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Sample records for autotitrating positive airway

  1. Auto-titrating versus fixed continuous positive airway pressure for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea: a systematic review with meta-analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ip Stanley

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obstructive sleep apnea is a relatively common disorder that can lead to lost productivity and cardiovascular disease. The form of positive airway treatment that should be offered is unclear. Methods MEDLINE and the Cochrane Central Trials registry were searched for English language randomized controlled trials comparing auto-titrating positive airway pressure (APAP with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP in adults with obstructive sleep apnea (inception through 9/2010. Six researchers extracted information on study design, potential bias, patient characteristics, interventions and outcomes. Data for each study were extracted by one reviewer and confirmed by another. Random effects model meta-analyses were performed for selected outcomes. Results Twenty-four randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria. In individual studies, APAP and fixed CPAP resulted in similar changes from baseline in the apnea-hypopnea index, most other sleep study measures and quality of life. By meta-analysis, APAP improved compliance by 11 minutes per night (95% CI, 3 to 19 minutes and reduced sleepiness as measured by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale by 0.5 points (95% CI, 0.8 to 0.2 point reduction compared with fixed CPAP. Fixed CPAP improved minimum oxygen saturation by 1.3% more than APAP (95% CI, 0.4 to 2.2%. Studies had relatively short follow-up and generally excluded patients with significant comorbidities. No study reported on objective clinical outcomes. Conclusions Statistically significant differences were found but clinical importance is unclear. Because the treatment effects are similar between APAP and CPAP, the therapy of choice may depend on other factors such as patient preference, specific reasons for non-compliance and cost.

  2. Positive airway pressure treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and depression and a better mood Normal sleep patterns Lower blood pressure (in people with high blood pressure) Your health care provider will prescribe the type of PAP machine that ... patterns. Bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP or BIPAP) has ...

  3. Positive Airway Pressure Device Technology Past and Present: What's in the "Black Box"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lee K; Javaheri, Shahrokh

    2017-12-01

    Since the introduction of continuous positive airway pressure (PAP) for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in 1981, PAP technology has diversified exponentially. Compact and quiet fixed continuous PAP flow generators, autotitrating PAP devices, and bilevel PAP devices that can treat multiple sleep-disordered breathing phenotypes including OSA, central sleep apnea (CSA), combinations of OSA and CSA, and hypoventilation are available. Adaptive servo-ventilators can suppress Hunter-Cheyne-Stokes breathing and CSA and treat coexisting obstructive events. Volume-assured pressure support PAP apparatus purports to provide a targeted degree of ventilatory assistance while also treating cooccurring OSA and/or CSA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Improvised bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improvised bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP) device at the National Hospital Abuja gives immediate improvement in respiratory rate and oxygenation in neonates with respiratory distress.

  5. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Lamwers, Stephanie; Tepel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is linked to increased cardiovascular risk. This risk can be reduced by nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) treatment. As OSA is associated with an increase of several vasoconstrictive factors, we investigated whether nCPAP influences the digital volume...... pulse wave. We performed digital photoplethysmography during sleep at night in 94 consecutive patients who underwent polysomnography and 29 patients treated with nCPAP. Digital volume pulse waves were obtained independently of an investigator and were quantified using an algorithm for continuous.......01; n = 94) and the arousal index (Spearman correlation, r = 0.21; p CPAP treatment, the AHI was significantly reduced from 27 ± 3 events · h(-1) to 4 ± 2 events · h(-1) (each n = 29; p

  6. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, R; Wung, J T

    1998-01-01

    Progress in neonatal intensive care is closely linked to improvements in the management of respiratory failure in small infants. This applies to the care of the preterm infants with immature lungs, and also to treatment of the preterm or full term infants with specific diseases that are associated with respiratory failure. Respiratory distress of the newborn continues to account for significant morbidity in the intensive care unit. The spectrum of disease ranges from mild distress to severe respiratory failure requiring varying degrees of support. The current modalities of ventilatory assistance range from the more benign continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to conventional mechanical ventilation, and on to high frequency ventilation. It is a reasonable supposition that the type of ventilatory assistance provided to these infants should be graded according to the severity of the disease. However, the principal objective in selecting the mode of respiratory support should be to use a modality which results in minimal volo- or barotrauma to the infant. The following detailed description on CPAP explains its physiological effects, delivery system, indications for use, application, maintenance, and associated complications. The equipment described is simple to use, has a greater cost benefit, and has a more universal application, which is of help to smaller units including those in the developing parts of the world. We have also included our institutional clinical experience of CPAP usage in very low birth weight infants from the periods before and after commercial availability of surfactant in the United States.

  7. Improvised bubble continuous positive airway pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2014-08-15

    Aug 15, 2014 ... ous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is often sufficient to tide a preterm infant through RDS. ... eration in BCPAP and arrived at a modification of the existing bubble CPAP device which is effective, ..... gestational age dependent, oxygen induced retinopathy. Conclusion. The NHA-BCPAP device produces ...

  8. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy: new generations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Garvey, John F

    2012-02-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the treatment of choice for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). However, CPAP is not tolerated by all patients with OSAS and alternative modes of pressure delivery have been developed to overcome pressure intolerance, thereby improving patient comfort and adherence. Auto-adjustable positive airway pressure (APAP) devices may be utilised for the long-term management of OSAS and may also assist in the initial diagnosis of OSAS and titration of conventional CPAP therapy. Newer modalities such as C-Flex and A-Flex also show promise as treatment options in the future. However, the evidence supporting the use of these alternative modalities remains scant, in particular with regard to long-term cardiovascular outcomes. In addition, not all APAP devices use the same technological algorithms and data supporting individual APAP devices cannot be extrapolated to support all. Further studies are required to validate the roles of APAP, C-Flex and A-Flex. In the interim, standard CPAP therapy should continue as the mainstay of OSAS management.

  9. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy: new generations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Garvey, John F

    2010-02-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the treatment of choice for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). However, CPAP is not tolerated by all patients with OSAS and alternative modes of pressure delivery have been developed to overcome pressure intolerance, thereby improving patient comfort and adherence. Auto-adjustable positive airway pressure (APAP) devices may be utilised for the long-term management of OSAS and may also assist in the initial diagnosis of OSAS and titration of conventional CPAP therapy. Newer modalities such as C-Flex and A-Flex also show promise as treatment options in the future. However, the evidence supporting the use of these alternative modalities remains scant, in particular with regard to long-term cardiovascular outcomes. In addition, not all APAP devices use the same technological algorithms and data supporting individual APAP devices cannot be extrapolated to support all. Further studies are required to validate the roles of APAP, C-Flex and A-Flex. In the interim, standard CPAP therapy should continue as the mainstay of OSAS management.

  10. Effect of body position on ventilation distribution in preterm infants on continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Judith L; Johnston, Leanne; Brauer, Sandy G; Woodgate, Paul G; Pham, Trang M T; Schibler, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Although continuous positive airway pressure is used extensively in neonatal intensive care units, and despite the belief that positioning is considered vital to the maintenance of good lung ventilation, no data exist on regional ventilation distribution in infants on continuous positive airway pressure ventilatory support. To investigate the effect of body position on regional ventilation in preterm infants on continuous positive airway pressure ventilatory support using electrical impedance tomography. Randomized crossover study design. Neonatal intensive care unit. Twenty-four preterm infants on continuous positive airway pressure were compared to six spontaneously breathing preterm infants. Random assignment of the order of the positions supine, prone, and quarter prone. Changes in global and regional lung volume were measured with electrical impedance tomography. Although there were no differences between positions, regional tidal volume was increased in the posterior compared with the anterior lung (p positive airway pressure. The posterior lung filled earlier than the anterior lung in the spontaneously breathing infants (p positive airway pressure the right lung filled before the left lung (p positive airway pressure than in the healthy infants (p preterm infants on continuous positive airway pressure using electrical impedance tomography. Gravity had little impact on regional ventilation distribution in preterm infants on continuous positive airway pressure or in spontaneously breathing infants in the supine or prone position, indicating that ventilation distribution in preterm infants is not gravity-dependent but follows an anatomical pattern. AUSTRALIA NEW ZEALAND CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRY:: ACTRN12606000210572.

  11. Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure for weaning with tracheostomy tubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieperink, Willem; Aarts, Leon P. H. J.; Rodgers, Michael G. G.; Delwig, Hans; Nijsten, Maarten W. N.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In patients who are weaned with a tracheostomy tube ( TT), continuous positive airway pressure ( CPAP) is frequently used. Dedicated CPAP systems or ventilators with bulky tubing are usually applied. However, CPAP can also be effective without a ventilator by the disposable Bous-signac

  12. Early surfactant therapy and nasal continuous positive airways ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of nasal continuous positive airways pressure. (NCPAP) in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. (RDS) reduces the need for mechanical ventilation (MV)1 and decreases mortality.2 MV in preterm infants is further reduced by early administration of porcine surfactant (Curosurf) followed by immediate ...

  13. Early surfactant therapy and nasal continuous positive airways ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To determine if the administration of porcine surfactant 100 mg/kg within 24 hours after birth, to infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) receiving nasal continuous positive airways pressure (NCPAP) and inspired oxygen (FiO2) 0.3 - 0.4, decreased the need for mechanical ventilation (MV) during the first ...

  14. Acute impact of continuous positive airway pressure on nasal patency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsalobre, Leonardo; Pezato, Rogério; Gasparini, Hiran; Haddad, Fernanda; Gregório, Luis Carlos; Fujita, Reginaldo R

    2017-07-01

    Continuous airflow in the upper airway can cause discomfort, leading to nasopharyngeal complaints. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the acute effects of continuous positive upper-airway pressure on nasal patency in awake normal subjects. Twenty-seven adults (17 men; 10 women; age range, 18 to 43 years) were exposed to continuous airway pressure (20 cmH 2 O) in the nasal cavity, delivered by a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device through a nasal mask for 2 hours. Visual analogue scale (VAS) of nasal obstruction, Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) modified scale, acoustic rhinometry (AR), and peak nasal inspiratory flow (PF) were measured before and after the use of CPAP. There was an increase in nasal obstruction scores both on the VAS (p nasal cavity volume on AR (p Nasal parameters were significantly worse in the rhinitis group, with higher nasal obstruction scores on the VAS (p = 0.001) and NOSE scale (p CPAP is associated with subjective and objective reductions in nasal patency. In individuals with allergic nasal symptoms, deterioration is even more severe than in patients without these symptoms. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  15. Sleep apnea is associated with bronchial inflammation and continuous positive airway pressure-induced airway hyperresponsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devouassoux, Gilles; Lévy, Patrick; Rossini, Eliane; Pin, Isabelle; Fior-Gozlan, Michèle; Henry, Mireille; Seigneurin, Daniel; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2007-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is associated with systemic and upper airway inflammation. Pharyngeal inflammation has a potential role in upper airway collapse, whereas systemic inflammation relates to cardiovascular morbidity. However, the presence of an inflammatory involvement of lower airway has been poorly investigated. The aim of the study was to demonstrate an inflammatory process at the bronchial level in patients with OSA and to analyze effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) application and humidification on bronchial mucosa. The study was conducted by using sequential induced sputum for cell analysis and IL-8 production, nitric oxide exhalation measurement, and methacholine challenge before and after CPAP. Bronchial neutrophilia and a high IL-8 concentration were observed in untreated OSA compared with controls (75% +/- 20% vs 43% +/- 12%, P Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is associated with bronchial inflammation. Our data demonstrate CPAP effect on the development of AHR, possibly facilitated by the pre-existing inflammation. Both issues should be evaluated during long-term CPAP use. Results showing a spontaneous bronchial inflammation in OSA and the development of a CPAP-related AHR require a long-term follow-up to evaluate consequences on chronic bronchial obstruction.

  16. Continuous positive airway pressure and body position alter lung ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pulmonary clearance rate was assessed through pulmonary scintigraphy under spontaneous breathing and under 20 and 10 cmH2O CPAP in the sitting and supine positions. The clearance rate was expressed as the half-time (T1/2), that is, the time for the activity to decrease to 50% of the peak value. 20 cmH2O CPAP ...

  17. Positional therapy in patients with residual positional obstructive sleep apnea after upper airway surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benoist, L.B.L.; Verhagen, M.; Torensma, B.; van Maanen, J.P.; de Vries, N.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/background: A considerable portion of patients has residual positional obstructive sleep apnea (POSA) after upper airway surgery. Those patients could benefit from additional treatment with positional therapy (PT). The objective of this prospective study was to assess the additional effect

  18. Facial deformations during nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Andrew; Simmons, Anne; Hoffman, Mark; Schindhelm, Klaus

    2016-12-08

    Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA), characterised by repeated collapse of the pharyngeal airway during sleep, causes cessation of breathing followed by arousal, restoring normality. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) is a non-invasive, effective treatment for OSA where positive pressure is applied to the airway through a mask, maintaining patency. Nasal masks are commonly used, contacting the face across the upper lip, sides of the nose and the nasal bridge. Despite health benefits, therapy compliance is sub-optimal, often due to poor mask fit and discomfort. Masks have been designed to conform to the facial profile, but have not taken into account facial deformations. The nature of facial deformations while undergoing CPAP therapy is unknown. This study investigates the facial deformations experienced by a patient while undergoing nasal CPAP therapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans of the face were acquired of participants in the reference configuration and while undergoing CPAP therapy. The CPAP scan volume was registered onto the reference volume prior to surface generation for each state. Perpendicular deformation was measured from the reference facial profile to the deformed profile. Large facial deformations were measured at the sides of the nose (4.6±1.6mm) and the upper lip (4.9±1.8mm) with much smaller deformations at the nasal bridge (2.4±0.2mm). When normalised by applied load and tissue thickness, no difference was found. These findings and techniques can be used to consider facial deformation in the development of future nasal CPAP masks to improve comfort and compliance to therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Insomnia complaints in lean patients with obstructive sleep apnea negatively affect positive airway pressure treatment adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysteinsdottir, Bjorg; Gislason, Thorarinn; Pack, Allan I; Benediktsdottir, Bryndís; Arnardottir, Erna S; Kuna, Samuel T; Björnsdottir, Erla

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the determinants of long-term adherence to positive airway pressure treatment among patients with obstructive sleep apnea, with special emphasis on patients who stop positive airway pressure treatment within 1 year. This is a prospective long-term follow-up of subjects in the Icelandic Sleep Apnea Cohort who were diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea between 2005 and 2009, and started on positive airway pressure treatment. In October 2014, positive airway pressure adherence was obtained by systematically evaluating available clinical files (n = 796; 644 males, 152 females) with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index ≥15 events per h). The mean follow-up time was 6.7 ± 1.2 years. In total, 123 subjects (15.5%) returned their positive airway pressure device within the first year, 170 (21.4%) returned it later and 503 (63.2%) were still using positive airway pressure. The quitters within the first year had lower body mass index, milder obstructive sleep apnea, less sleepiness, and more often had symptoms of initial and late insomnia compared with long-term positive airway pressure users at baseline. Both initial and late insomnia were after adjustment still significantly associated with being an early quitter among subjects with body mass index insomnia are associated with early quitting on positive airway pressure among non-obese subjects. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  20. Early nasal continuous positive airway pressure in a cohort of the smallest infants in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bo M; Esbjørn, Barbara Hoff; Greisen, G

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate neurodevelopmental outcome at age 5 y of age in a cohort of preterm children treated mainly with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in the neonatal period.......To evaluate neurodevelopmental outcome at age 5 y of age in a cohort of preterm children treated mainly with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in the neonatal period....

  1. Proportional positive airway pressure: a new concept to treat obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, J; Becker, H; Cassel, W; Rostig, S; Peter, J H

    2001-03-01

    Proportional positive airway pressure (PPAP) was designed to optimize airway pressure for the therapy of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). In a randomized crossover prospective study, the clinical feasibility of PPAP and its immediate effects on the breathing disorder and sleep in comparison with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was evaluated. Twelve patients requiring CPAP therapy underwent CPAP and PPAP titration in a random order. Obstructive and mixed respiratory events could be completely abolished with both forms of treatment. This efficacy could be achieved at a significantly lower mean mask pressure during PPAP titration (8.45+/-2.42 cmH2O) compared to CPAP (9.96+/-2.7 cmH2O) (p=0.002). The mean minimal arterial oxygen saturation (Sa,O2) (82.8+/-6.5%) on the diagnostic night increased significantly (pPPAP titration. Total sleep time, slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep increased significantly by the same amount during both CPAP and PPAP titration (pPPAP titration night, four patients did not have a preference, and two patients preferred CPAP. The present data show that proportional positive airway pressure is as effective as continuous positive airway pressure in eliminating obstructive events and has the same immediate effect on sleep. The lower average mask pressure during proportional positive airway pressure implies potential advantages compared to continuous positive airway pressure. Proportional positive airway pressure presents a new effective therapeutic approach to obstructive sleep apnoea.

  2. Routine use of humidification with nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsnop, C J; Miseski, S; Rochford, P D

    2010-09-01

    Heated humidification can reduce nasal symptoms caused by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment, but its routine use has not been studied over the medium term in a randomized controlled trial. The aim of this study is to determine if heated humidification would reduce nasal symptoms and improve adherence with CPAP treatment in all patients with sleep apnoea irrespective of whether they had nasal symptoms initially. A randomized, parallel group design. Patients were treated for 3 months with a Fisher & Paykel HC201 pump with built-in heated humidification, or with the heater disabled and without water. Adherence was measured with a timer built into the pumps. Nasal symptoms were measured with a 10-cm visual analogue scale. There were 25 in the humidification group and 29 in the non-humidification group. After 12 weeks mean (standard deviation) adherence with CPAP was 4.7 (2.4) and 4.5 (2.2) hours per night respectively. Nasal symptoms that were reduced were nose blocked* 6 (12), 18 (26); sneezing* 4 (8), 15 (25); dry nose* 8 (12), 24 (33); stuffy nose* 7 (14), 22(31); dry mouth* 13 (18), 33(36); and runny nose* 6 (17), 14 (29). Parameters marked with an asterisk '*' had P humidification with CPAP in all patients with sleep apnoea reduced nasal symptoms, but did not improve adherence. © 2010 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2010 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  3. Portable power supply options for positive airway pressure devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Certal, Victor; Camacho, Macario

    2015-01-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) often face the challenge of how to power their positive airway pressure (PAP) devices when alternating current power supplies are not available in remote areas with lack of electricity or frequent power outages. This article elucidates portable power supply options for PAP devices with the aim to increase alternative power source awareness among medical providers. A search of scientific databases (Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and the Cochrane Library) was carried out on the topic of alternative portable power supply options for treatment of OSA. Scientific databases listed above yielded only limited results. Most articles were found via Google search. These articles were reviewed for alternative power supply options for OSA patients when alternating current is not available. The power supply options in this article include lead-acid batteries (starter, marine and deep-cycle batteries), lithium ion batteries, solar kits, battery packs, backup power systems, portable generators, and travel-size PAP devices. There are several options to power PAP devices with direct current when alternating current is not available. Knowledgeable primary care physicians especially in rural and remote areas can help OSA patients improve PAP compliance in order to mitigate morbidity and long-term complications of OSA.

  4. Personality correlates of adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Alicia M; Everhart, Daniel Erik; Davis, Claude Ervin; Wuensch, Karl L; Lee, Daniel O; Demaree, Heath A

    2011-12-01

    Adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been problematic. Understanding the factors associated with nonadherence may assist with psychosocial interventions. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between adherence and three measures of personality and coping strategies. Ratings on the behavioral inhibition system/behavioral activation system (BIS/BAS) scales, the ways of coping inventory, and a broad personality measure (mini-IPIP) were analyzed with a binary logistic regression among 63 subjects, adult men (31) and women (32), diagnosed with OSA. Data from the CPAP device was obtained following initial 30 days at minimum, with adherence defined as >4 h/night on 70% of nights. Elevated BIS was the strongest predictor of nonadherence (r = -.452, p < .01), followed by neuroticism. The regression correctly classified 73% of participants as adherent or nonadherent. Nonadherence is associated with elevated BIS scores and neuroticism, which indicates that personality factors play a role in determining adherence to CPAP. Although more research is needed to draw firm conclusions, the differences noted in BIS may also point toward differences in neurophysiological function. The BIS scale may be a useful tool for predicting nonadherence and assist with the development of intervention strategies that will increase adherence.

  5. Evaluation of a new pediatric positive airway pressure mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushida, Clete A; Halbower, Ann C; Kryger, Meir H; Pelayo, Rafael; Assalone, Valerie; Cardell, Chia-Yu; Huston, Stephanie; Willes, Leslee; Wimms, Alison J; Mendoza, June

    2014-09-15

    The choice and variety of pediatric masks for continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is limited in the US. Therefore, clinicians often prescribe modified adult masks. Until recently a mask for children aged mask for children aged 2-7 years (Pixi; ResMed Ltd, Sydney, Australia). Patients aged 2-7 years were enrolled and underwent in-lab baseline polysomnography (PSG) using their previous mask, then used their previous mask and the VPAP III ST-A flow generator for ≥ 10 nights at home. Thereafter, patients switched to the Pixi mask for ≥ 2 nights before returning for a PSG during PAP therapy via the Pixi mask. Patients then used the Pixi mask at home for ≥ 21 nights. Patients and their parents/guardians returned to the clinic for follow-up and provided feedback on the Pixi mask versus their previous mask. AHI with the Pixi mask was 1.1 ± 1.5/h vs 2.6 ± 5.4/h with the previous mask (p = 0.3538). Parents rated the Pixi mask positively for: restfulness of the child's sleep, trouble in getting the child to sleep, and trouble in having the child stay asleep. The Pixi mask was also rated highly for leaving fewer or no marks on the upper lip and under the child's ears, and being easy to remove. The Pixi mask is suitable for children aged 2-7 years and provides an alternative to other masks available for PAP therapy in this age group. © 2014 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  6. Effect of body position on preterm newborns receiving continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunherotti, Marisa Aa; Martinez, Edson Z; Martinez, Francisco E

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of body position on the cardiorespiratory indicators of preterm newborns receiving nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Analytical, observational, prospective, cross-sectional, randomised crossover study was carried out on sixteen newborns that received nasal CPAP. The infants had a mean gestational age of 29.7 ± 2 weeks and birthweight of 1353 ± 280 g. Cardiorespiratory indicators (respiratory rate, heart rate and oxygen saturation) were evaluated in each infant in the supine, prone and right and left lateral decubitus positions at intervals of 10 min over a period of 60 min. The cardiorespiratory indicators were similar and within the normal range in the four decubitus positions. There was no difference in respiratory or heart rate between body positions. Although they showed desirable values, oxygen saturation was significantly lower in left lateral decubitus (96.6 ± 1.7%) when compared to the supine (97.1 ± 1.3%) and prone positions (97.4 ± 1.1%) (p = 0.00) and was also significantly lower in right lateral decubitus (96.9 ± 1.4%) when compared to the prone position (p = 0.00). We found no preferential decubitus position for preterm newborns receiving nasal CPAP, the supine position may be a choice, but the left and right lateral positions were less advantageous in terms of oxygen saturation. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Randomized trial of prongs or mask for nasal continuous positive airway pressure in preterm infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kieran, Emily A

    2012-11-01

    To determine whether nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) given with nasal prongs compared with nasal mask reduces the rate of intubation and mechanical ventilation in preterm infants within 72 hours of starting therapy.

  8. Neonatal pneumatocele as a complication of nasal continuous positive airway pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bie, H. M. A.; van Toledo-Eppinga, L.; Verbeke, J. I. M. L.; van Elburg, R. M.

    2002-01-01

    A preterm infant with mild respiratory insufficiency resulting from respiratory distress syndrome developed a pneumatocele after the start of nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Pneumonia was excluded by sputum and blood cultures. Treatment with high frequency oscillation ventilation resulted

  9. Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation or Conventional Mechanical Ventilation for Neonatal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Badiee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to assess the success rate of nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV for treatment of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP failure and prevention of conventional ventilation (CV in preterm neonates. Methods: Since November 2012 to April 2013, a total number of 55 consecutive newborns with gestational ages of 26-35 weeks who had CPAP failure were randomly assigned to one of the two groups. The NIPPV group received NIPPV with the initial peak inspiratory pressure (PIP of 16-20 cmH 2 O and frequency of 40-60 breaths/min. The CV group received PIP of 12-20 cmH 2 O and frequency of 40-60 breaths/min. Results: About 74% of newborns who received NIPPV for management of CPAP failure responded to NIPPV and did not need intubation and mechanical ventilation. Newborns with lower postnatal age at entry to the study and lower 5 min Apgar score more likely had NIPPV failure. In addition, treatment failure was higher in newborns who needed more frequent doses of surfactant. Duration of oxygen therapy was 9.28 days in CV group and 7.77 days in NIPPV group (P = 0.050. Length of hospital stay in CV group and NIPPV groups were 48.7 and 41.7 days, respectively (P = 0.097. Conclusions: NIPPV could decrease the need for intubation and mechanical ventilation in preterm infants with CPAP failure.

  10. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Thresholds for Nasolacrimal Air Regurgitation in a Cadaveric Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, Alexander D; Cherfan, Daniel G; Drake, Richard L; McBride, Jennifer M; Hwang, Catherine J; Perry, Julian D; Cheng, Olivia T

    2018-01-10

    To elucidate the mechanisms underlying nasolacrimal air regurgitation (AR) in the setting of continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Twelve nasolacrimal systems of 6 fresh female human cadavers were evaluated individually for AR using continuous positive airway pressure therapy before any nasolacrimal procedure. Cadavers were then randomly assigned to undergo nasolacrimal duct probing or endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy and then each hemisystem was again evaluated for AR. The pressure where AR was first observed (discovery pressure) or maximum possible pressure in systems without AR was recorded. In systems that demonstrated AR, the pressure was then gradually decreased to the lowest pressure where regurgitation persisted. This pressure was recorded as the secondary threshold pressure. None of the 12 unoperated nasolacrimal systems or the 6 systems that underwent nasolacrimal duct probing demonstrated AR through the maximum continuous positive airway pressure therapy (30 cm H2O). After endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy, all 6 nasolacrimal systems demonstrated AR. The mean discovery pressure was 16.0 cm H2O (range, 14.0-18.0 cm H2O) and mean secondary threshold pressure was 7.25 cm H2O (range, 6.5-8.0 cm H2O). Air regurgitation during continuous positive airway pressure therapy in the setting of prior endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy can be replicated in a cadaver model. The secondary threshold pressures required for AR in this model were similar to AR pressures reported clinically. Prior to dacryocystorhinostomy, patients using continuous positive airway pressure therapy should be counseled on AR, and physicians should consider this phenomenon when evaluating ophthalmic complaints in postoperative patients on positive airway pressure therapy.

  11. Motivational Interviewing (MINT) Improves Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Acceptance and Adherence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Sara; Smith, Simon S.; Oei, Tian P. S.; Douglas, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is poor. We assessed the effectiveness of a motivational interviewing intervention (motivational interview nurse therapy [MINT]) in addition to best practice standard care to improve acceptance and adherence to CPAP therapy in people with…

  12. Nap-titration : An effective alternative for continuous positive airway pressure titration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, A; Stegenga, B; Meinesz, AF; van der Hoeven, JH; Wijkstra, PJ

    When treating Obstructive Steep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS) several alternatives for standard (manual) continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) titration are feasible. A practical alternative is titration without polysomnography during an afternoon nap (Nap-titration). The aim of the present

  13. Airflow behavior changes in upper airway caused by different head and neck positions: Comparison by computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Huang, Shi-Wei; Chen, Lian-Hua; Qi, Yang; Qiu, Yi-Min; Li, Shi-Tong

    2017-02-08

    The feasibility of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to evaluate airflow characteristics in different head and neck positions has not been established. This study compared the changes in volume and airflow behavior of the upper airway by CFD simulation to predict the influence of anatomical and physiological airway changes due to different head-neck positions on mechanical ventilation. One awake volunteer with no risk of difficult airway underwent computed tomography in neutral position, extension position (both head and neck extended), and sniffing position (head extended and neck flexed). Three-dimensional airway models of the upper airway were reconstructed. The total volume (V) and narrowest area (A min ) of the airway models were measured. CFD simulation with an Spalart-Allmaras model was performed to characterize airflow behavior in neutral, extension, and sniffing positions of closed-mouth and open-mouth ventilation. The comparison result for V was neutral position was nearly 3.0 times that in neutral position and 1.7 times that in extension position. The pressure drop and velocity increasing were more obvious in neutral than sniffing or extension position at the same airflow rate. In sniffing position, pressure differences decreased and velocity remained almost constant. Recirculation airflow was generated near the subglottic region in neutral and extension positions. Sniffing position improves airway patency by increasing airway volume and decreasing airway resistance, suggesting that sniffing position may be the optimal choice for mask ventilation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Airway responsiveness to mannitol in asthma is associated with chymase-positive mast cells and eosinophilic airway inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrild, Asger; Bergqvist, A; Baines, K J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to inhaled mannitol is associated with indirect markers of mast cell activation and eosinophilic airway inflammation. It is unknown how AHR to mannitol relates to mast cell phenotype, mast cell function and measures of eosinophilic inflammation in airway...... tissue. We compared the number and phenotype of mast cells, mRNA expression of mast cell-associated genes and number of eosinophils in airway tissue of subjects with asthma and healthy controls in relation to AHR to mannitol. METHODS: Airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled mannitol was measured in 23 non......-smoking, corticosteroid-free asthmatic individuals and 10 healthy controls. Mast cells and eosinophils were identified in mucosal biopsies from all participants. Mast cells were divided into phenotypes based on the presence of chymase. mRNA expression of mast cell-associated genes was measured by real-time PCR. RESULTS...

  15. Aerosol delivery and humidification with the Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thille, Arnaud W; Bertholon, Jean-François; Becquemin, Marie-Hélène; Roy, Monique; Lyazidi, Aissam; Lellouche, François; Pertusini, Esther; Boussignac, Georges; Maître, Bernard; Brochard, Laurent

    2011-10-01

    A simple method for effective bronchodilator aerosol delivery while administering continuing continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) would be useful in patients with severe bronchial obstruction. To assess the effectiveness of bronchodilator aerosol delivery during CPAP generated by the Boussignac CPAP system and its optimal humidification system. First we assessed the relationship between flow and pressure generated in the mask with the Boussignac CPAP system. Next we measured the inspired-gas humidity during CPAP, with several humidification strategies, in 9 healthy volunteers. We then measured the bronchodilator aerosol particle size during CPAP, with and without heat-and-moisture exchanger, in a bench study. Finally, in 7 patients with acute respiratory failure and airway obstruction, we measured work of breathing and gas exchange after a β(2)-agonist bronchodilator aerosol (terbutaline) delivered during CPAP or via standard nebulization. Optimal humidity was obtained only with the heat-and-moisture exchanger or heated humidifier. The heat-and-moisture exchanger had no influence on bronchodilator aerosol particle size. Work of breathing decreased similarly after bronchodilator via either standard nebulization or CPAP, but P(aO(2)) increased significantly only after CPAP aerosol delivery. CPAP bronchodilator delivery decreases the work of breathing as effectively as does standard nebulization, but produces a greater oxygenation improvement in patients with airway obstruction. To optimize airway humidification, a heat-and-moisture exchanger could be used with the Boussignac CPAP system, without modifying aerosol delivery.

  16. Maxillomandibular Advancement Surgery as Alternative to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Morbidly Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea : A Case Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doff, Michiel H. J.; Jansma, Johan; Schepers, Rutger H.; Hoekema, Aamoud

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a sleep-related breathing disorder, characterized by disrupted snoring and repetitive upper airway obstructions. Oral appliance therapy is an effective alternative to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and is especially effective in mild and

  17. New developments in the use of positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeder, Schafer; Malhotra, Atul; Patel, Sanjay R.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disorder which afflicts a large number of individuals around the world. OSA causes sleepiness and is a major cardiovascular risk factor. Since its inception in the early 1980’s, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has emerged as the major treatment of OSA, and it has been shown to improve sleepiness, hypertension, and a number of cardiovascular indices. Despite its successes, adherence with treatment remains a major limitation. Herein we will review the evidence behind the use of positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy, its various modes, and the methods employed to improve adherence. We will also discuss the future of PAP therapy in OSA and personalization of care. PMID:26380760

  18. Treatment of early-onset preeclampsia with continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Clare; Tong, Stephen; Wilson, Danielle; Howard, Mark; Walker, Susan P

    2015-05-01

    Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. There is no treatment for preeclampsia other than delivery. Sleep-disordered breathing is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preeclampsia, but it is not known whether treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) improves perinatal outcomes. We report a 35-year-old primigravid woman diagnosed with preeclampsia at 30 weeks of gestation. A sleep study confirmed severe sleep-disordered breathing, and CPAP treatment was started. After CPAP treatment, both clinical and biochemical markers of preeclampsia improved. In addition, circulating angiogenic markers of preeclampsia improved. As a result, the pregnancy safely continued for 30 days, allowing the fetus to gain gestation. Continuous positive airway pressure may be a novel treatment for women with early-onset preeclampsia associated with sleep-disordered breathing.

  19. Clinical predictors of central sleep apnea evoked by positive airway pressure titration

    OpenAIRE

    Bianchi, Matt; Gannon,Karen; Lovell,Kathy; Merlino,Margaret; Mojica,James; Moro,Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    Marilyn Moro,1 Karen Gannon,1 Kathy Lovell,1 Margaret Merlino,1 James Mojica,2 Matt T Bianchi,1,3 1Neurology Department, 2Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 3Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Purpose: Treatment-emergent central sleep apnea (TECSA), also called complex apnea, occurs in 5%–15% of sleep apnea patients during positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy, but the clinical predictors are not w...

  20. Treatment of obstructive sleep-disordered breathing with positive airway pressure systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pevernagie

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Positive airway pressure systems are widely used to treat patients with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep-disordered breathing. The application of stable continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP via the nose (nasal CPAP has been the mainstay of treatment since the early 1980s. For treatment to be effective, the pressure level must be fine-tuned to restore patency of the individual patient's upper airway. Currently, there is ongoing controversy concerning which outcomes to observe when adapting the pressure level, and which methods to use for pressure adaptation. Adjusting the pressure level to control apnoeas and hypopnoeas is one major objective, but may not be sufficient to restore normal sleep. Evidence is available that elimination of inspiratory flow limitation leads to better results. In recent years, it has become evident that the use of empirically set CPAP or automatic CPAP devices parallel the clinical results obtained with the classical approach of manual CPAP titration. A striking and still unexplained paradox lies in the fact that automatic CPAP devices perform very differently on the bench, but still yield satisfactory results on several clinical outcomes, e.g. control of sleep-related respiratory disturbances, restoration of good sleep quality and daytime alertness. Understanding the functioning of automatic CPAP devices can prove difficult, as the mode of operation is usually not disclosed by the manufacturers. At present, it is impossible to make any scientifically sound statement on the appropriateness of using automatic continuous positive airway pressure devices for the routine treatment of patients with obstructive sleep-disordered breathing. For this purpose, convincing results of phase I–III clinical trials are needed.

  1. Short-term effects of positive expiratory airway pressure in patients being weaned from mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Mello Rieder

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility and the cardiorespiratory effects of using positive expiratory airway pressure, a physiotherapeutic tool, in comparison with a T-tube, to wean patients from mechanical ventilation. METHODS/DESIGN: A prospective, randomized, cross-over study. SETTING: Two intensive care units. PATIENTS AND INTERVENTIONS: We evaluated forty patients who met weaning criteria and had been mechanically-ventilated for more than 48 hours, mean age 59 years, including 23 males. All patients were submitted to the T-tube and Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure devices, at 7 cm H2O, during a 30-minute period. Cardiorespiratory variables including work of breathing, respiratory rate (rr, peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2, heart rate (hr, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressures (SAP, DAP, MAP were measured in the first and thirtieth minutes. The condition was analyzed as an entire sample set (n=40 and was also divided into subconditions: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=14 and non-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (non- chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=26 categories. Comparisons were made using a t-test and Analysis of Variance. The level of significance was p < 0.05. RESULTS: Our data showed an increase in work of breathing in the first and thirtieth minutes in the EPAP condition (0.86+ 0.43 and 1.02+1.3 as compared with the T-tube condition (0.25+0.26 and 0.26+0.35 (p<0.05, verified by the flow-sensor monitor (values in J/L. No statistical differences were observed when comparing the Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure and T-tube conditions with regard to cardiorespiratory measurements. The same result was observed for both chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and non- chronic obstructive pulmonary disease subconditions. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrated that, in weaning patients from mechanical ventilation, the use of a fixed level of Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure caused an increase in work of

  2. The NOFLO trial: low-flow nasal prongs therapy in weaning nasal continuous positive airway pressure in preterm infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Sinéad M

    2013-07-01

    To determine if low-flow nasal prongs therapy with room air, compared with no treatment, facilitates weaning from nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) in very low birth weight (VLBW, birth weight <1500 g) infants.

  3. Clinical predictors of central sleep apnea evoked by positive airway pressure titration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Marilyn; Gannon, Karen; Lovell, Kathy; Merlino, Margaret; Mojica, James; Bianchi, Matt T

    2016-01-01

    Treatment-emergent central sleep apnea (TECSA), also called complex apnea, occurs in 5%-15% of sleep apnea patients during positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy, but the clinical predictors are not well understood. The goal of this study was to explore possible predictors in a clinical sleep laboratory cohort, which may highlight those at risk during clinical management. We retrospectively analyzed 728 patients who underwent PAP titration (n=422 split-night; n=306 two-night). Demographics and self-reported medical comorbidities, medications, and behaviors as well as standard physiological parameters from the polysomnography (PSG) data were analyzed. We used regression analysis to assess predictors of binary presence or absence of central apnea index (CAI) ≥5 during split-night PSG (SN-PSG) versus full-night PSG (FN-PSG) titrations. CAI ≥5 was present in 24.2% of SN-PSG and 11.4% of FN-PSG patients during titration. Male sex, maximum continuous positive airway pressure, and use of bilevel positive airway pressure were predictors of TECSA, and rapid eye movement dominance was a negative predictor, for both SN-PSG and FN-PSG patients. Self-reported narcotics were a positive predictor of TECSA, and the time spent in stage N2 sleep was a negative predictor only for SN-PSG patients. Self-reported history of stroke and the CAI during the diagnostic recording predicted TECSA only for FN-PSG patients. Clinical predictors of treatment-evoked central apnea spanned demographic, medical history, sleep physiology, and titration factors. Improved predictive models may be increasingly important as diagnostic and therapeutic modalities move away from the laboratory setting, even as PSG remains the gold standard for characterizing primary central apnea and TECSA.

  4. Auto-trilevel versus bilevel positive airway pressure ventilation for hypercapnic overlap syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Mei; Huai, De; Cao, Juan; Ning, Ding; Xue, Rong; Xu, Meijie; Huang, Mao; Zhang, Xilong

    2018-03-01

    Although bilevel positive airway pressure (Bilevel PAP) therapy is usually used for overlap syndrome (OS), there is still a portion of OS patients in whom Bilevel PAP therapy could not simultaneously eliminate residual apnea events and hypercapnia. The current study was expected to explore whether auto-trilevel positive airway pressure (auto-trilevel PAP) therapy with auto-adjusting end expiratory positive airway pressure (EEPAP) can serve as a better alternative for these patients. From January of 2014 to June of 2016, 32 hypercapnic OS patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) and moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) were recruited. Three variable modes of positive airway pressure (PAP) from the ventilator (Prisma25ST, Weinmann Inc., Germany) were applicated for 8 h per night. We performed the design of each mode at each night with an interval of two nights with no PAP treatment as a washout period among different modes. In Bilevel-1 mode (Bilevel-1), the expiratory positive airway pressure (EPAP) delivered from Bilevel PAP was always set as the lowest PAP for abolishment of snoring. For each patient, the inspiratory positive airway pressure (IPAP) was constantly set the same as the minimal pressure for keeping end-tidal CO 2 (ETCO 2 ) ≤45 mmHg for all three modes. However, the EPAP issued by Bilevel PAP in Bilevel-2 mode (Bilevel-2) was kept 3 cmH 2 O higher than that in Bilevel-1. In auto-trilevel mode (auto-trilevel) with auto-trilevel PAP, the initial part of EPAP was fixed at the same PAP as that in Bilevel-1 while the EEPAP was automatically regulated to rise at a range of ≤4 cmH 2 O based on nasal airflow wave changes. Comparisons were made for parameters before and during or following treatment as well as among different PAP therapy modes. The following parameters were compared such as nocturnal apnea hypopnea index (AHI), minimal SpO 2 (minSpO 2 ), arousal index, sleep structure and efficiency

  5. Cardiovascular risk in patients with sleep apnoea with or without continuous positive airway pressure therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberts, Morten; Nielsen, O W; Lip, G Y H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prognostic significance of age and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on cardiovascular disease in patients with sleep apnoea has not been assessed previously. METHODS: Using nationwide databases, the entire Danish population was followed from 2000 until 2011. First...... with sleep apnoea, in particular in patients younger than 50 years (IRR 2.12, 95% CI 1.64-2.74 and IRR 2.34, 95% CI 1.77-3.10, respectively). Subsequent CPAP therapy was not associated with altered prognosis. CONCLUSIONS: Sleep apnoea is associated with increased risk of ischaemic stroke and MI, particularly...

  6. Continuous positive airway pressure treatment increases bronchial reactivity in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczynski, Piotr; Gorska, Katarzyna; Przybylowski, Tadeusz; Bielicki, Piotr; Zielinski, Jan; Chazan, Ryszarda

    2009-01-01

    The effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on the function of the lower airways are poorly understood. One of the methods used to determine the influence of positive pressure breathing on lower airways is the bronchial hyperreactivity test. Some authors report that CPAP increases bronchial hyperreactivity, while others report decreases. To assess the influence of CPAP treatment on bronchial reactivity and the effects of bronchial hyperreactivity on compliance to CPAP treatment. The study group consisted of 101 obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients (88 men and 13 women) with a mean age of 51 ± 11 years, mean apnea-hypopnea index of 53 ± 20 and mean body mass index of 32.6 ± 5.4. Patients were randomly assigned to a treatment group that received 3 weeks of CPAP therapy (group 1) or to a nontreatment control group (group 2). Pulmonary function tests and the methacholine bronchial provocation test were performed at baseline and 3 weeks later. There were no statistically significant differences between treated and control groups in anthropometry and polysomnography variables. At baseline, bronchial hyperreactivity was found in 6 patients from group 1 and 5 patients from group 2. A significant increase in bronchial reactivity was observed after CPAP treatment. Log PC20M decreased from 1.38 ± 0.30 at baseline to 1.26 ± 0.50 (p bronchial hyperreactivity during CPAP treatment were characterized by significantly lower FEV1, FVC and MEF50 values. CPAP produces statistically significant bronchial hyperreactivity. However, there were no clinical symptoms and it is not necessary to withdraw previous therapies. Copyright © 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Efficacy of daytime continuous positive airway pressure titration in severe obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkowski, J C; Verschelden, P; Kimoff, R J

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate manual nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) titration during daytime polysomnography compared with conventional overnight titration for patients with severe obstructive sleep apnoea. Thirty-two patients who underwent daytime titration were retrospectively matched (for age, sex, body mass index and apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI)) to a group titrated overnight during the same period. Successful titration was defined as the identification of the nCPAP level (effective nCPAP (Peff)) required to eliminate respiratory events during all sleep stages. After 3 months of therapy on nCPAP at Peff, nCPAP utilization history was obtained and a group of patients underwent a repeat polysomnogram (PSG) and completed a follow-up Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score. Initial titration was successful in 91% of daytime patients and 91% of overnight patients. The success of daytime titration was not related to diagnostic AHI or ESS score. Subjective nCPAP utilization was statistically similar in both groups. On the follow-up PSG, there were no significant differences between daytime (n=11) and overnight (n=11) patients in measures of sleep quality or respiratory disturbance. Both groups demonstrated similar and significant improvements in ESS score. These findings suggest that the effective nasal continuous positive airway pressure can be accurately established during daytime titration in a substantial proportion of severe, symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea patients.

  8. [Influence of body position on the displacement of nasal prongs in preterm newborns receiving continuous positive airway pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunherotti, Marisa Afonso Andrade; Martinez, Francisco Eulógio

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of body position on the displacement of nasal prongs in preterm infants. This prospective, randomized, crossover study enrolled infants born at a mean gestational age of 29.7±2 weeks, birth weight of 1.353±280g and 2.9±2.2 days of life, submitted to continuous positive airway pressure by nasal prongs. The main outcome was the number of times that the nasal prongs were displaced following infant positioning in the following body positions: prone, right lateral, left lateral, and supine, according to a pre-established random order. Moreover, cardiorespiratory variables (respiratory rate, heart rate, and oxygen saturation) were evaluated for each body position. Data for each position were collected every 10 minutes, over a period of 60minutes. An occurrence was defined when the nasal prongs were displaced from the nostrils after 3 minutes in the desired position, requiring intervention of the examiner. Among the 16 studied infants, the occurrence of nasal prong displacement was only observed in the prone position (9 infants-56.2%) and in the left lateral position (2 infants-12.5%). The number of times that the prongs were displaced was 11 in the prone position (seven within the first 10minutes) and two in the left lateral position (one within the first 10minutes). No clinically significant changes were observed in the cardiorespiratory variables. Maintenance of the nasal prongs to provide adequate noninvasive respiratory support was harder in the prone position. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical predictors of central sleep apnea evoked by positive airway pressure titration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moro M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Marilyn Moro,1 Karen Gannon,1 Kathy Lovell,1 Margaret Merlino,1 James Mojica,2 Matt T Bianchi,1,3 1Neurology Department, 2Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 3Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Purpose: Treatment-emergent central sleep apnea (TECSA, also called complex apnea, occurs in 5%–15% of sleep apnea patients during positive airway pressure (PAP therapy, but the clinical predictors are not well understood. The goal of this study was to explore possible predictors in a clinical sleep laboratory cohort, which may highlight those at risk during clinical management.Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 728 patients who underwent PAP titration (n=422 split night; n=306 two-night. Demographics and self-reported medical comorbidities, medications, and behaviors as well as standard physiological parameters from the polysomnography (PSG data were analyzed. We used regression analysis to assess predictors of binary presence or absence of central apnea index (CAI ≥5 during split PSG (SN-PSG versus full-night PSG (FN-PSG titrations.Results: CAI ≥5 was present in 24.2% of SN-PSG and 11.4% of FN-PSG patients during titration. Male sex, maximum continuous positive airway pressure, and use of bilevel positive airway pressure were predictors of TECSA, and rapid eye movement dominance was a negative predictor, for both SN-PSG and FN-PSG patients. Self-reported narcotics were a positive predictor of TECSA, and the time spent in stage N2 sleep was a negative predictor only for SN-PSG patients. Self-reported history of stroke and the CAI during the diagnostic recording predicted TECSA only for FN-PSG patients.Conclusion: Clinical predictors of treatment-evoked central apnea spanned demographic, medical history, sleep physiology, and titration factors. Improved predictive models may be increasingly important as diagnostic and therapeutic modalities move away from the

  10. Influence of upper body position on middle cerebral artery blood velocity during continuous positive airway pressure breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund Rasmussen, J; Mantoni, T; Belhage, B

    2007-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a treatment modality for pulmonary oxygenation difficulties. CPAP impairs venous return to the heart and, in turn, affects cerebral blood flow (CBF) and augments cerebral blood volume (CBV). We considered that during CPAP, elevation of the upper body...... in 11 healthy subjects during CPAP at different body positions (15 degrees head-down tilt, supine, 15 degrees, 30 degrees and 45 degrees upper body elevation). In the supine position, 10 cmH(2)O of CPAP reduced MCA V(mean) by 9 +/- 3% and increased cHbT by 4 +/- 2 micromol/L (mean +/- SEM); (P ....05). In the head-down position, CPAP increased cHbT to 13 +/- 2 micromol/L but left MCA V(mean) unchanged. Upper body elevation by 15 degrees attenuated the CPAP associated reduction in MCA V(mean) (-7 +/- 2%), while cHbT returned to baseline (1 +/- 2 micromol/L). With larger elevation of the upper body MCA V...

  11. Continuous positive airway pressure and conventional mechanical ventilation in the treatment of meconium aspiration syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, J P

    2008-12-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a complex syndrome that ranges in severity from mild respiratory distress to severe respiratory failure, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn and sometimes death. Understanding of the syndrome's complicated pathophysiology will help determine the appropriate treatment strategy, including the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) and other therapies. Approximately 30 to 50% of infants diagnosed with MAS will require CPAP or mechanical ventilation. The optimum modes of ventilation for MAS are not known. Very few studies have been conducted to determine 'best' ventilatory strategies. Despite the introduction, over the last two decades, of innovative ventilatory treatments for this disease (for example, surfactant, high-frequency ventilation, inhaled nitric oxide, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation), the majority of infants can be successfully managed with CPAP or mechanical ventilation alone.

  12. Treatment of sleep-disordered breathing with positive airway pressure devices: technology update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karin Gardner; Johnson, Douglas Clark

    2015-01-01

    Many types of positive airway pressure (PAP) devices are used to treat sleep-disordered breathing including obstructive sleep apnea, central sleep apnea, and sleep-related hypoventilation. These include continuous PAP, autoadjusting CPAP, bilevel PAP, adaptive servoventilation, and volume-assured pressure support. Noninvasive PAP has significant leak by design, which these devices adjust for in different manners. Algorithms to provide pressure, detect events, and respond to events vary greatly between the types of devices, and vary among the same category between companies and different models by the same company. Many devices include features designed to improve effectiveness and patient comfort. Data collection systems can track compliance, pressure, leak, and efficacy. Understanding how each device works allows the clinician to better select the best device and settings for a given patient. This paper reviews PAP devices, including their algorithms, settings, and features.

  13. Nasal colonization among premature infants treated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Hany; Hammad, Tarek A; Ozen, Maide; Sandhu, Inderjeet; Taylor, Chita; Olaode, Adenike; Mohamed, Mohamed; Keiser, John

    2011-04-01

    We examined the relationship between the use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and nasal colonization among low-birth-weight (LBW) infants. We prospectively cultured the nares of LBW infants on admission and weekly until hospital discharge. The modality of respiratory support during each culture was recorded. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to test the relationship between CPAP and nasal colonization. Analyses were repeated after stratifying infants into three birth-weight categories: 1500 to 2499 g, 1000 to 1499 g, and nasal cultures were obtained from 167 infants. Nasal colonization with gram-negative bacilli was increased with the use of CPAP in all birth-weight categories ( P Nasal colonization with any potential pathogen increased with the use of CPAP in all birth-weight categories ( P Nasal CPAP is associated with increased colonization with gram-negative bacilli. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  14. Predicting uptake of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinner, Timothy; McNeil, Lindsay; Olaithe, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    diagnosed with OSA. Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS), Fatigue Severity Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale and Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised (IPQ-R) were administered at time of sleep study. These, patient demographics and sleep study variables were used to determine factors predicting patient......Purpose: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a common disorder, for which continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is a standard treatment. Despite its well-established efficacy, many patients choose not to initiate CPAP treatment. The present study investigated the degree to which...... biological measures (e.g. Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index [AHI]), symptom experiences (e.g. fatigue) and illness representations (e.g. perceived consequences) predict the decision of individuals newly diagnosed with OSA to undergo a trial of CPAP therapy. Methods: Four hundred forty-nine individuals (316 males) newly...

  15. Structural Changes Following Velopharyngeal Resistance Training (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy): A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Youkyung; Pfeil, Gwenlyn

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility/effectiveness of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to document velopharyngeal (VP) structural changes induced by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Changes in velar length and thickness, levator veli palatini (LVP) length and thickness, velar volume, and intravelar muscular proportion along the course of CPAP therapy participation (Pre-CPAP, Post-CPAP, and withdrawal). Velar and LVP lengths remained nearly the same, with the median changes (Δ) less than 0.6%, across repeated conditions. Although varying in magnitudes of change, median velar volume (Δ4%), velar thickness (Δ20%), LVP thickness (Δ17%), and intravelar muscular proportion (Δ10%) illustrated a consistent pattern of increases following the 8-week CPAP therapy. These VP structural measurements slightly decreased but remained above the pretraining condition after 8-week detraining. This report successfully demonstrated that MRI is a viable tool to document CPAP therapy-induced VP structural changes while providing preliminary empirical data.

  16. Does personality play a role in continuous positive airway pressure compliance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L. Maschauer

    2017-03-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP adherence is low among individuals with obstructive sleep apnoea. Type D personality and high scores on the depression and hypochondriasis scales on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI have been identified as factors contributing to non-compliance with CPAP. Further research into personality type may assist in understanding why some people adhere to CPAP, while others fail. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA is a condition characterised by repetitive, intermittent partial or complete collapse/obstruction of the upper airway during sleep. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP is highly efficacious in treating OSA but its effectiveness is limited due to suboptimal acceptance and adherence rates, with as many as 50% of OSA patients discontinuing CPAP treatment within the first year. Until recently, research has focused on examining mechanistic and demographic factors that could explain nonadherence (e.g. age, sex, race and education level with limited applicability in a prospective or clinical manner. More recent research has focused on personality factors or types of patients with OSA who comply and do not comply with CPAP adherence in an attempt to enhance the accuracy of predicting treatment compliance. Type D personality has been found to be prevalent in one third of patients with OSA. The presence of Type D personality increases noncompliance and poor treatment outcomes due to negative affectivity, social inhibition, unhealthy lifestyle, and a reluctance to consult and/or follow medical advice. Conversely, individuals who are more likely to adhere to CPAP treatment tend to have a high internal locus of control and high self-efficacy, self-refer for treatment, and have active coping skills. By assessing personality and coping skills, the clinician may gain insight into the likelihood of a patient’s adherence to treatment. If the patient displays potential risk factors for CPAP noncompliance, the

  17. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in Gestational Diabetes With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirakalwasan, Naricha; Amnakkittikul, Somvang; Wanitcharoenkul, Ekasitt; Charoensri, Suranut; Saetung, Sunee; Chanprasertyothin, Suwannee; Chailurkit, La-Or; Panburana, Panyu; Bumrungphuet, Sommart; Thakkinstian, Ammarin; Reutrakul, Sirimon

    2018-03-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). This study assessed the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in obese pregnant females with GDM and OSA. A randomized controlled trial was conducted (April 2014 - June 2016). Obese females at 24 to 34 weeks gestation and with diet-controlled GDM were screened for OSA. Those with OSA were randomly assigned to receive 2 weeks nightly CPAP or be part of a waitlist control group. After 2 weeks, all patients were offered CPAP. The primary outcome was glucose metabolism, obtained from an oral meal tolerance test (MTT) at baseline and 2 weeks. Pregnancy outcomes were collected. Eighteen patients were randomized to CPAP and 18 to control groups. There were no significant changes between groups in fasting glucose, glucose response to MTT, and insulin sensitivity or secretion after 2 weeks. Those adherent to CPAP had significantly improved insulin secretion ( P = .016) compared to the control group. When a counterfactual instrumental variable approach was applied to deal with nonadherence, the CPAP group had significantly improved insulin secretion ( P = .002) and insulin sensitivity ( P = .015). Lower rates of preterm delivery ( P = .002), unplanned cesarean section ( P = .005), and neonatal intensive care unit admissions ( P < .001) were observed among those who used CPAP longer than 2 weeks. Two weeks of CPAP in females with GDM and OSA did not result in improved glucose levels, but insulin secretion improved in those adherent to CPAP. Continued CPAP use was possibly associated with improved pregnancy outcomes. Registry: ClinicalTrials.gov; Title: Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Gestational Diabetes: Incidence and Effects of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment on Glucose Metabolism; Identifier: NCT02108197; URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02108197. © 2018 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  18. Sleep architecture, insulin resistance and the nasal cycle: Implications for positive airway pressure therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A.P. Crofts

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The global pandemic of metabolic disease is worsening. The metabolic theory of obesity proposes that hormonal changes, especially hyperinsulinaemia, precede metabolic disease development. Although quality sleep is recognised as a key factor for good health, less is known about disrupted sleep as a risk factor for hyperinsulinaemia.   Aim: To explore the relationship between sleep, especially sleep architecture and the nasal cycle, on insulin secretion in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA with comorbid metabolic disease. This review includes a discussion of the potential role of Rest-Activity-Cycler positive airway pressure (RACer-PAP, a novel non-pharmacological OSA treatment strategy.   Methods: A narrative review of all the relevant papers known to the authors was conducted. This review also included results from a polysomnographic sleep clinic pilot study (n = 3 comparing sleep efficiency of RACer-PAP to nasal continuous positive airways pressure (n-CPAP in OSA patients.   Results: Metabolic disease is strongly associated with disturbed sleep. Sleep architecture influences cerebral hormonal secretion, lateral shifts in the autonomic nervous system and nasal airflow dominance. Disturbed sleep shortens short-wave sleep periods, decreasing insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. Improvements to metabolic function during n-CPAP treatment are inconsistent. If RACer-PAP demonstrates superior effects on sleep architecture and autonomic function, it may offer advantages in OSA patients with comorbid metabolic disease.   Conclusion: Improving sleep architecture by maintaining the nasal cycle proposes a novel non-pharmacological treatment paradigm for treating OSA with comorbid metabolic disease. Research is required to demonstrate if RACer-PAP therapy influences whole night sleep architecture, sympathovagal balance and markers of metabolic disease.

  19. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for the respiratory care of the newborn infant.

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    Diblasi, Robert M

    2009-09-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a noninvasive form of respiratory assistance that has been used to support spontaneously breathing infants with lung disease for nearly 40 years. Following reports that mechanical ventilation contributes to pulmonary growth arrest and the development of chronic lung disease, there is a renewed interest in using CPAP as the prevailing method for supporting newborn infants. Animal and human research has shown that CPAP is less injurious to the lungs than is mechanical ventilation. The major concepts that embrace lung protection during CPAP are the application of spontaneous breathing at a constant distending pressure and avoidance of intubation and positive-pressure inflations. A major topic for current research focuses on whether premature infants should be supported initially with CPAP following delivery, or after the infant has been extubated following prophylactic surfactant administration. Clinical trials have shown that CPAP reduces the need for intubation/mechanical ventilation and surfactant administration, but it is still unclear whether CPAP reduces chronic lung disease and mortality, compared to modern lung-protective ventilation techniques. Despite the successes, little is known about how best to manage patients using CPAP. It is also unclear whether different strategies or devices used to maintain CPAP play a role in improving outcomes in infants. Nasal CPAP technology has evolved over the last 10 years, and bench and clinical research has evaluated differences in physiologic effects related to these new devices. Ultimately, clinicians' abilities to perceive changes in the pathophysiologic conditions of infants receiving CPAP and the quality of airway care provided are likely to be the most influential factors in determining patient outcomes.

  20. Choosing an Oronasal Mask to Deliver Continuous Positive Airway Pressure May Cause More Upper Airway Obstruction or Lead to Higher Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Requirements than a Nasal Mask in Some Patients: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Justin R; Aiyappan, Vinod; Mercer, Jeremy; Catcheside, Peter G; Chai-Coetzer, Ching Li; McEvoy, R Doug; Antic, Nick

    2016-09-15

    The choice of mask interface used with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy can affect the control of upper airway obstruction (UAO) in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We describe a case series of four patients with paradoxical worsening of UAO with an oronasal mask and the effect of changing to a nasal mask. We retrospectively reviewed the case histories of 4 patients and recorded patient demographics, in-laboratory and ambulatory CPAP titration data, CPAP therapy data, type of mask interface used and potential confounding factors. The 4 cases (mean ± SD: age = 59 ± 16 y; BMI = 30.5 ± 4.5 kg/m(2)) had a high residual apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI) (43 ± 14.2 events/h) and high CPAP pressure requirements (14.9 ± 6.6 cmH2O) with an oronasal mask. Changing to a nasal mask allowed adequate control of UAO with a significant reduction in the average residual AHI (3.1 ± 1.5 events/h). In two of the four cases, it was demonstrated that control of UAO was obtained at a much lower CPAP pressure compared to the oronasal mask (Case one = 17.5 cmH2O vs 12cmH2O; Case two = 17.9 cmH2O vs 7.8 cmH2O). Other potential confounding factors were unchanged. There are various physiological observations that may explain these findings but it is uncertain which individuals are susceptible to these mechanisms. If patients have OSA incompletely controlled by CPAP with evidence of residual UAO and/or are requiring surprisingly high CPAP pressure to control OSA with an oronasal mask, the choice of mask should be reviewed and consideration be given to a trial of a nasal mask. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1209. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  1. Treatment of presumed acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema in an ambulance system by nurses using Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieperink, Willem; Weelink, E. E. M.; van der Horst, I. C. C.; de Vos, R.; Jaarsma, T.; Aarts, L. P. H. J.; Zijlstra, F.; Nijsten, M. W. N.

    Background: Early initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) applied by face mask benefits patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema (ACPE). The simple disposable Boussignac CPAP (BCPAP) has been used in ambulances by physicians. In the Netherlands, ambulances are manned by

  2. Oral Appliance Versus Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome : A 2-Year Follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doff, Michiel H. J.; Hoekema, Aarnoud; Wijkstra, Peter J.; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.; Slater, James J. R. Huddleston; de Bont, Lambert G. M.; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Oral appliance therapy has emerged as an important alternative to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in treating patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). In this study we report about the subjective and objective treatment outcome of oral appliance therapy and

  3. Higher Effective Oronasal versus Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Effect of Mandibular Stabilization

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    M Kaminska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In some individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, oronasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP leads to poorer OSA correction than nasal CPAP. The authors hypothesized that this results from posterior mandibular displacement caused by the oronasal mask.

  4. Simulated driving in obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea : effects of oral appliances and continuous positive airway pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, Aarnoud; Stegenga, Boudewijn; Bakker, Marije; Brouwer, Wiebo H.; de Bont, Lambert G. M.; Wijkstra, Peter J.; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.

    Impaired simulated driving performance has been demonstrated in obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) patients. Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) generally improves simulated driving performance, the effects of oral-appliance (OA) therapy are unknown. The aims of this

  5. Impact of Polysomnographic Parameters on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Patient with Obstructive Sleep Apnea in 2012

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    Abolfazl Mozafari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives : O bstructive sleep apnea is a preventable and prevalent major health hazard with serious health consequences including excessive daytime sleepiness, cognitive disturbances, depression, cardiovascular diseases and hypertension. Obstructive sleep apnea is a disorder affecting 2 to 4% of the adult population. The continuous positive airway pressur e (CPAP i s the most efficacious therapy and is often the first option for these patients. The pressure titration during laboratory polysomnography is required for treatment by CPAP.   Methods: The patients with obstructive sleep apnea requiring continuous positive airway pressure treatment were selected . CPAP titration was done according to American Academy of Sleep Medicine protocol. Comparison among continuous positive airway pressure with polysomnographic parameters was performed and analyzed with Pearson correlation coefficient. For analysis of qualitative parameters, we used chi-square and then checked with SPSS version 18 software.   Results: From 125 patients with obstructive sleep apnea, there were 112 cases with inclusion criteria. Mean age of participants was 55.07 ± 12, male frequency was 59.2%, apnea hypopnea index was 43.62 and mean continuous positive airway pressure was 12.50 . There was significant relationship among the pressure of continuous positive airway pressure with apnea hypopnea index (P=0.028, arousal index (P=0.011, body mass index (P=0.041 and O2 desaturation index (P=0.022, although age was not significantly related.   Conclusion: In accordance to this data, we found out a prediction equation for optimal CPAP in our patients

  6. Treatment of sleep-disordered breathing with positive airway pressure devices: technology update

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    Johnson KG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Karin Gardner Johnson, Douglas Clark Johnson Department of Medicine, Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, MA, USA Abstract: Many types of positive airway pressure (PAP devices are used to treat sleep-disordered breathing including obstructive sleep apnea, central sleep apnea, and sleep-related hypoventilation. These include continuous PAP, autoadjusting CPAP, bilevel PAP, adaptive servoventilation, and volume-assured pressure support. Noninvasive PAP has significant leak by design, which these devices adjust for in different manners. Algorithms to provide pressure, detect events, and respond to events vary greatly between the types of devices, and vary among the same category between companies and different models by the same company. Many devices include features designed to improve effectiveness and patient comfort. Data collection systems can track compliance, pressure, leak, and efficacy. Understanding how each device works allows the clinician to better select the best device and settings for a given patient. This paper reviews PAP devices, including their algorithms, settings, and features. Keywords: BiPAP, CPAP, iVAPS, AVAPS, ASV, positive pressure respiration, instrumentation, treatment algorithm

  7. Is the Relationship between Race and Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Adherence Mediated by Sleep Duration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Martha E.; Rosen, Carol L.; Wang, Rui; Auckley, Dennis; Benca, Ruth; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Iber, Conrad; Zee, Phyllis; Redline, Susan; Kapur, Vishesh K.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Black race has been associated with decreased continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence. Short sleep duration, long sleep latency, and insomnia complaints may affect CPAP adherence as they affect sleep and opportunity to use CPAP. We assessed whether self-reported sleep measures were associated with CPAP adherence and if racial variations in these sleep characteristics may explain racial differences in CPAP adherence. Design: Analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial (HomePAP), which investigated home versus laboratory-based diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. Setting: Seven American Academy of Sleep Medicine-accredited sleep centers in five cities in the United States. Patients or Participants: Enrolled subjects (n = 191) with apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 15 and sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale > 12). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Multivariable regression was used to assess if subjective sleep measures and symptoms predicted 3-mo CPAP use. Mediation analysis was used to assess if sleep measures mediated the association of race with CPAP adherence. Black participants reported shorter sleep duration and longer sleep latency at baseline than white and Hispanic participants. Shorter sleep duration and longer sleep latency predicted worse CPAP adherence. Sleep duration mediated the association of black race with lower CPAP adherence. However, insomnia symptoms were not associated with race or CPAP adherence. Conclusions: Among subjects with similar severity of obstructive sleep apnea and sleepiness, baseline self-reported sleep duration and latency, but not perceived insomnia, predicted CPAP adherence over 3 mo. Sleep duration explains some of the observed differences in CPAP use by race. Sleep duration and latency should be considered when evaluating poor CPAP adherence. Clinical Trial Information: Portable Monitoring for Diagnosis and Management of Sleep Apnea (HomePAP) URL: http

  8. [Comparison of different continuous positive airway pressure titration methods for obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingjing; Ye, Jingying; Zhang, Peng; Kang, Dan; Cao, Xin; Zhang, Yuhuan; Ding, Xiu; Zheng, Li; Li, Hongguang; Bian, Qiuli

    2014-10-01

    To explore whether there were differences between the results of automatic titration and the results of manual titration for positive airway pressure treatment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and its influencing factors, the results might provide a theoretical basis for the rational use of two pressure titration methods. Sixty one patients with OSAHS were included in this study. All patients underwent a manual titration and an automatic titration within one week. The clinical informations, polysomnography data, and the results of both two titration of all patients were obtained for analysis. The overall apnea/hypopnea index was (63.1 ± 17.7)/h, with a range of 14.9/h to 110.4/h. The treatment pressure of manual titration was (8.4 ± 2.1) cmH(2)O, which was significantly lower than the treatment pressure of automatic titration, (11.5 ± 2.7) cmH(2)O (t = -9.797, P titration and manual titration), it was found that the pressure of automatic titration was significantly higher in patients with a ΔP > 3 cmH(2)O than in patients with a ΔP ≤ 3 cmH(2)O, which was (13.3 ± 2.3) cmH(2)O vs (10.0 ± 2.0) cmH(2)O (t = -6.159, P titration between these two groups, which was (8.6 ± 2.4) cmH(2)O vs (8.3 ± 2.0)cmH(2)O (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference in age, body mass index, neck circumference, abdomen circumference, apnea hypopnea index, and arterial oxygen saturation between these two groups. The treatment pressure of automatic titration is usually higher than that of manual titration. For patients with a high treatment pressure which is derived from automatic titration, a suggestion about manual titration could be given to decrease the potential treatment pressure of continuous positive airway pressure, which may be helpful in improving the comfortableness and the compliance of this treatment.

  9. An authentic animal model of the very preterm infant on nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargaville, Peter A; Lavizzari, Anna; Padoin, Priscila; Black, Don; Zonneveld, Elroy; Perkins, Elizabeth; Sourial, Magdy; Rajapaksa, Anushi E; Davis, Peter G; Hooper, Stuart B; Moss, Timothy Jm; Polglase, Graeme R; Tingay, David G

    2015-12-01

    The surge in uptake of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for respiratory support in preterm infants has occurred in the absence of an authentic animal model. Such a model would allow investigation of research questions of physiological and therapeutic importance. We therefore aimed to develop a preterm lamb model of the non-intubated very preterm infant on CPAP. After staged exteriorisation and instrumentation, preterm lambs were delivered from anaesthetised ewes at 131 to 133 days gestation. Via a single nasal prong (4-mm internal diameter, 6- to 7-cm depth), positive pressure was delivered from the outset, with nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) used until transition to nasal CPAP was attempted, and periodically thereafter for hypoventilation. Caffeine and doxapram were used as respiratory stimulants. Gastric distension was prevented with an oesophageal balloon. Cardiorespiratory parameters and results of arterial blood gas analyses were monitored throughout the study period, which continued for 150 min after first transition to CPAP. Ten preterm lambs were studied, at gestation 132 ± 1 days (mean ± SD) and birth weight 3.6 ± 0.45 kg. After stabilisation on NIPPV, transition to nasal CPAP was first attempted at 28 ± 11 min. There was transient respiratory acidosis, with gradual resolution as spontaneous respiratory activity increased. In the final hour, 79% ± 33% of time was spent on CPAP alone, with typical respiratory rates around 60 breaths per minute. PaCO2 at end-experiment was 58 ± 36 mmHg. Non-intubated preterm lambs can be effectively transitioned to nasal CPAP soon after birth. This animal model will be valuable for further research.

  10. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS with positive airway pressure (PAP

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    Felipe Campo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to treat any disease, an adequate multidisciplinary management and involving the patient in the long term are necessary, since not treating patients implies an enormous burden for the health system and the society. Currently, different treatments for patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS can be found, being PAP (positive airway pressure the most frequently chosen after ruling out anatomical abnormalities susceptible to surgery. Indications for PAP therapy include patients with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI ≥15 events/hour or ≥5 and ≤14 events/hour and complaints of excessive daytime sleepiness, cognitive impairment and affective disorder or insomnia, documented arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, or cerebrovascular event history. It is important to remember that AHI should be based on polysomnographic recording of sleep ≥2 hours. There are different modalities of treatment with PAP and intervention should be sought to improve adherence to the device, which is the main limiting factor for achieving efficacy in the treatment. The impact of OSAHS treatment has been investigated, but most of the reported studies are observational.

  11. Asthma outcomes improve with continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pariente, J; Plaza, V; Soriano, J B; Mayos, M; López-Viña, A; Picado, C; Vigil, L

    2017-05-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in asthma patients with concomitant obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) seems to have a favorable impact on asthma, but data are inconsistent due to methodological limitations of previous studies. Prospective, multicenter study. We examined asthma outcomes after 6 months of CPAP in 99 adult asthma patients (mean age 57 years) with OSAS (respiratory disturbance index ≥20). Asthma control and quality of life were assessed with the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) and the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (MiniAQLQ), respectively. Data were analyzed by intention-to-treat basis. The mean ± SD score of the ACQ decreased from 1.39 ± 0.91 at baseline to 1.0 ± 0.78 at 6 months (P = 0.003), the percentage of patients with uncontrolled asthma from 41.4% to 17.2% (P = 0.006), and the percentage of patients with asthma attacks in the 6 months before and after treatment from 35.4% to 17.2% (P = 0.015). The score of the mAQLQ increased from 5.12 ± 1.38 to 5.63 ± 1.17 (P = 0.009). There were also significant improvements in symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and rhinitis, bronchial reversibility, and exhaled nitric oxide values (all P obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. © 2016 The Authors. Allergy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Improvement in Physical Activity in Persons With Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treated With Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Raymonde E; Duttuluri, Manideep; Gibson, Charlisa D; Mir, Sadaf; Fuhrmann, Katherine; Eden, Edward; Supariwala, Azhar

    2017-03-01

    Exercise improves sleep quality, yet people with untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may engage in less physical activity (PA) due to fatigue and daytime sleepiness. We examined changes in PA and sleep quality before and after treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in OSA patients. In this prospective longitudinal study, persons with a primary diagnosis of OSA were enrolled at a community-based hospital in New York City. At 3 time intervals pre- and post-CPAP (3-8 months), we measured sleep quality using validated questionnaires, perceived PA using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), and actual PA using pedometer steps per day. We sought to investigate how CPAP use and changes in sleep quality impacted the number of steps taken, as recorded in pedometer steps. In total, 62 patients were enrolled in the study from March 2012 to July 2014. In all, patients averaged 53 years of age, and 26 patients (42%) were female. Among all participants, 86% of persons had moderate to severe sleep apnea (AHI ≥15). Approximately 73% of participants were compliant with CPAP use. Poor sleep quality correlated with lower actual PA (P = .004) at baseline. At 3 and 7 months, there was significant improvement in sleep quality (Δ -2.63 ± 3.4 and Δ -3.5 ± 3.8; P improvement in sleep quality and actual PA.

  13. Continuous positive airway pressure machines and the work of coordinating technologies at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Tiago

    2008-06-01

    Research on the use of health technology at home has consistently reported that it is underpinned by users' evaluations of the technology in relation to their illness trajectory, their social network, and the place where it is used. Recent studies have also revealed that the efficacy of health technologies depends upon users' work that is largely invisible to professionals, managers and designers. This paper draws on the most widely used therapy for the management of sleep apnoea, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), to show how users maintain workable relationships between it and other technological elements of the domestic environment. Qualitative analysis was performed of an archive of messages sent to a web-based support group for sleep disorders between 1994 and 2007. Users describe two related techniques: first, drawing on their embodied knowledge of using domestic technologies to imagine potential, alternative environments for CPAP; and second, using their body as an instrument to assess the ;fit' of each of the attempted arrangements. The interaction between these two techniques entails frequent shifts in users' understandings of their illness and those involved in its management. Strategies of implementation of health technologies at home should acknowledge and incorporate the embodied knowledge processes of users.

  14. Effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy on partners' sexual lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Mustafa; Kaya, Coskun; Catli, Tolgahan; Hancı, Deniz; Bolluk, Ozge; Aydin, Yunus

    2016-01-01

    To assess sexual functioning in male and female partners before and after nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Twenty-one male patients with moderate to severe OSA and erectile dysfunction, and their female partner, were recruited into this prospective study. Males diagnosed with OSA were treated with nasal CPAP therapy for 12 weeks. Women were assessed for sexual functioning using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), and for mood status using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), before and after their male partner underwent nasal CPAP therapy. Sexual functioning was assessed in men using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), before and after nasal CPAP therapy. After nasal CPAP therapy for OSA in men, IIEF scores were significantly higher than pre-treatment scores. Total pre- and post-treatment IIEF scores (mean ± standard deviation) were 50.28 ± 15.88 and 65.42 ± 7.47, respectively, P nasal CPAP therapy on sexual functioning in both the male and female partners. Moreover, our findings indicate that improved sexual function in women after their male partner underwent nasal CPAP also had psychological benefits.

  15. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: Is it a route for infection in those with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea?

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    Liam Mercieca

    Full Text Available Introduction: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP is the standard treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA, with limited data about the prevalence of respiratory infections and microbial colonization in these patients. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine if CPAP use is associated with respiratory infections and to identify the organisms that colonize or infect these patients. Method: A retrospective, case-controlled study in patients diagnosed with OSA was carried out. 137 patients were recruited and interviewed using a questionnaire. A nasal swab was taken from each patient. Patients using CPAP machines had swabs taken from masks and humidifiers. Results: 66 (48.2% patients received CPAP treatment with 60.6% of them having a heated humidifier. 78.8% were male, with the majority using a full face mask (63.6%. No significant difference was seen in the prevalence of rhinosinusitis, lower respiratory tract infections and hospital admissions for pneumonia between CPAP and non-CPAP treated patients. The presence of a humidifier did not influence the prevalence of infections. Commensal flora was predominantly cultured from nasal swabs from both patient groups. Coagulase Negative Staphylococci and Diphtheroids were the main organisms cultured from masks and humidifiers respectively. Conclusions: This study shows that the use of CPAP, choice of mask and humidifier have no significant impact on the prevalence of infections and micro-organisms isolated. This is very reassuring to the physician prescribing CPAP therapy and users.

  16. The effect of nasal surgery on nasal continuous positive airway pressure compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Justin; George, Charles; Rotenberg, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the standard therapy for sleep apnea; however, compliance rates are historically poor. Among the most commonly cited reasons for nonadherence is nasal obstruction. Our study sought to examine if nasal surgery actually increases CPAP compliance. Prospective case series. Nasal CPAP-intolerant obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients, with documented nasal obstruction, underwent septoplasty plus inferior turbinoplasty. Preoperative and postoperative data were collected on CPAP usage per night and subjective nasal obstruction with the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) Scale questionnaire. Eighteen patients met inclusion criteria and underwent septoplasty. CPAP usage increased significantly from 0.5 hours per night preoperatively to 5 hours per night postoperatively (P nasal obstruction on the NOSE Scale decreased from 16.1 preoperatively to 5.4 following surgical intervention (P CPAP pressure decreased from 11.9 preoperatively to 9.2 after surgery, with a trend toward significance (P = .062). This study demonstrates improved CPAP compliance rates following septoplasty in OSA patients with nasal obstruction. Correction of nasal obstruction should be offered in nasal CPAP-intolerant individuals to improve CPAP compliance. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Mathematical Equations to Predict Positive Airway Pressures for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Systematic Review

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    Macario Camacho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To systematically review the international literature for mathematical equations used to predict effective pressures for positive airway pressure (PAP devices. Methods. Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Web of Science, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library were searched through June 27, 2015. The PRISMA statement was followed. There was no language limitation. Results. 709 articles were screened, fifty were downloaded, and twenty-six studies presented equations that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. In total, there were 4,436 patients in the development phases and 3,489 patients in the validation phases. Studies performed multiple linear regressions analyses as part of the equation(s development and included the following variables: physical characteristics, polysomnography data, behavioral characteristics, and miscellaneous characteristics, which were all predictive to a variable extent. Of the published variables, body mass index (BMI and mean oxygen saturation are the most heavily weighted, while BMI (eighteen studies, apnea-hypopnea index (seventeen studies, and neck circumference (eleven studies were the variables most frequently used in the mathematical equations. Ten studies were from Asian countries and sixteen were from non-Asian countries. Conclusion. This systematic review identified twenty-six unique studies reporting mathematical equations which are summarized. Overall, BMI and mean oxygen saturation are the most heavily weighted.

  18. Facilitators and Barriers to Positive Airway Pressure Adherence for Adolescents. A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alebraheem, Zahra; Toulany, Alene; Baker, Adele; Christian, Jennifer; Narang, Indra

    2018-01-01

    Low adherence to positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment for adolescents with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can have long-term cardiometabolic and developmental impact. To explore the facilitators and barriers to PAP use in adolescents with OSA. We conducted a qualitative study using a descriptive thematic analysis approach. A total of 21 interviews were conducted in the clinical setting with adolescents prescribed PAP to treat OSA within the previous 12 months. Interview audio recordings were transcribed verbatim for analysis. Transcripts were reviewed, and data were categorized using a coding framework developed by the research team. Codes were structured into themes related to the barriers and facilitators to using PAP. Participants described numerous challenges with the physical design of the PAP machine, including the restriction of the tubing, the discomfort of the mask, and concerns with its size and weight. A period of adjustment to wearing and preparing the PAP machine was described whereby participants had to develop their own strategies to improve comfort. After initiating the therapy, the challenges experienced by participants were cited more often than the perceived benefits, particularly for those who were less adherent. Finally, the unique needs of adolescents were highlighted, which impacted the amount of family support desired in using PAP. This study identifies factors affecting PAP adherence when prescribed in adolescence and highlights the need for ongoing dialogue between adolescents and their clinical team with respect to challenges encountered, troubleshooting, adherence strategies, and parental engagement.

  19. Continuous positive airway pressure with helmet versus mask in infants with bronchiolitis: an RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidini, Giovanna; Piastra, Marco; Marchesi, Tiziana; De Luca, Daniele; Napolitano, Luisa; Salvo, Ida; Wolfler, Andrea; Pelosi, Paolo; Damasco, Mirco; Conti, Giorgio; Calderini, Edoardo

    2015-04-01

    Noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is usually applied with a nasal or facial mask to treat mild acute respiratory failure (ARF) in infants. A pediatric helmet has now been introduced in clinical practice to deliver CPAP. This study compared treatment failure rates during CPAP delivered by helmet or facial mask in infants with respiratory syncytial virus-induced ARF. In this multicenter randomized controlled trial, 30 infants with respiratory syncytial virus-induced ARF were randomized to receive CPAP by helmet (n = 17) or facial mask (n = 13). The primary endpoint was treatment failure rate (defined as due to intolerance or need for intubation). Secondary outcomes were CPAP application time, number of patients requiring sedation, and complications with each interface. Compared with the facial mask, CPAP by helmet had a lower treatment failure rate due to intolerance (3/17 [17%] vs 7/13 [54%], P = .009), and fewer infants required sedation (6/17 [35%] vs 13/13 [100%], P = .023); the intubation rates were similar. In successfully treated patients, CPAP resulted in better gas exchange and breathing pattern with both interfaces. No major complications due to the interfaces occurred, but CPAP by mask had higher rates of cutaneous sores and leaks. These findings confirm that CPAP delivered by helmet is better tolerated than CPAP delivered by facial mask and requires less sedation. In addition, it is safe to use and free from adverse events, even in a prolonged clinical setting. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Nasal bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP) versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in preterm infants ≤32 weeks: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Zhi-Hui; Li, Wen-Bin; Liu, Wei; Cai, Bao-Huan; Wang, Jing; Yang, Min; Li, Wei; Chang, Li-Wen

    2016-05-01

    To investigate whether Bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP), compared with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), is a more effective therapeutic strategy in preterm infants ≤32 weeks. All inborn infants between 26(+1) and 32(+6) weeks' gestation, admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU ) of Tongji Medical Hospital between 1 January, 2010 and 31 December, 2011 (the 2010-2011 cohort or CPAP cohort) and between 1 January, 2012 and 31 December, 2013 (the 2012-2013 cohort or BiPAP cohort), were retrospectively identified. The primary outcome was intubation in infants CPAP were subsequently intubated (P CPAP, reduced the need for intubation within the first 72 h of age. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  1. Effect of personality traits on adherence with positive airway pressure therapy in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copur, Ahmet Sinan; Erik Everhart, D; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Zhengjia; Shekhani, Haris; Mathevosian, Sipan; Loveless, James; Watson, Eric; Kadri, Imtiazali; Wallace, Leandra; Simon, Edwin; Fulambarker, Ashok M

    2017-08-30

    Patient adherence with positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is a significant clinical problem in obstructive sleep apnea treatment. Personality traits may be a factor for non-adherence. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between PAP therapy adherence and patient personality traits. Patients were screened and recruited during their visit to a sleep clinic. Baseline data were collected from each patient's electronic chart. Behavioral inhibition system/behavioral activation system (BIS/BAS) scales, short measure of five-factor model personality traits (mini-IPIP), positive and negative affect score (PANAS), and appetitive motivation scores (AMS) tests were used to measure personality traits. Data from the PAP device were obtained following a minimum of an initial 30 days, with adherence defined as >4 h/night on 70% of nights. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression and Pearson correlation tests were used to analyze the data. A total of 400 patients were recruited. Three hundred twenty-one patients had all the data and were included in the study. Behavioral activation system-fun seeking (BAS-FS) and, to a certain extent, negative affect were significantly associated with adherence. Intellect/imagination was marginally significant. Additionally, older age (>65 years), profession, PAP type, side effects, efficiency, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), and residual AHI showed significant associations with patient adherence with PAP therapy. Multivariate analysis revealed that BAS-FS was still a significant predictor of adherence even after adjusting for other covariates. BAS-FS, negative affect, and intellect/imagination are significant factors for adherence to PAP therapy in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

  2. Self-Efficacy and Short-Term Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthopoulos, Melissa S; Kim, Ji Young; Blechner, Michael; Chang, Ming-Yu; Menello, Mary Kate; Brown, Christina; Matthews, Edward; Weaver, Terri E; Shults, Justine; Marcus, Carole L

    2017-07-01

    Infants, children, and adolescents are increasingly being prescribed continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), yet adherence is often poor. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between caregiver and patient-reported health cognitions about CPAP prior to starting CPAP and CPAP adherence at 1 month. We hypothesized that greater caregiver-reported self-efficacy would be positively associated with CPAP adherence in children. We also evaluated patient-reported self-efficacy and caregiver- and patient-reported risk perception and outcome expectations as they related to adherence, as well as how demographic factors influenced these relationships. A pediatric modification of the Self-Efficacy Measure for Sleep Apnea Questionnaire was administered to children and adolescents with OSAS-prescribed CPAP and their caregivers during the clinical CPAP-initiation visit. The primary outcome variable for adherence was the average total minutes of CPAP usage across all days from the date that CPAP was initiated to 31 days later. Unadjusted ordinary least-square regression showed a significant association between caregiver-reported self-efficacy and adherence (p = .007), indicating that mean daily CPAP usage increased by 48.4 minutes when caregiver-reported self-efficacy increased by one point (95% confidence interval 13.4-83.4 minutes). No other caregiver- or patient-reported cognitive health variables were related to CPAP use. This study indicates that caregiver CPAP-specific self-efficacy is an important factor to consider when starting youth on CPAP therapy for OSAS. Employing strategies to improve caregiver self-efficacy, beginning at CPAP initiation, may promote CPAP adherence. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Acute application of bilevel positive airway pressure influences the cardiac autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoni, Camila Bianca Falasco; Mendes, Renata Gonçalves; Di Thommazo, Luciana; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive positive pressure has been used to treat several diseases. However, the physiological response of the cardiac autonomic system during bilevel positive airway pressure (Bilevel) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the heart rate variability (HRV) during Bilevel in young healthy subjects. Twenty men underwent 10-minute R-R interval recordings during sham ventilation (SV), Bilevel of 8-15 cmH(2)O and Bilevel of 13-20 cmH(2)O. The HRV was analyzed by means of the parallel R-R interval (mean R-Ri), the standard deviation of all R-Ri (SDNN), the root mean square of the squares of the differences between successive R-Ri (rMSSD), the number of successive R-Ri pairs that differ by more than 50 milliseconds (NN50), the percentage of successive R-Ri that differ by more than 50 milliseconds (pNN50), the low frequency (LF), the high frequency (HF) and SD1 and SD2. Additionally, physiological variables, including blood pressure, breathing frequency and end tidal CO(2), were collected. Repeated-measures ANOVA and Pearson correlation were used to assess the differences between the three studied conditions and the relationships between the delta of Bilevel at 13-20 cmH(2)O and sham ventilation of the HRV indexes and the physiological variables, respectively. The R-Ri mean, rMSSD, NN50, pNN50 and SD1 were reduced during Bilevel of 13-20 cmH(2)O as compared to SV. An R-Ri mean reduction was also observed in Bilevel of 13-20 cmH(2)O compared to 8-15 cmH(2)O. Both the R-Ri mean and HF were reduced during Bilevel of 8-15 cmH(2)O as compared to SV, while the LF increased during application of Bilevel of 8-15 cmH(2)O as compared to SV. The delta (between Bilevel at 13-20 cmH(2)O and sham ventilation) of ETCO(2) correlated positively with LF, HF, the LF/HF ratio, SDNN, rMSSD and SD1. Acute application of Bilevel was able to alter the cardiac autonomic nervous system, resulting in a reduction in parasympathetic activity and an increase in sympathetic activity

  4. Continuous nasal positive airway pressure with a mouth leak: effect on nasal mucosal blood flux and nasal geometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, M. J.; McGregor, F. B.; Roberts, D. N.; Schroter, R. C.; Pride, N. B.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Obstructive sleep apnoea is a common condition. Treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), while effective and safe, causes nasal congestion and stuffiness in some patients. The hypothesis that this study aimed to test was that nasal CPAP with a mouth leak and subsequent unidirectional airflow across the nasal mucosa causes an increase in nasal mucosal blood flux and a fall in both nasal volume and minimal cross sectional area. A secondary aim was to study if...

  5. Continuous positive airway pressure improves sleep and daytime sleepiness in patients with Parkinson disease and sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neikrug, Ariel B; Liu, Lianqi; Avanzino, Julie A; Maglione, Jeanne E; Natarajan, Loki; Bradley, Lenette; Maugeri, Alex; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Palmer, Barton W; Loredo, Jose S; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), common in Parkinson disease (PD), contributes to sleep disturbances and daytime sleepiness. We assessed the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on OSA, sleep, and daytime sleepiness in patients with PD. This was a randomized placebo-controlled, crossover design. Patients with PD and OSA were randomized into 6 w of therapeutic treatment or 3 w of placebo followed by 3 w of therapeutic treatment. Patients were evaluated by polysomnography (PSG) and multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) pretreatment (baseline), after 3 w, and after 6 w of CPAP treatment. Analyses included mixed models, paired analysis, and within-group analyses comparing 3 w to 6 w of treatment. Sleep laboratory. Thirty-eight patients with PD (mean age = 67.2 ± 9.2 y; 12 females). Continuous positive airway pressure. PSG OUTCOME MEASURES: sleep efficiency, %sleep stages (N1, N2, N3, R), arousal index, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), and % time oxygen saturation sleep-onset latency (MSL). There were significant group-by-time interactions for AHI (P sleep. The paired sample analyses revealed that 3 w of therapeutic treatment resulted in significant decreases in arousal index (t = 3.4, P = 0.002). All improvements after 3 w were maintained at 6 w. Finally, 3 w of therapeutic CPAP also resulted in overall decreases in daytime sleepiness (P = 0.011). Therapeutic continuous positive airway pressure versus placebo was effective in reducing apnea events, improving oxygen saturation, and deepening sleep in patients with Parkinson disease and obstructive sleep apnea. Additionally, arousal index was reduced and effects were maintained at 6 weeks. Finally, 3 weeks of continuous positive airway pressure treatment resulted in reduced daytime sleepiness measured by multiple sleep latency test. These results emphasize the importance of identifying and treating obstructive sleep apnea in patients with Parkinson disease.

  6. Continuous positive airway pressure requirements in patients with tetraplegia and obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guen, M C; Cistulli, P A; Berlowitz, D J

    2012-11-01

    Clinic-based retrospective case-control study. To compare continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) requirements between patients with tetraplegia and able-bodied patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Melbourne, Australia. Diagnostic and CPAP titration polysomnograms of 219 able-bodied, and 25 patients with tetraplegia and OSA were compared for apnoea hypopnoea index (AHI) and CPAP levels required to effectively treat OSA. Demographics and body mass index (BMI) were obtained for each patient. ASIA score and injury date were obtained for patients with tetraplegia. There was no significant difference in AHI (P=0.102) between the two groups; however, able-bodied patients were significantly older (P=0.003), required significantly higher levels of CPAP to control their OSA (Ptetraplegia. In the tetraplegia group, there was no significant correlation between AHI and effective CPAP (r=0.022, P=0.92) or between AHI and BMI (r=-0.196, P=0.35). There was a significant correlation between effective CPAP and BMI (r=0.411, P=0.041). Among able-bodied patients, over two-thirds (68.8%) required 10-16 cm H(2)0 to control their OSA and nearly one-third required over 16 cm H(2)0. In contrast, over two-thirds (68.8%) in the tetraplegia group required less than 10 cm H(2)0 of CPAP to control their OSA. This retrospective study suggests that OSA patients with tetraplegia require significantly less CPAP to treat their OSA at any given AHI than those who are able-bodied. This suggests that additional unknown factors may contribute to the high prevalence of OSA in tetraplegia.

  7. Impact of heated humidification with automatic positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnea therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Sara Moreira da Silva Trindade; Boléo-Tomé, José Pedro Correia Fernandes; Canhão, Cristina Maria Sardinha; Dias, Ana Rita Tavares; Teixeira, Joana Isaac; Pinto, Paula Maria Gonçalves; Caetano, Maria Cristina de Brito Eusébio Bárbara Prista

    2008-09-01

    To study the impact that heated humidification instituted in the beginning of automatic positive airway pressure (APAP) therapy has on compliance with and the side effects of the treatment. Thirty-nine treatment-naïve patients with obstructive sleep apnea were randomized into two groups to receive APAP using one of two modalities: with heated humidification (APAPwith group); and without heated humidification (APAPw/o group).Patients were evaluated at 7 and 30 days after APAP initiation. The following parameters were analyzed: compliance with treatment (mean number of hours/night); side effects (dry nose or mouth, nasal obstruction and rhinorrhea); daytime sleepiness (Epworth sleepiness scale score) and subjective comfort (visual analog scale score). Patients were also evaluated in terms of residual apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), as well as mean pressures and leaks registered in the ventilators. There were no differences between the two groups in terms of mean age (APAPwith: 57.4 +/- 9.2; APAPw/o: 56.5 +/- 10.7 years), AHI (APAPwith: 28.1 +/- 14.0; APAPw/o: 28.8 +/- 20.5 events/hour of sleep), baseline Epworth score (APAPwith: 11.2 +/- 5.8; APAPw/o: 11.9 +/- 6.3) and initial nasal symptoms. Compliance was similar in both groups (APAPwith: 5.3 +/- 2.4; APAPw/o: 5.2 +/- 2.3 h/night). There were no differences in any of the other parameters analyzed. The introduction of heated humidification at the beginning of APAP therapy provided no advantage in terms of treatment compliance or side effects of treatment.

  8. Is the relationship between race and continuous positive airway pressure adherence mediated by sleep duration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Martha E; Rosen, Carol L; Wang, Rui; Auckley, Dennis; Benca, Ruth; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Iber, Conrad; Zee, Phyllis; Redline, Susan; Kapur, Vishesh K

    2013-02-01

    Black race has been associated with decreased continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence. Short sleep duration, long sleep latency, and insomnia complaints may affect CPAP adherence as they affect sleep and opportunity to use CPAP. We assessed whether self-reported sleep measures were associated with CPAP adherence and if racial variations in these sleep characteristics may explain racial differences in CPAP adherence. Analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial (HomePAP), which investigated home versus laboratory-based diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. Seven American Academy of Sleep Medicine-accredited sleep centers in five cities in the United States. Enrolled subjects (n = 191) with apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 15 and sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale > 12). N/A. Multivariable regression was used to assess if subjective sleep measures and symptoms predicted 3-mo CPAP use. Mediation analysis was used to assess if sleep measures mediated the association of race with CPAP adherence. Black participants reported shorter sleep duration and longer sleep latency at baseline than white and Hispanic participants. Shorter sleep duration and longer sleep latency predicted worse CPAP adherence. Sleep duration mediated the association of black race with lower CPAP adherence. However, insomnia symptoms were not associated with race or CPAP adherence. Among subjects with similar severity of obstructive sleep apnea and sleepiness, baseline self-reported sleep duration and latency, but not perceived insomnia, predicted CPAP adherence over 3 mo. Sleep duration explains some of the observed differences in CPAP use by race. Sleep duration and latency should be considered when evaluating poor CPAP adherence. PORTABLE MONITORING FOR DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF SLEEP APNEA (HOMEPAP) URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00642486. NIH clinical trials registry number: NCT00642486.

  9. Early effects of continuous positive airway pressure in a rodent model of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaseca, I; Lehrer-Coriat, E; Torres, M; Aguilar, F; Almendros, I; Martínez-Vidal, B M; Farré, R; Montserrat, J M

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most commonly used treatment in obstructive sleep apnea. In a previous rat model study, we demonstrated that nasal CPAP induces early rhinitis expressed by nasal neutrophil extravasation. Here we hypothesized that nasal CPAP would worsen nasal inflammation on a previously inflamed mucosa. The objective of this study was to evaluate the early nasal CPAP effects of allergic rhinitis (AR) in a rodent model. Twenty Sprague-Dawley rats were sensitized with intraperitoneal ovalbumin (OVA). Nasal inflammation was induced by the administration of intranasal OVA during consecutive days. The same procedure was performed in 20 control rats treated with saline solution. The allergic (AR) and non-allergic (NAR) rats were then randomized to nasal CPAP at 10 cm H 2 O for five hours or to sham CPAP. The degree of nasal inflammation was assessed by evaluating the percentage of neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils, and lymphocytes in the nasal mucosa. An unpaired Mann-Whitney test was used to analyze differences between groups. The greatest inflammation was observed in the group of AR without CPAP (1.24% ± 0.94%), followed by NAR with CPAP (0.64% ± 0.30%), AR with CPAP (0.64% ± 0.40%), and NAR without CPAP (0.21% ± 0.29%). Administration of nasal CPAP or allergy sensitization can produce, individually, neutrophil extravasation on the nasal mucosa of a rat model. The application of both stimuli is not responsible for increased inflammation. Therefore, this study suggests that rhinitis is not a major limitation for CPAP administration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effectiveness of prehospital continuous positive airway pressure in the management of acute pulmonary edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubble, Michael W; Richards, Michael E; Jarvis, Roger; Millikan, Tori; Young, Dwayne

    2006-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) with standard pharmacologic treatment in the management of prehospital acute pulmonary edema. Using a nonrandomized control group design, all consecutive patients presenting to two participating emergency medical services (EMS) systems with a field impression of acute pulmonary edema between July 1, 2004, and June 30, 2005, were included in the study. The control EMS system patients received standard treatment with oxygen, nitrates, furosemide, morphine, and, if indicated, endotracheal intubation. The intervention EMS system patients received CPAP via face mask at 10 cm H2O in addition to standard therapy. Ninety-five patients received standard therapy, and 120 patients received CPAP and standard therapy. Intubation was required in 8.9% of CPAP-treated patients compared with 25.3% in the control group (p = 0.003), and mortality was lower in the CPAP group than in the control group (5.4% vs. 23.2%; p = 0.000). When compared with the control group, the CPAP group had more improvement in respiratory rate (-4.55 vs. -1.81; p = 0.001), pulse rate (-4.77 vs. 0.82; p = 0.013), and dyspnea score (-2.11 vs. -1.36; p = 0.008). Using logistic regression to control for potential confounders, patients receiving standard treatment were more likely to be intubated (odds ratio, 4.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.64 to 9.95) and more likely to die (odds ratio, 7.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.96 to 28.54) than those receiving standard therapy and CPAP. The prehospital use of CPAP is feasible, may avert the need for endotracheal intubation, and may reduce short-term mortality.

  11. Impact of Patient Education on Compliance with Positive Airway Pressure Treatment in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraç, Sema; Afşar, Gülgün Çetintaş; Oruç, Özlem; Topçuoğlu, Özgür Bilgin; Saltürk, Cüneyt; Peker, Yüksel

    2017-04-13

    BACKGROUND We addressed the impact of patient education followed by frequent visits on compliance with positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in a Turkish sleep clinic cohort. MATERIAL AND METHODS This single-center, randomized, controlled study was conducted in Istanbul, Turkey between June 2014 and April 2015. Among 115 eligible OSA patients (mean age 51.0±9.3 years; 75.5% men), 63 were randomized to standard support (SS) group (general information about OSA and PAP treatment at baseline), and 52 to educational support (ES) group (additional polysomnography chart viewing from both diagnostic and titration nights). All patients were scheduled to five PAP control visits between two weeks and six months after the PAP prescription. Primary outcome was the PAP compliance (4 hours/night for 70% of all the nights) at the last visit. RESULTS Average PAP usage was 4.2±2.5 hours/night in the SS group, and 5.2±2.1 hours/night in the ES group (p=0.027). PAP compliance was achieved among 68.3% in the SS group, and 86.5% in the ES group (p=0.021). In a multivariate analysis, ES strategy followed by frequent visits predicted PAP compliance (odds ratio [OR] 3.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-10.6; p=0.020). Other predictors were obesity (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.2-9.7; p=0.019) and severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index ≥30/hour) at baseline (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.2-17.6; p=0.023). Primary school education level was inversely related with PAP compliance (OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.9; p=0.036). CONCLUSIONS Patient education with polysomnography chart view followed by frequent visits increased long-term compliance with PAP treatment.

  12. Quality Improvement of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Chou, An-Kuo; Chen, Yu-Lien; Chou, Hung-Chieh; Tsao, Po-Nien; Hsieh, Wu-Shiun

    2017-06-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) therapy is widely used in neonates, but the clinical practice varies. However, nursing practice differs among individuals, and an inappropriate application method may delay the respiratory therapy, influence the beneficial effect of NCPAP, and increase complications. We introduced a quality improvement project to expedite the application of NCPAP therapy and decrease the incidence of nasal trauma. A new strategy of mobile NCPAP cart with prepacked fixation kits and a written protocol was implemented from April 2006. All medical staff answered a questionnaire to assess their basic knowledge before and after intensive training. The records of the patients who were treated with NCPAP from October 2005 to November 2006 were reviewed. Fifty-nine medical staff were involved in the project, and their mean score for the questionnaire improved from 69.2 points to 98.3 points after training. From October 2005 to November 2006, 113 infants were recruited in total and 82 of them were admitted after the protocol was implemented. The NCPAP cart dramatically shortened the preparation time (from 520 seconds to 72 seconds) and the application time (from 468 seconds to 200 seconds). The use of the nursing protocol significantly decreased the incidence of nasal trauma in the study population (45.2% vs. 19.6%, p = 0.006), but not in infants with a birth weight of < 1000 g. Risk factors for nasal skin trauma included lower gestational age and birth weight, longer duration of NCPAP use, and lack of standardized nursing care. The mobile NCPAP cart with prepacked fixation kits is a practical way of expediting the initiation of NCPAP therapy. The written nursing protocol decreased the incidence of nasal trauma in infants, except for those with an extremely low birth weight. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Comparison of nasal continuous positive airway pressure delivered by seven ventilators using simulated neonatal breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevhammar, Thomas; Nilsson, Kjell; Zetterström, Henrik; Jonsson, Baldvin

    2013-05-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) is an established treatment for respiratory distress in neonates. Most modern ventilators are able to provide NCPAP. There have been no large studies examining the properties of NCPAP delivered by ventilators. The aim of this study was to compare pressure stability and imposed work of breathing (iWOB) for NCPAP delivered by ventilators using simulated neonatal breathing. Experimental in vitro study. Research laboratory in Sweden. None. Neonatal breathing was simulated using a mechanical lung simulator. Seven ventilators were tested at different CPAP levels using two breath profiles. Pressure stability and iWOB were determined. Results from three ventilators revealed that they provided a slight pressure support. For these ventilators, iWOB could not be calculated. There were large differences in pressure stability and iWOB between the tested ventilators. For simulations using the 3.4-kg breath profile, the pressure swings around the mean pressure were more than five times greater, and iWOB more than four times higher, for the system with the highest measured values compared with the system with the lowest. Overall, the Fabian ventilator was the most pressure stable system. Evita XL and SERVO-i were found more pressure stable than Fabian in some simulations. The results for iWOB were in accordance with pressure stability for systems that allowed determination of this variable. Some of the tested ventilators unexpectedly provided a minor degree of pressure support. In terms of pressure stability, we have not found any advantages of ventilators as a group compared with Bubble CPAP, Neopuff, and variable flow generators that were tested in our previous study. The variation between individual systems is great within both categories. The clinical importance of these findings needs further investigation.

  14. Overnight Motor Skill Learning Outcomes in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Shane; O'Driscoll, Denise M; Hamilton, Garun S; Conduit, Russell

    2016-05-15

    To determine the effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in alleviating known impairments in the overnight consolidation of motor skill learning in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Twenty-five patients with untreated moderate-severe OSA, 13 first-night CPAP users, 17 compliant CPAP users, and 14 healthy control patients were trained on a motor sequence learning task (Sequential Finger Tapping Task, SFTT) and were subsequently tested prior to and after polysomnographic recorded sleep. Measures of subjective sleepiness (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale) and sustained attention (Psychomotor Vigilance Task) were also completed before and after sleep. Typical analyses of overnight improvement on the SFTT show significantly greater overnight gains in motor task speed in controls (+11.6 ± 4.7%, p = 0.007) and compliant CPAP users (+8.9 ± 4.3%, p = 0.008) compared to patients with OSA (-4.86 ± 4.5%). Additional analyses suggest that these improvements in motor performance occurred prior to the sleep episode, as all groups significantly improved (15% to 22%) over a 10-min presleep rest period. Thereafter, performance in all groups significantly deteriorated over sleep (6% to 16%) with trends toward patients with OSA showing greater losses in performance compared to control patients and compliant CPAP users. No between-group differences in subjective sleepiness and sustained attention were found presleep and postsleep. The current data suggest impairments in overnight motor learning in patients with OSA may be a combination of deficient stabilization of memory over a sleep episode as well as increased vulnerability to time on task fatigue effects. Compliant CPAP usage possibly offsets both of these impediments to learning outcomes by improving both sleep quality and subsequent daytime function. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  15. Type of Mask May Impact on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Adherence in Apneic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, Jean Christian; Tamisier, Renaud; Dias-Domingos, Sonia; Sapene, Marc; Martin, Francis; Stach, Bruno; Grillet, Yves; Muir, Jean François; Levy, Patrick; Series, Frederic; Pepin, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Rationale In obstructive sleep apnea patients (OSA), continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence is crucial to improve symptoms and cardiometabolic outcomes. The choice of mask may influence CPAP adherence but this issue has never been addressed properly. Objective To evaluate the impact of nasal pillows, nasal and oronasal masks on CPAP adherence in a cohort of OSA. Methods Newly CPAP treated OSA participating in “Observatoire Sommeil de la Fédération de Pneumologie”, a French national prospective cohort, were included between March 2009 and December 2011. Anthropometric data, medical history, OSA severity, sleepiness, depressive status, treatment modalities (auto-CPAP versus fixed pressure, pressure level, interface type, use of humidifiers) and CPAP-related side effects were included in multivariate analysis to determine independent variables associated with CPAP adherence. Results 2311 OSA (age = 57(12) years, apnea+hypopnea index = 41(21)/h, 29% female) were included. Nasal masks, oronasal masks and nasal pillows were used by 62.4, 26.2 and 11.4% of the patients, respectively. In univariate analysis, oronasal masks and nasal pillows were associated with higher risk of CPAP non-adherence. CPAP non-adherence was also associated with younger age, female gender, mild OSA, gastroesophageal reflux, depression status, low effective pressure and CPAP-related side effects. In multivariate analysis, CPAP non-adherence was associated with the use of oronasal masks (OR = 2.0; 95%CI = 1.6; 2.5), depression, low effective pressure, and side effects. Conclusion As oronasal masks negatively impact on CPAP adherence, a nasal mask should be preferred as the first option. Patients on oronasal masks should be carefully followed. PMID:23691209

  16. Estimating sleep parameters using nasal pressure signals applicable to continuous positive airway pressure devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Uk; Erdenebayar, Urtnasan; Joo, Eun-Yeon; Lee, Kyoung-Joung

    2017-06-27

    This paper proposes a method for classifying sleep-wakefulness and estimating sleep parameters using nasal pressure signals applicable to a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device. In order to classify the sleep-wakefulness states of patients with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), apnea-hypopnea and snoring events are first detected. Epochs detected as SDB are classified as sleep, and time-domain- and frequency-domain-based features are extracted from the epochs that are detected as normal breathing. Subsequently, sleep-wakefulness is classified using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier in the normal breathing epoch. Finally, four sleep parameters-sleep onset, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time and sleep efficiency-are estimated based on the classified sleep-wakefulness. In order to develop and test the algorithm, 110 patients diagnosed with SDB participated in this study. Ninety of the subjects underwent full-night polysomnography (PSG) and twenty underwent split-night PSG. The subjects were divided into 50 patients of a training set (full/split: 42/8), 30 of a validation set (full/split: 24/6) and 30 of a test set (full/split: 24/6). In the experiments conducted, sleep-wakefulness classification accuracy was found to be 83.2% in the test set, compared with the PSG scoring results of clinical experts. Furthermore, all four sleep parameters showed higher correlations than the results obtained via PSG (r  ⩾  0.84, p  CPAP, sleep-wakefulness classification performances were evaluated for each CPAP in the split-night PSG data. The results indicate that the accuracy and sensitivity of sleep-wakefulness classification by CPAP variation shows no statistically significant difference (p  CPAP devices and evaluation of the quality of sleep.

  17. Gel pillow designed specifically for obstructive sleep apnea treatment with continuous positive airway pressure

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    Adriana Salvaggio

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To determine whether the use of a gel pillow with side cutouts designed to accommodate a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP mask and reduce head temperature improves the efficacy of and adherence to auto-CPAP therapy. Methods: Twenty-three consecutive CPAP-naïve patients with obstructive sleep apnea were enrolled in the study. Patients were given an auto-CPAP machine with an appropriate CPAP mask and were instructed to use CPAP for 15 nights. They were instructed to sleep with their own pillow (the control pillow from nights 1 to 5 and with either a foam pillow or a gel pillow, both of which had side cutouts, for 5 consecutive nights each, in random order. After night 15, auto-CPAP machine data were downloaded and patients rated their satisfaction with each pillow on a visual analog scale. Results: Twenty-two patients completed the protocol. The pressures administered, residual apnea-hypopnea index, air leaks, and mean duration of CPAP use did not differ among the periods during which each pillow was used. Patients were significantly more satisfied with the gel pillow than with the control pillow and the foam pillow (p = 0.022 and p = 0.004, respectively, their level of satisfaction with the gel pillow correlating significantly with excessive daytime sleepiness (r2 = 0.19; p = 0.0443. Conclusions: Among obstructive sleep apnea patients treated with nasal CPAP, the use of a gel pillow with side cutouts appears to have no impact on treatment effectiveness. Nevertheless, such patients seem to prefer a gel pillow over other types of pillows.

  18. Effectiveness of intranasal sodium hyaluronate in mitigating adverse effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy.

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    La Mantia, Ignazio; Andaloro, Claudio

    2017-11-19

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in moderate-to-severe cases of obstructive sleep apnea can cause nasal discomfort and other undesirable problems. The aim of our study was to test the effects of sodium hyaluronate on nasal problems that patients experienced in their daily lives, sleepiness, nasal resistance to airflow, nasal mucociliary clearance, changes in inflammatory markers, and compliance to CPAP in three groups of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on CPAP therapy. A total of 102 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] of ≥10/hour) were randomized into three treatment groups: (1) hyaluronate plus CPAP, (2) saline solution plus CPAP, and (3) CPAP-only groups. Outcome measures were the extent of improvement in the Mini Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (MiniRQLQ) mean scores, sleepiness, nasal resistance to airflow, nasal mucociliary clearance, changes in inflammatory markers, and compliance to CPAP. Significant improvement in each outcome measure was determined by comparing scores at baseline and after 4 weeks for each treatment group. Significant improvement in the MiniRQLQ overall mean score was observed both in the hyaluronate plus CPAP (p CPAP groups (p CPAP group had better improvement compared with the saline solution plus CPAP group (0.24 versus 0.12, respectively). An increase in nasal inflammatory markers and saccharin transit test score was observed in all three groups, although it was statistically lower in the hyaluronate plus CPAP group (all p CPAP therapy, but future studies over a longer period of time after treatment should be performed to corroborate our findings.

  19. Application of continuous positive airway pressure in the delivery room: a multicenter randomized clinical trial

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    W.A. Goncalves-Ferri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated whether the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP in the delivery room alters the need for mechanical ventilation and surfactant during the first 5 days of life and modifies the incidence of respiratory morbidity and mortality during the hospital stay. The study was a multicenter randomized clinical trial conducted in five public university hospitals in Brazil, from June 2008 to December 2009. Participants were 197 infants with birth weight of 1000-1500 g and without major birth defects. They were treated according to the guidelines of the American Academy of Pediatrics (APP. Infants not intubated or extubated less than 15 min after birth were randomized for two treatments, routine or CPAP, and were followed until hospital discharge. The routine (n=99 and CPAP (n=98 infants studied presented no statistically significant differences regarding birth characteristics, complications during the prenatal period, the need for mechanical ventilation during the first 5 days of life (19.2 vs 23.4%, P=0.50, use of surfactant (18.2 vs 17.3% P=0.92, or respiratory morbidity and mortality until discharge. The CPAP group required a greater number of doses of surfactant (1.5 vs 1.0, P=0.02. When CPAP was applied to the routine group, it was installed within a median time of 30 min. We found that CPAP applied less than 15 min after birth was not able to reduce the need for ventilator support and was associated with a higher number of doses of surfactant when compared to CPAP applied as clinically indicated within a median time of 30 min.

  20. Effects of imposed resistance on tidal volume with 5 neonatal nasal continuous positive airway pressure systems.

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    Cook, Shannon E; Fedor, Katherine L; Chatburn, Robert L

    2010-05-01

    Neonates with respiratory distress syndrome are often treated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Nasal CPAP methods include electronic feedback control, underwater seal, flow opposition, and flow opposition with fluidic flow reversal on expiration. Few studies have compared those modes, and the results have been contradictory. We compared the effect of resistive load on simulated tidal volume (V(T)) with 5 neonatal nasal CPAP systems: Fisher and Paykel nasal CPAP tubing with Maquet Servo-i ventilator in NIV CPAP mode; Cardinal Health AirLife nasal CPAP system; Fisher and Paykel nasal CPAP tubing with water-seal pressure generator; AirLife infant nasal CPAP generator kit; and Hamilton Medical Arabella fluidic nasal CPAP generator. The lung simulator settings were: compliance 0.5 mL/cm H2O, resistance 125 H2O/L/s, sinusoidal patient-effort range 6.5-26 cm H2O, rise 25%, hold 0%, release 25%, respiratory rate 65 breaths/min. We compared the mean values from 10 breaths. The mean inspiratory pressure drop and V(T) difference (compared to the simulator alone, unloaded) increased with V(T), respectively, from 0.32 cm H2O to 1.73 cm H2O, and from -0.04 mL to -0.40 mL. Flow opposition had the smallest pressure drop (from 0.10 cm H2O to 0.64 cm H2O, P nasal CPAP's pressure drop was largest (P or = 9 mL the electronic nasal CPAP's pressure drop was largest (P nasal CPAP systems correlate with the differences in unassisted V(T) due to loading effects. The ventilator imposed the least load, and the AirLife nasal CPAP system imposed the most.

  1. Type of mask may impact on continuous positive airway pressure adherence in apneic patients.

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    Jean Christian Borel

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: In obstructive sleep apnea patients (OSA, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP adherence is crucial to improve symptoms and cardiometabolic outcomes. The choice of mask may influence CPAP adherence but this issue has never been addressed properly. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of nasal pillows, nasal and oronasal masks on CPAP adherence in a cohort of OSA. METHODS: Newly CPAP treated OSA participating in "Observatoire Sommeil de la Fédération de Pneumologie", a French national prospective cohort, were included between March 2009 and December 2011. Anthropometric data, medical history, OSA severity, sleepiness, depressive status, treatment modalities (auto-CPAP versus fixed pressure, pressure level, interface type, use of humidifiers and CPAP-related side effects were included in multivariate analysis to determine independent variables associated with CPAP adherence. RESULTS: 2311 OSA (age = 57(12 years, apnea+hypopnea index = 41(21/h, 29% female were included. Nasal masks, oronasal masks and nasal pillows were used by 62.4, 26.2 and 11.4% of the patients, respectively. In univariate analysis, oronasal masks and nasal pillows were associated with higher risk of CPAP non-adherence. CPAP non-adherence was also associated with younger age, female gender, mild OSA, gastroesophageal reflux, depression status, low effective pressure and CPAP-related side effects. In multivariate analysis, CPAP non-adherence was associated with the use of oronasal masks (OR = 2.0; 95%CI = 1.6; 2.5, depression, low effective pressure, and side effects. CONCLUSION: As oronasal masks negatively impact on CPAP adherence, a nasal mask should be preferred as the first option. Patients on oronasal masks should be carefully followed.

  2. Type of mask may impact on continuous positive airway pressure adherence in apneic patients.

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    Borel, Jean Christian; Tamisier, Renaud; Dias-Domingos, Sonia; Sapene, Marc; Martin, Francis; Stach, Bruno; Grillet, Yves; Muir, Jean François; Levy, Patrick; Series, Frederic; Pepin, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    In obstructive sleep apnea patients (OSA), continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence is crucial to improve symptoms and cardiometabolic outcomes. The choice of mask may influence CPAP adherence but this issue has never been addressed properly. To evaluate the impact of nasal pillows, nasal and oronasal masks on CPAP adherence in a cohort of OSA. Newly CPAP treated OSA participating in "Observatoire Sommeil de la Fédération de Pneumologie", a French national prospective cohort, were included between March 2009 and December 2011. Anthropometric data, medical history, OSA severity, sleepiness, depressive status, treatment modalities (auto-CPAP versus fixed pressure, pressure level, interface type, use of humidifiers) and CPAP-related side effects were included in multivariate analysis to determine independent variables associated with CPAP adherence. 2311 OSA (age = 57(12) years, apnea+hypopnea index = 41(21)/h, 29% female) were included. Nasal masks, oronasal masks and nasal pillows were used by 62.4, 26.2 and 11.4% of the patients, respectively. In univariate analysis, oronasal masks and nasal pillows were associated with higher risk of CPAP non-adherence. CPAP non-adherence was also associated with younger age, female gender, mild OSA, gastroesophageal reflux, depression status, low effective pressure and CPAP-related side effects. In multivariate analysis, CPAP non-adherence was associated with the use of oronasal masks (OR = 2.0; 95%CI = 1.6; 2.5), depression, low effective pressure, and side effects. As oronasal masks negatively impact on CPAP adherence, a nasal mask should be preferred as the first option. Patients on oronasal masks should be carefully followed.

  3. Assessing the performance of the Whisperflow continuous positive airway pressure generator: a bench study.

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    Glover, G W; Fletcher, S J

    2009-06-01

    There are few data describing the performance of the Whisperflow continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) generator. (i) (a) A static test of 11 Whisperflow devices examining maximum flow generation with no load and with 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, 15, and 20 cm H2O valve loading, at varying Fi(O2). (b) CPAP valves (Accu-peep(R), Vital Signs, Totowa, NJ, USA) were tested by measuring mean upstream pressure at varying flows in five valves (2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, 15, and 20 cm H2O). (ii) We measured the mean and minimum inspiratory mask pressure generated by a representative Whisperflow device in a model of spontaneous respiration. Measurements were made with combinations of Fi(O2), ventilatory frequency, tidal volume, and valve loading similar to those encountered in clinical practice. (i) (a) The flow generated by the Whisperflow valves decreases with increasing valve load and increasing Fi(O2) (from 140 to 20 litre min(-1)). (b) The CPAP valves maintain the required pressure within acceptable limits against varying flow. (ii) At all permutations, the mean inspiratory mask pressure was significantly lower than that required. At high inspiratory flow rates, the minimum inspiratory pressure approached atmospheric pressure. The Whisperflow may not perform as expected. Clinicians should be cautious when using this device, particularly with high Fi(O2) and CPAP valve load. The flow setting should be set at maximum. Failure of CPAP therapy may be due to failure of the generator. Further in vivo data are required.

  4. The Efficacy of Low-Level Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for the Treatment of Snoring.

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    Guzman, Michelle A; Sgambati, Francis P; Pho, Huy; Arias, Rafael S; Hawks, Erin M; Wolfe, Erica M; Ötvös, Tamás; Rosenberg, Russell; Dakheel, Riad; Schneider, Hartmut; Kirkness, Jason P; Smith, Philip L; Schwartz, Alan R

    2017-05-15

    To assess effects of low-level continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on snoring in habitual snorers without obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). A multicenter prospective in-laboratory reversal crossover intervention trial was conducted between September 2013 and August 2014. Habitual snorers were included if they snored (inspiratory sound pressure level ≥ 40 dBA) for ≥ 30% all sleep breaths on a baseline sleep study (Night 1), and if significant OSA and daytime somnolence were absent. Included participants then underwent a CPAP titration study at 2, 4, or 6 cm H 2 O (Night 2) to examine snoring responses to step-increases in nasal pressure, a treatment night at optimal pressure (Night 3), followed by baseline night (Night 4). At each pressure, snoring intensity was measured on each breath. Snoring frequency was quantified as a percentage of sleep breaths at thresholds of 40, 45, 50, and 55 dBA. Sleep architecture and OSA severity were characterized using standard measurements. On baseline sleep studies, participants demonstrated snoring at ≥ 40 dBA on 53 ± 3% and ≥ 45 dBA on 35 ± 4% of breaths. Snoring frequency decreased progressively as nasal pressure increased from 0 to 4 cm H 2 O at each threshold, and plateaued thereafter. CPAP decreased snoring frequency by 67% and 85% at 40 and 45 dBA, respectively. Intervention did not alter sleep architecture and sleep apnea decreased minimally. Low-level CPAP below the range required to treat OSA diminished nocturnal snoring, and produced uniform reduction in nightly noise production below the World Health Organization's limit of 45 dBA. ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT01949584. © 2017 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  5. Nasal Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure Devices (Provent for OSA: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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    Muhammad Riaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To quantify the effectiveness of nasal expiratory positive airway pressure (nasal EPAP devices or Provent as treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Methods. PubMed and six other databases were searched through November 15, 2015, without language limitations. Results. Eighteen studies (920 patients were included. Pre- and post-nasal EPAP means ± standard deviations (M ± SD for apnea-hypopnea index (AHI in 345 patients decreased from 27.32±22.24 to 12.78±16.89 events/hr (relative reduction = 53.2%. Random effects modeling mean difference (MD was −14.78 events/hr [95% CI −19.12, −10.45], p value < 0.00001. Oxygen desaturation index (ODI in 247 patients decreased from 21.2±19.3 to 12.4±14.1 events/hr (relative reduction = 41.5%, p value < 0.00001. Lowest oxygen saturation (LSAT M ± SD improved in 146 patients from 83.2±6.8% to 86.2±11.1%, MD 3 oxygen saturation points [95% CI 0.57, 5.63]. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS M ± SD improved (359 patients from 9.9±5.3 to 7.4±5.0, MD −2.5 [95% CI −3.2, −1.8], p value < 0.0001. Conclusion. Nasal EPAP (Provent reduced AHI by 53.2%, ODI by 41.5% and improved LSAT by 3 oxygen saturation points. Generally, there were no clear characteristics (demographic factors, medical history, and/or physical exam finding that predicted favorable response to these devices. However, limited evidence suggests that high nasal resistance could be associated with treatment failure. Additional studies are needed to identify demographic and polysomnographic characteristics that would predict therapeutic success with nasal EPAP (Provent.

  6. Natural history of treatment-emergent central sleep apnea on positive airway pressure: A systematic review.

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    Nigam, Gaurav; Riaz, Muhammad; Chang, Edward T; Camacho, Macario

    2018-01-01

    Treatment-emergent central sleep apnea (TECSA) is observed in some patients when they are treated with positive airway pressure (PAP) after significant resolution of the preexisting obstructive events in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The objective of this study was to systematically review the literature for studies describing the natural history of TECSA. PubMed, Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochran Library databases were searched through June 29, 2017. Five studies were identified that discussed the natural history of TECSA. TECSA developed in 3.5%-19.8% of PAP-treated patients. Treatment-persistent central sleep apnea (TPCSA), representing protracted periods of PAP therapy-related central apneas, was noted in 14.3%-46.2% of patients with TECSA. Delayed-TECSA (D-TECSA) represents an anomalous TECSA entity appearing weeks to months after initial PAP therapy. D-TECSA was observed in 0.7%-4.2% of OSA patients undergoing PAP treatment (after at least 1 month). In patients with TECSA, a higher apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and central apnea index at their baseline study or a higher residual AHI at their titration study may be associated with an increased likelihood of conversion to TPCSA. Overall, TECSA developed in 3.5%-19.8% of PAP-treated patients with OSA. The vast majority will experience complete resolution of central apneas over a few weeks to months. Unfortunately, about a third of patients with TECSA may continue to exhibit persistence of central sleep apnea on reevaluation. A small proportion may experience D-TECSA after few weeks to several months of initial exposure to PAP therapy.

  7. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP after lung resection: a randomized clinical trial

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    Ligia dos Santos Roceto

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Noninvasive mechanical ventilation during the postoperative period (PO following lung resection can restore residual functional capacity, improve oxygenation and spare the inspiratory muscles. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP associated with physiotherapy, compared with physiotherapy alone after lung resection. DESIGN AND SETTING: Open randomized clinical trial conducted in the clinical hospital of Universidade Estadual de Campinas. METHOD: Sessions were held in the immediate postoperative period (POi and on the first and second postoperative days (PO1 and PO2, and the patients were reassessed on the discharge day. CPAP was applied for two hours and the pressure adjustment was set between 7 and 8.5 cmH2O. The oxygenation index (OI, Borg scale, pain scale and presence of thoracic drains and air losses were evaluated. RESULTS : There was a significant increase in the OI in the CPAP group in the POi compared to the Chest Physiotherapy (CP group, P = 0.024. In the CP group the OI was significantly lower on PO1 (P = 0,042, than CPAP group. The air losses were significantly greater in the CPAP group in the POi and on PO1 (P = 0.001, P = 0.028, but there was no significant difference between the groups on PO2 and PO3. There was a statistically significant difference between the groups regarding the Borg scale in the POi (P < 0.001, but there were no statistically significant differences between the groups regarding the pain score. CONCLUSION: CPAP after lung resection is safe and improves oxygenation, without increasing the air losses through the drains. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01285648

  8. Resistance training improves cardiac output, exercise capacity and tolerance to positive airway pressure in Fontan physiology.

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    Cordina, Rachael L; O'Meagher, Shamus; Karmali, Alia; Rae, Caroline L; Liess, Carsten; Kemp, Graham J; Puranik, Raj; Singh, Nalin; Celermajer, David S

    2013-09-30

    Subjects with Fontan-type circulation have no sub-pulmonary ventricle and thus depend exquisitely on the respiratory bellows and peripheral muscle pump for cardiac filling. We hypothesised that resistance training to augment the peripheral muscle pump might improve cardiac filling, reduce inspiratory-dependence of IVC return to the heart and thus improve exercise capacity and cardiac output on constant positive airway pressure (CPAP). Eleven Fontan subjects (32+/-2 years, mean+/-SEM) had cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and exercise testing (CPET); six underwent 20 weeks of high-intensity resistance training; others were non-exercising controls. After training, CPET was repeated. Four trainers had MRI with real-time flow measurement at rest, exercise and on CPAP in the trained state and following a 12-month detrain. In the trained state, muscle strength increased by 43% (p=0.002), as did total muscle mass (by 1.94 kg, p=0.003) and peak VO2 (by 183 ml/min, p=0.02). After detraining, calf muscle mass and peak workload had fallen significantly (pexercise (by 16 ml, p=0.04); inspiratory-dependent IVC blood return during exercise was 40% higher (p=0.02). On CPAP, cardiac output was lower in the detrained state (101 vs. 77 ml/s, p=0.03). Resistance muscle training improves muscle mass, strength and is associated with improved cardiac filling, stroke volume, exercise capacity and cardiac output on CPAP, in adults with Fontan-type circulation. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Non-invasive Positive Airway Pressure in Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Present and Future Perspectives.

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    Ramírez-Molina, Victor R; Gómez-de-Terreros, Francisco J; Barca-Durán, Javier; Masa, Juan F

    2017-08-01

    Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is a sleep disorder that has acquired great importance worldwide because of its prevalence and association with obesity leading to increased morbidity and mortality with reduced quality of life. The primary feature is insufficient sleep-related ventilation, resulting in abnormally elevated arterial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO 2 ) during sleep and demonstration of daytime hypoventilation. There are three main mechanisms that can generate diurnal hypoventilation in obese patients: alteration of the respiratory mechanics secondary to obesity; central hypoventilation secondary to leptin resistance and sleep disorder with sleep hypoventilation and obstructive apnoeas, which can be potentially solved with the use of positive airway pressure: non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). There are no established guidelines for the treatment of OHS, and only a few randomised controlled trials have been published. In this review, we have gone over the role of positive airway pressure, in particular the mechanisms that produce improvement, ventilatory modes available, clinical applications, technical considerations and future research. In addition, we added a review on NIV efficacy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), both in acute respiratory failure due to exacerbation and mainly in stable setting where more controversy and scientific contributions are coming.

  10. Modafinil Increases Awake EEG Activation and Improves Performance in Obstructive Sleep Apnea during Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Withdrawal

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    Wang, David; Bai, Xiao Xue; Williams, Shaun C.; Hua, Shu Cheng; Kim, Jong-Won; Marshall, Nathaniel S.; D'Rozario, Angela; Grunstein, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We examined the changes in waking electroencephalography (EEG) biomarkers with modafinil during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) withdrawal in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to investigate neurophysiological evidence for potential neurocognitive improvements. Design: Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study. CPAP was used for the first night and then withdrawn for 2 subsequent nights. Each morning after the 2 CPAP withdrawal nights, patients received either 200 mg modafinil or placebo. After a 5-w washout, the procedure repeated with the crossover drug. Setting: University teaching hospital. Participants: Stable CPAP users (n = 23 men with OSA) Measurement and Results: Karolinska Drowsiness Test (KDT) (awake EEG measurement with eyes open and closed), Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), and driving simulator Performance were assessed bihourly during the 3 testing days following CPAP treatment and CPAP withdrawal nights. Compared to placebo, modafinil significantly increased awake EEG activation (faster EEG frequency) with increased alpha/delta (A/D) ratio (P Modafinil administration during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) withdrawal increased awake EEG activation, which correlated to improved performance. This study provides supporting neurophysiological evidence that modafinil is a potential short-term treatment option during acute CPAP withdrawal. Citation: Wang D, Bai XX, Williams SC, Hua SC, Kim JW, Marshall NS, D'Rozario A, Grunstein RR. Modafinil increases awake EEG activation and improves performance in obstructive sleep apnea during continuous positive airway pressure withdrawal. SLEEP 2015;38(8):1297–1303. PMID:26158894

  11. Oral appliance versus continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a 2-year follow-up.

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    Doff, Michiel H J; Hoekema, Aarnoud; Wijkstra, Peter J; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Huddleston Slater, James J R; de Bont, Lambert G M; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    2013-09-01

    Oral appliance therapy has emerged as an important alternative to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in treating patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). In this study we report about the subjective and objective treatment outcome of oral appliance therapy and CPAP in patients with OSAS. Cohort study of a previously conducted randomized clinical trial. University Medical Center, Groningen, The Netherlands. One hundred three patients with OSAS. CPAP and oral appliance therapy (Thornton Adjustable Positioner type-1, Airway Management, Inc., Dallas, TX, USA). Objective (polysomnography) and subjective (Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire, Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey [SF-36]) parameters were assessed after 1 and 2 years of treatment. Treatment was considered successful when the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was oral appliance therapy and CPAP in treating mild to severe OSAS in a 2-year follow-up. More patients (not significant) dropped out under oral appliance therapy (47%) compared with CPAP (33%). Both therapies showed substantial improvements in polysomnographic and neurobehavioral outcomes. However, CPAP was more effective in lowering the AHI and showed higher oxyhemoglobin saturation levels compared to oral appliance therapy (P Oral appliance therapy should be considered as a viable treatment alternative to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). In patients with severe OSAS, CPAP remains the treatment of first choice. The original randomized clinical trial, of which this study is a 2-year follow-up, is registered at ISRCTN.org; identifier: ISRCTN18174167; trial name: Management of the obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome: oral appliance versus continuous positive airway pressure therapy; URL: http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN18174167.

  12. Hematological evaluation in males with obstructive sleep apnea before and after positive airway pressure

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    A. Feliciano

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a systemic inflammatory disease associated with cardiovascular consequences. Red blood cell distribution width (RDW, mean platelet volume (MPV, and platelet distribution width (PDW are recognized biomarkers of cardiovascular morbidity/mortality. Limited data is available on the association between these parameters and OSAS severity and the relationship with positive airway pressure therapy (PAP. In this prospective study of male OSAS patients we analyzed hematological data in order to evaluate their value in predicting OSAS severity, the relationship with sleep parameters, and their behavior under PAP. Seventy-three patients were included (mean age 46.5 years, of which 36 were mild (49.3%, 10 moderate (13.7%, and 27 severe (37%. The mean RDW increased significantly with OSAS severity and showed a positive correlation with respiratory disturbance index and hypoxemic burdens. Additionally, a group of 48 patients (mean age 47.2 years were submitted to PAP. After six months, red blood cell count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet count showed a significant decrease (p < 0.0001; p < 0.0001; p = 0.001; p < 0.0001; respectively. Concerning OSAS severity, these parameters also significantly decreased in mild patients (p = 0.003; p = 0.043; p = 0.020; p = 0.014; respectively but only hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet count decreased in severe cases (p < 0.0001; p = 0.008; p = 0.018; respectively. This study demonstrated an association between RDW values and OSAS severity. Moreover, red cell and platelet parameters changed significantly after PAP, supporting its cardiovascular protective effect. RDW may become a simple/inexpensive blood biomarker, making it useful in prioritizing OSAS patients waiting for polysomnography, and red cell and platelet parameters could be useful in PAP follow up. Keywords: RDW, MPV, PDW, Red cell parameters, Platelet parameters, OSAS, PAP

  13. An ultrasound evaluation of laryngeal mask airway position in pediatric patients: an observational study.

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    Kim, Jeongmin; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Won Oak; Kil, Hae Keum

    2015-02-01

    In children, the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is frequently displaced within the hypopharynx, resulting in repositioning of the device. When the tip of the LMA is placed in the esophageal inlet, the arytenoids are moved ventrally. When the LMA is rotated or deviated, the ventral movement of the arytenoids may result in asymmetric elevation of an arytenoid cartilage, which can be detected with ultrasound (US). In this study, we sought to estimate the incidence of LMA malposition detected with US in pediatric patients. The primary end point was to compare the incidence of LMA malposition between US and fiber optic bronchoscopy (FOB). The secondary end points were to find the interrelationship between US-detected and FOB-detected malposition of the LMA and to locate the diagnostic performance of US in detecting LMA malposition. In this observational study, 100 consecutive children were included. After anesthetic induction, US evaluation was performed before and after LMA insertion to obtain the glottic image on the anterior neck. FOB was performed to assess LMA position (FOB LMA grade and LMA rotation grade). With a post-LMA US image, the symmetry of the arytenoid cartilages was evaluated. Asymmetrical elevation of an arytenoid cartilage in reference to the glottic midline and the opposite arytenoid cartilage was graded as 0 to 3 (US arytenoid grade). The interrelationships between US arytenoid grade and FOB LMA grade or LMA rotation grade were assessed. The incidence of asymmetrical elevation of an arytenoid was 50% (95% confidence interval [CI], 40%-60%). On FOB, the incidence of LMA malposition was 78% (95% CI, 69%-86%), and that of LMA rotation was 43% (95% CI, 33%-53%). The incidence of LMA malposition was higher with FOB (P < 0.0001), but the incidence of rotation was similar (P = 0.395). US arytenoid grade did not correlate with FOB LMA grade (P = 0.611) but showed a significant correlation with LMA rotation grade (P < 0.0001; 95% CI, 60%-83%). To detect a

  14. Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) for apnea of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemyre, B; Davis, P G; de Paoli, A G

    2002-01-01

    Apnea of prematurity is almost universal in infants who are born before 34 weeks gestation. Previous randomised trials and systematic reviews have found methylxanthines to be effective in preventing apnea of prematurity. However, recent concerns about potential long term side effects of methylxanthines on the neurodevelopment of low birth weight infants have led to an increased interest in alternate methods of treating apnea of prematurity. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) is a useful method of respiratory support which reduces the incidence of obstructive or mixed apnea. However, apneic infants managed with NCPAP, with or without methylxanthines, sometimes require endotracheal intubation with its attendant morbidity and cost. Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) is a simple, effective mode of respiratory support for older children and adults. It has been used to treat apnea in preterm infants but case reports of gastrointestinal perforations have limited its widespread use. In preterm infants with recurrent apnea, does treatment with NIPPV lead to a greater reduction in apnea and need for intubation and mechanical ventilation, as compared with treatment with NCPAP? Does NIPPV increase the incidence of gastrointestinal complications, i.e. gastric distension leading to cessation of feeds, or perforation? MEDLINE was searched (1966-Oct week 2, 2001). Other sources included the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Cochrane Library, Disk Issue 3, 2001) and CINAHL (1982-Sept week 4, 2001). Also used were expert informants, previous reviews including cross-references, and conference and symposia proceedings. All randomised and quasi-randomised trials were included. Participants included unventilated preterm infants experiencing apnea of prematurity. Interventions compared were intermittent positive pressure ventilation administered via the nasal route, either by short nasal prongs or nasopharyngeal tube, and nasal CPAP delivered by

  15. Effects of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Cognitive and Functional Outcome of Stroke Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea : A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaronson, J.A.; Hofman, W.F.; van Bennekom, C.A.M.; van Bezeij, T.; van den Aardweg, J.G.; Groet, E.; Kylstra, W.A.; Schmand, B.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in stroke patients is associated with worse functional and cognitive status during inpatient rehabilitation. We hypothesized that a four-week period of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment would improve cognitive and functional

  16. Optimizing fresh gas flow and circuit design for the delivery of continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersten, A D; Rutten, A J; Vedig, A E

    1991-02-01

    To examine the effect of varying circuit design and the fresh gas flow rate on the circuit work imposed by a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) circuit. Circuit work was measured during simulated inspiration (500 mL) with a lung model at inspiratory flow rates (V) of 40, 60, and 80 L/min during the administration of 10 cm H2O CPAP through either a modified Mapleson-A or modified Mapleson-D circuit, both alone and when connected to a face mask (i.e., simulating an intubated and nonintubated patient). Fresh gas flow was varied from 10 to 250 L/min. The minimum circuit work occurred at a fresh gas flow rate approximating V; however, circuit work was consistently lower for the modified Mapleson-A circuit compared with the modified Mapleson-D circuit. As the fresh gas flow rate was increased sequentially to 250 L/min, circuit work remained close to the minimum value for the modified Mapleson-A, but increased gradually with the modified Mapleson-D, e.g., from 0.017 kg.m/L at a fresh gas flow rate and V of 80 L/min to 0.035 kg.m/L at a fresh gas flow rate of 250 L/min and a V of 80 L/min. Rotation of the fresh gas flow inlet did not change the circuit work vs. fresh gas flow rate relationship. Addition of a face mask resulted in a smaller increase in circuit work for the modified Mapleson-D with increasing fresh gas flow rate. However, unlike the modified Mapleson-A circuit alone, the addition of a mask caused circuit work to increase with increasing fresh gas flow rate. The modified Mapleson-A circuit at a fresh gas flow rate equal to V minimizes circuit work, and hence represents an optimal CPAP circuit. The increases in circuit work at fresh gas flow rates above V that were found with the modified Mapleson-D circuit are not due to inertial differences, and are likely due to turbulent gas flow.

  17. Improvement in headaches with continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karin G; Ziemba, Alexis M; Garb, Jane L

    2013-02-01

    We aimed to identify clinical features in patients with severe headaches that predicted obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and determine clinical and sleep study characteristics that predicted headache improvement with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Many patients with headaches complain of sleep symptoms and have OSA. There is often improvement of headaches with CPAP treatment. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients referred to adult neurology clinic for headaches and sent for polysomnography between January 2008 and December 2009. Follow-up ranged from 18 to 42 months. Eighty-two headache patients (70 females, 12 males) were studied. Mean age was 45±13 years (females 45±13, males 43±11) and mean body mass index was 32±9. Headache types included 17% chronic migraine without aura, 22% episodic migraine without aura, 32% migraine with aura, 21% tension-type headache, 6% chronic post-traumatic headache, 11% medication overuse headache, and 7% other types. All patients were receiving standard treatment for their headaches by their neurologist. Fifty-two patients (63%) had OSA. Increasing age, female gender, and chronic migraine without aura were predictive of OSA. Of the patients with OSA, 33 (63%) used CPAP and 27 (82%) were adherent to CPAP. Headache improvement was reported by 40 patients (49%) due to either standard medical therapy or CPAP. Patients with OSA who were CPAP adherent (21/27) were more likely to have improvement in headaches than patients intolerant of CPAP (2/6), those that did not try CPAP (8/19), and those who did not have OSA (16/30) (P=.045). Of the 33 patients who used CPAP, 13 reported improvement in headaches specifically due to CPAP therapy and 10 additional patients noted benefit in sleep symptoms. The presence of witnessed apneas (P=.045) and male gender (P=.021) predicted improvement in headaches due to CPAP. Headache patients should be evaluated for the presence of OSA. Treating OSA improves headaches in some

  18. Effect of Nasal Obstruction on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment: Computational Fluid Dynamics Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakayama, Tadashi; Suzuki, Masaaki; Tanuma, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nasal obstruction is a common problem in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnea and limits treatment compliance. The purpose of this study is to model the effects of nasal obstruction on airflow parameters under CPAP using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and to clarify quantitatively the relation between airflow velocity and pressure loss coefficient in subjects with and without nasal obstruction. Methods We conducted an observational cross-sectional study of 16 Japanese adult subjects, of whom 9 had nasal obstruction and 7 did not (control group). Three-dimensional reconstructed models of the nasal cavity and nasopharynx with a CPAP mask fitted to the nostrils were created from each subject’s CT scans. The digital models were meshed with tetrahedral cells and stereolithography formats were created. CPAP airflow simulations were conducted using CFD software. Airflow streamlines and velocity contours in the nasal cavities and nasopharynx were compared between groups. Simulation models were confirmed to agree with actual measurements of nasal flow rate and with pressure and flow rate in the CPAP machine. Results Under 10 cmH2O CPAP, average maximum airflow velocity during inspiration was 17.6 ± 5.6 m/s in the nasal obstruction group but only 11.8 ± 1.4 m/s in the control group. The average pressure drop in the nasopharynx relative to inlet static pressure was 2.44 ± 1.41 cmH2O in the nasal obstruction group but only 1.17 ± 0.29 cmH2O in the control group. The nasal obstruction and control groups were clearly separated by a velocity threshold of 13.5 m/s, and pressure loss coefficient threshold of approximately 10.0. In contrast, there was no significant difference in expiratory pressure in the nasopharynx between the groups. Conclusion This is the first CFD analysis of the effect of nasal obstruction on CPAP treatment. A strong correlation between the inspiratory pressure loss coefficient and maximum airflow

  19. Continuous positive airway pressure improves exercise capacity and heart rate recovery in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeder, Micha T; Ammann, Peter; Münzer, Thomas; Schoch, Otto D; Korte, Wolfgang; Hürny, Christoph; Myers, Jonathan; Rickli, Hans

    2009-02-06

    There is a relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and heart failure (HF). Peak oxygen consumption (peak VO(2)), heart rate recovery, and N-terminal-pro-BNP (NT-proBNP) are strong prognostic predictors in HF. The effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) on these parameters in OSA patients are not well defined. Forty patients with newly diagnosed OSA [apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) 37 (20-65) h(-1)] underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing for assessment of peak VO(2) and heart rate recovery at one (HRR-1) and two (HRR-2) minutes after exercise termination as well as NT-proBNP measurement at baseline and after 7.9+/-1.4 months of effective nCPAP (nightly usage>3.5 h). The effects of nCPAP were compared in patients with mild-to-moderate (AHIor=30 h(-1); n=24) OSA. In the group as a whole, peak VO(2) (baseline: 31.9+/-9.3 vs. follow-up: 33.7+/-9.0 ml/kg/min; p=0.02) and HRR-2 [38 (32-43) vs. 42 (32-47) bpm; p=0.01] but not HRR-1 [22 (15-26) vs. 22 (16-27) bpm; p=0.16] improved from baseline to follow-up. The effect on peak VO(2) was mainly driven by a trend towards an increase in patients with mild-to-moderate OSA (31.8+/-10.7 vs. 33.9+/-10.2 ml/kg/min; p=0.08), whereas an effect on HRR-1 [20 (15-23) vs. 21 (16-26) bpm; p=0.03] and HRR-2 [38 (29-42) vs. 42 (33-47) bpm; p=0.004] was observed only in those with severe OSA. NT-proBNP levels remained unchanged [21 (11-45) vs. 26 (5-52) pg/ml; p=0.6]. Treatment with nCPAP is associated with an improvement in peak VO(2) and heart rate recovery in patients with OSA.

  20. Effect of Nasal Obstruction on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment: Computational Fluid Dynamics Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakayama, Tadashi; Suzuki, Masaaki; Tanuma, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Nasal obstruction is a common problem in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnea and limits treatment compliance. The purpose of this study is to model the effects of nasal obstruction on airflow parameters under CPAP using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and to clarify quantitatively the relation between airflow velocity and pressure loss coefficient in subjects with and without nasal obstruction. We conducted an observational cross-sectional study of 16 Japanese adult subjects, of whom 9 had nasal obstruction and 7 did not (control group). Three-dimensional reconstructed models of the nasal cavity and nasopharynx with a CPAP mask fitted to the nostrils were created from each subject's CT scans. The digital models were meshed with tetrahedral cells and stereolithography formats were created. CPAP airflow simulations were conducted using CFD software. Airflow streamlines and velocity contours in the nasal cavities and nasopharynx were compared between groups. Simulation models were confirmed to agree with actual measurements of nasal flow rate and with pressure and flow rate in the CPAP machine. Under 10 cmH2O CPAP, average maximum airflow velocity during inspiration was 17.6 ± 5.6 m/s in the nasal obstruction group but only 11.8 ± 1.4 m/s in the control group. The average pressure drop in the nasopharynx relative to inlet static pressure was 2.44 ± 1.41 cmH2O in the nasal obstruction group but only 1.17 ± 0.29 cmH2O in the control group. The nasal obstruction and control groups were clearly separated by a velocity threshold of 13.5 m/s, and pressure loss coefficient threshold of approximately 10.0. In contrast, there was no significant difference in expiratory pressure in the nasopharynx between the groups. This is the first CFD analysis of the effect of nasal obstruction on CPAP treatment. A strong correlation between the inspiratory pressure loss coefficient and maximum airflow velocity was found.

  1. Effect of Nasal Obstruction on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment: Computational Fluid Dynamics Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Wakayama

    Full Text Available Nasal obstruction is a common problem in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy for obstructive sleep apnea and limits treatment compliance. The purpose of this study is to model the effects of nasal obstruction on airflow parameters under CPAP using computational fluid dynamics (CFD, and to clarify quantitatively the relation between airflow velocity and pressure loss coefficient in subjects with and without nasal obstruction.We conducted an observational cross-sectional study of 16 Japanese adult subjects, of whom 9 had nasal obstruction and 7 did not (control group. Three-dimensional reconstructed models of the nasal cavity and nasopharynx with a CPAP mask fitted to the nostrils were created from each subject's CT scans. The digital models were meshed with tetrahedral cells and stereolithography formats were created. CPAP airflow simulations were conducted using CFD software. Airflow streamlines and velocity contours in the nasal cavities and nasopharynx were compared between groups. Simulation models were confirmed to agree with actual measurements of nasal flow rate and with pressure and flow rate in the CPAP machine.Under 10 cmH2O CPAP, average maximum airflow velocity during inspiration was 17.6 ± 5.6 m/s in the nasal obstruction group but only 11.8 ± 1.4 m/s in the control group. The average pressure drop in the nasopharynx relative to inlet static pressure was 2.44 ± 1.41 cmH2O in the nasal obstruction group but only 1.17 ± 0.29 cmH2O in the control group. The nasal obstruction and control groups were clearly separated by a velocity threshold of 13.5 m/s, and pressure loss coefficient threshold of approximately 10.0. In contrast, there was no significant difference in expiratory pressure in the nasopharynx between the groups.This is the first CFD analysis of the effect of nasal obstruction on CPAP treatment. A strong correlation between the inspiratory pressure loss coefficient and maximum airflow velocity was found.

  2. Effects of a short course of eszopiclone on continuous positive airway pressure adherence: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettieri, Christopher J; Shah, Anita A; Holley, Aaron B; Kelly, William F; Chang, Audrey S; Roop, Stuart A

    2009-11-17

    Adherence to short-term continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may predict long-term use. Unfortunately, initial CPAP intolerance may lead to poor adherence or abandonment of therapy. To determine whether a short course of eszopiclone at the onset of therapy improves long-term CPAP adherence more than placebo in adults with obstructive sleep apnea. Parallel randomized, placebo-controlled trial from March 2007 to December 2008. Randomization, maintained and concealed centrally by pharmacy personnel, was computer-generated using fixed blocks of 10. Referring physicians, investigators, and patients were blinded to the treatment assignment until after the final data were collected. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00612157). Academic sleep disorder center. 160 adults (mean age, 45.7 years [SD, 7.3]; mean apnea-hypopnea index, 36.9 events/h [SD, 23]) with newly diagnosed obstructive sleep apnea initiating CPAP. Eszopiclone, 3 mg (n = 76), or matching placebo (n = 78) for the first 14 nights of CPAP. Use of CPAP was measured weekly for 24 weeks. Adherence to CPAP (primary outcome) and the rate of CPAP discontinuation and improvements in symptoms (secondary outcomes) were compared. Follow-up at 1, 3, and 6 months was completed by 150, 136, and 120 patients, respectively. Patients in the eszopiclone group used CPAP for 20.8% more nights (95% CI, 7.2% to 34.4%; P = 0.003), 1.3 more hours per night for all nights (CI, 0.4 to 2.2 hours; P = 0.005), and 1.1 more hours per night of CPAP use (CI, 0.2 to 2.1 hours; P = 0.019). The hazard ratio for discontinuation of CPAP was 1.90 (CI, 1.1 to 3.4; P = 0.033) times higher in the placebo group. Side effects were reported in 7.1% of patients and did not differ between groups. Patients had severe obstructive sleep apnea treated at a specialized sleep center with frequent follow-up; results may not be generalizable to different settings. Patients' tolerance to CPAP and their reasons for discontinuation were not assessed

  3. Acute Effects of Positive Airway Pressure on Functional Mitral Regurgitation in Patients with Systolic Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Kato

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute effects of positive airway pressure (PAP [including continuous PAP (CPAP and adaptive servo-ventilation, an advanced form of bi-level PAP] on functional mitral regurgitation (fMR in patients with heart failure (HF with left ventricular (LV systolic dysfunction remain unclear. Thus, whether PAP therapy reduces fMR in such patients with HF was investigated.Methods and Results: Twenty patients with HF and LV systolic dysfunction defined as LV ejection fraction (LVEF <50% (14 men; mean LVEF, 35.0 ± 11.5% with fMR underwent echocardiography during 10-min CPAP (4 and 8 cm H2O and adaptive servo-ventilation. For fMR assessment, MR jet area fraction, defined as the ratio of MR jet on color Doppler to the left atrial area, was measured. The forward stroke volume (SV index (fSVI was calculated from the time-velocity integral, cross-sectional area of the aortic annulus, and body surface area. fMR significantly reduced on CPAP at 8 cm H2O (0.30 ± 0.12 and adaptive servo-ventilation (0.29 ± 0.12, compared with the baseline phase (0.37 ± 0.12 and CPAP at 4 cm H2O (0.34 ± 0.12 (P < 0.001. The fSVI did not change in any of the PAP sessions (P = 0.888. However, significant differences in fSVI responses to PAP were found between sexes (P for interaction, 0.006, with a significant reduction in fSVI in women (P = 0.041 and between patients with baseline fSVI ≥ and < the median value (27.8 ml/m2, P for interaction, 0.018, with a significant fSVI reduction in patients with high baseline fSVI (P = 0.028. In addition, significant differences were found in fSVI responses to PAP between patients with LV end-systolic volume (LVESV index ≥ and < the median value (62.0 ml/m2, P for interaction, 0.034, with a significant fSVI increase in patients with a high LVESV index (P = 0.023.Conclusion: In patients with HF, LV systolic dysfunction, and fMR, PAP can alleviate fMR without any overall changes in forward SV. However, MR alleviation due to PAP

  4. Continuous positive airway pressure versus theophylline for apnea in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson-Smart, D J; Subramaniam, P; Davis, P G

    2001-01-01

    Recurrent apnea is common in preterm infants, particularly at very early gestational ages. These episodes of loss of effective breathing can lead to hypoxemia and bradycardia which may be severe enough to require resuscitation including use of positive pressure ventilation. Theophylline and continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) are two treatments that have have been used to prevent apnea and its consequences. The main objective was to determine in preterm infants with recurrent apnea, if treatment with CPAP compared with treatment with theophylline leads to a clinically important reduction in apnea or use of mechanical ventilation, without clinically important side effects. Searches were made of the Oxford Database of Perinatal trials, the Cochrane Collaboration Clinical Trials Register, MEDLINE 1966 - July 2001, EMBASE 1980 - July 2001, CINAHL 1982 - July 2001(using text words 'theophylline', 'caffeine', 'CPAP', 'CDAP', 'positive pressure', 'apnea or apnoea' and MeSH term 'infant, premature'), previous reviews including cross references, abstracts, conferences and symposia proceedings, expert informants, mainly in the English language. Abstracts of the Society for Pediatric Research were searched from 1996 - 2001 inclusive. All trials using random or quasi-random allocation to CPAP or theophylline in preterm infants with clinical recurrent apnea/bradycardia were eligible. Data were extracted using standard methods of the Cochrane Collaboration and its Neonatal Review Group, with separate evaluation of trial quality and data extraction by each author and synthesis of data using relative risk. Only one eligible trial was found. The use of mask CPAP is associated with a higher treatment failure rate as measured by less than a 50% reduction in apnea or use of an alternative treatment [RR 2.89 (95% CI 1.12, 7.47); RD 0.42 (95% CI 0.11, 0.74)]. For every 2.4 infants (95% CI 1.4, 9.5) treated with mask CPAP rather than theophylline, there results one treatment

  5. Effect of occlusal plane control procedure on hyoid bone position and pharyngeal airway of hyperdivergent skeletal Class II patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolong; Zhao, Qing; Zhao, Rui; Gao, Meiya; Gao, Xiaolei; Lai, Wenli

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of occlusal plane control on the hyoid bone position and pharyngeal airway of hyperdivergent skeletal Class II patients during orthodontic treatment. Cephalograms of 47 hyperdivergent skeletal Class II subjects with occlusal plane control (OPC), and another 50 subjects without occlusal plane control (NOPC) were selected to compare the effects of the occlusal plane control procedure. Lateral cephalograms before treatment (T1), immediately after treatment (T2), and an average of 12 months after treatment (T3) were obtained, and 17 measurements were analyzed in each group and compared between groups. With respect to the T2-T1 changes, the sagittal discrepancies in both groups were alleviated. In the OPC group, both the occlusal and mandibular plane angles decreased, accompanied by anterior and superior movement and counterclockwise rotation of the hyoid bone. The overall changes from T3 to T1 in each group exhibited trends similar to that induced by treatment. As for pharyngeal airway space alterations, no significant difference in OPC group was presented throughout treatment or retention periods. The customized occlusal plane control procedure was effective for hyperdivergent skeletal Class II patients: The occlusal plane rotated counterclockwise, followed by a counterclockwise rotation of the mandibular plane. The hyoid bone moved anteriorly and superiorly, accompanied by its counterclockwise rotation. However, this procedure did not induce significant alteration of the pharyngeal airway space.

  6. Gel pillow designed specifically for obstructive sleep apnea treatment with continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvaggio, Adriana; Lo Bue, Anna; Isidoro, Serena Iacono; Romano, Salvatore; Marrone, Oreste; Insalaco, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether the use of a gel pillow with side cutouts designed to accommodate a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask and reduce head temperature improves the efficacy of and adherence to auto-CPAP therapy. Twenty-three consecutive CPAP-naïve patients with obstructive sleep apnea were enrolled in the study. Patients were given an auto-CPAP machine with an appropriate CPAP mask and were instructed to use CPAP for 15 nights. They were instructed to sleep with their own pillow (the control pillow) from nights 1 to 5 and with either a foam pillow or a gel pillow, both of which had side cutouts, for 5 consecutive nights each, in random order. After night 15, auto-CPAP machine data were downloaded and patients rated their satisfaction with each pillow on a visual analog scale. Twenty-two patients completed the protocol. The pressures administered, residual apnea-hypopnea index, air leaks, and mean duration of CPAP use did not differ among the periods during which each pillow was used. Patients were significantly more satisfied with the gel pillow than with the control pillow and the foam pillow (p = 0.022 and p = 0.004, respectively), their level of satisfaction with the gel pillow correlating significantly with excessive daytime sleepiness (r2 = 0.19; p = 0.0443). Among obstructive sleep apnea patients treated with nasal CPAP, the use of a gel pillow with side cutouts appears to have no impact on treatment effectiveness. Nevertheless, such patients seem to prefer a gel pillow over other types of pillows. Determinar se o uso de um travesseiro de gel com recortes laterais para acomodar a máscara de continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP, pressão positiva contínua nas vias aéreas) e diminuir a temperatura em torno da cabeça melhora a eficácia do tratamento com auto-CPAP e a adesão dos pacientes ao tratamento. Foram incluídos no estudo 23 pacientes consecutivos com apneia obstrutiva do sono que nunca haviam recebido tratamento com CPAP. Os

  7. Symptoms of insomnia among patients with obstructive sleep apnea before and after two years of positive airway pressure treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnsdóttir, Erla; Janson, Christer; Sigurdsson, Jón F; Gehrman, Philip; Perlis, Michael; Juliusson, Sigurdur; Arnardottir, Erna S; Kuna, Samuel T; Pack, Allan I; Gislason, Thorarinn; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndis

    2013-12-01

    To assess the changes of insomnia symptoms among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) from starting treatment with positive airway pressure (PAP) to a 2-y follow-up. Longitudinal cohort study. Landspitali--The National University Hospital of Iceland. There were 705 adults with OSA who were assessed prior to and 2 y after starting PAP treatment. PAP treatment for OSA. All patients underwent a medical examination along with a type 3 sleep study and answered questionnaires on health and sleep before and 2 y after starting PAP treatment. The change in prevalence of insomnia symptoms by subtype was assessed by questionnaire and compared between individuals who were using or not using PAP at follow-up. Symptoms of middle insomnia were most common at baseline and improved significantly among patients using PAP (from 59.4% to 30.7%, P insomnia tended to persist regardless of PAP treatment, and symptoms of late insomnia were more likely to improve among patients not using PAP. Patients with symptoms of initial and late insomnia at baseline were less likely to adhere to PAP (odds ratio [OR] 0.56, P = 0.007, and OR 0.53, P treatment significantly reduced symptoms of middle insomnia. Symptoms of initial and late insomnia, however, tended to persist regardless of positive airway pressure treatment and had a negative effect on adherence. Targeted treatment for insomnia may be beneficial for patients with obstructive sleep apnea comorbid with insomnia and has the potential to positively affect adherence to positive airway pressure.

  8. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on lung mechanics of babies after operation for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogswell, J J; Hatch, D J; Kerr, A A; Taylor, B

    1975-01-01

    The effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on lung mechanics was investigated in 12 babies after operation for severe congenital heart disease. At the time of study all babies were receiving or being weaned from ventilatory support and had abnormally low lung volume or compliance. During CPAP there was a fall in the pulmonary resistance which, with a slight decrease in minute ventilation, resulted in a significant decrease in the work of breathing. It is suggested that lowering the oxygen cost of breathing may contribute to the improvement in arterial oxygenation seen when CPAP is used. PMID:801862

  9. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on energy intake in obstructive sleep apnea: A pilot sham-controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Shechter, Ari; Kovtun, Kyle; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is among the leading risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). A reciprocal relationship between obesity and OSA has been proposed, which may be due to excessive food intake. We conducted a pilot study to test the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on energy intake (EI) in OSA patients using a sham-controlled crossover design. In-laboratory total daily EI was assessed after 2 mo of active and sham CPAP. Four men were enrolled (age ± SEM: 51.8 ± 2.1 y; body mas...

  10. A Randomized Trial of Low-Flow Oxygen versus Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Preterm Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiring, Christian; Steensberg, Jesper; Bjerager, Mia

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) stabilizes the residual volume and may decrease the risk of 'atelectotrauma', potentially promoting lung development in neonates. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether replacing nCPAP by low-flow O2 by nasal cannula affects lung function expre...... the a/A pO2 ratio or weight gain negatively. Thus, prolonged nCPAP seems not to have a positive effect on lung function at 28 days of life and replacement by low-flow O2 could reduce the cost of equipment and increase the ease of nursing.......BACKGROUND: Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) stabilizes the residual volume and may decrease the risk of 'atelectotrauma', potentially promoting lung development in neonates. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether replacing nCPAP by low-flow O2 by nasal cannula affects lung function.......001. There was no difference between groups in the fraction needing any respiratory support at 36 weeks' corrected age, length of stay, weight at discharge, and relative weight gain. CONCLUSIONS: Replacing nCPAP by low-flow O2 in preterm infants with GA >26 weeks at the end of the first week of life did not seem to affect...

  11. [Successful treatment of laryngomalacia and bilateral vocal cord paralysis with continuous positive airway pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovtić, Aleksandar; Minić, Predrag; Vukcević, Miodrag; Rodić, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Laryngomalacia is the most frequent congenital anomaly of airways, and it may cause obstructive sleep apneas. The associated vocal cord paralysis may aggravate the symptoms of upper airway obstruction. In a 14 month old boy severe laryngomalacia and bilateral vocal cord paralysis were diagnosed by flexible bronchoscopy. A sleep study showed a severe obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The patient was ventilated at home via the face mask with non invasive mechanical ventilation (CPAP) for a year. The level of pressure had to be set at 7 cm H2O to correct desaturation with an improvement in mean SpO2. On the follow up bronchoscopic examination laryngomalatia was improved, vocal cord paralysis persisted and sleep study revealed significant improvement. In the patient with severe laryngomalatia and bilateral vocal cord paralysis with OSA conservative treatment with CPAP was used instead of a surgical intervention. Non invasive ventilation was used every night, for at least 6 hours, without adverse events. Invasive measurement of transdiaphragmatic pressure is the best way of titrating of CPAP level. This case report suggests the efficacy of noninvasive titrating of CPAP level by the hemoglobin oxygen saturation trend measurement. In case of severe laryngomalatia and associated vocal cord paralysis, followed by OSA non invasive ventilation by nasal CPAP represents an effective and safe alternative to surgery.

  12. The Effect of Body Position on Pain Due to Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP in Premature Neonates: A Cross-Over Clinical Trial Study

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    Mahnaz Jabraeili

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The most common cause of admission to neonatal intensive care units (NICU is respiratory distress syndrome. One of the respiratory assistance methods is using nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP. Regarding the importance of pain control which is one of the major priorities in neonatal nursing care, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of body position on pain due to nasal CPAP in premature neonates. Materials and Methods In this cross-over clinical trial, 50 premature neonates who were receiving nasal CPAP admitted to the NICU of Imam Reza Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran, were included. The neonates were randomly placed at three body positions (fetal, supine, and prone positions. Pain was measured by Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital Pain Scale Neonates (ALPS-Neo pain assessment scale. The collected data were analyzed using the SPSS software (Version 22.0. Results Significant difference existed regarding pain of nasal CPAP among body positions (p< 0.001. Mean (SD pain was 5.15 (0.822 in fetal position, 6.260 (0.747 in prone position and 7.326 (0.792 in supine position. Conclusion Body positioning in premature neonates under nasal CPAP in NICU can be effective as a non-pharmacologic method in alleviating pain due to nasal CPAP. Among the studied positions, the lowest pain score was seen in fetal position.

  13. Modafinil Increases Awake EEG Activation and Improves Performance in Obstructive Sleep Apnea during Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Withdrawal.

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    Wang, David; Bai, Xiao Xue; Williams, Shaun C; Hua, Shu Cheng; Kim, Jong-Won; Marshall, Nathaniel S; D'Rozario, Angela; Grunstein, Ronald R

    2015-08-01

    We examined the changes in waking electroencephalography (EEG) biomarkers with modafinil during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) withdrawal in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to investigate neurophysiological evidence for potential neurocognitive improvements. Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study. CPAP was used for the first night and then withdrawn for 2 subsequent nights. Each morning after the 2 CPAP withdrawal nights, patients received either 200 mg modafinil or placebo. After a 5-w washout, the procedure repeated with the crossover drug. University teaching hospital. Stable CPAP users (n = 23 men with OSA). Karolinska Drowsiness Test (KDT) (awake EEG measurement with eyes open and closed), Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), and driving simulator Performance were assessed bihourly during the 3 testing days following CPAP treatment and CPAP withdrawal nights. Compared to placebo, modafinil significantly increased awake EEG activation (faster EEG frequency) with increased alpha/delta (A/D) ratio (P Modafinil administration during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) withdrawal increased awake EEG activation, which correlated to improved performance. This study provides supporting neurophysiological evidence that modafinil is a potential short-term treatment option during acute CPAP withdrawal. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  14. Cardiovascular Effects of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Meta-Analysis.

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    Aslan, Gamze; Afsar, Baris; Siriopol, Dimitrie; Kanbay, Asiye; Sal, Oguzhan; Benli, Caghan; Okcuoglu, John; Covic, Adrian; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2018-03-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the first-line treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Obstructive sleep apnea is a predictor of cardiovascular (CV) events. In this meta-analysis, we evaluated the effect of CPAP on left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), CV events, CV mortality, and all-cause mortality in patients with OSA. Nine articles (n = 9610 patients) were analyzed. Four different meta-analyses were performed: evaluation of LVEF, assessment of all-cause mortality, CV mortality, and CV events. Continuous positive airway pressure treatment was associated with a significant increase in LVEF (mean difference: 2.1%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.8%-3.4%). There was a nonsignificant reduction in all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.73-1.15) but a significant reduction of 66% in the risk of CV mortality associated with the CPAP treatment (HR: 0.34, 95% CI: 0.17-0.68, P = .002). There was a nonsignificant reduction in the risk of CV events in the CPAP-treated patients (HR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.60-1.18, P = .31). Our meta-analyses showed that CPAP treatment improves LVEF and could have a beneficial effect on CV mortality.

  15. Paradoxical reaction of blood pressure on sleep apnoea patients treated with Positive Airway Pressure

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    C. Chaves Loureiro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome (OSAS patients may develop hypertension and Positive Airway Pressure (PAP is an effective treatment in blood pressure (BP control. Objectives: Analyse a hypertensive OSAS population with unexpected BP rise after PAP usage and verify correlations between BP rise, either with OSAS severity index or nocturnal ventilatory support compliance. Methods: Descriptive, retrospective analysis of 30 patients with PAP treated OSA, for one year, on average, and with previous controlled hypertension, who developed a rise in BP, defined as augmentation of > 5 mmHg in systolic (SBP and/or diastolic BP (DBP, after PAP usage. Co-relational analysis of BP increase, with OSAS severity indexes and therapy compliance, using Pearson coefficient. Results: Of 508 consecutive patients followed in our Department, treated with nocturnal ventilatory support, 30 evolved with BP rise after initiating treatment (age 58 ± 10.8 years; Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index [AHI], 46.1 ± 18.68. After PAP usage, mean blood pressure (MBP, Systolic BP (SBP and Diastolic BP (DBP variation was 16 ± 15 mmHg, 20 ± 25 mmHg and 6 ± 19.4 mmHg, respectively. No patient showed significant BMI increase. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS value decreased 8.9 ± 5.48 points. MBP, SBP and DBP variations were not correlated with P90/P95, residual AHI, leaks or PAP compliance. Conclusions: No specific characteristics were identified in the group who developed a rise in BP with PAP usage. No correlations were found between rises in BP and OSAS severity indexes or PAP compliance. Neither BMI nor variation in wakefulness status explained the rise in BP. Studies relate polymorphisms of b1-adrenoreceptors with different BP responses to ventilatory support. More studies are needed to clarify the cause of this paradoxical response. Resumo: Introdução: Doentes com síndrome de Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono (SAOS podem desenvolver hipertensão arterial (HTA sendo a

  16. Early nasal continuous positive airway pressure versus INSURE in VLBW neonates

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    Ana Saianda

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence suggests the INSURE strategy (INtubate-SURfactant administration and Extubate to nasal continuous positive airway pressure [nCPAP] is superior to mechanical ventilation (MV with rescue surfactant for the management of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS in very low birth weight (VLBW neonates. There is limited data, however, to assess whether INSURE is superior to nCPAP alone. We aimed to compare these two strategies regarding early and late outcomes. Methods: Retrospective cohort study from Jan/2002 to Aug/2008. We included VLBW neonateswith gestational age (GA ≤ 30 weeks registered in the Vermont Oxford Network that used either nCPAP alone (nCPAP group, N = 40, or with INSURE (INSURE group, N = 56. We assessed early (RDS, need for rescue surfactant, and CPAP failure with MV and late outcomes (chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLD, mortality, and composite outcome of mortality and/or CLD. Results: Neonates in the INSURE group had lower mean GA, while other baseline variables were comparable. The proportion of RDS was significantly superior in the nCPAP group (53% vs. 30%; adjusted OR [95% CI] – 0.2 [0.1-0.6]. Therapeutic surfactant was administered to all cases with RDS in the nCPAP group, but to none from the INSURE group. MV was more frequently required in the nCPAP group (11/ 40, 28% vs. 9/ 56, 12%; p = 0.04. No statistically significant differences were found in either of the late outcomes. Conclusion: The use of nCPAP alone in VLBW neonates with GA ≤ 30 weeks may be associated with slightly poorer early outcomes than the INSURE strategy, but there were no significant differences in CLD or mortality. Resumo: Introdução: Pretende-se determinar se a utilização do método INSURE em recém-nascidos de muito baixo peso, com idade gestacional (IG ≤ 30 semanas se associa a menor morbilidade e mortalidade quando comparado com uso de nCPAP isolado. Métodos: Estudo de

  17. EXTUBATE: A randomised controlled trial of nasal biphasic positive airway pressure vs. nasal continuous positive airway pressure following extubation in infants less than 30 weeks' gestation: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

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    Victor Suresh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory distress syndrome remains a significant problem among premature infants. Mechanical ventilation through an endotracheal tube remains the mainstay of respiratory support but may be associated with lung injury and the development of chronic lung disease of prematurity. Efforts are needed to reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation in favour of less invasive forms of respiratory support and to improve rates of successful extubation. Non-invasive respiratory support has been demonstrated to be less injurious to the premature lung. Standard practice is to use nasal continuous positive airway pressure (n-CPAP following extubation to support the baby's breathing. Many clinicians also use nasal biphasic positive airway pressure (n-BiPAP in efforts to improve rates of successful extubation. However, there is currently no evidence that this confers any advantage over conventional nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Methods We propose an unblinded multi-centre randomised trial comparing n-CPAP with n-BiPAP in babies born before 30 weeks' gestation and less than two weeks old. Babies with congenital abnormalities and severe intra-ventricular haemorrhage will be excluded. 540 babies admitted to neonatal centres in England will be randomised at the time of first extubation attempt. The primary aim of this study is to compare the rate of extubation failure within 48 hours following the first attempt at extubation. The secondary aims are to compare the effect of n-BiPAP and n-CPAP on the following outcomes: 1. Maintenance of successful extubation for 7 days post extubation 2. Oxygen requirement at 28 days of age and at 36 weeks' corrected gestational age 3. Total days on ventilator, n-CPAP/n-BiPAP 4. Number of ventilator days following first extubation attempt 5. pH and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the first post extubation blood gas 6. Duration of hospital stay 7. Rate of abdominal distension requiring

  18. Influence of mouth opening on oropharyngeal humidification and temperature in a bench model of neonatal continuous positive airway pressure.

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    Fischer, Hendrik S; Ullrich, Tim L; Bührer, Christoph; Czernik, Christoph; Schmalisch, Gerd

    2017-02-01

    Clinical studies show that non-invasive respiratory support by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) affects gas conditioning in the upper airways, especially in the presence of mouth leaks. Using a new bench model of neonatal CPAP, we investigated the influence of mouth opening on oropharyngeal temperature and humidity. The model features the insertion of a heated humidifier between an active model lung and an oropharyngeal head model to simulate the recurrent expiration of heated, humidified air. During unsupported breathing, physiological temperature and humidity were attained inside the model oropharynx, and mouth opening had no significant effect on oropharyngeal temperature and humidity. During binasal CPAP, the impact of mouth opening was investigated using three different scenarios: no conditioning in the CPAP circuit, heating only, and heated humidification. Mouth opening had a strong negative impact on oropharyngeal humidification in all tested scenarios, but heated humidification in the CPAP circuit maintained clinically acceptable humidity levels regardless of closed or open mouths. The model can be used to test new equipment for use with CPAP, and to investigate the effects of other methods of non-invasive respiratory support on gas conditioning in the presence of leaks. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of obstructive sleep apnea and treatment with continuous positive airway pressure on stroke rehabilitation: rationale, design and methods of the TOROS study

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    Aaronson, Justine A.; van Bennekom, Coen A. M.; Hofman, Winni F.; van Bezeij, Tijs; van den Aardweg, Joost G.; Groet, Erny; Kylstra, Wytske A.; Schmand, Ben A.

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder in stroke patients. Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with stroke severity and poor functional outcome. Continuous positive airway pressure seems to improve functional recovery in stroke rehabilitation. To date, the effect of continuous positive

  20. Dynamic Characteristics of Mechanical Ventilation System of Double Lungs with Bi-Level Positive Airway Pressure Model

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    Dongkai Shen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent studies on the dynamic characteristics of ventilation system, it was considered that human had only one lung, and the coupling effect of double lungs on the air flow can not be illustrated, which has been in regard to be vital to life support of patients. In this article, to illustrate coupling effect of double lungs on flow dynamics of mechanical ventilation system, a mathematical model of a mechanical ventilation system, which consists of double lungs and a bi-level positive airway pressure (BIPAP controlled ventilator, was proposed. To verify the mathematical model, a prototype of BIPAP system with a double-lung simulators and a BIPAP ventilator was set up for experimental study. Lastly, the study on the influences of key parameters of BIPAP system on dynamic characteristics was carried out. The study can be referred to in the development of research on BIPAP ventilation treatment and real respiratory diagnostics.

  1. Experience of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (cpap) by infant flow driver in a neonatal unit of a developing country

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    Iqbal, A.; Waqar, T.; Safdar, C.A.; Iqbal, T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the safety and efficacy of nasal continuous positive airways pressure by infant flow drivers in neonates admitted with respiratory problems. Study Design: Quasi-experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted at CMH Lahore from April 2012 to March 2013. Subjects and Methods: All infants who were treated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) for various indications at neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of CMH Lahore were evaluated for gestational, age, weight, gender, indications and duration on nCPAP, pre-defined outcomes, complications and length of hospital stay. Efficacy was defined as the ability to manage an infant on nCPAP alone thus avoiding the need for mechanical ventilation. Results: During the study period, 343 neonates were admitted in NICU, forty five neonates were placed on nCPAP. Mean gestational age was 33.85+ 3 weeks. Mean weight was 2043 + 770 grams. Main indications for applying nCPAP were respiratory distress syndrome (48.9%) and neonatal pneumonia (17.8%). Most common complication was abdominal distension (6.7%). Out of 45 infants placed on nCPAP, 32 (71.1%) were managed on nCPAP alone while 13 (28.9%) needed mechanical ventilation after nCPAP failure. Conclusion: Nasal CPAP by an infant flow driver is a useful method to manage respiratory distress in neonates. It reduces the need for mechanical ventilation and can be used as first line respiratory support before mechanical ventilation. (author)

  2. Effect of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Infants With Meconium Aspiration Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

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    Pandita, Aakash; Murki, Srinivas; Oleti, Tejo Pratap; Tandur, Baswaraj; Kiran, Sai; Narkhede, Sachin; Prajapati, Amrut

    2018-02-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) as a primary respiratory therapy in meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) has not been studied extensively. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure, when applied in newborns with MAS, may resolve atelectasis by sufficiently expanding partially obstructed small airways and stabilizing the collapsing terminal airways to enhance oxygen exchange. To compare NCPAP vs standard care in neonates with moderate to severe respiratory failure due to MAS in reducing the need for invasive ventilation. This multicenter open-label, parallel-group (1:1 ratio) randomized clinical trial was conducted from August 5, 2014, to May 26, 2016. Data were collected from 3 tertiary care neonatal intensive care units. All infants admitted with respiratory distress, defined as Downe score greater than 4 and peripheral capillary oxygen saturation less than 90%, were assessed for study eligibility if the chest radiograph was suggestive of MAS and they met the other inclusion criteria: gestation longer than 35 weeks, a birth weight greater than 2000 g, and born through meconium-stained amniotic fluid. Infants were randomly assigned to either NCPAP or standard care (5-10 L/min hood oxygen). The primary outcome was the need for mechanical ventilation in the first 7 days of life. After excluding 14 infants, 67 infants were randomized to bubble NCPAP and 68 infants to standard care. Baseline characteristics were similar between the 2 groups. Infants randomized to the bubble NCPAP group needed mechanical ventilation less frequently in the first 7 days of life compared with standard care (2 [3.0%] vs 17 [25.0%]); odds ratio, 0.09; 95% CI, 0.02-0.43; P = .002). The need for surfactant (3 [4.5%] vs 11 [16.2%]; odds ratio, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.05-0.87) and culture-positive sepsis (4 [6.0%] vs 13 [19.0%]; odds ratio, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.09-0.93) were higher in the standard care group. There was an increased duration of oxygen therapy (median [interquartile range

  3. High-flow nasal prong oxygen therapy or nasopharyngeal continuous positive airway pressure for children with moderate-to-severe respiratory distress?*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brink, Fia; Duke, Trevor; Evans, Janine

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the use of high-flow nasal prong oxygen therapy to nasopharyngeal continuous positive airway pressure in a PICU at a tertiary hospital; to understand the safety and effectiveness of high-flow nasal prong therapy; in particular, what proportion of children require escalation of therapy, whether any bedside monitoring data predict stability or need for escalation, and complications of the therapies. This was a prospective observational study of the first 6 months after the introduction of high-flow nasal prong oxygen therapy at the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne. Data were collected on all children who were managed with either high-flow nasal prong oxygen therapy or nasopharyngeal continuous positive airway pressure. The mode of respiratory support was determined by the treating medical staff. Data were collected on each patient before the use of high-flow nasal prong or nasopharyngeal continuous positive airway pressure, at 2 hours after starting the therapy, and the children were monitored and data collected until discharge from the ICU. Therapy was considered to be escalated if children on high-flow nasal prong required a more invasive form or higher level of respiratory support, including nasopharyngeal continuous positive airway pressure or mask bilevel positive airway pressure or endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. Therapy was considered to be escalated if children on nasopharyngeal continuous positive airway pressure required bilevel positive airway pressure or intubation and mechanical ventilation. As the first mode of respiratory support, 72 children received high-flow nasal prong therapy and 37 received nasopharyngeal continuous positive airway pressure. Forty-four patients (61%) who received high-flow nasal prong first were weaned to low-flow oxygen or to room air and 21 (29%) required escalation of respiratory support, compared with children on nasopharyngeal continuous positive airway pressure

  4. Development and evaluation of a self-efficacy instrument for Japanese sleep apnea patients receiving continuous positive airway pressure treatment

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    Saito A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ayako Saito,1 Shigeko Kojima,2 Fumihiko Sasaki,3 Masamichi Hayashi,4 Yuki Mieno,4 Hiroki Sakakibara,5 Shuji Hashimoto1 1Department of Hygiene, School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Japan; 2Department of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences, Nihon Fukushi University, Handa, Japan; 3SDB Research Laboratory, Takaoka Clinic, Nagoya, Japan; 4Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine and Clinical Allergy, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Japan; 5Tokushige Kokyuki Clinic, Nagoya, Japan Abstract: The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a self-efficacy instrument for Japanese obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP. Analyzed subjects were 653 Japanese OSA patients (619 males and 34 females treated with CPAP at a sleep laboratory in a respiratory clinic in a Japanese city. Based on Bandura's social cognitive theory, the CPAP Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for Sleep Apnea in Japanese (CSESA-J was developed by a focus group of experts, using a group interview of OSA patients for the items of two previous self-efficacy scales for Western sleep apnea patients receiving CPAP treatment. CSESA-J has two subscales, one for self-efficacy and the other for outcome expectancy, and consists of a total of 15 items. Content validity was confirmed by the focus group. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the factor loadings of self-efficacy and outcome expectancy were 0.47–0.76 and 0.41–0.92, respectively, for the corresponding items. CSESA-J had a significant but weak positive association with the General Self-Efficacy Scale, and a strong positive association with “Self-efficacy scale on health behavior in patients with chronic disease.” Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.85 for the self-efficacy subscale and 0.89 for the outcome expectancy subscale. The intraclass correlation coefficient using data from the first and second measurements with

  5. Impact of Randomization, Clinic Visits, and Medical and Psychiatric Cormorbidities on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Adherence in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

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    Budhiraja, Rohit; Kushida, Clete A.; Nichols, Deborah A.; Walsh, James K.; Simon, Richard D.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Quan, Stuart F.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate factors associated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES) cohort. Methods: The data from a prospective 6-mo multicenter randomized controlled trial with 558 subjects randomized to active CPAP and 547 to sham CPAP were analyzed to assess adherence to CPAP during first 2 mo (early period) and during months 5-6 (late period). Results: Participants randomized to active CPAP had higher hours of nightly adherence compared to the sham CPAP group at both 2 (4.9 ± 2.0 h versus 4.07 ± 2.14 h, p CPAP were more likely to correctly identify their treatment group (70.0% versus 55.2%, p CPAP had higher hours of adherence than those who thought they were in the sham CPAP group at both 2 mo (4.91 ± 2.01 versus 4.17 ± 2.17, p CPAP, older age was significantly related to CPAP use > 4 h per night. Presence of cardiovascular disorders was associated with higher hours of CPAP use, whereas presence of anxiety was associated with a trend toward lower hours of CPAP use. Presence of nasal congestion was associated with a decrease in mean daily CPAP use between the early and the late adherence period. The adherence during the week prior to a clinic visit was higher than the average adherence during the 2-mo period prior to the visit. Conclusions: Randomization to active therapy, belief that one is in the active treatment group, older age, and possibly presence of cardiovascular disorders are positively linked to CPAP adherence. Nasal congestion and anxiety are negatively associated with CPAP adherence. CPAP nightly usage increases as clinic visits approach. Citation: Budhiraja R, Kushida CA, Nichols DA, Walsh JK, Simon RD, Gottlieb DJ, Quan SF. Impact of randomization, clinic visits, and medical and psychiatric cormorbidities on continuous positive airway pressure adherence in obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2016

  6. Effect of different levels of continuous positive airway pressure on the 99mTc-DTPA lung clearance

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    Dulciane Nunes Paiva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Positive airway pressure continues (CPAP produces significant hemodynamic changes that may influence the variability of breathing pattern and heart rate, acting as an additional therapy to prevent atelectasis and to combat hypoxia. The rate of inhaled 99 m Technetiumdiethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (99mTc-DTPA, along with changes in the lung epithelium cause an increase in the rate of clearance of this compound. The aim of this study was evaluate the pulmonary clearance rate of 99mTechnetium Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (99mTc-DTPA through the use of different levels of CPAP. Methods: It was a quasi-experimental study involving 17 healthy individuals with normal lung functional. 99mTc-DTPA, as aerosol, was nebulized for 3 minutes with the individual in a sitting position. The pulmonary clearance rate was assessed through pulmonary scintigraphy under spontaneous breathing and under 20 and 10 cmH2 O CPAP in the sitting position. The clearance rate was expressed as the half-time (T½ that is the time for the activity to decrease to 50% of the peak value. Results: 20 cmH2 O CPAP produced significant reduction of the T½ of 99mTc-DTPA in the sitting position (p=0.005. However, 10 cmH2 O CPAP did not alter the T½ of DTPA in the same positions. Conclusion: High levels of continuos positive pressure in normal lungs resulted in faster 99mTc-DTPA clearance moreover, 10 cmH2 O did not alter its clearance rate. KEYWORDS: Noninvasive ventilation. Technetium Tc 99m Pentetate. Radionuclide Imaging.

  7. Sexual function and obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea : A randomized clinical trial evaluating the effects of oral-appliance and continuous positive airway pressure therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, Aarnoud; Stel, Anna-Lucia; Stegenga, Boudewijn; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.; Wijkstra, Peter J.; van Driel, Mels F.; de Bont, Lambert G. M.

    Introduction. The obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is associated with sexual dysfunction. Although successful treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been demonstrated to improve sexual function, the effects of oral-appliance therapy are unknown. Aim. The aims

  8. The effect of obstructive sleep apnea and treatment with continuous positive airway pressure on stroke rehabilitation: rationale, design and methods of the TOROS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaronson, J.A.; van Bennekom, C.A.M.; Hofman, W.F.; van Bezeij, T.; van den Aardweg, J.G.; Groet, E.; Kylstra, W.A.; Schmand, B.A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder in stroke patients. Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with stroke severity and poor functional outcome. Continuous positive airway pressure seems to improve functional recovery in stroke rehabilitation. To date, the effect of

  9. A 64-year old man who sustained many episodes of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema successfully treated with Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure : A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieperink, Willem; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; Nannenberg-Koops, Jaqueline W.; Brouwer, Henk W.; Jaarsma, T.; Nieuwland, Wybe; Zijlstra, Felix; Nijsten, Maarten W. N.

    2007-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is standard treatment for patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema. We describe a patient who had 21 episodes of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema due to very poor patient compliance. This 64-year old man had end-stage congestive heart failure based

  10. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on neurocognitive function in obstructive sleep apnea patients: The Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushida, Clete A; Nichols, Deborah A; Holmes, Tyson H; Quan, Stuart F; Walsh, James K; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Simon, Richard D; Guilleminault, Christian; White, David P; Goodwin, James L; Schweitzer, Paula K; Leary, Eileen B; Hyde, Pamela R; Hirshkowitz, Max; Green, Sylvan; McEvoy, Linda K; Chan, Cynthia; Gevins, Alan; Kay, Gary G; Bloch, Daniel A; Crabtree, Tami; Dement, William C

    2012-12-01

    To determine the neurocognitive effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES) was a 6-month, randomized, double-blind, 2-arm, sham-controlled, multicenter trial conducted at 5 U.S. university, hospital, or private practices. Of 1,516 participants enrolled, 1,105 were randomized, and 1,098 participants diagnosed with OSA contributed to the analysis of the primary outcome measures. Active or sham CPAP MEASUREMENTS: THREE NEUROCOGNITIVE VARIABLES, EACH REPRESENTING A NEUROCOGNITIVE DOMAIN: Pathfinder Number Test-Total Time (attention and psychomotor function [A/P]), Buschke Selective Reminding Test-Sum Recall (learning and memory [L/M]), and Sustained Working Memory Test-Overall Mid-Day Score (executive and frontal-lobe function [E/F]) The primary neurocognitive analyses showed a difference between groups for only the E/F variable at the 2 month CPAP visit, but no difference at the 6 month CPAP visit or for the A/P or L/M variables at either the 2 or 6 month visits. When stratified by measures of OSA severity (AHI or oxygen saturation parameters), the primary E/F variable and one secondary E/F neurocognitive variable revealed transient differences between study arms for those with the most severe OSA. Participants in the active CPAP group had a significantly greater ability to remain awake whether measured subjectively by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale or objectively by the maintenance of wakefulness test. CPAP treatment improved both subjectively and objectively measured sleepiness, especially in individuals with severe OSA (AHI > 30). CPAP use resulted in mild, transient improvement in the most sensitive measures of executive and frontal-lobe function for those with severe disease, which suggests the existence of a complex OSA-neurocognitive relationship. Registered at clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier: NCT00051363. Kushida CA; Nichols DA; Holmes

  11. Effect of positive airway pressure during pre-oxygenation and induction of anaesthesia upon safe duration of apnoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melveetil S Sreejit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Induction of general anaesthesia per se as also the use of 100% oxygen during induction of anaesthesia, results in the development of atelectasis in dependent lung regions within minutes of anaesthetic induction. We aimed to assess the effect of application of a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP of 5 cm H 2 O during pre-oxygenation and induction of anaesthesia on the period of apnoea before the occurrence of clinically significant desaturation. Methods: In this prospective, randomised, and double-blind study, 40 patients posted for elective surgery were enrolled. Duration of apnoea was measured as the time from the administration of succinylcholine hydrochloride to the time when oxygen saturation fell to 93%. Student′s t-test was used for comparing the duration of apnoea. Results: The safe duration of apnoea was found to be significantly longer in patients receiving CPAP of 5 cm H 2 O (Group P; n = 16 compared to the group receiving no CPAP (Group Z; n = 20, that is, 496.56 ± 71.68 s versus 273.00 ± 69.31 s (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The application of CPAP of 5 cm H 2 O using a Mapleson "A" circuit with a fixed positive end-expiratory pressure device during 5 min of pre-oxygenation with 100% oxygen prior to the induction of anaesthesia provides a clearly longer duration of apnoea before clinically significant arterial desaturation occurs.

  12. Effect of positive airway pressure during pre-oxygenation and induction of anaesthesia upon safe duration of apnoea

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    Sreejit, Melveetil S; Ramkumar, Venkateswaran

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Induction of general anaesthesia per se as also the use of 100% oxygen during induction of anaesthesia, results in the development of atelectasis in dependent lung regions within minutes of anaesthetic induction. We aimed to assess the effect of application of a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) of 5 cm H2O during pre-oxygenation and induction of anaesthesia on the period of apnoea before the occurrence of clinically significant desaturation. Methods: In this prospective, randomised, and double-blind study, 40 patients posted for elective surgery were enrolled. Duration of apnoea was measured as the time from the administration of succinylcholine hydrochloride to the time when oxygen saturation fell to 93%. Student's t-test was used for comparing the duration of apnoea. Results: The safe duration of apnoea was found to be significantly longer in patients receiving CPAP of 5 cm H2O (Group P; n = 16) compared to the group receiving no CPAP (Group Z; n = 20), that is, 496.56 ± 71.68 s versus 273.00 ± 69.31 s (P Mapleson A circuit with a fixed positive end-expiratory pressure device during 5 min of pre-oxygenation with 100% oxygen prior to the induction of anaesthesia provides a clearly longer duration of apnoea before clinically significant arterial desaturation occurs. PMID:25937647

  13. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on the ocular surface.

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    Hayirci, Emre; Yagci, Ayse; Palamar, Melis; Basoglu, O K; Veral, Ali

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on the ocular surface. This is a prospective, sectional cohort study of 80 eyes of 40 patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Routine ophthalmologic examination and ocular surface evaluation, including biomicroscopy, Schirmer 1 testing, tear break-up time measurement, ocular surface staining, and conjunctival impression cytology, were performed in both of each patient's eyes before and 4 months after starting CPAP therapy. After CPAP therapy, increases in squamous metaplasia (Nelson classification: t = 0.34, P = 0.014) and Schirmer 1 score (t = 3.20, P = 0.008), and decreases in tear break-up time (t = -1.38, P = 0.008) in the right eyes were statistically significant, as compared with the pretreatment values. Although these parameters changed in a similar fashion in the left eyes, differences between the pre-CPAP and post-CPAP values were not significant. The findings indicate that CPAP therapy increased ocular irritation, tear evaporation, and squamous metaplasia in the conjunctiva of the patients' right and left eyes. Although the parameters measured were similar in both eyes before CPAP therapy, these parameters changed significantly after CPAP therapy only in the right eyes. The observed differences between the right and left eyes require further investigation to determine the possible effects of sleeping position, CPAP mask displacement, and the other factors involved.

  14. Positive airway pressure adherence and mask interface in the setting of sinonasal symptoms.

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    Schell, Amy E; Soose, Ryan J

    2017-10-01

    Despite reports of lower positive pressure adherence rates with oronasal masks, patients with sinonasal problems are often prescribed this interface over a nasal interface. The aim of this study was to characterize the relationship between mask type and therapy adherence in the setting of sinonasal symptoms. Retrospective case series with chart review. We reviewed 328 patients who underwent positive pressure titration between January 2012 and May 2015. Follow-up adherence data were available for 218 patients (66.5%). Multivariate analysis examined whether patients with sinonasal symptoms have improved adherence with oronasal masks compared to nasal or nasal pillow interfaces. At a median follow-up of 95 days, positive pressure adherence in patients with sinonasal symptoms was highest with the nasal pillow interface. When compared with oronasal interfaces, the odds of adequate therapy adherence were >5 times greater with nasal pillow interfaces (odds ratio [OR] = 5.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.61-16.80, P = .006) and >3 times greater with nasal interfaces (OR = 3.67, 95% CI = 1.20-11.26, P = .02) in these symptomatic patients. The presence of nasal problems does not predict the need for an oronasal mask. Positive pressure adherence rates are higher with nasal and nasal pillow interfaces compared to oronasal masks, even in patients with sinonasal complaints. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:2418-2422, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  15. Nasal masks or binasal prongs for delivering continuous positive airway pressure in preterm neonates-a randomised trial.

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    Chandrasekaran, Aparna; Thukral, Anu; Jeeva Sankar, M; Agarwal, Ramesh; Paul, Vinod K; Deorari, Ashok K

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) delivered using nasal masks with binasal prongs. We randomly allocated 72 neonates between 26 and 32 weeks gestation to receive bubble CPAP by either nasal mask (n = 37) or short binasal prongs (n = 35). Primary outcome was mean FiO 2 requirement at 6, 12 and 24 h of CPAP initiation and the area under curve (AUC) of FiO 2 against time during the first 24 h (FiO 2 AUC 0-24 ). Secondary outcomes were the incidence of CPAP failure and nasal trauma. FiO 2 requirement at 6, 12 and 24 h (mean (SD); 25 (5.8) vs. 27.9 (8); 23.8 (4.5) vs. 25.4 (6.8) and 22.6 (6.8) vs. 22.7 (3.3)) as well as FiO 2 AUC 0-24 (584.0 (117.8) vs. 610.6 (123.6)) were similar between the groups. There was no difference in the incidence of CPAP failure (14 vs. 20%; relative risk 0.67; 95% confidence interval 0.24-1.93). Incidence of severe nasal trauma was lower with the use of nasal masks (0 vs. 31%; p Nasal masks appear to be as efficacious as binasal prongs in providing CPAP. Masks are associated with lower risk of severe nasal trauma. CTRI2012/08/002868 What is Known? • Binasal prongs are better than single nasal and nasopharyngeal prongs for delivering continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in preventing need for re-intubation. • It is unclear if they are superior to newer generation nasal masks in preterm neonates requiring CPAP. What is New? • Oxygen requirement during the first 24 h of CPAP delivery is comparable with use of nasal masks and binasal prongs. • Use of nasal masks is, however, associated with significantly lower risk of severe grades of nasal injury.

  16. Continuous flow biphasic positive airway pressure by helmet in patients with acute hypoxic respiratory failure: effect on oxygenation.

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    Isgrò, Stefano; Zanella, Alberto; Sala, Chiara; Grasselli, Giacomo; Foti, Giuseppe; Pesenti, Antonio; Patroniti, Nicolò

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the effects of periodical high pressure breaths (SIGH) or biphasic positive pressure ventilation (BIPAP) during helmet continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with acute hypoxic respiratory failure. We used a recently developed electromechanical expiratory valve (TwinPAP, StarMed, Mirandola, Italy), which is time-cycled between two customizable positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels. We studied 21 patients (67 ± 17 years old) undergoing helmet CPAP. Continuous flow CPAP system was set at 60 l/min flow rate while maintaining clinical FiO(2) (51 ± 15%). Five steps, lasting 1 h each, were applied: (1) spontaneous breathing with PEEP 0 cmH(2)O (SB), (2) CPAP with PEEP 8 cmH(2)O (CPAP(basal)), (3) low PEEP, 8 cmH(2)O, for 25 s and high PEEP, 25 cmH(2)O, for 5 s (SIGH), (4) low PEEP, 8 cmH(2)O, for 3 s and high PEEP, 20 cmH(2)O, for 3 s (BIPAP), (5) CPAP with PEEP 8 cmH(2)O (CPAP(final)). We randomized the sequence of SIGH and BIPAP. PaO(2) was significantly higher during all steps compared to SB. When compared to CPAP(basal), both SIGH and BIPAP induced a further increase in PaO(2). PaO(2) during SIGH and BIPAP were not different. The oxygenation improvement was maintained during CPAP(final). Superimposed, nonsynchronized positive pressure breaths delivered during helmet CPAP by means of the TwinPAP system may improve oxygenation in patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, even at a rate as low as two breaths per minute.

  17. The effects of incremental continuous positive airway pressure on arterial oxygenation and pulmonary shunt during one-lung ventilation.

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    Kim, Yeon Dong; Ko, Seonghoon; Kim, Deokkyu; Lim, Hyungsun; Lee, Ji Hye; Kim, Min Ho

    2012-03-01

    Although one lung ventilation (OLV) is frequently used for facilitating thoracic surgical procedures, arterial hypoxemia can occur while using one lung anesthesia. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in 5 or 10 cmH(2)O to the non-ventilating lung is commonly recommended to prevent hypoxemia. We evaluated the effects of incremental CPAP to the non-ventilating lung on arterial oxygenation and pulmonary shunt without obstruction of the surgical field during OLV. Twenty patients that were scheduled for one lung anesthesia were included in this study. Systemic and pulmonary hemodynamic data and blood gas analysis was recorded every fifteen minutes according to the patient's positions and CPAP levels. CPAP was applied from 0 cmH(2)O by 3 cmH(2)O increments until a surgeon notifies that the surgical field was obstructed by the expanded lung. Following that, pulmonary shunt fraction (Q(S)/Q(T)) was calculated. There were no significant differences of Q(S)/Q(T) between supine and lateral positions with two lung ventilation (TLV). OLV significantly decreased arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO(2)) and increased Q(S)/Q(T) compared to TLV. PaO(2) and Q(S)/Q(T) significantly improved at 6 and 9 cmH(2)O of CPAP compared to 0 cmH(2)O. However, there were no significant differences of PaO(2) and Q(S)/Q(T) between 6 and 9 cmH(2)O CPAP. In 18 patients (90%), surgical fields were obstructed at 9 cmH(2)O CPAP. This study suggests that 6 cmH(2)O CPAP effectively improved arterial oxygenation without interference of the surgical field during OLV when CPAP was applied from 0 cmH(2)O in 3 cmH(2)O increments.

  18. The influence of nasal abnormalities in adherence to continuous positive airway pressure device therapy in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

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    Haddad, Fernanda Louise Martinho; Vidigal, Tatiana de Aguiar; Mello-Fujita, Luciane; Cintra, Fátima Dumas; Gregório, Luiz Carlos; Tufik, Sérgio; Bittencourt, Lia

    2013-12-01

    The few studies that examine the effect of nasal abnormalities on continuous positive airway pressure device (CPAP) adherence are controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of nasal abnormalities in CPAP adherence. We included patients with moderate to severe OSA. The patients were submitted to rhinoscopy, nasofibroscopy, nasal inspiratory peak flow, and acoustic rhinometry. The patients who used a CPAP for 4 h or more per night for at least 70 % of the nights over a 6-month period were considered to have good adherence. Thirty-four patients finished the study. Eleven (33.4 %) were female and 23 (67.6 %) were male. Sixteen (47.1 %) patients had good adherence. The body mass index (p = 0.030), neck circumference (p = 0.006), and apnea-hypopnea index (p = 0.032) were higher, and the oxyhemoglobin saturation minimum was lower (p = 0.041) in the good adherence group. Nasal parameters showed no differences between good and poor adherence groups. In Spearman's correlation, surprisingly, there was a negative correlation between the highest number of hours of CPAP use with smaller values of nasal minimal cross-sectional areas in the supine position (r, 0.375; p = 0.029). In the linear regression model, the nasal findings that predicted increased of the CPAP use were the following: lower scores of nasal symptoms (p = 0.007) and lower nasal volume in supine position (p = 0.001). The majority of the nasal parameters evaluated in this study did not influence CPAP adherence.

  19. Effects of positive airway pressure therapy on cardiovascular and metabolic markers in males with obstructive sleep apnea.

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    Feliciano, A; Oliveira, M J; Cysneiros, A; Martinho, C; Reis, R P; Penque, D; Pinto, P; Bárbara, C

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with cardiovascular/metabolic complications. Some analytical parameters (homocysteine, glycemic and lipidic profiles) are recognized markers of these consequences. Limited data is available on the association of these markers and OSAS's severity/response to positive airway pressure therapy (PAP). In this prospective study we analyzed polysomnographic and analytical data of male patients admitted to sleep laboratory. The aim was to evaluate metabolic/cardiovascular markers in snorers and OSAS patients, to relate with sleep parameters and PAP response. One-hundred and three patients were included, and 73 (71%) were OSAS patients. OSAS patients were similar to snorers except for higher body mass index (BMI) and dyslipidemia. Severe OSAS patients showed higher glycemia, HbA1c, insulin, and insulin resistance, and lower HDL cholesterol in comparison to mild-moderate (pprofile and triglycerides were slightly correlated with OSAS severity. 46 OSAS patients were submitted to 6 months of PAP, with a statistical decrease in mean values of homocysteine, glycemia, total and LDL cholesterol (pprofiles changed significantly after 6 months of PAP therapy in OSAS, supporting its cardiovascular and metabolic protective effect. Our study has reinforced the importance of analytical cardiovascular/metabolic evaluation as complementary tool of diagnosis/treatment response in OSAS. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. [Intraabdominal fat redistribution in long-term continuous positive airway pressure treatment in obstructive sleep apnea patients].

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    Català, Raquel; Ferré, Raimón; Sangenís, Sandra; Cabré, Anna; Hernández-Flix, Salvador; Masana, Lluís

    2016-06-03

    Obesity is the main risk factor for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The aim was to evaluate the long-term effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on intraabdominal fat distribution in OSA patients. Fifty OSA patients with and 35 without CPAP treatment criteria were followed-up for 2 years. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue (VAT and SAT) and preaortic intraabdominal fat (PIF) were assessed by sonography. In the non CPAP treated group, SAT and VAT mean values didn't change, while a significantly PIF growth was observed (55.19 [23.44] vs. 63.45 [23.94] mm, P=.021). In the CPAP treated group, VAT and PIF mean were not changed, while SAT decreased significantly (11.29 [5.69] vs. 10.47 [5.71] mm, P=.012). Long-term CPAP treatment produces intraabdominal fat redistribution and is associated with an anthropometric profile of lower cardiovascular risk in OSA patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on hemorheology and serum inflammatory factors in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome

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    Ye-Jun Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP on hemorheology and serum inflammatory factors in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS. Methods: A total of 87 patients with moderate and severe OSAHS from Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery of South Central Hospital of Wuhan University and Qianjiang Central Hospital were selected as research objects in the treatment group, while 37 healthy individuals were chosen as objects in the control group. The changes of hemorheology indexes including hematocrit (HCT, whole blood viscosity, platelet aggregation (PAG and endothelin (ET as well as serum inflammatory factors including interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-18 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α were measured in the control group and the treatment group, and comparisons involving these indexes were made between the two groups. Results: Before treatment, the hemorheology indexes HCT, whole blood viscosity (high, medium and low sheer rates, PAG and ET as well as the inflammatory factors IL-6, IL-18 and TNF-α levels were significantly higher than those in the control group; after CPAP treatment, all these indexed mentioned above in the treatment group were significantly decreased compared with before treatment. Conclusion: CPAP treatment has a reliable therapeutic effect on OSAHS patients, which can obviously improve the hemorheology and largely reduce the inflammatory response.

  2. Pressure support ventilation vs Continuous positive airway pressure for treating of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema: A pilot study.

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    Pagano, Antonio; Numis, Fabio G; Rosato, Valerio; Russo, Teresa; Porta, Giovanni; Bosso, Giorgio; Serra, Claudia; Masarone, Mario; Visone, Giuseppe; Paladino, Fiorella

    2018-04-24

    Non-invasive ventilation is usually adopted as a support to medical therapy in patients with acute pulmonary edema, but which modality between Pressure Support Ventilation (PSV) and Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) has better favourable effects is not been yet well known. Aim of this observational study was to provide data on these different non-invasive ventilation modalities in the management of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema. One-hundred-fifty-three patients consecutively admitted to the Emergency Room of two different Center were enrolled and randomly assigned to CPAP or PSV. Data relative to mortality, need of endotracheal intubation, sequential blood gas analysis were compared. Furthermore, there were no significant differences regarding mortality in the two groups, but patients treated with PSV had a significant lower rate of endotracheal intubation and a higher improvement of blood gas analyses parameters. In conclusion, our data support only a slight advantage in favour to PSV versus CPAP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimates of cost-effectiveness of prehospital continuous positive airway pressure in the management of acute pulmonary edema.

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    Hubble, Michael W; Richards, Michael E; Wilfong, Denise A

    2008-01-01

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in managing prehospital acute pulmonary edema in an urban EMS system. Using estimates from published reports on prehospital and emergency department CPAP, a cost-effectiveness model of implementing CPAP in a typical urban EMS system was derived from the societal perspective as well as the perspective of the implementing EMS system. To assess the robustness of the model, a series of univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses was performed on the input variables. The cost of consumables, equipment, and training yielded a total cost of $89 per CPAP application. The theoretical system would be expected to use CPAP 4 times per 1000 EMS patients and is expected to save 0.75 additional lives per 1000 EMS patients at a cost of $490 per life saved. CPAP is also expected to result in approximately one less intubation per 6 CPAP applications and reduce hospitalization costs by $4075 per year for each CPAP application. Through sensitivity analyses the model was verified to be robust across a wide range of input variable assumptions. Previous studies have demonstrated the clinical effectiveness of CPAP in the management of acute pulmonary edema. Through a theoretical analysis which modeled the costs and clinical benefits of implementing CPAP in an urban EMS system, prehospital CPAP appears to be a cost-effective treatment.

  4. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

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    Giorgiana Dediu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a disease with increasing prevalence nowadays, being associated with multiple cardiovascular diseases, such as arterial hypertension. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP on blood pressure values. Materials and methods. We performed a prospective interventional study on 52 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The patients were divided into 2 groups: Group A (who received both pharmacological and CPAP treatment and Group B (who received only pharmacological treatment, and were followed up at 3 and 6 months. The statistical analysis was made with SPSS and Microsoft Excel. At the same time, using the surrogate marker –RDW, we tried to evaluate the persistence of systemic inflammation, knowing that OSAS is associated with inflammation. Results. The systolic blood pressure values decreased at 6 months in all OSAS patients who have used CPAP, including patients with normal values of blood pressure. At the same time, the lack of OSAS treatment led to increased values of blood pressure by approximately 10 mmHg. We noticed a link between RDW, age and blood pressure values, respectively the increase of RDW and age may result in an increase in blood pressure. Conclusions. The OSAS treatment can decrease the blood pressure values. A higher RDW may be considered a negative prognostic factor for these patients, reflecting the role of systemic inflammation in the appearance of cardiovascular disorders.

  5. Oxidative stress mediated arterial dysfunction in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea and the effect of continuous positive airway pressure treatment

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    Del Ben Maria

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies suggest an increase of oxidative stress and a reduction of endothelial function in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS. We assessed the association between OSAS, endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Further aim was to evaluate the effect of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP on oxidative stress and arterial dysfunction. Methods We studied 138 consecutive patients with heavy snoring and possible OSAS. Patients underwent unattended overnight home polysomnography. Ten patients with severe OSAS were revaluated after 6 months of nCPAP therapy. To assess oxidative stress in vivo, we measured urinary 8-iso-PGF2α and serum levels of soluble NOX2-derived peptide (sNOX2-dp. Serum levels of nitrite/nitrate (NOx were also determined. Flow-mediated brachial artery dilation (FMD was measured to asses endothelial function. Results Patients with severe OSAS had higher urinary 8-iso-PGF2α (p Conclusions The results of our study indicate that patients with OSAS and cardiometabolic comorbidities have increased oxidative stress and arterial dysfunction that are partially reversed by nCPAP treatment.

  6. Health outcomes of continuous positive airway pressure versus oral appliance treatment for obstructive sleep apnea: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Phillips, Craig L; Grunstein, Ronald R; Darendeliler, M Ali; Mihailidou, Anastasia S; Srinivasan, Vasantha K; Yee, Brendon J; Marks, Guy B; Cistulli, Peter A

    2013-04-15

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and mandibular advancement device (MAD) therapy are commonly used to treat obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Differences in efficacy and compliance of these treatments are likely to influence improvements in health outcomes. To compare health effects after 1 month of optimal CPAP and MAD therapy in OSA. In this randomized crossover trial, we compared the effects of 1 month each of CPAP and MAD treatment on cardiovascular and neurobehavioral outcomes. Cardiovascular (24-h blood pressure, arterial stiffness), neurobehavioral (subjective sleepiness, driving simulator performance), and quality of life (Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire, Short Form-36) were compared between treatments. Our primary outcome was 24-hour mean arterial pressure. A total of 126 patients with moderate-severe OSA (apnea hypopnea index [AHI], 25.6 [SD 12.3]) were randomly assigned to a treatment order and 108 completed the trial with both devices. CPAP was more efficacious than MAD in reducing AHI (CPAP AHI, 4.5 ± 6.6/h; MAD AHI, 11.1 ± 12.1/h; P health outcomes were similar after 1 month of optimal MAD and CPAP treatment in patients with moderate-severe OSA. The results may be explained by greater efficacy of CPAP being offset by inferior compliance relative to MAD, resulting in similar effectiveness. Clinical trial registered with https://www.anzctr.org.au (ACTRN 12607000289415).

  7. Heart rate variability in non-apneic snorers and controls before and after continuous positive airway pressure

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    Mateika Jason H

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We hypothesized that sympathetic nervous system activity (SNSA is increased and parasympathetic nervous system activity (PNSA is decreased during non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep in non-apneic, otherwise healthy, snoring individuals compared to control. Moreover, we hypothesized that these alterations in snoring individuals would be more evident during non-snoring than snoring when compared to control. Methods To test these hypotheses, heart rate variability was used to measure PNSA and SNSA in 11 normotensive non-apneic snorers and 12 control subjects before and 7-days after adapting to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP. Results Our results showed that SNSA was increased and PNSA was decreased in non-apneic snorers during NREM compared to control. However, these changes were only evident during the study in which snoring was eliminated with nCPAP. Conversely, during periods of snoring SNSA and PNSA were similar to measures obtained from the control group. Additionally, within the control group, SNSA and PNSA did not vary before and after nCPAP application. Conclusion Our findings suggest that long-lasting alterations in autonomic function may exist in snoring subjects that are otherwise healthy. Moreover, we speculate that because of competing inputs (i.e. inhibitory versus excitatory inputs to the autonomic nervous system during snoring, the full impact of snoring on autonomic function is most evident during non-snoring periods.

  8. A real-world comparison of apnea-hypopnea indices of positive airway pressure device and polysomnography.

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    Ritwick Agrawal

    Full Text Available The apnea hypopnea index (AHI reported by positive airway pressure (PAP device is widely used in clinical practice, yet its correlation with standardized AHI obtained during the sleep study is not established. The current study was conducted to investigate the correlation between AHI estimated by the PAP device and reported on the smart card with the AHI found during the PAP polysomnography (PSG in the "real world" setting at an academic sleep center. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 280 patients who underwent a PAP titration PSG at Drexel sleep center, and were later prescribed a PAP device. The AHI was categorized in clinically relevant subgroups (as AHI ≤5 and AHI >5. The AHI at the final pressure on the PSG and the average AHI from the prescribed PAP device were compared. The results showed that in the majority (77.3% of patients (126 of 163, the AHI from both PAP device and PSG correlated well and were in the same category (AHI ≤5 and AHI >5 respectively. The majority of patients (80.7% with PSG AHI of 5, 61.5% patients reported good control, with AHI <5 on PAP device AHI. We conclude that in a majority of patients who were optimally titrated in the sleep laboratory, the PAP device continued to show optimal control at home.

  9. Nasal injury and comfort with jet versus bubble continuous positive airway pressure delivery systems in preterm infants with respiratory distress.

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    Khan, Jafar; Sundaram, Venkataseshan; Murki, Srinivas; Bhatti, Anuj; Saini, Shiv Sajan; Kumar, Praveen

    2017-12-01

    Nasal injuries with use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) range from blanching of nasal tip to septal necrosis and septal drop. This analysis was done in preterm neonates of nasal CPAP as primary support as part of a randomized trial comparing Jet device with Bubble device for delivery of CPAP, both through nasal prongs of different structure, make and fixation methods. Nasal injury was assessed using a validated nasal injury score. Out of 170 neonates enrolled, 103 (61%) had nasal injuries; moderate and severe injuries were observed in 18 (11%) and 8 (5%) infants, respectively. Septum was the most common site injured. The incidence and severity of nasal injury were significantly lesser in Jet group compared to Bubble group [RR 0.6 (95% C.I. 0.5-0.8); p CPAP device with its nasal interface had higher and more serious incidence of nasal injuries in comparison to Jet CPAP device. What is known: • Nasal injuries are becoming increasingly common with use of nasal CPAP low gestational age, low birth weight, longer use of CPAP and longer NICU stay are risk factors for such injuries • Validated nasal injury scores have been created for assessment of nasal trauma in neonates What is new: • Bubble device with its interface had higher and more serious incidence of nasal injuries in comparison to Jet device • Even though pain assessed by N-PASS was less with Jet device, prong displacements were more frequent with its system.

  10. The Impact of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea and Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Circulating Ischaemia-Modified Albumin Concentrations

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    Firat Uygur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS and the effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP on circulating ischaemia-modified albumin (IMA concentrations. The study included 97 newly diagnosed OSAS patients and 30 nonapnoeic controls. Blood samples were obtained in the morning after polysomnography. After 3 months of CPAP treatment, 31 patients with moderate-severe OSAS were reassessed for serum IMA concentrations. Significantly higher serum IMA concentrations were measured in the OSAS group than in the control group [0.518±0.091 absorbance units (ABSU, 0.415±0.068 ABSU, P<0.001]. Serum IMA concentrations correlated significantly with the apnoea-hypopnoea index, mean SaO2, desaturation index, and C-reactive protein concentrations. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that OSAS increased the serum IMA concentration independent of age, sex, body mass index, smoking habit, and cardiovascular disease. After 3 months of treatment with CPAP, OSAS patients had significantly lower serum IMA concentrations (0.555±0.062 ABSU to 0.431±0.063 ABSU, P<0.001. The results showed that OSAS is associated with elevated concentrations of IMA, which can be reversed by effective CPAP treatment.

  11. Optimal level of continuous positive airway pressure: auto-adjusting titration versus titration with a predictive equation.

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    Choi, Ji Ho; Jun, Young Joon; Oh, Jeong In; Jung, Jong Yoon; Hwang, Gyu Ho; Kwon, Soon Young; Lee, Heung Man; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Sang Hag; Lee, Seung Hoon

    2013-05-01

    The aims of the present study were twofold. We sought to compare two methods of titrating the level of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) - auto-adjusting titration and titration using a predictive equation - with full-night manual titration used as the benchmark. We also investigated the reliability of the two methods in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Twenty consecutive adult patients with OSAS who had successful, full-night manual and auto-adjusting CPAP titration participated in this study. The titration pressure level was calculated with a previously developed predictive equation based on body mass index and apnea-hypopnea index. The mean titration pressure levels obtained with the manual, auto-adjusting, and predictive equation methods were 9.0 +/- 3.6, 9.4 +/- 3.0, and 8.1 +/- 1.6 cm H2O,respectively. There was a significant difference in the concordance within the range of +/- 2 cm H2O (p = 0.019) between both the auto-adjusting titration and the titration using the predictive equation compared to the full-night manual titration. However, there was no significant difference in the concordance within the range of +/- 1 cm H2O (p > 0.999). When compared to full-night manual titration as the standard method, auto-adjusting titration appears to be more reliable than using a predictive equation for determining the optimal CPAP level in patients with OSAS.

  12. Titration effectiveness of two autoadjustable continuous positive airway pressure devices driven by different algorithms in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Mario Francesco; Quaranta, Vitaliano Nicola; Tedeschi, Ersilia; Drigo, Riccardo; Ranieri, Teresa; Carratù, Pierluigi; Resta, Onofrio

    2013-08-01

    Nocturnal application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the standard treatment for patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Determination of the therapeutic pressure (CPAP titration) is usually performed by a technician in the sleep laboratory during attended polysomnography. One possible alternative to manual titration is automated titration. Indeed, during the last 15 years, devices have been developed that deliver autoadjustable CPAP (A-CPAP). The aim of the present study was to compare the titration effectiveness of two A-CPAP devices using different flow-based algorithms in patients with OSA. This is a randomized study; 79 subjects underwent two consecutive unattended home A-CPAP titration nights with two different devices (Autoset Resmed; Remstar Auto Respironics); during the third and the fourth night, patients underwent portable monitoring in the sleep laboratory during fixed CPAP at the A-CPAP recommended pressure. Bland Altman plots showed good agreement between the recommended median and maximal pressure levels obtained with the two devices. A significant improvement was observed in all the sleep parameters by both A-CPAP machines to a similar degree. It was observed that the two A-CPAP devices using different algorithms are equally effective in initial titration of CPAP. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  13. Oxygen cost of breathing in postoperative patients. Pressure support ventilation vs continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viale, J P; Annat, G J; Bouffard, Y M; Delafosse, B X; Bertrand, O M; Motin, J P

    1988-03-01

    In seven postoperative patients with normal preoperative pulmonary function tests, we evaluated the oxygen cost of breathing (VO2resp) during continuous positive pressure ventilation (CPAP) and during a 15 cm H2O inspiratory pressure support ventilation (IPSV). For both periods, VO2 resp was estimated as the difference between total oxygen uptake of the period (VO2tot), measured by a mass-spectrometer system, and that during controlled ventilation. During CPAP ventilation, VO2resp was found to be 11.2 +/- 1.4 percent of VO2tot. During IPSV, VO2resp was found insignificant. It is concluded that a 15 cm H2O IPSV takes over the major part of the work of breathing in postoperative patients without preexisting pulmonary disease.

  14. Impact of continuous positive airway pressure on the pulmonary changes promoted by immersion in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzetti, Danize Aparecida; Quadros, Janayna Rodembuch Borba; Ribeiro, Bruna Esmerio; Callegaro, Letícia; Veppo, Aline Arebalo; Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra; Peçanha, Franck Maciel

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine whether different levels of CPAP improve the lung volumes and capacities of healthy subjects immersed in water. Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial, conducted between April and June of 2016, involving healthy female volunteers who were using oral contraceptives. Three 20-min immersion protocols were applied: control (no CPAP); CPAP5 (CPAP at 5 cmH2O); and CPAP10 (CPAP at 10 cmH2O). We evaluated HR, SpO2, FVC, FEV1, the FEV1/FVC ratio, peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), and FEF25-75%) at three time points: pre-immersion; 10 min after immersion; and 10 min after the end of each protocol. Results: We evaluated 13 healthy volunteers. The CPAP10 protocol reversed the restrictive pattern of lung function induced by immersion in water, maintaining pulmonary volumes and capacities for a longer period than did the CPAP5 protocol. Conclusions: When the hemodynamic change causing a persistent lung disorder, only the application of higher positive pressures is effective in maintaining long-term improvements in the pulmonary profile. PMID:29340488

  15. Role of spousal involvement in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP adherence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batool-Anwar S

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Little is known about the impact of spousal involvement on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP adherence. The aim of this study was to determine whether spouse involvement affects adherence with CPAP therapy, and how this association varies with gender. Methods: 194 subjects recruited from Apnea Positive Pressure Long Term Efficacy Study (APPLES completed the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS. The majority of participants were Caucasian (83%, and males (73%, with mean age of 56 years, mean BMI of 31 kg/m2. & 62% had severe OSA. The DAS is a validated 32-item self-report instrument measuring dyadic consensus, satisfaction, cohesion, and affectional expression. A high score in the DAS is indicative of a person’s adjustment to the marriage. Additionally, questions related to spouse involvement with general health and CPAP use were asked. CPAP use was downloaded from the device and self-report, and compliance was defined as usage > 4 h per night. Results: There were no significant differences in overall marital quality between the compliant and noncompliant subjects. However, level of spousal involvement was associated with increased CPAP adherence at 6 months (p=0.01. After stratifying for gender these results were significant only among males (p=0.03. Three years after completing APPLES, level of spousal involvement was not associated with CPAP compliance even after gender stratification. Conclusion: Spousal involvement is important in determining CPAP compliance in males in the 1st 6 months after initiation of therapy but is not predictive of longer-term adherence. Involvement of the spouse should be considered an integral part of CPAP initiation procedures.

  16. Spontaneous breathing with biphasic positive airway pressure attenuates lung injury in hydrochloric acid-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jingen; Zhang, Heng; Sun, Bing; Yang, Rui; He, Hangyong; Zhan, Qingyuan

    2014-06-01

    It has been proved that spontaneous breathing (SB) with biphasic positive airway pressure (BIPAP) can improve lung aeration in acute respiratory distress syndrome compared with controlled mechanical ventilation. The authors hypothesized that SB with BIPAP would attenuate lung injury in acute respiratory distress syndrome compared with pressure-controlled ventilation. Twenty male New Zealand white rabbits with hydrochloric acid aspiration-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome were randomly ventilated using the BIPAP either with SB (BIPAP plus SB group) or without SB (BIPAP minus SB group) for 5 h. Inspiration pressure was adjusted to maintain the tidal volume at 6 ml/kg. Both groups received the same positive end-expiratory pressure level at 5 cm H2O for hemodynamic goals. Eight healthy animals without ventilatory support served as the control group. The BIPAP plus SB group presented a lower ratio of dead space ventilation to tidal volume, a lower respiratory rate, and lower minute ventilation. No significant difference in the protein levels of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 in plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung tissue were measured between the two experimental groups. However, SB resulted in lower messenger ribonucleic acid levels of interleukin-6 (mean ± SD; 1.8 ± 0.7 vs. 2.6 ± 0.5; P = 0.008) and interleukin-8 (2.2 ± 0.5 vs. 2.9 ± 0.6; P = 0.014) in lung tissues. In addition, lung histopathology revealed less injury in the BIPAP plus SB group (lung injury score, 13.8 ± 4.6 vs. 21.8 ± 5.7; P hydrochloric acid-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome, SB with BIPAP attenuated lung injury and improved respiratory function compared with controlled ventilation with low tidal volume.

  17. Comparison of manual versus automatic continuous positive airway pressure titration and the development of a predictive equation for therapeutic continuous positive airway pressure in Chinese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiaying; Xiao, Sichang; Qiu, Zhihui; Song, Ning; Luo, Yuanming

    2013-04-01

    Whether the therapeutic nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) derived from manual titration is the same as derived from automatic titration is controversial. The purpose of this study was to compare the therapeutic pressure derived from manual titration with automatic titration. Fifty-one patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) (mean apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) = 50.6 ± 18.6 events/h) who were newly diagnosed after an overnight full polysomnography and who were willing to accept CPAP as a long-term treatment were recruited for the study. Manual titration during full polysomnography monitoring and unattended automatic titration with an automatic CPAP device (REMstar Auto) were performed. A separate cohort study of one hundred patients with OSA (AHI = 54.3 ± 18.9 events/h) was also performed by observing the efficacy of CPAP derived from manual titration. The treatment pressure derived from automatic titration (9.8 ± 2.2 cmH(2)O) was significantly higher than that derived from manual titration (7.3 ± 1.5 cmH(2)O; P titration (54.3 ± 18.9 events/h before treatment and 3.3 ± 1.7 events/h after treatment; P titration pressure derived from REMstar Auto is usually higher than the pressure derived from manual titration. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  18. A Comparison between Nasal Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation and Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Ventilation in the Treatment of Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Shah Farhat

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV is a non-invasive ventilatory mode, which delivers mechanical ventilation via nasal tubes or prongs. The present study was conducted to compare the efficacy of NIPPV and nasal continuous positive airway pressure ventilation (NCPAP in reducing the need for intubation in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS. Methods: This randomized, clinical trial was conducted at the neonatal intensive care unit of Imam Reza Hospital, affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences during eight months since April 2014. Preterm infants with RDS were recruited before showing any indications for endotracheal intubation after birth. The NIPPV and NCPAPV groups were matched in terms of clinical characteristics. Each infant was randomized to receive either NIPPV or NCPAPV immediately after extubation. Nasal ventilation was deemed successful if intubation was not required within at least 72 hours. Brain sonography was carried out on the third day of life in all infants. Data were recorded for all neonates until hospital discharge. Results: In total, 28% (15/53 and 26.4% (14/53 of infants in the NIPPV and NCPAPV groups were intubated within the first 72 h after birth, respectively (P=0.168. Neither of the procedures induced major adverse effects, although the incidence rate and severity of intraventricular hemorrhage were higher in the NIPPV group, compared to the NCPAPV group (P=0.026. Conclusion: Although NIPPV is confirmed as the first-line treatment for the management of neonatal RDS, this mode of ventilation showed no superiority over NCPAPV in eliminating the need for mechanical ventilation in the present study.

  19. Effects of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Cognitive Deficits in Middle-aged Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Yue-Ying; Deng, Yan; Xu, Xiu; Liu, Ya-Ping; Liu, Hui-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current views on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment to improve the cognitive deficits of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are controversial, so we performed a meta-analysis. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was undertaken in PubMed, CINAHL, Medline, PsycInfo, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CNKI, WanFang, VIP, and CBMdisc for studies published from June 1971 to July 2014. The outcome measures included neuropsychological tests of the 7 ...

  20. Limited predictability of maximal muscular pressure using the difference between peak airway pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure during proportional assist ventilation (PAV)

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Po-Lan; Kao, Pei-Shan; Lin, Wei-Chieh; Su, Pei-Fang; Chen, Chang-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background If the proportional assist ventilation (PAV) level is known, muscular effort can be estimated from the difference between peak airway pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (?P) during PAV. We conjectured that deducing muscle pressure from ?P may be an interesting method to set PAV, and tested this hypothesis using the oesophageal pressure time product calculation. Methods Eleven mechanically ventilated patients with oesophageal pressure monitoring under PAV were enro...

  1. Study into the use of continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome patients with daytime drowsiness

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    Clélia Maria Ribeiro Franco

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS is a respiratory disorder with high morbidity and mortality. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP is the most commonly prescribed conservative treatment for adults with OSAHS. CPAP therapy normalises or decreases OSAHS symptoms and can reduce and prevent OSAHS complications. Aims: To evaluate adherence to nasal CPAP treatment and CPAP impact on daytime drowsiness. Method: A sample of 20 patients evaluated for daytime drowsiness using the Epworth sleepiness scale and interviewed for adherence to nasal CPAP use. Results: There was a significant decrease in the level of daytime sleepiness of the patients users of nasal CPAP (p=0.017; patients not using nasal CPAP experienced a decrease without statistical significance (p=0.162. 100% of CPAP users reported benefits and 50% of these reported related discomforts. Conclusions: Patients with OSAHS that use CPAP have a greater reduced level of sleepiness than those who do not use it. Resumo: Introdução: A síndroma da apneia-hipopneia obstrutiva do sono (SAHOS é um distúrbio respiratório de elevada morbimortalidade. A terapia com pressão positiva contínua das vias aéreas (CPAP representa o tratamento conservador mais prescrito para a SAHOS e tem o intuito de restabelecer a patência das vias aéreas, normalizando o índice de eventos respiratórios obstrutivos, corrigindo os sintomas. Objectivo: Avaliar o impacto do uso do CPAP nasal sobre a hipersonia diurna em portadores de SAHOS. Método: Amostra de vinte doentes portadores de SAHOS diagnosticados por estudo de polissonografia de noite inteira, usuários ou não de CPAP nasal, todos avaliados quanto à hipersonia diurna através da escala de sonolência de Epworth. Resultados: O decréscimo do nível de sonolência diurna dos usuários de CPAP nasal foi significante (p=0,017, enquanto para não usuários de CPAP nasal a m

  2. Determination of new prediction formula for nasal continuous positive airway pressure in Turkish patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basoglu, Ozen K; Tasbakan, Mehmet Sezai

    2012-12-01

    Race/ethnicity may play an important role in determining body size, severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), and effective continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) (Peff). Turkey is composed of different ethnic groups. Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine new prediction formula for CPAP (Ppred) in Turkish OSAS patients, validate performance of this formula, and compare with Caucasian and Asian formulas. Peff of 250 newly diagnosed moderate-to-severe OSAS patients were calculated by in-laboratory manual titration. Correlation and multiple linear regression analysis were used to model effects of ten anthropometric and polysomnographic variables such as neck circumference (NC) and oxygen desaturation index (ODI) on Peff. New formula was validated in different 130 OSAS patients and compared with previous formulas. The final prediction formula was [Formula: see text]. When Peff of control group was assessed, it was observed that mean Peff was 8.39 ± 2.00 cmH(2)O and Ppred was 8.23 ± 1.22 cmH(2)O. Ppred was within ±3 cmH(2)O of Peff in 96.2% patients. Besides, Peff was significantly correlated with new formula, and prediction formulas developed for Caucasian and Asian populations (r = 0.651, p < 0.001, r = 0.648, p < 0.001, and r = 0.622, p < 0.001, respectively). It is shown that level of CPAP can be successfully predicted from our prediction formula, using NC and ODI and validated in Turkish OSAS patients. New equation correlates with other formulas developed for Caucasian and Asian populations. Our simple formula including ODI, marker of intermittent hypoxia, may be used easily in different populations.

  3. Nasal pillows as an alternative interface in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome initiating continuous positive airway pressure therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Silke

    2012-02-01

    Side-effects directly due to the nasal mask are common in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) commencing continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Recently, nasal pillows have been designed to overcome these issues. Limited evidence exists of the benefits and effectiveness of these devices. Twenty-one patients (19 male, 49+\\/-10years) with the established diagnosis of OSAS [apnoea\\/hypopnoea index (AHI): 52+\\/-22] and who had a successful CPAP titration were commenced on CPAP therapy (10+\\/-2cmH2O), and randomized to 4weeks of a nasal pillow (P) and a standard nasal mask (M) in a crossover design. Outcome measures were objective compliance, AHI, quality of life, Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS) and CPAP side-effects. There was no difference in compliance (M versus P: 5.1+\\/-1.9h versus 5.0+\\/-1.7h; P=0.701) and AHI (2.6+\\/-2.7 versus 3.0+\\/-2.9; P=0.509). Quality of life and ESS improved with CPAP, but there was no difference in the extent of improvement between both devices. Usage of nasal pillows resulted in less reported pressure on the face and more subjects found the nasal pillow the more comfortable device. However, there was no clear overall preference for either device at the end of the study (mask=57%, pillow=43%; P=0.513). The applied CPAP pressure did not correlate with compliance, AHI and ESS. Furthermore, no differences in outcome parameters were noted comparing groups with CPAP pressure <10 and >\\/=10cm H(2) O. Nasal pillows are equally effective in CPAP therapy, but do not generally lead to improved compliance.

  4. Absence of effect of nasal continuous positive airway pressure on the esophageal phase of nutritive swallowing in newborn lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeddi, Djamal; Cantin, Danny; Samson, Nathalie; Tian, Hao; Praud, Jean-Paul

    2013-08-01

    It is presently recommended that oral feeding be started in premature infants as soon as possible, often at an age at which nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is still required for ventilatory support. Our previous data showed that application of nCPAP up to 10 cmH2O in full-term lambs had no deleterious effect on cardiorespiratory safety, feeding efficiency, or on nutritive swallowing-breathing coordination. Besides fear of swallowing-breathing coordination disturbances, esophageal motility disruption by nCPAP could be a reason to delay oral feeding. To our knowledge, no study has focused on the effects of nCPAP on esophageal motility in the neonatal period. The aim of the present study was therefore to further assess the effects of nCPAP on oral feeding by assessing its effects on the esophageal phase of nutritive swallowing (nutritive esophagodeglutition). Six full-term lambs, ages 2 to 3 days, underwent esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring. Lambs were bottle-fed under 2 randomized conditions, namely spontaneous breathing and nCPAP 6 cmH(2)O. Beyond confirmation of unaltered feeding efficiency, analysis of multiple variables measured by impedance monitoring revealed that nCPAP 6 does not alter nutritive esophagodeglutition in any way (nCPAP vs spontaneous breathing, P > 0.1 for all variables). offering further support to neonatologists pleading for initiation of oral feeding in infants still on nCPAP, the present results set the foundations for similar clinical studies in preterm human infants to confirm the absence of effects of nCPAP on nutritive swallowing.

  5. Obstructive sleep apnea in Type 2 diabetes and impact of continuous positive airway pressure therapy on glycemic control

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    Javid Ahmad Malik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM are two interacting epidemics both with high prevalence and morbidity. Both epidemiologic and clinical studies suggest that the majority of patients with T2DM also have OSA and untreated OSA in these patients results in poor glycemic control leading to acceleration of diabetes-related complications. Objectives: To assess the prevalence and severity of OSA in T2DM patients and to assess the impact of OSA treatment on presenting symptoms and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c. Methods: We performed polysomnography (PSG studies and measured HbA1c in 62 consecutive patients with T2DM that were referred from various subspecialty clinics from July 2011 to August 2013. Results: In our 62 diabetic patients, 59 (95.2% had abnormal PSG. Based on Apnea–Hypopnea Index (AHI score, 3 (5.1% patients had mild, 28 (47.5% had moderate, and 28 (47.5% had severe OSA. The mean AHI of diabetic patients was significantly more than nondiabetic patients, i.e., 25.7 versus 19.7 (P = 0.001. Variables that significantly correlated with the presence of OSA include age, gender, body mass index (BMI, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (P < 0.05; however, on logistic regression only BMI, hypertension, and nocturia correlated with OSA. Overall, 59% of diabetic patients showed improvement in their glycemic control as measured by HbA1c with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP treatment. Significant, moderate, and mild categories of treatment response were respectively observed in 7%, 20%, and 32% of patients. Conclusion: Treatment of OSA with CPAP reduces HbA1c in a significant number of diabetics.

  6. Continuous positive airway pressure and diabetes risk in sleep apnea patients: A systemic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Kuang, Jian; Pei, Jian-Hao; Chen, Hong-Mei; Chen, Zhong; Li, Zhong-Wen; Yang, Hua-Zhang; Fu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Long; Chen, Zhi-Jiang; Lai, Shui-Qing; Zhang, Shu-Ting

    2017-04-01

    The study assessed the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by evaluating change in the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) fasting blood glucose (FBG) and fasting insulin following CPAP treatment in non-diabetic patients and pre-diabetic with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Medline, PubMed, Cochrane, and EMBASE databases were searched until August 24, 2015. The analysis included randomized controlled trials (RCTs), two arm prospective studies, cohort studies, and retrospective studies. The primary outcome measure was change of HOMA-IR in pre-diabetic patients receiving CPAP treatment. Twenty-three studies were included with 965 patients who had OSA. Nineteen studies were prospective studies and four were RCTs. CPAP therapy resulted in a significant reduction in the pooled standard difference in means of HOMA-IR (-0.442, P=0.001) from baseline levels compared with the control group. Change in FBG and fasting insulin from baseline levels was similar for the CPAP and control groups. For RCT studies (n=4), there was no difference in change in HOMA-IR or FBG levels from baseline between CPAP and control groups. The combined effect of RCTs showed that CPAP was associated with a significant reduction in change from baseline in fasting insulin than the control group (standardized diff. in means between groups=-0.479, P value=0.003). These findings support the use of CPAP in non-diabetic and pre-diabetic patients with OSA to reduce change of HOMA-IR and possibly reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in this patient population. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Predicting uptake of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA): a belief-based theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Timothy; McNeil, Lindsay; Olaithe, Michelle; Eastwood, Peter; Hillman, David; Phang, Janet; de Regt, Tamara; Bucks, Romola S

    2013-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a common disorder, for which continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is a standard treatment. Despite its well-established efficacy, many patients choose not to initiate CPAP treatment. The present study investigated the degree to which biological measures (e.g. Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index [AHI]), symptom experiences (e.g. fatigue) and illness representations (e.g. perceived consequences) predict the decision of individuals newly diagnosed with OSA to undergo a trial of CPAP therapy. Four hundred forty-nine individuals (316 males) newly diagnosed with OSA. Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS), Fatigue Severity Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale and Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised (IPQ-R) were administered at time of sleep study. These, patient demographics and sleep study variables were used to determine factors predicting patient decision to proceed with a trial of CPAP. The participants were most likely to attribute their OSA to unchangeable and psychological factors. For those with moderate OSA (AHI, 15 to 30) IPQ-R illness consequence was predictive of decision to initiate CPAP (p = 0.002). For severe OSA (AHI >30) age, ESS and IPQ illness causal beliefs were predictive of decision to initiate CPAP (p < 0.001). Illness beliefs are important determinants of the choice of recently diagnosed OSA patients whether or not to undertake a trial of CPAP therapy. Concerns about illness consequences were important in those with moderate OSA. In severe OSA, sleepiness symptoms are more prominent and a more significant determinant of CPAP uptake along with age and causal beliefs.

  8. Restoring the salivary cortisol awakening response through nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiciuc, Cristina Mihaela; Dima Cozma, Lucia Corina; Bercea, Raluca Mihaela; Lupusoru, Catalina Elena; Mihaescu, Traian; Szalontay, Andreea; Gianfreda, Angela; Patacchioli, Francesca Romana

    2013-10-01

    Partial and largely conflicting data are currently available on the interplay between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) activity in adult obese men. This study was performed to evaluate the daily trajectories of salivary cortisol, specifically with respect to the salivary cortisol awakening response (CAR), a common method used to assess HPA axis activity. The main findings of this study were that adult male obese subjects who were newly diagnosed with severe OSA showed the following: (1) a flattening of the CAR; (2) levels of cortisol at awakening that were lower than those of the controls; and (3) maintenance of the physiological circadian activity of the HPA axis, with the highest hormone concentrations produced in the morning and the lowest in the evening. This study was also designed to investigate the effects of 3 and 6 mos of treatment with continuous airways positive pressure (CPAP). CPAP use resulted in a significant recovery of the sleep patterns disrupted by OSA; moreover, mild neuropsychological signs of depression and anxiety in severe OSA patients were concomitantly progressively improved by CPAP treatment. Furthermore, this study reports that 3 and 6 mos of CPAP therapy restored the presence of CAR and was able to significantly reduce the difference in the morning cortisol levels between the OSA and control groups. In conclusion, we report here that compared with obese nonapneic matched controls, OSA patients present a dysregulation of HPA axis activity, as shown by the flattening of the diurnal pattern of cortisol production in response to repeated challenge due to hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. This dysregulation was especially detectable in the first hour after awakening and restored after 3 and 6 mos of treatment with CPAP.

  9. Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure for the management of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema: prospective study with a retrospective control group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarts Leon PHJ

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP treatment for acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema can have important benefits in acute cardiac care. However, coronary care units are usually not equipped and their personnel not adequately trained for applying CPAP with mechanical ventilators. Therefore we investigated in the coronary care unit setting the feasibility and outcome of the simple Boussignac mask-CPAP (BCPAP system that does not need a mechanical ventilator. Methods BCPAP was introduced in a coronary care unit where staff had no CPAP experience. All consecutive patients transported to our hospital with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, a respiratory rate > 25 breaths/min and a peripheral arterial oxygen saturation of Results During the 2-year prospective BCPAP study period 108 patients were admitted with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Eighty-four of these patients (78% were treated at the coronary care unit of which 66 (61% were treated with BCPAP. During the control period 66 patients were admitted over a 1-year period of whom 31 (47% needed respiratory support in the intensive care unit. BCPAP treatment was associated with a reduced hospital length of stay and fewer transfers to the intensive care unit for intubation and mechanical ventilation. Overall estimated savings of approximately € 3,800 per patient were achieved with the BCPAP strategy compared to conventional treatment. Conclusion At the coronary care unit, BCPAP was feasible, medically effective, and cost-effective in the treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Endpoints included mortality, coronary care unit and hospital length of stay, need of ventilatory support, and cost (savings.

  10. Prevalence and variability of use of home mechanical ventilators, positive airway pressure and oxygen devices in the Lombardy region, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitacca, Michele; Barbano, Luca; Colombo, Daniele; Leoni, Olivia; Guffanti, Enrico

    2018-01-29

    Few studies have analyzed the prevalence and accessibility of home mechanical ventilation (HMV) in Italy. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and prescription variability of HMV as well as of long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), in the Lombardy Region. Prescribing rates of HMV (both noninvasive and tracheostomies), CPAP (auto-CPAP, CPAP/other sleep machines) and LTOT (liquid-O2, O2-gas, concentrators) in the 15 Local Healthcare districts of Lombardy were gathered from billing data for 2012 and compared. Crude rates (per 100,000 population) and rates for the different healthcare districts were calculated. In 2012, 6325 patients were on HMV (crude prescription rate: 63/100,000) with a high variation across districts (8/100,000 in Milano 1 vs 150/100,000 in Pavia). There were 14,237 patients on CPAP (crude prescription rate: 142/100,000; CPAP/other sleep machines 95.3% vs auto-CPAP 4.7%) with also high intra-regional variation (56/100,000 in Mantova vs. 260/100,000 in Pavia). There were 21,826 patients on LTOT (prescription rate: 217/100,000 rate; liquid-O2 94%, O2-gas 2.08%, O2-concentrators 3.8%), with again high intra-regional variation (100/100,000 in Bergamo vs 410/100,000 in Valle Camonica). The crude rate of HMV prescriptions in Lombardy is very high, with a high intra-regional variability in prescribing HMV, LTOT and CPAP which is partly explainable by the accessibility to specialist centers with HMV/sleep-study facilities. Analysis of administrative data and variability mapping can help identify areas of reduced access for an improved standardization of services. An audit among Health Payer and prescribers to interpret the described huge variability could be welcomed.

  11. Efficacy of home single-channel nasal pressure for recommending continuous positive airway pressure treatment in sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masa, Juan F; Duran-Cantolla, Joaquin; Capote, Francisco; Cabello, Marta; Abad, Jorge; Garcia-Rio, Francisco; Ferrer, Antoni; Fortuna, Ana M; Gonzalez-Mangado, Nicolas; de la Peña, Monica; Aizpuru, Felipe; Barbe, Ferran; Montserrat, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    Unlike other prevalent diseases, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has no simple tool for diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making in primary healthcare. Home single-channel nasal pressure (HNP) may be an alternative to polysomnography for diagnosis but its use in therapeutic decisions has yet to be explored. To ascertain whether an automatically scored HNP apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), used alone to recommend continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment, agrees with decisions made by a specialist using polysomnography and several clinical variables. Patients referred by primary care physicians for OSA suspicion underwent randomized polysomnography and HNP. We analyzed the total sample and both more and less symptomatic subgroups for Bland and Altman plots to explore AHI agreement; receiver operating characteristic curves to establish area under the curve (AUC) measurements for CPAP recommendation; and therapeutic decision efficacy for several HNP AHI cutoff points. Of the 787 randomized patients, 35 (4%) were lost, 378 (48%) formed the more symptomatic and 374 (48%) the less symptomatic subgroups. AHI bias and agreement limits were 5.8 ± 39.6 for the total sample, 5.3 ± 38.7 for the more symptomatic, and 6 ± 40.2 for the less symptomatic subgroups. The AUC were 0.826 for the total sample, 0.903 for the more symptomatic, and 0.772 for the less symptomatic subgroups. In the more symptomatic subgroup, 70% of patients could be correctly treated with CPAP. Automatic HNP scoring can correctly recommend CPAP treatment in most of more symptomatic patients with OSA suspicion. Our results suggest that this device may be an interesting tool in initial OSA management for primary care physicians, although future studies in a primary care setting are necessary. Clinicaltrial.gov identifier: NCT01347398. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  12. A randomised controlled trial on the effect of mask choice on residual respiratory events with continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebben, Matthew R; Narizhnaya, Mariya; Segal, Alan Z; Barone, Daniel; Krieger, Ana C

    2014-06-01

    It has been found that mask style can affect the amount of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) required to reduce an apnoea/hyponoea index (AHI) to mask style to another post titration could affect the residual AHI with CPAP. The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in residual AHI with CPAP treatment between oronasal and nasal masks. Twenty-one subjects (age mean (M)=62.9, body mass index (BMI) M=29.6 kg/m2) were randomised (14 subjects completed the protocol) to undergo an in-laboratory CPAP titration with either a nasal mask or an oronasal mask. Subjects were then assigned this mask for 3weeks of at-home CPAP use with the optimal treatment pressure determined on the laboratory study (CPAP M=8.4 cm of H2O). At the end of this 3-week period, data were collected from the CPAP machine and the subject was given the other mask to use with the same CPAP settings for the next 3weeks at home (if the nasal mask was given initially, the oronasal one was given later and vice versa). On completion of the second 3-week period, data on residual AHI were again collected and compared with the first 3-week period on CPAP. A Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test (two-tailed) revealed that residual AHI with CPAP treatment was significantly higher with the oronasal compared with the nasal mask (z = -3.296, pmask, and 50% of the subjects had a residual AHI >10/h in the oronasal mask condition, even though all of these subjects were titrated to an AHI of mask compared with a nasal mask. Switching to an oronasal mask post titration results in an increase in residual AHI with CPAP treatment, and pressure adjustment may be warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea on visual processing of degraded words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudlove, Katie; Manuel, Ari; Hall, Rachel; Rieu, Romelie; Villarroel, Mauricio; Stradling, John

    2014-01-01

    In a previous uncontrolled study, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) improved vision in patients with diabetic macular oedema. We investigated whether the above improvement in vision (or visual processing) might have been due to reduced sleepiness, rather than a true improvement in retinal function. Twelve normal control subjects and 20 patients with OSA were tested for their ability to recognise degraded words, by means of a computer programme displaying 5-letter words every 4 s for 10 min, with variable amounts of the bottom half of the word missing; the percentage of the word necessary to achieve correct identification on average half the time was 'hunted' (the test score). All subjects were tested twice, 2-3 weeks apart; the OSA group after the commencement of CPAP. The Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS) in patients was measured at the same visit. The test score at visit 1 was 26.7% for normal subjects and 31.6% for patients with OSA. At visit 2, the test score was 25.0% for normal subjects and 29.9% for patients with OSA. The groups showed a small and identical improvement over the trial period in the test score, of 1.7% (p = 0.01 and p = 0.03 for the normal and OSA groups, respectively). The group with OSA experienced a drop in ESS of 7.5 (SD 5.5) points following treatment. The small and identical improvement in both groups suggests only a similar learning effect rather than any improvement due to reduced sleepiness.

  14. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on energy intake in obstructive sleep apnea: A pilot sham-controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechter, Ari; Kovtun, Kyle; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is among the leading risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). A reciprocal relationship between obesity and OSA has been proposed, which may be due to excessive food intake. We conducted a pilot study to test the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on energy intake (EI) in OSA patients using a sham-controlled crossover design. In-laboratory total daily EI was assessed after 2 mo of active and sham CPAP. Four men were enrolled (age ± SEM: 51.8 ± 2.1 y; body mass index: 31.5 ± 1.5 kg/m2). All received active treatment first. Meals (breakfast, lunch, dinner, snack) were served in excess portions at fixed times and additional palatable snacks were freely available throughout the day. Total EI was lower after active (3744 ± 511 kcal/d) vs. sham (4030 ± 456 kcal/d) CPAP but this difference was not significant (p = 0.51) due to variability in the free snack intake. When only fixed eating occasions were considered, daily EI was significantly lower in the active (3105 ± 513 kcal/d) vs. sham (3559 ± 420 kcal/d) condition (p = 0.006). This small pilot and feasibility study is the first to utilize a sham-controlled design to investigate the effects of CPAP treatment on objective measures of EI. Findings suggest that CPAP may cause a reduction in fixed meal intake. In demonstrating feasibility of study methodology, our study also suggests a larger randomized sham-controlled trial be conducted to fully characterize the effects of CPAP treatment on EI and energy balance overall. PMID:27769851

  15. Stroke and other cardiovascular events in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and the effect of continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Mirjam H; Jellema, Korne; Thomassen, Bregje J W; Alvarez-Estevez, Diego; Verbraecken, Johan; Rijsman, Roselyne M

    2017-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a known-risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. There are indications that treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) reduces the risk of new cardiovascular events. In this study, we analyzed the incidence of cardiovascular events in patients with OSA and compared for the impact of CPAP therapy. All polysomnographies performed in 2009 and 2010 were selected with an AHI ≥5 and patients older than 18 years. These 1110 patients were approached with a questionnaire about cardiovascular events and CPAP treatment. Finally, 554 patients were included in analyses. CPAP treatment was based on compliance (level 1 treatment) and extended with residual respiratory events (level 2 treatment). OSA was set as AHI ≥5 and classified in mild (AHI 5-15), moderate (AHI 15-30) and severe (AHI ≥30) OSA. 50 cardiovascular events occurred in 44 patients during follow-up (mean follow-up time 5.9 years) in 554 patients. The events were significantly higher in patients with increasing classification of OSA-severity (p = 0.016). A first-ever cardiovascular event did not differ significantly between mild, moderate and severe OSA. Untreated CPAP patients had significantly more cardiovascular events as compared to treated patients with a hazard ratio of 2.66 partially adjusted for age, AHI and smoking. There was no significant contribution of other cardiovascular risk factors. Patients with OSA with an indication for CPAP treatment have more cardiovascular events when untreated compared to treated patients. This indicates that treatment of OSA by CPAP can reduce the risk for cardiovascular events.

  16. Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with increased QT corrected interval dispersion: the effects of continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Nagihan; Dikmen, Nursel; Bozkus, Fulsen; Sungur, Aylin; Sarica, Selman; Orhan, Israfil; Samur, Anil

    2017-03-31

    Severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased QT corrected interval dispersion (QTcd) and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is thought to improve this arrhythmogenic marker. The aim of the study was to determine the decrease of ratio of cardiovascular risk in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The study included 65 patients with severe OSA who had an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) score of >30. Each patient underwent 12-channel electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring and polysomnography. Patients with an AHI score of <5 were used as the control group. The control group also underwent ECG monitoring and polysomnography testing. The QTcd levels of both groups were calculated. Three months after CPAP treatment, ECG recordings were obtained from the 65 patients with severe OSA again, and their QTcd values were calculated. There were 44 male and 21 female patients with severe OSA syndrome. The age, gender, body mass index, initial saturation, minimum saturation, average saturation, and desaturation index were determined in both groups. The QTc intervals of the OSA patients (62.48±16.29ms) were significantly higher (p=0.001) than those of the control group (29.72±6.30ms). There were statistically significant differences between the QTc values before and after the CPAP treatment, with pretreatment QTc intervals of 62.48±16.29ms and 3-month post-treatment values of 41.42±16.96ms (p=0.001). There was a positive and significant correlation between QTcd periods and the AHI and hypopnea index (HI) in OSA patients (p=0.001; r=0.71; p=0.001; r=0.679, respectively). CPAP treatment reduced the QTcd in patients with severe OSA. In addition, shortening the QTcd periods in patients with severe OSA may reduce their risk of arrhythmias and cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficacy of the addition of positive airway pressure to conventional chest physiotherapy in resolution of pleural effusion after drainage: protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Conceição Dos Santos, Elinaldo; Lunardi, Adriana Claudia

    2015-04-01

    Chest drainage for pleural effusion can cause pain and changes in respiratory function. It can also increase the risk of pulmonary complications and impair functional ability, which may increase length of hospital stay and the associated costs. For these reasons, surgical and clinical strategies have been adopted to reduce the duration of chest drainage. To evaluate the efficacy of the addition of intermittent positive airway pressure applied by the Muller reanimator via a rubber facial mask versus conventional physiotherapy on the duration of chest drainage (primary objective), and its effect on the recovery of respiratory function, length of hospital stay and incidence of pulmonary complications (secondary objectives). Randomised, controlled trial. Inpatients with pleural effusion, aged over 18 years, who have had chest drainage in situ for physiotherapy), a conventional chest physiotherapy group (conventional chest physiotherapy plus non-therapeutic positive airway pressure at 4 cmH2O) or a control group (non-therapeutic positive airway pressure at 4 cmH2O). All groups will receive treatment three times per day for 7 consecutive days. A blinded assessor will conduct all assessments. Peripheral oxygenation and chest drainage output will be measured over 7 consecutive days. Lung function will be re-assessed on Day 4 and Day 8. The criteria for removal of the chest drain will be a transudate output ≤ 200ml over 24hours and full lung expansion on chest radiography, as assessed by a blinded physician. Duration of chest drainage, length of hospital stay, and any pulmonary complications diagnosed during hospitalisation will be recorded. Intention to treat using: survival analysis for duration of chest drainage, and length of hospital stay; analysis of variance for chest-tube output, lung function and peripheral oxygen saturation; and chi-square tests for comparing the incidence of pulmonary complications between groups. Conventional chest physiotherapy and

  18. Application of positive airway pressure in restoring pulmonary function and thoracic mobility in the postoperative period of bariatric surgery: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Brigatto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate whether the application of bilevel positive airway pressure in the postoperative period of bariatric surgery might be more effective in restoring lung volume and capacity and thoracic mobility than the separate application of expiratory and inspiratory positive pressure. Method: Sixty morbidly obese adult subjects who were hospitalized for bariatric surgery and met the predefined inclusion criteria were evaluated. The pulmonary function and thoracic mobility were preoperatively assessed by spirometry and cirtometry and reevaluated on the 1st postoperative day. After preoperative evaluation, the subjects were randomized and allocated into groups: EPAP Group (n=20, IPPB Group (n=20 and BIPAP Group (n=20, then received the corresponding intervention: positive expiratory pressure (EPAP, inspiratory positive pressure breathing (IPPB or bilevel inspiratory positive airway pressure (BIPAP, in 6 sets of 15 breaths or 30 minutes twice a day in the immediate postoperative period and on the 1st postoperative day, in addition to conventional physical therapy. Results: There was a significant postoperative reduction in spirometric variables (p0.05. Thoracic mobility was preserved only in group BIPAP (p>0.05, but no significant difference was found in the comparison among groups (p>0.05. Conclusion: The application of positive pressure does not seem to be effective in restoring lung function after bariatric surgery, but the use of bilevel positive pressure can preserve thoracic mobility, although this technique was not superior to the other techniques.

  19. Application of positive airway pressure in restoring pulmonary function and thoracic mobility in the postoperative period of bariatric surgery: a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigatto, Patrícia; Carbinatto, Jéssica C.; Costa, Carolina M.; Montebelo, Maria I. L.; Rasera-Júnior, Irineu; Pazzianotto-Forti, Eli M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether the application of bilevel positive airway pressure in the postoperative period of bariatric surgery might be more effective in restoring lung volume and capacity and thoracic mobility than the separate application of expiratory and inspiratory positive pressure. Method: Sixty morbidly obese adult subjects who were hospitalized for bariatric surgery and met the predefined inclusion criteria were evaluated. The pulmonary function and thoracic mobility were preoperatively assessed by spirometry and cirtometry and reevaluated on the 1st postoperative day. After preoperative evaluation, the subjects were randomized and allocated into groups: EPAP Group (n=20), IPPB Group (n=20) and BIPAP Group (n=20), then received the corresponding intervention: positive expiratory pressure (EPAP), inspiratory positive pressure breathing (IPPB) or bilevel inspiratory positive airway pressure (BIPAP), in 6 sets of 15 breaths or 30 minutes twice a day in the immediate postoperative period and on the 1st postoperative day, in addition to conventional physical therapy. Results: There was a significant postoperative reduction in spirometric variables (p0.05). Thoracic mobility was preserved only in group BIPAP (p>0.05), but no significant difference was found in the comparison among groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: The application of positive pressure does not seem to be effective in restoring lung function after bariatric surgery, but the use of bilevel positive pressure can preserve thoracic mobility, although this technique was not superior to the other techniques. PMID:25590448

  20. Randomized crossover study assessing oropharyngeal leak pressure and fiber optic positioning : Laryngeal Mask Airway Supreme™ versus Laryngeal Tube LTS II™ size 2 in non-paralyzed anesthetized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasteiger, L; Ofner, S; Stögermüller, B; Ziegler, B; Brimacombe, J; Keller, C

    2016-08-01

    As there are currently no data available comparing the practicability of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) Supreme™ size 2 versus the laryngeal tube LTS II™ size 2 in children, this trial was conducted to quantify the differences between these two airway devices concerning leak pressure and fiber optic-controlled positioning in non-paralyzed, anesthetized pediatric patients. A total of 56 children aged 1-6 years and weighing between 11 and 23 kg were enrolled in the study. Anesthesia was intravenously induced according to local standards using fentanyl and propofol. After induction of anesthesia both airway devices were inserted consecutively in accordance with the randomization protocol. The mean oropharyngeal leak pressure was significantly higher for the LTS II™ (33±8 cmH2O) than for the LMA Supreme™ (21±7 cmH2O, p insertion (55Supreme LMA vs. 43LTSII, p insertion time (25 s Supreme LMA vs. 34 s LTSII, p laryngeal tube LTS II™. We conclude that oropharyngeal leak pressure, fiber optic position, first attempt insertion success rate and bloodstaining differed between the LMA Supreme™ and the LTS II™ in children.

  1. Enhanced airway dilation by positive-pressure inflation of the lungs compared with active deep inspiration in patients with asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slats, Annelies M.; Janssen, Kirsten; de Jeu, Ronald C.; van der Plas, Dirk T.; Schot, Robert; van den Aardweg, Joost G.; Sterk, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Deep inspiration temporarily reduces induced airways obstruction in healthy subjects. This bronchodilatory effect of deep inspiration is impaired in asthma. Passive machine-assisted lung inflation may augment bronchodilation compared with an active deep inspiration in patients with asthma by either

  2. A possible way to assess tidal exhaled nitric oxide in neonates and infants treated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Birgitte Johanne; Reim, Pauline Schibler; Pedersen, Ole Find

    2018-01-01

    The endogenous compound nitric oxide (NO) is released into the airways via inducible NO synthase (1),which has the capacity to produce NO when up-regulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines or exogenous factors, like hypoxia, bacterial toxins and viruses (2). Prematurely born infants are susceptible ...

  3. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinician Career Development Awards Clinician Training Awards Mutation Analysis Program Network News Network News: January 2018 Network ... for airway clearance. Facebook Twitter Email More Related Content Medications Autogenic Drainage Positive Expiratory Pressure High-Frequency ...

  4. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cycle of Breathing Technique Airway Clearance Techniques Autogenic Drainage Basics of Lung Care Chest Physical Therapy Coughing ... Facebook Twitter Email More Related Content Medications Autogenic Drainage Positive Expiratory Pressure High-Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation ( ...

  5. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... today. ANNUAL FUND Become a Corporate Supporter Cause Marketing Make a Charitable Gift Our Corporate Supporters Workplace ... for airway clearance. Facebook Twitter Email More Related Content Medications Autogenic Drainage Positive Expiratory Pressure High-Frequency ...

  6. Effects of positive airway pressure therapy on cardiovascular and metabolic markers in males with obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Feliciano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is associated with cardiovascular/metabolic complications. Some analytical parameters (homocysteine, glycemic and lipidic profiles are recognized markers of these consequences. Limited data is available on the association of these markers and OSAS's severity/response to positive airway pressure therapy (PAP. Material and methods: In this prospective study we analyzed polysomnographic and analytical data of male patients admitted to sleep laboratory. The aim was to evaluate metabolic/cardiovascular markers in snorers and OSAS patients, to relate with sleep parameters and PAP response. One-hundred and three patients were included, and 73 (71% were OSAS patients. OSAS patients were similar to snorers except for higher body mass index (BMI and dyslipidemia. Severe OSAS patients showed higher glycemia, HbA1c, insulin, and insulin resistance, and lower HDL cholesterol in comparison to mild–moderate (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.05, respectively. Glycemic profile and triglycerides were slightly correlated with OSAS severity. 46 OSAS patients were submitted to 6 months of PAP, with a statistical decrease in mean values of homocysteine, glycemia, total and LDL cholesterol (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, p < 0.05, respectively, and in glycemia and LDL cholesterol in severe group only (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, respectively. Results: This study demonstrated an association between glucose metabolism parameters and triglycerides with OSAS severity underlying the complexity of the process leading to cardiovascular/metabolic complications in this disorder. Moreover, homocysteine, glycemic and lipidic profiles changed significantly after 6 months of PAP therapy in OSAS, supporting its cardiovascular and metabolic protective effect. Conclusion: Our study has reinforced the importance of analytical cardiovascular/metabolic evaluation as

  7. Erectile Dysfunction and Sexual Hormone Levels in Men With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Efficacy of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Lin, Qi-Chang; Zeng, Hui-Qing; Jiang, Xing-Tang; Chen, Bo; Chen, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) and serum sexual hormone levels were evaluated in men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In these patients, the efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was determined. The 207 men (mean age 44.0 ± 11.1 years) enrolled in the study were stratified within four groups based on their apnea-hypopnea index score: simple snoring (n = 32), mild OSA (n = 29), moderate OSA (n = 38), and severe OSA (n = 108). The International Index of Erectile Dysfunction-5 (IIEF-5) score was obtained from each patient, and blood samples for the analysis of sexual hormones (prolactin, luteotropin, follicle-stimulating hormone, estradiol, progestin, and testosterone) were drawn in the morning after polysomnography. The IIEF-5 test and serum sexual hormone measurements were repeated after 3 months of CPAP treatment in 53 men with severe OSA. The prevalence of ED was 60.6 % in OSA patients overall and 72.2 % in those with severe OSA. Compared with the simple snoring group, patients with severe OSA had significantly lower testosterone levels (14.06 ± 5.62 vs. 17.02 ± 4.68, p = .018) and lower IIEF-5 scores (16.33 ± 6.50 vs. 24.09 ± 1.94, p = .001). The differences in the other sexual hormones between groups were not significant. After 3 months of CPAP treatment, there were no significant changes in sexual hormone levels, but the IIEF-5 score had improved significantly (18.21 ± 4.05 vs. 19.21 ± 3.86, p = .001). Severe OSA patients have low testosterone concentration and high ED prevalence. IIEF-5 scores increased significantly after CPAP treatment, but there was no effect on serum testosterone levels.

  8. [Treatment compliance with continuous positive airway pressure device among adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA): how many adhere to treatment?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrell, E Michael; Chomsky, Ofer; Shechter, Dalia

    2013-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) afflicts approximately 5% of the adult population and increases with age. The gold standard treatment is with the Continuous Positive Airways Pressure (CPAP) machine. Well-designed prospective trials to elucidate long term compliance with CPAP machine are rare. Assessing compliance and long-term use of CPAP machines among patients with OSA who were referred for treatment with this machine. A 4 years prospective cohort observational study was conducted using telephone interviews of 371 newly diagnosed patients with moderate to severe OSA, who received a specialist recommendation to use the CPAP machine which was bought and adjusted to their use. At the end of the first year, 126 (34%) of the OSA patients used the CPAP machine on a nightly basis (regular users), 120 (32.3%) had not used it at all, and 125 (33.7%) had used it only intermittently. The number of regular users increased between the 1st and 2nd year from 126 (34%), to 163 (44%) (p < 0.07) due to additions from the intermittent users group. The non-users group grew from 120 (32.3%) in the first year, and every year afterwards, up to 221 (59.6%) in the fourth year (p < 0.02). In contrast, there was a significant decrease in the intermittent users group, which declined from 125 (33.7%) in the first year to only 18 (4.8%) in the 4th year (p < 0.005). Most of the patients (92.9%) were males. The average age of the regular users was 59.6 years (+/- 11), which was higher in comparison to 55.9 years (+/- 10.3) for the non-users or 58.9 years (+/- 12.6) among the intermittent users (p = 0.064). There were no statistical differences in co-morbidities or demographics between the three groups. However, the regular users were found to have a higher score in the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and a minimal arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) level lower than the patients in the non-users and intermittent users groups (p = 0.019 and p = 0.03 respectively). Four years follow

  9. Acceleration sensors in abdominal wall position as a non-invasive approach to detect early breathing alterations induced by intolerance of increased airway resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Thomas; Bruells, Christian S; Rossaint, Rolf; Steffen, Henning; Disselhorst-Klug, Catherine; Czaplik, Michael; Zoremba, Norbert

    2017-11-10

    Early detection of respiratory overload is crucial to mechanically ventilated patients, especially during phases of spontaneous breathing. Although a diversity of methods and indices has been established, there is no highly specific approach to predict respiratory failure. This study aimed to evaluate acceleration sensors in abdominal and thoracic wall positions to detect alterations in breathing excursions in a setting of gradual increasing airway resistance. Twenty-nine healthy volunteers were committed to a standardized protocol of a two-minutes step-down spontaneous breathing on a 5 mm, 4 mm and then 3 mm orally placed endotracheal tube. Accelerator sensors in thoracic and abdominal wall position monitored breathing excursions. 15 participants passed the breathing protocol ("completed" group), 14 individuals cancelled the protocol due to subjective intolerance to the increasing airway resistance ("abandoned" group). Gradual increased respiratory workload led to a significant decrease of acceleration in abdominal wall position in the "abandoned" group compared to the "completed" group (p breathing alterations prior to respiratory failure. EK 309-15; by the Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Medicine, RWTH Aachen, Aachen, Germany. Retrospectively registered 28th of December 2015.

  10. Verifying the Relative Efficacy between Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy and Its Alternatives for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Network Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingwei Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a common breathing disorder, and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy together with its alternatives has been developed to treat this disease. This network meta-analysis (NMA was aimed to compare the efficacy of treatments for OSA. Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, and Embase were searched for eligible studies. A conventional and NMA was carried out to compare all therapies. Sleeping characteristics, including Apnea–Hypopnea Index (AHI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, arterial oxygen saturation, and arousal index (AI, and changes of blood pressure were selected as outcomes. A total of 84 studies were finally included after rigorous screenings. For the primary outcomes of AHI and ESS, the value of auto-adjusting positive airway pressure (APAP, CPAP, and oral appliance (OA all showed statistically reduction compared with inactive control (IC. Similar observation was obtained in AI, with treatments of the three active interventions. A lower effect of IC in SaO2 was exhibited when compared with APAP, CPAP, and OA. Similar statistically significant results were presented in 24 h systolic blood pressure and 24 h DBP when comparing with CPAP. Our NMA identified CPAP as the most efficacious treatment for OSA patients after the evaluation of sleeping characteristics and blood pressures. In addition, more clinical trials are needed for further investigation due to the existence of inconsistency observed in this study.

  11. A comparative effectiveness study of continuous positive airway pressure-related skin breakdown when using different nasal interfaces in the extremely low birth weight neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnam, Katherine M; McGrath, Jacqueline M; Salyer, Jeanne; Estes, Tracy; Jallo, Nancy; Bass, W Thomas

    2015-02-01

    A three group prospective randomized experimental design was conducted to identify differences in frequency and severity of nasal injuries when comparing various interfaces used during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and identified risk factors associated with injury. Seventy-eight neonates nasal prongs; continuous nasal mask; or alternating mask/prongs. Repeated measures ANOVA with Bonferroni correction demonstrated that significantly less skin injury was detected in the rotation interface group when compared to both mask and prong groups. In the final stepwise regression model (F = 11.51; R(2) = 0.221; p = 0.006) significant predictors of skin injury included number of days on nasal CPAP (p nasal injury was demonstrated using rotating mask/prong nasal interfaces. Future best practices must include precise selection of device size, developmental and CPAP device positioning with focused skin assessment including rapid intervention for skin injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. All-cause mortality from obstructive sleep apnea in male and female patients with and without continuous positive airway pressure treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Tønnesen, Philip; Ibsen, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: More information is needed about the effect on mortality of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), especially in women. METHODS: We employed a historical cohort study design, using data from 25,389 patients with a diagnosis of OSA...... selected from the Danish National Patient Registry for the period 1999-2009. We used Cox proportional hazard function to evaluate the all-cause mortality from OSA in middle-aged and elderly males and females who were treated, or not, with CPAP. RESULTS: Female OSA patients had a lower mortality than males....... Survival was increased by CPAP in 40- to 59-year-old and ≥60-year-old males, but no such effect was observed in females. Positive predictors of survival were young age, female gender, higher educational level, and low 3-year prior comorbidity as estimated by the Charlson Comorbidity Index. Negative...

  13. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your airways. Most are easy ... to loosen mucus from airway walls. See how different airway clearance techniques work to help you clear ...

  14. Cerebral hemodynamics in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during positive airways pressure (CPAP) therapy: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Fritschi, Ursula; Lehner, Isabella; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-03-01

    In obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) the periodic reduction or cessation of breathing due to narrowing or occlusion of the upper airway during sleep leads to daytime symptoms and increased cardiovascular risk, including stroke. The higher risk of stroke is related to the impairment in cerebral vascular autoregulation. Continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) therapy at night is the most effective treatment for OSA. However, there is no suitable bedside monitoring method evaluating the treatment efficacy of CPAP therapy, especially to monitor the recovery of cerebral hemodynamics. NIRS is ideally suited for non-invasive monitoring the cerebral hemodynamics during sleep. In this study, we will for first time assess dynamic changes of cerebral hemodynamics during nocturnal CPAP therapy in 3 patients with OSA using NIRS. We found periodic oscillations in HbO2, HHb, tissue oxygenation index (TOI) and blood volume associated with periodic apnea events without CPAP in all OSA patients. These oscillations were gradually attenuated and finally eliminated with the stepwise increments of CPAP pressures. The oscillations were totally eliminated in blood volume earlier than in other hemodynamic parameters. These results suggested that 1) the cerebral hemodynamic oscillations induced by OSA events can effectively be attenuated by CPAP therapy, and 2) blood flow and blood volume recovered first during CPAP therapy, followed by the recovery of oxygen consumption. Our study suggested that NIRS is a useful tool to evaluate the efficacy of CPAP therapy in patients with OSA bedside and in real time.

  15. Oronasal mask may compromise the efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure on OSA treatment: is there evidence for avoiding the oronasal route?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Rafaela Garcia Santos; Madeiro, Fernanda; Genta, Pedro Rodrigues; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2016-11-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) delivered by nasal mask is the gold standard treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, oral and oronasal masks are also available. We considered experimental evidence and reviewed clinical trials that evaluated the impact of oral and oronasal mask on OSA treatment. One recent study in 18 OSA patients that slept with a customized oronasal mask with two sealed compartments showed that the change of CPAP flow from nasal to oronasal and oral caused upper airway obstruction because of posterior displacement of the tongue demonstrated by nasoendoscopy. Oral masks use a mouthpiece that may stabilize the jaw and the tongue and have shown to be effective. However, oral masks are not widely used in clinical practice. Four out of five observational studies and all five reviewed randomized studies showed a worse performance of oronasal when compared with nasal masks. Oronasal masks were associated with higher residual apnea-hypopnea index, lower adherence, more leaks, and less satisfaction than nasal mask in the majority of the studies. Nasal CPAP must be the first choice to treat OSA. Patients on oronasal mask should be carefully followed. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  16. Comparison of 3 titration methods of positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a random, single-blind and self-control clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan LI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To evaluate the efficacy and safety of polysomnography-manual continuous positive airway pressure titration (PSG-CPAP, polysomnography-automatic positive airway pressure titration (PSG-APAP, or automatic positive airway pressure titration (APAP in patients with moderate or severe simple obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. Methods  Twenty patients with moderate or severe OSAS sequentially underwent PSG-CPAP, PSG-APAP and APAP titration 3 days apart, and then 3 primary efficacy indicators (titration pressure, remaining respiratory event and state of sleep, and safety indicators (compression injury of face skin, the subjective evaluation on degree of comfort or any complaint during titration were compared. Results  The results of efficacy indicators revealed that all PSG-APAP, APAP and PSG-CPAP were effective. Compared with the optimal pressure of PSG-CPAP titration, PSG-APAP and APAP pressures were 3.05 and 2.55cmH2O higher, respectively, in 90% of occasion (P0.05. There was no statistically significant difference between the optimal pressure of PSG-CPAP and the mean pressures of PSG-APAP and APAP (P>0.05. There was no statistically significant difference between the 3 titration methods on residue apnea/hypopnea index (AHI, P>0.05. The oxygen desaturation index (ODI decreased significantly after titration treatment (P0.05. Both PSG-CPAP and PSG-APAP titrations showed the same effects in improving ODI. Compared with basic PSG, no obvious improvement was found in sleep efficiency (SE after PSG-CPAP and PSG-APAP titration (P>0.05, however, the arousal index (ArI decreased obviously (P0.05. The results of safety indicators showed that no face skin compression injury or severe adverse event related to the titration was found in all the patients during the study. The main complaints of the patients were sleep disturbance, dryness of eyes or mouth, headache, breath holding and abdominal distention. Conclusion  Both PSG-APAP and

  17. Causes of the difficult airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanos, John G; Quereshy, Faisal A

    2010-03-01

    Recognizing a potentially difficult airway is important in avoiding a life-threatening emergency. There are 2 separate scenarios for considering the difficult airway: difficult mask ventilation (DMV) and difficult tracheal intubation (DTI). DMV can be described as lacking the ability to maintain oxygen saturation or lacking the ability to reverse signs of inadequate ventilation with positive-pressure mask ventilation under general anesthesia. DTI remains constant among anesthesia-related patient injuries, and is the third most common respiratory-related episode leading to death and possible brain damage. It is important to preoperatively assess every patient by completing a full history and physical. A thorough history can provide clues in detecting a possible difficult airway. Airway impairment has been further subdivided into the anatomic regions that affect the airway, namely above the larynx, supraglottic, glottic, subglottic, and tracheobronchial. This article discusses the factors that can result in a difficult airway. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Measurement of the square measure of the pharynx and the positional diagnosis of airway obstruction during obstructive sleep apnea syndrome by dynamic MRI

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    Ozuki, Taizo; Ohkubo, Yasuo; Abe, Kimihiko [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply dynamic MRI for the positional diagnosis of airway obstruction during snoring and sleep apnea and to compare the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) and the square measure of the pharynx obtained before and after laser-assisted uvula-palate-pharyngoplasty (LAUP). From December 1997 to October 1998, dynamic MRI and overnight monitoring were performed at the hospital of Tokyo Medical University on 42 patients who complained of snoring and symptoms related to sleep apnea syndrome (SAS). Of the 42 patients, four exhibited collapse at the position of the soft palate (soft palate type) as diagnosed by dynamic MRI, and four exhibited collapse at the position of the soft palate as well as the tongue (complex type). LAUP was performed on these eight patients with obstructive SAS (OSAS). After LAUP, the AHI of these eight patients with OSAS decreased significantly (p<0.05). The square measure of the pharynx of these eight patients was increased (p<0.01). The AHI of all four patients with soft-palate obstruction decreased, and the square measure of the pharynx of three of these four patients increased. The AHI of three of four patients with the complex type decreased, while the square measure of the pharynx of two of these four patients increased. (author)

  19. Oral appliance therapy versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolopoulou, M.; Byraki, A.; Ahlberg, J.; Heymans, M. W.; Hamburger, H. L.; de Lange, J.; Lobbezoo, F.; Aarab, G.

    2017-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with several sleep disorders and sleep-related problems. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the effects of a mandibular advancement device (MAD) with those of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) on self-reported

  20. The stable microbubble test for determining continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) success in very preterm infants receiving nasal CPAP from birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Risha; Morley, Colin J; Argus, Brenda; Tingay, David G; Donath, Susan; Davis, Peter G

    2013-01-01

    Very preterm infants can be treated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) from birth, but some fail. A rapid test, such as the stable microbubble test (SMT) on gastric aspirate, may identify those who can be managed successfully using CPAP. To determine if SMT can identify soon after birth, very preterm infants who may be successfully managed on CPAP alone. Stable microbubbles (diameter CPAP from birth. Infants failed CPAP if intubated at CPAP in the delivery room at a median (interquartile range) pressure 7 (6-8) cmH2O and FiO2 0.25 (0.21-0.3). Gastric aspirates were taken at a median (interquartile range) age of 0.5 (0.3-0.6) hours. The best cut-off point for predicting CPAP success or failure was a SMT count of 8 microbubbles/mm(2). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.8 (95% CI 0.7-0.9). A SMT count ≥8 microbubbles/mm(2) had a sensitivity of 53%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 60% for predicting CPAP success. Infants treated with CPAP from birth, who had SMT counts ≥8 microbubbles/mm(2) on their gastric aspirate, did not fail CPAP. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Early radiologic evidence of severe respiratory distress syndrome as a predictor of nasal continuous positive airway pressure failure in extremely low birth weight newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliaferro, T; Bateman, D; Ruzal-Shapiro, C; Polin, R A

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether early radiologic evidence of severe respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is predictive of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) failure in extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants during the first 72 h of age. Retrospective analysis of 235 consecutively inborn ELBW infants who received initial support with CPAP. CPAP success (n=151) and CPAP failure (n=84) groups were designated according to outcome within the first 72 h of age. We assessed the ability of radiologic evidence of severe RDS in the initial chest radiograph, alone and in combination with other variables available in the first hours of life, to predict CPAP failure. Severe RDS had a positive predictive value (PPV) of 0.81 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.64, 0.92) for CPAP failure. The combination of severe RDS and gestational age (GA) ⩽ 26 weeks had a PPV of 0.92 (95% CI 0.68, 0.96). Early radiologic evidence of severe RDS is predictive of CPAP failure, especially in infants with GA ⩽ 26 weeks.

  2. Effects of Heated Humidification and Topical Steroids on Compliance, Nasal Symptoms, and Quality of Life in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Using Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Silke; Doherty, Liam S.; Nolan, Geraldine M.; McNicholas, Walter T.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Nasal side effects are common in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) starting on nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. We tested the hypothesis that heated humidification or nasal topical steroids improve compliance, nasal side effects and quality of life in this patient group. Methods: 125 patients with the established diagnosis of OSAS (apnea/hypopnea index ≥ 10/h), who tolerated CPAP via a nasal mask, and who had a successful CPAP titration were randomized to 4 weeks of dry CPAP, humidified CPAP or CPAP with additional topical nasal steroid application (fluticasone, GlaxoWellcome). Groups were similar in all demographic variables and in frequency of nasal symptoms at baseline. Outcome measures were objective compliance, quality of life (short form 36), subjective sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale score) and nasal symptoms such as runny, dry or blocked nose, sneezing and headaches; all variables assessed using a validated questionnaire and by direct interview. Results: There was no difference in compliance between groups after 4 weeks (dry: 5.21 ± 1.66 h/night, fluticasone: 5.66 ± 1.68, humidifier: 5.21 ± 1.84; p = 0.444). Quality of life and subjective sleepiness improved in all groups, but there were no differences in the extent of improvement. Nasal Symptoms were less frequently reported in the humidifier group (28%) than in the remaining groups (dry: 70%, fluticasone: 53%, p = 0.002). However, the addition of fluticasone resulted in increased frequency of sneezing. Conclusion: The addition of a humidifier, but not nasal steroids decreases the frequency of nasal symptoms in unselected OSAS patients initiating CPAP therapy; however compliance and quality of life remain unaltered. Citation: Ryan S; Doherty LS; Nolan GM; McNicholas WT. Effects of heated humidification and topical steroids on compliance, nasal symptoms, and quality of life in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome using nasal

  3. High-Flow Nasal Cannula versus Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Primary Respiratory Support in Preterm Infants with Respiratory Distress: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murki, Srinivas; Singh, Jayesh; Khant, Chiragkumar; Kumar Dash, Swarup; Oleti, Tejo Pratap; Joy, Percy; Kabra, Nandkishor S

    2018-01-23

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is the standard noninvasive respiratory support for newborns with respiratory distress. Evidence for high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) as an alternative mode of respiratory support is inconclusive. The aim of this work was to evaluate whether HFNC is not inferior to nCPAP in reducing the need for higher respiratory support in the first 72 h of life when applied as a noninvasive respiratory support mode for preterm neonates with respiratory distress. Preterm infants (gestation ≥28 weeks and birth weight ≥1,000 g) with respiratory distress were randomized to either HFNC or nCPAP in a non-inferiority trial. Failure of the support mode in the first 72 h after birth was the primary outcome. Infants failing HFNC were rescued either with nCPAP or mechanical ventilation, and those failing nCPAP received mechanical ventilation. During the study period, 139 and 133 infants were randomized to the nCPAP and HFNC groups, respectively. The study was stopped after an interim analysis showed a significant difference (p respiratory distress (SAS score >5). When comparing HFNC to nCPAP as a primary noninvasive respiratory support in preterm infants with respiratory distress, HFNC is inferior to nCPAP in avoiding the need for a higher mode of respiratory support in the first 72 h of life. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Acceptance and Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA in a Southeast Asian privately funded healthcare system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheah Hooi Ken Lee

    Full Text Available Background: There is limited data on long term Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP adherence in Southeast Asian countries. This is a prospective study on CPAP adherence among Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients in a Southeast Asian privately funded healthcare system. Methods: Patients with moderate-severe OSA who had been initiated on CPAP at least one year previously were contacted for a scripted telephone interview to assess compliance and factors associated with CPAP adherence. Results: Of 135 consecutive patients diagnosed to have moderate to severe OSA, 78 (57.8% were initiated on CPAP treatment while 57 (42.2% rejected CPAP upfront. 41 (52.6% who initiated CPAP remained adherent at one year. OSA severity (AHI, ODI and symptomatic improvement after CPAP were associated with better adherence. Presence of machine related side effects was associated with lower adherence. Inconvenience, cost and poor disease perception were reported as major barriers to uptake of CPAP therapy. Conclusions: In this Southeast Asian privately funded healthcare system, almost half of all patients with significant OSA rejected CPAP treatment upfront, but adherence among those who started CPAP is comparable to other reports. Challenges with CPAP acceptance as well as CPAP adherence need to be addressed to improve outcomes.

  5. Human factors/usability barriers to home medical devices among individuals with disabling conditions: in-depth interviews with positive airway pressure device users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Constance H; Igodan, Uyi; Alessi, Cathy; Martin, Jennifer L; Dzierzewski, Joseph M; Josephson, Karen; Kramer, B Josea

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that medical equipment often fails to accommodate the needs of individuals with disabling conditions. Few studies have focused on the accessibility of home medical devices such as positive airway pressure (PAP), which is a type of home medical equipment prescribed for long-term therapy. The purpose of this study was to explore in detail the types of difficulties experienced by patients with physical/sensory impairments who use PAP devices, as an initial step in designing a questionnaire to survey users about this topic. In this descriptive study, in-depth interviews were conducted with 19 participants (9 patients with physical/sensory impairment and 10 health care providers). Interviews were coded and analyzed for major topics. Participants detailed the numerous ways in which current PAP devices fail to meet the needs of individuals with physical/sensory impairments (e.g., tremor, poor depth perception, paresis), by requiring patients to perform manually difficult tasks, such as inserting PAP parts through small apertures, attaching parts using a twisting motion, and lifting arms overhead to apply PAP headgear. These demands contributed to patients' frustration with and reduced usage of the home medical device. Our findings suggest that home medical devices such as PAP may not be currently designed to meet the needs of some users with physical/sensory impairments. Additional studies are needed to measure the prevalence and impact of impairment-related barriers on PAP adherence for this common medical equipment. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Impact of the type of mask on the effectiveness of and adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Garcia Santos de Andrade

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP is the gold standard for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Although CPAP was originally applied with a nasal mask, various interfaces are currently available. This study reviews theoretical concepts and questions the premise that all types of interfaces produce similar results. We revised the evidence in the literature about the impact that the type of CPAP interface has on the effectiveness of and adherence to OSA treatment. We searched the PubMed database using the search terms "CPAP", "mask", and "obstructive sleep apnea". Although we identified 91 studies, only 12 described the impact of the type of CPAP interface on treatment effectiveness (n = 6 or adherence (n = 6. Despite conflicting results, we found no consistent evidence that nasal pillows and oral masks alter OSA treatment effectiveness or adherence. In contrast, most studies showed that oronasal masks are less effective and are more often associated with lower adherence and higher CPAP abandonment than are nasal masks. We concluded that oronasal masks can compromise CPAP OSA treatment adherence and effectiveness. Further studies are needed in order to understand the exact mechanisms involved in this effect.

  7. High-flow nasal cannulae are associated with increased diaphragm activation compared with nasal continuous positive airway pressure in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasef, Nehad; El-Gouhary, Enas; Schurr, Patti; Reilly, Maureen; Beck, Jennifer; Dunn, Michael; Ng, Eugene

    2015-08-01

    High-flow nasal cannulae (HFNC) are increasingly used for respiratory management of preterm infants. However, their ability to provide support compared to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been questioned. We compared the effect of HFNC versus nasal CPAP on diaphragm electrical activity (EAdi) in preterm infants. Preterm infants ≤1500 g were randomised in a crossover design to receive 2 hours of either Infant Flow(®) CPAP (IF-CPAP) at 5-6 cmH2 O or HFNC with the flow rate adjusted to achieve an equivalent pharyngeal pressure. A feeding catheter with miniaturised sensors was inserted for continuous EAdi measurement. The study comprised ten infants. Physiologic parameters and oxygen requirements were not different between the two modes. However, seven infants demonstrated a higher EAdi peak and six showed a higher EAdi tonic on HFNC, even though the mean group data showed no difference between HFNC and IF-CPAP. Neural inspiratory time was significantly longer with HFNC than IF-CPAP (0.55 ± 0.11 versus 0.48 ± 0.06 seconds, p = 0.018). In this cohort of preterm infants, the majority exhibited greater diaphragm activation, as assessed by neural breathing patterns, when supported with HFNC than IF-CPAP, suggesting that nasal CPAP may provide more effective respiratory support. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Impact of the type of mask on the effectiveness of and adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnea*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Rafaela Garcia Santos; Piccin, Vivien Schmeling; Nascimento, Juliana Araújo; Viana, Fernanda Madeiro Leite; Genta, Pedro Rodrigues; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2014-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the gold standard for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Although CPAP was originally applied with a nasal mask, various interfaces are currently available. This study reviews theoretical concepts and questions the premise that all types of interfaces produce similar results. We revised the evidence in the literature about the impact that the type of CPAP interface has on the effectiveness of and adherence to OSA treatment. We searched the PubMed database using the search terms "CPAP", "mask", and "obstructive sleep apnea". Although we identified 91 studies, only 12 described the impact of the type of CPAP interface on treatment effectiveness (n = 6) or adherence (n = 6). Despite conflicting results, we found no consistent evidence that nasal pillows and oral masks alter OSA treatment effectiveness or adherence. In contrast, most studies showed that oronasal masks are less effective and are more often associated with lower adherence and higher CPAP abandonment than are nasal masks. We concluded that oronasal masks can compromise CPAP OSA treatment adherence and effectiveness. Further studies are needed in order to understand the exact mechanisms involved in this effect. PMID:25610507

  9. Impact of the type of mask on the effectiveness of and adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Rafaela Garcia Santos de; Piccin, Vivien Schmeling; Nascimento, Juliana Araújo; Viana, Fernanda Madeiro Leite; Genta, Pedro Rodrigues; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2014-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the gold standard for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Although CPAP was originally applied with a nasal mask, various interfaces are currently available. This study reviews theoretical concepts and questions the premise that all types of interfaces produce similar results. We revised the evidence in the literature about the impact that the type of CPAP interface has on the effectiveness of and adherence to OSA treatment. We searched the PubMed database using the search terms "CPAP", "mask", and "obstructive sleep apnea". Although we identified 91 studies, only 12 described the impact of the type of CPAP interface on treatment effectiveness (n = 6) or adherence (n = 6). Despite conflicting results, we found no consistent evidence that nasal pillows and oral masks alter OSA treatment effectiveness or adherence. In contrast, most studies showed that oronasal masks are less effective and are more often associated with lower adherence and higher CPAP abandonment than are nasal masks. We concluded that oronasal masks can compromise CPAP OSA treatment adherence and effectiveness. Further studies are needed in order to understand the exact mechanisms involved in this effect.

  10. Adolescents with obstructive sleep apnea adhere poorly to positive airway pressure (PAP, but PAP users show improved attention and school performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean W Beebe

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA is associated with medical and neurobehavioral morbidity across the lifespan. Positive airway pressure (PAP treatment has demonstrated efficacy in treating OSA and has been shown to improve daytime functioning in adults, but treatment adherence can be problematic. There are nearly no published studies examining functional outcomes such as academic functioning in adolescents treated with PAP. This study was conducted as an initial step towards determining whether PAP treatment improves daytime functioning among adolescents with OSA.Self-reported academic grades, self- and parent-reported academic quality of life, and objectively-measured attention were assessed before and after PAP was clinically initiated in a sample of 13 obese adolescents with OSA, as well as 15 untreated obese Controls without OSA. Based on adherence data, the treated group was divided into PAP Users (n = 6 and Non-Adherent participants (n = 7.Though demographically similar, the three groups significantly differed in how their academic performance and attention scores changed from baseline to follow-up. Non-Adherent participants showed worsening functioning over time, while PAP Users showed stable or improved functioning, similar to controls.Although many adolescents prescribed PAP for OSA are non-adherent to the treatment, those who adhere to treatment can display improved attention and academic functioning.

  11. Adolescents with obstructive sleep apnea adhere poorly to positive airway pressure (PAP), but PAP users show improved attention and school performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Dean W; Byars, Kelly C

    2011-03-17

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is associated with medical and neurobehavioral morbidity across the lifespan. Positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment has demonstrated efficacy in treating OSA and has been shown to improve daytime functioning in adults, but treatment adherence can be problematic. There are nearly no published studies examining functional outcomes such as academic functioning in adolescents treated with PAP. This study was conducted as an initial step towards determining whether PAP treatment improves daytime functioning among adolescents with OSA. Self-reported academic grades, self- and parent-reported academic quality of life, and objectively-measured attention were assessed before and after PAP was clinically initiated in a sample of 13 obese adolescents with OSA, as well as 15 untreated obese Controls without OSA. Based on adherence data, the treated group was divided into PAP Users (n = 6) and Non-Adherent participants (n = 7). Though demographically similar, the three groups significantly differed in how their academic performance and attention scores changed from baseline to follow-up. Non-Adherent participants showed worsening functioning over time, while PAP Users showed stable or improved functioning, similar to controls. Although many adolescents prescribed PAP for OSA are non-adherent to the treatment, those who adhere to treatment can display improved attention and academic functioning.

  12. Efficacy of Bilevel-auto Treatment in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Not Responsive to or Intolerant of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlucci, Annalisa; Ceriana, Piero; Mancini, Marco; Cirio, Serena; Pierucci, Paola; D'Artavilla Lupo, Nadia; Gadaleta, Felice; Morrone, Elisa; Fanfulla, Francesco

    2015-09-15

    Ventilation with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the gold standard therapy for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, it was recently suggested that a novel mode of ventilation, Bilevel-auto, could be equally effective in treating patients unable to tolerate CPAP. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of Bilevel-auto to treat OSA patients whose nocturnal ventilatory disturbances are not completely corrected by CPAP. We enrolled 66 consecutive OSA patients, not responsive to (group A) or intolerant of (group B) CPAP treatment, after a full night of manual CPAP titration in a laboratory. Full polysomnography data and daytime sleepiness score were compared for each group in the three different conditions: basal, during CPAP, and during Bilevel-auto. The apnea-hypopnea index decreased significantly during CPAP in both groups; however, in the group A, there was a further significant improvement during Bilevel-auto. The same trend was observed for oxygenation indices, while the distribution and the efficiency of sleep did not differ following the switch from CPAP to Bilevel-auto. This study confirmed the role of Bilevel-auto as an effective therapeutic alternative to CPAP in patients intolerant of this latter mode of ventilation. Moreover, extending the use of Bilevel-auto to those OSA patients not responsive to CPAP, we showed a significantly better correction of nocturnal respiratory disturbances. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  13. An observational study of the utility of continuous positive airway pressure ventilation for appropriate candidates in prehospital care in the Midwest region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Donncha, C; Cummins, N; Hennelly, D; Hannigan, A; Ryan, D

    2017-05-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) practitioners in Ireland have been recently licensed to use continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) ventilation for patients with pulmonary oedema. Both the British Thoracic Society and the Canadian Medical Association advocate the use of CPAP in hospital for patients with severe exacerbations of pulmonary oedema. The aim of this study was to identify prehospital patients in the Midwest, over a 6-month period, which could potentially benefit from CPAP if it were available in the National Ambulance Service. Potential CPAP patients were identified in the Advanced Paramedic Clinical Activity Study (APCAS) database and then followed up in the receiving hospital emergency department (ED) and medical records. Prior to this study, Irish guidance for prehospital use of CPAP did not exist and therefore the database was interrogated using a Toronto EMS Medical Directive. Descriptive analysis was conducted in Microsoft Excel and SPSS. Emergency AS1 calls (999/112) were assessed (n = 1369) and 141 patients (10.3, 95 % confidence interval 8.9-12.1 %) were identified as potential candidates for prehospital CPAP. Further investigation of ED records for 63 potential candidates found 36.5 % (95 % confidence interval 26-49 %) met the Toronto EMS criteria for CPAP. This study suggests that a suitable patient cohort for CPAP exists in the prehospital environment and highlights the need for a prospective study of CPAP use on these patients.

  14. Retrospective, nonrandomized controlled study on autoadjusting, dual-pressure positive airway pressure therapy for a consecutive series of complex insomnia disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krakow B

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Barry Krakow,1–3 Natalia D McIver,1,2 Victor A Ulibarri,1,2 Michael R Nadorff4,5 1Sleep & Human Health Institute, 2Maimonides Sleep Arts & Sciences, Ltd, Albuquerque, 3Los Alamos Medical Center, Los Alamos, NM, 4Department of Psychology, Mississippi State University, Mississippi, MS, 5Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA Purpose: Emerging evidence shows that positive airway pressure (PAP treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS in chronic insomnia patients (proposed “complex insomnia” disorder leads to substantial decreases in insomnia severity. Although continuous PAP (CPAP is the pressure mode most widely researched, intolerance to fixed pressurized air is rarely investigated or described in comorbidity patients. This retrospective study examined dual pressure, autoadjusting PAP modes in chronic, complex insomnia disorder patients.Patients and methods: Chronic insomnia disorder patients (mean [SD] insomnia severity index [ISI] =19.11 [3.34] objectively diagnosed with OSA or UARS and using either autobilevel PAP device or adaptive servoventilation (ASV device after failing CPAP therapy (frequently due to intolerance to pressurized air, poor outcomes, or emergence of CSA were divided into PAP users (≥20 h/wk and partial users (<20 h/wk for comparison. Subjective and objective baseline and follow-up measures were analyzed.Results: Of the 302 complex insomnia patients, PAP users (n=246 averaged 6.10 (1.78 nightly hours and 42.71 (12.48 weekly hours and partial users (n=56 averaged 1.67 (0.76 nightly hours and 11.70 (5.31 weekly hours. For mean (SD decreases in total ISI scores, a significant (group × time interaction was observed (F[1,300]=13.566; P<0.0001 with PAP users (–7.59 [5.92]; d=1.63 showing superior results to partial users (-4.34 [6.13]; d=0.81. Anecdotally, patients reported better tolerability with advanced PAP

  15. Claustrophobic tendencies and continuous positive airway pressure therapy non-adherence in adults with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Janalyn Cantey; Yang, Hyunju; King, Tonya S; Sawyer, Douglas A; Rizzo, Albert; Sawyer, Amy M

    2015-01-01

    (1) Determine claustrophobia frequency in adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) after first CPAP night; (2) determine if claustrophobia influences CPAP non-adherence. Claustrophobia is common among CPAP-treated OSA adults yet few studies have examined the problem. Secondary analysis of prospective, longitudinal study of OSA adults (n = 97). CPAP-Adapted Fear and Avoidance Scale (CPAP-FAAS) collected immediately after CPAP titration polysomnogram. objective CPAP use at 1 week and 1 month. Sixty-three percent had claustrophobic tendencies. Females had higher CPAP-FAAS scores than males. FAAS ≥ 25, positive score for claustrophobic tendencies, was influential on CPAP non-adherence at 1 week (aOR = 5.53, 95% CI 1.04, 29.24, p = 0.04) and less CPAP use at 1month (aOR = 5.06, 95% CI 1.48, 17.37, p = 0.01) when adjusted for body mass index and CPAP mask style. Claustrophobia is prevalent among CPAP-treated OSA adults and influences short-term and longer-term CPAP non-adherence. Interventions are needed to address this treatment-related barrier. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure in lowering blood pressure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea: a critical review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatureto-Borges F

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fernanda Fatureto-Borges,1 Geraldo Lorenzi-Filho,2 Luciano F Drager1,3 1Hypertension Unit, Heart Institute (InCor, 2Sleep Laboratory, Pulmonary Division, 3Hypertension Unit, Renal Division, University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is an extremely common comorbid condition in patients with hypertension, with a prevalence of ~50%. There is growing evidence suggesting that OSA is a secondary cause of hypertension, associated with both poor blood pressure (BP control and target organ damage in patients with hypertension. The application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP during sleep is the gold standard treatment of moderate- to-severe OSA and very effective in abolishing obstructive respiratory events. However, several meta-analyses showed that the overall impact of CPAP on BP is modest (~2 mmHg. There are several potential reasons for this disappointing finding, including the heterogeneity of patients studied (normotensive patients, controlled, and uncontrolled patients with hypertension, nonideal CPAP compliance, clinical presentation (there is some evidence that the positive impact of CPAP on lowering BP is more evident in sleepy patients, and the multifactorial nature of hypertension. In this review, we performed a critical analysis of the literature evaluating the impact of CPAP on BP in several subgroups of patients. We finally discussed perspectives in this important research area, including the urgent need to identify predictors of BP response to CPAP and the importance of precision medicine in this scenario. Keywords: cardiovascular disease, CPAP, hypertension, sleep apnea, treatment

  17. Effects of different levels of positive airway pressure on breathing pattern and heart rate variability after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.B.F. Pantoni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP produces important hemodynamic alterations, which can influence breathing pattern (BP and heart rate variability (HRV. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different levels of CPAP on postoperative BP and HRV after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG surgery and the impact of CABG surgery on these variables. Eighteen patients undergoing CABG were evaluated postoperatively during spontaneous breathing (SB and application of four levels of CPAP applied in random order: sham (3 cmH2O, 5 cmH2O, 8 cmH2O, and 12 cmH2O. HRV was analyzed in time and frequency domains and by nonlinear methods and BP was analyzed in different variables (breathing frequency, inspiratory tidal volume, inspiratory and expiratory time, total breath time, fractional inspiratory time, percent rib cage inspiratory contribution to tidal volume, phase relation during inspiration, phase relation during expiration. There was significant postoperative impairment in HRV and BP after CABG surgery compared to the preoperative period and improvement of DFAα1, DFAα2 and SD2 indexes, and ventilatory variables during postoperative CPAP application, with a greater effect when 8 and 12 cmH2O were applied. A positive correlation (P < 0.05 and r = 0.64; Spearman was found between DFAα1 and inspiratory time to the delta of 12 cmH2O and SB of HRV and respiratory values. Acute application of CPAP was able to alter cardiac autonomic nervous system control and BP of patients undergoing CABG surgery and 8 and 12 cmH2O of CPAP provided the best performance of pulmonary and cardiac autonomic functions.

  18. Effects of short-term continuous positive airway pressure on myocardial sympathetic nerve function and energetics in patients with heart failure and obstructive sleep apnea: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Allison B; Ziadi, Maria C; Leech, Judith A; Chen, Shin-Yee; Burwash, Ian G; Renaud, Jennifer; deKemp, Robert A; Haddad, Haissam; Mielniczuk, Lisa M; Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Guo, Ann; Chen, Li; Walter, Olga; Garrard, Linda; DaSilva, Jean N; Floras, John S; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2014-09-09

    Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), 2 states of increased metabolic demand and sympathetic nervous system activation, often coexist. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), which alleviates OSA, can improve ventricular function. It is unknown whether this is due to altered oxidative metabolism or presynaptic sympathetic nerve function. We hypothesized that short-term (6-8 weeks) CPAP in patients with OSA and heart failure with reduced ejection fraction would improve myocardial sympathetic nerve function and energetics. Forty-five patients with OSA and heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (left ventricular ejection fraction 35.8±9.7% [mean±SD]) were evaluated with the use of echocardiography and 11C-acetate and 11C-hydroxyephedrine positron emission tomography before and ≈6 to 8 weeks after randomization to receive short-term CPAP (n=22) or no CPAP (n=23). Work metabolic index, an estimate of myocardial efficiency, was calculated as follows: (stroke volume index×heart rate×systolic blood pressure÷Kmono), where Kmono is the monoexponential function fit to the myocardial 11C-acetate time-activity data, reflecting oxidative metabolism. Presynaptic sympathetic nerve function was measured with the use of the 11C-hydroxyephedrine retention index. CPAP significantly increased hydroxyephedrine retention versus no CPAP (Δretention: +0.012 [0.002, 0.021] versus -0.006 [-0.013, 0.005] min(-1); P=0.003). There was no significant change in work metabolic index between groups. However, in those with more severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index>20 events per hour), CPAP significantly increased both work metabolic index and systolic blood pressure (Penergetics. In those with more severe OSA, CPAP may improve cardiac efficiency. Further outcome-based investigation of the consequences of CPAP is warranted. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00756366. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Effects of heated humidification and topical steroids on compliance, nasal symptoms, and quality of life in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome using nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Silke

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Nasal side effects are common in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) starting on nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. We tested the hypothesis that heated humidification or nasal topical steroids improve compliance, nasal side effects and quality of life in this patient group. METHODS: 125 patients with the established diagnosis of OSAS (apnea\\/hypopnea index > or = 10\\/h), who tolerated CPAP via a nasal mask, and who had a successful CPAP titration were randomized to 4 weeks of dry CPAP, humidified CPAP or CPAP with additional topical nasal steroid application (fluticasone, GlaxoWellcome). Groups were similar in all demographic variables and in frequency of nasal symptoms at baseline. Outcome measures were objective compliance, quality of life (short form 36), subjective sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale score) and nasal symptoms such as runny, dry or blocked nose, sneezing and headaches; all variables assessed using a validated questionnaire and by direct interview. RESULTS: There was no difference in compliance between groups after 4 weeks (dry: 5.21 +\\/- 1.66 h\\/night, fluticasone: 5.66 +\\/- 1.68, humidifier: 5.21 +\\/- 1.84; p = 0.444). Quality of life and subjective sleepiness improved in all groups, but there were no differences in the extent of improvement. Nasal Symptoms were less frequently reported in the humidifier group (28%) than in the remaining groups (dry: 70%, fluticasone: 53%, p = 0.002). However, the addition of fluticasone resulted in increased frequency of sneezing. CONCLUSION: The addition of a humidifier, but not nasal steroids decreases the frequency of nasal symptoms in unselected OSAS patients initiating CPAP therapy; however compliance and quality of life remain unaltered.

  20. An Integrative Model of Physiological Traits Can be Used to Predict Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Response to Non Positive Airway Pressure Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Robert L; Edwards, Bradley A; Eckert, Danny J; Jordan, Amy S; Sands, Scott A; Malhotra, Atul; White, David P; Loring, Stephen H; Butler, James P; Wellman, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Both anatomical and nonanatomical traits are important in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) pathogenesis. We have previously described a model combining these traits, but have not determined its diagnostic accuracy to predict OSA. A valid model, and knowledge of the published effect sizes of trait manipulation, would also allow us to predict the number of patients with OSA who might be effectively treated without using positive airway pressure (PAP). Fifty-seven subjects with and without OSA underwent standard clinical and research sleep studies to measure OSA severity and the physiological traits important for OSA pathogenesis, respectively. The traits were incorporated into a physiological model to predict OSA. The model validity was determined by comparing the model prediction of OSA to the clinical diagnosis of OSA. The effect of various trait manipulations was then simulated to predict the proportion of patients treated by each intervention. The model had good sensitivity (80%) and specificity (100%) for predicting OSA. A single intervention on one trait would be predicted to treat OSA in approximately one quarter of all patients. Combination therapy with two interventions was predicted to treat OSA in ∼50% of patients. An integrative model of physiological traits can be used to predict population-wide and individual responses to non-PAP therapy. Many patients with OSA would be expected to be treated based on known trait manipulations, making a strong case for the importance of non-anatomical traits in OSA pathogenesis and the effectiveness of non-PAP therapies. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  1. [Efficacy of the Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure device in patients with acute respiratory failure attended by an emergency medical service: a randomized clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Regueiro, Irene; Mosteiro Díaz, María Pilar; Herrero Puente, Pablo; Argüelles Luis, Juan; Campa García, Ana María; García Fernández, José Antonio

    2016-02-01

    To assess the efficacy of the Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device for treating patients with acute respiratory failure transported by an emergency medical service. Retrospective, descriptive study of a series of patients treated with the Boussignac CPAP system by emergency medical service responders in Asturias between February 1, 2006, and March 19, 2012. We recorded demographic data, diagnosis, techniques and drugs used, technique failure and reasons, vital constants, (heart rate [HR], respiratory frequency [RF], systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and arterial oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry [SpO2]) at 5 times during the event (on contact without oxygen therapy in place, with conventional oxygen therapy, 5 and 15 minutes after starting CPAP, and on hospital transfer), and the duration of prehospital care. A total of 203 patients with a mean (SD) age of 74.5 (10.6) years were enrolled; 133 (65.5%) were men. One hundred five (81.3%) had acute heart failure. The device failed in 28 patients (13.8%), 13 (6.4%) of whom required intubation. One (0.5%) died while still in prehospital care. All vital constants improved with CPAP. SpO2 values increased at all 5 recording times (P<.001); HR and RF improved significantly at 5 and 15 minutes of CPAP and on transfer (P<.001). Systolic and diastolic pressures were significantly lower than baseline after 15 minutes of CPAP and on transfer. Duration of care was significantly longer in patients who did not tolerate CPAP and in patients who were intubated (P<.001). Most patients tolerated treatment with the Boussignac CPAP device and improved clinically. Few required intubation and mortality was very low.

  2. Prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder and its impact on adherence to continuous positive airway pressure therapy: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Weed, Jason G; Ren, Rong; Tang, Xiangdong; Zhang, Wei

    2017-08-01

    Although some authors have recently investigated the co-occurrence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), the topic remains insufficiently studied. The aim of this meta-analysis was to detect the pooled prevalence of OSA in PTSD and its impact on adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. We conducted a search for articles published until August 20, 2016, in PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO. The literature search identified 194 articles, and 12 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence rates of OSA based on different apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) criteria in PTSD patients was 75.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 44.1-92.5%) (AHI ≥5) and 43.6% (95% CI = 20.6-69.7%) (AHI ≥10), respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that there was a significant difference between the prevalence of OSA in veterans with PTSD compared to nonveterans or mixed samples. Patients with PTSD and OSA demonstrated significantly lower adherence to CPAP therapy (regular use: g = -0.658, 95% CI = -0.856 to -0.460; time of average use per night: g = -0.873, 95% CI = -1.550 to -0.196) compared with those with OSA alone. OSA is commonly seen in patients with PTSD. Given its negative impact on the adherence to CPAP therapy, the possibility of OSA should be monitored carefully in patients with PTSD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Positive Airway Pressure and Mechanical Ventilation of the Lungs During Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Pulmonary Adverse Events After Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Chia; Huang, Chi-Hsiang; Tu, Yu-Kang

    2018-04-01

    To investigate whether different ventilation strategies during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) can improve outcomes in adult cardiac surgery patients. Systematic review of randomized controlled trials with meta-analyses. Clinical trials for human studies up to July 2016 were obtained from electronic databases (Medline, Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) and reference lists of relevant randomized trials and review articles. Adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Patients who underwent cardiac surgery with CPB and ventilation or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Fifteen randomized controlled trials with 748 patients were analyzed. In cardiac surgery, CPAP use during CPB was associated with an improved alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient difference compared with no CPAP (weighted mean difference [WMD] = 4.11 kPa; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.85-7.37; I 2 = 28.8%). Ventilation during CPB did not improve the postoperative hypoxemia score (WMD = 30.94; 95% CI = -20.76 to 82.63; I 2 = 61%) or diffusion capacity compared with the apnea group (WMD = 2.59 kPa; 95% CI = -2.49 to 7.67; I 2 = 81.3%). Neither CPAP nor ventilation during CPB was associated with a shorter mechanical ventilation time or hospital stay. CPAP during CPB improved the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient difference compared with apnea, but ventilation during CPB did not. Neither CPAP nor ventilation during CPB demonstrated evidence of improving clinical outcomes in low- or intermediate-risk patients for elective cardiac surgery. The findings are inconclusive because of heterogeneity and small sample sizes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A cost-effectiveness analysis of nasal surgery to increase continuous positive airway pressure adherence in sleep apnea patients with nasal obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempfle, Judith S; BuSaba, Nicholas Y; Dobrowski, John M; Westover, Michael B; Bianchi, Matt T

    2017-04-01

    Nasal surgery has been implicated to improve continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compliance in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and nasal obstruction. However, the cost-effectiveness of nasal surgery to improve CPAP compliance is not known. We modeled the cost-effectiveness of two types of nasal surgery versus no surgery in patients with OSA and nasal obstruction undergoing CPAP therapy. Cost-effectiveness decision tree model. We built a decision tree model to identify conditions under which nasal surgery would be cost-effective to improve CPAP adherence over the standard of care. We compared turbinate reduction and septoplasty to nonsurgical treatment over varied time horizons from a third-party payer perspective. We included variables for cost of untreated OSA, surgical cost and complications, improved compliance postoperatively, and quality of life. Our study identified nasal surgery as a cost-effective strategy to improve compliance of OSA patients using CPAP across a range of plausible model assumptions regarding the cost of untreated OSA, the probability of adherence improvement, and a chronic time horizon. The relatively lower surgical cost of turbinate reduction made it more cost-effective at earlier time horizons, whereas septoplasty became cost-effective after a longer timespan. Across a range of plausible values in a clinically relevant decision model, nasal surgery is a cost-effective strategy to improve CPAP compliance in OSA patients with nasal obstruction. Our results suggest that OSA patients with nasal obstruction who struggle with CPAP therapy compliance should undergo evaluation for nasal surgery. 2c Laryngoscope, 127:977-983, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. The effects of topical nasal steroids on continuous positive airway pressure compliance in patients with obstructive sleep apnea: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charakorn, Natamon; Hirunwiwatkul, Prakobkiat; Chirakalwasan, Naricha; Chaitusaney, Busarakum; Prakassajjatham, Mantana

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), evaluating effects of topical nasal steroids on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine use and nasal symptoms. Data source: A comprehensive search of Pubmed, Scopus, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library was performed through April 2016. Manual searches and subject matter expert input were also obtained. Studies assessing effects of nasal steroids on CPAP machine use in adults, which reported quantitative outcome data of CPAP compliance, were included. Two studies (144 patients) met inclusion criteria. Both were randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials (RCT). Pooled fixed effects analysis did not identify a statistically significant difference between both the groups for average duration of CPAP machine use per night. But there was an overall increase in the usage of 0.4 h (95 % confidence interval (CI) (-0.20, 1.00); P = 0.19) in favor of nasal steroids. Difference of percentage of nights with CPAP use was not demonstrated (mean difference 0.06, 95 % CI (-0.27, 0.39); P = 0.71). There was also no significant difference in nasal symptoms (mean difference 0.63, 95 % CI (-0.11, 1.36), P = 0.1). Nasal steroids showed benefits on CPAP use, but did not reach statistical significance. Data was based on meta-analysis of RCTs of 4-week follow-up in unselected OSA patients. Future controlled studies with selected group and longer follow-up duration are needed to confirm the benefits of nasal steroid on CPAP compliance in OSA patients.

  6. The effect of nasal surgery on continuous positive airway pressure device use and therapeutic treatment pressures: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Macario; Riaz, Muhammad; Capasso, Robson; Ruoff, Chad M; Guilleminault, Christian; Kushida, Clete A; Certal, Victor

    2015-02-01

    The relationship between nasal surgery and its effect on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device therapeutic treatment pressures and CPAP device use has not been previously systematically examined. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis evaluating the effect of isolated nasal surgery on therapeutic CPAP device pressures and use in adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science, and The Cochrane Library were searched through July 15, 2014. The MOOSE consensus statement and PRISMA statement were followed. Eighteen studies (279 patients) reported CPAP data after isolated nasal surgery. Seven studies (82 patients) reported preoperative and postoperative mean therapeutic CPAP device pressures and standard deviations (SD), which reduced from 11.6 ± 2.2 to 9.5 ± 2.0 centimeters of water pressure (cwp) after nasal surgery. Pooled random effects analysis demonstrated a statistically significant pressure reduction, with a mean difference (MD) of -2.66 cwp (95% confidence interval (CI), -3.65 to -1.67); P CPAP use; and a subgroup analysis demonstrated that 89.1% (57 of 64 patients) who were not using CPAP prior to nasal surgery subsequently accepted, adhered to, or tolerated it after nasal surgery. Objective, device meter-based hours of use increased in 33 patients from 3.0 ± 3.1 to 5.5 ± 2.0 h in the short term (nasal surgery in patients with OSA and nasal obstruction reduces therapeutic CPAP device pressures and the currently published literature's objective and subjective data consistently suggest that it also increases CPAP use in select patients. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  7. The Effect of Non-nutritive Sucking on Transcutaneous Oxygen Saturation in Neonates under the Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Ahmadpour-kacho

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral beneficial effects of non-nutritive sucking in infants, including the physiological stability, relaxation, better transition from tube feeding to oral feeding have been reported. But its effect on oxygen saturation in neonates under the Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (NCPAPو (is not so clear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of non-nutritive sucking on transcutaneous oxygen saturation levels of neonates treated with NCPAP.Materials and MethodsThis quasi-experimental study was done on 25 preterm neonates, hospitalized with a diagnosis of respiratory distress, required NCPAP, in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU at the Ayatollah Rouhani Hospital and Babol Clinic, North of Iran. Non-nutritive sucking was elicited by a standard pacifier appropriate to their age one hour a day, and the mean oxygen saturation was measured before and after intervention by cardiopulmonary monitoring (Saadat Co., Iran. Data analyzed using SPSS-18.0 software.ResultsIn the 25 cases studied, the mean oxygen saturation values ​​before performing non-nutritive sucking was 96.31±2.88%, which was changed to 98.35±1.6% after intervention, and this increase was statistically significant (P = 0.004.Results showed that the gender, birth weight and gestational age of neonates had no effect on mean Blood oxygen saturation (SpO2level.ConclusionAccording to the results, using the non-nutritive sucking in premature neonates under the NCPAP, can improve oxygenation.

  8. High Flow Oxygen and Bilevel Positive Airway Pressure for Persistent Dyspnea in Patients With Advanced Cancer: A Phase II Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, David; Morgado, Margarita; Chisholm, Gary; Withers, Laura; Nguyen, Quan; Finch, Clarence; Frisbee-Hume, Susan; Bruera, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Context Dyspnea is one of the most distressing symptoms for cancer patients. The role of high flow oxygen (HFO) and bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) in the palliation of dyspnea has not been well characterized. Objectives To determine the feasibility of conducting a randomized trial of HFO and BiPAP in cancer patients, and to examine the changes in dyspnea, physiologic parameters and adverse effects with these modalities. Methods In this randomized study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01518140), we assigned hospitalized patients with advanced cancer and persistent dyspnea to either HFO or BiPAP for two hours. We assessed dyspnea with a numeric rating scale (NRS) and modified Borg scale (MBS) before and after the intervention. We also documented vital signs, transcutaneous carbon dioxide and adverse effects. Results Thirty patients were enrolled (1:1 ratio) and 23 (77%) completed the assigned intervention. HFO was associated with improvements in both NRS (mean 1.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.4, 3.4; P=0.02) and MBS (mean 2.1, 95% CI 0.6, 3.5; P=0.007). BiPAP also was associated with improvements in NRS (mean 3.2; 95% CI 1.3, 5.1; P=0.004) and MBS (mean 1.5, 95% CI −0.3, 3.2; P=0.13). There were no significant differences between HFO and BiPAP in dyspnea NRS (P=0.14) and MBS (P=0.47). Oxygen saturation improved with HFO (93% vs. 99%, P=0.003), and respiratory rate had a non-statistically significant decrease with both interventions (HFO -3; P=0.11; BiPAP -2, P=0.11 ). No significant adverse effects were observed. Conclusion HFO and BiPAP alleviated dyspnea, improved physiologic parameters and were safe. Our results justify larger randomized controlled trials to confirm these findings. PMID:23739633

  9. Impact of continuous positive airway pressure treatment on myocardial performance in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. A conventional and tissue Doppler echocardiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanzanis, George; Panou, Fotios; Lazaros, George; Oikonomou, Evangelos; Nikolopoulos, Ioannis; Mihaelidou, Makrina; Ntounis, George; Lekakis, John

    2015-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a highly prevalent condition related to several cardiovascular complications. We assessed the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on myocardial performance and various somatometric parameters in patients with severe OSA receiving CPAP. This is a prospective longitudinal study of 44 patients aged 55.8 ± 10.6 years (79.5 % men), with newly diagnosed moderate and severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index ≥15 with polysomnographic evaluation). All patients enrolled received CPAP therapy. The study protocol included a complete conventional and tissue Doppler echocardiographic study at baseline and 12 months after CPAP treatment. Among patients enrolled, 31 completed the prespecified study protocol. After CPAP therapy, a decrease in pulmonary artery systolic pressure (p < 0.001), right ventricular (RV) diameter (p = 0.012), inferior vena cava diameter (p = 0.005), and RV wall thickness (p = 0.006) was observed. In addition, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion values (p = 0.048) and tissue E/A ratio at the tricuspid annulus (p = 0.01) were significantly increased. Moreover, a reduction in left ventricular (LV) mass was observed (p < 0.001). With respect to somatometric parameters, body mass index and waist diameter (p < 0.001 for both) were reduced. Importantly, the improvement in apnea-hypopnea index was associated with the improvement in pulmonary artery systolic pressure, independently from confounders such as age, gender, and the reduction in body mass index. CPAP therapy in OSA patients was found to improve right heart chambers remodeling and performance as well as somatometric characteristics. The impact of CPAP on LV performance seems less pronounced.

  10. Control of OSA during automatic positive airway pressure titration in a clinical case series: predictors and accuracy of device download data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsin-Chia Carol; Hillman, David R; McArdle, Nigel

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the factors associated with physiologic control of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) during automatic positive airway pressure (APAP) titration in a clinical series. To also assess the usefulness of apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) data downloaded from the APAP device (Dev AHI). Retrospective review of a consecutive series of patients with OSA who underwent APAP titration (Autoset Spirit, ResMed, Bella Vista, New South Wales, Australia ) with simultaneous polysomnographic (PSG) monitoring in the sleep laboratory. Tertiary sleep clinic. There were 190 consecutive patients with OSA referred for APAP titration. There were 58% of patients who achieved optimal or good control of OSA (titration PSG AHI titration. The independent predictors of titration PSG AHI were a history of cardiac disease and elevated central apnea and arousal indices during the diagnostic study. Although the median and interquartile range (IQR) AHI from the device (7.0, 3.9-11.6 events/hr) was only slightly less than the PSG AHI (7.8, 3.9-14.4 events/hr, P = 0.04) during titration, case-by-case agreement between the two measures was poor (chi-square titration is often poor, and close clinical follow-up is particularly needed in patients with a history of cardiac disease or with high arousal or central apnea indices on the diagnostic study. Device AHI does not reliably assess control during APAP titration, and PSG assessment may be required if clinical response to treatment is poor. The findings relate to the ResMed AutoSet device and may not apply to other devices.

  11. The Effects of Massage with Coconut and Sunflower Oils on Oxygen Saturation of Premature Infants with Respiratory Distress Syndrome Treated With Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousan Valizadeh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays particular emphasis is placed on the developmental aspects of premature infants care. Massage therapy is one of the best-known methods of caring. Due to the minimal touch policy in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs, massaging is not usually performed on premature infants. However, there is not sufficient evidence to support the claim that newborn infants with complex medical conditions should not be massaged. This study aimed to determine the effects of massage with coconut and sunflower oils on oxygen saturation of infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS treated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP. Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial on 90 newborns who were admitted to Alzahra Hospital (Tabriz, Iran. The infants were divided into control and massage therapy groups (massage with coconut and sunflower oils. Data was collected using a hospital documentation form. A 15-minute daily massage was performed for 3 days. Respiratory rate (RR, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2 and oxygen saturation were measured 5 minutes before the massage, 3 times during the massage, and 5 minutes after the massage. The collected data was analyzed using a mixed model. Results: In comparison to coconut oil and control groups, mean oxygen saturation of sunflower oil group was improved. In addition, the coconut massage group showed lower oxygen saturation than the control group but was all values were within the normal range. Although massage decreased oxygen saturation, there was no need to increase FiO2. Conclusion: Massage therapy can provide developmental care for infants treated with NCPAP.

  12. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the CPAP mask every night. How Do You Know if You Need CPAP? When evaluating sleep apnea, your otolaryngologist may ask the following questions: Does your snoring disturb your family and friends? Do you have daytime sleepiness? •Do you wake frequently throughout the night? •Have you had episodes ...

  13. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... Twitter YouTube Instagram Email DONATE Breadcrumb Navigation Home Life With CF Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your airways. Most are easy to ...

  14. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your airways. ... or caregiver. Older kids and adults can choose ACTs that they can do on their own. Share ...

  15. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CF Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your ... for fitting ACTs into daily life Airway Clearance Techniques | Webcast To learn more about how you can ...

  16. Impact of Compression Stockings vs. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Overnight Fluid Shift and Obstructive Sleep Apnea among Patients on Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno C. Silva

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionObstructive sleep apnea (OSA is common in edematous states, notably in hemodialysis patients. In this population, overnight fluid shift can play an important role on the pathogenesis of OSA. The effect of compression stockings (CS and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP on fluid shift is barely known. We compared the effects of CS and CPAP on fluid dynamics in a sample of patients with OSA in hemodialysis, through a randomized crossover study.MethodsEach participant performed polysomnography (PSG at baseline, during CPAP titration, and after 1 week of wearing CS. Neck circumference (NC and segmental bioelectrical impedance were done before and after PSG.ResultsFourteen patients were studied (53 ± 9 years; 57% men; body mass index 29.7 ± 6.8 kg/m2. Apnea–hypopnea index (AHI decreased from 20.8 (14.2; 39.6 at baseline to 7.9 (2.8; 25.4 during CPAP titration and to 16.7 (3.5; 28.9 events/h after wearing CS (CPAP vs. baseline, p = 0.004; CS vs. baseline, p = 0.017; and CPAP vs. CS, p = 0.017. Nocturnal intracellular trunk water was higher after wearing CS in comparison to baseline and CPAP (p = 0.03. CS reduced the fluid accumulated in lower limbs during the day, although not significantly. Overnight fluid shift at baseline, CPAP, and CS was −183 ± 72, −343 ± 220, and −290 ± 213 ml, respectively (p = 0.006. Overnight NC increased at baseline (0.7 ± 0.4 cm, decreased after CPAP (−1.0 ± 0.4 cm, and while wearing CS (−0.4 ± 0.8 cm (CPAP vs. baseline, p < 0.0001; CS vs. baseline, p = 0.001; CPAP vs. CS, p = 0.01.ConclusionCS reduced AHI by avoiding fluid retention in the legs, favoring accumulation of water in the intracellular component of the trunk, thus avoiding fluid shift to reach the neck. CPAP improved OSA by exerting local pressure on upper airway, with no impact on fluid redistribution. CPAP performed significantly better than CS

  17. T-piece improves arterial and central venous oxygenation in trachestomized patients as compared to continuous positive airway pressure/pressure support ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovas, A; Molnár, Z

    2013-05-01

    T-piece has been widely used as T-piece trial to identify patients who are ready for extubation but it is seldom used as a weaning tool. Our objective was to investigate the effects of breathing via T-piece on gas exchange as compared to continuous positive airway pressure with pressure support (CPAP+PS) and CPAP with automatic tube compensation (CPAP+ATC) as it has not been evaluated yet. Tracheostomized, "ready to be weaned" critically ill patients were enrolled in this prospective, auto-control clinical trial. Arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) was determined on CPAP+PS (t0), 15 minutes later on CPAP+ATC (t1), then on T-piece at 15, 30 and 60 minutes (t2-4). ScvO2 was measured at t0 and t4. Settings of fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) were kept constant throughout the investigation. Twenty-five patients were enrolled. T-piece trial was interrupted in 4 cases after t2, due to pulmonary oedema, hypertension or fatigue. PaO2/FiO2 was significantly higher on T-piece (t3,4) then on CPAP (t0,1), P<0.05, PaO2/FiO2 did not change significantly on CPAP+PS (t0) vs. CPAP+ATC (t1) modes: median=208 (interquartile range: 175-266) vs. 223 (186-290) mmHg, P=0.102, but significantly increased from t0-t4: 208 (175-266) vs. 249 (215-325) mmHg, P=0.003, respectively. ScvO2 was significantly higher on T-piece at t4: 80% (75-82%) than on CPAP+PS at t0: 73% (71-78%), P<0.001. On the same FiO2 and PEEP setting, breathing via T-piece improved oxygenation and resulted in increased ScvO2 as compared to breathing on CPAP with PS. Our observations suggest a potential role of T-piece during weaning from mechanical ventilation.

  18. Airway distensibility in Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler Wille, Mathilde Marie; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Dirksen, Asger

    2013-01-01

    Rationale – Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a combination of chronic bronchitis and emphysema, which both may lead to airway obstruction. Under normal circumstances, airway dimensions vary as a function of inspiration level. We aim to study the influence of COPD and emphysema on t...... in causing airway narrowing, the latter most likely due to loss of elastic recoil of surrounding tissue....

  19. A Novel Therapy for Chronic Sleep-Onset Insomnia: A Retrospective, Nonrandomized Controlled Study of Auto-Adjusting, Dual-Level, Positive Airway Pressure Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakow, Barry; Ulibarri, Victor A; McIver, Natalia D; Nadorff, Michael R

    2016-09-29

    Evidence indicates that behavioral or drug therapy may not target underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms for chronic insomnia, possibly due to previously unrecognized high rates (30%-90%) of sleep apnea in chronic insomnia patients. Although treatment studies with positive airway pressure (PAP) demonstrate decreased severity of chronic sleep maintenance insomnia in patients with co-occurring sleep apnea, sleep-onset insomnia has not shown similar results. We hypothesized advanced PAP technology would be associated with decreased sleep-onset insomnia severity in a sample of predominantly psychiatric patients with comorbid sleep apnea. We reviewed charts of 74 severe sleep-onset insomnia patients seen from March 2011 to August 2015, all meeting American Academy of Sleep Medicine Work Group criteria for a chronic insomnia disorder and all affirming behavioral and psychological origins for insomnia (averaging 10 of 18 indicators/patient), as well as averaging 2 or more psychiatric symptoms or conditions: depression (65.2%), anxiety (41.9%), traumatic exposure (35.1%), claustrophobia (29.7%), panic attacks (28.4%), and posttraumatic stress disorder (20.3%). All patients failed continuous or bilevel PAP and were manually titrated with auto-adjusting PAP modes (auto-bilevel and adaptive-servo ventilation). At 1-year follow-up, patients were compared through nonrandom assignment on the basis of a PAP compliance metric of > 20 h/wk (56 PAP users) versus insomnia severity (Hedges' g = 1.72) and sleep-onset insomnia (g = 2.07) compared to partial users (g = 1.04 and 0.91, respectively). Both global and sleep-onset insomnia severity decreased below moderate levels in PAP users compared to partial users whose outcomes persisted at moderately severe levels. In a nonrandomized controlled retrospective study, advanced PAP technology (both auto-bilevel and adaptive servo-ventilation) were associated with large decreases in insomnia severity for sleep-onset insomnia patients who

  20. Initial treatment of respiratory distress syndrome with nasal intermittent mandatory ventilation versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir-Mohammad Armanian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS in premature infants who survived and its complications are a common problem. Due to high morbidity and mechanical ventilation (MV nowadays researchers in interested minimizing MV. To determine, in very low birth weight (BW preterm neonates with RDS, if initial treatment with nasal intermittent mandatory ventilation (early NIMV compared with early nasal continuous positive airway pressure (early NCPAP obtains more favorable outcomes in terms of the duration of treatment, and the need for endotracheal tube ventilation. Methods: In this single-center randomized control trial study, infants (BW ≤ 1500 g and/or gestational age ≤ 34 weeks with respiratory distress were considered eligible. Forty-four infants were randomly assigned to receive early-NIMV and 54 comparable infants to early-NCPAP. Surfactants were given, when FIO 2 requirement was of >30%. Primary outcomes were failure of noninvasive respiratory support, that is, the need for MV in the first 48 h of life and for the duration of noninvasive respiratory support in each group. Results: 98 infants were enrolled (44 in the NIMV and 54 in the NCPAP group. The Preventive power of MV of NIMV usage (95.5% was not lower than the NCPAP (98.1% strength (hazard ratio: 0.21 (95% confidence interval: 0.02-2.66; P: 0.23. The duration of noninvasive respiratory support in the NIMV group was significantly shorter than NCPAP (the median (range was 24 (18.00-48.00 h versus 48.00 (22.00-120.00 h in NIMV versus NCPAP groups; P < 0.001. Similarly, the duration of dependency on oxygen was less, for NIMV (the median (range was 96.00 (41.00-504.00 h versus144.00 (70.00-1130.00 h in NIMV versus NCPAP groups; P: 0.009. Interestingly, time to full enteral feeds and length of hospital stay were more favorable in the NIMV versus the NCPAP group. Conclusions: Initial treatment of RDS with NIMV was safe, and well tolerated. Furthermore, NIMV had excellent

  1. Oral health in patients treated by positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea: a population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carra, M C; Thomas, F; Schmitt, A; Pannier, B; Danchin, N; Bouchard, Ph

    2016-03-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have an increased risk of periodontal disease. Little is known about the oral health of OSA patients treated by continuous or bi-level positive airway pressure (CPAP/BiPAP). The aim of this population-based case-control study was to compare oral health variables (amount of plaque, calculus, gingival inflammation, and masticatory function) between CPAP/BiPAP users and control subjects. The study population was retrieved from a French cohort examined between 2012 and 2013 at the Centre d'Investigations Préventives et Cliniques of Paris. Cases were selected if they reported to be treated by CPAP/BiPAP; controls were age-, gender-, and BMI-matched based on a 1:2 ratio. Univariate and logistic regression analyses were performed for group comparisons. Over a total of 20,436 subjects, 287 CPAP/BiPAP users (mean age (SD) 57.6 years (11.5); 76.3 % males) who underwent medical and dental examinations were compared with 574 matched controls (no OSA, no CPAP/BiPAP). CPAP/BiPAP users reported significantly higher prevalence of diabetes (15.6 vs. 10.3 %; p = 0.012; odds ratio (OR) 1.68), history of hypertension (36.5 vs. 26.1 %; p = 0.003; OR 1.62), cardiovascular diseases (14.1 vs. 8.8 %; p = 0.029; OR 1.69), and sleep complaints (59 vs. 34.4 %; p = 0.0001; OR 2.75). CPAP/BiPAP users also showed higher levels of depression and stress compared to controls. However, no group difference was observed for the amount of dental plaque, calculus, gingival inflammation, and masticatory function. Oral health of OSA patients treated by CPAP/BiPAP is comparable to that of matched controls in terms of amount of plaque, gingival inflammation, and masticatory function.

  2. Limited predictability of maximal muscular pressure using the difference between peak airway pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure during proportional assist ventilation (PAV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Po-Lan; Kao, Pei-Shan; Lin, Wei-Chieh; Su, Pei-Fang; Chen, Chang-Wen

    2016-11-27

    If the proportional assist ventilation (PAV) level is known, muscular effort can be estimated from the difference between peak airway pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (ΔP) during PAV. We conjectured that deducing muscle pressure from ΔP may be an interesting method to set PAV, and tested this hypothesis using the oesophageal pressure time product calculation. Eleven mechanically ventilated patients with oesophageal pressure monitoring under PAV were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to seven assist levels (20-80%, PAV20 means 20% PAV gain) for 15 min. Maximal muscular pressure calculated from oesophageal pressure (P mus, oes ) and from ΔP (P mus, aw ) and inspiratory pressure time product derived from oesophageal pressure (PTP oes ) and from ΔP (PTP aw ) were determined from the last minute of each level. P mus, oes and PTP oes with consideration of PEEPi were expressed as P mus, oes, PEEPi and PTP oes, PEEPi , respectively. Pressure time product was expressed as per minute (PTP oes , PTP oes, PEEPi , PTP aw ) and per breath (PTP oes, br , PTP oes, PEEPi, br , PTP aw, br ). PAV significantly reduced the breathing effort of patients with increasing PAV gain (PTP oes 214.3 ± 80.0 at PAV20 vs. 83.7 ± 49.3 cmH 2 O•s/min at PAV80, PTP oes, PEEPi 277.3 ± 96.4 at PAV20 vs. 121.4 ± 71.6 cmH 2 O•s/min at PAV80, p PAV and underestimates P mus, oes for moderate-gain to high-gain PAV. An optimal P mus, aw could be achieved in 91% of cases with PAV60. When the PAV gain was adjusted to P mus, aw of 5-10 cmH 2 O, there was a 93% probability of PTP oes PAV has limited accuracy. The extrapolated pressure time product from ΔP is usually less than the pressure time product calculated from oesophageal pressure tracing. However, when the PAV gain was adjusted to P mus, aw of 5-10 cmH 2 O, there was a 90% probability of PTP oes and PTP oes, PEEPi within acceptable ranges. This information should be considered when applying

  3. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on anxiety, depression, and major cardiac and cerebro-vascular events in obstructive sleep apnea patients with and without coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Chung; Shen, Yu-Chih; Wang, Ji-Hung; Li, Yu-Ying; Li, Tzu-Hsien; Chang, En-Ting; Wang, Hsiu-Mei

    2017-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with bad cardiovascular outcomes and a high prevalence of anxiety and depression. This study investigated the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on the severity of anxiety and depression in OSA patients with or without coronary artery disease (CAD) and on the rate of cardio- and cerebro-vascular events in those with OSA and CAD. This prospective study included patients with moderate-to-severe OSA, with or without a recent diagnosis of CAD; all were started on CPAP therapy. Patients completed the Chinese versions of the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) at baseline and after 6-month follow-up. The occurrence of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) was assessed every 3 months up to 1 year. BAI scores decreased from 8.5 ± 8.4 at baseline to 5.4 ± 6.9 at 6 months in CPAP-compliant OSA patients without CAD ( P < 0.05). BAI scores also decreased from 20.7 ± 14.9 to 16.1 ± 14.5 in CPAP-compliant OSA patients with CAD. BDI-II scores decreased in CPAP-compliant OSA patients without CAD (from 11.1 ± 10.7 at baseline to 6.6 ± 9.5 at 6 months) and in CPAP-compliant OSA patients with CAD (from 20.4 ± 14.3 to 15.9 ± 7.3). In addition, there was a large effect size (ES) of BAI and BDI in 6-month CPAP treatment of OSA patients with CAD and a large ES in those with OSA under CPAP treatment. In OSA patients with CAD, the occurrence of MACCE was significantly lower in CPAP-compliant patients than that in CPAP noncompliant patients (11% in CPAP compliant and 50% in noncompliant; P < 0.05). CPAP improved anxiety and depression in OSA patients regardless of CAD. In OSA patients with CAD, CPAP-compliant patients had a lower 1-year rate of MACCE than CPAP-noncompliant patients.

  4. Curative effect of continuous positive airway pressure on treatment of patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and hypertension: A Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi-fang MIAO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To systematically evaluate the curative effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP on treatment of patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS and hypertension. Methods  The data were retrieved of randomized controlled trials (RCTs about the curative effect of CPAP on treatment of patients with OSAHS and hypertension from PubMed, Cochrane Library, CNKI, VIP, CBM and WanFang database from inception to Oct. 2015. Literature screening, data extraction and risk bias assessment were performed by two independent reviewers, and meta-analysis was then carried out by using RevMan 5.3 software. Results  A total of 16 RCTs involving 2101 patients were included. Meta-analysis revealed that, compared with the antihypertensive drug therapy alone, CPAP plus antihypertensive drug therapy significantly reduced the daytime systolic pressure [MD=–12.60, 95%CI(–17.68 to –7.52, P<0.00001], nighttime systolic pressure [MD=–21.90, 95%CI(–25.94 to –17.86, P<0.00001] and nighttime diastolic pressure [MD=–11.90, 95%CI(–15.44 to –8.36, P<0.00001], while created no significant difference in daytime diastolic pressure, 24-h mean systolic pressure and 24-h mean diastolic pressure in a following-up less than 12 weeks. Whereas in the following-up no less than 12 weeks, compared with the antihypertensive drug therapy alone, CPAP plus antihypertensive drug therapy significantly reduced the 24-h mean systolic pressure [MD=–7.88, 95%CI(–12.09 to –3.66, P=0.00002], 24-h mean diastolic pressure [MD=–5.14, 95%CI(–6.00 to –4.28, P<0.00001], daytime systolic pressure [MD=–5.89, 95%CI(–8.79 to –2.98, P<0.0001], daytime diastolic pressure [MD=–4.34, 95%CI(–6.32 to –2.36, P<0.0001]; nighttime systolic pressure [MD=–7.06, 95%CI(–11.12 to –2.99, P=0.0007] and nighttime diastolic pressure [MD=–4.49, 95%CI (–7.39 to –1.58, P=0.006]. Conclusions  The current evidences suggest that on the basis

  5. How does serum brain natriuretic peptide level change under nasal continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh Msaad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, which can be improved by using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy. However, the pathophysiological links between the two kinds of disease and the mechanism of the CPAP effect remain incompletely understood. We aimed to inquire into the myocardial involvement in this relationship. We suggested that serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP is sensitive enough to detect myocardial stress caused by OSAHS. Design and methods: Sixty-four subjects without cardiovascular disease (21 controls, 24 normotensive OSAHS patients, and 19 hypertensive OSAHS patients were analyzed for serum BNP at baseline and serially over 6 months. CPAP was applied to 23 patients with severe OSAHS. Results: At baseline, the serum BNP levels were significantly higher (p=0.0001 in the OSAHS group (22.3±14.79 pg/ml than in the control group (9.2±6.75 pg/ml. Increased serum BNP levels were significantly associated with mean transcutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2 (p<0.0001, minimal SpO2 (p=0.002, oxygen desaturation index (p=0.001, and total sleep time spent with SpO2 lower than 90% (p=0.002. All patients with elevated BNP levels (≥37 pg/ml had moderate or severe OSAHS (11/43 OSAHS patients. The more severe the OSAHS, the higher the BNP levels were. However, only the difference between severe and mild OSAHS was statistically significant (p=0.029. Hypertensive OSAHS patients had the highest baseline BNP levels (27.7±16.74 pg/ml. They were significantly higher (p=0.001 than in normotensive OSAHS patients (18±11.72 pg/ml (p=0.039 and the controls (9.2±6.75 pg/ml. As compared with baseline, treatment with CPAP significantly decreased BNP levels in both hypertensive and normotensive OSAHS patients (respectively, from 36±16.10 to 29.7±14.29 pg/ml, p<0.001, and from 20±10.09 to 16±8.98 pg/ml, p<0.001. In contrast, the BNP levels slightly increased

  6. Comparing the Laryngeal Mask Airway, Cobra Perilaryngeal Airway and Face Mask in Children Airway Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Beyza; Hatipoğlu, Zehra; Türktan, Mediha; Özcengiz, Dilek

    2016-04-01

    We compared the effects of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), face mask and Cobra perilaryngeal airway (PLA) in the airway management of spontaneously breathing paediatric patients undergoing elective inguinal surgery. In this study, 90 cases of 1-14-year-old children undergoing elective inguinal surgery were scheduled. The patients were randomly divided into three groups. Anaesthesia was provided with sevoflurane and 50%-50% nitrous oxide and oxygen. After providing an adequate depth of anaesthesia, supraglottic airway devices were inserted in the group I and II patients. The duration and number of insertion, haemodynamic parameters, plateau and peak inspiratory pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure of the patients were recorded preoperatively, after induction and at 5, 10, 15 and 30 min peroperatively. There were no statistical differences between the groups in terms of haemodynamic parameters (p>0.05). In group II, instrumentation success was higher and instrumentation time was shorter than group II. The positive end-expiratory pressure and plateau and peak inspiratory pressure values were statistically lower in group II (pairway safety and to avoid possible complications, LMA and Cobra PLA could be alternatives to face mask and that the Cobra PLA provided lower airway pressure and had a faster and more easy placement than LMA.

  7. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of treatment options. Airway Clearance Active Cycle of Breathing Technique Airway Clearance Techniques Autogenic Drainage Basics of ... Pulmonary Exacerbations Clinical Care Guidelines SCREENING & TREATING DEPRESSION & ANXIETY GUIDELINES Clinician Resources As a clinician, you’re ...

  8. Airway management in spontaneously breathing anaesthetized children: comparison of the Laryngeal Mask Airway with the cuffed oropharyngeal airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamaya, Biruta

    2002-06-01

    The efficacy and safety of the smallest size of the cuffed oropharyngeal airway (COPA) for school age, spontaneously breathing children was investigated and compared with the Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA). Seventy children of school age (7-16 years) were divided into two groups: the COPA (n=35) and the LMA (n=35). Induction was with propofol i.v. or halothane, nitrous oxide, oxygen and fentanyl. After depression of laryngopharyngeal reflexes, a COPA size 8 cm or an LMA was inserted. Ventilation was manually assisted until spontaneous breathing was established. For maintenance, propofol i.v. and fentanyl or halothane with nitrous oxide were used. Local anaesthesia or peripheral blocks were also used. Both extratracheal airways had a highly successful insertion rate, but more positional manoeuvres to achieve a satisfactory airway were required with the COPA, 28.6% versus LMA 2.9%. The need to change the method of airway management was higher (8.6%) in the COPA group. After induction, the need for assisted ventilation was higher in the LMA group 54.3% versus 20% in the COPA group. Airway reaction to cuff inflation was higher in the LMA group 14.3% versus COPA 5.7%. Problems during surgery were similar, except continuous chin support to establish an effective airway was more frequent (11.4%) in the COPA group. In the postoperative period, blood on the device and incidence of sore throat were detected less in the COPA group. The COPA is a good extratracheal airway that provides new possibilities for airway management in school age children with an adequate and well sealed airway, during spontaneous breathing or during short-term assisted manual ventilation.

  9. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Soleas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990. In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium.

  10. Human airway smooth muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Jongste, Johan

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThe function of airway smooth muscle in normal subjects is not evident. Possible physiological roles include maintenance of optimal regional ventilation/perfusion ratios, reduction of anatomic dead space, stabilisation of cartilaginous bronchi, defense against impurities and, less likely, squeezing mucus out of mucous glands and pulling open the alveoli next to the airways1 . Any role of airway smooth muscle is necessarily limited, because an important degree of contraction will l...

  11. Rhinovirus and airway allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutsuo Yamaya

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhinoviruses cause the majority of common colds, which often provoke wheezing in patients with asthma. The precise mechanisms responsible for the rhinovirus infection-induced exacerbations of bronchial asthma remain uncertain. However, several reports have demonstrated airway hyperresponsiveness, increases in chemical mediators in airway secretions, such as kinin and histamine, and airway inflammation in patients with bronchial asthma after rhinovirus infection. Rhinovirus infection induces the accumulation of inflammatory cells in airway mucosa and submucosa, including neutrophils, lymphocytes and eosinophils. Rhinovirus affects the barrier function of airway epithelial cells and activates airway epithelial cells and other cells in the lung to produce proinflammatory cytokines, including various types of interleukins, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor and RANTES, and histamine. Rhinovirus also stimulates the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and low-density lipoprotein receptors in the airway epithelium, receptors for major and minor rhinoviruses. Rhinovirus infection is inhibited by treatment with soluble ICAM-1 and by the reduction of ICAM-1 expression in airway epithelial cells after treatment with either glucocorticoid or erythromycin. Both soluble ICAM-1 and erythromycin have been reported to reduce the symptoms of common colds. Herein, we review the pathogenesis and management of rhinovirus infection-induced exacerbation of bronchial asthma and the relationship between rhinovirus infection and airway allergy.

  12. [Regeneration of airway epithelium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, D; Perotin, J-M; Lebargy, F; Birembaut, P; Deslée, G; Coraux, C

    2014-04-01

    Epithelial regeneration is a complex process. It can lead to the remodeling of the airway epithelium as in asthma, COPD or cystic fibrosis. The development of in vivo and in vitro models has allowed the analysis of remodeling mechanisms and showed the role of components of extracellular matrix, proteases, cytokines and growth factors. Airway epithelial progenitors and stems cells have been studied in these models. However, their identification remains difficult. Identification and characterization of airway epithelial progenitor/stem-cells, and a better knowledge of the regeneration process may allow the development of new therapeutic strategies for airway epithelial reconstitution. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of the apnea-hypopnea index determined by the S8 auto-CPAP, a continuous positive airway pressure device, in patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Kanako; Kasai, Takatoshi; Brewer, Gregory; Takaya, Hisashi; Maeno, Ken-ichi; Kasagi, Satoshi; Kawana, Fusae; Ishiwata, Sugao; Narui, Koji

    2010-04-15

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been established as an effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Recently, several auto-CPAP devices that can detect upper airway obstructive events and provide information about residual events while patients are on CPAP have come into clinical use. The purpose of this study was to compare the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) determined by the S8 auto-CPAP device with the AHI derived by polysomnography in patients with OSAHS. Consecutive patients with OSAHS titrated on S8 auto-CPAP were included. The correlation between AHI determined by manual scoring (AHI-PSG) and by S8 (AHIS8) during an overnight in-hospital polysomnogram with the patient on CPAP was assessed. Furthermore, the apnea index (Al) and the hypopnea index (HI) were evaluated separately. Seventy patients with OSAHS (94% men) were enrolled. The mean AHI on the diagnostic study was 51.9 +/- 2.4. During the titration, this device markedly suppressed the respiratory events (AHI-PSG, 4.2 +/- 0.4; AI, 1.9 +/- 0.3; HI, 2.3 +/- 0.3). On the other hand, the AHI-S8 was 9.9 +/- 0.6 (AI-S8, 2.4 +/- 0.3; HI-S8, 7.5 +/- 0.4). There was a strong correlation between the overall AHI-PSG and the AHI-S8 (r = 0.85, p S8 (r = 0.93, p S8 (r = 0.67, p S8 was observed. However, the correlation was weakened when the analysis was limited to the HI.

  14. Evaluation of short-term use of nocturnal nasal continuous positive airway pressure for a clinical profile and exercise capacity in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrit K Goel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS is a common chronic respiratory disease, characterized by repetitive complete or partial collapse of the upper airway during sleep. The clinical spectrum extends between stoppage of breathing, snoring, daytime somnolence, and fatigue, to serious cardiovascular disease, stroke, metabolic syndrome, increased morbidity, and mortality. We aim to evaluate the short-term use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP therapy for the clinical profile and exercise capacity of patients with OSAHS. Patient Selection: Twenty patients diagnosed with moderate-to-severe OSAHS were enrolled in the study (study group - 15; clinically and PSG-matched control group - 5. Materials and Methods: Each patient was clinically evaluated for sleep-related symptoms, and also assessed with spirometry, the six-minute walk test (6MWT, and a symptom-limited incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET. The study group patients were administered nCPAP therapy for eight hours each night for four weeks, while the control group patients were just observed. They were re-assessed after four weeks and the data were statistically analyzed between the two groups. Results: The study group patients showed a significant (P- < 0.05 improvement in the OSAHS symptoms-the Epworth sleepiness score, six-minute walk distance; duration of exercise, power output, peak oxygen uptake, anaerobic threshold, diastolic blood pressure, dyspnea, and fatigue-in comparison with the control group patients. The improvement in exercise capacity following nCPAP therapy was attributed to the relief of disabling the OSAHS symptoms and improved cardiovascular, ventilator, and musculoskeletal functions. Conclusion: All OSAHS patients must be treated with nCPAP.

  15. Airway Tree Extraction with Locally Optimal Paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Sporring, Jon; Pedersen, Jesper Johannes Holst

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to extract the airway tree from CT images by continually extending the tree with locally optimal paths. This is in contrast to commonly used region growing based approaches that only search the space of the immediate neighbors. The result is a much more robust method...... for tree extraction that can overcome local occlusions. The cost function for obtaining the optimal paths takes into account of an airway probability map as well as measures of airway shape and orientation derived from multi-scale Hessian eigen analysis on the airway probability. Significant improvements...... were achieved compared to a region growing based method, with up to 36% longer trees at a slight increase of false positive rate....

  16. Airway distensibility in Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler Wille, Mathilde Marie; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Dirksen, Asger

    2013-01-01

    -20% (mild), 20%-30% (moderate) or >30% (severe). Spirometry was performed annually and participants were divided into severity groups according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). Data were analysed in a mixed effects regression model with log(airway lumen diameter...... the interior and exterior airway wall surface in three dimensions, and branches were matched in consecutive scans by image registration. Emphysema was defined as attenuation referred to as % low-attenuation area 910 (%LAA910). Emphysema limits were set at

  17. Airway smooth muscle cells : regulators of airway inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuyderduyn, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    Airways from asthmatic subjects are more responsive to bronchoconstrictive stimuli than airways from healthy subjects. Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells mediate contraction of the airways by responding to the bronchoconstrictive stimuli, which was thought to be the primary role of ASM cells. In this

  18. Trichobezoar Causing Airway Compromise during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Y. Kao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. (1 Report the case of a 5-year-old female with trichotillomania and trichophagia that suffered airway compromise during esophagogastroduodenoscopy for removal of a trichobezoar. (2 Provide management recommendations for an unusual foreign body causing extubation and partial airway obstruction. Methods. Case report of a rare situation of airway compromise caused by a trichobezoar. Results. A 5-year-old patient underwent endoscopic retrieval of a gastric trichobezoar (hairball by the gastroenterology service under general endotracheal anesthesia in a sedation unit. During removal, the hairball, due to its large size, dislodged the endotracheal tube, effectively extubating the patient. The bezoar became lodged at the cricopharyngeus muscle. Attempts to remove the bezoar or reintubation were unsuccessful. The child was able to be mask ventilated while the otolaryngology service was called. Direct laryngoscopy revealed a hairball partially obstructing the view of the glottis from its position in the postcricoid area. The hairball, still entrapped in the snare from the esophagoscope, was grasped with Magill forceps and slowly extracted. The patient was then reintubated and the airway and esophagus were reevaluated. Conclusions. Trichobezoar is an uncommon cause of airway foreign body. Careful attention to airway management during these and similar foreign body extractions can prevent inadvertent extubations.

  19. Impact of airway morphological changes on pulmonary flows in scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, James; Garrido, Enrique; Valluri, Prashant

    2016-11-01

    The relationship between thoracic deformity in scoliosis and lung function is poorly understood. In a pilot study, we reviewed computed tomography (CT) routine scans of patients undergoing scoliosis surgery. The CT scans were processed to segment the anatomy of the airways, lung and spine. A three-dimensional model was created to study the anatomical relationship. Preliminary analysis showed significant airway morphological differences depending on the anterior position of the spine. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study was also conducted on the airway geometry using the inspiratory scans. The CFD model assuming non-compliant airway walls was capable of showing pressure drops in areas of high airway resistance, but was unable to predict regional ventilation differences. Our results indicate a dependence between the dynamic deformation of the airway during breathing and lung function. Dynamic structural deformation must therefore be incorporated within any modelling approaches to guide clinicians on the decision to perform surgical correction of the scoliosis.

  20. Relationship between airway pathophysiology and airway inflammation in older asthmatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsbjerg, Celeste M; Gibson, Peter G; Pretto, Jeffrey J

    2013-01-01

    , neutrophil airway inflammation increases airway closure during bronchoconstriction, while eosinophil airway inflammation increases airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). METHODS: Asthmatic subjects (n = 26), aged ≥55 years (68% female), were studied, and AHR to 4.5% saline challenge was measured by the response...... or eNO. CONCLUSIONS: In older patients with asthma, airway inflammatory cells are linked to abnormal airway physiology. Eosinophilic airway inflammation is associated with AHR while neutrophilic inflammation may be an important determinant of airflow limitation at rest and airway closure during......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Asthma-related morbidity is greater in older compared with younger asthmatics. Airway closure is also greater in older asthmatics, an observation that may be explained by differences in airway inflammation. We hypothesized that in older adult patients with asthma...

  1. Upper Airway Control in Airway Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliacek I

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Upper airways (UA are an organic component of the respiratory tract, they serve to respiration, respiratory tract protection and defense, phonation, deglutition, etc. The functions of UA are regulated by motor control of the oral, pharyngeal, and laryngeal muscles.

  2. Airway distensibility in Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler Wille, Mathilde Marie; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Dirksen, Asger

    2013-01-01

    on the airway distensibility, defined as the ratio of relative change in lumen diameter to the relative change in total lung volume (TLV) divided by predicted total lung capacity (pTLC) . Methods – We included 1900 participants from the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial (DLCST); all randomized to annual low...

  3. Airway Management Dilemma in a Patient with Maxillofacial Injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    He had tracheostomy and repair of the laceration under general anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was induced with intravenous ketamine with the patient in the left lateral position while traction on the tongue using a Magill's forceps ensured patency of the airway. A classical laryngeal mask airway was subsequently inserted to ...

  4. Prone surgery and laryngeal mask airways: an overview of recent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-08-17

    Aug 17, 2013 ... patient trauma. • Effective laryngeal mask airway (LMA) placement in the prone position may suggest a rescue airway in the event of endotracheal .... Facet infiltrations. • Rhizotomy. • Spinal decompression. • Spinal fusion. • Pilonidal sinus. • Melanoma excision on the back. • Bone marrow aspiration.

  5. Radiation induced changes in the airway - anaesthetic implications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    patient had no history of airway compromise during sleep or in the supine position, intramuscular morphine 4.5mg and ... he gave a history of having had radiotherapy for carcinoma of the lip, detected 7 years previously. He had .... tubation; an approach to airway assessment. Ma Zui Xue Za Zhi 1993;. 31 (3): 165 – 78. 4.

  6. Positioning the principles of precision medicine in care pathways for allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis - A EUFOREA-ARIA-EPOS-AIRWAYS ICP statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellings, P W; Fokkens, W J; Bachert, C

    2017-01-01

    approach for individuals suffering from chronic disabling conditions. Given the emerging data on the impact of patient stratification on treatment outcomes, European and American regulatory bodies support the principles of PM and its potential advantage over current treatment strategies. The aim...... of the current document was to propose a consensus on the position and gradual implementation of the principles of PM within existing adult treatment algorithms for allergic rhinitis (AR) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). At the time of diagnosis, prediction of success of the initiated treatment and patient...

  7. Efficacy and safety of adjunctive modafinil treatment on residual excessive daytime sleepiness among nasal continuous positive airway pressure-treated japanese patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a double-blind placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuichi; Takasaki, Yuji; Yamashiro, Yoshihiro

    2013-08-15

    This double-blind study evaluated the efficacy and safety of modafinil for treating excessive daytime sleepiness in Japanese patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Patients with residual excessive sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS] ≥ 11) on optimal nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) therapy (apnea-hypopnea index ≤ 10) were randomized to either 200 mg modafinil (n = 52) or placebo (n = 62) once daily for 4 weeks. Outcomes included baseline-week 4 changes in ESS total score, sleep latency on maintenance of wakefulness test (SL-MWT), nocturnal polysomnography, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and safety. All 114 randomized patients completed the study. Mean change in ESS total score (-6.6 vs -2.4, p modafinil than with placebo. ESS total score decreased from > 11 to modafinil-treated patients and 30.6% of placebo-treated patients (p modafinil and placebo groups, respectively (p = 0.146). Once-daily modafinil was effective and well tolerated for managing residual daytime sleepiness in Japanese OSAS patients with residual excessive daytime sleepiness on optimal nCPAP therapy.

  8. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea: a systematic review and meta-analysis of six randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qiang; Lv, Yunhui; Li, Kai; Ma, Lei; Du, Guodong; Xiang, Yan; Li, Xuqing

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate systematically the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The Cochrane Library, PubMed, ScienceDirect, and the Web of Science were searched for studies investigating the effects of CPAP on blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension and OSA. The selected studies underwent quality assessment and meta-analysis, as well as being tested for heterogeneity. Six randomized controlled trials were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled estimates of the changes in mean systolic blood pressure and mean diastolic blood pressure (as assessed by 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring) were -5.40 mmHg (95% CI: -9.17 to -1.64; p = 0.001; I2 = 74%) and -3.86 mmHg (95% CI: -6.41 to -1.30; p = 0.00001; I2 = 79%), respectively. CPAP therapy can significantly reduce blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension and OSA.

  9. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... people with cystic fibrosis so that they make smart decisions about CF-related research, treatment, and access ... Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram Email DONATE Breadcrumb Navigation Home Life With CF Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance ...

  10. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Family Parenting as an Adult With CF Treatments & Therapies People with cystic fibrosis are living longer ... to specialized CF care and a range of treatment options. Airway Clearance Active Cycle of Breathing Technique ...

  11. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... another member of your CF care team can show you how to perform many different ACTs and ... of children with CF and a respiratory therapist talk about the different techniques they use for airway ...

  12. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... There are different ways to clear your airways. Most are easy to do. Infants and toddlers will ... best ACT is the one that you are most likely to perform as part of your daily ...

  13. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CYSTIC FIBROSIS Learn about cystic fibrosis, a genetic lung disorder that affects the pancreas and other organs, ... Technique Airway Clearance Techniques Autogenic Drainage Basics of Lung Care Chest Physical Therapy Coughing and Huffing High- ...

  14. Airway protective mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Teresa

    2014-02-01

    Cough and swallow are highly coordinated reflex behaviors whose common purpose is to protect the airway. The pharynx is the common tube for air and food/liquid movement from the mouth into the thorax, has been largely overlooked, and is potentially seen as just a passive space. The thyropharyngeus muscle responds to cough inducing stimuli to prepare a transient holding area for material that has been removed from the subglottic airway. The cricopharyngeus muscle participates with the larynx to ensure regulation of pressure when a bolus/air is moving from the upper airway through to the thorax (i.e., inspiration or swallow) or the reverse (i.e., expiration reflex or vomiting). These vital mechanisms have not been evaluated in clinical conditions but could be impaired in many neurodegenerative diseases, leading to aspiration pneumonia. These newly described airway protective mechanisms need further study, especially in healthy and pathologic human populations.

  15. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinical Care Guidelines Liver Disease Clinical Care Guidelines Respiratory Care Guidelines CF Airway Clearance Therapies Clinical Care ... attack bacteria. Choose What's Best for You Your respiratory therapist or another member of your CF care ...

  16. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CFTR Modulator Therapies Mucus Thinners Nebulizer Care at Home Vascular Access Devices PICCs and Ports Partnerships for ... Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram Email DONATE Breadcrumb Navigation Home Life With CF Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance ...

  17. Human airway smooth muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. de Jongste (Johan)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThe function of airway smooth muscle in normal subjects is not evident. Possible physiological roles include maintenance of optimal regional ventilation/perfusion ratios, reduction of anatomic dead space, stabilisation of cartilaginous bronchi, defense against impurities and, less

  18. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... many challenges, including medical, social, and financial. By learning more about how you can manage your disease every day, you can ultimately help find a ... Cycle of Breathing Technique Airway Clearance Techniques Autogenic ...

  19. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the smaller airways to attack bacteria. Choose What's Best for You Your respiratory therapist or another member ... specific ACTs for you to try. However, the best ACT is the one that you are most ...

  20. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in CF Clinical Care Guidelines Cystic Fibrosis-Related Diabetes Clinical Care Guidelines Liver Disease Clinical Care Guidelines Respiratory Care Guidelines CF Airway Clearance Therapies Clinical Care Guidelines Chronic Medications to Maintain Lung ...

  1. Airway Protective Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Pitts, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Cough and swallow are highly coordinated reflex behaviors whose common purpose is to protect the airway. The pharynx is the common tube for air and food/liquid movement from the mouth into the thorax, has been largely overlooked, and is potentially seen as just a passive space. The thyropharyngeus muscle responds to cough inducing stimuli to prepare a transient holding area for material that has been removed from the subglottic airway. The cricopharyngeus muscle participates with the larynx t...

  2. New airways for resuscitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, T M; Hommers, C

    2006-06-01

    Over the last 15 years supraglottic airway devices (SADs), most notably the classic laryngeal mask airway (LMA) have revolutionised airway management in anaesthesia. In contrast for resuscitation, both in and outside hospital, facemask ventilation and tracheal intubation remain the mainstays of airway management. However there is evidence that both these techniques have complications and are often poorly performed by inexperienced personnel. Tracheal intubation also has the potential to cause serious harm or death through unrecognised oesophageal intubation. SADs may have a role in airway management for resuscitation as first responder devices, rescue devices or for use during patient extraction. In particular they may be beneficial as the level of skill required to use the device safely may be less than for the tracheal tube. Concerns have been expressed over the ability to ventilate the lungs successfully and also the risk of aspiration with SADs. The only SADs recommended by ILCOR in its current guidance are the classic LMA and combitube. Several SADs have recently been introduced with claims that ventilation and airway protection is improved. This pragmatic review examines recent developments in SAD technology and the relevance of this to the potential for using SADs during resuscitation. In addition to examining research directly related to resuscitation both on bench models and in patients the review also examines evidence from anaesthetic practice. SADS discussed include the classic, intubating and Proseal LMAs, the combitube, the laryngeal tube, laryngeal tube sonda mark I and II and single use laryngeal masks.

  3. Airway management in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration.

  4. Prevalence of central sleep apnea during continous positive airway pressure (CPAP) titration in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome at an altitude of 2640 m.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazurto Zapata, Maria Angelica; Martinez-Guzman, William; Vargas-Ramirez, Leslie; Herrera, Karen; Gonzalez-Garcia, Mauricio

    2015-03-01

    The occurrence of central apneas when applying positive pressure (CPAP) to patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is called complex sleep apnea (CompSA). This causes poor adherence to CPAP and persistence of symptoms. In Bogota, a city located at an altitude of 2640 m above sea level, chronic hypoxemia can generate certain instability of the respiratory system during sleep which could increase the presence of central apnea. The aim was to establish the prevalence of central apnea (central apnea index >5/h) in adults with moderate or severe OSAS during CPAP titration, and the factors associated with this. Patients over 18 years old with OSAS were referred to the Fundacion Neumologica Colombiana Sleep Center, from January 2008 to June 2010. Polysomnogram (PSG) for CPAP titration was performed according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria. The prevalence was calculated and the clinical and baseline PSG factors associated with the CompSA were analyzed. We included 988 patients, 58% men. CompSA prevalence was 11.6%. Factors associated with CompSA were: central apneas in the baseline PSG (OR: 5.34 [3.49-8.16]), history of heart failure (OR: 2.53 [1.58-4.07]), and male sex (OR: 1.68 [1.06-2.69]). The prevalence of complex sleep apnea in Bogota (11.6%) was intermediate compared to the reported in lower altitudes. The factors associated with the development of CompSA were male sex, heart failure, and the presence of central apnea in the baseline PSG. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Extubation of the difficult airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Khaldoun; Zayaruzny, Maksim; Spanakis, Spiro

    2011-01-01

    Managing the airway in the intensive care unit (ICU) is complicated by a wide array of physiologic factors. Difficult airway may be a consequence of patient’s anatomy or airway edema developed during the ICU stay and mechanical ventilation. The incidence of failed airways and of cardiac arrest related to airway instrumentation in the ICU is much higher than that of elective intubations performed in the operating room. In this article, we will provide a framework for identifying a difficult airway, criteria for safe extubation, as well as review the devices that are available for airway management in the ICU. Proficiency in identifying a potentially difficult airway and thorough familiarity with strategies and techniques of securing the airway are necessary for safe practice of critical care medicine

  6. Laryngotracheal anomalies and airway fluoroscopy in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaiah, Amal; Pereira, Kevin D

    2017-06-01

    The role of airway fluoroscopy in the diagnosis of laryngotracheal anomalies in infants is controversial. We aimed to (i) compare airway fluoroscopic characteristics with endoscopic findings in infants presenting for evaluation of upper airway obstruction and (ii) assess the as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) status for airway fluoroscopy as an initial diagnostic test in suspected laryngotracheal anomalies. We performed a retrospective review of children who underwent fluoroscopy and endoscopic evaluation of the airway in the operating room for suspected laryngotracheal anatomic abnormalities. Thirty-four infants who underwent both procedures at a tertiary level university-based children's hospital from January 1, 2008 to December 1, 2013 were included. Infants with suspected foreign bodies or an existing tracheostomy were excluded. Intraoperative findings from endoscopy and radiologic interpretation from fluoroscopy were compared using standard tools for validation of a diagnostic test. These metrics were compared with historic data that suggested good correlation between radiologic and endoscopic findings in older children. The median age was 3.6 months (range 1-8 months). The sensitivity of airway fluoroscopy for determining laryngotracheal pathology was 18%. Specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 83%, 67% and 35%, respectively. Although each fluoroscopic exposure was optimized for pediatric patients, the median cumulative exposure to ionizing radiation was 19 mR (range 10-34 mR). Airway fluoroscopy yields metrics that are overall poor to be considered a valid and accurate universal radiologic diagnostic test in infants evaluated for laryngotracheal pathology. The cumulative exposure to ionizing radiation from use of a fluoroscope cannot be justified by the sensitivity of the test and may not conform to ALARA standards for imaging in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Addis, A.; Adcock, I.; Agache, I.; Agusti, A.; Alonso, A.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Anto, J. M.; Bachert, C.; Baena-Cagnani, C. E.; Bai, C.; Baigenzhin, A.; Barbara, C.; Barnes, P. J.; Bateman, E. D.; Beck, L.; Bedbrook, A.; Bel, E. H.; Benezet, O.; Bennoor, K. S.; Benson, M.; Bernabeu-Wittel, M.; Bewick, M.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; Blain, H.; Blasi, F.; Bonini, M.; Bonini, S.; Boulet, L. P.; Bourdin, A.; Bourret, R.; Bousquet, P. J.; Brightling, C. E.; Briggs, A.; Brozek, J.; Buh, R.; Bush, A.; Caimmi, D.; Calderon, M.; Calverley, P.; Camargos, P. A.; Camuzat, T.; Canonica, G. W.; Carlsen, K. H.; Casale, T. B.; Cazzola, M.; Sarabia, A. M. Cepeda; Cesario, A.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Chavannes, N. H.; Chiron, R.; Chuchalin, A.; Chung, K. F.; Cox, L.; Crooks, G.; Crooks, M. G.; Cruz, A. A.; Custovic, A.; Dahl, R.; Dahlen, S. E.; De Blay, F.; Dedeu, T.; Deleanu, D.; Demoly, P.; Devillier, P.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A. T.; Djukanovic, R.; Dokic, D.; Douagui, H.; Dubakiene, R.; Eglin, S.; Elliot, F.; Emuzyte, R.; Fabbri, L.; Wagner, A. Fink; Fletcher, M.; Fokkens, W. J.; Fonseca, J.; Franco, A.; Frith, P.; Furber, A.; Gaga, M.; Garces, J.; Garcia-Aymerich, J.; Gamkrelidze, A.; Gonzales-Diaz, S.; Gouzi, F.; Guzman, M. A.; Haahtela, T.; Harrison, D.; Hayot, M.; Heaney, L. G.; Heinrich, J.; Hellings, P. W.; Hooper, J.; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M.; Iaccarino, G.; Jakovenko, D.; Jardim, J. R.; Jeandel, C.; Jenkins, C.; Johnston, S. L.; Jonquet, O.; Joos, G.; Jung, K. S.; Kalayci, O.; Karunanithi, S.; Keil, T.; Khaltaev, N.; Kolek, V.; Kowalski, M. L.; Kull, I.; Kuna, P.; Kvedariene, V.; Le, L. T.; Carlsen, K. C. Lodrup; Louis, R.; MacNee, W.; Mair, A.; Majer, I.; Manning, P.; Keenoy, E. de Manuel; Masjedi, M. R.; Meten, E.; Melo-Gomes, E.; Menzies-Gow, A.; Mercier, G.; Mercier, J.; Michel, J. P.; Miculinic, N.; Mihaltan, F.; Milenkovic, B.; Molimard, M.; Mamas, I.; Montilla-Santana, A.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Morgan, M.; N'Diaye, M.; Nafti, S.; Nekam, K.; Neou, A.; Nicod, L.; O'Hehir, R.; Ohta, K.; Paggiaro, P.; Palkonen, S.; Palmer, S.; Papadopoulos, N. G.; Papi, A.; Passalacqua, G.; Pavord, I.; Pigearias, B.; Plavec, D.; Postma, D. S.; Price, D.; Rabe, K. F.; Pontal, F. Radier; Redon, J.; Rennard, S.; Roberts, J.; Robine, J. M.; Roca, J.; Roche, N.; Rodenas, F.; Roggeri, A.; Rolland, C.; Rosado-Pinto, J.; Ryan, D.; Samolinski, B.; Sanchez-Borges, M.; Schunemann, H. J.; Sheikh, A.; Shields, M.; Siafakas, N.; Sibille, Y.; Similowski, T.; Small, I.; Sola-Morales, O.; Sooronbaev, T.; Stelmach, R.; Sterk, P. J.; Stiris, T.; Sud, P.; Tellier, V.; To, T.; Todo-Bom, A.; Triggiani, M.; Valenta, R.; Valero, A. L.; Valiulis, A.; Valovirta, E.; Van Ganse, E.; Vandenplas, O.; Vasankari, T.; Vestbo, J.; Vezzani, G.; Viegi, G.; Visier, L.; Vogelmeier, C.; Vontetsianos, T.; Wagstaff, R.; Wahn, U.; Wallaert, B.; Whalley, B.; Wickman, M.; Williams, D. M.; Wilson, N.; Yawn, B. P.; Yiallouros, P. K.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Yusuf, O. M.; Zar, H. J.; Zhong, N.; Zidarn, M.; Zuberbier, T.

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will

  8. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Addis, A.; Adcock, I.; Agache, I.; Agusti, A.; Alonso, A.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Anto, J. M.; Bachert, C.; Baena-Cagnani, C. E.; Bai, C.; Baigenzhin, A.; Barbara, C.; Barnes, P. J.; Bateman, E. D.; Beck, L.; Bedbrook, A.; Bel, E. H.; Benezet, O.; Bennoor, K. S.; Benson, M.; Bernabeu-Wittel, M.; Bewick, M.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; Blain, H.; Blasi, F.; Bonini, M.; Bonini, S.; Boulet, L. P.; Bourdin, A.; Bourret, R.; Bousquet, P. J.; Brightling, C. E.; Briggs, A.; Brozek, J.; Buhl, R.; Bush, A.; Caimmi, D.; Calderon, M.; Calverley, P.; Camargos, P. A.; Camuzat, T.; Canonica, G. W.; Carlsen, K. H.; Casale, T. B.; Cazzola, M.; Cepeda Sarabia, A. M.; Cesario, A.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Chavannes, N. H.; Chiron, R.; Chuchalin, A.; Chung, K. F.; Cox, L.; Crooks, G.; Crooks, M. G.; Cruz, A. A.; Custovic, A.; Dahl, R.; Dahlen, S. E.; de Blay, F.; Dedeu, T.; Deleanu, D.; Demoly, P.; Devillier, P.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A. T.; Djukanovic, R.; Dokic, D.; Douagui, H.; Dubakiene, R.; Eglin, S.; Elliot, F.; Emuzyte, R.; Fabbri, L.; Fink Wagner, A.; Fletcher, M.; Fokkens, W. J.; Fonseca, J.; Franco, A.; Frith, P.; Furber, A.; Gaga, M.; Garcés, J.; Garcia-Aymerich, J.; Gamkrelidze, A.; Gonzales-Diaz, S.; Gouzi, F.; Guzmán, M. A.; Haahtela, T.; Harrison, D.; Hayot, M.; Heaney, L. G.; Heinrich, J.; Hellings, P. W.; Hooper, J.; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M.; Iaccarino, G.; Jakovenko, D.; Jardim, J. R.; Jeandel, C.; Jenkins, C.; Johnston, S. L.; Jonquet, O.; Joos, G.; Jung, K. S.; Kalayci, O.; Karunanithi, S.; Keil, T.; Khaltaev, N.; Kolek, V.; Kowalski, M. L.; Kull, I.; Kuna, P.; Kvedariene, V.; Le, L. T.; Lodrup Carlsen, K. C.; Louis, R.; MacNee, W.; Mair, A.; Majer, I.; Manning, P.; de Manuel Keenoy, E.; Masjedi, M. R.; Melen, E.; Melo-Gomes, E.; Menzies-Gow, A.; Mercier, G.; Mercier, J.; Michel, J. P.; Miculinic, N.; Mihaltan, F.; Milenkovic, B.; Molimard, M.; Momas, I.; Montilla-Santana, A.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Morgan, M.; N'Diaye, M.; Nafti, S.; Nekam, K.; Neou, A.; Nicod, L.; O'Hehir, R.; Ohta, K.; Paggiaro, P.; Palkonen, S.; Palmer, S.; Papadopoulos, N. G.; Papi, A.; Passalacqua, G.; Pavord, I.; Pigearias, B.; Plavec, D.; Postma, D. S.; Price, D.; Rabe, K. F.; Radier Pontal, F.; Redon, J.; Rennard, S.; Roberts, J.; Robine, J. M.; Roca, J.; Roche, N.; Rodenas, F.; Roggeri, A.; Rolland, C.; Rosado-Pinto, J.; Ryan, D.; Samolinski, B.; Sanchez-Borges, M.; Schünemann, H. J.; Sheikh, A.; Shields, M.; Siafakas, N.; Sibille, Y.; Similowski, T.; Small, I.; Sola-Morales, O.; Sooronbaev, T.; Stelmach, R.; Sterk, P. J.; Stiris, T.; Sud, P.; Tellier, V.; To, T.; Todo-Bom, A.; Triggiani, M.; Valenta, R.; Valero, A. L.; Valiulis, A.; Valovirta, E.; van Ganse, E.; Vandenplas, O.; Vasankari, T.; Vestbo, J.; Vezzani, G.; Viegi, G.; Visier, L.; Vogelmeier, C.; Vontetsianos, T.; Wagstaff, R.; Wahn, U.; Wallaert, B.; Whalley, B.; Wickman, M.; Williams, D. M.; Wilson, N.; Yawn, B. P.; Yiallouros, P. K.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Yusuf, O. M.; Zar, H. J.; Zhong, N.; Zidarn, M.; Zuberbier, T.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will

  9. Customized bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2013-02-09

    Feb 9, 2013 ... To meet the increasing demand for a simple respiratory support for preterm babies in our institution, we modified the existing Bubble CPAP ... the humidified oxygen source (oxygen cylinder, oxygen concentrator or wall-piped oxygen) through the interface to the baby. It is interesting to note that these tubes ...

  10. Equine recurrent airway obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Niedźwiedź

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Equine Recurrent Airway Obstruction (RAO, also known as heaves or broken wind, is one of the most common disease in middle-aged horses. Inflammation of the airway is inducted by organic dust exposure. This disease is characterized by neutrophilic inflammation, bronchospasm, excessive mucus production and pathologic changes in the bronchiolar walls. Clinical signs are resolved in 3-4 weeks after environmental changes. Horses suffering from RAO are susceptible to allergens throughout their lives, therefore they should be properly managed. In therapy the most importanthing is to eliminate dustexposure, administration of corticosteroids and use bronchodilators to improve pulmonary function.

  11. Advanced Pediatric Airway Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Charles M; Jabbour, Noel

    2017-10-01

    Simulation is an emerging and viable means to increase pediatric airway surgical training. A variety of simulators currently exist that may be used or modified for laryngoscopy, bronchoscopy, and endoscopic intervention, although anatomic realism and utility for complex procedures are limited. There is a need for further development of improved endoscopic and anatomic models. Innovative techniques are enabling small-scale manufacturing of generalizable and patient-specific simulators. The high acuity of the pediatric airway patient makes the use of simulation an attractive modality for training, competency maintenance, and patient safety quality-improvement studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Desmin modulates lung elastic recoil and airway responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shardonofsky, Felix R; Capetanaki, Yassemi; Boriek, Aladin M

    2006-05-01

    Desmin is a structural protein that is expressed in smooth muscle cells of both airways and alveolar ducts. Therefore, desmin could be well situated to participate in passive and contractile force transmission in the lung. We hypothesized that desmin modulates lung compliance, lung recoil pressure, and airway contractile response. To test this hypothesis, respiratory system complex impedance (Zin,rs) at different positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels and quasi-static pressure-volume data were obtained in desmin-null and wild-type mice at baseline and during methacholine administration. Airways and lung tissue properties were partitioned by fitting Zin,rs to a constant-phase model. Relative to controls, desmin-null mice showed 1) lower values for lung stiffness and recoil pressure at baseline and induced airway constriction, 2) greater negative PEEP dependence of H and airway resistance under baseline conditions and cholinergic stimulation, and 3) airway hyporesponsiveness. These results demonstrate that desmin is a load-bearing protein that stiffens the airways and consequently the lung and modulates airway contractile response.

  13. Anesthetic concerns in a huge congenital sublingual swelling obscuring airway access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Presence of intraoral pathology poses a great challenge during management of pediatric airway. We report management of big intraoral cystic swelling physically occupying the entire oral cavity restricting access to airway. Preintubation aspiration of swelling was done to decrease its size and make room for airway manipulation, followed by laryngoscopy and intubation in lateral position. Airway patency is at risk in postoperative period also, in this case, though the swelling decreased in size postoperatively but presence of significant edema required placement of tongue stitch and modified nasopharyngeal airway. Case report highlights simple maneuvers to manage a difficult case.

  14. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NACFC Carolyn and C Richard Mattingly Leadership in Mental Health Care Award Mary M. Kontos Award NACFC Reflections ... help your infant or child manage their lung health, watch parents of children with CF and a respiratory therapist talk about the different techniques they use for airway clearance. ... Instagram Email Find a Clinical Trial Help us blaze ...

  15. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... center. Carrier Testing for Cystic Fibrosis CFTR-Related Metabolic Syndrome (CRMS) How Babies Are Screened in IRT-Only ... Nutrition in Children and Adults Clinical Care Guidelines Nutrition in Pediatrics Clinical ... Airway Clearance Therapies Clinical Care Guidelines Chronic Medications to Maintain Lung ...

  16. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Leaders About Us News Blog Chapters ... different ways to clear your airways. Most are easy to do. Infants and toddlers will need help from a parent or caregiver. Older kids and adults can choose ACTs that they can ...

  17. Upper airway evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.A.; Gefter, W.B.; Schnall, M.; Nordberg, J.; Listerud, J.; Lenkinski, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The authors are evaluating upper-airway sleep disorders with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and x-ray cine computed tomography (CT). Fixed structural anatomy is visualized with multisection spin-echo MR imaging, the dynamic component with cine CT. Unique aspects of the study are described in this paper

  18. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Their Families When There's More Than One Person With CF in the Same School Daily Life ... Awards and Grants Career Development Awards Research Awards Training Awards CF ... Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your ...

  19. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be taken through a nebulizer during ACTs. Inhaled antibiotics should be taken after ACTs are finished and the lungs are as clear of mucus as possible. This will allow the medication to reach deeply into the smaller airways to attack bacteria. Choose What's Best for You Your respiratory therapist ...

  20. Obstetric airway management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    face mask. There were 66 cases of aspiration (0.15%) and two mortalities. Both of the mortalities occurred secondary to solid food aspiration. Mendelson correctly identified delayed gastric emptying in the labouring patient, coupled with the loss of airway reflexes during general anaesthesia, as contributory factors to the ...

  1. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Team Your cystic fibrosis care team includes a group of CF health care professionals who partner with ... Awards and Grants Career Development Awards Research Awards Training Awards CF ... Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your ...

  2. Extraglottic airway devices: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma B

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bimla Sharma, Chand Sahai, Jayashree Sood Department of Anaesthesiology, Pain and Perioperative Medicine, Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, New Delhi, India Abstract: Extraglottic airway devices (EADs have revolutionized the field of airway management. The invention of the laryngeal mask airway was a game changer, and since then, there have been several innovations to improve the EADs in design, functionality, safety and construction material. These have ranged from changes in the shape of the mask, number of cuffs and material used, like rubber, polyvinylchloride and latex. Phthalates, which were added to the construction material in order to increase device flexibility, were later omitted when this chemical was found to have serious adverse reproductive outcomes. The various designs brought out by numerous companies manufacturing EADs resulted in the addition of several devices to the airway market. These airway devices were put to use, many of them with inadequate or no evidence base regarding their efficacy and safety. To reduce the possibility of compromising the safety of the patient, the Difficult Airway Society (DAS formed the Airway Device Evaluation Project Team (ADEPT to strengthen the evidence base for airway equipment and vet the new extraglottic devices. A preuse careful analysis of the design and structure may help in better understanding of the functionality of a particular device. In the meantime, the search for the ideal EAD continues. Keywords: extraglottic airway devices, laryngeal mask airway, other extraglottic airway devices, safety, technology update

  3. Use of Respiratory Support in the Biphase Ventilation Airway Mode in the Newborn

    OpenAIRE

    S. N. Koval; A. Ye. Kulagin

    2006-01-01

    Biphasic positive airway pressure (BIPAP) (also known as DuoPAP, BiLevel, BiVent, PCV+, SPAP) is a mode of ventilation with cycling variations between two continuous positive airway pressure levels. It is a mixture of pressure controlled ventilation and spontaneous breathing, which is unrestricted in each phase of the respiratory cycle. The volume displacement caused by the difference between Phigh and Plow airway pressure level. The phase time ratio (PTR — the BIPAP frequency) is calculated ...

  4. Infant flow biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure (BP- NCPAP vs. infant flow NCPAP for the facilitation of extubation in infants' ≤ 1,250 grams: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Brien Karel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of mechanical ventilation is associated with lung injury in preterm infants and therefore the goal is to avoid or minimize its use. To date there is very little consensus on what is considered the "best non-invasive ventilation mode" to be used post-extubation. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure (BP-NCPAP vs. NCPAP in facilitating sustained extubation in infants ≤ 1,250 grams. Methods We performed a randomized controlled trial of BP-NCPAP vs. NCPAP in infants ≤ 1,250 grams extubated for the first time following mechanical ventilation since birth. Infants were extubated using preset criteria or at the discretion of the attending neonatologist. The primary outcome was the incidence of sustained extubation for 7 days. Secondary outcomes included incidence of adverse events and short-term neonatal outcomes. Results Sixty-seven infants received BP-NCPAP and 69 NCPAP. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. The trial was stopped early due to increased use of non-invasive ventilation from birth, falling short of our calculated sample size of 141 infants per group. The incidence of sustained extubation was not statistically different between the BP-NCPAP vs. NCPAP group (67% vs. 58%, P = 0.27. The incidence of adverse events and short-term neonatal outcomes were similar between the two groups (P > 0.05 except for retinopathy of prematurity which was noted to be higher (P = 0.02 in the BP-NCPAP group. Conclusions Biphasic NCPAP may be used to assist in weaning from mechanical ventilation. The effectiveness and safety of BP-NCPAP compared to NCPAP needs to be confirmed in a large multi-center trial as our study conclusions are limited by inadequate sample size. Clinical Trials Registration # NCT00308789 Source of support Grant # 06-06, Physicians Services Incorporated Foundation, Toronto, Canada. Summit technologies Inc. provided

  5. Randomized controlled trial of two methods of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (N-CPAP) in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome: underwater bubbly CPAP vs. Medijet system device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mohammad Bagher; Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Balila, Masumeh; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Janani, Raheleh; Safavi-nia, Sima; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Alikhah, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    There has been an increasing interest in the application of non-invasive respiratory support in preterm infants, and different types of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (N-CPAP) devices are being used in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs). The objective of the present study was to compare the duration of CPAP need and possible complications of two methods of (N-CPAP) delivery: Bubble CPAP (B-CPAP) and Medijet (MJ) system device in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). This prospective randomized clinical trial was performed on 161 preterm infants (28-37 weeks of gestational age) with RDS and eligible for CPAP therapy. The infants were inborn and admitted in a level III NICU of Al-Zahra Teaching Hospital (Tabriz, Iran) from April 2010 to September 2011. All infants were randomized in the first hour of life to B-CPAP or MJ system. Short binasal prongs were used in both groups and CPAP was set at the level of 5-6 cm H2O. The primary outcome of this study was duration of CPAP need (hour). Other outcomes, such as complications of the two methods of N-CPAP, were evaluated using a checklist. Ninety infants were randomized to the MJ system, and 71 were randomized to B-CPAP. The mean gestational age and birth weight were similar in the two groups, as was the duration of CPAP need (44.3 ± 20.64 vs. 49.2 ± 21.2 hours, respectively; p=0.66). Moreover, the probability of complications, such as CPAP failure rate, pulmonary hemorrhage, pneumothorax, intraventricular hemorrhage, abdominal distention, necrotizing enterocolitis, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia, was the same between the two study groups (p>0.05). There was a trend of more hyperemia of the nose in the B-CPAP group in comparison to the MJ system group (10% versus 3.3%, respectively), but the difference was not significant (p=0.08). In conclusion, the MJ system is as effective as B-CPAP in the management of infants with RDS.

  6. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure on post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder and obstructive sleep apnea: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Solh, Ali A; Vermont, Leah; Homish, Gregory G; Kufel, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Previous retrospective studies have shown that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) exerts salutary effect on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and nightmare distress. The relative magnitude of therapeutic benefits from CPAP and the strength of associations between duration of CPAP use and PTSD symptomatology are unknown. A prospective cohort design involving 47 combat veterans with PTSD and documented obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by overnight polysomnography. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score, PTSD checklist-Military (PCL-M), Nightmare Distress Questionnaire (NDQ), and Nightmare Frequency Questionnaire (NFQ) were administered at baseline and 3 months after CPAP therapy. Objective adherence was assessed at the 3-month follow-up. Twenty-two veterans with mild-to-moderate PTSD (PCL-M score 17-59) and 18 with severe-to-very-severe PTSD (PCL-M score 60-85) completed the study. There was a dose-dependent response of PCL-M to duration of CPAP usage (r = 0.45; p = 0.003). Veterans with severe-to-very-severe PTSD had a larger improvement in PTSD symptoms (d = 0.65; p = 0.004) compared with those with mild-to-moderate PTSD (d = 0.47; p = 0.04). CPAP usage was the only significant predictor of overall subjective improvement in PTSD symptoms (OR 10.5; p = 0.01). Significant changes in NDQ and NFQ scores following 3 months of treatment were observed in veterans adherent to CPAP, but the correlations with duration of CPAP use were not statistically significant (r = 0.24; p = 0.13 and r = 0.13; p = 0.4, respectively). Improvement of PTSD symptoms in veterans with OSA was more pronounced with prolonged use of CPAP. Adherence to treatment was linked to abatement in nightmare distress and frequency. Future investigation of multimodal treatment, including behavioral intervention combined with CPAP, is warranted. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Elevated Extravascular Lung Water Index (ELWI) as a Predictor of Failure of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Via Helmet (Helmet-CPAP) in Patients With Acute Respiratory Failure After Major Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo Calvo, Francisco Javier; Bejarano Ramirez, Natalia; Uña Orejon, Rafael; Villazala Garcia, Ruben; Yuste Peña, Ana Sofia; Belda, Francisco Javier

    2015-11-01

    NIV is increasingly used for prevention and treatment of respiratory complications and failure. Some of them are admitted to the PACU with advanced hemodynamic monitors which allow quantification of Extravascular Lung Water (EVLW) by transpulmonary thermodilution technique (TPTD) and Pulmonary Vascular Permeability (PVP) providing information on lung edema. The objective of this study was to ascertain if EVLW Index and PVP Index may predict failure (intubation) or success (non-intubation) in patients developing acute respiratory failure (ARF) in the postoperative period following major abdominal surgery, where the first line of treatment was non-invasive continuous positive airway pressure via a helmet. Hemodynamic variables, EVLWI and PVPI were monitored with a transpulmonary thermodilution hemodynamic monitor device (PiCCO™) before and after the application of CPAP. Avoidance of intubation was observed in 66% of patients with Helmet-CPAP. In these patients after the first hour of application of CPAP, PaO2/FiO2 ratio significantly increased (303.33±65.2 vs. 141.6±14.6, P<.01). Before starting Helmet-CPAP values of EVLWI and PVPI were significantly lower in non-intubated patients (EVLWI 8.6±1.08 vs. 11.8±0.99ml/kg IBW, P<.01 and PVPI 1.7±0.56 vs. 3.0±0.88, P<.01). An optimal cut-off value for EVLWI was established at 9.5, and at 2.45 for PVPI (sensitivity of 0.7; specificity of 0.9, P<.01). In this type of patient the physiological parameters that predict the failure of Helmet-CPAP with the greatest accuracy were the value of the EVLWI and PVPI before Helmet-CPAP institution and the PaO2/FiO2 ratio and the respiratory rate after one hour of CPAP. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Airway Management Approach in Nasocutaneous Fistula: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanoja, Ivanna A; Toth, Kenneth S

    2018-01-15

    We present a case of a 63-year-old man with nasocutaneous fistula located outside the area covered by a large adult facemask. The patient was uncooperative for the standard airway assessment and any attempt at awake intubation. Positive pressure ventilation was compromised by the fistula. Although the incidence of overall complications, including fistula formation, following free flap reconstruction for oropharyngeal cancer is reported as high as 20%, few case reports detailing airway management exist. We demonstrate that it is possible to use conventional techniques to induce and ventilate a patient with a large, externalized, airway fistula by covering the defect with an occlusive transparent dressing.

  9. Lingual Tonsil Hypertrophy: rescuing the airway with videolaryngoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souki, Fouad Ghazi; Yemul-Golhar, Shweta Rahul; Zeyed, Yosaf; Pretto, Ernesto A

    2016-12-01

    Lingual tonsils are lymphatic tissues located at the base of the tongue that may hypertrophy causing difficulty and sometimes inability to ventilate or intubate during anesthesia. Routine airway assessment fails to diagnose lingual tonsil hypertrophy. There is limited experience with use of videolaryngoscopy in cases of lingual tonsil hypertrophy. We present a case of difficult airway due to unanticipated lingual tonsil hypertrophy successfully managed by atypical video laryngoscope positioning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intraoperative endobronchial rupture of pulmonary hydatid cyst: An airway catastrophe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid cyst disease of lungs may not be symptomatic. It may present as spontaneous rupture in pleura or a bronchus. During spontaneous breathing, cyst content of endobronchially ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst is mostly evacuated by coughing. However, during positive pressure ventilation such extruded fragments may lodge into smaller airway leading to an airway catastrophe. We present such accidental endobronchial rupture of pulmonary hydatid cyst during surgery, its prompt detection, and management by rigid bronchoscopy.

  11. Biomarkers in Airway Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M Leung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The inherent limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted clinicians and scientists to search for surrogate markers of airway diseases. Although few biomarkers have been widely accepted into the clinical armamentarium, the authors explore three sources of biomarkers that have shown promise as indicators of disease severity and treatment response. In asthma, exhaled nitric oxide measurements can predict steroid responsiveness and sputum eosinophil counts have been used to titrate anti-inflammatory therapies. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory plasma biomarkers, such as fibrinogen, club cell secretory protein-16 and surfactant protein D, can denote greater severity and predict the risk of exacerbations. While the multitude of disease phenotypes in respiratory medicine make biomarker development especially challenging, these three may soon play key roles in the diagnosis and management of airway diseases.

  12. Lipids in airway secretions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaskar, K.R.; DeFeudis O'Sullivan, D.; Opaskar-Hincman, H.; Reid, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Lipids form a significant portion of airway mucus yet they have not received the same attention that epithelial glycoproteins have. We have analysed, by thin layer chromatography, lipids present in airway mucus under 'normal' and hypersecretory (pathological) conditions.The 'normals' included (1) bronchial lavage obtained from healthy human volunteers and from dogs and (2) secretions produced ''in vitro'' by human (bronchial) and canine (tracheal) explants. Hypersecretory mucus samples included (1) lavage from dogs made bronchitic by exposure to SO 2 , (2) bronchial aspirates from acute and chronic tracheostomy patients, (3) sputum from patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis and (4) postmortem secretions from patients who died from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or from status asthmaticus. Cholesterol was found to be the predominant lipid in 'normal' mucus with lesser amounts of phospholipids. No glycolipids were detected. In the hypersecretory mucus, in addition to neutral and phospholipids, glycolipids were present in appreciable amounts, often the predominant species, suggesting that these may be useful as markers of disease. Radioactive precursors 14 C acetate and 14 C palmitate were incorporated into lipids secreted ''in vitro'' by canine tracheal explants indicating that they are synthesised by the airway. (author)

  13. Anticholinergic treatment in airways diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flynn, Robert A

    2009-10-01

    The prevalence of chronic airways diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma is increasing. They lead to symptoms such as a cough and shortness of breath, partially through bronchoconstriction. Inhaled anticholinergics are one of a number of treatments designed to treat bronchoconstriction in airways disease. Both short-acting and long-acting agents are now available and this review highlights their efficacy and adverse event profile in chronic airways diseases.

  14. Azithromycin ameliorates airway remodeling via inhibiting airway epithelium apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanqi; Pu, Yue; Li, Diandian; Zhou, Liming; Wan, Lihong

    2017-02-01

    Azithromycin can benefit treating allergic airway inflammation and remodeling. In the present study, we hypothesized that azithromycin alleviated airway epithelium injury through inhibiting airway epithelium apoptosis via down regulation of caspase-3 and Bax/Bcl2 ratio in vivo and in vitro. Ovalbumin induced rat asthma model and TGF-β1-induced BEAS-2B cell apoptosis model were established, respectively. In vivo experiments, airway epithelium was stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) to histologically evaluate the airway inflammation and remodeling. Airway epithelium apoptotic index (AI) was further analyzed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), while expression of apoptosis related gene (Bax, Bcl2, Caspase-3) in lungs were measured by qRT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. In vitro experiments, apoptosis were evaluated by Flow cytometry (FCM) and TUNEL. Above apoptosis related gene were also measured by qRT-PCR and western blotting. Compared with the OVA group, azithromycin significantly reduced the inflammation score, peribronchial smooth muscle layer thickness, epithelial thickening and goblet cell metaplasia (Pazithromycin-treated rats (Pazithromycin significantly suppressed TGF-β1-induced BEAS-2B cells apoptosis (PAzithromycin is an attractive treatment option for reducing airway epithelial cell apoptosis by improving the imbalance of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and inhibiting Caspase-3 level in airway epithelium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA) as an alternative to airway ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: To evaluate the possibility of airway management using a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) during dental procedures on mentally retarded (MR) patients and patients with genetic diseases. Design: A prospective pilot study. Setting: University Hospital. Methods: A pilot study was designed to induce general ...

  16. Incidence of unanticipated difficult airway using an objective airway score versus a standard clinical airway assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Anders Kehlet; Rosenstock, Charlotte Valentin; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    -specific assessment. Data from patients' pre-operative airway assessment are registered in the Danish Anaesthesia Database. Objective scores for intubation and mask ventilation grade the severity of airway managements. The accuracy of predicting difficult intubation and mask ventilation is measured for each group...... the examination and registration of predictors for difficult mask ventilation with a non-specified clinical airway assessment on prediction of difficult mask ventilation.Method/Design: We cluster-randomized 28 Danish departments of anaesthesia to airway assessment either by the SARI or by usual non...... that registration of the SARI and predictors for difficult mask ventilation are mandatory for the intervention group but invisible to controls....

  17. Rhinosinusitis and the lower airways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellings, Peter W.; Hens, Greet

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between upper and lower airway disease has been recognized for centuries, with recent studies showing a direct link between upper and airway inflammation in allergic patients. The mechanisms underlying the interaction between nasal and bronchial inflammation have primarily been

  18. Allergic Fungal Airway Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick, E M; Woolnough, K; Pashley, C H; Wardlaw, A J

    Fungi are ubiquitous and form their own kingdom. Up to 80 genera of fungi have been linked to type I allergic disease, and yet, commercial reagents to test for sensitization are available for relatively few species. In terms of asthma, it is important to distinguish between species unable to grow at body temperature and those that can (thermotolerant) and thereby have the potential to colonize the respiratory tract. The former, which include the commonly studied Alternaria and Cladosporium genera, can act as aeroallergens whose clinical effects are predictably related to exposure levels. In contrast, thermotolerant species, which include fungi from the Candida, Aspergillus, and Penicillium genera, can cause a persistent allergenic stimulus independent of their airborne concentrations. Moreover, their ability to germinate in the airways provides a more diverse allergenic stimulus, and may result in noninvasive infection, which enhances inflammation. The close association between IgE sensitization to thermotolerant filamentous fungi and fixed airflow obstruction, bronchiectasis, and lung fibrosis suggests a much more tissue-damaging process than that seen with aeroallergens. This review provides an overview of fungal allergens and the patterns of clinical disease associated with exposure. It clarifies the various terminologies associated with fungal allergy in asthma and makes the case for a new term (allergic fungal airway disease) to include all people with asthma at risk of developing lung damage as a result of their fungal allergy. Lastly, it discusses the management of fungirelated asthma.

  19. A Subject-Specific Acoustic Model of the Upper Airway for Snoring Sounds Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shumit; Bradley, T. Douglas; Taheri, Mahsa; Moussavi, Zahra; Yadollahi, Azadeh

    2016-05-01

    Monitoring variations in the upper airway narrowing during sleep is invasive and expensive. Since snoring sounds are generated by air turbulence and vibrations of the upper airway due to its narrowing; snoring sounds may be used as a non-invasive technique to assess upper airway narrowing. Our goal was to develop a subject-specific acoustic model of the upper airway to investigate the impacts of upper airway anatomy, e.g. length, wall thickness and cross-sectional area, on snoring sounds features. To have a subject-specific model for snoring generation, we used measurements of the upper airway length, cross-sectional area and wall thickness from every individual to develop the model. To validate the proposed model, in 20 male individuals, intensity and resonant frequencies of modeled snoring sounds were compared with those measured from recorded snoring sounds during sleep. Based on both modeled and measured results, we found the only factor that may positively and significantly contribute to snoring intensity was narrowing in the upper airway. Furthermore, measured resonant frequencies of snoring were inversely correlated with the upper airway length, which is a risk factor for upper airway collapsibility. These results encourage the use of snoring sounds analysis to assess the upper airway anatomy during sleep.

  20. An interventional airway delivery service for congenital high airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaneza, M M C; Cameron, A; Clement, W A; Fairgrieve, R; Ledingham, M A; Morrissey, M S; Simpson, J; Wynne, D M; Kubba, H

    2015-08-01

    Congenital airway obstruction is rare but potentially fatal. We developed a complex airways interventional delivery team to manage such cases. Antenatal imaging detects airway compromise at an early stage and facilitates the planning of delivery procedures ('ex utero intrapartum treatment' and 'operation on placental support') which maintain feto-placental circulation whilst an airway is secured. A retrospective review was performed of cases in which ENT input was required at birth for airway obstruction. Four neonates were delivered before implementation of the service: two were intubated and another two underwent tracheostomy but died in the peri-natal period. Seven neonates were delivered after implementation of the service: six were intubated and one underwent immediate tracheostomy. Five subsequently underwent tracheostomy (three have since been decannulated). One child with multiple congenital anomalies died due to respiratory failure. Airway obstruction was caused by lymphatic malformation, teratoma, costo-craniomandibular syndrome and choristoma. In the absence of other anomalies, interventional airway delivery led to reduced mortality and improved outcomes.

  1. [Changes in small airway function in rhinitis without asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Junfeng; Wang, Qiuping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Zhiyi; Shi, Xu; Guan, Weijie; Wu, Kunmin; Xu, Li; Chen, Wei; Xue, Fei; Jiang, Manjie; Cheng, You; Wang, Tianyou; Zhong, Nanshan

    2015-11-01

    Observe the changes of small airway function in patients with rhinitis but without asthma and/or lower airway symptoms. Between June 2008 and December 2012, we recruited 903 subjects, including 377 with allergic rhinitis (AR), 262 with non-allergic rhinitis (NAR) and 264 healthy subjects. All subjects underwent meticulous history taking, nasal examination, allergen skin prick test, blood routine test, serum total immunoglobin E assay, pulmonary ventilation function test and bronchial challenge test. The indices of FEV1/FVC%, MEF25pred% and MMEFpred% were lower in AR group than in the control group (P rhinitis group and the control group (P > 0.05). The positive rate of airway hyperresponsiveness(AHR) in AR group and in NAR group was 12.2%, 6.1% respectively. Indices of small airway function were all lower in the AHR group than NAHR group in rhinitis. Compared with healthy controls, small airway function in patients with rhinitis has apparent changes, part of rhinitis patients has AHR, and is associated with small airway function changes.

  2. Airway narrowing and bronchodilation to deep inspiration in bronchial segments from subjects with and without reported asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Peter B; Jones, Robyn L; Cairncross, Alvenia; Elliot, John G; Mitchell, Howard W; James, Alan L; McFawn, Peter K

    2013-05-15

    The present study presents preliminary findings on how structural/functional abnormalities of the airway wall relate to excessive airway narrowing and reduced bronchodilatory response to deep inspiration (DI) in subjects with a history of asthma. Bronchial segments were acquired from subjects undergoing surgery, mostly to remove pulmonary neoplasms. Subjects reported prior doctor-diagnosed asthma (n = 5) or had no history of asthma (n = 8). In vitro airway narrowing in response to acetylcholine was assessed to determine maximal bronchoconstriction and sensitivity, under static conditions and during simulated tidal and DI maneuvers. Fixed airway segments were sectioned for measurement of airway wall dimensions, particularly the airway smooth muscle (ASM) layer. Airways from subjects with a history of asthma had increased ASM (P = 0.014), greater maximal airway narrowing under static conditions (P = 0.003), but no change in sensitivity. Maximal airway narrowing was positively correlated with the area of the ASM layer (r = 0.58, P = 0.039). In tidally oscillating airways, DI produced bronchodilation in airways from the control group (P = 0.0001) and the group with a history of asthma (P = 0.001). While bronchodilation to DI was reduced with increased airway narrowing (P = 0.02; r = -0.64)), when the level of airway narrowing was matched, there was no difference in magnitude of bronchodilation to DI between groups. Results suggest that greater ASM mass in asthma contributes to exaggerated airway narrowing in vivo. In comparison, the airway wall in asthma may have a normal response to mechanical stretch during DI. We propose that increased maximal airway narrowing and the reduced bronchodilatory response to DI in asthma are independent.

  3. Airway necrosis after salvage esophagectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Norimitsu; Hokamura, Nobukazu; Tachimori, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    Salvage esophagectomy is the sole curative intent treatment for patients with persistent or recurrent locoregional disease after definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for esophageal carcinoma. However, salvage esophagectomy is a very high-risk operation, and airway necrosis is a fatal complication. Between 1997 and 2007, 49 patients with thoracic esophageal cancer underwent salvage esophagectomy after definitive CRT. We retrospectively compared patients with and without airway necrosis, and investigated operative procedures related to airway necrosis. Airway necrosis occurred in five patients (10.2%), of four patients (80%) died during their hospitalization. Airway necrosis seemed to be closely related to operative procedures, such as resection of bronchial artery and cervical and subcarinal lymph node dissection. Bronchogastric fistula following necrosis of gastric conduit occured in 2 patients reconstructed through posterior mediastinal route. Airway necrosis is a highly lethal complication after salvage esophagectomy. It is important in salvage esophagectomy to take airway blood supply into consideration sufficiently and to reconstruct through retrosternal route to prevent bronchogastric fistula. (author)

  4. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness results from the randomised controlled Trial of Oral Mandibular Advancement Devices for Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea (TOMADO) and long-term economic analysis of oral devices and continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharples, Linda; Glover, Matthew; Clutterbuck-James, Abigail; Bennett, Maxine; Jordan, Jake; Chadwick, Rebecca; Pittman, Marcus; East, Clare; Cameron, Malcolm; Davies, Mike; Oscroft, Nick; Smith, Ian; Morrell, Mary; Fox-Rushby, Julia; Quinnell, Timothy

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea (OSAH) causes excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), impairs quality of life (QoL) and increases cardiovascular disease and road traffic accident risks. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment is clinically effective but undermined by intolerance, and its cost-effectiveness is borderline in milder cases. Mandibular advancement devices (MADs) are another option, but evidence is lacking regarding their clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness in milder disease. (1) Conduct a randomised controlled trial (RCT) examining the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MADs against no treatment in mild to moderate OSAH. (2) Update systematic reviews and an existing health economic decision model with data from the Trial of Oral Mandibular Advancement Devices for Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea (TOMADO) and newly published results to better inform long-term clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MADs and CPAP in mild to moderate OSAH. A crossover RCT comparing clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of three MADs: self-moulded [SleepPro 1™ (SP1); Meditas Ltd, Winchester, UK]; semibespoke [SleepPro 2™ (SP2); Meditas Ltd, Winchester, UK]; and fully bespoke [bespoke MAD (bMAD); NHS Oral-Maxillofacial Laboratory, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK] against no treatment, in 90 adults with mild to moderate OSAH. All devices improved primary outcome [apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI)] compared with no treatment: relative risk 0.74 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62 to 0.89] for SP1; relative risk 0.67 (95% CI 0.59 to 0.76) for SP2; and relative risk 0.64 (95% CI 0.55 to 0.76) for bMAD (p devices were cost-effective at £20,000/quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), with SP2 the best value below £39,800/QALY. A MEDLINE, EMBASE and Science Citation Index search updating two existing systematic reviews (one from November 2006 and the other from June 2008) to August 2013 identified 77 RCTs in adult OSAH

  5. Airway fibroepithelial polyposis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Labarca

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroepithelial polyps are benign lesions, frequently found in the skin and genitourinary tract. Airway involvement is rare, and few case reports have been published. Our patient was a 79 y.o. male smoker, who was referred to us with a 3-month history of dry cough. At physical examination, the patient looked well, but a chest CT showed a 6-mm polyp lesion in his trachea. A flexible bronchoscopy confirmed this lesion, and forceps biopsies were performed. Argon plasma coagulation was used to completely resect and treat the lesion. Pathological analysis revealed a fibroepithelial polyp (FP. The aim of this manuscript is to report a case of FP with bronchoscopic management and to review the current literature about this condition.

  6. Airway Complications After Lung Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Laura; Machuzak, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Airway complications remain a significant source of morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation. The incidence of complications is wide-ranging depending on the definition of the event, and there is still no universally accepted grading system for airway findings after transplantation. Additionally, although surgical technique and organ preservation have improved, other modifiable risk factors remain unclear. The management is as wide-ranging as the definitions. A multimodality approach is often needed with airway stenting reserved for refractory cases and stent management by a transplant team with expertise in placement and management of long-term complications." Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Stenting of major airway constriction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiaomei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlated issues in the stenting treatment of major airway constriction. Methods: Nineteen cases of major airway stenting procedure were studied retrospectively. The clinical choice of stents of different advantages or deficiencies were discussed. The importance of intravenous anesthesia supporting, life-parameters monitoring during the procedures and the prevention of complications were analysed. Results: Under intravenous and local anesthesia, 19 Wallstents had been successively placed and relieved 19 cases of major airway constrictions due to malignant or benign diseases (15 of tumors, 3 of tuberculosis, 1 of tracheomalacia). Intravenous anesthesia and life-parameters monitoring had made the procedures more safe and precise. Conclusions: Major airway stenting is an reliable method for relieving tracheobronchial stenosis; and intravenous anesthesia supporting and life-parameters monitoring guarantee the satisfactions of procedures

  8. Airway management and morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    Morbidly obese patients present with excess fatty tissue externally on the breast, neck, thoracic wall and abdomen and internally in the mouth, pharynx and abdomen. This excess tissue tends to make access (intubation, tracheostomy) to and patency (during sedation or mask ventilation) of the upper...... in morbidly obese patients and should be followed by actions to counteract atelectasis formation. The decision as to weather to use a rapid sequence induction, an awake intubation or a standard induction with hypnotics should depend on the thorough airway examination and comorbidity and should not be based...... solely on whether morbid obesity is present or not. It is important to ensure sufficient depth of anaesthesia before initiating manipulation of the airway because inadequate anaesthesia depth predisposes to aspiration if airway management becomes difficult. The intubating laryngeal mask airway is more...

  9. Antimicrobial peptides in the airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, D M; Yim, S; Ryan, L K; Kisich, K O; Diamond, G

    2006-01-01

    The airway provides numerous defense mechanisms to prevent microbial colonization by the large numbers of bacteria and viruses present in ambient air. An important component of this defense is the antimicrobial peptides and proteins present in the airway surface fluid (ASF), the mucin-rich fluid covering the respiratory epithelium. These include larger proteins such as lysozyme and lactoferrin, as well as the cationic defensin and cathelicidin peptides. While some of these peptides, such as human beta-defensin (hBD)-1, are present constitutively, others, including hBD2 and -3 are inducible in response to bacterial recognition by Toll-like receptor-mediated pathways. These peptides can act as microbicides in the ASF, but also exhibit other activities, including potent chemotactic activity for cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems, suggesting they play a complex role in the host defense of the airway. Inhibition of antimicrobial peptide activity or gene expression can result in increased susceptibility to infections. This has been observed with cystic fibrosis (CF), where the CF phenotype leads to reduced antimicrobial capacity of peptides in the airway. Pathogenic virulence factors can inhibit defensin gene expression, as can environmental factors such as air pollution. Such an interference can result in infections by airway-specific pathogens including Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and influenza virus. Research into the modulation of peptide gene expression in animal models, as well as the optimization of peptide-based therapeutics shows promise for the treatment and prevention of airway infectious diseases.

  10. [Use of the size 3 ProSeal laryngeal mask airway in children. Results of a randomized crossover investigation with the Classic laryngeal mask airway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, K; Roettger, C; Wulf, H

    2006-02-01

    The low-pressure airway seal of the Classic laryngeal mask airway (CLMA) can be inadequate for positive pressure ventilation (PPV) in children. The ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (PLMA) forms a more effective seal of the airway than the CLMA and facilitates gastric tube placement in adults. The size 3 PLMA can be used in adults and children. The CLMA and PLMA were studied in random order -- crossover -- in 30 anaesthetized, non-paralysed children (average age 10.6 years, average body weight 39 kg). Airway leak pressure, maximum tidal volume, ease of insertion, quality of initial airway and fiberoptic position were determined. Gastric tube placement was assessed for the PLMA. The mean airway leak pressure in neutral head position (27.0 vs. 16.8 cm H(2)O), maximum flexion (38.3 vs. 26.2 cm H(2)O) and maximum extension (21.1 vs. 14.2 cm H(2)O) as well as the mean maximum tidal volume (1432 vs. 1062 ml) were significantly higher (pairway leak pressure seem to make the size 3 PLMA a more suitable device for PPV in children than the same size CLMA.

  11. A randomized comparison of pediatric-sized Streamlined Liner of Pharyngeal Airway and Laryngeal Mask Airway-Unique in paralyzed children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenxiu; Wei, Xinchuan

    2016-05-01

    The pediatric-sized Streamlined Liner of Pharyngeal Airway (SLIPA) is a new supraglottic airway device for children. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical performance of the pediatric-sized SLIPA with the Laryngeal Mask Airway-Unique in paralyzed children under positive pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV). One hundred children, aged 2 months to 12 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II were enrolled and randomly allocated to the SLIPA group or the Laryngeal Mask Airway-Unique group (50 patients in each group). The primary outcome variable was oropharyngeal leak pressure. Other outcome variables were first insertion success rate, insertion time, minor airway interventions required for successful insertion, intraoperative dislodgement, ventilatory data, and perioperative complications. The insertion characteristics, ventilation data, and perioperative complications were comparable between the two groups. The leak pressure of the SLIPA was significantly higher than that of the Laryngeal Mask Airway-Unique [median (IQR): 25 (22-30) cm H2O vs. 21 (19-26) cm H2O, respectively; mean ± sd: 25.3 ± 4.6 cm H2O vs. 22.6 ± 4.8 cm H2O, respectively; P = 0.006]. The incidence of intraoperative dislodgment was significantly lower in the SLIPA group than in the Laryngeal Mask Airway-Unique group (0 vs. 6 patients, respectively; P = 0.027). In conclusion, both the SLIPA and the Laryngeal Mask Airway-Unique can be used effectively without severe complications in paralyzed children. Additionally, the SLIPA provides a better airway seal and better intraoperative position stability than the Laryngeal Mask Airway-Unique. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Vessel-guided airway tree segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Sporring, Jon; Ashraf, Haseem

    2010-01-01

    method is evaluated on 250 low dose computed tomography images from a lung cancer screening trial. Our experiments showed that applying the region growing algorithm on the airway appearance model produces more complete airway segmentations, leading to on average 20% longer trees, and 50% less leakage......This paper presents a method for airway tree segmentation that uses a combination of a trained airway appearance model, vessel and airway orientation information, and region growing. We propose a voxel classification approach for the appearance model, which uses a classifier that is trained...... to differentiate between airway and non-airway voxels. This is in contrast to previous works that use either intensity alone or hand crafted models of airway appearance. We show that the appearance model can be trained with a set of easily acquired, incomplete, airway tree segmentations. A vessel orientation...

  13. Prone surgery and laryngeal mask airways: an overview of recent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinicians tend to avoid the use of a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in the prone position, but several trials demonstrate its low rate of complication if patient selection is performed properly. Obesity is also demonstrated not to be a contraindication to this anaesthetic technique. Patients are more haemodynamically stable if ...

  14. Multiscale Vessel-guided Airway Tree Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Sporring, Jon; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a method for airway tree segmentation that uses a combination of a trained airway appearance model, vessel and airway orientation information, and region growing. The method uses a voxel classification based appearance model, which involves the use of a classifier that is trai......This paper presents a method for airway tree segmentation that uses a combination of a trained airway appearance model, vessel and airway orientation information, and region growing. The method uses a voxel classification based appearance model, which involves the use of a classifier...

  15. Effects of open mouth and rubber dam on upper airway patency and breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatani, Kazuhiro; Matsuo, Koichiro; Kawase, Soichiro; Wakimoto, Nina; Taguchi, Akira; Ogasawara, Tadashi

    2013-06-01

    Rubber dams increase the quality and safety of dental treatment. However, the condition of a rubber dam over an open mouth may also obstruct the route for respiration. We tested whether an open mouth with or without a rubber dam would affect upper airway patency and breathing pattern. Twenty young healthy volunteers were imaged with a magnetic resonance (MR) system under three conditions: mouth closed, mouth open, and rubber dam with mouth open. Respiration was concurrently monitored with plethysmography. MRI slices of the upper airway were obtained at 5-mm thicknesses, and the size of the cross-sectional area of the upper airway was measured by image analysis software. Respiratory cycle duration and tidal volume were also measured with digital signal analysis software. The volume of the upper airway became significantly decreased with the mouth open. Analysis of each cross-sectional area of the upper airway revealed that while the oropharyngeal area was significantly narrower with an open mouth, the retropalatal and hypopharyngeal areas were not affected. Placing a rubber dam had no additional influence on upper airway patency but was seen to significantly shorten mean respiratory duration and decrease tidal volume. Open mouth position plays the largest role in decreased upper airway patency, and open mouth position with a rubber dam may further disrupt breathing pattern. Breathing pattern may become deteriorated by airway obstruction during dental treatments requiring a rubber dam.

  16. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Coughing and Huffing High-Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation Positive Expiratory Pressure Clinical Trials Clinical Trials 101 What ... Twitter Email More Related Content Medications Autogenic Drainage Positive Expiratory Pressure High-Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (the ...

  17. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Huffing High-Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation Positive Expiratory Pressure Clinical Trials Clinical Trials 101 What to Consider ... More Related Content Medications Autogenic Drainage Positive Expiratory Pressure High-Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (the Vest) Follow ...

  18. Registry of emergency airways arriving at combat hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bruce D; Cuniowski, Peter A; Muck, Andrew; De Lorenzo, Robert A

    2008-06-01

    Prehospital Emergency Medical Services have demonstrated variable success with regards to prehospital airway management in U.S. civilian settings. We attempted to identify the incidence of successful prehospital endotracheal intubations in the modern combat environment. This was a prospective, observational study. Data collection occurred at Combat Support Hospitals (CSH) within Operation Iraqi Freedom locations between January 2005 and March 2007. Military trauma physicians systematically examined casualties presenting to the CSH that received advanced prehospital airway management. Correct endotracheal tube (ETT) positioning was verified using an explicit combination of clinical findings and colorimetric end-tidal carbon dioxide detection. The primary outcome was correct placement of the ETTs by combat prehospital providers. A total of 6,875 combat casualties presented to participating CSHs during the study period, of which there were 293 (4.2%) advanced prehospital airways, of which 282 (97.3%) were trauma patients. Prehospital airway management included: 253 endotracheal intubations (86.6%); 23 supraglottic airways (7.5%), and 17 cricothyrotomies (5.8%). Of the ETTs, upon arrival to the CSH, 242 (95.7%) were determined to be correctly placed. There were 11 incorrectly placed ETTs: 10 were in the right mainstem bronchus, and 1 was found to be dislodged in the hypopharynx. There were no unrecognized battlefield esophageal intubations. Under combat conditions, the overall rate of correctly placed ETTs performed by military prehospital providers was comparable with that of published U.S. civilian paramedic data.

  19. Purinergic signaling in the airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey; Brouns, Inge; Adriaensen, Dirk; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre

    2012-10-01

    Evidence for a significant role and impact of purinergic signaling in normal and diseased airways is now beyond dispute. The present review intends to provide the current state of knowledge of the involvement of purinergic pathways in the upper and lower airways and lungs, thereby differentiating the involvement of different tissues, such as the epithelial lining, immune cells, airway smooth muscle, vasculature, peripheral and central innervation, and neuroendocrine system. In addition to the vast number of well illustrated functions for purinergic signaling in the healthy respiratory tract, increasing data pointing to enhanced levels of ATP and/or adenosine in airway secretions of patients with airway damage and respiratory diseases corroborates the emerging view that purines act as clinically important mediators resulting in either proinflammatory or protective responses. Purinergic signaling has been implicated in lung injury and in the pathogenesis of a wide range of respiratory disorders and diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammation, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, and pulmonary hypertension. These ostensibly enigmatic actions are based on widely different mechanisms, which are influenced by the cellular microenvironment, but especially the subtypes of purine receptors involved and the activity of distinct members of the ectonucleotidase family, the latter being potential protein targets for therapeutic implementation.

  20. Airway obstruction and gas leak during mask ventilation of preterm infants in the delivery room.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-07-01

    Preterm infants with inadequate breathing receive positive pressure ventilation (PPV) by mask with variable success. The authors examined recordings of PPV given to preterm infants in the delivery room for prevalence of mask leak and airway obstruction.

  1. Postoperative Airway Obstruction by a Bone Fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Schober

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative airway obstructions are potentially life-threatening complications. These obstructions may be classified as functional (sagging tongue, laryngospasm, or bronchospasm, pathoanatomical (airway swelling or hematoma within the airways, or foreign body-related. Various cases of airway obstruction by foreign bodies have previously been reported, for example, by broken teeth or damaged airway instruments. Here we present the exceptional case of a postoperative airway obstruction due to a large fragment of the patient’s maxillary bone, left accidentally in situ after transoral surgical tumor resection. Concerning this type of airway obstruction, we discuss possible causes, diagnosis, and treatment options. Although it is an exceptional case after surgery, clinicians should be aware of this potentially life-threatening complication. In summary, this case demonstrates that the differential diagnosis of postoperative airway obstructions should include foreign bodies derived from surgery, including tissue and bone fragments.

  2. Clinical review: Management of difficult airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeron, Olivier; Amour, Julien; Vivien, Benoît; Aubrun, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    Difficulties or failure in airway management are still important factors in morbidity and mortality related to anesthesia and intensive care. A patent and secure airway is essential to manage anesthetized or critically ill patients. Oxygenation maintenance during tracheal intubation is the cornerstone of difficult airway management and is always emphasized in guidelines. The occurrence of respiratory adverse events has decreased in claims for injuries due to inadequate airway management mainly at induction of anesthesia. Nevertheless, claim reports emphasize that airway emergencies, tracheal extubation and/or recovery of anesthesia phases are still associated with death or brain damage, indicating that additional educational support and management strategies to improve patient safety are required. The present brief review analyses specific problems of airway management related to difficult tracheal intubation and to difficult mask ventilation prediction. The review will focus on basic airway management including preoxygenation, and on some oxygenation and tracheal intubation techniques that may be performed to solve a difficult airway. PMID:17184555

  3. Clinical review: management of difficult airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeron, Olivier; Amour, Julien; Vivien, Benoît; Aubrun, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    Difficulties or failure in airway management are still important factors in morbidity and mortality related to anesthesia and intensive care. A patent and secure airway is essential to manage anesthetized or critically ill patients. Oxygenation maintenance during tracheal intubation is the cornerstone of difficult airway management and is always emphasized in guidelines. The occurrence of respiratory adverse events has decreased in claims for injuries due to inadequate airway management mainly at induction of anesthesia. Nevertheless, claim reports emphasize that airway emergencies, tracheal extubation and/or recovery of anesthesia phases are still associated with death or brain damage, indicating that additional educational support and management strategies to improve patient safety are required. The present brief review analyses specific problems of airway management related to difficult tracheal intubation and to difficult mask ventilation prediction. The review will focus on basic airway management including preoxygenation, and on some oxygenation and tracheal intubation techniques that may be performed to solve a difficult airway.

  4. Extraction of Airways from CT (EXACT'09)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lo, P.; Ginneken, B. van; Reinhardt, J.M.; Tarunashree, Y.; Jong, P.A. de; Irving, B.; Fetita, C.; Ortner, M.; Pinho, R.; Sijbers, J.; Feuerstein, M.; Fabijanska, A.; Bauer, C.; Beichel, R.; Mendoza, C.S.; Wiemker, R.; Lee, J. van der; Reeves, A.P.; Born, S.; Weinheimer, O.; Rikxoort, E.M. van; Tschirren, J.; Mori, K.; Odry, B.; Naidich, D.P.; Hartmann, I.J.; Hoffman, E.A.; Prokop, M.; Pedersen, J.H.; de Bruijne, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a framework for establishing a reference airway tree segmentation, which was used to quantitatively evaluate fifteen different airway tree extraction algorithms in a standardized manner. Because of the sheer difficulty involved in manually constructing a complete reference

  5. Defective parasympathetic innervation is associated with airway branching abnormalities in experimental CDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Julie; Saxena, Deeksha; Zhang, GuangFeng; Gittes, George K; Potoka, Douglas A

    2015-07-15

    Developmental mechanisms leading to lung hypoplasia in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) remain poorly defined. Pulmonary innervation is defective in the human disease and in the rodent models of CDH. We hypothesize that defective parasympathetic innervation may contribute to airway branching abnormalities and, therefore, lung hypoplasia, during lung development in CDH. The murine nitrofen model of CDH was utilized to study the effect of the cholinergic agonist carbachol on embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) lung explant cultures. Airway branching and contractions were quantified. In a subset of experiments, verapamil was added to inhibit airway contractions. Sox9 immunostaining and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation were used to identify and quantify the number and proliferation of distal airway epithelial progenitor cells. Intra-amniotic injections were used to determine the in vivo effect of carbachol. Airway branching and airway contractions were significantly decreased in nitrofen-treated lungs compared with controls. Carbachol resulted in increased airway contractions and branching in nitrofen-treated lungs. Nitrofen-treated lungs exhibited an increased number of proliferating Sox9-positive distal epithelial progenitor cells, which were decreased and normalized by treatment with carbachol. Verapamil inhibited the carbachol-induced airway contractions in nitrofen-treated lungs but had no effect on the carbachol-induced increase in airway branching, suggesting a direct carbachol effect independent of airway contractions. In vivo treatment of nitrofen-treated embryos via amniotic injection of carbachol at E10.5 resulted in modest increases in lung size and branching at E17.5. These results suggest that defective parasympathetic innervation may contribute to airway branching abnormalities in CDH. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Airway management and morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    airway and the function of the lungs (decreased residual capacity and aggravated ventilation perfusion mismatch) worse than in lean patients. Proper planning and preparation of airway management is essential, including elevation of the patient's upper body, head and neck. Preoxygenation is mandatory......Morbidly obese patients present with excess fatty tissue externally on the breast, neck, thoracic wall and abdomen and internally in the mouth, pharynx and abdomen. This excess tissue tends to make access (intubation, tracheostomy) to and patency (during sedation or mask ventilation) of the upper...... in morbidly obese patients and should be followed by actions to counteract atelectasis formation. The decision as to weather to use a rapid sequence induction, an awake intubation or a standard induction with hypnotics should depend on the thorough airway examination and comorbidity and should not be based...

  7. Work of breathing as a tool to diagnose severe fixed upper airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khirani, S; Pierrot, S; Leboulanger, N; Ramirez, A; Breton, D; Couloigner, V; Fauroux, B

    2014-03-01

    A 4-year-old girl with bilateral vocal fold palsy was successfully decannulated from tracheotomy after seven laryngeal procedures. But an important stridor and dyspnea recurred 13 months after decannulation. Nocturnal gas exchange was normal but her daytime work of breathing was increased by fourfold, without any beneficial effect of nasal noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure ventilation (CPAP), reflecting a severe fixed airway obstruction. Endoscopic examination confirmed the work of breathing findings showing glottic and supraglottic stenosis. This upper airway obstruction was successfully treated with a recannulation. In conclusion, the major message of this case report is that measurement of the work of breathing was able to document the "fixed" nature of the airway obstruction, by showing no improvement even with highest tolerated levels of nasal CPAP. As such, the work of breathing may be proposed as a screening tool to quantify and assess the reversibility of severe upper airway obstruction in children. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... Autogenic Drainage Positive Expiratory Pressure High-Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (the Vest) ... Cystic Fibrosis Foundation 4550 Montgomery Ave. Suite 1100 N Bethesda, MD ...

  9. Clinical review: Management of difficult airways

    OpenAIRE

    Langeron, Olivier; Amour, Julien; Vivien, Benoît; Aubrun, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    Difficulties or failure in airway management are still important factors in morbidity and mortality related to anesthesia and intensive care. A patent and secure airway is essential to manage anesthetized or critically ill patients. Oxygenation maintenance during tracheal intubation is the cornerstone of difficult airway management and is always emphasized in guidelines. The occurrence of respiratory adverse events has decreased in claims for injuries due to inadequate airway management mainl...

  10. Recurrent upper airway infections and bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, J; Ardito, F; Calò, L; Mancinelli, L; Imperiali, M; Parrilla, C; Picciotti, P M; Fadda, G

    2007-04-01

    Bacterial biofilms identified in various medical devices used in otorhinolaryngology, including tympanostomy tubes, voice prostheses, and cochlear implants, can directly colonise mucosal tissues. The upper airways seem to be at high risk for this type of colonisation. Chronic and/or recurrent upper airway infections may be related to the complex structural and biochemical (quorum sensing) organisation of the biofilm which interferes with the activity of antibiotics (including those with proven in vitro efficacy), thus promoting the establishment of a chronic infection eradicable only by surgical treatment. Biofilm formation plays a role in upper respiratory infections: it not only explains the resistance of these infections to antibiotic therapy but it also represents an important element that contributes to the maintenance of a chronic inflammatory reaction. To document the presence of biofilms in surgical tissue specimens from patients with recurrent infection diseases, and identify their possible role in the chronicity of these infectious processes. We examined 32 surgical specimens from the upper respiratory tract (tonsils, adenoids, mucosa from the ethmoid and maxillary sinuses) of 28 patients (20 adults, eight children) with upper airway infections that had persisted despite repeated treatment with anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics with demonstrated in vitro efficacy. Tissues were cultured using conventional methods and subjected to scanning electron microscopy for detection of biofilm formation. Over 80 per cent (26/32; 81.3 per cent) of the tissue specimens were culture-positive. Bacterial biofilms (associated in most cases with coccoid bacteria) were observed in 65.6 per cent of the tissue samples.

  11. Airway management in Ludwig's angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, S P; Merry, A F; Anderson, B

    1999-12-01

    A 37-year-old 91 kg man presented with features of Ludwig's angina. Anaesthesia for incision and drainage of his submandibular abscess was undertaken by two specialist anaesthetists with an otorhinolaryngological surgeon prepared for immediate tracheostomy. After preoxygenation, gas induction with sevoflurane in oxygen was followed by a gush of pus into the oral cavity and laryngospam causing acute upper airway obstruction. This resolved with 25 mg of suxamethonium and an endotracheal tube was passed into the trachea with difficulty. Options for management of the difficult airway in Ludwig's angina are discussed.

  12. Emergency surgical airway management in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, C V; Nørskov, A K; Wetterslev, J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The emergency surgical airway (ESA) is the final option in difficult airway management. We identified ESA procedures registered in the Danish Anaesthesia Database (DAD) and described the performed airway management. METHODS: We extracted a cohort of 452 461 adult patients undergoing...

  13. Airway Complications following ingestion of corrosive | Ezike ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Corrosive ingestion is a major health problem in our environment. The proximal third of the oesophagus and the upper airway are mostly affected. These frequently result in life threatening airway complications demanding urgent tracheostomy. Key words: Corrosives, Burns, Airway, Respiratory distress.

  14. Functional phenotype of airway myocytes from asthmatic airways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, David B.; Trian, Thomas; Siddiqui, Sana; Pascoe, Chris D.; Ojo, Oluwaseun O.; Johnson, Jill R.; Dekkers, Bart G. J.; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala; Bagchi, Rushita; Burgess, Janette K.; Kanabar, Varsha

    In asthma, the airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell plays a central role in disease pathogenesis through cellular changes which may impact on its microenvironment and alter ASM response and function. The answer to the long debated question of what makes a 'healthy' ASM cell become 'asthmatic' still

  15. Supra-Epiglottic Upper Airway Volume in Elderly Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet, Claire; Abdirahman Mohamed Moussa, Syad; Celle, Sébastien; Laurent, Bernard; Barthélémy, Jean-Claude; Barral, Fabrice-Guy; Roche, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Small upper airway measurements areas and high body mass index are recognized risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in non-elderly populations; however, there is limited information regarding elderly patients. We evaluated whether upper airway volume is associated with OSAS and OSAS treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment and whether BMI is correlated with upper airway volume and measurements in elderly subjects. In 60 volunteers aged 75.58±0.9 years: 20 OSAS, 20 OSAS chronically treated with CPAP, and 20 controls, semi-automatic segmentation, retropalatal distance and transverse diameter of the supra-epiglottic upper airway were evaluated using 3DT1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Anteroposterior to transverse diameter ratio was defined as retropalatar diameter/transverse diameter. There were no significant differences in supra-epiglottic upper airway volume between OSAS, CPAP treated patients, and controls. There were significant differences in retropalatal distance and anteroposterior to transverse diameter ratio between OSAS, CPAP treated patients, and controls (P = 0.008 and Psupra-epiglottic upper airway volume. In elderly subjects, OSAS and body mass index are not associated with changes in supra-epiglottic upper airway volume but are associated with modification of pharynx shape.

  16. Assessment of Upper and Lower Pharyngeal Airway Width in Skeletal Class I, II and III Malocclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalu Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a close relationship between the dimensions of airway and the sagittal skeletal malocclusion which makes it reasonable to expect that width of airway is a reflection of determining patency of airway in different skeletal malocclusion groups. So, aim of this study was to assess the upper and lower pharyngeal airway width in skeletal Class I, II and III malocclusion groups and also to evaluate sexual dimorphism in western Uttar Pradesh population. Materials and methods: A sample of 150 subjects in the age group of 18 to 25 years, from Western Uttar Pradesh adult population was selected on the basis of skeletal Class I, II and III malocclusion. Digital lateral cephalograms were taken in natural head position. Nine variables were selected which included four upper and five lower pharyngeal airway variables. Results: Upper and lower pharynx showed statistical significant difference among the skeletal Class I, II and III malocclusion and also between males and females. Conclusion: Wider upper and lower pharyngeal airway width was seen in males than in females in both skeletal Class I as well as Class III malocclusion groups respectively. Skeletal Class III malocclusion subjects had the widest airway width as compared to skeletal Class I malocclusion group. Skeletal Class II malocclusion, airway width was found to be narrowest.

  17. Prolonged ozone exposure in an allergic airway disease model: Adaptation of airway responsiveness and airway remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Chang-Soo

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short-term exposure to high concentrations of ozone has been shown to increase airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR. Because the changes in AHR and airway inflammation and structure after chronic ozone exposure need to be determined, the goal of this study was to investigate these effects in a murine model of allergic airway disease. Methods We exposed BALB/c mice to 2 ppm ozone for 4, 8, and 12 weeks. We measured the enhanced pause (Penh to methacholine and performed cell differentials in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. We quantified the levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ in the supernatants of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids using enzyme immunoassays, and examined the airway architecture under light and electron microscopy. Results The groups exposed to ozone for 4, 8, and 12 weeks demonstrated decreased Penh at methacholine concentrations of 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/ml, with a dose-response curve to the right of that for the filtered-air group. Neutrophils and eosinophils increased in the group exposed to ozone for 4 weeks compared to those in the filtered-air group. The ratio of IL-4 to INF-γ increased significantly after exposure to ozone for 8 and 12 weeks compared to the ratio for the filtered-air group. The numbers of goblet cells, myofibroblasts, and smooth muscle cells showed time-dependent increases in lung tissue sections from the groups exposed to ozone for 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the increase in AHR associated with the allergic airway does not persist during chronic ozone exposure, indicating that airway remodeling and adaptation following repeated exposure to air pollutants can provide protection against AHR.

  18. Is surgical airway necessary for airway management in deep neck infections and Ludwig angina?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Mary M; Davis, James W; Parks, Steven N

    2011-02-01

    Deep neck infections are potentially life-threatening conditions because of airway compromise. Management requires early recognition, antibiotics, surgical drainage, and effective airway control. The Surgical Education and Self-Assessment Program 12 states that awake tracheostomy is the treatment of choice for these patients. With advanced airway control techniques such as retrograde intubation, GlideScope, and fiberoptic intubation, surgical airway is not required. A retrospective analysis of all deep neck abscesses treated from December 1999 to July 2006 was performed. All patients who underwent urgent or emergent surgery for Ludwig angina and submental, submandibular, sublingual, and parapharyngeal abscesses (Current Procedural Terminology codes 41015, 41016, 41017, 42320, and 42725) were included in our review. Charts were studied for age, presence of true Ludwig angina, presence of airway compromise, airway management, morbidity/mortality, and the requirement for surgical airway. Of 29 patients, 6 (20%) had symptoms consistent with true Ludwig angina. Nineteen (65.5%) had evidence of airway compromise. Eight (42%) of these 19 patients required advanced airway control techniques. No patient required a surgical airway, and no mortality resulted from airway compromise. Advance airway control techniques were required more often in patients with airway compromise (P Ludwig angina and deep neck abscesses requires good clinical judgment. Patients with deep neck infections and symptoms of airway compromise may be safely managed with advanced airway control techniques. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... cystic fibrosis comes with many challenges, including medical, social, and financial. By learning more about how you ... Huffing High-Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation Positive Expiratory Pressure Clinical Trials Clinical Trials 101 What to Consider ...

  20. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... the daily lives of people with CF. CF Peer Connect Community Voice CONTRIBUTE TO OUR RESEARCH IMPACT ... More Related Content Medications Autogenic Drainage Positive Expiratory Pressure High-Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (the Vest) Follow ...

  1. Anaesthesia and subglottic airway obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: shared airway; jet ventilation; TIVA/TCI; laser excision; monitoring. Abstract. In this article, we describe the anaesthetic ... (Submitted: 2009-07-14, Accepted: 2010-10-04). S Afr J Anaesth Analg 2011;17(2):182-184 ... Jet ventilation and TCI/TIVA (total intravenous anaesthesia) are our techniques of choice for ...

  2. allergy, asthma airway and anaphylaxis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The perioperative preparation of children presenting for surgery aims to identify medical problems that might influence the outcome and to institute management strategies to reduce those risks. Respiratory and airway complications remain the most significant cause of morbidity and mortality in modern paediatric ...

  3. Pharyngeal airway changes following mandibular setback surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Ramesh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of dentofacial deformities with jaw osteotomies has an effect on airway anatomy and therefore mandibular setback surgery has the potential to diminish airway size. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of mandibular setback surgery on airway size. 8 consecutive patients were examined prospectively. All patients underwent mandibular setback surgery. Cephalometric analysis was performed preoperatively and 3 months post operatively with particular attention to pharyngeal airway changes. Pharyngeal airway size decreased considerably in all, patients thus predisposing to development of obstructive sleep apnea. Therefore, large anteroposterior discrepancies should be corrected by combined maxillary and mandibular osteotomies.

  4. The Size 1 ProSeal™ laryngeal mask airway in infants: a randomized, noncrossover study with the Classic™ laryngeal mask airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gil, Maite; Mantilla, Ignacio; Blanco, Teresa; Teigell, Enrique; Hervias, Mónica; Fernández-López, Rosa

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, numerous scientific publications have endorsed the superiority of the ProSeal™ laryngeal mask airway (PLMA) over the Classic™ laryngeal mask airway (cLMA) in adults, children, and infants. The PLMA forms a better seal for both the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, provides easier access to the gastrointestinal tract, and exerts lower mucosal pressures for a given seal pressure. This study aims to determine whether this superiority can also be observed for the size 1 PLMA used in anesthetized neonates and infants with positive pressure ventilation. Sixty consecutive neonates and infants undergoing elective surgical procedures were randomized to airway management with the size 1 PLMA or cLMA. For all patients, we recorded ease of insertion, effective airway time, number of placement attempts, oropharyngeal leak pressure, fiberoptic position, audible leaks, mask displacement, number of reinsertions during maintenance, gastric insufflation, and frequency of blood stain. Ease of insertion, successful insertion in airway tube, and frequency of blood stain were similar in both groups. Effective airway time was lower for the PLMA group (30.5 vs 35.6 s). Oropharyngeal leak pressure was higher with the PLMA (32.9 vs 22.2 cm H(2)O, P mask displacements during maintenance of anesthesia with the PLMA (0% vs 26.7%, P Mask reinsertion was not necessary during maintenance of anesthesia with the PLMA, although it was necessary in 14 cases in the cLMA group (0% vs 46%, P airway control device during neonatal and infant anesthesia, allowing higher peak airway pressure during positive pressure ventilation, with fewer mask displacements and gastric insufflations than the cLMA. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Surgical airway in emergency department intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Lindsay A; Dunn, Mark; Mckeown, Dermot W; Oglesby, Angela J

    2011-06-01

    To determine the frequency of and primary indication for surgical airway during emergency department intubation. Prospectively collected data from all intubations performed in the emergency department from January 1999 to July 2007 were analysed to ascertain the frequency of surgical airway access. Original data were collected on a structured proforma, entered into a regional database and analysed. Patient records were then reviewed to determine the primary indication for a surgical airway. Emergency department intubation was undertaken in 2524 patients. Of these, only five patients (0.2%) required a surgical airway. The most common indication for a surgical airway was trauma in four of the five patients. Two patients had attempted rapid sequence induction before surgical airway. Two patients had gaseous inductions and one patient received no drugs. In all five patients, surgical airway was performed secondary to failed endotracheal intubation attempt(s) and was never the primary technique used. In our emergency department, surgical airway is an uncommon procedure. The rate of 0.2% is significantly lower than rates quoted in other studies. The most common indication for surgical airway was severe facial or neck trauma. Our emergency department has a joint protocol for emergency intubation agreed by the Departments of Emergency Medicine, Anaesthesia and Critical Care at the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. We believe that the low surgical airway rate is secondary to this collaborative approach. The identified low rate of emergency department surgical airway has implications for training and maintenance of skills for emergency medicine trainees and physicians.

  6. Effect of Bronchial Thermoplasty on Airway Closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Brown

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Bronchial Thermoplasty, a procedure that applies thermal energy to the airway wall has been shown to impair the ability of airway to contract in response to methacholine chloride (Mch. The technique has been advocated as an alternative treatment for asthma that may permanently limit airway narrowing. In previous experimental studies in dogs and humans, it was shown that those airways treated with bronchial thermoplasty had significant impairment of Mch responsiveness. Methods In the present study, we investigated the ability of canine airways to close completely with very high concentrations of Mch after bronchial thermoplasty. Bronchial thermoplasty was performed on dogs using the Alair System, comprising a low power RF controller and a basket catheter with four electrodes. A local atomization of Mch agonist was delivered directly to the epithelium of the same airway locations with repeated challenges. Airway size was measured with computed tomography, and closure was considered to occur in any airway where the lumen fell below the resolution of the scanner (< 1 mm. Results Our results show that, while treated airways still have the capacity to close at very high doses of Mch, this ability is seriously impaired after treatment, requiring much higher doses. Conclusions Bronchial thermoplasty as currently applied seems to simply shift the entire dose response curve toward increasing airway size. Thus, this procedure simply serves to minimize the ability of airways to narrow under any level of stimulation.

  7. Airway malacia in children with achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessoffy, Kimberly E; Modaff, Peggy; Pauli, Richard M

    2014-02-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the frequency of airway malacia in infants and young children with achondroplasia, a population well known to be at risk for a variety of respiratory problems. We also wished to evaluate what, if any, contribution airway malacia makes to the complex respiratory issues that may be present in those with achondroplasia. Retrospective chart review of all infants and young children with achondroplasia who were assessed through the Midwest Regional Bone Dysplasia Clinics from 1985 through 2012 (n = 236) was completed. Records of comprehensive clinical examinations, polysomnographic assessments, and airway visualization were reviewed and abstracted using a data collection form. Analyses were completed comparing the group with and those without evidence for airway malacia. Thirteen of 236 patients (5.5%) were found to have airway malacia. Most of those affected had lower airway involvement (9/13). The presence of airway malacia was correlated with an increased occurrence of obstructive sleep apnea as well as need for oxygen supplementation, airway surgeries and tracheostomy placement. Although estimates of the frequency of airway malacia in the general population are limited, its frequency in children with achondroplasia appears to be much higher than any published general population estimate. The presence of airway malacia appears to confound other breathing abnormalities in this population and results in the need for more invasive airway treatments. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Analysis of airways in computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is major cause of death and disability world-wide. It affects lung function through destruction of lung tissue known as emphysema and inflammation of airways, leading to thickened airway walls and narrowed airway lumen. Computed Tomography (CT) imaging...... have become the standard with which to assess emphysema extent but airway abnormalities have so far been more challenging to quantify. Automated methods for analysis are indispensable as the visible airway tree in a CT scan can include several hundreds of individual branches. However, automation...... the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial. This includes methods for extracting airway surfaces from the images and ways of achieving comparable measurements in airway branches through matching and anatomical labelling. The methods were used to study effects of differences in inspiration level at the time...

  9. Temporal and Spatial Expression of Transforming Growth Factor-β after Airway Remodeling to Tobacco Smoke in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Laura L.; Nguyen, Yen P.; Aspeé, Rayza; Bolton, Sarah J.; Shen, Yi-hsin; Wang, Lei; Kenyon, Nicholas J.; Smiley-Jewell, Suzette

    2016-01-01

    Airway remodeling is strongly correlated with the progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this study, our goal was to characterize progressive structural changes in site-specific airways, along with the temporal and spatial expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in the lungs of male spontaneously hypertensive rats exposed to tobacco smoke (TS). Our studies demonstrated that TS-induced changes of the airways is dependent on airway generation and exposure duration for proximal, midlevel, and distal airways. Stratified squamous epithelial cell metaplasia was evident in the most proximal airways after 4 and 12 weeks but with minimal levels of TGF-β–positive epithelial cells after only 4 weeks of exposure. In contrast, epithelial cells in midlevel and distal airways were strongly TGF-β positive at both 4 and 12 weeks of TS exposure. Airway smooth muscle volume increased significantly at 4 and 12 weeks in midlevel airways. Immunohistochemistry of TGF-β was also found to be significantly increased at 4 and 12 weeks in lymphoid tissues and alveolar macrophages. ELISA of whole-lung homogenate demonstrated that TGF-β2 was increased after 4 and 12 weeks of TS exposure, whereas TGF-β1 was decreased at 12 weeks of TS exposure. Airway levels of messenger RNA for TGF-β2, as well as platelet-derived growth factor-A, granulocyte-macrophage colony–stimulating factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor-α, growth factors regulated by TGF-β, were significantly decreased in animals after 12 weeks of TS exposure. Our data indicate that TS increases TGF-β in epithelial and inflammatory cells in connection with airway remodeling, although the specific role of each TGF-β isoform remains to be defined in TS-induced airway injury and disease. PMID:26637070

  10. A cohort evaluation of the laryngeal mask airway-Supreme™ in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Narasimhan; Sohn, Lisa E; Chang, Edwina; Sawardekar, Amod

    2012-08-01

    To assess the clinical performance of the laryngeal mask airway-Supreme in children. The purpose of this prospective audit was to evaluate the feasibility of the laryngeal mask airway-Supreme in clinical practice and generate data for future comparison trials. The laryngeal mask airway-Supreme is a new second-generation supraglottic airway that was recently released in limited pediatric sizes (sizes 1, 2). One hundred children, ASA I-III, newborn to 16 years of age, and undergoing various procedures requiring a size 1, 2, or 3 laryngeal mask airway-Supreme were studied. Assessments included insertion success rates, airway leak pressures, success of gastric tube insertion, quality of airway, and perioperative complications. The first-time insertion success rate was 97%, with an overall insertion success rate of 100%. The mean initial airway leak pressure for all patients was 22.3 ± 6.6 cm H(2) O. Gastric tube placement was possible in 98% of patients. Complications were noted in six patients: coughing or laryngospasm (n = 3), sore throat (n = 1), and dysphonia (n = 2). The laryngeal mask airway-Supreme was inserted with a high degree of success on the first attempt by clinicians with limited prior experience with the device. It was effectively used for a variety of procedures in children undergoing spontaneous and mechanical ventilation with minimal complications. The leak pressures demonstrated in this study, along with access for gastric decompression, suggest that the laryngeal mask airway-Supreme may be an effective device for positive pressure ventilation in children. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Effects of complete denture wearing on the head posture and posterior airway space: A cephalometric study†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Suat Gokce

    2011-03-01

    Conclusion: Airway protection maintenance with extension and flexion of the head is vital because any rehabilitation involves the head and neck region. Correlation coefficients indicated significant changes in dynamic measurements of the natural head position related to complete dentures. Immediate head extension and alterations of posterior airway dimensions were observed following airway obstruction because of the insertion of complete dentures. The significant changes found in the study should help practitioners understand the mechanisms of craniofacial and cranio-vertical features before planning massive rehabilitations that reduce the oral cavity space.

  12. Airway remodelling and inflammation in asthma are dependent on the extracellular matrix protein fibulin-1c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Cooley, Marion A; Nair, Prema M; Donovan, Chantal; Hsu, Alan C; Jarnicki, Andrew G; Haw, Tatt Jhong; Hansbro, Nicole G; Ge, Qi; Brown, Alexandra C; Tay, Hock; Foster, Paul S; Wark, Peter A; Horvat, Jay C; Bourke, Jane E; Grainge, Chris L; Argraves, W Scott; Oliver, Brian G; Knight, Darryl A; Burgess, Janette K; Hansbro, Philip M

    2017-12-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. It is characterized by allergic airway inflammation, airway remodelling, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Asthma patients, in particular those with chronic or severe asthma, have airway remodelling that is associated with the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, such as collagens. Fibulin-1 (Fbln1) is an important ECM protein that stabilizes collagen and other ECM proteins. The level of Fbln1c, one of the four Fbln1 variants, which predominates in both humans and mice, is increased in the serum and airways fluids in asthma but its function is unclear. We show that the level of Fbln1c was increased in the lungs of mice with house dust mite (HDM)-induced chronic allergic airway disease (AAD). Genetic deletion of Fbln1c and therapeutic inhibition of Fbln1c in mice with chronic AAD reduced airway collagen deposition, and protected against AHR. Fbln1c-deficient (Fbln1c -/- ) mice had reduced mucin (MUC) 5 AC levels, but not MUC5B levels, in the airways as compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Fbln1c interacted with fibronectin and periostin that was linked to collagen deposition around the small airways. Fbln1c -/- mice with AAD also had reduced numbers of α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells around the airways and reduced airway contractility as compared with WT mice. After HDM challenge, these mice also had fewer airway inflammatory cells, reduced interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, IL-33, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and CXCL1 levels in the lungs, and reduced IL-5, IL-33 and TNF levels in lung-draining lymph nodes. Therapeutic targeting of Fbln1c reduced the numbers of GATA3-positive Th2 cells in the lymph nodes and lungs after chronic HDM challenge. Treatment also reduced the secretion of IL-5 and IL-13 from co-cultured dendritic cells and T cells restimulated with HDM extract. Human epithelial cells cultured with Fbln1c peptide produced more CXCL1 mRNA than medium-treated controls. Our data show

  13. Acute airway obstruction during spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buggy, D J; Hughes, N

    1998-10-01

    A 30-year-old primiparous Caucasian woman with known placenta praevia required an emergency caesarean section for a mild antepartum haemorrhage at the onset of spontaneous term labour. Following intravenous prehydration with 500 ml gelatin colloid (Haemaccel trade mark ), spinal anaesthesia was induced in the sitting position with 2.6 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (13 mg). The patient was then placed in the recumbent position with left lateral tilt, whereupon she suddenly became dyspnoeic. A generalized erythematous urticarial rash with associated facial, periorbital, glossal and perioral oedema became evident. Although maternal blood pressure remained within normal limits, emergency conversion to general anaesthesia with tracheal intubation was necessary to secure the airway. Laryngoscopy revealed gross submucosal, epiglottic and pharyngeal oedema, characteristics of the syndrome of angioneurotic oedema, which may complicate an anaphylactoid reaction. After the airway was secured with a cuffed endotracheal tube, caesarean section proceeded uneventfully and a healthy male infant was delivered. Maternal facial and airway oedema subsided and extubation was performed in intensive care 2 h later. Life-threatening airway obstruction often accompanies angioneurotic oedema. Since parturients have a higher incidence of difficult airway management than the general population, anaphylactoid reactions presenting as angioneurotic oedema pose a particular challenge for the anaesthetist. The lower incidence of allergy associated with hydroxyethyl starch (Hetastarch) may make it a more appropriate choice of colloid in this setting. However, the balance of evidence now suggests that vasopressors, particularly ephedrine, are superior to fluids for maintenance of blood pressure during regional anaesthesia for caesarean section.

  14. Effect of Bronchial Thermoplasty on Airway Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert; Wizeman, William; Danek, Christopher; Mitzner, Wayne

    2007-10-12

    BACKGROUND: Bronchial Thermoplasty, a procedure that applies thermal energy to the airway wall has been shown to impair the ability of airway to contract in response to methacholine chloride (Mch). The technique has been advocated as an alternative treatment for asthma that may permanently limit airway narrowing. In previous experimental studies in dogs and humans, it was shown that those airways treated with bronchial thermoplasty had significant impairment of Mch responsiveness. METHODS: In the present study, we investigated the ability of canine airways to close completely with very high concentrations of Mch after bronchial thermoplasty. Bronchial thermoplasty was performed on dogs using the Alair System, comprising a low power RF controller and a basket catheter with four electrodes. A local atomization of Mch agonist was delivered directly to the epithelium of the same airway locations with repeated challenges. Airway size was measured with computed tomography, and closure was considered to occur in any airway where the lumen fell below the resolution of the scanner (Bronchial thermoplasty as currently applied seems to simply shift the entire dose response curve toward increasing airway size. Thus, this procedure simply serves to minimize the ability of airways to narrow under any level of stimulation.

  15. Anatomic measures of upper airway structures in obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose E. Barrera

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Determine if anatomic dimensions of airway structures are associated with airway obstruction in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients. Methods: Twenty-eight subjects with (n = 14 and without (n = 14 OSA as determined by clinical symptoms and sleep studies; volunteer sample. Skeletal and soft tissue dimensions were measured from radiocephalometry and magnetic resonance imaging. The soft palate thickness, mandibular plane-hyoid (MP-H distance, posterior airway space (PAS diameters and area, and tongue volume were calculated. Results: Compared to controls, the OSA group demonstrated a significantly longer MP-H distance (P = 0.009 and shorter nasal PAS diameter (P = 0.02. The PAS area was smaller (P = 0.002 and tongue volume larger in the OSA group (P = 0.004. The MP-H distance, PAS measurements, and tongue volume are of clinical relevance in OSA patients. Conclusions: A long MP-H distance, and small PAS diameters and area are significant anatomic measures in OSA; however the most substantial parameter found was a large tongue volume. Keywords: Obstructive sleep apnea, Anatomy, Anatomic measurement, Posterior airway space, Tongue volume, Hyoid position

  16. [Effects of shivering on airway rewarming].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Ying; Yan, Pei-Hua; Yang, Zeng-Ren; Sun, Fang-Ren; Shan, Qiu-Ling; Li, Yu-Qing

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the effects of shivering on airway rewarming. The hypothermic dog model without shivering was established by immersing an anesthetized dog in cold water and administering atracurium to inhibit the dog shivering. The model dog respired warm fully humidified (40-45 degrees C, RH 99.9%) air and room temperature air(19 +/- 1 degrees C, RH 30% - 75%) to rewarm each for 2 hours, the priority of different temperature air respired was arranged randomly. After rewarming for 4 hours, the relaxed dog breathed warm humidified air by positive pressure ventilation in order to restore its spontaneous respiratory. Then the dog continued to respire warm humidified air spontaneously until the esophageal (Te) and rectal temperature (Tr) of the dog achieved the same degrees as the dog was immersed in the water. The metabolic heat production was detected by indirect calorimetry during the experiment. (1) When the shivering was inhibited, inhaling warm humidified air for 2 hours made the Tr and Te of the dogs increase 0.26-0.39 degrees C and 0.44-1.11 degrees C per hour respectively, inhaling air at room temperature for 2 hours made Tr and Te of the dogs decrease 0.24-0.51 degrees C and 0.58-0.67 degrees C per hour, respectively. And the changes in Tr and Te of the dogs were unrelated to the priority of inhaling air at different temperature. (2) When the dog with shivering respired spontaneously warm humidified air, the rewarming rates of Tr and Te were 2.26-2.33 degrees C/h and 1.96-2.38 degrees C/h respectively, quicker than those of the dogs whose shivering was inhibited. (3) Compared with metabolic heat production of the unshivering dog respiring warm humidified air by positive pressure ventilation, that of the shivering dog respiring warm humidified air spontaneously increased outstandingly, shivering thermogenesis made the rewarming rates increased obviously. Airway rewarming is a method conducive to rewarming of hypothermia. When the body is shivering, the

  17. Intratracheal Administration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulates Tachykinin System, Suppresses Airway Remodeling and Reduces Airway Hyperresponsiveness in an Animal Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Urbanek

    Full Text Available The need for new options for chronic lung diseases promotes the research on stem cells for lung repair. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can modulate lung inflammation, but the data on cellular processes involved in early airway remodeling and the potential involvement of neuropeptides are scarce.To elucidate the mechanisms by which local administration of MSCs interferes with pathophysiological features of airway hyperresponsiveness in an animal model.GFP-tagged mouse MSCs were intratracheally delivered in the ovalbumin mouse model with subsequent functional tests, the analysis of cytokine levels, neuropeptide expression and histological evaluation of MSCs fate and airway pathology. Additionally, MSCs were exposed to pro-inflammatory factors in vitro.Functional improvement was observed after MSC administration. Although MSCs did not adopt lung cell phenotypes, cell therapy positively affected airway remodeling reducing the hyperplastic phase of the gain in bronchial smooth muscle mass, decreasing the proliferation of epithelium in which mucus metaplasia was also lowered. Decrease of interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-13 and increase of interleukin-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage was also observed. Exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines, MSCs upregulated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Moreover, asthma-related in vivo upregulation of pro-inflammatory neurokinin 1 and neurokinin 2 receptors was counteracted by MSCs that also determined a partial restoration of VIP, a neuropeptide with anti-inflammatory properties.Intratracheally administered MSCs positively modulate airway remodeling, reduce inflammation and improve function, demonstrating their ability to promote tissue homeostasis in the course of experimental allergic asthma. Because of a limited tissue retention, the functional impact of MSCs may be attributed to their immunomodulatory response combined with the interference of neuropeptide system activation and tissue

  18. Prevailing practices in airway management: a prospective single-centre observational study of endotracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Geraldine Pei Chin; Kannan, Anusha; Koh, Kwong Fah; Venkatesan, Kumaresh; Seet, Edwin

    2018-03-01

    Airway management during anaesthesia has potential difficulties and risks. We aimed to investigate the utility of routine airway assessment for predicting difficult tracheal intubation, review the prevailing practice of videolaryngoscope use amongst anaesthetists in a teaching hospital and determine the incidence of intraoperative and postoperative airway-related complications. A prospective observational study of 1,654 patients undergoing general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation over a seven-month period was performed. Data regarding airway and anaesthetic management was collected and analysed. Videolaryngoscopes were used as the first-choice equipment in 60.5% of the cohort. The incidence of difficult intubation was 2.1%, of which 45.7% of cases were unanticipated. The sensitivity of airway assessment was 54.3%, with a positive predictive value of 8.1%. When difficult intubation was anticipated, more videolaryngoscopes were used as the first equipment of choice compared to the Macintosh laryngoscope (p < 0.001). In the Macintosh group, more patients required a change of airway equipment (p = 0.015), but the number of intubation attempts was similar (p = 0.293). The incidence of intraoperative (p = 0.920) and postoperative complications (p = 0.380) were similar in both groups. Using the current predictors of difficult intubation, half of the difficult airways we encountered were unanticipated. Videolaryngoscopes were preferred when difficulty was anticipated and were also used in routine tracheal intubation. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  19. Airway clearance techniques used by people with cystic fibrosis in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoo, Z H; Daniels, T; Wildman, M J; Teare, M D; Bradley, J M

    2015-12-01

    To describe the current use of airway clearance techniques among people with cystic fibrosis (CF) in the UK, and the baseline characteristics for users of different airway clearance techniques. Analysis of the UK CF Registry 2011 data. All people with CF in the UK aged ≥11 years (n=6372). Of the 6372 people on the UK CF registry in 2011, 89% used airway clearance techniques. The most commonly used primary techniques were forced expiratory techniques (28%) and oscillating positive expiratory pressure (PEP) (23%). Postural drainage and high-frequency chest wall oscillation were used by 4% and 1% of people with CF, respectively. The male:female ratio of individuals who used exercise as their primary airway clearance technique was 2:1, compared with 1:1 for other techniques. Individuals with more severe lung disease tended to use devices such as non-invasive ventilation or high-frequency chest wall oscillation. Forced expiratory techniques and oscillating PEP are the most common airway clearance techniques used by people with CF in the UK, and postural drainage and high-frequency chest wall oscillation are the least common techniques. This is significant in terms of planning airway clearance technique trials, where postural drainage has been used traditionally as the comparator. The use of airway clearance techniques varies between countries, but the reasons for these differences are unknown. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prenatal MRI Findings of Fetuses with Congenital High Airway Obstruction Sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Carolina V. A.; Linam, Leann E.; Kline-Fath, Beth M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati (United States)] (and others)

    2009-04-15

    To define the MRI findings of congenital high airway obstruction sequence (CHAOS) in a series of fetuses. Prenatal fetal MR images were reviewed in seven fetuses with CHAOS at 21 to 27 weeks of gestation. The MRI findings were reviewed. The MRI parameters evaluated included the appearance of the lungs and diaphragm, presence or absence of hydrops, amount of amniotic fluid, airway appearance, predicted level of airway obstruction, and any additional findings or suspected genetic syndromes. All the fetuses viewed (7 of 7) demonstrated the following MRI findings: dilated airway below the level of obstruction, increased lung signal, markedly increased lung volumes with flattened or inverted hemidiaphragms, massive ascites, centrally positioned and compressed heart, as well as placentomegaly. Other frequent findings were anasarca (6 of 7) and polyhydramnios (3 of 7). MRI identified the level of obstruction as laryngeal in five cases and tracheal in two cases. In four of the patients, surgery or autopsy confirmed the MRI predicted level of obstruction. Associated abnormalities were found in 4 of 7 (genetic syndromes in 2). Postnatal radiography (n = 3) showed markedly hyperinflated lungs with inverted or flattened hemidiaphragms, strandy perihilar opacities, pneumothoraces and tracheotomy. Two fetuses were terminated and one fetus demised in utero. Four fetuses were delivered via ex utero intrapartum treatment procedure. MRI shows a consistent pattern of abnormalities in fetuses with CHAOS, accurately identifies the level of airway obstruction, and helps differentiate from other lung abnormalities such as bilateral congenital pulmonary airway malformation by demonstrating an abnormally dilated airway distal to the obstruction.

  1. Awake measures of nasal resistance and upper airway resistance on CPAP during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masdeu, Maria J; Seelall, Vijay; Patel, Amit V; Ayappa, Indu; Rapoport, David M

    2011-02-15

    Since on CPAP, the nose is the primary determinant of upper airway resistance, we assess utility of noninvasive measures of nasal resistance during wakefulness as a predictor of directly assessed upper airway resistance on CPAP during sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome. Patients with complaints of snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness were recruited. 14 subjects underwent daytime evaluations including clinical assessment, subjective questionnaires to assess nasal symptoms and evaluation of nasal resistance with acoustic rhinometry (AR) and active anterior rhinomanometry (RM) in the sitting and supine positions. Patients underwent nocturnal polysomnography on optimal CPAP with measurements of supraglottic pressure to evaluate upper airway resistance. Comparisons were made between nasal resistance using AR and RM during wakefulness, and between AR and RM awake and upper airway resistance during sleep. Our study shows that measures of awake nasal resistance using AR and RM had little or no correlation to each other in the sitting position, whereas there was significant but weak correlation in the supine position. Upper airway resistance measured while on CPAP during sleep did not show significant relationships to any of the awake measures of nasal resistance (AR or RM). Awake measurements of nasal resistance do not seem to be predictive of upper airway resistance during sleep on CPAP.

  2. Airway injury during emergency transcutaneous airway access: a comparison at cricothyroid and tracheal sites.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Salah, Nazar

    2009-12-01

    Oxygenation via the cricothyroid membrane (CTM) may be required in emergencies, but inadvertent tracheal cannulation may occur. In this study, we compared airway injury between the tracheal and CTM sites using different techniques for airway access.

  3. 75 FR 13079 - Action Affecting Export Privileges; MAHAN AIRWAYS; Mahan Airways, Mahan Tower, No. 21, Azadegan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ... Regulations and TDO, a United Kingdom court found Mahan Airways in contempt of court on February 1, 2010, for... contempt finding against Mahan Airways in the U.K. litigation, which I understand is still ongoing. I note...

  4. Mediators on human airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, C; Johnson, P; Anticevich, S; Ammit, A; McKay, K; Hughes, M; Black, J

    1997-01-01

    1. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in asthma may be due to several abnormalities, but must include alterations in the airway smooth muscle responsiveness and/or volume. 2. Increased responsiveness of airway smooth muscle in vitro can be induced by certain inflammatory cell products and by induction of sensitization (atopy). 3. Increased airway smooth muscle growth can also be induced by inflammatory cell products and atopic serum. 4. Mast cell numbers are increased in the airways of asthmatics and, in our studies, in airway smooth muscle that is sensitized and hyperresponsive. 5. We propose that there is a relationship between mast cells and airway smooth muscle cells which, once an allergic process has been initiated, results in the development of critical features in the lungs in asthma.

  5. Extraction of airways from CT (EXACT’09)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Ginneken, Bram van; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a framework for establishing a reference airway tree segmentation, which was used to quantitatively evaluate 15 different airway tree extraction algorithms in a standardized manner. Because of the sheer difficulty involved in manually constructing a complete reference standard...... from scratch, we propose to construct the reference using results from all algorithms that are to be evaluated. We start by subdividing each segmented airway tree into its individual branch segments. Each branch segment is then visually scored by trained observers to determine whether...... or not it is a correctly segmented part of the airway tree. Finally, the reference airway trees are constructed by taking the union of all correctly extracted branch segments. Fifteen airway tree extraction algorithms from different research groups are evaluated on a diverse set of 20 chest computed tomography (CT) scans...

  6. Airway injury during high-level exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippelen, Pascale; Anderson, Sandra D

    2012-05-01

    Airway epithelial cells act as a physical barrier against environmental toxins and injury, and modulate inflammation and the immune response. As such, maintenance of their integrity is critical. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that exercise can cause injury to the airway epithelium. This seems the case particularly for competitive athletes performing high-level exercise, or when exercise takes place in extreme environmental conditions such as in cold dry air or in polluted air. Dehydration of the small airways and increased forces exerted on to the airway surface during severe hyperpnoea are thought to be key factors in determining the occurrence of injury of the airway epithelium. The injury-repair process of the airway epithelium may contribute to the development of the bronchial hyper-responsiveness that is documented in many elite athletes.

  7. Special position for the anaesthetic management of a patient with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to achieve a suitable supine position which is fundamental during airway management, we created a hole in the operating table to fit her giant back mass. Exhibition of this special operating table may help to achieve a suitable position and ease airway management which is not possible with routine tables in cases ...

  8. Multi-modal anatomical optical coherence tomography and CT for in vivo dynamic upper airway imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Santosh; Bu, Ruofei; Price, Hillel; Zdanski, Carlton; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2017-02-01

    We describe a novel, multi-modal imaging protocol for validating quantitative dynamic airway imaging performed using anatomical Optical Coherence Tomography (aOCT). The aOCT system consists of a catheter-based aOCT probe that is deployed via a bronchoscope, while a programmable ventilator is used to control airway pressure. This setup is employed on the bed of a Siemens Biograph CT system capable of performing respiratory-gated acquisitions. In this arrangement the position of the aOCT catheter may be visualized with CT to aid in co-registration. Utilizing this setup we investigate multiple respiratory pressure parameters with aOCT, and respiratory-gated CT, on both ex vivo porcine trachea and live, anesthetized pigs. This acquisition protocol has enabled real-time measurement of airway deformation with simultaneous measurement of pressure under physiologically relevant static and dynamic conditions- inspiratory peak or peak positive airway pressures of 10-40 cm H2O, and 20-30 breaths per minute for dynamic studies. We subsequently compare the airway cross sectional areas (CSA) obtained from aOCT and CT, including the change in CSA at different stages of the breathing cycle for dynamic studies, and the CSA at different peak positive airway pressures for static studies. This approach has allowed us to improve our acquisition methodology and to validate aOCT measurements of the dynamic airway for the first time. We believe that this protocol will prove invaluable for aOCT system development and greatly facilitate translation of OCT systems for airway imaging into the clinical setting.

  9. Cholinergic Regulation of Airway Inflammation and Remodelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Kolahian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine is the predominant parasympathetic neurotransmitter in the airways that regulates bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion. Recent findings suggest that acetylcholine regulates additional functions in the airways, including inflammation and remodelling during inflammatory airway diseases. Moreover, it has become apparent that acetylcholine is synthesized by nonneuronal cells and tissues, including inflammatory cells and structural cells. In this paper, we will discuss the regulatory role of acetylcholine in inflammation and remodelling in which we will focus on the role of the airway smooth muscle cell as a target cell for acetylcholine that modulates inflammation and remodelling during respiratory diseases such as asthma and COPD.

  10. Translaryngeal jet ventilation and end-tidal PCO2 monitoring during varying degrees of upper airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, K R; Menegazzi, J J; Yealy, D M; Klain, M M; Molner, R L; Goode, J S

    1991-11-01

    To explore the ventilatory adequacy of translaryngeal jet ventilation (TLJV) during partial upper airway obstruction and the usefulness of monitoring end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2) during this condition. Prospective, nonrandomized, sequential crossover design. Apneic dog model (five dogs; mean weight, 23 kg). Animals were intubated with a 9.0-mm endotracheal tube with the tip positioned above the cricothyroid membrane. Upper airway obstructions of 40%, 69%, and 80% were created. TLJV was performed through the cricothyroid membrane using a 13-gauge catheter with 100% oxygen, 45 psi, 15 breaths per minute, and 30% inspiratory time for 15 minutes at each upper airway obstruction. Data collected at baseline (no upper airway obstruction) and one-minute intervals included arterial blood pressures, continuous PaCO2 measurements, and PETCO2 at the TLJV catheter tip and above the level of obstruction. Arterial blood gases were obtained at 0 and 15 minutes. Data were analyzed using Pearson's correlation, analysis of variance, and Turkey's multiple comparisons (significance, P less than .05). Baseline values for all variables did not significantly differ at the onset of each testing phase. Mean pH increased significantly from baseline during 69% upper airway obstruction (7.36 to 7.54, P less than .05) and 80% upper airway obstruction (7.39 to 7.61, P less than .01). Mean PaCO2 decreased significantly from baseline during all upper airway obstructions: 40% upper airway obstruction (39.9 to 33.6 mm Hg, P less than .01), 69% upper airway obstruction (38.3 to 25.6 mm Hg, P less than .001), and 80% upper airway obstruction (36.2 to 18.2 mm Hg, P less than .001). PaCO2, PETCO2, and pH differed significantly between each level of upper airway obstruction (P less than .01). PETCO2 was significantly correlated with PaCO2 (r = .84, P less than .001) and did not significantly differ from PaCO2. No signs of barotrauma were observed in any animal at any degree of upper airway obstruction. TLJV

  11. Airway epithelial NF-κB activation promotes Mycoplasma pneumoniae clearance in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Jiang

    Full Text Available Respiratory infections including atypical bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp contribute to the pathobiology of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Mp infection mainly targets airway epithelium and activates various signaling pathways such as nuclear factor κB (NF-κB. We have shown that short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1 (SPLUNC1 serves as a novel host defense protein and is up-regulated upon Mp infection through NF-κB activation in cultured human and mouse primary airway epithelial cells. However, the in vivo role of airway epithelial NF-κB activation in host defense against Mp infection has not been investigated. In the current study, we investigated the effects of in vivo airway epithelial NF-κB activation on lung Mp clearance and its association with airway epithelial SPLUNC1 expression.Non-antimicrobial tetracycline analog 9-t-butyl doxycycline (9-TB was initially optimized in mouse primary tracheal epithelial cell culture, and then utilized to induce in vivo airway epithelial specific NF-κB activation in conditional NF-κB transgenic mice (CC10-(CAIKKβ with or without Mp infection. Lung Mp load and inflammation were evaluated, and airway epithelial SPLUNC1 protein was examined by immunohistochemistry. We found that 9-TB treatment in NF-κB transgene positive (Tg+, but not transgene negative (Tg- mice significantly reduced lung Mp load. Moreover, 9-TB increased airway epithelial SPLUNC1 protein expression in NF-κB Tg+ mice.By using the non-antimicrobial 9-TB, our study demonstrates that in vivo airway epithelial NF-κB activation promotes lung bacterial clearance, which is accompanied by increased epithelial SPLUNC1 expression.

  12. Airway contractility and remodeling : Links to asthma symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    West, Adrian R.; Syyong, Harley T.; Siddiqui, Sana; Pascoe, Chris D.; Murphy, Thomas M.; Maarsingh, Harm; Deng, Linhong; Maksym, Geoffrey N.; Bosse, Ynuk

    Respiratory symptoms are largely caused by obstruction of the airways. In asthma, airway narrowing mediated by airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction contributes significantly to obstruction. The spasmogens produced following exposure to environmental triggers, such as viruses or allergens, are

  13. Findings of the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test and its relationship with response to modafinil therapy for residual excessive daytime sleepiness in obstructive sleep apnea patients adequately treated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuichi; Miki, Masuo; Tabata, Toshiyuki

    We aimed to examine the relationship between subjective and objective sleepiness in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients with residual sleepiness, and to determine whether baseline objective sleepiness severity predicts the response to modafinil therapy. Data were obtained from a randomized, placebo-controlled modafinil (200 mg/day) study in Japanese OSAS patients with residual sleepiness receiving nasal continuous positive pressure (n-CPAP) treatment. We analyzed 50 participants whose subjective (Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS] total score) and objective (Maintenance of Wakefulness Test [MWT] sleep latency) sleepiness were evaluated before and after treatment. Subjects were dichotomized into two subgroups according to the mean baseline MWT sleep latency. ESS total score and MWT sleep latency changes after treatment were compared between the placebo and modafinil groups in both subgroups. The mean baseline ESS total score and MWT sleep latency were 14.1 ± 2.8 and 14.2 ± 4.9 min, respectively; there was no significant correlation between these two variables. Patient characteristics were similar between the two subgroups (MWT sleep latency: modafinil group than in the placebo group (p = 0.005). In the ≥14-min subgroup, changes in these parameters did not differ between the treatment groups. In OSAS patients with residual sleepiness, the objective sleepiness level was not as high as expected, despite increased subjective sleepiness. Improvements in subjective and objective sleepiness seemed difficult to achieve with modafinil treatment among subjects with less objective sleepiness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultrasonography - A viable tool for airway assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi B Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Accurate prediction of the Cormack-Lehane (CL grade preoperatively can help in better airway management of the patient during induction of anaesthesia. Our aim was to determine the utility of ultrasonography in predicting CL grade. Methods: We studied 100 patients undergoing general endotracheal anaesthesia. Mallampati (MP class, thyromental distance (TMD and sternomental distance (SMD were noted. Ultrasound measurements of the anterior neck soft tissue thickness at the level of the hyoid (ANS-Hyoid, anterior neck soft tissue thickness at the level of the vocal cords (ANS-VC and ratio of the depth of the pre-epiglottic space (Pre-E to the  distance from the epiglottis to the mid-point of the distance between the vocal cords (E-VC were obtained. CL grade was noted during intubation. Chi-square test was employed to determine if there was any statistical difference in the measurements of patients with different CL grades. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV and accuracy were calculated for the various parameters. Results: The incidence of difficult intubation was 14%. An ANS-VC >0.23 cm had a sensitivity of 85.7% in predicting a CL Grade of 3 or 4, which was higher than that of MP class, TMD and SMD. However, the specificity, PPV and accuracy were lower than the physical parameters. The NPV was comparable. Conclusion: Ultrasound is a useful tool in airway assessment. ANS-VC >0.23 cm is a potential predictor of difficult intubation. ANS-Hyoid is not indicative of difficult intubation. The ratio Pre-E/E-VC has a low to moderate predictive value.

  15. Ultrasonography - A viable tool for airway assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Preethi B; Punetha, Pankaj; Chalam, Kolli S

    2016-11-01

    Accurate prediction of the Cormack-Lehane (CL) grade preoperatively can help in better airway management of the patient during induction of anaesthesia. Our aim was to determine the utility of ultrasonography in predicting CL grade. We studied 100 patients undergoing general endotracheal anaesthesia. Mallampati (MP) class, thyromental distance (TMD) and sternomental distance (SMD) were noted. Ultrasound measurements of the anterior neck soft tissue thickness at the level of the hyoid (ANS-Hyoid), anterior neck soft tissue thickness at the level of the vocal cords (ANS-VC) and ratio of the depth of the pre-epiglottic space (Pre-E) to the distance from the epiglottis to the mid-point of the distance between the vocal cords (E-VC) were obtained. CL grade was noted during intubation. Chi-square test was employed to determine if there was any statistical difference in the measurements of patients with different CL grades. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy were calculated for the various parameters. The incidence of difficult intubation was 14%. An ANS-VC >0.23 cm had a sensitivity of 85.7% in predicting a CL Grade of 3 or 4, which was higher than that of MP class, TMD and SMD. However, the specificity, PPV and accuracy were lower than the physical parameters. The NPV was comparable. Ultrasound is a useful tool in airway assessment. ANS-VC >0.23 cm is a potential predictor of difficult intubation. ANS-Hyoid is not indicative of difficult intubation. The ratio Pre-E/E-VC has a low to moderate predictive value.

  16. Regulated Mucin Secretion from Airway Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Bruce Adler

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Secretory epithelial cells of the proximal airways synthesize and secrete gel-forming polymeric mucins. The secreted mucins adsorb water to form mucus that is propelled by neighboring ciliated cells, providing a mobile barrier which removes inhaled particles and pathogens from the lungs. Several features of the intracellular trafficking of mucins make the airway secretory cell an interesting comparator for the cell biology of regulated exocytosis. Polymeric mucins are exceedingly large molecules (up to 3x10^6 D per monomer whose folding and initial polymerization in the ER requires the protein disulfide isomerase Agr2. In the Golgi, mucins further polymerize to form chains and possibly branched networks comprising more than 20 monomers. The large size of mucin polymers imposes constraints on their packaging into transport vesicles along the secretory pathway. Sugar side chains account for >70% of the mass of mucins, and their attachment to the protein core by O-glycosylation occurs in the Golgi. Mature polymeric mucins are stored in large secretory granules ~1 um in diameter. These are translocated to the apical membrane to be positioned for exocytosis by cooperative interactions among MARCKS, cysteine string protein (CSP, HSP70 and the cytoskeleton. Mucin granules undergo exocytic fusion with the plasma membrane at a low basal rate and a high stimulated rate. Both rates are mediated by a regulated exocytic mechanism as indicated by phenotypes in both basal and stimulated secretion in mice lacking Munc13-2, a sensor of the second messengers calcium and diacylglycerol (DAG. Basal secretion is induced by low levels of activation of P2Y2 purinergic and A3 adenosine receptors by extracellular ATP released in paracrine fashion and its metabolite adenosine. Stimulated secretion is induced by high levels of the same ligands, and possibly by inflammatory mediators as well. Activated receptors are coupled to phospholipase C by Gq, resulting in the

  17. Cephalometric study of the upper airways and dentoalveolar height in open bite patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjo, Filipe; Pinho, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    Open bite is related to various etiological factors and, in many cases, is difficult to diagnose. The present study is aimed at evaluating, through cephalometric analysis, the dimensions of the upper airways and dentoalveolar heights in open bite (OB) patients versus normal overbite patients. The relationship between the width of the upper airways and the lack of overbite is also studied, in order to differentiate between dental open bite (DOB) and skeletal open bite (SOB). Eighty X-rays were selected from files of orthodontic patients to form the control sample (n=40) and open bite sample (n=40). Dimensions of the upper airways and dentoalveolar heights were measured in both samples, using 16 linear measurements, two angle values and one ratio. In OB patients, anteroposterior narrowing of the upper airways, mainly in the nasopharynx and oropharynx, was observed, together with forward displacement of the hyoid bone and increased maxillary and mandibular dentoalveolar heights, and anterior facial height. In SOB, the overbite was more negative and facial growth was more clockwise-oriented than in DOB. Greater narrowing of the airways in the anteroposterior orientation was also noted. In DOB, there was evidence of muscular adaptation, as shown by increased values of the hyoid bone displacement to a more anterior and lower position, and increased values of the vertical dimensions of the airways. An increase in posterior facial height was also observed allowing anterior rotation of the mandible. The results suggest that the airway's dimensions reflect a tendency to open bite. The variable vertical airway length (Val) and the position of the hyoid bone allow the adaptive potential of these individuals to be determined and make the treatment of open bites more predictable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Scandinavian SSAI clinical practice guideline on pre-hospital airway management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehn, M; Hyldmo, P K; Magnusson, V; Kurola, J; Kongstad, P; Rognås, L; Juvet, L K; Sandberg, M

    2016-08-01

    The Scandinavian society of anaesthesiology and intensive care medicine task force on pre-hospital airway management was asked to formulate recommendations following standards for trustworthy clinical practice guidelines. The literature was systematically reviewed and the grading of recommendations assessment, development and evaluation (GRADE) system was applied to move from evidence to recommendations. We recommend that all emergency medical service (EMS) providers consider to: apply basic airway manoeuvres and airway adjuncts (good practice recommendation); turn unconscious non-trauma patients into the recovery position when advanced airway management is unavailable (good practice recommendation); turn unconscious trauma patients to the lateral trauma position while maintaining spinal alignment when advanced airway management is unavailable [strong recommendation, low quality of evidence (QoE)]. We suggest that intermediately trained providers use a supraglottic airway device (SAD) or basic airway manoeuvres on patients in cardiac arrest (weak recommendation, low QoE). We recommend that advanced trained providers consider using an SAD in selected indications or as a rescue device after failed endotracheal intubation (ETI) (good practice recommendation). We recommend that ETI should only be performed by advanced trained providers (strong recommendation, low QoE). We suggest that videolaryngoscopy is considered for ETI when direct laryngoscopy fails or is expected to be difficult (weak recommendation, low QoE). We suggest that advanced trained providers apply cricothyroidotomy in 'cannot intubate, cannot ventilate' situations (weak recommendation, low QoE). This guideline for pre-hospital airway management includes a combination of techniques applied in a stepwise fashion appropriate to patient clinical status and provider training. © 2016 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Acta Anaesthesiologica

  19. Teaching consultants airway management skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nargozian, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Airway management skills are integral to the practice of anaesthesiology and also to the practice of emergency medicine and allied health professions such as respiratory care, emergency medical technology, and emergency and critical care nursing. The basic information to be taught is the same but the level of detail will vary depending on the audience. The learning process usually involves progression from didactic lessons to skills training on inanimate models to supervised clinical practice. Modalities that may be used for skills training include cadavers, recently dead patients, videotapes, mannequins, simulators and virtual reality trainers. To maintain knowledge and skills, review and possible retraining should be conducted on an approximately annual basis.

  20. Airway management: induced tension pneumoperitoneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Khedher; Amine, El Ghali Mohamed; Abdelbaki, Azouzi; Jihene, Ayachi; Khaoula, Meddeb; Yamina, Hamdaoui; Mohamed, Boussarsar

    2016-01-01

    Pneumoperitoneum is not always associated with hollow viscus perforation. Such condition is called non-surgical or spontaneous pneumoperitoneum. Intrathoracic causes remain the most frequently reported mechanism inducing this potentially life threatening complication. This clinical condition is associated with therapeutic dilemma. We report a case of a massive isolated pneumoperitoneum causing acute abdominal hypertension syndrome, in a 75 year female, which occurred after difficult airway management and mechanical ventilation. Emergent laparotomy yielded to full recovery. The recognition of such cases for whom surgical management can be avoided is primordial to avoid unnecessary laparotomy and its associated morbidity particularly in the critically ill.

  1. Native Small Airways Secrete Bicarbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Shamsuddin, A. K. M.; Quinton, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of Cl− impermeability in cystic fibrosis (CF) and the cloning of the responsible channel, CF pathology has been widely attributed to a defect in epithelial Cl− transport. However, loss of bicarbonate (HCO3−) transport also plays a major, possibly more critical role in CF pathogenesis. Even though HCO3− transport is severely affected in the native pancreas, liver, and intestines in CF, we know very little about HCO3− secretion in small airways, the principle site of morbidi...

  2. Bronchology Treatment Of The Malignant Airway Stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slivka, R. et al

    2007-01-01

    Central airway stenosis is benign or malignant etiology. Multidiscplinary approach is useful in treatment central airway stenosis. In inoperable cases, interventional bronchology is good therapeutic alternative. We can use NdYAG laser, argon plasma coagulation, elektrocautery, cryotherapy, photodynamic therapy and stents for obstruction release. In malignant stenosis, we combine often methods of the interventional bronchology with brachytherapy, chemotherapy and external radiotherapy. (author)

  3. Management of Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome: A Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Mathur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : This disorder, also known by terms such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, upper airway sleep disorder and snoring. Snoring has also been identified as a possible risk factor for hyper tension, ischemic heart disease and stroke. The role of dentistry in sleep disorders is becoming more significant, especially in co- managing patients with simple snoring and mild to moderate OSA. The practicing dental professional has the opportunity to assist patients at a variety of levels, starting with the recognition of a sleep -related disorder, referring patients to a physician for evaluation and assisting in the management of sleep disorders. The first and simplest option would be behaviour modification, followed by insertion of oral devices suited to the patient, especially in those with mild to moderate OSA. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP and surgic al options are chosen for patients with moderate to severe OSA.

  4. Difficult airway response team: a novel quality improvement program for managing hospital-wide airway emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Lynette J; Herzer, Kurt R; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I; Berkow, Lauren C; Haut, Elliott R; Hillel, Alexander T; Miller, Christina R; Feller-Kopman, David J; Schiavi, Adam J; Xie, Yanjun J; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W; Mirski, Marek A

    2015-07-01

    Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. We developed a quality improvement program-the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)-to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had 3 core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a Web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index >40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous or current tracheostomy. Twenty

  5. Video laryngoscopes and the obstetric airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Brown, S; Russell, R

    2015-05-01

    The pitfalls surrounding securing the airway in the obstetric patient are well documented. From Tunstall's original failed intubation drill onwards, there has been progress both in recognition of the difficulties of airway management in the pregnant patient and development of algorithms to enhance patient safety. Current trends in obstetric anaesthesia have resulted in a significant decrease in exposure of anaesthetists, especially trainees, to caesarean section under general anaesthesia, compounding the difficulties in safely managing the airway. Video laryngoscopes have recently appeared in airway algorithms. They improve glottic visualisation and are useful in the management of the difficult non-obstetric airway, including those in morbidly obese patients and in the setting of a rapid-sequence induction. There is growing interest in the potential use of video laryngoscopes in the obstetric population and as a teaching tool to maximise training opportunities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Efeitos da pressão positiva expiratória nas vias aéreas sobre a atividade eletromiográfica da musculatura acessória da inspiração em portadores de DPOC Effects of expiratory positive airway pressure on the electromyographic activity of accessory inspiratory muscles in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dannuey Machado Cardoso

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a atividade eletromiográfica (AE dos músculos esternocleidomastoideo (ECM e escaleno durante e após a aplicação de expiratory positive airway pressure (EPAP, pressão positiva expiratória nas vias aéreas em portadores de DPOC. MÉTODOS: Ensaio clínico simples cego com 13 indivíduos hígidos como controles e 12 pacientes com DPOC estável. No momento basal, foram determinados a AE em respiração espontânea, parâmetros da função pulmonar e a força muscular respiratória. Posteriormente, foi aplicada EPAP de 15 cmH2O com uma máscara facial durante 25 min, com o registro do sinal eletromiográfico dos músculos ECM e escaleno a cada 5 min. Um último registro foi obtido 10 min após a retirada da máscara. RESULTADOS: Observamos que o comportamento da AE dos músculos ECM e escaleno foi semelhante nos controles e pacientes com DPOC (p = 0,716 e p = 0,789, respectivamente. Porém, ao longo da aplicação de EPAP, ambos os músculos mostraram uma tendência ao aumento da AE. Além disso, houve uma redução significativa da AE do ECM entre o momento final e basal (p = 0,034. CONCLUSÕES: A aplicação de EPAP promoveu uma redução significativa da AE do músculo ECM tanto nos controles quanto nos portadores de DPOC estável. Porém, isso não ocorreu em relação à AE do músculo escaleno.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the electromyographic activity (EA of sternocleidomastoid (SCM and scalene muscles during and after the use of expiratory positive airway pressure (EPAP in patients with COPD. METHODS: This was a clinical single-blind trial involving 13 healthy subjects as controls and 12 patients with stable COPD. At baseline, we determined EA during spontaneous respiration, lung function parameters, and respiratory muscle strength. Subsequently, EPAP at 15 cmH2O was applied by means of a face mask for 25 min, during which the EA of the SCM and scalene muscles was recorded every 5 min. A final record was obtained 10 min

  7. [Diagnostic and therapeutic methods for perioperative children with congenital heart disease with airway stenosis in pediatric intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuan; Liu, Xi-cheng; Li, Dan-dan; Zhu, Bin; Xiao, Li-jun; Feng, Zhi-chun; Zhu, Yi-min

    2013-11-01

    To explore the diagnostic and therapeutic methods for perioperative children with congenital heart disease (CHD) with airway stenosis in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Fiberoptic bronchoscopy was used for the diagnosis of 100 CHD cases in PICU who were clinically considered to have possible airway malformation because of complicated difficult-to-control lung infection, atelectasis and failure with the ventilator after surgery from January 2010 to October 2011. Cases who were confirmed to have severe airway stenosis by bronchoscopy and weaning from the ventilator after surgery were treated with balloon expandable stents into the desired position in the bronchoscopy. There were 73 cases (73%) of CHD patients with airway abnormalities, including 31 cases of severe stenosis (31%), moderate stenosis in 29 cases (29%), mild stenosis in 13 cases (13%). Nine of the 10 children in whom the mechanical ventilation was hard to be stopped after surgery because of severe airway stenosis were weaned from mechanical ventilation successfully by fiberoptic bronchoscopy, while one case died from primary disease with severe sepsis after the placement of bronchial stents. CHD children with difficult-to-control lung infection, atelectasis and failure with ventilator after surgery are often complicated with airway abnormalities. The therapeutic bronchoscopy with airway stent can be used for cases with weaning from the ventilator because of severe airway stenosis.

  8. [Laryngeal tube II : alternative airway for children?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalk, R; Scheller, B; Peter, N; Rosskopf, W; Byhahn, C; Zacharowski, K; Meininger, D

    2011-06-01

    Difficult airway situations both expected and unexpected, present major challenges to every anesthesiologist, especially in pediatric anesthesia. However, the integration of extraglottic airway devices, such as the laryngeal mask, into the algorithm of difficult airways has improved the handling of difficult airway situations. A device for establishing a supraglottic airway, the laryngeal tube (LT), was introduced in 1999. The LT is an extraglottic airway designed to secure a patent airway during either spontaneous breathing or controlled ventilation. The design of the device has been revised several times and a further development is the LTS II/LTS-D, which provides an additional channel for the insertion of a gastric drain tube. This article reports on the successful use of the LTS II in 12 children aged from 2 days to 6 years when endotracheal intubation, alternative mask or laryngeal mask ventilation failed. Use of the LTS II was associated with a high level of success, securing the airway when other techniques had failed. The potential advantage of the LTS II over the standard LT is an additional suction port, which allows gastric tube placement and can be used as an indirect indicator of correct placement. With a modified insertion technique using an Esmarch manoeuvre, placement was simple and fast to perform. In emergency situations when direct laryngoscopy fails or is too time-consuming the LTS II tube is recommended as an alternative device to secure the airway. As with all extraglottic airway devices, familiarity and clinical experience with the respective device and the corresponding insertion technique are essential for safe and successful use, especially in emergency situations.

  9. A multicentre, randomised controlled, non-inferiority trial, comparing nasal high flow with nasal continuous positive airway pressure as primary support for newborn infants with early respiratory distress born in Australian non-tertiary special care nurseries (the HUNTER trial): study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Brett J; Roberts, Calum T; Arnolda, Gaston R B; Wright, Ian M R; Owen, Louise S; Dalziel, Kim M; Foster, Jann P; Davis, Peter G; Buckmaster, Adam G

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Nasal high-flow (nHF) therapy is a popular mode of respiratory support for newborn infants. Evidence for nHF use is predominantly from neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). There are no randomised trials of nHF use in non-tertiary special care nurseries (SCNs). We hypothesise that nHF is non-inferior to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) as primary support for newborn infants with respiratory distress, in the population cared for in non-tertiary SCNs. Methods and analysis The HUNTER trial is an unblinded Australian multicentre, randomised, non-inferiority trial. Infants are eligible if born at a gestational age ≥31 weeks with birth weight ≥1200 g and admitted to a participating non-tertiary SCN, are 1 hour. Infants are randomised to treatment with either nHF or CPAP. The primary outcome is treatment failure within 72 hours of randomisation, as determined by objective oxygenation, apnoea or blood gas criteria or by a clinical decision that urgent intubation and mechanical ventilation, or transfer to a tertiary NICU, is required. Secondary outcomes include incidence of pneumothorax requiring drainage, duration of respiratory support, supplemental oxygen and hospitalisation, costs associated with hospital care, cost-effectiveness, parental stress and satisfaction and nursing workload. Ethics and dissemination Multisite ethical approval for the study has been granted by The Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Australia (Trial Reference No. 34222), and by each participating site. The trial is currently recruiting in eight centres in Victoria and New South Wales, Australia, with one previous site no longer recruiting. The trial results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and will be presented at national and international conferences. Trial registration number Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): ACTRN12614001203640; pre-results. PMID:28645982

  10. Adaptação do Bird Mark 7 para oferta de pressão positiva contínua nas vias aéreas em ventilação não-invasiva: estudo em modelo mecânico Adapting the Bird Mark 7 to deliver noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure: a bench study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Mayumi Kikuti

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Testar a eficiência da adaptação do ventilador Bird Mark 7 para oferecer pressão positiva contínua nas vias aéreas, conhecida como continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP em inglês, em ventilação não-invasiva. MÉTODOS: Estudo experimental utilizando um modelo mecânico do sistema respiratório. O Bird Mark 7 foi alimentado com 400 e 500 kPa e foi testado em CPAP de 5, 10 e 15 cmH2O. Para avaliar a eficiência da adaptação foram analisados os seguintes variáveis: diferença entre a CPAP pré-determinada e a CPAP realmente atingida (CPAPreal; área da pressão da via aérea sob o nível de CPAP ajustado (ÁREA CPAP; e volume corrente gerado. RESULTADOS: A adaptação do Bird Mark 7 para oferecer CPAP em ventilação não-invasiva conseguiu atingir o volume corrente esperado em todas as situações de esforço inspiratório (normal ou elevado, pressão de alimentação (400 ou 500 kPa e valor de CPAP (5, 10 ou 15 cmH2O. Para os CPAPs de 5 e 10 cmH2O, o CPAPreal foi muito próximo do pré-determinado, e a ÁREA CPAP teve valor próximo de zero. Para o CPAP de 15 cmH2O, o CPAPreal ficou abaixo do pré-determinado, e a ÁREA CPAP teve valor elevado. CONCLUSÃO: A eficiência da adaptação do Bird Mark 7 para oferecer CPAP em ventilação não-invasiva foi boa para os valores de CPAP de 5 e 10 cmH2O e insuficiente para CPAP de 15 cmH2O. Se adaptado como em nosso estudo, o Bird Mark 7 pode ser uma opção para oferta de CPAP até 10 cmH2O em locais onde equipamentos de ventilação não-invasiva são escassos ou inexistentes.OBJECTIVE: To test the efficiency of the Bird Mark 7 ventilator adapted to deliver continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP in noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. METHODS: This was an experimental study using a mechanical model of the respiratory system. A Bird Mark 7 ventilator was supplied with 400 and 500 kPa and tested at CPAP of 5, 10 and 15 cmH2O. The following variables were analyzed

  11. Improving airway segmentation in computed tomography using leak detection with convolutional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnier, Jean-Paul; Rikxoort, Eva M van; Setio, Arnaud A A; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M; Ginneken, Bram van; Ciompi, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    We propose a novel method to improve airway segmentation in thoracic computed tomography (CT) by detecting and removing leaks. Leak detection is formulated as a classification problem, in which a convolutional network (ConvNet) is trained in a supervised fashion to perform the classification task. In order to increase the segmented airway tree length, we take advantage of the fact that multiple segmentations can be extracted from a given airway segmentation algorithm by varying the parameters that influence the tree length and the amount of leaks. We propose a strategy in which the combination of these segmentations after removing leaks can increase the airway tree length while limiting the amount of leaks. This strategy therefore largely circumvents the need for parameter fine-tuning of a given airway segmentation algorithm. The ConvNet was trained and evaluated using a subset of inspiratory thoracic CT scans taken from the COPDGene study. Our method was validated on a separate independent set of the EXACT'09 challenge. We show that our method significantly improves the quality of a given leaky airway segmentation, achieving a higher sensitivity at a low false-positive rate compared to all the state-of-the-art methods that entered in EXACT09, and approaching the performance of the combination of all of them. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Effects of Proresolution of Ellagic Acid in an Experimental Model of Allergic Airway Inflammation

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    Claudiney de Freitas Alves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a disease of airway inflammation characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilic inflammation, and hypersecretion of mucus. Ellagic acid, a compound derived from medicinal plants and fruits, has shown anti-inflammatory activity in several experimental disease models. We used the classical experimental model, in BALB/c mice, of sensibilization with ovalbumin to determine the effect of ellagic acid (10 mg/kg; oral route in the resolution of allergic airways response. Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg; subcutaneous route was used as a positive control. The control group consisted of nonimmunized mice that received challenge with ovalbumin. Ellagic acid and dexamethasone or vehicle (water were administered before or after intranasal allergen challenge. Ellagic acid accelerated the resolution of airways inflammation by decreasing total leukocytes and eosinophils numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, the mucus production and lung inflammation in part by reducing IL-5 concentration, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO activity, and P-selectin expression, but not activator protein 1 (AP-1 and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB pathways. In addition, ellagic acid enhanced alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of IgG-OVA-coated beads ex vivo, a new proresolving mechanism for the clearance of allergen from the airways. Together, these findings identify ellagic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for accelerating the resolution of allergic airways inflammation.

  13. Cephalometric norms for the upper airway in a healthy North Indian population

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    Dipti Shastri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim was to obtain normative data for cephalometric measurements of the upper airway in the North Indian population. Design: Observational study. Setting: University department and teaching hospital out-patient clinic. Subjects and Methods: A total of 180 healthy patients were included out of which 90 were males (age range, 8-16 years, and 90 were females (age range, 8-16 years, with normal skeletal facial profile, no history of snoring, sleep apnea, upper airway disease, tonsillectomy or adenoidectomy, obesity, or pathology in the pharynx. Twenty cephalometric airway measurements, including size of the tongue, soft palate, nasopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and relative position of the hyoid bone and valleculae were obtained. Landmarks on cephalometric radiographs were digitized and measurements were made using a specially designed computer program. Error analysis of measurements was performed and comparison of measurements according to sex was made. Results: Significant sex dimorphism was seen for the majority of measurements, with the exception of minimal depth of the airway, oropharyngeal depth of the airway, and the soft palate angle with the hard palate. Conclusion: A minimum sagittal dimension of the upper airway was evident despite differences in measurements between sexes. Findings from this study should be a useful reference for the assessment of sleep apnea in the North Indian population.

  14. Apical Localization of Zinc Transporter ZnT4 in Human Airway Epithelial Cells and Its Loss in a Murine Model of Allergic Airway Inflammation

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    Chiara Murgia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The apical cytoplasm of airway epithelium (AE contains abundant labile zinc (Zn ions that are involved in the protection of AE from oxidants and inhaled noxious substances. A major question is how dietary Zn traffics to this compartment. In rat airways, in vivo selenite autometallographic (Se-AMG-electron microscopy revealed labile Zn-selenium nanocrystals in structures resembling secretory vesicles in the apical cytoplasm. This observation was consistent with the starry-sky Zinquin fluorescence staining of labile Zn ions confined to the same region. The vesicular Zn transporter ZnT4 was likewise prominent in both the apical and basal parts of the epithelium both in rodent and human AE, although the apical pools were more obvious. Expression of ZnT4 mRNA was unaffected by changes in the extracellular Zn concentration. However, levels increased 3-fold during growth of cells in air liquid interface cultures and decreased sharply in the presence of retinoic acid. When comparing nasal versus bronchial human AE cells, there were significant positive correlations between levels of ZnT4 from the same subject, suggesting that nasal brushings may allow monitoring of airway Zn transporter expression. Finally, there were marked losses of both basally-located ZnT4 protein and labile Zn in the bronchial epithelium of mice with allergic airway inflammation. This study is the first to describe co-localization of zinc vesicles with the specific zinc transporter ZnT4 in airway epithelium and loss of ZnT4 protein in inflamed airways. Direct evidence that ZnT4 regulates Zn levels in the epithelium still needs to be provided. We speculate that ZnT4 is an important regulator of zinc ion accumulation in secretory apical vesicles and that the loss of labile Zn and ZnT4 in airway inflammation contributes to AE vulnerability in diseases such as asthma.

  15. Comparison of the CobraPLA (Cobra Perilaryngeal Airway) and the Laryngeal Mask Airway Unique in children under pressure controlled ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitini, Luis; Carmi, Nurit; Yanovski, Boris; Tome, Riad; Resnikov, Igor; Gankin, Igor; Somri, Mostafa; Alfery, David

    2008-04-01

    The Laryngeal Mask Airway-Unique (LMAU) and CobraPLA (Cobra Perilaryngeal Airway) are supraglottic airway devices. There are no published studies comparing these devices in children breathing with pressure controlled ventilation (PCV). Eighty pediatric patients, scheduled for elective general surgery of short duration, were randomly assigned to have either a CobraPLA or a LMAU used for airway management using PCV. We compared the devices with respect to (i) ability to form an effective cuff seal, (ii) oxygenation, (iii) endtidal carbon dioxide level, (iv) time to achieve an effective airway, (v) airway interventions required for insertion, (vi) fiberoptic score, (vii) respiratory variables and (vii) adverse events. Cuff seal pressure was significantly higher for CobraPLA (27.08 +/- 4.15 cmH(2)O) than for LMAU (20.91 +/- 2.47 cmH(2)O). Oxygenation was similar in both groups while the mean endtidal CO(2) in the CobraPLA group was significantly higher than in the LMAU group (36.47 +/- 1.93 mmHg vs 34.71 +/- 3.05 mmHg, P = 0.021). Time and ease of insertion were similar, with CobraPLA requiring more frequent jaw lift and LMAU requiring more frequent adjustment of the head and neck to achieve a proper position. Fiberoptic scores were excellent with both devices. Respiratory variables were similar with the exception that the plateau pressure and mean peak pressures were significantly lower with CobraPLA. There was a low rate of blood mucosal staining of the devices. No patient in either group reported a sore throat. Both devices appear to be safe and effective in establishing an adequate airway in healthy children undergoing surgery of short duration with PCV.

  16. Airway, feeding and growth in infants with Robin sequence and sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, M; Bailey, S; Walker, K; Hensley, R; Kol-Castro, C; Badawi, N; Cheng, A; Waters, K

    2013-04-01

    Robin sequence (RS) is associated with airway abnormalities that result in functional problems of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), feeding difficulties, and consequent poor growth. We evaluated the relationships between OSA severity, airway and feeding interventions, and weight at 12 months in infants with RS and OSA. Retrospective notes review of children with RS managed at our neonatal unit (1998-2010, inclusive). Of 39 infants studied, 10 (25.6%) had mild/moderate OSA, and 29 (74.4%) severe. Infants with severe OSA required more airway interventions in hospital (82.8 vs 30.0%, p = 0.004) and at discharge (72.4 vs 20.0%, p = 0.007) than those with mild/moderate OSA; 30.0% of infants with mild/moderate OSA required continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) during admission and 20.0% on discharge, but amongst those with severe OSA 82.8% required airway interventions as an inpatient, 17.2% underwent mandibular distraction osteogenesis, and 55.2% required CPAP on discharge. Those with severe OSA were also more likely to require tube feeding on discharge (89.7 vs 50.0%, p = 0.02). Overall, children were on a lower weight centiles at discharge compared to birth (-10.2 centiles) and at 12 months of age compared to birth (-14.8 centiles), but this occurred irrespective of OSA severity or need for airway interventions or tube feeding. Infants with RS commonly have OSA, feeding and airway difficulties. Weight at 12 months appeared not to be influenced by OSA severity, feeding or airway problems, suggesting that current intervention/management strategy results in the severely affected infants growing as well as those affected less severely. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Post-extubation airway obstruction. Literature review

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    Álvaro SÁNCHEZ-TABERNERO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: airway obstruction after extubation in any surgery is a critical event with low incidence, which may require reintubation or tracheostomy, which often otolaryngologist is required. Objective: To determine the prevalence of BVA and its causes through systematic literature review. Method: Literature review in PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane clinical trials, meta-analysis, reviews and case series and control over airway obstruction after extubation that requires reintubation in adults. Results: 6 studies and one clinical practice guidelines were selected. The most common cause of extubation failure is blocking the airway for various reasons (pharyngeal muscle weakness residual effect -often farmacologycal-, laryngospasm, vocal cord paralysis, edema of upper respiratory tract, cervical postoperative hematoma, foreign bodies or secretions. Most cases of re-intubation occurred within 2 hours after extubation. Conclusions: The most common cause of failure after general anesthesia extubation is blocking the airway generally caused by residual neuromuscular blocking effect. Airway obstruction risk increases in airway and head and neck surgery. Difficult intubation guidlines have improved performance and reduced adverse events and similar strategies must be implemented in extubation. The procedure extubation and reintubation should be documented. Working groups airway must be multidisciplinary and include specialists in otolaryngology.

  18. Color analysis of the human airway wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Deepa; McLennan, Geoffrey; Donnelley, Martin; Delsing, Angela; Suter, Melissa; Flaherty, Dawn; Zabner, Joseph; Hoffman, Eric A.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2002-04-01

    A bronchoscope can be used to examine the mucosal surface of the airways for abnormalities associated with a variety of lung diseases. The diagnosis of these abnormalities through the process of bronchoscopy is based, in part, on changes in airway wall color. Therefore it is important to characterize the normal color inside the airways. We propose a standardized method to calibrate the bronchoscopic imaging system and to tabulate the normal colors of the airway. Our imaging system consists of a Pentium PC and video frame grabber, coupled with a true color bronchoscope. The calibration procedure uses 24 standard color patches. Images of these color patches at three different distances (1, 1.5, and 2 cm) were acquired using the bronchoscope in a darkened room, to assess repeatability and sensitivity to illumination. The images from the bronchoscope are in a device-dependent Red-Green-Blue (RGB) color space, which was converted to a tri-stimulus image and then into a device-independent color space sRGB image by a fixed polynomial transformation. Images were acquired from five normal human volunteer subjects, two cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and one normal heavy smoker subject. The hue and saturation values of regions within the normal airway were tabulated and these values were compared with the values obtained from regions within the airways of the CF patients and the normal heavy smoker. Repeated measurements of the same region in the airways showed no measurable change in hue or saturation.

  19. Nurses' Awareness about Principles of Airway Suctioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad; Shahbazi, Sara

    2017-08-01

    Airway suctioning is one of the most common interventions for patients with respiratory disorders and having adequate knowledge in implementing this technique is quite crucial for nurses. To assess the nurses' awareness about principles of airway suctioning. This study was a cross-sectional study done on 85 staff nurses' in Vali-Asr hospital. Sampling was based on census data collection. A researcher made questionnaire was used for assessment of nurses' awareness about the principles of airway suctioning. The validity and reliability (Cronbach's alpha=0.78) of the questionnaire have been examined and proved. The level of nurses' awareness about airway suctioning was measured based on the questionnaire that includes demographic and specialty information in the form of eight questions of 3-selection-item. The maximum and minimum score of knowledge ranged between 0-8. The data obtained was statistically analysed using SPSS software Version 16.0 and was analysed using descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation coefficient. The results reveal that the nurses' awareness about principles of airway suctioning was average. There was a significant association between knowledge and gender of nurses (pprinciples of airway suctioning was more than men. The results indicate that nurses' awareness of airway suctioning technique was in an average state. Considering the importance of this technique and the effects this technique has on the patients' haemodynamic status, we recommend in-service courses.

  20. Educating the Educator: Teaching Airway Adjunct Techniques in Athletic Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" ("Competencies") now requires athletic training educators (ATEs) to introduce into the curriculum various types of airway adjuncts including: (1) oropharyngeal airways (OPA), (2) nasopharyngeal airways (NPA), (3) supraglottic airways (SGA), and (4) suction. The addition of these…

  1. Postmortem magnetic resonance appearances of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthurs, Owen J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Chitty, Lyn S. [UCL Institute of Child Health, Genetics and Genomic Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Great Ormond Street and UCLH NHS Foundation Trusts, London (United Kingdom); Judge-Kronis, Lydia [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is a rare life-threatening condition characterised by complete or near-complete developmental obstruction of the foetal airway. Although antenatal imaging findings have been described, the postmortem MRI findings have not been reported. To present postmortem MRI features of CHAOS. We retrospectively reviewed our hospital pathology and imaging databases for cases of CHAOS over a 2-year period. We identified two cases of CHAOS. In both cases, postmortem plain radiographs demonstrated gross abdominal distension with distortion and splaying of the rib cage. Both foetuses had characteristic postmortem MRI findings including large-volume fluid-filled lungs on T2-weighted imaging, diaphragmatic eversion, fluid-filled airway dilatation below the level of obstruction, centrally positioned and compressed heart, and massive ascites. One foetus had an associated limb abnormality. Postmortem MRI in foetuses suspected of having CHAOS allows confirmation of the diagnosis, determination of the anatomical level of the atresia or stenosis, and identification of associated abnormalities without the need for invasive autopsy. (orig.)

  2. Airway allergy and skin reactivity to aeroallergens in Riyadh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almogren, Adel

    2009-01-01

    To determine the pattern of skin prick test reactivity to aeroallergens in patients with asthma and rhinitis (airway allergy) residing in Riyadh region. This is a retrospective cross sectional study based on data analysis of skin prick test results of individuals with clinical diagnosis of airway allergy. Allergy skin prick test result data of 139 Saudi nationals from Riyadh region tested at King Khalid University Hospital between January 2003 and March 2004 was analyzed retrospectively. This group comprised of 53% females and 47% males, with a mean age of 27 +/- 12 years. A set of aeroallergens extracts for both indoor and outdoor allergens including fungal spores was used to test the patients. Seventy-five percent (105) of patients reacted to one or more allergen extracts. The most frequently reacting indoor allergen was house dust mite (77.8%) followed by the cat (33.6%) and cockroach (19.2%). Among the outdoor allergens Prosopis juliflora was tested positive in 72.1%, Bermuda grass in 53.8%, Chenopodium album in 47.1%, Rye grass in 36.5% and Salsola kali in 36.5%. A significant proportion of patients were also found reacting to Moulds (18.2%) and Aspergillus fumigatus (18.2%) extracts. Sensitivity to one or more aeroallergens was common in patients, indicating high level of aeroallergen sensitization in patients with airway allergy residing in Riyadh region. (author)

  3. Another method to maintain positive-pressure ventilation through the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-02-18

    Feb 18, 2013 ... loss of airway, as a result of obstruction because of crusting and inspissated mucous plugs. However, short-term positive-pressure ventilation may be required for periodic assessment of the airway in a patient with the Montgomery®. T tube in situ. We hereby discuss a method of maintaining ventilation, as ...

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pediatric airway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auringer, S.T.; Bisset, G.S. III; Myer, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Evaluation of the pediatric airway is often complex and may require multiple imaging techniques and invasive procedures. We performed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the airway in 34 children with clinical evidence of chronic airway obstruction and compared MR findings with those obtained by surgery and/or endoscopy. MR diagnoses included vascular compression in 15 patients, primary tracheomalacic states in 12 patients, and mediastinal masses in 4 patients. Findings were normal for 3 patients. The MR findings were in agreement with the endoscopic findings in 25 to 28 cases and in agreement with the surgical findings in 21 to 21 cases. (orig./GDG)

  5. Predictors of Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Elite Athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toennesen, Louise L; Porsbjerg, Celeste; Pedersen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Elite athletes frequently experience asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). We aimed to investigate predictors of airway pathophysiology in a group of unselected elite summer-sport athletes, training for the summer 2008 Olympic Games, including markers of airway inflammation......, systemic inflammation, and training intensity. METHODS: Fifty-seven Danish elite summer-sport athletes with and without asthma symptoms all gave a blood sample for measurements of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF...

  6. Eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthmatic patients is associated with an altered airway microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrild, Asger; Kiilerich, Pia; Brejnrod, Asker Daniel

    2017-01-01

    of eosinophilic airway inflammation correlates with variations in the microbiome across asthmatic patients, whereas neutrophilic airway inflammation does not. This warrants further investigation on molecular pathways involved in both patients with eosinophilic and those with noneosinophilic asthma.......BACKGROUND: Asthmatic patients have higher microbiome diversity and an altered composition, with more Proteobacteria and less Bacteroidetes compared with healthy control subjects. Studies comparing airway inflammation and the airway microbiome are sparse, especially in subjects not receiving anti......-inflammatory treatment. OBJECTIVE: We sought to describe the relationship between the airway microbiome and patterns of airway inflammation in steroid-free patients with asthma and healthy control subjects. METHODS: Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected from 23 steroid-free nonsmoking patients with asthma and 10...

  7. Airway Remodelling in Asthma: From Benchside to Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Bergeron

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway remodelling refers to the structural changes that occur in both large and small airways relevant to miscellaneous diseases including asthma. In asthma, airway structural changes include subepithelial fibrosis, increased smooth muscle mass, gland enlargement, neovascularization and epithelial alterations. Although controversial, airway remodelling is commonly attributed to an underlying chronic inflammatory process. These remodelling changes contribute to thickening of airway walls and, consequently, lead to airway narrowing, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, airway edema and mucous hypersecretion. Airway remodelling is associated with poor clinical outcomes among asthmatic patients. Early diagnosis and prevention of airway remodelling has the potential to decrease disease severity, improve control and prevent disease expression. The relationship between structural changes and clinical and functional abnormalities clearly deserves further investigation. The present review briefly describes the characteristic features of airway remodelling observed in asthma, its clinical consequences and relevance for physicians, and its modulation by therapeutic approaches used in the treatment of asthmatic patients.

  8. Airway resistance at maximum inhalation as a marker of asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connor George T

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthmatics exhibit reduced airway dilation at maximal inspiration, likely due to structural differences in airway walls and/or functional differences in airway smooth muscle, factors that may also increase airway responsiveness to bronchoconstricting stimuli. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that the minimal airway resistance achievable during a maximal inspiration (Rmin is abnormally elevated in subjects with airway hyperresponsiveness. Methods The Rmin was measured in 34 nonasthmatic and 35 asthmatic subjects using forced oscillations at 8 Hz. Rmin and spirometric indices were measured before and after bronchodilation (albuterol and bronchoconstriction (methacholine. A preliminary study of 84 healthy subjects first established height dependence of baseline Rmin values. Results Asthmatics had a higher baseline Rmin % predicted than nonasthmatic subjects (134 ± 33 vs. 109 ± 19 % predicted, p = 0.0004. Sensitivity-specificity analysis using receiver operating characteristic curves indicated that baseline Rmin was able to identify subjects with airway hyperresponsiveness (PC20 min % predicted, FEV1 % predicted, and FEF25-75 % predicted, respectively. Also, 80% of the subjects with baseline Rmin min > 145% predicted had hyperresponsive airways, regardless of clinical classification as asthmatic or nonasthmatic. Conclusions These findings suggest that baseline Rmin, a measurement that is easier to perform than spirometry, performs as well as or better than standard spirometric indices in distinguishing subjects with airway hyperresponsiveness from those without hyperresponsive airways. The relationship of baseline Rmin to asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness likely reflects a causal relation between conditions that stiffen airway walls and hyperresponsiveness. In conjunction with symptom history, Rmin could provide a clinically useful tool for assessing asthma and monitoring response to treatment.

  9. Airway cellularity, lipid laden macrophages and microbiology of gastric juice and airways in children with reflux oesophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewindon PJ

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD can cause respiratory disease in children from recurrent aspiration of gastric contents. GORD can be defined in several ways and one of the most common method is presence of reflux oesophagitis. In children with GORD and respiratory disease, airway neutrophilia has been described. However, there are no prospective studies that have examined airway cellularity in children with GORD but without respiratory disease. The aims of the study were to compare (1 BAL cellularity and lipid laden macrophage index (LLMI and, (2 microbiology of BAL and gastric juices of children with GORD (G+ to those without (G-. Methods In 150 children aged Results BAL neutrophil% in G- group (n = 63 was marginally but significantly higher than that in the G+ group (n = 77, (median of 7.5 and 5 respectively, p = 0.002. Lipid laden macrophage index (LLMI, BAL percentages of lymphocyte, eosinophil and macrophage were similar between groups. Viral studies were negative in all, bacterial cultures positive in 20.7% of BALs and in 5.3% of gastric aspirates. BAL cultures did not reflect gastric aspirate cultures in all but one child. Conclusion In children without respiratory disease, GORD defined by presence of reflux oesophagitis, is not associated with BAL cellular profile or LLMI abnormality. Abnormal microbiology of the airways, when present, is not related to reflux oesophagitis and does not reflect that of gastric juices.

  10. Comprehensive airway management of patients with maxillofacial trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellman, Robert M; Losquadro, William D

    2008-11-01

    Airway management in patients with maxillofacial trauma is complicated by injuries to routes of intubation, and the surgeon is frequently asked to secure the airway. Airway obstruction from hemorrhage, tissue prolapse, or edema may require emergent intervention for which multiple intubation techniques exist. Competing needs for both airway and surgical access create intraoperative conflicts during repair of maxillofacial fractures. Postoperatively, edema and maxillomandibular fixation place the patient at risk for further airway compromise.

  11. Critical Airway Team: A Retrospective Study of an Airway Response System in a Pediatric Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterrett, Emily C; Myer, Charles M; Oehler, Jennifer; Das, Bobby; Kerrey, Benjamin T

    2017-12-01

    Objective Study the performance of a pediatric critical airway response team. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Freestanding academic children's hospital. Subjects and Methods A structured review of the electronic medical record was conducted for all activations of the critical airway team. Characteristics of the activations and patients are reported using descriptive statistics. Activation of the critical airway team occurred 196 times in 46 months (March 2012 to December 2015); complete data were available for 162 activations (83%). For 49 activations (30%), patients had diagnoses associated with difficult intubation; 45 (28%) had a history of difficult laryngoscopy. Results Activation occurred at least 4 times per month on average (vs 3 per month for hospital-wide codes). The most common reasons for team activation were anticipated difficult intubation (45%) or failed intubation attempt (20%). For 79% of activations, the team performed an airway procedure, most commonly direct laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. Bronchoscopy was performed in 47% of activations. Surgical airway rescue was attempted 4 times. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation occurred in 41 activations (25%). Twenty-nine patients died during or following team activation (18%), including 10 deaths associated with the critical airway event. Conclusion Critical airway team activation occurred at least once per week on average. Direct laryngoscopy, tracheal intubation, and bronchoscopic procedures were performed frequently; surgical airway rescue was rare. Most patients had existing risk factors for difficult intubation. Given our rate of serious morbidity and mortality, primary prevention of critical airway events will be a focus of future efforts.

  12. Alternatives for OSAHS treatment: selection of patients for upper airway surgery and oral appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Boudewyns

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP is considered to represent the standard treatment for patients with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS, poor treatment compliance and/or refusal is an issue in 20–30% of these patients. As an alternative to life-long CPAP treatment, conservative procedures exist with dental appliances for mandibular advancement, as well as curative surgical techniques. Surgical treatment of OSAHS can be divided into the following two main groups: 1 upper airway surgery by soft tissue resection (uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, etc., and 2 skeletal procedures, such as maxillo-mandibular advancement. Proper selection of patients for the different treatment modalities is the key for full treatment success. Patient-related factors, such as the site of upper airway collapse, craniofacial characteristics, dental health, obesity, age, profession and positional dependence, as well as treatment-related factors, should be evaluated before a final proposal for these treatment alternatives is formulated.

  13. Prehospital airway management: A prospective case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbers, N E R; Hamaekers, A E W; Jansen, J; Wijering, S C; Thomas, O; Wilbers-van Rens, R; van Zundert, A A J

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a one-year prospective study involving a prehospital Emergency Medical Service in the Netherlands to investigate the incidence of failed or difficult prehospital endotracheal intubation. During the study period the paramedics were asked to fill in a registration questionnaire after every endotracheal intubation. Of the 26,271 patient contacts, 256 endotracheal intubations were performed by paramedics in one year. Endotracheal intubation failed in 12 patients (4.8%). In 12.0% of 249 patients, a Cormack and Lehane grade III laryngoscopy was reported and a grade IV laryngoscopy was reported in 10.4%. The average number of endotracheal intubations per paramedic in one year was 4.2 and varied from zero to a maximum of 12. The median time between arrival on the scene and a positive capnograph was 7 min.38 s in the case of a Cormack and Lehane grade I laryngoscopy and 14 min.58 s in the case of a Cormack and Lehane grade 4 laryngoscopy. The incidence of endotracheal intubations performed by Dutch paramedics in one year was low, but endotracheal intubation was successful in 95.2%, which is comparable with findings in international literature. Early capnography should be used consistently in prehospital airway management.

  14. Upper airway obstruction in canine laryngeal paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amis, T C; Smith, M M; Gaber, C E; Kurpershoek, C

    1986-05-01

    The type and the severity of airway obstruction in 30 dogs with bilateral laryngeal paralysis was assessed, using tidal breathing flow-volume loop (TBFVL) analysis. The dogs had clinical evidence of mild-to-severe upper airway obstruction (ie, respiratory distress, exercise intolerance, stridor). Seventeen dogs had TBFVL consistent with a nonfixed (inspiratory) obstruction, 10 had TBFVL indicative of a fixed (inspiratory/expiratory) obstruction, and 3 had normal TBFVL. Analysis of TBFVL confirmed that dogs with laryngeal paralysis have upper airway obstruction that differs in type and severity. Use of TBFVL provided a quantitative evaluation of airway obstruction and demonstrated the effects of bilateral laryngeal paralysis on the breathing patterns of dogs.

  15. Application of a new combined model including radiological indicators to predict difficult airway in patients undergoing surgery for cervical spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mao; Li, Xiaoxi; Wang, Jun; Guo, Xiangyang

    2014-01-01

    Airway management is crucial in clinical anesthesia. Many complications associated with airway management result from unexpected difficult airway, but predicting a difficult airway is a major challenge. We investigated the efficacy of a new combined model including radiological indicators to predict difficult airway in patients undergoing surgery for cervical spondylosis, a population with a high incidence of difficult airway. We randomly enrolled 303 patients scheduled for elective surgery for cervical spondylosis at Peking University Third Hospital between August 2012 and March 2013. Preoperatively, patients were evaluated for difficult airway according to a clinical index and parameters on lateral cervical radiographs and magnetic resonance images. Difficult airway was defined as Cormack-Lehane grades III-IV. Logistic regression was used to identify a combined (clinical and radiological) model for difficult airway. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to describe the effectiveness of prediction. We identified three clinical predictive factors using the ROC curve: mouth opening, sternomental distance, and neck mobility. We created a clinical model using three factors: gender, age, and mouth opening, with odds ratios (OR) of 0.370, 1.034, and 0.358, respectively. Using the clinical and radiological parameters, we formulated a combined model with five risk factors: gender, mouth opening, atlanto-occipital gap, the angle from the second to sixth cervical vertebraes in the neutral position, and the angle difference of d (the angle between the laryngeal axis and the epiglottic axis) from the neutral position to extension (OR: 0.107, 0.355, 0.846, 1.057, and 0.952, respectively). The sensitivity and specificity of the combined model were 80.0% and 65.7%, respectively, and the ROC curve confirmed that the combined model was better than any single clinical predictor and the clinical model. The efficacy of the combined model including both clinical and

  16. A comparative study of Laryngeal Mask Airway size 1 vs. i-gel size 1 in infants undergoing daycare procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Deepanjali; Koul, Archna; Sharma, Bimla; Sood, Jayashree

    2015-04-01

    The i-gel size 1 is a relatively new, single use, second generation supraglottic airway device. This prospective, randomized, observational study compares the suitability of the i-gel size 1 with the classical Laryngeal Mask Airway (cLaryngeal Mask Airway) size 1 in pediatric patients undergoing elective daycare procedures. Forty ASA I and II children (2-5 kg body weight) were randomized to two groups of 20 each, to receive either the i-gel or the cLaryngeal Mask Airway as an airway device. The primary outcome variable was oropharyngeal seal pressure (OSP). We also assessed ease of insertion, number of insertion attempts, time taken for successful insertion and any intra-operative complications. Demographic data did not differ between the two groups. The OSP with the i-gel was 22.30 ± 4.72 cm H2O as compared to 18.05 ± 1.95 cm H2O with the cLaryngeal Mask Airway and the difference was statistically significant (P = 0.001). Displacement of the airway device following change of position was reported less often with the i-gel as compared to the cLaryngeal Mask Airway [n = 1 (5%) vs. n = 5 (35%), P = 0.04]. There were no major complications with either device and rest of all the variables were comparable with both the devices. The OSP of the i-gel size 1 was higher than that of the cLaryngeal Mask Airway. This was statistically significant, although may not be of clinical significance. The i-gel size 1 is less prone to displacement during position changes. However, being a preliminary study carried out on a small number of patients, further trials are warranted to come to any definite conclusion. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [The influence of airway supporting maneuvers on glottis view in pediatric fiberoptic bronchoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umutoglu, Tarik; Gedik, Ahmet Hakan; Bakan, Mefkur; Topuz, Ufuk; Daskaya, Hayrettin; Ozturk, Erdogan; Cakir, Erkan; Salihoglu, Ziya

    2015-01-01

    Flexible fiber optic bronchoscopy is a valuable intervention for evaluation and management of respiratory diseases in both infants, pediatric and adult patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the airway supporting maneuvers on glottis view during pediatric flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy. In this randomized, controlled, crossover study; patients aged between 0 and 15 years who underwent flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy procedure having American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II risk score were included. Patients having risk of difficult intubation, intubated or patients with tracheostomy, and patients with reduced neck mobility or having cautions for neck mobility were excluded from this study. After obtaining best glottic view at the neutral position, patients were positioned jaw trust with open mouth, jaw trust with teeth prottution, head tilt chin lift and triple airway maneuvers and best glottis scores were recorded. Total of 121 pediatric patients, 57 girls and 64 boys, were included in this study. Both jaw trust with open mouth and jaw trust with teeth prottution maneuvers improved the glottis view compared with neutral position (p0.05). Head tilt chin lift and triple airway maneuvers improved glottis view when compared with both jaw trust with open mouth and jaw trust with teeth prottution maneuvers and neutral position (ptriple airway maneuvers (p>0.05). All airway supporting maneuvers improved glottic view during pediatric flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy; however head tilt chin lift and triple airway maneuvers were found to be the most effective maneuvers. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. The influence of airway supporting maneuvers on glottis view in pediatric fiberoptic bronchoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umutoglu, Tarik; Gedik, Ahmet Hakan; Bakan, Mefkur; Topuz, Ufuk; Daskaya, Hayrettin; Ozturk, Erdogan; Cakir, Erkan; Salihoglu, Ziya

    2015-01-01

    Flexible fiber optic bronchoscopy is a valuable intervention for evaluation and management of respiratory diseases in both infants, pediatric and adult patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the airway supporting maneuvers on glottis view during pediatric flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy. In this randomized, controlled, crossover study; patients aged between 0 and 15 years who underwent flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy procedure having American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II risk score were included. Patients having risk of difficult intubation, intubated or patients with tracheostomy, and patients with reduced neck mobility or having cautions for neck mobility were excluded from this study. After obtaining best glottic view at the neutral position, patients were positioned jaw trust with open mouth, jaw trust with teeth prottution, head tilt chin lift and triple airway maneuvers and best glottis scores were recorded. Total of 121 pediatric patients, 57 girls and 64 boys, were included in this study. Both jaw trust with open mouth and jaw trust with teeth prottution maneuvers improved the glottis view compared with neutral position (p0.05). Head tilt chin lift and triple airway maneuvers improved glottis view when compared with both jaw trust with open mouth and jaw trust with teeth prottution maneuvers and neutral position (ptriple airway maneuvers (p>0.05). All airway supporting maneuvers improved glottic view during pediatric flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy; however head tilt chin lift and triple airway maneuvers were found to be the most effective maneuvers. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Routine airway surveillance in pediatric tracheostomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergin, Ozgul; Adil, Eelam; Kawai, Kosuke; Watters, Karen; Moritz, Ethan; Rahbar, Reza

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to review airway findings in children with tracheostomies who underwent surveillance direct laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy (DLB) to determine the yield of routine airway evaluation in these patients. Retrospective chart review at tertiary referral children's hospital. A retrospective chart review was conducted of all of the children with tracheostomies who underwent DLB after tracheostomy between 1984 and 2015. A total of 303 patients met inclusion criteria. The median time interval between tracheostomy and first follow-up DLB was 12.0 months (IQR 4.8-28.9 months). There was no significant difference in the incidence of airway lesions between patients who underwent endoscopy tracheostomy versus those who had a longer time interval between tracheostomy and DLB (p = 0.16). One hundred sixty seven patients (55.1%) were diagnosed with lesions, with suprastomal granulation (39.9%) being the most common. Symptomatic patients were significantly more likely to have an airway lesion identified (69.9% versus 42.0%; p tracheostomy were significantly more likely to have an airway lesion (p = 0.01). The high incidence of airway lesions noted during surveillance DLB support the utility of routine airway endoscopy in pediatric tracheostomy patients. Symptomatic patients, those with ventilator dependence, or cardiopulmonary or trauma indications for tracheostomy are more likely to have airway lesions and should be monitored closely. The ideal time interval between surveillance endoscopies needs to be examined further. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Impending Airway Compromise due to Cystic Hygroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Shavit

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on a 3-month-old infant, who arrived in the pediatric emergency department (ED with a cervical cystic hygroma causing an impending compromise of the airway. We recognize that such a lesion can rapidly progress, and the judicious use of imaging in the ED may help to avoid airway compromise and possibly fatal complications. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:368–369.

  1. Airways obstruction, coal mining, and disability.

    OpenAIRE

    Lapp, N L; Morgan, W K; Zaldivar, G

    1994-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that the inhalation of coal in the absence of complicated coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) or smoking can lead to disabling airways obstruction. The cause of such obstruction has been variously attributed to emphysema or bronchitis. The frequency of significant airways obstruction in a group of United States coal miners seeking compensation for occupationally induced pulmonary impairment was therefore determined. In a sample of 611 "Black Lung" claimants there...

  2. Airway Management in Athletes Wearing Lacrosse Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G; Boergers, Richard J; Lininger, Monica R

    2018-03-01

      Patient ventilation volume and rate have been found to be compromised due to the inability to seal a pocket mask over the chinstrap of football helmets. The effects of supraglottic airway devices such as the King LT and of lacrosse helmets on these measures have not been studied.   To assess the effects of different airway management devices and helmet conditions on producing quality ventilations while performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation on simulation manikins.   Crossover study.   Simulation laboratory.   Thirty-six athletic trainers (12 men, 24 women) completed this study.   Airway-management device (pocket mask, oral pharyngeal airway, King LT airway [KA]) and helmet condition (no helmet, Cascade helmet, Schutt helmet, Warrior helmet) served as the independent variables. Participant pairs performed 2 minutes of 2-rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation under 12 trial conditions.   Ventilation volume (mL), ventilation rate (ventilations/min), rating of perceived difficulty (RPD), and percentage of quality ventilations were the dependent variables.   A significant interaction was found between type of airway-management device and helmet condition on ventilation volume and rate ( F 12,408 = 2.902, P < .0001). In addition, a significant interaction was noted between airway-management device and helmet condition on RPD scores ( F 6,204 = 3.366, P = .003). The no-helmet condition produced a higher percentage of quality ventilations compared with the helmet conditions ( P ≤ .003). Also, the percentage of quality ventilations differed, and the KA outperformed each of the other devices ( P ≤ .029).   The helmet chinstrap inhibited quality ventilation (rate and volume) in airway procedures that required the mask to be sealed on the face. However, the KA allowed quality ventilation in patients wearing a helmet with the chinstrap fastened. If a KA is not available, the helmet may need to be removed to provide quality ventilations.

  3. Glutamate receptors and the airways hyperreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strapkova, Anna; Antosova, Martina

    2012-03-01

    It is proposed the link between the hyperactivity of NMDA receptors and airway hyperresponsiveness. We investigated the effect of agents modulating the activity of NMDA receptors in the ovalbumin-induced airway hyperreactivity in guinea pigs. The airways hyperreactivity was influenced by the agonist (NMDA) and selective antagonist - competitive (AP-5) and non-competitive (MK-801) of NMDA receptors. Airway responsiveness to histamine or acetylcholine was evaluated in in vitro conditions. NMDA administration caused the increase of tracheal smooth muscle response in ovalbumin-induced hyperreactivity to acetylcholine. MK 801 as well as AP-5 provoked the decrease of reactivity mainly to acetylcholine in tracheal smooth muscle, while the former, non-competitive antagonist was more effective. We recorded more pronounced response in tracheal than in lung tissue smooth muscle with more considerable response to acetylcholine than to histamine. The results of experiments show the modification of airway smooth muscles responses by agents modulating the activity of NMDA receptors. They confirm the possibility of NMDA receptors participation in experimental airway hyperreactivity. The results enlarge information regarding the link of the inflammatory diseases and glutamatergic system.

  4. Link between vitamin D and airway remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berraies A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anissa Berraies, Kamel Hamzaoui, Agnes HamzaouiPediatric Respiratory Diseases Department, Abderrahmen Mami Hospital, Ariana, and Research Unit 12SP15 Tunis El Manar University, Tunis, TunisiaAbstract: In the last decade, many epidemiologic studies have investigated the link between vitamin D deficiency and asthma. Most studies have shown that vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of asthma and allergies. Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with asthma severity and loss of control, together with recurrent exacerbations. Remodeling is an early event in asthma described as a consequence of production of mediators and growth factors by inflammatory and resident bronchial cells. Consequently, lung function is altered, with a decrease in forced expiratory volume in one second and exacerbated airway hyperresponsiveness. Subepithelial fibrosis and airway smooth muscle cell hypertrophy are typical features of structural changes in the airways. In animal models, vitamin D deficiency enhances inflammation and bronchial anomalies. In severe asthma of childhood, major remodeling is observed in patients with low vitamin D levels. Conversely, the antifibrotic and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D in smooth muscle cells have been described in several experiments. In this review, we briefly summarize the current knowledge regarding the relationship between vitamin D and asthma, and focus on its effect on airway remodeling and its potential therapeutic impact for asthma.Keywords: vitamin D, asthma, airway remodeling, airway smooth muscle, supplementation

  5. Ultrasound: A novel tool for airway imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharthkumar Bhikhabhai Parmar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The scope of ultrasound is emerging in medical science, particularly outside traditional areas of radiology practice. Aims: We designed this study to evaluate feasibility of bedside sonography as a tool for airway assessment and to describe sonographic anatomy of airway. Settings and Design: A prospective, clinical study. Materials and Methods: We included 100 adult, healthy volunteers of either sex to undergo airway imaging systemically starting from floor of the mouth to the sternal notch in anterior aspect of neck by sonography. Results: We could visualize mandible and hyoid bone as a bright hyperechoic structure with hypoechoic acoustic shadow underneath. Epiglottis, thyroid cartilage, cricoid cartilage, and tracheal rings appeared hypoechoic. Vocal cords were visualized through thyroid cartilage. Interface between air and mucosa lining the airway produced a bright hyperechoic linear appearance. Artifacts created by intraluminal air prevented visualization of posterior pharynx, posterior commissure, and posterior wall of trachea. Conclusions: Ultrasound is safe, quick, noninvasive, repeatable, and bedside tool to assess the airway and can provide real-time dynamic images relevant for several aspects of airway management.

  6. Prevention of Morbidity in sickle cell disease--qualitative outcomes, pain and quality of life in a randomised cross-over pilot trial of overnight supplementary oxygen and auto-adjusting continuous positive airways pressure (POMS2a): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jo; Inusa, Baba; Liossi, Christina; Jacob, Eufemia; Murphy, Patrick B; Hart, Nicholas; Gavlak, Johanna; Sahota, Sati; Chorozoglou, Maria; Nwosu, Carol; Gwam, Maureen; Gupta, Atul; Rees, David C; Thein, Swee Lay; Reading, Isabel C; Kirkham, Fenella J; Cheng, Man Yeung Edith

    2015-08-25

    Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is an inherited disorder of haemoglobin. Patients experience long-term health care problems, affecting quality of life (QOL) including frequent acute pain, which is difficult to document in trials except as hospital admissions. Pilot data suggests that overnight respiratory support, either supplementary oxygen or auto-adjusting continuous positive airways pressure (APAP), is safe and may have clinical benefit. This pilot trial aims to determine which intervention is more acceptable to participants and whether there are other advantages of one over the other, e.g. in respiratory function or haematological parameters, before conducting the Phase 2 trial of overnight respiratory support funded by the National Institutes of Health Research. This is a pilot cross-over interventional trial with the order of interventions decided by simple randomization. Ten adults (age over 18 years) and 10 children (aged between 8 and 18 years) with homozygous sickle cell disease (haemoglobin SS, HbSS), recruited regardless of symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing, will undergo overnight pulse oximetry and will have two interventions, overnight oxygen and APAP, for a week each in randomised order with a washout week between interventions. Participants will complete online diaries via an iPad throughout the 29 days of the study and will complete QOL questionnaires and have measurement of haematology, biochemistry, spirometry and lung volumes (adults only) at 3 time points, at baseline and after each intervention, as well as in-depth semi-structured qualitative interviews after each intervention, carried out by an experienced psychologist. Both qualitative and statistical methods will be used to analyze the data. The primary outcome is qualitative data looking at participant experience from the transcribed interviews after each intervention. The participant's view on feasibility, acceptability and preference will specifically be explored. The QOL, laboratory and

  7. Estudo sobre o impacto do uso de aparelho de emissão de pressão positiva contínua nas vias aéreas superiores na hipersonia diurna em portadores da síndroma de apneia do sono Study into the use of continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome patients with daytime drowsiness

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    Clélia Maria Ribeiro Franco

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: A síndroma da apneia -hipopneia obstrutiva do sono (SAHOS é um distúrbio respiratório de elevada morbimortalidade. A terapia com pressão positiva contínua das vias aéreas (CPAP representa o tratamento conservador mais prescrito para a SAHOS e tem o intuito de restabelecer a patência das vias aéreas, normalizando o índice de eventos respiratórios obstrutivos, corrigindo os sintomas. Objectivo: Avaliar o impacto do uso do CPAP nasal sobre a hipersonia diurna em portadores de SAHOS. Método: Amostra de vinte doentes portadores de SAHOS diagnosticados por estudo de polissonografia de noite inteira, usuários ou não de CPAP nasal, todos avaliados quanto à hipersonia diurna através da escala de sonolência de Epworth. Resultados: O decréscimo do nível de sonolência diurna dos usuários de CPAP nasal foi significante (p=0,017, enquanto para não usuários de CPAP nasal a média do mesmo diminuiu sem significância estatística (p=0,162. Quanto à adesão à terapia com CPAP, 100% dos usuários relataram benefícios e, destes, 50% referiram desconfortos durante o uso. Conclusões: Portadores de SAHOS usuários do CPAP nasal têm o seu nível de hipersonia diurna diminuído em relação àqueles que não o utilizam.Background: Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS is a respiratory disorder with high morbidity and mortality. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP is the most commonly prescribed conservative treatment for adults with OSAHS. CPAP therapy normalises or decreases OSAHS symptoms and can reduce and prevent OSAHS complications. Aims: To evaluate adherence to nasal CPAP treatment and CPAP impact on daytime drowsiness. Method: A sample of 20 patients evaluated for daytime drowsiness using the Epworth sleepiness scale and interviewed for adherence to nasal CPAP use. Results: There was a significant decrease in the level of daytime sleepiness of the patients users of nasal CPAP (p=0.017; patients not

  8. O impacto do CPAP na reabilitação cardíaca de pacientes com ICC: relato de caso El impacto del CPAP en la rehabilitación cardíaca de pacientes con ICC: caso clínico The impact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP on the cardiac rehabilitation of patients with congestive heart failure: case report

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    Murillo Frazão de Lima e Costa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A insuficiência cardíaca congestiva é uma patologia que limita a função física do paciente. Neste estudo foi analisada uma paciente, realizando um programa de reabilitação cardíaca associado à pressão positiva contínua nas vias aéreas, aferindo-se antes do estudo e após 6 semanas, o teste de caminhada de 6 minutos (TC6M, questionário de qualidade de vida e ecocardiograma. A paciente aumentou a distância no TC6M de 152,5 m para 520,44 m. O questionário Minnesota reduziu de 62 para 18. A fração de ejeção subiu de 33% para 36%. Na paciente estudada a conduta melhorou o desempenho físico e a qualidade de vida.La insuficiencia cardíaca congestiva es una patología que limita la función física del paciente. En este estudio fue analizada una paciente, realizando un programa de rehabilitación cardíaca asociado a la presión positiva continua en las vías aéreas, realizando antes del estudio y después de 6 semanas, el test de caminata de 6 minutos (TC6M, cuestionario de calidad de vida y ecocardiograma. La paciente aumentó la distancia en el TC6M de 152,5 m a 520,44 m. El cuestionario Minnesota redujo de 62 a 18. La fracción de eyección subió de 33% a 36%. En la paciente estudiada la conducta mejoró el desempeño físico y la calidad de vida.Congestive heart failure is a pathology that limits the patient's physical function. This study analyzed one patient who was submitted to a cardiac rehabilitation program associated to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP, by assessing the results of the six-minute walk test (6MWT and a questionnaire on the quality of life and performing an echocardiographic assessment before the study and after six weeks. The distance walked by the patient increased from 152.5 m to 520.44 m at the 6MWT. The Minnesota questionnaire score decreased from 62 to 18. Ejection fraction increased from 33% to 36%. Therefore, the management chosen for this case improved the patient's physical performance

  9. Airway foreign body in children

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    Marina GONZÁLEZ-HERRERO

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The aspiration of a foreign body in children is a frequent emergency in pediatrics, being potentially lethal. Method: Narrative review. Results: This pathology mainly affects children under 5 years of age with a peak of incidence between the first and third years of life. The clinic will depend on the type of foreign body (size, shape, possibility of breaking, organic or not, the age of the child and the location of the object. In our environment, the most frequent is the aspiration of nuts (peanuts and sunflower seeds. After the initial picture, an asymptomatic period tends to occur, which favors delayed diagnosis and leads to possible errors in the diagnosis. Discussion: An adequate clinical history and a high diagnostic suspicion are fundamental to favor an early treatment. The presence of a normal chest X-ray does not exclude the presence of a foreign body in the airway, so a bronchoscopy is indicated if the diagnostic suspicion is high. The treatment of choice is extraction by rigid bronchoscopy, being controversial the use of flexible fibrobronchoscope. Conclusions: Conclusions: The aspiration of a foreign body is a pediatric emergency that requires a diagnosis and early treatment. The highest incidence occurs in children under 3 years and more frequently in men. The most commonly aspirated material in our environment are nuts, mainly located in the bronchial tree. The initial episode may go unnoticed, delaying the diagnosis and may lead to progressive respiratory distress in the child. A detailed clinical history and suspicion of this pathology are essential in children at risk age who present with cough and dyspnea of sudden onset. The existence of a normal chest radiograph should not postpone bronchoscopy when there is high clinical suspicion. The treatment of choice for the extraction of foreign bodies in airways in children is rigid bronchoscopy, being controversial the use of the flexible fibrobronchoscope

  10. An ovine tracheal explant culture model for allergic airway inflammation

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    Abeynaike Latasha

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The airway epithelium is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthmatic disease. However, much of our understanding of airway epithelial cell function in asthma has been derived from in vitro studies that may not accurately reflect the interactive cellular and molecular pathways active between different tissue constituents in vivo. Methods Using a sheep model of allergic asthma, tracheal explants from normal sheep and allergic sheep exposed to house dust mite (HDM allergen were established to investigate airway mucosal responses ex vivo. Explants were cultured for up to 48 h and tissues were stained to identify apoptotic cells, goblet cells, mast cells and eosinophils. The release of cytokines (IL-1α, IL-6 and TNF-α by cultured tracheal explants, was assessed by ELISA. Results The general morphology and epithelial structure of the tracheal explants was well maintained in culture although evidence of advanced apoptosis within the mucosal layer was noted after culture for 48 h. The number of alcian blue/PAS positive mucus-secreting cells within the epithelial layer was reduced in all cultured explants compared with pre-cultured (0 h explants, but the loss of staining was most evident in allergic tissues. Mast cell and eosinophil numbers were elevated in the allergic tracheal tissues compared to naïve controls, and in the allergic tissues there was a significant decline in mast cells after 24 h culture in the presence or absence of HDM allergen. IL-6 was released by allergic tracheal explants in culture but was undetected in cultured control explants. Conclusions Sheep tracheal explants maintain characteristics of the airway mucosa that may not be replicated when studying isolated cell populations in vitro. There were key differences identified in explants from allergic compared to control airways and in their responses in culture for 24 h. Importantly, this study establishes the potential for the

  11. Mechanical interactions between adjacent airways in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baoshun; Bates, Jason H T

    2014-03-15

    The forces of mechanical interdependence between the airways and the parenchyma in the lung are powerful modulators of airways responsiveness. Little is known, however, about the extent to which adjacent airways affect each other's ability to narrow due to distortional forces generated within the intervening parenchyma. We developed a two-dimensional computational model of two airways embedded in parenchyma. The parenchyma itself was modeled in three ways: 1) as a network of hexagonally arranged springs, 2) as a network of triangularly arranged springs, and 3) as an elastic continuum. In all cases, we determined how the narrowing of one airway was affected when the other airway was relaxed vs. when it narrowed to the same extent as the first airway. For the continuum and triangular network models, interactions between airways were negligible unless the airways lay within about two relaxed diameters of each other, but even at this distance the interactions were small. By contrast, the hexagonal spring network model predicted that airway-airway interactions mediated by the parenchyma can be substantial for any degree of airway separation at intermediate values of airway contraction forces. Evidence to date suggests that the parenchyma may be better represented by the continuum model, which suggests that the parenchyma does not mediate significant interactions between narrowing airways.

  12. SIMPLE, TIMELY, SAFELY? LARYNGEAL MASK AND PEDIATRIC AIRWAY.

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    Karišik, Marijana

    2016-03-01

    Laryngeal mask airway (LMA) was a useful, powerful airway management device for routine pediatric airway management, pediatric difficult airway, and in pediatric emergency situations. Over years, various designs, induction and insertion techniques have been described. LMA provides ease of placement and removal as compared with endotracheal intubation, less traumatism for the respiratory tract, better tolerability by patients, improved hemodynamic stability during emergency, less coughing, less sore throat, avoidance of laryngoscopy, and hands free airway. On the other hand, LMA is not suitable to overcome functional airway problems and mechanical airway obstruction in children. Simple airway management in pediatric patients is normally easy in experienced hands, for anesthesiologists working in specialized hospitals with appropriate personnel and equipment that guarantee optimal safety in these patients. On the other hand, pediatric airway management is a great challenge for anesthesiologists working in departments with a small number of pediatric surgical procedures. Careful preoperative evaluation, preparation and training in the recognition of challenges in pediatric airway are essential for the management of the airway in children. LMA plays a special role in the management of difficult pediatric airway; as a supraglottic airway device, it is incorporated into difficult pediatric airway algorithms.

  13. Lower airway papillomatosis in children.

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    Zawadzka-Głos, Lidia; Jakubowska, Anna; Chmielik, Mieczysław; Bielicka, Anna; Brzewski, Michał

    2003-10-01

    Laryngeal papilloma in children is a frequent disease caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) type 6 or type 11. This disease has a tendency to recur and the changes are histologically benign. In some cases papilloma may affect the lower levels of the respiratory tract. In this study, among 90 patients treated for laryngeal papillomatosis, in four children papilloma of trachea, bronchi and lung tissue were detected in endoscopic and radiological examination. This constitutes 4.4% of all patients. Compact nodules and acquired cysts between 5 and 50 mm long were found in chest X-rays and in computerised tomography. These cysts appeared from 4 to 8 years after establishing a diagnosis of laryngeal papilloma, and 1 year after recognising papilloma in the trachea. In all four children the presence of nodules and cysts in the lungs was preceded by recurrent pneumonia, emphysema or atelectasis of the lungs. All children with laryngeal papillomatosis should have a chest X-ray. Detection of acquired cyst-like changes in lung tissue in children with laryngeal papillomatosis is a warning of future papilloma in the trachea and bronchi, with involvement of lung tissue. In differential diagnosis of these changes in the lungs we should take into consideration the presence of papilloma in the bronchi. A prognosis of papillomatosis in the lower airways in children is always serious.

  14. A novel technique in airway management of neonates with occipital encephalocele.

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    Rangaswamy, N; Pramanik, A K

    2014-11-01

    Airway stabilization in neonates with occipital encephalocele (OE) is critical during surgery or if they develop hypoxic-respiratory failure. Endotracheal intubation can be challenging due to difficulty in positioning the head in a patient with large occipital mass. We describe a novel technique for positioning neonates with large OE using a commonly used hospital apparatus which facilitated appropriate positioning of the baby and successful endotracheal intubation with ease and no additional staff.

  15. Automatic airway-artery analysis on lung CT to quantify airway wall thickening and bronchiectasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez-Rovira, Adria; Kuo, Wieying; Petersen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Bronchiectasis and airway wall thickening are commonly assessed in computed tomography (CT) by comparing the airway size with the size of the accompanying artery. Thus, in order to automate the quantification of bronchiectasis and wall thickening following a similar principle, there is a...