30-m) roll of Mylar. The first layer is composed of a water-soluble "release layer, " which can be a material such as NaCl. After depositing NaCl, the second layer involves 40 nm of supporting layer material . either Al2O3 or MgO. The thickness of the layer can be tuned to synthesize flakes that are larger or smaller than those obtained with a 40-nm deposition. Finally, the third layer consists of a thin Fe catalyst layer with a thickness of 0.5 nm. The thickness of this layer ultimately determines the diameter of SWNT growth, and a layer that is too thick will result in the growth of multiwalled carbon nanotubes instead of single-wall nanotubes. However, between a thickness of 0.5 nm to 1 nm, single-walled carbon nanotubes are known to be the primary constituent. After this three-layer deposition process, the Mylar is rolled through a bath of water, which allows catalyst-coated flakes to detach from the Mylar. The flakes are then collected and dried. The method described here for making such flakes is analogous to that which is used to make birefringent ink that is

  7. Perceptions of regulatory approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halin, Magnus; Leinonen, Ruusaliisa

    2012-01-01

    Ms. Ruusaliisa Leinonen and Mr. Magnus Halin from Fortum gave a joint presentation on industry perceptions of regulatory oversight of LMfS/SC. It was concluded that an open culture of discussion exists between the regulator (STUK) and the licensee, based on the common goal of nuclear safety. An example was provided of on how regulatory interventions helped foster improvements to individual and collective dose rate trends, which had remained static. Regulatory interventions included discussions on the ALARA concept to reinforce the requirement to continuously strive for improvements in safety performance. Safety culture has also been built into regulatory inspections in recent years. Training days have also been organised by the regulatory body to help develop a shared understanding of safety culture between licensee and regulatory personnel. Fortum has also developed their own training for managers and supervisors. Training and ongoing discussion on LMfS/SC safety culture is considered particularly important because both Fortum and the regulatory body are experiencing an influx of new staff due to the demographic profile of their organisations. It was noted that further work is needed to reach a common understanding of safety culture on a practical level (e.g., for a mechanic setting to work), and in relation to the inspection criteria used by the regulator. The challenges associated with companies with a mix of energy types were also discussed. This can make it more difficult to understand responsibilities and decision making processes, including the role of the parent body organisation. It also makes communication more challenging due to increased complexity and a larger number of stakeholders

  8. Laboratory Tests of Substrate Physical Properties May Not Represent the Retention Capacity of Green Roof Substrates In Situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Szota

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Green roofs can be used to reduce the volume of polluted stormwater that is generated by cities. Modelling rainfall retention is critical, but green roof water balance models often rely on the physical properties of substrates. In these models, substrate water holding capacity (WHC determines the depth of water which can be stored before runoff is generated; whereas, the permanent wilting point (PWP limits evapotranspiration. The WHC and PWP, as well as plant available water (PAW; where PAW = WHC − PWP, as determined from laboratory tests, may not truly reflect how substrates perform on green roofs. We therefore ran a simulated rainfall experiment on green roof modules to (i compare the rainfall retention of vegetated and non-vegetated substrates with different WHC and PAW, and (ii relate retention to substrate storage capacity, as calculated from laboratory measures of WHC and PAW. We found that the PAW of a substrate is a better indicator of evapotranspiration and retention when compared with WHC. However, we also found that substrates always retained less water than their calculated storage capacity would suggest, most likely being due to their high permeability. Our results indicate that using laboratory-derived measures of WHC and PAW in green roof models may be over-estimating both evapotranspiration and rainfall retention.

  9. Antisense expression of an Arabidopsis ran binding protein renders transgenic roots hypersensitive to auxin and alters auxin-induced root growth and development by arresting mitotic progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. H.; Arnold, D.; Lloyd, A.; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    We cloned a cDNA encoding an Arabidopsis Ran binding protein, AtRanBP1c, and generated transgenic Arabidopsis expressing the antisense strand of the AtRanBP1c gene to understand the in vivo functions of the Ran/RanBP signal pathway. The transgenic plants showed enhanced primary root growth but suppressed growth of lateral roots. Auxin significantly increased lateral root initiation and inhibited primary root growth in the transformants at 10 pM, several orders of magnitude lower than required to induce these responses in wild-type roots. This induction was followed by a blockage of mitosis in both newly emerged lateral roots and in the primary root, ultimately resulting in the selective death of cells in the tips of both lateral and primary roots. Given the established role of Ran binding proteins in the transport of proteins into the nucleus, these findings are consistent with a model in which AtRanBP1c plays a key role in the nuclear delivery of proteins that suppress auxin action and that regulate mitotic progress in root tips.

  10. Microstructure of WC/C coatings deposited on steel substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hosson, J.T.M.; Carvalho, N.J.M.; Brebbia, CA

    2001-01-01

    Electron microscopy, including scanning (SEM), transmission (TEM) and high-resolution (HRTEM) were employed to characterise slightly different tungsten carbide/carbon coatings deposited onto steel substrates. Complementary techniques, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron spectroscopy

  11. Effect of substrate temperature on electrical and magnetic properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . Figure 1. The temperature dependence of resistivity for LPMO films grown at different substrate temperatures (solid and open circles are the data in zero and 1 T magnetic field). The inset shows the variation of magnetoresistance with ...

  12. Effects of Ganoderma lucidum Spent Mushroom Substrate Extract on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) from spent mushroom substrate on milk and serum immunoglobulin levels and serum antioxidant capacity. Methods: Forty cows within the same parity and stage of lactation and with similar body weight were randomly divided into four groups ...

  13. Substrate Curvature Regulates Cell Migration -A Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiuxiu; Jiang, Yi

    Cell migration in host microenvironment is essential to cancer etiology, progression and metastasis. Cellular processes of adhesion, cytoskeletal polymerization, contraction, and matrix remodeling act in concert to regulate cell migration, while local extracellular matrix architecture modulate these processes. In this work we study how stromal microenvironment with native and cell-derived curvature at micron-meter scale regulate cell motility pattern. We developed a 3D model of single cell migration on a curved substrate. Mathematical analysis of cell morphological adaption to the cell-substrate interface shows that cell migration on convex surfaces deforms more than on concave surfaces. Both analytical and simulation results show that curved surfaces regulate the cell motile force for cell's protruding front through force balance with focal adhesion and cell contraction. We also found that cell migration on concave substrates is more persistent. These results offer a novel biomechanical explanation to substrate curvature regulation of cell migration. NIH 1U01CA143069.

  14. Curvature and bow of bulk GaN substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foronda, Humberto M.; Young, Erin C.; Robertson, Christian A.; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, UCSB, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Romanov, Alexey E. [Materials Department, UCSB, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); ITMO University, St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Beltz, Glenn E. [Mechanical Engineering Department, UCSB, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2016-07-21

    We investigate the bow of free standing (0001) oriented hydride vapor phase epitaxy grown GaN substrates and demonstrate that their curvature is consistent with a compressive to tensile stress gradient (bottom to top) present in the substrates. The origin of the stress gradient and the curvature is attributed to the correlated inclination of edge threading dislocation (TD) lines away from the [0001] direction. A model is proposed and a relation is derived for bulk GaN substrate curvature dependence on the inclination angle and the density of TDs. The model is used to analyze the curvature for commercially available GaN substrates as determined by high resolution x-ray diffraction. The results show a close correlation between the experimentally determined parameters and those predicted from theoretical model.

  15. HgCdTe photovoltaic detectors on Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanio, K.R.; Bean, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    HgCdTe photovoltaic detectors have been fabricated on Si substrates through intermediate CdTe/GaAs layers. Encapsulation of the GaAs between the CdTe and Si prevents unintentional doping of the HgCdTe by Ga and As. Uniform epitaxial GaAs is grown on three inch diameter Si substrates. Detectors on such large area Si substrates will offer hybrid focal plane arrays whose dimensions are not limited by the difference between the coefficients of thermal expansion of the Si signal processor and the substrate for the HgCdTe detector array. The growth of HgCdTe detectors on the Si signal processors for monolithic focal plane arrays is also considered. 40 references

  16. Direct transfer of graphene films for polyurethane substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilani, C.; Romani, E.C.; Larrudé, D.G.; Barbosa, Gelza M.; Freire, F.L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphene was prepared by CVD using copper foils as substrates. • Monolayer, bilayer and multilayer graphene were transferred to PU. • Samples were characterized by Raman and optical spectroscopies. • PU/monolayer graphene has transmittance around 80% in visible range. - Abstract: We have proposed the direct transfer of large-area graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition to polymeric substrate by evaporating of solvents of polyurethane/tetrahydrofurane solution. The graphene films on polyurethane substrates were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, optical and atomic force microscopies and UV–vis spectroscopy measurements. The Raman spectra revealed that it is possible to transfer in a controlled manner monolayer, bilayer and multilayer graphene films over polyurethane substrate.

  17. Direct transfer of graphene films for polyurethane substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilani, C.; Romani, E.C.; Larrudé, D.G. [Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barbosa, Gelza M. [Diretoria de Sistemas de Armas da Marinha, Marinha do Brasil, 20010-00 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Freire, F.L., E-mail: lazaro@vdg.fis.puc-rio.br [Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • Graphene was prepared by CVD using copper foils as substrates. • Monolayer, bilayer and multilayer graphene were transferred to PU. • Samples were characterized by Raman and optical spectroscopies. • PU/monolayer graphene has transmittance around 80% in visible range. - Abstract: We have proposed the direct transfer of large-area graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition to polymeric substrate by evaporating of solvents of polyurethane/tetrahydrofurane solution. The graphene films on polyurethane substrates were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, optical and atomic force microscopies and UV–vis spectroscopy measurements. The Raman spectra revealed that it is possible to transfer in a controlled manner monolayer, bilayer and multilayer graphene films over polyurethane substrate.

  18. Collapse of molecularly thin lubricant layers between elastic substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, T

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the dynamics of layering transitions and other structure formation processes in molecularly thin liquid films upon reducing the separation between two atomically smooth mica substrates. Using a newly developed surface forces apparatus with two-dimensional imaging capability, we followed the hydrodynamic processes during drainage with unprecedented precision. Depending on the substrate elasticity and the approach rate, drainage occurs either in a series of consecutive layering transitions or in a single step. In the latter case, nanoscopic amounts of liquid are trapped inside the contact area transiently. The experimental observations are explained qualitatively by combining hydrodynamic effects with elastic deformations of the substrates. Furthermore, we present evidence for anisotropy in the fluid dynamics induced by the lattice symmetry of the substrates.

  19. Silicon based substrate with calcium aluminosilicate/thermal barrier layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Miller, Robert Alden (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Nagaraj, Bangalore A. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a calcium alumino silicate.

  20. Substrate integrated Lead-Carbon hybrid ultracapacitor with flooded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-07-18

    mat (AGM) and silica-gel sulphuric acid electrolyte ... Hybrid ultracapacitor; substrate-integrated PbO2 electrode; silica-gel electrolyte. 1. Introduction ...... Density Capacitors for Electric Vehicles”, EG & G. Idaho. Inc., Report No.

  1. Optical measurement of microroughness of pigment coatings on rough substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elton, N. J.

    2009-02-01

    The optical determination of rms roughness at the sub-wavelength scale by measurement of specular intensity as a function of wavelength or angle of incidence is well known. The method is normally used for specimens that are macroscopically flat. However, important industrial materials such as coated paper and paint consist of microscopically rough pigment coatings on a macroscopically rough substrate. Numerical modelling is used to assess the applicability and limitations of optical measurement of microroughness for such materials. Experimental results are presented for a range of paints on substrates of various macroroughness. Model and data are in fair agreement and show that the presence of substrate macroroughness always leads to an underestimation of microroughness. Generally, optical measurements of microroughness are only comparable for substrates of similar macroroughness and a limiting value exists above which measurements may not be meaningful.

  2. Graphene substrates enhance optical transfection efficiency in pluripotent stem cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khanyile, T

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies directed at investigating the role of nanomaterial substrates with varying properties in tissue engineering research are essential. In this research arena, pluripotent stem cells are popular for their self renewing ability and are widely...

  3. Copper Metallic Substrates for High Temperature Superconducting Coated Conductors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yust, Nicholas A; Nekkanti, Rama; Brunke, Lyle B; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Barnes, Paul N

    2006-01-01

    ...) coated conductor applications. A comparison is made between Cu substrates fabricated by reverse cold rolling followed by recrystallization, from stock materials that were obtained in the form of extruded rod and rolled plate...

  4. Evaluation of substrates from renewable-resources in biosurfactants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of substrates from renewable-resources in biosurfactants production by Pseudomonas strains. Sidnei Cerqueira dos Santos, Luzimar Gonzaga Fernandez, Juan Carlos Rossi-Alva, Milton Ricardo de Abreu Roque ...

  5. Concentration of radiocesium in cultivated mushrooms and substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Sadaaki; Higasa, Mamoru; Urabe, Ken-ichi; Haraguchi, Masato; Omura, Toshitaka

    2008-01-01

    Concentrations of 134 Cs, 137 Cs and 40 K in mushrooms cultivated in Saitama prefecture and those substrates were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. In all mushrooms and substrates, 134 Cs was not detected. Concentrations of 137 Cs in mushrooms were in the range of 0.012 - 2.1 Bq/kg·fresh, and those in substrates were in the range of 0.080 - 1.8 Bq/kg·dry. Concentrations of 137 Cs in mushrooms varied widely with mushroom species, and the average concentration of 137 Cs in Lentinus edodes (Shiitake) was over 30 times higher than that in Pleurotus ostreatus (Hiratake). Mushroom-to-substrate concentration ratios of 137 Cs (fresh/dry) were 0.11-0.53. They were higher than the reported transfer factors for common agricultural plants. (author)

  6. In situ synthesis of nanoparticles on substrates by inkjet printing

    KAUST Repository

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu

    2014-12-23

    Nanoparticles may be formed on a substrate by mixing precursor solutions deposited by an inkjet printer. A first solution is deposited on a substrate from a first inkjet print cartridge. Then, a second solution is deposited on the substrate from a second inkjet print cartridge. The solutions may be printed in an array of droplets on the substrate. Nanoparticles form when droplets of the first solution overlap with droplets of the second solution. In one example, the nanoparticles may be gold nanoparticles formed from mixing a first solution of 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB) and oleylamine and a second solution of gold chloride trihydrite and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The nanoparticles may be incorporated into optoelectronic devices.

  7. Substrate protein recognition mechanism of archaeal and eukaryotic chaperonins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Pooja; Jayasinghe, Manori; Stan, George

    2009-03-01

    Chaperonins are double ring-shaped biological nanomachines that assist protein folding. Spectacular conformational changes take place within each chaperonin ring using energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. These changes result in transitions from the open to the closed ring. Substrate proteins bind to the open ring and are encapsulated within the closed ring cavity. We focus on the substrate protein recognition mechanism of archaeal and eukaryotic chaperonins. We predict substrate protein binding sites using structural and bioinformatic analyses of functional states during the chaperonin cycle. Based on large changes in solvent accessible surface area and contact maps we glean the functional role of chaperonin amino acids. During the transition between open to closed chaperonin ring, the largest change in accessible surface area of amino acids is found in helical protrusion and two helices located at the cavity opening. Our calculations suggest that the helical protrusion and two helices constitute the substrate protein binding site.

  8. Radiolabelled substrates for studying biological effects of trace contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A programme of coordinated isotopic tracer-aided investigations of the biological side-effects of foreign chemical residues in food and agriculture, initiated in 1973, was reviewed. The current status of representative investigations from the point of view of techniques and priorities was assessed. Such investigations involved radioactive substrates for studying DNA injury and its repair; 14 C-labelled acetylcholine as substrate for measuring enzyme inhibition due to the presence of, or exposure to, anticholinesteratic contaminants; radioactive substrates as indication of side-effects in non-target organisms and of their comparative susceptibilities; radioactive substrates as indicators of persistence or biodegradability of trace contaminants of soil or water; and labelled pools for studying the biological side-effects of trace contaminants. Priorities were identified

  9. Pattern of diffusion-limited aggregation on nonuniform substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Ouyang Wen Ze; Zou Xian Wu; Jin Zhun Zhi

    2003-01-01

    Pattern of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) on nonuniform substrate was investigated by computer simulations. The nonuniform substrates are represented by Leath percolations with the probability p. p stands for the degree of nonuniformity and takes values in the range p sub c<=p<=1, where p sub c is the threshold of percolation. The DLA cluster grows up on the Leath percolation substrate. The patterns of the DLA clusters appear asymmetrical and nonuniform, and the branches are relative few for the case p is close to p sub c. In addition, the pattern depends on the shape of substrate. As p increases from p sub c to 1, cluster changes to pure DLA gradually. Correspondingly, the fractal dimension increases from 1.46 to 1.68. Also, the random walks on Leath percolations through the range p sub c<=p<=1 were examined. Our simulations show the Honda-Toyoki-Matsushita relation is still reasonable for fractional dimensional systems.

  10. Elucidating Substrate Promiscuity within the FabI Enzyme Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Gabriel S; O'Brien, Terrence E; Vinson, Logan; Carlin, Dylan Alexander; Yao, Andrew; Mak, Wai Shun; Tagkopoulos, Ilias; Facciotti, Marc T; Tantillo, Dean J; Siegel, Justin B

    2017-09-15

    The rapidly growing appreciation of enzymes' catalytic and substrate promiscuity may lead to their expanded use in the fields of chemical synthesis and industrial biotechnology. Here, we explore the substrate promiscuity of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases (commonly known as FabI) and how that promiscuity is a function of inherent reactivity and the geometric demands of the enzyme's active site. We demonstrate that these enzymes catalyze the reduction of a wide range of substrates, particularly α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. In addition, we demonstrate that a combination of quantum mechanical hydride affinity calculations and molecular docking can be used to rapidly categorize compounds that FabI can use as substrates. The results here provide new insight into the determinants of catalysis for FabI and set the stage for the development of a new assay for drug discovery, organic synthesis, and novel biocatalysts.

  11. Large area periodic ferromagnetic nanowires deposited onto a polymer substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zighem, F.; Faurie, D.; Belmeguenai, M.; Garcia-Sanchez, A.; Lupo, P.; Adeyeye, A. O.

    2017-07-01

    There are various challenges associated with the fabrication of highly ordered magnetic nanostructures on flexible substrates due to the compatibility with lithography and deposition techniques. In this article, we present a nanofabrication technique to synthesize a large area (5 × 5 mm2) of ferromagnetic nanowires on top of a polymer substrate (Kapton®) using interference lithography and sputtering processes. We have systematically characterized their static and dynamic magnetic behaviors using magneto-optical Kerr magnetometry and broadband ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy. To evaluate the quality of our approach, we also deposited an identical array of nanowires on Silicon substrates for comparison. The nanowires deposited on the two substrates display similar static and dynamic properties, including the identical magnetization reversal process, number of resonance modes, and comparable damping parameters. The results suggest the good quality of our nanowires and their suitability in future flexible spintronic devices.

  12. Comment on ``Ferromagnetic film on a superconducting substrate''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonin, E. B.

    2002-10-01

    A superconducting substrate is not able to shrink drastically domains in a ferromagnetic film, contrary to the prediction of Bulaevskii and Chudnovsky. This is shown on the basis of the exact solution for the stripe domain structure.

  13. Optical measurement of microroughness of pigment coatings on rough substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elton, N J

    2009-01-01

    The optical determination of rms roughness at the sub-wavelength scale by measurement of specular intensity as a function of wavelength or angle of incidence is well known. The method is normally used for specimens that are macroscopically flat. However, important industrial materials such as coated paper and paint consist of microscopically rough pigment coatings on a macroscopically rough substrate. Numerical modelling is used to assess the applicability and limitations of optical measurement of microroughness for such materials. Experimental results are presented for a range of paints on substrates of various macroroughness. Model and data are in fair agreement and show that the presence of substrate macroroughness always leads to an underestimation of microroughness. Generally, optical measurements of microroughness are only comparable for substrates of similar macroroughness and a limiting value exists above which measurements may not be meaningful

  14. Alternative fuels from waste cellulosic substrates and poly furfuryl alcohol

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides methods for manufacturing alternative fuels from waste cellulosic substrates reinforced by poly furfuryl alcohol (PFA). PFA, as a matrix, is obtained from the condensation polymerization of furfuryl alcohol – a waste of sugarcane...

  15. Modelling of Substrate Noise and Mitigation Schemes for UWB Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Ming; Mikkelsen, Jan H.; Larsen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    -mode designs, digital switching noise is an ever-present problem that needs to be taken into consideration. This is of particular importance when low cost implementation technologies, e.g. lightly doped substrates, are aimed for. For traditional narrow-band designs much of the issue can be mitigated using...... tuned elements in the signal paths. However, for UWB designs this is not a viable option and other means are therefore required. Moreover, owing to the ultra-wideband nature and low power spectral density of the signal, UWB mixed-signal integrated circuits are more sensitive to substrate noise compared...... with narrow-band circuits. This chapter presents a study on the modeling and mitigation of substrate noise in mixed-signal integrated circuits (ICs), focusing on UWB system/circuit designs. Experimental impact evaluation of substrate noise on UWB circuits is presented. It shows how a wide-band circuit can...

  16. Short Term Innovative Research on Sensors on Flexible Substrates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Butler, Donald

    2001-01-01

    .... The results on this investigation will form a basis for the production of other micromachined sensors such as pressure/strain sensors, "hair-like" touch and flow sensors, and accelerometers on flexible substrates...

  17. Wind Speed Perception and Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agdas, Duzgun; Webster, Gregory D.; Masters, Forrest J.

    2012-01-01

    Background How accurately do people perceive extreme wind speeds and how does that perception affect the perceived risk? Prior research on human–wind interaction has focused on comfort levels in urban settings or knock-down thresholds. No systematic experimental research has attempted to assess people's ability to estimate extreme wind speeds and perceptions of their associated risks. Method We exposed 76 people to 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 mph (4.5, 8.9, 13.4, 17.9, 22.3, and 26.8 m/s) winds in randomized orders and asked them to estimate wind speed and the corresponding risk they felt. Results Multilevel modeling showed that people were accurate at lower wind speeds but overestimated wind speeds at higher levels. Wind speed perceptions mediated the direct relationship between actual wind speeds and perceptions of risk (i.e., the greater the perceived wind speed, the greater the perceived risk). The number of tropical cyclones people had experienced moderated the strength of the actual–perceived wind speed relationship; consequently, mediation was stronger for people who had experienced fewer storms. Conclusion These findings provide a clearer understanding of wind and risk perception, which can aid development of public policy solutions toward communicating the severity and risks associated with natural disasters. PMID:23226230

  18. Wind speed perception and risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duzgun Agdas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: How accurately do people perceive extreme wind speeds and how does that perception affect the perceived risk? Prior research on human-wind interaction has focused on comfort levels in urban settings or knock-down thresholds. No systematic experimental research has attempted to assess people's ability to estimate extreme wind speeds and perceptions of their associated risks. METHOD: We exposed 76 people to 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 mph (4.5, 8.9, 13.4, 17.9, 22.3, and 26.8 m/s winds in randomized orders and asked them to estimate wind speed and the corresponding risk they felt. RESULTS: Multilevel modeling showed that people were accurate at lower wind speeds but overestimated wind speeds at higher levels. Wind speed perceptions mediated the direct relationship between actual wind speeds and perceptions of risk (i.e., the greater the perceived wind speed, the greater the perceived risk. The number of tropical cyclones people had experienced moderated the strength of the actual-perceived wind speed relationship; consequently, mediation was stronger for people who had experienced fewer storms. CONCLUSION: These findings provide a clearer understanding of wind and risk perception, which can aid development of public policy solutions toward communicating the severity and risks associated with natural disasters.

  19. Mothers’ Perceptions of Toddler Beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Rigo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of obesity among Australian pre-school children is a major concern with links to poor health outcomes. One contributing factor is excess energy intake. Sugar-sweetened beverages are energy-dense, nutrient-poor, readily available and have been implicated in the increasing prevalence of obesity. Furthermore, preschooler beverage consumption may develop into dietary habits that track into adulthood. There is little research on factors influencing parents’ decision-making when serving beverages to their preschoolers, or on mothers’ perceptions of preschooler’s beverages. The aim of this study was to explore mothers’ perceptions of commonly consumed preschooler beverages. Methods: The Repertory Grid Technique and the Laddering Technique methodologies were utilized in interviews with 28 mothers from Melbourne, Australia, to explore beverage perceptions. Results: A large number of diverse perceptual categories (‘constructs’ (n = 22 about beverages were elicited, demonstrating the complexity of mothers’ perceptions when making beverage choices for their preschoolers. The five most common categories were related to health, sugar, dairy, packaging, and additives. Thematic analysis of responses from the laddering method identified three major themes: concerns about the types of beverages mothers would like to provide their preschoolers, the healthiness of a beverage, and the sugar content. Conclusions: Mothers’ perceptions of beverages are sophisticated and need to be included in the design of health communication strategies by health promoters and government agencies to influence mothers’ beverage selections for their preschoolers.

  20. Substrate integrated Lead-Carbon hybrid ultracapacitor with flooded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pb-C HUCs comprise substrate-integrated PbO2 (SI-PbO2) as positive electrodes and high surface-area carbon with graphite-sheet substrate as negative ... The specific capacitance values for 2 V Pb-C HUCs are found to be 166 F/g, 102 F/g and 152 F/g with a faradaic efficiency of 98%, 92% and 88% for flooded, AGM and ...

  1. Enzyme Substrate Specificity Conferred by Distinct Conformational Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, Florencia; Saltzberg, Daniel; Allen, Karen N; Tolan, Dean R

    2015-11-04

    Substrate recognition is one of the hallmarks of enzyme catalysis. Enzyme conformational changes have been linked to selectivity between substrates with little direct evidence. Aldolase, a glycolytic enzyme, must distinguish between two physiologically important substrates, fructose 1-phosphate and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, and provides an excellent model system for the study of this question. Previous work has shown that isozyme specific residues (ISRs) distant from the active site are responsible for kinetic distinction between these substrates. Notably, most of the ISRs reside in a cluster of five surface α-helices, and the carboxyl-terminal region (CTR), and cooperative interactions among these helices have been demonstrated. To test the hypothesis that conformational changes are at the root of these changes, single surface-cysteine variants were created with the cysteine located on helices of the cluster and CTR. This allowed for site-specific labeling with an environmentally sensitive fluorophore, and subsequent monitoring of conformational changes by fluorescence emission spectrophotometry. These labeled variants revealed different spectra in the presence of saturating amounts of each substrate, which suggested the occurrence of different conformations. Emission spectra collected at various substrate concentrations showed a concentration dependence of the fluorescence spectra, consistent with binding events. Lastly, stopped-flow fluorescence spectrophotometry showed that the rate of these fluorescence changes was on the same time-scale as catalysis, thus suggesting a link between the different fluorescence changes and events during catalysis. On the basis of these results, we propose that different conformational changes may be a common mechanism for dictating substrate specificity in other enzymes with multiple substrates.

  2. Ultrasound-Enhanced Biogas Production from Different Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    González-Fernández, Cristina; Timmers, Rudolphus Antonius; Ruiz, Begona

    2015-01-01

    Among the biofuel production processes using different substrates, the biogas generation process is one of the simplest. Compared with bioethanol or biodiesel production processes, anaerobic digestion is a process where all the organic matter (carbohydrates, lipids and proteins) can be biologically...... production. The present chapter is dedicated to providing a review of ultrasound pretreatment applied to different substrates (lignocelullosic materials, manures, sludge and microalgae). The advantages and constraints, that ultrasound pretreatment exhibit towards biogas production, are discussed and compared...

  3. White Top-Emitting OLEDs on Metal Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Freitag, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    This work focusses on the development of top-emitting white organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), which can be fabricated on metal substrates. Bottom-emitting OLEDs have been studied intensively over the years and show promising perspectives for future commercial applications in general lighting. The development of top-emitting devices has fallen behind despite the opportunities to produce these devices also on low-cost opaque substrates. This is due to the challenges of top-light-emission c...

  4. Substrate specificity determinants of class III nucleotidyl cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharambe, Nikhil G; Barathy, Deivanayaga V; Syed, Wajeed; Visweswariah, Sandhya S; Colaςo, Melwin; Misquith, Sandra; Suguna, Kaza

    2016-10-01

    The two second messengers in signalling, cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, are produced by adenylyl and guanylyl cyclases respectively. Recognition and discrimination of the substrates ATP and GTP by the nucleotidyl cyclases are vital in these reactions. Various apo-, substrate- or inhibitor-bound forms of adenylyl cyclase (AC) structures from transmembrane and soluble ACs have revealed the catalytic mechanism of ATP cyclization reaction. Previously reported structures of guanylyl cyclases represent ligand-free forms and inactive open states of the enzymes and thus do not provide information regarding the exact mode of substrate binding. The structures we present here of the cyclase homology domain of a class III AC from Mycobacterium avium (Ma1120) and its mutant in complex with ATP and GTP in the presence of calcium ion, provide the structural basis for substrate selection by the nucleotidyl cyclases at the atomic level. Precise nature of the enzyme-substrate interactions, novel modes of substrate binding and the ability of the binding pocket to accommodate diverse conformations of the substrates have been revealed by the present crystallographic analysis. This is the first report to provide structures of both the nucleotide substrates bound to a nucleotidyl cyclase. Coordinates and structure factors have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank with accession numbers: 5D15 (Ma1120 CHD +ATP.Ca 2+ ), 5D0E (Ma1120 CHD +GTP.Ca 2+ ), 5D0H (Ma1120 CHD (KDA→EGY)+ATP.Ca 2+ ), 5D0G (Ma1120 CHD (KDA→EGY)+GTP.Ca 2+ ). Adenylyl cyclase (EC number: 4.6.1.1). © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  5. Coating-substrate-simulations applied to HFQ® forming tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopold Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a comparative analysis of coating-substrate simulations applied to HFQTM forming tools is presented. When using the solution heat treatment cold die forming and quenching process, known as HFQTM, for forming of hardened aluminium alloy of automotive panel parts, coating-substrate-systems have to satisfy unique requirements. Numerical experiments, based on the Advanced Adaptive FE method, will finally present.

  6. Broadband antireflection nanodome structures on SiC substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Zhu, Xiaolong; Møller, Uffe Visbech

    2013-01-01

    Nanodome structures are demonstrated on the SiC substrate by using nanosphere lithography and dry etching. Significant surface antireflection has been observed over a broad spectral range from 400 nm to 1600 nm.......Nanodome structures are demonstrated on the SiC substrate by using nanosphere lithography and dry etching. Significant surface antireflection has been observed over a broad spectral range from 400 nm to 1600 nm....

  7. Substrate utilization and VSS relations in activated sludge processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droste, R.L.; Fernandes, L.; Sun, X. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1993-12-31

    A new empirical substrate removal model for activated sludge in continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CFSTR) and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was developed in this study. This model includes an exponential function of volatile suspended solids to express the active biomass which is actually involved in substrate utilization. Results indicate that the proposed exponential models predict more accurately effluent COD in CFSTR and SBR systems than the first or zero order models. (author). 7 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  8. Adhesive interactions of geckos with wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Dryden, Daniel M; Olderman, Jeffrey; Peterson, Kelly A; Niewiarowski, Peter H; French, Roger H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-07-06

    Fluorinated substrates like Teflon® (poly(tetrafluoroethylene); PTFE) are well known for their role in creating non-stick surfaces. We showed previously that even geckos, which can stick to most surfaces under a wide variety of conditions, slip on PTFE. Surprisingly, however, geckos can stick reasonably well to PTFE if it is wet. In an effort to explain this effect, we have turned our attention to the role of substrate surface energy and roughness when shear adhesion occurs in media other than air. In this study, we removed the roughness component inherent to commercially available PTFE and tested geckos on relatively smooth wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates. We found that roughness had very little effect on shear adhesion in air or in water and that the level of fluorination was most important for shear adhesion, particularly in air. Surface energy calculations of the two fluorinated substrates and one control substrate using the Tabor-Winterton approximation and the Young-Dupré equation were used to determine the interfacial energy of the substrates. Using these interfacial energies we estimated the ratio of wet and dry normal adhesion for geckos clinging to the three substrates. Consistent with the results for rough PTFE, our predictions show a qualitative trend in shear adhesion based on fluorination, and the quantitative experimental differences highlight the unusually low shear adhesion of geckos on dry smooth fluorinated substrates, which is not captured by surface energy calculations. Our work has implications for bioinspired design of synthetics that can preferentially stick in water but not in air.

  9. Preparation of surface enhanced Raman substrate and its characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Wang, J. Y.; Wang, J. Q.

    2017-10-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a fast, convenient and highly sensitive detection technique, and preparing the good effect and repeatable substrate is the key to realize the trace amount and quantitative detection in the field of food safety detection. In this paper, a surface enhanced Raman substrate based on submicrometer silver particles structure was prepared by chemical deposition method, and characterized its structure and optical properties.

  10. Colloidal quantum dot solar cells on curved and flexible substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Kramer, Illan J.

    2014-10-20

    © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are semiconductor nanocrystals synthesized with, processed in, and deposited from the solution phase, potentially enabling low-cost, facile manufacture of solar cells. Unfortunately, CQD solar cell reports, until now, have only explored batch-processing methods - such as spin-coating - that offer limited capacity for scaling. Spray-coating could offer a means of producing uniform colloidal quantum dot films that yield high-quality devices. Here, we explore the versatility of the spray-coating method by producing CQD solar cells in a variety of previously unexplored substrate arrangements. The potential transferability of the spray-coating method to a roll-to-roll manufacturing process was tested by spray-coating the CQD active layer onto six substrates mounted on a rapidly rotating drum, yielding devices with an average power conversion efficiency of 6.7%. We further tested the manufacturability of the process by endeavoring to spray onto flexible substrates, only to find that spraying while the substrate was flexed was crucial to achieving champion performance of 7.2% without compromise to open-circuit voltage. Having deposited onto a substrate with one axis of curvature, we then built our CQD solar cells onto a spherical lens substrate having two axes of curvature resulting in a 5% efficient device. These results show that CQDs deposited using our spraying method can be integrated to large-area manufacturing processes and can be used to make solar cells on unconventional shapes.

  11. SIMULATION OF HEAT TRANSFER BY COOLING CHANNELS IN LTCC SUBSTRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas GIRASEK

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal resistance, flow analysis, pressure drop and distribution of coolant inside multilayer LTCC (Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramics substrate are detailed investigated in this paper. For this reason four various structures of internal channels in the multilayer LTCC substrates were designed and simulated. The simulation 3D model consist of 6 LTCC of DuPont 951® layer with cooling microchannel in middle of substrate, power chips paced on top of LTCC and silver sintered joints under power chips. The impact of the structure of channels, volume flow and power loss of die was simulated, calculated and analyzed by using the simulation software Mentor Graphics FloEFDTM. The structure and size of channels have the significant impact on thermal resistance, pressure of coolant as well as the effectivity of cooling power components which can be placed on LTCC substrate. The thermal resistance was calculated from the temperature gradient among chip junction, the inlet fluid and the thermal load of chip. Optimizing and comparison of cooling channels structure inside LTCC substrates and analyzing the effect of volume flow for achieving the least thermal resistance of LTCC multilayer substrate is the main contribution of this paper.

  12. Caged Protein Prenyltransferase Substrates: Tools for Understanding Protein Prenylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGraw, Amanda J.; Hast, Michael A.; Xu, Juhua; Mullen, Daniel; Beese, Lorena S.; Barany, George; Distefano, Mark D. (Duke); (UMM)

    2010-11-15

    Originally designed to block the prenylation of oncogenic Ras, inhibitors of protein farnesyltransferase currently in preclinical and clinical trials are showing efficacy in cancers with normal Ras. Blocking protein prenylation has also shown promise in the treatment of malaria, Chagas disease and progeria syndrome. A better understanding of the mechanism, targets and in vivo consequences of protein prenylation are needed to elucidate the mode of action of current PFTase (Protein Farnesyltransferase) inhibitors and to create more potent and selective compounds. Caged enzyme substrates are useful tools for understanding enzyme mechanism and biological function. Reported here is the synthesis and characterization of caged substrates of PFTase. The caged isoprenoid diphosphates are poor substrates prior to photolysis. The caged CAAX peptide is a true catalytically caged substrate of PFTase in that it is to not a substrate, yet is able to bind to the enzyme as established by inhibition studies and X-ray crystallography. Irradiation of the caged molecules with 350 nm light readily releases their cognate substrate and their photolysis products are benign. These properties highlight the utility of those analogs towards a variety of in vitro and in vivo applications.

  13. Cracking in thin films of colloidal particles on elastomeric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael; Sharp, James

    2012-02-01

    The drying of thin colloidal films of particles is a common industrial problem (e.g paint drying, ceramic coatings). An often undesirable side effect is the appearance of cracks. As the liquid in a suspension evaporates, particles are forced into contact both with each other and the substrate, forming a fully wetted film. Under carefully controlled conditions the observed cracks grow orthogonal to the drying front, spaced at regular intervals along it. In this work we investigated the role of the substrate in constraining the film. Atomic force microscopy, was used to image the particle arrangements on the top and bottom surfaces of films, dried on liquid and glass substrates. We present convincing evidence that the interface prevents particle rearrangements at the bottom of the film, leading to a mismatch strain between upper and lower surfaces of the film which appears to drive cracking. We show that when the modulus of the substrate becomes comparable to the stresses measured in the films, the crack spacing is significantly altered. We also show that cracks do not form on liquid substrates. These combined experiments highlight the importance of substrate constraint in the crack formation mechanism.[4pt] [1] M.I. Smith, J.S. Sharp, Langmuir 27, 8009 (2011)

  14. Acclimatization and growth of ornamental pineapple seedlings under organic substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Carlos Colombo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro propagation techniques are commonly used to produce ornamental pineapple seedlings in commercial scale, aiming to attend the growers with genetic and sanitary quality seedlings. However, the choice of the ideal substrate is essential for the acclimatization and growth stage of the seedlings propagated by this technique, since some substrates can increase the seedling mortality and/or limit the seedling growth due to its physical and chemical characteristics. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the acclimatization of ornamental pineapple [Ananas comosus (L. Merr. var. ananassoides (Baker Coppens & Leal] on different substrates. Seedlings with approximately seven centimeters, obtained from in vitro culture, were transplanted into styrofoam trays filled with the following substrates: sphagnum; semi-composed pine bark; carbonized rice husk; sphagnum + semicomposed pine bark; sphagnum + carbonized rice husk; and semi-composed pine bark + carbonized rice husk. Each treatment was replicated five times using 10 plants. At 180 days, there were evaluated the following variables: survival percentage, plant height, number of leaves, leaf area, largest root length, and shoot and root dry matter. The substrate semi-composed pine bark + carbonized rice husk presented the lowest mean (62% for survival percentage. The semi-composed pine bark and semi-composed pine bark + carbonized rice husk treatments presented significant increments in some evaluated biometric characteristics. The semi-composed pine bark is the most favorable substrate for the A. comosus var. ananassoids acclimatization.

  15. Characterizing Protease Specificity: How Many Substrates Do We Need?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schauperl

    Full Text Available Calculation of cleavage entropies allows to quantify, map and compare protease substrate specificity by an information entropy based approach. The metric intrinsically depends on the number of experimentally determined substrates (data points. Thus a statistical analysis of its numerical stability is crucial to estimate the systematic error made by estimating specificity based on a limited number of substrates. In this contribution, we show the mathematical basis for estimating the uncertainty in cleavage entropies. Sets of cleavage entropies are calculated using experimental cleavage data and modeled extreme cases. By analyzing the underlying mathematics and applying statistical tools, a linear dependence of the metric in respect to 1/n was found. This allows us to extrapolate the values to an infinite number of samples and to estimate the errors. Analyzing the errors, a minimum number of 30 substrates was found to be necessary to characterize substrate specificity, in terms of amino acid variability, for a protease (S4-S4' with an uncertainty of 5 percent. Therefore, we encourage experimental researchers in the protease field to record specificity profiles of novel proteases aiming to identify at least 30 peptide substrates of maximum sequence diversity. We expect a full characterization of protease specificity helpful to rationalize biological functions of proteases and to assist rational drug design.

  16. Substrate viscosity enhances correlation in epithelial sheet movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrell, Michael; Kamm, Roger; Matsudaira, Paul

    2011-07-20

    The movement of the epithelium plays vital roles in the development and renewal of complex tissues, from the separation of tissues in the early embryo, to turnover in the homeostasis of the gastrointestinal mucosa. Yet, despite its importance, a clear interpretation of the mechanism for collective motion in epithelial sheets remains elusive. This interpretation is prohibited by the lack of understanding of the relationship between motion and cell-cell contact, and their mediation by the mechanical properties of the underlying substrate. To better mimic physiological substrates that have inherent viscosity, we probe this relationship using polydimethylsiloxane, a substrate whose mechanical properties can be tuned from predominantly elastic to viscous by altering its cross-linking content. We therefore characterize the comparative spatiotemporal correlations in cell velocity during the movement of an epithelial monolayer as a function of the viscoelasticity of the substrate. Our results show that high correlation in cell velocity is achieved when the substrate G''(ω) is ~0.4 × G'(ω). This correlation is driven by a balance between cell-cell contact and the adhesion and contraction of the extracellular matrix. For G'(ω) > G'(ω), this balance shifts, and contraction of the tissue drives the substrate to flow, further elevating the correlation in movement. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. MTH1 Substrate Recognition--An Example of Specific Promiscuity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Willem M Nissink

    Full Text Available MTH1 (NUDT1 is an oncologic target involved in the prevention of DNA damage. We investigate the way MTH1 recognises its substrates and present substrate-bound structures of MTH1 for 8-oxo-dGTP and 8-oxo-rATP as examples of novel strong and weak binding substrate motifs. Investigation of a small set of purine-like fragments using 2D NMR resulted in identification of a fragment with weak potency. The protein-ligand X-Ray structure of this fragment provides insight into the role of water molecules in substrate selectivity. Wider fragment screening by NMR resulted in three new protein structures exhibiting alternative binding configurations to the key Asp-Asp recognition element of the protein. These inhibitor binding modes demonstrate that MTH1 employs an intricate yet promiscuous mechanism of substrate anchoring through its Asp-Asp pharmacophore. The structures suggest that water-mediated interactions convey selectivity towards oxidized substrates over their non-oxidised counterparts, in particular by stabilization of a water molecule in a hydrophobic environment through hydrogen bonding. These findings may be useful in the design of inhibitors of MTH1.

  18. Face processing pattern under top-down perception: a functional MRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie; Liu, Jiangang; Zhao, Jizheng; Zhang, Hui; Shi, Guangming

    2009-02-01

    Although top-down perceptual process plays an important role in face processing, its neural substrate is still puzzling because the top-down stream is extracted difficultly from the activation pattern associated with contamination caused by bottom-up face perception input. In the present study, a novel paradigm of instructing participants to detect faces from pure noise images is employed, which could efficiently eliminate the interference of bottom-up face perception in topdown face processing. Analyzing the map of functional connectivity with right FFA analyzed by conventional Pearson's correlation, a possible face processing pattern induced by top-down perception can be obtained. Apart from the brain areas of bilateral fusiform gyrus (FG), left inferior occipital gyrus (IOG) and left superior temporal sulcus (STS), which are consistent with a core system in the distributed cortical network for face perception, activation induced by top-down face processing is also found in these regions that include the anterior cingulate gyrus (ACC), right oribitofrontal cortex (OFC), left precuneus, right parahippocampal cortex, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), right frontal pole, bilateral premotor cortex, left inferior parietal cortex and bilateral thalamus. The results indicate that making-decision, attention, episodic memory retrieving and contextual associative processing network cooperate with general face processing regions to process face information under top-down perception.

  19. Student athletes' perceptions of self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Samuel Y; Kent, Aubrey

    2003-01-01

    Several factors have been found to contribute to the development of the self in adolescents, including religion, race, competence, leadership, physical appearance, and gender. The purpose of this study was to describe the development of self-perception in adolescent athletes and make comparisons with respect to gender and class level. One hundred seventy-five high school athletes were administered Harter's (1988) Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents. The data were analyzed for both the overall sample and demographic subgroups. Males had a significantly higher mean score on athletic competence than did females. Males also viewed both athletic competence and social acceptance as significantly more important than did females. These findings are discussed in the context of relevant literature on adolescents' perceptions of self.

  20. Emotion words shape emotion percepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Maria; Lindquist, Kristen A; Barsalou, Lawrence; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2012-04-01

    People believe they see emotion written on the faces of other people. In an instant, simple facial actions are transformed into information about another's emotional state. The present research examined whether a perceiver unknowingly contributes to emotion perception with emotion word knowledge. We present 2 studies that together support a role for emotion concepts in the formation of visual percepts of emotion. As predicted, we found that perceptual priming of emotional faces (e.g., a scowling face) was disrupted when the accessibility of a relevant emotion word (e.g., anger) was temporarily reduced, demonstrating that the exact same face was encoded differently when a word was accessible versus when it was not. The implications of these findings for a linguistically relative view of emotion perception are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Nurses' perceptions of patient rounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Kathleen; Lake, Kristen; LeMunyon, Danielle; Paul, Darilyn; Whitmore, Karen

    2012-02-01

    This descriptive pilot study explored hospital staff nurses' perceptions toward the practice of patient rounding. Rounding has re-emerged as a standard practice initiative among nurses in hospitals and has been associated with a decrease in call lights and falls, increased patient satisfaction and safety, and quieter nursing units. Regardless of these outcomes, controversy exists among nurses regarding rounding. The Nurses' Perception of Patient Rounding Scale (K. Neville, unpublished manuscript, 2010) was developed to gain an understanding of nurses' perceptions of rounding. Nurses identified rounding as valuable and perceived hourly rounding to be beneficial to patients and families but significantly less beneficial to their own professional practice. Challenges to rounding as a practice include issues of documentation, patient ratios, and skill mix. Findings support the need for further research to address the challenges of patient rounding for nursing.

  2. Emotion Words Shape Emotion Percepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Maria; Lindquist, Kristen A.; Barsalou, Lawrence; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2015-01-01

    People believe they see emotion written on the faces of other people. In an instant, simple facial actions are transformed into information about another's emotional state. The present research examined whether a perceiver unknowingly contributes to emotion perception with emotion word knowledge. We present 2 studies that together support a role for emotion concepts in the formation of visual percepts of emotion. As predicted, we found that perceptual priming of emotional faces (e.g., a scowling face) was disrupted when the accessibility of a relevant emotion word (e.g., anger) was temporarily reduced, demonstrating that the exact same face was encoded differently when a word was accessible versus when it was not. The implications of these findings for a linguistically relative view of emotion perception are discussed. PMID:22309717

  3. The Philadelphia Face Perception Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Amy; Lawler, Kathy; Olson, Ingrid R; Aguirre, Geoffrey K

    2008-01-01

    The Philadelphia Face Perception Battery (PFPB) tests four aspects of face perception: discrimination of facial similarity, attractiveness, gender, and age. Calibration with 116 neurologically intact subjects yielded average performance of ~90%. Across subjects, there was a low correlation (perception. There were modest effects of subject demographic factors upon performance, and test-retest reliability scores (between 0.37 and 0.75) were comparable to other neuropsychological batteries. Modification of the stimuli to obscure internal facial features lowered performance on the age, gender, and attractiveness discrimination tests between 2 and 4 standard deviations. The clinical sensitivity of the battery was demonstrated by testing a patient with acquired prosopagnosia. She showed performance impairments of between 2 and 4 standard deviations on all sub-tests. The PFPB is freely available for non-commercial use. PMID:18082362

  4. Effect of Substrate Permittivity and Thickness on Performance of Single-Layer, Wideband, U-Slot Antennas on Microwave Substrates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Natarajan, V; Chatterjee, D

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents effects of substrate permittivity and thickness on the performance characteristics like impedance bandwidth, radiation efficiency and gain of a single-layer, wideband, U-slot antenna...

  5. [Time perceptions and representations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordjman, S

    2015-09-01

    Representations of time and time measurements depend on subjective constructs that vary according to changes in our concepts, beliefs, societal needs and technical advances. Similarly, the past, the future and the present are subjective representations that depend on each individual's psychic time and biological time. Therefore, there is no single, one-size-fits-all time for everyone, but rather a different, subjective time for each individual. We need to acknowledge the existence of different inter-individual times but also intra-individual times, to which different functions and different rhythms are attached, depending on the system of reference. However, the construction of these time perceptions and representations is influenced by objective factors (physiological, physical and cognitive) related to neuroscience which will be presented and discussed in this article. Thus, studying representation and perception of time lies at the crossroads between neuroscience, human sciences and philosophy. Furthermore, it is possible to identify several constants among the many and various representations of time and their corresponding measures, regardless of the system of time reference. These include the notion of movements repeated in a stable rhythmic pattern involving the recurrence of the same interval of time, which enables us to define units of time of equal and invariable duration. This rhythmicity is also found at a physiological level and contributes through circadian rhythms, in particular the melatonin rhythm, to the existence of a biological time. Alterations of temporality in mental disorders will be also discussed in this article illustrated by certain developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders. In particular, the hypothesis will be developed that children with autism would need to create discontinuity out of continuity through stereotyped behaviors and/or interests. This discontinuity repeated at regular intervals could have been

  6. Idealism and materialism in perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, David; Brown, Dora

    2015-01-01

    Koenderink (2014, Perception, 43, 1-6) has said most Perception readers are deluded, because they believe an 'All Seeing Eye' observes an objective reality. We trace the source of Koenderink's assertion to his metaphysical idealism, and point to two major weaknesses in his position-namely, its dualism and foundationalism. We counter with arguments from modern philosophy of science for the existence of an objective material reality, contrast Koenderink's enactivism to his idealism, and point to ways in which phenomenology and cognitive science are complementary and not mutually exclusive.

  7. Episiotomy: perceptions from adolescent puerperae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziele Figueiredo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify the perception of the teenager puerperas regarding the practice of episiotomy. Methodology. This is a study with qualitative nature developed with 11 teenage puerperas in the Obstetrics Unit of one hospital located in the metropolitan region of São Paulo, Brazil. Results. Teens knew of the existence of episiotomy, but they unaware the reasons for its realization. Pain, discomfort and burning were negative repercussions presented, but most of them believe that assisted procedure in their delivery showing confidence in the professional who carried it out. Conclusion. Adolescents have different perceptions on the practice of the episiotomy, ranging from resignation to outrage.

  8. Autism: tactile perception and emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernon, E; Pry, R; Baghdadli, A

    2007-08-01

    For many years, and especially since Waynbaum and Wallon, psychology and psychopathology have dealt with cognitive perception, but have had little to do with the affective qualities of perception. Our aim was to study the influence of the sensory environment on people with autism. Several experiments were carried out using different forms of tactile stimulation (passive and active subjects). Our data showed specific responses in children with autism and intellectual disability. These children displayed a strong (positive) valence to the stimulation provided. They were very attracted to the stimulation and were excited by it.

  9. Real-time sensing of epithelial cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions by impedance spectroscopy on porous substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, D.; RoyChaudhuri, C.; Pal, D.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized porous silicon (PS) is a common topographical biocompatible substrate that potentially provides a distinct in vitro environment for better understanding of in vivo behavior. But in the reported studies on oxidized PS, cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions have been detected only by fluorescent labeling. This paper is the first attempt to investigate real-time sensing of these interactions on HaCaT cells by label-free impedance spectroscopy on oxidized PS of two pore diameters (50 and 500 nm). One of the major requirements for successful impedance spectroscopy measurement is to restrict the channeling of electric field lines through the pores. To satisfy this criterion, we have designed the pore depths after analyzing the penetration of the medium by using computational fluid dynamics simulation. A distributed electrical model was also developed for estimating the various cellular attributes by considering a pseudorandom distribution of pores. It is observed from the impedance measurements and from the model that the proliferation rate increases for 50 nm pores but decreases for 500 nm pores compared to that for planar substrates. The rate of decrease in cell substrate separation (h) in the initial stage is more than the rate of increase in cell-cell junction resistance (R b ) corresponding to the initial adhesion phase of cells. It is observed that R b and h are higher for 50 nm pores than those for planar substrates, corresponding to the fact that substrates more conducive toward cell adhesion encourage cell-cell interactions than direct cell-substrate interactions. Thus, the impedance spectroscopy coupled with the proposed theoretical framework for PS substrates can sense and quantify the cellular interactions

  10. Substrate deposit effect on the characteristic of an intertidal macroalgal community

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Imchen, T.

    Present study consists the effect of substrate deposit (silt, clay, sand, gravel and shards of shells) on the characteristic of an intertidal rocky shore macroalgae Macroalgal assemblage was segregated from substrate deposit in two stages Substrate...

  11. Visual perception skills testing: preliminary results

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, Andrew C

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Good visual perception skills are important in the effective manipulation of Tangible User Interfaces. This paper reports on the application of a test set researchers have developed specifically to quantify the visual perception skills of children...

  12. Career Appearance Perceptions of Selected University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweat, Sarah; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Investigates perceptions of importance of appearance in job acquisition, retention and promotion among 498 university students. Focuses specifically on the relations between career appearance perceptions and demographic characteristics, university statuses, and current and projected employment situations. (Author/CM)

  13. Dissociating Prediction Failure: Considerations from Music Perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Suzi; Hansen, Niels Christian

    2016-01-01

    Dissociating Prediction Failure: Considerations from Music Perception The Journal of Neuroscience, 16 March 2016, 36(11): 3103-3105;......Dissociating Prediction Failure: Considerations from Music Perception The Journal of Neuroscience, 16 March 2016, 36(11): 3103-3105;...

  14. PERCEPTION OF HOST COMMUNITIES TOWARD THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DORCAS

    PERCEPTION OF HOST COMMUNITIES TOWARD THE IMPLEMENTATION OF. PARK LAWS IN OKOMU NATIONAL ... Keywords; Perception, Host communities, Park laws, Implementation, Wildilife conservation. INTRODUCTION. The contributions ... which were not taken into account at the time these national parks were ...

  15. Gender differences in the perception of crowd perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang eBai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated whether the first impression of a crowd of faces—crowd perception—is influenced by social background and cognitive processing. Specifically, we explored whether males and females, two groups that are distinct biologically and socially, differ in their ability to extract ensemble characteristics from crowds of faces that were comprised of different identities. Participants were presented with crowds of similar faces and were instructed to scroll through a morphed continuum of faces until they found a face that was representative of the average identity of each crowd. Consistent with previous research, females were more precise in single face perception. Furthermore, the results showed that females were generally more accurate in estimating the average identity of a crowd. However, the correlation between single face discrimination and crowd averaging differed between males and females. Specifically, male subjects’ ensemble integration superiority slightly compensated for their poor single face perception; their performance on the crowd perception task was not as poor as would be expected from their single face discrimination ability. Overall, the results suggest that group perception is not an isolated or uniform cognitive mechanism, but rather one that interacts with biological and social processes.

  16. Action and Perception Are Temporally Coupled by a Common Mechanism That Leads to a Timing Misperception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astefanoaei, Corina; Daye, Pierre M.; FitzGibbon, Edmond J.; Creanga, Dorina-Emilia; Rufa, Alessandra; Optican, Lance M.

    2015-01-01

    We move our eyes to explore the world, but visual areas determining where to look next (action) are different from those determining what we are seeing (perception). Whether, or how, action and perception are temporally coordinated is not known. The preparation time course of an action (e.g., a saccade) has been widely studied with the gap/overlap paradigm with temporal asynchronies (TA) between peripheral target onset and fixation point offset (gap, synchronous, or overlap). However, whether the subjects perceive the gap or overlap, and when they perceive it, has not been studied. We adapted the gap/overlap paradigm to study the temporal coupling of action and perception. Human subjects made saccades to targets with different TAs with respect to fixation point offset and reported whether they perceived the stimuli as separated by a gap or overlapped in time. Both saccadic and perceptual report reaction times changed in the same way as a function of TA. The TA dependencies of the time change for action and perception were very similar, suggesting a common neural substrate. Unexpectedly, in the perceptual task, subjects misperceived lights overlapping by less than ∼100 ms as separated in time (overlap seen as gap). We present an attention-perception model with a map of prominence in the superior colliculus that modulates the stimulus signal's effectiveness in the action and perception pathways. This common source of modulation determines how competition between stimuli is resolved, causes the TA dependence of action and perception to be the same, and causes the misperception. PMID:25632126

  17. Illness perceptions in patients with fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Van Ittersum, M. W.; van Wilgen, C. P.; Hilberdink, W. K. H. A.; Groothoff, J. W.; van der Schans, C. P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Former studies in chronic diseases showed the importance of patients' beliefs and perceptions. The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire was developed to assess these illness perceptions. Our goal was to investigate psychometric properties of the IPQ-R for Fibromyalgia Dutch language version (IPQ-R FM-Dlv) and to describe illness perceptions of participants with FM. Methods: 196 patients completed the IPQ-R FM-Dlv. Internal consistency, domain structure and inter domain correlat...

  18. Precise micropatterning of silver nanoparticles on plastic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammosova, Lena; Jiang, Yu; Suvanto, Mika; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Silver ink has been deposited on plastic substrate and silver nanoparticles have been produced. • 3D control allows both ink superimposing and deposition on complicated surfaces. • Polyol method ensures the formation of metallic mircopatterns with high uniformity. • Substrate wettability, ink volume, and sintering temperature influences deposited patterns. - Abstract: Conventional fabrication methods to obtain metal patterns on polymer substrates are restricted by high operating temperature and complex preparation steps. The present study demonstrates a simple yet versatile method for preparation of silver nanoparticle micropatterns on polymer substrates with various surface geometry. With the microworking robot technique, we were able not only to directly structure the surface, but also precisely deposit silver nanoparticle ink on the desired surface location with the minimum usage of ink material. The prepared silver nanoparticle ink, containing silver cations and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a reducing agent, yields silver nanoparticle micropatterns on plastic substrates at low sintering temperature without any contamination. The influence of the ink behaviour was studied, such as substrate wettability, ink volume, and sintering temperature. The ultraviolet visible (UV–vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurements revealed the formation of micropatterns with uniformly distributed silver nanoparticles. The prepared patterns are expected to have a broad range of applications in optics, medicine, and sensor devices owing to the unique properties of silver. Furthermore, the deposition of a chemical compound, which is different from the substrate material, not only adds a fourth dimension to the prestructured three-dimensional (3D) surfaces, but also opens new application areas to the conventional surface structures.

  19. Precise micropatterning of silver nanoparticles on plastic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammosova, Lena; Jiang, Yu; Suvanto, Mika; Pakkanen, Tapani A., E-mail: tapani.pakkanen@uef.fi

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Silver ink has been deposited on plastic substrate and silver nanoparticles have been produced. • 3D control allows both ink superimposing and deposition on complicated surfaces. • Polyol method ensures the formation of metallic mircopatterns with high uniformity. • Substrate wettability, ink volume, and sintering temperature influences deposited patterns. - Abstract: Conventional fabrication methods to obtain metal patterns on polymer substrates are restricted by high operating temperature and complex preparation steps. The present study demonstrates a simple yet versatile method for preparation of silver nanoparticle micropatterns on polymer substrates with various surface geometry. With the microworking robot technique, we were able not only to directly structure the surface, but also precisely deposit silver nanoparticle ink on the desired surface location with the minimum usage of ink material. The prepared silver nanoparticle ink, containing silver cations and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a reducing agent, yields silver nanoparticle micropatterns on plastic substrates at low sintering temperature without any contamination. The influence of the ink behaviour was studied, such as substrate wettability, ink volume, and sintering temperature. The ultraviolet visible (UV–vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurements revealed the formation of micropatterns with uniformly distributed silver nanoparticles. The prepared patterns are expected to have a broad range of applications in optics, medicine, and sensor devices owing to the unique properties of silver. Furthermore, the deposition of a chemical compound, which is different from the substrate material, not only adds a fourth dimension to the prestructured three-dimensional (3D) surfaces, but also opens new application areas to the conventional surface structures.

  20. TRIBOLOGY OF BIO-INSPIRED NANOWRINKLED FILMS ON ULTRASOFT SUBSTRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juergen M. Lackner

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetic design of new materials uses nature as antetype, learning from billions of years of evolution. This work emphasizes the mechanical and tribological properties of skin, combining both hardness and wear resistance of its surface (the stratum corneum with high elasticity of the bulk (epidermis, dermis, hypodermis. The key for combination of such opposite properties is wrinkling, being consequence of intrinsic stresses in the bulk (soft tissue: Tribological contact to counterparts below the stress threshold for tissue trauma occurs on the thick hard stratum corneum layer pads, while tensile loads smooth out wrinkles in between these pads. Similar mechanism offers high tribological resistance to hard films on soft, flexible polymers, which is shown for diamond-like carbon (DLC and titanium nitride thin films on ultrasoft polyurethane and harder polycarbonate substrates. The choice of these two compared substrate materials will show that ultra-soft substrate materials are decisive for the distinct tribological material. Hierarchical wrinkled structures of films on these substrates are due to high intrinsic compressive stress, which evolves during high energetic film growth. Incremental relaxation of these stresses occurs by compound deformation of film and elastic substrate surface, appearing in hierarchical nano-wrinkles. Nano-wrinkled topographies enable high elastic deformability of thin hard films, while overstressing results in zigzag film fracture along larger hierarchical wrinkle structures. Tribologically, these fracture mechanisms are highly important for ploughing and sliding of sharp and flat counterparts on hard-coated ultra-soft substrates like polyurethane. Concentration of polyurethane deformation under the applied normal loads occurs below these zigzag cracks. Unloading closes these cracks again. Even cyclic testing do not lead to film delamination and retain low friction behavior, if the adhesion to the substrate is high

  1. Determinants and Prediction of Esterase Substrate Promiscuity Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Coscolín, Cristina; Santiago, Gerard; Chow, Jennifer; Stogios, Peter J; Bargiela, Rafael; Gertler, Christoph; Navarro-Fernández, José; Bollinger, Alexander; Thies, Stephan; Méndez-García, Celia; Popovic, Ana; Brown, Greg; Chernikova, Tatyana N; García-Moyano, Antonio; Bjerga, Gro E K; Pérez-García, Pablo; Hai, Tran; Del Pozo, Mercedes V; Stokke, Runar; Steen, Ida H; Cui, Hong; Xu, Xiaohui; Nocek, Boguslaw P; Alcaide, María; Distaso, Marco; Mesa, Victoria; Peláez, Ana I; Sánchez, Jesús; Buchholz, Patrick C F; Pleiss, Jürgen; Fernández-Guerra, Antonio; Glöckner, Frank O; Golyshina, Olga V; Yakimov, Michail M; Savchenko, Alexei; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Yakunin, Alexander F; Streit, Wolfgang R; Golyshin, Peter N; Guallar, Víctor; Ferrer, Manuel; The Inmare Consortium

    2018-01-19

    Esterases receive special attention because of their wide distribution in biological systems and environments and their importance for physiology and chemical synthesis. The prediction of esterases' substrate promiscuity level from sequence data and the molecular reasons why certain such enzymes are more promiscuous than others remain to be elucidated. This limits the surveillance of the sequence space for esterases potentially leading to new versatile biocatalysts and new insights into their role in cellular function. Here, we performed an extensive analysis of the substrate spectra of 145 phylogenetically and environmentally diverse microbial esterases, when tested with 96 diverse esters. We determined the primary factors shaping their substrate range by analyzing substrate range patterns in combination with structural analysis and protein-ligand simulations. We found a structural parameter that helps rank (classify) the promiscuity level of esterases from sequence data at 94% accuracy. This parameter, the active site effective volume, exemplifies the topology of the catalytic environment by measuring the active site cavity volume corrected by the relative solvent accessible surface area (SASA) of the catalytic triad. Sequences encoding esterases with active site effective volumes (cavity volume/SASA) above a threshold show greater substrate spectra, which can be further extended in combination with phylogenetic data. This measure provides also a valuable tool for interrogating substrates capable of being converted. This measure, found to be transferred to phosphatases of the haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase superfamily and possibly other enzymatic systems, represents a powerful tool for low-cost bioprospecting for esterases with broad substrate ranges, in large scale sequence data sets.

  2. Tribology of bio-inspired nanowrinkled films on ultrasoft substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Juergen M; Waldhauser, Wolfgang; Major, Lukasz; Teichert, Christian; Hartmann, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Biomimetic design of new materials uses nature as antetype, learning from billions of years of evolution. This work emphasizes the mechanical and tribological properties of skin, combining both hardness and wear resistance of its surface (the stratum corneum) with high elasticity of the bulk (epidermis, dermis, hypodermis). The key for combination of such opposite properties is wrinkling, being consequence of intrinsic stresses in the bulk (soft tissue): Tribological contact to counterparts below the stress threshold for tissue trauma occurs on the thick hard stratum corneum layer pads, while tensile loads smooth out wrinkles in between these pads. Similar mechanism offers high tribological resistance to hard films on soft, flexible polymers, which is shown for diamond-like carbon (DLC) and titanium nitride thin films on ultrasoft polyurethane and harder polycarbonate substrates. The choice of these two compared substrate materials will show that ultra-soft substrate materials are decisive for the distinct tribological material. Hierarchical wrinkled structures of films on these substrates are due to high intrinsic compressive stress, which evolves during high energetic film growth. Incremental relaxation of these stresses occurs by compound deformation of film and elastic substrate surface, appearing in hierarchical nano-wrinkles. Nano-wrinkled topographies enable high elastic deformability of thin hard films, while overstressing results in zigzag film fracture along larger hierarchical wrinkle structures. Tribologically, these fracture mechanisms are highly important for ploughing and sliding of sharp and flat counterparts on hard-coated ultra-soft substrates like polyurethane. Concentration of polyurethane deformation under the applied normal loads occurs below these zigzag cracks. Unloading closes these cracks again. Even cyclic testing do not lead to film delamination and retain low friction behavior, if the adhesion to the substrate is high and the initial

  3. Exploring Risk Perceptions of Emerging Infectious Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. de Zwart (Onno)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is about risk perception of infectious diseases, with a special focus on the emerging infections SARS and avian influenza, and explores potential determinants of risk perception and the relation of risk perception with precautionary behaviours. In this first chapter I discuss

  4. Illness perceptions in patients with fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ittersum, M.W.; van Wilgen, C.P.; Hilberdink, W.K.; Groothoff, J.W.; van der Schans, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Former studies in chronic diseases showed the importance of patients' beliefs and perceptions. The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire was developed to assess these illness perceptions. Our goal was to investigate psychometric properties of the IPQ-R for Fibromyalgia Dutch language

  5. Illness perceptions in patients with fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ittersum, M. W.; van Wilgen, C. P.; Hilberdink, W. K. H. A.; Groothoff, J. W.; van der Schans, C. P.

    Objective: Former studies in chronic diseases showed the importance of patients' beliefs and perceptions. The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire was developed to assess these illness perceptions. Our goal was to investigate psychometric properties of the IPQ-R for Fibromyalgia Dutch language

  6. Community College Students: Perceptions and Paradoxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporrimo, Rosaria

    2008-01-01

    This article explores perceptions of community college students and their characteristics, focusing on issues of responsibility, perceptions of self and others, personal experiences, and academic preparedness relative to community college status. A brief survey was developed to measure these perceptions in both community college and 4-year/senior…

  7. Perception of agricultural biotechnology among farmers, journalists ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to establish the perception of farmers, journalists and scientists of genetically-modified (GM) crops in Tanzania. Its specific objectives were to determine the perception of GM Crops among farmers, journalists and scientists in Tanzania, and to determine the factors that influence their perception.

  8. Light alloys as substrate material for bipolar plates; Leichtmetall-Legierungen als Substrat fuer Bipolarplatten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicke, R. [PSFU GmbH, Wernigerode (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Light alloys as substrate material for bipolar plates in fuel cells offer a number of advantages compared to stainless steel sheets. First, the specific weight is smaller, costs are lower, but also bulk properties like thermal and electric conductivities are much better than in the case of stainless steel. Regarding graphite polymer composite materials, the electric conductivity of light alloys again is much higher leading to a considerably lower internal resistance of the cells. Metal sheets, in general, are more attractive with respect to building up compact stacks with high power densities since metal sheets can be produced easily down to thicknesses of around 0.1 mm, whereby graphite composite materials most often have a thickness of at least around 2 mm. In addition, the economics of using light alloys as bipolar plate material is advantageous also for small and medium quantities of production (for instance making use of photochemical etching), but also for high volume production where both conventional techniques like stamping and also more advanced processes like hydroforming can be employed. A major challenge is the identification and technological control and improvement of surface modification / coating processes which lead to low ohmic contact resistances and a good corrosion protection under the electrochemical conditions within a fuel cell environment. Different coating technologies and the characteristics of several coatings will be discussed. (orig.)

  9. Neural substrates for semantic memory of familiar songs: is there an interface between lyrics and melodies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoko; Ishii, Kenji; Sakuma, Naoko; Kawasaki, Keiichi; Oda, Keiichi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    Findings on song perception and song production have increasingly suggested that common but partially distinct neural networks exist for processing lyrics and melody. However, the neural substrates of song recognition remain to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the neural substrates involved in the accessing "song lexicon" as corresponding to a representational system that might provide links between the musical and phonological lexicons using positron emission tomography (PET). We exposed participants to auditory stimuli consisting of familiar and unfamiliar songs presented in three ways: sung lyrics (song), sung lyrics on a single pitch (lyrics), and the sung syllable 'la' on original pitches (melody). The auditory stimuli were designed to have equivalent familiarity to participants, and they were recorded at exactly the same tempo. Eleven right-handed nonmusicians participated in four conditions: three familiarity decision tasks using song, lyrics, and melody and a sound type decision task (control) that was designed to engage perceptual and prelexical processing but not lexical processing. The contrasts (familiarity decision tasks versus control) showed no common areas of activation between lyrics and melody. This result indicates that essentially separate neural networks exist in semantic memory for the verbal and melodic processing of familiar songs. Verbal lexical processing recruited the left fusiform gyrus and the left inferior occipital gyrus, whereas melodic lexical processing engaged the right middle temporal sulcus and the bilateral temporo-occipital cortices. Moreover, we found that song specifically activated the left posterior inferior temporal cortex, which may serve as an interface between verbal and musical representations in order to facilitate song recognition.

  10. Neural substrates for semantic memory of familiar songs: is there an interface between lyrics and melodies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Saito

    Full Text Available Findings on song perception and song production have increasingly suggested that common but partially distinct neural networks exist for processing lyrics and melody. However, the neural substrates of song recognition remain to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the neural substrates involved in the accessing "song lexicon" as corresponding to a representational system that might provide links between the musical and phonological lexicons using positron emission tomography (PET. We exposed participants to auditory stimuli consisting of familiar and unfamiliar songs presented in three ways: sung lyrics (song, sung lyrics on a single pitch (lyrics, and the sung syllable 'la' on original pitches (melody. The auditory stimuli were designed to have equivalent familiarity to participants, and they were recorded at exactly the same tempo. Eleven right-handed nonmusicians participated in four conditions: three familiarity decision tasks using song, lyrics, and melody and a sound type decision task (control that was designed to engage perceptual and prelexical processing but not lexical processing. The contrasts (familiarity decision tasks versus control showed no common areas of activation between lyrics and melody. This result indicates that essentially separate neural networks exist in semantic memory for the verbal and melodic processing of familiar songs. Verbal lexical processing recruited the left fusiform gyrus and the left inferior occipital gyrus, whereas melodic lexical processing engaged the right middle temporal sulcus and the bilateral temporo-occipital cortices. Moreover, we found that song specifically activated the left posterior inferior temporal cortex, which may serve as an interface between verbal and musical representations in order to facilitate song recognition.

  11. The Perception-Action Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Thor

    2017-01-01

    Milner and Goodale’s Two Visual Systems Hypothesis (TVSH) is regarded as common ground in recent discussions of visual consciousness. A central part of TVSH is a functional model of vision and action (a functional perception-action model, PAM for short). In this paper, I provide a brief overview ...

  12. Assertive behavior: advantages and perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheinov V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this information-analytical paper analyzes and summarizes the results of all available international research and assertiveness assertive behavior relating to the identification of their strengths and the perception of these phenomena in society. Are some suggestions for overcoming the problems detected.

  13. Student Perceptions of Computerized Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino-Silva, Juan

    2008-01-01

    The challenge to test small groups by means of microcomputers demands appropriate software design and sound test design. To comply with this demand, students' beliefs or perceptions on the advantages and disadvantages of a computerized test were tapped. Overall, self-reported advantages outnumbered disadvantages to a significant degree. This was…

  14. Perceptions of the Third Sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, R.H.F.P.; Brink Lund, A.

    2014-01-01

    How do citizens in Europe view third sector organizations? How can differences in perceptions of the third sector among citizens in Europe be explained? And how is the third sector assessed therein with regard to its contribution to social innovation? Based on the limited scope of the evidence

  15. Risk perception in western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeberg, Lennart

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes empirical work on risk perception and some related dimensions, in particular with regard to radiation and nuclear power hazards. Most of the data cited come from a current CEC project in which 5 countries in Western Europe have participated. Models of risk perception are discussed and some generally valid findings concerning risk perception are summarized. Risk is seen to be a primary factor in many policy matters and clearly, to the public, more important than utility considerations. Previously formulated models (the Psychometric Model and Cultural Theory) are found to be deficient and a much more efficient alternative is suggested. It is stressed that risk perception is of interest foremost because it can be of value to decision makers in making difficult policy decisions in matters of risk. Hence, it is important to ask what facets of perceived risk are most strongly related to demand for risk mitigation. It is found that expected severity of consequences of an hazard is the clearly most important dimension. The paper concludes with a brief summary of a case study of Swedish experience with high-level nuclear waste repository siting

  16. Gender and Perception of Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Fatma; Tarhan, Sinem; Köksal, Eda Çürükvelioglu

    2018-01-01

    There are negative impacts of gender stereotypes particularly on the education of girls and women. The purpose of this study is to examine pre-service teachers' profession perceptions within the context of gender using word association test technique and to identify the definition of the concept of "profession" depending on sex. This…

  17. Relating particles and texture perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, L.; Wijk, de R.A.; Bilt, van der A.; Prinz, J.F.; Janssen, A.M.; Bosman, F.

    2005-01-01

    Practically all foods contain particles. It has been suggested that the presence of particles in food may affect the perception of sensory attributes. In the present study we investigated the effect of size and type (hardness and shape) of particles added to a CMC based vanilla custard dessert. The

  18. Attentional episodes in visual perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wyble, Brad; Potter, Mary C.; Bowman, Howard; Nieuwenstein, Mark

    Is one's temporal perception of the world truly as seamless as it appears? This article presents a computationally motivated theory suggesting that visual attention samples information from temporal episodes (episodic simultaneous type/serial token model; Wyble, Bowman, & Nieuwenstein, 2009). Breaks

  19. Memory and Perception: Remembering Snowflake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi FERNÁNDEZ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Memories have the power to elicit certain beliefs in us. These are beliefs about time and beliefs about perception. The aim of this paper is to propose a notion of mnemonic content that can account for the rationality of forming those beliefs on the basis of our memories.

  20. Perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, James F.; Maynard, William S.

    1975-01-01

    This study investigated the possible implications of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) for employee expectations and satisfactions. Specifically, interest centered on the question of how perceptions of an organization's involvement in the resolution of current societal problems might relate to members' expectations of equitable job rewards and…

  1. The perception of small crime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douhou, S.; Magnus, J.R.; van Soest, A.H.O.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we measure perceptions of incorrect behavior or ‘small crime’, based on a questionnaire administered to a large representative sample from the Dutch population. In the questionnaire we ask the respondents to rate the severity or justifiability of a number of small crimes. We present

  2. Subcultural Influences on Person Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Asia; Waggoner, Ashley S.

    2010-01-01

    Cognition offers a natural setting for the intersection of the research interests of both sociologists and psychologists. The study of cultural influences on automatic processing highlights the shared interests of social psychologists from both disciplines. In particular, the examination of subcultural differences in person perception is a…

  3. Perception of naturalness in textiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overvliet, Krista E.; Karana, Elvin; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    In many daily contexts, we prefer natural 'materials' over un-natural ones. Textiles embodied in garments that are worn on the body all day, or in bed sheets slept under every night touch us literally, on a daily basis. Hence among all other materials, 'naturalness perception' has a strong impact on

  4. Student Perceptions of Classroom Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamlem, Siv M.; Smith, Kari

    2013-01-01

    Feedback to students has been identified as a key strategy in learning and teaching, but we know less about how feedback is understood by students. The purpose of this study is to gain more insight into lower secondary students' perceptions of when and how they find classroom feedback useful. This article draws on data generated through individual…

  5. Students' perception of the teaching

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    ABSTRACT. Plant and machinery valuation is an important aspect of valuation which is taught within the Estate Management and Valuation curriculum in Nigerian universities. This study examined the perception of students towards the teaching and learning of plant and machinery valuation in a typical Nigerian university.

  6. Colloidal aspects of texture perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van T.

    2010-01-01

    The perception of complex textures in food is strongly related to the way food is processed during eating, and is modulated by other basic characteristics, such as taste and aroma. An understanding at the colloidal level of the basic processes in the mouth is essential in order to link the

  7. Gender differences in crowd perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Leib, Allison Y.; Puri, Amrita M.; Whitney, David; Peng, Kaiping

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether the first impression of a crowd of faces—crowd perception—is influenced by social background and cognitive processing. Specifically, we explored whether males and females, two groups that are distinct biologically and socially, differ in their ability to extract ensemble characteristics from crowds of faces that were comprised of different identities. Participants were presented with crowds of similar faces and were instructed to scroll through a morphed continuum of faces until they found a face that was representative of the average identity of each crowd. Consistent with previous research, females were more precise in single face perception. Furthermore, the results showed that females were generally more accurate in estimating the average identity of a crowd. However, the correlation between single face discrimination and crowd averaging differed between males and females. Specifically, male subjects' ensemble integration slightly compensated for their poor single face perception; their performance on the crowd perception task was not as poor as would be expected from their single face discrimination ability. Overall, the results suggest that group perception is not an isolated or uniform cognitive mechanism, but rather one that interacts with biological and social processes. PMID:26388805

  8. Children's Perceptions of Gender Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christia Spears; Bigler, Rebecca S.

    2004-01-01

    Children (N = 76; ages 5-10 years) participated in a study designed to examine perceptions of gender discrimination. Children were read scenarios in which a teacher determined outcomes for 2 students (1 boy and 1 girl). Contextual information (i.e., teacher's past behavior), the gender of the target of discrimination (i.e., student), and the…

  9. Lubrication and perception of foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Food structure is determined by its composition and the interaction between the compositional or structural elements. Both food structure and the texture perception of foods undergo dynamic changes during different phases of oral processing. During oral

  10. Ethical perception of modern biotechnology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-30

    Sep 30, 2011 ... 3Faculty of Education, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia. Accepted 12 ... the Klang Valley region of Malaysia and to compare their ethical perception across several demographic .... sample size required for each statistical analysis was considered. Comparison of ...

  11. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, Jacob Dirk; Thomas, Tom; van Berkum, Eric C.; van Arem, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against non-

  12. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, Jacob Dirk; Thomas, Tom; van Berkum, Eric C.; van Arem, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against

  13. Nuclear waste - perceptions and realities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, D.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses the complex scientific, sociological, political and emotive aspects of nuclear waste. The public perception of the hazards and risks, to present and future generations, in the management of nuclear wastes are highlighted. The cost of nuclear waste management to socially acceptable and technically achievable standards is discussed. (UK)

  14. School Counselors' Perceptions of Cyberbullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kathy D.

    2010-01-01

    This was a qualitative study which examined school counselors' perceptions of cyberbullying. Thirty-two school counselors were asked seven reflection questions in regards to their experiences, roles/responsibilities, concerns, challenges and recommendations in handling cyberbullying occurrences with students. From the data analysis, three…

  15. Visual art and visual perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    Visual art and visual perception ‘Visual art’ has become a minor cul-de-sac orthogonal to THE ART of the museum directors and billionaire collectors. THE ART is conceptual, instead of visual. Among its cherished items are the tins of artist’s shit (Piero Manzoni, 1961, Merda d’Artista) “worth their

  16. Adolescents' Perceptions of their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Leonard; Luchterhand, Elmer

    1977-01-01

    Resource theory predicts a negative change in perception of parents by youth as they advance through high school. This theory was tested as 1820 inner city youth answered 54 items comprising four factors: Parental Permissiveness, Seeking Parental Advice, Family Estrangement and Family Disagreement. (Editor/RK)

  17. Biological motion distorts size perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veto, Peter; Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Troje, Nikolaus F.

    2017-02-01

    Visual illusions explore the limits of sensory processing and provide an ideal testbed to study perception. Size illusions - stimuli whose size is consistently misperceived - do not only result from sensory cues, but can also be induced by cognitive factors, such as social status. Here we investigate, whether the ecological relevance of biological motion can also distort perceived size. We asked observers to judge the size of point-light walkers (PLWs), configurations of dots whose movements induce the perception of human movement, and visually matched control stimuli (inverted PLWs). We find that upright PLWs are consistently judged as larger than inverted PLWs, while static point-light figures do not elicit the same effect. We also show the phenomenon using an indirect paradigm: observers judged the relative size of a disc that followed an inverted PLW larger than a disc following an upright PLW. We interpret this as a contrast effect: The upright PLW is perceived larger and thus the subsequent disc is judged smaller. Together, these results demonstrate that ecologically relevant biological-motion stimuli are perceived larger than visually matched control stimuli. Our findings present a novel case of illusory size perception, where ecological importance leads to a distorted perception of size.

  18. Language Learners' Perceptions of Accent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Julie; Wennerstrom, Ann; Richard, Dara; Wu, Su Hui

    2006-01-01

    This study analyzed the accent perceptions of a group of 37 English language learners and 10 American undergraduate students. Each subject listened to a one-minute passage read by four speakers with different accents of English: General American, British English, Chinese English, and Mexican English. Participants then attempted to identify the…

  19. Graduates: Perceptions of MBA Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bledsoe, Maynard T.; Oatsvall, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    MBA worth--who decides? Much of the current assessment comes from market driven and/or institutional perspectives. This research examines responses from Meredith College MBA graduates to determine their perceptions of the worth and value of their MBA experience.

  20. Colloidal aspects of texture perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, T. van; Aken, G.A. van; Jongh, H.H.J. de; Hamer, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, considerable attention has been given to the understanding of texture attributes that cannot directly be related to physical properties of food, such as creamy, crumbly and watery. The perception of these attributes is strongly related to the way the food is processed during food intake,

  1. In search of natural substrates and inhibitors of MDR pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, K

    2001-04-01

    The function of microbial MDRs remains a hotly debated subject. Given the very broad substrate specificities of some MDRs, like the RND pumps that can extrude all classes of amphipathic compounds (cationic, neutral, and anionic), it seems difficult to develop a rationale for pinpointing possible natural substrates of these translocases. At the same time, several clues can be used to guide our search for natural MDR substrates. One is the fact that amphipathic cations appear to be the preferred substrates of MDRs. These substances are extruded by MDRs of all 5 known families and are the almost exclusive substrates of SMR and MF family MDRs. The universal nature of amphipathic cations as MDR substrates suggests that these were the substances that fueled the evolution of MDR pumps. Two factors apparently favored this particular class of molecules for the role of original MDR substrates--need and opportunity. Unlike other substances, amphipathic cations accumulate in the cell driven by the membrane potential, which makes cations potentially the most dangerous toxins. At the same time, amphipathic cations are highly hydrated and do not permeate the membrane as readily as neutral compounds, making it feasible to design a defense based on an efflux pump. The paucity of known cationic (non-basic) antimicrobials might be a result of using MDR-expressing microbial cells for antibiotic discovery. Plant amphipathic cations, the berberine alkaloids, are good MDR substrates. The Berberis plants produce 5'-methoxyhydnocarpin-D, an MDR inhibitor that potentiates the action of berberine. It is suggested that the further evolution of MDR pumps was determined largely by the barrier function of the membrane they reside in. Thus Gram negative bacteria have an outer membrane barrier that slows the penetration of virtually all amphipathic molecules, and transenvelope MDRs of the RND and EmrAB-type extrude their substrates across this barrier. A low permeability of the cytoplasmic

  2. Methanogens in hypersaline environments and their substrates for methane production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, J. A.; Kelley, C. A.; Chanton, J.; Tazaz, A.; Bebout, B.

    2009-12-01

    The goal of our study was to determine the dominant substrates being used by methanogens in salt ponds in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. These are extreme environments that have been used as analogs for ancient life, terrestrial and extraterrestrial. Microbial mat and/or sediments from the ponds, amended either with site water only (controls) or with site water and various substrates, were incubated in N2 flushed serum vials. We hypothesized that trimethylamine, a degradation product of the osmoregulant glycine betaine, would be a dominant substrate in all ponds, as has been previously reported. Additionally we incubated with methanol, dimethylsulfide, monomethylamine, bicarbonate, and acetate, all reported to be substrates of great importance in other hypersaline environments. Concentrations of methane in the vial headspaces were monitored through time to obtain methane production rates. As expected, trimethylamine stimulated methane production over the controls in all incubations. Dimethylsulfide and methanol also stimulated methane production; the former increased methane production in the lowest salinity pond (55 ppt salinity) and the latter at one of the highest salinity ponds (184 ppt salinity). In addition to methane production data, stable carbon isotopic values of the methane in methane-rich bubbles collected at the sites as well as in the particulate organic carbon (POC) of the microbial mat/sediment were obtained. Fractionation factors, a measure of the isotopic differences between methane and substrate, can help indicate dominant substrates. Published fractionation factors differ depending on the substrate used and increase in the following order of use by methanogens: acetate, dimethylsulfide, CO2 reduction/trimethylamine and methanol. Since trimethylamine was used as a substrate at all of these sites, high fractionation factors in the range of 1.05 to 1.07 (the published range for trimethylamine) were expected. However, the apparent

  3. Hot Films on Ceramic Substrates for Measuring Skin Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noffz, Greg; Leiser, Daniel; Bartlett, Jim; Lavine, Adrienne

    2003-01-01

    Hot-film sensors, consisting of a metallic film on an electrically nonconductive substrate, have been used to measure skin friction as far back as 1931. A hot film is maintained at an elevated temperature relative to the local flow by passing an electrical current through it. The power required to maintain the specified temperature depends on the rate at which heat is transferred to the flow. The heat transfer rate correlates to the velocity gradient at the surface, and hence, with skin friction. The hot-film skin friction measurement method is most thoroughly developed for steady-state conditions, but additional issues arise under transient conditions. Fabricating hot-film substrates using low-thermal-conductivity ceramics can offer advantages over traditional quartz or polyester-film substrates. First, a low conductivity substrate increases the fraction of heat convected away by the fluid, thus increasing sensitivity to changes in flow conditions. Furthermore, the two-part, composite nature of the substrate allows the installation of thermocouple junctions just below the hot film, which can provide an estimate of the conduction heat loss.

  4. Gecko Adhesion on Wet and Dry Patterned Substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Y Stark

    Full Text Available Perhaps one of the most astounding characteristics of the gecko adhesive system is its versatility. Geckos can locomote across complex substrates in a variety of conditions with apparent ease. In contrast, many of our synthetic pressure sensitive adhesives fail on substrates that are dirty, wet or rough. Although many studies have investigated the effect of environmental challenges on performance, the interaction of multiple, potentially compromising variables is studied less often. Here we focus on substrate structure and surface water, both of which are highly relevant to the biological system and to synthetic design. To do this we utilized a highly controlled, patterned substrate (Sharklet®, by Sharklet® Technologies Inc.. This allowed us to test independently and jointly the effects of reduced surface area substrates, with a defined pattern, on adhesion in both air and water. Our results show that adhesion is not significantly impaired in air, whereas surface area and pattern significantly affect adhesion in water. These findings highlight the need to study multiple parameters that are relevant to the gecko adhesive system to further improve our understanding of the biological system and to design better, more versatile synthetics.

  5. Waste use as substrate to yield guava seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Odemir Salvador

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The guava tree (Psidium guajava L., considered a rustic plant, can be found growing naturally in low-fertility soils. However, when commercially cultivated it needs considerable amounts of fertilizers and soil correctives to attain good yields. These special measures for cultivation start with choice of a suitable substrate to grow good-quality seedlings, allowing them to reach their full productive potential. The aim of this work was to study the effect of different substrates (S1 – soil, S2 – vermiculite+soil+fine sand, S3 – cattle manure+soil+fine sand, S4 – commercial substrate+soil+fine sand, S5 – urban compost+soil+fine sand, S6 – sewage sludge+soil+fine sand, S7 – earthworm compost+soil+fine sand, S8 – chopped sugarcane bagasse+soil+fine sand, and S9 – sugarcane filter cake+soil+fine sand in completely randomized design with four replicates on the development and nutritional state of guava seedlings. The result showed that the best substrates were vermiculite+soil+fine sand; earthworm compost+soil+fine sand; sugarcane bagasse+soil+fine sand, and filter cake+soil+fine sand. The use of sewage sludge and urban trash compost should be further studied for the composition of substrates.

  6. Microbial activity measurements by means of tritium-labelled substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, H.G.

    1979-01-01

    Two improved methods to determine microbial activity at nearly in situ conditions are reported. The first is valid for the identification of active bacteria metabolizing on easily degradable organic compounds by means of 3 H-micro-autoradiography. The second method provides reliable uptake rates of 3 H-substrates with one substrate concentration added to the sample. Uptake velocities were calculated from the Lineweaver-Burke equation. Measurements of active bacterial numbers and biomass as well as heterotrophic activities obtained by applying these methods to a brackish water environment are discussed. A correlation matrix between bacterial variables and ecological relevant parameters is established. An average annual number of 970x10 3 ml -1 active bacteria were found in the research area, that is 41% of the total number of bacteria. Active bacterial biomass averaged 10.3 μg C1 -1 in comparison with 19.3 μg C1 -1 total bacterial biomass. Turnover times of substrates ranged between 7 and 147 h for amino acids. Uptake velocities (Vsub(m)) of four 3 H-substrates (amino-acid mixture, leucine, glucose, acetate) exhibited a close relationship with chlorophyll a concentrations and water temperature. The similarity of Vsub(m) plots indicates the presence of uptake properties for different substrates in bacteria living in areas with insufficient nutrient supply. (author)

  7. The market of huge monolithic mirror substrates for optical astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döhring, Thorsten

    2013-09-01

    Professional astronomical telescopes are complex optical systems at the limit of technical feasibility. Often monolithic primary mirrors and sometimes even secondary mirrors with huge dimensions are used. Prominent examples are the two reflectors of the Large Binocular Telescope and the giant mirrors of VLT, GEMINI, and SUBARU. The performance of such precision optical components significantly depends on the physical parameters and the quality of their substrate materials. Within this paper selection criteria for mirror substrates will be discussed, thereby considering the important technical parameters as well as commercial points and aspects of project management. Qualities and limitations of classical mirror substrate materials like Zerodur, ULE, Sitall, borosilicate glass and Cervit will be evaluated and compared to new substrate materials like silicon carbide and beryllium. The different suppliers and their production processes are presented. In addition large mirrors of existing observatories and of telescopes under construction will be listed, thereby concentrating on mirrors above three meter in diameter. An outlook on material trends and on future astronomical telescopes closes this overview on the market of huge monolithic mirror substrates for optical astronomy.

  8. Crystal structure of substrate free form of glycerol dehydratase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Der-Ing; Dotson, Garry; Turner, Jr., Ivan; Reiss, Lisa; Emptage, Mark (Du Pont)

    2010-03-08

    Glycerol dehydratase (GDH) and diol dehydratase (DDH) are highly homologous isofunctional enzymes that catalyze the elimination of water from glycerol and 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) to the corresponding aldehyde via a coenzyme B{sub 12}-dependent radical mechanism. The crystal structure of substrate free form of GDH in complex with cobalamin and K{sup +} has been determined at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. Its overall fold and the subunit assembly closely resemble those of DDH. Comparison of this structure and the DDH structure, available only in substrate bound form, shows the expected change of the coordination of the essential K{sup +} from hexacoordinate to heptacoordinate with the displacement of a single coordinated water by the substrate diol. In addition, there appears to be an increase in the rigidity of the K{sup +} coordination (as measured by lower B values) upon the binding of the substrate. Structural analysis of the locations of conserved residues among various GDH and DDH sequences has aided in identification of residues potentially important for substrate preference or specificity of protein-protein interactions.

  9. Cleavage of mispaired heteroduplex DNA substrates by numerous restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhans, Mark T; Palladino, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    The utility of restriction endonucleases as a tool in molecular biology is in large part due to the high degree of specificity with which they cleave well-characterized DNA recognition sequences. The specificity of restriction endonucleases is not absolute, yet many commonly used assays of biological phenomena and contemporary molecular biology techniques rely on the premise that restriction enzymes will cleave only perfect cognate recognition sites. In vitro, mispaired heteroduplex DNAs are commonly formed, especially subsequent to polymerase chain reaction amplification. We investigated a panel of restriction endonucleases to determine their ability to cleave mispaired heteroduplex DNA substrates. Two straightforward, non-radioactive assays are used to evaluate mispaired heteroduplex DNA cleavage: a PCR amplification method and an oligonucleotide-based assay. These assays demonstrated that most restriction endonucleases are capable of site-specific double-strand cleavage with heteroduplex mispaired DNA substrates, however, certain mispaired substrates do effectively abrogate cleavage to undetectable levels. These data are consistent with mispaired substrate cleavage previously reported for Eco RI and, importantly, extend our knowledge of mispaired heteroduplex substrate cleavage to 13 additional enzymes.

  10. The influence of substrate material on ascidian larval settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Anna L; Dijkstra, Jennifer A; Harris, Larry G

    2016-05-15

    Submerged man-made structures present novel habitat for marine organisms and often host communities that differ from those on natural substrates. Although many factors are known to contribute to these differences, few studies have directly examined the influence of substrate material on organism settlement. We quantified larval substrate preferences of two species of ascidians, Ciona intestinalis (cryptogenic, formerly C. intestinalis type B) and Botrylloides violaceus (non-native), on commonly occurring natural (granite) and man-made (concrete, high-density polyethylene, PVC) marine materials in laboratory trials. Larvae exhibited species-specific settlement preferences, but generally settled more often than expected by chance on concrete and HDPE. Variation in settlement between materials may reflect preferences for rougher substrates, or may result from the influence of leached chemicals on ascidian settlement. These findings indicate that an experimental plate material can influence larval behavior and may help us understand how substrate features may contribute to differences in settlement in the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Adhesion mechanisms of nanoparticle silver to substrate materials: identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Sungchul; Baldwin, Daniel F

    2010-01-01

    Nanoparticle silver (NPS) conductors are increasingly being investigated for printed electronics applications. However, the adhesion mechanism of the nanoparticle silver to substrate materials has not been identified yet. In particular, the adhesion of NPS to organic materials such as the widely used polyimide Kapton HN and Kapton FPC dry films is concerned with low adhesion strength because the processed polymer surface is chemically inert. Moreover, its adhesion to substrate materials such as benzocyclobutene (BCB), copper and aluminum was found to be very weak. Therefore, in this paper, the mechanisms of NPS adhesion to organic and inorganic materials are identified as the first step in improving NPS adhesion strength. Improving the adhesion strength of NPS will be the key issue for printed electronics applications. The adhesion of NPS to substrate materials was found to be mainly attributed to van der Waals forces based on particle adhesion mechanisms. This finding provides the initiative of developing an adhesion prediction model of NPS to substrate materials in order to provide guidelines for improving the NPS adhesion strength to the substrate materials used in printed electronics.

  12. Effect Of Various Substrates On Eudrilus eugeniae (Oligochaeta Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpoame, M.

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the effects of substrate on Eudrilus eugeniae production, 360 worms were raised in plastic buckets containing manure either from cattle (BV, from sheep (CM, from rabbit (CL, and from chicken (FP. At the end of the experiment which lasted 4 months, worm productivity was estimated at 111.9 g/kg of substrate in CL, 86.3 g/kg in CM, and 33.0 g/kg in BV. Substrate FP was inadequate as worms escaped from it. In another trial aiming at determining some of E. Eugeniae's reproductive parameters, each of the 3 substrates BV, CL, and CM was distributed into 15 plastic half bottles and was inoculated with one cocoon. In the 3 substrates cocoon incubation time and growing period were estimated at 3 to 4 weeks and 6 to 7 weeks respectively. Cocoons were laid approximately a week after the pairing of worms. On the average, each worm laid 2 cocoons per week.

  13. Cultivation of Schizophyllum commune mushroom on different wood substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.N. Dasanayaka

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Schizophyllum commune is an edible mushroom grown on wood under natural conditions. Present study focused on cultivation of S.commune on different wood substrates since it is not commercially cultivated. A pure culture of S. commune was obtained by growing a tissue of the mushroom on Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA medium. Spawns were produced by growing the mycelium on paddy grains. Mushroom was cultivated on sawdust of seven different wood substrates. The maximum yield was observed in sawdust of jackfruit (Artocarpusheterophyllus followed by sawdust of rambutan (Nepheliumlappaceum and country almond (Terminaliacatappa. A significant difference was not observed when mango (Mangiferaindica elephant apple (Dilleniaindica, tulip wood tree (Harpulliaarborea and thungfaa (Alstoniamacrophylla sawdust used as substrate. The lowest yield was observed in thungfaa (Alstoniamacrophylla sawdust. Effect of some additives on the yield was studied and significant difference in yield was observed when rice bran and used-tea leaves used as additives. Effect of rice bran on yield was studied using different ratios of sawdust to rice bran and the highest was observed in 2:1 ratio of sawdust to rice bran. The best incubating temperature for mycelial growth on the substrate was 350C. The composition of the mushroom on a dry weight basis was; 71.4% moisture, 23.35% crude protein and 6% ash. Tested wood species are promising substrates for cultivation of S.communeas cottage industry.

  14. Yield of lettuce grown in aquaponic system using different substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo A. Jordan

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the aquaponic system, the characteristics of the materials used as substrate directly affect plant development, because besides acting as a support base, they must present a surface to fix microorganisms, responsible for the conversion of nutrients into forms more easily available to plants. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of four growing substrates on the yield of lettuce grown in aquaponic system. The experimental design was randomized blocks with four treatments, which corresponded to the substrates, and six replicates. Plants were grown using the nutrient film technique (NFT system. The substrates used in the experiment were: coconut shell fiber with crushed stone #3, expanded vermiculite, zeolite and phenolic foam. The treatment with phenolic foam was considered as the least suitable for lettuce cultivation in aquaponic system, because it caused lower yield (20.8 t ha-1. The treatment using coconut shell fiber with crushed stone #3 was considered as the most adequate, since it led to higher yield (39.9 t ha-1 compared with the other substrates analyzed.

  15. Effects of substrate binding site residue substitutions of xynA from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens on substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Anil S; Pawar, Vishakha A; Panchal, Ketankumar J; Sudhir, Ankit P; Dave, Bhaumik R; Patel, Darshan H; Subramanian, R B

    2018-02-13

    The aromatic residues of xylanase enzyme, W187, Y124, W144, Y128 and W63 of substrate binding pocket from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens were investigated for their role in substrate binding by homology modelling and sequence analysis. These residues are highly conserved and play an important role in substrate binding through steric hindrance. The substitution of these residues with alanine allows the enzyme to accommodate nonspecific substrates. Wild type and mutated genes were cloned and overexpressed in BL21. Optimum pH and temperature of rBAxn exhibited pH 9.0 and 50 °C respectively and it was stable up to 215 h. Along with the physical properties of rBAxn, kinetic parameters (K m 19.34 ± 0.72 mg/ml; k cat 6449.12 ± 155.37 min - 1 and k cat /K m 333.83 ± 6.78 ml min - 1  mg - 1 ) were also compared with engineered enzymes. Out of five mutations, W63A, Y128A and W144A lost almost 90% activity and Y124A and W187A retained almost 40-45% xylanase activity. The site-specific single mutation, led to alteration in substrate specificity from xylan to CMC while in case of double mutant the substrate specificity was altered from xylan to CMC, FP and avicel, indicating the role of aromatic residues on substrate binding, catalytic process and overall catalytic efficiency.

  16. Bodily action penetrates affective perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantoni, Carlo; Rigutti, Sara; Gerbino, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Fantoni & Gerbino (2014) showed that subtle postural shifts associated with reaching can have a strong hedonic impact and affect how actors experience facial expressions of emotion. Using a novel Motor Action Mood Induction Procedure (MAMIP), they found consistent congruency effects in participants who performed a facial emotion identification task after a sequence of visually-guided reaches: a face perceived as neutral in a baseline condition appeared slightly happy after comfortable actions and slightly angry after uncomfortable actions. However, skeptics about the penetrability of perception (Zeimbekis & Raftopoulos, 2015) would consider such evidence insufficient to demonstrate that observer's internal states induced by action comfort/discomfort affect perception in a top-down fashion. The action-modulated mood might have produced a back-end memory effect capable of affecting post-perceptual and decision processing, but not front-end perception. Here, we present evidence that performing a facial emotion detection (not identification) task after MAMIP exhibits systematic mood-congruent sensitivity changes, rather than response bias changes attributable to cognitive set shifts; i.e., we show that observer's internal states induced by bodily action can modulate affective perception. The detection threshold for happiness was lower after fifty comfortable than uncomfortable reaches; while the detection threshold for anger was lower after fifty uncomfortable than comfortable reaches. Action valence induced an overall sensitivity improvement in detecting subtle variations of congruent facial expressions (happiness after positive comfortable actions, anger after negative uncomfortable actions), in the absence of significant response bias shifts. Notably, both comfortable and uncomfortable reaches impact sensitivity in an approximately symmetric way relative to a baseline inaction condition. All of these constitute compelling evidence of a genuine top-down effect on

  17. Separating semiconductor devices from substrate by etching graded composition release layer disposed between semiconductor devices and substrate including forming protuberances that reduce stiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Nielson, Gregory N; Cederberg, Jeffrey G; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

    2015-05-12

    A method includes etching a release layer that is coupled between a plurality of semiconductor devices and a substrate with an etch. The etching includes etching the release layer between the semiconductor devices and the substrate until the semiconductor devices are at least substantially released from the substrate. The etching also includes etching a protuberance in the release layer between each of the semiconductor devices and the substrate. The etch is stopped while the protuberances remain between each of the semiconductor devices and the substrate. The method also includes separating the semiconductor devices from the substrate. Other methods and apparatus are also disclosed.

  18. Categorical Perception of Sound Frequency by Crickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyttenbach, Robert A.; May, Michael L.; Hoy, Ronald R.

    1996-09-01

    Partitioning continuously varying stimuli into categories is a fundamental problem of perception. One solution to this problem, categorical perception, is known primarily from human speech, but also occurs in other modalities and in some mammals and birds. Categorical perception was tested in crickets by using two paradigms of human psychophysics, labeling and habituation-dishabituation. The results show that crickets divide sound frequency categorically between attractive (16 kilohertz) sounds. There is sharp discrimination between these categories but no discrimination between different frequencies of ultrasound. This demonstration of categorical perception in an invertebrate suggests that categorical perception may be a basic and widespread feature of sensory systems, from humans to invertebrates.

  19. [Biogas production from cellulose-containing substrates: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsavkelova, E A; Netrusov, A I

    2012-01-01

    Anaerobic microbial conversion of organic substrates to various biofuels is one of the alternative energy sources attracting the greatest attention of scientists. The advantages of biogas production over other technologies are the ability of methanogenic communities to degrade a broad range of substrates and concomitant benefits: neutralization of organic waste, reduction of greenhouse gas emission, and fertilizer production. Cellulose-containing materials are a good substrate, but their full-scale utilization encounters a number of problems, including improvement of the quality and amount ofbiogas produced and maintenance of the stability and high efficiency of microbial communities. We review data on microorganisms that form methanogenic cellulolytic communities, enzyme complexes of anaerobes essential for cellulose fiber degradation, and feedstock pretreatment, as biodegradation is hindered in the presence of lignin. Methods for improving biogas production by optimization of microbial growth conditions are considered on the examples of biogas formation from various types of plant and paper materials: writing paper and cardboard.

  20. Peptidomics methods for the identification of peptidase-substrate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Anna Mari; Kim, Yun-Gon; Saghatelian, Alan

    2013-02-01

    Peptidases have important roles in controlling physiological signaling through their regulation of bioactive peptides. Understanding and controlling bioactive peptide regulation is of great biomedical interest and approaches that elucidate the interplay between peptidases and their substrates are vital for achieving this goal. Here, we highlight the utility of recent peptidomics approaches in identifying endogenous substrates of peptidases. These approaches reveal bioactive substrates and help characterize the biochemical functions of the enzyme. Most recently, peptidomics approaches have been applied to address the challenging question of identifying the peptidases responsible for regulating specific bioactive peptides. Since peptidases are of great biomedical interest, these approaches will begin to impact our ability to identify new drug targets that regulate important bioactive peptides. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.