WorldWideScience

Sample records for autotrophic feiii oxide

  1. Abundances of Hyperthermophilic Autotrophic Fe(III) Oxide Reducers and Heterotrophs in Hydrothermal Sulfide Chimneys of the Northeastern Pacific Ocean ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Ver Eecke, Helene C.; Kelley, Deborah S.; Holden, James F.

    2008-01-01

    The abundances of hyperthermophilic heterotrophs, methanogens, and autotrophic reducers of amorphous Fe(III) oxide in 18 samples of deep-sea hydrothermal vent sulfide chimneys of the Endeavour Segment were measured. The results indicate that conditions favor the growth of iron reducers toward the interiors of these deposits and that of heterotrophs toward the outer surfaces near high-temperature polychaete worms (Paralvinella sulfincola).

  2. Abundances of Hyperthermophilic Autotrophic Fe(III) Oxide Reducers and Heterotrophs in Hydrothermal Sulfide Chimneys of the Northeastern Pacific Ocean ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ver Eecke, Helene C.; Kelley, Deborah S.; Holden, James F.

    2009-01-01

    The abundances of hyperthermophilic heterotrophs, methanogens, and autotrophic reducers of amorphous Fe(III) oxide in 18 samples of deep-sea hydrothermal vent sulfide chimneys of the Endeavour Segment were measured. The results indicate that conditions favor the growth of iron reducers toward the interiors of these deposits and that of heterotrophs toward the outer surfaces near high-temperature polychaete worms (Paralvinella sulfincola). PMID:18978076

  3. Autotrophic ammonia oxidation by soil thaumarchaea

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Offre, Pierre R.; He, Ji-Zheng; Verhamme, Daniel T.; Nicol, Graeme W.; Prosser, James I.

    2010-01-01

    Nitrification plays a central role in the global nitrogen cycle and is responsible for significant losses of nitrogen fertilizer, atmospheric pollution by the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide, and nitrate pollution of groundwaters. Ammonia oxidation, the first step in nitrification, was thought to be performed by autotrophic bacteria until the recent discovery of archaeal ammonia oxidizers. Autotrophic archaeal ammonia oxidizers have been cultivated from marine and thermal spring environments, bu...

  4. Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as the electron acceptor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Aklujkar, Ma; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Mester, Tunde

    2008-12-01

    e(III) oxides are the most abundant source of reducible Fe(III) by microorganisms in most soils and sediments, yet few studies on the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms during growth on Fe(III) oxide have been conducted because of the technical difficulties in working with cell growth and harvest in the presence of Fe(III) oxides. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a representative of the Geobacter species that predominate in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) oxide is important. In order to better understand the physiology of Geobacter species during growth on Fe(III) oxide, the proteome of G. sulfurreducens grown on Fe(III) oxide was compared with the proteome of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) citrate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) revealed 19 proteins that were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). These included proteins related to protein synthesis, electron transfer and energy production, oxidative stress, protein folding, outer membrane proteins, nitrogen metabolism and hypothetical proteins. Further analysis of the proteome with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag method revealed additional proteins associated with growth on Fe(III) oxide. These included the outer-membrane c-type cytochrome, OmcS and OmcG, which genetic studies have suggested are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Furthermore, several other cytochromes, as yet unstudied, were detected to be significantly up regulated during growth on Fe(III) oxide and other proteins of unknown function were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). PilA, the structural protein for pili, which is required for Fe(III) oxide reduction, and other pilin-associated proteins were also more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide. Confirmation of the differential expression of proteins known to be important in Fe(III) oxide reduction was observed, and an additional number of previously

  5. Advanced experimental analysis of controls on microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction. First year progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roden, E.E.; Urrutia, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    'The authors have made considerable progress toward a number of project objectives during the first several months of activity on the project. An exhaustive analysis was made of the growth rate and biomass yield (both derived from measurements of cell protein production) of two representative strains of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (Shewanellaalga strain BrY and Geobactermetallireducens) growing with different forms of Fe(III) as an electron acceptor. These two fundamentally different types of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) showed comparable rates of Fe(III) reduction, cell growth, and biomass yield during reduction of soluble Fe(III)-citrate and solid-phase amorphous hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Intrinsic growth rates of the two FeRB were strongly influenced by whether a soluble or a solid-phase source of Fe(III) was provided: growth rates on soluble Fe(III) were 10--20 times higher than those on solid-phase Fe(III) oxide. Intrinsic FeRB growth rates were comparable during reduction of HF0 and a synthetic crystalline Fe(III) oxide (goethite). A distinct lag phase for protein production was observed during the first several days of incubation in solid-phase Fe(III) oxide medium, even though Fe(III) reduction proceeded without any lag. No such lag between protein production and Fe(III) reduction was observed during growth with soluble Fe(III). This result suggested that protein synthesis coupled to solid-phase Fe(III) oxide reduction in batch culture requires an initial investment of energy (generated by Fe(III) reduction), which is probably needed for synthesis of materials (e.g. extracellular polysaccharides) required for attachment of the cells to oxide surfaces. This phenomenon may have important implications for modeling the growth of FeRB in subsurface sedimentary environments, where attachment and continued adhesion to solid-phase materials will be required for maintenance of Fe(III) reduction activity. Despite considerable differences in the rate and

  6. Carbohydrate oxidation coupled to Fe(III) reduction, a novel form of anaerobic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, J D; Councell, T; Ellis, D J; Lovley, D R

    1998-12-01

    An isolate, designated GC-29, that could incompletely oxidize glucose to acetate and carbon dioxide with Fe(III) serving as the electron acceptor was recovered from freshwater sediments of the Potomac River, Maryland. This metabolism yielded energy to support cell growth. Strain GC-29 is a facultatively anaerobic, gram-negative motile rod which, in addition to glucose, also used sucrose, lactate, pyruvate, yeast extract, casamino acids or H2 as alternative electron donors for Fe(III) reduction. Stain GC-29 could reduce NO3(-), Mn(IV), U(VI), fumarate, malate, S2O3(2-), and colloidal S0 as well as the humics analog, 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate. Analysis of the almost complete 16S rRNA sequence indicated that strain GC-29 belongs in the Shewanella genus in the epsilon subdivision of the Proteobacteria. The name Shewanella saccharophilia is proposed. Shewanella saccharophilia differs from previously described fermentative microorganisms that metabolize glucose with the reduction of Fe(III) because it transfers significantly more electron equivalents to Fe(III); acetate and carbon dioxide are the only products of glucose metabolism; energy is conserved from Fe(III) reduction; and glucose is not metabolized in the absence of Fe(III). The metabolism of organisms like S. saccharophilia may account for the fact that glucose is metabolized primarily to acetate and carbon dioxide in a variety of sediments in which Fe(III) reduction is the terminal electron accepting process. PMID:16887653

  7. Nitrogen removal by autotrophic ammonium oxidizing bacteria enrichment under anaerobic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Pongsak (Lek) Noophan; Chalermraj Wantawin; Siriporn Sripiboon; Sanya Sirivitayapakorn

    2008-01-01

    Sludge from an anoxic tank at the centralized wastewater treatment plant, Nong Khaem, Bangkok, Thailand, was inoculatedin an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR). The optimal compositions and operating conditions of the stock of autotrophic ammonium oxidizing bacteria medium were determined. The process of oxidizing ammonium with bacteria under anaerobic conditions is often referred to as the Anammox process (NO2- to N2 gas, using NH4+ as the electron donor and NO2- as the electron accep...

  8. The life cycle of iron Fe(III) oxide: impact of fungi and bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, Steeve

    2014-05-01

    Iron oxides are ubiquitous reactive constituents of soils, sediments and aquifers. They exhibit vast surface areas which bind a large array of trace metals, nutrients and organic molecules hence controlling their mobility/reactivity in the subsurface. In this context, understanding the "life cycle" of iron oxide in soils is paramount to many biogeochemical processes. Soils environments are notorious for their extreme heterogeneity and variability of chemical, physical conditions and biological agents at play. Here, we present studies investigating the role of two biological agents driving iron oxide dynamics in soils, root-associated fungi (mycorrhiza) and bacteria. Mycorrhiza filaments (hypha) grow preferentially around, and on the surface of nutrient-rich minerals, making mineral-fungi contact zones, hot-spots of chemical alteration in soils. However, because of the microscopic nature of hyphae (only ~ 5 µm wide for up to 1 mm long) and their tendency to strongly adhere to mineral surface, in situ observations of this interfacial micro-environment are scarce. In a microcosm, ectomycorrhiza (Paxillus involutus) was grown symbiotically with a pine tree (Pinus sylvestris) in the presence of freshly-cleaved biotite under humid, yet undersaturated, conditions typical of soils. Using spatially-resolved ion milling technique (FIB), transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy (TEM/STEM-EDS), synchrotron based X-ray microscopy (STXM), we were able to quantify the speciation of Fe at the biotite-hypha interface. The results shows that substantial oxidation of biotite structural-Fe(II) into Fe(III) subdomains occurs at the contact zone between mycorrhiza and biotite. Once formed, iron(III) oxides can reductively dissolve under suboxic conditions via several abiotic and microbial pathways. In particular, they serve as terminal electron acceptors for the oxidation of organic matter by iron reducing bacteria. We aimed here to understand the role of Fe(III) mineral

  9. Autotrophic Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria Contribute Minimally to Nitrification in a Nitrogen-Impacted Forested Ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, F L; Cantera, JJL; Fenn, M E; Stein, L.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Deposition rates of atmospheric nitrogenous pollutants to forests in the San Bernardino Mountains range east of Los Angeles, California, are the highest reported in North America. Acidic soils from the west end of the range are N-saturated and have elevated rates of N-mineralization, nitrification, and nitrate leaching. We assessed the impact of this heavy nitrogen load on autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing communities by investigating their composition, abundance, and activity. Analysis of 177 cl...

  10. The abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in activated sludge under autotrophic domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Ma, Chao; Sun, Shifang; Xie, Hui; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Jun; Song, Cunjiang

    2013-04-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) play a key role in nitrogen-removal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) as they can transform ammonia into nitrite. AOB can be enriched in activated sludge through autotrophic domestication although they are difficult to be isolated. In this study, autotrophic domestication was carried out in a lab-scale sequencing-batch-reactor (SBR) system with two activated sludge samples. The ammonia removal capacity of the sludge samples increased during the domestication, and pH exhibited a negative correlation with the ammonia removal amount, which indicated that it was one important factor of microbial ammonia oxidation. The count of AOB, measured by the most probable number (MPN) method, increased significantly during autotrophic domestication as ammonia oxidation efficiency was enhanced. We investigated the changes in the community structure of AOB before and after domestication by amoA clone library and T-RFLP profile. It showed that AOB had been successfully enriched and the community structure significantly shifted during the domestication. Two groups of AOB were found in sludge samples: Nitrosomonas-like group remained predominant all the time and Nitrosospira-like group changed obviously. Simultaneously, the total heterotrophic bacteria were investigated by MPN and Biolog assay. The metabolic diversity of heterotrophs had changed minutely, although the count of them decreased significantly and lost superiority of microbial communities in the sludge. PMID:24620598

  11. Mechanisms for Electron Transfer Through Pili to Fe(III) Oxide in Geobacter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovley, Derek R. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2015-03-09

    The purpose of these studies was to aid the Department of Energy in its goal of understanding how microorganisms involved in the bioremediation of metals and radionuclides sustain their activity in the subsurface. This information is required in order to incorporate biological processes into decision making for environmental remediation and long-term stewardship of contaminated sites. The proposed research was designed to elucidate the mechanisms for electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides in Geobacter species because Geobacter species are abundant dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms in a diversity of sites in which uranium is undergoing natural attenuation via the reduction of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) or when this process is artificially stimulated with the addition of organic electron donors. This study investigated the novel, but highly controversial, concept that the final conduit for electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides are electrically conductive pili. The specific objectives were to: 1) further evaluate the conductivity along the pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens and related organisms; 2) determine the mechanisms for pili conductivity; and 3) investigate the role of pili in Fe(III) oxide reduction. The studies demonstrated that the pili of G. sulfurreducens are conductive along their length. Surprisingly, the pili possess a metallic-like conductivity similar to that observed in synthetic organic conducting polymers such as polyaniline. Detailed physical analysis of the pili, as well as studies in which the structure of the pili was genetically modified, demonstrated that the metallic-like conductivity of the pili could be attributed to overlapping pi-pi orbitals of aromatic amino acids. Other potential mechanisms for conductivity, such as electron hopping between cytochromes associated with the pili were definitively ruled out. Pili were also found to be essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction in G. metallireducens. Ecological studies demonstrated

  12. Enhanced reduction of Fe(III) oxides and methyl orange by Klebsiella oxytoca in presence of anthraquinone-2-disulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Wang, Shi; Tang, Qing-Wen; Cao, Ming-Yue; Li, Jia; Yuan, Kun; Wang, Ping; Li, Wen-Wei

    2016-05-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca GS-4-08 is capable of azo dye reduction, but its quinone respiration and Fe(III) reduction abilities have not been reported so far. In this study, the abilities of this strain were reported in detail for the first time. As the biotic reduction of Fe(III) plays an important role in the biogeochemical cycles, two amorphous Fe(III) oxides were tested as the sole electron acceptor during the anaerobic respiration of strain GS-4-08. For the reduction of goethite and hematite, the biogenic Fe(II) concentrations reached 0.06 and 0.15 mM, respectively. Humic acid analog anthraquinone-2-disulfonate (AQS) was found to serve as an electron shuttle to increase the reduction of both methyl orange (MO) and amorphous Fe(III) oxides, and improve the dye tolerance of the strain. However, the formation of Fe(II) was not accelerated by biologically reduced AQS (B-AH2QS) because of the high bioavailability of soluble Fe(III). For the K. oxytoca strain, high soluble Fe(III) concentrations (above 1 mM) limit its growth and decolorization ability, while lower soluble Fe(III) concentrations produce an electron competition with MO initially, and then stimulate the decolorization after the electron couples of Fe(III)/Fe(II) are formed. With the ability to respire both soluble Fe(III) and insoluble Fe(III) oxides, this formerly known azo-reducer may be used as a promising model organism for the study of the interaction of these potentially competing processes in contaminated environments. PMID:26762391

  13. Microbial Fe(III) Oxide Reduction in Chocolate Pots Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, N. W.; Roden, E. E.; Boyd, E. S.; Converse, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Previous work on dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) has focused on high temperature, low pH environments where soluble Fe(III) is utilized as an electron acceptor for respiration. Much less attention has been paid to DIR in lower temperature, circumneutral pH environments, where solid phase Fe(III) oxides are the dominant forms of Fe(III). This study explored the potential for DIR in the warm (ca. 40-50°C), circumneutral pH Chocolate Pots hot springs (CP) in YNP. Most probable number (MPN) enumerations and enrichment culture studies confirmed the presence of endogenous microbial communities that reduced native CP Fe(III) oxides. Enrichment cultures demonstrated sustained DIR coupled to acetate and lactate oxidation through repeated transfers over ca. 450 days. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes indicated that the dominant organisms in the enrichments were closely affiliated with the well known Fe(III) reducer Geobacter metallireducens. Additional taxa included relatives of sulfate reducing bacterial genera Desulfohalobium and Thermodesulfovibrio; however, amendment of enrichments with molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, suggested that sulfate reduction was not a primary metabolic pathway involved in DIR in the cultures. A metagenomic analysis of enrichment cultures is underway in anticipation of identifying genes involved in DIR in the less well-characterized dominant organisms. Current studies are aimed at interrogating the in situ microbial community at CP. Core samples were collected along the flow path (Fig. 1) and subdivided into 1 cm depth intervals for geochemical and microbiological analysis. The presence of significant quantities of Fe(II) in the solids indicated that DIR is active in situ. A parallel study investigated in vitro microbial DIR in sediments collected from three of the coring sites. DNA was extracted from samples from both studies for 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic sequencing in order to obtain a

  14. Nitrogen removal by autotrophic ammonium oxidizing bacteria enrichment under anaerobic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongsak (Lek Noophan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Sludge from an anoxic tank at the centralized wastewater treatment plant, Nong Khaem, Bangkok, Thailand, was inoculatedin an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR. The optimal compositions and operating conditions of the stock of autotrophic ammonium oxidizing bacteria medium were determined. The process of oxidizing ammonium with bacteria under anaerobic conditions is often referred to as the Anammox process (NO2- to N2 gas, using NH4+ as the electron donor and NO2- as the electron acceptor. The startup period for the anammox culture took more than three months. With ammoniumand nitrite concentration ratios of 1:1.38 and 1:1.6, the nitrogen conversion rate zero order. Fluorescent in situ hybridization(FISH was used to identify specific autotrophic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (Nitrosomonas spp., Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans, and Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis. Results from this work demonstrated a shift in the species of ammonium oxidizing bacteria from Nitrosomonas spp. to Candidati Brocadia anammoxidans and Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, with increased ammonium concentrations from 3 mM to 15 mM. Under NH4+:NO2- ratios of 1:1.38 and 1:1.6 the ammoniumoxidizing bacteria were able to remove both ammonium and nitrite simultaneously. The specific nitrogen removal rate of theanammox bacteria (Candidati Brocadia anammoxidans and Kuenenia stuttgartiensis was significantly higher than that of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (Nitrosomonas spp.. Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (Candidati Brocadia anammoxidans and Kuenenia stuttgartiensis are strict anaerobes.

  15. Microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction potential in Chocolate Pots hot spring, Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, N W; He, S; Converse, B J; Beard, B L; Johnson, C M; Boyd, E S; Roden, E E

    2016-05-01

    Chocolate Pots hot springs (CP) is a unique, circumneutral pH, iron-rich, geothermal feature in Yellowstone National Park. Prior research at CP has focused on photosynthetically driven Fe(II) oxidation as a model for mineralization of microbial mats and deposition of Archean banded iron formations. However, geochemical and stable Fe isotopic data have suggested that dissimilatory microbial iron reduction (DIR) may be active within CP deposits. In this study, the potential for microbial reduction of native CP Fe(III) oxides was investigated, using a combination of cultivation dependent and independent approaches, to assess the potential involvement of DIR in Fe redox cycling and associated stable Fe isotope fractionation in the CP hot springs. Endogenous microbial communities were able to reduce native CP Fe(III) oxides, as documented by most probable number enumerations and enrichment culture studies. Enrichment cultures demonstrated sustained DIR driven by oxidation of acetate, lactate, and H2 . Inhibitor studies and molecular analyses indicate that sulfate reduction did not contribute to observed rates of DIR in the enrichment cultures through abiotic reaction pathways. Enrichment cultures produced isotopically light Fe(II) during DIR relative to the bulk solid-phase Fe(III) oxides. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes from enrichment cultures showed dominant sequences closely affiliated with Geobacter metallireducens, a mesophilic Fe(III) oxide reducer. Shotgun metagenomic analysis of enrichment cultures confirmed the presence of a dominant G. metallireducens-like population and other less dominant populations from the phylum Ignavibacteriae, which appear to be capable of DIR. Gene (protein) searches revealed the presence of heat-shock proteins that may be involved in increased thermotolerance in the organisms present in the enrichments as well as porin-cytochrome complexes previously shown to be involved in extracellular electron transport. This analysis offers

  16. Role of "electron shuttles" in the bioreduction of Fe(III) oxides in humid forest tropical soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretyazhko, T.; Sposito, G.

    2004-12-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB) can reduce Fe(III) oxides either by direct contact between the organisms and the oxide surface or by indirect mechanisms not involving contact. These latter mechanisms can include (i) "electron shuttling" or (ii) soluble Fe(III) complexation with subsequent reduction. In the presence of humic substances, indirect Fe(III) reduction occurs, particularly by mechanism (i). Important electron-accepting groups in humic substances include quinone moieties, complexed Fe(III) and conjugated aromatic moieties. A model compound frequently used to study mechanism (i) is anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), which is believed to function as an "electron shuttle" in a manner similar to humic substances. We are currently investigating Fe(III) reduction in humid tropical forest soils as affected by "electron shuttles," using AQDS and humic substances in our experiments. The soil samples were collected at the bottom of a toposequence in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Development of anaerobic conditions in these soils occurs due to high precipitation and runoff water inputs. Fourteen-day anoxic incubations of soil suspensions amended with AQDS showed enhanced production of both soluble and particulate forms of Fe(II) as compared to non-amended soil suspensions. Our data indicated clearly that DIRB in the soil could utilize added "electron shuttles" effectively to reduce Fe(III). To examine factors controlling Fe(III) reduction by humic acid (HA), three IHSS HA samples (soil, peat and Leonardite) were both abiotically reduced by H2 treatment and microbially reduced by incubation with a filtrate from a soil suspension, then titrated with three different oxidants (iodine, cyanoferrate, and ferric citrate) to provide chemical and biological estimates of electron-accepting capacity at pH 5 and 7. The results will be discussed in terms of the three oxidants used, the properties of the HA samples, pH, and the effects of chemical

  17. Thaumarchaeotes abundant in refinery nitrifying sludges express amoA but are not obligate autotrophic ammonia oxidizers

    OpenAIRE

    Mußmann, M; Brito, I.; A. Pitcher; Hatzenpichler, R.; Richter, A; Nielsen, J. L.; Nielsen, P. H.; Daims, H.; MÜller, A.; Wagner, M.; Head, I.M.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrification is a core process in the global nitrogen cycle that is essential for the functioning of many ecosystems. The discovery of autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) within the phylum Thaumarchaeota has changed our perception of the microbiology of nitrification, in particular since their numerical dominance over ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in many environments has been revealed. These and other data have led to a widely held assumption that all amoA-encoding members of the...

  18. Thaumarchaeotes abundant in refinery nitrifying sludges express amoA but are not obligate autotrophic ammonia oxidizers

    OpenAIRE

    Mußmann, Marc; Brito, Ivana; Pitcher, Angela; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Hatzenpichler, Roland; Richter, Andreas; Nielsen, Jeppe L.; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Müller, Anneliese; Daims, Holger; WAGNER, MICHAEL; Head, Ian M.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrification is a core process in the global nitrogen cycle that is essential for the functioning of many ecosystems. The discovery of autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) within the phylum Thaumarchaeota has changed our perception of the microbiology of nitrification, in particular since their numerical dominance over ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in many environments has been revealed. These and other data have led to a widely held assumption that all amoA-encoding members of the...

  19. Autotrophic, hydrogen-oxidizing, denitrifying bacteria in groundwater, potential agents for bioremediation of nitrate contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.L.; Ceazan, M.L.; Brooks, M.H.

    1994-01-01

    Addition of hydrogen or formate significantly enhanced the rate of consumption of nitrate in slurried core samples obtained from an active zone of denitrification in a nitrate-contaminated sand and gravel aquifer (Cape Cod, Mass.). Hydrogen uptake by the core material was immediate and rapid, with an apparent K(m) of 0.45 to 0.60 ??M and a V(max) of 18.7 nmol cm-3 h-1 at 30??C. Nine strains of hydrogen-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria were subsequently isolated from the aquifer. Eight of the strains grew autotrophically on hydrogen with either oxygen or nitrate as the electron acceptor. One strain grew mixotrophically. All of the isolates were capable of heterotrophic growth, but none were similar to Paracoccus denitrificans, a well-characterized hydrogen-oxidizing denitrifier. The kinetics for hydrogen uptake during denitrification were determined for each isolate with substrate depletion progress curves; the K(m)s ranged from 0.30 to 3.32 ??M, with V(max)s of 1.85 to 13.29 fmol cell-1 h-1. Because these organisms appear to be common constituents of the in situ population of the aquifer, produce innocuous end products, and could be manipulated to sequentially consume oxygen and then nitrate when both were present, these results suggest that these organisms may have significant potential for in situ bioremediation of nitrate contamination in groundwater.

  20. Protection of Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacteria from UV Radiation by Biogenic Fe(III) Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, Tina; Konhauser, Kurt; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Due to the lack of an ozone layer in the Archean, ultraviolet radiation (UVR) reached early Earth's surface almost unattenuated; as a consequence, a terrestrial biosphere in the form of biological soil crusts would have been highly susceptible to lethal doses of irradiation. However, a self-produced external screen in the form of nanoparticular Fe(III) minerals could have effectively protected those early microorganisms. In this study, we use viability studies by quantifying colony-forming units (CFUs), as well as Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction rates, to show that encrustation in biogenic and abiogenic Fe(III) minerals can protect a common soil bacteria such as the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 and strain 2AN from harmful UVC radiation. Analysis of DNA damage by quantifying cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) confirmed the protecting effect by Fe(III) minerals. This study suggests that Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, as would have grown in association with mafic and ultramafic soils/outcrops, would have been able to produce their own UV screen, enabling them to live in terrestrial habitats on early Earth. PMID:27027418

  1. Morphology and physiology of facultative autotrophic coryneformic bacteria with ability of carbon monoxide oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two coryneform bacterial strains (IFAM 1131 and IFAM 1133) capable of living on CO as the sole energy and carbon source were selected from a number of co-tolerant bacteria and studied more closely. Both strains could provisionally be grouped in the genera Arthrobacter. Their ability for hetorotrophic growth with a variety of C-sources and also autotrophic growth under CO and H2 atmospheric conditions characterised the test strains as facultative autotrophs. They could clearly be distinguished from all other CO- and H2-autotrophic bacterial strains described in the literature. Studies on strain IFAM 1131 using 14CO shared that for CO-autotrophic growth, carbon monoxide is oxidised to CO2. Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity, only found in autotrophically - grown cells, provided evidence for CO2 as the C-source and its fixation via the calvin cycle. The CO-oxidising system was also active in the absence of CO2. Gas chromatographically determined conversion rates for CO-autotrophically-grown static cultures of the strain IFAM 1131 revealed that some 20% of the CO oxidised to CO2 was fixed during logarithmic growth. (orig./MG)

  2. Interactions of the metal tolerant heterotrophic microorganisms and iron oxidizing autotrophic bacteria from sulphidic mine environment during bioleaching experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremic, Sanja; Beškoski, Vladimir P; Djokic, Lidija; Vasiljevic, Branka; Vrvić, Miroslav M; Avdalović, Jelena; Gojgić Cvijović, Gordana; Beškoski, Latinka Slavković; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina

    2016-05-01

    Iron and sulfur oxidizing chemolithoautotrophic acidophilic bacteria, such as Acidithiobacillus species, hold the dominant role in mine environments characterized by low pH values and high concentrations of reduced sulfur and iron compounds, such as ores, rocks and acid drainage waters from mines. On the other hand, heterotrophic microorganisms, especially their biofilms, from these specific niches are receiving increased attention, but their potential eco-physiological roles have not been fully understood. Biofilms are considered a threat to human health, but biofilms also have beneficial properties as they are deployed in waste recycling and bioremediation systems. We have analyzed interactions of the metal tolerant heterotrophic microorganisms in biofilms with iron oxidizing autotrophic bacteria both from the sulphidic mine environment (copper mine Bor, Serbia). High tolerance to Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Cr(6+) and the presence of genetic determinants for the respective metal tolerance and biofilm-forming ability was shown for indigenous heterotrophic bacteria that included strains of Staphylococcus and Rhodococcus. Two well characterized bacteria- Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (known biofilm former) and Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 (known metal resistant representative) were also included in the study. The interaction and survivability of autotrophic iron oxidizing Acidithiobacillus bacteria and biofilms of heterotrophic bacteria during co-cultivation was revealed. Finally, the effect of heterotrophic biofilms on bioleaching process with indigenous iron oxidizing Acidithiobacillus species was shown not to be inhibitory under in vitro conditions. PMID:26942859

  3. Dissimilatory reduction of FeIII (EDTA) with microorganisms in the system of nitric oxide removal from the flue gas by metal chelate absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Bi-yao; LI Wei; JING Guo-hua; SHI Yao

    2004-01-01

    In the system of nitric oxide removal from the flue gas by metal chelate absorption, it is an obstacle that ferrous absorbents are easily oxidized by oxygen in the flue gas to ferric counterparts, which are not capable of binding NO. By adding iron metal or electrochemical method, FeIII (EDTA) can be reduced to FeII (EDTA). However, there are various drawbacks associated with these techniques. The dissimilatory reduction of FeIII (EDTA) with microorganisms in the system of nitric oxide removal by metal chelate absorption was investigated. Ammonium salt instead of nitrate was used as the nitrogen source, as nitrates inhibited the reduction of FeIII due to the competition between the two electron acceptors. Supplemental glucose and lactate stimulated the formation of FeII more than ethanol as the carbon sources. The microorganisms cultured at 50℃ were not very sensitive to the other experimental temperature, the reduction percentage of FeIII varied little with the temperature range of 30~50℃. Concentrated Na2CO3 solution was added to adjust the solution pH to an optimal pH range of 6~7. The overall results revealed that the dissimilatory ferric reducing microorganisms present in the mix-culture are probably neutrophilic, moderately thermophilic FeIII reducers.

  4. Wet oxidative method for removal of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol in water using Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II) supported MCM41 catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaliha, Suranjana [Department of Chemistry, Gauhati University, Guwahati 781014, Assam (India); Bhattacharyya, Krishna Gopal [Department of Chemistry, Gauhati University, Guwahati 781014, Assam (India)], E-mail: krishna2604@sify.com

    2008-02-11

    Chlorophenols in water are resistant to biological oxidation and they have to be destroyed by chemical oxidation. In the present work, Fe(III), Co(II) and Ni(II) incorporated MCM41 mesoporous solids were used as catalysts for oxidation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol in water with or without the oxidant, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The catalysts were prepared by impregnation and were characterized by XRD and FTIR measurements. The parent MCM41, Fe(III), Co(II) and Ni(II) impregnated MCM41 had cation exchange capacity of 20.5, 25.5, 24.2, 26.0 mequiv./100 g, respectively. The catalysts were used after calcination at 773-873 K for 5 h. The reactions were carried out in a high pressure stirred reactor at 0.2 MPa (autogenous) and 353 K under various reaction conditions. The conversion achieved with Fe(III), Co(II) and Ni(II) incorporated MCM41 in 5 h is respectively 59.4, 50.0 and 65.6% with 2,4,6-TCP:H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molar ratio of 1:1, and 60.2, 60.9 and 68.8% in absence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The oxidation has a first order rate coefficient of (1.2-4.8) x 10{sup -3} min{sup -1}. The results show that introduction of Fe(III), Co(II) and Ni(II) into MCM-41 through impregnation produces very effective catalysts for wet oxidation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol.

  5. Nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidation (NAFO) by denitrifying bacteria: a perspective autotrophic nitrogen pollution control technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Zheng, Ping; Wang, Ru; Li, Wei; Lu, Huifeng; Zhang, Jiqiang

    2014-12-01

    The nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidation (NAFO) is an important discovery in the fields of microbiology and geology, which is a valuable biological reaction since it can convert nitrate into nitrogen gas, removing nitrogen from wastewater. The research on NAFO can promote the development of novel autotrophic biotechnologies for nitrogen pollution control and get a deep insight into the biogeochemical cycles. In this work, batch experiments were conducted with denitrifying bacteria as biocatalyst to investigate the performance of nitrogen removal by NAFO. The results showed that the denitrifying bacteria were capable of chemolithotrophic denitrification with ferrous salt as electron donor, namely NAFO. And the maximum nitrate conversion rates (qmax) reached 57.89 mg (g VSS d)−1, which was the rate-limiting step in NAFO. Fe/N ratio, temperature and initial pH had significant influences on nitrogen removal by NAFO process, and their optimal values were 2.0 °C, 30.15 °C and 8.0 °C, respectively. PMID:25461924

  6. Performance of nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidizing (NAFO) process: a novel prospective technology for autotrophic denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Zheng, Ping; Li, Wei; Wang, Ru; Ding, Shuang; Abbas, Ghulam

    2015-03-01

    Nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidizing (NAFO) is a valuable biological process, which utilizes ferrous iron to convert nitrate into nitrogen gas, removing nitrogen from wastewater. In this work, the performance of NAFO process was investigated as a nitrate removal technology. The results showed that NAFO system was feasible for autotrophic denitrification. The volumetric loading rate (VLR) and volumetric removal rate (VRR) under steady state were 0.159±0.01 kg-N/(m(3) d) and 0.073±0.01 kg-N/(m(3) d), respectively. In NAFO system, the effluent pH was suggested as an indicator which demonstrated a good correlation with nitrogen removal. The nitrate concentration was preferred to be less than 130 mg-N/L. Organic matters had little influence on NAFO performance. Abundant iron compounds were revealed to accumulate in NAFO sludge with peak value of 51.73% (wt), and they could be recycled for phosphorus removal, with capacity of 16.57 mg-P/g VS and removal rate of 94.77±2.97%, respectively. PMID:25576990

  7. Physiological and taxonomic description of the novel autotrophic, metal oxidizing bacterium, Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Karrie A; Hedrick, David B.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Thrash, J. Cameron; White, David C.; Achenbach, Laurie A.; Coates, John D.

    2009-01-01

    A lithoautotrophic, Fe(II) oxidizing, nitrate-reducing bacterium, strain 2002 (ATCC BAA-1479; =DSM 18807), was isolated as part of a study on nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation in freshwater lake sediments. Here we provide an in-depth phenotypic and phylogenetic description of the isolate. Strain 2002 is a gram-negative, non-spore forming, motile, rod-shaped bacterium which tested positive for oxidase, catalase, and urease. Analysis of the complete 16S rRNA gene sequence placed strain 2002 in...

  8. [Abundance and Community Composition of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Two Completely Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal over Nitrite Systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing-feng; Li, Ting; Zhang, Shu-jun; Fan, Xiao-yan; Pan, Kai-ling; Ma, Qian; Yuan, Ya-lin

    2015-08-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, which was thought to be only performed by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In recent years, ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) was also confirmed to take part in ammonia oxidation. The diversity and abundance of AOA have been investigated in various environments, however, little is known regarding the AOA in the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) wastewater treatment process. In this study, the abundance and diversity of AOA were investigated in the biofilm and flocculent activated sludge collected in a lab-scale (L) CANON system and a pilot-scale (P) CANON systems, respectively. The quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) was applied to investigate the abundance of AOA and the diversity of AOA was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloning and sequencing. The qPCR results showed that the average abundance of AOA amoA gene of L and P was 2.42 x 10(6) copies x g(-1) dry sludge and 6.51 x 10(6) copies x g(-1) dry sludge, respectively. The abundance of AOA in biofilm was 10.1-14.1 times higher than that in flocculent activated sludge. For P system, the abundance of AOA in flocculent activated sludge was 1.8 times higher than that in biofilm. The results indicated that the abundance of AOA might be affected by different sludge morphology. The diversity of AOA in P system was extremely limited, only one OTU was observed, which was classified into Nitrosopumilus subcluster 5.2. The diversity of AOA in L system was higher, eight OTUs were observed, which were classified into five genera: Nitrososphaera subcluster 9, subcluster 8.1, subcluster 4.1, subcluster 1.1 and Nitrosopumilus subcluster 5.2. The diversity and abundance of AOA were different in CANON systems with different sludge morphology. AOA may play an important role in ammonia oxidation in CANON system. PMID:26592025

  9. Nitrilotriacetate Stimulation of Anaerobic Fe(III) Respiration by Mobilization of Humic Materials in Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Luu, Y.; Ramsay, B. A.; Ramsay, J A

    2003-01-01

    An enrichment culture capable of naphthalene mineralization reduced Fe(III) oxides without direct contact in anaerobic soil microcosms when the Fe(III) was placed in dialysis membranes or entrapped within alginate beads. Both techniques demonstrated that a component in soil, possibly humic materials, facilitated Fe(III) reduction when direct contact between cells and Fe(III) was not possible. The addition of the synthetic Fe(III) chelator, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), to soil enhanced Fe(III)...

  10. Autotrophic nitrogen assimilation and carbon capture for microbial protein production by a novel enrichment of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matassa, Silvio; Verstraete, Willy; Pikaar, Ilje; Boon, Nico

    2016-09-15

    Domestic used water treatment systems are currently predominantly based on conventional resource inefficient treatment processes. While resource recovery is gaining momentum it lacks high value end-products which can be efficiently marketed. Microbial protein production offers a valid and promising alternative by upgrading low value recovered resources into high quality feed and also food. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria to upgrade ammonium and carbon dioxide under autotrophic growth conditions. The enrichment of a generic microbial community and the implementation of different culture conditions (sequenced batch resp. continuous reactor) revealed surprising features. At low selection pressure (i.e. under sequenced batch culture at high solid retention time), a very diverse microbiome with an important presence of predatory Bdellovibrio spp. was observed. The microbial culture which evolved under high rate selection pressure (i.e. dilution rate D = 0.1 h(-1)) under continuous reactor conditions was dominated by Sulfuricurvum spp. and a highly stable and efficient process in terms of N and C uptake, biomass yield and volumetric productivity was attained. Under continuous culture conditions the maximum yield obtained was 0.29 g cell dry weight per gram chemical oxygen demand equivalent of hydrogen, whereas the maximum volumetric loading rate peaked 0.41 g cell dry weight per litre per hour at a protein content of 71%. Finally, the microbial protein produced was of high nutritive quality in terms of essential amino acids content and can be a suitable substitute for conventional feed sources such as fishmeal or soybean meal. PMID:27262118

  11. Cultivation of Autotrophic Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea from Marine Sediments in Coculture with Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Byoung-Joon; Park, Soo-Je; Yoon, Dae-No; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2010-01-01

    The role of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in nitrogen cycling in marine sediments remains poorly characterized. In this study, we enriched and characterized AOA from marine sediments. Group I.1a crenarchaea closely related to those identified in marine sediments and “Candidatus Nitrosopumilus maritimus” (99.1 and 94.9% 16S rRNA and amoA gene sequence identities to the latter, respectively) were substantially enriched by coculture with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB). The selective enrichmen...

  12. Green oxidation of alkenes in ionic liquid solvent by hydrogen peroxide over high performance Fe(III) Schiff base complexes immobilized on MCM-41

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohammad Taghi Goldani; Ali Mohammadi; Reza Sandaroos

    2014-05-01

    A series of Fe(III) Schiff base complexes immobilized on MCM-41 were prepared and characterized by various physicochemical and spectroscopic methods. The complexes were used for oxidation of cyclohexene by 30% hydrogen peroxide in the presence and absence of ethylmethyl imidazolium chloride (EMIM) ionic liquid as solvent. The immobilized complexes proved to be effective catalysts and generally exhibited much higher catalytic performance than their homogeneous analogue. Catalytic performance of the complexes was also found to be closely related to the Schiff base ligands used. Additionally, ion liquid solvent efficiently improved all the catalytic performances. Finally, the reaction was extended to different alkenes using the heterogeneous complex 2-L4. Among all the alkenes, those containing -electron-withdrawing groups and trans-orientations exhibited lower tendency for oxidation.

  13. Inmirania thermothiophila gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic, facultatively autotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing gammaproteobacterium isolated from a shallow-sea hydrothermal vent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobodkina, Galina B; Baslerov, Roman V; Novikov, Andrei A; Viryasov, Mikhail B; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Slobodkin, Alexander I

    2016-02-01

    A novel thermophilic, facultatively autotrophic bacterium, strain S2479T, was isolated from a thermal spring located in a tidal zone of a geothermally heated beach (Kuril Islands, Russia). Cells of strain S2479T were rod-shaped and motile with a Gram-negative cell-wall type. The temperature range for growth was 35-68 °C (optimum 65 °C), and the pH range for growth was pH 5.5-8.8 (optimum pH 6.5). Growth of strain S2479T was observed in the presence of NaCl concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 % (w/v) (optimum 1.5-2.0 %). The strain oxidized sulfur and thiosulfate as sole energy sources for autotrophic growth under anaerobic conditions with nitrate as electron acceptor. Strain S2479T was also capable of heterotrophic growth by reduction of nitrate with oxidation of low-chain fatty acids and a limited number of other carboxylic acids or with complex proteinaceous compounds. Nitrate was reduced to N2. Sulfur compounds were oxidized to sulfate. Strain S2479T did not grow aerobically during incubation at atmospheric concentration of oxygen but was able to grow microaerobically (1 % of oxygen in gas phase). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the strain was a member of the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae, order Chromatiales, class Gammaproteobacteria. On the basis of phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, strain S2479T represents a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Inmirania thermothiophila gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is S2479T ( = DSM 100275T = VKM B-2962T). PMID:26582356

  14. A survey of 16S rRNA and amoA genes related to autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria of the ß-subdivision of the class proteobacteria in contaminated groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, I.A.; Stephen, J.R.; Chang, Y.J.; Bruggemann, J.; Long, P.E.; McKinley, J.P.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; White, D.C.; MacNaughton, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the size and structure of autotrophic ammonia oxidizer (AAO) communities in the groundwater of a contamination plume originating from a mill- tailings disposal site. The site has high levels of dissolved N from anthropogenic sources, and exhibited wide variations in th

  15. Bioactivity of pyridine-2-thiolato-1-oxide metal complexes: Bi(III), Fe(III) and Ga(III) complexes as potent anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis prospective agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Ignacio; Marino, Leonardo Biancolino; Demoro, Bruno; Echeverría, Gustavo A; Piro, Oscar E; Leite, Clarice Q F; Pavan, Fernando R; Gambino, Dinorah

    2014-11-24

    In the search for new therapeutic tools against tuberculosis and to further address the therapeutic potential of pyridine-2-thiol 1-oxide (Hmpo) metal complexes, two new octahedral [M(III)(mpo)3] complexes, with M = Ga or Bi, were synthesized and characterized in the solid state and in solution. Attempts to crystallize [Ga(III)(mpo)3] in CH2Cl2 led to single crystals of the reaction product [GaCl(mpo)2], where the gallium(III) ion is in a square basis pyramidal environment, trans-coordinated at the basis to two pyridine-2-thiolato 1-oxide anions acting as bidentate ligands through their oxygen and sulfur atoms. The biological activity of the new [M(III)(mpo)3] complexes together with that of the previously reported Fe(III) analogous compound and the pyridine-2-thiol 1-oxide sodium salt (Na mpo) was evaluated on Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The compounds showed excellent activity, both in the standard strain H37Rv ATCC 27294 (pan-susceptible) and in five clinical isolates that are resistant to the standard first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs isoniazid and rifampicin. These pyridine-2-thiol 1-oxide derivatives are promising compounds for the treatment of resistant tuberculosis. PMID:25261824

  16. Formation, reactivity, and aging of ferric oxide particles formed from Fe(II) and Fe(III) sources: Implications for iron bioavailability in the marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bligh, Mark W.; Waite, T. David

    2011-12-01

    Freshly formed amorphous ferric oxides (AFO) in the water column are potentially highly reactive, but with reactivity declining rapidly with age, and have the capacity to partake in reactions with dissolved species and to be a significant source of bioavailable iron. However, the controls on reactivity in aggregated oxides are not well understood. Additionally, the mechanism by which early rapid aging occurs is not clear. Aging is typically considered in terms of changes in crystallinity as the structure of an iron oxide becomes more stable and ordered with time thus leading to declining reactivity. However, there has been recognition of the role that aggregation can play in determining reactivity, although it has received limited attention. Here, we have formed AFO in seawater in the laboratory from either an Fe(II) or Fe(III) source to produce either AFO(II) or AFO(III). The changes in reactivity of these two oxides following formation was measured using both ligand-promoted dissolution (LPD) and reductive dissolution (RD). The structure of the two oxides was examined using light scattering and X-ray adsorption techniques. The dissolution rate of AFO(III) was greater than that of AFO(II), as measured by both dissolution techniques, and could be attributed to both the less ordered molecular structure and smaller primary particle size of AFO(III). From EXAFS analysis shortly (90 min) following formation, AFO(II) and AFO(III) were shown to have the same structure as aged lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite respectively. Both oxides displayed a rapid decrease in dissolution rate over the first hours following formation in a pattern that was very similar when normalised. The early establishment and little subsequent change of crystal structure for both oxides undermined the hypothesis that increasing crystallinity was responsible for early rapid aging. Also, an aging model describing this proposed process could only be fitted to the data with kinetic parameters that were

  17. Faster autotrophic growth of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing microorganisms in presence of nitrite, using inocula from Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Sanchez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Título en español: Crecimiento rápido autotrófico de microorganismos anaerobios oxidadores de amonio en presencia de nitrito, usando inóculos de ColombiaShort Title: Growth from Colombian inoculated anammoxSummary: Anammox is a nitrite dependent process, catalyzed by bacteria of the order Brocadiales. Anammox bacteria oxidize ammonia under anoxic conditions, with nitrite as electron acceptor producing dinitrogen gas. Here, we demonstrated the presence of anammox bacteria by enriched them in a SBR reactor, with anaerobic samples taken from de bottom of a pond used in primary wastewater treatment. The enrichment reached nitrogen (N removal rates of nearly 1.92kg N/m3/day. (The stoichiometry of the reaction matched previous anammox studies. The enriched bacterial communities were analyzed by Fluorescence In situ Hybridization (FISH, and showed nearly a 90% of enrichment at the end of the experiment (day 90. As far as we know, this is the first time that the anammox bacteria were enriched using Colombian inocula. The enrichment was achieved in relatively short time with high yields and has an excellent potential for application in wastewater treatment opening the opportunity to treat nitrogen-rich effluents by partial nitritation and anammox, thereby decreasing operational costs with respect to aeration (nitrification and addition of organic electron donor (heterotrophic denitrification. This more sustainable treatment is a good alternative to control nutrient pollution in water bodies in tropical countries.Key words: nitrogen cycle; advanced treatment; anammox;  nitritation; nitratation; denitrification.Resumen: La oxidación anaerobia del amonio (anammox, es un proceso nitrito dependiente, catalizado por bacterias del filo planctomicetes. Estas bacterias oxidan el amonio en ausencia de oxígeno, con nitrito como aceptor de electrones produciendo nitrógeno molecular. En Colombia, demostramos la presencia de estas bacterias mediante el

  18. Study of Fe(III) adsorption onto Dowex-Marathon resin, as a rate determining step of the U(IV) oxidation in 235U enrichment column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fe(III) adsorption onto Dowex-Marathon resin was well described by pseudo-second order kinetics with a high correlation factor for all the experimental concentrations. The results were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. The activation energy Ea (7.96 ± 0.2 kJ/mol) indicates a physisorption process as in the case of U(VI) adsorption onto the same resin. The thermodynamic parameters: ΔG deg = (-7.91) / (-13.68) kJ/mol, ΔH deg = 35.60 ± 0.89 kJ/mol and ΔS deg = 143.31 ± 3.58 J/mol K, were determined, the Fe(III) adsorption being spontaneous and endothermic. (author)

  19. A survey of 16S rRNA and amoA genes related to autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria of the beta-subdivision of the class proteobacteria in contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, I. A.; Stephen, J. R.; Chang, Y-J.; Bruggemann, J.; Macnaughton, S. J.; White, D. C. [Tennessee Univ., Center for Environmental Biotechnology, Knoxville, TN (United States); Long, P. E.; McKinley, J. P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Kowalchuk, G. A. [Netherlands Inst. of Ecology, Centre for Terrestrial Ecology, Heteren (Netherlands)

    2000-11-01

    Various genetic study methods were combined to profile beta-proteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing populations in ground water extracted from the subsurface of a contamination plume resulting from the disposal of tailings from a uranium mill at Shiprock, New Mexico. The objectives of this study were to characterize the ammonia-oxidizing populations at this site in terms of the diversity of dominant ammonia-oxidizing bacteria 16S and amoA genes, and to determine whether the ground water ammonia-oxidizing populations were linked to the dissolved nitrate concentration. Several studies have suggested that the genus Nitrosospira dominates over Nitrosomonas in bulk soil environments. Ammonia-oxidizing bacterial population sizes were estimated by competitive polymerase chain reaction targeting the gene amoA; it correlated significantly with nitrate concentration. Both 16S rDNA and amoA analyses suggested that all samples were dominated by Nitrosomonas over Nitrosospira in ground water, suggesting that ground water ammonia oxidizers are more like those dominating freshwater sediments than those dominant in bulk soil. It was concluded that the failure of the Shiprock site to remediate anthropogenic nitrogen is not likely to be related to the toxic effects of uranium on autotrophic nitrification. Indeed, it is more likely to be the result of factors such as the availability of organic carbon or other electron donors. 45 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  20. Autotrophic growth of nitrifying community in an agricultural soil

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Weiwei; Zhang, Caixia; Zeng,Xiaowei; Feng, Youzhi; Weng, Jiahua; Lin, Xiangui; Zhu, Jianguo; Xiong, Zhengqin; Xu, Jian; Cai, Zucong; Jia, Zhongjun

    2011-01-01

    The two-step nitrification process is an integral part of the global nitrogen cycle, and it is accomplished by distinctly different nitrifiers. By combining DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) and high-throughput pyrosequencing, we present the molecular evidence for autotrophic growth of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in agricultural soil upon ammonium fertilization. Time-course incubation of SIP microcosms indicated t...

  1. Enrichment and Characterization of an Autotrophic Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon of Mesophilic Crenarchaeal Group I.1a from an Agricultural Soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, M.Y.; Park, S.J.; Min, D.; Kim, J.S.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Kim, G.J.; Madsen, E.L.; Rhee, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Soil nitrification is an important process for agricultural productivity and environmental pollution. Though one cultivated representative of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea from soil has been described, additional representatives warrant characterization. We describe an ammonia-oxidizing archaeon (strain

  2. Direct Adherence of Fe(III) Particles onto Sheaths of Leptothrix sp. Strain OUMS1 in Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Tatsuki Kunoh; Hideki Hashimoto; Tomoko Suzuki; Naoyuki Hayashi; Katsunori Tamura; Mikio Takano; Hitoshi Kunoh; Jun Takada

    2016-01-01

    Leptothrix species, one of the Fe/Mn-oxidizing bacteria, oxidize Fe(II) and produce extracellular, microtubuar, Fe-encrusted sheaths. Since protein(s) involved in Fe(II) oxidation is excreted from Leptothrix cells, the oxidation from Fe(II) to Fe(III) and subsequent Fe(III) deposition to sheaths have been thought to occur in the vicinity or within the sheaths. Previously, Fe(III) particles generated in MSVP medium amended with Fe(II) salts by abiotic oxidation were directly recruited onto cel...

  3. Preconcentration of Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) with ethylenediamine-modified graphene oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Zawisza, Beata; Baranik, Anna; Malicka, Ewa; Talik, Ewa; Sitko, Rafał

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel solid phase sorbent that was synthesized by coupling graphene oxide (GO) to ethylenediamine (EDA). This nanomaterial (referred to as GO-EDA) is capable of adsorbing the ions of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc and lead. The ethylenediamine-modified graphene oxide was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The analytical procedure relies on (a) sorption of metal ions on GO-EDA dispersed ...

  4. Melanin Production and Use as a Soluble Electron Shuttle for Fe(III) Oxide Reduction and as a Terminal Electron Acceptor by Shewanella algae BrY†

    OpenAIRE

    Turick, Charles E.; Tisa, Louis S.; Caccavo, Jr., Frank

    2002-01-01

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) utilize numerous compounds as terminal electron acceptors, including insoluble iron oxides. The mechanism(s) of insoluble-mineral reduction by DMRB is not well understood. Here we report that extracellular melanin is produced by Shewanella algae BrY. The extracted melanin served as the sole terminal electron acceptor. Upon reduction the reduced, soluble melanin reduced insoluble hydrous ferric oxide in the absence of bacteria, thus demonstrating th...

  5. Abiotic oxidation of pyrite by Fe(III) in acidic media and its implications for sulfur isotope measurements of lattice-bound sulfate in sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazumdar, A.; Goldberg, T.; Strauss, H.

    of sample powder were subjected to overnight leaching in 0.5 M NaCl solution under constant stirring. This process dissolves any easily soluble sulfate, including any secondary sulfates resulting from pyrite oxidation via weathering. BaCl 2 solution... but was found sufficient for complete dissolution of francolite and the coexisting minor calcite/ dolomite matrix. Another set of dissolution experiments was performed using the same set of sample powder but reaction proceeded under closed vessel condition...

  6. Regulation of carbon dioxide fixation in facultatively autotrophic bacteria. A phisiological and genetical study.

    OpenAIRE

    Meijer, Wilhelmus Gerhardus

    1990-01-01

    Autotrophic bactcria are capable of CO2 fixation via the Calvin cycle, emplofng energy derived from the oxidation of anorganic substrates (e.g. Hz), simple organic substrates (one-carbon compounds, e.g. methanol, formate), or from light. Ribulose-1,5-bisphospbate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisC/O), pbosphoribulokinase (PRK) and fructosebisphosphatase (FBPase) are the unique enzymes of this autotrophic pathway (Chapter 1). ... Zie: Summary

  7. Freshwater autotrophic picoplankton: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. STOCKNER

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Autotrophic picoplankton (APP are distributed worldwide and are ubiquitous in all types of lakes of varying trophic state. APP are major players in carbon production in all aquatic ecosystems, including extreme environments such as cold ice-covered and/or warm tropical lakes and thermal springs. They often form the base of complex microbial food webs, becoming prey for a multitude of protozoan and micro-invertebrate grazers, that effectively channel APP carbon to higher trophic levels including fish. In this review we examine the existing literature on freshwater autotrophic picoplankton, setting recent findings and current ecological issues within an historic framework, and include a description of the occurrence and distribution of both single-cell and colonial APP (picocyanobacteria in different types of lakes. In this review we place considerable emphasis on methodology and ecology, including sampling, counting, preservation, molecular techniques, measurement of photosynthesis, and include extensive comment on their important role in microbial food webs. The model outlined by Stockner of an increase of APP abundance and biomass and a decrease of its relative importance with the increase of phosphorus concentration in lakes has been widely accepted, and only recently confirmed in marine and freshwater ecosystems. Nevertheless the relationship which drives the APP presence and importance in lakes of differing trophic status appears with considerable variation so we must conclude that the success of APP in oligotrophic lakes worldwide is not a certainty but highly probable.

  8. Amplification of 16S ribosomal RNA genes of autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria demonstrates the ubiquity of nitrosospiras in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiorns, W D; Hastings, R C; Head, I M; McCarthy, A J; Saunders, J R; Pickup, R W; Hall, G H

    1995-11-01

    Oligonucleotide sequences selected from the 16S rRNA genes of various species of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were evaluated as specific PCR amplification primers and probes. The specificities of primer pairs for eubacterial, Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas rRNA genes were established with sequence databases, and the primer pairs were used to amplify DNA from laboratory cultures and environmental samples. Eubacterial rRNA genes amplified from samples of soil and activated sludge hybridized with an oligonucleotide probe specific for Nitrosospira spp., but not with a Nitrosomonas-specific probe. Lakewater and sediment samples were analysed using a nested PCR technique in which eubacterial rRNA genes were subjected to a secondary amplification with Nitrosomonas or Nitrosospira specific primers. Again, the presence of Nitrosospira DNA, but not Nitrosomonas DNA, was detected and this was confirmed by hybridization of the amplified DNA with an internal oligonucleotide probe. Enrichments of lakewater and sediment samples, incubated for two weeks in the presence of ammonium, produced nitrite and were found to contain DNA from both Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas as determined by nested PCR amplification and probing of 16S rRNA genes. This demonstrates that Nitrosospira spp. are widespread in the environment. The implications of the detection of Nitrosomonas DNA only after enrichment culture are discussed. PMID:8535507

  9. To clone the ammonia monooxygenase gene of autotrophic bacteria ammonium oxidation capacity%化能自养菌氨单加氧酶基因的克隆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚国利; 张甜; 史政豪; 魏选明; 王磊

    2015-01-01

    氨氧化细菌是一类革兰氏阴性的化能自养菌.也是生物脱氮工艺中不可缺少的一类细菌.本研究通过以土壤为材料富集氨氧化细菌,并从富集土样的全基因组中成功扩增到amoA全长基因,与NCBI标准菌株 Nitrosomonas sp .GH22序列同源性达到99%,并用amoA 全长基因构建得克隆载体,经菌落PC R和双酶切鉴定正确,为后期构建新型的生物脱氮基因工程菌奠定基础.%Ammonia oxidizing bacteria is a class of gram negative chemoautotrophic bacteria , and it is also a kind of indispensable in the process of biological removal of nitrogen .In this study ,the amoA gene was successfully amplified from the whole genome of the enriched soil sample ,then put this amoA gene sequence blasted in Genbank through Internet online;at last ,we get a result that it has high homology with the amoA gene of Nitrosomonas sp . GH22(99% ) .According to the amoA full‐length gene constructed a cloned vector ,through the identification of colony PCR and restriction analysis were correct ,to lay the foundation for the later construction of a new biological nitrogen removal genetically engineered bacteri‐a.

  10. Elemental sulfur formation and nitrogen removal from wastewaters by autotrophic denitrifiers and anammox bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunshuang; Zhao, Dongfeng; Yan, Laihong; Wang, Aijie; Gu, Yingying; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2015-09-01

    Elemental sulfur (S(0)) formation from and nitrogen removal on sulfide, nitrate and ammonium-laden wastewaters were achieved by denitrifying ammonium oxidation (DEAMOX) reactor with autotrophic denitrifiers and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria. The sulfide to nitrate ratio is a key process parameter for excess accumulation of S(0) and a ratio of 1.31:1 is a proposed optimum. The Alishewanella, Thauera and Candidatus Anammoximicrobium present respectively the autotrophic denitrifiers and anammox bacteria for the reactor. DEAMOX is demonstrated promising biological process for treating organics-deficient (S+N) wastewaters with excess S(0) production. PMID:26022701

  11. Direct Adherence of Fe(III Particles onto Sheaths of Leptothrix sp. Strain OUMS1 in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuki Kunoh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptothrix species, one of the Fe/Mn-oxidizing bacteria, oxidize Fe(II and produce extracellular, microtubuar, Fe-encrusted sheaths. Since protein(s involved in Fe(II oxidation is excreted from Leptothrix cells, the oxidation from Fe(II to Fe(III and subsequent Fe(III deposition to sheaths have been thought to occur in the vicinity or within the sheaths. Previously, Fe(III particles generated in MSVP medium amended with Fe(II salts by abiotic oxidation were directly recruited onto cell-encasing and/or -free sheaths of L. cholodnii SP-6. In this study, whether this direct Fe(III adherence to sheaths also occurs in silicon-glucose-peptone (SGP medium amended with Fe(0 (SGP + Fe was investigated using another strain of Leptothrix sp., OUMS1. Preparation of SGP + Fe with Fe powder caused turbidity within a few hours due to abiotic generation of Fe(III particles via Fe(II, and the medium remained turbid until day 8. When OUMS1 was added to SGP + Fe, the turbidity of the medium cleared within 35 h as Fe(III particles adhered to sheaths. When primitive sheaths, cell-killed, cell-free, or lysozyme/EDTA/SDS- and proteinase K-treated sheath remnants were mixed with Fe(III particles, the particles immediately adhered to each. Thus, vital activity of cells was not required for the direct Fe(III particle deposition onto sheaths regardless of Leptothrix strains.

  12. New method for the direct determination of dissolved Fe(III) concentration in acid mine waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for direct determination of dissolved Fe(III) in acid mine water has been developed. In most present methods, Fe(III) is determined by computing the difference between total dissolved Fe and dissolved Fe(II). For acid mine waters, frequently Fe(II) much-gt Fe(III); thus, accuracy and precision are considerably improved by determining Fe(III) concentration directly. The new method utilizes two selective ligands to stabilize Fe(III) and Fe(II), thereby preventing changes in Fe reduction-oxidation distribution. Complexed Fe(II) is cleanly removed using a silica-based, reversed-phase adsorbent, yielding excellent isolation of the Fe(III) complex. Iron(III) concentration is measured colorimetrically or by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The method requires inexpensive commercial reagents and simple procedures that can be used in the field. Calcium(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Al(III), Zn(II), and Cd(II) cause insignificant colorimetric interferences for most acid mine waters. Waters containing >20 mg of Cu/L could cause a colorimetric interference and should be measured by GFAAS. Cobalt(II) and Cr(III) interfere if their molar ratios to Fe(III) exceed 24 and 5, respectively. Iron(II) interferes when its concentration exceeds the capacity of the complexing ligand. Because of the GFAAS elemental specificity, only Fe(II) is a potential interferent in the GFAAS technique. The method detection limit is 2 microg/L using GFAAS and 20 microg/L by colorimetry

  13. A first insight into the occurrence and expression of functional amoA and accA genes of autotrophic and ammonia-oxidizing bathypelagic Crenarchaeota of Tyrrhenian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimov, Michail M.; Cono, Violetta La; Denaro, Renata

    2009-05-01

    The autotrophic and ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaeal assemblage at offshore site located in the deep Mediterranean (Tyrrhenian Sea, depth 3000 m) water was studied by PCR amplification of the key functional genes involved in energy (ammonia mono-oxygenase alpha subunit, amoA) and central metabolism (acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha subunit, accA). Using two recently annotated genomes of marine crenarchaeons, an initial set of primers targeting archaeal accA-like genes was designed. Approximately 300 clones were analyzed, of which 100% of amoA library and almost 70% of accA library were unambiguously related to the corresponding genes from marine Crenarchaeota. Even though the acetyl-CoA carboxylase is phylogenetically not well conserved and the remaining clones were affiliated to various bacterial acetyl-CoA/propionyl-CoA carboxylase genes, the pool of archaeal sequences was applied for development of quantitative PCR analysis of accA-like distribution using TaqMan ® methodolgy. The archaeal accA gene fragments, together with alignable gene fragments from the Sargasso Sea and North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (ALOHA Station) metagenome databases, were analyzed by multiple sequence alignment. Two accA-like sequences, found in ALOHA Station at the depth of 4000 m, formed a deeply branched clade with 64% of all archaeal Tyrrhenian clones. No close relatives for residual 36% of clones, except of those recovered from Eastern Mediterranean, was found, suggesting the existence of a specific lineage of the crenarchaeal accA genes in deep Mediterranean water. Alignment of Mediterranean amoA sequences defined four cosmopolitan phylotypes of Crenarchaeota putative ammonia mono-oxygenase subunit A gene occurring in the water sample from the 3000 m depth. Without exception all phylotypes fell into Deep Marine Group I cluster that contain the vast majority of known sequences recovered from global deep-sea environment. Remarkably, three phylotypes accounted for 91% of all Mediterranean

  14. Regulation of carbon dioxide fixation in facultatively autotrophic bacteria. A phisiological and genetical study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Wilhelmus Gerhardus

    1990-01-01

    Autotrophic bactcria are capable of CO2 fixation via the Calvin cycle, emplofng energy derived from the oxidation of anorganic substrates (e.g. Hz), simple organic substrates (one-carbon compounds, e.g. methanol, formate), or from light. Ribulose-1,5-bisphospbate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisC/O), pb

  15. Perfluorooctanoic acid degradation in the presence of Fe(III) under natural sunlight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • PFOA was photo-chemically decomposed in the presence of Fe(III) and natural sunlight. • An alternative reaction pathway involves hydroxyl radical as confirmed by EPR. • Common oxidant-persulfate increased PFOA defluorination extent. -- Abstract: Due to the high bond dissociation energy (BDE) of C-F bonds (116 kcal/mol), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a highly recalcitrant pollutant. Herein, we demonstrate a novel method to decompose PFOA in the presence of sunlight and ferric iron (Fe(III)). Under such conditions, 97.8 ± 1.7% of 50 μM PFOA decomposed within 28 days into shorter-chain intermediates and fluoride (F−), with an overall defluorination extent of 12.7 ± 0.5%. No PFOA was removed under visible light, indicating that UV radiation is required for PFOA decomposition. Spectroscopic analysis indicates that the decomposition reaction is likely initiated by electron-transfer from PFOA to Fe(III), forming Fe(II) and an unstable organic carboxyl radical. An alternative mechanism for the formation of this organic radical involves hydroxyl radicals, detected by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The observation that PFOA can be degraded by Fe(III) under solar irradiation provides mechanistic insight into a possibly overlooked natural attenuation process. Because Fe(III) is abundant in natural waters and sunlight is essentially free, this work represents a potentially important step toward the development of simple and inexpensive remediation strategies for PFOA-contaminated water

  16. Perfluorooctanoic acid degradation in the presence of Fe(III) under natural sunlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dandan [Beijing Key Laboratory of Water Resource and Environmental Engineering, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Xiu, Zongming [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Liu, Fei [Beijing Key Laboratory of Water Resource and Environmental Engineering, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Wu, Gang [Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas-Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Adamson, Dave; Newell, Charles [GSI Environmental Inc., Houston, TX 77098 (United States); Vikesland, Peter [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Tsai, Ah-Lim [Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas-Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Alvarez, Pedro J., E-mail: alvarez@rice.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • PFOA was photo-chemically decomposed in the presence of Fe(III) and natural sunlight. • An alternative reaction pathway involves hydroxyl radical as confirmed by EPR. • Common oxidant-persulfate increased PFOA defluorination extent. -- Abstract: Due to the high bond dissociation energy (BDE) of C-F bonds (116 kcal/mol), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a highly recalcitrant pollutant. Herein, we demonstrate a novel method to decompose PFOA in the presence of sunlight and ferric iron (Fe(III)). Under such conditions, 97.8 ± 1.7% of 50 μM PFOA decomposed within 28 days into shorter-chain intermediates and fluoride (F{sup −}), with an overall defluorination extent of 12.7 ± 0.5%. No PFOA was removed under visible light, indicating that UV radiation is required for PFOA decomposition. Spectroscopic analysis indicates that the decomposition reaction is likely initiated by electron-transfer from PFOA to Fe(III), forming Fe(II) and an unstable organic carboxyl radical. An alternative mechanism for the formation of this organic radical involves hydroxyl radicals, detected by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The observation that PFOA can be degraded by Fe(III) under solar irradiation provides mechanistic insight into a possibly overlooked natural attenuation process. Because Fe(III) is abundant in natural waters and sunlight is essentially free, this work represents a potentially important step toward the development of simple and inexpensive remediation strategies for PFOA-contaminated water.

  17. Radiosensitization of thymine by Fe(III)-1,2 dihydroxyanthraquinone complex in dilute aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complex of Fe(III) with 1,2 dihydroxy 9, 10, anthraquinone (DHA) has been prepared. The metal ion forms a 1:3 complex with DHA. The complex is formed due to the dissociation of one proton per ligand bound to the metal ion. The stability constant of the Fe(III) complex is 1.61 x 1032. The complex reduces the catalytic flow of electrons from NADH to molecular O2 through NADH dehydrogenease over DHA. The Fe(III) complex is seen to be an efficient radiosensitizer towards γ-radiation induced degradation of thymine in a nitrous oxide saturated medium. (author). 31 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  18. New method for the direct determination of dissolved Fe(III) concentration in acid mine waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, T.B.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Cunningham, K.M.; Ball, J.W.; McCleskey, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    A new method for direct determination of dissolved Fe(III) in acid mine water has been developed. In most present methods, Fe(III) is determined by computing the difference between total dissolved Fe and dissolved Fe(II). For acid mine waters, frequently Fe(II) >> Fe(III); thus, accuracy and precision are considerably improved by determining Fe(III) concentration directly. The new method utilizes two selective ligands to stabilize Fe(III) and Fe(II), thereby preventing changes in Fe reduction-oxidation distribution. Complexed Fe(II) is cleanly removed using a silica-based, reversed-phase adsorbent, yielding excellent isolation of the Fe(III) complex. Iron(III) concentration is measured colorimetrically or by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The method requires inexpensive commercial reagents and simple procedures that can be used in the field. Calcium(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), AI(III), Zn(II), and Cd(II) cause insignificant colorimetric interferences for most acid mine waters. Waters containing >20 mg of Cu/L could cause a colorimetric interference and should be measured by GFAAS. Cobalt(II) and Cr(III) interfere if their molar ratios to Fe(III) exceed 24 and 5, respectively. Iron(II) interferes when its concentration exceeds the capacity of the complexing ligand (14 mg/L). Because of the GFAAS elemental specificity, only Fe(II) is a potential interferent in the GFAAS technique. The method detection limit is 2 ??g/L (40 nM) using GFAAS and 20 ??g/L (0.4 ??M) by colorimetry.A new method for direct determination of dissolved Fe(III) in acid mine water has been developed. In most present methods, Fe(III) is determined by computing the difference between total dissolved Fe and dissolved Fe(II). For acid mine waters, frequently Fe(II)???Fe(III); thus, accuracy and precision are considerably improved by determining Fe(III) concentration directly. The new method utilizes two selective ligands to stabilize Fe(III) and Fe(II), thereby preventing changes

  19. Dissimilatory Reduction of Fe(III) and Other Electron Acceptors by a Thermus Isolate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieft, T. L. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Fredrickson, J. K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Onstott, T. C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Geological and Geophysical Sciences; Gorby, Y. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kostandarithes, H. M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Bailey, T. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kennedy, D. W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Li, S. W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Plymale, A. E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Spadoni, C. M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Gray, M. S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-10-25

    A thermophilic bacterium that could use O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Fe(III), or S{sup o} as terminal electron acceptors for growth was isolated from groundwater sampled at 3.2 km depth in a South African gold mine. This organism, designated SA-01, clustered most closely with members of the genus Thermus, as determined by 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. The 16S rDNA sequence of SA-01 was >98% similar to that of Thermus strain NMX2 A.1, which was previously isolated by other investigators from a thermal spring in New Mexico. Strain NMX2 A.1 was also able to reduce Fe(III) and other electron acceptors, whereas Thermus aquaticus (ATCC 25104) and Thermus filiformis (ATCC 43280) did not reduce NO{sub 3}{sup -} or Fe(III). Neither SA-01 nor NMX2 A.1 grew fermentatively, i.e., addition of an external electron acceptor was required for anaerobic growth. Thermus SA-01 reduced soluble Fe(III) complexed with citrate or nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA); however, it could only reduce relatively small quantities (0.5 mM) of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) except when the humic acid analog 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS) was added as an electron shuttle, in which case 10 mM Fe(III) was reduced. Fe(III)-NTA was reduced quantitatively to Fe(II), was coupled to the oxidation of lactate, and could support growth through three consecutive transfers. Suspensions of Thermus SA-01 cells also reduced Mn(IV), Co(III)-EDTA, Cr(VI), and AQDS. Mn(IV)-oxide was reduced in the presence of either lactate or H{sub 2}. Both strains were also able to mineralize NTA to CO{sub 2} and to couple its oxidation to Fe(III) reduction and growth. The optimum temperature for growth and Fe(III) reduction by Thermus SA-01 and NMX2 A.1 is approximately 65 C; optimum pH is 6.5 to 7.0. This is the first report of a Thermus sp. being able to couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe, Mn or S.

  20. Stimulation of autotrophic denitrification by intrusions of the Bosporus Plume into the anoxic Black Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara A. Fuchsman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Autotrophic denitrification was measured in the southwestern coastal Black Sea, where the Bosporus Plume injects oxidized chemical species (especially O2 and NO3- into the oxic, suboxic and anoxic layers. Prominent oxygen intrusions caused an overlap of NOx- and sulfide at the same station where autotrophic denitrification activity was detected with incubation experiments. Several bacteria that have been proposed to oxidize sulfide in other low oxygen environments were found in the Black Sea including SUP05, Sulfurimonas, Arcobacter, and BS-GSO2. Comparison of TRFLP profiles from this mixing zone station and the Western Gyre (a station not affected by the Bosporus Plume indicate the greatest relative abundance of Sulfurimonas and Arcobacter at the appropriate depths at the mixing zone station. The autotrophic gammaproteobacterium BS-GSO2 correlated with ammonium fluxes rather than with sulfide fluxes and the maximum in SUP05 peak height was shallower than the depths where autotrophic denitrification was detected. Notably, anammox activity was not detected at the mixing zone station, though low levels of DNA from the anammox bacteria Candidatus Scalindua were present. These results provide evidence for a modified ecosystem with different N2 production pathways in the southwest coastal region compared to that found in the rest of the Black Sea. Moreover, the same Sulfurimonas phylotype (BS139 was previously detected on >30 μm particles in the suboxic zone of the Western Gyre along with DNA of potential sulfate reducers, so it is possible that particle-attached autotrophic denitrification may be an overlooked N2 production pathway in the central Black Sea as well.

  1. Redox stratified biofilms to support completely autotrophic nitrogen removal: Principles and results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Smets, Barth F.

    biofilm structure with aerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria dominating the areas of the biofilm closer to the membrane surface while anaerobic oxidizing bacteria populated mainly the outer biofilm region. The biofilm was approximately 500 m thick and featured both aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidizing...... the outgrowth of nitrite oxidizing bacteria communities. Autotrophic nitrogen removal is already revealing itself as a cheap alternative to treat concentrated nitrogen streams. However, we believe that this concept can be taken a step further in MABRs and become an even more cost-effective, compact...

  2. Management of microbial community composition, architecture and performance in autotrophic nitrogen removing bioreactors through aeration regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutlu, A. Gizem

    Completely autotrophic nitrogen removal from nitrogen-rich wastewaters through the nitritation -plus- anaerobic ammonium oxidation processes can greatly reduce operational energy costs compared to traditional nitrogen removal processes. The footprint can be further reduced by process intensificat......Completely autotrophic nitrogen removal from nitrogen-rich wastewaters through the nitritation -plus- anaerobic ammonium oxidation processes can greatly reduce operational energy costs compared to traditional nitrogen removal processes. The footprint can be further reduced by process...... some of the collateral impacts could be isolated, increasing process understanding. It was demonstrated that aeration strategy can be used as a powerful tool to manipulate the microbial community composition, its architecture and reactor performance. We suggest operation via intermittent aeration with...

  3. Influence of humic acid imposed changes of ferrihydrite aggregation on microbial Fe(III) reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstaetter, Katja; Borch, Thomas; Kappler, Andreas

    2012-05-01

    size of the magnetite produced by Fe(III) reduction in the presence of HA is lower than the magnetite produced in the absence of HA. In summary, this study shows that both the concentration of HA and Fe(III) minerals strongly influence microbial Fe(III) reduction rates and the mineralogy of the reduction products. Thus, deviations in iron (hydr)oxide reactivity with changes in aggregation state, such as HA induced ferrihydrite aggregation, need to be considered within natural environments.

  4. Evaluation of siderite and magnetite formation in BIFs by pressure-temperature experiments of Fe(III) minerals and microbial biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halama, Maximilian; Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria potentially contributed to the deposition of Archean banded iron formations (BIFs), before the evolution of cyanobacterially-generated molecular oxygen (O2), by using sunlight to oxidize aqueous Fe(II) and precipitate Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides. Once deposited at the seafloor, diagenetic reduction of the Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides by heterotrophic bacteria produced secondary Fe(II)-bearing minerals, such as siderite (FeCO3) and magnetite (Fe3O4), via the oxidation of microbial organic carbon (i.e., cellular biomass). During deeper burial at temperatures above the threshold for life, thermochemical Fe(III) reduction has the potential to form BIF-like minerals. However, the role of thermochemical Fe(III) reduction of primary BIF minerals during metamorphism, and its impact on mineralogy and geochemical signatures in BIFs, is poorly understood. Consequently, we simulated the metamorphism of the precursor and diagenetic iron-rich minerals (ferrihydrite, goethite, hematite) at low-grade metamorphic conditions (170 °C, 1.2 kbar) for 14 days by using (1) mixtures of abiotically synthesized Fe(III) minerals and either microbial biomass or glucose as a proxy for biomass, and (2) using biogenic minerals formed by phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Mössbauer spectroscopy and μXRD showed that thermochemical magnetite formation was limited to samples containing ferrihydrite and glucose, or goethite and glucose. No magnetite was formed from Fe(III) minerals when microbial biomass was present as the carbon and electron sources for thermochemical Fe(III) reduction. This could be due to biomass-derived organic molecules binding to the mineral surfaces and preventing solid-state conversion to magnetite. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed siderite contents of up to 17% after only 14 days of incubation at elevated temperature and pressure for all samples with synthetic Fe(III) minerals and biomass, whereas 6% of the initial Fe(III) was

  5. Clostridium difficile is an autotrophic bacterial pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Köpke

    Full Text Available During the last decade, Clostridium difficile infection showed a dramatic increase in incidence and virulence in the Northern hemisphere. This incessantly challenging disease is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial infectious diarrhea and became life-threatening especially among elderly people. It is generally assumed that all human bacterial pathogens are heterotrophic organisms, being either saccharolytic or proteolytic. So far, this has not been questioned as colonization of the human gut gives access to an environment, rich in organic nutrients. Here, we present data that C. difficile (both clinical and rumen isolates is also able to grow on CO2+H2 as sole carbon and energy source, thus representing the first identified autotrophic bacterial pathogen. Comparison of several different strains revealed high conservation of genes for autotrophic growth and showed that the ability to use gas mixtures for growth decreases or is lost upon prolonged culturing under heterotrophic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of C. difficile (heterotrophic growth on various substrates as well as autotrophy could allow the organism in the gut to avoid competition by niche differentiation and contribute to its survival when stressed or in unfavorable conditions that cause death to other bacteria. This may be an important trait for the pathogenicity of C. difficile.

  6. Nontronite (NAu-1) Structure Associated with Microbial Fe(III) Reduction in Various Redox Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, T.; Kim, S.; Kim, J.

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires the structural Fe(III) of smectite and promotes illite formation in O2-free environment (Kostka et al., 1996, Kim et al., 2004). Since S. oneidensis is a facultative iron reducing bacterium, it is crucial to understand the structural changes induced by bio-reduction of structural Fe(III) in various redox conditions. Furthermore, the changes in cation exchange capacity (CEC) of bio-reduced nontronite upon the modification of mineral structure has not been extensively studied in terms of Fe-cycling. In this present study, we reported the evolution of nontronite structure at various time points in various redox conditions and corresponding CEC upon reduction and re-oxidation. S. oneidensis MR-1 was incubated in M1 medium with Na-lactate as the electron donor and Fe in nontronite (NAu-1) as the sole electron acceptor at pH 7 in anaerobic chamber for 3 hrs, 12 hrs, 1 day, 2 days, 4 days, 7 days, 14 days, and 21 days. O2 gas bubbling was then applied to the sample at each time point for 24 hours for re-oxidation. The triplet samples at each time point for both reduction and re-oxidation experiments were prepared. The extent of Fe(III) reduction measured by 1,10-phenanthroline method (Stucki and Anderson, 1981) indicated that the structural Fe(III) was reduced up to 8.8% of total Fe(III) within 21 days. XRD data with various treatments such as air dried, glycolated and lithium-saturated showed that K-nontronite may be formed because no discrete 10-Å illite peak was observed in Li-saturated sample upon glycolation. The CEC increased from 747 meg/kg to 1145 meg/kg during Fe(III) reduction and decreased to 954 meg/kg upon re-oxidation, supporting the possible formation of K-nontronite. The direct observation by electron microscopy verified the structural changes in nontonite in various redox conditions. The long-term experiment for 6 months, is in progress in anaerobic chamber, and results will be discussed. Kim, J. W., Dong, H., Seabaugh

  7. Autotrophic microbe metagenomes and metabolic pathways differentiate adjacent red sea brine pools

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yong

    2013-04-29

    In the Red Sea, two neighboring deep-sea brine pools, Atlantis II and Discovery, have been studied extensively, and the results have shown that the temperature and concentrations of metal and methane in Atlantis II have increased over the past decades. Therefore, we investigated changes in the microbial community and metabolic pathways. Here, we compared the metagenomes of the two pools to each other and to those of deep-sea water samples. Archaea were generally absent in the Atlantis II metagenome; Bacteria in the metagenome were typically heterotrophic and depended on aromatic compounds and other extracellular organic carbon compounds as indicated by enrichment of the related metabolic pathways. In contrast, autotrophic Archaea capable of CO2 fixation and methane oxidation were identified in Discovery but not in Atlantis II. Our results suggest that hydrothermal conditions and metal precipitation in the Atlantis II pool have resulted in elimination of the autotrophic community and methanogens.

  8. Sequential Aeration of Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactors for High-Rate Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal: Experimental Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Sun, Sheng-Peng; Lackner, Susanne;

    2010-01-01

    One-stage autotrophic nitrogen (N) removal, requiring the simultaneous activity of aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB and AnAOB), can be obtained in spatially redox-stratified biofilms. However, previous experience with Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactors (MABRs) has revealed a...... difficulty in reducing the abundance and activity of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB), which drastically lowers process efficiency. Here we show how sequential aeration is an effective strategy to attain autotrophic N removal in MABRs: Two separate MABRs, which displayed limited or no N removal under......S rRNA gene confirmed that sequential aeration, even at elevated average O2 loads, stimulated the abundance of AnAOB and AOB and prevented the increase in NOB. Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were 100-fold lower compared to other anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox)-nitritation systems. Hence, by...

  9. Geochemical control of microbial Fe(III) reduction potential in wetlands: Comparison of the rhizosphere to non-rhizosphere soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J.V.; Emerson, D.; Megonigal, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    We compared the reactivity and microbial reduction potential of Fe(III) minerals in the rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soil to test the hypothesis that rapid Fe(III) reduction rates in wetland soils are explained by rhizosphere processes. The rhizosphere was defined as the area immediately adjacent to a root encrusted with Fe(III)-oxides or Fe plaque, and non-rhizosphere soil was 0.5 cm from the root surface. The rhizosphere had a significantly higher percentage of poorly crystalline Fe (66??7%) than non-rhizosphere soil (23??7%); conversely, non-rhizosphere soil had a significantly higher proportion of crystalline Fe (50??7%) than the rhizosphere (18??7%, Prhizosphere Fe(III)-oxide pool in 4 h compared to 23% of the soil Fe(III)-oxide pool. Similarly, microbial reduction consumed 75-80% of the rhizosphere pool in 10 days compared to 30-40% of the non-rhizosphere soil pool. Differences between the two pools persisted when samples were amended with an electron-shuttling compound (AQDS), an Fe(III)-reducing bacterium (Geobacter metallireducens), and organic carbon. Thus, Fe(III)-oxide mineralogy contributed strongly to differences in the Fe(III) reduction potential of the two pools. Higher amounts of poorly crystalline Fe(III) and possibly humic substances, and a higher Fe(III) reduction potential in the rhizosphere compared to the non-rhizosphere soil, suggested the rhizosphere is a site of unusually active microbial Fe cycling. The results were consistent with previous speculation that rapid Fe cycling in wetlands is due to the activity of wetland plant roots. ?? 2004 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mannitol in six autotrophic stramenopiles and Micromonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittami, Simon M; Aas, Hoai T N; Paulsen, Berit S; Boyen, Catherine; Edvardsen, Bente; Tonon, Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Mannitol plays a central role in brown algal physiology since it represents an important pathway used to store photoassimilate. Several specific enzymes are directly involved in the synthesis and recycling of mannitol, altogether forming the mannitol cycle. The recent analysis of algal genomes has allowed tracing back the origin of this cycle in brown seaweeds to a horizontal gene transfer from bacteria, and furthermore suggested a subsequent transfer to the green microalga Micromonas. Interestingly, genes of the mannitol cycle were not found in any of the currently sequenced diatoms, but were recently discovered in pelagophytes and dictyochophytes. In this study, we quantified the mannitol content in a number of ochrophytes (autotrophic stramenopiles) from different classes, as well as in Micromonas. Our results show that, in accordance with recent observations from EST libraries and genome analyses, this polyol is produced by most ochrophytes, as well as the green alga tested, although it was found at a wide range of concentrations. Thus, the mannitol cycle was probably acquired by a common ancestor of most ochrophytes, possibly after the separation from diatoms, and may play different physiological roles in different classes. PMID:21720212

  11. Biogas desulfurization using autotrophic denitrification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrakdar, Alper; Tilahun, Ebrahim; Calli, Baris

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of an autotrophic denitrification process for desulfurization of biogas produced from a chicken manure digester. A laboratory scale upflow fixed bed reactor (UFBR) was operated for 105 days and fed with sodium sulfide or H2S scrubbed from the biogas and nitrate as electron donor and acceptor, respectively. The S/N ratio (2.5 mol/mol) of the feed solution was kept constant throughout the study. When the UFBR was fed with sodium sulfide solution with an influent pH of 7.7, about 95 % sulfide and 90 % nitrate removal efficiencies were achieved. However, the inlet of the UFBR was clogged several times due to the accumulation of biologically produced elemental sulfur particles and the clogging resulted in operational problems. When the UFBR was fed with the H2S absorbed from the biogas and operated with an influent pH of 8-9, around 98 % sulfide and 97 % nitrate removal efficiencies were obtained. In this way, above 95 % of the H2S in the biogas was removed as elemental sulfur and the reactor effluent was reused as scrubbing liquid without any clogging problem. PMID:26428238

  12. Heterotrophic and Autotrophic Microbial Populations in Cold Perennial Springs of the High Arctic ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Nancy N.; Greer, Charles W.; Andersen, Dale T.; Tille, Stefanie; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Whyte, Lyle G.

    2008-01-01

    The saline springs of Gypsum Hill in the Canadian high Arctic are a rare example of cold springs originating from deep groundwater and rising to the surface through thick permafrost. The heterotrophic bacteria and autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (up to 40% of the total microbial community) isolated from the spring waters and sediments were classified into four phyla (Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria) based on 16S rRNA gene analysis; heterotrophic isolates were primarily psychrotolerant, salt-tolerant, facultative anaerobes. Some of the isolates contained genes for thiosulfate oxidation (soxB) and anoxygenic photosynthesis (pufM), possibly enabling the strains to better compete in these sulfur-rich environments subject to long periods of illumination in the Arctic summer. Although leucine uptake by the spring water microbial community was low, CO2 uptake was relatively high under dark incubation, reinforcing the idea that primary production by chemoautotrophs is an important process in the springs. The small amounts of hydrocarbons in gases exsolving from the springs (0.38 to 0.51% CH4) were compositionally and isotopically consistent with microbial methanogenesis and possible methanotrophy. Anaerobic heterotrophic sulfur oxidation and aerobic autotrophic sulfur oxidation activities were demonstrated in sediment slurries. Overall, our results describe an active microbial community capable of sustainability in an extreme environment that experiences prolonged periods of continuous light or darkness, low temperatures, and moderate salinity, where life seems to rely on chemolithoautotrophy. PMID:18805995

  13. Formaldehyde as a carbon and electron shuttle between autotroph and heterotroph populations in acidic hydrothermal vents of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, James J; Whitmore, Laura M; Isern, Nancy G; Romine, Margaret F; Riha, Krystin M; Inskeep, William P; Kreuzer, Helen W

    2016-05-01

    The Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park contains a large number of hydrothermal systems, which host microbial populations supported by primary productivity associated with a suite of chemolithotrophic metabolisms. We demonstrate that Metallosphaera yellowstonensis MK1, a facultative autotrophic archaeon isolated from a hyperthermal acidic hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) spring in Norris Geyser Basin, excretes formaldehyde during autotrophic growth. To determine the fate of formaldehyde in this low organic carbon environment, we incubated native microbial mat (containing M. yellowstonensis) from a HFO spring with (13)C-formaldehyde. Isotopic analysis of incubation-derived CO2 and biomass showed that formaldehyde was both oxidized and assimilated by members of the community. Autotrophy, formaldehyde oxidation, and formaldehyde assimilation displayed different sensitivities to chemical inhibitors, suggesting that distinct sub-populations in the mat selectively perform these functions. Our results demonstrate that electrons originally resulting from iron oxidation can energetically fuel autotrophic carbon fixation and associated formaldehyde excretion, and that formaldehyde is both oxidized and assimilated by different organisms within the native microbial community. Thus, formaldehyde can effectively act as a carbon and electron shuttle connecting the autotrophic, iron oxidizing members with associated heterotrophic members in the HFO community. PMID:26995682

  14. Formaldehyde as a carbon and electron shuttle between autotroph and heterotroph populations in acidic hydrothermal vents of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, James J.; Whitmore, Laura M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Romine, Margaret F.; Riha, Krystin M.; Inskeep, William P.; Kreuzer, Helen W.

    2016-03-19

    The Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park contains a large number of hydrothermal systems, which host microbial populations supported by primary productivity associated with a suite of chemolithotrophic metabolisms. We demonstrate that Metallosphaera yellowstonesis MK1, a facultative autotrophic archaeon isolated from a hyperthermal acidic hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) spring in Norris Geyser Basin, excretes formaldehyde during autotrophic growth. To determine the fate of formaldehyde in this low organic carbon environment, we incubated native microbial mat (containing M. yellowstonensis) from a HFO spring with 13C-formaldehyde. Isotopic analysis of incubation-derived CO2 and biomass showed that formaldehyde was both oxidized and assimilated by members of the community. Autotrophy, formaldehyde oxidation, and formaldehyde assimilation displayed different sensitivities to chemical inhibitors, suggesting that distinct sub-populations in the mat selectively perform these functions. Our results demonstrate that electrons originally resulting from iron oxidation can energetically fuel autotrophic carbon fixation and associated formaldehyde excretion, and that formaldehyde is both oxidized and assimilated by different organisms within the native microbial community. Thus, formaldehyde can effectively act as a carbon and electron shuttle connecting the autotrophic, iron oxidizing members with associated heterotrophic members in the HFO community.

  15. Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal in a Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactor Under Continuous Aeration: A Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilmore, Kevin R.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.;

    2013-01-01

    allowed anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AnaerAOB) to develop and be retained for > 250 days. Daily autotrophic nitrogen removal of 1.7 g N/m(2) (75% of influent N load) was achieved at an oxygen/nitrogen surface loading ratio of 2.2, with up to 85% of the influent N proceeding through Anaer......AOB. During early nitritation, nitrogen oxide (NO(g), NO2(g), and N2O(g)) emissions comprised up to 10% of the removed influent nitrogen, but emissions disappeared after proliferation of AnaerAOB. Microbial communities were radially stratified, with aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AerAOB) colonizing...... elimination of gaseous nitrogen oxide emissions....

  16. 两个 CANON 污水处理系统中氨氧化古菌的丰度和多样性研究%Abundance and Community Composition of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Two Completely Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal over Nitrite Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高景峰; 李婷; 张树军; 樊晓燕; 潘凯玲; 马谦; 袁亚林

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, which was thought to be only performed by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In recent years, ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) was also confirmed to take part in ammonia oxidation. The diversity and abundance of AOA have been investigated in various environments, however, little is known regarding the AOA in the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite ( CANON) wastewater treatment process. In this study, the abundance and diversity of AOA were investigated in the biofilm and flocculent activated sludge collected in a lab-scale (L) CANON system and a pilot-scale (P) CANON systems, respectively. The quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) was applied to investigate the abundance of AOA and the diversity of AOA was determined by polymerase chain reaction ( PCR), cloning and sequencing. The qPCR results showed that the average abundance of AOA amoA gene of L and P was 2. 42 × 106 copies·g - 1 dry sludge and 6. 51 × 106 copies·g - 1 dry sludge, respectively. The abundance of AOA in biofilm was 10. 1-14. 1 times higher than that in flocculent activated sludge. For P system, the abundance of AOA in flocculent activated sludge was 1. 8 times higher than that in biofilm. The results indicated that the abundance of AOA might be affected by different sludge morphology. The diversity of AOA in P system was extremely limited, only one OTU was observed, which was classified into Nitrosopumilus subcluster 5. 2. The diversity of AOA in L system was higher, eight OTUs were observed, which were classified into five genera: Nitrososphaera subcluster 9, subcluster 8. 1, subcluster 4. 1, subcluster 1. 1 and Nitrosopumilus subcluster 5. 2. The diversity and abundance of AOA were different in CANON systems with different sludge morphology. AOA may play an important role in ammonia oxidation in CANON system.%近期,氨氧化古菌(ammonia-oxidizing archaea,AOA)在各类环境中的发现,打破了人们原

  17. Spectrophotometric speciation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) using hydrazone-micelle systems and flow injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two hydrazones were synthesised, namely salicylhyrazone (SH) and trihydroxyacetophenone (THAPH) were synthesised with the objective of developing a method for determining of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in the presence of each other and hence the total iron.those hydrazones were selected so as to combine the ability of phenolic compounds to complex Fe(III) ions and the complexing characteristics of hydrazones. The complexes of Fe(II)SH and Fe(III)SH as well those of Fe(II)-THAPH and Fe(III)-THAPH had shown maximum absorbance at λ=412 nm which was not not modified by presence of micelles i.e. sodium n-dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and n-hexa dodecyl pyridinium bromide. The maximum absorbance for all complexes takes place around a neutral pH. Generally, in addition, of n-hexa dodecylpyridinium bromide to fe(II)-SH and Fe(III)-SH absorbance of the complexes increases with increasing the concentration of the micelle. The effects of the addition of sodium n-dodecyle sulphate (SDS) to Fe(III)-SH is also studied. Generally, increasing the concentration of the micelle decrease the absorbance of the complexes. To study the effect of the presence of Fe(II) and Fe(III) on the determination of each other,mixtures of Fe(II)-SH and Fe(III)-SH are studied. However, the use of ascorbic acid as a reducing reagent for Fe(III) did not produce the needed results but non reducible results, which may be due to the masking effect of ascorbic acid and thus making the metal not available to the ligand. However, conversion of Fe(II) to Fe(III) prior to the determination was avoided as this requires the use of oxidant, which will oxidise the ligand as well. To establish the condition for the maximum absorbance of THAPH complexes, the effect of the base was investigated by using sodium and ammonium hydroxide. Generally, increasing the concentration of the base decreases the abosrbance. as expected, ammonium hydroxide produced positive results than sodium hydroxide. After establishing the optimum Fi

  18. Microbial community stratification in Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactors for Completely Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Ruscalleda, Maël; Terada, Akihiko;

    bacterial granules or biofilms. In this sense, completely autotrophic nitrogen removal from high ammonium strength wastewater was achieved in a Membrane-Aereated Biofilm Reactor (MABR) in a single step. Here, a biofilm containing nitrifiers (Aerobic Ammonium and Nitrite Oxidizing Bacteria, AOB and NOB......Due to the necessity of a source of nitrite, most of the processes involving Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) are based on a separated two-step process with a previous partial-nitritation reactor. However, these two processes can occur simultaneously in the same reactor by taking advantage of......, respectively) and Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidizing Bacteria (AnAOB) is grown on bubbleless aeration membranes to remove ammonium. Since oxygen permeates through the membrane-biofilm interface while ammonium diffuses into the biofilm from the biofilm-liquid interface, oxygen gradients can be established across the...

  19. Effect of desferrioxamine B and Suwannee River fulvic acid on Fe(III) release and Cr(III) desorption from goethite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Angela G.; Hudson-Edwards, Karen A.; Dubbin, William E.

    2016-04-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating ligands that facilitate the solubilisation of Fe(III) and form stable complexes with a range of contaminant metals and therefore may significantly affect their biogeochemical cycling. Desferrioxamine B (DFOB) is a trihydroxamate siderophore that acts synergistically with fulvic acid and low molecular weight organic ligands to release Fe from Fe(III) oxides. We report the results of batch dissolution experiments in which we determine the rates of Cr(III) desorption and Fe(III) release from Cr(III)-treated synthetic goethite as influenced by DFOB, by fulvic acid, and by the two compounds in combination. We observed that adsorbed Cr(III) at 3% surface coverage significantly reduced Fe(III) release from goethite for all combinations of DFOB and fulvic acid. When DFOB (270 μM) was the only ligand present, dissolved Fe(III) and Cr(III) increased approximately 1000-fold and 16-fold, respectively, as compared to the ligand-free system, a difference we attribute to the slow rate of water exchange of Cr(III). Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) acts synergistically with DFOB by (i) reducing the goethite surface charge leading to increased HDFOB+ surface excess and by (ii) forming aqueous Fe(III)-SRFA species whose Fe(III) is subsequently removed by DFOB to yield aqueous Fe(III)-DFOB complexes. These observations shed new light on the synergistic relationship between DFOB and fulvic acid and reveal the mechanisms of Fe(III) acquisition available to plants and micro-organisms in Cr(III) contaminated environments.

  20. Particle Aggregation During Fe(III) Bioreduction in Nontronite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisi, D. P.; Dong, H.; Hi, Z.; Kim, J.

    2005-12-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the rate and mechanism of particle aggregation during bacterial Fe (III) reduction in different size fractions of nontronite and to investigate the role of different factors contributing to particle aggregation. To achieve this goal, microbial Fe(III) reduction experiments were performed with lactate as an electron donor, Fe(III) in nontronite as an electron acceptor, and AQDS as an electron shuttle in bicarbonate buffer using Shewanella putrefaceins CN32. These experiments were performed with and without Na- pyrophosphate as a dispersant in four size fractions of nontronite (0.12-0.22, 0.41-0.69, 0.73-0.96 and 1.42-1.8 mm). The rate of nontronite aggregation during the Fe(III) bioreduction was measured by analyzing particle size distribution using photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and SEM images analysis. Similarly, the changes in particle morphology during particle aggregation were determined by analyses of SEM images. Changes in particle surface charge were measured with electrophoretic mobility analyzer. The protein and carbohydrate fraction of EPS produced by cells during Fe(III) bioreduction was measured using Bradford and phenol-sulfuric acid extraction method, respectively. In the presence of the dispersant, the extent of Fe(III) bioreduction was 11.5-12.2% within the first 56 hours of the experiment. There was no measurable particle aggregation in control experiments. The PCS measurements showed that the increase in the effective diameter (95% percentile) was by a factor of 3.1 and 1.9 for particle size of 0.12-0.22 mm and 1.42-1.80 mm, respectively. The SEM image analyses also gave the similar magnitude of increase in particle size. In the absence of the dispersant, the extent of Fe(III) bioreduction was 13.4-14.5% in 56 hours of the experiment. The rate of aggregation was higher than that in the presence of the dispersant. The increase in the effective diameter (95% percentile) was by a factor of 13.6 and 4.1 for

  1. Aeration control by monitoring the microbiological activity using fuzzy logic diagnosis and control. Application to a complete autotrophic nitrogen removal reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiocchi, Riccardo; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine;

    2015-01-01

    microbial groups on the other hand, the diagnosis provides information on: nitritation, nitratation, anaerobic ammonium oxidation and overall autotrophic nitrogen removal. These four results give insight into the state of the process and are used as inputs for the controller that manipulates the aeration to...

  2. A Strongly Spin-Frustrated Fe(III) 7 Complex with a Canted Intermediate Spin Ground State of S=7/2 or 9/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Kartik Chandra; Mereacre, Valeriu; Kostakis, George E; Lan, Yanhua; Anson, Christopher E; Prisecaru, Ion; Waldmann, Oliver; Powell, Annie K

    2015-07-20

    A disk-shaped [Fe(III) 7 (Cl)(MeOH)6 (μ3 -O)3 (μ-OMe)6 (PhCO2 )6 ]Cl2 complex with C3 symmetry has been synthesised and characterised. The central tetrahedral Fe(III) is 0.733 Å above the almost co-planar Fe(III) 6 wheel, to which it is connected through three μ3 -oxide bridges. For this iron-oxo core, the magnetic susceptibility analysis proposed a Heisenberg-Dirac-van Vleck (HDvV) mechanism that leads to an intermediate spin ground state of S=7/2 or 9/2. Within either of these ground state manifolds it is reasonable to expect spin frustration effects. The (57) Fe Mössbauer (MS) analysis verifies that the central Fe(III) ion easily aligns its magnetic moment antiparallel to the externally applied field direction, whereas the other six peripheral Fe(III) ions keep their moments almost perpendicular to the field at stronger fields. This unusual canted spin structure reflects spin frustration. The small linewidths in the magnetic Mössbauer spectra of polycrystalline samples clearly suggest an isotropic exchange mechanism for realisation of this peculiar spin topology. PMID:26073059

  3. Estimating autotrophic respiration in streams using daily metabolism data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowing the fraction of gross primary production (GPP) that is immediately respired by autotrophs and their closely associated heterotrophs (ARf) is necessary to understand the trophic base and carbon spiraling in streams. We show a means to estimate ARf from daily metabolism da...

  4. Autotrophic acetyl coenzyme A biosynthesis in Methanococcus maripaludis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To detect autotrophic CO2 assimilation in cell extracts of Methanococcus maripaludis, lactate dehydrogenase and NADH were added to convert pyruvate formed from autotropically synthesized acetyl coenzyme A to lactate. The lactate produced was determined spectrophotometrically. When CO2 fixation was pulled in the direction of lactate synthesis, CO2 reduction to methane was inhibited. Bromoethanesulfonate (BES), a potent inhibitor of methanogenesis, enhanced lactate synthesis, and methyl coenzyme M inhibited it in the absence of BES. Lactate synthesis was dependent on CO2 and H2, but H2 + CO2-independent synthesis was also observed. In cell extracts, the rate of lactate synthesis was about 1.2 nmol min-1 mg of protein-1. When BES was added, the rate of lactate synthesis increased to 2.1 nmol min-1 mg of protein-1. Because acetyl coenzyme A did not stimulate lactate synthesis, pyruvate synthase may have been the limiting activity in these assays. Radiolabel from 14CO2 was incorporated into lactate. The percentages of radiolabel in the C-1, C-2, and C-3 positions of lactate were 73, 33, and 11%, respectively. Both carbon monoxide and formaldehyde stimulated lactate synthesis. 14CH2O was specifically incorporated into the C-3 of lactate, and 14CO was incorporated into the C-1 and C-2 positions. Low concentrations of cyanide also inhibited autotrophic growth, CO dehydrogenase activity, and autotrophic lactate synthesis. These observations are in agreement with the acetogenic pathway of autotrophic CO2 assimilation

  5. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, J K; Kostandarithes, H M; Li, S W; Plymale, A E; Daly, M J

    2000-05-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO(2) and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH(2)DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml(-1)) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms. PMID:10788374

  6. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Kostandarithes, H.M.; Li, S.W.; Plymake, A.E.; Daly, M.J.

    2000-05-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO{sub 2} and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH{sub 2}DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml{sup {minus}1}) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms.

  7. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO2 and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH2DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml-1) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms

  8. Denitrification characteristics of a sulfur autotrophic denitrification reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenxiao ZHANG

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The denitrification characteristics of a sulfur autotrophic denitrification reactor are investigated. The results show that domestication of sulfur autotrophic bacteria is completed within 15 days after biofilm formation in the reactor, which is shorter than other similar researches. The nitrogen removal rate remains over than 90%, and the denitrification rate reaches 18.5 mg N/(L·h with influent NO-3-N of 70 mg/L , influent pH of 8 and HRT of 4.3 h . Thiobacillus denitrificans are observed in the whole reactor when domestication finishes, while it is more abundant in the middle and lower part. The optimal influent NO-3-N concentration for the reactor is 50 mg/L, the optimal temperature is 30~35 ℃, the optimal influent pH is 7~8, and the nitrogen removal rate is over than 90%.

  9. Photo-autotrophic Production of Poly(hydroxyalkanoates) in Cyanobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Drosg, B.; Fritz, I; Gattermayr, F.; Silvestrini, L.

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, poly(hydroxyalkanoates) (PHA) were solely produced using heterotrophic bacteria in aerobic cultivation. With respect to the great potential (500 Mt yr–1) of raw industrial CO2 streams and even greater potential of flue gases, the focus on photo-autotrophic biotechnological processes is increasing steadily. Primarily, PHA-gene transfer from heterotrophic bacteria into algae and plant cells was attempted, with the intention to combine the known biosynthesis pathway with...

  10. Concurrent nitrate and Fe(III) reduction during anaerobic biodegradation of phenols in a sandstone aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette; Crouzet, C.; Arvin, Erik;

    2000-01-01

    and selected redox sensitive parameters at the end of the experiment. The sandstone material was characterized with respect to oxidation and reduction potential and Fe(II) and Fe(III) speciation prior to use for all microcosms and at the end of the experiments for selected microcosms. The redox conditions......, in the unamended microcosm. For microcosm systems. with solid aquifer materials. dissolution of organic substances from the solid material may occur. A quantitative determination of the speciation (mineral types and quantity) of electron acceptors associated with the solids, at levels relevant for degradation......The biodegradation of phenols (similar to 5, 60, 600 mg 1(-1)) under anaerobic conditions (nitrate enriched and unamended) was studied in laboratory microcosms with sandstone material and groundwater from within an anaerobic ammonium plume in an aquifer, The aqueous phase was sampled and analyzed...

  11. Overall Water Splitting by Sono-Catalysis Using Homogeneous Catalysts of Fe(III) Compounds: Aim of Construction of a Photosynthesis-Like System under Sonication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Hisashi

    2002-05-01

    The decomposition of water was performed using a sono-catalytic reaction system, which is a joint system of sonochemical and catalytical reactions. By sono-catalysis, overall water splitting was accomplished through the combined effect of these reactions. Water-soluble ferric (Fe(III)) compounds, Pt-black, and metal oxides such as titanium oxide (TiO2) and iron oxide (Fe2O3) were used as catalysts. Homogeneous Fe(III) catalyst was effective for oxygen (O2) generation under sonication, particularly iron ammonium sulfate (iron alum, (FeNH4(SO4)2). Hydrogen (H2) was also evolved by sonication. Thus, overall water (H2O) splitting was accomplished using the sono-catalytic technique. Furthermore, a photosynthesis-like system under sonication is discussed.

  12. Performance of a completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite process for treating wastewater with different substrates at ambient temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyan Chang; Dong Li; Yuhai Liang; Zhuo Yang; Shaoming Cui; Tao Liu; Huiping Zeng

    2013-01-01

    The stability and parameters of a bio-ceramic filter for completely autotrophic nitrogen removal were investigated.The completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) reactor was fed with different concentrations of ammonia (400,300,and 200 mg N/L) but constant influent ammonia load.The results showed that the CANON system can achieve good treatment performance at ambient temperature (15-23℃).The average removal rate and removal loading of NH4 +-N and TN was 83.90%,1.26 kg N/(m3.day),and 70.14%,1.09 kg N/(m3.day),respectively.Among the influencing factors like pH,dissolved oxygen and alkalinity,it was indicated that the pH was the key parameter of the performance of the CANON system.Observing the variation of pH would contribute to better control of the CANON system in an intuitive and fast way.Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of microorganisms further revealed that there were some significant changes in the community structure of ammonium oxidizing bacteria,which had low diversity in different stages,while the species of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria were fewer and the community composition was relatively stable.These observations showed that anaerobic ammonia oxidation was more stable than the aerobic ammonia oxidation,which could explain that why the CANON system maintained a good removal efficiency under the changing substrate conditions.

  13. Relationship between P and the most reactive fraction of Fe(III) oxyhydroxide in various aquatic and sedimentary environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anschutz, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Phosphorus can experience a series of biogeochemical pathways. Primary P has an igneous origin and occurs mostly as apatite in bedrocks. Once P is dissolved as phosphate ion, it can incorporate organic matter or become adsorbed onto inorganic particles. The liberation of P from organic matter through bacterial respiration produces a subsequent flux back to the biota or a storage in Fe and Al oxyhydroxides, or in authigenic or biogenic phosphate minerals. The adsorption of phosphate on Fe- and Al-oxide and oxyhydroxide has been extensively studied in soil science because phosphorus is a limiting nutrient in terrestrial ecosystems, and sorptive removal of natural or fertilizer phosphorus impacts the production level of crops and forests. Fe(III) oxides/oxyhydroxides are subject to reductive dissolution, and consequently redox conditions play an important role in soil P-bioavailability. The main process of phosphorus removal from the aquatic systems is burial with sediments. Exchange between sediment and overlying water takes place through benthic biogeochemical processes, including organic-P mineralization, redox-driven Fe-P cycling, and benthic phosphorus efflux from sediments. A portion of the pore-water phosphate derived from organic matter mineralization may be adsorbed onto detrital or authigenic iron oxyhydroxides in the oxidized zone of the sediment. Once advected in the reduced zone of sediments through burial or bioturbation, the most reducible fraction of Fe(III) phase can be reduced and solubilized, leading to a release of phosphate. Eventually, P can be buried over long period as relict organic-P, P associated with refractory iron oxides, and apatite. Therefore, Fe-bound P is often the initial sink of P supplied by organic matter, but not the major final sink. Several techniques have been developed to extract P bound to Fe(III) phases. The citrate-dithionite buffered (CDB) solution is one of the most often used solution to measure Fe(III)-bound P. CDB

  14. Environmental Factors Affecting Ammonium Oxidation Under Iron Reducing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Huang, S.; Ruiz-Urigüen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) oxidation coupled to iron (Fe) reduction in the absence of oxygen and nitrate/nitrite (NO3-/NO2-) has been reported by several investigators and referred to as Feammox. Feammox is a biological reaction, where Fe(III) is the electron acceptor, which is reduced to Fe(II), and NH4+ is the electron donor, which is oxidized to NO2-. Through a 180-day anaerobic incubation experiment, and using PCR-DGGE, 454-pyosequecing and qPCR analysis, we have shown that an Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6, a previously unreported species in the Acidimicrobiaceae family, might be either responsible or plays a key role in the Feammox process, We have enriched these Feammox bacteria (65.8% in terms of cell numbers) in a membrane reactor, and isolated the pure Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 strain in an autotrophic medium. In samples collected and then incubated from a series of local wetland-, upland-, as well as storm-water detention pond-sediments, Feammox activity was only detected in acidic soil environments that contain Fe oxides. Using primers we developed for this purpose, Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 was detected in all incubations where Feammox was observed. Anaerobic incubations of Feammox enrichment cultures adjusted to different pH, revealed that the optimal pH for Feammox is 4 ~ 5, and the reaction does not proceed when pH > 7. Feammox was still proceeding at pH as low as 2. In Feammox culture amended with different Fe(III) sources, Feammox reaction proceeded only when Fe oxides (ferrihydrite or goethite ) were supplied, whereas samples incubated with ferric chloride or ferric citrate showed no measurable NH4+ oxidation. Furthermore, we have also determined from incubation experiments conducted with a temperature gradient (10 ~ 35℃), that the Feammox process was active when the temperature is above 15℃, and the optimal temperature is 20℃. Incubations of enrichment culture with 79% Feammox bacteria appeared to remove circa 8% more NH4+ at 20ºC than at

  15. Nitrification and growth of autotrophic nitrifying bacteria and Thaumarchaeota in the coastal North Sea

    OpenAIRE

    B. Veuger; Pitcher, A.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrification and the associated growth of autotrophic nitrifiers, as well as the contributions of bacteria and Thaumarchaeota to total autotrophic C-fixation by nitrifiers were investigated in the Dutch coastal North Sea from October 2007 to March 2008. Rates of nitrification were determined by incubation of water samples with 15N-ammonium and growth of autotrophic nitrifiers was measured by incubation with 13C-DIC in the presence and absen...

  16. The Effects of Perchlorates on the Permafrost Methanogens: Implication for Autotrophic Life on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Shcherbakova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial permafrost represents a range of possible cryogenic extraterrestrial ecosystems on Earth-like planets without obvious surface ice, such as Mars. The autotrophic and chemolithotrophic psychrotolerant methanogens are more likely than aerobes to function as a model for life forms that may exist in frozen subsurface environments on Mars, which has no free oxygen, inaccessible organic matter, and extremely low amounts of unfrozen water. Our research on the genesis of methane, its content and distribution in permafrost horizons of different ages and origin demonstrated the presence of methane in permanently frozen fine-grained sediments. Earlier, we isolated and described four strains of methanogenic archaea of Methanobacterium and Methanosarcina genera from samples of Pliocene and Holocene permafrost from Eastern Siberia. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on the growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. Furthermore, as shown in the studies strain M2T M. arcticum, probably can use perchlorate anion as an electron acceptor in anaerobic methane oxidation. Earth’s subzero subsurface environments are the best approximation of environments on Mars, which is most likely to harbor methanogens; thus, a biochemical understanding of these pathways is expected to provide a basis for designing experiments to detect autotrophic methane-producing life forms on Mars.

  17. Lipid-based liquid biofuels from autotrophic microalgae: energetic and environmental performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Reijnders

    2013-01-01

    Commercial cultivation of autotrophic microalgae for food production dates back to the 1950s. Autotrophic microalgae have also been proposed as a source for lipid-based liquid biofuels. As yet, there is no commercial production of such biofuels and estimated near-term prices are far in excess of fos

  18. Bioleaching mechanism of Zn, Pb, In, Ag, Cd and As from Pb/Zn smelting slag by autotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Huang, Qifei; Li, Ting; Xin, Baoping; Chen, Shi; Guo, Xingming; Liu, Changhao; Li, Yuping

    2015-08-15

    A few studies have focused on release of valuable/toxic metals from Pb/Zn smelting slag by heterotrophic bioleaching using expensive yeast extract as an energy source. The high leaching cost greatly limits the practical potential of the method. In this work, autotrophic bioleaching using cheap sulfur or/and pyrite as energy matter was firstly applied to tackle the smelting slag and the bioleaching mechanisms were explained. The results indicated autotrophic bioleaching can solubilize valuable/toxic metals from slag, yielding maximum extraction efficiencies of 90% for Zn, 86% for Cd and 71% for In, although the extraction efficiencies of Pb, As and Ag were poor. The bioleaching performance of Zn, Cd and Pb was independent of leaching system, and leaching mechanism was acid dissolution. A maximum efficiency of 25% for As was achieved by acid dissolution in sulfursulfur oxidizing bacteria (S-SOB), but the formation of FeAsO4 reduced extraction efficiency in mixed energy source - mixed culture (MS-MC). Combined works of acid dissolution and Fe(3+) oxidation in MS-MC was responsible for the highest extraction efficiency of 71% for In. Ag was present in the slag as refractory AgPb4(AsO4)3 and AgFe2S3, so extraction did not occur. PMID:25996622

  19. Effect of inorganic carbon on the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, You-Peng; Li, Shan; Fang, Fang; Guo, Jin-Song; Zhang, Qiang; Gao, Xu

    2012-12-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) are autotrophic microorganisms. Inorganic carbon (IC) is their main carbon source. The effects of IC limitation on AOB and AnAOB in the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) were examined. The optimal IC concentration in the influent was investigated. The start-up time of the CANON process from the activated sludge in the SBBR was 80 d under controlled free ammonia (FA) conditions and sufficient IC source. The AOB and AnAOB activities were limited by an IC concentration of 50 mg-C-L(-1) in the influent, whilst the nitrogen loading rate (NLR) was 200 mg-N x L(-1) x d(-1). The experiment on recovering the influent IC showed that AOB and AnAOB activities were affected by the IC limitation, and not by the pH or FA, at 200mg-N x L(-1) x d(-1) NLR and 50mg-C x L(-1) IC in the CANON process. The activities were recovered by increasing the IC concentration in the influent. From an economic point of view, the optimal IC concentration in the influent was 250mg-C x L(-1) at 200mg-N x L(-1) x d(-1) NLR in this CANON system. PMID:23437661

  20. Autotrophic nitrogen removal in one lab-scale vertical submerged biofilm reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhiwei; Chen, Yingxu; Li, Wenhong; Yang, Shangyuan; Du, Ping

    In this study, the process performance of a new vertical submerged biofilm reactor for complete autotrophic ammonia removal was investigated using synthetic wastewater. The main objectives of this study were to evaluate the flexibility of the reactor, achieve partial autotrophic nitrification with influent ammonium nitrogen ranging from 40 to 280 mg L -1, and achieve a stable half partial autotrophic nitrification by controlling hydraulic retention time (HRT) and alkalinity. A very low concentration of nitrate was observed in the effluent during nitrification. Then autotrophic denitrification revealed Anammox bacteria were present and active in the central anaerobic parts of the bioreactor which was inoculated with a mixed microbial consortium from activated sludge. The results of this study demonstrated that autotrophic denitrification processes can coexist with heterotrophic denitrifying processes in the same environment even if Anammox bacteria were less competitive than heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria.

  1. Coprecipitation of Pu(IV) with Fe(III) and Cr(III) hydroxides from nitrate-acetate solutions in hydrothermal conditions modeling deep disposal of liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precipitation of Fe(III), Cr(III), Ni(II), Mn(II) and coprecipitation of Pu with Fe(III) and Cr(III) from nitrate-acetate solutions are investigated. It is shown that plutonium coprecipitates in noticeable degree at pH≥4. Plutonium is included in precipitate composition only when FeOOH phase is forming; formation of Pu(IV) compound with Fe2O3 does not observed. In conditions studied in water phase plutonium can exist in oxidation state +4 forming monoacetate or hydroxyacetate complexes

  2. Energetic Limitations on Microbial Respiration of Organic Compounds using Aqueous Fe(III) Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, H.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic matter constitutes up to 75% of the terrestrial carbon stock. Microorganisms mediate the breakdown of organic compounds and the return of carbon to the atmosphere, predominantly through respiration. Microbial respiration requires an electron acceptor and an electron donor such as small fatty acids, organic acids, alcohols, sugars, and other molecules that differ in oxidation state of carbon. Carbon redox state affects how much energy is required to oxidize a molecule through respiration. Therefore, different organic compounds should offer a spectrum of energies to respiring microorganisms. However, microbial respiration has traditionally focused on the availability and reduction potential of electron acceptors, ignoring the organic electron donor. We found through incubation experiments that the organic compound serving as electron donor determined how rapidly Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 respires organic substrate and the extent of reduction of the electron acceptor. We simulated a range of energetically favorable to unfavorable electron acceptors using organic chelators bound to Fe(III) with equilibrium stability constants ranging from log(K) of 11.5 to 25.0 for the 1:1 complex, where more stable complexes are less favorable for microbial respiration. Organic substrates varied in nominal oxidation state of carbon from +2 to -2. The most energetically favorable substrate, lactate, promoted up to 30x more rapid increase in percent Fe(II) compared to less favorable substrates such as formate. This increased respiration on lactate was more substantial with less stable Fe(III)-chelate complexes. Intriguingly, this pattern contradicts respiration rate predicted by nominal oxidation state of carbon. Our results suggest that organic substrates will be consumed so long as the energetic toll corresponding to the electron donor half reaction is counterbalanced by the energy available from the electron accepting half reaction. We propose using the chemical

  3. Autotrophic and heterotrophic activity in Arctic first-year sea ice: seasonal study from Malene Bight, SW Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Dorte Haubjerg; Kristensen, Morten; Rysgaard, Søren; Glud, Ronnie Nøhr; Hansen, Per Juel; Hillingsøe, Karen Marie

    2010-01-01

    followed by an algal bloom in late March and April, leading to a net autotrophic community. During February and March, the oxygen level in the bag incubations remained constant, validating the low balanced heterotrophic and autotrophic activity. As the autotrophic activity exceeded the heterotrophic...

  4. Fe(II) Sorption On Pyrophyllite: Effect Of Structural Fe(III) (impurity) In Pyrophyllite On Nature Of Layered Double Hydroxide (LDH) Secondary Mineral Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starcher, Autumn N.; Li, Wei; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Elzinga, E. J.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2016-06-18

    Fe(II)-Al(III)-LDH (layered double hydroxide) phases have been shown to form from reactions of aqueous Fe(II) with Fe-free Al-bearing minerals (phyllosilicate/clays and Al-oxides). To our knowledge, the effect of small amounts of structural Fe(III) impurities in “neutral” clays on such reactions, however, were not studied. In this study to understand the role of structural Fe(III) impurity in clays, laboratory batch studies with pyrophyllite (10 g/L), an Al-bearing phyllosilicate, containing small amounts of structural Fe(III) impurities and 0.8 mM and 3 mM Fe(II) (both natural and enriched in 57Fe) were carried out at pH 7.5 under anaerobic conditions (4% H2 – 96% N2 atmosphere). Samples were taken up to 4 weeks for analysis by Fe-X-ray absorption spectroscopy and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. In addition to the precipitation of Fe(II)-Al(III)-LDH phases as observed in earlier studies with pure minerals (no Fe(III) impurities in the minerals), the analyses indicated formation of small amounts of Fe(III) containing solid(s), most probably hybrid a Fe(II)-Al(III)/Fe(III)-LDH phase. The mechanism of Fe(II) oxidation was not apparent but most likely was due to interfacial electron transfer from the sorbed Fe(II) to the structural Fe(III) and/or surface-sorption-induced electron-transfer from the sorbed Fe(II) to the clay lattice. Increase in the Fe(II)/Al ratio of the LDH with reaction time further indicated the complex nature of the samples. This research provides evidence for the formation of both Fe(II)-Al(III)-LDH and Fe(II)-Fe(III)/Al(III)-LDH-like phases during reactions of Fe(II) in systems that mimic the natural environments. Better understanding Fe phase formation in complex laboratory studies will improve models of natural redox systems.

  5. Targeting Autotrophic and Lithotrophic Microorganisms from Fumarolic Ice Caves of Mt. Erebus, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitori, R.; Davis, R.; Connell, L.; Kelley, M.; Staudigel, H.; Tebo, B. M.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial and aquatic volcanic oligotrophic environments can host microorganisms that obtain their energy from reduced inorganic chemicals present in volcanic rocks and soils. We sampled basaltic rock from terrestrial Dark Oligotrophic Volcanic Ecosystems (DOVEs) located in two fumarole ice caves, Warren and Warren West, located near the summit of Mt. Erebus, Antarctica. For reference, we sampled a similar cave, Harry's Dream, which receives continuous light during the Austral summer. We report here culturing data for bacterial and eukaryotic microbes from rocky soils in these caves when targeting lithotrophic organisms using media containing reduced inorganic compounds (Mn2+, Fe2+, NH4+). In addition, to test for the possible presence of inorganic carbon fixation, we screened samples for the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) gene. Culturing of soil samples on media targeting both autotrophs and heterotrophs yielded a diverse collection of generally slow-growing colonies of bacteria (majority), fungi and non-fungal eukaryotes. Manganese(II)-oxidizing colonies were identified in Warren and Harry's Dream, and these exhibited two colony morphotypes upon subculturing. Sequencing of the PCR amplified 16S rRNA gene identified a bacterium distantly related to Pseudonocardia sp., a genus with known manganese oxidizers. Other bacteria enriched included members of the Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. There was a low diversity in cultured eukaryotes representing several potential undescribed species (Geomyces sp., Penicillium sp.) and isolates that may represent alternate, previously undescribed habitats and forms (Psilolechia leprosa, Alternaria alternata). One Warren isolate was a 99% 16S rRNA match to the N2 fixer Bradyrhizobium sp.; when inoculated into liquid medium specific for N2 fixers, growth was maintained upon subculture. Putative iron oxidizers were also enriched from the two DOVE caves, using slush agar iron

  6. Carbon mineralization in Arctic sediments northeast of Svalbard: Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction as principal anaerobic respiratory pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandieken, Verona; Nickel, Maren; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2006-01-01

    Carbon oxidation rates and pathways were determined in 3 sediments at latitude 79 degrees to 81 degrees N in the Barents Sea, where the ice cover restricts primary production to a few months of the year. Oxygen uptake (1.5 to 3.5 imnol m(-2) d(-1)) and sulfate reduction (= 60 mu mol cm(-3)) and Fe......(III) (>= 108 mu mol cm(-3)), dissimilatory Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction contributed between 69 and >= 90% to anaerobic carbon mineralization in the upper 10 cm of the sediments. At 2 of the 3 stations, sulfate reduction rates were below our detection limit of 1 nmol cm(-3) d(-1). Solid Mn and Fe(III) were...... and sulfate reduction at 5 to 10 cm. Rates of microbial carbon oxidation were low compared to those in fjords on the west and south coasts of Svalbard. This is in accordance with the limited organic carbon supply by primary and secondary productivity caused by long periods of ice coverage....

  7. Amperometric determination of V(V), Cr(III), Mn(VII), Cr(VI) and Fe(III) with 3-mercaptopropanoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amperometric determination of V(V), Cr(III), Mn(VII), Cr(VI) and Fe(III) is reported with the help of 3-mercaptopropanoic acid (MPSH). The fundamental reaction involved in case of the first two species is complexation while that in case of Mn(VII) is oxidation of MPSH; the last two species do not interact chemically with the acid and the new methods reported are based on the phenomenon of current compensation. Metal ion: MPSH ratio is 1:2 for V(V) and Cr(III), 1:4 for Cr(VI) and 1:0.66 for Fe(III); this ratio for Mn(VII) is 1:1 if the metal ion is used as titrant and 2:1 if MPSH is used in that capacity. Tolerance for diverse foreign ions has also been worked out. (author). 14 refs., 2 tabs

  8. An autotrophic H 2 -oxidizing, nitrate-respiring, Tc(VII)-reducing A cidovorax sp. isolated from a subsurface oxic-anoxic transition zone: H 2 -oxidizing, Tc-reducing Acidovorax spp.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fredrickson, James K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Plymale, Andrew E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dohnalkova, Alice C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Resch, Charles T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McKinley, James P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shi, Liang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-08

    Increasing concentrations of H2 with depth were observed across a geologic unconformity and associated redox transition zone in the subsurface at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington, USA. An opposing gradient characterized by decreasing O2 and nitrate concentrations was consistent with microbial-catalyzed biogeochemical processes. Sterile sand was incubated in situ within a multi-level sampler placed across the redox transition zone to evaluate the potential for Tc(VII) reduction and for enrichment of H2-oxidizing denitrifiers capable of reducing Tc(VII). H2-driven TcO4- reduction was detected in sand incubated at all depths but was strongest in material from a depth of 17.1 m. Acidovorax spp. were isolated from H2-nitrate enrichments from colonized sand from 15.1 m, with one representative, strain JHL-9, subsequently characterized. JHL-9 grew on acetate with either O2 or nitrate as electron acceptor (data not shown) and on medium with bicarbonate, H2 and nitrate. JHL-9 also reduced pertechnetate (TcO4-) under denitrifying conditions with H2 as the electron donor. H2-oxidizing Acidovorax spp. in the subsurface at Hanford and other locations may contribute to the maintenance of subsurface redox gradients and offer the potential for Tc(VII) reduction.

  9. The influence of Fe(III) on oil biodegradation in excessively moistened soils and sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.; Trofimov, S. Ya.; Shoba, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    Soils are self-purified from oil slowly, in the north, in particular, where hydromorphic conditions and low temperatures hinder the process. Oxidation of oil hydrocarbons depends on the type of electron acceptors and decreases in the following sequence: denitrification > Mn4+ reduction > Fe3+ reduction > sulfate reduction > methanogenesis. Usually, not all of these redox reactions develop in contaminated excessively moistened soils and sediments. Fe(III) reduction and methanogenesis are the most common: the latter is manifested near the contamination source, while the former develops in less contaminated areas. Fe reduction hinders the methanogenesis. In oil-contaminated areas, Fe reduction is also combined with sulfate reduction, the latter intensifying Fe reduction due to the formation of iron sulfides. Concurrently with oil degradation in excessively moistened soils and sediments, the composition of iron compounds changes due to the increasing Fe(II) share magnetite, as well as siderite and ferrocalcite (in calcareous deposits), and iron sulfides (in S-containing medium) are formed.

  10. Intercalation of Coordinatively Unsaturated Fe(III) Ion within Interpenetrated Metal-Organic Framework MOF-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Rebecca J; Burns, Thomas; Greer, Samuel M; Kobera, Libor; Stoian, Sebastian A; Korobkov, Ilia; Hill, Stephen; Bryce, David L; Woo, Tom K; Murugesu, Muralee

    2016-06-01

    Coordinatively unsaturated Fe(III) metal sites were successfully incorporated into the iconic MOF-5 framework. This new structure, Fe(III) -iMOF-5, is the first example of an interpenetrated MOF linked through intercalated metal ions. Structural characterization was performed with single-crystal and powder XRD, followed by extensive analysis by spectroscopic methods and solid-state NMR, which reveals the paramagnetic ion through its interaction with the framework. EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopy confirmed that the intercalated ions were indeed Fe(III) , whereas DFT calculations were employed to ascertain the unique pentacoordinate architecture around the Fe(III) ion. Interestingly, this is also the first crystallographic evidence of pentacoordinate Zn(II) within the MOF-5 SBU. This new MOF structure displays the potential for metal-site addition as a framework connector, thus creating further opportunity for the innovative development of new MOF materials. PMID:27061210

  11. Radiosensitization by cobalt and Fe(III) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention concerns the rendering of hypoxic cells more sensitive to irradiation by treatment with a Co(III) to Fe(III) co-ordination compound selected from the group consisting of- (1) compounds having the formula: [CoNnX6-n]y where n has a value of 3 or 4; N is an uncharged nitrogen donor atom that is contained in a ligand; X represents an anionic ligand; and y represents the charge on the complex; (2) compounds having the formula: [CoA2X1D]y1 where A represents a bidentate or tetradentate negative ligand containing N or O donor atoms; X1 and D represent the same or different monodentate ligands; and y1 represents a positive or negative charge on the complex; (3) compounds having the formula: [CoZ3] where Z represents a chelating mononegative ligand; and (4) Compounds of the formula: [FeTT1]+ where T and T1, which may be the same or different, represent mononegative tridentate ligands

  12. Effects of HRT and water temperature on nitrogen removal in autotrophic gravel filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing-Hang; He, Sheng-Bing; Wu, Su-Qing; Huang, Jung-Chen; Zhou, Wei-Li; Chen, Xue-Chu

    2016-03-01

    Organic Carbon added to low ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C/N ratio) wastewater to enhance heterotrophic denitrification performance might lead to higher operating costs and secondary pollution. In this study, sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3) was applied as an electron donor for a gravel filter (one kind of constructed wetland) to investigate effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and water temperature on the nitrate removal efficiency. The results show that with an HRT of 12 h, the average total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiencies were 91% at 15-20 °C and 18% at 3-6 °C, respectively. When HRT increased to 24 h, the average TN removal increased accordingly to 41% at 3-6 °C, suggesting denitrification performance was improved by extended HRT at low water temperatures. Due to denitrification, 96% of added nitrate nitrogen (NO3(-)-N) was converted to nitrogen gas, with a mean flux of nitrous oxide (N2O) was 0.0268-0.1500 ug m(-2) h(-1), while 98.86% of thiosulfate was gradually converted to sulfate throughout the system. Thus, our results show that the sulfur driven autotrophic denitrification constructed wetland demonstrated an excellent removal efficiency of nitrate for wastewater treatment. The HRT and water temperature proved to be two influencing factors in this constructed wetland treatment system. PMID:26766357

  13. Coupling between anammox and autotrophic denitrification for simultaneous removal of ammonium and sulfide by enriched marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Del Toro, E Emilia; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, the capacity of enrichments derived from marine sediments collected from different sites of the Mexican littoral to perform anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) coupled to sulfide-dependent denitrification for simultaneous removal of ammonium and sulfide linked to nitrite reduction was evaluated. Sulfide-dependent denitrification out-competed anammox during the simultaneous oxidation of sulfide and ammonium. Significant accumulation of elemental sulfur (ca. 14-30 % of added sulfide) occurred during the coupling between the two respiratory processes, while ammonium was partly oxidized (31-47 %) due to nitrite limitation imposed in sediment incubations. Nevertheless, mass balances revealed up to 38 % more oxidation of the electron donors available (ammonium and sulfide) than that expected from stoichiometry. Recycling of nitrite, from nitrate produced through anammox, is proposed to contribute to extra oxidation of sulfide, while additional ammonium oxidation is suggested by sulfate-reducing anammox (SR-anammox). The complex interaction between nitrogenous and sulfurous compounds occurring through the concomitant presence of autotrophic denitrification, conventional anammox and SR-anammox may significantly drive the nitrogen and sulfur fluxes in marine environments. PMID:26994921

  14. Current views on the regulation of autotrophic carbon dioxide fixation via the Calvin cycle in bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Dijkhuizen, L; Harder, W

    1984-01-01

    The Calvin cycle of carbon dioxide fixation constitutes a biosynthetic pathway for the generation of (multi-carbon) intermediates of central metabolism from the one-carbon compound carbon dioxide. The product of this cycle can be used as a precursor for the synthesis of all components of cell material. Autotrophic carbon dioxide fixation is energetically expensive and it is therefore not surprising that in the various groups of autotrophic bacteria the operation of the cycle is under strict m...

  15. Investigation of mixotrophic, heterotrophic, and autotrophic growth of Chlorella vulgaris under agricultural waste medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Mirzaie, M A; Kalbasi, M; Mousavi, S M; Ghobadian, B

    2016-01-01

    Growth of Chlorella vulgaris and its lipid production were investigated under autotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic conditions. Cheap agricultural waste molasses and corn steep liquor from industries were used as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. Chlorella vulgaris grew remarkably under this agricultural waste medium, which resulted in a reduction in the final cost of the biodiesel production. Maximum dry weight of 2.62 g L(-1) was obtained in mixotrophic growth with the highest lipid concentration of 0.86 g L(-1). These biomass and lipid concentrations were, respectively, 140% and 170% higher than autotrophic growth and 300% and 1200% higher than heterotrophic growth. In mixotrophic growth, independent or simultaneous occurrence of autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolisms was investigated. The growth of the microalgae was observed to take place first heterotrophically to a minimum substrate concentration with a little fraction in growth under autotrophic metabolism, and then the cells grew more autotrophically. It was found that mixotrophic growth was not a simple combination of heterotrophic and autotrophic growth. PMID:25807048

  16. Selective transport of Fe(III) using ionic imprinted polymer (IIP) membrane particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djunaidi, Muhammad Cholid; Jumina, Siswanta, Dwi; Ulbricht, Mathias

    2015-12-01

    The membrane particles was prepared from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polymer IIP with weight ratios of 1: 2 and 1: 1 using different adsorbent templates and casting thickness. The permeability of membrane towards Fe(III) and also mecanism of transport were studied. The selectivity of the membrane for Fe(III) was studied by performing adsorption experiments also with Cr(III) separately. In this study, the preparation of Ionic Imprinted Polymer (IIP) membrane particles for selective transport of Fe (III) had been done using polyeugenol as functional polymer. Polyeugenol was then imprinted with Fe (III) and then crosslinked with PEGDE under alkaline condition to produce polyeugenol-Fe-PEGDE polymer aggregates. The agrregates was then crushed and sieved using mesh size of 80 and the powder was then used to prepare the membrane particles by mixing it with PVA (Mr 125,000) solution in 1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) solvent. The membrane was obtained after casting at a speed of 25 m/s and soaking in NaOH solution overnight. The membrane sheet was then cut and Fe(III) was removed by acid to produce IIP membrane particles. Analysis of the membrane and its constituent was done by XRD, SEM and size selectivity test. Experimental results showed the transport of Fe(III) was faster with the decrease of membrane thickness, while the higher concentration of template ion correlates with higher Fe(III) being transported. However, the transport of Fe(III) was slower for higher concentration of PVA in the membrane. IImparticles works through retarded permeation mechanism, where Fe(III) was bind to the active side of IIP. The active side of IIP membrane was dominated by the -OH groups. The selectivity of all IIP membranes was confirmed as they were all unable to transport Cr (III), while NIP (Non-imprinted Polymer) membrane was able transport Cr (III).

  17. Expanding leaves of mature deciduous forest trees rapidly become autotrophic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, Sonja G; Schädel, Christina

    2010-10-01

    Emerging leaves in evergreen tree species are supplied with carbon (C) from the previous year's foliage. In deciduous trees, no older leaves are present, and the early phase of leaf development must rely on C reserves from other tissues. How soon developing leaves become autotrophic and switch from being C sinks to sources has rarely been studied in mature forest trees, and simultaneous comparisons of species are scarce. Using a canopy crane and a simple (13)CO(2)-pulse-labelling technique, we demonstrate that young leaves of mature trees in three European deciduous species (Fagus sylvatica L., Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., Tilia platyphyllos Scop.) start assimilating CO(2) at a very early stage of development (10-50% expanded). One month after labelling, all leaves were still strongly (13)C enriched, suggesting that recent photosynthates had been incorporated into slow turnover pools such as cellulose or lignin and thus had contributed to leaf growth. In line with previous studies performed at the same site, we found stronger incorporation of recent photosynthates into growing tissues of T. platyphyllos compared with F. sylvatica and Q. petraea. Non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) concentrations analysed for one of the three study species (F. sylvatica) showed that sugar and starch pools rapidly increased during leaf development, suggesting that newly developed leaves soon produce more NSC than can be used for growth. In conclusion, our findings indicate that expanding leaves of mature deciduous trees become C autonomous at an early stage of development despite the presence of vast amounts of mobile carbohydrate reserves. PMID:20688879

  18. The contribution of Fe(III) and humic acid reduction to ecosystem respiration in drained thaw lake basins of the Arctic Coastal Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, David A.; Raab, Theodore K.; Goria, Dominic; Zlamal, Jaime

    2013-04-01

    research showed that anaerobic respiration using iron (Fe) oxides as terminal electron acceptor contributed substantially to ecosystem respiration (ER) in a drained thaw lake basin (DTLB) on the Arctic coastal plain. As DTLBs age, the surface organic layer thickens, progressively burying the Fe-rich mineral layers. We therefore hypothesized that Fe(III) availability and Fe reduction would decline with basin age. We studied four DTLBs across an age gradient, comparing seasonal changes in the oxidation state of dissolved and extractable Fe pools and the estimated contribution of Fe reduction to ER. The organic layer thickness did not strictly increase with age for these four sites, though soil Fe levels decreased with increasing organic layer thickness. However, there were surprisingly high levels of Fe minerals in organic layers, especially in the ancient basin where cryoturbation may have transported Fe upward through the profile. Net reduction of Fe oxides occurred in the latter half of the summer and contributed an estimated 40-45% to ecosystem respiration in the sites with the thickest organic layers and 61-63% in the sites with the thinnest organic layers. All sites had high concentrations of soluble Fe(II) and Fe(III), explained by the presence of siderophores, and this pool became progressively more reduced during the first half of the summer. Redox titrations with humic acid (HA) extracts and chelated Fe support our view that this pattern indicates the reduction of HA during this interval. We conclude that Fe(III) and HA reductions contribute broadly to ER in the Arctic coastal plain.

  19. Homogeneous (Fe(III) and Heterogeneous (TiO2) Photocatalysts for Pollutants Removal from the Aquatic Compartment: Comparison and Complementarity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Měšťánková, H.; Mailhot, G.; Krýsa, J.; Jirkovský, Jaromír; Bolte, M.

    Goslar : CUTEC, 2004 - (Vogelpohl, A.), s. 198-203 [International Conference on Oxidation Technologies for Water and Wastewater Treatment /3./. Goslar (DE), 18.05.2003-22.05.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/02/0983; GA ČR GA104/02/0662 Grant ostatní: Barrande(FR) 203/20 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : Fe(III) aquacomplexes * photocatalyst * photodegradation process Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  20. Bioavailability of Fe(III) in natural soils and the impact on mobility of inorganic contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosson, David S.; Cowan, Robert M.; Young, Lily Y.; Hacherl, Eric L.; Scala, David J.

    2002-10-03

    Inorganic contaminants, such as heavy metals and radionuclides, can adhere to insoluble Fe(III) minerals resulting in decreased mobility of these contaminants through subsurface environments. Dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (DIRB), by reducing insoluble Fe(III) to soluble Fe(II), may enhance contaminant mobility. The Savannah River Site, South Carolina (SRS), has been subjected to both heavy metal and radionuclide contamination. The overall objective of this project is to investigate the release of inorganic contaminants such as heavy metals and radionuclides that are bound to solid phase soil Fe complexes and to elucidate the mechanisms for mobilization of these contaminants that can be associated with microbial Fe(III) reduction. This is being accomplished by (i) using uncontaminated and contaminated soils from SRS as prototype systems, (ii) evaluating the diversity of DIRBs within the samples and isolating cultures for further study, (iii) using batch microcosms to evaluate the bioavailability of Fe(III) from pure minerals and SRS soils, (iv) developing kinetic and mass transfer models that reflect the system dynamics, and (v) carrying out soil column studies to elucidate the dynamics and interactions amongst Fe(III) reduction, remineralization and contaminant mobility.

  1. Co-modification of F− and Fe(III) ions as a facile strategy towards effective separation of photogenerated electrons and holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The Fe(III)/F-TiO2 photocatalyst was prepared by a facile, wet chemical method. • Fe(III)/F-TiO2 exhibited higher photocatalytic activity than TiO2, Fe(III)/TiO2 and F-TiO2. • The synergistic effect of Fe(III) and F ions contributed to the enhanced activity of TiO2. - Abstract: The combination of cocatalysts for simultaneously promoting rapid transfer of photogenerated electrons and holes is one of the effective strategies to improve photocatalytic activity of semiconductor photocatalysts. In this study, highly efficient TiO2 photocatalyst with co-modification of F and Fe(III) ions was prepared by a facile two wet-chemical method including Fe(III) ions impregnation and then F-ion adsorption on the TiO2 surface. The photocatalytic results demonstrated that the simultaneously modified Fe(III)/F-TiO2 photocatalyst exhibited obvious enhancement of photocatalytic performance compared with the pure TiO2 and single-component modified Fe(III)/TiO2 and F-TiO2. Based on the present experimental results, we propose a possible synergistic effect of Fe(III) and F ions to illustrate the enhanced photocatalytic activity of Fe(III)/F-TiO2 photocatalyst, namely the Fe(III) ions act as effective active sites to rapidly transfer the photogenerated electrons in the CB of TiO2 and then reduce oxygen, while F ions work as other effective active sites to rapidly transfer the photogenerated holes in the VB of TiO2 and then form free hydroxide radical to oxidize the organic substances. As a result, the transfer rate and the interfacial catalytic reaction of photogenerated electrons and holes were simultaneously accelerated, which resulted in the enhanced photocatalytic performance of Fe(III)/F-TiO2 photocatalyst. Due to the low cost and abundant resource of Fe and F, the obtained photocatalyst is promising for practical application. Furthermore, the present work can provide some good ideas for the rational preparation of new and high

  2. Co-modification of F{sup −} and Fe(III) ions as a facile strategy towards effective separation of photogenerated electrons and holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xuefei; Yu, Rui; Wang, Ping; Chen, Feng [School of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Life Sciences, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Yu, Huogen, E-mail: yuhuogen@whut.edu.cn [School of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Life Sciences, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); State Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for Architectures, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The Fe(III)/F-TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst was prepared by a facile, wet chemical method. • Fe(III)/F-TiO{sub 2} exhibited higher photocatalytic activity than TiO{sub 2}, Fe(III)/TiO{sub 2} and F-TiO{sub 2}. • The synergistic effect of Fe(III) and F ions contributed to the enhanced activity of TiO{sub 2}. - Abstract: The combination of cocatalysts for simultaneously promoting rapid transfer of photogenerated electrons and holes is one of the effective strategies to improve photocatalytic activity of semiconductor photocatalysts. In this study, highly efficient TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst with co-modification of F and Fe(III) ions was prepared by a facile two wet-chemical method including Fe(III) ions impregnation and then F-ion adsorption on the TiO{sub 2} surface. The photocatalytic results demonstrated that the simultaneously modified Fe(III)/F-TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst exhibited obvious enhancement of photocatalytic performance compared with the pure TiO{sub 2} and single-component modified Fe(III)/TiO{sub 2} and F-TiO{sub 2}. Based on the present experimental results, we propose a possible synergistic effect of Fe(III) and F ions to illustrate the enhanced photocatalytic activity of Fe(III)/F-TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst, namely the Fe(III) ions act as effective active sites to rapidly transfer the photogenerated electrons in the CB of TiO{sub 2} and then reduce oxygen, while F ions work as other effective active sites to rapidly transfer the photogenerated holes in the VB of TiO{sub 2} and then form free hydroxide radical to oxidize the organic substances. As a result, the transfer rate and the interfacial catalytic reaction of photogenerated electrons and holes were simultaneously accelerated, which resulted in the enhanced photocatalytic performance of Fe(III)/F-TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst. Due to the low cost and abundant resource of Fe and F, the obtained photocatalyst is promising for practical application. Furthermore, the

  3. Direct Involvement of ombB, omaB and omcB Genes in Extracellular Reduction of Fe(III) by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yimo; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang

    2015-10-01

    The tandem gene clusters orfR-ombB-omaB-omcB and orfS-ombC-omaC-omcC of the metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA are responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite [a poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide]. Each gene cluster encodes a putative transcriptional factor (OrfR/OrfS), a porin-like outer-membrane protein (OmbB/OmbC), a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt, OmaB/OmaC) and an outer-membrane c-Cyt (OmcB/OmcC). The individual roles of OmbB, OmaB and OmcB in extracellular reduction of Fe(III), however, have remained either uninvestigated or controversial. Here, we showed that replacements of ombB, omaB, omcB and ombB-omaB with an antibiotic gene in the presence of ombC-omaC-omcC had no impact on reduction of Fe(III)-citrate by G. sulfurreducens PCA. Disruption of ombB, omaB, omcB and ombB-omaB in the absence of ombC-omaC-omcC, however, severely impaired the bacterial ability to reduce Fe(III)-citrate as well as ferrihydrite. These results unequivocally demonstrate an overlapping role of ombB-omaB-omcB and ombC-omaC-omcC in extracellular Fe(III) reduction by G. sulfurreducens PCA. Involvement of both ombB-omaB-omcB and ombC-omaC-omcC in extracellular Fe(III) reduction reflects the importance of these trans-outer membrane protein complexes in the physiology of this bacterium. Moreover, the kinetics of Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite reduction by these mutants in the absence of ombC-omaC-omcC were nearly identical, which clearly show that OmbB, OmaB and OmcB contribute equally to extracellular Fe(III) reduction. Finally, orfS was found to have a negative impact on the extracellular reduction of Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite in G. sulfurreducens PCA probably by serving as a transcriptional repressor.

  4. Sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification significantly reduces N2O emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiming; Zhao, Qing; Lu, Hui; Ding, Zhi; Meng, Liao; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-03-01

    The Sulfate reduction-Autotrophic denitrification-Nitrification Integrated (SANI) process build on anaerobic carbon conversion through biological sulfate reduction and autotrophic denitrification by using the sulfide byproduct from the previous reaction. This study confirmed extra decreases in N2O emissions from the sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification by investigating N2O reduction, accumulation, and emission in the presence of different sulfide/nitrate (S/N) mass ratios at pH 7 in a long-term laboratory-scale granular sludge autotrophic denitrification reactor. The N2O reduction rate was linearly proportional to the sulfide concentration, which confirmed that no sulfide inhibition of N2O reductase occurred. At S/N = 5.0 g-S/g-N, this rate resulted by sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrifying granular sludge (average granule size = 701 μm) was 27.7 mg-N/g-VSS/h (i.e., 2 and 4 times greater than those at 2.5 and 0.8 g-S/g-N, respectively). Sulfide actually stimulates rather than inhibits N2O reduction no matter what granule size of sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrifying sludge engaged. The accumulations of N2O, nitrite and free nitrous acid (FNA) with average granule size 701 μm of sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrifying granular sludge engaged at S/N = 5.0 g-S/g-N were 4.7%, 11.4% and 4.2% relative to those at 3.0 g-S/g-N, respectively. The accumulation of FNA can inhibit N2O reduction and increase N2O accumulation during sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification. In addition, the N2O gas emission level from the reactor significantly increased from 14.1 ± 0.5 ppmv (0.002% of the N load) to 3707.4 ± 36.7 ppmv (0.405% of the N load) as the S/N mass ratio in the influent decreased from 2.1 to 1.4 g-S/g-N over the course of the 120-day continuous monitoring period. Sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification may significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions from biological nutrient removal when sulfur conversion processes are applied. PMID

  5. Woodchip-sulfur based heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (WSHAD) process for nitrate contaminated water remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Feng, Chuanping; Hu, Weiwu; Xi, Beidou; Chen, Nan; Zhao, Baowei; Liu, Ying; Hao, Chunbo; Pu, Jiaoyang

    2016-02-01

    Nitrate contaminated water can be effectively treated by simultaneous heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (HAD). In the present study, woodchips and elemental sulfur were used as co-electron donors for HAD. It was found that ammonium salts could enhance the denitrifying activity of the Thiobacillus bacteria, which utilize the ammonium that is produced by the dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in the woodchip-sulfur based heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (WSHAD) process. The denitrification performance of the WSHAD process (reaction constants range from 0.05485 h(-1) to 0.06637 h(-1)) is better than that of sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification (reaction constants range from 0.01029 h(-1) to 0.01379 h(-1)), and the optimized ratio of woodchips to sulfur is 1:1 (w/w). No sulfate accumulation is observed in the WSHAD process and the alkalinity generated in the heterotrophic denitrification can compensate for alkalinity consumption by the sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification. The symbiotic relationship between the autotrophic and the heterotrophic denitrification processes play a vital role in the mixotrophic environment. PMID:26650451

  6. Diversity and succession of autotrophic microbial community in high-elevation soils along deglaciation chronosequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinbo; Kong, Weidong; Zhang, Guoshuai; Khan, Ajmal; Guo, Guangxia; Zhu, Chunmao; Wei, Xiaojie; Kang, Shichang; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M

    2016-10-01

    Global warming has resulted in substantial glacier retreats in high-elevation areas, exposing deglaciated soils to harsh environmental conditions. Autotrophic microbes are pioneering colonizers in the deglaciated soils and provide nutrients to the extreme ecosystem devoid of vegetation. However, autotrophic communities remain less studied in deglaciated soils. We explored the diversity and succession of the cbbL gene encoding the large subunit of form I RubisCO, a key CO2-fixing enzyme, using molecular methods in deglaciated soils along a 10-year deglaciation chronosequence on the Tibetan Plateau. Our results demonstrated that the abundance of all types of form I cbbL (IA/B, IC and ID) rapidly increased in young soils (0-2.5 years old) and kept stable in old soils. Soil total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) gradually increased along the chronosequence and both demonstrated positive correlations with the abundance of bacteria and autotrophs, indicating that soil TOC and TN originated from autotrophs. Form IA/B autotrophs, affiliated with cyanobacteria, exhibited a substantially higher abundance than IC and ID. Cyanobacterial diversity and evenness increased in young soils (<6 years old) and then remained stable. Our findings suggest that cyabobacteria play an important role in accumulating TOC and TN in the deglaciated soils. PMID:27465079

  7. Mutualism between autotrophic and heterophic bacteria in leaching of low grade ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During solubilization processes of low grade sulphidic ores, the auto trophic bacteria oxidize reduced sulphur compounds and ferrous iron to sulphates and ferric iron respectively. The ore leaching bio topes are not only colonized by auto trophic bacteria (Thiobacillus spp., Leptospirillum ferro oxidans and sulfolobus sp.) but the heterotrophic microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi of various species are also found in these habitats. The autotrophs, in addition to energy metabolism, also produce organic compounds which in excess amount inhibit their growth. Through the utilization of such compounds and also through the production of carbon dioxide and ammonia, these heterotorphs can help bio leaching processes. Effect of one of the heterotrophs; methylobacterium sp., a nitrogen scavenger, found in as association with the thio bacilli in one of the leaching bio tope in Germany was studied in leaching of a carbonate bearing complex (containing copper, iron, zinc and lead) sulphidic ore, in shake flask studies. T. ferro oxidans (Strain F-40) reported to be non nitrogen fixer and strain F-41, a nitrogen fixing thiobacillus were studied for leachability behaviour alone and in combination with T. thio oxidans (lacking nitrogen fixing ability) using media with and without added ammonium nitrogen. In addition the effect of methylobacterium sp. (alt-25) was also tested with the afore mentioned combinations. Nitrogen fixation by T. ferro oxidans did not suffice the nitrogen requirement and the leaching system in laboratory needed addition of nitrogen. The heterotrophic nitrogen scavenger also did not have a positive influence in nitrogen limited system. In case where ammonium nitrogen was also provided in the media, this heterotroph had a negative in own growth and leaving lesser amount available for thio bacilli. This high amount of acid is a limiting factor in bio leaching of high carbonate uranium ores. Uranium ore ecosystems have also been found to contain

  8. Autotrophic antimonate bio-reduction using hydrogen as the electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chun-Yu; Wen, Li-Lian; Zhang, Yin; Luo, Shan-Shan; Wang, Qing-Ying; Luo, Yi-Hao; Chen, Ran; Yang, Xiaoe; Rittmann, Bruce E; Zhao, He-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Antimony (Sb), a toxic metalloid, is soluble as antimonate (Sb(V)). While bio-reduction of Sb(V) is an effective Sb-removal approach, its bio-reduction has been coupled to oxidation of only organic electron donors. In this study, we demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of autotrophic microbial Sb(V) reduction using hydrogen gas (H2) as the electron donor without extra organic carbon source. SEM and EDS analysis confirmed the production of the mineral precipitate Sb2O3. When H2 was utilized as the electron donor, the consortium was able to fully reduce 650 μM of Sb(V) to Sb(III) in 10 days, a rate comparable to the culture using lactate as the electron donor. The H2-fed culture directed a much larger fraction of it donor electrons to Sb(V) reduction than did the lactate-fed culture. While 98% of the electrons from H2 were used to reduce Sb(V) by the H2-fed culture, only 12% of the electrons from lactate was used to reduce Sb(V) by the lactate-fed culture. The rest of the electrons from lactate went to acetate and propionate through fermentation, to methane through methanogenesis, and to biomass synthesis. High-throughput sequencing confirmed that the microbial community for the lactate-fed culture was much more diverse than that for the H2-fed culture, which was dominated by a short rod-shaped phylotype of Rhizobium (α-Protobacteria) that may have been active in Sb(V) reduction. PMID:26519630

  9. Role of Menaquinones in Fe(III) Reduction by Membrane Fractions of Shewanella putrefaciens

    OpenAIRE

    Saffarini, Daad A.; Blumerman, Seth L.; Mansoorabadi, Karen J.

    2002-01-01

    Two Tn5-generated mutants of Shewanella putrefaciens with insertions in menD and menB were isolated and analyzed. Both mutants were deficient in the use of several terminal electron acceptors, including Fe(III). This deficiency was overcome by the addition of menaquinone (vitamin K2). Isolated membrane fractions from both mutants were unable to reduce Fe(III) in the absence of added menaquinone when formate was used as the electron donor. These results indicate that menaquinones are essential...

  10. Coexistence of spin-crossover and magnetic ordering in the dendrimeric Fe(III) complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic properties of the dendrimeric spin-crossover Fe(III) complex of formula [Fe(L)2]+PF6-, where L = 3,5-di[3,4,5-tris(tetradecyloxy) benzoyl-oxy]benzoyl-4-salicylidene-N'-ethyl-N-ethylene-diamine are reported for the first time. EPR spectroscopy shows that the compound displays a gradual spin-crossover in the temperature range (70-300 K) and undergoes an antiferromagnetic ordering below 10 K. Mossbauer spectroscopy data confirm the existence of magnetic ordering at 5 K in the Fe(III) dendrimeric complex.

  11. Fe(III) mobilisation by carbonate in low temperature environments: Study of the solubility of ferrihydrite in carbonate media and the formation of Fe(III) carbonate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We have determined thermodynamic stabilities of Fe(III)-carbonate species. • We have determined the effect of those species on the solubility of ferrihydrite. • Results. • Highlight the importance of two Fe(III)-carbonate: FeOHCO3 and Fe(CO3)33−. - Abstract: The linkage between the iron and the carbon cycles is of paramount importance to understand and quantify the effect of increased CO2 concentrations in natural waters on the mobility of iron and associated trace elements. In this context, we have quantified the thermodynamic stability of mixed Fe(III) hydroxo-carbonate complexes and their effect on the solubility of Fe(III) oxihydroxides. We present the results of carefully performed solubility measurements of 2-line ferrihydrite in the slightly acidic to neutral–alkaline pH ranges (3.8–8.7) under constant pCO2 varying between (0.982–98.154 kPa) at 25 °C. The outcome of the work indicates the predominance of two Fe(III) hydroxo carbonate complexes FeOHCO3 and Fe(CO3)33−, with formation constants log*β°1,1,1 = 10.76 ± 0.38 and log β°1,0,3 = 24.24 ± 0.42, respectively. The solubility constant for the ferrihydrite used in this study was determined in acid conditions (pH: 1.8–3.2) in the absence of CO2 and at T = (25 ± 1) °C, as log*Ks,0 = 1.19 ± 0.41. The relative stability of the Fe(III)-carbonate complexes in alkaline pH conditions has implications for the solubility of Fe(III) in CO2-rich environments and the subsequent mobilisation of associated trace metals that will be explored in subsequent papers

  12. Fe(III), Cr(VI), and Fe(III) mediated Cr(VI) reduction in alkaline media using a Halomonas isolate from Soap Lake, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanEngelen, Michael R; Peyton, Brent M; Mormile, Melanie R; Pinkart, Holly C

    2008-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium is one of the most widely distributed environmental contaminants. Given the carcinogenic and mutagenic consequences of Cr(VI) exposure, the release of Cr(VI) into the environment has long been a major concern. While many reports of microbial Cr(VI) reduction are in circulation, very few have demonstrated Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions. Since Cr(VI) exhibits higher mobility in alkaline soils relative to pH neutral soils, and since Cr contamination of alkaline soils is associated with a number of industrial activities, microbial Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions requires attention.Soda lakes are the most stable alkaline environments on earth, and contain a wide diversity of alkaliphilic organisms. In this study, a bacterial isolate belonging to the Halomonas genus was obtained from Soap Lake, a chemically stratified alkaline lake located in central Washington State. The ability of this isolate to reduce Cr(VI) and Fe(III) was assessed under alkaline (pH = 9), anoxic, non-growth conditions with acetate as an electron donor. Metal reduction rates were quantified using Monod kinetics. In addition, Cr(VI) reduction experiments were carried out in the presence of Fe(III) to evaluate the possible enhancement of Cr(VI) reduction rates through electron shuttling mechanisms. While Fe(III) reduction rates were slow compared to previously reported rates, Cr(VI) reduction rates fell within range of previously reported rates. PMID:18401687

  13. Effect of heterotrophic versus autotrophic food on feeding and reproduction of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa : relationship with prey fatty acid composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broglio, E.; Jonasdottir, Sigrun; Calbet, A.; Jakobsen, Hans Henrik; Saiz, E.

    2003-01-01

    ) and ingestion rates, or as the quotient: EPR/ingestion rate. The diets, offered in monoculture, were the heterotrophic ciliates Strombidium sulcatum or Mesodinium pulex, the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Gymnodinium dominans, the autotrophic cryptophyte Rhodomonas salina and the autotrophic...

  14. Estimation of autotrophic soil respiration in a boreal forest using three different approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmala, Liisa; Pumpanen, Jukka; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2016-04-01

    It is generally challenging to separate autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration. The reason for these difficulties is connected with the intimate interaction of the key processes in soil. Root-associated microbes practically colonize the whole soil volume while decomposition processes occur in the same matrix. Therefore, autotrophic and heterotrophic processes cannot be separated in natural systems. However, there are several methods that can be used to better understand the dynamics of these two. A classical method is called 'trenching' where a trench is dug around a known volume of soil and the roots entering the soil are cut from the living trees thus blocking the C flow from them. The second way to separate autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration relies on the difference in the isotopic signature (13C) of plant-derived or decomposition-derived CO2. The third way to separate the sources is to study the differences in the short- and long-term temperature dependencies in CO2 soil emissions. This is possible especially in boreal forests where the biological activity has a strong seasonal cycle. We compared these three methods in an experiment conducted in a southern boreal middle-aged Scots pine stand in Finland. Our data provides a unique possibility to critically evaluate current methods for estimating autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration. The knowledge is needed to study further plant physiology and plant-microbe interactions in soil.

  15. Fluidization velocity assessment of commercially available sulfur particles for use in autotrophic denitrification biofilters

    Science.gov (United States)

    There has been no evaluation of sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification using fluidized biofilters in a recirculating aquaculture system to mitigate nitrate-nitrogen loads. The objectives of this work were to quantify the particle size distribution, specific surface area, and fluidization velocitie...

  16. Expression of Heterogenous Arsenic Resistance Genes in the Obligately Autotrophic Biomining Bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Ji-Bin; Yan, Wang-Ming; Bao, Xue-Zhen

    1994-01-01

    Two arsenic-resistant plasmids were constructed and introduced into Thiobacillus ferrooxidans strains by conjugation. The plasmids with the replicon of wide-host-range plasmid RSF1010 were stable in T. ferrooxidans. The arsenic resistance genes originating from the heterotroph were expressed in this obligately autotrophic bacterium, but the promoter derived from T. ferrooxidans showed no special function in its original host.

  17. Autotrophic nitrogen removal from low strength waste water at low temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, T.L.G.; Wang, Y.; Kampman, C.; Zeeman, G.; Temmink, B.G.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2012-01-01

    Direct anaerobic treatment of municipal waste waters allows for energy recovery in the form of biogas. A further decrease in the energy requirement for waste water treatment can be achieved by removing the ammonium in the anaerobic effluent with an autotrophic process, such as anammox. Until now, an

  18. Anaerobic Oxidation of Toluene, Phenol, and p-Cresol by the Dissimilatory Iron-Reducing Organism, GS-15

    OpenAIRE

    Lovley, Derek R.; Lonergan, Debra J.

    1990-01-01

    The dissimilatory Fe(III) reducer, GS-15, is the first microorganism known to couple the oxidation of aromatic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) and the first example of a pure culture of any kind known to anaerobically oxidize an aromatic hydrocarbon, toluene. In this study, the metabolism of toluene, phenol, and p-cresol by GS-15 was investigated in more detail. GS-15 grew in an anaerobic medium with toluene as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor. Growth c...

  19. Detection of autotrophic verrucomicrobial methanotrophs in a geothermal environment using stable isotope probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eSharp

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Genomic analysis of the methanotrophic verrucomicrobium Methylacidiphilum infernorum strain V4 has shown that most pathways conferring its methanotrophic lifestyle are similar to those found in proteobacterial methanotrophs. However, due to the large sequence divergence of its methane monooxygenase-encoding genes (pmo, ‘universal’ pmoA polymerase chain reaction (PCR primers do not target these bacteria. Unlike proteobacterial methanotrophs, Methylacidiphilum fixes carbon autotrophically, and uses methane only for energy generation. As a result, techniques used to detect methanotrophs in the environment such as 13CH4-stable isotope probing (SIP and pmoA-targeted PCR do not detect verrucomicrobial methanotrophs, and they may have been overlooked in previous environmental studies. We developed a modified SIP technique to identify active methanotrophic verrucomicrobia in the environment by labelling with 13CO2 and 13CH4, individually and in combination. Testing the protocol in M. infernorum strain V4 resulted in assimilation of 13CO2 but not 13CH4, verifying its autotrophic lifestyle. To specifically detect methanotrophs (as opposed to other autotrophs via 13CO2-SIP, a quantitative PCR (qPCR assay specific for verrucomicrobial-pmoA genes was developed and used in combination with SIP. Incubation of an acidic, high-temperature geothermal soil with 13CH4 + 12CO2 caused little shift in the density distribution of verrucomicrobial-pmoA genes relative to controls. However, labelling with 13CO2 in combination with 12CH4 or 13CH4 induced a strong shift in the distribution of verrucomicrobial-pmoA genes towards the heavy DNA fractions. The modified SIP technique demonstrated that the primary methanotrophs active in the soil were autotrophs and belonged to the Verrucomicrobia. This is the first demonstration of autotrophic, non-proteobacterial methanotrophy in situ, and provides a tool to detect verrucomicrobial methanotrophs in other ecosystems.

  20. Development of biological platform for the autotrophic production of biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nymul

    of the current status of metabolic engineering of chemolithoautotrophs is carried out in order to identify the challenges and likely routes to overcome them. This is presented in Chapter 3 of this dissertation. The initial metabolic engineering and bioreactor studies was carried out using a number of gene-constructs on R. capsulatus and R. eutropha. The gene-constructs consisted of Plac promoter followed by the triterpene synthase genes (SS or BS) and other upstream genes. A comparison of the production of triterpenes were done in the different growth modes that R. capsulatus was capable of growing---aerobic heterotrophic, anaerobic photoheterotrophic and aerobic chemoautotrophic. Autotrophic productivity could likely be improved much further by increasing the available mass-transfer of the reactor. These efforts are presented in Chapter 4 of this dissertation. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  1. Examining thiosulfate-driven autotrophic denitrification through respirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Mabel; Guisasola, Albert; Gamisans, Xavier; Gabriel, David

    2014-10-01

    Anoxic respirometry was applied to characterize a sulfide-oxidizing nitrate-reducing (SO-NR) culture obtained from an anoxic biogas desulfurizing biotrickling filter treating high loads of H2S. Immobilized biomass extracted from the biotrickling filter was grown in a suspended culture with thiosulfate as electron donor to obtain the biomass growth yield and the S2O3(2)(-)/NO3(-) consumed ratio. Afterward, respirometry was applied to describe thiosulfate oxidation under anoxic conditions. A pure culture of Thiobacillus denitrificans was also used as a control culture in order to validate the procedure proposed in this work to characterize the SO-NR biomass. Respirometric profiles obtained with this microbial culture showed that nitrite was formed as intermediate during nitrate reduction and revealed that no competitive inhibition appeared when both electron acceptors were present in the medium. Although final bioreaction products depended on the initial S2O3(2)(-)/NO3(-) ratio, such ratio did not affect thiosulfate oxidation or denitrification rates. Moreover, respirometric profiles showed that the specific nitrite uptake rate depended on the biomass characteristics being that of a SO-NR mixed culture (39.8mgNg(-1) VSSh(-1)) higher than that obtained from a pure culture of T. denitrificans (19.7mgNg(-1) VSSh(-1)). For the first time, the stoichiometry of the two-step denitrification mechanism with thiosulfate oxidation and biomass growth associated was solved for both reactions. PMID:25065782

  2. Microbial Fe(II) oxidation: cell-mineral interactions and implications for modern and ancient environments

    OpenAIRE

    Hegler, Florian

    2011-01-01

    Iron is a ubiquitous redox-active element in the environment. Ferrous and ferric iron are the dominant redox species. Biological as well as chemical processes mediate the redox-change between the two species. While Fe(II) is rather soluble at circumneutral pH, Fe(III) is scarcely soluble and Fe(III) minerals form which precipitate as Fe(III)(hydr)oxides. These Fe(III) minerals may sorb or precipitate on the cell surface of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria and ultimately this can lead to encrustat...

  3. Microbial Fe(III) Reduction in Acidic Mining Lake Sediments after Addition of an Organic Substrate and Lime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To elucidate the role of Fe(III) reduction in mining lake sediments amended with organic substrates, we performed a large (10 m diameter) enclosure experiment in which sediments were amended with Carbokalk, a waste product from sugar industry containing organic carbon and lime. Fe(III) reduction rates were determined monthly by measuring the accumulation of Fe(II) in the sediments in the field. Fe(III) reduction rates were also determined by incubating sediment samples with synthetic Fe(III) oxyhydroxide under in situ temperature in the laboratory. Sulfate reduction was selectively inhibited in the Fe(III) reduction experiments by addition of sodium molybdate. Sulfate reduction was measured by accumulation of reduced inorganic sulfides in the field and by 35S radiotracer using a core injection technique. Sediment incubation and determination of sulfate reduction rates with radiotracer showed that sulfate reduction and direct microbial Fe(III) reduction occurred simultaneously in the upper centimeters of the sediments and that both processes contributed to alkalinity generation. However, Fe(III) reduction was the initial process and rates were at least 3.5 fold higher than sulfate reduction rates. The results indicate that the presence of suitable anions for Fe(II) precipitation as carbonate or sulfide is needed in order to prevent loss of potential alkalinity by Fe(II) diffusion and reoxidation in the water column

  4. Direct Involvement of ombB, omaB and omcB Genes in Extracellular Reduction of Fe(III by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimo eLiu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The tandem gene clusters orfR-ombB-omaB-omcB and orfS-ombC-omaC-omcC of the metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA are responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III-citrate and ferrihydrite [a poorly crystalline Fe(III oxide]. Each gene cluster encodes a putative transcriptional factor (OrfR/OrfS, a porin-like outer-membrane protein (OmbB/OmbC, a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt, OmaB/OmaC and an outer-membrane c-Cyt (OmcB/OmcC. The individual roles of OmbB, OmaB and OmcB in extracellular reduction of Fe(III, however, have remained either uninvestigated or controversial. Here, we showed that replacements of ombB, omaB, omcB and ombB-omaB with an antibiotic gene in the presence of ombC-omaC-omcC had no impact on reduction of Fe(III-citrate by G. sulfurreducens PCA. Disruption of ombB, omaB, omcB and ombB-omaB in the absence of ombC-omaC-omcC, however, severely impaired the bacterial ability to reduce Fe(III-citrate as well as ferrihydrite. These results unequivocally demonstrate an overlapping role of ombB-omaB-omcB and ombC-omaC-omcC in extracellular Fe(III reduction by G. sulfurreducens PCA. Involvement of both ombB-omaB-omcB and ombC-omaC-omcC in extracellular Fe(III reduction reflects the importance of these trans-outer membrane protein complexes in the physiology of this bacterium. Moreover, the kinetics of Fe(III-citrate and ferrihydrite reduction by these mutants in the absence of ombC-omaC-omcC were nearly identical, which suggests that absence of any protein subunit eliminates function of OmaB/OmbB/OmcB protein complex. Finally, orfS was found to have a negative impact on the extracellular reduction of Fe(III-citrate and ferrihydrite in G. sulfurreducens PCA probably by serving as a transcriptional repressor.

  5. Does As(III) interact with Fe(II), Fe(III) and organic matter through ternary complexes?

    OpenAIRE

    Catrouillet, Charlotte; Davranche, Mélanie; Dia, Aline; Bouhnik-Le Coz, Martine; Demangeat, Edwige; Gruau, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    International audience Up until now, only a small number of studies have been dedicated to the binding processes of As(III) with organic matter (OM) via ionic Fe(III) bridges; none was interested in Fe (II). Complexation isotherms were carried out with As(III), Fe(II) or Fe(III) and Leonardite humic acid (HA). Although PHREEQC/Model VI, implemented with OM thiol groups, reproduced the experimental datasets with Fe(III), the poor fit between the experimental and modeled Fe(II) data suggeste...

  6. Anaerobic oxidation of toluene, phenol, and p-cresol by the dissimilatory iron-reducing organism, GS-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D.R.; Lonergan, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The dissimilatory Fe(III) reducer, GS-15, is the first microorganism known to couple the oxidation of aromatic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) and the first example of a pure culture of any kind known to anaerobically oxidize an aromatic hydrocarbon, toluene. In this study, the metabolism of toluene, phenol, and p-cresol by GS-15 was investigated in more detail. GS-15 grew in an anaerobic medium with toluene as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor. Growth coincided with Fe(III) reduction. [ring-14C]toluene was oxidized to 14CO2, and the stoichiometry of 14CO2 production and Fe(III) reduction indicated that GS-15 completely oxidized toluene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. Magnetite was the primary iron end product during toluene oxidation. Phenol and p-cresol were also completely oxidized to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor, and GS-15 could obtain energy to support growth by oxidizing either of these compounds as the sole electron donor. p-Hydroxybenzoate was a transitory extracellular intermediate of phenol and p-cresol metabolism but not of toluene metabolism. GS-15 oxidized potential aromatic intermediates in the oxidation of toluene (benzylalcohol and benzaldehyde) and p-cresol (p-hydroxybenzylalcohol and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde). The metabolism described here provides a model for how aromatic hydrocarbons and phenols may be oxidized with the reduction of Fe(III) in contaminated aquifers and petroleum-containing sediments.

  7. Anaerobic oxidation of toluene, phenol, and p-cresol by the dissimilatory iron-reducing organism, GS-15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissimilatory Fe(III) reducer, GS-15, is the first microorganism known to couple the oxidation of aromatic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) and the first example of a pure culture of any kind known to anaerobically oxidize an aromatic hydrocarbon, toluene. In this study, the metabolism of toluene, phenol, and p-cresol by GS-15 was investigated in more detail. GS-15 grew in an anaerobic medium with toluene as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor. Growth coincided with Fe(III) reduction. [ring-14C]toluene was oxidized to 14CO2, and the stoichiometry of 14CO2 production and Fe(III) reduction indicated that GS-15 completely oxidized toluene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. Magnetite was the primary iron end product during toluene oxidation. Phenol and p-cresol were also completely oxidized to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor, and GS-15 could obtain energy to support growth by oxidizing either of these compounds as the sole electron donor. p-Hydroxybenzoate was a transitory extracellular intermediate of phenol and p-cersol metabolism but not of toluene metabolism. GS-15 oxidized potential aromatic intermediates in the oxidation of toluene (benzylalcohol and benzaldehyde) and p-cersol (p-hydroxybenzylalchol and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde). The metabolism described here provides a model for how aromatic hydrocarbons and phenols may be oxidized with the reduction of Fe(III) in contaminated aquifers and petroleum-containing sediments

  8. Autotrophic ammonia removal from landfill leachate in anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneethi, S; Joseph, Kurian

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) process, an advanced biological nitrogen removal, removes ammonia using nitrite as the electron acceptor without oxygen. In this paper, ANAMMOX process was adopted for removing NH4+-N from landfill leachate having low COD using anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). The AnMBR was optimized for nitrogen loading rate (NLR) varying from 0.025 to 5 kg NH4+-N/m3/d with hydraulic retention time (HRT) ranging from 1 to 3d. NH4+-N removal efficacy of 85.13 +/- 9.67% with the mean nitrogen removal rate of 5.54 +/- 0.63 kg NH4+-N/m3/d was achieved with NLR of 6.51 +/- 0.20kg NH4+-N/m3/d at 1.5 d HRT. The nitrogen transformation intermediates in the form of hydrazine (N2H4) and hydroxylamine (NH2OH) were 0.008 +/- 0.005 and 0.006 +/- 0.001 mg/l, respectively, indicating co-existence of aerobic ammonia oxidizers and ANAMMOX. The free ammonia (NH3) and free nitrous acid (HNO2) concentrations were 26.61 +/- 16.54 mg/l and (1.66 +/- 0.95) x 10(-5) mg/l, preventing NO2(-)-N oxidation to NO3(-)-N enabling sustained NH4+-N removal. PMID:24617075

  9. Microbial Reducibility of Fe(III Phases Associated with the Genesis of Iron Ore Caves in the Iron Quadrangle, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceth W. Parker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The iron mining regions of Brazil contain thousands of “iron ore caves” (IOCs that form within Fe(III-rich deposits. The mechanisms by which these IOCs form remain unclear, but the reductive dissolution of Fe(III (hydroxides by Fe(III reducing bacteria (FeRB could provide a microbiological mechanism for their formation. We evaluated the susceptibility of Fe(III deposits associated with these caves to reduction by the FeRB Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to test this hypothesis. Canga, an Fe(III-rich duricrust, contained poorly crystalline Fe(III phases that were more susceptible to reduction than the Fe(III (predominantly hematite associated with banded iron formation (BIF, iron ore, and mine spoil. In all cases, the addition of a humic acid analogue enhanced Fe(III reduction, presumably by shuttling electrons from S. oneidensis to Fe(III phases. The particle size and quartz-Si content of the solids appeared to exert control on the rate and extent of Fe(III reduction by S. oneidensis, with more bioreduction of Fe(III associated with solid phases containing more quartz. Our results provide evidence that IOCs may be formed by the activities of Fe(III reducing bacteria (FeRB, and the rate of this formation is dependent on the physicochemical and mineralogical characteristics of the Fe(III phases of the surrounding rock.

  10. Sorption and desorption of Fe(III) on natural and chemically modified zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fe(III) uptake from aqueous solutions by natural and chemically modified zeolites was investigated using a gradual radioexchange method and AAS technique. The leachability of Fe(III) from loaded zeolites was studied too. The Fe-uptake reached the value of 60 mg x g-1 for the zeolite chemically treated with 6 mol x l-1 solution of NaOH and it is more than twelve times higher than that of the raw zeolite. The leachability of the loaded zeolite samples in water and alkaline solution was up 5%. The leachability of the same zeolites in acid solution depended on the concentration of modifying solution. The leachability at pH = 2.6 in the range 2-20% at pH = 1.9 was many times higher. The results of the radioexchange and AAS methods were compared. (author)

  11. Autotrophic and heterotrophic bacterial diversity from Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A basic understanding of the types and functions of microbiota present within the deep subsurface of Yucca Mountain will be important in terms of modeling the long term stability of a nuclear waste repository. Microorganisms can degrade building materials used in tunnel construction such as concrete and steel. For example, high concentrations of nitrifying bacteria, may cause corrosion of concrete due to the release of nitric acid. Likewise, sulfur-oxidizing and iron-oxidizing bacteria have been implicated in microbially influenced corrosion (MIC), and may contribute to the degradation of waste packages. In addition, the metabolic activities of microbiota may alter the geochemistry of surrounding environments, which may in turn influence the permeability of subsurface strata and the fate of radioactive compounds. Microorganisms that play roles in these processes have diverse methods of obtaining the energy required for growth and metabolism and have been recovered from a wide range of environments, including the deep subsurface. The purpose of this research was to determine if these bacterial groups, important to the long-term success of a high-level nuclear waste repository, were indigenous to Yucca Mountain

  12. Analysis of Microbial Communities in Biofilms from CSTR-Type Hollow Fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactors for Autotrophic Nitrification and Hydrogenotrophic Denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung-Hun; Kim, Byung-Chun; Choi, Okkyoung; Kim, Hyunook; Sang, Byoung-In

    2015-10-28

    Two hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactors (HF-MBfRs) were operated for autotrophic nitrification and hydrogenotrophic denitrification for over 300 days. Oxygen and hydrogen were supplied through the hollow fiber membrane for nitrification and denitrification, respectively. During the period, the nitrogen was removed with the efficiency of 82-97% for ammonium and 87-97% for nitrate and with the nitrogen removal load of 0.09-0.26 kg NH4(+)-N/m(3)/d and 0.10-0.21 kg NO3(-)-N/m(3)/d, depending on hydraulic retention time variation by the two HF-MBfRs for autotrophic nitrification and hydrogenotrophic denitrification, respectively. Biofilms were collected from diverse topological positions in the reactors, each at different nitrogen loading rates, and the microbial communities were analyzed with partial 16S rRNA gene sequences in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Detected DGGE band sequences in the reactors were correlated with nitrification or denitrification. The profile of the DGGE bands depended on the NH4(+) or NO3(-) loading rate, but it was hard to find a major strain affecting the nitrogen removal efficiency. Nitrospira-related phylum was detected in all biofilm samples from the nitrification reactors. Paracoccus sp. and Aquaspirillum sp., which are an autohydrogenotrophic bacterium and an oligotrophic denitrifier, respectively, were observed in the denitrification reactors. The distribution of microbial communities was relatively stable at different nitrogen loading rates, and DGGE analysis based on 16S rRNA (341f /534r) could successfully detect nitrate-oxidizing and hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria but not ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the HF-MBfRs. PMID:26095385

  13. Lactate dehydrogenase from autotrophic and heterotrophic cells of the marine diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis Reimann & Lewin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darley, W M; Smiley, R H

    1976-10-01

    Cultures of Cylindrotheca furisormis grown either autotrohpically or heterotrophically on lactate contained significant amounts of NAD-dependent L(+)-lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27). Polyacylamide gel electrophoresis of crude enzyme extracts revealed a single band which was indistinguishable between autotrohpic and heterotrohpic cells. The Km for lactate of partially purified preparations was lower under heterotrophic conditions. The specific activity in crude extracts was higher under autotrophic than heterotrophic conditions; it dropped precipitously when autotrophic cells were transferred to the dark, increasing again only in the presence of lactate. These and related observations suggest that this enzyme has at most only a minor role in the assimilation of lactate during heterotrophic growth on lactate. PMID:184899

  14. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-Induced Fe(III) Reduction Facilitates Roxarsone Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guowei; Ke, Zhengchen; Liang, Tengfang; Liu, Li; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Although microbial activity and associated iron (oxy)hydroxides are known in general to affect the environmental dynamics of 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzenearsonic acid (roxarsone), the mechanistic understanding of the underlying biophysico-chemical processes remains unclear due to limited experimental information. We studied how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 –a widely distributed metal-reducing bacterium, in the presence of dissolved Fe(III), affects roxarsone transformations and biogeochemical cycling in a model aqueous system. The results showed that the MR-1 strain was able to anaerobically use roxarsone as a terminal electron acceptor and to convert it to a single product, 3-amino-4-hydroxybenzene arsonic acid (AHBAA). The presence of Fe(III) stimulated roxarsone transformation via MR-1-induced Fe(III) reduction, whereby the resulting Fe(II) acted as an efficient reductant for roxarsone transformation. In addition, the subsequent secondary Fe(III)/Fe(II) mineralization created conditions for adsorption of organoarsenic compounds to the yielded precipitates and thereby led to arsenic immobilization. The study provided direct evidence of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-induced direct and Fe(II)-associated roxarsone transformation. Quantitative estimations revealed a candidate mechanism for the early-stage environmental dynamics of roxarsone in nature, which is essential for understanding the environmental dynamics of roxarsone and successful risk assessment. PMID:27100323

  15. Autotrophic and heterotrophic food sources of copepods in the Scheldt estuary as traced by stable C and N isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    L. De Brabandere

    2005-01-01

    Estuaries draining densely populated watersheds experience significant anthropogenic pressure and sustain large autotrophic and heterotrophic production owing to an increased input of nutrients and organic matter. Polluted estuaries are often net heterotrophic systems. Our objective was to study the relative contributionof autotrophic and heterotrophic food webs in sustaining the high productivity of pelagic estuarine ecosystems along the estuarine gradient of the Scheldt estuary. We concentr...

  16. Detection of autotrophic verrucomicrobial methanotrophs in a geothermal environment using stable isotope probing

    OpenAIRE

    ChristineSharp; MatthewStott

    2012-01-01

    Genomic analysis of the methanotrophic verrucomicrobium “Methylacidiphilum infernorum” strain V4 has shown that most pathways conferring its methanotrophic lifestyle are similar to those found in proteobacterial methanotrophs. However, due to the large sequence divergence of its methane monooxygenase-encoding genes (pmo), ‘universal’ pmoA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers do not target these bacteria. Unlike proteobacterial methanotrophs, “Methylacidiphilum” fixes carbon autotrophically...

  17. Detection of autotrophic verrucomicrobial methanotrophs in a geothermal environment using stable isotope probing

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp, Christine E; Stott, Matthew B.; Dunfield, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    Genomic analysis of the methanotrophic verrucomicrobium “Methylacidiphilum infernorum” strain V4 has shown that most pathways conferring its methanotrophic lifestyle are similar to those found in proteobacterial methanotrophs. However, due to the large sequence divergence of its methane monooxygenase-encoding genes (pmo), “universal” pmoA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers do not target these bacteria. Unlike proteobacterial methanotrophs, “Methylacidiphilum” fixes carbon autotrophically...

  18. Expression of Heterogenous Arsenic Resistance Genes in the Obligately Autotrophic Biomining Bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, J B; Yan, W M; Bao, X Z

    1994-07-01

    Two arsenic-resistant plasmids were constructed and introduced into Thiobacillus ferrooxidans strains by conjugation. The plasmids with the replicon of wide-host-range plasmid RSF1010 were stable in T. ferrooxidans. The arsenic resistance genes originating from the heterotroph were expressed in this obligately autotrophic bacterium, but the promoter derived from T. ferrooxidans showed no special function in its original host. PMID:16349341

  19. Modeling, Experimentation, and Control of Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal in Granular Sludge Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine

    is convenient for treating anaerobic digester liquor, landfill leachate, or special industrial wastewaters, because costs related to the need for aeration and carbon addition are lowered by 60% and 100%, respectively, compared to conventional nitrification denitrification treatment. Energy and......Complete autotrophic nitrogen removal (CANR) is a novel process that can increase the treatment capacity for wastewaters containing high concentrations of nitrogen and low organic carbon to nitrogen ratios, through an increase of the volumetric removal rate by approximately five times. This process...

  20. Partitioning Longleaf Pine Soil Respiration into Its Heterotrophic and Autotrophic Components through Root Exclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Althea A. ArchMiller; Lisa J. Samuelson

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and accurate estimations of the heterotrophic and autotrophic components of total soil respiration (Rs) are important for calculating forest carbon budgets and for understanding carbon dynamics associated with natural and management-related disturbances. The objective of this study was to use deep (60 cm) root exclusion tubes and paired control (i.e., no root exclusion) collars to estimate heterotrophic respiration (Rh) and Rs, respectively, in three 26-year-old longleaf pine (Pinus pal...

  1. Fate of 14C-labeled microbial products derived from nitrifying bacteria in autotrophic nitrifying biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Okabe, Satoshi; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Ito, Tsukasa

    2005-01-01

    The cross-feeding of microbial products derived from 14C-labeled nitrifying bacteria to heterotrophic bacteria coexisting in an autotrophic nitrifying biofilm was quantitatively analyzed by using microautoradiography combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (MAR-FISH). After only nitrifying bacteria were labeled with [14C] bicarbonate, biofilm samples were incubated with and without NH4+ as a sole energy source for 10 days. The transfer of 14C originally incorporated into nitrifying b...

  2. Nitrification and growth of autotrophic nitrifying bacteria and Thaumarchaeota in the coastal North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veuger, B.; Pitcher, A.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2013-03-01

    Nitrification and the associated growth of autotrophic nitrifiers, as well as the contributions of bacteria and Thaumarchaeota to total autotrophic C-fixation by nitrifiers were investigated in the Dutch coastal North Sea from October 2007 to March 2008. Rates of nitrification were determined by incubation of water samples with 15N-ammonium and growth of autotrophic nitrifiers was measured by incubation with 13C-DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon) in the presence and absence of nitrification inhibitors (nitrapyrin and chlorate) in combination with compound-specific stable isotope (13C) analysis of bacterial and Thaumarchaeotal lipid biomarkers. Net nitrification during the sampling period was evident from the concentration dynamics of ammonium, nitrite and nitrate. Measured nitrification rates were high (41-221 nmol N L-1 h-1). Ammonium assimilation was always substantially lower than nitrification - with nitrification on average contributing 89% (range 73-97%) to total ammonium consumption. 13C-DIC fixation into bacterial and Thaumarchaeotal lipids was strongly reduced by the nitrification inhibitors (27-95 %). The inhibitor-sensitive 13C-PLFA (phospholipid-derived fatty acid) pool was dominated by the common PLFAs 16:0, 16:1ω7c and 18:1ω7c throughout the whole sampling period and occasionally also included the polyunsaturated fatty acids 18:2ω6c and 18:3ω3. 13C-DIC fixation activity of the nitrifying bacteria was much higher than that of the nitrifying Thaumarchaeota throughout the whole sampling period, even during the peak in Thaumarchaeotal abundance and activity. This suggests that the contribution of autotrophic Thaumarchaeota to nitrification during winter in the coastal North Sea may have been smaller than expected from their gene abundance (16S rRNA and amoA (ammonia monooxygenase)). These results emphasize the importance of direct measurements of the actual activity of bacteria and Thaumarchaeota, rather than abundance measurements only, in order to

  3. Nitrification and growth of autotrophic nitrifying bacteria and Thaumarchaeota in the coastal North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Veuger

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrification and the associated growth of autotrophic nitrifiers, as well as the contributions of bacteria and Thaumarchaeota to total autotrophic C-fixation by nitrifiers were investigated in the Dutch coastal North Sea from October 2007 to March 2008. Rates of nitrification were determined by incubation of water samples with 15N-ammonium and growth of autotrophic nitrifiers was measured by incubation with 13C-DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon in the presence and absence of nitrification inhibitors (nitrapyrin and chlorate in combination with compound-specific stable isotope (13C analysis of bacterial and Thaumarchaeotal lipid biomarkers. Net nitrification during the sampling period was evident from the concentration dynamics of ammonium, nitrite and nitrate. Measured nitrification rates were high (41–221 nmol N L−1 h−1. Ammonium assimilation was always substantially lower than nitrification – with nitrification on average contributing 89% (range 73–97% to total ammonium consumption. 13C-DIC fixation into bacterial and Thaumarchaeotal lipids was strongly reduced by the nitrification inhibitors (27–95 %. The inhibitor-sensitive 13C-PLFA (phospholipid-derived fatty acid pool was dominated by the common PLFAs 16:0, 16:1ω7c and 18:1ω7c throughout the whole sampling period and occasionally also included the polyunsaturated fatty acids 18:2ω6c and 18:3ω3. 13C-DIC fixation activity of the nitrifying bacteria was much higher than that of the nitrifying Thaumarchaeota throughout the whole sampling period, even during the peak in Thaumarchaeotal abundance and activity. This suggests that the contribution of autotrophic Thaumarchaeota to nitrification during winter in the coastal North Sea may have been smaller than expected from their gene abundance (16S rRNA and amoA (ammonia monooxygenase. These results emphasize the importance of direct measurements of the actual activity of bacteria and Thaumarchaeota, rather than abundance

  4. Nitrification and growth of autotrophic nitrifying bacteria and Thaumarchaeota in the coastal North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Veuger

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitrification and the associated growth of autotrophic nitrifiers, as well as the contributions of bacteria and Thaumarchaeota to total autotrophic C-fixation by nitrifiers were investigated in the Dutch coastal North Sea from October 2007 to March 2008. Rates of nitrification were determined by incubation of water samples with 15N-ammonium and growth of autotrophic nitrifiers was measured by incubation with 13C-DIC in the presence and absence of nitrification inhibitors (nitrapyrin and chlorate in combination with compound-specific stable isotope (13C analysis of bacterial- and Thaumarchaeotal lipid biomarkers. Net nitrification during the sampling period was evident from the concentration dynamics of ammonium, nitrite and nitrate. Measured nitrification rates were high (41–221 nmol N l−1h−1. Ammonium assimilation was always substantially lower than nitrification with nitrification on average contributing 89% (range 73–97% to total ammonium consumption.

    13C-DIC fixation into bacterial and Thaumarchaeotal lipids was strongly reduced by the nitrification inhibitors (27–95%. The inhibitor-sensitive 13C-PLFA pool was dominated by the common PLFAs 16:0, 16:1ω7c and 18:1ω7c throughout the whole sampling period and occasionally also included the polyunsaturated fatty acids 18:2ω6c and 18:3ω3. Cell-specific 13C-DIC fixation activity of the nitrifying bacteria was much higher than that of the nitrifying Thaumarchaeota throughout the whole sampling period, even during the peak in Thaumarchaeotal abundance and activity. This suggests that the contribution of autotrophic Thaumarchaeota to nitrification during winter in the coastal North Sea may have been smaller than expected from their gene abundance. These results emphasize the importance of direct measurements of the actual activity of bacteria and Thaumarchaeota, rather than abundance

  5. Sorption characteristics of Np on Fe(II) + Fe(III) oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sorption of neptunium on magnetite, hematite and biotite in 0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 M NaNO3 was investigated at 25degC for pH values between 1 and 8. The pH dependence of the sorption was different among three Np-iron-containing mineral systems. However, there were no or a little (biotite) dependence of sorption on ionic strength. After the sorption experiment, desorption experiments, with water of which pH was adjusted to corresponding values, 1 M KCl and 0.1 M potassium oxalate were also carried out to investigate the Np sorption form. The Np sorbed loosely can be desorbed by water and the Np sorbed as an exchangeable ion can be desorbed by KCl while the Np sorbed on non-crystalline part of iron-containing mineral by K2C2O4. The remaining Np amount, that could not be extracted by water, 1 M KCl and 0.1 M K2C2O4, is considered to be sorbed on the crystalline part of iron-containing minerals. It was found that for magnetite 50% of sorbed Np were sorbed by ion exchange and 25% were sorbed on the crystalline part, and that for biotite 35% of Np were sorbed by ion exchange and 30% were sorbed on the crystalline part. The sorption on crystalline part was a dominant mechanism together with ion exchange in magnetite and biotite systems. For hematite system, the sorption mechanism was different blow and above around pH 6. Ion exchange was dominant mechanism below pH 6 while the sorption on non-crystalline and crystalline parts were dominant mechanisms above pH 6. This phenomenon is considered because surface of hematite changed with increase of pH. Sorption kinetics of Np was also investigated. Sorption process consists of a rapid initial uptake followed by slow increase and sorption reaches nearly equilibrium in one hour. It was found that this rapid sorption was correlative loose sorption and ion exchange sorption in desorption experiment and this slow sorption was correlative sorption on non-crystalline and crystalline part in desorption experiment form quantitative point of view in the cases of magnetite and hematite in acidic solution. (author)

  6. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea have more important role than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in ammonia oxidation of strongly acidic soils

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Hu, Hang-Wei; Shen, Ju-Pei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrated the involvement of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in the global nitrogen cycle, but the relative contributions of AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to ammonia oxidation are still in debate. Previous studies suggest that AOA would be more adapted to ammonia-limited oligotrophic conditions, which seems to be favored by protonation of ammonia, turning into ammonium in low-pH environments. Here, we investigated the autotrophic nitrification activity of AOA...

  7. Model-based evaluation of the role of Anammox on nitric oxide and nitrous oxide productions in membrane aerated biofilm reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Smets, Barth F.; Yuan, Zhiguo;

    2013-01-01

    A multispecies one-dimensional biofilm model considering nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) productions for membrane aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) that remove nitrogen autotrophically through aerobic ammonia oxidation followed by Anammox is used to study the role of Anammox activity on th...

  8. Moessbauer studies of magnetic and crystal field properties in Fe(III) mixed chelates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moessbauer studies were performed on mixed Fe(III) complexes with two ligands, one of the ligands being N,N-ethylene bis(salicyladimine) and the other N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamate. Moessbauer spectra were measured of four complexes with the dialkyl end group being N-ethyl2, N-butyl2, pyrrolidyl and piperidyl, respectively. Evaluation and comparison of the spectra and the relaxation patterns indicate that the size of the axial zero field splitting constant and consequently the spin of the ground state Kramer's doublet depends on the type of the alkyl group in the N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamate ligand. (A.K.)

  9. Elucidation of the Fe(III) Gallate Structure in Historical Iron Gall Ink

    OpenAIRE

    Ponce, Also; Lynn B. Brostoff; Sarah K. Gibbons; Peter Zavalij; Carol Viragh; Joseph Hooper; Sufian Alnemrat; Gaskell, Karen J.; Bryan Eichhorn

    2016-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.analchem.6b00088 Synthetic, structural, spectroscopic and aging studies conclusively show that the main colorant of historical iron gall ink (IGI) is an amorphous form of Fe(III) gallate· xH2O (x = ∼1.5−3.2). Comparisons between experimental samples and historical documents, including an 18th century hand-written manuscript by George Washington, by IR and Raman spectroscopy, XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectrosco...

  10. Concurrent nitrate and Fe(III) reduction during anaerobic biodegradation of phenols in a sandstone aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette; Crouzet, C.; Arvin, Erik; Mouvet, C.

    levels relevant for degradation of specific organic compounds in aquifers, cannot always be obtained. Hence, complete mass balances of electron acceptor consumption fur specific organic compounds degradation are difficult to confine. For aquifer materials with low initial Fe(II) content, Fe......(II) determinations on solids and in aqueous phase samples may provide valuable information on Fe(III) reduction. However, in microcosms with natural sediments and where electron acceptors are associated with the sediments, complete mass-balances for substrates and electron accepters are not likely to be obtained. (C...

  11. Autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification for simultaneous removal of nitrogen, sulfur and organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Lorna; Aguirre, Juan P; Muñoz, Maria A; Barahona, Andrea; Huiliñir, Cesar; Montalvo, Silvio; Borja, Rafael

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this investigation was to assess the startup and operation of a laboratory-scale hybrid UASB-Anaerobic Filter Reactor (UASFB) of 1 L volume, kept at 30°C, in order to carry out a simultaneous autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification process. First, the heterotrophic and autotrophic populations were separately enriched, with specific cultures and subsequently the UASFB was inoculated with 2 g L(-1) of volatile suspended solids (VSS), with a ratio of 1.5:1 (autotrophs: heterotrophs). The influent or synthetic wastewater used was composed of: Na2S2O3·5H2O, CH3COOK, NaNO3, NaHCO3, K2HPO4, NH4Cl and saline solution. The concentrations varied depending on the organic loading rate (OLR), nitrogen loading rate (NLR) and sulfur loading rate (SLR) applied. In the UASFB reactor, two experimental conditions were tested and assessed: (i) COD/N ratio of 3.6 and SLR of 0.75 kg S m(-3) d(-1); and (ii) COD/N ratio of 5.8 and SLR of 0.25 kg S m(-3) d(-1). The results obtained demonstrated that an inoculum coming from an anaerobic reactor was able to carry out the process, obtaining a maximum nitrate removal of 85.3% in the first stage of operation and 99.5% in the second stage. The recovery of sulfur in form of sulfate in the effluent did not present a tendency to stabilize during the measured time, with a maximum thiosulfate removal of 32.5%, when the SLR was lowered to 0.25 kg S m(-3) d(-1). The maximum organic matter elimination, measured as COD, was 75.8%, which indicates the relatively good performance and behavior of the heterotrophic microorganisms. PMID:27093220

  12. Enhanced start-up of anaerobic facultatively autotrophic biocathodes in bioelectrochemical systems

    KAUST Repository

    Zaybak, Zehra

    2013-12-01

    Biocathodes in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) can be used to convert CO2 into diverse organic compounds through a process called microbial electrosynthesis. Unfortunately, start-up of anaerobic biocathodes in BESs is a difficult and time consuming process. Here, a pre-enrichment method was developed to improve start-up of anaerobic facultatively autotrophic biocathodes capable of using cathodes as the electron donor (electrotrophs) and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Anaerobic enrichment of bacteria from freshwater bog sediment samples was first performed in batch cultures fed with glucose and then used to inoculate BES cathode chambers set at -0.4V (versus a standard hydrogen electrode; SHE). After two weeks of heterotrophic operation of BESs, CO2 was provided as the sole electron acceptor and carbon source. Consumption of electrons from cathodes increased gradually and was sustained for about two months in concert with a significant decrease in cathode chamber headspace CO2. The maximum current density consumed was -34±4mA/m2. Biosynthesis resulted in organic compounds that included butanol, ethanol, acetate, propionate, butyrate, and hydrogen gas. Bacterial community analyses based on 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed Trichococcus palustris DSM 9172 (99% sequence identity) as the prevailing species in biocathode communities, followed by Oscillibacter sp. and Clostridium sp. Isolates from autotrophic cultivation were most closely related to Clostridium propionicum (99% sequence identity; ZZ16), Clostridium celerecrescens (98-99%; ZZ22, ZZ23), Desulfotomaculum sp. (97%; ZZ21), and Tissierella sp. (98%; ZZ25). This pre-enrichment procedure enables simplified start-up of anaerobic biocathodes for applications such as electrofuel production by facultatively autotrophic electrotrophs. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Nitrate removal from groundwater by cooperating heterotrophic with autotrophic denitrification in a biofilm-electrode reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Intensified biofilm-electrode reactor using cooperative denitrification is developed. → IBER combines heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification. → CO2 formed by heterotrophic denitrification is used by autotrophic bacteria. → Optimum running conditions are C/N = 0.75, HRT = 8 h, and I = 40 mA. → A novel degradation mechanism for cooperating denitrification process is proposed. - Abstract: An intensified biofilm-electrode reactor (IBER) combining heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification was developed for treatment of nitrate contaminated groundwater. The reactor was evaluated with synthetic groundwater (NO3-N50 mg L-1) under different hydraulic retention times (HRTs), carbon to nitrogen ratios (C/N) and electric currents (I). The experimental results demonstrate that high nitrate and nitrite removal efficiency (100%) were achieved at C/N = 1, HRT = 8 h, and I = 10 mA. C/N ratios were reduced from 1 to 0.5 and the applied electric current was changed from 10 to 100 mA, showing that the optimum running condition was C/N = 0.75 and I = 40 mA, under which over 97% of NO3-N was removed and organic carbon (methanol) was completely consumed in treated water. Simultaneously, the denitrification mechanism in this system was analyzed through pH variation in effluent. The CO2 produced from the anode acted as a good pH buffer, automatically controlling pH in the reaction zone. The intensified biofilm-electrode reactor developed in the study was effective for the treatment of groundwater polluted by nitrate.

  14. Nitrate removal from groundwater by cooperating heterotrophic with autotrophic denitrification in a biofilm-electrode reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yingxin [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 3058572 (Japan); Feng, Chuanping, E-mail: fengchuangping@gmail.com [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Qinghong; Yang, Yingnan; Zhang, Zhenya; Sugiura, Norio [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 3058572 (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Intensified biofilm-electrode reactor using cooperative denitrification is developed. {yields} IBER combines heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification. {yields} CO{sub 2} formed by heterotrophic denitrification is used by autotrophic bacteria. {yields} Optimum running conditions are C/N = 0.75, HRT = 8 h, and I = 40 mA. {yields} A novel degradation mechanism for cooperating denitrification process is proposed. - Abstract: An intensified biofilm-electrode reactor (IBER) combining heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification was developed for treatment of nitrate contaminated groundwater. The reactor was evaluated with synthetic groundwater (NO{sub 3}{sup -}N50 mg L{sup -1}) under different hydraulic retention times (HRTs), carbon to nitrogen ratios (C/N) and electric currents (I). The experimental results demonstrate that high nitrate and nitrite removal efficiency (100%) were achieved at C/N = 1, HRT = 8 h, and I = 10 mA. C/N ratios were reduced from 1 to 0.5 and the applied electric current was changed from 10 to 100 mA, showing that the optimum running condition was C/N = 0.75 and I = 40 mA, under which over 97% of NO{sub 3}{sup -}N was removed and organic carbon (methanol) was completely consumed in treated water. Simultaneously, the denitrification mechanism in this system was analyzed through pH variation in effluent. The CO{sub 2} produced from the anode acted as a good pH buffer, automatically controlling pH in the reaction zone. The intensified biofilm-electrode reactor developed in the study was effective for the treatment of groundwater polluted by nitrate.

  15. Heterotrophic denitrification vs. autotrophic anammox – quantifying collateral effects on the oceanic carbon cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Koeve

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of fixed nitrogen to N2 in suboxic waters is estimated to contribute roughly a third to total oceanic losses of fixed nitrogen and is hence understood to be of major importance to global oceanic production and, therefore, to the role of the ocean as a sink of atmospheric CO2. At present heterotrophic denitrification and autotrophic anammox are considered the dominant sinks of fixed nitrogen. Recently, it has been suggested that the trophic nature of pelagic N2-production may have additional, "collateral" effects on the carbon cycle, where heterotrophic denitrification provides a shallow source of CO2 and autotrophic anammox a shallow sink. Here, we analyse the stoichiometries of nitrogen and associated carbon conversions in marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZ focusing on heterotrophic denitrification, autotrophic anammox, and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrite and ammonium in order to test this hypothesis quantitatively. For open ocean OMZs the combined effects of these processes turn out to be clearly heterotrophic, even with high shares of the autotrophic anammox reaction in total N2-production and including various combinations of dissimilatory processes which provide the substrates to anammox. In such systems, the degree of heterotrophy (ΔCO2:ΔN2, varying between 1.7 and 6.5, is a function of the efficiency of nitrogen conversion. On the contrary, in systems like the Black Sea, where suboxic N-conversions are supported by diffusive fluxes of NH4+ originating from neighbouring waters with sulphate reduction, much lower values of ΔCO2:ΔN2 can be found. However, accounting for concomitant diffusive fluxes of CO2, the ratio approaches higher values similar to those computed for open ocean OMZs. Based on this analysis, we question the significance of collateral effects concerning the trophic

  16. Performance of an autotrophic nitrogen removing reactor: Diagnosis through fuzzy logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Mutlu, Ayten Gizem; Gernaey, Krist; Smets, Barth F.; Sin, Gürkan

    Autotrophic nitrogen removal through nitritation-anammox in one stage SBRs is an energy and cost efficient alternative to conventional treatment methods. Intensification of an already complex biological system challenges our ability to observe, understand, diagnose, and control the system. A fuzzy...... logic diagnosis tool was developed, utilizing stoichiometric and concentration ratio measurements and removal efficiencies, along with rules derived from process knowledge. The tool could accurately determine the overall performance of the system and can therefore serve as a powerful tool to provide...

  17. Effect of pH and Fe(III) ions on chalcopyrite bioleaching by an adapted consortium from biogas sweetening

    OpenAIRE

    Dorado Castaño, Antonio David; Solé Sardans, Maria Montserrat; Lao Luque, Concepción; Alfonso Abella, María Pura; Gamisans Noguera, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Particle size, pH and Fe(III) ions affect the process of bioleaching of copper from chalcopyrite ores. In the study presented herein a copper sulfide ore was subjected to bioleaching process using a mixed microbial consortium obtained from a biotrickling filter treating high loads of H2S at different mineral particle size, distinct medium pH and various additional Fe(III) ion concentrations as leaching agent. After 1300 h of operation, the total copper recovery achieved a value of 50% in the ...

  18. Simultaneous Determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in Pharmaceutical Samples by Post-Column Derivatization/HPLC

    OpenAIRE

    ŞENYUVA, Hamide Z.; SARICA, Deniz Yurtsever; ÖZDEN, Tuncel

    2002-01-01

    A post-column derivatization HPLC method with visible absorbance detection at 521 nm was modified for the simultaneous determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in mixtures. The method was applied to pharmaceuticals marketed in Turkey. Iron species were separated on a post-column derivatization HPLC, IonPac CS5A (4x250 mm) analytical column using a pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid based eluent. The determinations of Fe(II) and Fe(III) were also realized by the most common method of FAAS, to...

  19. The sulfocyanic theory on the origin of life: towards a critical reappraisal of an autotrophic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perezgasga, L.; Silva, E.; Lazcano, A.; Negrin-Mendoza, A.

    2003-10-01

    In the early 1930s, Alfonso L. Herrera proposed his so-called sulfocyanic theory on the origin of life, an autotrophic proposal on the first living beings according to which NH4SCN and H2CO acted as raw materials for the synthesis of bio-organic compounds inside primordial photosynthetic protoplasmic structures. Although the work of Herrera is frequently cited in historical analysis of the development of the origin of life studies, very little attention has been given to the chemical significance of the reactions he published. In this paper we report the results of our search for amino acids obtained from a reactive mixture used by Herrera from 1933 onwards. Chromatograms using the high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique suggest the presence of several amino acids, the total yield being 2% of the initial thiocyanate used. Preliminary identification based on HPLC retention times suggests the presence of glycine, alanine, cysteine and methionine. Alanine was the most abundant amino acid in all samples of fractionated material analysed. Although the starting materials used by Herrera were determined by his autotrophic hypothesis on the origin of cells, our results show that his experiments may provide insights into the abiotic synthesis of sulfur-containing amino acids within the framework of a heterotrophic emergence of life.

  20. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur isotopic change during heterotrophic (Pseudomonas aureofaciens) and autotrophic (Thiobacillus denitrificans) denitrification reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Takahiro; Alvarez, Kelly; Lin, In-Tian; Shimada, Jun

    2015-12-01

    In batch culture experiments, we examined the isotopic change of nitrogen in nitrate (δ(15)NNO3), carbon in dissolved inorganic carbon (δ(13)CDIC), and sulfur in sulfate (δ(34)SSO4) during heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification of two bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aureofaciens and Thiobacillus denitrificans). Heterotrophic denitrification (HD) experiments were conducted with trisodium citrate as electron donor, and autotrophic denitrification (AD) experiments were carried out with iron disulfide (FeS2) as electron donor. For heterotrophic denitrification experiments, a complete nitrate reduction was accomplished, however bacterial denitrification with T. denitrificans is a slow process in which, after seventy days nitrate was reduced to 40% of the initial concentration by denitrification. In the HD experiment, systematic change of δ(13)CDIC (from -7.7‰ to -12.2‰) with increase of DIC was observed during denitrification (enrichment factor εN was -4.7‰), suggesting the contribution of C of trisodium citrate (δ(13)C=-12.4‰). No SO4(2-) and δ(34)SSO4 changes were observed. In the AD experiment, clear fractionation of δ(13)CDIC during DIC consumption (εC=-7.8‰) and δ(34)SSO4 during sulfur use of FeS2-S (around 2‰), were confirmed through denitrification (εN=-12.5‰). Different pattern in isotopic change between HD and AD obtained on laboratory-scale are useful to recognize the type of denitrification occurring in the field. PMID:26529303

  1. High CO2 subsurface environment enriches for novel microbial lineages capable of autotrophic carbon fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, A. J.; Jerett, J.; Castelle, C. J.; Thomas, B. C.; Sharon, I.; Brown, C. T.; Anantharaman, K.; Emerson, J. B.; Hernsdorf, A. W.; Amano, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tringe, S. G.; Woyke, T.; Banfield, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface environments span the planet but remain little understood from the perspective of the capacity of the resident organisms to fix CO2. Here we investigated the autotrophic capacity of microbial communities in range of a high-CO2 subsurface environments via analysis of 250 near-complete microbial genomes (151 of them from distinct species) that represent the most abundant organisms over a subsurface depth transect. More than one third of the genomes belonged to the so-called candidate phyla radiation (CPR), which have limited metabolic capabilities. Approximately 30% of the community members are autotrophs that comprise 70% of the microbiome with metabolism likely supported by sulfur and nitrogen respiration. Of the carbon fixation pathways, the Calvin Benson Basham Cycle was most common, but the Wood-Ljungdhal pathway was present in the greatest phylogenetic diversity of organisms. Unexpectedly, one organism from a novel phylum sibling to the CPR is predicted to fix carbon by the reverse TCA cycle. The genome of the most abundant organism, an archaeon designated "Candidatus Altiarchaeum hamiconexum", was also found in subsurface samples from other continents including Europe and Asia. The archaeon was proven to be a carbon fixer using a novel reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. These results provide evidence that carbon dioxide is the major carbon source in these environments and suggest that autotrophy in the subsurface represents a substantial carbon dioxide sink affecting the global carbon cycle.

  2. The feasibility of using a two-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal process to treat sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bin; Zhang, Shujun; Zhang, Liang; Yi, Peng; Wang, Junmin; Wang, Shuying; Peng, Yongzhen

    2011-09-01

    The feasibility of using a two-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal process to treat sewage was examined in this study. The obtained results showed that total nitrogen (TN) could be efficiently removed by 88.38% when influent TN and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were 45.87 and 44.40 mg/L, respectively. In the first stage, nitritation was instantly achieved by the bioaugmentation strategy, and can be maintained under limited oxygen condition (below 0.2mg/L). The ratio of nitrite to ammonium in the effluent of the nitritation reactor can be controlled at approximate 1.0 by adjusting aeration rate. In the second stage, anammox was realized in the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, where the total nitrogen removal rate was 0.40 kg Nm(-3)d(-1) under limited-substrate condition. Therefore, the organic matter in sewage can be firstly concentrated in biomass which could generate biogas (energy). Then, nitrogen in sewage could be removed in a two-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal process. PMID:21719278

  3. Particulate Pyrite Autotrophic Denitrification (PPAD) for Remediation of Nitrate-contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, S.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, L. C.; Henderson, M.; Feng, C.; Ergas, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The rapid movement of human civilization towards urbanization, industrialization, and increased agricultural activities has introduced a large amount of nitrate into groundwater. Nitrate is a toxic substance discharged from groundwater to rivers and leads to decreased dissolved oxygen and eutrophication. For this experiment, an electron donor is needed to convert nitrate into non-toxic nitrogen gas. Pyrite is one of the most abundant minerals in the earth's crust making it an ideal candidate as an electron donor. The overall goal of this research was to investigate the potential for pyrite to be utilized as an electron donor for autotrophic denitrification of nitrate-contaminated groundwater. Batch studies of particulate pyrite autotrophic denitrification (PPAD) of synthetic groundwater (100 mg NO3--N L-1) were set up with varying biomass concentration, pyrite dose, and pyrite particle size. Reactors were seeded with mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (VSS) from a biological nitrogen removal wastewater treatment facility. PPAD using small pyrite particles (treatment and promoted the utilization of pyrite in the field of environmental remediation.

  4. Bio-electrochemical synthesis of commodity chemicals by autotrophic acetogens utilizing CO_{2} for environmental remediation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GUGAN JABEEN; ROBINA FAROOQ

    2016-09-01

    Bio-electrochemical synthesis (BES) is a technique in which electro-autotrophic bacteria such as Clostridiumljungdahlii utilize electric currents as an electron source from the cathode to reduce CO_{2} to extracellular, multicarbon,exquisite products through autotrophic conversion. The BES of volatile fatty acids and alcohols directly fromCO_{2} is a sustainable alternative for non-renewable, petroleum-based polymer production. This conversion ofCO_{2} implies reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The synthesis of heptanoic acid, heptanol, hexanoic acidand hexanol, for the first time, by Clostridium ljungdahlii was a remarkable achievement of BES. In ourstudy, these microorganisms were cultivated on the cathode of a bio-electrochemical cell at −400 mV by aDC power supply at 37°C, pH 6.8, and was studied for both batch and continuous systems. Pre-enrichment ofbio-cathode enhanced the electroactivity of cells and resulted in maximizing extracellular products in lesstime. The main aim of the research was to investigate the impact of low-cost substrate CO_{2}, and the longercathode recovery range was due to bacterial reduction of CO_{2} to multicarbon chemical commodities withelectrons driven from the cathode. Reactor design was simplified for cost-effectiveness and to enhance energyefficiencies. The Columbic recovery of ethanoic acid, ethanol, ethyl butyrate, hexanoic acid, heptanoic acidand hexanol being in excess of 80% proved that BES was a remarkable technology.

  5. Bio-electrochemical synthesis of commodity chemicals by autotrophic acetogens utilizing CO2 for environmental remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Gugan; Farooq, Robina

    2016-09-01

    Bio-electrochemical synthesis (BES) is a technique in which electro-autotrophic bacteria such as Clostridium ljungdahlii utilize electric currents as an electron source from the cathode to reduce CO2 to extracellular, multicarbon, exquisite products through autotrophic conversion. The BES of volatile fatty acids and alcohols directly from CO2 is a sustainable alternative for non-renewable, petroleum-based polymer production. This conversion of CO2 implies reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The synthesis of heptanoic acid, heptanol, hexanoic acid and hexanol, for the first time, by Clostridium ljungdahlii was a remarkable achievement of BES. In our study, these microorganisms were cultivated on the cathode of a bio-electrochemical cell at -400 mV by a DC power supply at 37 degree Centrigrade, pH 6.8, and was studied for both batch and continuous systems. Pre-enrichment of bio-cathode enhanced the electroactivity of cells and resulted in maximizing extracellular products in less time. The main aim of the research was to investigate the impact of low-cost substrate CO2, and the longer cathode recovery range was due to bacterial reduction of CO2 to multicarbon chemical commodities with electrons driven from the cathode. Reactor design was simplified for cost-effectiveness and to enhance energy efficiencies. The Columbic recovery of ethanoic acid, ethanol, ethyl butyrate, hexanoic acid, heptanoic acid and hexanol being in excess of 80 percent proved that BES was a remarkable technology. PMID:27581929

  6. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur isotopic change during heterotrophic (Pseudomonas aureofaciens) and autotrophic (Thiobacillus denitrificans) denitrification reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Takahiro; Alvarez, Kelly; Lin, In-Tian; Shimada, Jun

    2015-12-01

    In batch culture experiments, we examined the isotopic change of nitrogen in nitrate (δ15NNO3), carbon in dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC), and sulfur in sulfate (δ34SSO4) during heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification of two bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aureofaciens and Thiobacillus denitrificans). Heterotrophic denitrification (HD) experiments were conducted with trisodium citrate as electron donor, and autotrophic denitrification (AD) experiments were carried out with iron disulfide (FeS2) as electron donor. For heterotrophic denitrification experiments, a complete nitrate reduction was accomplished, however bacterial denitrification with T. denitrificans is a slow process in which, after seventy days nitrate was reduced to 40% of the initial concentration by denitrification. In the HD experiment, systematic change of δ13CDIC (from - 7.7‰ to - 12.2‰) with increase of DIC was observed during denitrification (enrichment factor εN was - 4.7‰), suggesting the contribution of C of trisodium citrate (δ13C = - 12.4‰). No SO42 - and δ34SSO4 changes were observed. In the AD experiment, clear fractionation of δ13CDIC during DIC consumption (εC = - 7.8‰) and δ34SSO4 during sulfur use of FeS2-S (around 2‰), were confirmed through denitrification (εN = - 12.5‰). Different pattern in isotopic change between HD and AD obtained on laboratory-scale are useful to recognize the type of denitrification occurring in the field.

  7. Sulfide removal by simultaneous autotrophic and heterotrophic desulfurization-denitrification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An anaerobic attached-growth bioreactor (AAGBR) of 3.52 L was operated for 510 days to treat sulfide-laden organic wastewater where nitrate and nitrite were introduced as electron acceptors. When the influent sulfide was kept at 200 mg S2--S/L and organic carbon was increased from 20 to 33.6 mg C/L, and the hydraulic retention time decreased from 41.4 to 2.67 h, the removal rates of sulfide and organic carbon reached 99.9% and 91.8% at the loading rates of 1800 mg S2--S/(L d) and 302.4 mg C/(L d), respectively. Simultaneously, the introduced electron acceptors of nitrate and nitrite were, respectively, removed by 99.9% and 99.9% at the loading rates of 472.5 mg NO3--N/(L d) and 180 mg NO2--N/(L d). Inside the AAGBR, both autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification processes were noted to take place. When the influent organic carbon was increased from 20 to 33.6 mg C/L, the nitrate and nitrite consumed for heterotrophic denitrification accounted for 27.3% and 48.5%, respectively. This simultaneous autotrophic and heterotrophic desulfurization-denitrification process has provided a demonstration of the possibility to eliminate sulfide and organic carbon with the presence of nitrate and nitrite

  8. Anaerobic, Nitrate-Dependent Oxidation of U(IV) Oxide Minerals by the Chemolithoautotrophic Bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beller, H R

    2004-06-25

    Under anaerobic conditions and at circumneutral pH, cells of the widely-distributed, obligate chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans oxidatively dissolved synthetic and biogenic U(IV) oxides (uraninite) in nitrate-dependent fashion: U(IV) oxidation required the presence of nitrate and was strongly correlated to nitrate consumption. This is the first report of anaerobic U(IV) oxidation by an autotrophic bacterium.

  9. Ammonium Oxidation Under Iron Reducing Conditions: Environmental Factors Characterization and Process Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shan; Ruiz, Melany; Jaffe, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) oxidation coupled to iron (Fe) reduction in the absence of oxygen and nitrate/nitrite (NO3-/NO2-) has been reported by several investigators and is referred to as Feammox. Feammox is a biological reaction, where Fe(III) is the electron acceptor, which is reduced to Fe(II), and NH4+ is the electron donor, which is oxidized to NO2-. An Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium named A6, a previously unreported species in the Acidimicrobiaceae family, has been identified as being responsible for the Feammox process(1, 2) Feammox process was noted in riparian wetland soils in New Jersey(1,3), in tropical rainforest soils in Puerto Rico (4) and in paddy soils in China (5). In addition to these published locations, Feammox process was also found in samples collected from a series of local wetland-, upland-, as well as storm-water detention pond-sediments in New Jersey, river sediments from South Carolina, and forested soils near an acid mine drainage (Dabaoshan, Guangdong province) in China. Using primers acm342f - 439r (2), Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 was detected in samples where Feammox was observed, after strictly anaerobic incubations. According to a canonical correspondence analysis with environmental characteristics and soil microbial communities, the species-environment relationship indicated that pH and Fe oxides content were the primary factors controlling Feammox process. Anaerobic incubations of Feammox enrichment cultures adjusted to different pH, revealed that the optimal pH for Feammox is 4 ~ 5, and the reaction does not proceed when pH > 7. No correlation was found between the distributions of Feammox bacteria and other NH4+ oxidation bacteria. Pure Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 strain was isolated in an autotrophic medium, from an active Feammox membrane reactor (A6 was enriched to 65.8% of the total bacteria). A 13C labeled CO2 amendment was conducted, and the 13C in cells of A6 increased from 1.80% to 10.3% after 14 days incubation. In a separate

  10. TD-DFT study of the light-induced spin crossover of Fe(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saureu, Sergi; de Graaf, Coen

    2016-01-14

    Two light-induced spin-crossover Fe(III) compounds have been studied with time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to investigate the deactivation mechanism and the role of the ligand-field states as intermediates in this process. The B3LYP* functional has previously shown its ability to accurately describe (light-induced) spin-crossover in Fe(II) complexes. Here, we establish its performance for Fe(III) systems using [Fe(qsal)2](+) (Hqsal = 2-[(8-quinolinylimino)methyl]phenol) and [Fe(pap)2](+) (Hpap = 2-(2-pyridylmethyleneamino)phenol) as test cases comparing the B3LYP* results to experimental information and to multiconfigurational wave function results. In addition to rather accurate high spin (HS) and low spin (LS) state geometries, B3LYP* also predicts ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) states with large oscillator strength in the energy range where the UV-VIS spectrum shows an intense absorption band, whereas optically allowed π-π* excitations on the ligands were calculated at higher energy. Subsequently, we have generated a two-dimensional potential energy surface of the HS and LS states varying the Fe-N and Fe-O distances. LMCT and metal centered (MC) excited states were followed along the approximate minimal energy path that connects the minima of the HS and LS on this surface. The (2)LMCT state has a minimum in the same region as the initial LS state, where we also observe a crossing with the intermediate spin (IS) state. Upon the expansion of the coordination sphere of the Fe(III) ion, the IS state crosses with the HS state and further expansion of the coordination sphere leads to the excited spin state trapping as observed in experiment. The calculation of the intersystem crossing rates reveals that the deactivation from (2)LMCT → IS → HS competes with the (2)LMCT → IS → LS pathway, in line with the low efficiency encountered in experiments. PMID:26660866

  11. Heterocyclic tri-urea isocyanurate bridged groups modified periodic mesoporous organosilica synthesized for Fe(III) adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, Vijay Kumar [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical Technology, North Maharashtra University Jalgaon-425001 (India); Division of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune-411 008 (India); Selvaraj, M. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Pusan National University, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Parambadath, Surendran; Chu, Sang-Wook; Park, Sung Soo [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Mishra, Satyendra [Department of Chemical Technology, North Maharashtra University Jalgaon-425001 (India); Singh, Raj Pal [Division of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune-411 008 (India); Ha, Chang-Sik, E-mail: csha@pnu.edu [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    To achieve a high level of heavy metal adsorption, 1,1 Prime ,1 Double-Prime -(1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyl)tris(3-(3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl)urea) (TTPU) was synthesized as a novel melamine precursor and incorporated on the silica surface of periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO). The melamine modified PMOs (MPMOs) were synthesized under acidic conditions using TTPU, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and Pluronic P123 as a template and the modified PMOs were characterized using the relevant instrumental techniques. The characteristic materials were used as adsorbents for the adsorption of Fe(III) ions. Fe(III) adsorption studies revealed MPMO-7.5 to be a good absorbent with higher adsorption efficiency than other MPMOs. - Graphical Abstract: A new organosilica precursor, TTPU, has been successfully synthesized and characterized to incorporate on the silica surface of periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO). The melamine modified PMOs (MPMOs), in particular, the MPMO-7.5 was found to exhibit good adsorption efficiency for Fe(III). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of new melamine modified periodic mesoporous organosilicas (MPMOs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new organosilica precursor, TTPU, has been successfully synthesized for the MPMOs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MPMOs were characterized by the relevant instrumental techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPMO-7.5 exhibits higher adsorption efficiency for Fe(III) ions than other MPMOs.

  12. Does As(III) interact with Fe(II), Fe(III) and organic matter through ternary complexes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrouillet, Charlotte; Davranche, Mélanie; Dia, Aline; Bouhnik-Le Coz, Martine; Demangeat, Edwige; Gruau, Gérard

    2016-05-15

    Up until now, only a small number of studies have been dedicated to the binding processes of As(III) with organic matter (OM) via ionic Fe(III) bridges; none was interested in Fe (II). Complexation isotherms were carried out with As(III), Fe(II) or Fe(III) and Leonardite humic acid (HA). Although PHREEQC/Model VI, implemented with OM thiol groups, reproduced the experimental datasets with Fe(III), the poor fit between the experimental and modeled Fe(II) data suggested another binding mechanism for As(III) to OM. PHREEQC/Model VI was modified to take various possible As(III)-Fe(II)-OM ternary complex conformations into account. The complexation of As(III) as a mononuclear bidentate complex to a bidentate Fe(II)-HA complex was evidenced. However, the model needed to be improved since the distribution of the bidentate sites appeared to be unrealistic with regards to the published XAS data. In the presence of Fe(III), As(III) was bound to thiol groups which are more competitive with regards to the low density of formed Fe(III)-HA complexes. Based on the new data and previously published results, we propose a general scheme describing the various As(III)-Fe-MO complexes that are able to form in Fe and OM-rich waters. PMID:26939079

  13. New method for simultaneous determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in water using flow injection technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method exploits the possibilities of flow injection gradient titration in a system of reversed flow with spectrophotometric detection. In the developed approach a small amount of titrant (EDTA) is injected into a stream of sample containing a mixture of indicators (sulfosalicylic acid and 1,10-phenanthroline). In acid environment sulfosalicylic acid forms a complex with Fe(III), whereas 1,10-phenanthroline forms a complex with Fe(II). Measurements are performed at wavelength λ = 530 nm when radiation is absorbed by both complexes. After injection EDTA replaces sulfosalicylic acid and forms with Fe(III) more stable colourless complex. As a result, a characteristic 'cut off' peak is registered with a width corresponding to the Fe(III) concentration and with a height corresponding to the Fe(II) concentration. Calibration was performed by titration of four two-component standard solutions of the Fe(II)/Fe(III) concentrations established in accordance with 22 factorial plan. The method was tested with the use of synthetic samples and then it was applied to the analysis of water samples taken from artesian wells. Under optimized experimental conditions Fe(II) and Fe(III) were determined with precision less than 0.8 and 2.5% (RSD) and accuracy less than 3.2 and 5.1% (relative error) within the concentration ranges of 0.1-3.0 and 0.9-3.5 mg L-1 of both analytes, respectively.

  14. Exploring the biochemistry at the extracellular redox frontier of bacterial mineral Fe(III) respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, David J.; Edwards, Marcus; White, Gaye F.; Baiden, Nanakow; Hartshorne, Robert S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Zachara, John M.; Gates, Andrew J.; Butt, Julea N.; Clarke, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Many species of the bacterial Shewanella genus are notable for their ability to respire in anoxic environments utilizing insoluble minerals of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) as extracellular electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis, the process is dependent on the decahaem electron-transport proteins that lie at the extracellular face of the outer membrane where they can contact the insoluble mineral substrates. These extracellular proteins are charged with electrons provided by an inter-membrane electron-transfer pathway that links the extracellular face of the outer membrane with the inner cytoplasmic membrane and thereby intracellular electron sources. In the present paper, we consider the common structural features of two of these outermembrane decahaem cytochromes, MtrC and MtrF, and bring this together with biochemical, spectroscopic and voltammetric data to identify common and distinct properties of these prototypical members of different clades of the outer-membrane decahaem cytochrome superfamily.

  15. An operation protocol for facilitating start-up of single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removing reactors based on process stoichiometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutlu, A. Gizem; Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Sin, Gürkan; Smets, Barth F.

    2012-01-01

    Start-up and operation of single-stage nitritation/anammox reactor employing complete autotrophic nitrogen can be difficult. Keeping the performance criteria and monitoring the microbial community composition may not be easy or fast enough to take action on time. In this study, a control strategy...

  16. Coniochaeta ligniaria: antifungal activity of the cryptic endophytic fungus associated with autotrophic cultures of the medicinal plant Smallanthus sonchifolius (Asteraceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few studies have addressed the presence and bioactivity of endophytic fungi living in plantlets growing under in vitro conditions. We isolated a fungus UM 109 from autotrophic cultures of the medicinal plant Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacon). The species was identified as Coniochaeta ligniaria using ...

  17. Decadal warming causes a consistent and persistent shift from heterotrophic to autotrophic respiration in contrasting permafrost ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks Pries, Caitlin E; van Logtestijn, Richard S P; Schuur, Edward A G; Natali, Susan M; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Aerts, Rien; Dorrepaal, Ellen

    2015-12-01

    Soil carbon in permafrost ecosystems has the potential to become a major positive feedback to climate change if permafrost thaw increases heterotrophic decomposition. However, warming can also stimulate autotrophic production leading to increased ecosystem carbon storage-a negative climate change feedback. Few studies partitioning ecosystem respiration examine decadal warming effects or compare responses among ecosystems. Here, we first examined how 11 years of warming during different seasons affected autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration in a bryophyte-dominated peatland in Abisko, Sweden. We used natural abundance radiocarbon to partition ecosystem respiration into autotrophic respiration, associated with production, and heterotrophic decomposition. Summertime warming decreased the age of carbon respired by the ecosystem due to increased proportional contributions from autotrophic and young soil respiration and decreased proportional contributions from old soil. Summertime warming's large effect was due to not only warmer air temperatures during the growing season, but also to warmer deep soils year-round. Second, we compared ecosystem respiration responses between two contrasting ecosystems, the Abisko peatland and a tussock-dominated tundra in Healy, Alaska. Each ecosystem had two different timescales of warming (permafrost ecosystems. PMID:26150277

  18. Cross effect of temperature, pH and free ammonia on autotrophic denitrification process with sulphide as electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Carmen; Mora, Mabel; Fernández, Isaac; Mosquera-Corral, Anuska; Campos, José Luis; Méndez, Ramón

    2014-02-01

    Autotrophic denitrification is a suitable technology to simultaneously remove oxidised nitrogen compounds and reduced sulphur compounds yielding nitrogen gas, sulphur and sulphate as the main products. In this work, several batch tests were conducted to investigate the cross effect of temperature, pH and free ammonia on the autotrophic denitrification. Denitrification efficiencies above 95% were achieved at 35°C and pH 7.5-8.0 with maximum specific autotrophic denitrifying activities up to 188mgN2g(-1)VSSd(-1). Free ammonia did not show any effect on denitrification at concentrations up to 53mg NH3-NL(-1). Different sulphide concentrations were also tested with stoichiometric nitrite and nitrate concentrations. Sulphide inhibited denitrification at concentrations higher than 200mgS(2-)L(-1). A 50% inhibition was also found at nitrite concentrations above 48mg NO2(-)-NL(-1). The maximum specific activity decreased until a value of 25mgN2g(-1) VSSd(-1) at 232mg NO2(-)-NL(-1). The Haldane model was used to describe denitrification inhibition caused by nitrite. Kinetic parameters determined from the fitting of experimental data were rmax=176mgN2g(-1)VSSd(-1), Ks=10.7mg NO2(-)-NL(-1) and Ki=34.7mg NO2(-)-NL(-1). The obtained model allowed optimising an autotrophic denitrification process by avoiding situations of inhibition and thus obtaining higher denitrification efficiencies. PMID:24216266

  19. Autotrophic and heterotrophic activity in Arctic first-year sea-ice: Seasonal study from Marlene Bight, SW Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Dorte Haubjerg; Kristensen, Morten; Rysgaard, Søren;

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of autotrophic and heterotrophic activities of Arctic sea ice (Malene Bight, SW Greenland) as measured by 2 different approaches: (1) standard incubation techniques ((HCO3-)-C-14 and [H-3] thymidine incubation) on sea ice cores brought to the laboratory and (2) cores incubated ...

  20. Selection of controlled variables in bioprocesses. Application to a SHARON-Anammox process for autotrophic nitrogen removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Valverde Perez, Borja; Sin, Gürkan

    Selecting the right controlled variables in a bioprocess is challenging since the objectives of the process (yields, product or substrate concentration) are difficult to relate with a given actuator. We apply here process control tools that can be used to assist in the selection of controlled...... variables to the case of the SHARON-Anammox process for autotrophic nitrogen removal....

  1. Nutrients removal and nitrous oxide emission during simultaneous nitrification, denitrification, and phosphorus removal process: effect of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wenlin; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Weihua; Zhou, Xiaowei

    2016-08-01

    The short- and long-term influences of ferric iron (Fe(III)) on nutrients removal and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission during SNDPR process were evaluated. According to the continuous cycle experiments, it was concluded that the addition of Fe(III) could lower the nitrogen removal of the following cycle during SNDPR process, which was mainly induced by the chemical removal of phosphorus. However, the impacts were transitory, and simultaneous nitrogen and phosphorus removal would recover from the inhibition of Fe(III) after running certain cycles. Moreover, the addition of Fe(III) could stimulate N2O emission transitorily during SNDPR process. However, if Fe(III) was added into reactor continuously, the nitrogen removal would be improved, especially at low Fe load condition. It was because that the activity of NO reductase was enhanced by the addition of Fe. However, the low Fe load in reactor would induce more N2O emission. When Fe(III) load was 40 mg/L in the reactor, the N2O yield was 10 % higher than control. The TN removal was weakened when Fe(III) load reached to 60 mg/L, and the N2O yield was lower than control, due to the inhibition of the high Fe load on denitrification enzymes. PMID:27137189

  2. The effect of clay particles on the activity of suspended autotrophic nitrifying bacteria and on the performance of an air-lift reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, M J; Pacheco, A P; Pinho, I A; Melo, L F

    2001-02-01

    Clay minerals have some properties, namely a high surface area and the ability of ion exchange that may exert some effects on microbial systems. It is often difficult to know the way the clay is exerting its influence and whether its presence improves a given metabolic process. The present work concerns the study of the effect of the addition of powdered kaolin to autotrophic nitrification systems, and includes the study of the effects of the particles on the activity of a suspended nitrifying bacteria consortium and on the performance of an air-lift biofilm reactor used for tertiary nitrification. Concerning the suspended culture, kaolin particles produced stimulation on the specific endogenous and exogenous respiration rates of the bacteria, probably due to a nutritional effect supplied by the clay. This effect was more pronounced for the ammonia oxidation rates, although nitrite oxidation was also enhanced but to a lesser extent. In respect to the presence of kaolin particles in the air-lift reactor, the results obtained indicate that the clay particles become incorporated in the biofilm pellets, but do not change significantly their thickness or their shape. However, nitrate production decreased when the concentration of particles increased. The low adsorption of ammonia by the kaolin indicated that the clay particles embedded in the biofilm did not probably retain the ions. Although it was not proved, precipitation of salts may have occurred. PMID:11349371

  3. Development of novel control strategies for single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal: A process oriented approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Gernaey, Krist;

    2014-01-01

    The autotrophic nitrogen removing granular sludge process is a novel and intensified process. However, its stable operation and control remain a challenging issue. In this contribution, a process oriented approach was used to develop, evaluate and benchmark novel control strategies to ensure stable...... operation and rejection of disturbances. Three novel control strategies were developed, evaluated, and benchmarked against each other: a feedforward control (control structure 1 – CS#1), a rule-based feedback control (CS#2), and a feedforward–feedback controller, in which the feedback loop updates the set...... satisfactorily. Thus, the appropriate design will depend on the specific disturbances in the influent generated in the upstream units of the wastewater treatment plant....

  4. Biodegradation of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) in completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shen-Yi; Lu, Li-An; Lin, Jih-Gaw

    2016-06-01

    This study conducted a completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process in a continuous anoxic upflow bioreactor to treat synthetic wastewater with TMAH (tetramethylammonium hydroxide) ranging from 200 to 1000mg/L. The intermediates were analyzed for understanding the metabolic pathway of TMAH biodegradation in CANON process. In addition, (15)N-labeled TMAH was used as the substrate in a batch anoxic bioreactor to confirm that TMAH was converted to nitrogen gas in CANON process. The results indicated that TMAH was almost completely biodegraded in CANON system at different influent TMAH concentrations of 200, 500, and 1000mg/L. The average removal efficiencies of total nitrogen were higher than 90% during the experiments. Trimethylamine (TMA) and methylamine (MA) were found to be the main biodegradation intermediates of TMAH in CANON process. The production of nitrogen gas with (15)N-labeled during the batch anaerobic bioreactor indicated that CANON process successfully converted TMAH into nitrogen gas. PMID:26879202

  5. A novel control strategy for single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal in SBR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Gernaey, Krist; Smets, Barth F.; Sin, Gürkan

    2015-01-01

    A novel feedforward–feedback control strategy was developed for complete autotrophic nitrogen removal in a sequencing batch reactor. The aim of the control system was to carry out the regulation of the process while keeping the system close to the optimal operation. The controller was designed...... based on a process model and then tested experimentally. The resulting batch-to-batch control strategy had the total nitrogen removal efficiency as controlled variable and the setting of the aeration mass flow controller as manipulated variable. Compared to manual operation mode (constant air supply...... lab-scale reactor is a promising result, which brings this control strategy one step closer to full-scale implementation....

  6. Membrane biofouling in a wastewater nitrification reactor: microbial succession from autotrophic colonization to heterotrophic domination

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Huijie

    2015-10-22

    Membrane biofouling is a complex process that involves bacterial adhesion, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) excretion and utilization, and species interactions. To obtain a better understanding of the microbial ecology of biofouling process, this study conducted rigorous, time-course analyses on the structure, EPS and microbial composition of the fouling layer developed on ultrafiltration membranes in a nitrification bioreactor. During a 14-day fouling event, three phases were determined according to the flux decline and microbial succession patterns. In Phase I (0-2 days), small sludge flocs in the bulk liquid were selectively attached on membrane surfaces, leading to the formation of similar EPS and microbial community composition as the early biofilms. Dominant populations in small flocs, e.g., Nitrosomonas, Nitrobacter, and Acinetobacter spp., were also the major initial colonizers on membranes. In Phase II (2-4 d), fouling layer structure, EPS composition, and bacterial community went through significant changes. Initial colonizers were replaced by fast-growing and metabolically versatile heterotrophs (e.g., unclassified Sphingobacteria). The declining EPS polysaccharide to protein (PS:PN) ratios could be correlated well with the increase in microbial community diversity. In Phase III (5-14 d), heterotrophs comprised over 90% of the community, whereas biofilm structure and EPS composition remained relatively stable. In all phases, AOB and NOB were constantly found within the top 40% of the fouling layer, with the maximum concentrations around 15% from the top. The overall microbial succession pattern from autotrophic colonization to heterotrophic domination implied that MBR biofouling could be alleviated by forming larger bacterial flocs in bioreactor suspension (reducing autotrophic colonization), and by designing more specific cleaning procedures targeting dominant heterotrophs during typical filtration cycles.

  7. Residence time of carbon substrate for autotrophic respiration of a grassland ecosystem correlates with the carbohydrate status of its vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostler, Ulrike; Lehmeier, Christoph A.; Schleip, Inga; Schnyder, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Ecosystem respiration is composed of two component fluxes: (1) autotrophic respiration, which comprises respiratory activity of plants and plant-associated microbes that feed on products of recent photosynthetic activity and (2) heterotrophic respiration of microbes that decompose organic matter. The mechanistic link between the availability of carbon (C) substrate for ecosystem respiration and its respiratory activity is not well understood, particularly in grasslands. Here, we explore, how the kinetic features of the supply system feeding autotrophic ecosystem respiration in a temperate humid pasture are related to the content of water-soluble carbohydrates and remobilizable protein (as potential respiratory substrates) in vegetation biomass. During each September 2006, May 2007 and September 2007, we continuously labeled 0.8 m2 pasture plots with 13CO2/12CO2 and observed ecosystem respiration and its tracer content every night during the 14-16 day long labeling periods. We analyzed the tracer kinetics with a pool model, which allowed us to precisely partition ecosystem respiration into its autotrophic and heterotrophic flux components. At the end of a labeling campaign, we harvested aboveground and belowground plant biomass and analyzed its non-structural C contents. Approximately half of ecosystem respiration did not release any significant amount of tracer during the labeling period and was hence characterized as heterotrophic. The other half of ecosystem respiration was autotrophic, with a mean residence time of C in the respiratory substrate pool between 2 and 6 d. Both the rate of autotrophic respiration and the turnover of its substrate supply pool were correlated with plant carbohydrate content, but not with plant protein content. These findings are in agreement with studies in controlled environments that revealed water-soluble carbohydrates as the main substrate and proteins as a marginal substrate for plant respiration under favorable growth conditions

  8. Can we distinguish autotrophic respiration from heterotrophic respiration in a field site using high temporal resolution CO2 flux measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, Beatrice; Berger, Sina; Praetzel, Leandra; Blodau, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The processes behind C-cycling in peatlands are important to understand for assessing the vulnerability of peatlands as carbon sinks under changing climate conditions. Especially boreal peatlands are likely to underlie strong alterations in the future. It is expected that C-pools that are directly influenced by vegetation and water table fluctuations can be easily destabilized. The CO2 efflux through respiration underlies autotrophic and heterotrophic processes that show different feedbacks on changing environmental conditions. In order to understand the respiration fluxes better for more accurate modelling and prognoses, the determination of the relative importance of different respiration sources is necessary. Earlier studies used e.g. exfoliation experiments, incubation experiments or modelling approaches to estimate the different respiration sources for the total ecosystem respiration (Reco). To further the understanding in this topic, I want to distinguish autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration using high temporal resolution measurements. The study site was selected along a hydrological gradient in a peatland in southern Ontario (Canada) and measurements were conducted from May to September 2015 once per month. Environmental controls (water table, soil temperature and soil moisture) that effect the respiration sources were recorded. In my study I used a Li-COR 6400XT and a Los Gatos greenhouse gas analyzer (GGA). Reco was determined by chamber flux measurements with the GGA, while simultaneously CO2 respiration measurements on different vegetation compartments like roots, leaves and mosses were conducted using the Li-COR 6400XT. The difference between Reco and autotrophic respiration equals heterotrophic respiration. After the measurements, the vegetation plots were harvested and separated for all compartments (leaves, roots, mosses, soil organic matter), dried and weighed. The weighted respiration rates from all vegetation compartments sum up to

  9. Studies on a Novel Actinobacteria Species Capable of Oxidizing Ammonium under Iron Reduction Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanh, Shan; Ruiz-Urigüen, Melany; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) oxidation coupled to iron reduction in the absence of oxygen and nitrate/nitrite (NO3-/NO2-) was noted in a forested riparian wetland in New Jersey (1,2), and in tropical rainforest soils (3), and was coined Feammox (4). Through a 180-days anaerobic incubation of soil samples collected at the New Jersey site, and using 16S rDNA PCR-DGGE, 454-pyosequecing, and qPCR analysis, we have shown that an Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6, belonging to the phylum Actinobacteria, is responsible for this Feammox process, described previously (1,2). We have enriched these Feammox bacteria in a high efficiency Feammox membrane reactor (with 85% NH4+removal per 48h), and isolated the pure Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 strain 5, in an autotrophic medium. To determine if the Feammox bacteria found in this study are common, at least at the regional scale, we analyzed a series of local wetland-, upland-, as well as storm-water detention pond-sediments. Through anaerobic incubations and molecular biology analysis, the Feammox reaction and Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 were found in three of twenty soil samples collected, indicating that the Feammox pathway might be widespread in selected soil environments. Results show that soil pH and Fe(III) content are key environmental factors controlling the distributions of Feammox bacteria, which require acidic conditions and the presence of iron oxides. Results from incubation experiments conducted at different temperatures have shown that, in contrast to another anaerobic ammonium oxidation pathways (e.g., anammox), the optimal temperature of the Feammox process is ~ 20° and that the organisms are still active when the temperature is around 10°. An incubation experiment amended with acetylene gas (C2H2) as a selected inhibitor showed that in the Feammox reaction, Fe(III) is the electron acceptor, which is reduced to Fe(II), and NH4+is the electron donor, which is oxidized to NO2-. After this process, NO2- is converted to

  10. Role of Fe(III) in preventing humic interference during As(III) detection on gold electrode: Spectroscopic and voltammetric evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhong-Gang [Nanomaterials and Environmental Detection Laboratory, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Chen, Xing; Jia, Yong; Liu, Jin-Huai [Nanomaterials and Environmental Detection Laboratory, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Huang, Xing-Jiu, E-mail: xingjiuhuang@iim.ac.cn [Nanomaterials and Environmental Detection Laboratory, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Humic acids interfere with the voltammetric detection of As(III) on gold electrode through adsorption and possible complexation. • Addition of Fe(III) removes this interference and helps in the electroanalytical detection of As(III). • FTIR and XPS studies suggest that the formation of Fe(III)–HA complex prevents adsorption of HA on gold and limits As–HA complex formation. - Abstract: A drawback of As(III) detection using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) is that it is susceptible to interferences from various metals or organic compounds, especially in real sample water. This study attempts to understand the interference of co-existing of Fe(III) and humic acid (HA) molecules to the electrochemical detection of As(III) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrochemical experiments include stripping of As(III) in the solutions containing HA with different concentrations, cyclic voltammetry in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in the presence of HA or Fe(III) with/without addition of Fe(III) or HA, and stripping of As(III) in the presence of HA or Fe(III) with/without addition of Fe(III) or HA. FTIR and XPS are employed to confirm the affinity of HA to Fe(III) or As(III) in acidic condition.

  11. Equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganic aqueous Fe(III) and the siderophore complex, Fe(III)-desferrioxamine B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Baker, Joel A.; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2008-01-01

    In oxic oceans, most of the dissolved iron (Fe) exists as complexes with siderophore-like, strongly coordinating organic ligands. Thus, the isotope composition of the little amount of free inorganic Fe that is available for precipitation and preservation in the geological record may largely...... be controlled by isotope fractionation between the free and complexed iron.We have determined the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation induced by organic ligand activity in experiments with solutions having co-existing inorganic Fe(III) species and siderophore complexes, Fedesferrioxamine B (at pH 2). The two...... differently complexed Fe(III) pools were separated by addition of Na2CO3, which led to immediate precipitation of the inorganic Fe without causing significant dissociation of Fe-desferrioxamine complexes. Experiments using enriched 57Fe tracer showed that isotopic equilibration between the 57Fe...

  12. Evidence for microbial Fe(III) reduction in anoxic, mining-impacted lake sediments (Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, D.E.; March, A.W.; Bostick, B.; Spring, S.; Caccavo, F. Jr.; Fendorf, S.; Rosenzweig, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    Mining-impacted sediments of Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, contain more than 10% metals on a dry weight basis, approximately 80% of which is iron. Since iron (hydr)oxides adsorb toxic, ore-associated elements, such as arsenic, iron (hydr)oxide reduction may in part control the mobility and bioavailability of these elements. Geochemical and microbiological data were collected to examine the ecological role of dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in this habitat. The concentration of mild-acid-extractable Fe(II) increased with sediment depth up to 50 g kg{sup {minus}1}, suggesting that iron reduction has occurred recently. The maximum concentrations of dissolved Fe(II) in interstitial water (41 mg liter{sup {minus}1}) occurred 10 to 15 cm beneath the sediment-water interface, suggesting that sulfidogenesis may not be the predominant terminal electron-accepting process in this environment and that dissolved Fe(II) arises from biological reductive dissolution of iron (hydr)oxides. The concentration of sedimentary magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), a common product of bacterial Fe(III) hydroxide reduction, was as much as 15.5 g kg{sup {minus}1}. Most-probable-number enrichment cultures revealed that the mean density of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria was 8.3 x 10{sup 5} cells g (dry weight) of sediment{sup {minus}1}. Two new strains of dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria were isolated from surface sediments. Collectively, the results of this study support the hypothesis that dissimilatory reduction of iron has been and continues to be an important biogeochemical process in the environment examined.

  13. Fe(III) hydroxide nucleation and growth on quartz in the presence of Cu(II), Pb(II), and Cr(III): metal hydrolysis and adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chong; Hu, Yandi

    2015-01-01

    Fe(III) hydroxide nanoparticles are an essential carrier for aqueous heavy metals. Particularly, iron hydroxide precipitation on mineral surfaces can immobilize aqueous heavy metals. Here, we used grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) to quantify nucleation and growth of iron hydroxide on quartz in 0.1 mM Fe(NO3)3 solution in the presence of Na(+), Cu(2+), Pb(2+), or Cr(3+) at pH = 3.7 ± 0.1. In 30 min, the average radii of gyration (R(g)) of particles on quartz grew from around 2 to 6 nm in the presence of Na(+) and Cu(2+). Interestingly, the particle sizes remained 3.3 ± 0.3 nm in the presence of Pb(2+), and few particles formed in the presence of Cr(3+). Quartz crystal microbalance dissipation (QCM-D) measurements showed that only Cr(3+) adsorbed onto quartz, while Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) did not. Cr(3+) adsorption changed the surface charge of quartz from negative to positive, thus inhibiting the precipitation of positively charged iron hydroxide on quartz. Masses and compositions of the precipitates were also quantified. This study provided new insights on interactions among quartz, iron hydroxide, and metal ions. Such information is helpful not only for environmental remediation but also for the doping design of iron oxide catalysts. PMID:25496643

  14. Coordination polymers of Fe(iii) and Al(iii) ions with TCA ligand: distinctive fluorescence, CO2 uptake, redox-activity and oxygen evolution reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Barun; Sappati, Subrahmanyam; Singh, Santosh K; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Ghosh, Prasenjit; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2016-04-19

    Fe and Al belong to different groups in the periodic table, one from the p-block and the other from the d-block. In spite of their different groups, they have the similarity of exhibiting a stable 3+ oxidation state. Here we have prepared Fe(iii) and Al(iii) based coordination polymers in the form of metal-organic gels with the 4,4',4''-tricarboxyltriphenylamine (TCA) ligand, namely Fe-TCA and Al-TCA, and evaluated some important physicochemical properties. Specifically, the electrical conductivity, redox-activity, porosity, and electrocatalytic activity (oxygen evolution reaction) of the Fe-TCA system were noted to be remarkably higher than those of the Al-TCA system. As for the photophysical properties, almost complete quenching of the fluorescence originating from TCA was observed in case of the Fe-TCA system, whereas for the Al-TCA system a significant retention of fluorescence with red-shifted emission was observed. Quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed to unravel the origin of such discriminative behaviour of these coordination polymer systems. PMID:26961352

  15. The outer membrane protein Omp35 affects the reduction of Fe(III, nitrate, and fumarate by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myers Charles R

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses several electron acceptors to support anaerobic respiration including insoluble species such as iron(III and manganese(IV oxides, and soluble species such as nitrate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide and many others. MR-1 has complex branched electron transport chains that include components in the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm, and outer membrane (OM. Previous studies have implicated a role for anaerobically upregulated OM electron transport components in the use of insoluble electron acceptors, and have suggested that other OM components may also contribute to insoluble electron acceptor use. In this study, the role for an anaerobically upregulated 35-kDa OM protein (Omp35 in the use of anaerobic electron acceptors was explored. Results Omp35 was purified from the OM of anaerobically grown cells, the gene encoding Omp35 was identified, and an omp35 null mutant (OMP35-1 was isolated and characterized. Although OMP35-1 grew on all electron acceptors tested, a significant lag was seen when grown on fumarate, nitrate, and Fe(III. Complementation studies confirmed that the phenotype of OMP35-1 was due to the loss of Omp35. Despite its requirement for wild-type rates of electron acceptor use, analysis of Omp35 protein and predicted sequence did not identify any electron transport moieties or predicted motifs. OMP35-1 had normal levels and distribution of known electron transport components including quinones, cytochromes, and fumarate reductase. Omp35 is related to putative porins from MR-1 and S. frigidimarina as well as to the PorA porin from Neisseria meningitidis. Subcellular fraction analysis confirmed that Omp35 is an OM protein. The seven-fold anaerobic upregulation of Omp35 is mediated post-transcriptionally. Conclusion Omp35 is a putative porin in the OM of MR-1 that is markedly upregulated anaerobically by a post-transcriptional mechanism. Omp35 is required for normal rates of growth on Fe(III

  16. Effect of nitrate enrichment and diatoms on the bioavailability of Fe(III) oxyhydroxide colloids in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng-Jiao; Huang, Bang-Qin; Li, Shun-Xing; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-03-01

    The photoconversion of colloidal iron oxyhydroxides was a significant source of bioavailable iron in coastal systems. Diatoms dominate phytoplankton communities in coastal and upwelling regions. Diatoms are often exposed to eutrophication. We investigated the effects of different species of diatom, cell density, illumination period, and nitrate additions on the bioavailability of Fe(III) oxy-hydroxide colloids in seawaters. With the increase of illumination period from 1 to 4 h, the ratios of concentrations of total dissolved Fe (DFe) to colloidal iron oxyhydroxides and Fe(II) to DFe increased up to 24.3% and 23.9% for seawater without coastal diatoms, 45.6% and 30.2% for Skeletonema costatum, 44.3% and 29.7% for Thalassiosira weissflogii, respectively. The photochemical activity of coastal diatoms themselves (excluding the dissolved organic matter secreted by algae) on the species transformation of iron in seawater (including the light-induced dissolution of Fe(III) oxyhydroxide colloids and the photo-reduction of Fe(III) into Fe(II)) was confirmed for the first time. There was no significant difference of the ability of S. costatum and Thalassiosira weissflogii on the photoconversion of colloidal iron oxyhydroxides. The photoproduction of dissolved Fe(II) and DFe in the seawater with or without diatoms could be depressed by the nitrate addition. PMID:26766021

  17. Nitrate removal and microbial analysis by combined micro-electrolysis and autotrophic denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wei; Li, Desheng; Li, Jinlong; Hu, Qianyi; Deng, Shihai

    2016-07-01

    A process combining micro-electrolysis and autotrophic denitrification (CEAD) with iron-carbon micro-electrolysis carriers was developed for nitrate removal. The process was performed using organic-free influent with a NO3(-)-N concentration of 40.0±3.0mg/L and provided an average nitrate removal efficiency of 95% in stable stages. The total nitrogen removal efficiency reached 75%, with 21% of NO3(-)-N converted into NH4(+)-N. The corresponding hydraulic retention time was 8-10h, and the optimal pH ranged from 8.5 to 9.5. Microbial analysis with high-throughput sequencing revealed that dominant microorganisms in the reactor belonged to the classes of β-, γ-, and α-Proteobacteria. The abundance of the genera Thermomonas significantly increased during the operation, comprising 21.4% and 24.1% in sludge attached to the carriers in the middle and at the bottom of the reactor, respectively. The developed CEAD achieved efficient nitrate removal from water without organics, which is suitable for practical application. PMID:27019127

  18. Investigating the association between photosynthetic efficiency and generation of biophotoelectricity in autotrophic microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciniciato, Gustavo P. M. K.; Ng, Fong-Lee; Phang, Siew-Moi; Jaafar, Muhammad Musoddiq; Fisher, Adrian C.; Yunus, Kamran; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells operating with autotrophic microorganisms are known as biophotovoltaic devices. It represents a great opportunity for environmentally-friendly power generation using the energy of the sunlight. The efficiency of electricity generation in this novel system is however low. This is partially reflected by the poor understanding of the bioelectrochemical mechanisms behind the electron transfer from these microorganisms to the electrode surface. In this work, we propose a combination of electrochemical and fluorescence techniques, giving emphasis to the pulse amplitude modulation fluorescence. The combination of these two techniques allow us to obtain information that can assist in understanding the electrical response obtained from the generation of electricity through the intrinsic properties related to the photosynthetic efficiency that can be obtained from the fluorescence emitted. These were achieved quantitatively by means of observed changes in four photosynthetic parameters with the bioanode generating electricity. These are the maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm), alpha (α), light saturation coefficient (Ek) and maximum rate of electron transfer (rETRm). The relationship between the increases in the current density collected by the bioanode to the decrease of the rETRm values in the photosynthetic pathway for the two microorganisms was also discussed. PMID:27502051

  19. Startup and oxygen concentration effects in a continuous granular mixed flow autotrophic nitrogen removal reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varas, Rodrigo; Guzmán-Fierro, Víctor; Giustinianovich, Elisa; Behar, Jack; Fernández, Katherina; Roeckel, Marlene

    2015-08-01

    The startup and performance of the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process was tested in a continuously fed granular bubble column reactor (BCR) with two different aeration strategies: controlling the oxygen volumetric flow and oxygen concentration. During the startup with the control of oxygen volumetric flow, the air volume was adjusted to 60mL/h and the CANON reactor had volumetric N loadings ranging from 7.35 to 100.90mgN/Ld with 36-71% total nitrogen removal and high instability. In the second stage, the reactor was operated at oxygen concentrations of 0.6, 0.4 and 0.2mg/L. The best condition was 0.2 mgO2/L with a total nitrogen removal of 75.36% with a CANON reactor activity of 0.1149gN/gVVSd and high stability. The feasibility and effectiveness of CANON processes with oxygen control was demonstrated, showing an alternative design tool for efficiently removing nitrogen species. PMID:25965951

  20. Performance of completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite process under different aeration modes and dissolved oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinsong GUO; Guohong YANG; Fang FANG; Yu QIN

    2008-01-01

    In this study, three sequential batch biofilm reactors (SBBRs) were operated for 155 days to evaluate the performance of completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process under different aeration modes and dissolved oxygen (DO). Synthetic wastewater with 160-mg NH4+-N/L was fed into the reac-tors. In the continuously-aerated reactor, the efficiency of the ammonium nitrogen conversion and total nitrogen (TN) removal reached 80% and 70%, respectively, with DO between 0.8-1.0 mg/L. Whereas in the intermit-tently-aerated reactor, at the aeration/non-aeration ratio of 1.0, ammonium was always under the detection limit and 86% of TN was removed with DO between 2.0 2.5 mg/L during the aeration time. Results show that CANON could be achieved in both continuous and inter-mittent aeration pattern. However, to achieve the same nitrogen removal efficiency, the DO needed in the inter-mittently-aerated sequential batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) during the aeration period was higher than that in the continuously-aerated SBBR. In addition, the DO in the CANON system should be adjusted to the aeration mode, and low DO was not a prerequisite to CANON process.

  1. Study of a combined heterotrophic and sulfur autotrophic denitrification technology for removal of nitrate in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combined two-step process of heterotrophic denitrification in a fluidized reactor and sulfur autotrophic denitrification processes (CHSAD) was developed for the removal of nitrate in drinking water. In this process, the advantage of high efficiency of heterotrophic denitrification with non-excessive methanol and the advantage of non-pollution of sulfur autotriphic denitrification were integrated in this CHSAD process. And, this CHSAD process had the capacity of pH balance and could control the concentration of SO42- in effluent by adjusting the operation condition. When the influent nitrate was 30 mg NO3--N/L, the reactor could be operated efficiently at the hydraulic retention time (HRT) ranging from 20 to 40 min with C:N ratio (mg CH3OH:mg NO3--N) of 2.0 (methanol as carbon source). The nitrate removal was nearly 100% and there was no accumulated nitrite or residual methanol in the effluent. The effluent pH was about 7.5 and the sulfate concentration was lower than 130 mg/L. The maximum volume-loading rate of the reactor was 2.16 kg NO3--N/(m3 d). The biomass and scanning electron microscopy graphs of biofilm were also analyzed.

  2. Metabolic engineering of Cupriavidus necator for heterotrophic and autotrophic alka(e)ne production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crépin, Lucie; Lombard, Eric; Guillouet, Stéphane E

    2016-09-01

    Alkanes of defined carbon chain lengths can serve as alternatives to petroleum-based fuels. Recently, microbial pathways of alkane biosynthesis have been identified and enabled the production of alkanes in non-native producing microorganisms using metabolic engineering strategies. The chemoautotrophic bacterium Cupriavidus necator has great potential for producing chemicals from CO2: it is known to have one of the highest growth rate among natural autotrophic bacteria and under nutrient imbalance it directs most of its carbon flux to the synthesis of the acetyl-CoA derived polymer, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), (up to 80% of intracellular content). Alkane synthesis pathway from Synechococcus elongatus (2 genes coding an acyl-ACP reductase and an aldehyde deformylating oxygenase) was heterologously expressed in a C. necator mutant strain deficient in the PHB synthesis pathway. Under heterotrophic condition on fructose we showed that under nitrogen limitation, in presence of an organic phase (decane), the strain produced up to 670mg/L total hydrocarbons containing 435mg/l of alkanes consisting of 286mg/l of pentadecane, 131mg/l of heptadecene, 18mg/l of heptadecane, and 236mg/l of hexadecanal. We report here the highest level of alka(e)nes production by an engineered C. necator to date. We also demonstrated the first reported alka(e)nes production by a non-native alkane producer from CO2 as the sole carbon source. PMID:27212691

  3. Influence of Reactive Transport on the Reduction of U(VI) in the Presence of Fe(III) and Nitrate: Implications for U(VI) Immobilization by Bioremediation / Biobarriers- Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.D. Wood

    2007-01-01

    Subsurface contamination by metals and radionuclides represent some of the most challenging remediation problems confronting the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. In situ remediation of these contaminants by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) has been proposed as a potential cost effective remediation strategy. The primary focus of this research is to determine the mechanisms by which the fluxes of electron acceptors, electron donors, and other species can be controlled to maximize the transfer of reductive equivalents to the aqueous and solid phases. The proposed research is unique in the NABIR portfolio in that it focuses on (i) the role of flow and transport in the initiation of biostimulation and the successful sequestration of metals and radionuclides [specifically U(VI)], (ii) the subsequent reductive capacity and stability of the reduced sediments produced by the biostimulation process, and (iii) the potential for altering the growth of biomass in the subsurface by the addition of specific metabolic uncoupling compounds. A scientifically-based understanding of these phenomena are critical to the ability to design successful bioremediation schemes. The laboratory research will employ Shewanella putrefaciens (CN32), a facultative DMRB that can use Fe(III) oxides as a terminal electron acceptor. Sediment-packed columns will be inoculated with this organism, and the reduction of U(VI) by the DMRB will be stimulated by the addition of a carbon and energy source in the presence of Fe(III). Separate column experiments will be conducted to independently examine: (1) the importance of the abiotic reduction of U(VI) by biogenic Fe(II); (2) the influence of the transport process on Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization, with emphasis on methods for controlling the fluxes of aqueous species to maximize uranium reduction; (3) the reductive capacity of biologically-reduced sediments (with respect to re-oxidation by convective fluxes of O2 and NO3-) and

  4. Influence of Reactive Transport on the Reduction of U(VI) in the Presence of Fe(III) and Nitrate: Implications for U(VI) Immobilization by Bioremediation/Biobarriers - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subsurface contamination by metals and radionuclides represent some of the most challenging remediation problems confronting the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. In situ remediation of these contaminants by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) has been proposed as a potential cost effective remediation strategy. The primary focus of this research is to determine the mechanisms by which the fluxes of electron acceptors, electron donors, and other species can be controlled to maximize the transfer of reductive equivalents to the aqueous and solid phases. The proposed research is unique in the NABIR portfolio in that it focuses on (i) the role of flow and transport in the initiation of biostimulation and the successful sequestration of metals and radionuclides [specifically U(VI)], (ii) the subsequent reductive capacity and stability of the reduced sediments produced by the biostimulation process, and (iii) the potential for altering the growth of biomass in the subsurface by the addition of specific metabolic uncoupling compounds. A scientifically-based understanding of these phenomena are critical to the ability to design successful bioremediation schemes. The laboratory research will employ Shewanella putrefaciens (CN32), a facultative DMRB that can use Fe(III) oxides as a terminal electron acceptor. Sediment-packed columns will be inoculated with this organism, and the reduction of U(VI) by the DMRB will be stimulated by the addition of a carbon and energy source in the presence of Fe(III). Separate column experiments will be conducted to independently examine: (1) the importance of the abiotic reduction of U(VI) by biogenic Fe(II); (2) the influence of the transport process on Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization, with emphasis on methods for controlling the fluxes of aqueous species to maximize uranium reduction; (3) the reductive capacity of biologically-reduced sediments (with respect to re-oxidation by convective fluxes of O2 and NO3-) and

  5. Flow injection spectrophotometric determination of Fe(III) and V(v)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phenylflourone was synthesized with the objective of developing a method for determining Fe(III) and V(V) in the pressence of micelles using flow injectoin technique. Phenylflourone showed a wavelength of maximum absorption at 412 nm which was not affected by the presence of miccelles i.e. n-hexadodecylpyridinum bromide and sodium n-dodecylsulphate, but they have different effects on the absorbance of PHF. The example of PHF-Fe(III) and PHF-V(V) showed the wavelength of the maximum absorption at 4428 nm and 412 nm, respectively. Presence of micelles shifted the wavelength of the two complexes to a lower one. Generally the addition of micelles increased the absorbance of phenylflourone metal ions complexes except for PHF-V(V) with hexadodecylpyridinum bromide. With flow injection technique two approaches were practiced the use of micelle as a carrier or water as a carrier. Sodium n-dodecylsulphate increased the absorbance of the two complexes when it was used as a carrier or added to the metal ions using water as carrier. On the other hand, the use of n-hexadodecylpyridinum bromide as carrieer increased the absorbance of the complexes but it decreased the absorbance when it was used in conjunction with metal ions and water as a carrier. After establishing the optimum FI conditions for PHF-Fe(III) and PHF-V(V) complexes, the calibration curves were construction and produced semiliner response in the concentration range studied. Ti(IV) III, Mo(VI) showed a positive interference in PHF-Fe(III) and PHF-V(V) complexes, respectively.(Author)

  6. Methemoglobinemia caused by 8-aminoquinoline drugs: DFT calculations suggest an analogy to H4B's role in nitric oxide synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    We suggest a possible mechanism of how 8-aminoquinolines (8-AQ's) cause hemotoxicity by oxidizing hemoglobin to methemoglobin. In our DFT calculations, we found that 5-hydroxyprimaquine is able to donate an electron to O2 to facilitate its conversion to H2O2. Meanwhile, Fe(II) is oxidized to Fe(III)...

  7. Incidence of plant cover over the autotrophic nitrifying bacteria population in a fragment of Andean forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was determined the incidence of plant cover (forest vs. pasture), on the autotrophy nitrifying bacteria, through the effect of biotic factors (radical exudate) and abiotic factors (temperature, ph and humidity), in a high mountain cloud forest fragment. The site of study was located near La Mesa (Cundinamarca) municipality. The temperature of soil was measured in situ, and soil samples were collected and carried to the laboratory for pH and humidity percentage measurements. Serial soil dilution method was used for plating samples on a selective culture medium with ammonium sulphate as nitrogen source, in order to estimate the autotrophic nitrifying bacteria population levels. Grown colonies were examined macro and microscopically. The quantity of nitrates produced by bacteria cultured in vitro was determined spectra-photometrical. In relation to the abiotic factors, there was no significant differences of pH between both plant covers, but there were significant for soil humidity and temperature (p<0.05). There were highly significant differences with respect to the bacteria population levels (p<0.0001) and with respect to nitrate production. This suggests a higher bacterial activity in the under forest cover. The radical exudate from both types of plant cover reduced the viability of bacteria in vitro, from 1:1 to 1:30 exudate bacteria proportions. In the soils physical and chemical analysis, it was found a higher P and Al concentrations, and a higher CIC and organic matter content under the forest cover. It is suggested the importance of this functional group in this ecosystem

  8. Exploratory Research - Using Volatile Organic Compounds to Separate Heterotrophic and Autotrophic Forest Soil Respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Scott D [Mississippi State University; Hatten, Jeffrey A [Oregon State University

    2015-02-09

    The initial focus of this project was to develop a method to partition soil respiration into its components (autotrophic, heterotrophic etc.) using the fingerprint of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from soils. We were able to identify 63 different VOCs in our study; however, due to technical difficulties we were unable to take reliable measurements in order to test our hypotheses and develop this method. In the end, we changed the objectives of the project. Our new objectives were to characterize the effects of species and soil moisture regime on the composition of soil organic matter. We utilized the soils from the greenhouse experiment we had established for the soil VOC study and determined the lignin biomarker profiles of each of the treatments. We found that moisture had a significant effect on the carbon content of the soils with the low moisture treatments having higher carbon content than the high moisture treatments. We found that the relative yield of syringyl phenols (SP), ligin (Lig), and substituted fatty acids (SFA) were elevated in deciduous planted pots and reduced in conifer planted pots relative to plant-free treatments. Our results suggest nuttall oak preserved lignin and SFA, while loblolly pine lost lignin and SFA similarly to the plant free treatments. Since we did not find that the carbon concentrations of the soils were different between the species, nuttall oak probably replaced more native soil carbon than loblolly pine. This suggests that relative to loblolly pine, nuttall oak is a priming species. Since priming may impact soil carbon pools more than temperature or moisture, determining which species are priming species may facilitate an understanding of the interaction that land use and climate change may have on soil carbon pools.

  9. Autotrophic carbon budget in coral tissue: a new 13C-based model of photosynthate translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Pascale; Grover, Renaud; Maguer, Jean François; Legendre, Louis; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine

    2012-04-15

    Corals live in symbiosis with dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinum. These dinoflagellates translocate a large part of the photosynthetically fixed carbon to the host, which in turn uses it for its own needs. Assessing the carbon budget in coral tissue is a central question in reef studies that still vexes ecophysiologists. The amount of carbon fixed by the symbiotic association can be determined by measuring the rate of photosynthesis, but the amount of carbon translocated by the symbionts to the host and the fate of this carbon are more difficult to assess. In the present study, we propose a novel approach to calculate the budget of autotrophic carbon in the tissue of scleractinian corals, based on a new model and measurements made with the stable isotope (13)C. Colonies of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata were incubated in H(13)CO (-)(3)-enriched seawater, after which the fate of (13)C was followed in the symbionts, the coral tissue and the released particulate organic carbon (i.e. mucus). Results obtained showed that after 15 min, ca. 60% of the carbon fixed was already translocated to the host, and after 48 h, this value reached 78%. However, ca. 48% of the photosynthetically fixed carbon was respired by the symbiotic association, and 28% was released as dissolved organic carbon. This is different from other coral species, where coral tissue after 48 h. Results show that our (13)C-based model could successfully trace the carbon flow from the symbionts to the host, and the photosynthetically acquired carbon lost from the symbiotic association. PMID:22442377

  10. Autotrophic growth: methylated carbon monoxide dehydrogenase as an intermediate of acetyl-CoA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new pathway of autotrophic growth has been discovered in certain anaerobic bacteria in which acetyl-CoA is the product formed from CO2 for initiation of anabolism rather than 3-phosphoglycerate as in the Calvin Cycle. CO2 is reduced in combination with tetrahydrofolate to methyltetrahydrofolate (CH3THF) and is the source of the CH3 group. CO2 or CO is the source of the carbonyl group. CO dehydrogenase (CODH), corrinoid enzyme, methyltransferase, ferredoxin and CODH disulfide reductase have been isolated from Clostridium thermoaceticum and shown to catalyze the synthesis of acetyl-CoA from CH3THF, CO and CoA. The methyltransferase catalyzes transfer of the CH3 group from CH3THF to the corrinoid enzyme from which the methyl is transferred to CODH. CO is bound to the Ni of CODH forming a Ni-Fe-C center. When CO2 is the source of carbon, H2 and hydrogenase are required for reduction of the CO2 by CODH. CODH disulfide reductase is required for the addition of CoA to the CODH (Pezacka, E. and Wood, H.G. J. Biol. Chem., in press). Then, CODH catalyzes the combination of the three groups forming acetyl-CoA. The authors have now succeeded in methylating CODH using 14CH3I or 14CH3-B12. With the resulting 14CH3-CODH, only CODH disulfide reductase is required for synthesis of [14C]acetyl-CoA from CO and CoA. The amino acid sequence at the CH3-site is being investigated

  11. Partitioning Longleaf Pine Soil Respiration into Its Heterotrophic and Autotrophic Components through Root Exclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Althea A. ArchMiller

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Rapid and accurate estimations of the heterotrophic and autotrophic components of total soil respiration (Rs are important for calculating forest carbon budgets and for understanding carbon dynamics associated with natural and management-related disturbances. The objective of this study was to use deep (60 cm root exclusion tubes and paired control (i.e., no root exclusion collars to estimate heterotrophic respiration (Rh and Rs, respectively, in three 26-year-old longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill. stands in western Georgia. Root biomass was measured in root exclusion tubes and control collars after 102–104 days of incubation and fine root biomass loss from root exclusion was used to quantify root decay. Mean Rs from control collars was 3.3 micromol•CO2•m−2•s−1. Root exclusion tubes decreased Rs, providing an estimate of Rh. Mean Rh was 2.7 micromol•CO2•m−2•s−1 when uncorrected by pretreatment variation, root decay, or soil moisture compared to 2.1 micromol•CO2•m−2•s−1 when Rh was corrected for root decay. The corresponding ratio of Rh to Rs ranged from 66% to 82%, depending on the estimation method. This study provides an estimate of Rh in longleaf pine forests, and demonstrates the potential for deep root exclusion tubes to provide relatively rapid assessments (i.e., ~40 days post-treatment of Rh in similar forests. The range in Rh to Rs is comparable to other reports for similar temperate coniferous ecosystems.

  12. Drinking Water Denitrification using Autotrophic Denitrifying Bacteria in a Fluidized Bed Bioreactor 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolmotaleb Seid-mohammadi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Contamination of drinking water sources with nitrate may cause adverse effects on human health. Due to operational and maintenance problems of physicochemical nitrate removal processes, using biological denitrification processes have been performed. The aim of this study is to evaluate nitrate removal efficiency from drinking water using autotrophic denitrifying bacteria immobilized on sulfur impregnated activated carbon in a fluidized bed bioreactor. Materials and Methods: After impregnating activated carbon by sulfur as a microorganism carriers and enrichment and inoculation of denitrifying bacteria, a laboratory-scale fluidized bed bioreactor was operated. Nitrate removal efficiency, nitrite, turbidity, hardness and TOC in the effluent were examined during the whole experiment under various conditions including constant influent nitrate concentration as 90 mg NO3--N/l corresponding to different HRT ranging from 5.53 to 1.5 hr. Results: We found that  the denitrification rates was depended on the hydraulic retention time and the nitrate removal efficiency was up to 98%  and nitrite concentration was lower than 1mg/l at optimum HRT=2.4 hr respectively. Moreover, there was no difference in hardness between influent and effluent due to supplying sodium bicarbonate as carbon source for denitrifying bacteria.  However pH, TOC, hardness, and turbidity of the effluent met the W.H.O guidelines for drinking water.  Conclusion: This study demonstrated that an innovative carrier as sulfur impregnated activated carbon could be used as both the biofilm carrier and energy source for treating nitrate contaminated drinking water in the lab-scale fluidized bed bioreactor.

  13. Enhanced abiotic and biotic contributions to dechlorination of pentachlorophenol during Fe(III) reduction by an iron-reducing bacterium Clostridium beijerinckii Z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel Fe(III) reducing bacterium, Clostridium beijerinckii Z, was isolated from glucose amended paddy slurries, and shown to dechlorinate pentachlorophenol (PCP). Fifty percent of added PCP was removed by C. beijerinckii Z alone, which increased to 83% in the presence of both C. beijerinckii Z and ferrihydrite after 11 days of incubation. Without C. beijerinckii Z, the surface-bound Fe(II) also abiotically dechlorinated more than 40% of the added PCP. This indicated that the biotic dechlorination by C. beijerinckii Z is a dominant process causing PCP transformation through anaerobic dechlorination, and that the dechlorination rates can be accelerated by simultaneous reduction of Fe(III). A biochemical electron transfer coupling process between sorbed Fe(II) produced by C. beijerinckii Z and reductive dehalogenation is a possible mechanism. This finding increases our knowledge of the role of Fe(III) reducing genera of Clostridium in dechlorinating halogenated organic pollutants, such as PCP, in anaerobic paddy soils. - Highlights: • A novel Fe(III) reducing bacterium Clostridium beijerinckii Z was isolated and could dechlorinate pentachlorophenol. • Anaerobic transformation of PCP by C. beijerinckii Z could be accelerated by simultaneous reduction of Fe(III). • Biochemical electron transfer coupling between Fe redox cycling and reductive dechlorination was the mechanism involved. • The finding increases our knowledge of Clostridium sp. regarding their multiple functions for dechlorinating pollutants

  14. Carbon budgets for three autotrophic Australian estuaries: Implications for global estimates of the coastal air-water CO2 flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, D. T.; Eyre, B. D.

    2012-03-01

    Estuaries are `hot spots' in the global carbon cycle, yet data on carbon dynamics, in particular air-sea CO2 fluxes, from autotrophic systems are rare. Estuarine carbon budgets were constructed for three geomorphically distinct warm temperate Australian estuaries over an annual cycle. All three estuaries were net autotrophic, with annual net ecosystem metabolism (NEM) ranging from 8 ± 13.4 molC m-2 yr-1 to 10 ± 14 molC m-2 yr-1. There was a net flux of CO2 from the atmosphere to the estuaries of between 0.4 ± 0.6 molC m-2 yr-1 and 2 ± 0.9 molC m-2 yr-1. Loading of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the estuaries varied markedly within and between the estuaries, and was directly related to freshwater inflow. While NEM was similar in all three estuaries, the ratio of benthic versus pelagic contributions to NEM differed, with NEM dominated by pelagic production in the river dominated system, benthic production dominating in the intermediate estuary, and equal contributions of benthic and pelagic production in the marine dominated lagoon. All three estuaries exported more organic carbon than was imported, fueled by additional organic carbon supplied by NEM. The estuaries essentially acted as bioreactors, transforming DIC to organic carbon. Burial of organic carbon ranged from 1.2 ± 0.3 molC m-2 yr-1 to 4.4 ± 1.2 molC m-2 yr-1 and represented up to half of NEM. The annual net uptake of atmospheric CO2 in these systems, along with previous estimates of the global estuarine CO2flux being based predominantly on heterotrophic, large river dominated estuarine systems, indicates that the global estimate of the estuarine air-water CO2flux may be over-estimated due to the lack of studies from autotrophic marine dominated estuaries.

  15. Soil moisture sensitivity of autotrophic and heterotrophic forest floor respiration in boreal xeric pine and mesic spruce forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ťupek, Boris; Launiainen, Samuli; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Heikkinen, Jukka; Lehtonen, Aleksi

    2016-04-01

    Litter decomposition rates of the most process based soil carbon models affected by environmental conditions are linked with soil heterotrophic CO2 emissions and serve for estimating soil carbon sequestration; thus due to the mass balance equation the variation in measured litter inputs and measured heterotrophic soil CO2 effluxes should indicate soil carbon stock changes, needed by soil carbon management for mitigation of anthropogenic CO2 emissions, if sensitivity functions of the applied model suit to the environmental conditions e.g. soil temperature and moisture. We evaluated the response forms of autotrophic and heterotrophic forest floor respiration to soil temperature and moisture in four boreal forest sites of the International Cooperative Programme on Assessment and Monitoring of Air Pollution Effects on Forests (ICP Forests) by a soil trenching experiment during year 2015 in southern Finland. As expected both autotrophic and heterotrophic forest floor respiration components were primarily controlled by soil temperature and exponential regression models generally explained more than 90% of the variance. Soil moisture regression models on average explained less than 10% of the variance and the response forms varied between Gaussian for the autotrophic forest floor respiration component and linear for the heterotrophic forest floor respiration component. Although the percentage of explained variance of soil heterotrophic respiration by the soil moisture was small, the observed reduction of CO2 emissions with higher moisture levels suggested that soil moisture response of soil carbon models not accounting for the reduction due to excessive moisture should be re-evaluated in order to estimate right levels of soil carbon stock changes. Our further study will include evaluation of process based soil carbon models by the annual heterotrophic respiration and soil carbon stocks.

  16. Phototrophic biofilm assembly in microbial-mat-derived unicyanobacterial consortia: model systems for the study of autotroph-heterotroph interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    StephenRLindemann

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Microbial autotroph-heterotroph interactions influence biogeochemical cycles on a global scale, but the diversity and complexity of natural systems and their intractability to in situ manipulation make it challenging to elucidate the principles governing these interactions. The study of assembling phototrophic biofilm communities provides a robust means to identify such interactions and evaluate their contributions to the recruitment and maintenance of phylogenetic and functional diversity over time. To examine primary succession in phototrophic communities, we isolated two unicyanobacterial consortia from the microbial mat in Hot Lake, Washington, characterizing the membership and metabolic function of each consortium. We then analyzed the spatial structures and quantified the community compositions of their assembling biofilms. The consortia retained the same suite of heterotrophic species, identified as abundant members of the mat and assigned to Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Autotroph growth rates dominated early in assembly, yielding to increasing heterotroph growth rates late in succession. The two consortia exhibited similar assembly patterns, with increasing relative abundances of members from Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria concurrent with decreasing relative abundances of those from Gammaproteobacteria. Despite these similarities at higher taxonomic levels, the relative abundances of individual heterotrophic species were substantially different in the developing consortial biofilms. This suggests that, although similar niches are created by the cyanobacterial metabolisms, the resulting webs of autotroph-heterotroph and heterotroph-heterotroph interactions are specific to each primary producer. The relative simplicity and tractability of the Hot Lake unicyanobacterial consortia make them useful model systems for deciphering interspecies interactions and assembly principles relevant to natural

  17. Oxidation of sulphide minerals-VI Ferrous and ferric iron in the water-soluble oxidation products of iron sulphide minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, H F

    1979-06-01

    A pseudo-kinetic method has been developed for determining the ferrous and ferric iron in the water-soluble oxidation products of pyrrhotite, pyrite and chalcopyrite, and ores and concentrates containing them. Two determinations are required for each material. In one, the total iron is determined with 1,10-phenanthroline after reduction to Fe(II). In the other, the reduction of Fe(III) is retarded by complexation with fluoride. The difference in the amount of ferrous phenanthranoline complex produced in these two determinations is a function of the original FE(III) concentration and of time. PMID:18962467

  18. Fractionation of Fe isotopes during Fe(II) oxidation by a marine photoferrotroph is controlled by the formation of organic Fe-complexes and colloidal Fe fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Wu, Wenfang; Schoenberg, Ronny; Byrne, James; Michel, F. Marc; Pan, Yongxin; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Much interest exists in finding mineralogical, organic, morphological, or isotopic biosignatures for Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that are retained in Fe-rich sediments, which could indicate the activity of these organisms in Fe-rich seawater, more common in the Precambrian Era. To date, the effort to establish a clear Fe isotopic signature in Fe minerals produced by Fe(II)-oxidizing metabolisms has been thwarted by the large kinetic fractionation incurred as freshly oxidized aqueous Fe(III) rapidly precipitates as Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals at near neutral pH. The Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals resulting from abiotic Fe(II) oxidation are isotopically heavy compared to the Fe(II) precursor and are not clearly distinguishable from minerals formed by FeOB isotopically. However, in marine hydrothermal systems and Fe(II)-rich springs the minerals formed are often isotopically lighter than expected considering the fraction of Fe(II) that has been oxidized and experimentally-determined fractionation factors. We measured the Fe isotopic composition of aqueous Fe (Feaq) and the final Fe mineral (Feppt) produced in batch experiment using the marine Fe(II)-oxidizing phototroph Rhodovulum iodosum. The δ56Feaq data are best described by a kinetic fractionation model, while the evolution of δ56Feppt appears to be controlled by a separate fractionation process. We propose that soluble Fe(III), and Fe(II) and Fe(III) extracted from the Feppt may act as intermediates between Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) precipitation. Based on 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and X-ray total scattering, we suggests these Fe phases, collectively Fe(II/III)interm, may consist of organic-ligand bound, sorbed, and/or colloidal Fe(II) and Fe(III) mineral phases that are isotopically lighter than the final Fe(III) mineral product. Similar intermediate phases, formed in response to organic carbon produced by FeOB and inorganic

  19. An operation protocol for facilitating start-up of single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removing reactors based on process stoichiometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutlu, A. Gizem; Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Sin, Gürkan;

    2012-01-01

    Start-up and operation of single-stage nitritation/anammox reactor employing complete autotrophic nitrogen can be difficult. Keeping the performance criteria and monitoring the microbial community composition may not be easy or fast enough to take action on time. In this study, a control strategy...... is developed based on stoichiometric analysis of monitored nitrogen species. This analysis can serve as a strong decision-making tool to take appropriate actions with respect to the operational conditions to accelerate start up or attainment of near complete nitritation-anammox performance....

  20. Reaction Mechanisms of Metals with Hydrogen Sulfide and Thiols in Model Wine. Part 2: Iron- and Copper-Catalyzed Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitman, Gal Y; Danilewicz, John C; Jeffery, David W; Elias, Ryan J

    2016-05-25

    Sulfidic off-odors arising during wine production are frequently removed by Cu(II) fining. In part 1 of this study ( 10.1021/acs.jafc.6b00641 ), the reaction of H2S and thiols with Cu(II) was examined; however, the interaction of iron and copper is also known to play an important synergistic role in mediating non-enzymatic wine oxidation. The interaction of these two metals in the oxidation of H2S and thiols (cysteine, 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, and 6-sulfanylhexan-1-ol) was therefore examined under wine-like conditions. H2S and thiols (300 μM) were reacted with Fe(III) (100 or 200 μM) alone and in combination with Cu(II) (25 or 50 μM), and concentrations of H2S and thiols, oxygen, and acetaldehyde were monitored over time. H2S and thiols were shown to be slowly oxidized in the presence of Fe(III) alone and were not bound to Fe(III) under model wine conditions. However, Cu(II) added to model wine containing Fe(III) was quickly reduced by H2S and thiols to form Cu(I) complexes, which then rapidly reduced Fe(III) to Fe(II). Oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of oxygen regenerated Fe(III) and completed the iron redox cycle. In addition, sulfur-derived oxidation products were observed, and the formation of organic polysulfanes was demonstrated. PMID:27133088

  1. Arsenopyrite oxidation - A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenopyrite (FeAsS) is the most common As-bearing sulfide mineral. Under oxidising conditions, such as those in mine waste systems, it breaks down to release acids of As and S into the environment, resulting in acid mine drainage with high concentrations of dissolved As. In this communication, current knowledge of arsenopyrite oxidation is reviewed based on a survey of the existing literature, which has focused on processes and reactions at the mineral surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has shown that the oxidation of arsenopyrite in acid is more rapid than in air, water, or in alkaline solutions. Oxidation products reported by XPS include Fe(III) oxide, As(III), As(V), SO32- and SO42-. The elemental constituents of arsenopyrite oxidise at different rates, although there is no consensus as to which is the fastest or slowest to oxidise. Electrochemical studies have highlighted the formation of elemental S on the arsenopyrite surface, while XPS studies suggest that only oxy-anions of S form. Kinetic studies of arsenopyrite oxidation suggest that O2 and Fe3+ are the dominant inorganic agents causing arsenopyrite dissolution. The bacterially-mediated oxidation of arsenopyrite by acidophilic Fe- and S-oxidising bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus caldus, is more extensive than abiotic oxidation. The literature pertaining to arsenopyrite oxidation is divided regarding the reaction stoichiometry, and the composition and layering of surface overlayers.

  2. A microscale multi-functional metal-organic framework as a fluorescence chemosensor for Fe(III), Al(III) and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yang; Zheng, Xiang-Jun; Jin, Lin-Pei

    2016-06-01

    A microscale metal-organic framework [Eu(atpt)1.5(phen)(H2O)]n (H2atpt=2-aminoterephthalic acid, phen=1,10-phenanthroline) (Eu-MOF) was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, luminescence spectrum, powder X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscope. The fluorescence response of Eu-MOF to metal ions and aldehydes showed that Eu-MOF is highly selective to Fe(III), Al(III) and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde (2-OH-NA). Eu-MOF could be utilized as a multi-functional fluorescence chemosensor for Fe(III), Al(III) and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde (2-OH-NA). The detection limit of Fe(III), Al(III) and 2-OH-NA was 45, 10 and 36μM, respectively. The corresponding sensing mechanisms were explored. PMID:26967663

  3. The Influence of the Amide Linkage in the Fe(III) -Binding Properties of Catechol-Modified Rosamine Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queirós, Carla; Leite, Andreia; G M Couto, Maria; Cunha-Silva, Luís; Barone, Giampaolo; de Castro, Baltazar; Rangel, Maria; M N Silva, André; M G Silva, Ana

    2015-10-26

    The two new fluorescent ligands RosCat1 and RosCat2 contain catechol receptors connected to rosamine platforms through an amide linkage and were synthesized by using microwave-assisted coupling reactions of carboxyl- or amine-substituted rosamines with the corresponding catechol units and subsequent deprotection. RosCat1 possesses a reverse amide, whereas RosCat2 has the usual oriented amide bond (HNCO vs. CONH, respectively). The ligands were characterized by means of NMR spectroscopy, mass-spectrometry, and DFT calculations and X-ray crystallography studies for RosCat1. The influence of the amide linkage on the photophysical properties of the fluorescent ligands was assessed in different solvents and showed a higher fluorescence quantum yield for RosCat1. The coordination chemistry of these ligands with a Fe(III) center has been rationalized by mass-spectrometric analysis and semiempirical calculations. Octahedral Fe(III) complexes were obtained by the chelation of three RosCat1 or RosCat2 ligands. Interestingly, the unconventional amide connectivity in RosCat1 imposes the formation of an eight-membered ring on the chelate complex through a "salicylate-type" mode of coordination. PMID:26493881

  4. Adaptation of the autotrophic acetogen Sporomusa ovata to methanol accelerates the conversion of CO2 to organic products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Höglund, Daniel; Koza, Anna;

    2015-01-01

    Acetogens are efficient microbial catalysts for bioprocesses converting C1 compounds into organic products. Here, an adaptive laboratory evolution approach was implemented to adapt Sporomusa ovata for faster autotrophic metabolism and CO2 conversion to organic chemicals. S. ovata was first adapted...... increased 5-fold. Furthermore, acetate production rate from CO2 with an electrode serving as the electron donor was increased 6.5-fold confirming that the acceleration of the autotrophic metabolism of the adapted strain is independent of the electron donor provided. Whole-genome sequencing, transcriptomic....... The results demonstrate that an efficient strategy to increase rates of CO2 conversion in bioprocesses like microbial electrosynthesis is to evolve the microbial catalyst by adaptive laboratory evolution to optimize its autotrophic metabolism....

  5. A new ion-selective electrode based on aluminium tungstate for Fe(III) determination in rock sample, pharmaceutical sample and water sample

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mu Naushad

    2008-12-01

    An inorganic cation exchanger, aluminum tungstate (AT), has been synthesized by adding 0.1 M sodium tungstate gradually into 0.1 M aluminium nitrate at pH 1.2 with continuous stirring. The ion exchange capacity for Na+ ion and distribution coefficients of various metal ions was determined on the column of aluminium tungstate. The distribution studies of various metal ions showed the selectivity of Fe(III) ions by this cation exchange material. So, a Fe(III) ion-selective membrane electrode was prepared by using this cation exchange material as an electroactive material. The effect of plasticizers viz. dibutyl phthalate (DBP), dioctylphthalate (DOP), di-(butyl) butyl phosphate (DBBP) and tris-(2-ethylhexylphosphate) (TEHP), has also been studied on the performance of membrane sensor. It was observed that the membrane containing the composition AT: PVC: DBP in the ratio 2 : 20 : 15 displayed a useful analytical response with excellent reproducibility, low detection limit, wide working pH range (1–3.5), quick response time (15 s) and applicability over a wide concentration range of Fe(III) ions from 1 × 10-7 M to 1 × 10-1 M with a slope of 20 ± 1 mV per decade. The selectivity coefficients were determined by the mixed solution method and revealed that the electrode was selective for Fe(III) ions in the presence of interfering ions. The electrode was used for atleast 5 months without any considerable divergence in response characteristics. The constructed sensor was used as indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Fe(III) ions against EDTA and Fe(III) determination in rock sample, pharmaceutical sample and water sample. The results are found to be in good agreement with those obtained by using conventional methods.

  6. Metabolic potential of microbial mats and microbialites: Autotrophic capabilities described by an in silico stoichiometric approach from shared genomic resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueda-García, Daniel; Falcón, Luisa I

    2016-08-01

    Microbialites and microbial mats are complex communities with high phylogenetic diversity. These communities are mostly composed of bacteria and archaea, which are the earliest living forms on Earth and relevant to biogeochemical evolution. In this study, we identified the shared metabolic pathways for uptake of inorganic C and N in microbial mats and microbialites based on metagenomic data sets. An in silico analysis for autotrophic pathways was used to trace the paths of C and N to the system, following an elementary flux modes (EFM) approach, resulting in a stoichiometric model. The fragility was analyzed by the minimal cut sets method. We found four relevant pathways for the incorporation of CO2 (Calvin cycle, reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle, reductive acetyl-CoA pathway, and dicarboxylate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle), some of them present only in archaea, while nitrogen fixation was the most important source of N to the system. The metabolic potential to incorporate nitrate to biomass was also relevant. The fragility of the network was low, suggesting a high redundancy of the autotrophic pathways due to their broad metabolic diversity, and highlighting the relevance of reducing power source. This analysis suggests that microbial mats and microbialites are "metabolic pumps" for the incorporation of inorganic gases and formation of organic matter. PMID:27324427

  7. Phototrophic Biofilm Assembly in Microbial-Mat-Derived Unicyanobacterial Consortia: Model Systems for the Study of Autotroph-Heterotroph Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Jessica K.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Kim, Young-Mo; Chrisler, William B.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Hu, Dehong; Metz, Thomas O.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lindemann, Stephen R.

    2014-04-07

    Though microbial autotroph-heterotroph interactions influence biogeochemical cycles on a global scale, the diversity and complexity of natural systems and their intractability to in situ environmental manipulation makes elucidation of the principles governing these interactions challenging. Examination of primary succession during phototrophic biofilm assembly provides a robust means by which to elucidate the dynamics of such interactions and determine their influence upon recruitment and maintenance of phylogenetic and functional diversity in microbial communities. We isolated and characterized two unicyanobacterial consortia from the Hot Lake phototrophic mat, quantifying the structural and community composition of their assembling biofilms. The same heterotrophs were retained in both consortia and included members of Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, taxa frequently reported as consorts of microbial photoautotrophs. Cyanobacteria led biofilm assembly, eventually giving way to a late heterotrophic bloom. The consortial biofilms exhibited similar patterns of assembly, with the relative abundances of members of Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria increasing and members of Gammaproteobacteria decreasing as colonization progressed. Despite similar trends in assembly at higher taxa, the consortia exhibited substantial differences in community structure at the species level. These similar patterns of assembly with divergent community structures suggest that, while similar niches are created by the metabolism of the cyanobacteria, the resultant webs of autotroph-heterotroph and heterotroph-heterotroph interactions driving metabolic exchange are specific to each primary producer. Altogether, our data support these Hot Lake unicyanobacterial consortia as generalizable model systems whose simplicity and tractability permit the deciphering of community assembly principles relevant to natural microbial communities.

  8. Extraction and structural characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), pellets in autotrophic nitrifying biofilm and activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhiwei; Li, Wenhong; Yang, Shangyuan; Du, Ping

    2010-10-01

    The composition and the distribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and pellets of autotrophic nitrifying biofilm and activated sludge were investigated in this work. Fourier-transform Infrared Spectroscopy, fluorescent in situ hybridization and fluorescence staining were used to examine proteins, carbohydrates, humic substances and DNA being present in the biofilms and the sludge samples. To investigate extraction efficiency and its effect on characterization of tightly bounded EPS, four extraction methods (ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), NaOH, cationic exchange resin (CER), ultrasound) were compared. EDTA and ultrasound showed more effective extraction ability than NaOH and CER. NaOH and ultrasound extraction led to high activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from cell lysis, which was confirmed by fluorescence staining analysis. Ultrasound and NaOH extraction yielded 18% and 11% of dead cells in biofilm, respectively, whereas they obtained 11% and 9% of dead cells in activated sludge, respectively. Four layers of extractible products were separated from autotrophic nitrifiering flocs. The extraction results indicated that extraction yield in different layers varied in a wide range: 3-6% of soluble EPS, 5-10% of loosely bound EPS, 34-67% of tightly bound EPS and 30-60% of pellets. PMID:20655088

  9. Characterization of the start-up period of single-step autotrophic nitrogen removal in a sequencing batch reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jin-song; QIN Yu; FANG Fang; YANG Guo-hong

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of the start-up period of single-step autotrophic nitrogen removal process were investigated. The autotrophic nitrogen removal process used a sequencing batch reactor to treat wastewater of medium to low ammonia-nitrogen concentration, with dissolved oxygen (DO), hydraulic retention time (HRT) and temperature controlled. The experimental conditions were temperature at (30(2) (C, ammonia concentration of (60 to 120) mg/L, DO of (0.8 to 1.0) mg/L, pH from 7.8 to 8.5 and HRT of 24 h. The rates of nitrification and nitrogen removal turn out to be 77% and 40%, respectively, after a start up period going through three stages divided according to nitrite accumulation: sludge domestication, nitrifying bacteria selection and sludge adaptation. It is demonstrated that dissolved oxygen is critical to nitrite accumulation and elastic YJZH soft compound packing is superior to polyhedral hollow balls in helping the bacteria adhere to the membrane.

  10. Summer monsoon onset-induced changes of autotrophic pico- and nanoplankton in the largest monsoonal estuary along the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mohan, A.P.; Jyothibabu, R.; Jagadeesan, L.; Lallu, K.R.; Karnan, C.

        Environ. Monit. Assess., vol.188; 2016; no.93 doi: 10.1007/s10661-016-5096-7 Summer Monsoon Onset -induced Changes of Autotrophic Pico - and Nano - plankton in the Largest Monsoonal Estuary along the West Coast of India Arya P. Mohan, Jyothibabu, R...: Phytoplankton, Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus, Picoeukaryotes, Cochin Backwaters  2    1. Introduction Smaller autotrophic plankton consist of pico - (0.2 - 2 μm) and nano - (2 - 20 μm) size ranges inhabiting the euphotic ocean surface layer. Earlier studies...

  11. Start-up of a completely autotrophic nitrogen removal process in a three- dimensional electrode-biofilm reactor%三维电极生物膜反应器全程自养脱氮的启动研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭劲松; 杨琳; 陈猷鹏; 方芳; 唐金晶

    2012-01-01

    A completely autotrophic nitrogen removal process was started up in a three-dimensional electrode-biofilm reactor for artificial ammonia wastewater treatment. The titanium rod coated with a thin layer of ruthenium was used as anode to generate oxygen. In the aerobic area, NH4^+-N was oxidized to NO3^- -N or NO2^- -N by nitrifying bacteria. The active carbon fiber-felt was used as cathode to generate hydrogen. And in this anaerobic area, the denitrification was completed while hydrogen was acted as the electron donor. A lot of carbon particles were filled in tbe cathode area used as three- dimensional electrode. Nitrification and denitrification process were controlled by adjusting dissolved oxygen and pH values under the condition that the initial concentration of ammonia-nitrogen was 30 mg·L^-1 , the hydraulic retention time was 24h and the temperature was 30℃. After biofilm was formed and stabilized, the removal rate of NH4^+-N and TN achieved 97.8% and 92.4% respectively. It was indicated that the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal was started up successfully. The scanning electron microscopy showed that the bacteria on surface of activated carbon fiber felt were mainly short rod-shaped Pseudomonas, while the bacteria on the surface of the activated carbon particles were Micrococcus denitrificans. They both belong to hydrogen autotrophic denitrifying bacteria. In the reactor, the stable autotrophic nitrogen system was gradually established.%采用人工配制氨氮废水,对三维电极生物膜反应器进行全程自养脱氮的启动研究.反应器中阳极采用钌涂层钛棒,在阳极区电解水产氧供硝化菌进行硝化反应;阴极采用活性炭纤维毡,并在阴极区填充活性炭颗粒构建三维电极,在阴极区电解水产氢供反硝化菌完成反硝化过程.在进水NH4^+-N浓度30mg·L^-1、温度30℃、HRT为24h的试验条件下,通过调节DO和pH实现对硝化和反硝化反应的控制.结果

  12. Potential autotrophic metabolisms in ultra-basic reducing springs associated with present-day continental serpentinization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, P. L.; Miles, S.; Kohl, L.; Kavanagh, H.; Ziegler, S. E.; Brazelton, W. J.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    Ultra-basic reducing springs at continental sites of serpentinization act as windows into the biogeochemistry of this subsurface exothermic environment rich in H2 and CH4 gases. Biogeochemical carbon transformations in these systems are of interest because serpentinization creates conditions that are amenable to abiotic and biotic reduction of carbon. However, little is known about the metabolic capabilities of the microorganisms that live in this environment. To determine the potential for autotrophic metabolisms, bicarbonate and CO substrate addition microcosm experiments were performed using water and sediment from an ultra-basic reducing spring in the Tablelands, Newfoundland, Canada, a site of present-day continental serpentinization. CO was consistently observed to be utilized in the Live but not the Killed controlled replicates amended with 10% 13C labelled CO and non-labelled (natural C isotope abundance) CO. In the Live CO microcosms with natural C isotope abundance, the residual CO became enriched in 13C (~10 ‰) consistent with a decrease in the fraction of CO remaining. In the Killed CO controlled replicates with natural C isotope abundance the CO showed little 13C enrichment (~1.3 ‰). The data from the Live CO microcosms were well described by a Rayleigh isotopic distillation model, yielding an isotopic enrichment factor for microbial CO uptake of 15.7 ×0.5 ‰ n=2. These data suggest that there was microbial CO utilization in these experiments. The sediment and water from the 13C-labelled and non-labelled, Live and Killed microcosms were extracted for phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) to determine changes in community composition between treatments as well as to determine the microbial uptake of CO. The difference in community composition between the Live and Killed microcosms was not readily resolvable based on PLFA distributions. Additionally, the microbial uptake of 13CO had minimal to no affect on the δ13C of the cellular biomarkers, with the

  13. Nitrification and Autotrophic Nitrifying Bacteria in a Hydrocarbon-Polluted Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Deni, Jamal; Penninckx, Michel J.

    1999-01-01

    In vitro ammonia-oxidizing bacteria are capable of oxidizing hydrocarbons incompletely. This transformation is accompanied by competitive inhibition of ammonia monooxygenase, the first key enzyme in nitrification. The effect of hydrocarbon pollution on soil nitrification was examined in situ. In a microcosm study, adding diesel fuel hydrocarbon to an uncontaminated soil (agricultural unfertilized soil) treated with ammonium sulfate dramatically reduced the amount of KCl-extractable nitrate bu...

  14. Uranium(VI) reduction by nanoscale zero-valent iron in anoxic batch systems: The role of Fe(II) and Fe(III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Sen; Chen, Yongheng; Xiang, Wu; Bao, Zhengyu; Liu, Chongxuan; Deng, Baolin

    2014-12-01

    The role of Fe(II) and Fe(III) on U(VI) reduction by nanoscale zerovalent iron (nanoFe0) was investigated using two iron chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and triethanolamine (TEA) under a CO2-free anoxic condition. The results showed U(VI) reduction was strongly inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and TEA in a pH range from 6.92 to 9.03. For instance, at pH 6.92 the observed U(VI) reduction rates decreased by 80.7% and 82.3% in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline and TEA, respectively. The inhibition was attributed to the formation of stable complexes between 1,10-phenanthroline and Fe(II) or TEA and Fe(III). In the absence of iron chelators, U(VI) reduction can be enhanced by surface-bound Fe(II) on nanoFe0. Our results suggested that Fe(III) and Fe(II) probably acted as an electron shuttle to mediate the transfer of electrons from nanoFe0 to U(VI), therefore a combined system with Fe(II), Fe(III) and nanoFe0 can facilitate the U(VI) reductive immobilization in the contaminated groundwater.

  15. Sorption of Ni(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) ions from Aqueous Solutions Using Activated Carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An activated carbon was tested for its ability to remove transition metal ions from aqueous solutions. Physical, chemical and liquid-phase adsorption characterizations of the carbon were done following standard procedures. Studies on the removal of Ni(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) ions were attempted by varying adsorbate dose, pH of the metal ion solution and time in batch mode. The equilibrium adsorption data were fitted with Freundlich and Langmuir and the isotherm constants were evaluated, equilibrium time of the different three metal ions were determined. pH was found to have a significant role to play in the adsorption. The processes were endothermic and the thermodynamic parameters were evaluated. Desorption studies indicate that ion-exchange mechanism is operating

  16. Regulation of Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Metabolism in Pseudomonas oxalaticus OX1. Growth on Fructose and on Mixtures of Fructose and Formate in Batch and Continuous Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkhuizen, L.; Harder, W.

    1984-01-01

    In Pseudomonas oxalaticus the synthesis of enzymes involved in autotrophic CO2 fixation via the Calvin cycle is regulated by repression/derepression. During growth of the organism on fructose alone, the synthesis of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) remained fully repressed, both in batch

  17. Methane Suppression: The Impacts of Fe(III) and Humic Acids on Net Methane Flux from Arctic Tundra Wetlands in Alaska and Finland (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, D.; Miller, K.; Lai, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic soils contain large reservoirs of carbon (C) that are vulnerable to loss from climatic warming. However the potential global impacts of this C depend on whether it is lost primarily in the form of methane (CH4) or carbon dioxide (CO2), two gases with very different greenhouse warming potentials. In anaerobic environments, the relative production of CH4 vs. CO2 may be controlled by the presence of alternative terminal electron acceptors, which allow more thermodynamically favorable anaerobic respiratory pathways to dominate over methanogenesis. This work investigated how the addition of terminal electron acceptors, ferric iron (Fe(III)) and humic acids, affected net CH4 fluxes from high-latitude wetland ecosystems. We conducted two manipulative field experiments in Barrow, Alaska (71° N) and Finnish Lapland (69° N). The ecosystem in Barrow was known from previous studies to be rich in Fe(III) and to harbor a microbial community that is dominated by Fe(III)- and humic acid-reducing microorganisms. The role of these alternative electron acceptors had not previously been studied at the Finnish site. CH4 and CO2 fluxes were measured using a portable trace gas analyzer from experimental plots, before and after amendments with Fe(III) (in the chelated form, ferric nitrilotriacetic acid), humic acids, or water as a control. Both in the ecosystem with permafrost and naturally high levels of soil Fe (Barrow, AK) and in the ecosystem with no permafrost and naturally low levels of soil Fe (Petsikko, Finland), the addition of the alternative electron acceptors Fe(III) and humic acids significantly reduced net CH4 flux. CO2 fluxes were not significantly altered by the treatments. The reduction in CH4 flux persisted for at least several weeks post-treatment. There was no significant difference between the reduction caused by humic acids versus that from Fe(III). These results show that the suppression of CH4 flux by Fe(III) and humic acids is a widespread phenomenon that

  18. Effects of dissolved oxygen on microbial community of single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal system treating simulating mature landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xin; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Jiale; Qing, Xiaoxia; He, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    The performance of four identical sequencing biofilm batch reactors (SBBR) for autotrophic nitrogen removal was investigated with 2000mg/L ammonia-containing mature landfill leachate at 30°C. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of dissolved oxygen (DO) on the performance and microbial community of single-stage nitrogen removal using anammox and partial nitritation (SNAP) system. At an applied load of 0.5kgNm(-3)d(-1), average total nitrogen removal efficiency (TNRE) above 90% was long-term achieved with an optimal DO concentration of 2.7mg/L. The microelectrode-measured profiles showed the microenvironments inside the biofilms. 16S ribosomal Ribonucleic Acid (rRNA) amplicon pyrosequencing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were used to analyze the microbial variations of different DO concentrations and different positions inside one reactor. PMID:27450126

  19. Autotrophic growth and lipid production of Chlorella sorokiniana in lab batch and BIOCOIL photobioreactors: Experiments and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concas, Alessandro; Malavasi, Veronica; Costelli, Cristina; Fadda, Paolo; Pisu, Massimo; Cao, Giacomo

    2016-07-01

    A novel mathematical model for the quantitative assessment of the effect of dissolved nitrogen on the autotrophic batch-growth and lipid accumulation of Chlorella sorokiniana, is proposed in this work. Model results have been validated through comparison with suitable experimental data performed in lab photobioreactors. Further experiments have been then performed using the BIOCOIL photobioreactor operated in fed-batch mode. The experimental results, which show that a maximum growth rate of 0.52day(-1) and a lipid content equal to 25%wt can be achieved with the BIOICOIL, have been successfully predicted through the proposed model. Therefore, the model might represent a first step toward the development of a tool for the scale-up and optimization of the operating conditions of BIOCOIL photobioreactors. Finally, the fatty acid methyl esters obtained by trans-esterification of lipids extracted from C. sorokiniana, have been analyzed in view of the assessment of their usability for producing biodiesel. PMID:27030952

  20. A novel high-throughput drip-flow system to grow autotrophic biofilms of contrasting diversities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnunen, Marta; Dechesne, Arnaud; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen;

    . Thus, thicker biofilms are likely to host greater diversity. A system with 40 replicates has been constructed using flow-through polypropylene columns housing a defined number of single-sized glass beads supported by a stainless steel mesh. Biofilms consisting primarily of ammonia oxidizing and nitrite...... oxidizing bacteria are cultivated on the beads using a drip-flow assembly by feeding a mineral medium containing ammonium-N as sole energy source. Biofilm thickness is controlled by setting the surficial loading rate to 0.168 g NH4- N/m2/day or 1.678 g NH4-N /m2/day, which should theoretically result in...

  1. Impact of CO2 concentration on autotrophic metabolisms and carbon fate in saline aquifers - A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupraz, Sebastien; Fabbri, Antonin; Joulian, Catherine; Dictor, Marie-Christine; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne; Ménez, Bénédicte; Crouzet, Catherine; Henry, Benoît; Garrido, Francis

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and quantify the fate and speciation of carbon that can occur in mixtures of geological media (crushed rock) and autotrophic microbial communities. A sulfate reducing bacterium (Desulfotomaculum geothermicum) and a methanogenic archaeon (Methanothermococcus thermolithotrophicus) were both tested separately and together, with and without crushed sedimentary rock (carbonaceous sandstone) for different CO2 partial pressures (0.22, 0.88, 3.52, and 8 bar) at 54 °C in saline artificial groundwater. In order to quantify the respective metabolic activities, the inorganic gases of interest (H2, CH4, H2S and CO2) were measured and the speciation of carbon was assessed by measuring volatile, non-purgeable, total and dissolved organic carbon as well as total and dissolved inorganic carbon. Despite a protective effect of the mineral matrix, the results showed a high sensitivity of autotrophic microorganisms to the stress induced by pressures of CO2 superior to one bar and revealed that a part of this stress was due to direct toxic effects. M. thermolithotrophicus demonstrated a better tolerance to CO2 and was dominating the consortia. This ascendancy was interpreted as resulting from equilibrium displacement due to transport effects of methane between the liquid and gas phases. Abiotic dissolution was observed but some biomineralization processes of carbonates were also identified for D. geothermicum. Both strains displayed very different patterns in their conversion of inorganic carbon: while M. thermolithotrophicus was mainly producing methane, D. geothermicum induced the formation of biomass. The availability of crushed rock increased the proportion of sessile biofilms. All these results were analyzed in correlation with a successful PHREEQC simulation and demonstrate the strong influence of the microbial activities and diversity on the carbon fate in the immediate surroundings of geological CCS storage zones.

  2. The catalytic ozonization of model lignin compounds in the presence of Fe(III) ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben'ko, E. M.; Mukovnya, A. V.; Lunin, V. V.

    2007-05-01

    The ozonization of several model lignin compounds (guaiacol, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, phenol, and vanillin) was studied in acid media in the presence of iron(III) ions. It was found that Fe3+ did not influence the initial rate of the reactions between model phenols and ozone but accelerated the oxidation of intermediate ozonolysis products. The metal concentration dependences of the total ozone consumption and effective rate constants of catalytic reaction stages were determined. Data on reactions in the presence of oxalic acid as a competing chelate ligand showed that complex formation with Fe3+ was the principal factor that accelerated the ozonolysis of model phenols at the stage of the oxidation of carboxylic dibasic acids and C2 aldehydes formed as intermediate products.

  3. Monodisperse superparamagnetic nanoparticles by thermolysis of Fe(III) oleate and mandelate complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Patsula, Vitalii; Petrovský, Eduard; Kovářová, Jana; Konefal, Rafal; Horák, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 292, č. 9 (2014), s. 2097-2110. ISSN 0303-402X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/12/0381; GA MŠk 7E12053 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 246513 - NADINE Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:67985530 Keywords : superparamagnetic * nanoparticles * iron oxide Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography (GFU-E) Impact factor: 1.865, year: 2014

  4. Oxidized Hemoglobin Is an Endogenous Proinflammatory Agonist That Targets Vascular Endothelial Cells*

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Gabriela; Jeney, Viktoria; Chora, Ângelo; Larsen, Rasmus; Balla, Jozsef; Soares, Miguel P.

    2009-01-01

    Several pathologic conditions are associated with hemolysis, i.e. release of ferrous (Fe(II)) hemoglobin from red blood cells. Oxidation of cell-free hemoglobin produces (Fe(III)) methemoglobin. More extensive oxidation produces (Fe(III)/Fe(IV)O) ferryl hemoglobin. Both cell-free methemoglobin and ferryl hemoglobin are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of hemolytic disorders. We show hereby that ferryl hemoglobin, but not hemoglobin or methemoglobin, acts as a potent proinflammatory a...

  5. Spin-State Energetics of Fe(III) and Ru(III) Aqua Complexes: Accurate ab Initio Calculations and Evidence for Huge Solvation Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoń, Mariusz; Gąssowska, Katarzyna; Szklarzewicz, Janusz; Broclawik, Ewa

    2016-04-12

    Aqua complexes of transition metals are useful models for understanding the electronic structure of metal-oxide species relevant in photocatalytic water splitting. Moreover, spin-forbidden d-d transitions of aqua complexes provide valuable experimental data of spin-state energetics, which can be used for benchmarking of computational methods. Here, low-energy spin states of Fe(III) and Ru(III) aqua complexes are studied with an array of DFT and high-level wave function methods (CASPT2, RASPT2, NEVPT2, CCSD(T)-F12, and other coupled cluster methods up to full CCSDT). The results from single-reference and multireference methods are cross-checked, and the amount of multireference character for both considered spin states of [Fe(H2O)6](3+) is carefully analyzed. In addition to small [M(H2O)6](3+) clusters (M = Fe, Ru), we also employ larger models [M(H2O)6·(H2O)12](3+), with explicit water molecules in the second coordination sphere, to describe the situation in aqueous solution. By comparing the results for both types of models, our calculations evidence large and systematic solvation effects on the spin-state energetics. It is found that, due to the interaction with hydrogen-bonded water molecules in the second coordination sphere, the first coordination sphere undergoes a noticeable contraction and deformation. In consequence, the presence of solvation shell affects the relative energies of spin states by as much as 3-4 × 10(3) cm(-1) (∼10 kcal/mol). Once this solvation effect is accounted for, the spin-state energetics from CCSD(T) and NEVPT2 calculations turn out to be in an excellent agreement with the experimental estimates, which was not the case for isolated [M(H2O)6](3+) species is gas phase. We thus postulate that significant discrepancies between theory and experimental data for [Fe(H2O)6](3+) that were previously reported in the literature may be plausibly resolved and attributed to the neglect of explicit solvation effects and also, to some extent, to

  6. Influence of Oxygen and Nitrate on Fe (Hydr)oxide Mineral Transformation and Soil Microbial Communities during Redox Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Jacqueline; Roden, Eric E; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Oscillations between reducing and oxidizing conditions are observed at the interface of anaerobic/oxic and anaerobic/anoxic environments, and are often stimulated by an alternating flux of electron donors (e.g., organic carbon) and electron acceptors (e.g., O2 and NO3(-)). In iron (Fe) rich soils and sediments, these oscillations may stimulate the growth of both Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) and Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), and their metabolism may induce cycling between Fe(II) and Fe(III), promoting the transformation of Fe (hydr)oxide minerals. Here, we examine the mineralogical evolution of lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite, and the adaptation of a natural microbial community to alternating Fe-reducing (anaerobic with addition of glucose) and Fe-oxidizing (with addition of nitrate or air) conditions. The growth of FeRB (e.g., Geobacter) is stimulated under anaerobic conditions in the presence of glucose. However, the abundance of these organisms depends on the availability of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides. Redox cycling with nitrate results in decreased Fe(II) oxidation thereby decreasing the availability of Fe(III) for FeRB. Additionally, magnetite is detected as the main product of both lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite reduction. In contrast, introduction of air results in increased Fe(II) oxidation, increasing the availability of Fe(III) and the abundance of Geobacter. In the lepidocrocite reactors, Fe(II) oxidation by dissolved O2 promotes the formation of ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite, whereas in the ferrihydrite reactors we observe a decrease in magnetite stoichiometry (e.g., oxidation). Understanding Fe (hydr)oxide transformation under environmentally relevant redox cycling conditions provides insight into nutrient availability and transport, contaminant mobility, and microbial metabolism in soils and sediments. PMID:26949922

  7. Abiotic Nitrous Oxide Production in Natural and Artificial Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, H.; Stanton, C. L.; Cavazos, A. R.; Ostrom, N. E.; Glass, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The ocean contributes approximately one third of global sources of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. While nitrification is thought to be the dominant pathway for marine N2O production, mechanisms remain unresolved. Previous studies have carried the implicit assumption that marine N2O originates directly from enzymatic sources. However, abiotic production of N2O is possible via chemical reactions between nitrogenous intermediates and redox active trace metals in seawater. In this study, we investigated N2O production and isotopic composition in treatments with and without added hydroxylamine (NH2OH) and nitric oxide (NO), intermediates in microbial oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, and Fe(III). Addition of substrates to sterile artificial seawater was compared with filtered and unfiltered seawater from Sapelo Island, coastal Georgia, USA. N2O production was observed immediately after addition of Fe(III) in the presence of NH2OH at pH 8 in sterile artificial seawater. Highest N2O production was observed in the presence of Fe(III), NO, and NH2OH. The isotopomer site preference of abiotically produced N2O was consistent with previous studies (31 ± 2 ‰). Higher abiotic N2O production was observed in sterile artificial seawater (salinity: 35 ppt) than filtered Sapelo Island seawater (salinity: 25 ppt) whereas diluted sterile artificial seawater (18 ppt) showed lowest N2O production, suggesting that higher salinity promotes enhanced abiotic N2O production. Addition of Fe(III) to unfiltered Sapelo Island seawater stimulated N2O production. The presence of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), which lack known N2O producing enzymes, in Sapelo Island seawater was confirmed by successful amplification of the archaeal amoA gene, whereas ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), which contain N2O-producing enzymes were undetected. Given the few Fe-containing proteins present in AOA, it is likely that Fe(III) addition promoted N2O production via an abiotic vs. enzymatic N2O mechanism

  8. Corrosion of steel in carbonated media: The oxidation processes of chukanovite (Fe2(OH)2CO3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Oxidation of chukanovite does not lead to carbonated green rust. • Both lepidocrocite and goethite can result from the oxidation of chukanovite. • Violent oxidation of chukanovite by hydrogen peroxide leads to a Fe(III) oxycarbonate. • Chukanovite crystal structure withstands a partial oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). - Abstract: The oxidation of aqueous suspensions of chukanovite (Fe2(OH)2CO3) obtained by mixing NaOH, FeCl2 and Na2CO3 solutions was studied. The reaction was monitored by recording the pH and the redox potential of a platinum electrode immersed in the suspension. The precipitate was analyzed at various oxidation stages by infrared spectroscopy. The end products were also characterized by X-ray diffraction. The oxidation by air of the suspensions leads to lepidocrocite and goethite without formation of an intermediate green rust compound. Violent oxidation of chukanovite by hydrogen peroxide leads to a Fe(III) oxycarbonate with a crystal structure closely related to that of chukanovite

  9. Management of microbial community composition, architecture and performance in autotrophic nitrogen removing bioreactors through aeration regimes

    OpenAIRE

    Mutlu, A. Gizem; Smets, Barth F.; Sin, Gürkan

    2015-01-01

    Fuldstændig autotrof fjernelse af kvælstof (der består af delvis nitrifikation koblet med anaerob ammonium oxidation) fra spildevand med et højt kvælstof indhold kan i høj grad minimere omkostninger i form af energibesparelse sammenlignet med den konventionelle behandling af spildevand. Dette forbrug kan reduceres yderligere ved en intensivering af processen, hvor begge processer kører i samme reaktor. Dette kan lade sig gøre i systemer med biofilmdannelse eller bioaggregater, der skaber de n...

  10. Preparation and characterization of Pyridoxine complexes of Fe(III), Mo(VI), Cd(II), Hg(II), and U(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyridoxine (vit B6) reacts with Fe(III), Mo(VI), Cd(II), Hg(II), and U(VI) in aqueous medium to produce solid stable compounds. The compound were characterized by using elemetal analysis data (C'H'N) and different spectroscopic techniques (IR and UV-visible). Condutance behaviour of aqueous solution and the thermal decomposition nature of the complexes were also studied

  11. IR, UV-Vis, magnetic and thermal characterization of chelates of some catecholamines and 4-aminoantipyrine with Fe(III) and Cu(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Gehad G.; Zayed, M. A.; El-Dien, F. A. Nour; El-Nahas, Reham G.

    2004-07-01

    The dopamine derivatives participate in the regulation of wide variety of physiological functions in the human body and in medication life. Increase and/or decrease in the concentration of dopamine in human body reflect an indication for diseases such as Schizophrenia and/or Parkinson diseases. α-Methyldopa (α-MD) in tablets is used in medication of hypertension. The Fe(III) and Cu(II) chelates with coupled products of adrenaline hydrogen tartarate (AHT), levodopa (LD), α-MD and carbidopa (CD) with 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AAP) are prepared and characterized. Different physico-chemical methods like IR, magnetic and UV-Vis spectra are used to investigate the structure of these chelates. Fe(III) form 1:2 (M:catecholamines) chelates while Cu(II) form 1:1 chelates. Catecholamines behave as a bidentate mono- or dibasic ligands in binding to the metal ions. IR spectra show that the catecholamines are coordinated to the metal ions in a bidentate manner with O,O donor sites of the phenolic - OH. Magnetic moment measurements reveal the presence of Fe(III) chelates in octahedral geometry while the Cu(II) chelates are square planar. The thermal decomposition of Fe(III) and Cu(II) complexes is studied using thermogravimetric (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) techniques. The water molecules are removed in the first step followed immediately by decomposition of the ligand molecules. The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, energy of activation, enthalpy, entropy and free energy change of the complexes are evaluated and the relative thermal stability of the complexes are discussed.

  12. Mixed ligand complex formation of FeIII with boric acid and typical N-donor multidentate ligands

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G N Mukherjee; Ansuman Das

    2002-06-01

    Equilibrium study of the mixed ligand complex formation of FeIII with boric acid in the absence and in the presence of 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, diethylenetriamine and triethylenetetramine (L) in different molar ratios provides evidence of formation of Fe(OH)2+, Fe(OH)$^{+}_{2}$, Fe(L)3+, Fe(H2BO4), Fe(OH)(H2BO4)-, Fe(OH)2(H2BO4)2-, Fe(L)(H2BO4) and Fe2(L)2(BO4)+ complexes. Fe(L)$^{3+}_{2}$, Fe(L)2(H2BO4) and Fe2(L)4(BO4)+ complexes are also indicated with 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline. Complex formation equilibria and stability constants of the complexes at 25 ± 0 × 1° C in aqueous solution at a fixed ionic strength, = 0.1 mol -3 (NaNO3) have been determined by potentiometric method.

  13. Turn-on fluorogenic and chromogenic detection of Fe(III) and its application in living cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaraman, Gandhi; Sathiyaraja, Vijayaraj; Chellappa, Duraisamy, E-mail: dcmku123@gmail.com

    2014-01-15

    Two rhodamine-based sensors RDI-1, RDI-2 was designed and synthesized by incorporation of the rhodamine 6G fluorophore and 2-formyl imidazole as the recognizing unit via the imine linkages. RDI-1, RDI-2 exhibits very high selectivity and an excellent sensitivity towards Fe(III) ions in aqueous buffer solution on compared with other probes. The color change from colorless to pink and turn-on fluorescence after binding with iron (III) was observed. Based on jobs plot and ESI-MS studies, the 1:1 binding mode was proposed. Live cell imaging experiments with each probe showed that these probes widely applicable to detect Fe{sup 3+} in living cells. -- Highlights: • Two rhodamine based probes was synthesized and used to recognize iron (III). • The chemosensors can be applied to detect iron(III) ions by color and turn-on fluorescent changes. • The very low detection limit was reported. • The applicability of these probes for live cell fluorescence imaging was studied.

  14. Crystal structure of the coordination polymer [FeIII2{PtII(CN4}3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksym Seredyuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The title complex, poly[dodeca-μ-cyanido-diiron(IIItriplatinum(II], [FeIII2{PtII(CN4}3], has a three-dimensional polymeric structure. It is built-up from square-planar [PtII(CN4]2− anions (point group symmetry 2/m bridging cationic [FeIIIPtII(CN4]+∞ layers extending in the bc plane. The FeII atoms of the layers are located on inversion centres and exhibit an octahedral coordination sphere defined by six N atoms of cyanide ligands, while the PtII atoms are located on twofold rotation axes and are surrounded by four C atoms of the cyanide ligands in a square-planar coordination. The geometrical preferences of the two cations for octahedral and square-planar coordination, respectively, lead to a corrugated organisation of the layers. The distance between neighbouring [FeIIIPtII(CN4]+∞ layers corresponds to the length a/2 = 8.0070 (3 Å, and the separation between two neighbouring PtII atoms of the bridging [PtII(CN4]2− groups corresponds to the length of the c axis [7.5720 (2 Å]. The structure is porous with accessible voids of 390 Å3 per unit cell.

  15. Sequentially aerated membrane biofilm reactors for autotrophic nitrogen removal: microbial community composition and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Franck, Stephanie; Gülay, Arda;

    2014-01-01

    (rich in oxygen) and AnAOB in regions neighbouring the liquid phase. Both communities were separated by a transition region potentially populated by denitrifying heterotrophic bacteria. AOB and AnAOB bacterial groups were more abundant and diverse than NOB, and dominated by the r...... reduction of the NOB Nitrospira and Nitrobacter and a 10-fold increase in AnAOB numbers. The study of biofilm sections with relevant 16S rRNA fluorescent probes revealed strongly stratified biofilm structures fostering aerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in biofilm areas close to the membrane surface......-strategists Nitrosomonas europaea and Ca. Brocadia anammoxidans, respectively. Taken together, the present work presents tools to better engineer, monitor and control the microbial communities that support robust, sustainable and efficient nitrogen removal....

  16. The effect of clay particles on the activity of suspended autotrophic nitrifying bacteria and on the performance of an air-lift reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, M. J.; Pacheco, A. P.; I. A. Pinho; Melo, L. F.

    2001-01-01

    Clay minerals have some properties, namely a high surface area and the ability of ion exchange that may exert some effects on microbial systems. It is often difficult to know the way the clay is exerting its influence and whether its presence improves a given metabolic process The present work concerns the study of the effect of the addition of Powdered kaolin to autotrophic nitrification systems, and includes the study of the effects of the particles on the activity of a suspended nitrifying...

  17. The Role of Coulomb Interactions for Spin Crossover Behaviors and Crystal Structural Transformation in Novel Anionic Fe(III Complexes from a π-Extended ONO Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suguru Murata

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the π-extension effect on an unusual negative-charged spin crossover (SCO FeIII complex with a weak N2O4 first coordination sphere, we designed and synthesized a series of anionic FeIII complexes from a π-extended naphthalene derivative ligand. Acetonitrile-solvate tetramethylammonium (TMA salt 1 exhibited an SCO conversion, while acetone-solvate TMA salt 2 was in a high-spin state. The crystal structural analysis for 2 revealed that two-leg ladder-like cation-anion arrays derived from π-stacking interactions between π-ligands of the FeIII complex anion and Coulomb interactions were found and the solvated acetone molecules were in one-dimensional channels between the cation-anion arrays. A desolvation-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to desolvate compound 2’ may be driven by Coulomb energy gain. Furthermore, the structural comparison between quasi-polymorphic compounds 1 and 2 revealed that the synergy between Coulomb and π-stacking interactions induces a significant distortion of coordination structure of 2.

  18. The determination of adsorption capacity of anion exchange resin Dowex-Marathon for Ti(IV) and Fe(III) chlorocomplexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The adsorption capacity of anion exchange resin Dowex-Marathon for Ti(IV) and Fe(III) chlorocomplexes from HCl solution was determined. The measurements were performed for different HCl solution concentrations and temperatures using batch operation as contact method between solution and resin. The Fe(III) adsorption capacities increased with HCl solution concentrations and contact temperatures. In the case of Ti(IV) considerable adsorption capacities were observed only at HCl concentrations >7 M. For the same ion the adsorption capacity does not depend on temperature in the range of 30 - 70 deg C. At 50 deg C there is an important difference between adsorption capacity for Fe(III), (105.7 mg Fe/g dry resin) and for U(VI), (227 mg U/g dry resin), allowing the recovery of uranium adsorption band in the 235U enriching column, using band displacement technique. A solution of TiCl3 0.1 M in HCl >7 M can be utilized as reduction agent at the rear edge of the uranium band, according to the important adsorption capacity of Ti(IV) in those conditions. (author)

  19. [Single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal reactor with self-generated granular sludge for treating sludge dewatering effluent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian-ping; Du, Bing; Liu, Yin; Qin, Yong-sheng

    2009-10-15

    Single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal (SANR) has been observed in a long-term operated nitrosation air-lift reactor for treating digested sludge dewatering effluent from sewage wastewater treatment plant. A kind of so called self-generated granular sludge which undertake the SANR reaction has oriented formed. The performance of SANR reactor cultivated above sludge for treating sludge dewatering effluent has been tested and better results have been reached. When the influent total nitrogen (TN) was kept about 350 mg/L (mainly ammonium nitrogen), the average TN removal efficiency and nitrogen removal load were 74.8% (maximum 86.92%) and 0.68 kg x (m3 x d)(-1) [maximum 0.9 kg x (m3 x d)(-1)] respectively. The operation stability and nitrogen removal efficiency have been enforced after adding a certain quantity powered activated carbon. The influent ammonium concentration, nitrogen load and aeration rate have a great effect on SANR reactor as well as the influent organic compound, pH, alkalinity have a relatively low effect. The parameters such as the ratios of aeration rate/deltaTN, aeration rate/deltaNH4+ -N, deltaALK/deltaTN can be used for better controlling the reaction. PMID:19968119

  20. Extraction and characterization of extracellular polymeric substances in biofilm and sludge via completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, You-Peng; Li, Chun; Guo, Jin-Song; Fang, Fang; Gao, Xu; Zhang, Peng; Li, Shan

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were extracted from sludge and biofilm via the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) system. Tightly bound (TB)-EPS were extracted using four physical methods, namely, cationic exchange resin (CER), sonication, heating, and steaming. CER was the most effective and most suitable method for extraction among the four methods. Moreover, the ultraviolet-vis spectra of TB-EPS indicated that few cells were destroyed by the CER method. The major component contents of total EPS, proteins, carbohydrates, humic substances, and DNA in sludge were 60.77, 49.84, 21.63, and 9.01 mg/g volatile suspended solids (VSS) and 90.03, 29.01, 15.96, and 10.04 mg/g VSS in biofilm, respectively. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra results indicated differences in the EPS functional groups between biofilm and sludge. The results of the batch experiments showed that the biofilm activity was significantly higher than that of the sludge in the CANON system. Furthermore, biomass activity was probably influenced by the EPS composition and distribution in the sludge and biofilm. PMID:23239415

  1. Autotrophic hydrogen photoproduction by operation of carbon-concentrating mechanism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under sulfur deprivation condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Min Eui; Shin, Ye Sol; Kim, Byung Woo; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-03-10

    Under autotrophic conditions, starch plays an important role in establishing anoxic conditions during PSII-dependent hydrogen (H2) photoproduction in microalgae. This is because starch is the sole organic substrate during respiratory consumption of internal oxygen (O2) from PSII-dependent direct pathway. Herein, we propose a novel approach to further facilitate the internal starch synthesis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii through the operation of carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) along with a two-stage process based on sulfur (S) deprivation, thereby resulting in enhanced anaerobic capacity during PSII-dependent H2 photoproduction. When CCM-induced cells were exposed to high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) (5%, v/v) with S deprivation, internal levels of starch were significantly elevated by retaining a functional CCM with the boosted photosynthetic activity during 24h of O2 evolution phase (I) of S deprivation. Consequently, during H2 production phase of S deprivation at irradiance of 50μEm(-2)s(-1), the concentrations of starch and H2 in CCM-induced cells were remarkably enhanced by 65.0% and 218.9% compared to that of CCM-uninduced cells, respectively. The treatment of low-CO2-driven CCM induction prior to S deprivation is a cost-effective and energy-efficient strategy that significantly improves the solar-driven H2 production by microalgae; this is particularly realizable in an industrial scale. PMID:26812657

  2. Potential for large-bodied zooplankton and dreissenids to alter the productivity and autotrophic structure of lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Scott N; Althouse, B; Devlin, S P; Vadeboncoeur, Y; Vander Zanden, M J

    2014-08-01

    While limnological studies have emphasized the importance of grazers on algal biomass and primary production in pelagic habitats, few studies have examined their potential role in altering total ecosystem primary production and it's partitioning between pelagic and benthic habitats. We modified an existing ecosystem production model to include biotic feedbacks associated with two groups of large-bodied grazers of phytoplankton (large-bodied zooplankton and dreissenid mussels) and estimated their effects on total ecosystem production (TEP), and the partitioning of TEP between phytoplankton and periphyton (autotrophic structure) across large gradients in lake size and total phosphorus (TP) concentration. Model results indicated that these filter feeders were capable of reducing whole-lake phytoplankton production by 20-70%, and increasing whole-lake benthic production between 0% and 600%. Grazer effects on TEP were constrained by lake size, trophic status, and potential feedbacks between grazing and maximum rates of benthic photosynthesis (BP(MAX)). In small (mean depth Z 100 m), Bf was minor (< 10%) in the presence or absence of grazers, but increases in littoral habitat and the stimulation of benthic production in these ecosystems could be of ecological relevance because littoral zones in large lakes contain a relatively high proportion of within-lake biodiversity and are important for whole-lake food webs. PMID:25230476

  3. Myoglobin-induced oxidative damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irwin, J A; Ostdal, H; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    Reaction of equine Fe(III) myoglobin with H2O2 gives rise to an Fe(IV)-oxo species at the heme center and protein (globin)-derived radicals. Studies have shown that there are two (or more) sites for the protein-derived radical: at tyrosine (Tyr-103) or tryptophan (Trp-14). The latter radical reac...... that protein-to-protein damage transfer and protein chain-oxidation may occur readily in biological systems.......Reaction of equine Fe(III) myoglobin with H2O2 gives rise to an Fe(IV)-oxo species at the heme center and protein (globin)-derived radicals. Studies have shown that there are two (or more) sites for the protein-derived radical: at tyrosine (Tyr-103) or tryptophan (Trp-14). The latter radical reacts...... times, possibly via secondary reactions. We have investigated, by EPR spectroscopy, the reactivity of the Trp-14 peroxyl radical with amino acids, peptides, proteins, and antioxidants, with the aim of determining whether this species can damage other targets, i.e., whether intermolecular protein-to-protein...

  4. Magnetic and low temperature phonon studies of CoCr2O4 powders doped with Fe(III) and Ni(II) ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive temperature-dependent phonon studies and low-temperature magnetic measurements of CoCr2−xFexO4 (for x=0.5, 1 and 2) and Co0.9Ni0.1Cr2O4 polycrystalline powders are presented. The main aim of these studies was to obtain information on phonon and structural properties of these compounds as well as strength of spin–phonon coupling in the magnetically ordered phases. IR and Raman spectra show that doping of CoCr2O4 with Fe(III) ions leads to broadening of bands and appearance of new bands due to the formation of inverted spinel structure. In contrast to this behavior, doping with 10 mol% of Ni(II) ions leads to weak increase of band width only. Magnetization measured as a function of temperature and external magnetic field showed that magnetic properties of Co0.9Ni0.1Cr2O4 sample are similar to those reported for pure CoCr2O4, i.e., partial substitution of Ni(II) for Co(II) leads to slight shift of the ferrimagnetic phase transition at TC and spiral spin order transition at TS towards lower values. The change of crystallization preference induced by incorporation of increasing concentration of Fe(III) ions in the spinel lattice causes significant increase of TC and decrease of TS. The latter transition disappears completely for higher concentrations of Fe(III). The performed temperature-dependent IR studies revealed interesting anomalous behavior of phonons below TC for CoCr1.5Fe0.5O4 and Co0.9Ni0.1Cr2O4, which was attributed to spin–phonon coupling. - Graphical abstract: Visualization of normal spinel-type AB2O4 structure, where blue octahedrons denote BO6 and red tetrahedrons AO4 units as well as IR and Raman spectra of Co0.9Ni0.1Cr2O4 powder. - Highlights: • TC (TS) increases (decreases) with increasing Fe(III) concentration. • Ni(II) ions doping up to 10 mol% does not change remarkably TC and TS. • Doping with Fe(III) ions causes increase of spinel inversion parameter. • Spin–phonon interactions in Co0.9Ni0.1Cr2O4 and CoCr1.5Fe0.5O4 were

  5. The potential impact of microbial Fe(III) reduction on subsurface U(VI) mobility at a low level radioactive waste storage site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, M.J.; Livens, F.R.; Vaughan, D.J.; Lloyd, J.R. [Williamson Research Centre for Molecular Environmental Science and School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Beadle, I.; Small, J.S. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, Risley, Warrington WA3 6AS (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Fe(III) oxy-hydroxides have the potential to be utilised as terminal electron acceptors by indigenous microbial communities in the British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) low level radioactive waste storage site at Drigg (Cumbria, UK) and these organisms may have a critical control on the biogeochemical cycling of several environmentally important radionuclides. In terms of radiological impact at Drigg, uranium is the most significant contributor to radiological impact and it is strongly influenced by biogeochemical processes. In terms of mass (moles) it is also the most abundant radionuclide in the Drigg inventory. Thus, the potential biotic and abiotic effects of Fe(III) reduction on U(VI) mobility in the Drigg subsurface are of interest. Culture-dependent and molecular techniques showed that the sediments in and around the Drigg site contained a diversity of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria. A series of microcosm experiments were utilised to create environmentally relevant experimental conditions. Microcosms set up using Drigg sediment and synthetic ground water were spiked with 100 {mu}M U(VI) and acetate as an electron donor. U(VI) concentrations in groundwater were measured using a chemical assay while total U levels were determined using ICP-MS. Fe(II) levels were determined using the ferrozine method. Sediment surface areas were measured using BET analysis. The low surface area of the sediments resulted in only a small proportion of the 100 {mu}M U(VI) spike sorbing onto mineral surfaces. The addition of ferri-hydrite to some microcosms resulted in an immediate lowering of soluble U(VI) concentrations, suggesting that the formation of soluble U(VI) complexes were not responsible for the minimal adsorption. The presence of biogenic Fe(II) in the microcosms did not affect the soluble U(VI) concentration. Similarly, soluble U(VI) levels remained unchanged when sediments were spiked with U(VI) post-microbial Fe(III) reduction. However, a

  6. The potential impact of microbial Fe(III) reduction on subsurface U(VI) mobility at a low level radioactive waste storage site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Fe(III) oxy-hydroxides have the potential to be utilised as terminal electron acceptors by indigenous microbial communities in the British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) low level radioactive waste storage site at Drigg (Cumbria, UK) and these organisms may have a critical control on the biogeochemical cycling of several environmentally important radionuclides. In terms of radiological impact at Drigg, uranium is the most significant contributor to radiological impact and it is strongly influenced by biogeochemical processes. In terms of mass (moles) it is also the most abundant radionuclide in the Drigg inventory. Thus, the potential biotic and abiotic effects of Fe(III) reduction on U(VI) mobility in the Drigg subsurface are of interest. Culture-dependent and molecular techniques showed that the sediments in and around the Drigg site contained a diversity of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria. A series of microcosm experiments were utilised to create environmentally relevant experimental conditions. Microcosms set up using Drigg sediment and synthetic ground water were spiked with 100 μM U(VI) and acetate as an electron donor. U(VI) concentrations in groundwater were measured using a chemical assay while total U levels were determined using ICP-MS. Fe(II) levels were determined using the ferrozine method. Sediment surface areas were measured using BET analysis. The low surface area of the sediments resulted in only a small proportion of the 100 μM U(VI) spike sorbing onto mineral surfaces. The addition of ferri-hydrite to some microcosms resulted in an immediate lowering of soluble U(VI) concentrations, suggesting that the formation of soluble U(VI) complexes were not responsible for the minimal adsorption. The presence of biogenic Fe(II) in the microcosms did not affect the soluble U(VI) concentration. Similarly, soluble U(VI) levels remained unchanged when sediments were spiked with U(VI) post-microbial Fe(III) reduction. However, a lowering in

  7. Autotrophic nitrogen removal from black water: calcium addition as a requirement for settleability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaff, M S; Temmink, H; Zeeman, G; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Buisman, C J N

    2011-01-01

    Black (toilet) water contains half of the organic load in the domestic wastewater, as well as the major fraction of the nutrients nitrogen and phosphorus. When collected with vacuum toilets, the black water is 25 times more concentrated than the total domestic wastewater stream, i.e. including grey water produced by laundry, showers etc. A two-stage nitritation-anammox process was successfully employed and removed 85%-89% of total nitrogen in anaerobically treated black water. The (free) calcium concentration in black water was too low (42 mg/L) to obtain sufficient granulation of anammox biomass. The granulation and retention of the biomass was improved considerably by the addition of 39 mg/L of extra calcium. This resulted in a volumetric nitrogen removal rate of 0.5 gN/L/d, irrespective of the two temperatures of 35 °C and 25 °C at which the anammox reactors were operated. Nitrous oxide, a very strong global warming gas, was produced in situations of an incomplete anammox conversion accompanied by elevated levels of nitrite. PMID:20822793

  8. Autotrophic Biological Denitrification for Complete Removal of Nitrogen from Septic System Wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objective of this research was to develop a reliable, robust, and maintenance-free passive system for biological denitrification in on-site wastewater treatment systems. The process relies on sulfur oxidizing denitrifying bacteria in upflow packed bioreactors. Since this process consumes alkalinity, it is necessary to add a solid-phase buffer that can scavenge the H+ as it is generated by the biologically-mediated reaction and arrest the drop in the pH value. This study investigated the use of limestone, marble chips and crushed oyster shell as solid-phase buffers that provide alkalinity.Two bench-scale upflow column reactors and two field-scale bioreactors were constructed and packed with sulfur pellets and an alkalinity source. The pilot scale bioreactors (∼200 L each) were installed at the Massachusetts Alternative Septic System Test Center (MASSTC) in Sandwich, MA. The pilot-scale bioreactors performed better when oyster shell was used as the solid-phase buffer vis-a-vis marble chips. In both (pilot-scale and laboratory-scale) systems, denitrification rates were high with the effluent NO3- -N concentration consistently below 8 mg/L

  9. Synthesis, characterization and stability of Cr(III) and Fe(III) hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papassiopi, N.; Vaxevanidou, K.; Christou, C.; Karagianni, E.; Antipas, G.S.E., E-mail: gantipas@metal.ntua.gr

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Fe(III)–Cr(III) hydroxides enhance groundwater quality better than pure Cr(III) compounds. • Crystalline Cr(OH){sub 3}·3H{sub 2}O was unstable, with a solubility higher than 50 μg/l. • Amorphous Cr(OH){sub 3}(am) was stable with a solubility lower than 50 μg/l in the range 5.7 < pH < 11. • For mixed Fe{sub 0.75}Cr{sub 0.25}(OH){sub 3}, the stability region was extended to 4.8 < pH < 13.5. -- Abstract: Chromium is a common contaminant of soils and aquifers and constitutes a major environmental problem. In nature, chromium usually exists in the form of two oxidation states, trivalent, Cr(III), which is relatively innocuous for biota and for the aquatic environment, and hexavalent, Cr(VI) which is toxic, carcinogenic and very soluble. Accordingly, the majority of wastewater and groundwater treatment technologies, include a stage where Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III), in order to remove chromium from the aqueous phase and bind the element in the form of environmentally stable solid compounds. In the absence of iron the final product is typically of the form Cr(OH){sub 3}·xH{sub 2}O whereas in the presence of iron the precipitate is a mixed Fe{sub (1−x)}Cr{sub x}(OH){sub 3} phase. In this study, we report on the synthesis, characterisation and stability of mixed (Fe{sub x},Cr{sub 1−x})(OH){sub 3} hydroxides as compared to the stability of Cr(OH){sub 3}. We established that the plain Cr(III) hydroxide, abiding to the approximate molecular formula Cr(OH){sub 3}·3H{sub 2}O, was crystalline, highly soluble, i.e. unstable, with a tendency to transform into the stable amorphous hydroxide Cr(OH){sub 3}(am) phase. Mixed Fe{sub 0.75}Cr{sub 0.25}(OH){sub 3} hydroxides were found to be of the ferrihydrite structure, Fe(OH){sub 3}, and we correlated their solubility to that of a solid solution formed by plain ferrihydrite and the amorphous Cr(III) hydroxide. Both our experimental results and thermodynamic calculations indicated that mixed Fe

  10. Rare bacteriohopanepolyols as markers for an autotrophic, intra-aerobic methanotroph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kool, Dorien M.; Talbot, Helen M.; Rush, Darci; Ettwig, Katharina; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2014-07-01

    Bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs) and their diagenetic products, hopanoids, are of great interest for their potential as biomarker lipids in both present day environments as well as in the geological record. Specific structural features such as methylation of the A-ring, and number and type of functional groups of C35 BHPs have been held characteristic for certain groups of organisms. Here we investigated the potential presence of BHPs in the unusual anaerobic methanotroph Methylomirabilis oxyfera and another Methylomirabilis sp. Although M. oxyfera thrives in anoxic settings, it uses internally produced molecular oxygen (from nitrite) for the oxidation of methane. We found that Methylomirabilis spp. synthesizes bacteriohopanehexol (BHP-hexol), -pentol, and -tetrol, and 3-methyl derivatives of each as major BHPs. None of the C-35 amino-BHPs that are more commonly observed in methanotrophs were detected. Our findings provide the first ever account of a 3-methyl-BHP-hexol, and only the second known source organism for BHP-hexol after Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris. As the genes required for C3-methylation seem to be exclusively present in microorganisms with an aerobic metabolism, the abundant presence of 3-methyl-BHPs in Methylomirabilis spp. denotes for the first time the potential production of 3-methyl hopanoids in anoxic environments. Furthermore, with 13C-labeling experiments we show that M. oxyfera does not assimilate methane-carbon, but rather C from bicarbonate/CO2, into its BHPs. This implies that methanotroph-derived hopanoids do not necessarily exhibit a strongly depleted carbon isotopic signature, which is commonly anticipated with methanotrophy. This may have implications for the interpretation of the presence of hopanoids and their isotopic signature in the paleorecord.

  11. Oxidation of Elemental Sulfur in Selected Soils of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An incubation experiment was carried out in laboratory to study the effect of temperature, moisture,phosphorus, organic matter, cropping and previous elemental sulfur application on elemental sulfur oxidation in four selected soils, fluvo-aquic soil, black soil, yellow-brown soil and red soil. In all the soils tested, sulfur oxidation rate was influenced by temperature and the temperature coefficient (Q10) values at the range from 10to 30 ℃ were 4.41, 4.05, 6.19 and 3.71 for the four soils, respectively. The rate of sulfur oxidation was parabolically related to soil water content. The optimum moisture content for the maximum oxidation rate was different among soils. Phosphorus increased the oxidation rate of elemental sulfur by 57.7%, 33.1%, 21.7% and 26.4% for the above four soils, respectively, compared with the control (no phosphorus applied). Organic material of corn straw which was ground and passed through a 0.5-mm sieve also increased the oxidation rate of elemental sulfur in the four soils by 59.8%, 7.8%, 39.2% and 540.4%, respectively. Elemental sulfur which was applied previously to soils significantly enhanced the oxidation of elemental sulfur subsequently added and increased sulfur-oxidizing populations such as autotrophic elemental sulfur oxidizers with pH optimum 6.8, autotrophic thiosulfate oxidizers with pH optimum 6.8, heterotrophic thiosulfate oxidizers and heterotrophic sulfate producers. Cropping had little effect on lemental sulfur-oxidizing potentiality of soils.

  12. Stepwise oxidation of bioleached oil shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, D.K.; Shih, S.; Yen, T.F.

    1974-01-01

    Bioleaching of Green River oil shale by acid-producing autotrophic sulfur bacteria was simulated by dilute acid treatment. In this manner about 40 percent weight loss (dolomite and calcite) was achieved. This acid treated oil shale sample was stepwise oxidized (ca. 30 cycles) in a mild alkaline permagnate solution for the removal of kerogen. The acids recovered from the oxidation were converted to methyl esters and subsequently analyzed by gas chromatography and NMR spectroscopy. For comparison, products derived from other oxidative means (air, hydrogen peroxides, ozone, etc.) are discussed. Aside from the elucidation of the kerogen structure, the objective of the study was to achieve an economic process for the recovery of useful chemicals from oil shale kerogen.

  13. Whole-genome sequencing reveals novel insights into sulfur oxidation in the extremophile Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Huaqun; Zhang, Xian; Li, Xiaoqi; He, Zhili; Liang, Yili; Guo, Xue; Hu, Qi; Xiao, Yunhua; Cong, Jing; Ma, Liyuan; Niu, Jiaojiao; Liu, Xueduan

    2014-01-01

    Background Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans (A. thiooxidans), a chemolithoautotrophic extremophile, is widely used in the industrial recovery of copper (bioleaching or biomining). The organism grows and survives by autotrophically utilizing energy derived from the oxidation of elemental sulfur and reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (RISCs). However, the lack of genetic manipulation systems has restricted our exploration of its physiology. With the development of high-throughput sequencing techno...

  14. A Genetic System for Clostridium ljungdahlii: a Chassis for Autotrophic Production of Biocommodities and a Model Homoacetogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leang, C; Ueki, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR

    2013-02-04

    Methods for genetic manipulation of Clostridium ljungdahlii are of interest because of the potential for production of fuels and other biocommodities from carbon dioxide via microbial electrosynthesis or more traditional modes of autotrophy with hydrogen or carbon monoxide as the electron donor. Furthermore, acetogenesis plays an important role in the global carbon cycle. Gene deletion strategies required for physiological studies of C. ljungdahlii have not previously been demonstrated. An electroporation procedure for introducing plasmids was optimized, and four different replicative origins for plasmid propagation in C. ljungdahlii were identified. Chromosomal gene deletion via double-crossover homologous recombination with a suicide vector was demonstrated initially with deletion of the gene for FliA, a putative sigma factor involved in flagellar biogenesis and motility in C. ljungdahlii. Deletion of fliA yielded a strain that lacked flagella and was not motile. To evaluate the potential utility of gene deletions for functional genomic studies and to redirect carbon and electron flow, the genes for the putative bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases, adhE1 and adhE2, were deleted individually or together. Deletion of adhE1, but not adhE2, diminished ethanol production with a corresponding carbon recovery in acetate. The double deletion mutant had a phenotype similar to that of the adhE1-deficient strain. Expression of adhE1 in trans partially restored the capacity for ethanol production. These results demonstrate the feasibility of genetic investigations of acetogen physiology and the potential for genetic manipulation of C. ljungdahlii to optimize autotrophic biocommodity production.

  15. Autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolism of microbial planktonic communities in an oligotrophic coastal marine ecosystem: seasonal dynamics and episodic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Bonilla-Findji

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A 18 month study was performed in the Bay of Villefranche to assess the episodic and seasonal variation of autotrophic and heterotrophic ecosystem processes. A typical spring bloom was encountered, where maximum of gross primary production (GPP was followed by maxima of bacterial respiration (BR and production (BP. The trophic balance (heterotrophy vs. autotrophy of the system did not exhibit any seasonal trend although a strong intra-annual variability was observed. On average, the community tended to be net heterotrophic with a GPP threshold for a balanced metabolism of 2.8 μmol O2 l−1 d−1. Extended forest fires in summer 2003 and a local episodic upwelling in July 2003 likely supplied orthophosphate and nitrate into the system. These events were associated with an enhanced bacterioplankton production (up to 2.4-fold, respiration (up to 4.5-fold and growth efficiency (up to 2.9-fold but had no effect on GPP. A Sahara dust wet deposition event in February 2004 stimulated bacterial abundance, production and growth efficiency but not GPP. Our study suggests that short-term disturbances such as wind-driven upwelling, forest fires and Sahara dust depositions can have a significant but previously not sufficiently considered influence on phytoplankton- and bacterioplankton-mediated ecosystem functions and can modify or even mask the seasonal dynamics. The study also indicates that atmospheric deposition of nutrients and particles not only impacts phytoplankton but also bacterioplankton and could, at times, also shift systems stronger towards net heterotrophy.

  16. Autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolism of microbial planktonic communities in an oligotrophic coastal marine ecosystem: seasonal dynamics and episodic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Bonilla-Findji

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A 18 month study was performed in the Bay of Villefranche to assess the episodic and seasonal variation of autotrophic and heterotrophic ecosystem processes. A typical spring bloom was encountered, where maximum of gross primary production (GPP was followed by maxima of bacterial respiration (BR and production (BP. The trophic balance (heterotrophy vs. autotrophy of the system did not exhibit any seasonal trend although a strong intra-annual variability was observed. On average, the community tended to be net heterotrophic with a GPP threshold for a balanced metabolism of 1.1 μmol O2 l−1 d−1. Extended forest fires in summer 2003 and a local episodic upwelling in July 2003 likely supplied orthophosphate and nitrate into the system. These events were associated with an enhanced bacterioplankton production (up to 2.4-fold, respiration (up to 4.5-fold and growth efficiency (up to 2.9-fold but had no effect on GPP. A Sahara dust wet deposition event in February 2004 stimulated bacterial abundance, production and growth efficiency but not GPP. Our study suggests that short-term disturbances such as wind-driven upwelling, forest fires and Sahara dust depositions can have a significant but previously not sufficiently considered influence on phytoplankton- and bacterioplankton-mediated ecosystem functions and can modify or even mask the seasonal dynamics. The study also indicates that atmospheric deposition of nutrients and particles not only impacts phytoplankton but also bacterioplankton and could, at times, also shift systems stronger towards net heterotrophy.

  17. Bacterial diversity of autotrophic enriched cultures from remote, glacial Antarctic, Alpine and Andean aerosol, snow and soil samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. González-Toril

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Four different communities and one culture of autotrophic microbial assemblages were obtained by incubation of samples collected from high elevation snow in the Alps (Mt. Blanc area and the Andes (Nevado Illimani summit, Bolivia, from Antarctic aerosol (French station Dumont d'Urville and a maritime Antarctic soil (King George Island, South Shetlands, Uruguay Station Artigas, in a minimal mineral (oligotrophic media. Molecular analysis of more than 200 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that all cultured cells belong to the Bacteria domain. Phylogenetic comparison with the currently available rDNA database allowed sequences belonging to Proteobacteria Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes phyla to be identified. The Andes snow culture was the richest in bacterial diversity (eight microorganisms identified and the marine Antarctic soil the poorest (only one. Snow samples from Col du Midi (Alps and the Andes shared the highest number of identified microorganisms (Agrobacterium, Limnobacter, Aquiflexus and two uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clones. These two sampling sites also shared four sequences with the Antarctic aerosol sample (Limnobacter, Pseudonocardia and an uncultured Alphaproteobacteriaclone. The only microorganism identified in the Antarctica soil (Brevundimonas sp. was also detected in the Antarctic aerosol. Most of the identified microorganisms had been detected previously in cold environments, marine sediments soils and rocks. Air current dispersal is the best model to explain the presence of very specific microorganisms, like those identified in this work, in environments very distant and very different from each other.

  18. Autotrophic growth: the methyl binding site of CO dehydrogenase in the synthesis of acetyl-CoA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pathway in which CO or CO2 and H2 is used as a source of energy and carbon to synthesize acetyl-CoA is used for autotrophic growth of acetogenes, methanogens and some sulfate-reducing bacteria. All enzymes involved in this pathway have been purified from C. thermoaceticum. Five of them: CO dehydrogenase (CODH), corrinoid protein, methyltransferase, CODH disulfide reductase (SSRd) and ferredoxin catalyzed synthesis of acetyl-CoA from methyltetrahydrofolate, CO and CoA. CODH is a central enzyme catalyzing the condensation of CH3, CO and CoA and per se it catalyzes a reversible exchange of CO with acetyl-CoA. Thus, CODH must have binding sites for CH3, CO and CoA. They have succeeded in methylating β subunits of CODH using 14CH3I or 14CH-corrinoid protein, a native donor of the CH3 group in synthesis of acetyl-CoA. With resulting [14CH3]CODH, only SSRd is required for synthesis of [14C]acetyl-CoA from CO and CoA. The kinetic studies show that CH3I is a competitive inhibitor for exchange reaction between CO and acetyl-CoA. Acetaldehyde and acetyl-CoA but not acetic acid and CoA protected CODH against methylation by CH3I. Methyl group bound to CODH is very slowly removed by CO and CoA and acetyl-CoA accelerated this process. These data confirm that CH3 group from CH3I and CH3-corrinoid protein is bound to the methyl binding site of CODH

  19. Reflexion M\\"ossbauer analysis of the in situ oxidation products hydroxycarbonate green rust

    CERN Document Server

    Naille, Sebastien; Louber, Didier; Jean, Paul Moulin; Ruby, Christian; 10.1088/1742-6596/217/1/012084

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the nature of the oxidation products of FeII-III hydroxycarbonate FeII4FeIII2(OH)12CO3~3H2O (green rust GR(CO32-)) by using the miniaturised M\\"ossbauer spectrometer MIMOS II. Two M\\"ossbauer measurements methods are used: method (i) with green rust pastes coated with glycerol and spread into Plexiglas sample holders, and method (ii) with green rust pastes in the same sample holders but introduced into a gas-tight cell with a beryllium window under a continuous nitrogen flow. Method (ii) allows us to follow the continuous deprotonation of GR(CO32-) into the fully ferric deprotonated form FeIII6O4(OH)8CO3~3H2O by adding the correct amount of H2O2, without any further oxidation or degradation of the samples.

  20. Genomic analysis reveals versatile heterotrophic capacity of a potentially symbiotic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium in sponge

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Renmao

    2014-08-29

    Sulfur-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) play essential roles in marine sponges. However, the detailed characteristics and physiology of the bacteria are largely unknown. Here, we present and analyse the first genome of sponge-associated SOB using a recently developed metagenomic binning strategy. The loss of transposase and virulence-associated genes and the maintenance of the ancient polyphosphate glucokinase gene suggested a stabilized SOB genome that might have coevolved with the ancient host during establishment of their association. Exclusive distribution in sponge, bacterial detoxification for the host (sulfide oxidation) and the enrichment for symbiotic characteristics (genes-encoding ankyrin) in the SOB genome supported the bacterial role as an intercellular symbiont. Despite possessing complete autotrophic sulfur oxidation pathways, the bacterium developed a much more versatile capacity for carbohydrate uptake and metabolism, in comparison with its closest relatives (Thioalkalivibrio) and to other representative autotrophs from the same order (Chromatiales). The ability to perform both autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolism likely results from the unstable supply of reduced sulfur in the sponge and is considered critical for the sponge-SOB consortium. Our study provides insights into SOB of sponge-specific clade with thioautotrophic and versatile heterotrophic metabolism relevant to its roles in the micro-environment of the sponge body. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Role of microbial Fe(III) reduction and solution chemistry in aggregation and settling of suspended particles in the Mississippi River Delta plain, Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisi, D.P.; Ji, S.; Dong, H.; Blake, R.E.; Eberl, D.D.; Kim, J.

    2008-01-01

    River-dominated delta areas are primary sites of active biogeochemical cycling, with productivity enhanced by terrestrial inputs of nutrients. Particle aggregation in these areas primarily controls the deposition of suspended particles, yet factors that control particle aggregation and resulting sedimentation in these environments are poorly understood. This study was designed to investigate the role of microbial Fe(III) reduction and solution chemistry in aggregation of suspended particles in the Mississippi Delta. Three representative sites along the salinity gradient were selected and sediments were collected from the sediment-water interface. Based on quantitative mineralogical analyses 88-89 wt.% of all minerals in the sediments are clays, mainly smectite and illite. Consumption of SO421 and the formation of H2S and pyrite during microbial Fe(III) reduction of the non-sterile sediments by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 in artificial pore water (APW) media suggest simultaneous sulfate and Fe(III) reduction activity. The pHPZNPC of the sediments was ??? 3.5 and their zeta potentials at the sediment-water interface pH (6.9-7.3) varied from -35 to -45 mV, suggesting that both edges and faces of clay particles have negative surface charge. Therefore, high concentrations of cations in pore water are expected to be a predominant factor in particle aggregation consistent with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Experiments on aggregation of different types of sediments in the same APW composition revealed that the sediment with low zeta potential had a high rate of aggregation. Similarly, addition of external Fe(II) (i.e. not derived from sediments) was normally found to enhance particle aggregation and deposition in all sediments, probably resulting from a decrease in surface potential of particles due to specific Fe(II) sorption. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) images showed predominant face-to-face clay aggregation in native

  2. Propiedades de los iones Fe(II) y Fe(III) en disolución. Reacciones con reactivos generales y especiales. Ensayos de identificación.

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Se muestran las características analíticas de los cationes Fe(II) y Fe(III) en disolución presentando las reacciones químicas de los mismos frente a los reactivos generales y a los reactivos especiales. Estas reacciones van acompañadas de fotos que permiten apreciar los cambios de colores de las disoluciones y precipitados que aparecen en la disolución de ensayo. La descriptiva finaliza con pruebas de identificación de cada ión en ausencia de especies interferentes.

  3. Variegatic acid from Serpula lacyrmans reduces FeIII and interacts with other fungal metabolites for location-specific generation and scavenging of reactive oxygen species

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yuan; MAHANEY, JAMES; Jellison, Jody; Cao, Jinzhen; Gressler, Julia; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Goodell, Barry

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to clarify the role of variegatic acid (VA) secreted from Serpula lacyrmans in a chelator-mediated Fenton (CMF) system, including FeIII reduction and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of H2O2 and oxalate. As the principle component of the fungal extracellular matrix (ECM), β-glucan isolated from Basidiomycota species was also assessed in scavenging ROS with regard to its potential as a protective barrier for fungal hyphae. Our results demonstrate ...

  4. Summer monsoon onset-induced changes of autotrophic pico- and nanoplankton in the largest monsoonal estuary along the west coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Arya P; Jyothibabu, R; Jagadeesan, L; Lallu, K R; Karnan, C

    2016-02-01

    This study presents the response of autotrophic pico- and nanoplankton to southwest monsoon-associated hydrographical transformations in the Cochin backwaters (CBW), the largest monsoonal estuary along the west coast of India. By the onset of the southwest monsoon, the euhaline/mesohaline conditions in the downstream/upstream of CBW usually transform into oligohaline/limnohaline. The flow cytometer analysis revealed the dominance of picoeukaryotes > Synechococcus > nanoautotrophs, with Prochlorococcus either very low or entirely absent. Synechococcus abundance was high during the pre-southwest monsoon (10(6) L(-1)), which dwindled with heavy fresh water influx during the southwest monsoon (10(5) L(-1)). The drastic drop in salinity and faster flushing of the CBW during the southwest monsoon replaced the euhaline/mesohaline strain of Synechococcus with an oligohaline/limnohaline strain. Epifluorescence microscopy analyses showed that, among the two strains of Synechococcus, the phycoerythrin-rich (PE-rich) one was dominant in the mesohaline/euhaline conditions, whereas the phycocyanin-rich (PC-rich) strain dominated in oligohaline/limnohaline conditions. Although Synechococcus abundance diminished during the southwest monsoon, the total abundance of picoplankton community remained virtually unchanged in the upstream due to an increase in the abundance of picoeukaryotes. On the other hand, the autotrophic nanoplankton abundance increased from pre-monsoon levels of av. 3.8 × 10(6)-av. 9.5 × 10(6) L(-1) at the onset of the southwest monsoon. Utilizing suitable multivariate analyses, the study illustrated the differential response and niche preference of various smaller communities of autotrophs to the southwest monsoon-associated hydrographical ramifications in a large monsoonal estuary, which may be applicable to similar such estuaries situated along the Indian coastline. PMID:26780412

  5. New oxides with weberite structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxides CaPbSb2O7 (1), NaSESb2O7 with SE = La, Nd, Eu, Gd (2), NaMsup(II)SbTeO7 with Msup(II) = Ca, Cd, Sr (3) and (Nasub(0.5)Msub(1.5)sup(II)(Fesub(0.5)Tesub(1.5))O7 with Msup(II) = Ca, Cd (4) crystallize in the orthorhombic weberite structure. The lattice constants of the compounds (1), (2) and (4) are communicated. In the Te(VI) compound (4) Fe(III) can be substituted by Mn(III) or Co(III). For the until now known weberites the ionic radius Rsub(A):Rsub(B) ratio is between 1.6 and 1.9. It is supposed that the weberite structure is more favoured for covalent bonds than the pyrochlore structure. (author)

  6. Preconcentration of Cu(II), Fe(III) and Pb(II) with 2-((2-aminoethylamino)methyl)phenol-functionalized activated carbon followed by ICP-OES determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qun; Hu, Zheng; Jiang, Yin; Chang, Xijun; Tu, Zhifeng; Zhang, Lina

    2010-03-15

    A procedure for separation and preconcentration trace amount of Cu(II), Fe(III) and Pb(II) by 2-((2-aminoethylamino)methyl)phenol-functionalized activated carbon (AC-AMP) packed column has been proposed. Under the optimized conditions (pH 4, flow rate 2.0 mL min(-1)), Cu(II), Fe(III) and Pb(II) were retained on the column, then quantitatively eluted by 2 mL 1 mol L(-1) nitric acid solution and determined by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The tolerance limits of electrolytes were very high. The adsorption capacity of AC-AMP was found to be 12.1, 67.1, and 16.2 mg g(-1) for Cu(II), Fe(III), and Pb(II), respectively. According to the definition of International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, the detection limits (3 sigma) of this method for Cu(II), Fe(III) and Pb(II) were 0.27, 0.41 and 0.16 microg L(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviation under optimum conditions is less than 3.0% (n=11). The proposed method has been validated by analyzing a certified reference material and successfully applied to the preconcentration and determination of Cu(II), Fe(III), and Pb(II) in actual samples with satisfactory results. PMID:19926213

  7. Aeration control by monitoring the microbiological activity using fuzzy logic diagnosis and control. Application to a complete autotrophic nitrogen removal reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiocchi, Riccardo; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Gernaey, Krist; Sin, Gürkan

    2015-01-01

    contribution describes the development of a fuzzy-logic based system for both diagnosis and control of a CANR reactor. Based on a combination of measurements of the nitrogen species concentration in the influent and in the effluent on the one hand, and insights into the activities of three distinctive...... the reactor.The diagnosis tool was first evaluated using 100 days of real process operation data obtained from a lab-scale single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removing reactor. This evaluation revealed that the fuzzy logic diagnosis is able to provide a realistic description of the microbiological state...

  8. Autotrophic fixation of geogenic CO2 by microorganisms contributes to soil organic matter formation and alters isotope signatures in a wetland mofette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, M. E.; Beulig, F.; von Fischer, J.; Muhr, J.; Küsel, K.; Trumbore, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    To quantify the contribution of autotrophic microorganisms to organic matter (OM) formation in soils, we investigated natural CO2 vents (mofettes) situated in a wetland in northwest Bohemia (Czech Republic). Mofette soils had higher soil organic matter (SOM) concentrations than reference soils due to restricted decomposition under high CO2 levels. We used radiocarbon (Δ14C) and stable carbon (δ13C) isotope ratios to characterize SOM and its sources in two mofettes and compared it with respective reference soils, which were not influenced by geogenic CO2. The geogenic CO2 emitted at these sites is free of radiocarbon and enriched in 13C compared to atmospheric CO2. Together, these isotopic signals allow us to distinguish C fixed by plants from C fixed by autotrophic microorganisms using their differences in 13C discrimination. We can then estimate that up to 27 % of soil organic matter in the 0-10 cm layer of these soils was derived from microbially assimilated CO2. Isotope values of bulk SOM were shifted towards more positive δ13C and more negative Δ14C values in mofettes compared to reference soils, suggesting that geogenic CO2 emitted from the soil atmosphere is incorporated into SOM. To distinguish whether geogenic CO2 was fixed by plants or by CO2 assimilating microorganisms, we first used the proportional differences in radiocarbon and δ13C values to indicate the magnitude of discrimination of the stable isotopes in living plants. Deviation from this relationship was taken to indicate the presence of microbial CO2 fixation, as microbial discrimination should differ from that of plants. 13CO2-labelling experiments confirmed high activity of CO2 assimilating microbes in the top 10 cm, where δ13C values of SOM were shifted up to 2 ‰ towards more negative values. Uptake rates of microbial CO2 fixation ranged up to 1.59 ± 0.16 μg gdw-1 d-1. We inferred that the negative δ13C shift was caused by the activity of autotrophic microorganisms using the Calvin

  9. Distribution patterns and biomass estimates of diatoms and autotrophic dinoflagellates in the NE Atlantic during June and July 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yallop, M. L.

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of microphytoplankton communities were determined from samples collected in the northeast Atlantic Ocean in the early summer of 1996 during the PRIME Cruise of the RRS Discovery. A combination of light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy techniques was used to determine the species composition of two of the main groups of phytoplankton: Bacillariophyceae and Dinophyta. Two series of samples were collected; the first set of samples was collected between 18 and 29 June 1996 during a Lagrangian time-series study in the vicinity of 59°N 20°W tracking a mesoscale cold-core eddy; the second set of samples was collected between 4 and 10 July 1996 during a transect along the 20°W meridian from 59 to 37°N. A total of 155 samples were analysed over various depths down to 150 m, and 78 phytoplankton species were identified. Samples taken during the Lagrangian time-series study were dominated by diatom species, including Ephemera planamembranacea and Pseudo-nitzschia species, whilst the main representative of the microphytoplankton dinoflagellates was Ceratium fusus. On the transect, several Ceratium species were common, including C. furca C. fusus, and C. lineatum, and three other autotrophic dinoflagellates were frequent including Prorocentrum minimum, Oxytoxum scolopax and Gonyaulax polygramma. A number of diatoms dominated the profiles along the transect including Leptocylindrus mediterraneus, Thalassiosira oestrupii, and representatives of the genera Haslea and Pseudo-nitzschia. Standing stocks of both groups were low and typical of post-bloom carbon levels. Diatom biomass exceeded that of dinoflagellate biomass in the eddy although the reverse situation was seen in the more southerly stations along the transect. Maximum abundances of the dinoflagellate communities were situated in the surface waters within the mixed layer, while depth maxima of certain diatoms were noted at around 40 m below the depth of the mixed layer

  10. Large-scale demonstration of the sulfate reduction autotrophic denitrification nitrification integrated (SANI(®)) process in saline sewage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Ekama, George A; Chui, Ho-Kwong; Wang, Bo; Cui, Yan-Xiang; Hao, Tian-Wei; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the Sulfate reduction Autotrophic denitrification Nitrification Integrated (SANI(®)) process was developed for the removal of organics and nitrogen with sludge minimization in the treatment of saline sewage (with a Sulfate-to-COD ratio > 0.5 mg SO4(2-)-S/mg COD) generated from seawater used for toilet flushing or salt water intrusion. Previously investigated in lab- and pilot-scale, this process has now been scaled up to a 800-1000 m(3)/d full-scale demonstration plant. In this paper, the design and operating parameters of the SANI demo plant built in Hong Kong are analyzed. After a 4-month start-up period, a stable sulfur cycle-based biological nitrogen removal system having a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 12.5 h was developed, thereby reducing the amount of space needed by 30-40% compared with conventional activated sludge (CAS) plants in Hong Kong. The demo plant satisfactorily met the local effluent discharge limits during both the summer and winter periods. In winter (sewage temperature of 21 ± 1 °C), the maximum volumetric loading rates for organic conversion, nitrification, and denitrification were 2 kg COD/(m(3)·d), 0.39 kg N/(m(3)·d), and 0.35 kg N/(m(3)·d), respectively. The biological sludge production rate of SANI process was 0.35 ± 0.08 g TSSproduced/g BOD5 (or 0.19 ± 0.05 g TSS/g COD), which is 60-70% lower than that of the CAS process in Hong Kong. While further process optimization is possible, this study demonstrates the SANI process can be potentially implemented for the treatment of saline sewage. PMID:27232994

  11. Bioalteration of synthetic Fe(III)-, Fe(II)-bearing basaltic glasses and Fe-free glass in the presence of the heterotrophic bacteria strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Impact of siderophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Anne; Rossano, Stéphanie; Trcera, Nicolas; Huguenot, David; Fourdrin, Chloé; Verney-Carron, Aurélie; van Hullebusch, Eric D.; Guyot, François

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the role of micro-organisms and their siderophores in the first steps of the alteration processes of basaltic glasses in aqueous media. In this regard, three different types of glasses - with or without iron, in the reduced Fe(II) or oxidized Fe(III) states - were prepared on the basis of a simplified basaltic glass composition. Control and Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculated experiments were performed in a buffered (pH 6.5) nutrient depleted medium to stimulate the production of the pyoverdine siderophore. Results show that the presence of P. aeruginosa has an effect on the dissolution kinetics of all glasses as most of the calculated elemental release rates are increased compared to sterile conditions. Reciprocally, the composition of the glass in contact with P. aeruginosa has an impact on the bacterial growth and siderophore production. As an essential nutrient for this microbial strain, Fe notably appears to play a central role during biotic experiments. Its presence in the glass stimulates the bacterial growth and minimizes the synthesis of pyoverdine. Moreover the initial Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio in the glasses modulates this synthesis, as pyoverdine is not detected at all in the system in contact with Fe(III)-bearing glass. Finally, the dissolution rates appear to be correlated to siderophore concentrations as they increase with respect to sterile experiments in the order Fe(III)-bearing glass bacteria, as initial dissolution rates are increased by a factor of 3. This study attests to the essential role of siderophores in the P. aeruginosa-promoted dissolution processes of basaltic glasses as well as to the complex relationships between the nutritional potential of the glass and its dissolution rates.

  12. Biogeophysical interactions control the formation of iron oxide microbial biofilms in acidic geothermal outflow channels of Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, J.; Berstein, H. C.; Jay, Z.; Kozubal, M. A.; Jennings, R. D.; Inskeep, W. P.

    2012-12-01

    Amorphous iron oxyhydroxide microbial mats in acidic (pH ~ 3) geothermal outflow channels of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are habitats for diverse populations of autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms from the domains Archaea and Bacteria. These systems have been extensively characterized with regards to geochemical, physical, and microbiological (e.g., metagenomics) analyses; however, there is minimal data describing the formation of these iron oxide microbial mats. A conceptual model of Fe(III)-oxide microbial mat development was created, which includes four distinct stages. Autotrophic archaea (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis) and bacteria (Hydrogenobaculum spp.) are the first colonizers (Stage I) that provide pools of organic carbon for heterotrophic thermophiles (Stage II). M. yellowstonensis is an autotrophic Sulfolobales that is responsible for the oxidation of Fe(II) and can thus be defined as the mat 'architect' creating suitable habitats for microbial niches (e.g., anaerobic microorganisms) (Stage III). The last phase of mat formation (Stage IV) represents a pseudo-steady state mature microbial mat, which has been the subject of all previous microbial surveys of these systems. The conceptual model for Fe(III)-oxide microbial mat development was tested by inserting glass (SiO2) microscope slides into the main flow channels of two acidic geothermal springs in YNP. Slides were removed at various time intervals and analyzed for total iron accretion, microbial community structure (i.e., 16S rRNA gene abundance), and mRNA expression of community members. Routine geochemical and physical (e.g., flow) parameters were also measured to decipher their relative contribution to mat development. Initial and previous results show that autotrophic microorganisms (e.g, M. yellowstonensis) are often the first to colonize the glass slides and their activity was confirmed by mRNA expression of genes related to iron oxidation and carbon fixation. Heterotrophs are rare

  13. Allelopathy of Aquatic Autotrophs

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    Allelopathy in aquatic environments may provide a competitive advantage to angiosperms, algae, or cyanobacteria in their interaction with other primary producers. Allelopathy can influence the competition between different photoautotrophs for resources and change the succession of species, for exarnple, in phytoplankton cornmunities. Field evidence and laboratory studies indicate that allelopathy occurs in all aquatic habitats (marine and freshwater), and that ail prirnary producing organisms...

  14. Solvent extraction of Sc(III), Zr(IV), Th(IV), Fe(III), and Lu(III) with thiosubstituted organophosphinic acid extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solvent extraction of Sc(III), Zr(IV), Th(IV), Fe(III) and Lu(III) with Cyanex 302 (bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)monothiphosphinic acid) and Cyanex 301 (bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)dithiophosphinic acid) in n-hexane from acidic aqueous solutions has been investigated systematically. The effect of equilibrium aqueous acidity on the extraction with these reagents was studied. The separation of Th(IV), Fe(III) and Lu(III) from Sc(III), or the separation of other metals from Lu(III) with Cyanex 302, can be achieved by controlling the aqueous acidity. However, Cyanex 301 exhibited a poor selectivity for the above metals, except for Lu(III). The extraction of these metals with Cyanex 272, Cyanex 302 and Cyanex 301 has been compared. The stripping percentages of Sc(III) for Cyanex 302 and Cyanex 301 in a single stage are near 78% and 75% with 3.5 mol/L and 5.8 mol/L sulphuric acid solutions, respectively. The effects of extractant concentration and temperature on the extraction of Sc(III) were investigated. The stoichiometry of the extraction of Sc(III) with Cyanex 302 was determined. The role of different components of Cyanex 302 in the extraction of Sc(III) was discussed. 18 refs., 10 figs

  15. INVESTIGATION OF THE TRANSFORMATION OF URANIUM UNDER IRON-REDUCING CONDITIONS: REDUCTION OF UVI BY BIOGENIC FEII/FEIII HYDROXIDE (GREEN RUST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Loughlin, Edward J.; Scherer, Michelle M.; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2006-12-31

    The recent identification of green rusts (GRs) as products of the reduction of FeIII oxyhydroxides by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, coupled with the ability of synthetic (GR) to reduce UVI species to insoluble UO2, suggests that biogenic green rusts (BioGRs) may play an important role in the speciation (and thus mobility) of U in FeIII-reducing environments. The objective of our research was to examine the potential for BioGR to affect the speciation of U under FeIII-reducing conditions. To meet this objective, we designed and executed a hypothesis-driven experimental program to identify key factors leading to the formation of BioGRs as products of dissimilatory FeIII reduction, to determine the key factors controlling the reduction of UVI to UIV by GRs, and to identify the resulting U-bearing mineral phases. The results of this research significantly increase our understanding of the coupling of biotic and abiotic processes with respect to the speciation of U in iron-reducing environments. In particular, the reduction of UVI to UIV by BioGR with the subsequent formation of U-bearing mineral phases may be effective for immobilizing U in suboxic subsurface environments. This information has direct applications to contaminant transport modeling and bioremediation engineering for natural or enhanced in situ remediation of subsurface contamination.

  16. Mechanism of Selenite Removal by a Mixed Adsorbent Based on Fe–Mn Hydrous Oxides Studied Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Chubar, Natalia

    2014-11-18

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Selenium cycling in the environment is greatly controlled by various minerals, including Mn and Fe hydrous oxides. At the same time, such hydrous oxides are the main inorganic ion exchangers suitable (on the basis of their chemical nature) to sorb (toxic) anions, separating them from water solutions. The mechanism of selenite adsorption by the new mixed adsorbent composed of a few (amorphous and crystalline) phases [maghemite, MnCO3, and X-ray amorphous Fe(III) and Mn(III) hydrous oxides] was studied by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy [supported by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) data]. The complexity of the porous adsorbent, especially the presence of the amorphous phases of Fe(III) and Mn(III) hydrous oxides, is the main reason for its high selenite removal performance demonstrated by batch and column adsorption studies shown in the previous work. Selenite was bound to the material via inner-sphere complexation (via oxygen) to the adsorption sites of the amorphous Fe(III) and Mn(III) oxides. This anion was attracted via bidentate binuclear corner-sharing coordination between SeO3 2- trigonal pyramids and both FeO6 and MnO6 octahedra; however, the adsorption sites of Fe(III) hydrous oxides played a leading role in selenite removal. The contribution of the adsorption sites of Mn(III) oxide increased as the pH decreased from 8 to 6. Because most minerals have a complex structure (they are seldom based on individual substances) of various crystallinity, this work is equally relevant to environmental science and environmental technology because it shows how various solid phases control cycling of chemical elements in the environment.

  17. Sequential dark-photo fermentation and autotrophic microalgal growth for high-yield and CO{sub 2}-free biohydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Yung-Chung [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701 (China); Chen, Chun-Yen [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701 (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China); Lee, Chi-Mei [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung (China); Chang, Jo-Shu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701 (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China); Center for Biosciences and Biotechnology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China)

    2010-10-15

    Dark fermentation, photo fermentation, and autotrophic microalgae cultivation were integrated to establish a high-yield and CO{sub 2}-free biohydrogen production system by using different feedstock. Among the four carbon sources examined, sucrose was the most effective for the sequential dark (with Clostridium butyricum CGS5) and photo (with Rhodopseudomonas palutris WP3-5) fermentation process. The sequential dark-photo fermentation was stably operated for nearly 80 days, giving a maximum H{sub 2} yield of 11.61 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose and a H{sub 2} production rate of 673.93 ml/h/l. The biogas produced from the sequential dark-photo fermentation (containing ca. 40.0% CO{sub 2}) was directly fed into a microalga culture (Chlorella vulgaris C-C) cultivated at 30 C under 60 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}/s illumination. The CO{sub 2} produced from the fermentation processes was completely consumed during the autotrophic growth of C. vulgaris C-C, resulting in a microalgal biomass concentration of 1999 mg/l composed mainly of 48.0% protein, 23.0% carbohydrate and 12.3% lipid. (author)

  18. Production Response and Digestive Enzymatic Activity of the Pacific White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931 Intensively Pregrown in Microbial Heterotrophic and Autotrophic-Based Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel J. Becerra-Dórame

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Shrimp postlarvae were reared into different microcosm systems without water exchange; a traditional system based on simple fertilization to improve microalgae concentration (control, an autotrophic system (AS based on the promotion of biofloc and biofilm by the addition of fertilizer and artificial substrates and a heterotrophic system (HS based on the promotion of heterotrophic bacteria by the addition of nitrogenous and carbonaceous sources and artificial substrates. Better growth performance and survival were registered in shrimp from the AS and HS compared to the control. Feed conversion ratios were below 0.7 for all treatments, but AS and HS were significantly lower than the control. Regarding digestive performance, no significant differences were observed for trypsin, amylase and lipase activities among AS and control shrimp; however, shrimp from HS showed a higher trypsin and amylase activities, suggesting a higher digestive activity caused by the presence of microbial bioflocs. The presence of biofilm and bioflocs composed by either autotrophic or heterotrophic organisms in combination with formulated feed improved the growth performance and survival of shrimp. Apparently, such combination fits the nutritional requirements of shrimp.

  19. An evidence-based framework for predicting the impact of differing autotroph-heterotroph thermal sensitivities on consumer-prey dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhou; Zhang, Lu; Zhu, Xuexia; Wang, Jun; Montagnes, David J S

    2016-07-01

    Increased temperature accelerates vital rates, influencing microbial population and wider ecosystem dynamics, for example, the predicted increases in cyanobacterial blooms associated with global warming. However, heterotrophic and mixotrophic protists, which are dominant grazers of microalgae, may be more thermally sensitive than autotrophs, and thus prey could be suppressed as temperature rises. Theoretical and meta-analyses have begun to address this issue, but an appropriate framework linking experimental data with theory is lacking. Using ecophysiological data to develop a novel model structure, we provide the first validation of this thermal sensitivity hypothesis: increased temperature improves the consumer's ability to control the autotrophic prey. Specifically, the model accounts for temperature effects on auto- and mixotrophs and ingestion, growth and mortality rates, using an ecologically and economically important system (cyanobacteria grazed by a mixotrophic flagellate). Once established, we show the model to be a good predictor of temperature impacts on consumer-prey dynamics by comparing simulations with microcosm observations. Then, through simulations, we indicate our conclusions remain valid, even with large changes in bottom-up factors (prey growth and carrying capacity). In conclusion, we show that rising temperature could, counterintuitively, reduce the propensity for microalgal blooms to occur and, critically, provide a novel model framework for needed, continued assessment. PMID:26684731

  20. Synthesis of Zn-Fe layered double hydroxides via an oxidation process and structural analysis of products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Kazuya; Tamura, Kenji; Anraku, Sohtaro; Sato, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Masaya; Yamada, Hirohisa

    2015-08-01

    The synthesis of Zn-Fe(III) layered double hydroxides was attempted, employing different pathways using either Fe(II) or Fe(III) species together with Zn as the initial reagents. The product derived from the synthesis employing Fe(II) was found to transition to a Zn-Fe(III) layered double hydroxides phase following oxidation process. In contrast, the product obtained with Fe(III) did not contain a layered double hydroxides phase, but rather consisted of simonkolleite and hydrous ferric oxide. It was determined that the valency of the Fe reagent used in the initial synthesis affected the generation of the layered double hydroxides phase. Fe(II) species have ionic radii and electronegativities similar to those of Zn, and therefore are more likely to form trioctahedral hydroxide layers with Zn species.

  1. Growth of iron(III)-reducing bacteria on clay minerals as the sole electron acceptor and comparison of growth yields on a variety of oxidized iron forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostka, Joel E; Dalton, Dava D; Skelton, Hayley; Dollhopf, Sherry; Stucki, Joseph W

    2002-12-01

    Smectite clay minerals are abundant in soils and sediments worldwide and are typically rich in Fe. While recent investigations have shown that the structural Fe(III) bound in clay minerals is reduced by microorganisms, previous studies have not tested growth with clay minerals as the sole electron acceptor. Here we have demonstrated that a pure culture of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 as well as enrichment cultures of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria from rice paddy soil and subsurface sediments are capable of conserving energy for growth with the structural Fe(III) bound in smectite clay as the sole electron acceptor. Pure cultures of S. oneidensis were used for more detailed growth rate and yield experiments on various solid- and soluble-phase electron acceptors [smectite, Fe(III) oxyhydroxide FeOOH, Fe(III) citrate, and oxygen] in the same minimal medium. Growth was assessed as direct cell counts or as an increase in cell carbon (measured as particulate organic carbon). Cell counts showed that similar growth of S. oneidensis (10(8) cells ml(-1)) occurred with smectitic Fe(III) and on other Fe forms [amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide, and Fe citrate] or oxygen as the electron acceptor. In contrast, cell yields of S. oneidensis measured as the increase in cell carbon were similar on all Fe forms tested while yields on oxygen were five times higher, in agreement with thermodynamic predictions. Over a range of particle loadings (0.5 to 4 g liter(-1)), the increase in cell number was highly correlated to the amount of structural Fe in smectite reduced. From phylogenetic analysis of the complete 16S rRNA gene sequences, a predominance of clones retrieved from the clay mineral-reducing enrichment cultures were most closely related to the low-G+C gram-positive members of the Bacteria (Clostridium and Desulfitobacterium) and the delta-Proteobacteria (members of the Geobacteraceae). Results indicate that growth with smectitic Fe(III) is similar in magnitude to that with Fe(III

  2. A pentanuclear iron catalyst designed for water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Masaya; Kondo, Mio; Kuga, Reiko; Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi; Hayami, Shinya; Praneeth, Vijayendran K. K.; Yoshida, Masaki; Yoneda, Ko; Kawata, Satoshi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki

    2016-02-01

    Although the oxidation of water is efficiently catalysed by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (refs 1 and 2), it remains one of the main bottlenecks when aiming for synthetic chemical fuel production powered by sunlight or electricity. Consequently, the development of active and stable water oxidation catalysts is crucial, with heterogeneous systems considered more suitable for practical use and their homogeneous counterparts more suitable for targeted, molecular-level design guided by mechanistic understanding. Research into the mechanism of water oxidation has resulted in a range of synthetic molecular catalysts, yet there remains much interest in systems that use abundant, inexpensive and environmentally benign metals such as iron (the most abundant transition metal in the Earth’s crust and found in natural and synthetic oxidation catalysts). Water oxidation catalysts based on mononuclear iron complexes have been explored, but they often deactivate rapidly and exhibit relatively low activities. Here we report a pentanuclear iron complex that efficiently and robustly catalyses water oxidation with a turnover frequency of 1,900 per second, which is about three orders of magnitude larger than that of other iron-based catalysts. Electrochemical analysis confirms the redox flexibility of the system, characterized by six different oxidation states between FeII5 and FeIII5; the FeIII5 state is active for oxidizing water. Quantum chemistry calculations indicate that the presence of adjacent active sites facilitates O-O bond formation with a reaction barrier of less than ten kilocalories per mole. Although the need for a high overpotential and the inability to operate in water-rich solutions limit the practicality of the present system, our findings clearly indicate that efficient water oxidation catalysts based on iron complexes can be created by ensuring that the system has redox flexibility and contains adjacent water-activation sites.

  3. Effects of pulsed atrazine exposures on autotrophic community structure, biomass, and production in field-based stream mesocosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ryan S; Brain, Richard A; Back, Jeffrey A; Becker, Christopher; Wright, Moncie V; Toteu Djomte, Valerie; Scott, W Casan; Virgil, Steven R; Brooks, Bryan W; Hosmer, Alan J; Chambliss, C Kevin

    2016-03-01

    The authors performed a multiple-pulsed atrazine experiment to measure responses of autotrophic endpoints in outdoor stream mesocosms. The experiment was designed to synthetically simulate worst-case atrazine chemographs from streams in agricultural catchments to achieve 60-d mean concentrations of 0 μg/L (control), 10 μg/L, 20 μg/L, and 30 μg/L. The authors dosed triplicate streams with pulses of 0 μg/L, 50 μg/L, 100 μg/L, and 150 μg/L atrazine for 4 d, followed by 7 d without dosing. This 11-d cycle occurred 3 times, followed by a recovery (untreated) period from day 34 to day 60. Mean ± standard error 60-d atrazine concentrations were 0.07 ± 0.03 μg/L, 10.7 ± 0.05 μg/L, 20.9 ± 0.24 μg/L, and 31.0 ± 0.17 μg/L for the control, 10-μg/L, 20-μg/L, and 30-μg/L treatments, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that periphyton and phytoplankton community structure did not differ among treatments on any day of the experiment, including during the atrazine pulses. Control periphyton biomass in riffles was higher immediately following the peak of the first atrazine pulse and remained slightly higher than some of the atrazine treatments on most days through the peak of the last pulse. However, periphyton biomass was not different among treatments at the end of the present study. Phytoplankton biomass was not affected by atrazine. Metaphyton biomass in pools was higher in the controls near the midpoint of the present study and remained higher on most days for the remainder of the study. Ceratophyllum demersum, a submersed macrophyte, biomass was higher in controls than in 20-μg/L and 30-μg/L treatments before pulse 3 but was not different subsequent to pulse 3 through the end of the present study. Maximum daily dissolved oxygen (DO, percentage of saturation) declined during each pulse in approximate proportion to magnitude of dose but rapidly converged among treatments after the third pulse. However

  4. Some ozone advanced oxidation processes to improve the biological removal of selected pharmaceutical contaminants from urban wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Espejo, Azahara; Aguinaco, Almudena; Amat Payá, Ana María; Fernando J. Beltrán

    2014-01-01

    Removal of nine pharmaceutical compounds¿acetaminophen (AAF), antipyrine (ANT), caffeine (CAF), carbamazepine (CRB), diclofenac (DCF), hydrochlorothiazide (HCT), ketorolac (KET), metoprolol (MET) and sulfamethoxazole (SMX)¿spiked in a primary sedimentation effluent of a municipal wastewater has been studied with sequential aerobic biological and ozone advanced oxidation systems. Combinations of ozone, UVA black light and Fe(III) or Fe3O4 constituted the chemical systems. During the ...

  5. Development of a C3-symmetric benzohydroxamate tripod: Trimetallic complexation with Fe(III), Cr(III) and Al(III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baral, Minati; Gupta, Amit; Kanungo, B. K.

    2016-06-01

    The design, synthesis and physicochemical characterization of a C3-symmetry Benzene-1,3,5-tricarbonylhydroxamate tripod, noted here as BTHA, are described. The chelator was built from a benzene as an anchor, symmetrically extended by three hydroxamate as ligating moieties, each bearing O, O donor sites. A combination of absorption spectrophotometry, potentiometry and theoretical investigations are used to explore the complexation behavior of the ligand with some trivalent metal ions: Fe(III), Cr(III), and Al(III). Three protonation constants were calculated for the ligand in a pH range of 2-11 in a highly aqueous medium (9:1 H2O: DMSO). A high rigidity in the molecular structure restricts the formation of 1:1 (M/L) metal encapsulation but shows a high binding efficiency for a 3:1 metal ligand stoichiometry giving formation constant (in β unit) 28.73, 26.13 and 19.69 for [M3L]; Mdbnd Fe(III), Al(III) and Cr(III) respectively, and may be considered as an efficient Fe-carrier. The spectrophotometric study reveals of interesting electronic transitions occurred during the complexation. BTHA exhibits a peak at 238 nm in acidic pH and with the increase of pH, a new peak appeared at 270 nm. A substantial shifting in both of the peaks in presence of the metal ions implicates a s coordination between ligand and metal ions. Moreover, complexation of BTHA with iron shows three distinct colors, violet, reddish orange and yellow in different pH, enables the ligand to be considered for the use as colorimetric sensor.

  6. Speciative Determination of Dissolved Inorganic Fe(II, Fe(III and Total Fe in Natural Waters by Coupling Cloud Point Extraction with FAAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan GÜRKAN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A new cloud point extraction (CPE method for the preconcentration of trace iron speciation in natural waters prior to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS was developed in the present study. In this method, Fe(II sensitively and selectively reacts with Calcon carboxylic acid (CCA in presence of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC yielding a hydrophobic complex at pH 10.5, which is then entrapped in surfactant-rich phase. Total Fe was accurately and reliably determined after the reduction of Fe(III to Fe(II with sulfite. The amount of Fe(III in samples was determined from the difference between total Fe and Fe(II. CPC was used not only as an auxiliary ligand in CPE, but also as sensitivity enhancement agent in FAAS. The nonionic surfactant, polyethylene glycol tert-octylphenyl ether (Triton X-114 was used as an extracting agent. The analytical variables affecting CPE efficiency were investigated in detail. The preconcentration/enhancement factors of 50 and 82 respectively, were obtained for the preconcentration of Fe(II with 50 mL solution. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of Fe(II in linear range of 0.2-60 μg L-1 was 0.06 μg L-1. The relative standard deviation was 2.7 % (20 μg L-1, N: 5, recoveries for Fe(II were in range of 99.0-102.0% for all water samples including certified reference materials (CRMs. In order to verify its accuracy, two CRMs were analyzed and the results obtained were statistically in good agreement with the certified values.

  7. Synthesis, physicochemical characterization, DFT calculation and biological activities of Fe(III) and Co(II)-omeprazole complexes. Potential application in the Helicobacter pylori eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Marcos G.; Vega Hissi, Esteban G.; Rizzi, Alberto C.; Brondino, Carlos D.; Salinas Ibañez, Ángel G.; Vega, Alba E.; Silva, Humberto J.; Mercader, Roberto; Narda, Griselda E.

    2014-03-01

    The reaction between the antiulcer agent omeprazole (OMZ) with Fe(III) and Co(II) ions was studied, observing a high ability to form metal complexes. The isolated microcrystalline solid complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), magnetic measurements, thermal study, FTIR, UV-Visible, Mössbauer, electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and DFT calculations. The metal-ligand ratio for both complexes was 1:2 determined by elemental and thermal analysis. FTIR spectroscopy showed that OMZ acts as a neutral bidentate ligand through the pyridinic nitrogen of the benzimidazole ring and the oxygen atom of the sulfoxide group, forming a five-membered ring chelate. Electronic, Mössbauer, and EPR spectra together with magnetic measurements indicate a distorted octahedral geometry around the metal ions, where the coordination sphere is completed by two water molecules. SEM and XRPD were used to characterize the morphology and the crystal nature of the complexes. The most favorable conformation for the Fe(III)-OMZ and Co(II)-OMZ complexes was obtained by DFT calculations by using B3LYP/6-31G(d)&LanL2DZ//B3LYP/3-21G(d)&LanL2DZ basis set. Studies of solubility along with the antibacterial activity against Helicobacter pylori for OMZ and its Co(II) and Fe(III) complexes are also reported. Free OMZ and both metal complexes showed antibacterial activity against H. pylori. Co(II)-OMZ presented a minimal inhibitory concentration ˜32 times lower than that of OMZ and ˜65 lower than Fe(III)-OMZ, revealing its promising potential use for the treatment of gastric pathologies associated with the Gram negative bacteria. The morphological changes observed in the cell membrane of the bacteria after the incubation with the metal-complexes were also analyzed by SEM microscopy. The antimicrobial activity of the complexes was proved by the viability test.

  8. Heterotrophs are key contributors to nitrous oxide production in mixed liquor under low C-to-N ratios during nitrification - batch experiments and modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domingo Felez, Carlos; Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Petersen, Morten S.;

    2016-01-01

    model structures have been proposed without consensus calibration procedures. Here, we present a new experimental design that was used to calibrate AOB-driven N2O dynamics of a mixed culture. Even though AOB activity was favoured with respect to HB, oxygen uptake rates indicated HB activity. Hence......Nitrous oxide (N2O), a by-product of biological nitrogen removal during wastewater treatment, is produced by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria (HB). Mathematical models are used to predict N2O emissions, often including AOB as the main N2O producer. Several......, rigorous experimental design for calibration of autotrophic N2O production from mixed cultures is essential. The proposed N2O production pathways were examined using five alternative process models confronted with experimental data inferred. Individually, the autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification...

  9. Investigations on photosynthetic pigments of Lemnaceae, pt. 14: The effect of UV-B radiation on deetiolating and autotrophically growing plants of Lemna gibba L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In deetiolating plants of Lemma gibba L., the biosynthesis of photosynthetically active pigments (chlorophyll a and b, beta-carotene, lutein, violaxanthin and neoxanthin) was reduced by UV-B radiation (2,5 W cnt * m-2) in dependence on the exposure time (8-96-h). The biosynthesis of chlorophyll b was more inhibited than that of chlorophyll a, that of the chlorophylls more than that of the carotenoids and that of beta-carotene more than that of the xanthophylls notably lutein. In autotrophic plants. UV-B radiation (42, 72 and 120 h) causes a strong reduction of the pigment content. The alteration of the ratios between the pigments was the same as in deetiolating plants. In deetiolating as well as in autotropically cultivated plants of Lemma gibba, the termination of the UV-B radiation is followed by an approach to the original ratios

  10. An operational protocol for facilitating start-up of single-stage autotrophic nitrogen-removing reactors based on process stoichiometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutlu, Ayten Gizem; Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Sin, Gürkan;

    2013-01-01

    Start-up and operation of single-stage nitritation–anammox sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) for completely autotrophic nitrogen removal can be challenging and far from trivial. In this study, a step-wise procedure is developed based on stoichiometric analysis of the process performance from...... nitrogen species measurements to systematically guide start-up and normal operation efforts (instead of trial and error). The procedure is successfully applied to laboratory-scale SBRs for start-up and maintained operation over an 8-month period. This analysis can serve as a strong decision-making tool to...... take appropriate actions with respect to reactor operation to accelerate start-up or ensure high-rate N removal via the nitritation–anammox pathway....

  11. Electrocatalytic Materials and Techniques for the Anodic Oxidation of Various Organic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Everett Treimer

    2002-06-27

    The focus of this thesis was first to characterize and improve the applicability of Fe(III) and Bi(V) doped PbO{sub 2} film electrodes for use in anodic O-transfer reactions of toxic and waste organic compounds, e.g. phenol, aniline, benzene, and naphthalene. Further, they investigated the use of alternative solution/electrode interfacial excitation techniques to enhance the performance of these electrodes for remediation and electrosynthetic applications. Finally, they have attempted to identify a less toxic metal oxide film that may hold promise for future studies in the electrocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis of O-transfer reactions using metal oxide film electrodes.

  12. Thermally induced transformations of iron oxide stabilised APC residues from waste incineration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette Abildgaard; Koch, C.B.

    2001-01-01

    Air pollution control (APC) facilities at waste incinerator plants produce large quantities of solid residues rich in salts and heavy metals. Heavy metals are readily released to water from the residues and it has, therefore, been found suitable to apply a rapid co-precipitation/adsorption process...... as a means to immobilize the toxic elements. In the 'Ferrox process', this immobilization is based on co-precipitation with an Fe(III) oxide formed by oxidation of Fe(II) by air in an aqueous slurry with the APC residue at alkaline pH. In this work we have undertaken a Mossbauer spectroscopy study of...

  13. The ammonia monooxygenase structural gene amoA as a functional marker: molecular fine-scale analysis of natural ammonia-oxidizing populations.

    OpenAIRE

    Rotthauwe, J H; K. P. WITZEL; Liesack, W.

    1997-01-01

    The naturally occurring genetic heterogeneity of autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing populations belonging to the beta subclass of the Proteobacteria was studied by using a newly developed PCR-based assay targeting a partial stretch of the gene which encodes the active-site polypeptide of ammonia monooxygenase (amoA). The PCR yielded a specific 491-bp fragment with all of the nitrifiers tested, but not with the homologous stretch of the particulate methane monooxygenase, a key enzyme of methane-oxi...

  14. A Mononuclear Fe(III) Single Molecule Magnet with a 3/2↔5/2 Spin Crossover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossin, Susanne L.; Tran, Ba L.; Adhikari, Debashis;

    2012-01-01

    The air stable complex [(PNP)FeCl2] (1) (PNP = N[2-P(CHMe2)2-4-methylphenyl]2–), prepared from one-electron oxidation of [(PNP)FeCl] with ClCPh3, displays an unexpected S = 3/2 to S = 5/2 transition above 80 K as inferred by the dc SQUID magnetic susceptibility measurement. The ac SQUID magnetiza...

  15. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1

    OpenAIRE

    Fredrickson, J. K.; Kostandarithes, H. M.; Li, S. W.; Plymale, A. E.; Daly, M J

    2000-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO2 and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfo...

  16. pH variation and influence in an autotrophic nitrogen removing biofilm system using an efficient numerical solution strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Valverde Perez, Borja; Gernaey, Krist; Sin, Gürkan

    2013-01-01

    nitritation-anammox process for a range of operating points. The simulation results showed that pH profiles were consistently increasing with increasing depth into the granule, since the proton producing aerobic ammonium oxidizers (AOB) were located close to the granule surface.Despite this pH profile, more...

  17. Virus-Templated Near-Amorphous Iron Oxide Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sachin N; Khan, Abid A; Espinosa, Ana; Garcia, Miguel A; Nuansing, Wiwat; Ungureanu, Mariana; Heddle, Jonathan G; Chuvilin, Andrey L; Wege, Christina; Bittner, Alexander M

    2016-06-14

    We present a simple synthesis of iron oxide nanotubes, grown under very mild conditions from a solution containing Fe(II) and Fe(III), on rod-shaped tobacco mosaic virus templates. Their well-defined shape and surface chemistry suggest that these robust bionanoparticles are a versatile platform for synthesis of small, thin mineral tubes, which was achieved efficiently. Various characterization tools were used to explore the iron oxide in detail: Electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), magnetometry (SQUID-VSM), diffraction (XRD, TEM-SAED), electron spectroscopies (EELS, EDX, XPS), and X-ray absorption (XANES with EXAFS analysis). They allowed determination of the structure, crystallinity, magnetic properties, and composition of the tubes. The protein surface of the viral templates was crucial to nucleate iron oxide, exhibiting analogies to biomineralization in natural compartments such as ferritin cages. PMID:27181278

  18. Bioalteration of synthetic Fe(III)-, Fe(II)-bearing basaltic glasses and Fe-free glass in the presence of the heterotrophic bacteria strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Impact of siderophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Anne; Rossano, Stéphanie; Trcera, Nicolas; Huguenot, David; Fourdrin, Chloé; Verney-Carron, Aurélie; van Hullebusch, Eric D.; Guyot, François

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the role of micro-organisms and their siderophores in the first steps of the alteration processes of basaltic glasses in aqueous media. In this regard, three different types of glasses - with or without iron, in the reduced Fe(II) or oxidized Fe(III) states - were prepared on the basis of a simplified basaltic glass composition. Control and Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculated experiments were performed in a buffered (pH 6.5) nutrient depleted medium to stimulate the production of the pyoverdine siderophore. Results show that the presence of P. aeruginosa has an effect on the dissolution kinetics of all glasses as most of the calculated elemental release rates are increased compared to sterile conditions. Reciprocally, the composition of the glass in contact with P. aeruginosa has an impact on the bacterial growth and siderophore production. As an essential nutrient for this microbial strain, Fe notably appears to play a central role during biotic experiments. Its presence in the glass stimulates the bacterial growth and minimizes the synthesis of pyoverdine. Moreover the initial Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio in the glasses modulates this synthesis, as pyoverdine is not detected at all in the system in contact with Fe(III)-bearing glass. Finally, the dissolution rates appear to be correlated to siderophore concentrations as they increase with respect to sterile experiments in the order Fe(III)-bearing glass < Fe(II)-bearing glass < Fe-free glass. This increase is attributed to complexation reactions between siderophores and Fe or Al for Fe(II)-bearing glass or Fe-free glass, respectively. The dissolution of an Fe-free glass is significantly improved in the presence of bacteria, as initial dissolution rates are increased by a factor of 3. This study attests to the essential role of siderophores in the P. aeruginosa-promoted dissolution processes of basaltic glasses as well as to the complex relationships between the nutritional potential of the glass and

  19. A Mononuclear Fe(III) Single Molecule Magnet with a 3/2↔5/2 Spin Crossover

    OpenAIRE

    Mossin, Susanne L.; Tran, Ba L.; Adhikari, Debashis; Pink, Maren; Heinemann, Frank W.; Sutter, Jörg; Szilagyi, Robert K.; Meyer, Karsten; Mindiola, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    The air stable complex [(PNP)FeCl2] (1) (PNP = N[2-P(CHMe2)2-4-methylphenyl]2–), prepared from one-electron oxidation of [(PNP)FeCl] with ClCPh3, displays an unexpected S = 3/2 to S = 5/2 transition above 80 K as inferred by the dc SQUID magnetic susceptibility measurement. The ac SQUID magnetization data, at zero field and between frequencies 10 and 1042 Hz, clearly reveal complex 1 to have frequency dependence on the out-of-phase signal and thus being a single molecular magnet with a therma...

  20. Anaerobic Removal of Ammonia Nitrogen by an Autotrophic Reactor with Fixed Film Opering in a Sequential Batch

    OpenAIRE

    Murilo C. Lucas; José H. A. Vasconcelos; Francisco Javier Cuba Téran; Carla Eloísa Diniz dos Santos

    2010-01-01

    This study presents results of ammonia nitrogen oxidation in absence of molecular oxygen. They were obtained after the operation of a sequential batch anaerobic reactor with fixed film. After the inoculation with sludge from an anaerobic stabilization pond of a slaughterhouse wastewater treatment plant, the reactor was fed with a synthetic culture media, as described by Martins (2007), in order to establish ideal conditions for growth and development of Anammox culture. The duration of the ba...

  1. Synthesis of Zn–Fe layered double hydroxides via an oxidation process and structural analysis of products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Kazuya, E-mail: kazuya.morimoto@aist.go.jp [Institute for Geo-Resources and Environment, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8567 (Japan); Tamura, Kenji [Environmental Remediation Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Anraku, Sohtaro [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Sato, Tsutomu [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Suzuki, Masaya [Institute for Geo-Resources and Environment, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8567 (Japan); Yamada, Hirohisa [Environmental Remediation Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The synthesis of Zn–Fe(III) layered double hydroxides was attempted, employing different pathways using either Fe(II) or Fe(III) species together with Zn as the initial reagents. The product derived from the synthesis employing Fe(II) was found to transition to a Zn–Fe(III) layered double hydroxides phase following oxidation process. In contrast, the product obtained with Fe(III) did not contain a layered double hydroxides phase, but rather consisted of simonkolleite and hydrous ferric oxide. It was determined that the valency of the Fe reagent used in the initial synthesis affected the generation of the layered double hydroxides phase. Fe(II) species have ionic radii and electronegativities similar to those of Zn, and therefore are more likely to form trioctahedral hydroxide layers with Zn species. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis of Zn–Fe(III) layered double hydroxides was attempted, employing different pathways using either Fe(II) or Fe(III) species together with Zn as the initial reagents. - Highlights: • Iron valency affected the generation of Zn–Fe layered double hydroxides. • Zn–Fe layered double hydroxides were successfully synthesized using Fe(II). • Fe(II) species were likely to form trioctahedral hydroxide layers with Zn species.

  2. Synthesis of Zn–Fe layered double hydroxides via an oxidation process and structural analysis of products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of Zn–Fe(III) layered double hydroxides was attempted, employing different pathways using either Fe(II) or Fe(III) species together with Zn as the initial reagents. The product derived from the synthesis employing Fe(II) was found to transition to a Zn–Fe(III) layered double hydroxides phase following oxidation process. In contrast, the product obtained with Fe(III) did not contain a layered double hydroxides phase, but rather consisted of simonkolleite and hydrous ferric oxide. It was determined that the valency of the Fe reagent used in the initial synthesis affected the generation of the layered double hydroxides phase. Fe(II) species have ionic radii and electronegativities similar to those of Zn, and therefore are more likely to form trioctahedral hydroxide layers with Zn species. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis of Zn–Fe(III) layered double hydroxides was attempted, employing different pathways using either Fe(II) or Fe(III) species together with Zn as the initial reagents. - Highlights: • Iron valency affected the generation of Zn–Fe layered double hydroxides. • Zn–Fe layered double hydroxides were successfully synthesized using Fe(II). • Fe(II) species were likely to form trioctahedral hydroxide layers with Zn species

  3. Redox cycling of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in magnetite by Fe-metabolizing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, James; Klueglein, Nicole; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Appel, Erwin; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-03-26

    Despite the regular occurrence of both magnetite and iron-metabolizing bacteria in the same environments, it is currently unknown whether the iron(II) and iron(III) in magnetite can be cycled between different bacteria and whether or how magnetic properties are affected by this metabolic activity. We show through magnetic and spectroscopic measurements that the phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizer Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1 can oxidize solid-phase magnetite nanoparticles using light energy, leading to a decrease in the measured magnetic susceptibility (MS). This process likely occurs at the surface and is reversible in the dark by the Fe(III)-reducer Geobacter sulfurreducens resulting in an increase in MS. These results show that iron ions bound in highly crystalline mineral magnetite are bioavailable as electron stores and electron sinks under varying environmental conditions, making magnetite a potential “biogeobattery” during day/night cycles. These findings are relevant for environmental studies and reinforce the impact of microbial redox processes on the global iron cycle.

  4. Speciation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in Contaminated Aquifer Sediments Using Chemical Extraction Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heron, Gorm; Crouzet, Catherine.; Bourg, Alain C. M.; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1994-01-01

    nine aquifer sediments from different redox environments sampled in a landfill leachate plume. Ion-exchangeable Fe(I1) is easily quantified by anaerobic CaClz extraction. A rapid indication of the redox status of a sediment sample can be achieved by a 0.5 M HC1 extraction. This extraction gives an......The iron mineralogy of aquifer sediments was described by chemical extraction techniques. Single-step extractions including 1 M CaC12, NaAc, oxalate, dithionite, Ti(II1)- EDTA, 0.5 M HC1,5 M HC1, hot 6 M HC1, and a sequential extraction by HI and CrIIHC1 were tested on standard iron minerals and...... indication of the content of amorphous Fe(II1) and reduced Fe(I1) species such as FeS and FeC03, though the fractions are not quantified. A good estimate of the iron(II1) oxide content contributing to the oxidation capacity (OXC) of the sediment is given by the Ti(II1)-EDTA extraction. The iron(I1) sulfide...

  5. Enhanced arsenite removal through surface-catalyzed oxidative coagulation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Bland, Garret D; Yan, Weile

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic being a naturally-occurring groundwater contaminant is subject to stringent water quality regulations. Coagulation and adsorption are widely used methods to treat arsenic-contaminated water, however, these treatments have been reported to be less efficient for the removal of arsenite (As(III)) than arsenate (As(V)). In this study, the feasibility of in situ oxidation of As(III) during coagulation was investigated in two systems: Fe(II) or H2O2-assisted oxidative coagulation treatment using ferric chloride as the coagulant. This setup exploits the catalytic property of the fresh formed Fe(III) hydroxide colloids in coagulation suspension to mediate the production of reactive oxidants capable of As(III) oxidation. Fe(II)-assisted coagulation brought about small improvements in As(III) removal compared to treatment with Fe(III) coagulant alone, however, its arsenic removal efficiency is strongly dependent on pH (observed optimal pH = 7-9). Addition of H2O2 together with ferric chloride led to a significant enhancement in arsenic retention at pH 6-8, with final arsenic concentrations well below the U.S.EPA regulatory limit (10 μg/L). H2O2-assisted oxidative coagulation can attain reliable As(III) removal over a broad pH range of 4-9. Radical quenching experiments reveal the participation of superoxide radical in As(III) removal in the oxidative coagulation systems. Phosphate (at > 0.1 mM) strongly suppresses As(III) removal efficiency, whereas carbonate and humic acid pose a minor impact. Overall, the results suggest that a low dose addition of H2O2 along with ferric coagulant is a feasible method for the existing water treatment facilities to achieve improved As(III) removal efficiency. PMID:26897520

  6. Simultaneous determination of Fe(III) and Al(III) by first-derivative spectrophotometry and partial least-squares (PLS-2) method - application to post-haemodialysis fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguerssif, Nadia; Benamor, Mohamed; Kachbi, Malek; Draa, Mohamed Tahar

    2008-01-01

    Derivative spectrophotometry (graphical method) and partial least-squares regression (numerical method) methods were developed for the spectrophotometric multi-component analysis of post-haemodialysis fluids and synthetic mixtures containing Al(III) and Fe(III) without any chemical separation. The complexes of these metal ions with chrome azurol S were formed immediately at pH 5.5 and were stable for at least 3h. The graphical method is based on the use of first-derivative spectra for evaluation because working wavelength determination was more precise and spectral overlap was less than in the ordinary spectra. Two wavelengths at which the complexes exhibited maximum absorption values for Fe(III) and Al(III) were selected as analytical wavelengths, i.e., 675 and 623.5 nm, respectively. Lambert-Beer's law is obeyed between 0.0896-8.064 microg/mL Fe(III) and 0.054-0.486 microg/mL Al(III). Limits of detection for Fe(III) and Al(III) were 0.056 and 0.044 microg/mL, respectively. The reproducibility, expressed as variation coefficients, for two sets of 10 standard mixtures containing 3.584 microg/mL Fe(III) and 0.27 microg/mL Al(III) were 1.9% and 2% for iron and aluminium, respectively. In the numerical method, a training set was randomly prepared by using 14 samples. The concentration of each component has been varied in the linear range of the analytical signal. The spectral regions between 510 and 720 nm were selected for the analysis of the binary mixture of Fe(III)/Al(III). The proposed methods were validated by using synthetic binary mixtures and applied to the simultaneous determination of Fe(III) and Al(III) in post-haemodialysis samples. The obtained results were compared with each other; in general, both multi-component methods gave rise to similar recovery results for laboratory-prepared mixtures and real samples. PMID:18755392

  7. Biogeophysical interactions control the formation of iron oxide microbial biofilms in acidic geothermal outflow channels of Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, J.; Berstein, H. C.; Jay, Z.; Kozubal, M. A.; Jennings, R. D.; Inskeep, W. P.

    2012-12-01

    Amorphous iron oxyhydroxide microbial mats in acidic (pH ~ 3) geothermal outflow channels of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are habitats for diverse populations of autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms from the domains Archaea and Bacteria. These systems have been extensively characterized with regards to geochemical, physical, and microbiological (e.g., metagenomics) analyses; however, there is minimal data describing the formation of these iron oxide microbial mats. A conceptual model of Fe(III)-oxide microbial mat development was created, which includes four distinct stages. Autotrophic archaea (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis) and bacteria (Hydrogenobaculum spp.) are the first colonizers (Stage I) that provide pools of organic carbon for heterotrophic thermophiles (Stage II). M. yellowstonensis is an autotrophic Sulfolobales that is responsible for the oxidation of Fe(II) and can thus be defined as the mat 'architect' creating suitable habitats for microbial niches (e.g., anaerobic microorganisms) (Stage III). The last phase of mat formation (Stage IV) represents a pseudo-steady state mature microbial mat, which has been the subject of all previous microbial surveys of these systems. The conceptual model for Fe(III)-oxide microbial mat development was tested by inserting glass (SiO2) microscope slides into the main flow channels of two acidic geothermal springs in YNP. Slides were removed at various time intervals and analyzed for total iron accretion, microbial community structure (i.e., 16S rRNA gene abundance), and mRNA expression of community members. Routine geochemical and physical (e.g., flow) parameters were also measured to decipher their relative contribution to mat development. Initial and previous results show that autotrophic microorganisms (e.g, M. yellowstonensis) are often the first to colonize the glass slides and their activity was confirmed by mRNA expression of genes related to iron oxidation and carbon fixation. Heterotrophs are rare

  8. Oxidation of Dodecanoate Intercalated Iron(II)–Iron(III) Layered Double Hydroxide to Form 2D Iron(III) (Hydr)oxide Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Li‐Zhi; Ayala‐Luis, Karina B.; Fang, Liping;

    2013-01-01

    A planar trioctahedral iron(II)–iron(III) hydroxide (green rust, GR) intercalated with dodecanoate (GRC12) has been oxidized by dioxygen to produce the corresponding planar iron(III) (hydr)oxide. The formulae of GRC12 and the final iron(III) product (oxGRC12) were determined to be FeII2.00FeIII1.......00(OH)5.31(C12H23O2)0.66(SO4)0.51 and FeIII3O2.18(OH)3.13(C12H23O2)0.56(SO4)0.47, respectively. oxGRC12 has the same planar layer structure as GRC12, as revealed by identical powder X‐ray diffraction patterns. The electrostatic interactions between the interlayer dodecanoate (C12) anions and the iron...... hydroxide planar layer were preserved during the oxidation, as shown by FTIR spectroscopy. The high positive charge in the hydroxide layer produced by the oxidation of iron(II) to iron(III) is partially compensated by the deprotonation of hydroxy groups, as shown by X‐ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The...

  9. Subsurface Uranium Fate and Transport: Integrated Experiments and Modeling of Coupled Biogeochemical Mechanisms of Nanocrystalline Uraninite Oxidation by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides - Project Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyton, Brent M. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Timothy, Ginn R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Sani, Rajesh K. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States)

    2013-08-14

    Subsurface bacteria including sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO2. We have shown that SRB reduce U(VI) to nanometer-sized UO2 particles (1-5 nm) which are both intra- and extracellular, with UO2 inside the cell likely physically shielded from subsequent oxidation processes. We evaluated the UO2 nanoparticles produced by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 under growth and non-growth conditions in the presence of lactate or pyruvate and sulfate, thiosulfate, or fumarate, using ultrafiltration and HR-TEM. Results showed that a significant mass fraction of bioreduced U (35-60%) existed as a mobile phase when the initial concentration of U(VI) was 160 µM. Further experiments with different initial U(VI) concentrations (25 - 900 M) in MTM with PIPES or bicarbonate buffers indicated that aggregation of uraninite depended on the initial concentrations of U(VI) and type of buffer. It is known that under some conditions SRB-mediated UO2 nanocrystals can be reoxidized (and thus remobilized) by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides, common constituents of soils and sediments. To elucidate the mechanism of UO2 reoxidation by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, we studied the impact of Fe and U chelating compounds (citrate, NTA, and EDTA) on reoxidation rates. Experiments were conducted in anaerobic batch systems in PIPES buffer. Results showed EDTA significantly accelerated UO2 reoxidation with an initial rate of 9.5 M day-1 for ferrihydrite. In all cases, bicarbonate increased the rate and extent of UO2 reoxidation with ferrihydrite. The highest rate of UO2 reoxidation occurred when the chelator promoted UO2 and Fe(III) (hydr)oxide dissolution as demonstrated with EDTA. When UO2 dissolution did not occur, UO2 reoxidation likely proceeded through an aqueous Fe(III) intermediate as observed for both NTA and

  10. Characterization of an Autotrophic Nitrogen-Removing Biofilm from a Highly Loaded Lab-Scale Rotating Biological Contactor

    OpenAIRE

    Pynaert, Kris; Smets, Barth F.; Wyffels, Stijn; Beheydt, Daan; Siciliano, Steven D.; Verstraete, Willy

    2003-01-01

    In this study, a lab-scale rotating biological contactor (RBC) treating a synthetic NH4+ wastewater devoid of organic carbon and showing high N losses was examined for several important physiological and microbial characteristics. The RBC biofilm removed 89% ± 5% of the influent N at the highest surface load of approximately 8.3 g of N m−2 day−1, with N2 as the main end product. In batch tests, the RBC biomass showed good aerobic and anoxic ammonium oxidation (147.8 ± 7.6 and 76.5 ± 6.4 mg of...

  11. Stable isotopes and iron oxide mineral products as markers of chemodenitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L Camille; Peters, Brian; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S; Casciotti, Karen L; Fendorf, Scott

    2015-03-17

    When oxygen is limiting in soils and sediments, microorganisms utilize nitrate (NO3-) in respiration--through the process of denitrification--leading to the production of dinitrogen (N2) gas and trace amounts of nitrous (N2O) and nitric (NO) oxides. A chemical pathway involving reaction of ferrous iron (Fe2+) with nitrite (NO2-), an intermediate in the denitrification pathway, can also result in production of N2O. We examine the chemical reduction of NO2- by Fe(II)--chemodenitrification--in anoxic batch incubations at neutral pH. Aqueous Fe2+ and NO2- reacted rapidly, producing N2O and generating Fe(III) (hydr)oxide mineral products. Lepidocrotite and goethite, identified by synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, were produced from initially aqueous reactants, with two-line ferrihydrite increasing in abundance later in the reaction sequence. Based on the similarity of apparent rate constants with different mineral catalysts, we propose that the chemodenitrification rate is insensitive to the type of Fe(III) (hydr)oxide. With stable isotope measurements, we reveal a narrow range of isotopic fractionation during NO2- reduction to N2O. The location of N isotopes in the linear N2O molecule, known as site preference, was also constrained to a signature range. The coexistence of Fe(III) (hydr)oxide, characteristic 15N and 18O fractionation, and N2O site preference may be used in combination to qualitatively distinguish between abiotic and biogenically emitted N2O--a finding important for determining N2O sources in natural systems. PMID:25683572

  12. Structure of Fe(III) precipitates generated by Fe(0) electrocoagulation in the presence of groundwater ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genuchten, C. M.; Pena, J.; Addy, S. E.; Gadgil, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Electrocoagulation (EC) using Fe(0) electrodes is an inexpensive and efficient technology capable of removing a variety of contaminants from water supplies. Because of its ease of use and modest electricity and Fe(0) requirements, EC has potential as an arsenic-removal technology for rural South Asia, where millions drink groundwater contaminated by arsenic. In EC, a small external voltage applied to a sacrificial Fe(0) anode in contact with an electrolyte (e.g. pumped groundwater containing arsenic) promotes the oxidative dissolution of Fe ions, which polymerize and create reactive hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) in-situ with a high affinity for binding contaminants. The chemical composition of the electrolyte influences EC performance. For example, major inorganic ions present in groundwater (e.g. Ca, Mg, P, As(V), Si) alter the pathway by which FeO6 oligomers polymerize to form crystalline Fe (oxyhydr)oxide minerals. Because the precipitate structure largely determines properties that govern the efficiency of EC systems (e.g. precipitate reactivity and colloidal stability), it is essential to understand the individual and interdependent structural effects of common groundwater ions. In this work, we integrate Fe K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy with the Pair Distribution Function (PDF) technique to create a detailed description of EC precipitate structure as a function of electrolyte chemistry. EC precipitate samples were generated in a range of individual and combined concentrations of Ca, Mg, P, As(V), and Si, encompassing most of the typical levels found in natural groundwater. Combining complementary EXAFS and PDF techniques with batch uptake experiments and general chemical reasoning, we obtain structural representations of EC precipitates that are inaccessible with any single characterization technique. Our results indicate that the presence of As(V), P, and Si oxyanions promote the formation of nanoscale material bearing similar, but not identical, intermediate

  13. Texturing a pyramid-like structure on a silicon surface via the synergetic effect of copper and Fe(III) in hydrofluoric acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ming; Li, Shaoyuan; Deng, Jianxin; Li, Yuping; Ma, Wenhui; Zhou, Yang

    2016-05-01

    An innovative approach is proposed to texture a pyramid structure on a silicon surface via Cu-catalyzed chemical etching in the HF/FeCl3 system. The surface and cross-section morphologies of the formed pyramid structure were examined by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results revealed that numerous silicon pyramid-like structures with hemlines of 0.1 ∼ 3 μm and height of 0.1 ∼ 2 μm are close together, and the top angle of the pyramid structure is 90°. Additionally, the systematic study of the effects of the etching time and the concentration of FeCl3 on the pyramid-like structures by the atom configuration model of silicon crystal faces demonstrated that the etching proceeds preferentially along the directions of silicon. A formation mechanism of the pyramid-like structure is proposed. The results imply that the synergetic effect of Cu nanoparticles and Fe(III) could conveniently generate a pyramid-like architecture on the surface of silicon in hydrofluoric acid solution.

  14. Studies on some salicylaldehyde Schiff base derivatives and their complexes with Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Ni(II) and Cu(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Latif, S. A.; Hassib, H. B.; Issa, Y. M.

    2007-07-01

    The formation constants of some transition metal ions Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Ni(II) and Cu(II) binary complexes containing Schiff bases resulting from condensation of salicylaldehyde with aniline (I), 2-aminopyridine (II), 4-aminopyridine (III) and 2-aminopyrimidine (IV) were determined pH-metrically in ethanolic medium (80%, v/v). The formation constants were determined for all binary complexes. The important infrared (IR) spectral bands corresponding to the active groups in the four ligands and the solid complexes under investigation were studied. The solid complexes have been synthesized and studied by thermogravimetric analysis. The thermal dehydration and decomposition of these complexes were studied kinetically using the integral method applying the Coats-Redfern equation. It was found that the thermal decomposition of the complexes follow second order kinetics. The thermodynamic parameters of the decomposition are also reported. The electronic absorption spectra of the investigated ligands were carried out to determine the p Ka values spectrophotometrically.

  15. Methanogenesis as a potential source of chemical energy for primary biomass production by autotrophic organisms in hydrothermal systems on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollom, Thomas M.

    Geochemical models are used to explore the possibility that lithoautotrophic methanogenesis (the conversion of CO2 plus H2 to methane) could be a source of metabolically useful chemical energy for the production of biomass at putative European hydrothermal systems. Two cases are explored: a relatively reduced methane-rich ocean and a relatively oxidized sulfate-and bicarbonate-rich ocean. In the case of a methane-rich ocean, a source of CO2 for methanogenesis is provided by conversion of dissolved methane to CO2 during reaction of ocean water with igneous rocks at high temperatures in the subsurface. Fluid-rock reactions also provide a source of dissolved H2 in the hydrothermal fluid. When this fluid circulates back to the ocean floor and mixes with seawater, conversion of the dissolved CO2 and H2 to methane provides a potential source of chemical energy that can be used to drive metabolic processes. For the case of a sulfate- and carbonate-rich ocean, reaction with reduced igneous rocks at high temperatures will also produce hydrothermal fluids with high H2 concentrations (as occurs in hydrothermal systems on Earth). Mixing of the resulting hydrothermal fluid with seawater in a relatively oxidized ocean could supply energy from either methanogenesis or sulfate reduction. For plausible compositions of a European ocean, methanogenesis can supply similar amounts of energy to that which supports the prolific ecosystems surrounding submarine hydrothermal vents on Earth. Even in the most optimistic case, however, the total amount of biomass that could be supported globally by lithoautotrophic microbes on Europa is extremely small compared to the biomass produced photosynthetically on Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient metabolic energy could apparently be available at hydrothermal systems on Europa to support an origin of life and localized ecosystems.

  16. Influence of the nature of the oxidizing agents on the mechanism of the oxidation of carbon monoxide in the presence of an aqua complex of palladium (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of the oxidation of CO in the presence of an aqua complex of Pd(II) by VO+2 and Fe(III) ions and by heteropolyacids (HPA) viz., H3PMo12O40,H4PMo11 VO40, and H4PW11VO40, was studied. A comparison of the data obtained with the results of the oxidation of CO by strong oxidizing agents - Cr2O72- and Ce(IV) ions - made it possible to conclude that rapid occurrence of the reaction requires an optimum potential of the oxidizing agent 0.7 < E < 1 V. This confirms the assumption that the intermediate carbonyl complexes of partially reduced palladium are the most active in this reaction

  17. Microbial oxidation of mixtures of methylmercaptan and hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyan, A; Kolhatkar, R; Sublette, K L; Beitle, R

    1998-01-01

    Refinery spent-sulfidic caustic, containing only inorganic sulfides, has previously been shown to be amenable to biotreatment with Thiobacillus denitrificans strain F with complete oxidation of sulfides to sulfate. However, many spent caustics contain mercaptans that cannot be metabolized by this strict autotroph. An aerobic enrichment culture was developed from mixed Thiobacilli and activated sludge that was capable of simultaneous oxidation of inorganic sulfide and mercaptans using hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and methylmercaptan (MeSH) gas feeds used to simulate the inorganic and organic sulfur of a spent-sulfidic caustic. The enrichment culture was also capable of biotreatment of an actual mercaptan-containing, spent-sulfidic caustic but at lower rates than predicted by operation on MeSH and H2S fed to the culture in the gas phase, indicating that the caustic contained other inhibitory components. PMID:18576062

  18. Structure, infrared and Raman spectroscopic studies of newly synthetic AII(SbV0.50FeIII0.50)(PO4)2 (Adbnd Ba, Sr, Pb) phosphates with yavapaiite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aatiq, Abderrahim; Tigha, My Rachid; Fakhreddine, Rachid; Bregiroux, Damien; Wallez, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis and structural study of three new AII(SbV0.5FeIII0.5)(PO4)2 (Adbnd Ba, Sr, Pb) phosphates belonging to the Asbnd Sbsbnd Fesbnd Psbnd O system were reported here for the first time. Structures of [Ba], [Sr] and [Pb] compounds, obtained by solid state reaction in air atmosphere, were determined at room temperature from X-ray powder diffraction using the Rietveld method. BaII(SbV0.5FeIII0.5)(PO4)2 features the yavapaiite-type structure, with space group C2/m, Z = 2 and a = 8.1568(4) Å; b = 5.1996(3) Å c = 7.8290(4) Å; β = 94.53(1)°. AII(SbV0.5FeIII0.5)(PO4)2 (Adbnd Sr, Pb) compounds have a distorted yavapaiite structure with space group C2/c, Z = 4 and a = 16.5215(2) Å; b = 5.1891(1) Å c = 8.0489(1) Å; β = 115.70(1)° for [Sr]; a = 16.6925(2) Å; b = 5.1832(1) Å c = 8.1215(1) Å; β = 115.03(1)° for [Pb]. Raman and Infrared spectroscopic study was used to obtain further structural information about the nature of bonding in selected compositions.

  19. An isotope approach based on C-13 pulse-chase labelling vs. the root trenching method to separate heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration in cultivated peatlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biasi, C.; Pitkamaki, A. S.; Tavi, N. M.; Koponen, H. T.; Martikainen, P. J. [Univ.of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Science], e-mail: christina.biasi@uef.fi

    2012-11-01

    We tested an isotope method based on C-13 pulse-chase labelling for determining the fractional contribution of soil microbial respiration to overall soil respiration in an organic soil (cutaway peatland, eastern Finland), cultivated with the bioenergy crop, reed canary grass. The plants were exposed to CO{sub 2}-13 for five hours and the label was thereafter determined in CO{sub 2} derived from the soil-root system. A two-pool isotope mixing model was used to separate sources of respiration. The isotopic approach showed that a minimum of 50% of the total CO{sub 2} originated from soil-microbial respiration. Even though the method uses undisturbed soil-plant systems, it has limitations concerning the experimental determination of the true isotopic signal of all components contributing to autotrophic respiration. A trenching experiment which was comparatively conducted resulted in a 71% fractional contribution of soil-microbial respiration. This value was likely overestimated. Further studies are needed to evaluate critically the output from these two partitioning approaches. (orig.)

  20. Effect of C/N Ratio,Temperature,pH on Autotrophic Denitrification Rate with Hydrogen Gas,Iron (II) and Sodium Sulfide as Electron Donors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junfeng Su; Sicheng Shao; Tinglin Huang; Fang Ma; Gang Wen; Shengchen Zheng; Kai Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate is considered to be one of the most widely present pollutants leading to eutrophication of environment. The purpose of this work was to isolate and identify new anaerobic denitrifying bacteria from reservoir sediments and utilize different electron donors for isolates to improve nitrate removal efficiency. Using traditional enrichment approach, one purified anaerobic bacterium ( Y12 ) capable of NO-3⁃N removal from sediments was obtained. The species identity of Y12 was determined via 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis to be Acinetobacter. In this work, the fastest denitrification rates were observed with ferrous iron as electron donor. And, slightly slower rates were observed with hydrogen and sodium sulfide as electron donors. However, when used hydrogen gas, ferrous iron and sodium sulfide as electron donors, C/N ratios had little effect on autotrophic denitrification rate at the initial C/N ratio from 1.5 to 9.0. Meanwhile, when made use of hydrogen gas, ferrous iron and sodium sulfide as electron donors, a maximum nitrate removal ratio of 100.00%, 91.43%and 87.99% at the temperature of 30℃, respectively. Moreover, maximum denitrification activity was observed at pH 6.0-7.0.

  1. Effect of red cyst cell inoculation and iron(II) supplementation on autotrophic astaxanthin production by Haematococcus pluvialis under outdoor summer conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Min-Eui; Choi, Yoon Young; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-01-20

    The negative effect of heat stress on the autotrophic astaxanthin production by Haematococcus pluvialis has been observed during outdoor culture in summer. Under the summer conditions, the proliferation of vegetative cells was highly halted in the green stage and the inducibility in the biosynthesis of astaxanthin was partly hindered in the red stage. Herein, under outdoor summer conditions in which variations of the diurnal temperature occur, heat-stress-driven inefficient vegetative growth of H. pluvialis was highly improved by inoculating the red cyst cells; thereby, maintaining relatively moderate intracellular carotenoid levels in the green stage. Subsequently, a remarkably enhanced astaxanthin titer was successfully obtained by supplementing 50 μM iron(II) to induce the heat stress-driven Haber-Weiss reaction in the red stage. As a result, the productivity of astaxanthin in the cells cultured under summer temperature conditions (23.4-33.5 °C) using the two methods of red cell (cyst) inoculation and the iron(Fe(2+)) supplementation was increased by 147% up to 5.53 mg/L day compared with that of the cells cultured under spring temperature conditions (17.5-27.3 °C). Our technical solutions will definitely improve the annual natural astaxanthin productivity in H. pluvialis in locations confronted by hot summer weather, particularly in large-scale closed photobioreactor systems. PMID:26630998

  2. Remediation of nitrate-nitrogen contaminated groundwater using a pilot-scale two-layer heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification permeable reactive barrier with spongy iron/pine bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoxin; Huang, Yuanying; Hu, Hongyan; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Ying; Deng, Renwei

    2015-07-01

    A novel two-layer heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification (HAD) permeable reactive barrier (PRB) was proposed for remediating nitrate-nitrogen contaminated groundwater in an oxygen rich environment, which has a packing structure of an upstream pine bark layer and a downstream spongy iron and river sand mixture layer. The HAD PRB involves biological deoxygenation, heterotrophic denitrification, hydrogenotrophic denitrification, and anaerobic Fe corrosion. Column and batch experiments were performed to: (1) investigate the NO3(-)-N removal and inorganic geochemistry; (2) explore the nitrogen transformation and removal mechanisms; (3) identify the hydrogenotrophic denitrification capacity; and (4) evaluate the HAD performance by comparison with other approaches. The results showed that the HAD PRB could maintain constant high NO3(-)-N removal efficiency (>91%) before 38 pore volumes (PVs) of operation (corresponding to 504d), form little or even negative NO2(-)-N during the 45 PVs, and produce low NH4(+)-N after 10 PVs. Aerobic heterotrophic bacteria played a dominant role in oxygen depletion via aerobic respiration, providing more CO2 for hydrogenotrophic denitrification. The HAD PRB significantly relied on heterotrophic denitrification. Hydrogenotrophic denitrification removed 10-20% of the initial NO3(-)-N. Effluent total organic carbon decreased from 403.44mgL(-1) at PV 1 to 9.34mgL(-1) at PV 45. Packing structure had a noticeable effect on its denitrification. PMID:25747301

  3. Comparative investigation on integrated vertical-flow biofilters applying sulfur-based and pyrite-based autotrophic denitrification for domestic wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Zhe; Li, Lu; Feng, Chuanping; Dong, Shanshan; Chen, Nan

    2016-07-01

    Two parallel biofilters applying sulfur/pyrite-based autotrophic denitrification were investigated for removing COD, TP and TN by a coordinated process. Results demonstrated good performance by removing 86.32% vs 87.14% COD and 92.56% vs 89.65% NH4(+)-N. Biofilter with sulfur (BS) was superior on nitrate (89.74% vs 80.72%) and TN removal (83.18% vs 70.42%) while biofilter with pyrite (BP) was better on TP removal (82.58% vs 77.40%) and maintaining sulfate (27.56mgL(-1) vs 41.55mgL(-1)) and pH (7.13 vs 6.31). Water-permeable adsorbents lowered clogging risk and buffered loading. Clone library revealed reasons of diversities, pH variation and sulfate accumulation of both biofilters. Sulfur was efficient on denitrification but whose byproducts were troublesome, pyrite produced less byproduct but which was sensitive to organics. This research was the first attempt to systematically compare two promising alternatives and their merits/demerits for rural wastewater on-site treatment. PMID:27015019

  4. Review:Anaerobic ammonium oxidation for treatment of ammonium-rich wastewaters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei ZHANG; Ping ZHENG; Chongojian TANG; Ren-cun JIN

    2008-01-01

    The concept of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) is presently of great interest.The functional bacteria belonging to the Planctomycete phylum and their metabolism are investigated by microbiologists.Meanwhile,the ANAMMOX is equally valuable in treatment of ammonium-rich wastewaters.Related processes including partial nitritation-ANAMMOX and completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) have been developed,and lab-scale experiments proved that both processes were quite feasible in engineering with appropriate control.Successful full-scale practice in the Netherlands will ac-celerate application of the process in future.This review introduces the microbiology and more focuses on application of the ANAMMOX process.

  5. Physiology, Fe(II) oxidation, and Fe mineral formation by a marine planktonic cyanobacterium grown under ferruginous conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanner, Elizabeth; Wu, Wenfang; Hao, Likai; Wuestner, Marina; Obst, Martin; Moran, Dawn; McIlvin, Matthew; Saito, Mak; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Evidence for Fe(II) oxidation and deposition of Fe(III)-bearing minerals from anoxic or redox-stratified Precambrian oceans has received support from decades of sedimentological and geochemical investigation of Banded Iron Formations (BIF). While the exact mechanisms of Fe(II) oxidation remains equivocal, reaction with O2 in the marine water column, produced by cyanobacteria or early oxygenic phototrophs, was likely. In order to understand the role of cyanobacteria in the deposition of Fe(III) minerals to BIF, we must first know how planktonic marine cyanobacteria respond to ferruginous (anoxic and Fe(II)-rich) waters in terms of growth, Fe uptake and homeostasis, and Fe mineral formation. We therefore grew the common marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002 in closed bottles that began anoxic, and contained Fe(II) concentrations that span the range of possible concentrations in Precambrian seawater. These results, along with cell suspension experiments, indicate that Fe(II) is likely oxidized by this strain via chemical oxidation with oxygen produced during photosynthesis, and not via any direct enzymatic or photosynthetic pathway. Imaging of the cell-mineral aggregates with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) are consistent with extracellular precipitation of Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals, but that >10% of Fe(III) sorbs to cell surfaces rather than precipitating. Proteomic experiments support the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Fe(II) toxicity to Synechococcus PCC 7002. The proteome expressed under low Fe conditions included multiple siderophore biosynthesis and siderophore and Fe transporter proteins, but most siderophores are not expressed during growth with Fe(II). These results provide a mechanistic and quantitative framework for evaluating the geochemical consequences of perhaps life’s greatest metabolic innovation, i.e. the evolution and activity of oxygenic photosynthesis, in ferruginous

  6. Ferrous iron oxidation by molecular oxygen under acidic conditions: The effect of citrate, EDTA and fulvic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Adele M.; Griffin, Philippa J.; Waite, T. David

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the rates of Fe(II) oxidation by molecular oxygen in the presence of citrate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) were determined over the pH range 4.0-5.5 and, for all of the ligands investigated, found to be substantially faster than oxidation rates in the absence of any ligand. EDTA was found to be particularly effective in enhancing the rate of Fe(II) oxidation when sufficient EDTA was available to complex all Fe(II) present in solution, with a kinetic model of the process found to adequately describe all results obtained. When Fe(II) was only partially complexed by EDTA, reactions with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and heterogeneous Fe(II) oxidation were found to contribute significantly to the removal rate of iron from solution at different stages of oxidation. This was possible due to the rapid rate at which EDTA enhanced Fe(II) oxidation and formed ROS and Fe(III). The rapid rate of Fe(III) generation facilitated the formation of free ferric ion activities in excess of those required for ferric oxyhydroxide precipitation following Fe(III)-EDTA dissociation. In comparison, the rate of Fe(II) oxidation was slower in the presence of citrate, and therefore the concentrations of free Fe(III) able to form in the initial stages of Fe(II) oxidation were much lower than those formed in the presence of EDTA, despite the resultant Fe(III)-citrate complex being less stable than that of Fe(III)-EDTA. The slower rate of citrate enhanced oxidation also resulted in slower rates of ROS generation, and, as such, oxidation of the remaining inorganic Fe(II) species by ROS was negligible. Overall, this study demonstrates that organic ligands may substantially enhance the rate of Fe(II) oxidation. Even under circumstances where the ligand is not present at sufficient concentrations to complex all of the Fe(II) in solution, ensuing oxidative processes may sustain an enhanced rate of Fe(II) oxidation relative to that of

  7. Influence of organics and silica on Fe(II) oxidation rates and cell-mineral aggregate formation by the green-sulfur Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium Chlorobium ferrooxidans KoFox - Implications for Fe(II) oxidation in ancient oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, Tina; Byrne, James M.; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Obst, Martin; Crowe, Sean; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Most studies on microbial phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation (photoferrotrophy) have focused on purple bacteria, but recent evidence points to the importance of green-sulfur bacteria (GSB). Their recovery from modern ferruginous environments suggests that these photoferrotrophs can offer insights into how their ancient counterparts grew in Archean oceans at the time of banded iron formation (BIF) deposition. It is unknown, however, how Fe(II) oxidation rates, cell-mineral aggregate formation, and Fe-mineralogy vary under environmental conditions reminiscent of the geological past. To address this, we studied the Fe(II)-oxidizer Chlorobium ferrooxidans KoFox, a GSB living in co-culture with the heterotrophic Geospirillum strain KoFum. We investigated the mineralogy of Fe(III) metabolic products at low/high light intensity, and in the presence of dissolved silica and/or fumarate. Silica and fumarate influenced the crystallinity and particle size of the produced Fe(III) minerals. The presence of silica also enhanced Fe(II) oxidation rates, especially at high light intensities, potentially by lowering Fe(II)-toxicity to the cells. Electron microscopic imaging showed no encrustation of either KoFox or KoFum cells with Fe(III)-minerals, though weak associations were observed suggesting co-sedimentation of Fe(III) with at least some biomass via these aggregates, which could support diagenetic Fe(III)-reduction. Given that GSB are presumably one of the most ancient photosynthetic organisms, and pre-date cyanobacteria, our findings, on the one hand, strengthen arguments for photoferrotrophic activity as a likely mechanism for BIF deposition on a predominantly anoxic early Earth, but, on the other hand, also suggest that preservation of remnants of Fe(II)-oxidizing GSB as microfossils in the rock record is unlikely.

  8. Final Report: Molecular mechanisms and kinetics of microbial anaerobic nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Day, Peggy A. [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Asta, Maria P. [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Kanematsu, Masakazu [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Beller, Harry [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhou, Peng [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Steefel, Carl [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-02-27

    In this project, we combined molecular genetic, spectroscopic, and microscopic techniques with kinetic and reactive transport studies to describe and quantify biotic and abiotic mechanisms underlying anaerobic, nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, which influences the long-term efficacy of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium at DOE sites. In these studies, Thiobacillus denitrificans, an autotrophic bacterium that catalyzes anaerobic U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, was used to examine coupled oxidation-reduction processes under either biotic (enzymatic) or abiotic conditions in batch and column experiments with biogenically produced UIVO2(s). Synthesis and quantitative analysis of coupled chemical and transport processes were done with the reactive transport modeling code Crunchflow. Research focused on identifying the primary redox proteins that catalyze metal oxidation, environmental factors that influence protein expression, and molecular-scale geochemical factors that control the rates of biotic and abiotic oxidation.

  9. Electrochemical reduction of nitrous oxide on La1-xSrxFeO3 perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrous oxide and oxygen has been studied on cone-shaped electrodes of La1-xSrxFeO3-delta perovskites in an all solid state cell, using cyclic voltammetry. It was shown that the activity of the La1-xSrxFeO3-delta perovskites for the electrochemical reduction of...... nitrous oxide mainly depends on the amount of Fe(III) and oxide ion vacancies. The activity of the La1-xSrxFeO3-delta perovskites towards the electrochemical reduction of nitrous oxide is much lower than the activity of the La1-xSrxFeO3-delta perovskites towards the electrochemical reduction of oxygen...

  10. Biological nitrogen removal in one step by nitritation and anaerobic oxidation of ammonia in biofilms; Einstufige biologische Stickstoffelimination durch Nitritation und anaerobe Ammonium-Oxidation im Biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmer, C.; Tromm, C.; Hippen, A.; Rosenwinkel, K.H.; Seyfried, C.F.; Kunst, S. [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Siedlungswasserwirtschaft und Abfalltechnik

    1999-07-01

    For biological treatment of high nitrogenous wastewaters with low C/N ratio autotrophic microorganisms which are able to convert ammonium directly into nitrogen gas are especially interesting. It is exceptionally difficult to verify their presence and importance in mixed populations of full scale wastewater treatment plants. So it could not be clarified finally up to now which basic microbial reactions lead to single stage complete nitrogen removal, here called deammonification, in the nitrification step (biological contactor) of the leachate treatment plant in Mechernich. It succeeded meanwhile to establish the process of deammonification in a continuous flow moving-bed pilot plant. In batch experiments which biomass-covered carriers nitrogen conversions could become investigated at the intact biofilm for the first time. Two autotrophic nitrogen conversion reactions could be proved in the biofilm depending on dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration: A nitritation under aerobic conditions and an anaerobic ammonium oxidation. For the anaerobic ammonium oxidation nitrite was used as electron acceptor with ammonium as electron donor. N{sub 2} was the end product of the reaction. The ratio of ammonium conversion to nitrite conversion was 1:1,37, which was described in the same range for the ANAMMOX-process (1:1,31{+-}0,06). Nitrate could not be used as electron acceptor. Nitrite had to be added to the experiment to obtain oxygen independent oxidation of ammonium. The parts of nitritation and anaerobic ammonium conversion in nitrogen conversion could be controlled by the DO concentration. At a DO concentration of 0.7 mg/l both processes were balanced, so that a direct almost complete elimination of ammonium was possible without any dosage of nitrite. The added ammonium was partially oxidised to nitrite and partially oxidised anaerobically. The aerobic ammonium oxidation to nitrite in the outer oxygen supplied biofilm layers produced the reactant for the anaerobic ammonium

  11. Experimental and molecular modeling studies of the interaction of the polypyridyl Fe(II) and Fe(III) complexes with DNA and BSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnamfar, Mohammad Taghi; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Simpson, Jim; Darabi, Farivash; Shahpiri, Azar; Khayamian, Taghi; Ebrahimi, Malihe; Amiri Rudbari, Hadi; Salimi, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Two mononuclear iron complexes, [Fe(tppz)2](PF6)2·H2O (1) and Fe(tppz)Cl3·2CHCl3 (2) where tppz is (2,3,5,6-tetra(2-pyridyl)pyrazine), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopic methods (UV-Vis and IR) and single crystal X-ray structure analysis. The interaction of (1) as the nitrate salt ([Fe(tppz)2](NO3)2) with calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been monitored by UV-Vis spectroscopy, competitive fluorescence titration, circular dichroism (CD), voltammetric techniques, viscosity measurement, and gel electrophoresis. Gel electrophoresis of DNA with [Fe(tppz)2](NO3)2 demonstrated that the complex also has the ability to cleave supercoiled plasmid DNA. The results have indicated that the complex binds to CT-DNA by three binding modes, viz., electrostatic, groove and partial insertion of the pyridyl rings between the base stacks of double-stranded DNA. Molecular docking of [Fe(tppz)2](NO3)2 with the DNA sequence d(ACCGACGTCGGT)2 suggests the complex fits into the major groove. The water-insoluble complex (2) can catalyze the cleavage of BSA at 40 °C. There are no reports of the catalytic effect of polypyridyl metal complexes on the BSA cleavage. Molecular docking of (2) with BSA suggests that, when the chloro ligands in the axial positions are replaced by water molecules, the BSA can interact with the Fe(III) complex more easily.

  12. Simultaneous oxidation of arsenic and antimony at low and circumneutral pH, with and without microbial catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asta, Maria P.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic and Sb are common mine-water pollutants and their toxicity and fate are strongly influenced by redox processes. In this study, simultaneous Fe(II), As(III) and Sb(III) oxidation experiments were conducted to obtain rates under laboratory conditions similar to those found in the field for mine waters of both low and circumneutral pH. Additional experiments were performed under abiotic sterile conditions to determine the biotic and abiotic contributions to the oxidation processes. The results showed that under abiotic conditions in aerated Fe(III)–H2SO4 solutions, Sb(III) oxidizes slightly faster than As(III). The oxidation rates of both elements were accelerated by increasing As(III), Sb(III), Fe(III), and Cl- concentrations in the presence of light. For unfiltered circumneutral water from the Giant Mine (Yellowknife, NWT, Canada), As(III) oxidized at 15–78 μmol/L/h whereas Sb(III) oxidized at 0.03–0.05 μmol/L/h during microbial exponential growth. In contrast, As(III) and Sb(III) oxidation rates of 0.01–0.03 and 0.01–0.02 μmol/L/h, respectively, were obtained in experiments performed with acid unfiltered mine waters from the Iberian Pyritic Belt (SW Spain). These results suggest that the Fe(III) formed from microbialoxidation abiotically oxidized As(III) and Sb(III). After sterile filtration of both mine water samples, neither As(III), Sb(III), nor Fe(II) oxidation was observed. Hence, under the experimental conditions, bacteria were catalyzing As and Sb oxidation in the Giant Mine waters and Fe oxidation in the acid waters of the Iberian Pyrite Belt.

  13. Aerobic oxidation of mackinawite (FeS) and its environmental implication for arsenic mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hoon Y.; Han, Young-Soo; Park, Sung W.; Hayes, Kim F.

    2010-06-01

    Oxidation of mackinawite (FeS) and concurrent mobilization of arsenic were investigated as a function of pH under oxidizing conditions. At acidic pH, FeS oxidation is mainly initiated by the proton-promoted dissolution, which results in the release of Fe(II) and sulfide in the solution. While most of dissolved sulfide is volatilized before being oxidized, dissolved Fe(II) is oxidized into green rust-like precipitates and goethite ( α-FeOOH). At basic pH, the development of Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide coating on the FeS surface inhibits the solution-phase oxidation following FeS dissolution. Instead, FeS is mostly oxidized into lepidocrocite ( γ-FeOOH) via the surface-mediated oxidation without dissolution. At neutral pH, FeS is oxidized via both the solution-phase oxidation following FeS dissolution and the surface-mediated oxidation mechanisms. The mobilization of arsenic during FeS oxidation is strongly affected by FeS oxidation mechanisms. At acidic pH (and to some extent at neutral pH), the rapid FeS dissolution and the slow precipitation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides results in arsenic accumulation in water. In contrast, the surface-mediated oxidation of FeS at basic pH leads to the direct formation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides, which provides effective adsorbents for As under oxic conditions. At acidic and neutral pH, the solution-phase oxidation of dissolved Fe(II) accelerates the oxidation of the less adsorbing As(III) to the more adsorbing As(V). This study reveals that the oxidative mobilization of As may be a significant pathway for arsenic enrichment of porewaters in sulfidic sediments.

  14. Arsenite and ferrous iron oxidation linked to chemolithotrophic denitrification for the immobilization of arsenic in anoxic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Sierra-Alvarez, R.; Milner, L.; Oremland, R.; Field, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore a bioremediation strategy based on injecting NO3- to support the anoxic oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) and arsenite (As(III)) in the subsurface as a means to immobilize As in the form of arsenate (As(V)) adsorbed onto biogenic ferric (Fe(III)) (hydr)oxides. Continuous flows and filled columns were used to simulate a natural anaerobic groundwater and sediment system with co-occurring As(III) and Fe(II) in the presence (column SF1) or absence (column SF2) of nitrate, respectively. During operation for 250 days, the average influent arsenic concentration of 567 ??g L-1 was reduced to 10.6 (??9.6) ??g L-1 in the effluent of column SF1. The cumulative removal of Fe(II) and As(III) in SF1 was 6.5 to 10-fold higher than that in SF2. Extraction and measurement of the mass of iron and arsenic immobilized on the sand packing of the columns were close to the iron and arsenic removed from the aqueous phase during column operation. The dominant speciation of the immobilized iron and arsenic was Fe(III) and As(V) in SF1, compared with Fe(II) and As(III) in SF2. The speciation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that microbial oxidation of As(III) and Fe(II) linked to denitrification resulted in the enhanced immobilization of aqueous arsenic in anaerobic environments by forming Fe(III) (hydr)oxide coated sands with adsorbed As(V). ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  15. 自养硝化污泥除磷能力研究%Study on the capacity of phosphorus removal of autotrophic nitrifying sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    南亚萍; 袁林江; 赵倩; 李扬扬; 王晓昌

    2011-01-01

    The phosphorus uptake by autotrophic nitrifying bacteria was studied. The nitrifying bacteria phosphorus uptake ability discussed was fed with different nutrient with ammonia, inorganic carbon and ammonia, inorganic carbon when cultured under anaerobic/aerobic condition. Results indicated that in the condition similar to EBPR of phosphate accumulating organisms, phosphorus could not be removed by the nitrifying bacteria. Cell dyeing displayed that they had no PHB granules or poly-P granules. The nitrifying bacteria had no clear phosphorus removal ability cultured in the traditional mode of phosphorus removal of phosphate accumulating bacteria. The phenomenon and the reasons caused by energy utilization,nutritional type and culture conditions were discussed.%采用静态试验对自养硝化污泥的除磷特性进行研究.分别提供氨、无机碳源和氨、无机碳源三种营养条件,考察了厌氧—好氧交替环境下硝化细菌摄取磷酸盐的情况.结果表明:在与聚磷菌的运行模式相对应的条件下,硝化污泥无除磷效果;通过染色观察,硝化细菌体内几乎没有PHB颗粒及异染颗粒;按照传统聚磷菌除磷模式培养的硝化细菌未表现出明显的除磷特性.论文从能量利用、营养类型及培养条件等方面对该现象和产生的原因进行了分析.

  16. Location of nanophase Fe-oxides in palagonitic soils: Implication for Martian pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Palagonitic materials from Mauna Kea, Hawaii, were identified as Mars analogs based on their spectral and magnetic properties. These materials probably resulted from hydrothermal alteration during eruption of the volcano and/or from weathering under ambient conditions. The reflectance spectra of the Mars surface obtained by Earth-based telescopes and the reflectance spectra of analogs obtained in the laboratory show features due to electronic transitions of Fe(III) in oxide particles that range in size from nanometer (nanophase) to micrometer sized or larger. The presence of Fe(III) suggests oxidizing conditions during the alteration process in Mars that may have occurred in the past or during a slow ongoing process. Two naturally altered basaltic samples from Hawaii (HWMK12 and HWMK13) and a laboratory-altered (PH-13-DCGT2) basaltic glass similar in elemental composition to the above two samples was examined. All three samples exhibited spectral characteristics similar to martian bright-region spectra. Chemical and mineralogical changes occurring at the surface of these basalts were studied in order to understand the basis for their Mars-like properties. The spectral properties of the three samples were examined after the removal of Fe oxides by chemical extractants.

  17. Microbial lithotrophic oxidation of structural Fe(II) in biotite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelobolina, Evgenya; Xu, Huifang; Konishi, Hiromi; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Wu, Tao; Blöthe, Marco; Roden, Eric

    2012-08-01

    Microorganisms are known to participate in the weathering of primary phyllosilicate minerals through the production of organic ligands and acids and through the uptake of products of weathering. Here we show that the lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture described by Straub et al. (K. L. Straub, M. Benz, B. Schink, and F. Widdel, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 62:1458-1460, 1996) can grow via oxidation of structural Fe(II) in biotite, a Fe(II)-rich trioctahedral mica found in granitic rocks. Oxidation of silt/clay-sized biotite particles was detected by a decrease in extractable Fe(II) content and simultaneous nitrate reduction. Mössbauer spectroscopy confirmed structural Fe(II) oxidation. Approximately 1.5 × 10(7) cells were produced per μmol of Fe(II) oxidized, in agreement with previous estimates of the growth yield of lithoautotrophic circumneutral-pH Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Microbial oxidation of structural Fe(II) resulted in biotite alterations similar to those found in nature, including a decrease in the unit cell b dimension toward dioctahedral levels and Fe and K release. Structural Fe(II) oxidation may involve either direct enzymatic oxidation, followed by solid-state mineral transformation, or indirect oxidation as a result of the formation of aqueous Fe, followed by electron transfer from Fe(II) in the mineral to Fe(III) in solution. Although it is not possible to distinguish between these two mechanisms with available data, the complete absence of aqueous Fe in oxidation experiments favors the former alternative. The demonstration of microbial oxidation of structural Fe(II) suggests that microorganisms are directly responsible for the initial step in the weathering of biotite in granitic aquifers and the plant rhizosphere. PMID:22685132

  18. Incorporation of oxidized uranium into Fe (hydr)oxides during Fe(II) catalyzed remineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nico, Peter S.; Stewart, Brandy D.; Fendorf, Scott

    2009-07-01

    The form of solid phase U after Fe(II) induced anaerobic remineralization of ferrihydrite in the presence of aqueous and absorbed U(VI) was investigated under both abiotic batch and biotic flow conditions. Experiments were conducted with synthetic ground waters containing 0.168 mM U(VI), 3.8 mM carbonate, and 3.0 mM Ca{sup 2+}. In spite of the high solubility of U(VI) under these conditions, appreciable removal of U(VI) from solution was observed in both the abiotic and biotic systems. The majority of the removed U was determined to be substituted as oxidized U (U(VI) or U(V)) into the octahedral position of the goethite and magnetite formed during ferrihydrite remineralization. It is estimated that between 3% and 6% of octahedral Fe(III) centers in the new Fe minerals were occupied by U(VI). This site specific substitution is distinct from the non-specific U co-precipitation processes in which uranyl compounds, e.g. uranyl hydroxide or carbonate, are entrapped with newly formed Fe oxides. The prevalence of site specific U incorporation under both abiotic and biotic conditions and the fact that the produced solids were shown to be resistant to both extraction (30 mM KHCO{sub 3}) and oxidation (air for 5 days) suggest the potential importance of sequestration in Fe oxides as a stable and immobile form of U in the environment.

  19. Hotspots of anaerobic ammonia oxidation in land - freshwater interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Guibing; Wang, Shanyun; Wang, Weidong;

    2013-01-01

    sampled fromlake riparian zones in North China. Laboratory incubations in the presence of ammonium or nitrate—at concentrations equivalent to no more than 10% of those detected in situ—yielded some of the highest potential anammox activities reported for natural environments to date. Potential rates of......For decades, the conversion of organic nitrogen to dinitrogen gas by heterotrophic bacteria, termed heterotrophic denitrification, was assumed to be the main pathway of nitrogen loss in natural ecosystems. Recently, however, autotrophic bacteria have been shown to oxidize ammonium in the absence of...... anammox peaked in sediments sampled from the interface between the land and the water, as did the abundance of annamox bacteria. Scaling our findings up to the entire lake system, we estimate that interfacial anammox hotspots account for the loss of 103 gNm-2 yr-1 from this lake region, and around one...

  20. Ferrate(VI) and ferrate(V) oxidation of cyanide, thiocyanate, and copper(I) cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyanide (CN-), thiocyanate (SCN-), and copper(I) cyanide (Cu(CN)43-) are common constituents in the wastes of many industrial processes such as metal finishing and gold mining, and their treatment is required before the safe discharge of effluent. The oxidation of CN-, SCN-, and Cu(CN)43- by ferrate(VI) (FeVIO42-; Fe(VI)) and ferrate(V) (FeVO43-; Fe(V)) has been studied using stopped-flow and premix pulse radiolysis techniques. The rate laws for the oxidation of cyanides were found to be first-order with respect to each reactant. The second-order rate constants decreased with increasing pH because the deprotonated species, FeO42-, is less reactive than the protonated Fe(VI) species, HFeO4-. Cyanides react 103-105 times faster with Fe(V) than with Fe(VI). The Fe(V) reaction with CN- proceeds by sequential one-electron reductions from Fe(V) to Fe(IV) to Fe(III). However, a two-electron transfer process from Fe(V) to Fe(III) occurs in the reaction of Fe(V) with SCN- and Cu(CN)43-. The toxic CN- species of cyanide wastes is converted into relatively non-toxic cyanate (NCO-). Results indicate that Fe(VI) is highly efficient in removing cyanides from electroplating rinse water and gold mill effluent

  1. Ca alginate as scaffold for iron oxide nanoparticles synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Finotelli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, nanotechnology has developed to a stage that makes it possible to process magnetic nanoparticles for the site-specific delivery of drugs. To this end, it has been proposed as biomaterial for drug delivery system in which the drug release rates would be activated by a magnetic external stimuli. Alginate has been used extensively in the food, pharmaceutical and biomedical industries for their gel forming properties in the presence of multivalent cations. In this study, we produced iron oxide nanoparticles by coprecipitation of Fe(III and Fe(II. The nanoparticles were entrapped in Ca alginate beads before and after alginate gelation. XRD analysis showed that particles should be associated to magnetite or maghemite with crystal size of 9.5 and 4.3 nm, respectively. Studies using Mössbauer spectroscopy corroborate the superparamagnetic behavior. The combination of magnetic properties and the biocompatibility of alginate suggest that this biomaterial may be used as biomimetic system.

  2. Extraction of Pd(II), Pt(IV), Fe(III), Zn(II), Cu(II) and Ag(I) From Hydrochloric Acid Solutions with Selected Cyanamides as a Novel Extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three of structurally related novel extractants namely; N, Ndihexylcyanamide( DHCY), N,N-di(2-ethylhexyl)cyanamide (DEHCY) and N, N-d-octyl cyanamid (DOCY) were synthesized in our laboratory and characterized by different techniques. The general method for synthesizing the above extractants was to react relevant secondary amines with cyanogen bromide in presence of sodium acetate anhydride. Their extracting ability for Pd(II), Pt(IV), Fe(III), Zn(II), Cu(II) and Ag(I) from hydrochloric acid media in toluene as diluent has been studied. The extraction of hydrochloric acid was studied also. Pd(II) was strongly extracted by the extractants used at low hydrochloric acid concentration and the extraction decreased with increasing hydrochloric concentration while the reverse in extraction behavior was found in is the case of Pt(IV), Fe(III) and Zn(II) extraction. Both Cu(II) and Ag(I) were found to be poor extracted with this synthesized extractants. Hydrochloric acid was extracted only in its high concentration region. A systematic investigation has been carried out on the extraction of Pd(II) by using two synthesized extractants. Pd(II) was extracted as a solvated complex with the composition, metal:chloride ion:extractant = l:2:2 the extracted species was also studied using IR spectra

  3. Synthesis and characterization of dopamine substitue tripodal trinuclear [(salen/salophen/salpropen)M] (Mdbnd Cr(III), Mn(III), Fe(III) ions) capped s-triazine complexes: Investigation of their thermal and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Şaban; Koç, Ziya Erdem

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we aimed to synthesize and characterize a novel tridirectional ligand including three catechol groups and its novel tridirectional-trinuclear triazine core complexes. For this purpose, we used melamine (2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazine) (MA) as starting material. 2,4,6-tris(4-carboxybenzimino)-1,3,5-triazine (II) was synthesized by the reaction of an equivalent melamine (I) and three equivalent 4-carboxybenzaldehyde. 4,4‧,4″-((1E,1‧E,1″E)-((1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyl)tris(azanylylidene))tris(methanylylidene))tris(N-(3,4-dihydroxyphenethyl)benzamide) L (IV) was synthesized by the reaction of one equivalent (II) and three equivalent dopamine (3,4-dihydroxyphenethylamine) (DA) by using two different methods. (II, III, IV) and nine novel trinuclear Cr(III), Mn(III) and Fe(III) complexes of (IV) were characterized by means of elemental analyses, 1H NMR, FT-IR spectrometry, LC-MS (ESI+) and thermal analyses. The metal ratios of the prepared complexes were performed using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS). We also synthesized novel tridirectional-trinuclear systems and investigated their effects on magnetic behaviors of [salen, salophen, salpropen Cr(III)/Mn(III)/Fe(III)] capped complexes. The complexes were determined to be low-spin distorted octahedral Mn(III) and Fe(III), and distorted octahedral Cr(III) all bridged by catechol group.

  4. Nitric oxide activation by distal redox modulation in tetranuclear iron nitrosyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Graham; Thompson, Niklas B; Lionetti, Davide; Agapie, Theodor

    2015-11-11

    A series of tetranuclear iron complexes displaying a site-differentiated metal center was synthesized. Three of the metal centers are coordinated to our previously reported ligand, based on a 1,3,5-triarylbenzene motif with nitrogen and oxygen donors. The fourth (apical) iron center is coordinatively unsaturated and appended to the trinuclear core through three bridging pyrazolates and an interstitial μ4-oxide moiety. Electrochemical studies of complex [LFe3(PhPz)3OFe][OTf]2 revealed three reversible redox events assigned to the Fe(II)4/Fe(II)3Fe(III) (-1.733 V), Fe(II)3Fe(III)/Fe(II)2Fe(III)2 (-0.727 V), and Fe(II)2Fe(III)2/Fe(II)Fe(III)3 (0.018 V) redox couples. Combined Mössbauer and crystallographic studies indicate that the change in oxidation state is exclusively localized at the triiron core, without changing the oxidation state of the apical metal center. This phenomenon is assigned to differences in the coordination environment of the two metal sites and provides a strategy for storing electron and hole equivalents without affecting the oxidation state of the coordinatively unsaturated metal. The presence of a ligand-binding site allowed the effect of redox modulation on nitric oxide activation by an Fe(II) metal center to be studied. Treatment of the clusters with nitric oxide resulted in binding of NO to the apical iron center, generating a {FeNO}(7) moiety. As with the NO-free precursors, the three reversible redox events are localized at the iron centers distal from the NO ligand. Altering the redox state of the triiron core resulted in significant change in the NO stretching frequency, by as much as 100 cm(-1). The increased activation of NO is attributed to structural changes within the clusters, in particular, those related to the interaction of the metal centers with the interstitial atom. The differences in NO activation were further shown to lead to differential reactivity, with NO disproportionation and N2O formation performed by the more

  5. MS title: Catalytic oxidation and removal of arsenite in the presence of Fe ions and zero-valent Al metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Liang-Ching; Chen, Kai-Yue; Chan, Ya-Ting; Deng, Youjun; Hwang, Che-En; Liu, Yu-Ting; Wang, Shan-Li; Kuan, Wen-Hui; Tzou, Yu-Min

    2016-11-01

    Arsenic immobilization in acid mine drainage (AMD) is required prior to its discharge to safeguard aquatic organisms. Zero-valent aluminum (ZVAl) such as aluminum beverage cans (AlBC) was used to induce the oxidation of As(III) to As(V) and enhance the subsequent As removal from an artificially prepared AMD. While indiscernible As(III) oxidation was found in aerated ZVAl systems, the addition of 0.10-0.55mM Fe(II) or Fe(III) into the AMD significantly promoted the As(V) production. Reactions between Fe(II) and H2O2, which was produced through an oxidative reaction of ZVAl with dissolved oxygen, generated OH radicals. Such OH radicals subsequently induced the As(III) oxidation. Over the course of the Fenton like reaction, ZVAl not only directly generated the H2O2, but indirectly enhanced the OH radical production by replenishing Fe(II). Arsenite oxidation in the aerated ZVAl/Fe and AlBC/Fe systems followed zero- and first-order kinetics. Differences in the kinetic reactions of ZVAl and AlBC with respect to As(III) oxidation were attributed to higher productive efficiency of the oxidant in the AlBC systems. After the completion of As(III) oxidation, As(V) could be removed simultaneously with Al(III) and Fe(III) by increasing solution's pH to 6 to produce Al/Fe hydroxides as As(V) scavengers or to form Al/Fe/As co-precipitates. PMID:27285595

  6. Kinetic studies on the oxidation of oxyhemoglobin by biologically active iron thiosemicarbazone complexes: relevance to iron-chelator-induced methemoglobinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Maram T; Rodríguez, Carlos; Richardson, Des R; Martínez, Manuel; Bernhardt, Paul V

    2014-03-01

    The oxidation of oxyhemoglobin to methemoglobin has been found to be facilitated by low molecular weight iron(III) thiosemicarbazone complexes. This deleterious reaction, which produces hemoglobin protein units unable to bind dioxygen and occurs during the administration of iron chelators such as the well-known 3-aminopyridine-2-pyridinecarbaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (3-AP; Triapine), has been observed in the reaction with Fe(III) complexes of some members of the 3-AP structurally-related thiosemicarbazone ligands derived from di-2-pyridyl ketone (HDpxxT series). We have studied the kinetics of this oxidation reaction in vitro using human hemoglobin and found that the reaction proceeds with two distinct time-resolved steps. These have been associated with sequential oxidation of the two different oxyheme cofactors in the α and β protein chains. Unexpected steric and hydrogen-bonding effects on the Fe(III) complexes appear to be the responsible for the observed differences in the reaction rate across the series of HDpxxT ligand complexes used in this study. PMID:24317633

  7. Vídeo 2 de 11: Análisis Químico Cualitativo. Identificación de Cationes - Identificación del Catión Co(II): Resolución de la Interferencia con Fe(III)

    OpenAIRE

    Palacios Santander, José María; Cubillana Aguilera, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Vídeo 2 de 11. Análisis Químico Cualitativo. Identificación de Cationes - Identificación del Catión Co(II): Resolución de la Interferencia con Fe(III). En el presente vídeo se describe el proceso de identificación del catión Co(II), así como el procedimiento a seguir para resolver la interferencia con el catión Fe(III).

  8. Anaerobic Nitrate-Dependent Metal Bio-Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, K.; Knox, T.; Achenbach, L. A.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Direct biological oxidation of reduced metals (Fe(II) and U(IV)) coupled to nitrate reduction at circumneutral pH under anaerobic conditions has been recognized in several environments as well as pure culture. Several phylogentically diverse mesophilic bacteria have been described as capable of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation (NFOx). Our recent identification of a freshwater mesophilic, lithoautotroph, Ferrutens nitratireducens strain 2002, capable of growth through NFOx presents an opportunity to further study metal bio- oxidation. Continuing physiological studies revealed that in addition to Fe(II) oxidation, strain 2002 is capable of oxidizing U(IV) (4 μM) in washed cell suspensions with nitrate serving as the electron acceptor. Pasteurized cultures exhibited abiotic oxidation of 2 μM U(IV). Under growth conditions, strain 2002 catalyzed the oxidation of 12 μM U(IV) within a two week period. Cultures amended with sodium azide, an electron transport inhibitor, demonstrated limited oxidation (7 μM) similar to pasteurized cultures, supporting the direct role of electron transport in U(IV) bio-oxidation. The oxidation of U(IV) coupled denitrification at circumneutral pH would yield enough energy to support anaerobic microbial growth (ΔG°'= -460.36 kJ/mole). It is currently unknown whether or not strain 2002 can couple this metabolism to growth. The growth of F. nitratireducens strain 2002 utilizing Fe(II) as the sole electron donor was previously demonstrated. The amount of U(IV) (~12 μM) that strain 2002 oxidized under similar autotrophic growth conditions yields 0.0019 kJ, enough energy for the generation of ATP (5.3 x 10-20 kJ ATP-1), but not enough energy for cell replication as calculated for nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidizing conditions (0.096 kJ) assuming a similar metabolism. In addition to F. nitratireducens strain 2002, a nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidizing bacterium isolated from U contaminated groundwater, Diaphorobacter sp. strain

  9. Combined autoradiography and immunofluorescence for estimation of single cell activity by ammonium-oxidizing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunofluorescence and 14CO2 autoradiography were used for simultaneously enumerating and assaying the autotrophic activity of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in seawater. Relative activity (14CO2 assimilation as measured by autoradiography) and abundance were measured in simulated in situ incubations at seven stations in the primary NO2- maximum region of the Northeast Pacific Ocean. More than 104 cells-liter-1 were present; relative activity often showed a peak near the surface and an increase in the NO2- max region below the photic zone. The method permits assessment of individual cell activity; most cells at all depths were active in CO2 assimilation, usually at low and quite variable levels. Relative activity was positively correlated with the abundance of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, temperature, total dark CO2 assimilation and phenopigment concentration

  10. Hydrogen peroxide detoxification is a key mechanism for growth of ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Geol; Park, Soo-Je; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Jung, Man-Young; Kim, So-Jeong; Gwak, Joo-Han; Hong, Heeji; Si, Ok-Ja; Lee, SangHoon; Madsen, Eugene L.; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), that is, members of the Thaumarchaeota phylum, occur ubiquitously in the environment and are of major significance for global nitrogen cycling. However, controls on cell growth and organic carbon assimilation by AOA are poorly understood. We isolated an ammonia-oxidizing archaeon (designated strain DDS1) from seawater and used this organism to study the physiology of ammonia oxidation. These findings were confirmed using four additional Thaumarchaeota strains from both marine and terrestrial habitats. Ammonia oxidation by strain DDS1 was enhanced in coculture with other bacteria, as well as in artificial seawater media supplemented with α-keto acids (e.g., pyruvate, oxaloacetate). α-Keto acid-enhanced activity of AOA has previously been interpreted as evidence of mixotrophy. However, assays for heterotrophic growth indicated that incorporation of pyruvate into archaeal membrane lipids was negligible. Lipid carbon atoms were, instead, derived from dissolved inorganic carbon, indicating strict autotrophic growth. α-Keto acids spontaneously detoxify H2O2 via a nonenzymatic decarboxylation reaction, suggesting a role of α-keto acids as H2O2 scavengers. Indeed, agents that also scavenge H2O2, such as dimethylthiourea and catalase, replaced the α-keto acid requirement, enhancing growth of strain DDS1. In fact, in the absence of α-keto acids, strain DDS1 and other AOA isolates were shown to endogenously produce H2O2 (up to ∼4.5 μM), which was inhibitory to growth. Genomic analyses indicated catalase genes are largely absent in the AOA. Our results indicate that AOA broadly feature strict autotrophic nutrition and implicate H2O2 as an important factor determining the activity, evolution, and community ecology of AOA ecotypes. PMID:27339136

  11. Spectroscopic and thermal degradation behavior of Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes with thiopental sodium anesthesia drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S.

    2013-04-01

    A new series of Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes have been synthesized with thiopental sodium anesthesia drug. The elemental analyses of the complexes are confined to stoichiometry of the formulas [M(TPL)3]ṡnH2O (M = Cr(III) or Fe(III); n = 6 or 5), [M(TPL)2(H2O)2]ṡnH2O (M = Mn(II), Co(II) or Ni(II); n = 0 or 4), and [M(TPL)2] (M = Cu(II) or Zn(II); n = 2 or 0) respectively, where TPL is thiopental chelating agent. Structures have been discussed and suggested upon elemental analyses, infrared, Raman, electronic, electron spin resonance, 1H NMR spectral data and magnetic studies. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) was performed of metal complexes. The XRD patterns indicate crystalline nature for the complexes. The measured low molar conductance values in dimethylsulfoxide indicate that the complexes are non-electrolyte nature. Spectroscopic discussion refer that coordination take place through three types: Cdbnd N (pyrimidine moiety) nitrogen and C2sbnd S (2-thiolate group) for Cr(III), Mn(II) and Fe(III), C6dbnd O (amido group) oxygen and C2sbnd S (2-thiolate group) for Co(II) and Ni(II), and Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions coordinated via Cdbnd N (pyrimidine moiety) nitrogen, C2dbnd S (2-thiolate group) and C6dbnd O (amido group) oxygen, respectively. The thermal behavior (TG/DTG/DTA) of the complexes was studied and kinetic parameters were determined by Horowitz-Metzger and Coats-Redfern methods. The thiopental and its complexes have been screened for their antimicrobial (G+ and G-) bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and fungi (Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans) activities by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method.

  12. Synthesis and magnetic properties of Co{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x=0÷1) nanopowders by thermal decomposition of Co(II), Zn(II) and Fe(III) carboxylates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanescu, Mircea; Bozdog, Marius [University Politehnica Timisoara, Research Institute for Renewable Energy, 2 Piata Victoriei, 300006 Timisoara (Romania); Muntean, Cornelia, E-mail: cornelia.muntean@upt.ro [University Politehnica Timisoara, Research Institute for Renewable Energy, 2 Piata Victoriei, 300006 Timisoara (Romania); Stefanescu, Oana [University Politehnica Timisoara, Research Institute for Renewable Energy, 2 Piata Victoriei, 300006 Timisoara (Romania); Vlase, Titus [West University of Timisoara, 4 B-dul Vasile Parvan, 300223 Timisoara (Romania)

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles of cobalt–zinc ferrite Co{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} with x varying from 0 to 1.0 were prepared by a new method, the thermal decomposition of carboxylates of Fe(III), Co(II) and Zn(II). The obtained carboxylate precursor was characterized by thermal analysis and FT-IR spectroscopy. The precursor was annealed at 350, 600 and 1000 °C. It was found that the spinel cobalt–zinc ferrite was formed starting at 350 °C, but in mixture with simple oxides γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and ZnO. At 1000 °C Co{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was formed quantitatively as a single, well-crystallized phase. The saturation magnetization of the samples annealed at 1000 °C decreased significantly with increasing Zn{sup 2+} content from 83.93 emu/g (x=0) to 4.92 emu/g (x=1.0). At 350 and 600 °C the saturation magnetization had the same trend, even if there were contributions of other magnetic phases. Obtaining of spinel ferrite was evidenced by X-ray diffractometry and FT-IR spectrometry. Powder morphology was determined by scanning electron microscopy. Magnetic properties of the synthesized ferrites were investigated employing a conventional induction method. - Highlights: • We synthesized Co{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles by decomposition of metal-carboxylates. • Decomposition leads to a homogeneous mixture of high reactive amorphous metal oxides. • This new method involves a faster synthesis procedure and yields virtually 100%. • Magnetic properties of Co{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} depend on Zn content and annealing temperature.

  13. Microbial Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction in northern Barents Sea sediments under different conditions of ice cover and organic carbon deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickel, Maren; Vandieken, Verona; Brüchert, Volker;

    2008-01-01

    Carbon oxidation rates and pathways were determined in two sediments at latitude 75° and 77°N southeast of Svalbard in the northern Barents Sea. Seasonal ice cover restricts primary production to few months a year, which determines the sedimentation rate of organic material to the seafloor. At one...... contrast, in a sediment that had not been ice covered for at least 12 months and with more organic carbon and a higher sedimentation rate, sulfate reduction was the most important anaerobic electron-accepting process (>80% of anaerobic carbon oxidation). In the upper 3 cm, microbial Fe and sulfate...

  14. Fe(III) mineral reduction followed by partial dissolution and reactive oxygen species generation during 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene transformation by the aerobic yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    OpenAIRE

    Ziganshin, Ayrat M; Ziganshina, Elvira E; Byrne, James; Gerlach, Robin; Struve, Ellen; Biktagirov, Timur; Rodionov, Alexander; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the factors that influence pollutant transformation in the presence of ferric (oxyhydr)oxides is crucial to the efficient application of different remediation strategies. In this study we determined the effect of goethite, hematite, magnetite and ferrihydrite on the transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) by Yarrowia lipolytica AN-L15. The presence of ferric (oxyhydr)oxides led to a small decrease in the rate of TNT removal. In all cases, a significant release of NO2 − fro...

  15. Pollution Control Meets Sustainability: Structure-Activity Studies on New Iron Oxide-Based CO Oxidation Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Roland; Bauer, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    A new class of catalysts for the oxidation of CO based on iron oxide as a biocompatible, earth-abundant and non-toxic metal is presented. The catalytic activities achieved with these catalysts provide promising milestones towards the substitution of noble metals in CO oxidation catalysts. The catalysts can be obtained by using iron core-shell nanoparticle precursors. The metal used for the shell material determines whether the iron core is integrated in or isolated from the support. The active iron site is effectively integrated into the γ-Al2 O3 support if an aluminum shell is present in the core-shell precursor. When the metal used for the shell is different from the support, an isolated structure is formed. Using this directed synthesis approach, different iron oxide species can be obtained and their structural differences are linked to distinct catalytic activities, as demonstrated by combined in-depth analytical studies using XRD, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), UV/Vis, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. The key species responsible for high catalytic activity is identified as isolated tetrahedrally coordinated Fe(III) centers, whereas aggregation leads to a reduction in activity. PMID:27440425

  16. Antioxidative Mechanisms of Sulfite and Protein-Derived Thiols during Early Stages of Metal Induced Oxidative Reactions in Beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Marianne N; Krämer, Anna C; Andersen, Mogens L

    2015-09-23

    The radical-mediated reactions occurring during the early stages of beer storage were studied by following the rate of oxygen consumption, radical formation as detected by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and concentrations of the antioxidant compounds sulfite and thiols. Addition of either Fe(III) or Fe(II) had similar effects, indicating that a fast redox equilibrium is obtained between the two species in beer. Addition of iron in combination with hydrogen peroxide gave the most pronounced levels of oxidation due to a direct initiation of ethanol oxidation through generation of hydroxyl radicals by the Fenton reaction. The concentration of sulfite decreased more than the thiol concentration, suggesting that thiols play a secondary role as antioxidants by mainly quenching 1-hydroxyethyl radicals that are intermediates in the oxidation of ethanol. Increasing the temperature had a minor effect on the rate of oxygen consumption. PMID:26325117

  17. Heme-independent Redox Sensing by the Heme-Nitric Oxide/Oxygen-binding Protein (H-NOX) from Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadyay, Roma; Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Schaub, Tanner; Yukl, Erik T

    2016-08-19

    Heme nitric oxide/oxygen (H-NOX)-binding proteins act as nitric oxide (NO) sensors among various bacterial species. In several cases, they act to mediate communal behavior such as biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and motility by influencing the activity of downstream signaling proteins such as histidine kinases (HisKa) in a NO-dependent manner. An H-NOX/HisKa regulatory circuit was recently identified in Vibrio cholerae, and the H-NOX protein has been spectroscopically characterized. However, the influence of the H-NOX protein on HisKa autophosphorylation has not been evaluated. This process may be important for persistence and pathogenicity in this organism. Here, we have expressed and purified the V. cholerae HisKa (HnoK) and H-NOX in its heme-bound (holo) and heme-free (apo) forms. Autophosphorylation assays of HnoK in the presence of H-NOX show that the holoprotein in the Fe(II)-NO and Fe(III) forms is a potent inhibitor of HnoK. Activity of the Fe(III) form and aerobic instability of the Fe(II) form suggested that Vibrio cholerae H-NOX may act as a sensor of the redox state as well as NO. Remarkably, the apoprotein also showed robust HnoK inhibition that was dependent on the oxidation of cysteine residues to form disulfide bonds at a highly conserved zinc site. The importance of cysteine in this process was confirmed by mutagenesis, which also showed that holo Fe(III), but not Fe(II)-NO, H-NOX relied heavily upon cysteine for activation. These results highlight a heme-independent mechanism for activation of V. cholerae H-NOX that implicates this protein as a dual redox/NO sensor. PMID:27358409

  18. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, I C; Levine, J S

    1986-05-01

    Biogenic emissions of nitric and nitrous oxides have important impacts on the photochemistry and chemistry of the atmosphere. Although biogenic production appears to be the overwhelming source of N(2)O, the magnitude of the biogenic emission of NO is very uncertain. In soils, possible sources of NO and N(2)O include nitrification by autotrophic and heterotrophic nitrifiers, denitrification by nitrifiers and denitrifiers, nitrate respiration by fermenters, and chemodenitrification. The availability of oxygen determines to a large extent the relative activities of these various groups of organisms. To better understand this influence, we investigated the effect of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO(2)) on the production of NO and N(2)O by a wide variety of common soil nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The production of NO per cell was highest by autotrophic nitrifiers and was independent of pO(2) in the range tested (0.5 to 10%), whereas N(2)O production was inversely proportional to pO(2). Nitrous oxide production was highest in the denitrifier Pseudomonas fluorescens, but only under anaerobic conditions. The molar ratio of NO/N(2)O produced was usually greater than unity for nitrifiers and much less than unity for denitrifiers. Chemodenitrification was the major source of both the NO and N(2)O produced by the nitrate respirer Serratia marcescens. Chemodenitrification was also a possible source of NO and N(2)O in nitrifier cultures but only when high concentrations of nitrite had accumulated or were added to the medium. Although most of the denitrifiers produced NO and N(2)O only under anaerobic conditions, chemostat cultures of Alcaligenes faecalis continued to emit these gases even when the cultures were sparged with air. Based upon these results, we predict that aerobic soils are primary sources of NO and that N(2)O is produced only when there is sufficient soil moisture to provide the anaerobic microsites

  19. Influence of Ni(II) and Fe(III) complexes of 1,2 dihydroxy 9,10 anthraquinone on the modification in calf thymus DNA upon gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation when allowed to fall upon cells or DNA, the radicals produced modify the base-pair region of the double strands. Radiation-induced double-strand modifications in calf thymus DNA were detected using Ni(II) and Fe(III) complexes of 1,2 dihydroxy 9,10 anthraquinone (DHA). 60Co was used as the source for γ-radiation and ethidium bromide (EB) as the fluorescent dye for detecting double-strand modifications caused in DNA. Results show that the Fe(III)-DHA complex is more efficient in modifying the base-pair region in double-stranded DNA in comparison to DHA or the Ni(II)-DHA complex

  20. Comportamento do ácido fítico na presença de Fe(II) e Fe(III) Behaviour of phytic acid in the presence of iron(II) and iron(III)

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna Raquel Quirrenbach; Francieli Kanumfre; Neiva Deliberali Rosso; Marco Aurélio Carvalho Filho

    2009-01-01

    O ácido fítico, dependendo do valor de pH, apresenta alto potencial quelante, complexando íons metálicos, inibindo, assim, a produção de espécies reativas de oxigênio, responsáveis pela destruição oxidativa em sistemas biológicos. Esse potencial quelante tem fundamentado diversos estudos aplicados à ação antioxidante em produtos alimentícios. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar o grau de interação do ácido fítico com os íons metálicos Fe(II) e Fe(III), de importância biológica, em condições...

  1. Ligational behavior of clioquinol antifungal drug towards Ag(I), Hg(II), Cr(III) and Fe(III) metal ions: Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal, morphological and antimicrobial studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2015-04-01

    This article presents a synthesis, characterization, theoretical and biological (anti-bacterial, and anti-fugal) evaluation studies of Ag(I), Hg(II), Cr(III) and Fe(III) complexes of clioquinol (CQ) drug ligand. Structures of the titled complexes cited herein were discussed using elemental analyses and spectral measurements e.g., IR, 1H NMR, and electronic studies. The results confirmed the formation of the clioquinol complexes by three molar ratios (1:1) for Ag(I), (1:2) for Hg(II) and (1:3) for both Cr(III) and Fe(III) metal ions. The clioquinol reacts as a bidentate chelate bound to all respected metal ions through the oxygen and nitrogen of quinoline-8-ol. The metal(II) ions coordinated to clioquinol ligand through deprotonation of sbnd OH terminal group. Infrared and 1H NMR spectral data confirm that coordination is via the oxygen of phenolic group and nitrogen atom of quinoline moiety. The molar conductance measurements of the CQ complexes in DMSO correspond to be non-electrolyte nature. Thus, these complexes may be formulated as [Ag(CQ)(H2O)2] H2O, [Hg(CQ)2]ṡ2H2O, [Cr(CQ)3] and [Fe(CQ)3]H2O. The Coats-Redfern method, the kinetic thermodynamic parameters like activation energies (E∗), entropies (ΔS∗), enthalpies (ΔH∗), and Gibbs free energies (ΔG∗) of the thermal decomposition reactions have been deduced from thermogravimetric curves (TG) with helpful of differential thermo gravimetric (DTG) curves. The narrow size distribution in nano-scale range for the clioquinol complexes have been discussed using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer (EDX) analyzer.

  2. Reduction of Uranium(VI) under Sulfate-reducing Conditions in the Presence of Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sani, Rajesh K.; Peyton, Brent M.; Amonette, James E.; Geesey, Gill G.

    2004-06-01

    U(VI) dissolved in a modified lactate-C medium (either sulfate- or lactate-limited) was reacted with a mixture of an Fe(III)-(hydr)oxide mineral (hematite, goethite, or ferrihydrite) and quartz under anoxic conditions and equivalent mineral surface areas. After sorption equilibration, the suspensions were inoculated with a sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20). Inoculation of the suspensions containing sulfate-limited medium yielded significant SRB growth, along with concomitant reduction of sulfate and removal of U(VI) from solution. Inoculation of the suspensions containing lactate-limited medium yielded similar results while lactate was still present. Once the lactate was depleted, however, some of the U that had been removed from solution was re-solubilized in the hematite treatment and, to a lesser extent, in the goethite treatment. No re-solubilization was observed in the lactate-limited ferrihydrite treatment even after a prolonged incubation of four months. Analysis by U L3-edge XANES spectroscopy of mineral specimens sampled without inoculation yielded a typical U(VI) spectrum. Mineral specimens sampled at the end of the experiment yielded spectra similar to that of uraninite, thus providing strong evidence for SRB-promoted removal of U(VI) from solution by reductive precipitation of uraninite. Consequently, U re-solubilization was attributed to re-oxidation of the uraninite by Fe(III) present in the (hydr)oxide phases. Our results thus suggest that inoculation with SRB mediates reduction of soluble U(VI) to an insoluble U(IV) oxide so long as a suitable electron donor is available. Depletion of the electron donor may result in partial re-oxidation of the U(IV) to soluble U(VI) species when the surfaces of crystalline Fe(III) (hydr)oxides are incompletely reduced by reaction with SRB-generated sulfide.

  3. Specific Bonds between an Iron Oxide Surface and Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lower, Brian H.; Shi, Liang; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Droubay, Timothy C.; McCready, David E.; Lower, Steven K.

    2007-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is purported to express outer membrane cytochromes (e.g., MtrC and OmcA) that transfer electrons directly to Fe(III) in a mineral during anaerobic respiration. A prerequisite for this type of reaction would be the formation of a stable bond between a cytochrome and an iron oxide surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to detect whether a specific bond forms between a hematite (Fe2O3) thin film, created with oxygen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, and ...

  4. Magnesium Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium is an element your body needs to function normally. Magnesium oxide may be used for different reasons. Some ... to relieve heartburn, sour stomach, or acid indigestion. Magnesium oxide also may be used as a laxative ...

  5. Unifying Evaluation of the Technical Performances of Iron-Tetra-amido Macrocyclic Ligand Oxidation Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNardo, Matthew A; Mills, Matthew R; Ryabov, Alexander D; Collins, Terrence J

    2016-03-01

    The main features of iron-tetra-amido macrocyclic ligand complex (a sub-branch of TAML) catalysis of peroxide oxidations are rationalized by a two-step mechanism: Fe(III) + H2O2 → Active catalyst (Ac) (kI), and Ac + Substrate (S) → Fe(III) + Product (kII). TAML activators also undergo inactivation under catalytic conditions: Ac → Inactive catalyst (ki). The recently developed relationship, ln(S0/S∞) = (kII/ki)[Fe(III)]tot, where S0 and S∞ are [S] at time t = 0 and ∞, respectively, gives access to ki under any conditions. Analysis of the rate constants kI, kII, and ki at the environmentally significant pH of 7 for a broad series of TAML activators has revealed a 6 orders of magnitude reactivity differential in both kII and ki and 3 orders differential in kI. Linear free energy relationships linking kII with ki and kI reveal that the reactivity toward substrates is related to the instability of the active TAML intermediates and suggest that the reactivity in all three processes derives from a common electronic origin. The reactivities of TAML activators and the horseradish peroxidase enzyme are critically compared. PMID:26886296

  6. Simultaneous removal of methylene blue and copper(II) ions by photoelectron catalytic oxidation using stannic oxide modified iron(III) oxide composite electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Photoelectron catalytic oxidation was used for methylene blue and Cu2+ removal. • SnO2/Fe2O3 was prepared and characterized for use as photoanodes and photocathodes. • Optimal reaction conditions were determined for methylene blue and Cu2+ removal. • Methylene blue removal followed the Langmuir–Freundlich–Hinshelwood kinetic model. • Cu2+ removal followed the first-order rate model. - Abstract: Stannic oxide modified Fe(III) oxide composite electrodes (SnO2/Fe2O3) were synthesized for simultaneously removing methylene blue (MB) and Cu(II) from wastewater using photoelectron catalytic oxidation (PEO). The SnO2/Fe2O3 electrodes were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and photoelectrochemical techniques. The removal of MB and Cu(II) by PEO using the SnO2/Fe2O3 composite electrodes was studied in terms of reaction time, electric current density, and pH of the electrolyte. The kinetics of the reactions were investigated using batch assays. The optimal reaction time, pH, and electric current density of the PEO process were determined to be 30 min, 6.0, and 10 mA/cm2, respectively. The removal rates of MB from wastewater treated by PEO and electron catalytic oxidation process were 84.87% and 70.64%, respectively, while the recovery rates of Cu(II) were 91.75% and 96.78%, respectively. The results suggest that PEO is an effective method for the simultaneous removal of MB and Cu(II) from wastewater, and the PEO process exhibits a much higher removal rate for MB and Cu(II) compared to the electron catalytic oxidation process. Furthermore, the removal of MB was found to follow the Langmuir–Freundlich–Hinshelwood kinetic model, whereas the removal of Cu(II) fitted well to the first-order reaction model

  7. Column solid phase extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese(II) and iron(III) ions in water, food and biological samples using 3-(1-methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid on synthesized graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: pourjavid@gmail.com [NFCRS, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sehat, Ali Akbari [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University College of Science, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14155-6455, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Arabieh, Masoud; Yousefi, Seyed Reza; Hosseini, Majid Haji; Rezaee, Mohammad [NFCRS, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    A modified, selective, highly sensitive and accurate procedure for the determination of trace amounts of manganese and iron ions is established in the presented work. 3-(1-Methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid (MPPC) and graphene oxide (GO) were used in a glass column as chelating reagent and as adsorbent respectively prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The adsorption mechanism of titled metals complexes on GO was investigated by using computational chemistry approach based on PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface (PES). The effect of some parameters including pH, flow rate and volume of sample and type, volume and concentration of eluent, as well as the adsorption capacity of matrix ions on the recovery of Mn(II) and Fe(III) was investigated. The limit of detection was 145 and 162 ng L{sup −1} for Mn(II) and Fe(III), respectively. Calibration was linear over the range of 0.31–355 μg L{sup −1} for Mn(II) and 0.34–380 μg L{sup −1} for Fe(III) ions. The method was successfully applied for the determination of understudied ions in water, food and biological samples. - Highlights: • We use synthesized graphene oxide as adsorbent for SPE of Mn(II) and Fe(III) ions. • Adsorption mechanism was investigated by PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface. • Detection limits were 145 and 162 ng L{sup −1} for Mn and Fe, respectively. • The preconcentration factor was 325 and sample flow rate is 8 mL min{sup −1}. • It was successfully applied to the determination of Mn and Fe ions in real samples.

  8. Rapid acceleration of ferrous iron/peroxymonosulfate oxidation of organic pollutants by promoting Fe(III)/Fe(II) cycle with hydroxylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jing; Ma, Jun; Chen, Liwei; Li, Xuchun; Guan, Yinghong; Xie, Pengchao; Pan, Chao

    2013-10-15

    The reaction between ferrous iron (Fe(II)) with peroxymonosulfate (PMS) generates reactive oxidants capable of degrading refractory organic contaminants. However, the slow transformation from ferric iron (Fe(III)) back to Fe(II) limits its widespread application. Here, we added hydroxylamine (HA), a common reducing agent, into Fe(II)/PMS process to accelerate the transformation from Fe(III) to Fe(II). With benzoic acid (BA) as probe compound, the addition of HA into Fe(II)/PMS process accelerated the degradation of BA rapidly in the pH range of 2.0-6.0 by accelerating the key reactions, including the redox cycle of Fe(III)/Fe(II) and the generation of reactive oxidants. Both sulfate radicals and hydroxyl radicals were considered as the primary reactive oxidants for the degradation of BA in HA/Fe(II)/PMS process with the experiments of electron spin resonance and alcohols quenching. Moreover, HA was gradually degraded to N2, N2O, NO2 (−), and NO3 (−), while the environmentally friendly gas of N2 was considered as its major end product in the process. The present study might provide a promising idea based on Fe(II)/PMS process for the rapid degradation of refractory organic contaminants in water treatment. PMID:24033112

  9. A Nitrospira metagenome illuminates the physiology and evolution of globally important nitrite-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücker, Sebastian; Wagner, Michael; Maixner, Frank; Pelletier, Eric; Koch, Hanna; Vacherie, Benoit; Rattei, Thomas; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Spieck, Eva; Le Paslier, Denis; Daims, Holger

    2010-07-27

    Nitrospira are barely studied and mostly uncultured nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, which are, according to molecular data, among the most diverse and widespread nitrifiers in natural ecosystems and biological wastewater treatment. Here, environmental genomics was used to reconstruct the complete genome of "Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii" from an activated sludge enrichment culture. On the basis of this first-deciphered Nitrospira genome and of experimental data, we show that Ca. N. defluvii differs dramatically from other known nitrite oxidizers in the key enzyme nitrite oxidoreductase (NXR), in the composition of the respiratory chain, and in the pathway used for autotrophic carbon fixation, suggesting multiple independent evolution of chemolithoautotrophic nitrite oxidation. Adaptations of Ca. N. defluvii to substrate-limited conditions include an unusual periplasmic NXR, which is constitutively expressed, and pathways for the transport, oxidation, and assimilation of simple organic compounds that allow a mixotrophic lifestyle. The reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle as the pathway for CO2 fixation and the lack of most classical defense mechanisms against oxidative stress suggest that Nitrospira evolved from microaerophilic or even anaerobic ancestors. Unexpectedly, comparative genomic analyses indicate functionally significant lateral gene-transfer events between the genus Nitrospira and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing planctomycetes, which share highly similar forms of NXR and other proteins reflecting that two key processes of the nitrogen cycle are evolutionarily connected. PMID:20624973

  10. A synthetic peptide with the putative iron binding motif of amyloid precursor protein (APP does not catalytically oxidize iron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Honarmand Ebrahimi

    Full Text Available The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP, which is a key player in Alzheimer's disease, was recently reported to possess an Fe(II binding site within its E2 domain which exhibits ferroxidase activity [Duce et al. 2010, Cell 142: 857]. The putative ligands of this site were compared to those in the ferroxidase site of ferritin. The activity was indirectly measured using transferrin, which scavenges the Fe(III product of the reaction. A 22-residue synthetic peptide, named FD1, with the putative ferroxidase site of APP, and the E2 domain of APP were each reported to exhibit 40% of the ferroxidase activity of APP and of ceruloplasmin. It was also claimed that the ferroxidase activity of APP is inhibited by Zn(II just as in ferritin. We measured the ferroxidase activity indirectly (i by the incorporation of the Fe(III product of the ferroxidase reaction into transferrin and directly (ii by monitoring consumption of the substrate molecular oxygen. The results with the FD1 peptide were compared to the established ferroxidase activities of human H-chain ferritin and of ceruloplasmin. For FD1 we observed no activity above the background of non-enzymatic Fe(II oxidation by molecular oxygen. Zn(II binds to transferrin and diminishes its Fe(III incorporation capacity and rate but it does not specifically bind to a putative ferroxidase site of FD1. Based on these results, and on comparison of the putative ligands of the ferroxidase site of APP with those of ferritin, we conclude that the previously reported results for ferroxidase activity of FD1 and - by implication - of APP should be re-evaluated.

  11. Extending the benchmark simulation model no2 with processes for nitrous oxide production and side-stream nitrogen removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiocchi, Riccardo; Sin, Gürkan; Gernaey, Krist V.

    2015-01-01

    increased the total nitrogen removal by 10%; (ii) reduced the aeration demand by 16% compared to the base case, and (iii) the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria is most influencing nitrous oxide emissions. The extended model provides a simulation platform to generate, test and compare novel control......In this work the Benchmark Simulation Model No.2 is extended with processes for nitrous oxide production and for side-stream partial nitritation/Anammox (PN/A) treatment. For these extensions the Activated Sludge Model for Greenhouse gases No.1 was used to describe the main waterline, whereas the...... Complete Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal (CANR) model was used to describe the side-stream (PN/A) treatment. Comprehensive simulations were performed to assess the extended model. Steady-state simulation results revealed the following: (i) the implementation of a continuous CANR side-stream reactor has...

  12. Reoxidation of Reduced Uranium with Iron(III) (Hydr)Oxides under Sulfate-Reducing Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricansG20 the effects of iron(III) (hydr)oxides (hematite, goethite, and ferrihydrite) on microbial reduction and reoxidation of uranium (U) were evaluated under lactate-limited sulfate-reducing conditions. With lactate present, G20 reduced U(VI) in both 1,4-piperazinediethanesulfonate (PIPES) and bicarbonate buffer. Once lactate was depleted, however, microbially reduced U served as an electron donor to reduce Fe(III) present in iron(III) (hydr)oxides. With the same initial amount of Fe(III) (10 mmol/L) for each iron(III) (hydr)oxide,reoxidation of U(IV) was greater with hematite than with goethite or ferrihydrite. As the initial mass loading of hematite increased from 0 to 20 mmol of Fe(III)/L, the rate and extent of U(IV) reoxidation increased. Subsequent addition of hematite [15 mmol of Fe(III)/L] to stationary-phase cultures containing microbially reduced U(IV) also resulted in rapid reoxidation to U(VI). Analysis by U L3-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) of microbially reduced U particles yielded spectra similar to that of natural uraninite. Observations by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis confirmed that precipitated U associated with cells was uraninite with particle diameters of 3-5 nm. By the same techniques, iron sulfide precipitates were found to have a variable Fe and S stoichiometry and were not associated with cells

  13. Reoxidation of Reduced Uranium with Iron(III) (Hydr)Oxides under Sulfate-Reducing Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sani, Rajesh K.; Peyton, Brent M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Amonette, James E.

    2005-03-04

    In cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricansG20 the effects of iron(III) (hydr)oxides (hematite, goethite, and ferrihydrite) on microbial reduction and reoxidation of uranium (U) were evaluated under lactate-limited sulfate-reducing conditions. With lactate present, G20 reduced U(VI) in both 1,4-piperazinediethanesulfonate (PIPES) and bicarbonate buffer. Once lactate was depleted, however, microbially reduced U served as an electron donor to reduce Fe(III) present in iron(III) (hydr)oxides. With the same initial amount of Fe(III) (10 mmol/L) for each iron(III) (hydr)oxide,reoxidation of U(IV) was greater with hematite than with goethite or ferrihydrite. As the initial mass loading of hematite increased from 0 to 20 mmol of Fe(III)/L, the rate and extent of U(IV) reoxidation increased. Subsequent addition of hematite [15 mmol of Fe(III)/L] to stationary-phase cultures containing microbially reduced U(IV) also resulted in rapid reoxidation to U(VI). Analysis by U L3-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) of microbially reduced U particles yielded spectra similar to that of natural uraninite. Observations by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis confirmed that precipitated U associated with cells was uraninite with particle diameters of 3-5 nm. By the same techniques, iron sulfide precipitates were found to have a variable Fe and S stoichiometry and were not associated with cells.

  14. Microbial iron(II oxidation in littoral freshwater lake sediments: Competition between phototrophic vs. nitrate-reducing iron(II-oxidizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AndreasKappler

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of neutrophilic microbial iron oxidation is mainly determined by local gradients of oxygen, light, nitrate and ferrous iron. In the anoxic top part of littoral freshwater lake sediments, nitrate-reducing and phototrophic Fe(II-oxidizers compete for the same e- donor; reduced iron. It is not yet understood how these microbes co-exist in the sediment and what role they play in the Fe cycle. We show that both metabolic types of anaerobic Fe(II-oxidizing microorganisms are present in the same sediment layer directly beneath the oxic-anoxic sediment interface. The photoferrotrophic MPNs counted 3.4•105 cells•g-1 and the autotrophic and mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II-oxidizers totalled 1.8•104 and 4.5•104 cells•g-1 dry weight sediment, respectively. To distinguish between the two microbial Fe(II oxidation processes and assess their individual contribution to the sedimentary Fe cycle, littoral lake sediment was incubated in microcosm experiments. Nitrate-reducing Fe(II-oxidizing bacteria exhibited a higher maximum Fe(II oxidation rate per cell, in both pure cultures and microcosms, than photoferrotrophs. In microcosms, photoferrotrophs instantly started oxidizing Fe(II, whilst nitrate-reducing Fe(II-oxidizers showed a significant lag-phase during which they probably use organics as e- donor before initiating Fe(II oxidation. This suggests that they will be outcompeted by phototrophic Fe(II-oxidizers during optimal light conditions; as phototrophs deplete Fe(II before nitrate-reducing Fe(II-oxidizers start Fe(II oxidation. Thus, the co-existence of the two anaerobic Fe(II-oxidizers may be possible due to a niche space separation in time by the day-night cycle, where nitrate-reducing Fe(II-oxidizers oxidize Fe(II during darkness and phototrophs play a dominant role in Fe(II oxidation during daylight. Furthermore, metabolic flexibility of Fe(II-oxidizing microbes may play a paramount role in the conservation of the

  15. Catalytic effect of free iron ions and heme-iron on chromophore oxidation of a polyene antibiotic amphotericin B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czernel, Grzegorz; Typek, Rafał; Klimek, Katarzyna; Czuryło, Aleksandra; Dawidowicz, Andrzej L.; Gagoś, Mariusz

    2016-05-01

    Owing to the presence of a chromophore in the amphotericin B (AmB) structure, the molecule can undergo the oxidation process. In this research, AmB chromophore oxidation was catalysed by iron ions (iron(III) chloride (FeCl3), pH 2.5) and by heme-iron (methemoglobin (HbFe(III)), and hemin (heme-Fe(III)) at pH 7.0). Additionally, we compared oxidation processes induced by the aforementioned oxidizing agents with autoxidation by dioxygen (O2) naturally occurring in a sample. The effects of the interaction of the oxidizing agents with AmB were analysed using molecular spectroscopies (electronic absorption (UV-Vis), fluorescence) and LC-MS. The use of a 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) chelator facilitated unambiguous determination of the oxidative effect of free iron(III) ions (FeIII) in an acidic solution on the AmB molecules. Also, the changes in the spectra of fluorescence emission centred at ∼470 nm indicate iron-catalysed processes of AmB chromophore oxidation. Unexpectedly, we found a similar spectroscopic effect for AmB induced by methemoglobin and hemin at pH 7.0. Methemoglobin and hemin at a concentration of 8 × 10-7 M (physiological) significantly increases the rate of the processes of AmB chromophore oxidation relative to the process of autoxidation.

  16. How Is the Oxidative Capacity of the Cloud Aqueous Phase Modified By Bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguillaume, L.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Passananti, M.; Wirgot, N.; Joly, M.; Sancelme, M.; Bianco, A.; Cartier, N.; Brigante, M.; Mailhot, G.; Delort, A. M.; Chaumerliac, N. M.

    2014-12-01

    The aqueous phase photochemical reactions of constituents present in atmospheric water like H2O2, NO3-, NO2- and Fe(III) aqua-complexes or organic complexes can form radicals such as the hydroxyl radical HO within the water drop. However, the literature lacks of data precising the rate of HO formation and the relative contribution of the photochemical sources of HO. The production of radicals in cloud aqueous phase drives the oxidative capacity of the cloud medium and the efficiency of organic matter oxidation. The oxidation of organic compounds is suspected to lead to oxygenated species that could contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass (Ervens et al., 2011). In current cloud chemistry models, HO concentrations strongly depend on the organic and iron amount. For high concentrations of organic compounds, this radical is efficiently consumed during the day due to the oxidation process. When iron concentrations are typical from continental cloud, the photolysis of Fe(III) complexes and the Fenton reaction drive the HO concentrations in the cloud models. The concept of biocatalysed reactions contributing to atmospheric chemistry as an alternative route to photochemistry is quite new (Vaïtilingom et al., 2013); it emerged from the recent discovery of metabolically active microorganisms in clouds. Microorganisms are well-known to degrade organic matter but they could also interact with oxidant species such as H2O2 (or their precursors) thanks to their oxidative and nitrosative stress metabolism that will act directly on these species and on their interactions with iron (metalloproteins and siderophores). For the moment, biological impact on radical chemistry within cloud has not been yet considered in cloud chemistry models. Bacterial activity will be introduced as catalysts in a multiphase cloud chemistry model using degradation rates measured in the laboratory. For example, biodegradation rates of the oxidants H2O2 by model bacteria will be tested in the

  17. Dependence of reaction rate of pyrite oxidation on temperature, pH and oxidant concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU; Long; WANG; Rucheng; XUE; Jiyue; CHEN; Fanrong; CHEN; J

    2005-01-01

    The kinetic sstudy of pyrite oxidation was performed in a series of experiments by a mixed flow reactor. The release rates of Fe(II) are in the order of 3.22×10-9-5.51×10-7 mol·m-2·s-1 at temperature (T ) 25 to 44℃, initial pH (pH )1.4 to 2.7, and initial Fe(III) concentration ([Fe(III)]I) 10-5 to 5×10-3 mol·kg-1. The release rate of Fe(II) increased with increasing T or/and pH or/and [Fe(III)]I in the above range. The rate law and activation energy of pyrite oxidation were derived by statistical analyses of Rfe(II) vs. [Fe(III)]I, Rfe(II) vs. pH and Rfe(II) vs. T, and are given as (1) Rate law: Rfe(II)=104.65e-64.54×103/8.31T[Fe(III)]i0.6./[H+]0.45 ; (2) activation energy: 64.54 ( 8.07 kJ·mol-1. The expression can be applied to more cases (e.g., quantifying the pollutant released from sulfide-rich mining waste and assessing reliable performance of underground repository sites where pyrite acts as an engineered barrier material). Using the rate law derived from this study, the magnitude of the pollutants transferred to secondary phases, soil and water from oxidized pyrite during Jiguanshan mine waste weathering was preliminarily estimated. The estimated magnitude is very high, suggesting that the pile has possibly posed significant impact on the water quality in this region.

  18. Synthesis of α- and β-FeOOH iron oxide nanoparticles in non-ionic surfactant medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forced hydrolysis of Fe(III) ions in acidic media was performed under controlled synthetic conditions to produce α- and β-FeOOH iron oxides. The forced hydrolysis synthesis was carried out, separately, in an aqueous medium and the lamellar lyotropic liquid crystalline phase of a commercial non-ionic surfactant/water system. The FT-IR analyses confirmed formation of α- and β-FeOOH iron oxides in the aqueous and the surfactant media with slight formation of ferrihydrite and haematite. TEM micrographs have shown that particles formed in the lamellar lyotropic phase are smaller than those produced in the aqueous medium with their smallest size dimension being constrained in the nanometre scale with a size ranging between 5 and 100 nm. Particles produced in the nanoscale size appeared to have different optical properties compared to their counterparts produced in the microscale size.

  19. Mechanism of oxidation of L-methionine by iron(III)-1,10-phenanthroline complex - A kinetic study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Vani; K Krishna Kishore; R Rambabu; L S A Dikshitulu

    2001-08-01

    Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of L-methionine by iron(III)-1, 10-phenanthroline complex have been studied in perchloric acid medium. The reaction is first order each in iron(III) and methionine. Increase in [phenanthroline] increases the rate while increase in [HClO4] decreases it. While the reactive species of the substrate is the zwitterionic form, that of the oxidant is [Fe(phen)2(H2O)2]3+. The proposed mechanism leads to the rate law $$\\dfrac{d[Fe(phen)^{2+}_3]}{dt} = \\dfrac{k_2 K_4 K_3 K^2_2 [Fe^{III}] [\\text{phen}^2] [\\text{Met}]}{(1+K_1 [H^+]) ([H^+]^2 + K_4 K_3 K^2_2[\\text{phen}]^2)}.$$

  20. Ammonia oxidation rates and nitrification in the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Silvia E.; Babbin, Andrew R.; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrification rates, as well as the relationships between rates and ammonia oxidizer abundance (both archaeal and bacterial), were investigated in the Arabian Sea. Ammonia oxidation rates were measured directly using 15N-NH4+stable isotope additions in gas-impermeable, trace metal clean trilaminate bags (500 mL) at in situ temperature. Tracer incubations were performed at three stations at depths above, below, and within the oxycline of the open-ocean oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Ammonia oxidation rates were similar to previous open-ocean measurements, ranging from undetectable to 21.6 ± 0.1 nmol L-1 d-1. The highest rates at each station occurred at the primary nitrite maximum (above the OMZ), and rates were very low at depths greater than 900 m. The abundances of both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were estimated using theamoA gene by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Both AOA and AOB amoA were detected above, within, and below the OMZ, although the AOA were always more abundant than the AOB, by a factor of 35-216. Nitrification rates were not directly correlated to AOA or AOB amoA abundance. These rates offer new insight into the role of nitrification in the mesopelagic zone. The abundance of AOA amoA genes at 1000 m suggests that ˜50% of the microbial biomass could be autotrophic. Additionally, the integrated nitrification rate at depth implies that nitrification could consume most of the ammonium produced by the flux of organic carbon in the mesopelagic zone.

  1. Autotrophy as a predominant mode of carbon fixation in anaerobic methane-oxidizing microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann, Matthias Y; Wegener, Gunter; Elvert, Marcus; Yoshinaga, Marcos Yukio; Lin, Yu-Shih; Holler, Thomas; Mollar, Xavier Prieto; Knittel, Katrin; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2012-11-20

    The methane-rich, hydrothermally heated sediments of the Guaymas Basin are inhabited by thermophilic microorganisms, including anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (mainly ANME-1) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (e.g., HotSeep-1 cluster). We studied the microbial carbon flow in ANME-1/ HotSeep-1 enrichments in stable-isotope-probing experiments with and without methane. The relative incorporation of (13)C from either dissolved inorganic carbon or methane into lipids revealed that methane-oxidizing archaea assimilated primarily inorganic carbon. This assimilation is strongly accelerated in the presence of methane. Experiments with simultaneous amendments of both (13)C-labeled dissolved inorganic carbon and deuterated water provided further insights into production rates of individual lipids derived from members of the methane-oxidizing community as well as their carbon sources used for lipid biosynthesis. In the presence of methane, all prominent lipids carried a dual isotopic signal indicative of their origin from primarily autotrophic microbes. In the absence of methane, archaeal lipid production ceased and bacterial lipid production dropped by 90%; the lipids produced by the residual fraction of the metabolically active bacterial community predominantly carried a heterotrophic signal. Collectively our results strongly suggest that the studied ANME-1 archaea oxidize methane but assimilate inorganic carbon and should thus be classified as methane-oxidizing chemoorganoautotrophs. PMID:23129626

  2. Selective oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is presented a revision and discussion about the characteristics and factors that relate activity and selectivity in the catalytic and not catalytic partial oxidation of methane and the effect of variables as the temperature, pressure and others in the methane conversion to methanol. It thinks about the zeolites use modified for the catalytic oxidation of natural gas

  3. Oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains 18 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Oxidative Stress: Introductory Remarks; Radiolysis of DNA and Model Systems in the Presence of Oxygen; Organic Peroxy Free Radicals as Ultimate Agents in Oxygen Toxicity; Antimalarials; and the Role of Dietary Components in Oxidative Stress in Tissues

  4. Column solid phase extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese(II) and iron(III) ions in water, food and biological samples using 3-(1-methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid on synthesized graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza; Sehat, Ali Akbari; Arabieh, Masoud; Yousefi, Seyed Reza; Hosseini, Majid Haji; Rezaee, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    A modified, selective, highly sensitive and accurate procedure for the determination of trace amounts of manganese and iron ions is established in the presented work. 3-(1-Methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid (MPPC) and graphene oxide (GO) were used in a glass column as chelating reagent and as adsorbent respectively prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The adsorption mechanism of titled metals complexes on GO was investigated by using computational chemistry approach based on PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface (PES). The effect of some parameters including pH, flow rate and volume of sample and type, volume and concentration of eluent, as well as the adsorption capacity of matrix ions on the recovery of Mn(II) and Fe(III) was investigated. The limit of detection was 145 and 162 ng L(-1) for Mn(II) and Fe(III), respectively. Calibration was linear over the range of 0.31-355 μg L(-1) for Mn(II) and 0.34-380 μg L(-1) for Fe(III) ions. The method was successfully applied for the determination of understudied ions in water, food and biological samples. PMID:24411390

  5. Community analysis of ammonia oxidizer in the oxygen-limited nitritation stage of OLAND system by DGGE of PCR amplified 16S rDNA Fragments and FISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Dan; ZHANG De-min; LIU Yao-ping; CAO Wen-wei; CHEN Guan-xiong

    2004-01-01

    OLAND(oxygen limited autotrophic nitrification and denitrification) nitrogen removal system was constructed by coupling with oxygen limited nitritation stage and anaerobic ammonium oxidation stage. Ammonia oxidizer, as a kind of key bacteria in N cycle, plays an important role at the oxygen limited nitritation stage of OLAND nitrogen removal system. In this study, specific amplification of 16S rDNA fragment of ammonia oxidizer by nested PCR, separation of mixed PCR samples by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis(DGGE), and the quantification of ammonia oxidizer by Fluorescence in situ hybridization(FISH) were combined to investigate the shifts of community composition and quantity of ammonia oxidizer of the oxygen limited nitritation stage in OLAND system. It showed that the community composition of ammonia oxidizer changed drastically when dissolved oxygen was decreased gradually, and the dominant ammonia oxidizer of the steady nitrite accumulation stage were completely different from that of the early stage of oxygen limited nitritation identified by DGGE . It was concluded that the Nitrosomonas may be the dominant genus of ammonia oxidizer at the oxygen limited nitritation stage of OLAND system characterized by nested PCR-DGGE and FISH, and the percentage of Nitrosomonas was 72.5% ( 0.8% of ammonia oxidizer at the steady nitrite accumulation stage detected by FISH.

  6. Magnetite formation from ferrihydrite by hyperthermophilic archaea from Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal vent chimneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T Jennifer; Breves, E A; Dyar, M D; Ver Eecke, H C; Jamieson, J W; Holden, J F

    2014-05-01

    Hyperthermophilic iron reducers are common in hydrothermal chimneys found along the Endeavour Segment in the northeastern Pacific Ocean based on culture-dependent estimates. However, information on the availability of Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxides within these chimneys, the types of Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxides utilized by the organisms, rates and environmental constraints of hyperthermophilic iron reduction, and mineral end products is needed to determine their biogeochemical significance and are addressed in this study. Thin-section petrography on the interior of a hydrothermal chimney from the Dante edifice at Endeavour showed a thin coat of Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxide associated with amorphous silica on the exposed outer surfaces of pyrrhotite, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite in pore spaces, along with anhydrite precipitation in the pores that is indicative of seawater ingress. The iron sulfide minerals were likely oxidized to Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxide with increasing pH and Eh due to cooling and seawater exposure, providing reactants for bioreduction. Culture-dependent estimates of hyperthermophilic iron reducer abundances in this sample were 1740 and 10 cells per gram (dry weight) of material from the outer surface and the marcasite-sphalerite-rich interior, respectively. Two hyperthermophilic iron reducers, Hyperthermus sp. Ro04 and Pyrodictium sp. Su06, were isolated from other active hydrothermal chimneys on the Endeavour Segment. Strain Ro04 is a neutrophilic (pH opt 7-8) heterotroph, while strain Su06 is a mildly acidophilic (pH opt 5), hydrogenotrophic autotroph, both with optimal growth temperatures of 90-92 °C. Mössbauer spectroscopy of the iron oxides before and after growth demonstrated that both organisms form nanophase (hydrothermal systems that are mildly acidic where mineral weathering at increased temperatures occurs. PMID:24612368

  7. Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of Fe(III) and Ti(IV) by bis-(2-ethyl-hexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) in sulfuric acid medium; Extracao liquido-liquido de ferro (III) e titanio (IV) pelo acido bis-(2-etil-hexil) fosforico (D2EHPA) em meio de acido sulfurico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Glauco Correa da; Cunha, Jose Waldemar Silva Dias da [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica e Materiais Nucleares; Dweck, Jo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica. Dept. de Processos Inorganicos; Afonso, Julio Carlos [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Analitica]. E-mail: julio@iq.ufrj.br

    2008-07-01

    This work presents a study on the separation of Fe(III) and Ti(IV) from sulfuric acid leaching solutions of ilmenite (FeTiO{sub 3}) using liquid-liquid extraction with D2EHPA in n-dodecane as extracting agent. The distribution coefficients (K{sub D}) of the elements related to free acidity and concentration of Fe(III) and Ti(IV) were determined. Free acidity was changed from 3x10{sup -2} to 11.88 mol L{sup -1} and D2EHPA concentration was fixed at 1.5 mol L{sup 1}. Recovery of final products as well as recycling of wastes generated in the process were also investigated. The LLE process as a feasible alternative to obtain high-purity TiO{sub 2}. (author)

  8. Lipid hydroperoxide determination in dark chicken meat through a ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, A; Codony, R; Rafecas, M; Barroeta, A C; Guardiola, F

    2000-09-01

    A ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) method was adapted to measure lipid hydroperoxides (LHP) in raw and cooked dark chicken meat. Its applicability was evaluated using samples with different alpha-tocopherol contents or unsaturation degrees (both modulated by dietary supplementation). The FOX assay can work as an induced method because there is some oxidation of the sample extract during the incubation of the reaction. Consequently, it allows assessment of sample susceptibility to oxidation (response after some hours of incubation) and comparison of samples that are highly oxidized or readily susceptible to oxidation through their absorbance after 30 min of incubation. It is highly specific for LHP and showed a linear relationship between volume of meat extract and absorbance. However, the most suitable volume of extract and incubation time must be studied for each kind of sample. The use of butylated hydroxytoluene during this incubation is strongly discouraged because it attenuated the reaction by radical stabilization, thus diminishing Fe(III) formation and leading to a lower response. PMID:10995327

  9. Sulfur oxidation to sulfate coupled with electron transfer to electrodes by Desulfuromonas strain TZ1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, T; Bain, TS; Barlett, MA; Dar, SA; Snoeyenbos-West, OL; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR

    2014-01-02

    Microbial oxidation of elemental sulfur with an electrode serving as the electron acceptor is of interest because this may play an important role in the recovery of electrons from sulfidic wastes and for current production in marine benthic microbial fuel cells. Enrichments initiated with a marine sediment inoculum, with elemental sulfur as the electron donor and a positively poised (+300 mV versus Ag/AgCl) anode as the electron acceptor, yielded an anode biofilm with a diversity of micro-organisms, including Thiobacillus, Sulfurimonas, Pseudomonas, Clostridium and Desulfuromonas species. Further enrichment of the anode biofilm inoculum in medium with elemental sulfur as the electron donor and Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor, followed by isolation in solidified sulfur/Fe(III) medium yielded a strain of Desulfuromonas, designated strain TZ1. Strain TZ1 effectively oxidized elemental sulfur to sulfate with an anode serving as the sole electron acceptor, at rates faster than Desulfobulbus propionicus, the only other organism in pure culture previously shown to oxidize S with current production. The abundance of Desulfuromonas species enriched on the anodes of marine benthic fuel cells has previously been interpreted as acetate oxidation driving current production, but the results presented here suggest that sulfur-driven current production is a likely alternative.

  10. Desultovibrio frigidus sp nov and Desulfovibrio ferfireducens sp nov., psychrotolerant bacteria isolated from Arctic fiord sediments (Svalbard) with the ability to reduce Fe(III)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandieken, V.; Knoblauch, C.; Jørgensen, BB

    2006-01-01

    Strains 18(T) 61(T) and 77 were isolated from two permanently cold fjord sediments on the west coast of Svalbard. The three psychrotolerant strains, with temperature optima at 20-23 degrees C, were able to grow at the freezing point of sea water, -2 degrees C. The strains oxidized important...... absence of electron acceptors, fermentative growth was possible. The pH optimum for the strains was around 7(.)1. The DNA G+C contents were 43(.)3 and 42(.)0 mol% for strains 18(T) and 61(T), respectively. Strains 18(T) 61(T) and 77 were most closely related to Desulfovibrio hydrothermalis (95......(.)0-95(.)7% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Strains 18(T) and 77, exhibiting 99(.)9% sequence similarity, represent a novel species for which the name Desulfovibrio frigidus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is strain 18(T) (=DSM 17176(T)=jCM 12924(T)). Strain 61(T) was closely related to strains 18(T...

  11. Synthesis, characterization and performance in arsenic removal of iron-doped activated carbons prepared by impregnation with Fe(III) and Fe(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz, G. [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, Nancy-Universite, UMR CNRS 7555, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les Nancy (France); Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Circuito Universitario S/N, Chihuahua (Mexico); Fierro, V., E-mail: Vanessa.Fierro@lcsm-uhp.nancy.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, Nancy-Universite, UMR CNRS 7555, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les Nancy (France); Celzard, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, UMR CNRS 7555, Nancy-Universite, ENSTIB, 27 rue du Merle Blanc, BP 1041, 88051 Epinal Cedex 9 (France); Furdin, G. [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, Nancy-Universite, UMR CNRS 7555, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les Nancy (France); Gonzalez-Sanchez, G. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV) Miguel de Cervantes 120, Compl. Ind. Chih., 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Ballinas, M.L. [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Circuito Universitario S/N, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2009-06-15

    Arsenic removal from natural well water from the state of Chihuahua (Mexico) is investigated by adsorption using a commercial activated carbon (AC). The latter is used as such, or after oxidation by several chemicals in aqueous solution: nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonium persulphate. Raw and oxidised activated carbons are fully characterised (elementary analysis, surface chemistry, pore texture parameters, pH{sub ZC}, and TEM observation). Adsorption of As is measured in the aforementioned water, containing ca. 300 ppb of arsenic: removal of As is poor with the raw AC, and only the most oxidised carbons exhibit higher performances. By contrast, iron-doped ACs are much more efficient for that purpose, though their As uptake strongly depends on their preparation conditions: a number of samples were synthesised by impregnation of raw and oxidised ACs with HCl aqueous solutions of either FeCl{sub 3} or FeCl{sub 2} at various concentrations and various pH. It is shown that iron(II) chloride is better for obtaining high iron contents in the resultant ACs (up to 8.34 wt.%), leading to high As uptake, close to 0.036 mg As/g C. In these conditions, 100% of the As initially present in the natural well water is removed, as soon as the Fe content of the adsorbent is higher than 2 wt.%.

  12. Thermal, spectral, magnetic and biological studies of thiosemicarbazones complexes with metal ions: Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Fe(III), Zn(II), Mn(II) and UO2(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiosemicarbazones ligands, isatin-3-thiosemicarbazone(HIT) and N-acetylisatin-3-thiosemicarbazone (HAIT), which have tridentate ONN coordinating sites were prepared. The complexes of both ligands with Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Fe(III), Zn(II), Mn(II) and UO2(VI) ions were isolated. The ligands and their metal complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-Vis and mass spectra, also by conductance, magnetic moment and TG-DSC measurements. All the transition metal complexes have octahedral configurations, except Cu-complexes which have planar geometry and the UO2(VI) complexes which have coordination number 8 and may acquire the distorted dodecahedral geometry. Thermal studies explored the possibility of obtaining new complexes. Inversion from octahedral to square-planar configuration occurred upon heating the parent Ni-HIAT complex to form the corresponding pyrolytic product. The antifungal activity against the tested organisms showed that some metal complexes enhanced the activity with respect to the parent ligands. (author)

  13. Comparative ligational, optical band gap and biological studies on Cr(III) and Fe(III) complexes of hydrazones derived from 2-hydrazinyl-2-oxo-N-phenylacetamide with both vanillin and O-vanillin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, T. A.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.; Attia, M. I.; El-Tabai, M. N.

    2015-09-01

    The Cr(III) and Fe(III) complexes of hydrazones derived from the condensation of 2-hydrazinyl-2-oxo-N-phenylacetamide with both vanillin and o-vanillin synthesized and characterized by different conventional physicochemical techniques. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the different decomposition steps were calculated using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger equations. The bond lengths, bond angles, HOMO, LUMO, dipole moment and binding energy calculated by DFT calculations. The optical band gap (Eg) values equal 3.28, 3.03, 3.58 and 3.57 eV for [Cr(HL1)Cl2(H2O)2](0.75H2O), [Cr(HL2)Cl2(H2O)](H2O), [Fe(HL1)Cl2(H2O)2](0.5H2O) and [Fe(HL2)2Cl(H2O)](3H2O) complexes, respectively. The antibacterial activities tested against Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli bacteria.

  14. Chitosan film loaded with silver nanoparticles-sorbent for solid phase extraction of Al(III), Cd(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djerahov, Lubomir; Vasileva, Penka; Karadjova, Irina; Kurakalva, Rama Mohan; Aradhi, Keshav Krishna

    2016-08-20

    The present study describes the ecofriendly method for the preparation of chitosan film loaded with silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) and application of this film as efficient sorbent for separation and enrichment of Al(III), Cd(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II). The stable CS-AgNPs colloid was prepared by dispersing the AgNPs sol in chitosan solution at appropriate ratio and further used to obtain a cast film with very good stability under storage and good mechanical strength for easy handling in aqueous medium. The incorporation of AgNPs in the structure of CS film and interaction between the polymer matrix and nanoparticles were confirmed by UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy. The homogeneously embedded AgNPs (average diameter 29nm, TEM analysis) were clearly observed throughout the film by SEM. The CS-AgNPs nanocomposite film shows high sorption activity toward trace metals under optimized chemical conditions. The results suggest that the CS-AgNPs nanocomposite film can be feasibly used as a novel sorbent material for solid-phase extraction of metal pollutants from surface waters. PMID:27178907

  15. Anodic oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sidney D; Rudd, Eric J; Blomquist, Alfred T; Wasserman, Harry H

    2013-01-01

    Anodic Oxidation covers the application of the concept, principles, and methods of electrochemistry to organic reactions. This book is composed of two parts encompassing 12 chapters that consider the mechanism of anodic oxidation. Part I surveys the theory and methods of electrochemistry as applied to organic reactions. These parts also present the mathematical equations to describe the kinetics of electrode reactions using both polarographic and steady-state conditions. Part II examines the anodic oxidation of organic substrates by the functional group initially attacked. This part particular

  16. Oxygen and sulfur isotope systematics of sulfate produced during abiotic and bacterial oxidation of sphalerite and elemental sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, N.; Mayer, B.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Mandernack, K.W.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of metal sulfide oxidation in acid mine drainage (AMD) systems have primarily focused on pyrite oxidation, although acid soluble sulfides (e.g., ZnS) are predominantly responsible for the release of toxic metals. We conducted a series of biological and abiotic laboratory oxidation experiments with pure and Fe-bearing sphalerite (ZnS & Zn 0.88Fe 0.12S), respectively, in order to better understand the effects of sulfide mineralogy and associated biogeochemical controls of oxidation on the resultant ?? 34S and ?? 18O values of the sulfate produced. The minerals were incubated in the presence and absence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans at an initial solution pH of 3 and with water of varying ?? 18O values to determine the relative contributions of H 2O-derived and O 2-derived oxygen in the newly formed sulfate. Experiments were conducted under aerobic and anaerobic conditions using O 2 and Fe(III) aq as the oxidants, respectively. Aerobic incubations with A. ferrooxidans, and S o as the sole energy source were also conducted. The ??34SSO4 values from both the biological and abiotic oxidation of ZnS and ZnS Fe by Fe(III) aq produced sulfur isotope fractionations (??34SSO4-ZnS) of up to -2.6???, suggesting the accumulation of sulfur intermediates during incomplete oxidation of the sulfide. No significant sulfur isotope fractionation was observed from any of the aerobic experiments. Negative sulfur isotope enrichment factors (??34SSO4-ZnS) in AMD systems could reflect anaerobic, rather than aerobic pathways of oxidation. During the biological and abiotic oxidation of ZnS and ZnS Fe by Fe(III) aq all of the sulfate oxygen was derived from water, with measured ?? 18OSO 4-H 2O values of 8.2??0.2??? and 7.5??0.1???, respectively. Also, during the aerobic oxidation of ZnS Fe and S o by A. ferrooxidans, all of the sulfate oxygen was derived from water with similar measured ?? 18OSO 4-H 2O values of 8.1??0.1??? and 8.3??0.3???, respectively. During biological oxidation

  17. Analysis of cbbL, nifH, and pufLM in Soils from the Sør Rondane Mountains, Antarctica, Reveals a Large Diversity of Autotrophic and Phototrophic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahon, Guillaume; Tytgat, Bjorn; Stragier, Pieter; Willems, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are generally thought to be responsible for primary production and nitrogen fixation in the microbial communities that dominate Antarctic ecosystems. Recent studies of bacterial communities in terrestrial Antarctica, however, have shown that Cyanobacteria are sometimes only scarcely present, suggesting that other bacteria presumably take over their role as primary producers and diazotrophs. The diversity of key genes in these processes was studied in surface samples from the Sør Rondane Mountains, Dronning Maud Land, using clone libraries of the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) genes (cbbL, cbbM) and dinitrogenase-reductase (nifH) genes. We recovered a large diversity of non-cyanobacterial cbbL type IC in addition to cyanobacterial type IB, suggesting that non-cyanobacterial autotrophs may contribute to primary production. The nifH diversity recovered was predominantly related to Cyanobacteria, particularly members of the Nostocales. We also investigated the occurrence of proteorhodopsin and anoxygenic phototrophy as mechanisms for non-Cyanobacteria to exploit solar energy. While proteorhodopsin genes were not detected, a large diversity of genes coding for the light and medium subunits of the type 2 phototrophic reaction center (pufLM) was observed, suggesting for the first time, that the aerobic photoheterotrophic lifestyle may be important in oligotrophic high-altitude ice-free terrestrial Antarctic habitats. PMID:26582318

  18. 基于氨单加氧酶基因的自养脱氮菌群结构分析%Phylogenetic Analysis based on the amoA Gene of Ammonia Oxidizers in an Autotrophic Nitrogen-Removal Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑雪松; 龚钢明

    2009-01-01

    全程自养脱氮是一种在高氨氮低溶氧条件下完全由自养菌群作用脱除氮素的现象.以全程自养脱氮污泥为研究对象,特异性扩增氨单加氧酶活性基因amoA片段,建立克隆文库并对克隆序列进行系统发育学分析,考察全程自养脱氮系统从建立到退化过程中氨氧化菌的结构变迁.结果表明:Nitrosomonas oligotropha和Nitrosomonas europaea细菌是系统中的主要氨氧化菌,而随着系统的退化前者逐渐被后者完全取代,而氨氧化菌的种群变迁可能并不是全混流系统全程自养脱氮效率下降的原因.

  19. Assessment of the stoichiometry and efficiency of CO2 fixation coupled to reduced sulfur oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith M Klatt

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB couple the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds to the production of biomass. Their role in the cycling of carbon, sulfur, oxygen and nitrogen is, however, difficult to quantify due to the complexity of sulfur oxidation pathways. We describe a generic theoretical framework for linking the stoichiometry and energy conservation efficiency of autotrophic sulfur oxidation while accounting for the partitioning of the reduced sulfur pool between the energy generating and energy conserving steps as well as between the main possible products (sulfate versus elemental sulfur. Using this framework, we show that the energy conservation efficiency varies widely among SOB with no apparent relationship to their phylogeny. Aerobic SOB equipped with reverse dissimilatory sulfite reductase tend to have higher efficiency than those relying on the complete Sox pathway, whereas for anaerobic SOB the presence of membrane-bound, as opposed to periplasmic, nitrate reductase systems appears to be linked to higher efficiency. We employ the framework to also show how limited rate measurements can be used to estimate the primary productivity of SOB without the knowledge of the sulfate-to-elemental-sulfur production ratio. Finally, we discuss how the framework can help researchers gain new insights into the activity of SOB and their niches.

  20. The δ15N and δ18O values of N2O produced during the co-oxidation of ammonia by methanotrophic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandernack, Kevin W.; Mills, Christopher T.; Johnson, Craig A.; Rahn, Thomas; Kinney, Chad

    2009-01-01

    In order to determine if the δ15N and δ18O values of N2O produced during co-oxidation of NH4+ by methanotrophic (methane oxidizing) bacteria can be isotopically distinguished from N2O produced either by autotrophic nitrifying or denitrifying bacteria, we conducted laboratory incubation experiments with pure cultures of methanotrophic bacteria that were provided NH4Cl as an oxidation substrate. The N2O produced during NH4+ oxidation by methanotrophic bacteria showed nitrogen isotope fractionation between NH4+ and N2O (εN2O–NH4+) of − 48 and − 55‰ for Methylomonas methanica and Methylosinus trichosporium, OB3b respectively. These large fractionations are similar to those previously measured for autotrophic nitrifying bacteria and consistent with N2O formation by multiple rate limiting steps that include NH4+oxidation by the methane monooxygenase enzyme and reduction of NO2− to N2O. Consequently, N2O formed by NH4+ oxidation via methanotrophic or autotrophic nitrifying bacteria might generally be characterized by lower δ15NN2O values than that formed by denitrificaiton, although this also depends on the variability of δ15N of available nitrogen sources (e.g., NH4+, NO3−, NO2−). Additional incubations with M. trichosporium OB3b at high and low CH4 conditions in waters of different δ18O values revealed that 19–27% of the oxygen in N2O was derived from O2 with the remainder from water. The biochemical mechanisms that could explain this amount of O2 incorporation are discussed. The δ18O of N2O formed under high CH4 conditions was ~ + 15‰ more positive than that formed under lower CH4 conditions. This enrichment resulted in part from the incorporation of O2 into N2O that was enriched in 18O due to an isotope fractionation effect of − 16.1 ± 2.0‰ and − 17.5 ± 5.4‰ associated with O2 consumption during the high and low methane concentration incubations, respectively. Therefore, N2O formed by NH4+ oxidation

  1. Characterization of atomic structure of oxide films on carbon steel in simulated concrete pore solutions using EELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic structure of oxide films formed on carbon steel that are exposed to highly alkaline simulated concrete pore solutions was investigated using Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS). In particular, the effect of chloride exposure on film structure was studied in two types of simulated pore solutions: saturated calcium hydroxide (CH) and a solution prepared to represent typical concrete pore solutions (CP). It was shown that the films that form on carbon steel in simulated concrete pore solutions contained three indistinct layers. The inner oxide film had a structure similar to that of FeIIO, which is known to be unstable in the presence of chlorides. The outer oxide film mainly resembled Fe3O4 (FeIIO·Fe2IIIO3) in the CH solution and α-Fe2IIIO3/Fe3O4 in the CP solution. The composition of the transition layer between the inner and outer layers of the oxide film was mainly composed of Fe3O4 (FeIIO·Fe2IIIO3). In the presence of chloride, the relative amount of the FeIII/FeII increased, confirming that chlorides induce valence state transformation of oxides from FeII to FeIII, and the difference between the atomic structures of oxide film layers diminished.

  2. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by Nitrosomonas spp. and anammox bacteria in a sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lek Noophan, Pongsak; Sripiboon, Siriporn; Damrongsri, Mongkol; Munakata-Marr, Junko

    2009-02-01

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was inoculated with mixed nitrifying bacteria from an anoxic tank at the conventional activated sludge wastewater treatment plant in Nongkhaem, Bangkok, Thailand. This enriched nitrifying culture was maintained under anaerobic conditions using ammonium (NH(4)(+)) as an electron donor and nitrite (NO(2)(-)) as an electron acceptor. Autotrophic ammonium oxidizing bacteria survived under these conditions. The enrichment period for anammox culture was over 100 days. Both ammonium and nitrite conversion rates were proportional to the biomass of ammonium oxidizing bacteria; rates were 0.08 g N/gV SS/d and 0.05 g N/g VSS/d for ammonium and nitrite, respectively, in a culture maintained for 3 months at 42 mg N/L ammonium. The nitrogen transformation rate at a ratio of NH(4)(+)-N to NO(2)(-)-N of 1:1.38 was faster, and effluent nitrogen levels were lower, than at ratios of 1:0.671, 1:2.18, and 1:3.05. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to identify specific autotrophic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (Nitrosomonas spp., Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans, and Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis). The ammonium oxidizing culture maintained at 42 mg N/L ammonium was enriched for Nitrosomonas spp. (30%) over Candidati B. anammoxidans and K. stuttgartiensis (2.1%) while the culture maintained at 210 mg N/L ammonium was dominated by Candidati B. anammoxidans and K. stuttgartiensis (85.6%). The specific nitrogen removal rate of anammox bacteria (0.6 g N/g anammox VSS/d) was significantly higher than that of ammonium oxidizing bacteria (0.4 g N/g Nitrosomonas VSS/d). Anammox bacteria removed up to 979 mg N/L/d of total nitrogen (ammonium:nitrite concentrations, 397:582 mg N/L). These results suggest significant promise of this approach for application to wastewater with high nitrogen but low carbon content, such as that found in Bangkok. PMID:18423965

  3. Synthesis, investigation and spectroscopic characterization of piroxicam ternary complexes of Fe(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) with glycine and DL-phenylalanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Gehad G.; El-Gamel, Nadia E. A.

    2004-11-01

    The ternary piroxicam (Pir; 4-hydroxy-2-methyl- N-(2-pyridyl)-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxamide 1,1-dioxide) complexes of Fe(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) with various amino acids (AA) such as glycine (Gly) or DL-phenylalanine (PhA) were prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, IR, UV-Vis, magnetic moment, diffuse reflectance and X-ray powder diffraction. The UV-Vis spectra of Pir and the effect of metal chelation on the different interligand transitions are discussed in detailed manner. IR and UV-Vis spectra confirm that Pir behaves as a neutral bidentate ligand coordinated to the metal ions via the pyridine- N and carbonyl group of the amide moiety. Gly molecule acted as a uninegatively monodentate ligand and coordinate to the metal ions through its carboxylic group, in addition PhA acted as a uninegatively bidentate ligand and coordinate to the metal ions through its carboxylic and amino groups. All the chelates have octahedral geometrical structures while Cu(II)- and Zn(II)-ternary chelates with PhA have square planar geometrical structures. The molar conductance data reveal that most of these chelates are non electrolytes, while Fe(III)-Pir-Gly, Co(II)-, Ni(II)-, Cu(II)- and Zn(II)-Pir-PhA cheletes were 1:1 electrolytes. X-ray powder diffraction is used as a new tool to estimate the crystallinity of chelates as well as to elucidate their geometrical structures.

  4. Determination of an Effective Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs) Oxidation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardena, D. P.; Crimi, M.; Holsen, T.; Bellona, C.

    2014-12-01

    Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are a stable synthetic class of chemicals ubiquitously spread in environmental media (i.e. air, soil, biota, surface water and groundwater). The substances' strong polar carbon-fluorine bonds and their high thermal and chemical stability make them resistant to biological, chemical, and physical degradation. The purpose of this research is to identify the most effective oxidation method to treat perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) and their by-products that is suitable for in situ application. The laboratory oxidation study focuses on the more commonly detected and studied long-chain (C-8) PFAS; perfluorooctanoic acids (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS). Existing research evaluating oxidizing treatment effectiveness on perfluoroalkyl sulfoinoic acids (PFSAs) is limited. A review of the literature and results from preliminary studies indicate that activated persulfate and catalyzed hydrogen peroxide propagation (CHP) reactions appear to be promising oxidants for PFOA. It has been demonstrated that the reactivity of superoxide in water increases in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and solids. Superoxide generated in CHP reactions degrades PFOA seemingly similar to superoxide-mediated destruction of the perhalogenated compounds.The goal of this study is to look at conditions that promote generation of superoxide and look at PFASs treatment effectiveness and byproduct generation. CHP reactions are conducted with varying amount of H2O2 and Fe(III) to determine the optimum conditions for PFC degradation. Results will be compared to those of another experiment using manganese dioxide as a CHP catalyst with varied H2O2 concentration to generate superoxide to degrade PFASs. Activated persulfate conditions to be compared include alkaline pH activation, heat activation, and dual oxidation (combined H2O2 and persulfate ). This presentation will focus on a comparison of oxidation effectiveness under the

  5. 生物膜内自养硝化菌与异养菌竞争关系的研究进展%Progress on Competition between Autotrophic Nitrifying Bacteria and Heterotrophic Bacteria in Biofilm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷峻; 徐恒娟

    2013-01-01

    As one of efficient technologies in biological removal of organic matter and nitrogen,biofilm technology has been widely applied to the industrial and domestic wastewater treatment in the past decades.But during the practical wastewater treatment,insufficient and instable nitrogen removal often occurs.At present,many research mainly focused reactor performance,biofilm formation,hydrodynamics,mass transfer and reaction kinetics in the biofilm reactor.However,the competition between different microorganisms directly affects morphology,stability and conversion efficiency of biofilm.In this paper,the affecting factors were discussed,especially competition between autotrophic nitrifying bacteria and heterotrophic bacteria.Future issues were also proposed.%生物膜工艺作为一种高效的生物除碳脱氮技术,近20年来被广泛应用于工业废水和城市生活污水的生物处理.但在实际污水处理过程中,生物膜系统往往会出现脱氮效果不稳定的情况.目前大量的研究工作主要集中在系统的处理效率、生物膜形成、流体力学、传质以及反应动力学特性等方面.而生物膜内微生物之间的竞争关系直接影响到生物膜的形态、稳定性以及转化效率.本文针对生膜工艺及其影响因素对生物膜中自养硝化菌和异养菌竞争的研究进展进行了综述,并提出了值得进一步研究的内容.

  6. Anaerobic ferrous oxidation by heterotrophic denitrifying enriched culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ru; Zheng, Ping; Xing, Ya-Juan; Zhang, Meng; Ghulam, Abbas; Zhao, Zhi-Qing; Li, Wei; Wang, Lan

    2014-05-01

    Heterotrophic denitrifying enriched culture (DEC) from a lab-scale high-rate denitrifying reactor was discovered to perform nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidation (NAFO). The DEC was systematically investigated to reveal their denitrification activity, their NAFO activity, and the predominant microbial population. The DEC was capable of heterotrophic denitrification with methanol as the electron donor, and autotrophic denitrification with ferrous salt as the electron donor named NAFO. The conversion ratios of ferrous-Fe and nitrate-N were 87.41 and 98.74 %, and the consumption Fe/N ratio was 2.3:1 (mol/mol). The maximum reaction velocity and half saturation constant of Fe were 412.54 mg/(l h) and 8,276.44 mg/l, and the counterparts of N were 20.87 mg/(l h) and 322.58 mg/l, respectively. The predominant bacteria were Hyphomicrobium, Thauera, and Flavobacterium, and the predominant archaea were Methanomethylovorans, Methanohalophilus, and Methanolobus. The discovery of NAFO by heterotrophic DEC is significant for the development of wastewater treatment and the biogeochemical iron cycle and nitrogen cycle. PMID:24619339

  7. Radiolytic oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work under the Radiolytic Oxidation Contract from 1986 until April 1989 is reported. The effects of alpha- and gamma-irradiation on the chemistries of plutonium, neptunium and technetium, under conditions representative of the near fields of intermediate and high level waste repositories, were investigated. Gamma-radiolysis of Np (IV) results in oxidation in solutions below pH 12. Solutions of Tc (VII) are reduced to Tc (IV) by gamma-irradiation in contact with blast furnace slag/ordinary Portland cement under an inert atmosphere but not when in contact with pulverized fuel ash/ordinary Portland cement. Tc (IV) is shown to be susceptible to oxidation by the products of the alpha-radiolysis of water. The results of 'overall effects' experiments, which combined representative components of typical ILW or HLW near fields, supported these observations and also showed enhanced plutonium concentrations in alpha-irradiated, HLW simulations. Mathematical models of the behaviour of plutonium and neptunium during gamma-radiolysis have been developed and indicate that oxidation to Pu (VI) is possible at dose rates typical of those expected for HLW. Simulations at ILW dose rates have indicated some effect upon the speciation of neptunium. Laboratory studies of the gamma-irradiation of Np (IV) in bentonite-equilibrated water have also been modelled. Computer code used: PHREEQE, 8 Figs.; 48 Tabs.; 38 refs

  8. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.;

    2015-01-01

    .9 significant hazard ratio for death compared with the quartile with the lowest 8oxoGuo excretion when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoker status, s-HbA1c, urine protein excretion and s-cholesterol. We conclude that it is now established that RNA oxidation is an independent risk factor for death in type 2...

  9. Oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jelka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The unceasing need for oxygen is in contradiction to the fact that it is in fact toxic to mammals. Namely, its monovalent reduction can have as a consequence the production of short-living, chemically very active free radicals and certain non-radical agents (nitrogen-oxide, superoxide-anion-radicals, hydroxyl radicals, peroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid, and others. There is no doubt that they have numerous positive roles, but when their production is stepped up to such an extent that the organism cannot eliminate them with its antioxidants (superoxide-dismutase, glutathione-peroxidase, catalase, transferrin, ceruloplasmin, reduced glutathion, and others, a series of disorders is developed that are jointly called „oxidative stress.“ The reactive oxygen species which characterize oxidative stress are capable of attacking all main classes of biological macromolecules, actually proteins, DNA and RNA molecules, and in particular lipids. The free radicals influence lipid peroxidation in cellular membranes, oxidative damage to DNA and RNA molecules, the development of genetic mutations, fragmentation, and the altered function of various protein molecules. All of this results in the following consequences: disrupted permeability of cellular membranes, disrupted cellular signalization and ion homeostasis, reduced or loss of function of damaged proteins, and similar. That is why the free radicals that are released during oxidative stress are considered pathogenic agents of numerous diseases and ageing. The type of damage that will occur, and when it will take place, depends on the nature of the free radicals, their site of action and their source. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173034, br. 175061 i br. 31085

  10. Voltammetric determination of total dissolved iron in coastal waters using a glassy carbon electrode modified with reduced graphene oxide, Methylene Blue and gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nanocomposite, prepared from reduced graphene oxide (rGO), Methylene Blue (MB) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), was used to modify a glassy carbon electrode for the determination of total dissolved iron by differential pulse voltammetry. The use of rGO warrants a larger electrode surface and the presence of more active sites, while electron transfer is accelerated by incorporating AuNPs. MB acts as an electron mediator, as an anchor for the AuNPs (which were grown in situ), and also prevents the aggregation of rGO. The modified electrode displayed a remarkably improved sensitivity and selectivity for Fe(III). The kinetics of the electrode reaction is adsorption-controlled, and the reversible process involves one proton and one electron. The response to Fe(III) is linear in the 0.3 to 100 μM concentration range, and the detection limit is 15 nM. Possible interferences by other ions were studied. The electrode was successfully applied to the determination of total dissolved iron in real coastal waters. (author)

  11. Surface oxidization-reduction reactions in Columbia Plateau basalts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented which define principal oxidation-reduction reactions expected between ground water and iron in the Umtanum and Cohassett basalt flows of south central Washington. Data include kinetics of aqueous iron speciation, rates of O2 uptake and nature of oxyhydroxide precipitates. Such data are important in predicting behavior of radionuclides in basalt aquifers including determination of valence states, speciation, solubility, sorption, and coprecipitation on iron oxyhydroxide substrates and colloids. Analyses of the basalt by XPS indicates that ferrous iron is oxidized to ferric iron on the surface and that the total iron decreases as a function of pH during experimental weathering. Iron oxyhydroxide phases did not form surface coating on basalt surfaces but rather nucleated as separate plases in solution. No significant increases in Cs or Sr sorption were observed with increased weathering of the basalt. Concurrent increases in Fe(II) and decreases in Fe(III) in slightly to moderately acid solutions indicated continued oxidization of ferrous iron in the basalt. At neutral to basic pH, Fe(II) was strongly sorbed onto the basalt surface (Kd = 6.5 x 10-3 1 x m2) resulting in low dissolved concentrations even under anoxic conditions. The rate of O2 uptake increased with decreasing pH. Diffusion rates (-- 10-14 cm2 x s-1), calculated using a one-dimensional analytical model, indicate grain boundary diffusion. Comparisons of Eh values calculated by Pt electrode, dissolved O2 and Fe(II)/Fe(III) measurements showed considerable divergence, with the ferric-ferrous couple being the preferred method of estimating Eh

  12. Microbial Ecology Assessment of Mixed Copper Oxide/Sulfide Dump Leach Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhn, D F; Thompson, D N; Noah, K S

    1999-06-01

    Microbial consortia composed of complex mixtures of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria are responsible for the dissolution of metals from sulfide minerals. Thus, an efficient copper bioleaching operation depends on the microbial ecology of the system. A microbial ecology study of a mixed oxide/sulfide copper leaching operation was conducted using an "overlay" plating technique to differentiate and identify various bacterial consortium members of the genera Thiobacillus, Leptospirillum, Ferromicrobium, and Acidiphilium. Two temperatures (30C and 45C) were used to select for mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacteria. Cell numbers varied from 0-106 cells/g dry ore, depending on the sample location and depth. After acid curing for oxide leaching, no viable bacteria were recovered, although inoculation of cells from raffinate re-established a microbial population after three months. Due to the low pH of the operation, very few non-iron-oxidizing acidophilic heterotrophs were recovered. Moderate thermophiles were isolated from the ore samples. Pregnant liquor solutions (PLS) and raffinate both contained a diversity of bacteria. In addition, an intermittently applied waste stream that contained high levels of arsenic and fluoride was tested for toxicity. Twenty vol% waste stream in PLS killed 100% of the cells in 48 hours, indicating substantial toxicity and/or growth inhibition. The data indicate that bacteria populations can recover after acid curing, and that application of the waste stream to the dump should be avoided. Monitoring the microbial ecology of the leaching operation provided significant information that improved copper recovery.

  13. Isolation and characterization of facultative mixotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from constructed wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soulwène Kouki; Neila Saidi; Fadhel M'hiri; Houda Nasr; Hanène Cherif; Hadda Ouzari; Abdermaceur Hassen

    2011-01-01

    Autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) have been widely studied in constructed wetlands systems,while mixotrophic AOB have been less thoroughly examined.Heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from wastewater and rhizospheres of macrophytes of constructed wetlands,and then cultivated in a mixotrophic medium containing ammonium and acetic acid.A molecular characterization was accomplished using ITS-PCR amplification,and phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.Results showed the presence of 35 bacteria,among 400 initially heterotrophic isolates,that were able to remove ammonia.These 35 isolates were classified into 10 genetically different groups based on ITS pattern.Then,a collection of 10 isolates were selected because of their relatively high ammonia removal efficiencies (ARE ≥ 80%) and their phylogenetic diversity.In conditions of mixotrophy,these strains were shown to be able to grow (increase of optical density OD660 during incubation with assimilation of nitrogen into cellular biomass) and to oxidize ammonia (important ammonia oxidation efficiencies,AOE between 79% and 87%).Among these facultative mixotrophic AOB,four isolates were genetically related to Firmicutes (Bacillus and Exiguobacterium),three isolates were affiliated to Actinobacteria (Arthrobacter) and three other isolates were associated with Proteobacteria (Pseudomonas,Ochrobactrum and Bordetella).

  14. The electrochemisty of surface modified <10 nm metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Joseph J. P.

    Chapter One provides a general introduction of the research on metal oxide nanoparticles (MOx), highlighting their synthesis, surface modification, and functionalization. Emphasis is given to the different synthetic route for producing small (electrode (microE) experiments. Chapter Four investigates spectroscopic tagging of ITO and ZrO2 nanoparticles as well as electrochemical tagging of ZrO 2 and IrO2 nanoparticles. An unbound azo-dye was synthesized and attempts were made to attach the dye to the surface of ITO nanoparticles. Imine couple between a spectroscopic tag and ZrO2 nanoparticles was also explored, but resulted in very low surface coverages. ZrO2 nanoparticles were also ferrocene tagged using previously discussed siloxane chemistry as well as a new route using click chemistry with an azo-phosphate ligand. A similar approach was taken with hydrolytically synthesized IrO 2 and is included for comparison. Chapter Five studies the multivalent electrochemistry of 4 nm magnetite nanoparticles. These nanoparticles are synthesized via thermal degradation and capped with citric acid to make them water soluble. pH dependent electrochemistry was discovered and characterized using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and rotating disk electrode experiments. Two separate electrochemical species are present and undergo two irreversible, but separate electrochemical reactions; Fe(II) → Fe (III) and Fe(III) → Fe(II).

  15. Denitrification-coupled iron(ii) oxidation: a key process regulating the fate and transport of nitrate, phosphate, and arsenic in a wastewater-contaminated aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Repert, Deborah A.; Hart, C. P.

    2008-01-01

    Denitrification in the subsurface is often viewed as a heterotrophic process. However, some denitrifiers can also utilize inorganic electron donors. In particular, Fe(II), which is common in many aquifers, could be an important reductant for contaminant nitrate. Anoxic iron oxidation would have additional consequences, including decreased mobility for species like arsenic and phosphate, which bind strongly to hydrous Fe(III) oxide. A study was conducted in a wastewater contaminant plume on Cape Cod to assess the potential for denitrification- coupled Fe(II) oxidation. Previous changes in wastewater disposal upgradient of the study area had resulted in nitrate being transported into a portion of the anoxic zone of the plume and decreased concentrations of Fe(II), phosphate, and arsenic. A series of anoxic tracers (groundwater + nitrate + bromide) were injected into the unaffected, Fe(II)-containing zone under natural gradient conditions. Denitrification was stimulated within 1 m of transport (4 days) for both low and high (100 & 1000 μM) nitrate additions, initially producing stiochiometric quantities of nitrous oxide (>300 μM N) and trace amounts of nitrite. Subsequent injections at the same site reduced nitrate even more rapidly and produced less nitrous oxide, especially over longer transport distances. Fe(II) and nitrate concentrations decreased together and this was accompanied by an increase in colloidal Fe(III) and decreases in pH, total arsenic, and phosphate concentrations. All plume constituents returned to background levels several weeks after the tracer tests were completed. Groundwater microorganisms collected on filters during the tracer test rapidly and immediately reduced nitrite and oxidized Fe(II) in 3-hr laboratory incubations. Several pure cultures of Fe(II)-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria were isolated from core material and subsequently characterized. All of the isolates were mixotrophic, simultaneously oxidizing organic carbon and Fe

  16. Denitrification-Coupled Iron(II) Oxidation: A Key Process Regulating the Fate and Transport of Nitrate, Phosphate, and Arsenic in a Wastewater-Contaminated Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. L.; Kent, D. B.; Repert, D. A.; Hart, C. P.

    2007-12-01

    Denitrification in the subsurface is often viewed as a heterotrophic process. However, some denitrifiers can also utilize inorganic electron donors. In particular, Fe(II), which is common in many aquifers, could be an important reductant for contaminant nitrate. Anoxic iron oxidation would have additional consequences, including decreased mobility for species like arsenic and phosphate, which bind strongly to hydrous Fe(III) oxide. A study was conducted in a wastewater contaminant plume on Cape Cod to assess the potential for denitrification- coupled Fe(II) oxidation. Previous changes in wastewater disposal upgradient of the study area had resulted in nitrate being transported into a portion of the anoxic zone of the plume and decreased concentrations of Fe(II), phosphate, and arsenic. A series of anoxic tracers (groundwater + nitrate + bromide) were injected into the unaffected, Fe(II)-containing zone under natural gradient conditions. Denitrification was stimulated within 1 m of transport (4 days) for both low and high (100 & 1000 μM) nitrate additions, initially producing stiochiometric quantities of nitrous oxide (>300 μM N) and trace amounts of nitrite. Subsequent injections at the same site reduced nitrate even more rapidly and produced less nitrous oxide, especially over longer transport distances. Fe(II) and nitrate concentrations decreased together and this was accompanied by an increase in colloidal Fe(III) and decreases in pH, total arsenic, and phosphate concentrations. All plume constituents returned to background levels several weeks after the tracer tests were completed. Groundwater microorganisms collected on filters during the tracer test rapidly and immediately reduced nitrite and oxidized Fe(II) in 3-hr laboratory incubations. Several pure cultures of Fe(II)-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria were isolated from core material and subsequently characterized. All of the isolates were mixotrophic, simultaneously oxidizing organic carbon and Fe

  17. High-density PhyloChip profiling of stimulated aquifer microbial communities reveals a complex response to acetate amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handley, Kim M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wrighton, Kelly C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Piceno, Yvette M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andersen, Gary L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); DeSantis, Todd Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Kenneth H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wilkins, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); N' Guessan, A. Lucie [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Peacock, Aaron [Haley & Aldrich, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bargar, John [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL); Long, Philip E. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, 99353, USA; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2012-04-13

    There is increasing interest in harnessing the functional capacities of indigenous microbial communities to transform and remediate a wide range of environmental contaminants. Information about which community members respond to stimulation can guide the interpretation and development of remediation approaches. To comprehensively determine community membership and abundance patterns among a suite of samples associated with uranium bioremediation experiments we employed a high-density microarray (PhyloChip). Samples were unstimulated, naturally reducing, or collected during Fe(III) (early) and sulfate reduction (late biostimulation) from an acetate re-amended/amended aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, and from laboratory experiments using field-collected materials. Deep community sampling with PhyloChip identified hundreds-to-thousands of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) present during amendment, and revealed close similarity among highly enriched taxa from drill-core and groundwater well-deployed column sediment. Overall, phylogenetic data suggested stimulated community membership was most affected by a carryover effect between annual stimulation events. Nevertheless, OTUs within the Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing lineages, Desulfuromonadales and Desulfobacterales, were repeatedly stimulated. Less consistent, co-enriched taxa represented additional lineages associated with Fe(III) and sulfate reduction (for example, Desulfovibrionales; Syntrophobacterales; Peptococcaceae) and autotrophic sulfur oxidation (Sulfurovum; Campylobacterales). These data imply complex membership among highly stimulated taxa, and by inference biogeochemical responses to acetate, a non-fermentable substrate.

  18. Size dependent microbial oxidation and reduction of magnetite nano- and micro-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, James M.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Figueroa, Adriana I.; Qafoku, Odeta; Wang, Chongmin; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Jackson, Michael; Feinberg, Joshua; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The ability for magnetite to act as a recyclable electron donor and acceptor for Fe-metabolizing bacteria has recently been shown. However, it remains poorly understood whether microbe-mineral interfacial electron transfer processes are limited by the redox capacity of the magnetite surface or that of whole particles. Here we examine this issue for the phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1 and the Fe(III)-reducing bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens, comparing magnetite nanoparticles (d ≈ 12 nm) against microparticles (d ≈ 100–200 nm). By integrating surface-sensitive and bulk-sensitive measurement techniques we observed a particle surface that was enriched in Fe(II) with respect to a more oxidized core. This enables microbial Fe(II) oxidation to occur relatively easily at the surface of the mineral suggesting that the electron transfer is dependent upon particle size. However, microbial Fe(III) reduction proceeds via conduction of electrons into the particle interior, i.e. it can be considered as more of a bulk electron transfer process that is independent of particle size. The finding has potential implications on the ability of magnetite to be used for long range electron transport in soils and sediments.

  19. Colloidally stable surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles: Preparation, characterization and anti-tumor activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macková, Hana [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, AS CR, Heyrovsky Sq. 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Horák, Daniel, E-mail: horak@imc.cas.cz [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, AS CR, Heyrovsky Sq. 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Donchenko, Georgiy Viktorovich; Andriyaka, Vadim Ivanovich; Palyvoda, Olga Mikhailovna; Chernishov, Vladimir Ivanovich [Palladin Institute of Biochemistry, NASU, 9 Leontovich St., 01601 Kiev (Ukraine); Chekhun, Vasyl Fedorovich; Todor, Igor Nikolaevich [R. E. Kavetsky Institute of Experimental Pathology, Oncology and Radiobiology, NASU, 45 Vasylkivska St., 03022 Kiev (Ukraine); Kuzmenko, Oleksandr Ivanovich [Palladin Institute of Biochemistry, NASU, 9 Leontovich St., 01601 Kiev (Ukraine)

    2015-04-15

    Maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticles were obtained by co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) chlorides and subsequent oxidation with sodium hypochlorite and coated with poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) [P(DMAAm-AA)]. They were characterized by a range of methods including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), elemental analysis, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurements. The effect of superparamagnetic P(DMAAm-AA)-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles on oxidation of blood lipids, glutathione and proteins in blood serum was detected using 2-thiobarbituric acid and the ThioGlo fluorophore. Finally, mice received magnetic nanoparticles administered per os and the antitumor activity of the particles was tested on Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in male mice line C57BL/6 as an experimental in vivo metastatic tumor model; the tumor size was measured and the number of metastases in lungs was determined. Surface-modified γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles showed higher antitumor and antimetastatic activities than commercial CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles and the conventional antitumor agent cisplatin. - Highlights: • Maghemite nanoparticles were prepared and characterized. • Poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) coating was synthetized. • Blood lipid, glutathione and protein peroxidation/oxidation was determined. • Antitumor effect of coated particles on Lewis lung carcinoma in mice was observed.

  20. Colloidally stable surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles: Preparation, characterization and anti-tumor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles were obtained by co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) chlorides and subsequent oxidation with sodium hypochlorite and coated with poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) [P(DMAAm-AA)]. They were characterized by a range of methods including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), elemental analysis, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurements. The effect of superparamagnetic P(DMAAm-AA)-γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles on oxidation of blood lipids, glutathione and proteins in blood serum was detected using 2-thiobarbituric acid and the ThioGlo fluorophore. Finally, mice received magnetic nanoparticles administered per os and the antitumor activity of the particles was tested on Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in male mice line C57BL/6 as an experimental in vivo metastatic tumor model; the tumor size was measured and the number of metastases in lungs was determined. Surface-modified γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles showed higher antitumor and antimetastatic activities than commercial CuFe2O4 particles and the conventional antitumor agent cisplatin. - Highlights: • Maghemite nanoparticles were prepared and characterized. • Poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) coating was synthetized. • Blood lipid, glutathione and protein peroxidation/oxidation was determined. • Antitumor effect of coated particles on Lewis lung carcinoma in mice was observed

  1. Single stage biological nitrogen removal by nitritation and anaerobic ammonium oxidation in biofilm systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, C; Tromm, C; Hippen, A; Rosenwinkel, K H; Seyfried, C F; Kunst, S

    2001-01-01

    In full scale wastewater treatment plants with at times considerable deficits in the nitrogen balances, it could hitherto not be sufficiently explained which reactions are the cause of the nitrogen losses and which micro-organisms participate in the process. The single stage conversion of ammonium into gaseous end-products--which is henceforth referred to as deammonification--occurs particularly frequently in biofilm systems. In the meantime, one has succeeded to establish the deammonification processes in a continuous flow moving-bed pilot plant. In batch tests with the biofilm covered carriers, it was possible for the first time to examine the nitrogen conversion at the intact biofilm. Depending on the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, two autotrophic nitrogen converting reactions in the biofilm could be proven: one nitritation process under aerobic conditions and one anaerobic ammonium oxidation. With the anaerobic ammonium oxidation, ammonium as electron donor was converted with nitrite as electron acceptor. The end-product of this reaction was N2. Ammonium and nitrite did react in a stoichiometrical ratio of 1:1.37, a ratio which has in the very same dimension been described for the ANAMMOX-process (1:1.31 +/- 0.06). Via the oxygen concentration in the surrounding medium, it was possible to control the ratio of nitritation and anaerobic ammonium oxidation in the nitrogen conversion of the biofilm. Both processes were evenly balanced at a DO concentration of 0.7 mg/l, so that it was possible to achieve a direct, almost complete elimination of ammonium without addition of nitrite. One part of the provided ammonium did participate in the nitritation, the other in the anaerobic ammonium oxidation. Through the aerobic ammonium oxidation into nitrite within the outer oxygen supplied layers of the biofilm, the reaction partner was produced for the anaerobic ammonium oxidation within the inner layers of the biofilm. PMID:11379106

  2. Structural, spectral analysis and DNA studies of heterocyclic thiosemicarbazone ligand and its Cr(III), Fe(III), Co(II) Hg(II), and U(VI) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, T. A.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.; El Morshedy, R. M.

    2013-08-01

    The paper presents a combined experimental and computational study of novel Cr(III), Fe(III), Co(II), Hg(II) and U(VI) complexes of (E)-2-((3-hydroxynaphthalen-2-yl)methylene)-N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydrazinecarbothioamide (H2L). The ligand and its complexes have been characterized by elemental analyses, spectral (IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and 13C NMR), magnetic and thermal studies. IR spectra show that H2L is coordinated to the metal ions in a mononegative bi or tri manner. The structures are suggested to be octahedral for all complexes except Hg(II) complex is tetrahedral. Theoretical calculations have been performed to obtain IR spectra of ligand and its complexes using AM1, MM, Zindo/1, MM+ and PM3, methods. Satisfactory theoretical-experimental agreements were achieved by MM method for the ligand and PM3 for its complexes. DOS calculations carried out by MM (ADF) method for ligand Hg complex from which we concluded that the thiol form of the ligand is more active than thione form and this explains that the most complexation take place in that form. The calculated IR vibrations of the metal complexes, using the PM3 method was the nearest method for the experimental data, and it could be used for all complexes. Also, valuable information are obtained from calculation of molecular parameters for all compounds carried out by the previous methods of calculation (electronegativity of the coordination sites, net dipole moment of the metal complexes, values of heat of formation and binding energy) which approved that the complexes are more stable than ligand. The low value of ΔE could be expected to indicate H2L molecule has high inclination to bind with the metal ions. Furthermore, the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the different decomposition steps were calculated using the Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. Finally, the biochemical studies showed that, complex 2, 4 have powerful and complete degradation effect on DNA. For the foremost majority of cases the

  3. Sorption-induced reversible oxidation of Fe(2) at the smectite/water interface under strictly anoxic conditions. A Moessbauer spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies of Fe(II) sorption onto montmorillonite have been performed with the mineral extracted from the MX80 bentonite. These studies have shown that Fe(II) can be sorbed onto clay minerals in cation exchange position. The affinity of montmorillonite for Fe(II) and Ca(II) is identical. Fe(II) may also be specifically adsorbed onto montmorillonite clay edges. Moessbauer spectroscopy confirmed the high affinity of clay surfaces for Fe(II) sorption and showed that this sorption is mainly due to a two step mechanism: Fe(II) specific adsorption, followed by oxidation of the Fe(II) sorbed. The identification of the oxidizing agent was prohibited due to the complex chemistry of the natural MX80 montmorillonite. Thus, synthetic iron-free montmorillonite was used (chemical formula: Ca0.3 (A1.4Mg0.6) (Si4) O10(OH)2 ). 57Fe(II) sorption experiments were conducted in a N2 atmosphere gloves-box, in strictly anoxic conditions. Solid samples were synthesized in order to confirm the clay high affinity for Fe(II), in absence of structural oxidant, and to have a better comprehension of the sorption mechanism. Moessbauer spectra were recorded for each sample. Whereas no Fe(III) is detected in solution as pH was increased and then, a significant amount of surface sorbed Fe(III) was found to be reversibly produced, which amounts for 0-3% of total Fe in the pre-sorption edge acid region, up to 7% of total Fe when all Fe is sorbed in the neutral to alkaline pH range. From pH ≅ 2 to pH ≅ 7, a sorption edge plateau is observed. In this plateau, the sorbed-Fe(III)/sorbed-Fe ratio increases with pH, up to 45% at pH 7. Moessbauer spectra comparison with ferrous hydroxide, synthesized in the same redox conditions at higher pH, show that this oxidation can not be due to the trace amounts Oz in the suspension. The Moessbauer spectra components of both Fe(II) and Fe(III) appears as paramagnetic doublets: iron has not been polymerized, but is present as cations. This result shows that

  4. The aerobic respiratory chain of the acidophilic archaeon Ferroplasma acidiphilum: A membrane-bound complex oxidizing ferrous iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelle, Cindy J; Roger, Magali; Bauzan, Marielle; Brugna, Myriam; Lignon, Sabrina; Nimtz, Manfred; Golyshina, Olga V; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Guiral, Marianne

    2015-08-01

    The extremely acidophilic archaeon Ferroplasma acidiphilum is found in iron-rich biomining environments and is an important micro-organism in naturally occurring microbial communities in acid mine drainage. F. acidiphilum is an iron oxidizer that belongs to the order Thermoplasmatales (Euryarchaeota), which harbors the most extremely acidophilic micro-organisms known so far. At present, little is known about the nature or the structural and functional organization of the proteins in F. acidiphilum that impact the iron biogeochemical cycle. We combine here biochemical and biophysical techniques such as enzyme purification, activity measurements, proteomics and spectroscopy to characterize the iron oxidation pathway(s) in F. acidiphilum. We isolated two respiratory membrane protein complexes: a 850 kDa complex containing an aa3-type cytochrome oxidase and a blue copper protein, which directly oxidizes ferrous iron and reduces molecular oxygen, and a 150 kDa cytochrome ba complex likely composed of a di-heme cytochrome and a Rieske protein. We tentatively propose that both of these complexes are involved in iron oxidation respiratory chains, functioning in the so-called uphill and downhill electron flow pathways, consistent with autotrophic life. The cytochrome ba complex could possibly play a role in regenerating reducing equivalents by a reverse ('uphill') electron flow. This study constitutes the first detailed biochemical investigation of the metalloproteins that are potentially directly involved in iron-mediated energy conservation in a member of the acidophilic archaea of the genus Ferroplasma. PMID:25896560

  5. Growth of microalgae in autotrophic stationary systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Cunha

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we evaluate the growth of nine marine microalgae species (Nannochloropsis oculata, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Isochrysis galbana, Tetraselmis suecica, Tetraselmis chuii, Chaetoceros muelleri, Thalassiosira fluviatilis and Isochrysis sp. and one freshwater species (Chlorella vulgaris under stationary autotrophy conditions, using erlenmeyers fl asks with 800mL of culture medium exposed to constant light intensities providing a photon flux density of about 150μmol.m-2.s-1 and 25±2oC temperature and constant air flow. The experiment was carried out in a controlled environment considering a block delineating randomized over time with three replicates. The Nannochloropsis oculata showed the highest value of maximum cellular density, but with a longer period of time and a lower growth rate. This was probably due to its tiny cell size, demanding a large number of cells per volume to attain its optimum conditions for light, nutrients, water and atmospheric carbon dioxide. In addition, in spite of showing one of the lowest values of maximum cellular density, Thalassiosira fluviatilis was the species that reached its maximum in a short period of time at the highest growth rate. Chlorella vulgaris was the only freshwater species tested and it showed the poorest performance for all the variables analyzed in the current study.

  6. Autotrophic Ecosystems on the Early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, M.

    2003-01-01

    Ophiolite sequences, sections of lower oceanic crust and upper mantle that have been thrust onto continental craton, are located in northern and central California and provide easily accessible areas that serve as good analogs for similar, more extensive areas of the early Earth. We have begun investigating and characterizing these sites in order to understand better the processes that may be responsible for the water chemistry, mineralogy and biology of similar environments on the early Earth. The geophysical and geochemical processes in these terranes provide niches for unique communities of extremeophiles and likely provide a good analog to the location that first gave rise to life on Earth. The ophiolites found in northern and central California include the Trinity, Josephine, Coast Range and Point Sal, all of which are approximately 160 million years old. Fluids from serpentinizing springs are generally alkaline with high pH and H2 contents, indicating that the mafic rock compositions control the fluid composition through water-rock reactions during relatively low-grade hydrothermal processes. There are significant amounts of primary mineralogy remaining in the rocks, meaning that substantial alteration processes are still occurring in these terranes. The general reaction for serpentinization of olivine is given by one of the authors. olivine + H2O = serpentine + brucite + magnetite + H2. We have analyzed the mineralogical composition of several rock samples collected from the Coast Range Ophiolite near Clear Lake, CA by electron microprobe. The remnant primary mineralogy is fairly urnform in composition, with an olivine composition of Fo(sub 90), and with pyroxene compositions of En(sub 90) for orthopyroxene and En(sub 49)Wo(sub 48)Fs(sub 03) for the clinopyroxene. Other primary phases observed include chromites and other spinels. Examination of petrographic thin sections reveals that serpentinization reactions have occurred in these locations. The serpentine resulting from aqueous alteration of olivine resides in veins that are see to cross cut the primary mineral grains. There are several generations of alteration products, comprised mostly of serpentines that are magnesium rich, with magnetite, brucite and carbonates observed as accessory minerals. The formation of carbonates can be taken to indicate the presence of CO2 in the altering fluids. We collected samples from a spring in the Coast Range Ophiolite in order to determine whether the geochemical environment serves as a habitat for chemotrophic microorganisms. DNA was extracted from the sediment samples and the 16s rRNA gene was PCR amplified using universal Archaeal primers. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to determine the community of Archaea thriving in these samples. Our results indicate that there were 8 different genera of Archaea from a single sample. A sequence was obtained from one of these eight. The sequence is of an organism similar to Halorubrum tibetense, and alkalophilic Archaeon. This result suggests that these environments are likely hosts for communities of organisms that are adapted for the unique chemistry provided by the alkaline spring.

  7. Mannitol in six autotrophic stramenopiles and Micromonas

    OpenAIRE

    Dittami, Simon M.; Aas, Hoai TN; Paulsen, Berit Smestad; Boyen, Catherine; Edvardsen, Bente; Tonon, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Mannitol plays a central role in brown algal physiology since it represents an important pathway used to store photoassimilate. Several specific enzymes are directly involved in the synthesis and recycling of mannitol, altogether forming the mannitol cycle. The recent analysis of algal genomes has allowed tracing back the origin of this cycle in brown seaweeds to a horizontal gene transfer from bacteria, and furthermore suggested a subsequent transfer to the green micro-alga Micromonas. Inter...

  8. Electro-autotrophic synthesis of higher alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, James C.; Cho, Kwang Myung

    2015-10-06

    The disclosure provides a process that converts CO.sub.2 to higher alcohols (e.g. isobutanol) using electricity as the energy source. This process stores electricity (e.g. from solar energy, nuclear energy, and the like) in liquid fuels that can be used as high octane number gasoline substitutes. Instead of deriving reducing power from photosynthesis, this process derives reducing power from electrically generated mediators, either H.sub.2 or formate. H.sub.2 can be derived from electrolysis of water. Formate can be generated by electrochemical reduction of CO.sub.2. After delivering the reducing power in the cell, formate becomes CO.sub.2 and recycles back. Therefore, the biological CO.sub.2 fixation process can occur in the dark.

  9. PREFACE: Semiconducting oxides Semiconducting oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, Richard; Walsh, Aron

    2011-08-01

    Semiconducting oxides are amongst the most widely studied and topical materials in contemporary condensed matter science, with interest being driven both by the fundamental challenges posed by their electronic and magnetic structures and properties, and by the wide range of applications, including those in catalysis and electronic devices. This special section aims to highlight recent developments in the physics of these materials, and to show the link between developing fundamental understanding and key application areas of oxide semiconductors. Several aspects of the physics of this wide and expanding range of materials are explored in this special section. Transparent semiconducting oxides have a growing role in several technologies, but challenges remain in understanding their electronic structure and the physics of charge carriers. A related problem concerns the nature of redox processes and the reactions which interconvert defects and charge carriers—a key issue which may limit the extent to which doping strategies may be used to alter electronic properties. The magnetic structures of the materials pose several challenges, while surface structures and properties are vital in controlling catalytic properties, including photochemical processes. The field profits from and exploits a wide range of contemporary physical techniques—both experimental and theoretical. Indeed, the interplay between experiment and computation is a key aspect of contemporary work. A number of articles describe applications of computational methods whose use, especially in modelling properties of defects in these materials, has a long and successful history. Several papers in this special section relate to work presented at a symposium within the European Materials Research Society (EMRS) meeting held in Warsaw in September 2010, and we are grateful to the EMRS for supporting this symposium. We would also like to thank the editorial staff of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for

  10. Role of the caffeic acid oxidation products on the iron mobilization at the soil-root interface

    OpenAIRE

    Deiana, Salvatore Andrea; Gessa, Carlo Emanuele; Pilo, Maria Itria; Premoli, Alessandra Maria; Solinas, Vincenzo

    1995-01-01

    Previous results show that the reduction of Fe(III) by caffeiic acid (CAF) is strongly influenced by the pH of the reaction medium (DEIANA et al., 1995). In particular, it has been found that al pH > 3.8 the reducing activity of CAF towards the Fe(III) ions in solution is low, but it increases when Fe(III) is complexed as Fe(III)-polygalacturonate. The mobilization of the Fe(II) ions, which form upon the Fe(III) reduction, has been shown to depend mainly on the nature of the Fe(II...

  11. Soluble Iron as an In Situ Indicator of the Redox State of Humic Substances in Arctic Soil: Implications for Seasonal Regeneration of Oxidized Terminal Electron Acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, D.; Zlamal, J. E.; Srinivas, A. J.; Raab, T. K.

    2014-12-01

    Ferric iron (Fe(III)) and humic substances (HS) are important terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration in wet tundra soils of the Arctic Coastal Plain near Barrow, Alaska. These soils are rich in both solid phase Fe minerals (including oxides such as ferrihydrite and goethite and other minerals with reduced or mixed valence such as siderite and magnetite) and soluble Fe, chelated by siderophores and other small organic molecules. This latter pool may also include nanocolloidal Fe: extremely fine-grained minerals that pass through a 0.2 micron filter. Both the solid phase and aqueous Fe pools undergo seasonal changes in redox state as a result of biological reduction by Fe-reducing microorganisms and oxidation by a variety of potential mechanisms, both abiotic and biotic. These redox cycles of solid and aqueous pools are not in phase: solid phase Fe became progressively more reduced from mid- to late summer, while aqueous phase Fe became reduced over the first half of the summer. It is well-known that HS interact with Fe, and that HS can act as electron shuttles in the reduction of Fe oxides. In other ecosystems chelated Fe(III) has been incubated with soil samples and the resulting Fe(II) produced is used as an indicator of the reducing power of HS. In these Fe-rich Arctic soils, HS are continuously in contact with chelated Fe, and therefore we interpret the redox state of this pool as an indicator of HS redox status. To verify this we conducted redox titrations of extracted HS with both reduced and oxidized Fe chelates and showed that chelated Fe could interact with HS both as electron acceptor and donator. In a field experiment, the addition of oxidized humic acids to soils resulted in an immediate oxidation of the aqueous Fe pool within 24 hours, which we attribute to abiotic oxidation of Fe by HS, followed by a slow reduction of this pool over the next week, presumably due to biological Fe reduction of the HS/aqueous Fe pool. At the end of summer

  12. Arsenic transformation and mobilization from minerals by the arsenite oxidizing strain WAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhine, E.D.; Onesios, K.M.; Serfes, M.E.; Reinfelder, J.R.; Young, L.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of arsenic concentrations in New Jersey well water from the Newark Basin showed up to 15% of the wells exceed 10 ??g L-1, with a maximum of 215 ??g L-1. In some geologic settings in the basin, this mobile arsenic could be from the weathering of pyrite (FeS2) found in black shale that contains up to 4% arsenic by weight. We hypothesized that under oxic conditions at circumneutral pH, the microbially mediated oxidation of sulfide in the pyrite lattice would lead to the release of pyrite-bound arsenic. Moreover, the oxidation of aqueous As(III) to As(V) by aerobic microorganisms could further enhance arsenic mobilization from the solid phase. Enrichment cultures under aerobic, As(III)-oxidizing conditions were established under circumneutral pH with weathered black shale from the Newark Basin as the inoculum source. Strain WAO, an autotrophic inorganic-sulfur and As(III)-oxidizer, was isolated and phylogenetically and physiologically characterized. Arsenic mobilization studies from arsenopyrite (FeAsS) mineral, conducted with strain WAO at circumneutral pH, showed microbially enhanced mobilization of arsenic and complete oxidation of released arsenic and sulfur to stoichiometric amounts of arsenate and sulfate. In addition, WAO preferentially colonized pyrite on the surface of arsenic-bearing, black shale thick sections. These findings support the hypothesis that microorganisms can directly mobilize and transform arsenic bound in mineral form at circumneutral pH and suggest that the microbial mobilization of arsenic into groundwater may be important in other arsenic-impacted aquifers. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  13. Simultaneous nitrate and phosphate removal from wastewater lacking organic matter through microbial oxidation of pyrrhotite coupled to nitrate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruihua; Morrison, Liam; Collins, Gavin; Li, Aimin; Zhan, Xinmin

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the efficiency of a pyrrhotite autotrophic denitrification biofilter (PADB) technology for simultaneous N and P removal from wastewater lacking organic matter. A PADB was constructed with natural pyrrhotite as the biofilter medium and inoculated with autotrophic denitrifies enriched from anaerobic sludge. Over an operating period of 247 days, PADB efficiently removed NO3(-) and PO4(3-) simultaneously from wastewater that lacked organic matter. The hydraulic retention time (HRT), and influent NO3(-) and PO4(3-) concentrations affected the removal of NO3(-) and PO4(3-). A longer HRT led to lower concentrations of NO3(-) and PO4(3-) in the effluent. The PO4(3-) removal was influenced by NO3(-) removed; the more NO3(-) removed, the more PO4(3-) removed. As the synthetic wastewater containing NO3(-)-N of 28 mg L(-1) and PO4(3-)-P of 6 mg L(-1) in the absence of organic matter was treated by PADB at HRT of 24 h, total oxidized nitrogen (TON; NO2(-)-N + NO3(-)-N) and PO4(3-)-P concentrations of effluent were as low as 1.13 and 0.28 mg L(-1), respectively. When treatment of municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) secondary effluent with TON of 21.11 mg L(-1) and PO4(3-)-P of 2.62 mg L(-1) at HRT of 24 h, the effluent TON was 1.89 mg L(-1) and PO4(3-)-P was 0.34 mg L(-1). PO4(3-) was removed through the formation of secondary minerals with Fe and Ca. These secondary minerals contained elevated phosphorus, which presents a potential for P recovery from wastewater. PMID:27017573

  14. Accelerated evolutionary rate in sulfur-oxidizing endosymbiotic bacteria associated with the mode of symbiont transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, A S; Vrijenhoek, R C; Gaut, B S

    1998-11-01

    The nearly neutral theory of molecular evolution predicts that the rate of nucleotide substitution should accelerate in small populations at sites under low selective constraint. We examined these predictions with respect to the relative population sizes for three bacterial life histories within chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria: (1) free-living bacteria, (2) environmentally captured symbionts, and (3) maternally transmitted symbionts. Both relative rates of nucleotide substitution and relative ratios of loop, stem, and domain substitutions from 1,165 nt of the small-subunit 16S rDNA were consistent with expectations of the nearly neutral theory. Relative to free-living sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic bacteria, the maternally transmitted symbionts have faster substitution rates overall and also in low-constraint domains of 16S rDNA. Nucleotide substitition rates also differ between loop and stem positions. All of these findings are consistent with the predictions that these symbionts have relatively small effective population sizes. In contrast, the rates of nucleotide substitution in environmentally captured symbionts are slower, particularly in high-constraint domains, than in free-living bacteria. PMID:12572615

  15. Combined autoradiography and immunofluorescence for estimation of single cell activity by ammonium-oxidizing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunofluorescence and 14CO2 autoradiography were used for simultaneously enumerating and assaying the autotrophic activity of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in seawater. Relative activity (14CO2 assimilation as measured by autoradiography) and abundance were measured in simulated in situ incubations at seven stations in the primary NO2- maximum region of the Northeast Pacific Ocean. More than 104 cells liter-1 were present; relative activity often showed a peak near the surface and an increase in the NO2- max region below the photic zone. The method permits assessment of individual cell activity; most cells at all depths were active in CO2 assimilation, usually at low and quite variable levels. There were no differences in relative activity between samples incubated under simulated in situ conditions and in the dark. Relative activity was positively correlated with the abundance of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, temperature, total dark CO2 assimilation (as measured by liquid scintillation counting of replicate samples), and pheopigment concentration, and negatively correlated with oxygen concentration

  16. Influence of NO2 and metal ions on oxidation of aqueous-phase S(IV in atmospheric concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia R. Martins

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was made of the influence of atmospheric concentrations (15 or 130 ppbv of NO2 on the aqueous-phase oxidation rate of S(IV in the presence and absence of Fe(III, Mn(II and Cr(VI metal ions under controlled experimental conditions (pH, T, concentration of reactants, etc.. The reaction rate in the presence of the NO2 flow was slower than the reaction rate using only clean air with an initial S(IV concentration of 10-4 mol/L. NO2 appears to react with S(IV, producing a kind of inhibitor that slows down the reaction. Conversely, tenfold lower concentrations of S(IV ([S(IV]º = 10-5 mol/L caused a faster reaction in the presence of NO2 than the reaction using purified air. Under these conditions, therefore, the equilibrium shifts to sulfate formation. With the addition of Fe(III, Mn(II or Cr(VI in the presence of a NO2 flow, the reaction occurred faster under all the conditions in which S(IV oxidation was investigated.A reação de oxidação de S(IV em fase aquosa foi estudada em laboratório em presença de NO2 dos íons metálicos Fe(III, Mn(II, e Cr(VI sob condições experimentais controladas (pH, T, concentração dos reagentes, etc.. Na presença de corrente de ar com NO2 (15 ou 130 ppbv a reação de oxidação de S(IV ocorreu mais lentamente do que na presença de ar purificado, para uma concentração inicial de S(IV de 10-4 mol/L. Ao contrário, para concentração inicial de S(IV dez vezes menor ([S(IV]° = 10-5 mol/L a reação ocorreu mais rapidamente na presença de NO2. A explicação está relacionada com o equilíbrio envolvendo a formação de espécies intermediárias de longa vida, que impedem o prosseguimento da reação, porém a depender das concentrações relativas de S(IV e NO2, essas espécies se decompõem deslocando o equilíbrio no sentido de formação de sulfato. A adição dos íons Fe(III, Mn(II ou Cr(VI em presença de corrente de ar com NO2 indicou atividade catalítica para esses íons, em todas

  17. Isolation of microorganisms involved in reduction of crystalline iron(III oxides in natural environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki eHori

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reduction of crystalline Fe(III oxides is one of the most important electron sinks for organic compound oxidation in natural environments. Yet a limited number of isolates makes it difficult to understand physiology and ecological impact of the microorganisms involved. Here, two-staged cultivation was implemented to selectively enrich and isolate crystalline iron(III reducers in soils and sediments. Firstly, iron reducers were enriched and other untargeted eutrophs were depleted by two-year successive culture on a crystalline ferric iron oxide (i.e., goethite, lepidocrocite, hematite, or magnetite as electron acceptor. Fifty-eight out of 136 incubation conditions allowed the continued existence of microorganisms as confirmed by PCR amplification. High-throughput Illumina sequencing based on 16S rRNA genes revealed that the enrichment cultures on each of the ferric iron oxides contained bacteria belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria (mainly Geobacteraceae, followed by Firmicutes and Chloroflexi, which also comprised most of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs identified. The Venn diagrams indicated that the core OTUs enriched with all of the iron oxides were dominant in the Geobacteraceae. Secondly, 38 enrichment cultures including novel microorganisms were transferred to soluble-iron(III media in order to stimulate proliferation of the enriched iron reducers. Through extinction dilution-culture and single colony isolation, six strains within the Deltaproteobacteria were finally obtained; five strains belonged to the genus Geobacter and one strain to Pelobacter. These isolates had 94.8–98.1% sequence similarities of 16S rRNA genes to cultured relatives. All the isolates were able to grow on acetate and ferric iron but their physiological characteristics differed considerably in terms of growth rate. The results demonstrate the successful enrichment and isolation of novel iron(III reducers that were able to thrive by reducing highly

  18. Glycolic acid assisted one-step synthesis of Cu-Ni-Fe metal oxide nanocomposites by sol-gel-combustion method: Structural, spectroscopic and magnetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Manish [Department of Physics, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology, Allahabad, Allahabad 211004 (India); Ojha, Animesh K., E-mail: animesh_r1776@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology, Allahabad, Allahabad 211004 (India); Chaubey, S. [Department of Physics, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology, Allahabad, Allahabad 211004 (India); Sharma, Prashant K.; Pandey, Avinash C. [Nanophosphor Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India)

    2010-04-15

    The present article reports the synthesis of copper, nickel and iron-based metal oxide nanocomposites by sol-gel method using disproportion of Cu(II) and Fe(III) in basic media. The synthesized nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy (RS), differential scanning calorimetery (DSC)/thermogravemetric analysis (TGA), field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The XRD patterns of nanocomposites confirm the presence of spinel, CuO and FeO phases. The particle size of the nanocomposite has been calculated using HR-TEM micrographs and found to be in the range of 10-120 nm. The magnetic properties of nanocomposites were measured at room temperature. The values of saturation magnetization (Ms) and remanent magnetization (Mr) were increasing with increase of iron concentration.

  19. The oxidation of mackinawite (FeS): a Raman spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdoiseau, J.A.; Jeannin, M.; Sabot, R.; Refait, Ph. [La Rochelle Univ., Lab. d' Etude des Materiaux en Milieux Agressifs, EA 3167, 17 (France); Bourdoiseau, J.A. [ANDRA, 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France)

    2009-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: This study relates to the problem of nuclear wastes disposal. In France, it is envisaged that high-level radioactive wastes will be confined in a glass matrix, stored in a stainless steel canister, itself placed in a carbon steel overpack. The wastes will then be stored at a depth of {approx}500 m in a deep geological disposal, drilled in a very stiff (indurated) clay (argillite) formation. Localised leaks of sulphide from the environment, produced for instance by sulphate reducing bacteria, could occur. In order to estimate the probability of a localised corrosion phenomenon induced by such sulphide species on the steel surface of the overpack, the mechanisms have to be understood first. For such a study, micro-Raman spectroscopy is a unique technique since it can analyse corrosion products on local zones as small as {approx}2*2 {mu}m. Moreover, a recent work revealed that Raman analysis could provide information about the degrees of crystallisation, dehydration and oxidation of mackinawite FeS [1]. This iron-sulphur compound is the one that precipitates from dissolved Fe(II) and S(-II) species and is consequently the first corrosion product to form on steel in the presence of sulphide, typically in H{sub 2}S containing atmospheres or Na{sub 2}S electrolytes. It is sensitive to the oxidising action of O{sub 2} and can persist for long periods of time only under reduced conditions. In the presence of O{sub 2}, mackinawite can be transformed into greigite Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4}, into elemental sulphur and Fe(III) oxy-hydroxides and/or magnetite Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} [2]. Mackinawite samples were oxidized by various methods so that different oxidation degrees could be obtained. A complete oxidation under large oxygen flows led to lepidocrocite {gamma}-FeOOH and elemental sulphur {alpha}-S{sub 8}. Partial oxidation led to a progressive modification of the Raman spectrum of the iron-sulphur compound. After a slight oxidation, the spectrum was

  20. Bioflotation of sulfide minerals with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans in relation to copper activation and surface oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecina-Treviño, E T; Ramos-Escobedo, G T; Gallegos-Acevedo, P M; López-Saucedo, F J; Orrantia-Borunda, E

    2012-08-24

    Surface oxidation of sulfides and copper (Cu) activation are 2 of the main processes that determine the efficiency of flotation. The present study was developed with the intention to ascertain the role of the phenomena in the biomodification of sulfides by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans culture (cells and growth media) and their impact in bioflotation. Surface characteristics of chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and pyrrhotite, alone and in mixtures, after interaction with A. ferrooxidans were evaluated. Chalcopyrite floatability was increased substantially by biomodification, while bacteria depressed pyrrhotite floatability, favoring separation. The results showed that elemental sulfur concentration increased because of the oxidation generated by bacterial cells, the effect is intensified by the Fe(III) left in the culture and by galvanic contact. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans culture affects the Cu activation of sphalerite. The implications of elemental sulfur concentration and Cu activation of sphalerite are key factors that must be considered for the future development of sulfide bioflotation processes, since the depressive effect of cells could be counteracted by elemental sulfur generation. PMID:22920540

  1. Controls on the Fate and Speciation of Np(V) During Iron (Oxyhydr)oxide Crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bots, Pieter; Shaw, Samuel; Law, Gareth T W; Marshall, Timothy A; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Morris, Katherine

    2016-04-01

    The speciation and fate of neptunium as Np(V)O2(+) during the crystallization of ferrihydrite to hematite and goethite was explored in a range of systems. Adsorption of NpO2(+) to iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxide phases was reversible and, for ferrihydrite, occurred through the formation of mononuclear bidentate surface complexes. By contrast, chemical extractions and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analyses showed the incorporation of Np(V) into the structure of hematite during its crystallization from ferrihydrite (pH 10.5). This occurred through direct replacement of octahedrally coordinated Fe(III) by Np(V) in neptunate-like coordination. Subsequent analyses on mixed goethite and hematite crystallization products (pH 9.5 and 11) showed that Np(V) was incorporated during crystallization. Conversely, there was limited evidence for Np(V) incorporation during goethite crystallization at the extreme pH of 13.3. This is likely due to the formation of a Np(V) hydroxide precipitate preventing incorporation into the goethite particles. Overall these data highlight the complex behavior of Np(V) during the crystallization of iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxides, and demonstrate clear evidence for neptunium incorporation into environmentally important mineral phases. This extends our knowledge of the range of geochemical conditions under which there is potential for long-term immobilization of radiotoxic Np in natural and engineered environments. PMID:26913955

  2. 自养条件下高氯酸盐降解细菌群落研究%The Study of the Structure of Perchlorate(ClO4-)-degrading Bacterial Communities Under Autotrophic Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢宇轩; 关翔宇; 于丽莎; 刘菲

    2014-01-01

    For the purpose of further investigating the biological degradation under an autotrophic condition and well understanding the microbial community structures in a complex environment, hydrogen was used as an electron donor to completely reduce perchlorate(ClO4-)in this study. The composition of microbial communities after degradation was analyzed via the construction of a cloning library by using the High-Throughput Sequencing method(HiSeq 2000). 71 days were needed to completely degrade 10 mg/L ClO4-. Microbial phylogenic analysis of HD(hydrogen degradation)after degradation indicated that the relative abundance of total bacteria in the HD was 84.96%whereas the relative abundance of Proteobacteria was 68.11%, whose percentage accounting for the total bacteria reached to 80.16%. The relative abundance of Dechloromonas which is representative in PRB was 2.7%in the HD. Simultaneously, the relative abundance of Azospira was 3.1%. KEGG was used to analyze the function of bacteria in HD. The relative abundance of genes which engaged in carbohydrate metabolism was 4.75%, and the genes included in energy metabolism was 3.35%, whereas the genes participated in nitrogen cycle was 0.72%, and the genes involving chloride transformation was 0.83%. It was demonstrated that degradation of ClO4-in a complicated condition was achieved by various kinds of microbes rather than a single one. Adding hydrogen as an electron donor to change microbial community played a role in the purification or selection process in the system, which allowed the complex systems to have the specific capacity to remove given contaminates.%旨在研究自养条件下以氢气作为电子供体高氯酸根离子(ClO4-)的微生物降解机制,利用HiSeq 2000对微生物群落结构及多样性进行高通量测序及分析。结果表明,添加氢气的HD(hydrogen degradation)体系将10 mg/L ClO4-降至检出限以下共经历71 d。ClO4-完全降解后HD体系中总细菌的相对丰度为84

  3. 硫磺/石灰石自养反硝化系统脱氮除磷性能研究%Performance of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Removal of Sulfur/Limestone Autotrophic Denitrification System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁玉玲; 李睿华

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the performance of nitrogen and phosphorus removal of the sulfur/limestone system from low C/N municipal sewage,a sulfur/limestone packed column reactor fed with synthetic wastewater,and operated in the way of anaerobic biological filter was constructed.The effects of HRT,initial concentration of phosphate,pH and temperature on nitrogen and phosphorus removal were studied.The results showed that with influent of NO-3-N 30 mg/L,PO4^3--P 15 mg/L,the optimal HRT value was 6 h,and removal rates of TN and phosphorus were 100% and 44.64% respectively.Initial concentration of phosphate and initial pH had a significant influence on nitrogen and phosphorus removal.In order to keep nitrogen removal rate higher than 90%,initial concentration of phosphate should not be below 0.4 mg/L;the optimal pH value was 6.5,and removal rates of TN and phosphorus were 91.51% and 47.68% respectively.Temperature had a positive impact on that system,the nitrogen and phosphorus removal rate decreased with decreasing temperature.The nitrate removal efficiency was high in the temperature range of 18-30℃,and the efficiency of phosphorus removal rate reached about 50%,when the temperature was between 25-30℃.The dephosphorization behavior of sulfur/limestone system correlated closely with autotrophic denitrification process,and the mechanism of phosphate removal of the SLAD system was mainly due to chemical precipitation.The system had the performance of nitrogen and phosphorus removal from low C/N municipal sewage,the highest phosphorus removal rate could reach 50%.%为了考察硫磺/石灰石系统对于低C/N的城市污水进行同步脱氮除磷的性能,设计了体积比为1∶1的硫磺/石灰石柱式反应器,以人工配水为处理对象,采用厌氧生物滤池运行方式,研究了HRT、初始磷浓度、pH、温度等因素对其脱氮除磷性能的影响.结果表明,在进水NO 3^--N为30 mg/L左右,PO4^3--P为15 mg/L条件下,系统

  4. Specific bonds between an iron oxide surface and outer membrane cytochromes MtrC and OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower, Brian H; Shi, Liang; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Droubay, Timothy C; McCready, David E; Lower, Steven K

    2007-07-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is purported to express outer membrane cytochromes (e.g., MtrC and OmcA) that transfer electrons directly to Fe(III) in a mineral during anaerobic respiration. A prerequisite for this type of reaction would be the formation of a stable bond between a cytochrome and an iron oxide surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to detect whether a specific bond forms between a hematite (Fe(2)O(3)) thin film, created with oxygen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, and recombinant MtrC or OmcA molecules coupled to gold substrates. Force spectra displayed a unique force signature indicative of a specific bond between each cytochrome and the hematite surface. The strength of the OmcA-hematite bond was approximately twice that of the MtrC-hematite bond, but direct binding to hematite was twice as favorable for MtrC. Reversible folding/unfolding reactions were observed for mechanically denatured MtrC molecules bound to hematite. The force measurements for the hematite-cytochrome pairs were compared to spectra collected for an iron oxide and S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions. There is a strong correlation between the whole-cell and pure-protein force spectra, suggesting that the unique binding attributes of each cytochrome complement one another and allow both MtrC and OmcA to play a prominent role in the transfer of electrons to Fe(III) in minerals. Finally, by comparing the magnitudes of binding force for the whole-cell versus pure-protein data, we were able to estimate that a single bacterium of S. oneidensis (2 by 0.5 microm) expresses approximately 10(4) cytochromes on its outer surface. PMID:17468239

  5. Structure and oxidation state of hemitite surfaces reacted with aqueous Fe(II) at acidic and neutral pH.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, J. G.; Fenter, P.; Park, C.; Zhang, Z.; Rosso, K. M.; Washington Univ.; PNNL

    2010-01-01

    Structural changes and surface oxidation state were examined following the reaction of hematite (0 0 1), (0 1 2), and (1 1 0) with aqueous Fe(II). X-ray reflectivity measurements indicated that Fe(II) induces changes in the structure of all three surfaces under both acidic (pH 3) and neutral (pH 7) conditions. The structural changes were generally independent of pH although the extent of surface transformation varied slightly between acidic and neutral conditions; no systematic trends with pH were observed. Induced changes on the (1 1 0) and (0 1 2) surfaces include the addition or removal of partial surface layers consistent with either growth or dissolution. In contrast, a <1 nm thick, discontinuous film formed on the (0 0 1) surface that appears to be epitaxial yet is not a perfect extension of the underlying hematite lattice, being either structurally defective, compositionally distinct, or nanoscale in size and highly relaxed. Resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity measurements determined that the surface concentration of Fe(II) present after reaction at pH 7 was below the detection limit of approximately 0.5-1 {micro}mol/m{sup 2} on all surfaces. These observations are consistent with Fe(II) oxidative adsorption, whereby adsorbed Fe(II) is oxidized by structural Fe(III) in the hematite lattice, with the extent of this reaction controlled by surface structure at the atomic scale. The observed surface transformations at pH 3 show that Fe(II) oxidatively adsorbs on hematite surfaces at pH values where little net adsorption occurs, based on historical macroscopic Fe(II) adsorption behavior on fine-grained hematite powders. This suggests that Fe(II) plays a catalytic role, in which an electron from an adsorbed Fe(II) migrates to and reduces a lattice Fe(III) cation elsewhere, which subsequently desorbs in a scenario with zero net reduction and zero net adsorption. Given the general pH-independence and substantial mass transfer involved, this electron and atom

  6. Structure and Oxidation State of Hematite Surfaces Reacted with Aqueous Fe(II) at Acidic and Neutral pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, Jeffrey G.; Fenter, Paul; Park, Changyong; Zhang, Zhan; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2010-03-01

    Structural changes and surface oxidation state were examined following the reaction of hematite (001), (012), and (110) with aqueous Fe(II). X-ray reflectivity measurements indicated that Fe(II) induces changes in the structure of all three surfaces under both acidic (pH 3) and neutral (pH 7) conditions. The structural changes were generally independent of pH although the extent of surface transformation varied slightly between acidic and neutral conditions; no systematic trends with pH were observed. Induced changes on the (110) and (012) surfaces include the addition or removal of partial surface layers consistent with either growth or dissolution. In contrast, a <1 nm thick, discontinuous film formed on the (001) surface that appears to be epitaxial yet is not a perfect extension of the underlying hematite lattice, being either structurally defective, compositionally distinct, or nanoscale in size and highly relaxed. Resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity measurements determined that the surface concentration of Fe(II) present after reaction at pH 7 was below the detection limit of approximately 0.5 to 1 mol/m2 on all surfaces. These observations are consistent with Fe(II) oxidative adsorption, whereby adsorbed Fe(II) is oxidized by structural Fe(III) in the hematite lattice, with the extent of this reaction controlled by surface structure at the atomic scale. The observed surface transformations at pH 3 show that Fe(II) oxidatively adsorbs on hematite surfaces at pH values where little net adsorption occurs, based on historical macroscopic Fe(II) adsorption behavior on fine-grained hematite powders. This suggests that Fe(II) plays a catalytic role, in which an electron from an adsorbed Fe(II) migrates to and reduces a lattice Fe(III) cation elsewhere, which subsequently desorbs in a scenario with zero net reduction and zero net adsorption. Given the general pH-independence and substantial mass transfer involved, this electron and atom exchange processes

  7. Structure and oxidation state of hematite surfaces reacted with aqueous Fe(II) at acidic and neutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Jeffrey G.; Fenter, Paul; Park, Changyong; Zhang, Zhan; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2010-03-01

    Structural changes and surface oxidation state were examined following the reaction of hematite (0 0 1), (0 1 2), and (1 1 0) with aqueous Fe(II). X-ray reflectivity measurements indicated that Fe(II) induces changes in the structure of all three surfaces under both acidic (pH 3) and neutral (pH 7) conditions. The structural changes were generally independent of pH although the extent of surface transformation varied slightly between acidic and neutral conditions; no systematic trends with pH were observed. Induced changes on the (1 1 0) and (0 1 2) surfaces include the addition or removal of partial surface layers consistent with either growth or dissolution. In contrast, a <1 nm thick, discontinuous film formed on the (0 0 1) surface that appears to be epitaxial yet is not a perfect extension of the underlying hematite lattice, being either structurally defective, compositionally distinct, or nanoscale in size and highly relaxed. Resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity measurements determined that the surface concentration of Fe(II) present after reaction at pH 7 was below the detection limit of approximately 0.5-1 μmol/m 2 on all surfaces. These observations are consistent with Fe(II) oxidative adsorption, whereby adsorbed Fe(II) is oxidized by structural Fe(III) in the hematite lattice, with the extent of this reaction controlled by surface structure at the atomic scale. The observed surface transformations at pH 3 show that Fe(II) oxidatively adsorbs on hematite surfaces at pH values where little net adsorption occurs, based on historical macroscopic Fe(II) adsorption behavior on fine-grained hematite powders. This suggests that Fe(II) plays a catalytic role, in which an electron from an adsorbed Fe(II) migrates to and reduces a lattice Fe(III) cation elsewhere, which subsequently desorbs in a scenario with zero net reduction and zero net adsorption. Given the general pH-independence and substantial mass transfer involved, this electron and atom exchange

  8. Adsorption of arsenite and selenite using an inorganic ion exchanger based on Fe–Mn hydrous oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Szlachta, Małgorzata

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption behaviour and mechanism of As(III) and Se(IV) oxyanion uptake using a mixed inorganic adsorbent were studied. The novel adsorbent, based on Fe(III)-Mn(III) hydrous oxides and manganese(II) carbonate, was synthesised using a hydrothermal precipitation approach in the presence of urea. The inorganic ion exchanger exhibited a high selectivity and adsorptive capacity towards As(III) (up to 47.6mg/g) and Se(IV) (up to 29.0mg/g), even at low equilibrium concentration. Although pH effects were typical for anionic species (i.e., the adsorption decreased upon pH increase), Se(IV) was more sensitive to pH changes than As(III). The rates of adsorption of both oxyanions were high. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies showed that the ion exchange adsorption of both anions took place via OH - groups, mainly from Fe(III) but also Mn(III) hydrous oxides. MnCO 3 did not contribute directly to As(III) and Se(IV) removal. A higher adsorptive capacity of the developed material towards As(III) was partly due to partial As(III) oxidation during adsorption. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  9. Oxidation resistance of silicon ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutoshi, H.; Hirota, K.

    1984-01-01

    Oxidation resistance, and examples of oxidation of SiC, Si3N4 and sialon are reviewed. A description is given of the oxidation mechanism, including the oxidation product, oxidation reaction and the bubble size. The oxidation reactions are represented graphically. An assessment is made of the oxidation process, and an oxidation example of silicon ceramics is given.

  10. Thermally exfoliat