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Sample records for autosomal-recessive pitt-hopkins-like mental

  1. CNTNAP2 and NRXN1 are mutated in autosomal-recessive Pitt-Hopkins-like mental retardation and determine the level of a common synaptic protein in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zweier, Christiane; de Jong, Eiko K; Zweier, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Heterozygous copy-number variants and SNPs of CNTNAP2 and NRXN1, two distantly related members of the neurexin superfamily, have been repeatedly associated with a wide spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as developmental language disorders, autism spectrum disorders, epilepsy...... neuropsychiatric disorders and to severe MR as reported here, evidence for a synaptic role of the CNTNAP2-encoded protein CASPR2 has so far been lacking. Using Drosophila as a model, we now show that, as known for fly Nrx-I, the CASPR2 ortholog Nrx-IV might also localize to synapses. Overexpression of either...

  2. CNTNAP2 and NRXN1 are mutated in autosomal-recessive Pitt-Hopkins-like mental retardation and determine the level of a common synaptic protein in Drosophila.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweier, C.; Jong, E.K. de; Zweier, M.; Orrico, A.; Ousager, L.B.; Collins, A.L.; Bijlsma, E.K.; Oortveld, M.A.W.; Ekici, A.B.; Reis, A.; Schenck, A.; Rauch, A.

    2009-01-01

    Heterozygous copy-number variants and SNPs of CNTNAP2 and NRXN1, two distantly related members of the neurexin superfamily, have been repeatedly associated with a wide spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as developmental language disorders, autism spectrum disorders, epilepsy, and

  3. An autosomal recessive disorder with retardation of growth, mental deficiency, ptosis, pectus excavatum and camptodactyly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaldi, F.; Bennaceur, B.; Hammou, A.; Hamza, M.; Gharbi, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    Two strikingly similar brothers issued from consanguineous parents in the second degree present the following patterns of anomalies: Retardation of growth, mental deficiency, ocular abnormalities, pectus excavatum and camptodactyly. The ocular abnormalities include ptosis, microphthalmia and hypertelorism. No endocrine or metabolic aberrations are found. The authors conclude that the disorder has probably an autosomal recessive mode of transmission. (orig.)

  4. Autozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Pakistani family reveals a novel non-syndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation locus on 11p15-tel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehman, Shoaib ur; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Eiberg, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal recessive inherited mental retardation is an extremely heterogeneous disease and accounts for approximately 25% of all non-syndromic mental retardation cases. Autozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Pakistani family revealed a novel locus for non-syndromic autosomal recessive men...

  5. Autosomal recessive mental retardation syndrome with anterior maxillary protrusion and strabismus: MRAMS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Rainshtein, Limor; Inbar, Dov; Gothelf, Doron; Hennekam, Raoul; Straussberg, Rachel

    2007-08-01

    We report on a family in whom the combination of mental retardation (MR), anterior maxillary protrusion, and strabismus segregates. The healthy, consanguineous parents (first cousins) of Israeli-Arab descent had 11 children, 7 of whom (5 girls) were affected. They all had severe MR. Six of the seven had anterior maxillary protrusion with vertical maxillary excess, open bite, and prominent crowded teeth. None of the sibs with normal intelligence had jaw or dental anomalies. The child with MR but without a jaw anomaly was somewhat less severely retarded, had seizures and severe psychosis, which may point to his having a separate disorder. Biochemical and neurological studies, including brain MRI and standard cytogenetic studies, yielded normal results; fragile X was excluded, no subtelomeric rearrangements were detectable, and X-inactivation studies in the mother showed random inactivation. We have been unable to find a similar disorder in the literature, and suggest that this is a hitherto unreported autosomal recessive disorder, which we propose to name MRAMS (mental retardation, anterior maxillary protrusion, and strabismus). (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Autosomal recessive mental retardation syndrome with anterior maxillary protrusion and strabismus: MRAMS syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Rainshtein, Limor; Inbar, Dov; Gothelf, Doron; Hennekam, Raoul; Straussberg, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    We report on a family in whom the combination of mental retardation (MR), anterior maxillary protrusion, and strabismus segregates. The healthy, consanguineous parents (first cousins) of Israeli-Arab descent had 11 children, 7 of whom (5 girls) were affected. They all had severe MR. Six of the seven

  7. Autosomal recessive intestinal lymphangiectasia and lymphedema, with facial anomalies and mental retardation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekam, R. C.; Geerdink, R. A.; Hamel, B. C.; Hennekam, F. A.; Kraus, P.; Rammeloo, J. A.; Tillemans, A. A.

    1989-01-01

    We report on two male and two female relatives with intestinal lymphangiectasia; severe lymphedema of limbs, genitalia, and face; facial anomalies; seizures; mild growth retardation; and moderate mental retardation. Main facial anomalies are a flat face, flat nasal bridge, hypertelorism, small

  8. Macrocephaly, epilepsy, autism, dysmorphic features, and mental retardation in two sisters: a new autosomal recessive syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Orstavik, K H; Strømme, P; Ek, J; Torvik, A; Skjeldal, O H

    1997-01-01

    We report two sisters with macrocephaly, epilepsy, and severe mental retardation. The first child was a 14 year old girl born at term after a normal pregnancy, with birth weight 3600 g and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC) 36 cm (75th centile). Her head size increased markedly during the first six months of life, and was later stable at 2-3 cm above the 97.5th centile. Her development was characterised by psychomotor delay, epilepsy, and autistic features. Her face appeared mildly dysmorphi...

  9. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palau Francesc

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000, ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000 and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000. Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder, ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, α-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED, aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1, and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2. Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning, electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia.

  10. Autosomal recessive mode of inheritance of a Coffin-Siris like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonioli, E; Palmieri, A; Bertola, A; Bellini, C

    1995-01-01

    Autosomal recessive mode of inheritance of a Coffin-Siris like syndrome: Coffin-Siris syndrome is a rare mental retardation/multiple congenital anomalies syndrome; so far its pattern of inheritance is under debate. We report a child affected by this syndrome, the pedigree of which is consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive primary microcephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disorders ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific Articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (7 links) MICROCEPHALY 1, PRIMARY, AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE MICROCEPHALY 2, PRIMARY, AUTOSOMAL ...

  12. Blepharophimosis-mental retardation (BMR) syndromes: A proposed clinical classification of the so-called Ohdo syndrome, and delineation of two new BMR syndromes, one X-linked and one autosomal recessive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verloes, Alain; Bremond-Gignac, Dominique; Isidor, Bertrand; David, Albert; Baumann, Clarisse; Leroy, Marie-Anne; Stevens, René; Gillerot, Yves; Héron, Delphine; Héron, Bénédicte; Benzacken, Brigitte; Lacombe, Didier; Brunner, Han; Bitoun, Pierre

    2006-06-15

    We report on 11 patients from 8 families with a blepharophimosis and mental retardation syndrome (BMRS) phenotype. Using current nosology, five sporadic patients have Ohdo syndrome, associated with congenital hypothyroidism in two of them (thus also compatible with a diagnosis of Young-Simpson syndrome). In two affected sibs with milder phenotype, compensated hypothyroidism was demonstrated. In another family, an affected boy was born to the unaffected sister of a previously reported patient. Finally, in the last sibship, two affected boys in addition had severe microcephaly and neurological anomalies. A definitive clinical and etiologic classification of BMRS is lacking, but closer phenotypic analysis should lead to a more useful appraisal of the BMRS phenotype. We suggest discontinuing the systematic use of the term "Ohdo syndrome" when referring to patients with BMRS. We propose a classification of BMRS into five groups: (1) del(3p) syndrome, (possibly overlooked in older reports); (2) BMRS, Ohdo type, limited to the original patients of Ohdo; (3) BMRS SBBYS (Say-Barber/Biesecker/Young-Simpson) type, with distinctive dysmorphic features and inconstant anomalies including heart defect, optic atrophy, deafness, hypoplastic teeth, cleft palate, joint limitations, and hypothyroidism. BMRS type SBBYS is probably an etiologically heterogeneous phenotype, as AD and apparently AR forms exist; (4) BMRS, MKB (Maat-Kievit-Brunner) type, with coarse, triangular face, which is probably sex-linked; (5) BMRS V (Verloes) type, a probable new type with severe microcephaly, hypsarrhythmia, adducted thumbs, cleft palate, and abnormal genitalia, which is likely autosomal recessive. Types MKB and V are newly described here. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Carrier testing for autosomal-recessive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallance, Hilary; Ford, Jason

    2003-08-01

    The aim of carrier testing is to identify carrier couples at risk of having offspring with a serious genetic (autosomal recessive) disorder. Carrier couples are offered genetic consultation where their reproductive options, including prenatal diagnosis, are explained. The Ashkenazi Jewish population is at increased risk for several recessively inherited disorders (Tay-Sachs disease, Cystic fibrosis, Canavan disease, Gaucher disease, Familial Dysautonomia, Niemann-Pick disease, Fanconi anemia, and Bloom syndrome). Unlike Tay-Sachs disease, there is no simple biochemical or enzymatic test to detect carriers for these other disorders. However, with the rapid identification of disease-causing genes in recent years, DNA-based assays are increasingly available for carrier detection. Approximately 5% of the world's population carries a mutation affecting the globin chains of the hemoglobin molecule. Among the most common of these disorders are the thalassemias. The global birth rate of affected infants is at least 2 per 1000 (in unscreened populations), with the greatest incidence in Southeast Asian, Indian, Mediterranean, and Middle Eastern ethnic groups. Carriers are detected by evaluation of red cell indices and morphology, followed by more sophisticated hematological testing and molecular analyses. The following issues need to be considered in the development of a carrier screening program: (1) test selection based on disease severity and test accuracy; (2) funding for testing and genetic counselling; (3) definition of the target population to be screened; (4) development of a public and professional education program; (5) informed consent for screening; and (6) awareness of community needs.

  14. Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease: Antenatal Diagnosis and Histopathological Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayananda Kumar Rajanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD is one of the most common inheritable disease manifesting in infancy and childhood with a frequency of 1:6,000 to 1:55,000 births. The patient in her second trimester presented with a history of amenorrhea. Ultrasound examination revealed bilateral, enlarged, hyperechogenic kidneys, placentomegaly, and severe oligohydramnios. The pregnancy was terminated. An autopsy was performed on the fetus. Both the kidneys were found to be enlarged and the cut surface showed numerous cysts. The liver sections showed changes due to fibrosis. The final diagnosis of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease was made based on these findings. In this article, we correlate the ante-natal ultrasound and histopathological findings in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive hyper-IgE syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases Health Topic: Pneumonia Health Topic: Skin Infections Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome Additional NIH Resources (2 links) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: DOCK8 Deficiency National Institute of Allergy and ...

  16. Two novel mutations in ILDR1 gene cause autosomal recessive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table 1. Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss loci and related genes. STR-markers and primers used for screening the loci are listed. Repeated sequence. Locus. Gene STR marker. Position. Forward primer. Reverse primer. Length (bp). DFNB2 MYOTA D11s911 77448582-77448892 CA. D11S937. 77854318- ...

  17. Exome Sequencing and Directed Clinical Phenotyping Diagnose Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease Presenting as Autosomal Recessive Hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stitziel, Nathan O.; Fouchier, Sigrid W.; Sjouke, Barbara; Peloso, Gina M.; Moscoso, Alessa M.; Auer, Paul L.; Goel, Anuj; Gigante, Bruna; Barnes, Timothy A.; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Duga, Stefano; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Nikpay, Majid; Martinelli, Nicola; Girelli, Domenico; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kooperberg, Charles; Lange, Leslie A.; Ardissino, Diego; McPherson, Ruth; Farrall, Martin; Watkins, Hugh; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rader, Daniel J.; de Faire, Ulf; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J.; Charnas, Lawrence; Altshuler, David; Gabriel, Stacey; Kastelein, John J. P.; Defesche, Joep C.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hovingh, G. Kees

    2013-01-01

    Objective Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia is a rare inherited disorder, characterized by extremely high total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, that has been previously linked to mutations in LDLRAP1. We identified a family with autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia not

  18. Autosomal recessive progressive myoclonus epilepsy due to impaired ceramide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Striano, Pasquale; Italiano, Domenico; Calarese, Tiziana; Gasparini, Sara; Vanni, Nicola; Fruscione, Floriana; Genton, Pierre; Zara, Federico

    2016-09-01

    Autosomal recessive progressive myoclonus epilepsy due to impaired ceramide synthesis is an extremely rare condition, so far reported in a single family of Algerian origin presenting an unusual, severe form of progressive myoclonus epilepsy characterized by myoclonus, generalized tonic-clonic seizures and moderate to severe cognitive impairment, with probable autosomal recessive inheritance. Disease onset was between 6 and 16 years of age. Genetic study allowed to identify a homozygous nonsynonymous mutation in CERS1, the gene encoding ceramide synthase 1, a transmembrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), catalyzes the biosynthesis of C18-ceramides. The mutation decreased C18-ceramide levels. In addition, downregulation of CerS1 in neuroblastoma cell line showed activation of ER stress response and induction of proapoptotic pathways. This observation demonstrates that impairment of ceramide biosynthesis underlies neurodegeneration in humans.

  19. Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis with a unique imaging finding: multiple encephaloceles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saglam, Dilek; Bilgici, Meltem Ceyhan; Bekci, Tuemay; Albayrak, Canan; Albayrak, Davut

    2017-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a hereditary form of sclerosing bone dysplasia with various radiological and clinical presentations. The autosomal recessive type, also known as malignant osteopetrosis, is the most severe type, with the early onset of manifestations. A 5-month-old infant was admitted to our hospital with recurrent respiratory tract infections. Chest X-ray and skeletal survey revealed the classic findings of osteopetrosis, including diffuse osteosclerosis and bone within a bone appearance. At follow-up, the patient presented with, thickened calvarium, multiple prominent encephaloceles, and dural calcifications leading to the intracranial clinical manifestations with bilateral hearing and sight loss. Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis is one of the causes of encephaloceles and this finding may become dramatic if untreated. (orig.)

  20. Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis with a unique imaging finding: multiple encephaloceles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saglam, Dilek; Bilgici, Meltem Ceyhan; Bekci, Tuemay [Ondokuz Mayis University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kurupelit, Samsun (Turkey); Albayrak, Canan; Albayrak, Davut [Ondokuz Mayis University, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Kurupelit, Samsun (Turkey)

    2017-05-15

    Osteopetrosis is a hereditary form of sclerosing bone dysplasia with various radiological and clinical presentations. The autosomal recessive type, also known as malignant osteopetrosis, is the most severe type, with the early onset of manifestations. A 5-month-old infant was admitted to our hospital with recurrent respiratory tract infections. Chest X-ray and skeletal survey revealed the classic findings of osteopetrosis, including diffuse osteosclerosis and bone within a bone appearance. At follow-up, the patient presented with, thickened calvarium, multiple prominent encephaloceles, and dural calcifications leading to the intracranial clinical manifestations with bilateral hearing and sight loss. Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis is one of the causes of encephaloceles and this finding may become dramatic if untreated. (orig.)

  1. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene produce autosomal recessive ocular albinism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, R.A.; Summers, C.G.; Oetting, W.S. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Albinism has historically been divided into ocular (OA) and oculocutaneous (OCA) types based on the presence or absence of clinically apparent skin and hair involvement in an individual with the ocular features of albinism. The major genes for OCA include the tyrosinase gene in OCA1 and the P gene in OCA2. X-linked and autosomal recessive OA have been described and the responsible genes have not been identified. We now present six Caucasian individuals who have the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA but who have OCA1 as shown by the presence of mutations of the tyrosinase. They had white or very light hair and white skin at birth, and cutaneous pigment developed in the first decade of life. At ages ranging from 1.5-23 years, hair color was dark blond to light brown. The skin had generalized pigment and well developed tan was present on the exposed arm and face skin of four. Iris pigment was present and iris translucency varied. Molecular analysis of the tyrosinase gene, using PCR amplification and direct di-deoxy sequencing showed the following mutations: E398Z/E398Q, P406S/g346a, R402E/T373K, ?/D383N, and H211N/T373K. The homozygous individual was not from a known consanguineous mating. T373K is the most common tyrosinase gene mutation in our laboratory. Three of these mutations are associated with a total loss of tyrosinase activity (g346a splice-site, T373K, and D383N), while four are associated with residual enzyme activity (H211N, R402E, E398Q, and P406S). These studies show that mutations of the tyrosinase gene can produce the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA in an individual who has normal amounts of cutaneous pigment and the ability to tan after birth. This extends the phenotypic range of OCA1 to normal cutaneous pigment after early childhood, and suggest that mutations of the tyrosinase gene account for a significant number of individuals with autosomal recessive OA.

  2. Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH): clinical manifestations, genetic heterogeneity and mutation continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly (MCPH) is a rare disorder of neurogenic mitosis characterized by reduced head circumference at birth with variable degree of mental retardation. In MCPH patients, brain size reduced to almost one-third of its original volume due to reduced number of generated cerebral cortical neurons during embryonic neurogensis. So far, seven genetic loci (MCPH1-7) for this condition have been mapped with seven corresponding genes (MCPH1, WDR62, CDK5RAP2, CEP152, ASPM, CENPJ, and STIL) identified from different world populations. Contribution of ASPM and WDR62 gene mutations in MCPH World wide is more than 50%. By and large, primary microcephaly patients are phenotypically indistinguishable, however, recent studies in patients with mutations in MCPH1, WDR62 and ASPM genes showed a broader clinical and/or cellular phenotype. It has been proposed that mutations in MCPH genes can cause the disease phenotype by disturbing: 1) orientation of mitotic spindles, 2) chromosome condensation mechanism during embryonic neurogenesis, 3) DNA damage-response signaling, 4) transcriptional regulations and microtubule dynamics, 5) certain unknown centrosomal mechanisms that control the number of neurons generated by neural precursor cells. Recent discoveries of mammalian models for MCPH have open up horizons for researchers to add more knowledge regarding the etiology and pathophysiology of MCPH. High incidence of MCPH in Pakistani population reflects the most probable involvement of consanguinity. Genetic counseling and clinical management through carrier detection/prenatal diagnosis in MCPH families can help reducing the incidence of this autosomal recessive disorder. PMID:21668957

  3. Linkage of autosomal recessive lamellar ichthyosis to chromosome 14q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.J.; Compton, J.G.; Bale, S.J. [National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Bethesda, MD (United States); DiGiovanna, J.J. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Hashem, N. [Ains-Shams Univ. Medical Genetics Center, Cairo (Egypt)

    1994-12-01

    The authors have mapped the locus for lamellar ichthyosis (LI), an autosomal recessive skin disease characterized by abnormal cornification of the epidermis. Analysis using both inbred and outbred families manifesting severe LI showed complete linkage to several markers within a 9.3-cM region on chromosome 14q11. Affected individuals in inbred families were also found to have striking homozygosity for markers in this region. Linkage-based genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis is now available for informative at-risk families. Several transcribed genes have been mapped to the chromosome 14 region containing the LI gene. The transglutaminase 1 gene (TGM1), which encodes one of the enzymes responsible for cross-linking epidermal proteins during formation of the stratum corneum, maps to this interval. The TGM1 locus was completely linked to LI (Z = 9.11), suggesting that TGM1 is a good candidate for further investigation of this disorder. The genes for four serine proteases also map to this region but are expressed only in hematopoietic or mast cells, making them less likely candidates.

  4. Otologic Manifestations of Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Santiago, A; Rodríguez-Pascual, M; Knöpfel, N; Hernández-Martín, Á

    2015-11-01

    Few studies have investigated ear involvement in nonsyndromic autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI). To assess the type and frequency of otologic manifestations of ARCI in patients under follow-up at the pediatric dermatology department of our hospital. We prospectively studied the presence of ear pain, ear itching, tinnitus, otitis, cerumen impaction, accumulation of epithelial debris, and hearing loss. Daily hygiene measures, topical treatments, medical-surgical interventions, and frequency of visits to an ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialist were noted in the patients' medical records. Ear examination and hearing tests were performed in all cases. Ten patients were studied: 2 had a self-healing collodion baby phenotype and 8 had ichthyosis. There was mention of otologic manifestations in the records of all 8 patients with ichthyosis (100%); 6 of these patients (75%) had abnormalities in the external auditory canal examination and 2 (25%) had conductive hearing loss. Our findings are limited by the small number of patients studied, all of whom were younger than 19 years. The involvement of both dermatologists and ENT specialists in the management of patients with ichthyosis is crucial to ensure the application of the best therapeutic and preventive measures. More studies are needed to assess the prevalence and impact on quality of life of ear involvement in patients with ichthyosis and to determine the optimal interval between ENT visits for these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  5. Spectrum of Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström Pigg, Maritta; Bygum, Anette; Gånemo, Agneta

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) represents a heterogeneous group of rare disorders of cornification with 3 major subtypes: harlequin ichthyosis (HI), lamellar ichthyosis (LI) and congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE). A 4th subtype has also been proposed: pleomorphic...... ichthyosis (PI), characterized by marked skin changes at birth and subsequently mild symptoms. In nationwide screenings of suspected cases of ARCI in Denmark and Sweden, we identified 132 patients (age range 0.1-86 years) classified as HI (n = 7), LI (n = 70), CIE (n = 17) and PI (n = 38). At birth......-100%). A scoring (0-4) of ichthyosis/ery-thema past infancy showed widely different mean values in the subgroups: HI (3.2/3.1), LI (2.4/0.6), CIE (1.8/1.6), PI (1.1/0.3). Novel or recurrent mutations were found in 113 patients: TGM1 (n = 56), NIPAL4 (n = 15), ALOX12B (n = 15), ABCA12 (n = 8), ALOXE3 (n = 9), SLC27...

  6. MR cholangiography in children with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, G.; Benz-Bohm, G.; Kugel, H.; Keller, K.M.; Querfeld, U.

    1999-01-01

    Background. Magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) is a relatively new, non-invasive imaging technique of the biliary tree that has shown good correlation with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The liver manifestation of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF). CHF may be accompanied by Caroli's disease, which is characterised by a non-obstructive dilation of the intrahepatic bile ducts. Objective. A prospective study was conducted to determine the presence and extent of Caroli's disease in children with ARPKD. Materials and methods. Seven children with ARPKD aged from 3.0 to 10.1 years were examined. CHF was confirmed in all biopsied cases (5 of 7). All children had been followed by repeated abdominal US examinations for many years. The MR examination included a morphological imaging study using a T2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequence and a heavily T2-weighted inversion-recovery turbo spin-echo sequence with three-dimensional maximum intensity projection (MIP) reconstructions for MRC. Results. The diagnosis of Caroli's disease could be made in one case by US; in two other children Caroli's disease was suspected, but the differentiation from hepatic cysts was not possible. By MRC, Caroli's disease could be diagnosed in three of seven children. Furthermore, MRC with MIP reconstructions demonstrated the extent of the disease by showing the entire biliary tree from different angles. Conclusions. MRC is a valuable method to establish the diagnosis and demonstrate the extent of Caroli's disease. (orig.)

  7. Autosomal recessive agammaglobulinemia: a novel non-sense mutation in CD79a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Abbas; Plebani, Alessandro; Vitali, Massimiliano; Abolhassani, Hassan; Lougaris, Vassilios; Mirminachi, Babak; Rezaei, Nima; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2014-02-01

    This study describes the fifth case worldwide of autosomal recessive agammaglobulinemia due to a novel non-sense mutation in CD79a gene with a severe unusual onset due to an invasive central nervous system infection.

  8. Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease and Epidemiologic Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsa Yousefichaijan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD is a heterogeneous inherited disorder most commonly seen in childhood. The presentation is usually a palpable large mass in the flank or abdomen appearing at infancy or birth, leading to electrolyte abnormalities, pulmonary hypoplasia, oligohydramnious and the Potter’s syndrome. The survival rate of this disease is 70%. Multiple mutations of the polycystic kidney and hepatic disease 1 (PKHD1 are known that can cause ARPKD. On the other hand, mutations in PKHD1 have also been identified in about 30% of children with congenital hepatic fibrosis (the Caroli’s syndrome without any evidence of kidney involvement. Based on this evidence, not everyone with PKHD1 mutations will present with ARPKD. Recent studies have shown that nongenetic factors, including environmental exposures had a significant effect on manifestations of ARPKD. The present study aimed at investigating the possible link between ARPKD and its epidemiologic factors, hypothesizing that these epidemiologic conditions would influence the incidence of ARPKD. Objectives The present study aimed at evaluating a possible link between the ARPKD and its epidemiologic factors. Methods In this case-control study, children with ARPKD referred to Amirkabir hospital in Arak city, Iran, were compared with noninfected children. Examinations, interviews, and questionnaires were performed to collect data and the disease was diagnosed by a physician. Results The results of this study showed no significant relationship between epidemiological factors such as age, place of residence for families, sex, family education/occupation/ income, body mass index, stunted growth, slow growth, good growth, milk intake, water intake, failure to thrive and ARPKD. Conclusions Based on our findings, epidemiological factors did not have a significant effect on the occurrence of ARPKD.

  9. Mutations in PCDH21 cause autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Elsebet; Batbayli, M; Dunø, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy is a retinal dystrophy with early loss of cone photoreceptors and a parallel or subsequent loss of rod photoreceptors. It may be syndromic, but most forms are non-syndromic with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive inheritance.......Cone-rod dystrophy is a retinal dystrophy with early loss of cone photoreceptors and a parallel or subsequent loss of rod photoreceptors. It may be syndromic, but most forms are non-syndromic with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive inheritance....

  10. A Dutch family with autosomal recessively inherited lower motor neuron predominant motor neuron disease due to optineurin mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeldman, Emma; van der Kooi, Anneke J.; de Visser, Marianne; van Maarle, Merel C.; van Ruissen, Fred; Baas, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 10% of motor neuron disease (MND) patients report a familial predisposition for MND. Autosomal recessively inherited MND is less common and is most often caused by mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene. In 2010, autosomal recessively inherited mutations in the optineurin

  11. Phenotypic spectrum of autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophies caused by mutations in the ABCA4 (ABCR) gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klevering, B.J.; Blankenagel, A.; Maugeri, A.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Hoyng, C.B.; Rohrschneider, K.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the phenotype of 12 patients with autosomal recessive or isolated cone-rod types of progressive retinal degeneration (CRD) caused by mutations in the ABCA4 gene. METHODS: The charts of patients who had originally received a diagnosis of isolated or autosomal recessive CRD were

  12. The acrocallosal syndrome in first cousins: widening of the spectrum of clinical features and further support for autosomal recessive inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzel, A

    1988-01-01

    First cousins, related through their mothers, showed a pattern of craniofacial, brain, and limb anomalies consistent with the acrocallosal syndrome. Both patients had a defect of the corpus callosum, macrocephaly with a protruding forehead and occiput, hypertelorism, non-horizontal palpebral fissures, a small nose, notched ear lobes, and postaxial polydactyly of the hands. The boy, in addition, had hypospadias, cryptorchidism, inguinal hernias, duplication with syndactyly of the phalanges of the big toe, and a bipartite right clavicle. The girl had an arachnoidal cyst, a calvarian defect, and digitalisation of the thumbs. Motor and mental development was retarded in both patients. This observation provides further evidence of probable autosomal recessive inheritance of the acrocallosal syndrome and widens the spectrum of clinical findings and the variability of features in this rare malformation syndrome. Images PMID:3385741

  13. Spectrum of mutations in the renin-angiotensin system genes in autosomal recessive renal tubular dysgenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gribouval, Olivier; Morinière, Vincent; Pawtowski, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal recessive renal tubular dysgenesis (RTD) is a severe disorder of renal tubular development characterized by early onset and persistent fetal anuria leading to oligohydramnios and the Potter sequence, associated with skull ossification defects. Early death occurs in most cases from anuri...

  14. Prenatal diagnosis of autosomal recessive Robinow syndrome using 3D ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Bolette F.; Buciek, Hanne Hove; Kreiborg, Sven

    2017-01-01

    This article hypothesizes that it is possible to detect and diagnose both the autosomal recessive and dominant forms prenatally using ultrasound. By focusing on the characteristic phenotypical presentation, the examinator is able to diagnose the syndrome prenatally, which is of clinical importance...

  15. Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa with RP1 mutations is associated with myopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chassine, T.; Bocquet, B.; Daien, V.; Avila-Fernandez, A.; Ayuso, C.; Collin, R.W.J.; Corton, M.; Hejtmancik, J.F.; Born, L.I. van den; Klevering, B.J.; Riazuddin, S.A.; Sendon, N.; Lacroux, A.; Meunier, I.; Hamel, C.P.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the refractive error in patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) caused by RP1 mutations and to compare it with that of other genetic subtypes of RP. METHODS: Twenty-six individuals had arRP with RP1 mutations, 25 had autosomal dominant RP (adRP) with RP1

  16. The efficacy of microarray screening for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in routine clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huet, R.A.C. van; Pierrache, L.H.; Meester-Smoor, M.A.; Klaver, C.C.; Born, L.I. van den; Hoyng, C.B.; Wijs, I.J. de; Collin, R.W.J.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Klevering, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the efficacy of multiple versions of a commercially available arrayed primer extension (APEX) microarray chip for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). METHODS: We included 250 probands suspected of arRP who were genetically analyzed with the APEX microarray between

  17. Biallelic Mutations in CRB1 Underlie Autosomal Recessive Familial Foveal Retinoschisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vincent, A.; Ng, J.; Gerth-Kahlert, C.; Tavares, E.; Maynes, J.T.; Wright, T.; Tiwari, A.; Tumber, A.; Li, S.; Hanson, J.V.; Bahr, A.; MacDonald, H.; Bahr, L.; Westall, C.; Berger, W.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Hollander, A.I. den; Heon, E

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify the genetic cause of autosomal recessive familial foveal retinoschisis (FFR). METHODS: A female sibship with FFR was identified (Family-A; 17 and 16 years, respectively); panel based genetic sequencing (132 genes) and comparative genome hybridization (142 genes) were performed.

  18. Mutations in AGBL5, Encoding alpha-Tubulin Deglutamylase, Are Associated With Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astuti, G.D.; Arno, G.; Hull, S.; Pierrache, L.; Venselaar, H.; Carss, K.; Raymond, F.L.; Collin, R.W.J.; Faradz, S.M.; Born, L.I. van den; Webster, A.R.; Cremers, F.P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: AGBL5, encoding ATP/GTP binding protein-like 5, was previously proposed as an autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) candidate gene based on the identification of missense variants in two families. In this study, we performed next-generation sequencing to reveal additional RP cases

  19. CNGB3 mutations account for 50% of all cases with autosomal recessive achromatopsia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohl, S.; Varsanyi, B.; Antunes, G.A.; Baumann, B.; Hoyng, C.B.; Jagle, H.; Rosenberg, T.; Kellner, U.; Lorenz, B.; Salati, R.; Jurklies, B.; Farkas, A.; Andreasson, S.; Weleber, R.G.; Jacobson, S.G.; Rudolph, G.; Castellan, C.; Dollfus, H.; Legius, E.; Anastasi, M.; Bitoun, P.; Lev, D.; Sieving, P.A.; Munier, F.L.; Zrenner, E.; Sharpe, L.T.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Wissinger, B.

    2005-01-01

    Achromatopsia is a congenital, autosomal recessively inherited disorder characterized by a lack of color discrimination, low visual acuity (<0.2), photophobia, and nystagmus. Mutations in the genes for CNGA3, CNGB3, and GNAT2 have been associated with this disorder. Here, we analyzed the spectrum

  20. A Nonsense Mutation in PDE6H Causes Autosomal-Recessive Incomplete Achromatopsia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohl, S.; Coppieters, F.; Meire, F.; Schaich, S.; Roosing, S.; Brennenstuhl, C.; Bolz, S.; Genderen, M.M. van; Riemslag, F.C.; Lukowski, R.; Hollander, A.I. den; Cremers, F.P.M.; Baere, E. de; Hoyng, C.B.; Wissinger, B.

    2012-01-01

    Achromatopsia (ACHM) is an autosomal-recessive retinal dystrophy characterized by color blindness, photophobia, nystagmus, and severely reduced visual acuity. Its prevalence has been estimated to about 1 in 30,000 individuals. Four genes, GNAT2, PDE6C, CNGA3, and CNGB3, have been implicated in ACHM,

  1. Autosomal recessive ichthyosis with hypotrichosis syndrome: further delineation of the phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avrahami, L.; Maas, S.; Pasmanik-Chor, M.; Rainshtein, L.; Magal, N.; Smitt, J. H. S.; van Marle, J.; Shohat, M.; Basel-Vanagaite, L.

    2008-01-01

    Autosomal recessive ichthyosis with hypotrichosis (ARIH) syndrome, which is characterized by congenital ichthyosis, abnormal hair and corneal involvement, has recently been shown in one consanguineous Israeli Arab family to be caused by a mutation in the ST14 gene, which encodes serine protease

  2. Progeria (Hutchison - Gilford syndrome in siblings: In an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu Tanjore

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is an autosomal dominant, premature aging syndrome. Six and three year old female siblings had sclcrodermatous changes over the extremities, alopecia, beaked nose, prominent veins and bird-like facies. Radiological features were consistent with features of progeria. The present case highlights rarity of progeria in siblings with a possible autosomal recessive pattern.

  3. Elsahy-Waters Syndrome: Evidence for Autosomal Recessive Inheritance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castori, Marco; Cascone, Piero; Valiante, Michele; Laino, Luigi; Iannetti, Giorgio; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Grammatico, Paola

    2010-01-01

    Elsahy-Waters or branchioskeletogenital syndrome is a rare MCA/MR syndrome characterized by moderate mental retardation, hypospadias and characteristic craniofacial morphology, which includes brachycephaly, facial asymmetry, exotropia, hypertelorism/telechantus, broad nose, concave nasal ridge,

  4. ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 mutations cause autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecchiani, Celeste; Pedace, Lucia; Lo Giudice, Temistocle; Casella, Antonella; Mearini, Marzia; Gaudiello, Fabrizio; Pedroso, José L; Terracciano, Chiara; Caltagirone, Carlo; Massa, Roberto; St George-Hyslop, Peter H; Barsottini, Orlando G P; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Orlacchio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a group of hereditary peripheral neuropathies that share clinical characteristics of progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities, distal sensory loss, as well as diminished tendon reflexes. Hundreds of causative DNA changes have been found, but much of the genetic basis of the disease is still unexplained. Mutations in the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene are a frequent cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and peripheral axonal neuropathy, and account for ∼ 40% of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The overlap of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with both diseases, as well as the common autosomal recessive inheritance pattern of thin corpus callosum and axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in three related patients, prompted us to analyse the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene in affected individuals with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. We investigated 28 unrelated families with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease defined by clinical, electrophysiological, as well as pathological evaluation. Besides, we screened for all the known genes related to axonal autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2A2/HMSN2A2/MFN2, CMT2B1/LMNA, CMT2B2/MED25, CMT2B5/NEFL, ARCMT2F/dHMN2B/HSPB1, CMT2K/GDAP1, CMT2P/LRSAM1, CMT2R/TRIM2, CMT2S/IGHMBP2, CMT2T/HSJ1, CMTRID/COX6A1, ARAN-NM/HINT and GAN/GAN), for the genes related to autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and axonal peripheral neuropathy (SPG7/PGN, SPG15/ZFYVE26, SPG21/ACP33, SPG35/FA2H, SPG46/GBA2, SPG55/C12orf65 and SPG56/CYP2U1), as well as for the causative gene of peripheral neuropathy with or without agenesis of the corpus callosum (SLC12A6). Mitochondrial disorders related to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 were also excluded by sequencing POLG and TYMP genes. An additional locus for autosomal recessive Charcot

  5. ALS5/SPG11/ KIAA1840 mutations cause autosomal recessive axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecchiani, Celeste; Pedace, Lucia; Lo Giudice, Temistocle; Casella, Antonella; Mearini, Marzia; Gaudiello, Fabrizio; Pedroso, José L.; Terracciano, Chiara; Caltagirone, Carlo; Massa, Roberto; St George-Hyslop, Peter H.; Barsottini, Orlando G. P.; Kawarai, Toshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease is a group of hereditary peripheral neuropathies that share clinical characteristics of progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities, distal sensory loss, as well as diminished tendon reflexes. Hundreds of causative DNA changes have been found, but much of the genetic basis of the disease is still unexplained. Mutations in the ALS5/SPG11/ KIAA1840 gene are a frequent cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and peripheral axonal neuropathy, and account for ∼40% of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The overlap of axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease with both diseases, as well as the common autosomal recessive inheritance pattern of thin corpus callosum and axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease in three related patients, prompted us to analyse the ALS5/SPG11/ KIAA1840 gene in affected individuals with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease. We investigated 28 unrelated families with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease defined by clinical, electrophysiological, as well as pathological evaluation. Besides, we screened for all the known genes related to axonal autosomal recessive Charcot–Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2A2/HMSN2A2/ MFN2 , CMT2B1/ LMNA , CMT2B2/ MED25 , CMT2B5/ NEFL , ARCMT2F/dHMN2B/ HSPB1 , CMT2K/ GDAP1 , CMT2P/ LRSAM1 , CMT2R/ TRIM2 , CMT2S/ IGHMBP2 , CMT2T/ HSJ1 , CMTRID/ COX6A1 , ARAN-NM/ HINT and GAN/ GAN ), for the genes related to autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and axonal peripheral neuropathy (SPG7/ PGN , SPG15/ ZFYVE26, SPG21/ ACP33 , SPG35/ FA2H , SPG46/ GBA2 , SPG55/ C12orf65 and SPG56/ CYP2U1 ), as well as for the causative gene of peripheral neuropathy with or without agenesis of the corpus callosum ( SLC12A6 ) . Mitochondrial disorders related to Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 2 were also excluded by sequencing POLG and

  6. Infantile variant of Bartter syndrome and sensorineural deafness: A new autosomal recessive disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, D.; Shalev, H.; Carmi, Rivka; Ohaly, M. [Univ. of the Negev, Ashkelon (Israel)

    1995-12-04

    The infantile variant of Bartter syndrome (IBS) is usually associated with maternal polyhydramnios, premature birth, postnatal polyuria and hypokalemic hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis and a typical appearance. IBS is thought to be an autosomal recessive trait. Several congenital tubular defects are associated with sensorineural deafness (SND). However, an association between the IBS and SND has not been reported so far. Here we describe 5 children of an extended consanguineous Bedouin family with IBS and SND. In 3 of the cases, the typical electrolyte imbalance and facial appearance were detected neonatally. SND was detected as early as age 1 month, suggesting either coincidental homozygotization of 2 recessive genes or a pleiotropic effect of one autosomal recessive gene. This association suggests that evaluation of SND is warranted in every case of IBS. 35 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. A Novel Mutation in the Transglutaminase-1 Gene in an Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Vaigundan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Structure-function implication on a novel homozygous Trp250/Gly mutation of transglutaminase-1 (TGM1 observed in a patient of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis is invoked from a bioinformatics analysis. Structural consequences of this mutation are hypothesized in comparison to homologous enzyme human factor XIIIA accepted as valid in similar structural analysis and are projected as guidelines for future studies at an experimental level on TGM1 thus mutated.

  8. Improved Structure and Function in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Rat Kidneys with Renal Tubular Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K J; Zhang, Jizhong; Han, Ling; Kamocka, Malgorzata; Miller, Caroline; Gattone, Vincent H; Dominguez, Jesus H

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a truly catastrophic monogenetic disease, causing death and end stage renal disease in neonates and children. Using PCK female rats, an orthologous model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease harboring mutant Pkhd1, we tested the hypothesis that intravenous renal cell transplantation with normal Sprague Dawley male kidney cells would improve the polycystic kidney disease phenotype. Cytotherapy with renal cells expressing wild type Pkhd1 and tubulogenic serum amyloid A1 had powerful and sustained beneficial effects on renal function and structure in the polycystic kidney disease model. Donor cell engraftment and both mutant and wild type Pkhd1 were found in treated but not control PCK kidneys 15 weeks after the final cell infusion. To examine the mechanisms of global protection with a small number of transplanted cells, we tested the hypothesis that exosomes derived from normal Sprague Dawley cells can limit the cystic phenotype of PCK recipient cells. We found that renal exosomes originating from normal Sprague Dawley cells carried and transferred wild type Pkhd1 mRNA to PCK cells in vivo and in vitro and restricted cyst formation by cultured PCK cells. The results indicate that transplantation with renal cells containing wild type Pkhd1 improves renal structure and function in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and may provide an intra-renal supply of normal Pkhd1 mRNA.

  9. Genetic Causes of Putative Autosomal Recessive Intellectual Disability Cases in Hamedan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad Bastami

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic causes of autosomal recessive intellectual disabilities (AR-ID in Hamadan province of Iran. Materials & Methods: In this descriptive-analytical cross-sectional study, 25 families with more than one affected with putative autosomal recessive intellectual disability were chosen with collaboration of Welfare Organization of Hamadan province. Families were included a total of 60 patients (39 male and 21 female whose intellectual disability had been confirmed by Raven IQ test. Each family was asked for clinical examination and getting consent form. Blood sample was collected from each family. One proband from each family was tested for CGG repeat expansion in FMR1 gene, chromosomal abnormalities and inborn errors of metabolism. We also performed homozygosity mapping based on STR markers for seven known MCPH loci in families with primary microcephaly and AR-ID. Results: Five families had full mutation of Fragile X syndrome. No chromosomal abnormalities were identified. Metabolic screening revealed one family with Medium Chain Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase deficiency. None of three families with primary microcephaly and AR-ID showed linkage to any of known seven MCPH loci. Conclusion: The main causes of ID in Hamadan province were Fragile X syndrome and Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly with the frequencies of 20% and 12%, respectively.

  10. Confirmation of ADAMTSL4 mutations for autosomal recessive isolated bilateral ectopia lentis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, V Bennouna; Stoetzel, C; Pelletier, V; Perdomo-Trujillo, Y; Liebermann, L; Marion, V; De Korvin, H; Boileau, C; Dufier, J L; Dollfus, H

    2010-03-01

    Ectopia lentis (EL) is a zonular disease where alteration of the zonular fibers leads progressively to lens dislocation. It is most often associated with systemic diseases such as Marfan syndrome, Weill-Marchesani syndrome or homocystinuria. Isolated non syndromic ectopia lentis (IEL) is reported in families with autosomal inheritance, with dominant forms being more common than recessive. LTBP2 truncating mutations have been described as a cause of autosomal recessive ectopia lentis as a primary or secondary feature in patients showing ocular (eg, glaucoma) or extraocular manifestations (eg, Marfanoid habitus). Recently, ADAMTSL4 has been shown to be responsible for isolated autosomal recessive ectopia lentis in an inbred family. Herein we show a consanguineous family that carries a novel homozygous splice mutation IVS4-1G>A/IVS4-1G>A in ADAMTSL4 responsible for isolated autosomal recessive EL, thus confirming the involvement of this gene in this condition and underlining the major role of ADAMTS proteases in zonular fibers homeostasis.

  11. One-step noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for autosomal recessive homozygous point mutations using digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mun Young; Ahn, Soyeon; Kim, Min Young; Han, Jin Hee; Park, Hye-Rim; Seo, Han Kyu; Yoon, Jinsun; Lee, Seungmin; Oh, Doo-Yi; Kang, Changsoo; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2018-02-13

    Previously, we introduced a noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) protocol for diagnosing compound heterozygous autosomal recessive point mutations via maternal plasma DNA and simulated control genomic DNA sampling based on fetal DNA fraction. In our present study, we have improved our NIPT protocol to make it possible to diagnose homozygous autosomal recessive point mutations without the need to acquire fetal DNA fraction. Moreover, chi-squared test and empirical statistical range based on the proportion of mutant allele reads among the total reads served as the gatekeeping method. If this method yielded inconclusive results, then the Bayesian method was performed; final conclusion was drawn from the results of both methods. This protocol was applied to three families co-segregating congenital sensorineural hearing loss with monogenic homozygous mutations in prevalent deafness genes. This protocol successfully predicted the fetal genotypes from all families without the information about fetal DNA fraction using one-step dPCR reactions at least for these three families. Furthermore, we suspect that confirmatory diagnosis under this protocol is possible, not only by using picodroplet dPCR, but also by using the more readily available chip-based dPCR, making our NIPT protocol more useful in the diagnosis of autosomal recessive point mutations in the future.

  12. Improved Structure and Function in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Rat Kidneys with Renal Tubular Cell Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K J Kelly

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a truly catastrophic monogenetic disease, causing death and end stage renal disease in neonates and children. Using PCK female rats, an orthologous model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease harboring mutant Pkhd1, we tested the hypothesis that intravenous renal cell transplantation with normal Sprague Dawley male kidney cells would improve the polycystic kidney disease phenotype. Cytotherapy with renal cells expressing wild type Pkhd1 and tubulogenic serum amyloid A1 had powerful and sustained beneficial effects on renal function and structure in the polycystic kidney disease model. Donor cell engraftment and both mutant and wild type Pkhd1 were found in treated but not control PCK kidneys 15 weeks after the final cell infusion. To examine the mechanisms of global protection with a small number of transplanted cells, we tested the hypothesis that exosomes derived from normal Sprague Dawley cells can limit the cystic phenotype of PCK recipient cells. We found that renal exosomes originating from normal Sprague Dawley cells carried and transferred wild type Pkhd1 mRNA to PCK cells in vivo and in vitro and restricted cyst formation by cultured PCK cells. The results indicate that transplantation with renal cells containing wild type Pkhd1 improves renal structure and function in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and may provide an intra-renal supply of normal Pkhd1 mRNA.

  13. Mutations in c10orf11, a melanocyte-differentiation gene, cause autosomal-recessive albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grønskov, Karen; Dooley, Christopher M; Østergaard, Elsebet; Kelsh, Robert N; Hansen, Lars; Levesque, Mitchell P; Vilhelmsen, Kaj; Møllgård, Kjeld; Stemple, Derek L; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2013-03-07

    Autosomal-recessive albinism is a hypopigmentation disorder with a broad phenotypic range. A substantial fraction of individuals with albinism remain genetically unresolved, and it has been hypothesized that more genes are to be identified. By using homozygosity mapping of an inbred Faroese family, we identified a 3.5 Mb homozygous region (10q22.2-q22.3) on chromosome 10. The region contains five protein-coding genes, and sequencing of one of these, C10orf11, revealed a nonsense mutation that segregated with the disease and showed a recessive inheritance pattern. Investigation of additional albinism-affected individuals from the Faroe Islands revealed that five out of eight unrelated affected persons had the nonsense mutation in C10orf11. Screening of a cohort of autosomal-recessive-albinism-affected individuals residing in Denmark showed a homozygous 1 bp duplication in C10orf11 in an individual originating from Lithuania. Immunohistochemistry showed localization of C10orf11 in melanoblasts and melanocytes in human fetal tissue, but no localization was seen in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Knockdown of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) homolog with the use of morpholinos resulted in substantially decreased pigmentation and a reduction of the apparent number of pigmented melanocytes. The morphant phenotype was rescued by wild-type C10orf11, but not by mutant C10orf11. In conclusion, we have identified a melanocyte-differentiation gene, C10orf11, which when mutated causes autosomal-recessive albinism in humans. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic forms of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI): Vasopressin receptor defect (X-linked) and aquaporin defect (autosomal recessive and dominant).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichet, Daniel G; Bockenhauer, Detlef

    2016-03-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), which can be inherited or acquired, is characterized by an inability to concentrate urine despite normal or elevated plasma concentrations of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Polyuria with hyposthenuria and polydipsia are the cardinal clinical manifestations of the disease. About 90% of patients with congenital NDI are males with X-linked NDI who have mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor (AVPR2) gene encoding the vasopressin V2 receptor. In less than 10% of the families studied, congenital NDI has an autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with mutations in the aquaporin-2 (AQP2) gene. When studied in vitro, most AVPR2 and AQP2 mutations lead to proteins trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum and are unable to reach the plasma membrane. Prior knowledge of AVPR2 or AQP2 mutations in NDI families and perinatal mutation testing is of direct clinical value and can avert the physical and mental retardation associated with repeated episodes of dehydration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Case report of intrafamilial variability in autosomal recessive centronuclear myopathy associated to a novel BIN1 stop mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurul Semra

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Centronuclear myopathies (CNM describe a group of rare muscle diseases typically presenting an abnormal positioning of nuclei in muscle fibers. To date, three genes are known to be associated to a classical CNM phenotype. The X-linked neonatal form (XLCNM is due to mutations in MTM1 and involves a severe and generalized muscle weakness at birth. The autosomal dominant form results from DNM2 mutations and has been described with early childhood and adult onset (ADCNM. Autosomal recessive centronuclear myopathy (ARCNM is less characterized and has recently been associated to mutations in BIN1, encoding amphiphysin 2. Here we present the first clinical description of intrafamilal variability in two first-degree cousins with a novel BIN1 stop mutation. In addition to skeletal muscle defects, both patients have mild mental retardation and the more severely affected male also displays abnormal ventilation and cardiac arrhythmia, thus expanding the phenotypic spectrum of BIN1-related CNM to non skeletal muscle defects. We provide an up-to-date review of all previous cases with ARCNM and BIN1 mutations.

  16. Autosomal recessive dilated cardiomyopathy due to DOLK mutations results from abnormal dystroglycan O-mannosylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk J Lefeber

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic causes for autosomal recessive forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM are only rarely identified, although they are thought to contribute considerably to sudden cardiac death and heart failure, especially in young children. Here, we describe 11 young patients (5-13 years with a predominant presentation of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. Metabolic investigations showed deficient protein N-glycosylation, leading to a diagnosis of Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG. Homozygosity mapping in the consanguineous families showed a locus with two known genes in the N-glycosylation pathway. In all individuals, pathogenic mutations were identified in DOLK, encoding the dolichol kinase responsible for formation of dolichol-phosphate. Enzyme analysis in patients' fibroblasts confirmed a dolichol kinase deficiency in all families. In comparison with the generally multisystem presentation in CDG, the nonsyndromic DCM in several individuals was remarkable. Investigation of other dolichol-phosphate dependent glycosylation pathways in biopsied heart tissue indicated reduced O-mannosylation of alpha-dystroglycan with concomitant functional loss of its laminin-binding capacity, which has been linked to DCM. We thus identified a combined deficiency of protein N-glycosylation and alpha-dystroglycan O-mannosylation in patients with nonsyndromic DCM due to autosomal recessive DOLK mutations.

  17. A Defect in NIPAL4 Is Associated with Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis in American Bulldogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Margret L; Wang, Ping; Mauldin, Elizabeth A; Lin, Gloria; Henthorn, Paula S

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in the American bulldog is characterized by generalized scaling and erythema with adherent scale on the glabrous skin. We had previously linked this disorder to NIPAL4, which encodes the protein ichthyin. Sequencing of NIPAL4 revealed a homozygous single base deletion (CanFam3.1 canine reference genome sequence NC_06586.3 g.52737379del), the 157th base (cytosine) in exon 6 of NIPAL4 as the most likely causative variant in affected dogs. This frameshift deletion results in a premature stop codon producing a truncated and defective NIPAL4 (ichthyin) protein of 248 amino acids instead of the wild-type length of 404. Obligate carriers were confirmed to be heterozygous for this variant, and 150 clinically non-affected dogs of other breeds were homozygous for the wild-type gene. Among 800 American bulldogs tested, 34% of clinically healthy dogs were discovered to be heterozygous for the defective allele. More importantly, the development of this canine model of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis will provide insight into the development of new treatments across species.

  18. A Defect in NIPAL4 Is Associated with Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis in American Bulldogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margret L Casal

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in the American bulldog is characterized by generalized scaling and erythema with adherent scale on the glabrous skin. We had previously linked this disorder to NIPAL4, which encodes the protein ichthyin. Sequencing of NIPAL4 revealed a homozygous single base deletion (CanFam3.1 canine reference genome sequence NC_06586.3 g.52737379del, the 157th base (cytosine in exon 6 of NIPAL4 as the most likely causative variant in affected dogs. This frameshift deletion results in a premature stop codon producing a truncated and defective NIPAL4 (ichthyin protein of 248 amino acids instead of the wild-type length of 404. Obligate carriers were confirmed to be heterozygous for this variant, and 150 clinically non-affected dogs of other breeds were homozygous for the wild-type gene. Among 800 American bulldogs tested, 34% of clinically healthy dogs were discovered to be heterozygous for the defective allele. More importantly, the development of this canine model of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis will provide insight into the development of new treatments across species.

  19. Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin Kexin Type 9 Inhibition for Autosomal Recessive Hypercholesterolemia-Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thedrez, Aurélie; Sjouke, Barbara; Passard, Maxime; Prampart-Fauvet, Simon; Guédon, Alexis; Croyal, Mikael; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje; Peter, Jorge; Blom, Dirk; Ciccarese, Milco; Cefalù, Angelo B; Pisciotta, Livia; Santos, Raul D; Averna, Maurizio; Raal, Frederick; Pintus, Paolo; Cossu, Maria; Hovingh, Kees; Lambert, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in the vast majority of patients with autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia. Will PCSK9 inhibition with monoclonal antibodies, in particular alirocumab, be of therapeutic value for patients with autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH)? Primary lymphocytes were obtained from 28 genetically characterized ARH patients and 11 controls. ARH lymphocytes treated with mevastatin were incubated with increasing doses of recombinant PCSK9 with or without saturating concentrations of alirocumab. Cell surface LDL receptor expression measured by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy was higher in ARH than in control lymphocytes. PCSK9 significantly reduced LDL receptor expression in ARH lymphocytes albeit to a lower extent than in control lymphocytes (25% versus 76%, respectively), an effect reversed by alirocumab. Fluorescent LDL cellular uptake, also measured by flow cytometry, was reduced in ARH lymphocytes compared with control lymphocytes. PCSK9 significantly lowered LDL cellular uptake in ARH lymphocytes, on average by 18%, compared with a 46% reduction observed in control lymphocytes, an effect also reversed by alirocumab. Overall, the effects of recombinant PCSK9, and hence of alirocumab, on LDL receptor expression and function were significantly less pronounced in ARH than in control cells. PCSK9 inhibition with alirocumab on top of statin treatment has the potential to lower LDL cholesterol in some autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia patients. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. More Than Ataxia: Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders in Childhood Autosomal Recessive Ataxia Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Toni S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The autosomal recessive ataxias are a heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by complex neurological features in addition to progressive ataxia. Hyperkinetic movement disorders occur in a significant proportion of patients, and may sometimes be the presenting motor symptom. Presentations with involuntary movements rather than ataxia are diagnostically challenging, and are likely under-recognized. Methods A PubMed literature search was performed in October 2015 utilizing pairwise combinations of disease-related terms (autosomal recessive ataxia, ataxia–telangiectasia, ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1), ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2), Friedreich ataxia, ataxia with vitamin E deficiency), and symptom-related terms (movement disorder, dystonia, chorea, choreoathetosis, myoclonus). Results Involuntary movements occur in the majority of patients with ataxia–telangiectasia and AOA1, and less frequently in patients with AOA2, Friedreich ataxia, and ataxia with vitamin E deficiency. Clinical presentations with an isolated hyperkinetic movement disorder in the absence of ataxia include dystonia or dystonia with myoclonus with predominant upper limb and cervical involvement (ataxia–telangiectasia, ataxia with vitamin E deficiency), and generalized chorea (ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1, ataxia-telangiectasia). Discussion An awareness of atypical presentations facilitates early and accurate diagnosis in these challenging cases. Recognition of involuntary movements is important not only for diagnosis, but also because of the potential for effective targeted symptomatic treatment. PMID:27536460

  1. Autosomal recessive transmission of MYBPC3 mutation results in malignant phenotype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilu Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM due to mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins is most commonly inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Since nearly 50% of HCM cases occur in the absence of a family history, a recessive inheritance pattern may be involved. METHODS: A pedigree was identified with suspected autosomal recessive transmission of HCM. Twenty-six HCM-related genes were comprehensively screened for mutations in the proband with targeted second generation sequencing, and the identified mutation was confirmed with bi-directional Sanger sequencing in all family members and 376 healthy controls. RESULTS: A novel missense mutation (c.1469G>T, p.Gly490Val in exon 17 of MYBPC3 was identified. Two siblings with HCM were homozygous for this mutation, whereas other family members were either heterozygous or wild type. Clinical evaluation showed that both homozygotes manifested a typical HCM presentation, but none of others, including 5 adult heterozygous mutation carriers up to 71 years of age, had any clinical evidence of HCM. CONCLUSIONS: Our data identified a MYBPC3 mutation in HCM, which appeared autosomal recessively inherited in this family. The absence of a family history of clinical HCM may be due to not only a de novo mutation, but also recessive mutations that failed to produce a clinical phenotype in heterozygous family members. Therefore, consideration of recessive mutations leading to HCM is essential for risk stratification and genetic counseling.

  2. Identification of C12orf4 as a gene for autosomal recessive intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, A K; Pinelli, M; de Bie, C I; Mustonen, A; Määttä, T; Arts, H H; Wu, K; Roepman, R; Moilanen, J S; Raza, S; Varilo, T; Scala, G; Cocozza, S; Gilissen, C; van Gassen, K L I; Järvelä, I

    2017-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a major health problem in our society. Genetic causes of ID remain unknown because of its vast heterogeneity. Here we report two Finnish families and one Dutch family with affected individuals presenting with mild to moderate ID, neuropsychiatric symptoms and delayed speech development. By utilizing whole exome sequencing (WES), we identified a founder missense variant c.983T>C (p.Leu328Pro) in seven affected individuals from two Finnish consanguineous families and a deletion c.799_1034-429delinsTTATGA (p.Gln267fs) in one affected individual from a consanguineous Dutch family in the C12orf4 gene on chromosome 12. Both the variants co-segregated in the respective families as an autosomal recessive trait. Screening of the p.Leu328Pro variant showed enrichment in the North Eastern sub-isolate of Finland among anonymous local blood donors with a carrier frequency of 1:53, similar to other disease mutations with a founder effect in that region. To date, only one Arab family with a three affected individuals with a frameshift insertion variant in C12orf4 has been reported. In summary, we expand and establish the clinical and mutational spectrum of C12orf4 variants. Our findings implicate C12orf4 as a causative gene for autosomal recessive ID. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. [Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and complex nephronophtisis medullary cystic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Reseach during the past decade has led to the discovery that defects in some proteins that localize to primary cilia or the basal body are the main contributors to renal cyst development. Autosomal recessive polycystic disease and nephronophthisis- medullary cystic kidney disease are named ciliopathies. The cilium is a microtubule-based organelle that is found on most mammalian cells. Cilia-mediated hypothesis has evolved into the concept of cystogenesis, cilia bend by fluid initiate a calcium influx that prevents cyst formation. Cilia might sense stimuli in the cell enviroment and control cell polarity and mitosis. A new set of pathogenic mechanisms in renal cystic disease defined new therapeutic targets, control of intracellular calcium, inhibition of cAMP and down regulation cannonical Wnt signaling.

  4. SBF1 mutations associated with autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with cranial nerve involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manole, Andreea; Horga, Alejandro; Gamez, Josep; Raguer, Nuria; Salvado, Maria; San Millán, Beatriz; Navarro, Carmen; Pittmann, Alan; Reilly, Mary M; Houlden, Henry

    2017-01-01

    Biallelic mutations in the SBF1 gene have been identified in one family with demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT4B3) and two families with axonal neuropathy and additional neurological and skeletal features. Here we describe novel sequence variants in SBF1 (c.1168C>G and c.2209_2210del) as the potential causative mutations in two siblings with severe axonal neuropathy, hearing loss, facial weakness and bulbar features. Pathogenicity of these variants is supported by co-segregation and in silico analyses and evolutionary conservation. Our findings suggest that SBF1 mutations may cause a syndromic form of autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy (AR-CMT2) in addition to CMT4B3.

  5. Identification of Mutations in SDR9C7 in 6 Families with Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hotz, A; Fagerberg, C; Vahlquist, A

    2018-01-01

    a large consanguineous family were described as ARCI due to a homozygous mutation in LIPN.(7) However, the first symptoms appeared only from the age of 5 years and the criterion of a congenital form of ichthyosis is not fulfilled. In this study we report the clinical and molecular findings of seven ARCI......Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a heterogeneous group of disorders of keratinization. To date, ARCI has been associated with following genes: ABCA12, ALOX12B, ALOXE3, CERS3, CYP4F22, NIPAL4, TGM1, PNPLA1 and recently SDR9C7 and SULT2B1.(1-6) Furthermore, seven patients from...... patients who carried five previously unreported mutations in SDR9C7. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  6. Birth prevalence and mutation spectrum in danish patients with autosomal recessive albinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønskov, Karen; Ek, Jakob; Sand, Annie

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The study was initiated to investigate the mutation spectrum of four OCA genes and to calculate the birth prevalence in patients with autosomal recessive albinism. METHODS: Mutation analysis using dHPLC or direct DNA sequencing of TYR, OCA2, TYRP1, and MATP was performed in 62 patients....... Two mutations in one OCA gene explained oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) in 44% of the patients. Mutations in TYR were found in 26% of patients, while OCA2 and MATP caused OCA in 15% and 3%, respectively. No mutations were found in TYRP1. Of the remaining 56% of patients, 29% were heterozygous...... for a mutation in either TYR or OCA2, and 27% were without mutations in any of the four genes. Exclusive expression of the mutant allele was found in four heterozygous patients. A minimum birth prevalence of 1 in 14,000 was calculated, based on register data on 218 patients. The proportion of OCA to autosomal...

  7. Autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease presenting with cutaneous dermatoses and ocular infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, L C M; Manson, A L; Hardman, C; Carton, J; Seneviratne, S L; Ninis, N

    2013-04-01

    Dermatoses such as eczematous dermatitis and cutaneous infection are recognized presentations of primary immunodeficiency (PID). However, atopic dermatitis affects approximately 10% of infants, and cutaneous infections are not uncommon in children, therefore the challenge for the dermatologist is to distinguish the few patients that have PID from the many that do not. We report on a 6-year-old girl who was ultimately diagnosed with autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease (AR-CGD) after presenting to various hospitals with dermatitis, scalp plaques recalcitrant to treatment, and recurrent infections over a 3-year period, and describe some aspects of her diagnosis and management. This report highlights the importance of considering rare disorders such as AR-CGD in the differential diagnosis of recurrent or recalcitrant dermatological infections in children. © The Author(s). CED © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  8. Diagnosis and Management of Hepatobiliary Complications in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Wehrman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD is a congenital hepatorenal fibrocystic disease. The hepatic manifestations of ARPKD can range from asymptomatic to portal hypertension and massively dilated biliary system that results in liver transplantation. Hepatic complications of ARPKD typically present with signs of portal hypertension (splenomegaly and thrombocytopenia or cholangitis. Liver disease in ARPKD does not always correlate with severity of renal disease. Management of ARPKD-related liver disease is largely treating specific symptoms, such as antibiotics for cholangitis or endoscopic treatment for variceal bleeding. If complications cannot be managed medically, liver transplantation may be indicated. This mini-review will discuss the clinical manifestations and management of children with ARPKD liver disease.

  9. The efficacy of microarray screening for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Huet, Ramon A C; Pierrache, Laurence H M; Meester-Smoor, Magda A; Klaver, Caroline C W; van den Born, L Ingeborgh; Hoyng, Carel B; de Wijs, Ilse J; Collin, Rob W J; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Klevering, B Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of multiple versions of a commercially available arrayed primer extension (APEX) microarray chip for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). We included 250 probands suspected of arRP who were genetically analyzed with the APEX microarray between January 2008 and November 2013. The mode of inheritance had to be autosomal recessive according to the pedigree (including isolated cases). If the microarray identified a heterozygous mutation, we performed Sanger sequencing of exons and exon-intron boundaries of that specific gene. The efficacy of this microarray chip with the additional Sanger sequencing approach was determined by the percentage of patients that received a molecular diagnosis. We also collected data from genetic tests other than the APEX analysis for arRP to provide a detailed description of the molecular diagnoses in our study cohort. The APEX microarray chip for arRP identified the molecular diagnosis in 21 (8.5%) of the patients in our cohort. Additional Sanger sequencing yielded a second mutation in 17 patients (6.8%), thereby establishing the molecular diagnosis. In total, 38 patients (15.2%) received a molecular diagnosis after analysis using the microarray and additional Sanger sequencing approach. Further genetic analyses after a negative result of the arRP microarray (n = 107) resulted in a molecular diagnosis of arRP (n = 23), autosomal dominant RP (n = 5), X-linked RP (n = 2), and choroideremia (n = 1). The efficacy of the commercially available APEX microarray chips for arRP appears to be low, most likely caused by the limitations of this technique and the genetic and allelic heterogeneity of RP. Diagnostic yields up to 40% have been reported for next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques that, as expected, thereby outperform targeted APEX analysis.

  10. Loss of VPS13C Function in Autosomal-Recessive Parkinsonism Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Increases PINK1/Parkin-Dependent Mitophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lesage, S.; Drouet, V.; Majounie, E.; Deramecourt, V.; Jacoupy, M.; Nicolas, A.; Cormier-Dequaire, F.; Hassoun, S.M.; Pujol, C.; Ciura, S.; Erpapazoglou, Z.; Usenko, T.; Maurage, C.A.; Sahbatou, M.; Liebau, S.; Ding, J.; Bilgic, B.; Emre, M.; Erginel-Unaltuna, N.; Guven, G.; Tison, F.; Tranchant, C.; Vidailhet, M.; Corvol, J.C.; Krack, P.; Leutenegger, A.L.; Nalls, M.A.; Hernandez, D.G.; Heutink, P.; Gibbs, J.R.; Hardy, J.; Wood, N.W.; Gasser, T.; Durr, A.; Deleuze, J.F.; Tazir, M.; Destee, A.; Lohmann, E.; Kabashi, E.; Singleton, A.; Corti, O.; Brice, A.; Scheffer, H.; Bloem, B.R.; et al.,

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The genetic causes of approximately 50% of autosomal-recessive early-onset forms of Parkinson disease (PD) remain to be elucidated. Homozygozity mapping and exome sequencing in 62 isolated individuals with

  11. Additional case of Marden-Walker syndrome: support for the autosomal-recessive inheritance adn refinement of phenotype in a surviving patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrico, A; Galli, L; Zappella, M; Orsi, A; Hayek, G

    2001-02-01

    In this report, we present a 14-year-old girl, born to consanguineous parents, who presented with severe mental retardation, hypotonia, short stature, and congenital joint contractures. The craniofacial features were scaphocephaly, thin/long and immobile face, marked hypoplasia of the midface, temporal narrowness, blepharophimosis, palpebral ptosis, and strabismus. The combination of such a distinctive craniofacial appearance and psychomotor retardation allows us to recognize a new case of the Marden-Walker syndrome. Our patient represents one of the rare cases in which consanguineous mating supports the autosomal-recessive pattern of inheritance of this condition. Furthermore, through refining the phenotype of a surviving patient, this report may contribute to a better recognition of this disorder in older affected children.

  12. A Challenging Case of Hepatoblastoma Concomitant with Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease and Caroli Syndrome—Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevil Kadakia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of an 18-month-old female with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease, Caroli syndrome, and pure fetal type hepatoblastoma. The liver tumor was surgically resected with no chemotherapy given. Now 9 years post resection she demonstrates no local or distant recurrence and stable renal function.

  13. Molecular and phenotypic analysis of a family with autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy and Stargardt disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yzer, S.; Born, L.I. van den; Zonneveld, M.N.; Lopez, I.; Ayyagari, R.; Teye-Botchway, L.; Mota-Vieira, L.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Koenekoop, R.K.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify the causative gene mutations in three siblings with severe progressive autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy (arCRD) and their fifth paternal cousin with Stargardt disease (STGD1) and to specify the phenotypes. METHODS: We evaluated eight sibs of one family, three family

  14. Mutations in MFSD8, encoding a lysosomal membrane protein, are associated with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive macular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosing, S.; Born, L.I. van den; Sangermano, R.; Banfi, S.; Koenekoop, R.K.; Zonneveld-Vrieling, M.N.; Klaver, C.C.; Lith-Verhoeven, J.J. van; Cremers, F.P.M.; Hollander, A.I. den; Hoyng, C.B.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to identify the genetic defects in 2 families with autosomal recessive macular dystrophy with central cone involvement. DESIGN: Case series. PARTICIPANTS: Two families and a cohort of 244 individuals with various inherited maculopathies and cone disorders. METHODS:

  15. Decreased catalytic activity and altered activation properties of PDE6C mutants associated with autosomal recessive achromatopsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grau, Tanja; Artemyev, Nikolai O; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of the cone photoreceptor phosphodiesterase (PDE6C) have been recently reported in patients with autosomal recessive inherited achromatopsia (ACHM) and early-onset cone photoreceptor dysfunction. Here we present the results of a comprehensive...

  16. Modeling autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 1C in mice reveals distinct functions for Ltbp-4 isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bultmann-Mellin, Insa; Conradi, Anne; Maul, Alexandra C

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed an important role for LTBP-4 in elastogenesis. Its mutational inactivation in humans causes autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 1C (ARCL1C), which is a severe disorder caused by defects of the elastic fiber network. Although the human gene involved in ARCL1C has been...

  17. An intronic deletion in the PROM1 gene leads to autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidinger, Osnat; Leibu, Rina; Newman, Hadas; Rizel, Leah; Perlman, Ido; Ben-Yosef, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the genetic basis for autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) in a consanguineous Israeli Jewish family. Patients underwent a detailed ophthalmic evaluation, including eye examination, visual field testing, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and electrophysiological tests, electroretinography (ERG) and visual evoked potential (VEP). Genome-wide homozygosity mapping using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array was performed to identify homozygous regions shared among two of the affected individuals. Mutation screening of the underlying gene was performed with direct sequencing. In silico and in vitro analyses were used to predict the effect of the identified mutation on splicing. The affected family members are three siblings who have various degrees of progressive visual deterioration, glare, color vision abnormalities, and night vision difficulties. Visual field tests revealed central scotomas of different extension. Cone and rod ERG responses were reduced, with cones more severely affected. Homozygosity mapping revealed several homozygous intervals shared among two of the affected individuals. One included the PROM1 gene. Sequence analysis of the 26 coding exons of PROM1 in one affected individual revealed no mutations in the coding sequence or in intronic splice sites. However, in intron 21, proximate to the intron-exon junction, we observed a homozygous 10 bp deletion between positions -26 and -17 (c.2281-26_-17del). The deletion was linked to a known SNP, c.2281-6C>G. The deletion cosegregated with the disease in the family, and was not detected in public databases or in 101 ethnically-matched control individuals. In silico analysis predicted that this deletion would lead to altered intron 21 splicing. Bioinformatic analysis predicted that a recognition site for the SRSF2 splicing factor is located within the deleted sequence. The in vitro splicing assay demonstrated that c.2281-26_-17del leads to complete exon 22 skipping. A novel

  18. Appearance of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease in magnetic resonance imaging and RARE-MR-urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, S.; Uhl, M.; Zimmerhackl, L.B.; Hildebrandt, F.; Ermisch-Omran, B.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the appearance of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) on MRI and RARE-MR urography.Materials and methods. Seven boys and one girl (aged 3 months to 14 years, median 2.5 years) were evaluated. Images were obtained with 0.23-T and 1.5-T MR systems using T1-weighted (T1-W) spin-echo, T2-weighted (T2-W) turbo-spin-echo and RARE-MR-urography sequences. Signal intensities, morphological appearance of the affected kidneys and, specifically, the picture of the urinary tract on RARE-MR-urography were evaluated.Results. All children showed kidney enlargement, reniform but humpy kidney shape, homogeneously grainy renal parenchyma, normal renal pelvis and normal calyces. Signal intensity was hyperintense in T2-W images in all cases. In six cases (n = 7), T1-W images were hypointense. On RARE-MR urography a hyperintense, linear radial pattern was seen in the cortex and medulla which represents the characteristic microcystic dilatation of collecting ducts in ARPKD. Three boys and the girl presented with a few circumscribed small subcapsular cysts.Conclusions. In order to confirm the diagnosis of ARPKD, RARE-MR urography seems to be a non-invasive imaging tool that shows directly the microcystic dilated water-filled collecting ducts. (orig.)

  19. EYS Mutations Causing Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa: Changes of Retinal Structure and Function with Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. McGuigan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the EYS (eyes shut homolog gene are a common cause of autosomal recessive (ar retinitis pigmentosa (RP. Without a mammalian model of human EYS disease, there is limited understanding of details of disease expression and rates of progression of the retinal degeneration. We studied clinically and with chromatic static perimetry, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT, and en face autofluoresence imaging, a cohort of 15 patients (ages 12–51 at first visit, some of whom had longitudinal data of function and structure. Rod sensitivity was able to be measured by chromatic perimetry in most patients at their earliest visits and some patients retained patchy rod function into the fifth decade of life. As expected from RP, cone sensitivity persisted after rod function was no longer measurable. The photoreceptor nuclear layer of the central retina was abnormal except at the fovea in most patients at first visit. Perifoveal disease measured over a period of years indicated that photoreceptor structural loss was followed by dysmorphology of the inner retina and loss of retinal pigment epithelial integrity. Although there could be variability in severity, preliminary analyses of the rates of vision loss suggested that EYS is a more rapidly progressive disease than other ciliopathies causing arRP, such as USH2A and MAK.

  20. COL9A2 and COL9A3 mutations in canine autosomal recessive oculoskeletal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Orly; Guyon, Richard; Kukekova, Anna; Kuznetsova, Tatyana N; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Johnson, Jennifer; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Acland, Gregory M

    2010-08-01

    Oculoskeletal dysplasia segregates as an autosomal recessive trait in the Labrador retriever and Samoyed canine breeds, in which the causative loci have been termed drd1 and drd2, respectively. Affected dogs exhibit short-limbed dwarfism and severe ocular defects. The disease phenotype resembles human hereditary arthro-ophthalmopathies such as Stickler and Marshall syndromes, although these disorders are usually dominant. Linkage studies mapped drd1 to canine chromosome 24 and drd2 to canine chromosome 15. Positional candidate gene analysis then led to the identification of a 1-base insertional mutation in exon 1 of COL9A3 that cosegregates with drd1 and a 1,267-bp deletion mutation in the 5' end of COL9A2 that cosegregates with drd2. Both mutations affect the COL3 domain of the respective gene. Northern analysis showed that RNA expression of the respective genes was reduced in affected retinas. These models offer potential for studies such as protein-protein interactions between different members of the collagen gene family, regulation and expression of these genes in retina and cartilage, and even opportunities for gene therapy.

  1. RARE-MR-urography - a new diagnostic method in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, S.; Uhl, M. [University Hospital Freiburg (Germany). Div. of Pediatric Radiology; Zimmerhackl, L.B.; Hildebrandt, F. [University Hospital Freiburg (Germany). Div. of Pediatric Nephrology

    1999-09-01

    Purpose: To describe the appearance of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) by using a new diagnostic method: RARE-MR-urography. Material and Methods: Eight children were evaluated using MR images from 0.23 T and 1.5 T MR units, using T1-weighted spin-echo and T2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequences and RARE-MR-urography. Signal intensities, morphological appearance of the affected kidneys and, specifically, the picture of the urinary tract in RARE-MR-urography, were evaluated. Results: All children showed enlargement, reniform but humpy kidney shape, homogeneous-grainy renal parenchyma, normal renal pelvis and calyces. Although ARPKD is always associated with some degree of congenital hepatic fibrosis, there was no bile duct dilatation or liver fibrosis at the time of examination. Signal intensity was hyperintense in T2-weighted images in all cases. In 5 cases, T1-weighted images were hypointense. In RARE-MR-urography, hyperintense, linear, radial patterns in cortex and medulla were seen, which represent microcystic dilatation of collecting ducts and are therefore characteristic of ARPKD. Four patients presented with a few circumscribed small subcapsular cysts. Conclusion: RARE-MR-urography is a noninvasive method which demonstrates the pathognomonic water-filled cystic structures throughout the kidneys in ARPKD. (orig.)

  2. A novel autosomal recessive GJA1 missense mutation linked to Craniometaphyseal dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Hu

    Full Text Available Craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD is a rare sclerosing skeletal disorder with progressive hyperostosis of craniofacial bones. CMD can be inherited in an autosomal dominant (AD trait or occur after de novo mutations in the pyrophosphate transporter ANKH. Although the autosomal recessive (AR form of CMD had been mapped to 6q21-22 the mutation has been elusive. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing for one subject with AR CMD and identified a novel missense mutation (c.716G>A, p.Arg239Gln in the C-terminus of the gap junction protein alpha-1 (GJA1 coding for connexin 43 (Cx43. We confirmed this mutation in 6 individuals from 3 additional families. The homozygous mutation cosegregated only with affected family members. Connexin 43 is a major component of gap junctions in osteoblasts, osteocytes, osteoclasts and chondrocytes. Gap junctions are responsible for the diffusion of low molecular weight molecules between cells. Mutations in Cx43 cause several dominant and recessive disorders involving developmental abnormalities of bone such as dominant and recessive oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD; MIM #164200, 257850 and isolated syndactyly type III (MIM #186100, the characteristic digital anomaly in ODDD. However, characteristic ocular and dental features of ODDD as well as syndactyly are absent in patients with the recessive Arg239Gln Cx43 mutation. Bone remodeling mechanisms disrupted by this novel Cx43 mutation remain to be elucidated.

  3. The ADAMTS18 gene is responsible for autosomal recessive early onset severe retinal dystrophy

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    Peluso Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inherited retinal dystrophies, including Retinitis Pigmentosa and Leber Congenital Amaurosis among others, are a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders that lead to variable degrees of visual deficits. They can be caused by mutations in over 100 genes and there is evidence for the presence of as yet unidentified genes in a significant proportion of patients. We aimed at identifying a novel gene for an autosomal recessive form of early onset severe retinal dystrophy in a patient carrying no previously described mutations in known genes. Methods An integrated strategy including homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing was used to identify the responsible mutation. Functional tests were performed in the medaka fish (Oryzias latipes model organism to gain further insight into the pathogenic role of the ADAMTS18 gene in eye and central nervous system (CNS dysfunction. Results This study identified, in the analyzed patient, a homozygous missense mutation in the ADAMTS18 gene, which was recently linked to Knobloch syndrome, a rare developmental disorder that affects the eye and the occipital skull. In vivo gene knockdown performed in medaka fish confirmed both that the mutation has a pathogenic role and that the inactivation of this gene has a deleterious effect on photoreceptor cell function. Conclusion This study reveals that mutations in the ADAMTS18 gene can cause a broad phenotypic spectrum of eye disorders and contribute to shed further light on the complexity of retinal diseases.

  4. Risk Factors for Neurocognitive Functioning in Children with Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

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    Stephen R. Hooper

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This mini review provides an overview of the issues and challenges inherent in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD, with a particular focus on the neurological factors and neurocognitive functioning of this population. ARPKD typically is discovered at the end of pregnancy or during the neonatal developmental period and occurs in approximately 1 in 20,000 live births. During the neonatal period, there is a relatively high risk of death, with many infants dying from respiratory failure. As the child ages, they experience progressive kidney disease and become increasingly vulnerable to liver disease, with many individuals eventually requiring dual organ transplants. This mini review provides a brief description of ARPKD and describes the various factors that place children with ARPKD at risk for neurological and neuropsychological impairment (e.g., a genetic condition leading to chronic kidney disease and eventual transplant; difficult-to-treat hypertension; eventual liver disease; possible dual transplantation of the kidneys and liver; chronic lung disease, including that these factors are present during a critical period of brain development. Further, the mini review discusses the available studies that have addressed the neurocognitive functioning in children with ARPKD. This paper concludes by providing the key clinical and research challenges that face the field of pediatric nephrology with respect to the clinical and scientific study of the neurocognitive functioning of children with ARPKD. Selected directions are offered in both the clinical and research arenas for this multiorgan chronic condition.

  5. CONSANGUINITY AND HOMOZYGOSITY AMONG TUNISIAN PATIENTS WITH AN AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE DISORDER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmemi, Wided; Chelly, Imene; Kharrat, Maher; Chaabouni-Bouhamed, Habiba

    2015-11-01

    Consanguineous unions are a deeply rooted social practice among traditional societies. Despite their presumed social advantages, they can result in several health conditions. The aim of this study was: i) to compare consanguinity levels between Tunisian patients affected with autosomal recessive disorders (ARDs) and those with a chromosomal abnormality; and ii) to gain more insight into the mutational status of patients affected with ARDs. Data were collected from 290 files of patients affected by one of five ARDs confirmed by molecular analysis and 248 files of patients with confirmed Down syndrome. Information on the disease, mutation defining the disease, parents' relatedness and geographical origin was gathered. Consanguinity was found among 58% of the ARD patients and among 22% of Down syndrome patients, and a homozygous status was found in 90% of the patients born to related parents and in 70% of patients born to unrelated parents. Also, children from unrelated parents from the same geographical background were found to be more frequently affected by homozygous mutations than those from unrelated parents from different geographical backgrounds. The present study shows how marriage practices affect patterns of genetic variations and how they can lead to homogenization in the genetic pool.

  6. Missense mutations in the adhalin gene linked to autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberds, S.L.; Anderson, R.D.; Lim, L.E. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Adhalin, the 50-kDa dystrophin-associated glycoprotein, is deficient in skeletal muscle of patients having severe childhood autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy (SCARMD). In several North African families, SCARMD has been linked to markers in the pericentromeric region of chromosome l3q, but SCARMD has been excluded from linkage to this locus in other families. To determine whether the adhalin gene might be involved in SCARMD, human adhalin cDNA and large portions of the adhalin gene were cloned. Adhalin is a transmembrane glycoprotein with an extracellular domain bearing limited homology to domains of entactin and nerve growth factor receptor, suggesting that adhalin may serve as a receptor for an extracellular matrix protein. The adhalin gene was mapped to chromosome 17q12-q21.33, excluding the gene from involvement in 13q-linked SCARMD. A polymorphic microsatellite was identified within intron 6 of the adhalin gene, and one allelic variant of this marker cosegregated with the disease phenotype in a large French family with a lod score of 3.61 at 0 recombination. Adhalin is undetectable in skeletal muscle from affected members of this family. Missense mutations were identified within the adhalin gene that might cause SCARMD in this family. Thus, genetic defects in at least two components, dystrophin and adhalin, of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex can independently cause muscular dystrophies.

  7. WWOX and severe autosomal recessive epileptic encephalopathy: first case in the prenatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valduga, Mylène; Philippe, Christophe; Lambert, Laetitia; Bach-Segura, Pascale; Schmitt, Emmanuelle; Masutti, Jean Pierre; François, Bénédicte; Pinaud, Patrick; Vibert, Mireille; Jonveaux, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    WWOX has been recently implicated in autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia type 12 (SCAR12) and severe early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (EOEE). By array comparative genomic hybridization, we identified a 0.6 Mb homozygous deletion in 16q23.1 in a fetus presenting with brain anomalies. His older sister who died at the age of 22 months from an EOEE was also homozygous for the copy number variations in 16q23.1. This deletion includes the first six exons of WWOX and results in a null genotype in homozygous patients. This family gives additional support for the implication of WWOX in severe EOEEs. We report for the first time prenatal ultrasound findings in a fetus with a WWOX-null genotype. Our study expands the range of brain abnormalities in WWOX-related EOEEs. This additional family confirms the genotype-phenotype correlation with WWOX-null alleles associated with the most severe form of WWOX-related epileptic encephalopathy with premature death.

  8. Novel compound heterozygous MYO7A mutations in Moroccan families with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

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    Amina Bakhchane

    Full Text Available The MYO7A gene encodes a protein belonging to the unconventional myosin super family. Mutations within MYO7A can lead to either non syndromic hearing loss or to the Usher syndrome type 1B (USH1B. Here, we report the results of genetic analyses performed on Moroccan families with autosomal recessive non syndromic hearing loss that identified two families with compound heterozygous MYO7A mutations. Five mutations (c.6025delG, c.6229T>A, c.3500T>A, c.5617C>T and c.4487C>A were identified in these families, the latter presenting two differently affected branches. Multiple bioinformatics programs and molecular modelling predicted the pathogenic effect of these mutations. In conclusion, the absence of vestibular and retinal symptom in the affected patients suggests that these families have the isolated non-syndromic hearing loss DFNB2 (nonsyndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss presentation, instead of USH1B.

  9. Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS: typical clinical and neuroimaging features in a Brazilian family

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    J L Pedroso

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by late-infantile onset spastic ataxia and other neurological features. ARSACS has a high prevalence in northeastern Quebec, Canada. Several ARSACS cases have been reported outside Canada in recent decades. This is the first report of typical clinical and neuroimaging features in a Brazilian family with probable diagnosis of ARSACS.

  10. A novel deletion mutation in the TUSC3 gene in a consanguineous Pakistani family with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability

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    Ali Nadir

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intellectual disability (ID is a serious disorder of the central nervous system with a prevalence of 1-3% in a general population. In the past decades, the research focus has been predominantly on X-linked ID (68 loci and 19 genes for non syndromic X linked ID while for autosomal recessive nonsyndromic ID (NSID only 30 loci and 6 genes have been reported to date. Methods Genome-wide homozygosity mapping with 500 K Nsp1 array (Affymetrix, CNV analysis, PCR based breakpoint mapping and DNA sequencing was performed to explore the genetic basis of autosomal recessive nonsyndromic ID in a large Pakistani family. Results Data analysis showed linkage at 8p23 locus with common homozygous region between SNPs rs6989820 and rs2237834, spanning a region of 12.494 Mb. The subsequent CNV analysis of the data revealed a homozygous deletion of 170.673 Kb which encompassed the TUSC3 gene. Conclusion We report a novel deletion mutation in TUSC3 gene which is the second gene after TRAPPC9 in which mutation has been identified in more than one family with autosomal recessive NSID. The study will aid in exploring the molecular pathway of cognition.

  11. Targeted next-generation sequencing of a 12.5 Mb homozygous region reveals ANO10 mutations in patients with autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, S.; Hoischen, A.; Meijer, R.P.; Gilissen, C.F.H.A.; Neveling, K.; Wieskamp, N.A.W.; Brouwer, A.; Koenig, M.; Anheim, M.; Assoum, M.; Drouot, N.; Todorovic, S.; Milic-Rasic, V.; Lochmuller, H.; Stevanin, G.; Goizet, C.; David, A.; Durr, A.; Brice, A.; Kremer, B.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Schijvenaars, M.M.V.A.P.; Heister, A.; Kwint, M.P.; Arts, P.J.W.; Wijst, J.A.J. van der; Veltman, J.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Scheffer, H.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias comprise a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to their dominant counterparts, unraveling the molecular background of these ataxias has proven to be more complicated and the currently known mutations

  12. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing of a 12.5 Mb Homozygous Region Reveals ANO10 Mutations in Patients with Autosomal-Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, Sascha; Hoischen, Alexander; Meijer, Rowdy P. P.; Gilissen, Christian; Neveling, Kornelia; Wieskamp, Nienke; de Brouwer, Arjan; Koenig, Michel; Anheim, Mathieu; Assoum, Mirna; Drouot, Nathalie; Todorovic, Slobodanka; Milic-Rasic, Vedrana; Lochmueller, Hanns; Stevanin, Giovanni; Goizet, Cyril; David, Albert; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Kremer, Berry; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Schijvenaars, Mascha M. V. A. P.; Heister, Angelien; Kwint, Michael; Arts, Peer; van der Wijst, Jenny; Veltman, Joris; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Scheffer, Hans; Knoers, Nine

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias comprise a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to their dominant counterparts, unraveling the molecular background of these ataxias has proven to be more complicated and the currently known mutations

  13. Mutations in SULT2B1 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Lisa; Kim, Gwang-Jin; Marrakchi, Slaheddine; Christiansen, Julie; Turki, Hamida; Rauschendorf, Marc-Alexander; Lathrop, Mark; Hausser, Ingrid; Zimmer, Andreas D; Fischer, Judith

    2017-06-01

    Ichthyoses are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of genodermatoses associated with abnormal scaling of the skin over the whole body. Mutations in nine genes are known to cause non-syndromic forms of autosomal-recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI). However, not all genetic causes for ARCI have been discovered to date. Using whole-exome sequencing (WES) and multigene panel screening, we identified 6 ARCI-affected individuals from three unrelated families with mutations in Sulfotransferase family 2B member 1 (SULT2B1), showing their causative association with ARCI. Cytosolic sulfotransferases form a large family of enzymes that are involved in the synthesis and metabolism of several steroids in humans. We identified four distinct mutations including missense, nonsense, and splice site mutations. We demonstrated the loss of SULT2B1 expression at RNA and protein levels in keratinocytes from individuals with ARCI by functional analyses. Furthermore, we succeeded in reconstructing the morphologic skin alterations in a 3D organotypic tissue culture model with SULT2B1-deficient keratinocytes and fibroblasts. By thin layer chromatography (TLC) of extracts from these organotypic cultures, we could show the absence of cholesterol sulfate, the metabolite of SULT2B1, and an increased level of cholesterol, indicating a disturbed cholesterol metabolism of the skin upon loss-of-function mutation in SULT2B1. In conclusion, our study reveals an essential role for SULT2B1 in the proper development of healthy human skin. Mutation in SULT2B1 leads to an ARCI phenotype via increased proliferation of human keratinocytes, thickening of epithelial layers, and altered epidermal cholesterol metabolism. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa caused by mutations in the MAK gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Edwin M; Luo, Xunda; Héon, Elise; Lam, Byron L; Weleber, Richard G; Halder, Jennifer A; Affatigato, Louisa M; Goldberg, Jacqueline B; Sumaroka, Alexander; Schwartz, Sharon B; Cideciyan, Artur V; Jacobson, Samuel G

    2011-12-28

    To determine the disease expression in autosomal recessive (ar) retinitis pigmentosa (RP) caused by mutations in the MAK (male germ cell-associated kinase) gene. Patients with RP and MAK gene mutations (n = 24; age, 32-77 years at first visit) were studied by ocular examination, perimetry, and optical coherence tomography (OCT). All but one MAK patient were homozygous for an identical truncating mutation in exon 9 and had Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. The carrier frequency of this mutation among 1207 unrelated Ashkenazi control subjects was 1 in 55, making it the most common cause of heritable retinal disease in this population and MAK-associated RP the sixth most common Mendelian disease overall in this group. Visual acuities could be normal into the eighth decade of life. Kinetic fields showed early loss in the superior-temporal quadrant. With more advanced disease, superior and midperipheral function was lost, but the nasal field remained. Only a central island was present at late stages. Pigmentary retinopathy was less prominent in the superior nasal quadrant. Rod-mediated vision was abnormal but detectable in the residual field; all patients had rod>cone dysfunction. Photoreceptor layer thickness was normal centrally but decreased with eccentricity. At the stages studied, there was no evidence of photoreceptor ciliary elongation. The patterns of disease expression in the MAK form of arRP showed some resemblance to patterns described in autosomal dominant RP, especially the form caused by RP1 mutations. The similarity in phenotypes is of interest, considering that there is experimental evidence of interaction between Mak and RP1 in the photoreceptor cilium.

  15. Biallelic Mutations in CRB1 Underlie Autosomal Recessive Familial Foveal Retinoschisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ajoy; Ng, Judith; Gerth-Kahlert, Christina; Tavares, Erika; Maynes, Jason T; Wright, Thomas; Tiwari, Amit; Tumber, Anupreet; Li, Shuning; Hanson, James V M; Bahr, Angela; MacDonald, Heather; Bähr, Luzy; Westall, Carol; Berger, Wolfgang; Cremers, Frans P M; den Hollander, Anneke I; Héon, Elise

    2016-05-01

    To identify the genetic cause of autosomal recessive familial foveal retinoschisis (FFR). A female sibship with FFR was identified (Family-A; 17 and 16 years, respectively); panel based genetic sequencing (132 genes) and comparative genome hybridization (142 genes) were performed. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on both siblings using the Illumina-HiSeq-2500 platform. A sporadic male (Family-B; 35 years) with FFR underwent WES using Illumina NextSeq500. All three affected subjects underwent detailed ophthalmologic evaluation including fundus photography, autofluorescence imaging, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), and full-field electroretinogram (ERG). Panel-based genetic testing identified two presumed disease causing variants in CRB1 (p.Gly123Cys and p.Cys948Tyr) in Family-A sibship; no deletion or duplication was detected. WES analysis in the sibship identified nine genes with two or more shared nonsynonymous rare coding sequence variants; CRB1 remained a strong candidate gene, and CRB1 variants segregated with the disease. WES in Family-B identified two presumed disease causing variants in CRB1 (p.Ile167_Gly169del and p.Arg764Cys) that segregated with the disease phenotype. Distance visual acuity was 20/40 or better in all three affected except for the left eye of the older subject (Family-B), which showed macular atrophy. Fundus evaluation showed spoke-wheel appearance at the macula in five eyes. The SD-OCT showed macular schitic changes in inner and outer nuclear layers in all cases. The ERG responses were normal in all subjects. This is the first report to implicate CRB1 as the underlying cause of FFR. This phenotype forms the mildest end of the spectrum of CRB1-related diseases.

  16. Deletion at the GCNT2 Locus Causes Autosomal Recessive Congenital Cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irum, Bushra; Khan, Shahid Y; Ali, Muhammad; Daud, Muhammad; Kabir, Firoz; Rauf, Bushra; Fatima, Fareeha; Iqbal, Hira; Khan, Arif O; Al Obaisi, Saif; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Nasir, Idrees A; Khan, Shaheen N; Husnain, Tayyab; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Akram, Javed; Eghrari, Allen O; Riazuddin, S Amer

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the molecular basis of autosomal recessive congenital cataracts (arCC) in a large consanguineous pedigree. All participating individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmic examination. Each patient's medical history, particularly of cataracts and other ocular abnormalities, was compiled from available medical records and interviews with family elders. Blood samples were donated by all participating family members and used to extract genomic DNA. Genetic analysis was performed to rule out linkage to known arCC loci and genes. Whole-exome sequencing libraries were prepared and paired-end sequenced. A large deletion was found that segregated with arCC in the family, and chromosome walking was conducted to estimate the proximal and distal boundaries of the deletion mutation. Exclusion and linkage analysis suggested linkage to a region of chromosome 6p24 harboring GCNT2 (glucosaminyl (N-acetyl) transferase 2) with a two-point logarithm of odds score of 5.78. PCR amplifications of the coding exons of GCNT2 failed in individuals with arCC, and whole-exome data analysis revealed a large deletion on chromosome 6p in the region harboring GCNT2. Chromosomal walking using multiple primer pairs delineated the extent of the deletion to approximately 190 kb. Interestingly, a failure to amplify a junctional fragment of the deletion break strongly suggests an insertion in addition to the large deletion. Here, we report a novel insertion/deletion mutation at the GCNT2 locus that is responsible for congenital cataracts in a large consanguineous family.

  17. Growth in children with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease in the CKiD cohort study

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    Erum Aftab Hartung

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies have suggested that some children with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD have growth impairment out of proportion to their degree of chronic kidney disease (CKD. The objective of this study was to systematically compare growth parameters in children with ARPKD to those with other congenital causes of CKD in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD prospective cohort study. Methods: Height standard deviation scores (z-scores, proportion of children with severe short stature (z-score <-1.88, rates of growth hormone use, and annual change in height z-score were analyzed in children with ARPKD (n=22 compared to two matched control groups: children with aplastic/hypoplastic/dysplastic (A/H/D kidneys (n=44 and obstructive uropathy (OU (n=44. Differences in baseline characteristics were tested by Wilcoxon rank sum test or Fisher’s exact test. Matched differences in annual change in height z-score were tested by Wilcoxon signed rank test.Results: Median height z-score in children with ARPKD was -1.1 [interquartile range -1.5, -0.2]; 14% of the ARPKD group had height z-score <-1.88, and 18% were using growth hormone. There were no significant differences in median height z-score, proportion with height z-score <-1.88, growth hormone use, or annual change in height z-score between the ARPKD and control groups. Conclusions: Children with ARPKD and mild-to-moderate CKD in the CKiD cohort have a high prevalence of growth abnormalities, but these are similar to children with other congenital causes of CKD. This study does not support a disease-specific effect of ARPKD on growth, at least in the subset of children with mild-to-moderate CKD.

  18. Growth in Children with Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease in the CKiD Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Erum A; Dell, Katherine M; Matheson, Matthew; Warady, Bradley A; Furth, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that some children with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) have growth impairment out of proportion to their degree of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The objective of this study was to systematically compare growth parameters in children with ARPKD to those with other congenital causes of CKD in the chronic kidney disease in Children (CKiD) prospective cohort study. Height SD scores (z-scores), proportion of children with severe short stature (z-score growth hormone use, and annual change in height z-score were analyzed in children with ARPKD (n = 22) compared with two matched control groups: children with aplastic/hypoplastic/dysplastic kidneys (n = 44) and obstructive uropathy (OU) (n = 44). Differences in baseline characteristics were tested by Wilcoxon rank-sum test or Fisher's exact test. Matched differences in annual change in height z-score were tested by Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Median height z-score in children with ARPKD was -1.1 [interquartile range -1.5, -0.2]; 14% of the ARPKD group had height z-score growth hormone. There were no significant differences in median height z-score, proportion with height z-score growth hormone use, or annual change in height z-score between the ARPKD and control groups. Children with ARPKD and mild-to-moderate CKD in the CKiD cohort have a high prevalence of growth abnormalities, but these are similar to children with other congenital causes of CKD. This study does not support a disease-specific effect of ARPKD on growth, at least in the subset of children with mild-to-moderate CKD.

  19. A Founder Mutation in VPS11 Causes an Autosomal Recessive Leukoencephalopathy Linked to Autophagic Defects.

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    Jinglan Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic leukoencephalopathies (gLEs are a group of heterogeneous disorders with white matter abnormalities affecting the central nervous system (CNS. The causative mutation in ~50% of gLEs is unknown. Using whole exome sequencing (WES, we identified homozygosity for a missense variant, VPS11: c.2536T>G (p.C846G, as the genetic cause of a leukoencephalopathy syndrome in five individuals from three unrelated Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ families. All five patients exhibited highly concordant disease progression characterized by infantile onset leukoencephalopathy with brain white matter abnormalities, severe motor impairment, cortical blindness, intellectual disability, and seizures. The carrier frequency of the VPS11: c.2536T>G variant is 1:250 in the AJ population (n = 2,026. VPS11 protein is a core component of HOPS (homotypic fusion and protein sorting and CORVET (class C core vacuole/endosome tethering protein complexes involved in membrane trafficking and fusion of the lysosomes and endosomes. The cysteine 846 resides in an evolutionarily conserved cysteine-rich RING-H2 domain in carboxyl terminal regions of VPS11 proteins. Our data shows that the C846G mutation causes aberrant ubiquitination and accelerated turnover of VPS11 protein as well as compromised VPS11-VPS18 complex assembly, suggesting a loss of function in the mutant protein. Reduced VPS11 expression leads to an impaired autophagic activity in human cells. Importantly, zebrafish harboring a vps11 mutation with truncated RING-H2 domain demonstrated a significant reduction in CNS myelination following extensive neuronal death in the hindbrain and midbrain. Thus, our study reveals a defect in VPS11 as the underlying etiology for an autosomal recessive leukoencephalopathy disorder associated with a dysfunctional autophagy-lysosome trafficking pathway.

  20. Biallelic SUN5 Mutations Cause Autosomal-Recessive Acephalic Spermatozoa Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fuxi; Wang, Fengsong; Yang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Jingjing; Wu, Huan; Zhang, Zhou; Zhang, Zhiguo; He, Xiaojin; Zhou, Ping; Wei, Zhaolian; Gecz, Jozef; Cao, Yunxia

    2016-10-06

    Acephalic spermatozoa syndrome is a rare and severe form of teratozoospermia characterized by a predominance of headless spermatozoa in the ejaculate. Family clustering and consanguinity suggest a genetic origin; however, causative mutations have yet to be identified. We performed whole-exome sequencing in two unrelated infertile men and subsequent variant filtering identified one homozygous (c.824C>T [p.Thr275Met]) and one compound heterozygous (c.1006C>T [p.Arg356Cys] and c.485T>A [p.Met162Lys]) SUN5 (also named TSARG4) variants. Sanger sequencing of SUN5 in 15 additional unrelated infertile men revealed four compound heterozygous (c.381delA [p.Val128Serfs ∗ 7] and c.824C>T [p.Thr275Met]; c.381delA [p.Val128Serfs ∗ 7] and c.781G>A [p.Val261Met]; c.216G>A [p.Trp72 ∗ ] and c.1043A>T [p.Asn348Ile]; c.425+1G>A/c.1043A>T [p.Asn348Ile]) and two homozygous (c.851C>G [p.Ser284 ∗ ]; c.350G>A [p.Gly114Arg]) variants in six individuals. These 10 SUN5 variants were found in 8 of 17 unrelated men, explaining the genetic defect in 47.06% of the affected individuals in our cohort. These variants were absent in 100 fertile population-matched control individuals. SUN5 variants lead to absent, significantly reduced, or truncated SUN5, and certain variants altered SUN5 distribution in the head-tail junction of the sperm. In summary, these results demonstrate that biallelic SUN5 mutations cause male infertility due to autosomal-recessive acephalic spermatozoa syndrome. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Loss of VPS13C Function in Autosomal-Recessive Parkinsonism Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Increases PINK1/Parkin-Dependent Mitophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Lesage, S.; Drouet, V.; Majounie, E.; Deramecourt, V.; Jacoupy, M.; Nicolas, A.; Cormier-Dequaire, F.; Hassoun, S.M.; Pujol, C.; Ciura, S.; Erpapazoglou, Z.; Usenko, T.; Maurage, C.A.; Sahbatou, M.; Liebau, S.

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The genetic causes of approximately 50% of autosomal-recessive early-onset forms of Parkinson disease (PD) remain to be elucidated. Homozygozity mapping and exome sequencing in 62 isolated individuals with early-onset parkinsonism and confirmed consanguinity followed by data mining in the exomes of 1,348 PD-affected individuals identified, in three isolated subjects, homozygous or compound heterozygous t...

  2. Calpain 12 Function Revealed through the Study of an Atypical Case of Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochner, Ron; Samuelov, Liat; Sarig, Ofer; Li, Qiaoli; Adase, Christopher A; Isakov, Ofer; Malchin, Natalia; Vodo, Dan; Shayevitch, Ronna; Peled, Alon; Yu, Benjamin D; Fainberg, Gilad; Warshauer, Emily; Adir, Noam; Erez, Noam; Gat, Andrea; Gottlieb, Yehonatan; Rogers, Tova; Pavlovsky, Mor; Goldberg, Ilan; Shomron, Noam; Sandilands, Aileen; Campbell, Linda E; MacCallum, Stephanie; McLean, W H Irwin; Ast, Gil; Gallo, Richard L; Uitto, Jouni; Sprecher, Eli

    2017-02-01

    Congenital erythroderma is a rare and often life-threatening condition, which has been shown to result from mutations in several genes encoding important components of the epidermal differentiation program. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified in a child with congenital exfoliative erythroderma, hypotrichosis, severe nail dystrophy and failure to thrive, two heterozygous mutations in ABCA12 (c.2956C>T, p.R986W; c.5778+2T>C, p. G1900Mfs*16), a gene known to be associated with two forms of ichthyosis, autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis, and harlequin ichthyosis. Because the patient displayed an atypical phenotype, including severe hair and nail manifestations, we scrutinized the exome sequencing data for additional potentially deleterious genetic variations in genes of relevance to the cornification process. Two mutations were identified in CAPN12, encoding a member of the calpain proteases: a paternal missense mutation (c.1511C>A; p.P504Q) and a maternal deletion due to activation of a cryptic splice site in exon 9 of the gene (c.1090_1129del; p.Val364Lysfs*11). The calpain 12 protein was found to be expressed in both the epidermis and hair follicle of normal skin, but its expression was dramatically reduced in the patient's skin. The downregulation of capn12 expression in zebrafish was associated with abnormal epidermal morphogenesis. Small interfering RNA knockdown of CAPN12 in three-dimensional human skin models was associated with acanthosis, disorganized epidermal architecture, and downregulation of several differentiation markers, including filaggrin. Accordingly, filaggrin expression was almost absent in the patient skin. Using ex vivo live imaging, small interfering RNA knockdown of calpain 12 in skin from K14-H2B GFP mice led to significant hair follicle catagen transformation compared with controls. In summary, our results indicate that calpain 12 plays an essential role during epidermal ontogenesis and normal hair follicle cycling and that

  3. A Naturally Occurring Canine Model of Autosomal Recessive Congenital Stationary Night Blindness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mineo Kondo

    Full Text Available Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB is a non-progressive, clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease of impaired night vision. We report a naturally-occurring, stationary, autosomal recessive phenotype in beagle dogs with normal daylight vision but absent night vision. Affected dogs had normal retinas on clinical examination, but showed no detectable rod responses. They had "negative-type" mixed rod and cone responses in full-field ERGs. Their photopic long-flash ERGs had normal OFF-responses associated with severely reduced ON-responses. The phenotype is similar to the Schubert-Bornschein form of complete CSNB in humans. Homozygosity mapping ruled out most known CSNB candidates as well as CACNA2D4 and GNB3. Three remaining genes were excluded based on sequencing the open reading frame and intron-exon boundaries (RHO, NYX, causal to a different form of CSNB (RHO or X-chromosome (NYX, CACNA1F location. Among the genes expressed in the photoreceptors and their synaptic terminals, and mGluR6 cascade and modulators, reduced expression of GNAT1, CACNA2D4 and NYX was observed by qRT-PCR in both carrier (n = 2 and affected (n = 2 retinas whereas CACNA1F was down-regulated only in the affecteds. Retinal morphology revealed normal cellular layers and structure, and electron microscopy showed normal rod spherules and synaptic ribbons. No difference from normal was observed by immunohistochemistry (IHC for antibodies labeling rods, cones and their presynaptic terminals. None of the retinas showed any sign of stress. Selected proteins of mGluR6 cascade and its modulators were examined by IHC and showed that PKCα weakly labeled the rod bipolar somata in the affected, but intensely labeled axonal terminals that appeared thickened and irregular. Dendritic terminals of ON-bipolar cells showed increased Goα labeling. Both PKCα and Goα labeled the more prominent bipolar dendrites that extended into the OPL in affected but not normal retinas

  4. Genetic spectrum of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss in Pakistani families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobia Shafique

    Full Text Available The frequency of inherited bilateral autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL in Pakistan is 1.6/1000 individuals. More than 50% of the families carry mutations in GJB2 while mutations in MYO15A account for about 5% of recessive deafness. In the present study a cohort of 30 ARNSHL families was initially screened for mutations in GJB2 and MYO15A. Homozygosity mapping was performed by employing whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping in the families that did not carry mutations in GJB2 or MYO15A. Mutation analysis was performed for the known ARNSHL genes present in the homozygous regions to determine the causative mutations. This allowed the identification of a causative mutation in all the 30 families including 9 novel mutations, which were identified in 9 different families (GJB2 (c.598G>A, p.Gly200Arg; MYO15A (c.9948G>A, p.Gln3316Gln; c.3866+1G>A; c.8767C>T, p.Arg2923* and c.8222T>C, p.Phe2741Ser, TMC1 (c.362+18A>G, BSND (c.97G>C, p.Val33Leu, TMPRSS3 (c.726C>G, p.Cys242Trp and MSRB3 (c.20T>G, p.Leu7Arg. Furthermore, 12 recurrent mutations were detected in 21 other families. The 21 identified mutations included 10 (48% missense changes, 4 (19% nonsense mutations, 3 (14% intronic mutations, 2 (9% splice site mutations and 2 (9% frameshift mutations. GJB2 accounted for 53% of the families, while mutations in MYO15A were the second most frequent (13% cause of ARNSHL in these 30 families. The identification of novel as well as recurrent mutations in the present study increases the spectrum of mutations in known deafness genes which could lead to the identification of novel founder mutations and population specific mutated deafness genes causative of ARNSHL. These results provide detailed genetic information that has potential diagnostic implication in the establishment of cost-efficient allele-specific analysis of frequently occurring variants in combination with other reported mutations in Pakistani populations.

  5. A common founder mutation of CERKL underlies autosomal recessive retinal degeneration with early macular involvement among Yemenite Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auslender, Noa; Sharon, Dror; Abbasi, Anan H; Garzozi, Hanna J; Banin, Eyal; Ben-Yosef, Tamar

    2007-12-01

    To investigate the genetic basis and clinical manifestations of a characteristic form of retinal degeneration in the Yemenite Jewish population. Haplotype analysis for all known genes and loci underlying autosomal recessive nonsyndromic retinal degeneration was performed in a Yemenite Jewish family segregating autosomal recessive severe retinal degeneration. The causative mutation was detected by direct sequencing of the underlying gene, and its prevalence in additional affected and unaffected Yemenite Jews was determined. Patients who were homozygous for this mutation underwent ophthalmic evaluation, including funduscopy, electroretinography, electro-oculography, perimetry, and color vision testing. In the studied Yemenite Jewish family, we found evidence for linkage to the CERKL gene. Direct sequencing revealed a novel homozygous splice-site mutation, c.238+1G>A. An in vitro splicing assay demonstrated that this mutation leads to incorrect splicing. c.238+1G>A was found to cause retinal degeneration in six additional Yemenite Jewish families. The carrier frequency of this mutation in the Yemenite Jewish population is 4.4%. All c.238+1G>A homozygotes manifest widespread progressive impairment of rod and cone function with early macular involvement. c.238+1G>A is the second reported mutation of CERKL and is a prevalent founder mutation that underlies approximately 33% of autosomal recessive retinal degeneration cases in the Yemenite Jewish population. It is associated with a characteristic retinal degeneration phenotype with early macular involvement, concomitant progression of rod and cone impairment, and characteristic fundus findings. The identification of this mutation and phenotype will facilitate molecular diagnosis, carrier screening, and genetic counseling in the Yemenite Jewish population.

  6. A homozygous mutation in a consanguineous family consolidates the role of ALDH1A3 in autosomal recessive microphthalmia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, L; Fang, M; Dali, C

    2013-01-01

    to the identification of new genes. Very recently, homozygous variations within ALDH1A3 have been associated with autosomal recessive microphthalmia with or without cysts or coloboma, and with variable subphenotypes of developmental delay/autism spectrum disorder in eight families. In a consanguineous family where...... three of the five siblings were affected with microphthalmia/coloboma, we identified a novel homozygous missense mutation in ALDH1A3 using exome sequencing. Of the three affected siblings, one had intellectual disability and one had intellectual disability and autism, while the last one presented...

  7. Inhibitory action of chlorophyllin of autosome recessive lethals induced by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salceda, V.M.; Pimentel, P.A.E.; Cruces, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    on the damage caused by the radiation, it was into account the presence of lethal and semi lethals autosomal. One observes this way that even without the use of the radiation the semi lethals frequency is diminished when the chlorophyllin is applied, in this case the decrease was significant and although there was decrease in the case of the irradiated group this it was not significant; in the case of the lethal ones it happened the opposite it was not significant in radiation absence on the contrary elevate the frequency of this type of genes, however, before the radiation and with pre-treatment with chlorophyllin this it reduced the frequency of autosomal recessive lethals significantly. This is important because in the case of bound recessive lethals recessive to the sex this doesn't happen. (Author)

  8. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies Novel Compound Heterozygous Lysosomal Trafficking Regulator Gene Mutations Associated with Autosomal Recessive Chediak-Higashi Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yaqiong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Senfen; Chen, Feng; Gu, Yang; Hong, Enyu; Yu, Yongbo; Ni, Xin; Guo, Yongli; Shi, Tieliu; Xu, Zigang

    2017-02-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by varying degrees of oculocutaneous albinism, recurrent infections, and a mild bleeding tendency, with late neurologic dysfunction. This syndrome is molecularly characterized by pathognomonic mutations in the LYST (lysosomal trafficking regulator). Using whole genome sequencing (WGS) we attempted to identify novel mutations of CHS based on a family of CHS with atypical symptoms. The two patients demonstrated a phenotypic constellation including partial oculocutaneous albinism, frequency upper respiratory infection or a marginal intelligence, without bleeding tendency and severe immunodeficiency. WGS revealed two compound LYST mutations including a maternally inherited chr1:235969126G > A (rs80338652) and a novel paternally inherited chr1: 235915327A > AT, associated with autosomal recessive CHS. These two variants fall in the coding regions of LYST, resulting in premature truncation of LYST due to R1104X/N2535KfsX2 induced incomplete translation. Notably, the heterozygous carriers (i.e. parents) were unaffected. Our finding also reveals decreased plasma serotonin levels in patients with CHS compared with unaffected individuals for the first time. The present study contributes to improved understanding of the causes of this disease and provides new ideas for possible treatments.

  9. Discriminative Features in Three Autosomal Recessive Cutis Laxa Syndromes: Cutis Laxa IIA, Cutis Laxa IIB, and Geroderma Osteoplastica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Kariminejad

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cutis laxa is a heterogeneous condition characterized by redundant, sagging, inelastic, and wrinkled skin. The inherited forms of this disease are rare and can have autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked inheritance. Three of the autosomal recessive cutis laxa syndromes, namely cutis laxa IIA (ARCL2A, cutis laxa IIB (ARCL2B, and geroderma osteodysplastica (GO, have very similar clinical features, complicating accurate diagnosis. Individuals with these conditions often present with cutis laxa, progeroid features, and hyperextensible joints. These conditions also share additional features, such as short stature, hypotonia, and congenital hip dislocation, but the severity and frequency of these findings are variable in each of these cutis laxa syndromes. The characteristic features for ARCL2A are abnormal isoelectric focusing and facial features, including downslanting palpebral fissures and a long philtrum. Rather, the clinical phenotype of ARCL2B includes severe wrinkling of the dorsum of the hands and feet, wormian bones, athetoid movements, lipodystrophy, cataract and corneal clouding, a thin triangular face, and a pinched nose. Normal cognition and osteopenia leading to pathological fractures, maxillary hypoplasia, and oblique furrowing from the outer canthus to the lateral border of the supraorbital ridge are discriminative features for GO. Here we present 10 Iranian patients who were initially diagnosed clinically using the respective features of each cutis laxa syndrome. Each patient’s clinical diagnosis was then confirmed with molecular investigation of the responsible gene. Review of the clinical features from the cases reported from the literature also supports our conclusions.

  10. Using next-generation sequencing as a genetic diagnostic tool in rare autosomal recessive neurologic Mendelian disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao; Wang, Jun-Ling; Tang, Bei-Sha; Sun, Zhan-Fang; Shi, Yu-Ting; Shen, Lu; Lei, Li-Fang; Wei, Xiao-Ming; Xiao, Jing-Jing; Hu, Zheng-Mao; Pan, Qian; Xia, Kun; Zhang, Qing-Yan; Dai, Mei-Zhi; Liu, Yu; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Jiang, Hong

    2013-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing was used to investigate 9 rare Chinese pedigrees with rare autosomal recessive neurologic Mendelian disorders. Five probands with ataxia-telangectasia and 1 proband with chorea-acanthocytosis were analyzed by targeted gene sequencing. Whole-exome sequencing was used to investigate 3 affected individuals with Joubert syndrome, nemaline myopathy, or spastic ataxia Charlevoix-Saguenay type. A list of known and novel candidate variants was identified for each causative gene. All variants were genetically verified by Sanger sequencing or quantitative polymerase chain reaction with the strategy of disease segregation in related pedigrees and healthy controls. The advantages of using next-generation sequencing to diagnose rare autosomal recessive neurologic Mendelian disorders characterized by genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity are demonstrated. A genetic diagnostic strategy combining the use of targeted gene sequencing and whole-exome sequencing with the aid of next-generation sequencing platforms has shown great promise for improving the diagnosis of neurologic Mendelian disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Autosomal recessive MFN2-related Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with diaphragmatic weakness: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Christopher A; Rabideau, Marina; Blevins, Amy; Westbrook, Marjorie Jody; Ekstein, Tali; Nykamp, Keith; Deucher, Anne; Harper, Amy; Demmer, Laurie

    2016-06-01

    Pathogenic variants in the mitofusin 2 gene (MFN2) are the most common cause of autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT2) disease, which is typically characterized by axonal sensorimotor neuropathy. We report on a 7-month-old white female with hypotonia, motor delay, distal weakness, and motor/sensory axonal neuropathy in which next-generation sequencing analysis identified compound heterozygous pathogenic variants (c.2054_2069_1170del and c.392A>G) in MFN2. A review of the literature reveals that sporadic and familial cases of compound heterozygous or homozygous pathogenic MFN2 variants have been infrequently described, which indicates that MFN2 can also be inherited in a recessive manner. This case highlights several clinical findings not typically associated with MFN2 pathogenic variants, including young age of onset and rapidly progressing diaphragmatic paresis that necessitated tracheostomy and mechanical ventilation, and adds to the growing list of features identified in autosomal recessive MFN2-related CMT2. Our patient with MFN2-related CMT2 expands the clinical and mutational spectrum of individuals with autosomal recessive CMT2 and identifies a new clinical feature that warrants further observation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Genetic Linkage Analysis of DFNB2 Locus with Autosomal Recessive Hearing Loss in Families Negative for GJB2 Mutations in Khuzestan Province

    OpenAIRE

    Parisa Tahmasebi; Seyed Reza Kazemi Nezhad; Mohammad Amin Tabatabaiefar; Javad Mohammadi Asl; Nader Saki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hearing loss is a common sensory impairment in humans which half of its causes are genetic reasons. Genetic hearing loss can be divided into the two types of syndromic and non-syndromic, which 80% of non-syndromic cases is Autosomal Recessive Non-Syndromic Hearing Loss. The aim of the present research is to determine the contribution of DFNB2 locus (MYO7A gene) in causing an autosomal recessive hearing loss in the one group of the deaf families of Khuzestan province. ...

  13. A Mutation in LIPN, Encoding Epidermal Lipase N, Causes a Late-Onset Form of Autosomal-Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israeli, Shirli; Khamaysi, Ziyad; Fuchs-Telem, Dana; Nousbeck, Janna; Bergman, Reuven; Sarig, Ofer; Sprecher, Eli

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive congenital ichthyoses represent a large and heterogeneous group of disorders of epidermal cornification. Recent data suggest that most of these disorders might result from defective lipid transport and metabolism. In the present study, we describe a late-onset form of recessive ichthyosis in a large consanguineous pedigree. By using a combination of homozygosity mapping and positional candidate-gene screening, we identified a 2 bp deletion in LIPN that segregated with the disease phenotype throughout the family. LIPN encodes one of six acid lipases known to be involved in triglyceride metabolism in mammals . LIPN was found to be exclusively expressed in the epidermis and to be strongly induced during keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:21439540

  14. A Novel Homozygous Missense Mutation in HOXC13 Leads to Autosomal Recessive Pure Hair and Nail Ectodermal Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxiao; Orseth, Meredith Lee; Smith, J Michael; Brehm, Mary Abigail; Agim, Nnenna Gebechi; Glass, Donald Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia (PHNED) is a rare disorder that presents with hypotrichosis and nail dystrophy while sparing other ectodermal structures such as teeth and sweat glands. We describe a homozygous novel missense mutation in the HOXC13 gene that resulted in autosomal recessive PHNED in a Hispanic child. The mutation c.812A>G (p.Gln271Arg) is located within the DNA-binding domain of the HOXC13 gene, cosegregates within the family, and is predicted to be maximally damaging. This is the first reported case of a missense HOXC13 mutation resulting in PHNED and the first reported case of PHNED identified in a North American family. Our findings illustrate the critical role of HOXC13 in human hair and nail development. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Mutations in DZIP1L, which encodes a ciliary transition zone protein, cause autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hao; Galeano, Maria C. Rondón; Ott, Elisabeth; Kaeslin, Geraldine; Kausalya, P. Jaya; Kramer, Carina; Ortiz-Brüchle, Nadina; Hilger, Nadescha; Metzis, Vicki; Hiersche, Milan; Tay, Shang Yew; Tunningley, Robert; Vij, Shubha; Courtney, Andrew D.; Whittle, Belinda; Wühl, Elke; Vester, Udo; Hartleben, Björn; Neuber, Steffen; Frank, Valeska; Little, Melissa H.; Epting, Daniel; Papathanasiou, Peter; Perkins, Andrew C.; Wright, Graham D.; Hunziker, Walter; Gee, Heon Yung; Otto, Edgar A.; Zerres, Klaus; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Roy, Sudipto; Wicking, Carol; Bergmann, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD), usually considered to be a genetically homogeneous disease caused by mutations in PKHD1, has been associated with ciliary dysfunction. Here, we describe mutations in the DAZ interacting protein 1-like (DZIP1L) gene in patients with ARPKD, findings we have further validated by loss-of-function studies in mice and zebrafish. DZIP1L localizes to centrioles and at the distal end of basal bodies, and interacts with septin2, a protein implicated in maintenance of the periciliary diffusion barrier at the ciliary transition zone. Consistent with a defect in the diffusion barrier, we found that the ciliary membrane translocation of the PKD proteins, polycystin-1 and −2, is compromised in DZIP1L mutant cells. Together, these data provide the first conclusive evidence that ARPKD is not a homogeneous disorder, and establishes DZIP1L as a second gene involved in its pathogenesis. PMID:28530676

  16. Mutations in DZIP1L, which encodes a ciliary-transition-zone protein, cause autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hao; Galeano, Maria C Rondón; Ott, Elisabeth; Kaeslin, Geraldine; Kausalya, P Jaya; Kramer, Carina; Ortiz-Brüchle, Nadina; Hilger, Nadescha; Metzis, Vicki; Hiersche, Milan; Tay, Shang Yew; Tunningley, Robert; Vij, Shubha; Courtney, Andrew D; Whittle, Belinda; Wühl, Elke; Vester, Udo; Hartleben, Björn; Neuber, Steffen; Frank, Valeska; Little, Melissa H; Epting, Daniel; Papathanasiou, Peter; Perkins, Andrew C; Wright, Graham D; Hunziker, Walter; Gee, Heon Yung; Otto, Edgar A; Zerres, Klaus; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Roy, Sudipto; Wicking, Carol; Bergmann, Carsten

    2017-07-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD), usually considered to be a genetically homogeneous disease caused by mutations in PKHD1, has been associated with ciliary dysfunction. Here, we describe mutations in DZIP1L, which encodes DAZ interacting protein 1-like, in patients with ARPKD. We further validated these findings through loss-of-function studies in mice and zebrafish. DZIP1L localizes to centrioles and to the distal ends of basal bodies, and interacts with septin2, a protein implicated in maintenance of the periciliary diffusion barrier at the ciliary transition zone. In agreement with a defect in the diffusion barrier, we found that the ciliary-membrane translocation of the PKD proteins polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 is compromised in DZIP1L-mutant cells. Together, these data provide what is, to our knowledge, the first conclusive evidence that ARPKD is not a homogeneous disorder and further establish DZIP1L as a second gene involved in ARPKD pathogenesis.

  17. Familial Clustering of Unexplained Transient Respiratory Distress in 12 Newborns from Three Unrelated Families Suggests an Autosomal-Recessive Inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Guala

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on 12 near-term babies from three families in which an unexplained transient respiratory distress was observed. No known risk factor was present in any family and no sequelae were recorded at follow-up. The most common causes of respiratory distress at birth are Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome (NRD and Transient Tachypnea of the Newborn (TTN, and their cumulative incidence is estimated to be about 2%. Genetic factors have been identified in NRD (surfactant genes or suggested for TTN (genes affecting lung liquid clearance. Survivors from NRD may develop clinically relevant sequelae, while TTN does not cause any problem later in life. Our cases do not immediately fit NRD or TTN, while familial recurrence suggests the existence of a previously unreported subgroup on patients with respiratory distress for which autosomal-recessive inheritance is likely.

  18. An autosomal recessive DNASE1L3-related autoimmune disease with unusual clinical presentation mimicking systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonella, A; Mancano, G; Gremese, E; Alkuraya, F S; Patel, N; Gurrieri, F; Ferraccioli, G

    2017-06-01

    We describe the third family in the world, after Arabian and Turkish ones, displaying an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease (AID), mimicking systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), with unusual manifestations due to a homozygous frame-shift variant in DNASE1L3. SLE is a complex AID characterized by multiple organ involvement. Genetic risk variants identified account for only 15% of SLE heritability. Rare Mendelian forms have been reported, including DNASE1L3-related SLE. Through specific genetic tests we identified a homozygous 2 bp-deletion c.289_290delAC (NM_004944.2) in DNASE1L3, predicting frameshift and premature truncation (p.Thr97Ilefs*2). The same mutation was previously reported in three sisters, born from consanguineous parents and affected with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome (HUVS). As approximately 50% of individuals affected with HUVS develop SLE, it is still unclear whether it is a SLE sub-phenotype or a separate condition.

  19. Neuromuscular blocking effects of cisatracurium and its antagonism with neostigmine in a canine model of autosomal-recessive centronuclear myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Flores, M; Paré, M D; Campoy, L; Gleed, R D

    2015-12-01

    Centronuclear myopathy (CNM) is a rare congenital condition associated with skeletal muscle weakness. Patients with CNM may have decreased acetylcholine receptor expression and a reduced number of releasable quanta. Such perturbations could affect the time-course of neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) and their antagonism with cholinesterase inhibitors. As a result of the rarity of CNM, prospective data regarding NMBA use in this subpopulation is scarce. We evaluated the neuromuscular blocking effects of cisatracurium and its antagonism with neostigmine in a canine model of CNM. Six dogs with congenital autosomal-recessive CNM and six controls received cisatracurium 0.15 mg kg(-1) i.v. under general anaesthesia and intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Neuromuscular function was monitored with acceleromyography.When the second response (T2) to train-of-four (TOF) stimulation returned, neostigmine 0.04 mg kg(-1) (with glycopyrrolate) were administered i.v. The onset time, time to spontaneous return of T2, and the time to reach a TOF ratio ≥0.9 after neostigmine administration were recorded. Onset time was no different between groups. Median (interquartile range) time to return of T2 was 27 (24-31) min for control dogs and 26 (22-31) min for CNM dogs (P=0.93).After neostigmine administration, a TOF ratio ≥0.9 was reached in 12 (10-15) min and 17 (16-19) min in control and CNM, respectively (P=0.005). The spontaneous return of T2 was not different between groups. However, neostigmine-facilitated recovery was significantly slower in dogs with CNM. Canine autosomal-recessive CNM does not preclude the use of cisatracurium or its antagonism with neostigmine. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. A case report of novel mutation in PRF1 gene, which causes familial autosomal recessive hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordbar, Mohammad Reza; Modarresi, Farzaneh; Farazi Fard, Mohammad Ali; Dastsooz, Hassan; Shakib Azad, Nader; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali

    2017-05-03

    Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a life-threatening immunodeficiency and multi-organ disease that affects people of all ages and ethnic groups. Common symptoms and signs of this disease are high fever, hepatosplenomegaly, and cytopenias. Familial form of HLH disease, which is an autosomal recessive hematological disorder is due to disease-causing mutations in several genes essential for NK and T-cell granule-mediated cytotoxic function. For an effective cytotoxic response from cytotoxic T lymphocyte or NK cell encountering an infected cell or tumor cell, different processes are required, including trafficking, docking, priming, membrane fusion, and entry of cytotoxic granules into the target cell leading to apoptosis. Therefore, genes involved in these steps play important roles in the pathogenesis of HLH disease which include PRF1, UNC13D (MUNC13-4), STX11, and STXBP2 (MUNC18-2). Here, we report a novel missense mutation in an 8-year-old boy suffered from hepatosplenomegaly, hepatitis, epilepsy and pancytopenia. The patient was born to a first-cousin parents with no previous documented disease in his parents. To identify mutated gene in the proband, Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) utilizing next generation sequencing was used on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform on DNA sample from the patient. Results showed a novel deleterious homozygous missense mutation in PRF1 gene (NM_001083116: exon3: c. 1120 T > G, p.W374G) in the patient and then using Sanger sequencing it was confirmed in the proband and his parents. Since his parents were heterozygous for the identified mutation, autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance was confirmed in the family. Our study identified a rare new pathogenic missense mutation in PRF1 gene in patient with HLH disease and it is the first report of mutation in PRF1 in Iranian patients with this disease.

  1. Two Cases of Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis due to CYP4F22 Mutations: Expanding the Genotype of Self-Healing Collodion Baby

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noguera-Morel, L.; Feito-Rodriguez, M.; Maldonado-Cid, P.; Garcia-Minaur, S.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Gonzalez-Sarmiento, R.; Lucas-Laguna, R. De; Hernandez-Martin, A.; Torrelo, A.

    2016-01-01

    Collodion babies are born with a tight, shiny cast that sheds in a few weeks. After shedding, most patients will display features of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) later in life but in up to 10% of cases, the skin eventually becomes normal or only minimally involved, a phenotype

  2. Fine mapping of the autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa locus (RP12) on chromosome 1q; exclusion of the phosducin gene (PDC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Soest, S.; te Nijenhuis, S.; van den Born, L. I.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E. M.; Sharp, E.; Sandkuijl, L. A.; Westerveld, A.; Bergen, A. A.

    1996-01-01

    In a previous study on a large pedigree from a genetically isolated population in the Netherlands, we localized a gene for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa with paraarteriolar preservation of the retinal pigment epithelium (PPRPE) on the long arm of chromosome 1. In this study, we present an

  3. DOCK6 mutations are responsible for a distinct autosomal-recessive variant of Adams-Oliver syndrome associated with brain and eye anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukalo, Maja; Tilsen, Felix; Kayserili, Hülya; Müller, Dietmar; Tüysüz, Beyhan; Ruddy, Deborah M; Wakeling, Emma; Ørstavik, Karen Helene; Snape, Katie M; Trembath, Richard; De Smedt, Maryse; van der Aa, Nathalie; Skalej, Martin; Mundlos, Stefan; Wuyts, Wim; Southgate, Laura; Zenker, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS) is characterized by the association of aplasia cutis congenita with terminal transverse limb defects, often accompanied by additional cardiovascular or neurological features. Both autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive disease transmission have been observed, with recent gene discoveries indicating extensive genetic heterogeneity. Mutations of the DOCK6 gene were first described in autosomal-recessive cases of AOS and only five DOCK6-related families have been reported to date. Recently, a second type of autosomal-recessive AOS has been attributed to EOGT mutations in three consanguineous families. Here, we describe the identification of 13 DOCK6 mutations, the majority of which are novel, across 10 unrelated individuals from a large cohort comprising 47 sporadic cases and 31 AOS pedigrees suggestive of autosomal-recessive inheritance. DOCK6 mutations were strongly associated with structural brain abnormalities, ocular anomalies, and intellectual disability, thus suggesting that DOCK6-linked disease represents a variant of AOS with a particularly poor prognosis. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  4. Microarray-based mutation analysis of the ABCA4 (ABCR) gene in autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy and retinitis pigmentosa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klevering, B.J.; Ijzer, S.; Rohrschneider, K.; Zonneveld-Vrieling, M.N.; Allikmets, R.; Born, L.I. van den; Maugeri, A.; Hoyng, C.B.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in the ABCA4 gene have been associated with autosomal recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1), cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We employed a recently developed genotyping microarray, the ABCR400-chip, to search for known ABCA4 mutations in patients with isolated or

  5. Microcefalia primária autossômica recessiva em três famílias pernambucanas: aspectos clínicos e moleculares Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly in three families from Pernambuco: clinical and molecular aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela F. Leal

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: descrever os aspectos clínicos de três famílias pernambucanas com microcefalia primária autossômica recessiva e as análises de ligação em uma delas (família 2. MÉTODOS: três famílias consangüíneas pernambucanas, não relacionadas biologicamente, com microcefalia primária, foram estudadas. Os heredogramas e a história clínica dos afetados foram construídos com base em informações obtidas de seus pais e outros parentes. O exame físico foi realizado em todos os afetados, seus genitores e na quase totalidade dos irmãos normais dos afetados. O DNA genômico dos afetados da família 2 e de seus pais foi usado em reações de PCR (polimerase chain reaction com primers elaborados para amplificar marcadores microssatélites ligados aos locos já conhecidos de microcefalia primária autossômica recessiva. Os marcadores amplificados foram submetidos a eletroforese e seus alelos analisados. RESULTADOS: nas três famílias, os afetados apresentavam perímetro cefálico muito reduzido acompanhado de retardo mental e apenas uma paciente (da família 3 manifestava outras alterações neurológicas, mas sem dismorfias associadas. Estudos moleculares demonstraram que a microcefalia, na família 2, não apresentava ligação com nenhum dos locos associados à microcefalia primária autossômica recessiva já conhecidos. CONCLUSÕES: pelo menos mais um gene associado à microcefalia primária autossômica recessiva existe e aguarda identificação.OBJECTIVES: to describe the clinical findings in three families from Pernambuco with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly, and the linkage analysis in one of them (family 2. METHODS: three consanguineous families from Pernambuco, not related one to another and with primary microcephaly, were studied. The genealogical data and the clinical history of the affected individuals were obtained from their parents and other family members. All the affected subjects, almost all their normal

  6. Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis: CERS3 mutations identified by a next generation sequencing panel targeting ichthyosis genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssefian, Leila; Vahidnezhad, Hassan; Saeidian, Amir Hossein; Sotoudeh, Soheila; Mahmoudi, Hamidreza; Daneshpazhooh, Maryam; Aghazadeh, Nessa; Adams, Rebecca; Ghanadan, Alireza; Zeinali, Sirous; Fortina, Paolo; Uitto, Jouni

    2017-11-01

    There are at least 38 mutant genes known to be associated with the ichthyosis phenotypes, and autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a specific subgroup caused by mutations in 13 different genes. Mutations in some of these genes, such as CERS3 with only two previous reports, are rare. In this study, we identified mutations in candidate genes in consanguineous families with ARCI with a next generation sequencing (NGS) array that incorporates 38 ichthyosis associated genes. We applied this sequencing array to DNA from 140 ichthyosis families with high prevalence of consanguinity. Among these patients we identified six distinct, previously unreported mutations in CERS3 in six Iranian families. These mutations in each family co-segregated with the ichthyosis phenotype. The patients demonstrated collodion membrane at birth, acrogeria, generalized scaling, and hyperlinearity of the palms and soles. The presence of a significant percentage of CERS3 mutations in our cohort depicts a marked difference between the etiology of ichthyoses in genetically poorly characterized regions and well-characterized western populations. Also, it shows that rare alleles are more prevalent in the gene pool of consanguineous populations and emphasizes the importance of these population studies for better understanding of ichthyosis pathogenesis.

  7. Type I Transglutaminase Accumulation in the Endoplasmic Reticulum May Be an Underlying Cause of Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haibing; Jans, Ralph; Xu, Wen; Rorke, Ellen A.; Lin, Chen-Yong; Chen, Ya-Wen; Fang, Shengyun; Zhong, Yongwang; Eckert, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Type I transglutaminase (TG1) is an enzyme that is responsible for assembly of the keratinocyte cornified envelope. Although TG1 mutation is an underlying cause of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis, a debilitating skin disease, the pathogenic mechanism is not completely understood. In the present study we show that TG1 is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-associated protein that is trafficked through the ER for ultimate delivery to the plasma membrane. Mutation severely attenuates this processing and a catalytically inactive point mutant, TG1-FLAG(C377A), accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum and in aggresome-like structures where it is ubiquitinylated. This accumulation results from protein misfolding, as treatment with a chemical chaperone permits it to exit the endoplasmic reticulum and travel to the plasma membrane. ER accumulation is also observed for ichthyosis-associated TG1 mutants. Our findings suggest that misfolding of TG1 mutants leads to ubiquitinylation and accumulation in the ER and aggresomes, and that abnormal intracellular processing of TG1 mutants may be an underlying cause of ichthyosis. PMID:20663883

  8. Update on autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis: mRNA analysis using hair samples is a powerful tool for genetic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Akiyama, Masashi

    2015-07-01

    Research on the molecular genetics and pathomechanisms of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) has advanced considerably and several causative genes and molecules underlying the disease have been identified. Three major ARCI phenotypes are harlequin ichthyosis (HI), lamellar ichthyosis (LI), and congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE). Skin barrier defects are involved in the pathogenesis of ARCI. In this review, the causative genes of ARCI and its phenotypes as well as recent advances in the field are summarized. The known causative molecules underlying ARCI include ABCA12, TGM1, ALOXE3, ALOX12B, NIPAL4, CYP4F22, PNPLA1, CERS3, and LIPN. It is important to examine genetic associations and to elucidate the pathomechanisms of ARCI to establish effective therapies and beneficial genetic counseling. Next-generation sequencing is a promising method that enables the detection of causative disease mutations, even in cases of unexpected concomitant genetic diseases. For genetic diagnosis, obtaining mRNA from hair follicle epithelial cells, which are analogous to keratinocytes in the interfollicular epidermis, is convenient and minimally invasive in patients with ARCI. We confirmed that our mRNA analysis method using hair follicle samples can be applied not only to keratinization disorders, but also to other genetic diseases in the dermatology field. Studies that suggest potential next-generation therapies using ARCI model mice are also reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Localization of a gene for an autosomal recessive form of juvenile Parkinsonism to chromosome 6q25.2-27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumine, Hiroto; Shimoda-Matsubayashi, Satoe; Nakagawa-Hattori, Yuko [Tokyo Metropolitan Ebara Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    An autosomal recessive form of juvenile Parkinsonism (AR-JP) (MIM 600116) is a levodopa-responsive Parkinsonism whose pathological finding is a highly selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the zona compacta of the substantia nigra. By linkage analysis of diallelic polymorphism of the Mn-superoxide dismutase gene (SOD2), we found a family with AR-JP showing perfect segregation of the disease with the SOD2 locus. By extending the linkage analysis to 13 families with AR-JP, we discovered strong evidence for the localization of the AR-JP gene at chromosome 6q25.2-27, including the SOD2 locus, with the maximal cumulative pairwise LOD scores of 7.26 and 7.71 at D6S305 ({theta} = .03) and D6S253 ({theta} = .02), respectively. Observation of obligate recombination events, as well as multipoint linkage analysis, placed the AR-JP gene in a 17-cM interval between D6S437 and D6S264. Delineation of the AR-JP gene will be an important step toward our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying selective degeneration of the nigral neurons. 38 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Unraveling the genetic landscape of autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies using a homozygosity mapping approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimoń, Magdalena; Battaloǧlu, Esra; Parman, Yesim; Erdem, Sevim; Baets, Jonathan; De Vriendt, Els; Atkinson, Derek; Almeida-Souza, Leonardo; Deconinck, Tine; Ozes, Burcak; Goossens, Dirk; Cirak, Sebahattin; Van Damme, Philip; Shboul, Mohammad; Voit, Thomas; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Dan, Bernard; El-Khateeb, Mohammed S.; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Lopez-Laso, Eduardo; Goemans, Nathalie; Masri, Amira; Züchner, Stephan; Timmerman, Vincent; Topaloǧlu, Haluk; De Jonghe, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (ARCMT) are rare but severe disorders of the peripheral nervous system. Their molecular basis is poorly understood due to the extensive genetic and clinical heterogeneity, posing considerable challenges for patients, physicians, and researchers. We report on the genetic findings from a systematic study of a large collection of 174 independent ARCMT families. Initial sequencing of the three most common ARCMT genes (ganglioside-induced differentiation protein 1—GDAP1, SH3 domain and tetratricopeptide repeats-containing protein 2—SH3TC2, histidine-triad nucleotide binding protein 1—HINT1) identified pathogenic mutations in 41 patients. Subsequently, 87 selected nuclear families underwent single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping and homozygosity mapping, followed by targeted screening of known ARCMT genes. This strategy provided molecular diagnosis to 22 % of the families. Altogether, our unbiased genetic approach identified pathogenic mutations in ten ARCMT genes in a total of 41.3 % patients. Apart from a newly described founder mutation in GDAP1, the majority of variants constitute private molecular defects. Since the gene testing was independent of the clinical phenotype of the patients, we identified mutations in patients with unusual or additional clinical features, extending the phenotypic spectrum of the SH3TC2 gene. Our study provides an overview of the ARCMT genetic landscape and proposes guidelines for tackling the genetic heterogeneity of this group of hereditary neuropathies. PMID:25231362

  11. Genetic Linkage Analysis of the DFNB21 Locus in Autosomal Recessive Hearing Loss in Large Families from Khuzestan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahtab Khosrofar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Hearing loss (HL is the most common congenital defect in humans. One or two in thousand newborn babies have prelingual hearing loss. Autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL is the most common form of hereditary deafness. Hearing loss is more common in the developing countries which is due to genetic and environmental (cultural -health factors reasons. HL has a wide range of clinical demonstrations including: congenital or late onset, conductive or sensory-neural, syndromic or non-syndromic hearing loss. The goal of this project is to determine the portion of the DFNB21 (TECTA in ARNSHL in families with negative GJB2 gene in Khuzestan province. Materials and Methods: We studied 21 families with ARNSHL with at least 4 patients and negative for GJB2 mutations from Khuzestan province. Genetic linkage analysis was performed using STR markers linked to DFNB21 locus. Results: Following genetic linkage analysis and haplotyping, out of 21 families with ARNSHL, one family showed linkage to the DFNB21 (TECTA locus. Conclusion: The results of this project confirm other studies in Iran and give insight into the most common loci causing ARNSHL in Iran which could be helpful in research and clinic.

  12. Investigating Seven Recently Identified Genes in 100 Iranian Families with Autosomal Recessive Non-syndromic Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reihaneh Alikhani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hearing loss (HL is the most common sensory disorder, and affects 1 in 1000 newborns. About 50% of HL is due to genetics and 70% of them are non-syndromic with a recessive pattern of inheritance. Up to now, more than 50 genes have been detected which are responsible for autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss, (ARNSHL. In  Iran, HL is one of the most common disabilities due to consanguineous marriages. The aim was to investigate the prevalence of three new ARHL genes (GJB4, GJC3, and SLITRK6 reported in neighboring countries among Iranian families with ARNSHL. Methods: One hundred unrelated families with at least two affected siblings in consanguineous marriage, who were negative for GJB2 gene mutations, were selected. By using three STR markers for each gene, homozygosity mapping was performed. Results: Two families showed linkage to GJB4, six families were linked to GJC3 and only one family linked to SLITRK6. The samples of these families who showed linkage were sent for Sanger sequencing to detect the causative mutations. However, after analyzing the sequencing results, no mutation could be detected in either of the families. Molecular analysis for these nine families is underway in order to determine the pathogenic mutations using whole exome sequencing. Discussion: These data demonstrate a very low prevalence of mutation in these three genes (GJB4, GJC3, and SLITRK6 in the Iranian population, since no mutation was detected in our study group of 100 families.

  13. COL9A2 and COL9A3 mutations in canine autosomal recessive Oculo-skeletal Dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Orly; Guyon, Richard; Kukekova, Anna; Pearce-Kelling, Sue; Johnson, Jennifer; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Acland, Gregory M.

    2010-01-01

    Oculo-skeletal dysplasia segregates in two canine breeds, the Labrador retriever and samoyed, in which the causative loci have been termed drd1 and drd2, respectively. Affected dogs exhibit short-limbed dwarfism together with severe ocular defects, and this phenotype is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait in both breeds. The clinical and pathological appearance resembles human hereditary arthro-ophthalmopathies such as Stickler syndrome, or Marshall Syndrome, although these human disorders are usually dominant. Linkage studies in drd1-informative pedigrees mapped the locus to canine chromosome 24, and led to the identification of an insertional mutation in exon 1 of the gene COL9A3 that cosegregates with the disease. The drd2 locus was similarly mapped to canine chromosome 15 and shown to cosegregate with a 1,267 bp deletion mutation in the 5′ end of COL9A2. Both mutations affect the COL3 domain of the respective gene. Northern analysis showed reduced RNA expression in affected retina compared to normal. These models offer potential for studies such as protein-protein interactions between different members of the collagen gene family; regulation and expression of these genes in retina and cartilage, and even opportunities for gene therapy. PMID:20686772

  14. Autosomal recessive POLR1D mutation with decrease of TCOF1 mRNA is responsible for Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Elise; Collet, Corinne; Genevieve, David; Vincent, Marie; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Sanchez, Elodie; Bolender, Chantal; Eliot, Marie-Madeleine; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Passos-Bueno, Maria-Rita; Wieczorek, Dagmar; van Maldergem, Lionel; Doray, Bérénice

    2014-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is a mandibulofacial dysostosis caused by mutations in genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and synthesis. TCOF1 mutations are observed in ~80% of the patients and are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Recently, two other genes have been reported in TCOF1, POLR1C, and POLR1D in two unrelated consanguineous families. The four affected children shared the same homozygous mutation in POLR1D (c.163C>G, p.Leu55Val). This mutation is localized in a region encoding the dimerization domain of the RNA polymerase. It is supposed that this mutation impairs RNA polymerase, resulting in a lower amount of mature dimeric ribosomes. A functional analysis of the transcripts of TCOF1 by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed in the first family, demonstrating a 50% reduction in the index case, compatible with this hypothesis. This is the first report of POLR1D mutation being responsible for an autosomal recessive inherited Treacher Collins syndrome. These results reinforce the concept of genetic heterogeneity of Treacher Collins syndrome and underline the importance of combining clinical expertise and familial molecular analyses for appropriate genetic counseling.

  15. Autosomal recessive posterior column ataxia with retinitis pigmentosa caused by novel mutations in the FLVCR1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaibani, Aziz; Wong, Lee-Jun; Wei Zhang, Victor; Lewis, Richard Alan; Shinawi, Marwan

    2015-01-01

    Posterior column ataxia with retinitis pigmentosa (PCARP) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe sensory ataxia, muscle weakness and atrophy, and progressive pigmentary retinopathy. Recently, mutations in the FLVCR1 gene were described in four families with this condition. We investigated the molecular basis and studied the phenotype of PCARP in a new family. The proband is a 33-year-old woman presented with sensory polyneuropathy and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The constellation of clinical findings with normal metabolic and genetic evaluation, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis and normal levels of phytanic acid and vitamin E, prompted us to seek other causes of our patient's condition. Sequencing of FLVCR1 in the proband and targeted mutation testing in her two affected siblings revealed two novel variants, c.1547G > A (p.R516Q) and c.1593+5_+8delGTAA predicted, respectively, to be highly conserved throughout evolution and affecting the normal splicing, therefore, deleterious. This study supports the pathogenic role of FLVCR1 in PCARP and expands the molecular and clinical spectra of PCARP. We show for the first time that nontransmembrane domain (TMD) mutations in the FLVCR1 can cause PCARP, suggesting different mechanisms for pathogenicity. Our clinical data reveal that impaired sensation can be part of the phenotypic spectrum of PCARP. This study along with previously reported cases suggests that targeted sequencing of the FLVCR1 gene should be considered in patients with severe sensory ataxia, RP, and peripheral sensory neuropathy.

  16. Distribution of skeletal muscle involvement in autosomal recessive distal muscular dystrophy. A clinical and computed tomographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nakanishi, Takao; Kobayashi, Fumie

    1987-02-01

    Distribution of skeletal muscle involvement in 5 cases with autosomal recessive distal muscular dystrophy was studied clinically and by computed tomography (CT). Manual muscle test showed muscle involvement with a predilection for flexors in the lower leg and adductors in the thigh. Flexion and extension of the thigh and the lower leg was impaired to similar degree. In progressed cases, neck flexors and trunk muscles were also affected mildly. CT disclosed more clearly the preferential involvement of flexors in the lower leg, and involvement of both hamstrings center dot adductors group and extensors group of the thigh to similar degree. However, m. popliteus was curiously well preserved. In addition, there was a stage showing high density and hypertrophy of m. sartorius, m. gracilis, m. adductor, m. biceps femoris, m. semimenbranosus, m. semitendinosus or m. rectus femoris, which in thought to be compensatory hypertrophy. M. gluteus minimus in the pelvic girdle and m. dorsi proprii in the trunk were also liable to be affected. The CT findings are regarded as characteristic features noted clearly before muscle weakness and atrophy become apparent clinically. CT is very useful for distinguishing distal muscular dystrophy from rimmed vacuolar distal myopathy in which m. quadriceps femoris and flexors of the lower leg are usually well preserved without compensatory hypertrophy on CT.

  17. Autosomal recessive agammaglobulinemia due to defect in μ heavy chain caused by a novel mutation in the IGHM gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P; Justicia, A; Regueiro, A; Fariña, S; Couselo, J M; Loidi, L

    2017-09-01

    Agammaglobulinemia is a primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized by profoundly low or absent serum antibodies and low or absent circulating B cells. The most common form is X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) caused by mutations in BTK gene. The remaining cases, clinically similar to XLA, are autosomal recessive agammaglobulinemia (ARA). Nearly 30% of ARA cases present mutations in the μ heavy constant region gene IGHM. Here, we present a 7-month-old patient, born from non-consanguineous parents, who is affected by ARA due to defect in the μ heavy chain. The genetic study showed that the patient is compound heterozygous for an IGHM gene deletion and the novel nonsense mutation X57331.1:g.275C>A (p.Tyr43*) (ClinVar Accession Number: SCV000537868.1). This finding allows for an adequate genetic counseling to the family and also broadens the spectrum of already described point mutations at this locus. The IGHM gene is very complex and it is likely that yet unidentified mutations appear in other patients.

  18. Mutations in the ABCA4 (ABCR) Gene Are the Major Cause of Autosomal Recessive Cone-Rod Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugeri, Alessandra; Klevering, B. Jeroen; Rohrschneider, Klaus; Blankenagel, Anita; Brunner, Han G.; Deutman, August F.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Cremers, Frans P. M.

    2000-01-01

    The photoreceptor cell–specific ATP-binding cassette transporter gene (ABCA4; previously denoted “ABCR”) is mutated in most patients with autosomal recessive (AR) Stargardt disease (STGD1) or fundus flavimaculatus (FFM). In addition, a few cases with AR retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and AR cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) have been found to have ABCA4 mutations. To evaluate the importance of the ABCA4 gene as a cause of AR CRD, we selected 5 patients with AR CRD and 15 patients with isolated CRD, all from Germany and The Netherlands . Single-strand conformation–polymorphism analysis and sequencing revealed 19 ABCA4 mutations in 13 (65%) of 20 patients. In six patients, mutations were identified in both ABCA4 alleles; in seven patients, mutations were detected in one allele. One complex ABCA4 allele (L541P;A1038V) was found exclusively in German patients with CRD; one patient carried this complex allele homozygously, and five others were compound heterozygous. These findings suggest that mutations in the ABCA4 gene are the major cause of AR CRD. A primary role of the ABCA4 gene in STGD1/FFM and AR CRD, together with the gene's involvement in an as-yet-unknown proportion of cases with AR RP, strengthens the idea that mutations in the ABCA4 gene could be the most frequent cause of inherited retinal dystrophy in humans. PMID:10958761

  19. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for a Chinese family with autosomal recessive Meckel-Gruber syndrome type 3 (MKS3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Lu

    Full Text Available Meckel-Gruber syndrome type 3 is an autosomal recessive genetic defect caused by mutations in TMEM67 gene. In our previous study, we have identified a homozygous TMEM67 mutation in a Chinese family exhibiting clinical characteristics of MKS3, which provided a ground for further PGD procedure. Here we report the development and the first clinical application of the PGD for this MKS3 family. Molecular analysis protocol for clinical PGD procedure was established using 50 single cells in pre-clinical set-up. After whole genomic amplification by multiple displacement amplification with the DNA from single cells, three techniques were applied simultaneously to increase the accuracy and reliability of genetic diagnosis in single blastomere, including real-time PCR with Taq Man-MGB probe, haplotype analysis with polymorphic STR markers and Sanger sequencing. In the clinical PGD cycle, nine embryos at cleavage-stage were biopsied and subjected to genetic diagnosis. Two embryos diagnosed as free of TMEM67 mutation were transferred and one achieving normal pregnancy. Non-invasive prenatal assessment of trisomy 13, 18 and 21 by multiplex DNA sequencing at 18 weeks' gestation excluded the aneuploidy of the analyzed chromosomes. A healthy boy was delivered by cesarean section at 39 weeks' gestation. DNA sequencing from his cord blood confirmed the result of genetic analysis in the PGD cycle. The protocol developed in this study was proved to be rapid and safe for the detection of monogenic mutations in clinical PGD cycle.

  20. Identification of FASTKD2 compound heterozygous mutations as the underlying cause of autosomal recessive MELAS-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Da Hye; Choi, Young-Chul; Nam, Da Eun; Choi, Sun Seong; Kim, Ji Won; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2017-07-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a condition that affects many parts of the body, particularly the brain and muscles. This study examined a Korean MELAS-like syndrome patient with seizure, stroke-like episode, and optic atrophy. Target sequencing of whole mtDNA and 73 nuclear genes identified compound heterozygous mutations p.R205X and p.L255P in the FASTKD2. Each of his unaffected parents has one of the two mutations, and both mutations were not found in 302 controls. FASTKD2 encodes a FAS-activated serine-threonine (FAST) kinase domain 2 which locates in the mitochondrial inner compartment. A FASTKD2 nonsense mutation was once reported as the cause of a recessive infantile mitochondrial encephalomyopathy. The present case showed relatively mild symptoms with a late onset age, compared to a previous patient with FASTKD2 mutation, implicating an inter-allelic clinical heterogeneity. Because this study is the second report of an autosomal recessive mitochondrial encephalomyopathy patient with a FASTKD2 mutation, it will extend the phenotypic spectrum of the FASTKD2 mutation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. An autosomal recessive leucoencephalopathy with ischemic stroke, dysmorphic syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa maps to chromosome 17q24.2-25.3

    OpenAIRE

    Bouhouche Ahmed; Benomar Ali; Errguig Leila; Lachhab Lamiae; Bouslam Naima; Aasfara Jehanne; Sefiani Sanaa; Chabraoui Layachi; El Fahime Elmostafa; El Quessar Abdeljalil; Jiddane Mohamed; Yahyaoui Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Single-gene disorders related to ischemic stroke seem to be an important cause of stroke in young patients without known risk factors. To identify new genes responsible of such diseases, we studied a consanguineous Moroccan family with three affected individuals displaying hereditary leucoencephalopathy with ischemic stroke, dysmorphic syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa that appears to segregate in autosomal recessive pattern. Methods All family members underwent neurologic...

  2. Loss of VPS13C Function in Autosomal-Recessive Parkinsonism Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Increases PINK1/Parkin-Dependent Mitophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Suzanne; Drouet, Valérie; Majounie, Elisa; Deramecourt, Vincent; Jacoupy, Maxime; Nicolas, Aude; Cormier-Dequaire, Florence; Hassoun, Sidi Mohamed; Pujol, Claire; Ciura, Sorana; Erpapazoglou, Zoi; Usenko, Tatiana; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Sahbatou, Mourad; Liebau, Stefan; Ding, Jinhui; Bilgic, Basar; Emre, Murat; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan; Guven, Gamze; Tison, François; Tranchant, Christine; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Krack, Paul; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Nalls, Michael A.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heutink, Peter; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W.; Gasser, Thomas; Durr, Alexandra; Deleuze, Jean-François; Tazir, Meriem; Destée, Alain; Lohmann, Ebba; Kabashi, Edor; Singleton, Andrew; Corti, Olga; Brice, Alexis; Lesage, Suzanne; Tison, François; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Agid, Yves; Anheim, Mathieu; Bonnet, Anne-Marie; Borg, Michel; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Damier, Philippe; Destée, Alain; Dürr, Alexandra; Durif, Franck; Krack, Paul; Klebe, Stephan; Lohmann, Ebba; Martinez, Maria; Pollak, Pierre; Rascol, Olivier; Tranchant, Christine; Vérin, Marc; Viallet, François; Brice, Alexis; Lesage, Suzanne; Majounie, Elisa; Tison, François; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Nalls, Michael A.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Dürr, Alexandra; Arepalli, Sampath; Barker, Roger A.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Berg, Daniela; Bettella, Francesco; Bhatia, Kailash; de Bie, Rob M.A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Bonin, Michael; Lesage, Suzanne; Tison, François; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Agid, Yves; Anheim, Mathieu; Bonnet, Anne-Marie; Borg, Michel; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Damier, Philippe; Destée, Alain; Dürr, Alexandra; Durif, Franck; Krack, Paul; Klebe, Stephan; Lohmann, Ebba; Martinez, Maria; Pollak, Pierre; Rascol, Olivier; Tranchant, Christine; Vérin, Marc; Bras, Jose M.; Brockmann, Kathrin; Brooks, Janet; Burn, David J.; Charlesworth, Gavin; Chen, Honglei; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Chong, Sean; Clarke, Carl E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Counsell, Carl; Damier, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean-François; Deloukas, Panos; Deuschl, Günther; Dexter, David T.; van Dijk, Karin D.; Dillman, Allissa; Dong, Jing; Durif, Frank; Edkins, Sarah; Escott-Price, Valentina; Evans, Jonathan R.; Foltynie, Thomas; Gao, Jianjun; Gardner, Michelle; Goate, Alison; Gray, Emma; Guerreiro, Rita; Harris, Clare; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Hofman, Albert; Hollenbeck, Albert; Holmans, Peter; Holton, Janice; Hu, Michèle; Huang, Xuemei; Huber, Heiko; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Illig, Thomas; Jónsson, Pálmi V.; Kilarski, Laura L.; Jansen, Iris E.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew; Lichtner, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Lopez, Grisel; Lorenz, Delia; Lubbe, Steven; Lungu, Codrin; Martinez, María; Mätzler, Walter; McNeill, Alisdair; Moorby, Catriona; Moore, Matthew; Morrison, Karen E.; Mudanohwo, Ese; O’Sullivan, Sean S.; Owen, Michael J.; Pearson, Justin; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Pétursson, Hjörvar; Plagnol, Vincent; Pollak, Pierre; Post, Bart; Potter, Simon; Ravina, Bernard; Revesz, Tamas; Riess, Olaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rizzu, Patrizia; Ryten, Mina; Saad, Mohamad; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Sawcer, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony; Scheffer, Hans; Schulte, Claudia; Sharma, Manu; Shaw, Karen; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Shoulson, Ira; Shulman, Joshua; Sidransky, Ellen; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Stefánsson, Kári; Stockton, Joanna D.; Strange, Amy; Talbot, Kevin; Tanner, Carlie M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Trabzuni, Daniah; Traynor, Bryan J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Velseboer, Daan; Walker, Robert; van de Warrenburg, Bart; Wickremaratchi, Mirdhu; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; Wurster, Isabel; Williams, Nigel; Morris, Huw R.; Heutink, Peter; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W.; Gasser, Thomas; Singleton, Andrew B.; Brice, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The genetic causes of approximately 50% of autosomal-recessive early-onset forms of Parkinson disease (PD) remain to be elucidated. Homozygozity mapping and exome sequencing in 62 isolated individuals with early-onset parkinsonism and confirmed consanguinity followed by data mining in the exomes of 1,348 PD-affected individuals identified, in three isolated subjects, homozygous or compound heterozygous truncating mutations in vacuolar protein sorting 13C (VPS13C). VPS13C mutations are associated with a distinct form of early-onset parkinsonism characterized by rapid and severe disease progression and early cognitive decline; the pathological features were striking and reminiscent of diffuse Lewy body disease. In cell models, VPS13C partly localized to the outer membrane of mitochondria. Silencing of VPS13C was associated with lower mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial fragmentation, increased respiration rates, exacerbated PINK1/Parkin-dependent mitophagy, and transcriptional upregulation of PARK2 in response to mitochondrial damage. This work suggests that loss of function of VPS13C is a cause of autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism with a distinctive phenotype of rapid and severe progression. PMID:26942284

  3. Diagnostic exome sequencing for patients with a family history of consanguinity: over 38% of positive results are not autosomal recessive pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powis, Zöe; Farwell, Kelly D; Alamillo, Christina L; Tang, Sha

    2016-02-01

    Diagnostic exome sequencing (DES) is an effective tool for diagnosis in intractable cases where the underlying cause is thought be genetic. It is commonly assumed that patients with a family history of consanguinity will have increased detection rates for rare autosomal recessive Mendelian disorders through DES. Herein, we analyzed the diagnostic yield and relevant inheritance patterns within the DES cases with a reported consanguineous family history. Of the first 500 unselected cases referred for DES, 40 (8.0%) had a known consanguineous family history. Among the 40 cases, 13 (32.5%) received a definitive molecular diagnosis through DES and such positive rate is similar to that of families with no reported consanguinity (139/460, 30.2%, P=0.63). Although homozygous alterations likely related to consanguinity have been identified in eight positive cases, the other five (38.4%) causative mutations were unrelated to autosomal recessive inheritance. Our retrospective analysis demonstrated that individuals with known consanguinity were not more likely to have a positive DES result and a significant portion of the positive findings were not within an autosomal recessive gene. These results highlight that all applicable inheritance patterns should be considered for patients with a known family history of consanguinity.

  4. Prevalence of GJB2 Mutations in Affected Individuals from United Arab Emirates with Autosomal Recessive Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlili, Abdelaziz; Al Mutery, Abdullah; Kamal Eddine Ahmad Mohamed, Walaa; Mahfood, Mona; Hadj Kacem, Hassen

    2017-11-01

    Mutations in the gap junction protein beta 2 (GJB2) gene are responsible for more cases of nonsyndromic recessive hearing loss than any other gene. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of GJB2 mutations among affected individuals from United Arab Emirates (UAE). There were 50 individuals diagnosed with hereditary hearing loss and 120 healthy individuals enrolled in the study. The Sanger sequencing method was used to screen the GJB2 coding region in all affected individuals. The c.-1G>A variant was determined by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method in normal individuals. Nine cases with bi-allelic mutations and three cases with mono-allelic mutations were detected in 12 out of 50 patients (24%). The homozygous mutation c.35delG was identified as the cause of hearing loss in six participants (12%). The mutation c.506G>A was identified in three affected individuals (6%). The allelic frequency (14%) and low percentage of individuals that were homozygous (2%) for the c.35delG mutation suggest that there are other genes responsible for nonsyndromic deafness in the UAE population. The results reported here are a preliminary step in collecting epidemiological data regarding autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss related to GJB2 gene mutations among the UAE population. The c.35delG mutation of the GJB2 gene is the most frequently seen causative mutation in the UAE and is followed by the p.Cys169Tyr mutation.

  5. Mutations in SDR9C7 gene encoding an enzyme for vitamin A metabolism underlie autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigehara, Yohya; Okuda, Shujiro; Nemer, Georges; Chedraoui, Adele; Hayashi, Ryota; Bitar, Fadi; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Abbas, Ossama; Daou, Laetitia; Abe, Riichiro; Sleiman, Maria Bou; Kibbi, Abdul Ghani; Kurban, Mazen; Shimomura, Yutaka

    2016-10-15

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a heterogeneous group of hereditary skin disorder characterized by an aberrant cornification of the epidermis. ARCI is classified into a total of 11 subtypes (ARCI1-ARCI11) based on their causative genes or loci. Of these, the causative gene for only ARCI7 has not been identified, while it was previously mapped on chromosome 12p11.2-q13.1. In this study, we performed genetic analyses for three Lebanese families with ARCI, and successfully determined the linkage interval to 9.47 Mb region on chromosome 12q13.13-q14.1, which was unexpectedly outside of the ARCI7 locus. Whole-exome sequencing and the subsequent Sanger sequencing led to the identification of missense mutations in short chain dehydrogenase/reductase family 9C, member 7 (SDR9C7) gene on chromosome 12q13.3, i.e. two families shared an identical homozygous mutation c.599T > C (p.Ile200Thr) and one family had another homozygous mutation c.214C > T (p.Arg72Trp). In cultured cells, expression of both the mutant SDR9C7 proteins was markedly reduced as compared to wild-type protein, suggesting that the mutations severely affected a stability of the protein. In normal human skin, the SDR9C7 was abundantly expressed in granular and cornified layers of the epidermis. By contrast, in a patient’s skin, its expression in the cornified layer was significantly decreased. It has previously been reported that SDR9C7 is an enzyme to convert retinal into retinol. Therefore, our study not only adds a new gene responsible for ARCI, but also further suggests a potential role of vitamin A metabolism in terminal differentiation of the epidermis in humans.

  6. Homozygosity Mapping Reveals Mutations of GRXCR1 as a Cause of Autosomal-Recessive Nonsyndromic Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraders, Margit; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Oostrik, Jaap; Huygen, Patrick L.M.; Ali, Ghazanfar; Hoefsloot, Lies H.; Veltman, Joris A.; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Basit, Sulman; Ansar, Muhammad; Cremers, Cor W.R.J.; Kunst, Henricus P.M.; Ahmad, Wasim; Admiraal, Ronald J.C.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Kremer, Hannie

    2010-01-01

    We identified overlapping homozygous regions within the DFNB25 locus in two Dutch and ten Pakistani families with sensorineural autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (arNSHI). Only one of the families, W98-053, was not consanguineous, and its sibship pointed toward a reduced critical region of 0.9 Mb. This region contained the GRXCR1 gene, and the orthologous mouse gene was described to be mutated in the pirouette (pi) mutant with resulting hearing loss and circling behavior. Sequence analysis of the GRXCR1 gene in hearing-impaired family members revealed splice-site mutations in two Dutch families and a missense and nonsense mutation, respectively, in two Pakistani families. The splice-site mutations are predicted to cause frameshifts and premature stop codons. In family W98-053, this could be confirmed by cDNA analysis. GRXCR1 is predicted to contain a GRX-like domain. GRX domains are involved in reversible S-glutathionylation of proteins and thereby in the modulation of activity and/or localization of these proteins. The missense mutation is located in this domain, whereas the nonsense and splice-site mutations may result in complete or partial absence of the GRX-like domain or of the complete protein. Hearing loss in patients with GRXCR1 mutations is congenital and is moderate to profound. Progression of the hearing loss was observed in family W98-053. Vestibular dysfunction was observed in some but not all affected individuals. Quantitative analysis of GRXCR1 transcripts in fetal and adult human tissues revealed a preferential expression of the gene in fetal cochlea, which may explain the nonsyndromic nature of the hearing impairment. PMID:20137778

  7. Two sisters with clinical diagnosis of Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome: Is the condition in the family autosomal recessive?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondoh, T.; Hayashi, K.; Matsumoto, T. [Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)] [and others

    1995-10-09

    We report two sisters in a family representing manifestations of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), an X-linked immunodeficiency disorder. An elder sister had suffered from recurrent infections, small thrombocytopenic petechiae, purpura, and eczema for 7 years. The younger sister had the same manifestations as the elder sister`s for a 2-year period, and died of intracranial bleeding at age 2 years. All the laboratory data of the two patients were compatible with WAS, although they were females. Sialophorin analysis with the selective radioactive labeling method of this protein revealed that in the elder sister a 115-KD band that should be specific for sialophorin was reduced in quantity, and instead an additional 135-KD fragment was present as a main band. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of the sialophorin gene and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the PCR product demonstrated that there were no detectable size-change nor electrophoretic mobility change in the DNA from both patients. The results indicated that their sialophorin gene structure might be normal. Studies on the mother-daughter transmission of X chromosome using a pERT84-MaeIII polymorphic marker mapped at Xp21 and HPRT gene polymorphism at Xq26 suggested that each sister had inherited a different X chromosome from the mother. Two explanations are plausible for the occurrence of the WAS in our patients: the WAS in the patients is attributable to an autosomal gene mutation which may regulate the sialophorin gene expression through the WAS gene, or, alternatively, the condition in this family is an autosomal recessive disorder separated etiologically from the X-linked WAS. 17 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Canine disorder mirrors human disease: exonic deletion in HES7 causes autosomal recessive spondylocostal dysostosis in miniature Schnauzer dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cali E Willet

    Full Text Available Spondylocostal dysostosis is a congenital disorder of the axial skeleton documented in human families from diverse racial backgrounds. The condition is characterised by truncal shortening, extensive hemivertebrae and rib anomalies including malalignment, fusion and reduction in number. Mutations in the Notch signalling pathway genes DLL3, MESP2, LFNG, HES7 and TBX6 have been associated with this defect. In this study, spondylocostal dysostosis in an outbred family of miniature schnauzer dogs is described. Computed tomography demonstrated that the condition mirrors the skeletal defects observed in human cases, but unlike most human cases, the affected dogs were stillborn or died shortly after birth. Through gene mapping and whole genome sequencing, we identified a single-base deletion in the coding region of HES7. The frameshift mutation causes loss of functional domains essential for the oscillatory transcriptional autorepression of HES7 during somitogenesis. A restriction fragment length polymorphism test was applied within the immediate family and supported a highly penetrant autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. The mutation was not observed in wider testing of 117 randomly sampled adult miniature schnauzer and six adult standard schnauzer dogs; providing a significance of association of Praw = 4.759e-36 (genome-wide significant. Despite this apparently low frequency in the Australian population, the allele may be globally distributed based on its presence in two unrelated sires from geographically distant locations. While isolated hemivertebrae have been observed in a small number of other dog breeds, this is the first clinical and genetic diagnosis of spontaneously occurring spondylocostal dysostosis in a non-human mammal and offers an excellent model in which to study this devastating human disorder. The genetic test can be utilized by dog breeders to select away from the disease and avoid unnecessary neonatal losses.

  9. Canine disorder mirrors human disease: exonic deletion in HES7 causes autosomal recessive spondylocostal dysostosis in miniature Schnauzer dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willet, Cali E; Makara, Mariano; Reppas, George; Tsoukalas, George; Malik, Richard; Haase, Bianca; Wade, Claire M

    2015-01-01

    Spondylocostal dysostosis is a congenital disorder of the axial skeleton documented in human families from diverse racial backgrounds. The condition is characterised by truncal shortening, extensive hemivertebrae and rib anomalies including malalignment, fusion and reduction in number. Mutations in the Notch signalling pathway genes DLL3, MESP2, LFNG, HES7 and TBX6 have been associated with this defect. In this study, spondylocostal dysostosis in an outbred family of miniature schnauzer dogs is described. Computed tomography demonstrated that the condition mirrors the skeletal defects observed in human cases, but unlike most human cases, the affected dogs were stillborn or died shortly after birth. Through gene mapping and whole genome sequencing, we identified a single-base deletion in the coding region of HES7. The frameshift mutation causes loss of functional domains essential for the oscillatory transcriptional autorepression of HES7 during somitogenesis. A restriction fragment length polymorphism test was applied within the immediate family and supported a highly penetrant autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. The mutation was not observed in wider testing of 117 randomly sampled adult miniature schnauzer and six adult standard schnauzer dogs; providing a significance of association of Praw = 4.759e-36 (genome-wide significant). Despite this apparently low frequency in the Australian population, the allele may be globally distributed based on its presence in two unrelated sires from geographically distant locations. While isolated hemivertebrae have been observed in a small number of other dog breeds, this is the first clinical and genetic diagnosis of spontaneously occurring spondylocostal dysostosis in a non-human mammal and offers an excellent model in which to study this devastating human disorder. The genetic test can be utilized by dog breeders to select away from the disease and avoid unnecessary neonatal losses.

  10. Disorders of fatty acid oxidation and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease-different clinical entities and comparable perinatal renal abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, Agnes; Mehler, Katrin; Gottschalk, Ingo; Vierzig, Anne; Eydam, Marcus; Hauke, Jan; Beck, Bodo B; Liebau, Max C; Ensenauer, Regina; Weber, Lutz T; Habbig, Sandra

    2017-05-01

    Differential diagnosis of prenatally detected hyperechogenic and enlarged kidneys can be challenging as there is a broad phenotypic overlap between several rare genetic and non-genetic disorders. Metabolic diseases are among the rarest underlying disorders, but they demand particular attention as their prognosis and postnatal management differ from those of other diseases. We report two cases of cystic, hyperechogenic and enlarged kidneys detected on prenatal ultrasound images, resulting in the suspected diagnosis of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD). Postnatal clinical course and work-up, however, revealed early, neonatal forms of disorders of fatty acid oxidation (DFAO) in both cases, namely, glutaric acidemia type II, based on identification of the novel, homozygous splice-site mutation c.1117-2A > G in the ETFDH gene, in one case and carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency in the other case. Review of pre- and postnatal sonographic findings resulted in the identification of some important differences that might help to differentiate DFAO from ARPKD. In DFAO, kidneys are enlarged to a milder degree than in ARPKD, and the cysts are located ubiquitously, including also in the cortex and the subcapsular area. Interestingly, recent studies have pointed to a switch in metabolic homeostasis, referred to as the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis), as one of the underlying mechanisms of cell proliferation and cyst formation in cystic kidney disease. DFAO are characterized by the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, resulting in aerobic glycolysis, and thus they do resemble the Warburg effect. We therefore speculate that this inhibition might be one of the pathomechanisms of renal hyperproliferation and cyst formation in DFAO analogous to the reported findings in ARPKD. Neonatal forms of DFAO can be differentially diagnosed in neonates with cystic or hyperechogenic kidneys and necessitate immediate biochemical work-up to provide early

  11. Identification of a novel mutation in the PRCD gene causing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in a Turkish family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pach, Johanna; Kohl, Susanne; Gekeler, Florian; Zobor, Ditta

    2013-01-01

    Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD) is a canine form of autosomal recessive photoreceptor degeneration and serves as an animal model for human retinitis pigmentosa (RP). To date, only two RP-causing mutations of the PRCD gene have been reported in humans. We found a novel mutation in PRCD (c.52C>T, p.R18X) in three siblings affected by RP and present detailed morphologic and functional parameters. A complete ophthalmological examination was performed including psychophysical tests (best-corrected visual acuity, Lanthony Panel D-15 color vision test, and visual field) and electrophysiology (ganzfeld and multifocal electroretinogram). Additionally, color and infrared fundus photography, autofluorescence, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography recordings were performed. Genomic DNA of the three affected individuals was analyzed with high-throughput sequencing for all RP-related genes in a diagnostic set-up. We identified a novel homozygous mutation in PRCD (c.52C>T, p.R18X) with diagnostic high-throughput panel sequencing. All three patients showed an advanced stage of retinitis pigmentosa with reduced visual acuity (mean: 20/80), small residual visual fields (mean for target III4e: 1134.35 deg²), and non-detectable electrophysiological responses. Myopia, posterior subcapsular cataract, bone spicule-like pigmentation, and attenuated arterioles were typical findings. Interestingly, bull's eye maculopathy due to patchy retinal pigment epithelium atrophy was also present in all patients. The mean central retinal thickness observed in optical coherence tomography was 148 µm. The identification of a third mutation in PRCD confirms its role in the pathogenesis of RP. Clinical findings were in line with the morphological changes observed in previous studies. Bull's eye maculopathy seems to be a hallmark of RP due to mutations in the PRCD gene.

  12. Autosomal Recessive Inheritance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to sight-saving treatments and plays a key role in reducing visual impairment and blindness. NEI Home Contact Us A-Z Site Map NEI on Social Media Information in Spanish (Información en español) Website, Social ...

  13. Congenital sensorineural deafness in Australian stumpy-tail cattle dogs is an autosomal recessive trait that maps to CFA10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Sommerlad

    2010-10-01

    speckling. Fine mapping was then performed on 45 of these 50 dogs and a further 48 dogs (n = 93. Sequencing candidate gene Sox10 in 6 hearing ASCD, 2 unilaterally deaf ASCD and 2 bilaterally deaf ASCD did not reveal any disease-associated mutations.Deafness in ASCD is an incompletely penetrant autosomal recessive inherited disease that maps to CFA10.

  14. Skeletal muscle, but not cardiovascular function, is altered in a mouse model of autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Wacker

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR is a heritable disorder characterized by hypophosphatemia, osteomalacia, and poor bone development. ARHR results from inactivating mutations in the DMP1 gene with the human phenotype being recapitulated in the Dmp1 null mouse model which displays elevated plasma fibroblast growth factor 23. While the bone phenotype has been well characterized, it is not known what effects ARHR may also have on skeletal, cardiac, or vascular smooth muscle function, which is critical to understand to treat patients suffering from this condition. In this study, the extensor digitorum longus (EDL- fast-twitch muscle, soleus (SOL- slow-twitch muscle, heart, and aorta were removed from Dmp1 null mice and ex-vivo functional tests were simultaneously performed in collaboration by three different laboratories. Dmp1 null EDL and SOL muscles produced less force than wildtype muscles after normalization for physiological cross sectional area of the muscles. Both EDL and SOL muscles from Dmp1 null mice also produced less force after the addition of caffeine (which releases calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum which may indicate problems in excitation contraction coupling in these mice. While the body weights of the Dmp1 null were smaller than wildtype, the heart weight to body weight ratio was higher. However, there were no differences in pathological hypertrophic gene expression compared to wildtype and maximal force of contraction was not different indicating that there may not be cardiac pathology under the tested conditions. We did observe a decrease in the rate of force development generated by cardiac muscle in the Dmp1 null which may be related to some of the deficits observed in skeletal muscle. There were no differences observed in aortic contractions induced by PGF2a or 5-HT or in endothelium-mediated acetylcholine-induced relaxations or endothelium-independent sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxations. In

  15. Two novel mutations in the EYS gene are possible major causes of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in the Japanese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiro Hosono

    Full Text Available Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is a highly heterogeneous genetic disease including autosomal recessive (ar, autosomal dominant (ad, and X-linked inheritance. Recently, arRP has been associated with mutations in EYS (Eyes shut homolog, which is a major causative gene for this disease. This study was conducted to determine the spectrum and frequency of EYS mutations in 100 Japanese arRP patients. To determine the prevalence of EYS mutations, all EYS exons were screened for mutations by polymerase chain reaction amplification, and sequence analysis was performed. We detected 67 sequence alterations in EYS, of which 21 were novel. Of these, 7 were very likely pathogenic mutations, 6 were possible pathogenic mutations, and 54 were predicted non-pathogenic sequence alterations. The minimum observed prevalence of distinct EYS mutations in our study was 18% (18/100, comprising 9 patients with 2 very likely pathogenic mutations and the remaining 9 with only one such mutation. Among these mutations, 2 novel truncating mutations, c.4957_4958insA (p.S1653KfsX2 and c.8868C>A (p.Y2956X, were identified in 16 patients and accounted for 57.1% (20/35 alleles of the mutated alleles. Although these 2 truncating mutations were not detected in Japanese patients with adRP or Leber's congenital amaurosis, we detected them in Korean arRP patients. Similar to Japanese arRP results, the c.4957_4958insA mutation was more frequently detected than the c.8868C>A mutation. The 18% estimated prevalence of very likely pathogenic mutations in our study suggests a major involvement of EYS in the pathogenesis of arRP in the Japanese population. Mutation spectrum of EYS in 100 Japanese patients, including 13 distinct very likely and possible pathogenic mutations, was largely different from the previously reported spectrum in patients from non-Asian populations. Screening for c.4957_4958insA and c.8868C>A mutations in the EYS gene may therefore be very effective for the genetic testing

  16. Genetic Linkage Analysis of DFNB2 Locus with Autosomal Recessive Hearing Loss in Families Negative for GJB2 Mutations in Khuzestan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Tahmasebi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Hearing loss is a common sensory impairment in humans which half of its causes are genetic reasons. Genetic hearing loss can be divided into the two types of syndromic and non-syndromic, which 80% of non-syndromic cases is Autosomal Recessive Non-Syndromic Hearing Loss. The aim of the present research is to determine the contribution of DFNB2 locus (MYO7A gene in causing an autosomal recessive hearing loss in the one group of the deaf families of Khuzestan province. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 26 families with autosomal recessive hearing loss (with 4 patients and negative for GJB2 mutations in Khuzestan province. 22 families suffered from ARNSHL and 4 families suffered from Usher syndrome. Linkage analysis was performed by using STR (Short Tandem Repeat markers related to DFNB2 locus. Each family’s genotype was determined by PCR-PAGE method. Furthermore, haplotypes drawing and LOD score calculations were performed. Results: From 26 families with hearing loss participating in this research, following genetic linkage analysis and haplotypes drawing, two families (7.7% of the families showed linkage to DFNB2 locus. One family (4.5% suffered from ARNSHL and another family suffered from Usher syndrome. Conclusion: The results of the present research show that the contribution of DFNB2 locus in causing hearing loss in the population of Khuzestan province was similar to other studies conducted in Iran and this locus with other important loci should be considered to check in the hearing loss panel.

  17. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing of a 12.5 Mb Homozygous Region Reveals ANO10 Mutations in Patients with Autosomal-Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Sascha; Hoischen, Alexander; Meijer, Rowdy P.P.; Gilissen, Christian; Neveling, Kornelia; Wieskamp, Nienke; de Brouwer, Arjan; Koenig, Michel; Anheim, Mathieu; Assoum, Mirna; Drouot, Nathalie; Todorovic, Slobodanka; Milic-Rasic, Vedrana; Lochmüller, Hanns; Stevanin, Giovanni; Goizet, Cyril; David, Albert; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Kremer, Berry; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.C.; Schijvenaars, Mascha M.V.A.P.; Heister, Angelien; Kwint, Michael; Arts, Peer; van der Wijst, Jenny; Veltman, Joris; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Scheffer, Hans; Knoers, Nine

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias comprise a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to their dominant counterparts, unraveling the molecular background of these ataxias has proven to be more complicated and the currently known mutations provide incomplete coverage for genotyping of patients. By combining SNP array-based linkage analysis and targeted resequencing of relevant sequences in the linkage interval with the use of next-generation sequencing technology, we identified a mutation in a gene and have shown its association with autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia. In a Dutch consanguineous family with three affected siblings a homozygous 12.5 Mb region on chromosome 3 was targeted by array-based sequence capture. Prioritization of all detected sequence variants led to four candidate genes, one of which contained a variant with a high base pair conservation score (phyloP score: 5.26). This variant was a leucine-to-arginine substitution in the DUF 590 domain of a 16K transmembrane protein, a putative calcium-activated chloride channel encoded by anoctamin 10 (ANO10). The analysis of ANO10 by Sanger sequencing revealed three additional mutations: a homozygous mutation (c.1150_1151del [p.Leu384fs]) in a Serbian family and a compound-heterozygous splice-site mutation (c.1476+1G>T) and a frameshift mutation (c.1604del [p.Leu535X]) in a French family. This illustrates the power of using initial homozygosity mapping with next-generation sequencing technology to identify genes involved in autosomal-recessive diseases. Moreover, identifying a putative calcium-dependent chloride channel involved in cerebellar ataxia adds another pathway to the list of pathophysiological mechanisms that may cause cerebellar ataxia. PMID:21092923

  18. Unmasking an autosomal recessive disorder by a deletion in the DiGeorge/Velo-cardio-facial chromosome region (DGCR) in 22q11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budarf, M.L.; Michaud, D.; Emanuel, B. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Unmasking an autosomal recessive disorder by constitutional hemizygosity is well documented for the embryonal tumors RB and WAGR, where the second hit is a somatic event. Few deletion-mediated recessive conditions have been reported in patients with germline mutations. The major platelet receptor for von Willebrand factor, Glycoprotein Ib (GpIb), is a complex of two plasma membrane glycoproteins, Ib{alpha} and Ib{beta}, covalently linked by disulfide bonds. Defects in this receptor have been associated with the rare congenital autosomal recessive bleeding disorder, Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS). BSS is characterized by prolonged bleeding times, thrombocytopenia and very large platelets. The GpIb{beta} gene has been cloned and we have mapped it within the DGCR. We have identified a patient with phenotypic features of both BSS and VCFS. The patient was referred for 22q11-deletion FISH studies because of a conventricular VSD and mild dysmorphia. FISH with the N25 DiGeorge cosmid demonstrated a deletion in 22q11.2. Western blot analysis of the patient`s platelet proteins demonstrates a complete absence of GpIb{beta}. We suggest that haploinsufficiency for the DGCR in this patient unmasks a mutation in the remaining GpIb{beta} allele, resulting in manifestations of BSS. This mechanism, haploinsufficiency coupled with a mutation of the {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} chromosome, might explain some of the phenotypic variability seen amongst patients with 22q11.2 microdeletions. These results further suggest that patients with contiguous gene deletion syndromes are at increased risk for autosomal recessive disorders and that they provide the opportunity to {open_quotes}map{close_quotes}disease loci.

  19. Autosomal recessive hyper IgM syndrome associated with activation-induced cytidine deaminase gene in three Turkish siblings presented with tuberculosis lymphadenitis - Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Akar, H Haluk; van der Burg, Mirjam; Unal, Ekrem

    2015-09-01

    The hyper-immunoglobulin M (HIGM) syndrome is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders characterized by recurrent infections, decreased serum levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA, and normal/increased serum levels of IgM. Herein, we describe three Turkish siblings with HIGM syndrome who had a homozygous missense mutation (c.70C>T, p.Arg24Trp) in the activation-induced cytidine deaminase gene which results in autosomal recessive HIGM syndrome. Two of the siblings, sibling 1 and sibling 3, presented with cervical deep abscess and cervical tuberculosis lymphadenitis, respectively.

  20. Autosomal-recessive posterior microphthalmos is caused by mutations in PRSS56, a gene encoding a trypsin-like serine protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gal, Andreas; Rau, Isabella; El Matri, Leila

    2011-01-01

    heterogeneity of the trait. Using RT-PCR, PRSS56 transcripts were detected in samples derived from the human adult retina, cornea, sclera, and optic nerve. The expression of the mouse ortholog could be first detected in the eye at E17 and was maintained into adulthood. The predicted PRSS56 protein is a 603......Posterior microphthalmos (MCOP) is a rare isolated developmental anomaly of the eye characterized by extreme hyperopia due to short axial length. The population of the Faroe Islands shows a high prevalence of an autosomal-recessive form (arMCOP) of the disease. Based on published linkage data, we...

  1. A novel c.5308_5311delGAGA mutation in Senataxin in a Cypriot family with an autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamba-Papanicolaou Eleni

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Senataxin (chromosome 9q34 was recently identified as the causative gene for an autosomal recessive form of Ataxia (ARCA, termed as Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia, type 2 (AOA2 and characterized by generalized incoordination, cerebellar atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, "oculomotor apraxia" and increased alpha-fetoprotein (AFP. Here, we report a novel Senataxin mutation in a Cypriot ARCA family. Methods We studied several Cypriot autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia (ARCA families for linkage to known ARCA gene loci. We linked one family (909 to the SETX locus on chromosome 9q34 and screened the proband for mutations by direct sequencing. Results Sequence analysis revealed a novel c.5308_5311delGAGA mutation in exon 11 of the SETX gene. The mutation has not been detected in 204 control chromosomes from the Cypriot population, the remaining Cypriot ARCA families and 37 Cypriot sporadic cerebellar ataxia patients. Conclusion We identified a novel SETX homozygous c.5308_5311delGAGA mutation that co-segregates with ARCA with cerebellar atrophy and raised AFP.

  2. Autosomal-recessive posterior microphthalmos is caused by mutations in PRSS56, a gene encoding a trypsin-like serine protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gal, Andreas; Rau, Isabella; El Matri, Leila

    2011-01-01

    heterogeneity of the trait. Using RT-PCR, PRSS56 transcripts were detected in samples derived from the human adult retina, cornea, sclera, and optic nerve. The expression of the mouse ortholog could be first detected in the eye at E17 and was maintained into adulthood. The predicted PRSS56 protein is a 603......Posterior microphthalmos (MCOP) is a rare isolated developmental anomaly of the eye characterized by extreme hyperopia due to short axial length. The population of the Faroe Islands shows a high prevalence of an autosomal-recessive form (arMCOP) of the disease. Based on published linkage data, we...... amino acid long secreted trypsin-like serine peptidase. The c.1066dupC is likely to result in a functional null allele, whereas the two point mutations predict the replacement of evolutionary conserved and functionally important residues. Molecular modeling of the p.Trp309Ser mutant suggests that both...

  3. Novel homozygous mutations in the EVC and EVC2 genes in two consanguineous families segregating autosomal recessive Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Abdul; Raza, Syed I; Ali, Salman; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is a rare developmental disorder characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails, teeth, oral and cardiac abnormalities. It is caused by biallelic mutations in the EVC or EVC2 gene, separated by 2.6 kb of genomic sequence on chromosome 4p16. In the present study, we have investigated two consanguineous families of Pakistani origin, segregating EVC in autosomal recessive manner. Linkage in the families was established to chromosome 4p16. Subsequently, sequence analysis identified a novel nonsense mutation (p.Trp234*) in exon 8 of the EVC2 gene and 15 bp duplication in exon 14 of the EVC gene in the two families. This further expands the mutations in the EVC or EVC2 genes resulting in the EVC syndrome.

  4. Autosomal-recessive posterior microphthalmos is caused by mutations in PRSS56, a gene encoding a trypsin-like serine protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gal, Andreas; Rau, Isabella; El Matri, Leila

    2011-01-01

    Posterior microphthalmos (MCOP) is a rare isolated developmental anomaly of the eye characterized by extreme hyperopia due to short axial length. The population of the Faroe Islands shows a high prevalence of an autosomal-recessive form (arMCOP) of the disease. Based on published linkage data, we...... refined the position of the disease locus (MCOP6) in an interval of 250 kb in chromosome 2q37.1 in two large Faroese families. We detected three different mutations in PRSS56. Patients of the Faroese families were either homozygous for c.926G>C (p.Trp309Ser) or compound heterozygous for c.926G>C and c.526...

  5. A Register-Based Study of Diseases With an Autosomal Recessive Origin in Small Children in Denmark According to Maternal Country of Origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlund, Anna; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Pedersen, Grete Skøtt

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Compared with children born of Danish mothers, the mortality of children, born and living in Denmark, is significantly increased in those with a mother from Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Somalia, and Turkey. Consanguinity has been suggested to account for part of this disparity. Since...... information on consanguinity is lacking, this suggestion is difficult to test. With an indirect approach, we addressed this question by comparing the risk of diseases with autosomal recessive inheritance in children born in Denmark of Danish-born women and of women born in these five countries, respectively...... ratios for the diseases in children of foreign-born women compared with children of Danish-born women. RESULTS: Compared with offspring of Danish-born women, the risk of a consanguinity-related disease was significantly increased in children of foreign-born women, although the absolute risk was low...

  6. Autosomal recessive spastic tetraplegia caused by AP4M1 and AP4B1 gene mutation: expansion of the facial and neuroimaging features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Bilguvar, Kaya; Koçer, Naci; Yalçınkaya, Cengiz; Çağlayan, Okay; Gül, Ece; Sahin, Sezgin; Çomu, Sinan; Günel, Murat

    2014-07-01

    Adaptor protein complex-4 (AP4) is a component of intracellular transportation of proteins, which is thought to have a unique role in neurons. Recently, mutations affecting all four subunits of AP4 (AP4M1, AP4E1, AP4S1, and AP4B1) have been found to cause similar autosomal recessive phenotype consisting of tetraplegic cerebral palsy and intellectual disability. The aim of this study was analyzing AP4 genes in three new families with this phenotype, and discussing their clinical findings with an emphasis on neuroimaging and facial features. Using homozygosity mapping followed by whole-exome sequencing, we identified two novel homozygous mutations in AP4M1 and a homozygous deletion in AP4B1 in three pairs of siblings. Spastic tetraplegia, microcephaly, severe intellectual disability, limited speech, and stereotypic laughter were common findings in our patients. All patients also had similar facial features consisting of coarse and hypotonic face, bitemporal narrowing, bulbous nose with broad nasal ridge, and short philtrum which were not described in patients with AP4M1 and AP4B1 mutations previously. The patients presented here and previously with AP4M1, AP4B1, and AP4E1 mutations shared brain abnormalities including asymmetrical ventriculomegaly, thin splenium of the corpus callosum, and reduced white matter volume. The patients also had hippocampal globoid formation and thin hippocampus. In conclusion, disorders due to mutations in AP4 complex have similar neurological, facial, and cranial imaging findings. Thus, these four genes encoding AP4 subunits should be screened in patients with autosomal recessive spastic tetraplegic cerebral palsy, severe intellectual disability, and stereotypic laughter, especially with the described facial and cranial MRI features. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Confirmation of linkage and refinement of the RP28 locus for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 2p14-p15 in an Indian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Shetty, Jyoti; Kumar, Bharath; Blanton, Susan Halloran

    2004-06-15

    To report the linkage analysis of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in an Indian family. Individuals were examined for symptoms of retinitis pigmentosa and their blood samples were withdrawn for genetic analysis. The disorder was tested for linkage to known 14 adRP and 22 arRP loci using microsatellite markers. Seventeen individuals including seven affecteds participated in the study. All affected individuals had typical RP. The age of onset of the disease ranged from 8-18 years. The disorder in this family segregated either as an autosomal recessive trait with pseudodominance or an autosomal dominant trait. Linkage to an autosomal recessive locus RP28 on chromosome 2p14-p15 was positive with a maximum two-point lod score of 3.96 at theta=0 for D2S380. All affected individuals were homozygous for alleles at D2S2320, D2S2397, D2S380, and D2S136. Recombination events placed the minimum critical region (MCR) for the RP28 gene in a 1.06 cM region between D2S2225 and D2S296. The present data confirmed linkage of arRP to the RP28 locus in a second Indian family. The RP28 locus was previously mapped to a 16 cM region between D2S1337 and D2S286 in a single Indian family. Haplotype analysis in this family has further narrowed the MCR for the RP28 locus to a 1.06 cM region between D2S2225 and D2S296. Of 15 genes reported in the MCR, 14 genes (KIAA0903, OTX1, MDH1, UGP2, VPS54, PELI1, HSPC159, FLJ20080, TRIP-Br2, SLC1A4, KIAA0582, RAB1A, ACTR2, and SPRED2) are either expressed in the eye or retina. Further study needs to be done to test which of these genes is mutated in patients with RP linked to the RP28 locus.

  8. Purkinje Cell Degeneration and Motor Coordination Deficits in a New Mouse Model of Autosomal Recessive Spastic Ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Ding

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS is an early-onset neurodegenerative disorder. In 2007, a novel locus, SAX2, which is located on chromosome 17p13 and contains 3 genes, ankyrin repeat and FYVE domain-containing 1 (ANKFY1, β-arrestin 2 (ARRB2 and kinesin family member 1C (KIF1C, was linked to ARSACS. We generated Ankfy1 heterozygous (Ankfy1/+ mice to establish an animal model and examine the pathophysiological basis of ARSACS. The transgenic mice displayed an abnormal gait with progressive motor and cerebellar nerve dysfunction that was highly reminiscent of ARSACS. These clinical features were accompanied by an early-onset and progressive loss of Purkinje cells, followed by gliosis. Additionally, the loss of Ankfy1 function resulted in an abnormal expression of neurotrophic factors (NTFs in the Ankfy1/+ mouse cerebellum. Moreover, Purkinje cells cultured from neonatal Ankfy1/+ mice exhibited a shorter dendritic length and decreased numbers of dendritic spines. Importantly, cerebellar Purkinje cells from Ankfy1/+ mice and cells transfected with a lentiviral Ankfy1 shRNA underwent apoptosis. We propose that transgenic Ankfy1/+ mice are a useful model for studying the pathogenesis of ARSACS and for exploring the molecular mechanisms involved in this neurodegenerative disease.

  9. Paris-Trousseau thrombocytopenia is phenocopied by the autosomal recessive inheritance of a DNA-binding domain mutation in FLI1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, William S; Rabbolini, David J; Beutler, Lucinda; Chen, Qiang; Gabrielli, Sara; Mackay, Joel P; Brighton, Timothy A; Ward, Christopher M; Morel-Kopp, Marie-Christine

    2015-10-22

    Hemizygous deletion of a variable region on chromosome 11q containing FLI1 causes an inherited platelet-related bleeding disorder in Paris-Trousseau thrombocytopenia and Jacobsen syndrome. These multisystem disorders are also characterized by heart anomalies, changes in facial structure, and intellectual disability. We have identified a consanguineous family with autosomal recessive inheritance of a bleeding disorder that mimics Paris-Trousseau thrombocytopenia but has no other features of the 11q23 deletion syndrome. Affected individuals in this family have moderate thrombocytopenia; absent collagen-induced platelet aggregation; and large, fused α-granules in 1% to 5% of circulating platelets. This phenotype was caused by a FLI1 homozygous c.970C>T-point mutation that predicts an arginine-to-tryptophan substitution in the conserved ETS DNA-binding domain of FLI1. This mutation caused a transcription defect at the promoter of known FLI1 target genes GP6, GP9, and ITGA2B, as measured by luciferase assay in HEK293 cells, and decreased the expression of these target proteins in affected members of the family as measured by Western blotting of platelet lysates. This kindred suggests abnormalities in FLI1 as causative of Paris-Trousseau thrombocytopenia and confirms the important role of FLI1 in normal platelet development. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Summary of mutations underlying autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses (ARCI) in Arabs with four novel mutations in ARCI-related genes from the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastaki, Fatma; Mohamed, Madiha; Nair, Pratibha; Saif, Fatima; Mustafa, Ethar M; Bizzari, Sami; Al-Ali, Mahmoud T; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak

    2017-05-01

    Clinical and molecular heterogeneity is a prominent characteristic of congenital ichthyoses, with the involvement of numerous causative loci. Mutations in these loci feature in autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses (ARCIs) quite variably, with certain genes/mutations being more frequently uncovered in particular populations. In this study, we used whole exome sequencing as well as direct Sanger sequencing to uncover four novel mutations in ARCI-related genes, which were found in families from the United Arab Emirates. In silico tools such as CADD and SIFT Indel were used to predict the functional consequences of these mutations. The here-presented mutations occurred in three genes (ALOX12B, TGM1, ABCA12), and these are a mixture of missense and indel variants with damaging functional consequences on their encoded proteins. This study presents an overview of the mutations that were found in ARCI-related genes in Arabs and discusses molecular and clinical details pertaining to the above-mentioned Emirati cases and their novel mutations with special emphasis on the resulting protein changes. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  11. Most mutations that cause spinocerebellar ataxia autosomal recessive type 16 (SCAR16) destabilize the protein quality-control E3 ligase CHIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanack, Adam J; Newsom, Oliver J; Scaglione, Kenneth Matthew

    2018-02-23

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins promotes protein aggregation and neuronal death in many neurodegenerative diseases. To counteract misfolded protein accumulation, neurons have pathways that recognize and refold or degrade aggregation-prone proteins. One U-box-containing E3 ligase, C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), plays a key role in this process, targeting misfolded proteins for proteasomal degradation. CHIP plays a protective role in mouse models of neurodegenerative disease, and in humans, mutations in CHIP cause spinocerebellar ataxia autosomal recessive type 16 (SCAR16), a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by truncal and limb ataxia that results in gait instability. Here, we systematically analyzed CHIP mutations that cause SCAR16 and found that most SCAR16 mutations destabilize CHIP. This destabilization caused mutation-specific defects in CHIP activity, including increased formation of soluble oligomers, decreased interactions with chaperones, diminished substrate ubiquitination, and reduced steady-state levels in cells. Consistent with decreased CHIP stability promoting its dysfunction in SCAR16, most mutant proteins recovered activity when the assays were performed below the mutants' melting temperature. Together, our results have uncovered the molecular basis of genetic defects in CHIP function that cause SCAR16. Our insights suggest that compounds that improve the thermostability of genetic CHIP variants may be beneficial for treating patients with SCAR16. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Clinical Application of Screening for GJB2 Mutations before Cochlear Implantation in a Heterogeneous Population with High Rate of Autosomal Recessive Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Motasaddi Zarandy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical application of mutation screening and its effect on the outcome of cochlear implantation is widely debated. We investigated the effect of mutations in GJB2 gene on the outcome of cochlear implantation in a population with a high rate of consanguineous marriage and autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss. Two hundred and one children with profound prelingual sensorineural hearing loss were included. Forty-six patients had 35delG in GJB2. Speech awareness thresholds (SATs and speech recognition thresholds (SRTs improved following implantation, but there was no difference in performance between patients with GJB2-related deafness versus control (all >0.10. Both groups had produced their first comprehensible words within the same period of time following implantation (2.27 months in GJB2-related deaf versus 2.62 months in controls, =0.22. Although our findings demonstrate the need to uncover unidentified genetic causes of hereditary deafness, they do not support the current policy for genetic screening before cochlear implantation, nor prove a prognostic value.

  13. Novel Mutations and Mutation Combinations ofTMPRSS3Cause Various Phenotypes in One Chinese Family with Autosomal Recessive Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xue; Yuan, Yong-Yi; Wang, Guo-Jian; Xu, Jin-Cao; Su, Yu; Lin, Xi; Dai, Pu

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hearing impairment with postlingual onset is rare. Exceptions are caused by mutations in the TMPRSS3 gene, which can lead to prelingual (DFNB10) as well as postlingual deafness (DFNB8). TMPRSS3 mutations can be classified as mild or severe, and the phenotype is dependent on the combination of TMPRSS3 mutations. The combination of two severe mutations leads to profound hearing impairment with a prelingual onset, whereas severe mutations in combination with milder TMPRSS3 mutations lead to a milder phenotype with postlingual onset. We characterized a Chinese family (number FH1523) with not only prelingual but also postlingual hearing impairment. Three mutations in TMPRSS3 , one novel mutation c.36delC [p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12)], and two previously reported pathogenic mutations, c.916G>A (p.Ala306Thr) and c.316C>T (p.Arg106Cys), were identified. Compound heterozygous mutations of p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12) and p.Ala306Thr manifest as prelingual, profound hearing impairment in the patient (IV: 1), whereas the combination of p.Arg106Cys and p.Ala306Thr manifests as postlingual, milder hearing impairment in the patient (II: 2, II: 3, II: 5), suggesting that p.Arg106Cys mutation has a milder effect than p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12). We concluded that different combinations of TMPRSS3 mutations led to different hearing impairment phenotypes (DFNB8/DFNB10) in this family.

  14. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessments of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) progression and response to therapy in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokwu, Bernadette O; Anderson, Christian E; Flask, Chris A; Dell, Katherine M

    2018-03-14

    Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease (ARPKD) is associated with significant mortality and morbidity and there are currently no disease-specific treatments available for ARPKD patients. One major limitation in establishing new therapies for ARPKD is a lack of sensitive measures of kidney disease progression. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can provide multiple quantitative assessments of disease. We applied quantitative image analysis of high resolution (non-contrast) T2-weighted MRI techniques to study cystic kidney disease progression and response to therapy in the PCK rat model of ARPKD. Serial imaging over a 2 month period demonstrated that renal cystic burden (RCB, %)=[total cyst volume (TCV)/total kidney volume (TKV) × 100], TCV and, to a lesser extent, TKV, detected cystic kidney disease progression as well as the therapeutic effect of octreotide, a clinically-available medication shown previously to slow both kidney and liver disease progression in this model. All 3 MRI measures correlated significantly with histologic measures of renal cystic area, although the correlation of RCB and TCV was stronger than that of TKV. These preclinical MRI results provide a basis for applying these quantitative MRI techniques in clinical studies, to stage and measure progression in human ARPKD kidney disease.Pediatric Research accepted article preview online, 14 March 2018. doi:10.1038/pr.2018.24.

  15. Similar clinical, pathological, and genetic features in Chinese patients with autosomal recessive and dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jun; Dai, Shixu; Lu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Rui; Wang, Zhaoxia; Yuan, Yun; Lv, He

    2017-08-01

    Mutations in the ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 1 gene (GDAP1) cause rare subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2K and CMT4A). CMT2K is an axonal neuropathy while CMT4A is a demyelinating type. In a series of 169 Chinese CMT patients (79 CMT1, 52 CMT2 and 38 unclassified), four unrelated patients (2.37%) were identified with GDAP1 mutations, including two with autosomal recessive CMT2K (AR-CMT2K) and two dominant CMT2K (AD-CMT2K). All patients had disease onset before 5 years of age, and presented with muscle weakness, atrophy, and mild sensory disturbance in distal limbs. Motor nerve conduction velocities of the median nerve were within normal ranges, and compound muscle action potential ranged from 1.5 to 3.8 mV. Sural nerve biopsy revealed loss of large myelinated fibers with regeneration clusters and a few onion bulbs. Electron microscopy showed mitochondrial aggregation in both axons and Schwann cells, and neurofilament accumulation in giant unmyelinated fibers. The p.H256R mutation was found in all patients with GDAP1 compound heterozygous mutations, suggesting that it might be a common mutation in Chinese patients. This study observed no difference in the disease onset, phenotype severity, electrophysiological findings, or pathological changes between AR-CMT2K and AD-CMT2K patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Beneficial effect of combined treatment with octreotide and pasireotide in PCK rats, an orthologous model of human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Kugita

    Full Text Available Increased intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP in renal tubular epithelia accelerates the progression of polycystic kidney disease (PKD. Thus, decreasing cAMP levels by an adenylyl cyclase inhibitory G protein activator is considered to be an effective approach in ameliorating PKD. In fact, pasireotide (PAS was effective in reducing disease progression in animal models of PKD. However, hyperglycemia caused by the administration of PAS is an adverse effect in its clinical use. Whereas, co-administration of octreotide (OCT with PAS did not increase serum glucose in normal rats. In the current study, we examined the efficacy of combined treatment with OCT and PAS in PCK rats, an autosomal recessive PKD model. Four-week-old PCK males were treated with the long-acting release type of OCT, PAS, or a combination of both (OCT/PAS for 12 weeks. After termination, serum and renal tissue were used for analyses. Kidney weight, kidney weight per body weight, renal cyst area, renal Ki67 expression, and serum urea nitrogen were significantly decreased either in the PAS or OCT/PAS group, compared with vehicle. Renal tissue cAMP content was significantly decreased by PAS or OCT/PAS treatment, but not OCT, compared with vehicle. As a marker of cellular mTOR signaling activity, renal phospho-S6 kinase expression was significantly decreased by OCT/PAS treatment compared with vehicle, OCT, or PAS. Serum glucose was significantly increased by PAS administration, whereas no difference was shown between vehicle and OCT/PAS, possibly because serum glucagon was decreased either by the treatment of OCT alone or co-application of OCT/PAS. In conclusion, since serum glucose levels are increased by the use of PAS, its combination with OCT may reduce the risk of hyperglycemia associated with PAS monotherapy against PKD progression.

  17. Interactions between FATP4 and ichthyin in epidermal lipid processing may provide clues to the pathogenesis of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Vahlquist, Anders; Törmä, Hans

    2013-03-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is caused by mutations in ≥10 different genes, of which transglutaminase-1 (TGM1) predominates. A rare form is ichthyosis prematurity syndrome (IPS) caused by mutations in SLC27A4 encoding fatty acid transporter protein 4 (FATP4), believed to be an acyl-CoA synthetase activating long- and very-long-chain FA. Another ARCI is caused by mutations in NIPAL4, coding for ichthyin, which is proposed to be a magnesium transporter or a trans-membrane receptor. A possible interaction between FATP4 and ichthyin has not been studied before. To find common denominators in the pathogenesis of ARCI. FATP4 and ichthyin were analyzed by immunofluorescence and proximity ligation assay (PLA) in healthy and ARCI patient skin and in in vitro models of ARCI epidermis. Both proteins were expressed in the upper stratum granulosum of normal epidermis and PLA confirmed a close interaction between FATP4 and ichthyin. In IPS skin lacking FATP4 we found reduced ichthyin expression and this finding could be reproduced in organotypic epidermis with siRNA silenced SLC27A4. In contrast, increased FATP4 staining was found in patients with ichthyin (NIPAL4) mutations and in organotypic epidermis with silenced NIPAL4. In patients with TGM1 mutations, the expression of both FATP4 and ichthyin was increased, but the PLA signal was low probably indicating a malfunctioning protein interaction. Our study suggests that FATP4, ichthyin and TGM1 interact in lipid processing essential for maintaining the epidermal barrier function. It is also hypothesized that ichthyin serves as Mg(2+)-transporter for FATP4 in this process. Copyright © 2012 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Autosomal recessive transmission of a rare KRT74 variant causes hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia: allelism with dominant woolly hair/hypotrichosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykova, Doroteya; Klar, Joakim; Azhar, Aysha; Khan, Tahir Naeem; Malik, Naveed Altaf; Iqbal, Muhammad; Tariq, Muhammad; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Dahl, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    Pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia (PHNED) comprises a heterogeneous group of rare heritable disorders characterized by brittle hair, hypotrichosis, onychodystrophy and micronychia. Autosomal recessive (AR) PHNED has previously been associated with mutations in either KRT85 or HOXC13 on chromosome 12p11.1-q14.3. We investigated a consanguineous Pakistani family with AR PHNED linked to the keratin gene cluster on 12p11.1 but without detectable mutations in KRT85 and HOXC13. Whole exome sequencing of affected individuals revealed homozygosity for a rare c.821T>C variant (p.Phe274Ser) in the KRT74 gene that segregates AR PHNED in the family. The transition alters the highly conserved Phe274 residue in the coil 1B domain required for long-range dimerization of keratins, suggesting that the mutation compromises the stability of intermediate filaments. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses confirmed a strong keratin-74 expression in the nail matrix, the nail bed and the hyponychium of mouse distal digits, as well as in normal human hair follicles. Furthermore, hair follicles and epidermis of an affected family member stained negative for Keratin-74 suggesting a loss of function mechanism mediated by the Phe274Ser substitution. Our observations show for the first time that homozygosity for a KRT74 missense variant may be associated with AR PHNED. Heterozygous KRT74 mutations have previously been associated with autosomal dominant woolly hair/hypotrichosis simplex (ADWH). Thus, our findings expand the phenotypic spectrum associated with KRT74 mutations and imply that a subtype of AR PHNED is allelic with ADWH.

  19. Autosomal recessive transmission of a rare KRT74 variant causes hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia: allelism with dominant woolly hair/hypotrichosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doroteya Raykova

    Full Text Available Pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia (PHNED comprises a heterogeneous group of rare heritable disorders characterized by brittle hair, hypotrichosis, onychodystrophy and micronychia. Autosomal recessive (AR PHNED has previously been associated with mutations in either KRT85 or HOXC13 on chromosome 12p11.1-q14.3. We investigated a consanguineous Pakistani family with AR PHNED linked to the keratin gene cluster on 12p11.1 but without detectable mutations in KRT85 and HOXC13. Whole exome sequencing of affected individuals revealed homozygosity for a rare c.821T>C variant (p.Phe274Ser in the KRT74 gene that segregates AR PHNED in the family. The transition alters the highly conserved Phe274 residue in the coil 1B domain required for long-range dimerization of keratins, suggesting that the mutation compromises the stability of intermediate filaments. Immunohistochemical (IHC analyses confirmed a strong keratin-74 expression in the nail matrix, the nail bed and the hyponychium of mouse distal digits, as well as in normal human hair follicles. Furthermore, hair follicles and epidermis of an affected family member stained negative for Keratin-74 suggesting a loss of function mechanism mediated by the Phe274Ser substitution. Our observations show for the first time that homozygosity for a KRT74 missense variant may be associated with AR PHNED. Heterozygous KRT74 mutations have previously been associated with autosomal dominant woolly hair/hypotrichosis simplex (ADWH. Thus, our findings expand the phenotypic spectrum associated with KRT74 mutations and imply that a subtype of AR PHNED is allelic with ADWH.

  20. An autosomal recessive leucoencephalopathy with ischemic stroke, dysmorphic syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa maps to chromosome 17q24.2-25.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouhouche Ahmed

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-gene disorders related to ischemic stroke seem to be an important cause of stroke in young patients without known risk factors. To identify new genes responsible of such diseases, we studied a consanguineous Moroccan family with three affected individuals displaying hereditary leucoencephalopathy with ischemic stroke, dysmorphic syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa that appears to segregate in autosomal recessive pattern. Methods All family members underwent neurological and radiological examinations. A genome wide search was conducted in this family using the ABI PRISM linkage mapping set version 2.5 from Applied Biosystems. Six candidate genes within the region linked to the disease were screened for mutations by direct sequencing. Results Evidence of linkage was obtained on chromosome 17q24.2-25.3. Analysis of recombination events and LOD score calculation suggests linkage of the responsible gene in a genetic interval of 11 Mb located between D17S789 and D17S1806 with a maximal multipoint LOD score of 2.90. Sequencing of seven candidate genes in this locus, ATP5H, FDXR, SLC25A19, MCT8, CYGB, KCNJ16 and GRIN2C, identified three missense mutations in the FDXR gene which were also found in a homozygous state in three healthy controls, suggesting that these variants are not disease-causing mutations in the family. Conclusion A novel locus for leucoencephalopathy with ischemic stroke, dysmorphic syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa has been mapped to chromosome 17q24.2-25.3 in a consanguineous Moroccan family.

  1. Autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss is caused by novel compound heterozygous mutations in TMC1 from a Tibetan Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fangzhu; Li, Dejun; Wang, Ping; Fan, Dongyan; De, Ji; Zhu, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder worldwide. Biallelic mutations in 42 different genes have been identified as associated with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL). One of the common genes responsible for ARNSHL is TMC1. TMC1 mutations have been reported to cause non-syndromic hearing loss in a variety of populations. The current study is designed to investigate mutations prevalent among Chinese ethnic groups with ARNSHL. Targeted exome sequencing (TES) was employed to study the genetic causes of two siblings with ARNSHL in a Tibetan Chinese family. Variants identified by TES were further confirmed by Sanger sequencing. We identified two distinct variants in the TMC1 gene in two deaf siblings of one Tibetan Chinese family using TES. Both siblings inherited a paternal allele containing a deletion of c.1396_1398AAC (p.Asn466del) and a maternal allele containing an insertion of c.2210_2211insCT (p.Glu737HisfsX2). The former disrupts a highly conserved residue in the large intracellular loop domain adjacent to the fourth transmembrane domain, and the latter causes a truncation of a portion of the C-terminal domain. These variants were compound heterzygous and segregated with the hearing impairment in this family. The novel compound heterozygous mutant alleles of TMC1 identified in this study were responsible for the ARNSHL in this Tibetan Chinese family. Although compound heterozygous mutations in TMC1 occurring in different TMC1 domains have been previously described in Han Chinese; this result suggests that the TMC1 variants contributing to hereditary deafness in Chinese populations may be more complex than initially assumed and that sequence-based diagnostics will be required for a comprehensive evaluation of ARNSHL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An Empirical Biomarker-Based Calculator for Cystic Index in a Model of Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease-The Nieto-Narayan Formula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake A Nieto

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD is associated with progressive enlargement of the kidneys fuelled by the formation and expansion of fluid-filled cysts. The disease is congenital and children that do not succumb to it during the neonatal period will, by age 10 years, more often than not, require nephrectomy+renal replacement therapy for management of both pain and renal insufficiency. Since increasing cystic index (CI; percent of kidney occupied by cysts drives both renal expansion and organ dysfunction, management of these patients, including decisions such as elective nephrectomy and prioritization on the transplant waitlist, could clearly benefit from serial determination of CI. So also, clinical trials in ARPKD evaluating the efficacy of novel drug candidates could benefit from serial determination of CI. Although ultrasound is currently the imaging modality of choice for diagnosis of ARPKD, its utilization for assessing disease progression is highly limited. Magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography, although more reliable for determination of CI, are expensive, time-consuming and somewhat impractical in the pediatric population. Using a well-established mammalian model of ARPKD, we undertook a big data-like analysis of minimally- or non-invasive blood and urine biomarkers of renal injury/dysfunction to derive a family of equations for estimating CI. We then applied a signal averaging protocol to distill these equations to a single empirical formula for calculation of CI. Such a formula will eventually find use in identifying and monitoring patients at high risk for progressing to end-stage renal disease and aid in the conduct of clinical trials.

  3. Aberrant Smad3 phosphoisoforms in cyst-lining epithelial cells in the cpk mouse, a model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Taketsugu; Nakanishi, Koichi; Sato, Masashi; Mukaiyama, Hironobu; Togawa, Hiroko; Shima, Yuko; Miyajima, Masayasu; Nozu, Kandai; Nagao, Shizuko; Takahashi, Hisahide; Sako, Mayumi; Iijima, Kazumoto; Yoshikawa, Norishige; Suzuki, Hiroyuki

    2017-12-01

    Cystic epithelia acquire mesenchymal-like features in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). In this phenotypic alteration, it is well known that transforming growth factor (TGF)-β/Smad3 signaling is involved; however, there is emerging new data on Smad3 phosphoisoforms: Smad3 phosphorylated at linker regions (pSmad3L), COOH-terminal regions (pSmad3C), and both (pSmad3L/C). pSmad3L/C has a pathological role in colorectal cancer. Mesenchymal phenotype-specific cell responses in the TGF-β/Smad3 pathway are implicated in carcinomas. In this study, we confirmed mesenchymal features and examined Smad3 phosphoisoforms in the cpk mouse, a model of autosomal recessive PKD. Kidney sections were stained with antibodies against mesenchymal markers and domain-specific phospho-Smad3. TGF-β, pSmad3L, pSmad3C, JNK, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4, and c-Myc were evaluated by Western blotting. Cophosphorylation of pSmad3L/C was assessed by immunoprecipitation. α-Smooth muscle actin, which indicates mesenchymal features, was expressed higher in cpk mice. pSmad3L expression was increased in cpk mice and was predominantly localized in the nuclei of tubular epithelial cells in cysts; however, pSmad3C was equally expressed in both cpk and control mice. Levels of pSmad3L, JNK, CDK4, and c-Myc protein in nuclei were significantly higher in cpk mice than in controls. Immunoprecipitation showed that Smad3 was cophosphorylated (pSmad3L/C) in cpk mice. Smad3 knockout/ cpk double-mutant mice revealed amelioration of cpk abnormalities. These findings suggest that upregulating c-Myc through the JNK/CDK4-dependent pSmad3L pathway may be key to the pathophysiology in cpk mice. In conclusion, a qualitative rather than a quantitative abnormality of the TGF-β/Smad3 pathway is involved in PKD and may be a target for disease-specific intervention. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Does anonymous sperm donation increase the risk for unions between relatives and the incidence of autosomal recessive diseases due to consanguinity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serre, Jean-Louis; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Bernheim, Alain; Fellous, Marc; Rouen, Alexandre; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre

    2014-03-01

    In France gamete donation and notably sperm donation are anonymous. It has been claimed that anonymous artificial insemination by donor (AID) could highly contribute to an increase in the level of consanguinity and the incidence of autosomal recessive diseases, due to the unions between offspring of anonymous donors, unaware of their biological kinship, with the special case of unions between half-siblings. The actual incidence of consanguinity due to AID was compared with that resulting from the two other main sources of consanguinity and recessive diseases, i.e. voluntary unions between related individuals or inadvertent unions between the offspring of a common unknown male ancestor (false paternity). From these data, we estimated that expected unions in France between half sibs per year are 0.12 between offspring of sperm donors (1.2 every 10 years) and 0.5 between offspring of common male ancestors through false paternity (5 every 10 years). More generally, the inadvertent unions between false paternity offspring are roughly four times more frequent than those resulting from anonymous AID. We estimated that in the future, when AID has been in practice for several generations, out the 820 000 annual births in France, respectively, 6 and 25 births will be consanguineous through an unknown common ancestor related to anonymous AID and to a false paternity, both of which are negligible when compared with the 1256 children born from first-degree cousins. About 672 children per year are born with a recessive genetic disease due to the panmictic risk and additional affected cases due to consanguinity would be 34.54 for first-cousin offspring, 0.33 for offspring of individuals related due to false paternity and 0.079 for offspring of individuals related due to anonymous AID. Anonymous AID would therefore be responsible for 0.46% of consanguineous births and for 0.01% of recessive diseases. Therefore, the effect of anonymous AID on half-sibling unions, consanguinity and

  5. The human intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin: molecular characterization and chromosomal mapping of the gene to 10p within the autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia (MGA1) region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozyraki, R; Kristiansen, M; Silahtaroglu, A

    1998-01-01

    -5445 on the short arm of chromosome 10. This is within the autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia (MGA1) 6-cM region harboring the unknown recessive-gene locus of juvenile megaloblastic anemia caused by intestinal malabsorption of cobalamin (Imerslund-Gräsbeck's disease). In conclusion, the present...... molecular and genetic information on human cubilin now provides circumstantial evidence that an impaired synthesis, processing, or ligand binding of cubilin is the molecular background of this hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia. Udgivelsesdato: 1998-May-15...

  6. Do consanguineous parents of a child affected by an autosomal recessive disease have more DNA identical-by-descent than similarly-related parents with healthy offspring? Design of a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Martina C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The offspring of consanguineous relations have an increased risk of congenital/genetic disorders and early mortality. Consanguineous couples and their offspring account for approximately 10% of the global population. The increased risk for congenital/genetic disorders is most marked for autosomal recessive disorders and depends on the degree of relatedness of the parents. For children of first cousins the increased risk is 2-4%. For individual couples, however, the extra risk can vary from zero to 25% or higher, with only a minority of these couples having an increased risk of at least 25%. It is currently not possible to differentiate between high-and low-risk couples. The quantity of DNA identical-by-descent between couples with the same degree of relatedness shows a remarkable variation. Here we hypothesize that consanguineous partners with children affected by an autosomal recessive disease have more DNA identical-by-descent than similarly-related partners who have only healthy children. The aim of the study is thus to establish whether the amount of DNA identical-by-descent in consanguineous parents of children with an autosomal recessive disease is indeed different from its proportion in consanguineous parents who have healthy children only. Methods/Design This project is designed as a case-control study. Cases are defined as consanguineous couples with one or more children with an autosomal recessive disorder and controls as consanguineous couples with at least three healthy children and no affected child. We aim to include 100 case couples and 100 control couples. Control couples are matched by restricting the search to the same family, clan or ethnic origin as the case couple. Genome-wide SNP arrays will be used to test our hypothesis. Discussion This study contains a new approach to risk assessment in consanguineous couples. There is no previous study on the amount of DNA identical-by-descent in consanguineous

  7. Inhibitory action of chlorophyllin of autosome recessive lethals induced by irradiation; Accion inhibidora de la clorofilina de letales recesivos autosonicos inducidos por irradiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salceda, V.M.; Pimentel, P.A.E.; Cruces, M.P. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: vmss@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    chlorophyllin on the damage caused by the radiation, it was into accothe presence of lethal and semi lethals autosomal. One observes this way that even without the use of the radiation the semi lethals frequency is diminished when the chlorophyllin is applied, in this case the decrease was significant and although there was decrease in the case of the irradiated group this it was not significant; in the case of the lethal ones it happened the opposite it was not significant in radiation absence on the contrary elevate the frequency of this type of genes, however, before the radiation and with pre-treatment with chlorophyllin this it reduced the frequency of autosomal recessive lethals significantly. This is important because in the case of bound recessive lethals recessive to the sex this doesn't happen. (Author)

  8. The first USH2A mutation analysis of Japanese autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa patients: a totally different mutation profile with the lack of frequent mutations found in Caucasian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Hosono, Katsuhiro; Suto, Kimiko; Ishigami, Chie; Arai, Yuuki; Hikoya, Akiko; Hirami, Yasuhiko; Ohtsubo, Masafumi; Ueno, Shinji; Terasaki, Hiroko; Sato, Miho; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Endo, Shiori; Mizuta, Kunihiro; Mineta, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Mineo; Takahashi, Masayo; Minoshima, Shinsei; Hotta, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a highly heterogeneous genetic disease. The USH2A gene, which accounts for approximately 74-90% of Usher syndrome type 2 (USH2) cases, is also one of the major autosomal recessive RP (arRP) causative genes among Caucasian populations. To identify disease-causing USH2A gene mutations in Japanese RP patients, all 73 exons were screened for mutations by direct sequencing. In total, 100 unrelated Japanese RP patients with no systemic manifestations were identified, excluding families with obvious autosomal dominant inheritance. Of these 100 patients, 82 were included in this present study after 18 RP patients with very likely pathogenic EYS (eyes shut homolog) mutations were excluded. The mutation analysis of the USH2A revealed five very likely pathogenic mutations in four patients. A patient had only one very likely pathogenic mutation and the others had two of them. Caucasian frequent mutations p.C759F in arRP and p.E767fs in USH2 were not found. All the four patients exhibited typical clinical features of RP. The observed prevalence of USH2A gene mutations was approximately 4% among Japanese arRP patients, and the profile of the USH2A gene mutations differed largely between Japanese patients and previously reported Caucasian populations.

  9. KCNQ1 mutations associated with Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome and autosomal recessive Romano-Ward syndrome in India-expanding the spectrum of long QT syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Bijal; Puri, Ratna D; Namboodiri, Narayanan; Nair, Mohan; Sharma, Deepak; Movva, Sireesha; Saxena, Renu; Bohora, Shomu; Aggarwal, Neeraj; Vora, Amit; Kumar, Jatinder; Singh, Tarandeep; Verma, Ishwar C

    2016-06-01

    Long QT syndrome type 1 (LQT1) is the most common type of all Long QT syndromes (LQTS) and occurs due to mutations in KCNQ1. Biallelic mutations with deafness is called Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS) and without deafness is autosomal recessive Romano-Ward syndrome (AR RWS). In this prospective study, we report biallelic mutations in KCNQ1 in Indian patients with LQT1 syndrome. Forty patients with a clinical diagnosis of LQT1 syndrome were referred for molecular testing. Of these, 18 were excluded from the analysis as they did not fulfill the inclusion criteria of broad T wave ECG pattern of the study. Direct sequencing of KCNQ1 was performed in 22 unrelated probands, parents and at-risk family members. Mutations were identified in 17 patients, of which seven had heterozygous mutations and were excluded in this analysis. Biallelic mutations were identified in 10 patients. Five of 10 patients did not have deafness and were categorized as AR RWS, the rest being JLNS. Eight mutations identified in this study have not been reported in the literature and predicted to be pathogenic by in silico analysis. We hypothesize that the homozygous biallelic mutations identified in 67% of families was due to endogamous marriages in the absence of consanguinity. This study presents biallelic gene mutations in KCNQ1 in Asian Indian patients with AR JLNS and RWS. It adds to the scant worldwide literature of mutation studies in AR RWS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Syndrome of short stature, microcephaly, mental retardation, and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia--Lowry-Wood syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, N C; Thomas, P S; Hutchinson, J

    1986-05-01

    We describe a brother and a sister with a syndrome of short stature, microcephaly, mental retardation, and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. The parents were normal. This appears to be the second example of the syndrome first described by Lowry and Wood [1975] in two boys who had epiphyseal dysplasia, short stature, microcephaly, and nystagmus; one of these patients was mildly mentally retarded. The Lowry-Wood syndrome probably is an autosomal recessive trait.

  11. Autosomal Recessive Myotonia Congenita, A Muscle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The muscle diseases are frequently encountered in medical clinics in Nigeria. In many cases however they are not optimally managed. The ion channel diseases, 'channelopathies', are a group of muscle disorders that share a lot of clinical similarity. Misdiagnosis can occur especially in resource poor settings ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive congenital methemoglobinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell types. Each hemoglobin molecule contains four iron atoms, which are needed to carry oxygen. In normal ... direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What is precision medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Obstructive sleep ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive hypotrichosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... color than expected and is fragile and easily broken. Affected individuals often cannot grow hair longer than ... leading to woolly, fragile hair that is easily broken. A lack of these proteins in the epidermis ...

  14. Aspectos clínicos da doença renal policística autossômica recessiva DRPAR Clinical aspects of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Favoretto Dias

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A Doença Renal Policística Autossômica Recessiva (DRPAR é uma causa importante de morbidade e mortalidade pediátricas, com um espectro variável de manifestações clínicas. MÉTODOS: A apresentação e evolução clínica de 25 pacientes (Pts foram analisadas através da revisão de prontuários, aplicando-se os formulários propostos por Guay-Woodford et al. As morbidades associadas à doença foram avaliadas quanto à frequência e à idade de manifestação. RESULTADOS: A idade média de diagnóstico foi de 61,45 meses (0 a 336,5 meses, com distribuição similar entre os sexos (52% dos pts do sexo feminino. Houve histórico familiar da doença em 20% dos casos (5/25, com dois casos de consanguinidade. Na análise inicial, diagnosticou-se hipertensão arterial (HAS em 56% dos Pts (14/25; doença renal crônica estágio > 2 (DRC > 2 em 24% (6/25; infecções do trato urinário (ITU em 40% (10/25 e hipertensão portal (HP em 32% dos casos (8/25. Das ultrassonografias abdominais iniciais, 80% demonstraram rins ecogênicos com cistos grosseiros e 64% detectaram fígado e vias biliares normais. Inibidores da ECA foram utilizados em 36% dos Pts, betabloqueadores em 20%, bloqueadores de canais de cálcio em 28% e diuréticos em 36% dos casos. Na análise final, após um tempo de acompanhamento médio de 152,2 meses (29,8 a 274,9 meses, HAS foi diagnosticada em 76% dos Pts, DRC > 2 em 44%, ITU em 52% e HP em 68%. CONCLUSÃO: As altas morbidade e mortalidade associadas à DRPAR justificam a construção de um banco de dados internacional, visando ao estabelecimento de um tratamento de suporte precoce.INTRODUCTION: Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease (ARPKD is an important pediatric cause of morbidity and mortality, with a variable clinical spectrum. METHODS: The clinical presentation and evolution of 25 patients (Pts were analyzed by clinical record review, according to the forms proposed by Guay-Woodford et al

  15. Clinical spectrum of early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes: an autosomal recessive ataxia not to be missed Espectro clínico da ataxia cerebelar de início precoce com reflexos mantidos: uma ataxia autossômica recessiva para não ser esquecida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Pedroso

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias are a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders. In 1981, a neurological entity comprised by early onset progressive cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, pyramidal weakness of the limbs and retained or increased upper limb reflexes and knee jerks was described. This disorder is known as early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes. In this article, we aimed to call attention for the diagnosis of early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes as the second most common cause of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias, after Friedreich ataxia, and also to perform a clinical spectrum study of this syndrome. In this data, 12 patients from different families met all clinical features for early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes. Dysarthria and cerebellar atrophy were the most common features in our sample. It is uncertain, however, whether early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes is a homogeneous disease or a group of phenotypically similar syndromes represented by different genetic entities. Further molecular studies are required to provide definitive answers to the questions that remain regarding early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes.As ataxias cerebelares autossômicas recessivas são um grupo heterogêneo de doenças neurológicas. Em 1981, foi descrita uma entidade neurológica incluindo ataxia cerebelar progressiva de início precoce, disartria, liberação piramidal e manutenção ou aumento dos reflexos tendíneos nos membros superiores e inferiores. Essa síndrome é conhecida como ataxia cerebelar de início precoce com reflexos mantidos. Neste artigo, o objetivo foi chamar a atenção para o diagnóstico de ataxia cerebelar de início precoce com reflexos mantidos como a segunda causa mais comum de ataxia cerebelar autossômica recessiva, após a ataxia de Friedreich, e também realizar um estudo do espectro cl

  16. Autosomal recessive ichthyosis with limb reduction defect: A simple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ichthyosis is a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous disease that can be isolated and restricted to the skin manifestations or associated with extracutaneous symptoms. One of which is limb reduction defect known as CHILD syndrome; a rare inborn error of metabolism of cholesterol biosynthesis that is usually ...

  17. Autosomal recessive ichthyosis with limb reduction defect: A simple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2015-10-01

    Oct 1, 2015 ... Our patient is a 13 year old girl, the first in birth order of first cousin parents, (Fig. 1). She was born at term by cesarean sec- tion of uncomplicated pregnancy. The patient was born in a yellow, tight and shiny sheath that started to desquamate after two to three weeks and replaced by rounded dark scaly ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Canada, but it has since been found in populations worldwide. Related Information What information about a genetic ... are involved in chemical signaling between nerve cells ( neurons ). SYNE1 gene mutations that cause ARCA1 result in ...

  19. A new variant of autosomal recessive exfoliative ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvulunov, A; Cagnano, E; Kachko, L; Shorer, Z; Elbedour, K; Stevens, H

    2002-01-01

    We report unusual congenital ichthyosiform dermatosis in 5 of 12 children in two related families of unaffected, consanguineous Bedouin parents. It appeared shortly after birth as a fine peeling of nonerythematous skin on palms and soles. Gradually it evolved into prominent, well-demarcated areas of peeling skin in moist and traumatized regions. The cutaneous manifestations share features of ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (IBS) and peeling skin syndrome (PSS). Histologic examination revealed orthokeratosis, a thickened granular cell layer, and spongiosis without epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. On electron microscopy there was prominent intercellular edema and numerous aggregates of keratin filaments in basal keratinocytes. This combination of clinical, histologic, and ultrastructural features has not been previously reported in the heterogeneous group of congenital ichthyoses. We suggest that it represents a new variant of exfoliative ichthyosis.

  20. Two novel mutations in ILDR1 gene cause autosomal recessive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of Iran's Ministry of Health and Medical Education, writ- ten consent forms were obtained from participants. Physical examination of the affected individuals suggested a nonsyn- dromic HL pattern; no thyroid, ocular or cardiac symptoms were observed. Pure tone audiometry with air and bone con- duction was completed at ...

  1. Two novel mutations in ILDR1 gene cause autosomal recessive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, for genetic diag- nosis. According to the guidelines of the Ethic Committee .... (b) Pure tone air and bone conduction audiograms from left (blue) and right (red) ears of an affected individual in each family. (c) Sequence chromatographs of the mutated part of the ILDR1 gene in ...

  2. X-Linked and Autosomal Recessive Alport Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savige, Judith; Storey, Helen; Il Cheong, Hae

    2016-01-01

    Alport syndrome results from mutations in the COL4A5 (X-linked) or COL4A3/COL4A4 (recessive) genes. This study examined 754 previously- unpublished variants in these genes from individuals referred for genetic testing in 12 accredited diagnostic laboratories worldwide, in addition to all published...... COL4A5, COL4A3 and COL4A4 variants in the LOVD databases. It also determined genotype-phenotype correlations for variants where clinical data were available. Individuals were referred for genetic testing where Alport syndrome was suspected clinically or on biopsy (renal failure, hearing loss...

  3. Subtotal amelia in a child with autosomal recessive hypohidrotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report an inbred Tunisian family, in which the proband manifested signs of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, subtotal amelia, scoliosis and left renal agenesis. Two other family members had the full clinical criteria of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, characterized by deficient sweat glands, hypodontia, hypoplasia of ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blindness (Canada) ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific Articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (6 links) ... SN, Husnain T, Jiao X, MacDonald IM, Riazuddin S, Sieving PA, Katsanis N, Hejtmancik JF. ... article on PubMed Central Zeitz C, Jacobson SG, Hamel ...

  5. A Case of Tyrosinemia Type III with Status Epilepticus and Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Reza; Mostofizadeh, Neda; Hashemipour, Mahin

    2018-01-01

    Tyrosinemia type III is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of 4- hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4-HPPD). It is characterized by elevated levels of blood tyrosine and massive excretion of its derivatives into the urine. Clinical findings of tyrosinemia type III include neurological symptoms and mental retardation. Only a few patients presenting with this disease have been described, and the clinical phenotype remains variable and unclear. We present a case, who was admitted to the hospital at the age of 4 months for recurrent seizures. Two months later, she was admitted again with status epilepticus. Laboratory data showed increased level of tyrosine in the blood. She was treated with a diet low in tyrosine and phenylalanine and anamix formula that leading to catch-up growth and improvement of her symptoms. Plasma tyrosine level dropped to normal values. In any child who presents with the neurologic symptom, some rare diagnosis like tyrosinemia type III should be considered.

  6. Disease: H01204 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H01204 Cerebellar ataxia, mental retardation (MR), and dysequilibrium syndrome (CA...MRQ) Cerebellar ataxia, mental retardation (MR), and dysequilibrium syndrome (CAMRQ) is autosomal recessive,... Mutations in VLDLR as a cause for autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia with mental retardation (dysequilibrium

  7. Opitz C syndrome: Trigonocephaly, mental retardation and craniofacial dysmorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Avina Fierro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 4-year-old female child with a dysmorphic and neurological syndrome of trigonocephaly, mental and psychomotor retardation and dysmorphic facial features. The anomalies of the face were the following: slight upward palpebral fissures, ocular hypertelorism, depressed nasal bridge, hypoplastic nasal root, short nose with anteverted nares; small low set ears, smooth broad philtrum and thin upper lip. The patient had important cerebral anomalies with diffuse alterations in white matter that caused developmental delay with verbal and nonverbal disabilities and severe learning difficulties. This clinical presentation is compatible with the diagnosis of the Opitz C syndrome, a heterogeneous disease of multiple neurological and craniofacial abnormalities. The physical sign more detectable and notorious is the trigonocephaly that is manifested by a prominent metopic suture, but also can be distinguished the other minor facial anomalies that are found in the eyes, nose, mouth and ears that constitute the phenotype of the disorder. The neurological development was altered by the compression of the cerebral frontal lobes with narrowing of this cerebral area, producing hypotonia with muscle weakness, epileptic episodes manifested by seizures, and neurobehavioral and neurocognitive disorders. This syndrome is a very rare genetic disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance trait; our patient had no chromosomal abnormality in the usual karyotype but the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technique showed a balanced translocation between the chromosomes two and eleven: t(2:11 (q32.2/q24.

  8. Genetic Causes of Mental Retardation in Bushehr Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Papari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: About 50% of severe to profound intellectual disabilities (ID are caused by genetic factors. In this study we decided to investigate the genetic causes of ID in 69 Bushehrian families to provide information for genetic counseling, carrier detection, and prenatal diagnosis. Materials & Methods: In this study we excluded known chromosomal abnormalities. The majority of families had more than two affected individuals. Karyotyping for each proband with physical malformations was performed. One affected member from each family was tested for FMR1 mutation and metabolic screening. Families with ID and primary microcephaly were checked for 7 known MCPH genes by linkage analysis. Results: Chromosomal abnormality was not found in any of the families. One family had full mutation of CGG repeat of Fragile-X syndrome. Six out of 18 families with MCPH showed linkage to one of the MCPH loci. One family had a syndrome associated with microcephaly. Two families with microcephaly and one family with a non-syndromic form of mental retardation without microcephaly showed an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Conclusion: According to our results genetic causes of ID are very heterogeneous and autosomal recessive primary microcephaly has an extremely high prevalence (26.09% in Bushehr province of Iran.

  9. Completeness of catalogs of autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Kate, L P

    1992-06-01

    The completeness of McKusick's catalogs of Mendelian Inheritance in Man (MIM) as to the number of phenotypes included was studied by estimating the degree of concordance with the Dutch Gene Catalog of the Department of Medical Genetics of the University of Groningen, The Netherlands. On a total of 355 Mendelian phenotypes described in persons living in The Netherlands or originating from this country, there were nine disease entities which were not present in MIM. As judged from this comparison MIM attains 97.5% completeness (95% CI: 95.3-98.7%). Similar comparisons with data from other countries are needed before a final conclusion can be reached. Corresponding contributors in different countries or linguistic areas might further improve MIM's completeness.

  10. COMPLETENESS OF CATALOGS OF AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT, AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE, AND X-LINKED PHENOTYPES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TENKATE, LP

    1992-01-01

    The completeness of McKusick's catalogs of Mendelian Inheritance in Man (MIM) as to the number of phenotypes included was studied by estimating the degree of concordance with the Dutch Gene Catalog of the Department of Medical Genetics of the University of Groningen, The Netherlands. On a total of

  11. Exome sequencing identifies truncating mutations in human SERPINF1 in autosomal-recessive osteogenesis imperfecta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, J.; Semler, O.; Gilissen, C.F.H.A.; Li, Y.; Bolz, H.J.; Giunta, C.; Bergmann, C.; Rohrbach, M.; Koerber, F.; Zimmermann, K.; Vries, P.F. de; Wirth, B.; Schoenau, E.; Wollnik, B.; Veltman, J.A.; Hoischen, A.; Netzer, C.

    2011-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by bone fragility and susceptibility to fractures after minimal trauma. After mutations in all known OI genes had been excluded by Sanger sequencing, we applied next-generation sequencing to analyze the exome of a single

  12. Exome sequencing identifies truncating mutations in human SERPINF1 in autosomal-recessive osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jutta; Semler, Oliver; Gilissen, Christian; Li, Yun; Bolz, Hanno Jörn; Giunta, Cecilia; Bergmann, Carsten; Rohrbach, Marianne; Koerber, Friederike; Zimmermann, Katharina; de Vries, Petra; Wirth, Brunhilde; Schoenau, Eckhard; Wollnik, Bernd; Veltman, Joris A; Hoischen, Alexander; Netzer, Christian

    2011-03-11

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by bone fragility and susceptibility to fractures after minimal trauma. After mutations in all known OI genes had been excluded by Sanger sequencing, we applied next-generation sequencing to analyze the exome of a single individual who has a severe form of the disease and whose parents are second cousins. A total of 26,922 variations from the human reference genome sequence were subjected to several filtering steps. In addition, we extracted the genotypes of all dbSNP130-annotated SNPs from the exome sequencing data and used these 299,494 genotypes as markers for the genome-wide identification of homozygous regions. A single homozygous truncating mutation, affecting SERPINF1 on chromosome 17p13.3, that was embedded into a homozygous stretch of 2.99 Mb remained. The mutation was also homozygous in the affected brother of the index patient. Subsequently, we identified homozygosity for two different truncating SERPINF1 mutations in two unrelated patients with OI and parental consanguinity. All four individuals with SERPINF1 mutations have severe OI. Fractures of long bones and severe vertebral compression fractures with resulting deformities were observed as early as the first year of life in these individuals. Collagen analyses with cultured dermal fibroblasts displayed no evidence for impaired collagen folding, posttranslational modification, or secretion. SERPINF1 encodes pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a secreted glycoprotein of the serpin superfamily. PEDF is a multifunctional protein and one of the strongest inhibitors of angiogenesis currently known in humans. Our data provide genetic evidence for PEDF involvement in human bone homeostasis. Copyright © 2011 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Exome Sequencing Identifies Truncating Mutations in Human SERPINF1 in Autosomal-Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Jutta; Semler, Oliver; Gilissen, Christian; Li, Yun; Bolz, Hanno Jörn; Giunta, Cecilia; Bergmann, Carsten; Rohrbach, Marianne; Koerber, Friederike; Zimmermann, Katharina; de Vries, Petra; Wirth, Brunhilde; Schoenau, Eckhard; Wollnik, Bernd; Veltman, Joris A.

    2011-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by bone fragility and susceptibility to fractures after minimal trauma. After mutations in all known OI genes had been excluded by Sanger sequencing, we applied next-generation sequencing to analyze the exome of a single individual who has a severe form of the disease and whose parents are second cousins. A total of 26,922 variations from the human reference genome sequence were subjected to several filtering steps...

  14. Autosomal recessive ichthyosis with limb reduction defect: A simple association and not CHILD syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ichthyosis is a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous disease that can be isolated and restricted to the skin manifestations or associated with extracutaneous symptoms. One of which is limb reduction defect known as CHILD syndrome; a rare inborn error of metabolism of cholesterol biosynthesis that is usually restricted to one side of the body. Here we describe an Egyptian child with generalized lamellar ichthyosis and limb reduction defect. Most probably this is a simple association and not a rare case of CHILD syndrome with bilateral skin involvement.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the first signs of the disorder. About half of affected individuals have a stroke or similar episode before age 40. As the disease progresses, most people with CARASIL also develop mood and personality changes, a decline in thinking ability (dementia), memory ...

  16. Autosomal recessive truncating MAB21L1 mutation associated with a syndromic scrotal agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruel, A-L; Masurel-Paulet, A; Rivière, J-B; Duffourd, Y; Lehalle, D; Bensignor, C; Huet, F; Borgnon, J; Roucher, F; Kuentz, P; Deleuze, J-F; Thauvin-Robinet, C; Faivre, L; Thevenon, J

    2017-02-01

    We report on a boy with a rare malformative association of scrotum agenesis, ophthalmological anomalies, cerebellar malformation, facial dysmorphism and global development delay. The reported patient was carrying a homozygous frameshift in MAB21L1 detected by whole-exome sequencing, considered as the most likely disease-causing variant. Mab21l1 knockout mice present a strikingly similar malformative association of ophthalmological malformations of the anterior chamber and preputial glands hypoplasia. We hypothesize that MAB21L1 haploinsufficiency cause a previously undescribed syndrome with scrotal agenesis, ophthalmological anomalies, facial dysmorphism and gross psychomotor delay as remarkable hallmarks. Four cases from the literature were reported with features suggestive of a similar and recognizable clinical entity. We hypothesize that MAB21L1 should be the culprit gene in these patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Vici Syndrome: A Rare Autosomal Recessive Syndrome with Brain Anomalies, Cardiomyopathy, and Severe Intellectual Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Curtis Rogers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The objective of this study was to present and describe two additional patients diagnosed with Vici syndrome. Methods. Clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings of the two siblings are discussed in detail. The two patients' descriptions are compared with the other eleven patients reported in the literature. We also presented detailed autopsy results on the male sibling, which demonstrated cytoplasmic vacuoles of the cardiomyocytes and confirmed the clinical findings. Results. The patients reported here include the 13th and 14th patients reported with Vici syndrome. The summary of findings present in these patients includes postnatal growth retardation, developmental delay, bilateral cataracts, agenesis of the corpus callosum, cerebellar anomalies, gyral abnormalities, seizures, hypotonia, and cardiomyopathy. Conclusion. Vici syndrome should be suspected in any child with agenesis of the corpus callosum and one of the following findings: cardiomyopathy, cataracts, immune deficiency, or cutaneous hypopigmentation.

  18. Polymicrogyria and myoclonic epilepsy in autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Rony; Halevy, Ayelet; Aharoni, Sharon; Kraus, Dror; Konen, Osnat; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Straussberg, Rachel

    2016-10-01

    Cutis laxa syndromes are rare inherited disorders of skin and connective tissue metabolism associated with variable systemic involvement. The main clinical manifestation is loose, wrinkled, redundant, inelastic skin, hypotonia, typical facies including short nose and down-slanting palpebral fissures, and varying degrees of developmental delay. The aim of this report is to describe two siblings diagnosed with a moderate form of ATP6V0A2-related cutis laxa with polymicrogyria (cobblestone-like brain dysgenesis). One of the patients has myoclonic epilepsy which may have contributed to his more severe clinical presentation. The literature on cutis laxa syndromes is reviewed.

  19. A Novel Mutation in the EDAR Gene Causes Severe Autosomal Recessive Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Emil; Svendsen, Mathias Tiedemann; Lildballe, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    nasal discharge. The girl was the second born child of first-cousin immigrants from Northern Iraq. A novel homozygous mutation (c.84delC) in the EDAR gene was identified. This mutation most likely causes a frameshift in the protein product (p.S29fs*74). This results in abolition of all ectodysplasin......-mediated NF-kB signalling. This complete loss-of-function mutation likely accounts for the severe clinical abnormalities in ectodermal structures in the described patient. (C) 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  20. ITGB6 loss-of-function mutations cause autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Choi, Murim; Richardson, Amelia S; Reid, Bryan M; Lin, Brent P; Wang, Susan J; Kim, Jung-Wook; Simmer, James P; Hu, Jan C-C

    2014-04-15

    Integrins are cell-surface adhesion receptors that bind to extracellular matrices (ECM) and mediate cell-ECM interactions. Some integrins are known to play critical roles in dental enamel formation. We recruited two Hispanic families with generalized hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Analysis of whole-exome sequences identified three integrin beta 6 (ITGB6) mutations responsible for their enamel malformations. The female proband of Family 1 was a compound heterozygote with an ITGB6 transition mutation in Exon 4 (g.4545G > A c.427G > A p.Ala143Thr) and an ITGB6 transversion mutation in Exon 6 (g.27415T > A c.825T > A p.His275Gln). The male proband of Family 2 was homozygous for an ITGB6 transition mutation in Exon 11 (g.73664C > T c.1846C > T p.Arg616*) and hemizygous for a transition mutation in Exon 6 of Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS Xp22.13; g.355444T > C c.1697T > C p.Met566Thr). These are the first disease-causing ITGB6 mutations to be reported. Immunohistochemistry of mouse mandibular incisors localized ITGB6 to the distal membrane of differentiating ameloblasts and pre-ameloblasts, and then ITGB6 appeared to be internalized by secretory stage ameloblasts. ITGB6 expression was strongest in the maturation stage and its localization was associated with ameloblast modulation. Our findings demonstrate that early and late amelogenesis depend upon cell-matrix interactions. Our approach (from knockout mouse phenotype to human disease) demonstrates the power of mouse reverse genetics in mutational analysis of human genetic disorders and attests to the need for a careful dental phenotyping in large-scale knockout mouse projects.

  1. Libyan Boy with Autosomal Recessive Trait (P 22-phox Defect) of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We advise that pediatricians and general practitioners who treat chronic cases of lung diseases (with or without chronic diarrhea) should consider primary immunodeficiency disorders in the hope that early diagnosis and treatment may prevent chronic complications especially of the respiratory tract. Furthermore, we state ...

  2. The role of mutant protein level in autosomal recessive catecholamine dependent polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT2)

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, Guy; Shainberg, Asher; Hochhauser, Edith; Kurtzwald-Josefson, Efrat; Issac, Ahuva; El-Ani, Dalia; Aravot, Dan; Afek, Arnon; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Eldar, Michael; Arad, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Humans and genetically engineered mice with recessively inherited CPVT develop arrhythmia which may arise due to malfunction or degradation of calsequestrin (CASQ2). We investigated the relation between protein level and arrhythmia severity in CASQ2D307H/D307H (D307H), compared to CASQ2Δ/Δ (KO) and wild type (WT) mice. CASQ2 expression and Ca2+ transients were recorded in cardiomyocytes from neonatal or adult mice. Arrhythmia was studied in vivo using heart rhythm telemetry at rest, exercise ...

  3. Autosomal recessive mutations in THOC6 cause intellectual disability: syndrome delineation requiring forward and reverse phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, J S; Huang, L; Thevenon, J; Kariminedjad, A; Beaulieu, C L; Masurel-Paulet, A; Najmabadi, H; Fattahi, Z; Beheshtian, M; Tonekaboni, S H; Tang, S; Helbig, K L; Alcaraz, W; Rivière, J-B; Faivre, L; Innes, A M; Lebel, R R; Boycott, K M

    2017-01-01

    THOC6 is a part of the THO complex, which is involved in coordinating mRNA processing with export. The THO complex interacts with additional components to form the larger TREX complex (transcription export complex). Previously, a homozygous missense mutation in THOC6 in the Hutterite population was reported in association with syndromic intellectual disability. Using exome sequencing, we identified three unrelated patients with bi-allelic mutations in THOC6 associated with intellectual disability and additional clinical features. Two of the patients were compound heterozygous for a stop and a missense mutation, and the third was homozygous for a missense mutation; the missense mutations were predicted to be pathogenic by in silico analysis and modeling. Clinical features of the three newly identified patients and those previously reported are reviewed; intellectual disability is moderate to severe, and malformations are variable including renal and heart defects, cleft palate, microcephaly, and corpus callosum dysgenesis. Facial features are variable and include tall forehead, short upslanting palpebral fissures +/- deep set eyes, and a long nose with overhanging columella. These subtle facial features render the diagnosis difficult to make in isolation with certainty. Our results expand the mutational and clinical spectrum of this rare disease, confirm that THOC6 is an intellectual disability causing gene, while providing insight into the importance of the THO complex in neurodevelopment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 12 months and 18 months, as toddlers are learning to walk. The signs and symptoms worsen over ... links) Health Topic: Degenerative Nerve Diseases Health Topic: Movement Disorders Health Topic: Neurologic Diseases Genetic and Rare Diseases ...

  5. Mutations in c10orf11, a melanocyte-differentiation gene, cause autosomal-recessive albinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønskov, Karen; Dooley, Christopher M; Østergaard, Elsebet

    2013-01-01

    in an individual originating from Lithuania. Immunohistochemistry showed localization of C10orf11 in melanoblasts and melanocytes in human fetal tissue, but no localization was seen in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Knockdown of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) homolog with the use of morpholinos resulted...... in substantially decreased pigmentation and a reduction of the apparent number of pigmented melanocytes. The morphant phenotype was rescued by wild-type C10orf11, but not by mutant C10orf11. In conclusion, we have identified a melanocyte-differentiation gene, C10orf11, which when mutated causes autosomal...

  6. Hematologically important mutations: The autosomal recessive forms of chronic granulomatous disease (second update)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Dirk; Kuhns, Douglas B.; Maddalena, Anne; Bustamante, Jacinta; Kannengiesser, Caroline; de Boer, Martin; van Leeuwen, Karin; Köker, M. Yavuz; Wolach, Baruch; Roesler, Joachim; Malech, Harry L.; Holland, Steven M.; Gallin, John I.; Stasia, Marie-José

    2010-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous Disease (CGD) is an immunodeficiency disorder affecting about 1 in 250,000 individuals. The disease is caused by mutations in the genes encoding the components of the leukocyte NADPH oxidase. This enzyme produces superoxide, which is essential in the process of intracellular

  7. Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and congenital hepatic fibrosis (ARPKD/CHF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L. [National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Program, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Ocak, Iclal [National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Program, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Daryanani, Kailash [National Institutes of Health, Clinical Center, Department of Radiology, Bethesda, MD (United States); Font-Montgomery, Esperanza; Lukose, Linda; Bryant, Joy; Tuchman, Maya; Gahl, William A. [National Institutes of Health, National Human Genome Research Institute, Medical Genetics Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States); Mohan, Parvathi [George Washington University, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Washington, DC (United States); Heller, Theo [National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gunay-Aygun, Meral [National Institutes of Health, National Human Genome Research Institute, Medical Genetics Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States); National Institutes of Health, Intramural Program, Office of Rare Diseases, Office of the Directors, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2009-02-15

    ARPKD/CHF is an inherited disease characterized by non-obstructive fusiform dilatation of the renal collecting ducts leading to enlarged spongiform kidneys and ductal plate malformation of the liver resulting in congenital hepatic fibrosis. ARPKD/CHF has a broad spectrum of clinical presentations involving the kidney and liver. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and follow-up of ARPKD/CHF. Combined use of conventional and high-resolution US with MR cholangiography in ARPKD/CHF patients allows detailed definition of the extent of kidney and hepatobiliary manifestations without requiring ionizing radiation and contrast agents. (orig.)

  8. Combined Occurrence of Autosomal Dominant Aniridia and Autosomal Recessive Albinism in Several Members of a Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahalom, Claudia; Sharon, Dror; Dalia, Eli; Simhon, Shiran Ben; Shemesh, Efrat; Blumenfeld, Anat

    2015-06-01

    To characterize clinical and genetic aspects of a family with a unique combination of two hereditary blinding eye diseases. Comprehensive eye examination of proband and family members. Molecular analyses of the TYR and PAX6 genes. A young couple, both legally blind, requested genetic counselling regarding their ocular condition. The female was previously diagnosed with oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1A) and her spouse was diagnosed with Peters anomaly. A comprehensive clinical examination revealed that the female had OCA1A combined with signs of another ocular disease, showing some similarity to aniridia. A complete ocular examination of her family members revealed that her brother also suffered from the same combined phenotype, her father had typical OCA1A signs, and her mother and sister had aniridia-like phenotype, without clinical diagnosis until the time of presentation. Molecular analysis identified two compound heterozygous TYR mutations known to cause OCAIA and cosegregate with oculocutaneous albinism. In addition, we identified a novel heterozygous PAX6 mutation confirming the atypical aniridia phenotype. We report here a unique and rare clinical phenotype that is explained by the segregation of two severe inherited eye diseases. The clinical and genetic analysis in this family allowed them to receive accurate genetic counseling.

  9. Molecular diagnostic in two families affected with Autosomic Recessive Pigmentary Retinitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal Esquivel, A.

    1996-01-01

    This study included two Costa Rican families with members affected by Recessive Pigmentary Autosomic Retinitis (RPAR). The first family (C1) from the province of San Jose, has 10 alive affected members, and 14 obligatory carriers. They present an Early Appearance Degeneration, RPAR tipe1 (cane-cone). The author used polymorphic markers (STRPs) to discard some related regions, with the RP in the literature. He also used the Linkage program, for the analysis of ligaments. The second family (P1), proceeding from Acosta (situated in the province of Alajuela), has 13 alive affected members and 23 obligatory carriers and they present numerous consanguineous unions. This case is a RPAR with Early Appearance (Night Blindness, fat ERG), but with a shower degeneration. The author concludes that, with studies such as this one, there will be a capacity to offer RP molecular diagnostic, and also advance in its knowledge and treatment. (S. Grainger)

  10. Mutations in SNX14 cause a distinctive autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia and intellectual disability syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, Anna C.; Williams, Hywel; Setó-Salvia, Núria; Bacchelli, Chiara; Jenkins, Dagan; O'Sullivan, Mary; Mengrelis, Konstantinos; Ishida, Miho; Ocaka, Louise; Chanudet, Estelle; James, Chela; Lescai, Francesco; Anderson, Glenn; Morrogh, Deborah; Ryten, Mina; Duncan, Andrew J.; Pai, Yun Jin; Saraiva, Jorge M.; Ramos, Fabiana; Farren, Bernadette; Saunders, Dawn; Vernay, Bertrand; Gissen, Paul; Straatmaan-Iwanowska, Anna; Baas, Frank; Wood, Nicholas W.; Hersheson, Joshua; Houlden, Henry; Hurst, Jane; Scott, Richard; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Moore, Gudrun E.; Sousa, Sérgio B.; Stanier, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Intellectual disability and cerebellar atrophy occur together in a large number of genetic conditions and are frequently associated with microcephaly and/or epilepsy. Here we report the identification of causal mutations in Sorting Nexin 14 (SNX14) found in seven affected individuals from three

  11. PTRHD1 (C2orf79) mutations lead to autosomal-recessive intellectual disability and parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadi, Hamidreza; Azcona, Luis J; Aghamollaii, Vajiheh; Omrani, Mir Davood; Garshasbi, Masoud; Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Tafakhori, Abbas; Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Jamshidi, Javad; Darvish, Hossein; Paisán-Ruiz, Coro

    2017-02-01

    Atypical parkinsonism is a neurodegenerative disease that includes diverse neurological and psychiatric manifestations. We aimed to identify the disease-cauisng mutations in a consanguineous family featuring intellectual disability and parkinsonism. Full phenotypic characterization, followed by genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping and whole-genome sequencing, was carried out in all available family members. The chromosome, 2p23.3, was identified as the disease-associated locus, and a homozygous PTRHD1 mutation (c.157C>T) was then established as the disease-causing mutation. The pathogenicity of this PTRHD1 mutation was supported by its segregation with the disease status, its location in a functional domain of the encoding protein, as well as its absence in public databases and ethnicity-matched control chromosomes. Given the role of 2p23 locus in patients with intellectual disability and the previously reported PTRHD1 mutation (c.155G>A) in patients with parkinsonism and cognitive dysfunction, we concluded that the PTRHD1 mutation identified in this study is likely to be responsible for the phenotypic features of the family under consideration. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  12. CLPB Variants Associated with Autosomal-Recessive Mitochondrial Disorder with Cataract, Neutropenia, Epilepsy, and Methylglutaconic Aciduria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Carol; Smith, Laurie; Wibrand, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    3-methylglutaconic aciduria (3-MGA-uria) is a nonspecific finding associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, including defects of oxidative phosphorylation. 3-MGA-uria is classified into five groups, of which one, type IV, is genetically heterogeneous. Here we report five children with a form...... of type IV 3-MGA-uria characterized by cataracts, severe psychomotor regression during febrile episodes, epilepsy, neutropenia with frequent infections, and death in early childhood. Four of the individuals were of Greenlandic descent, and one was North American, of Northern European and Asian descent...

  13. Autosomal recessive long QT syndrome, type 1 in eight families from Saudi Arabia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bdier, Amnah Y.; Al-Ghamdi, Saleh; Verma, Prashant K.; Dagriri, Khalid; Alshehri, Bandar; Jiman, Omamah A.; Ahmed, Sherif E.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Al-Aama, Jumana Y.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most common primary cardiac arrhythmia syndromes is autosomal dominant long QT syndrome, type 1 (LQT1), chiefly caused by mono-allelic mutations in the KCNQ1 gene. Bi-allelic mutations in the KCNQ1 gene are causal to Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS), characterized by severe and

  14. Craniofacial anomalies, humero-radial synostosis, rhizomelic limb shortness: previously unrecognized autosomal recessive syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N; Teebi, Ahmad S

    2007-03-15

    Humero-radial synostosis (HRS) is a rare skeletal anomaly that might be seen in some craniosynostosis syndromes, notably Antley-Bixler syndrome, and in other disorders in association with skeletal anomalies. Here we report on two daughters of first cousin Saudi parents with syndromic HRS. Both patients had distinctive craniofacial features including cranium bifidum occultum, hypertelorism, epicanthus inversus, capillary hemangiomata, and malformed ears. Musculoskeletal examination revealed rhizomelic shortness with normal hands and feet. Skeletal survey showed bilateral HRS with no evidence of craniosynostosis. The craniofacial manifestations in these two patients do not match any of the syndromes known to be associated with HRS. We consider that the constellation is unique and apparently represents a previously unrecognized syndrome. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. A homozygous missense mutation in the IRBP gene (RBP3) associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, A.I. den; McGee, T.L.; Ziviello, C.; Banfi, S.; Dryja, T.P.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, F.; Ghosh, D.; Berson, E.L.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) has been considered essential for normal rod and cone function, as it mediates the transport of retinoids between the photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium. This study was performed to determine whether mutations in the IRBP

  16. GNB5 Mutations Cause an Autosomal-Recessive Multisystem Syndrome with Sinus Bradycardia and Cognitive Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodder, Elisabeth M; De Nittis, Pasquelena; Koopman, Charlotte D; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Moura de Souza, Carolina Fischinger; Lahrouchi, Najim; Guex, Nicolas; Napolioni, Valerio; Tessadori, Federico; Beekman, Leander; Nannenberg, Eline A; Boualla, Lamiae; Blom, Nico A; de Graaff, Wim; Kamermans, Maarten; Cocciadiferro, Dario; Malerba, Natascia; Mandriani, Barbara; Akdemir, Zeynep Hande Coban; Fish, Richard J; Eldomery, Mohammad K; Ratbi, Ilham; Wilde, Arthur A M; de Boer, Teun; Simonds, William F; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite; Sutton, V Reid; Kok, Fernando; Lupski, James R; Reymond, Alexandre; Bezzina, Connie R; Bakkers, Jeroen; Merla, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    GNB5 encodes the G protein β subunit 5 and is involved in inhibitory G protein signaling. Here, we report mutations in GNB5 that are associated with heart-rate disturbance, eye disease, intellectual disability, gastric problems, hypotonia, and seizures in nine individuals from six families. We observed an association between the nature of the variants and clinical severity; individuals with loss-of-function alleles had more severe symptoms, including substantial developmental delay, speech defects, severe hypotonia, pathological gastro-esophageal reflux, retinal disease, and sinus-node dysfunction, whereas related heterozygotes harboring missense variants presented with a clinically milder phenotype. Zebrafish gnb5 knockouts recapitulated the phenotypic spectrum of affected individuals, including cardiac, neurological, and ophthalmological abnormalities, supporting a direct role of GNB5 in the control of heart rate, hypotonia, and vision. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. THE DISTURBANCE OF METABOLISM OF THE AMINO ACIDS AS A CAUSATIVE FOR THE MENTAL RETARDATION-PHENYLKETONURIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina IVANOVSKA

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available PKU is the rare single-gene disease belonging to disturbance of metabolism of the amino acids, which in its own basics halved the mutated gene, whose leaning at the 12-chromosome charge for the synthesis of phenylalanine hydroxylase, turning on phenylalanine into tyrosine. Enzyme block usually leads to the accumulation of a toxic substrate and/or the deficient synthesis of a product needed for normal body function. In PKU there is a toxic accumulation of phenylalanine behind the deficient enzyme, phenylalanine hydrоxylase. The symptoms are: lighten hare, blue eyes, lithe pigmented skin, convulsion, mental retardation, low level of adrenalin caused for the lack of tyrosine, the urine have a specific smell of rats or gab.Inheritance of disease become in autosomal recessive way which always become possibility to stay hidden in the family and to inherit from knee to knee without manifestation of its own phenotype.The only therapy that successfully avoids the causes of this disease is phenylalanine-restricted diet. Today we have some affords for improvement of gene therapy, which can help us for determination to these disease. The success of the therapy depends from timing of the right detection also diagnostics all trough equivalent therapy which can successfully interrupt the new forms of mental retardation and other symptoms.

  18. A new syndrome: multiple congenital abnormalities and mental retardation in two brothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundar, M; Ozdemir, S Y; Fryns, J P

    2012-01-01

    In this report we present two brothers with abnormal neurological development, hypotonia, short stature, pylorus stenosis, pectus excavatum, brachycephaly due to craniosynostosis, frontal bossing, depressed nasal bridge, high arched-wide palate, downslant palpebral fissures, low-set, large ears, thin upper lip and bilateral cryptorchidism. The brothers were born to a couple of second cousins and were the third and fourth pregnancies of the mother. The father, the mother and the eldest sibling were phenotypically and chromosomally normal. The clinical findings of the brothers were found to be similar. These clinical findings were compared with syndromes showing some of the symptoms, namely Apert, FG, Floating-Harbor, Shprintzen-Goldberg and Rett Syndromes. However, when the findings were detailed, we observed that they did not match completely any of the syndromes in a discernable way. The MECP2 gene mutation was analysed because of mental retardation, poor neurological evolution and large ears, but no mutation was found. So these cases are presented as a new syndrome with apparent autosomal recessive inheritance.

  19. Recessive VARS2 mutation underlies a novel syndrome with epilepsy, mental retardation, short stature, growth hormone deficiency, and hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsemari, Abdulaziz; Al-Younes, Banan; Goljan, Ewa; Jaroudi, Dyala; BinHumaid, Faisal; Meyer, Brian F; Arold, Stefan T; Monies, Dorota

    2017-11-14

    Most mitochondrial and cytoplasmic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are encoded by nuclear genes. Syndromic disorders resulting from mutation of aaRSs genes display significant phenotypic heterogeneity. We expand aaRSs-related phenotypes through characterization of the clinical and molecular basis of a novel autosomal-recessive syndrome manifesting severe mental retardation, ataxia, speech impairment, epilepsy, short stature, microcephaly, hypogonadism, and growth hormone deficiency. A G>A variant in exon 29 of VARS2 (c.3650G>A) (NM_006295) was identified in the index case. This homozygous variant was confirmed by Sanger sequencing and segregated with disease in the family studied. The c.3650G>A change results in alteration of arginine to histidine at residue 1217 (R1217H) of the mature protein and is predicted to be pathogenic. These findings contribute to a growing list of aaRSs disorders, broadens the spectrum of phenotypes attributable to VARS2 mutations, and provides new insight into genotype-phenotype correlations among the mitochondrial synthetase genes.

  20. Clinical and neuroradiological study on adult cases of familial microcephaly associated with mental retardation and convulsive seizure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Nobuyuki; Kitabayashi, Toshiko.

    1987-01-01

    Microcephaly results from various causes, some genetic and some non-genetic. Recently, we encountered two families with microcephaly, mental retardation and convulsive seizure. These conform to an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. All adult cases were analyzed to describe the characteristic neuroradiographic findings. Although each presented a similar neurologic outlook, two cases secondarily resulting from infection or injuries to the developing brain during postnatal periods showed a specific variation. Skull X-P and CT scan of these two cases showed thickening of the carvarium, predominantly fronto-parietal lobe atrophy of the cerebrum, enlargement of the ventricle, and compensatory hypertrophy of sinuses. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed severe micropolygyria and hypogenesis of corpus callosum. Abnormalities such as skull X-P, CT scan and MRI were severer in the secondary than in the primary microcephalics. Although brain volume was reduced, the volume ratio of cortex to white watter was similar to that of normal brain. MRI on severe cases of microcephaly revealed a high signal intensity in inversion-recovery images on the brain stem where markedly atrophy was noted. In adult microcephaly, the extent of cerebral development was thought to be reflected in the corpus callosum and brain stem where neuron fibers were densely gathered. (author)

  1. Recessive VARS2 mutation underlies a novel syndrome with epilepsy, mental retardation, short stature, growth hormone deficiency, and hypogonadism

    KAUST Repository

    Alsemari, Abdulaziz

    2017-11-14

    Most mitochondrial and cytoplasmic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are encoded by nuclear genes. Syndromic disorders resulting from mutation of aaRSs genes display significant phenotypic heterogeneity. We expand aaRSs-related phenotypes through characterization of the clinical and molecular basis of a novel autosomal-recessive syndrome manifesting severe mental retardation, ataxia, speech impairment, epilepsy, short stature, microcephaly, hypogonadism, and growth hormone deficiency.A G>A variant in exon 29 of VARS2 (c.3650G>A) (NM_006295) was identified in the index case. This homozygous variant was confirmed by Sanger sequencing and segregated with disease in the family studied. The c.3650G>A change results in alteration of arginine to histidine at residue 1217 (R1217H) of the mature protein and is predicted to be pathogenic.These findings contribute to a growing list of aaRSs disorders, broadens the spectrum of phenotypes attributable to VARS2 mutations, and provides new insight into genotype-phenotype correlations among the mitochondrial synthetase genes.

  2. Protein implicated in nonsyndromic mental retardation regulates protein kinase A (PKA) activity

    KAUST Repository

    Altawashi, Azza

    2012-02-28

    Mutation of the coiled-coil and C2 domain-containing 1A (CC2D1A) gene, which encodes a C2 domain and DM14 domain-containing protein, has been linked to severe autosomal recessive nonsyndromic mental retardation. Using a mouse model that produces a truncated form of CC2D1A that lacks the C2 domain and three of the four DM14 domains, we show that CC2D1A is important for neuronal differentiation and brain development. CC2D1A mutant neurons are hypersensitive to stress and have a reduced capacitytoformdendritesandsynapsesinculture. Atthebiochemical level,CC2D1Atransduces signals to the cyclic adenosine 3?,5?-monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway during neuronal cell differentiation. PKA activity is compromised, and the translocation of its catalytic subunit to the nucleus is also defective in CC2D1A mutant cells. Consistently, phosphorylation of the PKA target cAMP-responsive element-binding protein, at serine 133, is nearly abolished in CC2D1A mutant cells. The defects in cAMP/PKA signaling were observed in fibroblast, macrophage, and neuronal primary cells derived from the CC2D1A KO mice. CC2D1A associates with the cAMP-PKA complex following forskolin treatment and accumulates in vesicles or on the plasma membrane in wild-type cells, suggesting that CC2D1A may recruit the PKA complex to the membrane to facilitate signal transduction. Together, our data show that CC2D1A is an important regulator of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway, which may be the underlying cause for impaired mental function in nonsyndromic mental retardation patients with CC2D1A mutation. 2012 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Hirschsprung disease, microcephaly, mental retardation, and characteristic facial features: delineation of a new syndrome and identification of a locus at chromosome 2q22-q23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowat, D R; Croaker, G D; Cass, D T; Kerr, B A; Chaitow, J; Adès, L C; Chia, N L; Wilson, M J

    1998-01-01

    We have identified six children with a distinctive facial phenotype in association with mental retardation (MR), microcephaly, and short stature, four of whom presented with Hirschsprung (HSCR) disease in the neonatal period. HSCR was diagnosed in a further child at the age of 3 years after investigation for severe chronic constipation and another child, identified as sharing the same facial phenotype, had chronic constipation, but did not have HSCR. One of our patients has an interstitial deletion of chromosome 2, del(2)(q21q23). These children strongly resemble the patient reported by Lurie et al with HSCR and dysmorphic features associated with del(2)(q22q23). All patients have been isolated cases, suggesting a contiguous gene syndrome or a dominant single gene disorder involving a locus for HSCR located at 2q22-q23. Review of published reports suggests that there is significant phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity within the group of patients with HSCR, MR, and microcephaly. In particular, our patients appear to have a separate disorder from Goldberg-Shprintzen syndrome, for which autosomal recessive inheritance has been proposed because of sib recurrence and consanguinity in some families. Images PMID:9719364

  4. Normal expression of the Fanconi anemia proteins FAA and FAC and sensitivity to mitomycin C in two patients with Seckel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abou-Zahr, F; Bejjani, B; Kruyt, FAE; Kurg, R; Bacino, C; Shapira, SK; Youssoufian, H

    1999-01-01

    Seckel syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. The classical presentation includes pre- and postnatal growth deficiency, mental retardation, and characteristic facial appearance. There have been several reports of associated hematological abnormalities and chromosomal breakage, findings

  5. A novel AP4M1 mutation in autosomal recessive cerebral palsy syndrome and clinical expansion of AP-4 deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Jameel, Muhammad; Klar, Joakim; Tariq, Muhammad; Moawia, Abubakar; Altaf Malik, Naveed; Seema Waseem, Syeda; Abdullah, Uzma; Naeem Khan, Tahir; Raininko, Raili; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Dahl, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder associated with intellectual disability in one-third of cases. Recent findings support Mendelian inheritance in subgroups of patients with the disease. The purpose of this study was to identify a novel genetic cause of paraplegic CP with intellectual disability in a consanguineous Pakistani family. METHODS: We performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in two brothers with CP and intellectual disability. Analysis of AP...

  6. High Resolution Ultrasonography for Assessment of Renal Cysts in the PCK Rat Model of Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Kapoor

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The PCK rat model of polycystic kidney disease is characterized by the progressive development of renal medullary cysts. Here, we evaluated the suitability of high resolution ultrasonography (HRU to assess the kidney and cyst volume in PCK rats, testing three different ultrasound image analysis methods, and correlating them with kidneys weights and histological examinations. Methods: After inducing anesthesia, PCK rats (n=18 were subjected to HRU to visualize the kidneys, to perform numeric and volumetric measurements of the kidney and any cysts observed, and to generate 3-dimensional images of the cysts within the kidney parenchyma. Results: HRU provided superior information in comparison to microscopic analysis of stained kidney sections. HRU-based kidney volumes correlated strongly with kidney weights (R2=0.809; PConclusion: HRU represents a useful diagnostic tool for kidney and cyst volume measurements in PCK rats. Sequential HRU examinations may be useful to study the effect of drugs on cyst growth without the need to euthanize experimental animals.

  7. Novel missense loss-of-function mutations of WNT1 in an autosomal recessive Osteogenesis imperfecta patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Joon Yeon; Jang, Woo Young; Lee, Hye-Ran; Park, Seon Young; Kim, Woo-Young; Park, Jong Hoon; Kim, Yonghwan; Cho, Tae-Joon

    2017-08-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable skeletal disorder characterized by bone fragility and low bone mass. Recently, loss-of-function mutations of WNT1 have been reported to be causative in OI or osteoporosis. We report an OI patient with novel compound heterozygous WNT1 missense mutations, p.Glu123Asp and p.Cys153Gly. Both mutations are found in the exon 3, and the p.Glu123Asp is the most proximal N-terminus missense mutation among the reported WNT1 missense mutations in OI patients. In vitro functional analysis reveals that while expression of wildtype WNT1 stimulates canonical WNT1-mediated β-catenin signaling, that of individual WNT1 mutant fails to do so, indicative of the pathogenic nature of the WNT1 variants. Although the pathogenic mechanism of WNT1 defects in OI has yet to be uncovered, these findings further contribute to the implications and importance of functional relevance of WNT1 in skeletal disorders. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. A mutation in the FOXE3 gene causes congenital primary aphakia in an autosomal recessive consanguineous Pakistani family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anjum, Iram; Eiberg, Hans; Baig, Shahid Mahmood

    2010-01-01

    was shown by diagnostic restriction enzyme digest, and marker analysis of another aphakia family from Madagascar carrying the same mutation excluded the presence of a founder mutation. Clinical re-examination of the family was not possible due to the escalating security concerns and internal displacement...

  9. Altered TGFβ signaling and cardiovascular manifestations in patients with autosomal recessive cutis laxa type I caused by fibulin-4 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Marjolijn; Holm, Tammy; Veith, Regan; Callewaert, Bert L; Adès, Lesley C; Baspinar, Osman; Pickart, Angela; Dasouki, Majed; Hoyer, Juliane; Rauch, Anita; Trapane, Pamela; Earing, Michael G; Coucke, Paul J; Sakai, Lynn Y; Dietz, Harry C; De Paepe, Anne M; Loeys, Bart L

    2010-01-01

    Fibulin-4 is a member of the fibulin family, a group of extracellular matrix proteins prominently expressed in medial layers of large veins and arteries. Involvement of the FBLN4 gene in cardiovascular pathology was shown in a murine model and in three patients affected with cutis laxa in association with systemic involvement. To elucidate the contribution of FBLN4 in human disease, we investigated two cohorts of patients. Direct sequencing of 17 patients with cutis laxa revealed no FBLN4 mutations. In a second group of 22 patients presenting with arterial tortuosity, stenosis and aneurysms, FBLN4 mutations were identified in three patients, two homozygous missense mutations (p.Glu126Lys and p.Ala397Thr) and compound heterozygosity for missense mutation p.Glu126Val and frameshift mutation c.577delC. Immunoblotting analysis showed a decreased amount of fibulin-4 protein in the fibroblast culture media of two patients, a finding sustained by diminished fibulin-4 in the extracellular matrix of the aortic wall on immunohistochemistry. pSmad2 and CTGF immunostaining of aortic and lung tissue revealed an increase in transforming growth factor (TGF)β signaling. This was confirmed by pSmad2 immunoblotting of fibroblast cultures. In conclusion, patients with recessive FBLN4 mutations are predominantly characterized by aortic aneurysms, arterial tortuosity and stenosis. This confirms the important role of fibulin-4 in vascular elastic fiber assembly. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence for the involvement of altered TGFβ signaling in the pathogenesis of FBLN4 mutations in humans. PMID:20389311

  10. The emergence of hepatic fibrosis and portal hypertension in infants and children with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premkumar, A.; Berdon, W.E.; Abramson, S.J.; Newhouse, J.H.; Levy, J.

    1988-01-01

    Long-term imaging and clinical findings are reported in six children whose polycystic kidney disease was detected in infancy or early childhood. Over time (2 years to 20 years) all patients developed portal hypertension from hepatic fibrosis, a problem primarily noted in recessive pattern polycystic kidney disease. Mild renal failure (two patients) was accompanied by serious systemic hypertension in the same patients. In one family, one of the babies also showed dilated right hepatic ducts. Imaging studies included urography and CT although recently ultrasonography was the method of choice. The relative renal and hepatic manifestations in these patients so changed with time that it would seem fallacious to attempt to use rigid classifications based on findings at initial diagnosis. (orig.)

  11. Biallelic Mutations in GNB3 Cause a Unique Form of Autosomal-Recessive Congenital Stationary Night Blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ajoy; Audo, Isabelle; Tavares, Erika; Maynes, Jason T; Tumber, Anupreet; Wright, Thomas; Li, Shuning; Michiels, Christelle; Condroyer, Christel; MacDonald, Heather; Verdet, Robert; Sahel, José-Alain; Hamel, Christian P; Zeitz, Christina; Héon, Elise

    2016-05-05

    Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is a heterogeneous group of non-progressive inherited retinal disorders with characteristic electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities. Riggs and Schubert-Bornschein are subtypes of CSNB and demonstrate distinct ERG features. Riggs CSNB demonstrates selective rod photoreceptor dysfunction and occurs due to mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in rod phototransduction cascade; night blindness is the only symptom and eye examination is otherwise normal. Schubert-Bornschein CSNB is a consequence of impaired signal transmission between the photoreceptors and bipolar cells. Schubert-Bornschein CSNB is subdivided into complete CSNB with an ON bipolar signaling defect and incomplete CSNB with both ON and OFF pathway involvement. Both subtypes are associated with variable degrees of night blindness or photophobia, reduced visual acuity, high myopia, and nystagmus. Whole-exome sequencing of a family screened negative for mutations in genes associated with CSNB identified biallelic mutations in the guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-3 gene (GNB3). Two siblings were compound heterozygous for a deletion (c.170_172delAGA [p.Lys57del]) and a nonsense mutation (c.1017G>A [p.Trp339(∗)]). The maternal aunt was homozygous for the nonsense mutation (c.1017G>A [p.Trp339(∗)]). Mutational analysis of GNB3 in a cohort of 58 subjects with CSNB identified a sporadic case individual with a homozygous GNB3 mutation (c.200C>T [p.Ser67Phe]). GNB3 encodes the β subunit of G protein heterotrimer (Gαβγ) and is known to modulate ON bipolar cell signaling and cone transducin function in mice. Affected human subjects showed an unusual CSNB phenotype with variable degrees of ON bipolar dysfunction and reduced cone sensitivity. This unique retinal disorder with dual anomaly in visual processing expands our knowledge about retinal signaling. Copyright © 2016 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel mutation in the sterol 27-hydroxylase gene of a woman with autosomal recessive cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garuti Rita

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Article abstract Mutations of the gene encoding the mitochondrial enzyme sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1 gene cause defects in the cholesterol pathway to bile acids that lead to the storage of cholestanol and cholesterol in tendons, lenses and the central nervous system. This disorder is the cause of a clinical syndrome known as cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX. Since 1991 several mutations of the CYP27A1 gene have been reported. We diagnosed the clinical features of CTX in a caucasian woman. Serum levels of cholestanol and 7α-hydroxycholesterol were elevated and the concentration of 27-hydroxycholesterol was reduced. Bile alcohols in the urine and faeces were increased. The analysis of the CYP27A1 gene showed that the patient was a compound heterozygote carrying two mutations both located in exon 8. One mutation is a novel four nucleotide deletion (c.1330-1333delTTCC that results in a frameshift and the occurrence of a premature stop codon leading to the formation of a truncated protein of 448 amino acids. The other mutation, previously reported, is a C - > T transition (c. c.1381C > T that converts the glutamine codon at position 461 into a termination codon (p.Q461X. These truncated proteins are expected to have no biological function being devoid of the cysteine residue at position 476 of the normal enzyme that is crucial for heme binding and enzyme activity.

  13. Canine Disorder Mirrors Human Disease: Exonic Deletion in HES7 Causes Autosomal Recessive Spondylocostal Dysostosis in Miniature Schnauzer Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Willet, Cali E.; Makara, Mariano; Reppas, George; Tsoukalas, George; Malik, Richard; Haase, Bianca; Wade, Claire M.

    2015-01-01

    Spondylocostal dysostosis is a congenital disorder of the axial skeleton documented in human families from diverse racial backgrounds. The condition is characterised by truncal shortening, extensive hemivertebrae and rib anomalies including malalignment, fusion and reduction in number. Mutations in the Notch signalling pathway genes DLL3, MESP2, LFNG, HES7 and TBX6 have been associated with this defect. In this study, spondylocostal dysostosis in an outbred family of miniature schnauzer dogs ...

  14. Lethal autosomal recessive epidermolytic ichthyosis due to a novel donor splice-site mutation in KRT10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covaciu, C; Castori, M; De Luca, N; Ghirri, P; Nannipieri, A; Ragone, G; Zambruno, G; Castiglia, D

    2010-06-01

    Epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI; MIM 113800), previously named bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma or epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, is a rare and clinically variable defect of cornification characterized by generalized erythema, erosions, scaling and easily breaking blisters that become less frequent later in life while hyperkeratosis increases. EI is caused by dominant mutations in either KRT1 or KRT10, encoding keratin 1 (K1) and keratin 10 (K10), respectively. Usually, mutations are missense substitutions into the highly conserved α-helical rod domains of the proteins. However, three inbred pedigrees in which EI is transmitted as a recessive trait due to KRT10 null mutations have been described. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 British Association of Dermatologists.

  15. Relative frequency of GJB2 gene mutations in autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL patients in Lorestan population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mitra Sapahvand

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: Unexpectedly, in this research just 17 percent of cases are covered. In this study 510 insCGAA mutation was seen. This is a new mutation which is not reported in other studied populations in the world. Hence, this research shows that – at least in our studied population- the effect of other genes that could cause non-syndromic hearing loss is possible and should be studied

  16. Transcription-terminating mutation in telethonin causing autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy type 2G in a European patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivé, Montse; Shatunov, Alexey; Gonzalez, Laura; Carmona, Olga; Moreno, Dolores; Quereda, Lidia Gonzalez; Martinez-Matos, J A; Goldfarb, Lev G; Ferrer, Isidro

    2008-12-01

    A 27-year-old woman of Moldavian origin presented at the age of 15 with progressive proximal limb weakness and painful cramps in her calf muscles. Clinical examination revealed prominent muscle weakness in proximal muscles of the lower extremities and distal anterior compartment of legs, and mild weakness in shoulder girdle muscles. In addition, she had marked calf hypertrophy, muscle atrophy involving the anterior and posterior compartments of the thighs, and the distal anterior compartment of legs, as well as mild scapular winging and hyperlordosis. A muscle biopsy taken from the biceps brachii showed mild dystrophic changes, absent vacuoles, and abundant lobulated fibers. Immunofluorescence and Western blot assays demonstrated complete telethonin deficiency. Molecular analysis revealed a homozygous Trp25X mutation in the telethonin (TCAP) gene resulting in termination of transcription at an early point. Four families from Brazil with telethonin deficiency have previously been reported and classified as LGMD2G, but the actual frequency of this disease is unknown. With this current identification of a case outside the Brazilian population, telethonin mutation-associated LGMD should be considered worldwide.

  17. Adhalin, the 50 kD dystrophin associated protein, is not the locus for severe childhood autosomal recessive dystrophy (SCARMD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, E.M.; Selig, S.; Kunkel, L.M. [Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in the carboxyl-terminus in dystrophin are normally sufficient to produce severely dystrophic muscle. This portion of dystrophin binds a complex of dystrophin-associated glycoproteins (DAGs). The genes encoding these DAGs are candidate genes for causing neuromuscular disease. Immunoreactivity for adhalin, the 50 kD DAG, is absent in muscle biopsies from patients with SCARMD, a form of dystrophy clinically similar Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Prior linkage analysis in SCARMD families revealed that the disease gene segregates with markers on chromosome 13. To determine the molecular role that adhalin may play in SCARMD, human cDNA and genomic sequences were isolated. Primers were designed based on predicted areas of conservation in rabbit adhalin and used in RT-PCR with human skeletal and cardiac muscle. RT-PCR products were confirmed by sequence as human adhalin and then used as probes for screening human cDNA and genomic libraries. Human and rabbit adhalin are 90% identical, and among the cDNAs, a novel splice form of adhalin was seen which may encode part of the 35 kD component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. To our surprise, only human/rodent hybrids containing human chromosome 17 amplified adhalin sequences in a PCR analysis. FISH analysis with three overlapping genomic sequences confirmed the chromosome 17 location and further delineated the map position to 17q21. Therefore, adhalin is excluded as the gene causing SCARMD.

  18. Loss of ZMPSTE24 (FACE-1) causes autosomal recessive restrictive dermopathy and accumulation of Lamin A precursors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarro, Claire L.; Cadiñanos, Juan; de Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Bernard, Rafaëlle; Courrier, Sébastien; Boccaccio, Irène; Boyer, Amandine; Kleijer, Wim J.; Wagner, Anja; Giuliano, Fabienne; Beemer, Frits A.; Freije, Jose M.; Cau, Pierre; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; López-Otín, Carlos; Badens, Catherine; Lévy, Nicolas

    2005-01-01

    Restrictive dermopathy (RD) is characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, tight and rigid skin with prominent superficial vessels, bone mineralization defects, dysplastic clavicles, arthrogryposis and early neonatal death. In two patients affected with RD, we recently reported two different

  19. Hypomorphic mutations in PGAP2, encoding a GPI-anchor-remodeling protein, cause autosomal-recessive intellectual disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Tawamie, Hasan; Murakami, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    families. Rescue experiments with the altered proteins in PGAP2-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cell lines showed less expression of cell-surface GPI-anchored proteins DAF and CD59 than of the wild-type protein, substantiating the pathogenicity of the identified alterations. Furthermore, we observed a full...

  20. Clinical and neuroimaging features of autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia 35 (SPG35): case reports, new mutations, and brief literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, Francesco; Berti, Beatrice; Romano, Alessandro; Baldacci, Jacopo; Rizzi, Riccardo; Grazia Alessandrì, M; Tessa, Alessandra; Procopio, Elena; Rubegni, Anna; Lourenḉo, Charles Marques; Simonati, Alessandro; Guerrini, Renzo; Santorelli, Filippo Maria

    2018-02-08

    Spastic paraplegia 35 (SPG35) is a recessive condition characterized by childhood onset, progressive course, complicated by dystonia, dysarthria, cognitive impairment, and epilepsy. Mutations in the FA2H gene have been described in several families, leading to the proposal of a single entity, named fatty acid hydrolase-associated neurodegeneration (FAHN). Several reports have described a polymorphic radiological picture with white matter lesions of various degrees and a distinct form of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation. While we reviewed the pertinent literature, we also report three new patients with SPG35, highlighting the possible absence of white matter lesions even after a long neuroimaging follow-up. Three-dimensional modeling of the mutated proteins was helpful to elucidate the role of the site of mutations and the correlation with the residual enzyme activity as determined in cultured skin fibroblasts.

  1. PLEKHG5 deficiency leads to an intermediate form of autosomal-recessive Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzedine, Hamid; Zavadakova, Petra; Planté-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Vaz Pato, Maria; Pinto, Nuno; Bartesaghi, Luca; Zenker, Jennifer; Poirot, Olivier; Bernard-Marissal, Nathalie; Arnaud Gouttenoire, Estelle; Cartoni, Romain; Title, Alexandra; Venturini, Giulia; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Makowski, Edward; Schöls, Ludger; Claeys, Kristl G.; Stendel, Claudia; Roos, Andreas; Weis, Joachim; Dubourg, Odile; Leal Loureiro, José; Stevanin, Giovanni; Said, Gérard; Amato, Anthony; Baraban, Jay; LeGuern, Eric; Senderek, Jan; Rivolta, Carlo; Chrast, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease (CMT) comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies characterized by progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities and distal sensory loss. Following the analysis of two consanguineous families affected by a medium to late-onset recessive form of intermediate CMT, we identified overlapping regions of homozygosity on chromosome 1p36 with a combined maximum LOD score of 5.4. Molecular investigation of the genes from this region allowed identification of two homozygous mutations in PLEKHG5 that produce premature stop codons and are predicted to result in functional null alleles. Analysis of Plekhg5 in the mouse revealed that this gene is expressed in neurons and glial cells of the peripheral nervous system, and that knockout mice display reduced nerve conduction velocities that are comparable with those of affected individuals from both families. Interestingly, a homozygous PLEKHG5 missense mutation was previously reported in a recessive form of severe childhood onset lower motor neuron disease (LMND) leading to loss of the ability to walk and need for respiratory assistance. Together, these observations indicate that different mutations in PLEKHG5 lead to clinically diverse outcomes (intermediate CMT or LMND) affecting the function of neurons and glial cells. PMID:23777631

  2. Mechanism for release of alkaline phosphatase caused by glycosylphosphatidylinositol deficiency in patients with hyperphosphatasia mental retardation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yoshiko; Kanzawa, Noriyuki; Saito, Kazunobu; Krawitz, Peter M; Mundlos, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N; Karadimitris, Anastasios; Maeda, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Taroh

    2012-02-24

    Hyperphosphatasia mental retardation syndrome (HPMR), an autosomal recessive disease characterized by mental retardation and elevated serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels, is caused by mutations in the coding region of the phosphatidylinositol glycan anchor biosynthesis, class V (PIGV) gene, the product of which is a mannosyltransferase essential for glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. Mutations found in four families caused amino acid substitutions A341E, A341V, Q256K, and H385P, which drastically decreased expression of the PIGV protein. Hyperphosphatasia resulted from secretion of ALP, a GPI-anchored protein normally expressed on the cell surface, into serum due to PIGV deficiency. In contrast, a previously reported PIGM deficiency, in which there is a defect in the transfer of the first mannose, does not result in hyperphosphatasia. To provide insights into the mechanism of ALP secretion in HPMR patients, we took advantage of CHO cell mutants that are defective in various steps of GPI biosynthesis. Secretion of ALP requires GPI transamidase, which in normal cells, cleaves the C-terminal GPI attachment signal peptide and replaces it with GPI. The GPI-anchored protein was secreted substantially into medium from PIGV-, PIGB-, and PIGF-deficient CHO cells, in which incomplete GPI bearing mannose was accumulated. In contrast, ALP was degraded in PIGL-, DPM2-, or PIGX-deficient CHO cells, in which incomplete shorter GPIs that lacked mannose were accumulated. Our results suggest that GPI transamidase recognizes incomplete GPI bearing mannose and cleaves a hydrophobic signal peptide, resulting in secretion of soluble ALP. These results explain the molecular mechanism of hyperphosphatasia in HPMR.

  3. Hereditary partial transcobalamin II deficiency with neurologic, mental and hematologic abnormalities in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplitsky, Valery; Huminer, David; Zoldan, Joseph; Pitlik, Silvio; Shohat, Mordechai; Mittelman, Moshe

    2003-12-01

    Transcobalamin II is a serum transport protein for vitamin B12. Small variations in TC-II affinity were recently linked to a high homocysteine level and increased frequency of neural tube defects. Complete absence of TC-II or total functional abnormality causes tissue vitamin B12 deficiency resulting in a severe disease with megaloblastic anemia and immunologic and intestinal abnormalities in the first months of life. This condition was described in hereditary autosomal-recessive form. Low serum TC-II without any symptoms or clinical significance was noted in relatives of affected homozygotes. To study 23 members of a four-generation family with hereditary vitamin B12 deficiency and neurologic disorders. Thorough neurologic, hematologic and family studies were supplemented by transcobalamin studies in 20 family members. Partial TC-II deficiency was found in 19 subjects. Apo TC-II (free TC-II unbound to vitamin B12) and total unsaturated B12 binding capacity were low in all tested individuals but one, and holo TC-II (TC-II bound by vitamin B12) was low in all family members. The presentation of the disease was chronic rather than acute. Early signs in children and young adults were dyslexia, decreased IQ, vertigo, plantar clonus and personality disorders. Interestingly, affected children and young adults had normal or slightly decreased serum vitamin B12 levels but were not anemic. Low serum B12 levels were measured in early adulthood. In mid-late adulthood megaloblastic anemia and subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord were diagnosed. Treatment with B12 injections resulted in a significant improvement. The pedigree is compatible with an autosomal-dominant transmission. This family study suggests a genetic heterogeneity of TC-II deficiency. We report the first family with a hereditary transmitted condition of low serum TC-II (partial TC-II deficiency) associated with neurologic and mental manifestations in childhood. Partial TC-II deficiency may decrease

  4. Retardo mental Mental retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio M. Vasconcelos

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Esta revisão aborda as recentes descobertas da neurobiologia do retardo mental, enfatizando os novos recursos da citogenética, das técnicas moleculares e da neurorradiologia para esclarecer o diagnóstico. FONTES DE DADOS: O autor pesquisou o banco de dados MEDLINE da National Library of Medicine utilizando as palavras-chave "mental retardation", "developmental disability", "child" e "adolescent" em diferentes combinações, abrangendo o período de janeiro de 2000 a outubro de 2003. Também foram utilizados os bancos de dados das revistas científicas Pediatrics e New England Journal of Medicine através da palavra-chave "mental retardation". No total, o autor consultou cerca de 1.500 títulos de artigos e 500 resumos, e teve acesso direto a 150 artigos completos pertinentes. Quando oportuno, algumas referências dos artigos consultados também foram consideradas. O site Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man foi utilizado como fonte de informações em genética clínica. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: Em outubro de 2003, o total de síndromes genéticas associadas a retardo mental chegou a 1.149. Considerando-se o conjunto das causas genéticas ou ambientais e congênitas ou adquiridas de retardo mental, a avaliação diagnóstica atual é capaz de esclarecer a etiologia em 50 a 70% dos casos. CONCLUSÕES: O autor sugere uma avaliação diagnóstica do retardo mental em etapas lógicas, visando ao uso racional dos dispendiosos recursos da citogenética, biologia molecular e neuroimagem.OBJECTIVE: This paper describes recent advances in the neurobiology of mental retardation, emphasizing new diagnostic resources provided by cytogenetics, molecular testing, and neuroimaging. SOURCES OF DATA: MEDLINE (January 2000 through October 2003, using the following key words: mental retardation, developmental disability, child, and adolescent. Search of the Pediatrics and New England Journal of Medicine websites using the key word mental retardation. The

  5. Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mental disorders include a wide range of problems, including Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, ... disorders, including schizophrenia There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history may play ...

  6. Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel and act as ... stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from ...

  7. B3GALNT2 mutations associated with non-syndromic autosomal recessive intellectual disability reveal a lack of genotype-phenotype associations in the muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maroofian, R.; Riemersma, M.; Jae, L.T.; Zhianabed, N.; Willemsen, M.H.; Wissink-Lindhout, W.M.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Mehrjardi, M.Y.V.; Ashrafi, M.R.; Kusters, B.; Kleefstra, T.; Jamshidi, Y.; Nasseri, M.; Pfundt, R.; Brummelkamp, T.R.; Abbaszadegan, M.R.; Lefeber, D.J.; Bokhoven, H. van

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The phenotypic severity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (MDDG) syndromes associated with aberrant glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan ranges from the severe Walker-Warburg syndrome or muscle-eye-brain disease to mild, late-onset, isolated limb-girdle muscular

  8. B3GALNT2 mutations associated with non-syndromic autosomal recessive intellectual disability reveal a lack of genotype-phenotype associations in the muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroofian, Reza; Riemersma, Moniek; Jae, Lucas T; Zhianabed, Narges; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Wissink-Lindhout, Willemijn M; Willemsen, Michèl A; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Mehrjardi, Mohammad Yahya Vahidi; Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza; Kusters, Benno; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Jamshidi, Yalda; Nasseri, Mojila; Pfundt, Rolph; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza; Lefeber, Dirk J; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2017-12-22

    The phenotypic severity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (MDDG) syndromes associated with aberrant glycosylation of α-dystroglycan ranges from the severe Walker-Warburg syndrome or muscle-eye-brain disease to mild, late-onset, isolated limb-girdle muscular dystrophy without neural involvement. However, muscular dystrophy is invariably found across the spectrum of MDDG patients. Using linkage mapping and whole-exome sequencing in two families with an unexplained neurodevelopmental disorder, we have identified homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in B3GALNT2. The first family comprises two brothers of Dutch non-consanguineous parents presenting with mild ID and behavioral problems. Immunohistochemical analysis of muscle biopsy revealed no significant aberrations, in line with the absence of a muscular phenotype in the affected siblings. The second family includes five affected individuals from an Iranian consanguineous kindred with mild-to-moderate intellectual disability (ID) and epilepsy without any notable neuroimaging, muscle, or eye abnormalities. Complementation assays of the compound heterozygous mutations identified in the two brothers had a comparable effect on the O-glycosylation of α-dystroglycan as previously reported mutations that are associated with severe muscular phenotypes. In conclusion, we show that mutations in B3GALNT2 can give rise to a novel MDDG syndrome presentation, characterized by ID associated variably with seizure, but without any apparent muscular involvement. Importantly, B3GALNT2 activity does not fully correlate with the severity of the phenotype as assessed by the complementation assay.

  9. Global Gene Expression Profiling in PPAR-γ Agonist-Treated Kidneys in an Orthologous Rat Model of Human Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Yoshihara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidneys are enlarged by aberrant proliferation of tubule epithelial cells leading to the formation of numerous cysts, nephron loss, and interstitial fibrosis in polycystic kidney disease (PKD. Pioglitazone (PIO, a PPAR-γ agonist, decreased cell proliferation, interstitial fibrosis, and inflammation, and ameliorated PKD progression in PCK rats (Am. J. Physiol.-Renal, 2011. To explore genetic mechanisms involved, changes in global gene expression were analyzed. By Gene Set Enrichment Analysis of 30655 genes, 13 of the top 20 downregulated gene ontology biological process gene sets and six of the top 20 curated gene set canonical pathways identified to be downregulated by PIOtreatment were related to cell cycle and proliferation, including EGF, PDGF and JNK pathways. Their relevant pathways were identified using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Gene and Genomes database. Stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1 is a key enzyme in fatty acid metabolism found in the top 5 genes downregulated by PIO treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the gene product of this enzyme was highly expressed in PCK kidneys and decreased by PIO. These data show that PIO alters the expression of genes involved in cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, and fatty acid metabolism.

  10. Exclusion of the GNAS locus in PHP-Ib patients with broad GNAS methylation changes: evidence for an autosomal recessive form of PHP-Ib?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rebollo, Eduardo; Pérez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Lecumberri, Beatriz; Turan, Serap; Anda, Emma; Pérez-Nanclares, Gustavo; Feig, Denice; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Bastepe, Murat; Jüppner, Harald

    2011-08-01

    Most patients with autosomal dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (AD-PHP-Ib) carry maternally inherited microdeletions upstream of GNAS that are associated with loss of methylation restricted to GNAS exon A/B. Only few AD-PHP-Ib patients carry microdeletions within GNAS that are associated with loss of all maternal methylation imprints. These epigenetic changes are often indistinguishable from those observed in patients affected by an apparently sporadic PHP-Ib form that has not yet been defined genetically. We have now investigated six female patients affected by PHP-Ib (four unrelated and two sisters) with complete or almost complete loss of GNAS methylation, whose healthy children (11 in total) showed no epigenetic changes at this locus. Analysis of several microsatellite markers throughout the 20q13 region made it unlikely that PHP-Ib is caused in these patients by large deletions involving GNAS or by paternal uniparental isodisomy or heterodisomy of chromosome 20 (patUPD20). Microsatellite and single-nucleotide variation (SNV) data revealed that the two affected sisters share their maternally inherited GNAS alleles with unaffected relatives that lack evidence for abnormal GNAS methylation, thus excluding linkage to this locus. Consistent with these findings, healthy children of two unrelated sporadic PHP-Ib patients had inherited different maternal GNAS alleles, also arguing against linkage to this locus. Based on our data, it appears plausible that some forms of PHP-Ib are caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutation(s) in an unknown gene involved in establishing or maintaining GNAS methylation. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  11. Identification of a novel homozygous mutation, TMPRSS3: c.535G>A, in a Tibetan family with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dongyan; Zhu, Wei; Li, Dejun; Ji, De; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Different ethnic groups have distinct mutation spectrums associated with inheritable deafness. In order to identify the mutations responsible for congenital hearing loss in the Tibetan population, mutation screening for 98 deafness-related genes by microarray and massively parallel sequencing of captured target exons was conducted in one Tibetan family with familiar hearing loss. A homozygous mutation, TMPRSS3: c.535G>A, was identified in two affected brothers. Both parents are heterozygotes and an unaffected sister carries wild type alleles. The same mutation was not detected in 101 control Tibetan individuals. This missense mutation results in an amino acid change (p.Ala179Thr) at a highly conserved site in the scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR) domain of the TMPRSS3 protein, which is essential for protein-protein interactions. Thus, this mutation likely affects the interactions of this transmembrane protein with extracellular molecules. According to our bioinformatic analyses, the TMPRSS3: c.535G>A mutation might damage protein function and lead to hearing loss. These data suggest that the homozygous mutation TMPRSS3: c.535G>A causes prelingual hearing loss in this Tibetan family. This is the first TMPRSS3 mutation found in the Chinese Tibetan population.

  12. Identification of a novel homozygous mutation, TMPRSS3: c.535G>A, in a Tibetan family with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyan Fan

    Full Text Available Different ethnic groups have distinct mutation spectrums associated with inheritable deafness. In order to identify the mutations responsible for congenital hearing loss in the Tibetan population, mutation screening for 98 deafness-related genes by microarray and massively parallel sequencing of captured target exons was conducted in one Tibetan family with familiar hearing loss. A homozygous mutation, TMPRSS3: c.535G>A, was identified in two affected brothers. Both parents are heterozygotes and an unaffected sister carries wild type alleles. The same mutation was not detected in 101 control Tibetan individuals. This missense mutation results in an amino acid change (p.Ala179Thr at a highly conserved site in the scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR domain of the TMPRSS3 protein, which is essential for protein-protein interactions. Thus, this mutation likely affects the interactions of this transmembrane protein with extracellular molecules. According to our bioinformatic analyses, the TMPRSS3: c.535G>A mutation might damage protein function and lead to hearing loss. These data suggest that the homozygous mutation TMPRSS3: c.535G>A causes prelingual hearing loss in this Tibetan family. This is the first TMPRSS3 mutation found in the Chinese Tibetan population.

  13. GPR179 Is Required for Depolarizing Bipolar Cell Function and Is Mutated in Autosomal-Recessive Complete Congenital Stationary Night Blindness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peachey, Neal S.; Ray, Thomas A.; Florijn, Ralph; Rowe, Lucy B.; Sjoerdsma, Trijntje; Contreras-Alcantara, Susana; Baba, Kenkichi; Tosini, Gianluca; Pozdeyev, Nikita; Iuvone, P. Michael; Bojang, Pasano; Pearring, Jillian N.; Simonsz, Huibert Jan; van Genderen, Maria; Birch, David G.; Traboulsi, Elias I.; Dorfman, Allison; Lopez, Irma; Ren, Huanan; Goldberg, Andrew F. X.; Nishina, Patsy M.; Lachapelle, Pierre; McCall, Maureen A.; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; Kamermans, Maarten; Gregg, Ronald G.

    2012-01-01

    Complete congenital stationary night blindness (cCSNB) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of retinal disorders characterized by nonprogressive impairment of night vision, absence of the electroretinogram (ERG) b-wave, and variable degrees of involvement of other visual functions. We

  14. Mutations in SLC33A1 cause a lethal autosomal-recessive disorder with congenital cataracts, hearing loss, and low serum copper and ceruloplasmin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huppke, Peter; Brendel, Cornelia; Kalscheuer, Vera

    2012-01-01

    of the protein. We also showed that AT-1 knockdown in HepG2 cells leads to reduced ceruloplasmin secretion, indicating that the low copper in serum is due to reduced ceruloplasmin levels and is not a sign of copper deficiency. The severity of the phenotype implies an essential role of AT-1 in proper...... or compound heterozygous mutations for all affected subjects in SLC33A1 encoding a highly conserved acetylCoA transporter (AT-1) required for acetylation of multiple gangliosides and glycoproteins. The mutations were found to cause reduced or absent AT-1 expression and abnormal intracellular localization......, hearing loss, and severe developmental delay. Cerebral MRI showed pronounced cerebellar hypoplasia and hypomyelination. Homozygosity mapping was performed and displayed a region of commonality among three families at chromosome 3q25. Deep sequencing and conventional sequencing disclosed homozygous...

  15. Clinical and molecular diagnosis of a Costa Rican family with autosomal recessive myotonia congenita (Becker disease carrying a new mutation in the CLCN1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Morales

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Myotonia congenita is a muscular disease characterized by myotonia, hypertrophy, and stiffness. It is inherited as either autosomal dominant or recessive known as Thomsen and Becker diseases, respectively. Here we confirm the clinical diagnosis of a family diagnosed with a myotonic condition many years ago and report a new mutation in the CLCN1 gene. The clinical diagnosis was established using ocular, cardiac, neurological and electrophysiological tests and the molecular diagnosis was done by PCR, SSCP and sequencing of the CLCN1 gene. The proband and the other affected individuals exhibited proximal and distal muscle weakness but no hypertrophy or muscular pain was found. The myotatic reflexes were lessened and sensibility was normal. Electrical and clinical myotonia was found only in the sufferers. Slit lamp and electrocardiogram tests were normal. Two affected probands presented diminution of the sensitive conduction velocities and prolonged sensory distal latencies. The clinical spectrum for this family is in agreement with a clinical diagnosis of Becker myotonia. This was confirmed by molecular diagnosis where a new disease-causing mutation (Q412P was found in the family and absent in 200 unaffected chromosomes. No latent myotonia was found in this family; therefore the ability to cause this subclinical sign might be intrinsic to each mutation. Implications of the structure-function-genotype relationship for this and other mutations are discussed. Adequate clinical diagnosis of a neuromuscular disorder would allow focusing the molecular studies toward the confirmation of the initial diagnosis, leading to a proper clinical management, genetic counseling and improving in the quality of life of the patients and relatives. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (1: 1-11. Epub 2008 March 31.La miotonía congénita es una enfermedad muscular caracterizada por miotonía, hipertrofia y rigidez. Se presenta con dos patrones de herencia, autosómica dominante en cuyo caso recibe el nombre de miotonía de Thomsen, o autosómica recesiva conocida como miotonía de Becker. En este trabajo se confirmó el diagnóstico clínico presuntivo hecho hace algunos años en una familia con una condición miotónica y se reporta una nueva mutación en el gen CLCN1. El diagnóstico clínico se estableció después de estudios oculares, cardíacos, neurológicos y electrofisiológicos. El diagnóstico molecular fue hecho mediante la PCR, SSCP y secuenciación del gen CLCN1. El caso índice y los otros individuos afectados exhibieron debilidad muscular proximal y distal, pero no se encontró hipertrofia ni dolor muscular. Los reflejos miotáticos estuvieron disminuidos y la sensibilidad fue normal. Se encontró miotonía clínica y eléctrica solo en los individuos afectados. Las pruebas de lámpara de hendidura y electrocardiograma resultaron normales. Dos individuos afectados presentaron disminución de las velocidades de conducción sensitiva y latencias distales sensoriales prolongadas. El cuadro clínico concuerda con la miotonía de Becker, lo cual se confirmó con el hallazgo de una mutación responsable de la enfermedad en el gen CLCN1 (Q412P, la cual se encontró en la familia y estuvo ausente en 200 cromosomas provenientes de la población general. No se encontró miotonía latente, por lo que probablemente la habilidad de causar este signo subclínico es intrínsica de cada mutación. Afinar el diagnóstico clínico diferencial de las enfermedades neuromusculares permitiría enfocar los estudios moleculares hacia la confirmación del diagnóstico inicial en forma eficiente, lo cual permitiría un manejo clínico y asesoramiento genético más adecuados y una mejora en la calidad de vida de los pacientes y sus familias.

  16. ATP6V0A2 mutations present in two Mexican Mestizo children with an autosomal recessive cutis laxa syndrome type IIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bahena-Bahena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with ARCL-IIA harbor mutations in ATP6V0A2 that codes for an organelle proton pump. The ARCL-IIA syndrome characteristically presents a combined glycosylation defect affecting N-linked and O-linked glycosylations, differentiating it from other cutis laxa syndromes and classifying it as a Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation (ATP6V0A2-CDG. We studied two Mexican Mestizo patients with a clinical phenotype corresponding to an ARCL-IIA syndrome. Both patients presented abnormal transferrin (N-linked glycosylation but Patient 1 had a normal ApoCIII (O-linked glycosylation profile. Mutational screening of ATP6V0A2 using cDNA and genomic DNA revealed in Patient 1 a previously reported homozygous nonsense mutation c.187C>T (p.R63X associated with a novel clinical finding of a VSD. In Patient 2 we found a homozygous c.2293C>T (p.Q765X mutation that had been previously reported but found that it also altered RNA processing generating a novel transcript not previously identified (r.2176_2293del; p.F726Sfs*10. This is the first report to describe Mestizo patients with molecular diagnosis of ARCL-IIA/ATP6V0A2-CDG and to establish that their mutations are the first to be found in patients from different regions of the world and with different genetic backgrounds.

  17. Mapa Mental

    OpenAIRE

    do Couto, Hildo Honório

    2017-01-01

    O objetivo principal deste artigo é mostrar que no interior do ecossistema mental da língua, e do nosso ecossistema cognitivo geral, existe uma parte que se pode chamar de mapa mental, intimamente associado ao mapa cognitivo. Após caracterizar o conceito de mapa mental e de associá-lo a conceitos assemelhados, comento o mapa mental que eu tinha de Brasília, por ter vivido lá por mais de 30 anos. Como me mudei para Goiânia, comecei a perder partes do mapa mental de Brasília. Por outro lado, es...

  18. Disease: H00803 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00803 Seizures-sensorineural deafness-ataxia-mental retardation-electrolyte imbalance... (SESAME) ; SeSAME/EAST syndrome Seizures-sensorineural deafness-ataxia-mental retardation-electrolyte imbalance...l deficit, and electrolyte imbalance. This disease links to autosomal recessive m

  19. Mentalizing animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasperbauer, Tyler Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Ethicists have tended to treat the psychology of attributing mental states to animals as an entirely separate issue from the moral importance of animals’ mental states. In this paper I bring these two issues together. I argue for two theses, one descriptive and one normative. The descriptive thesis...... holds that ordinary human agents use what are generally called phenomenal mental states (e.g., pain and other emotions) to assign moral considerability to animals. I examine recent empirical research on the attribution of phenomenal states and agential states (e.g., memory and intelligence) to argue...... that phenomenal mental states are the primary factor, psychologically, for judging an animal to be morally considerable. I further argue that, given the role of phenomenal states in assigning moral considerability, certain theories in animal ethics will meet significant psychological resistance. The normative...

  20. Mental Byomdannelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tina Vestermann; Boye, Anne Mette; Borchmann, Inger Haarup

    Formålet med publikationen er at præsentere metoden "Mental byomdannelse". Metoden viser, hvordan man via midlertidig brug af grunde kan undersøge et steds potentialer, tage et område i brug tidligt i en byomdannelsesproces og derved bidrage til at opbygge en ny identitet for området. Mental...... byomdannelse går ud på at skabe bevidsthed om et byudviklingsområde overfor byens borgere, kommende beboere og fremtidige brugere af området allerede mens den fysiske omdannelse er i gang. I publikationen præsenteres en værktøjskasse, som giver redskaber og ideer til, hvordan man kan sætte en mental...... byomdannelsesproces i gang i byens rum. Publikationen udgør en afrapportering fra et støttet forsøgsprojekt hvor metoden ”Mental byomdannelse” er udviklet ved at afprøve ideerne om mental byomdannelse i to cases i Ålborg Kommune, hhv. i Østre Havn og Nibe by. Formålet med at anvende metoden i de to cases har været...

  1. Syndrome de Sjögren-Larsson

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Misery, Laurent; Antoine, Jean-Christophe; Touraine, Renaud; Wanders, Ronald; Maitre, Séverine; Has, Christina; Perrot, Jean-Luc; Cambazard, Frédéric

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SJS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder. Patients suffer from congenital ichtyosis, mental retardation and symmetric spastic paralysis. Ichtyosis is usually pronounced and associated with erythroderma. Neurological manifestations occur usually between 4 and 13

  2. Sjogren-Larsson syndrome: Novel mutations in the ALDH3A2 gene in a French cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarret, Catherine; Rigal, Mélanie; Vaurs-Barrière, Catherine; Dorboz, Imen; Eymard-Pierre, Eléonore; Combes, Patricia; Giraud, Geneviève; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Afenjar, Alexandra; Francannet, Christine; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile

    2012-01-01

    Sjogren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by ichthyosis, spastic di- or tetraplegia and mental retardation due a defect of the fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH), related to mutations in the ALDH3A2 gene. In this study, we screened a French cohort of

  3. Epilepsy and Spinocerebellar Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A large consanguinous family from Saudi Arabia with 4 affected children presenting with an autosomal recessive ataxia, generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy and mental retardation is reported from the Institut de Genetique, Universite Louis Pasteur, Illkirch, France; Division of Pediatric Neurology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; and other centers.

  4. Joubert Syndrome - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandichhode S. T.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Joubert syndrome is a very rare malformation.It is estimated to affect between 1 in 80,000and 1 in 100,000 newborns.Joubert syndromeis an autosomal recessive disorder marked byagenesis of cerebellar vermis, ataxia, hypoto-nia, oculomotor apraxia, neonatal breathingproblems and mental retardation.

  5. Novel compound heterozygous frameshift mutations of C2orf37 in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Woodhouse–Sakati syndrome (WSS, MIM: 241080), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypogo- nadism, alopecia, diabetes mellitus, mental retardation and extrapyramidal manifestations, was first described in a few consanguineous Saudi families (Woodhouse and Sakati. 1983) and is now recognized in ...

  6. Joubert syndrome with orofacial digital features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Bhardwaj

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Joubert syndrome (JS is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by hypotonia, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, ocular abnormalities (e.g., pigmentary retinopathy, oculomotor apraxia, and nystagmus, renal cysts, and hepatic fibrosis. Respiratory abnormalities, as apnea and hyperpnea, may be present, as well as mental retardation. Since the clinical findings of JS are quite heterogeneous, determination of radiological findings is essential.

  7. Joubert Syndrome with Orofacial Digital Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Parveen; Sharma, Minoo; Ahluwalia, Karan

    2018-01-01

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by hypotonia, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, ocular abnormalities (e.g., pigmentary retinopathy, oculomotor apraxia, and nystagmus), renal cysts, and hepatic fibrosis. Respiratory abnormalities, as apnea and hyperpnea, may be present, as well as mental retardation. Since the clinical findings of JS are quite heterogeneous, determination of radiological findings is essential.

  8. Bardet-biedel syndrome: a case report and a review of literature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bardet- Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a group of autosomal recessive conditions with overlapping phenotype of rod-cone dystrophy, central obesity, mental retardation, and hypogonadism. There are very few reports of BBS from Sub-Saharan Africa. Objective: To report a case of BBS and review existing literature on ...

  9. A new locus for Seckel syndrome on chromosome 18p11.31-q11.2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børglum, Anders; Balslev, Thomas; Haagerup, Annette

    2001-01-01

    Seckel syndrome (MIM 210600) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with a heterogeneous appearance. Key features are growth retardation, microcephaly with mental retardation, and a characteristic 'bird-headed' facial appearance. We have performed a genome-wide linkage scan in a consanguineous fa...

  10. The oculocerebral syndrome in association with generalised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 14-year-old girl with generalised hypopigmentation, mental retardation, abnormal movements, and ocular anomalies is described. It is suggested that she represents a further case of oculocerebral albinism, a rare autosomal recessive condition. Reference is made to previous similar cases.

  11. Protein-truncating mutations in ASPM cause variable reduction in brain size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bond, Jacquelyn; Scott, Sheila; Hampshire, Daniel J.; Springell, Kelly; Corry, Peter; Abramowicz, Marc J.; Mochida, Ganesh H.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Maher, Eamonn R.; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Alswaid, Abdulrahman; Jafri, Hussain; Rashid, Yasmin; Mubaidin, Ammar; Walsh, Christopher A.; Roberts, Emma; Woods, C. Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in the ASPM gene at the MCPH5 locus are expected to be the most common cause of human autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH), a condition in which there is a failure of normal fetal brain development, resulting in congenital microcephaly and mental retardation. We have performed

  12. Mutation in the AP4M1 Gene Provides a Model for Neuroaxonal Injury in Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.H.M. Verkerk (Annemieke); R. Schot (Rachel); B. Dumee (Belinda); K. Schellekens (Karlijn); S.M.A. Swagemakers (Sigrid); A.M. Bertoli Avella (Aida); M. Leguin (Maarten); J. Dudink (Jeroen); P. Govaert (Paul); A.L. van Zwol (Arjen); J. Hirst (Jennifer); M.W. Wessels (Marja); C.E. Catsman-Berrevoets (Coriene); F.W. Verheijen (Frans); E. de Graaff (Esther); I.F.M. de Coo (René); J.M. Kros (Johan); R. Willemsen (Rob); P.J. Willems (Patrick); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); G.M.S. Mancini (Grazia)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractCerebral palsy due to perinatal injury to cerebral white matter is usually not caused by genetic mutations, but by ischemia and/or inflammation. Here, we describe an autosomal-recessive type of tetraplegic cerebral palsy with mental retardation, reduction of cerebral white matter, and

  13. Localization of a gene for molybdenum cofactor deficiency, on the short arm of chromosome 6, by homozygosity mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shalata, A.; Mandel, H.; Reiss, J.; Szargel, R.; Cohen-Akenine, A.; Dorche, C.; Zabot, M. T.; van Gennip, A.; Abeling, N.; Berant, M.; Cohen, N.

    1998-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MoCoD) is a fatal disorder manifesting, shortly after birth, with profound neurological abnormalities, mental retardation, and severe seizures unresponsive to any therapy. The disease is a monogenic, autosomal recessive disorder, and the existence of at least two

  14. Diagnostiek van het cerebro-hepato-renale syndroom van Zellweger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutgens, R. B.; Heymans, H. S.; Purvis, R.; Wanders, R. J.; Schrakamp, G.; van den Bosch, H.

    1984-01-01

    The cerebro-hepato-renal syndrome of Zellweger is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism. Clinically the disease is characterised by craniofacial malformations, a lack of muscle tone, disturbances in liver function, renal cysts and mental retardation. The disease is characterised

  15. Unusual cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis with fronto-temporal dementia phenotype.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guyant-Marechal, L.; Verrips, A.; Girard, C.; Wevers, R.A.; Zijlstra, F.; Sistermans, E.A.; Vera, P.; Campion, D.; Hannequin, D.

    2005-01-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is an autosomal recessive lipid storage disease caused by a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme 27-sterol hydroxylase (CYP27). We report a 53-year-old man, with an unusual phenotype of CTX. He had xanthomas since adolescence. He had no mental retardation and

  16. Mental Toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Tori; Cavanaugh, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    Mental toughness (MT) is defined as a set of attributes that allow an individual to persevere through difficult circumstances that ultimately can lead to successful outcomes. It is also a critical component of maximizing the performance of an athlete. These attributes assist with and promote a state of mind that enhances performance. A negative…

  17. Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIH/National Institute of Mental Health – Division of AIDS Research SAMHSA – Behavioral Health and HIV/AIDS SAMHSA – Suicide ... Office of Adolescent Health OAR NIH Office of AIDS Research OCR HHS Office for Civil Rights OFBNP HHS ...

  18. Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to situations and to people Alcohol or drug abuse Major changes in eating habits Sex drive changes Excessive anger, hostility or violence Suicidal thinking Sometimes symptoms of a mental health disorder appear as physical ... on Drug Abuse. http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-drug-addiction- ...

  19. Good Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mental Health This information in Spanish ( en español ) Good mental health Nutrition and mental health Exercise and ... a friend. Return to top More information on Good mental health Read more from womenshealth.gov Action ...

  20. Mental Illness Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News & Events About Us Home > Health Information Share Statistics Research shows that mental illnesses are common in ... of mental illnesses, such as suicide and disability. Statistics Top ı cs Mental Illness Any Anxiety Disorder ...

  1. Common Mental Health Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Susan R.; Levine, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of common student mental health issues and approaches for student affairs practitioners who are working with students with mental illness, and ways to support the overall mental health of students on campus.

  2. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  3. Latino Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NAMI About NAMI + x IN THIS SECTION La salud mental en la comunidad latina Share NAMI Share Home ... Support Diverse Communities Latinos IN THIS SECTION La salud mental en la comunidad latina Latino Mental Health Video ...

  4. [Mental Space Navigation and Mental Time Travel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2017-11-01

    We examined patients with mental space navigation or mental time travel disorder to identify regions in the brain that may play a critical role in mental time travel in terms of clinical neuropsychology. These regions included the precneus, posterior cingulate gyrus, retrosplenial cortex, and hippocampus, as well as the orbitofrontal cortex: the anterior and posterior medial areas were both shown to be important in this process. Further studies are required to define whether these form a network for mental time travel.

  5. Homeless mentally ill or mentally ill homeless?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, C I; Thompson, K S

    1992-06-01

    Mainstream psychiatry conceptualizes people who are homeless and mentally ill as distinct from other homeless persons because it is thought that their status stems from their mental disorder and the poor implementation of deinstitutionalization. The authors believe this dichotomy is illusory. They present data indicating that recent socioeconomic and political shifts contributed greatly to homelessness among all groups, regardless of mental illness; that those with and without mental illness have similar biographical and demographic profiles; that high levels of mental distress are common to all homeless persons; and that few mentally ill homeless persons require involuntary hospitalization. This perspective suggests novel responses that de-emphasize clinical solutions and focus on empowerment, consumerism, entitlement, community-level interventions, and closer alliances with other advocates for the homeless.

  6. Inhibition: Mental Control Process or Mental Resource?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im-Bolter, Nancie; Johnson, Janice; Ling, Daphne; Pascual-Leone, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The current study tested 2 models of inhibition in 45 children with language impairment and 45 children with normally developing language; children were aged 7 to 12 years. Of interest was whether a model of inhibition as a mental-control process (i.e., executive function) or as a mental resource would more accurately reflect the relations among…

  7. Mental Health Screening Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Important security updates for DBSAlliance.org. Read more... Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression Screening for Adult Depression Screening for ...

  8. International Student Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Welch, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the mental health status of international students in institutions of higher education, unique challenges these students face and their impact on mental health, and suggestions for ways to address these challenges.

  9. Mental Disorders - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Soomaali (Somali) MP3 EthnoMed Spanish (español) Expand Section Mental Disorders: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Enfermedades mentales: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español (Spanish) National Library of Medicine ...

  10. Mental Health and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Mental Health Mental Health and African Americans Poverty level affects mental health ... compared to 120% of non-Hispanic whites. 1 MENTAL HEALTH STATUS Serious psychological distress among adults 18 years ...

  11. Introduction to Mental Retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arc of the United States, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to define mental retardation and answer questions related to this topic. According to the American Association on Mental Retardation (AAMR), mental retardation is a disability that occurs before age 18. It is characterized by significant limitations in intellectual functioning and adaptive behaviors as expressed in…

  12. MENTAL DEFICIENCY. SECOND EDITION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HILLIARD, L.T.; KIRMAN, BRIAN H.

    REVISED TO INCLUDE LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES NEW IN BRITAIN SINCE THE 1957 EDITION, THE TEXT INCLUDES RECENT ADVANCES IN ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, AND TREATMENT OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY. CONSIDERATION OF THE BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY INCLUDES HISTORICAL AND LEGAL ASPECTS, THE SOCIAL BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFECT, PRENATAL CAUSES OF…

  13. Learn About Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Promotion . Fact sheet no. 220. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization. Chronic Illness & Mental Health . Bethesda, MD: National Institutes ... of-onset distributions of mental disorders in the World Health Organization’s World Mental Health Survey Initiative. World Psychiatry. 2007; ...

  14. Mental Health and Mental Disorder Recommendation Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchiwit, Manyat

    2017-12-01

    The characteristic differences among the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) countries in terms of trade and investment, society and cultural values, medical information and technology, and the living and working environment have become major health problems in terms of mental disorders. The purpose of this article is to identify the gaps in those aspects, to propose mental health and mental disorder recommendation programs, and to recommend policies for policy makers and research investors. A comparative analysis and literature review of existing policy, including overviews of previous research were used to generate a synthesis of the existing knowledge of the mental health and mental disorder recommendation programs. The review results recommend mental health and mental disorder programs for policy makers, research investors, and stakeholders in order to strengthen the directions for implementing these programs in the future. The healthcare provision in each country will not be limited only to its citizens; the healthcare markets and target groups are likely to expand to the neighboring countries in the context of changes in domestic and international factors, which have both positive and negative impacts according to the political, economic, and social situations of the influencing countries.

  15. Case Report: Whole exome sequencing reveals a novel frameshift deletion mutation p.G2254fs in COL7A1 associated with autosomal recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsudheen Karuthedath Vellarikkal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa simplex (DEB is a phenotypically diverse inherited skin fragility disorder. It is majorly manifested by appearance of epidermal bullae upon friction caused either by physical or environmental trauma. The phenotypic manifestations also include appearance of milia, scarring all over the body and nail dystrophy. DEB can be inherited in a recessive or dominant form and the recessive form of DEB (RDEB is more severe. In the present study, we identify a novel p.G2254fs mutation in COL7A1 gene causing a sporadic case of RDEB by whole exome sequencing (WES. Apart from adding a novel frameshift Collagen VII mutation to the repertoire of known mutations reported in the disease, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a genetically characterized case of DEB from India.

  16. Case Report: Whole exome sequencing reveals a novel frameshift deletion mutation p.G2254fs in COL7A1 associated with autosomal recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsudheen Karuthedath Vellarikkal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa simplex (DEB is a phenotypically diverse inherited skin fragility disorder. It is majorly manifested by appearance of epidermal bullae upon friction caused either by physical or environmental trauma. The phenotypic manifestations also include appearance of milia, scarring all over the body and nail dystrophy. DEB can be inherited in a recessive or dominant form and the recessive form of DEB (RDEB is more severe. In the present study, we identify a novel p.G2254fs mutation in COL7A1 gene causing a sporadic case of RDEB by whole exome sequencing (WES. Apart from adding a novel frameshift Collagen VII mutation to the repertoire of known mutations reported in the disease, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a genetically characterized case of DEB from India.

  17. Investigating the relationship of genetic mutations in GJB2 and linkage analysis of DFNB4 Locus in a group of non-syndromic hearing impaired people with autosomal recessive inheritance in Hormozgan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Ahangari

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Due to the high heterogeneity of loci associated with ARNSHL, other factors may be involved in the cause of deafness in families, without mutations in the GJB2 gene and the investigated locus. Therefore it is recommended to study other loci and more families in this matter.

  18. Inactivation of Pink1 gene in vivo sensitizes dopamine-producing neurons to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and can be rescued by autosomal recessive Parkinson disease genes, Parkin or DJ-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, M Emdadul; Mount, Matthew P; Safarpour, Farzaneh; Abdel-Messih, Elizabeth; Callaghan, Steve; Mazerolle, Chantal; Kitada, Tohru; Slack, Ruth S; Wallace, Valerie; Shen, Jie; Anisman, Hymie; Park, David S

    2012-06-29

    Mutations in the mitochondrial PTEN-induced kinase 1 (Pink1) gene have been linked to Parkinson disease (PD). Recent reports including our own indicated that ectopic Pink1 expression is protective against toxic insult in vitro, suggesting a potential role for endogenous Pink1 in mediating survival. However, the role of endogenous Pink1 in survival, particularly in vivo, is unclear. To address this critical question, we examined whether down-regulation of Pink1 affects dopaminergic neuron loss following 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) in the adult mouse. Two model systems were utilized: virally delivered shRNA-mediated knockdown of Pink1 and germ line-deficient mice. In both instances, loss of Pink1 generated significant sensitivity to damage induced by systemic MPTP treatment. This sensitivity was associated with greater loss of dopaminergic neurons in the Substantia Nigra pars compacta and terminal dopamine fiber density in the striatum region. Importantly, we also show that viral mediated expression of two other recessive PD-linked familial genes, DJ-1 and Parkin, can protect dopaminergic neurons even in the absence of Pink1. This evidence not only provides strong evidence for the role of endogenous Pink1 in neuronal survival, but also supports a role of DJ-1 and Parkin acting parallel or downstream of endogenous Pink1 to mediate survival in a mammalian in vivo context.

  19. Do consanguineous parents of a child affected by an autosomal recessive disease have more DNA identical-by-descent than similarly-related parents with healthy offspring? Design of a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teeuw, M.E.; Henneman, L.; Bochdanovits, Z.; Heutink, P.; Kuik, D.J.; Cornel, M.C.; ten Kate, L.P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The offspring of consanguineous relations have an increased risk of congenital/genetic disorders and early mortality. Consanguineous couples and their offspring account for approximately 10% of the global population. The increased risk for congenital/genetic disorders is most marked for

  20. Mental toughness in soccer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diment, Gregory Michael

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade mental toughness has been discussed as a significant factor in performance in elite sport. Few studies have explored mental toughness from a behavioral perspective, and no comprehensive lists of mental toughness behaviors have been developed. The aim of the study was to produce...... a systematic observation checklist of mental toughness behavior in professional soccer. Consistent with existing studies, the results created a systematic observation instrument containing 15 mental toughness behaviors. Practical implications include goal-setting, game analysis and self-modeling interventions...

  1. Finding the mental foramen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laher, Abdullah Ebrahim; Wells, Mike; Motara, Feroza; Kramer, Efraim; Moolla, Muhammed; Mahomed, Zeyn

    2016-05-01

    The mental foramen and mental nerve are clinically important landmarks for clinicians across various disciplines including dentists, oral maxillofacial surgeons, emergency physicians and plastic and reconstructive surgeons. To minimize complications related to procedures in the vicinity of the mental foramen and nerve, knowledge of its anatomy and anatomical variations is cardinal to concerned clinicians. In this review, basic anatomy, procedural complications, hard and soft tissue relations, variations between population groups, asymmetry, accessory mental foramina and the use of various radiological modalities to determine the position of the mental foramen are reviewed to provide a more thorough understanding of this important landmark.

  2. [From gene to disease: from the ABCA4 gene to Stargardt disease, cone-rod dystrophy and retinitis pigmentosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, F.P.M.; Maugeri, A.; Klevering, B.J.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2002-01-01

    Autosomal recessive Stargardt disease is caused by mutations in the ABCA4 gene. Mutations in ABCA4 are also found in two-thirds of cases with autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy, and a small fraction of patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. Patients with autosomal recessive

  3. Cerebellar and cerebral atrophy in trichothiodystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Sargent, Michael A.; Poskitt, Kenneth J.; Prendiville, Julie S.

    2005-01-01

    Trichothiodystrophy is a rare neuroectodermal disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance that is characterized by brittle hair, nail dysplasia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, and gonadal failure. We describe a female patient whose cranial MRI revealed almost total lack of myelination in the supratentorial white matter, which is similar to the previously described cases. In addition, there was progressive cerebellar and cerebral atrophy, which has not been well documented in association with trichothiodystrophy. (orig.)

  4. Cerebellar and cerebral atrophy in trichothiodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Sargent, Michael A.; Poskitt, Kenneth J. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Prendiville, Julie S. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Division of Paediatric Dermatology, Department of Paediatrics, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2005-10-01

    Trichothiodystrophy is a rare neuroectodermal disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance that is characterized by brittle hair, nail dysplasia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, and gonadal failure. We describe a female patient whose cranial MRI revealed almost total lack of myelination in the supratentorial white matter, which is similar to the previously described cases. In addition, there was progressive cerebellar and cerebral atrophy, which has not been well documented in association with trichothiodystrophy. (orig.)

  5. Anaesthetic management of a child with panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Sinha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN (Hallervorden-Spatz disease is a rare autosomal recessive chromosomal disorder characterised by progressive neuroaxonal dystrophy. The characteristic features include involuntary movements, rigidity, mental retardation, seizures, emaciation. The anaesthetic concerns include difficult airway, aspiration pneumonia, dehydration, and post-operative respiratory, and renal insufficiency. We report successful anaesthetic management of a 9-year-old intellectually disabled male child with PKAN, scheduled for ophthalmic surgery under general anaesthesia.

  6. Marinesco-Sjogren Syndrome With Sensori Neural Deafness And Primary Optic Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleem M A

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Marinesco-Sjogren syndrome (MSS is a rare genetically determined disorder characterised by bilateral cataract, cerebellar ataxia and mental deficiency. The pattern of inheritance is autosomal recessive but it may be variable. In MSS association of hyperlactacidaemia and hypopyruvicaemia, a defective oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, is supposed. We are reporting three patients of MSS along with sensorineural deafness and optic atrophy from a single Indian family.

  7. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: A rare case report from North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumir Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS is a rare ciliopathic human autosomal-recessive disorder, affecting multiple organ systems. Less than 15 cases have been reported from India. The authors present a classical case of BBS presenting to dermatology outpatient with hypogonadism and features such as marked central obesity, retinal dystrophy, polydactyly, structural renal abnormalities and mental retardation, along with a brief review of the literature. This case exemplifies the need for multidisciplinary management in such cases.

  8. Neuropsychological Symptoms of Juvenile-Onset Batten Disease: Experiences From 2 Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Heather R.; Kwon, Jennifer; Marshall, Frederick J.; de Blieck, Elisabeth A.; Pearce, David A.; Mink, Jonathan W.

    2007-01-01

    Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (Batten disease) is a progressive and fatal autosomal-recessive inherited lysosomal storage disorder of childhood. Core symptoms include vision loss, seizures, and mental and motor decline. This article presents data from 2 studies of neuropsychological function in juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. In the first cross-sectional pilot study, 15 children with genetic or clinicopathologic confirmation of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis comple...

  9. [Mental illness and media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magli, Erica; Buizza, Chiara; Pioli, Rosaria

    2004-06-01

    Many knowledges on the mental disease that the community possesses are turning out of information disclosed from the media. It's common in the press to connect actions of violence and murders to the mental diseases. For this reason, the reader is induced to infer that murders and other violent actions are more frequent in people who have suffered from mentally ill, than in the general population. The mystifying impression provided by media accrues from the fact that these reports are rarely compensated from positive reports. Objective of the present study is to characterize the type of information concerning mental illness diffused from the local daily paper "Giornale di Brescia" in the year 2001. The results show that many articles connote negatively the mental disease. The journalistic sensationalism, denounced facing the speech of the prejudgment in the comparisons of the mentally ill people, seems to still remain, in the considered year of publication, one unchanging tendency.

  10. Disaster mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henderson, Silja; Berliner, Peter; Elsass, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we focus on disaster mental health, particularly theoretical and research-based implications for intervention. The field of disaster mental health research is vast and impossible to cover in a single chapter, but we will visit central research, concepts, and understandings within...... disaster mental health and intervention, and refer to further literature where meaningful. We conclude the chapter with recommendations for further research....

  11. Physiotherapy and Mental Health

    OpenAIRE

    Probst, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Physiotherapy in mental health care and psychiatry is a recognized specialty within physiotherapy. It offers a rich variety of observational and evaluation tools as well as a range of interventions that are related to the patient’s physical and mental health problems based on evidence-based literature and a 50-year history. Physiotherapy in mental health care addresses human movement, function, physical activity and exercise in individual and group therapeutic settings. Additionally, it conne...

  12. Accessory mental foramen

    OpenAIRE

    Balcioglu, Huseyin Avni; Kocaelli, Humeyra

    2009-01-01

    Context: Accessory mental foramen is a rare anatomical variation. Even so, in order to avoid neurovascular complications, particular attention should be paid to the possible occurrence of one or more accessory mental foramen during surgical procedures involving the mandible. Case report: A 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scan of a female patient revealed an accessory mental foramen on the right side of her mandible. Conclusion: A 3D-CT scan should be obtained prior to mandibular sur...

  13. Urban mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Niels; Kristiansen, Christina Blanner; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

    2018-01-01

    areas include loneliness, violence, high crime rates, homelessness, noise and other pollutants, traffic accidents, drug abuse, and insufficiency of mental health services. Summary Urbanization is a global and growing phenomenon that pose significant challenges to mental health and mental health services....... Fast and unstructured urbanization, such as that seen in many developing countries, further exacerbates these challenges. There are promising initiatives emerging including initiatives to end homelessness, to improve access to green areas in urban environments, to provide emergency psychiatric services...

  14. Mental patients in prisons

    OpenAIRE

    ARBOLEDA-FLÓREZ, JULIO

    2009-01-01

    Mental conditions usually affect cognitive, emotional and volitional aspects and functions of the personality, which are also functions of interest in law, as they are essential at the time of adjudicating guilt, labeling the accused a criminal, and proffering a sentence. A relationship between mental illness and criminality has, thus, been described and given as one of the reasons for the large number of mental patients in prisons. Whether this relationship is one of causality or one that fl...

  15. Mental Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Švab, Vesna; Zaletel-Kragelj, Lijana

    2008-01-01

    Mental health conceptualize a state of well-being, perceived self efficacy, competence, autonomy, intergenerational dependence and recognition of the ability to realize one's intellectual and emotional potential. Mental health care are services provided to individuals or communities by agents of the health services or professions to promote, maintain, monitor, or restore mental health. Students will become familiar with extensiveness of the problem, and levels of preventing it. It is illustra...

  16. Salud mental y adicciones

    OpenAIRE

    Boccalari, Paola

    2013-01-01

    La recientemente reglamentada Ley Nacional de Salud Mental 26.657 plantea amplias reformas en el ámbito de la salud pública. Este escrito se detendrá en uno de los puntos de la ley referido al lugar de las adicciones en las políticas de salud mental. Reflexionará sobre las conexiones entre la salud mental y adicciones. Si bien desde la nueva ley las adicciones forman parte de las políticas de salud mental, la “Y” conectora entre ambas, a la vez que unifica ambos campos, también hace pensar en...

  17. Infant mental health in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toran, Hasnah; Squires, Jane; Lawrence, Karen

    2011-03-01

    The Infant Mental Health system in Malaysia is described, beginning with cultural and religious practices that influence mental health practices. Second, a description of the Malaysian mental health system, including historical influences, is given. Third, policy and services for young children with mental health problems are described. Finally, recommendations for future steps for developing an effective infant mental health system are presented, including the development of infant mental health policies by the government, increased personnel training, increased community mental health resources, integration of culture into the mental health system, and finally, development of appropriate screening and assessment instruments and systems. Copyright © 2011 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  18. Mental Health staff views on improving burnout and mental toughness

    OpenAIRE

    Posner, Zoe; Janssen, Jessica; Roddam, Hazel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose- Burnout in mental health staff is acknowledged as a major problem. The purpose of this paper is to gain an understanding of mental health staff views on improving burnout and mental toughness in mental health staff.\\ud Design/methodology/approach-Ten participants from two mental health rehabilitation units across the North West of England took part in a Nominal Group Technique (NGT). Participants consisted of mental health workers from varied roles in order to\\ud capture views from a...

  19. Children's Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Helping Children in Rural Areas Children's Mental Health Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Mental health in childhood means reaching developmental and emotional milestones, and learning healthy social skills and how to cope when ...

  20. Mental Pain and Suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verrocchio, Maria Cristina; Carrozzino, Danilo; Marchetti, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    a systematic review analyzing the relationship between mental pain and suicide by providing a qualitative data synthesis of the studies. Methods: We have conducted, in accordance with PRISMA guidelines, a systematic search for the literature in PubMed, Web Of Science, and Scopus. Search terms were "mental pain...

  1. Deconstructing Mental Rotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Axel

    2014-01-01

    A random walk model of the classical mental rotation task is explored in two experiments. By assuming that a mental rotation is repeated until sufficient evidence for a match/mismatch is obtained, the model accounts for the approximately linearly increasing reaction times (RTs) on positive trials...

  2. Women and mental health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kohen, Dora

    2000-01-01

    ... for the individual. Covering issues including perinatal psychiatric disorders, depression, eating disorders, schizophrenia, and alcohol and drug abuse - from a female perspective - Women and Mental Health will prove a valuable tool for all those working in the fields of mental health. Dora Kohen is a Consultant Psychiatrist and an Honorary Senior...

  3. Mental Retardation in Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Michael; And Others

    This monograph presents a general introduction to the history, classification, and characteristics of mental retardation. It begins with a discussion of the history of mental retardation from ancient Greece and Rome to the present. The beginnings of special education are traced to the early 19th century in Europe. Major influences in treatment of…

  4. Mentalization, embodiment and narrative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køster, Allan

    2017-01-01

    Recently, mentalization theory has risen to fame as a theoretical framework emphasising social cognition as a key issue in its approach to psychopathology and psychotherapy. In this paper, I review and criticise the social-ontological assumptions made by mentalization theory, arguing that, in spi...

  5. Mental activity and culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, Gert Jan

    2018-01-01

    How does culture affect mental activity? That question, applied to the design of social agents, is tackled in this chapter. Mental activity acts on the perceived outside world. It does so in three steps: perceive, interpret, select action. We see that when culture is taken into account, objective

  6. Women and mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unaiza Niaz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Issues related to the mental health of women are a priority these days. Many international organisations working in the field of psychiatry are having sections on it now. This approach can go a long way in the improvement of the available mental health services for this population.

  7. Malawi's Mental Health Service

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    legislation humane treatment for the mentally ill. In 1913 there was a .... way, the person leaves his village and his com- munity at a time when he is ..... fective treatment? How might we predict if an epileptic patient may commit murder? We have in our mental hospital population a number of people who have murdered while ...

  8. National Institute of Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to content Home Health Information Health Information Home Mental Health Information Statistics Consumer Health Publications Help for Mental ... Gordon discusses NIMH priorities and future directions in mental health research. More Autism Awareness Month Autism Spectrum Disorder ( ...

  9. Mental Health and Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Asian American > Mental Health Mental Health and Asian Americans Suicide was the 9th leading ... Americans is half that of the White population. MENTAL HEALTH STATUS Serious psychological distress among adults 18 years ...

  10. Women Veterans and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... violence (IPV) and women veterans More information on women veterans and mental health Recent research shows that about 25to 30 percent of veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan report symptoms of a mental disorder. Untreated mental ...

  11. Looking after your mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2010-01-01

    This leaflet outlines the signs of poor mental health and suggests steps that people can take to promote good mental health. It advises people to talk to someone if they feel that they may have a mental health problem.

  12. Accessory mental foramen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcioglu, Huseyin Avni; Kocaelli, Humeyra

    2009-11-01

    Accessory mental foramen is a rare anatomical variation. Even so, in order to avoid neurovascular complications, particular attention should be paid to the possible occurrence of one or more accessory mental foramen during surgical procedures involving the mandible. A 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scan of a female patient revealed an accessory mental foramen on the right side of her mandible. A 3D-CT scan should be obtained prior to mandibular surgeries so that the presence of accessory mental foramen can be detected, and so that the occurrence of a neurosensory disturbance or hemorrhage can be avoided. Although this anatomical variation is rare, it should be kept in mind that an accessory mental foramen may exist.

  13. [Religiosity and Mental Health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonelli, Raphael Maria

    2016-12-01

    Since 1978, two systematic evidence-based reviews of the available data on religiosity and mental health in the field of psychiatry have been done. More than 70 % found a relationship between level of religious/spiritual involvement and less mental disorder (positive), some found mixed results (positive and negative), and only about 5 % reported more mental disorder (negative), as was originally suggested by Sigmund Freud. There is good evidence that religious involvement is correlated with better mental health in the areas of depression, substance abuse, and suicide; some evidence in stress-related disorders and dementia; insufficient evidence in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and no data in many other mental disorders. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Consanguinity and genetic disorders: Profile from Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamamy, Hanan A.; Ajlouni, Kamel M.; Masri, Amira T.; Al-Hadidy, Azmy M.

    2007-01-01

    With 20-30% of all marriages occurring between first cousins, increasing attention in Jordan is now given to role of consanguinity in the occurrence of genetic diseases. The objective of this study is to define the specific categories of genetic disorders associated with consanguineous marriages. Etiological categories and consanguinity rates were studied among 623 families with genetic syndromes, congenital anomalies or mental retardation, or both, seen at the National Center for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Genetics for the period August 2002 to August 2006. Comparisons were made for first cousin marriage rates in the study group and that for the general population. First cousin marriages constituted 69%, 22% and 41.7% of marriages among families with autosomal recessive conditions (group 1), dominant, X-linked and chromosomal conditions (group 2) and sporadic undiagnosed conditions (group 3) respectively. The differences in the rates of the first cousin matings were highly significant when comparing known figures in the general population with group 1 and 3, but not significant with group 2. Two messages to the public and health care personnel regarding consanguinity can be derived from this study. The first message is that among genetic disorders, only autosomal recessive disorders are strongly associated with consanguinity. The second message is that approximately 30% of sporadic undiagnosed cases of mental retardation, congenital anomalies and dimorphism may have an autosomal recessive etiology with risks of recurrence in future pregnancies. (author)

  15. Homelessness and mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J

    1993-03-01

    In Great Britain 1-2 million people may be homeless. Most homeless people are men, but about 10-25% are women, of whom about half are accompanied by children. Significant mental illness is present in 30-50% of the homeless: functional psychoses predominate; acute distress and personality dysfunction are also prevalent. Co-morbidity of mental illness and substance abuse occurs in 20%, and physical morbidity rates exceed those of domiciled populations. The homeless mentally ill also have many social needs. Pathways to homelessness are complex; deinstitutionalization may be only one possible cause of the increase in the number of homeless people. There is much recent research estimating the extent of mental illness and the characteristics of selected subgroups of accessible homeless people. The evaluation of potential service solutions has received less attention. This review outlines the research, highlights current views on the definition and classification of homeless populations, and offers some guidelines on avenues which need to be explored.

  16. Psychoneuroimmunology of mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Virginia; Uribe, Javiera; Salvat-Pujol, Neus; Palao, Diego; Menchón, José Manuel; Labad, Javier

    2017-10-06

    The immune system is a key element in the organism's defence system and participates in the maintenance of homeostasis. There is growing interest in the aetiopathogenic and prognostic implications of the immune system in mental disorders, as previous studies suggest the existence of a dysregulation of the immune response and a pro-inflammatory state in patients with mental disorders, as well as an increased prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients suffering from autoimmune diseases or receiving immune treatments. This study aims to conduct a narrative review of the scientific literature on the role of Psychoneuroimmunology in mental disorders, with special focus on diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic issues. The development of this body of knowledge may bring in the future important advances in the vulnerability, aetiopathogenic mechanisms, diagnosis and treatment of some mental disorders. Copyright © 2017 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. What Is Mental Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Family Members For Educators For Community and Faith Leaders Conversations in Your Community How To Get Help Get Immediate Help Help for Veterans and Their Families Health Insurance and Mental Health Services Participate in a ...

  18. Women's Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tools and materials offering practical ways to help adolescent girls and adult women achieve better physical, mental, ... org Spanish-speaking operators available National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders 1-847-831-3438 9: ...

  19. Coagulation and Mental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Hoirisch-Clapauch

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The neurovascular unit is a key player in brain development, homeostasis, and pathology. Mental stress affects coagulation, while severe mental illnesses, such as recurrent depression and schizophrenia, are associated with an increased thrombotic risk and cardiovascular morbidity. Evidence indicates that the hemostatic system is involved to some extent in the pathogenesis, morbidity, and prognosis of a wide variety of psychiatric disorders. The current review focuses on emerging data linking coagulation and some psychiatric disorders.

  20. Radiation and mental retardation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pochin, E.E.

    1988-01-01

    A brief article discusses mental retardation in children who had been exposed to ionizing radiation in utero. The time of greatest sensitivity is between the 8th and 15th week after conception and the time of lesser sensitivity between the 16th and 25th weeks. An examination of the thresholds for exposure indicate that severe mental retardation would not result from any present environmental exposures of the public. (U.K.)

  1. Mental sundhed i skolen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen; Grabowski, Dan

    Denne rapport sætter fokus på børn og unges mentale sundhed. Skolen kan gøre en forskel ved at skabe rammerne for en mental sundhedsfremmende skole, der tænker sundhedsbegrebet bredt. Men skolen bør ikke stå alene med ansvaret og derfor er der behov for en samlet strategi. En mentalt sundhedsfrem...

  2. Mental Health, Racism, and Sexism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willie, Charles V., Ed.; And Others

    This volume, successor to the 1973 volume "Racism and Mental Health," presents a range of perspectives on mental health, prejudice, and discrimination. Contributors are of multiracial, multiethnic, and gender-diverse backgrounds. They use their existential experiences to analyze pressing mental health and mental illness issues. Contributions…

  3. Mental stress in college students

    OpenAIRE

    BLECHOVÁ, Romana

    2016-01-01

    The thesis deals with an incidence of mental stress of college students. The thesis is not only focused on the present, but also on the degree of mental stress and the factors that affect the degree of stress. The first objective is to analyse the incidence and impact of mental stress at students of the faculty. A partial objective is to describe the relation of physical activity and mental load, as many authors state that physically active individuals are mentally more resistant. Furthermore...

  4. Public mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindert, Jutta; Bilsen, Johan; Jakubauskiene, Marija

    2017-10-01

    Public mental health (PMH) is a major challenge for public health research and practice. This article is organized in six parts. First, we will highlight the significance of PMH; second, we will define mental health and mental disorders; third, we identify and describe determinants of mental health and mental disorders on which we worked in the past 10 years since the establishment of the PMH section such as social determinants and violence. Fourth, we will describe the development of the EUPHA PMH section and provide details on vulnerable groups in the field of PMH, on violence as a main determinant and on suicide as an outcome which affects all countries in the European region. Fifth, we describe policy and practice implications of the development of PMH and highlight the European dimension of PMH. We will conclude this article by providing an outlook on potential further development of PMH as regards research and policy and practice. Finally, we hope that the EUPHA PMH section will contribute to public health in the next 25 years and we can contribute to improvement of PMH in Europe. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  5. Multimodal mental imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanay, Bence

    2017-07-17

    When I am looking at my coffee machine that makes funny noises, this is an instance of multisensory perception - I perceive this event by means of both vision and audition. But very often we only receive sensory stimulation from a multisensory event by means of one sense modality, for example, when I hear the noisy coffee machine in the next room, that is, without seeing it. The aim of this paper is to bring together empirical findings about multimodal perception and empirical findings about (visual, auditory, tactile) mental imagery and argue that on occasions like this, we have multimodal mental imagery: perceptual processing in one sense modality (here: vision) that is triggered by sensory stimulation in another sense modality (here: audition). Multimodal mental imagery is not a rare and obscure phenomenon. The vast majority of what we perceive are multisensory events: events that can be perceived in more than one sense modality - like the noisy coffee machine. And most of the time we are only acquainted with these multisensory events via a subset of the sense modalities involved - all the other aspects of these multisensory events are represented by means of multisensory mental imagery. This means that multisensory mental imagery is a crucial element of almost all instances of everyday perception. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Double mental foramina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taruska Ventorini Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the location, trajectory, and characteristics of the neurovascular bundles in the jaws is fundamental to reduce risk of injuries to this structure during surgical procedures, especially when anatomical variations are present. The presence of anatomical variations associated with the mental foramen has been reported in some cases and is frequently undervalued in clinical procedures. Sensorial disturbances, such as paresthesia in the lower lip or cheeks, may occur as result of pressure on the mental foramen. These anatomical variations can be detected in clinical practice by imaging exams. Computed tomography has been established as a valuable imaging modality capable of providing in-depth information about maxillofacial structures, allowing detailed evaluation of their topography and anatomical variations, such as additional mental foramina. The objective of this article was to describe a case with double mental foramina that only could be observed in computed tomography images. The use of cone beam computed tomography has increased in dentistry, thus anatomical variations that may have an influence on the diagnosis and treatment planning must be recognized. Have a good knowledge of additional mental foramina may contribute to adequate anesthetic techniques and to avoid misdiagnosis of bone lesions and eventual damages to the nerves and vessel during surgical procedures in that region.

  7. Romantic relationships and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Scott; Holt-Lunstad, Julianne

    2017-02-01

    This paper reviews the research on relationships and mental health. Individuals who are more mentally healthy are more likely to select into relationships, but relationships are also demonstrably associated with mental health. The type of relationship matters - evidence suggests that more established, committed relationships, such as marriage, are associated with greater benefits than less committed unions such as cohabitation. The association between relationships and mental health is clearly bidirectional, however, stronger effects are observed when mental health is the outcome and relationships are the predictor, suggesting that the causal arrow flows more strongly from relationships to mental health than vice versa. Moreover, improving relationships improves mental health, but improving mental health does not reliably improve relationships. Our review of research corroborates the view that relationships are a keystone component of human functioning that have the potential to influence a broad array of mental health outcomes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Mental health informatics

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Insu; Yellowlees, Peter; Diederich, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces approaches that have the potential to transform the daily practice of psychiatrists and psychologists. This includes the asynchronous communication between mental health care providers and clients as well as the automation of assessment and therapy. Speech and language are particularly interesting from the viewpoint of psychological assessment. For instance, depression may change the characteristics of voice in individuals and these changes can be detected by a special form of speech analysis. Computational screening methods that utilise speech and language can detect subtle changes and alert clinicians as well as individuals and caregivers. The use of online technologies in mental health, however, poses ethical problems that will occupy concerned individuals, governments and the wider public for some time. Assuming that these ethical problems can be solved, it should be possible to diagnose and treat mental health disorders online (excluding the use of medication).

  9. Mental Health Ethnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringer, Agnes

    2017-01-01

    hospitalized, but to get inside the contemporary psychiatric institution and to participate in the social world of patients and professionals, I had to experiment with different ethnographic approaches. Ethnographies of mental health have become increasingly rare, and much research on language in psychiatric......In 2010, I began a PhD study to examine how professionals and patients talked to—and about—each other in mental health institutions in Denmark. One year later, I found myself chain-smoking, dressed in baggy clothing, and slouching on a sofa in a closed psychiatric ward. I had not myself been...... institutions is done by interview research. My study involved observing and participating in the day-to-day life at two mental health facilities: an outpatient clinic and an inpatient closed ward. The case study provides an account of some of the specific methodological problems and unanticipated events...

  10. Mental Fatigue Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery V. Rozhentsov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article offers the method for evaluation of mental fatigue, based on the method of paired light pulses. Ten pre-trained test men with normal vision, aged 18–20 participated in the experiment. Testees were showed subsequent paired light pulses at a 200 ms interval, divided by initial interpulse interval of 70 ms, recurring at the fixed time interval of 1 s. Testees determined the threshold interpulse interval, at which the two pulses in a pair merged into one, three times, using the method of successive approximation. Then testees solved algebraic equations with several unknowns for two hours. The threshold interpulse interval was determined three times every 20 minutes in the course of equations solving. The degree of mental fatigue DMF was calculated, using the formula: DMFi = (TPIi – TPI0 100% / TPIi; i = 1, 2, … , n, where DMFi is the degree of mental fatigue at the i-th measurement; TPIi is average arithmetic duration of threshold interpulse interval at the i-th measurement; TPI0 is average arithmetic duration of threshold interpulse interval before algebraic equations solving; n is the dimension of threshold interpulse interval measurement in the course of algebraic equations solving. After 20 minutes of work, the degree of mental fatigue of one of the testees was 9.5 %, rose to 21 % by the end of the first hour and exceeded 39 % by the end of the second hour. Similar dynamics of mental fatigue was observed in all testees, but its development and the degree of fatigue are individual. To prevent fatigue and ensure high level of efficiency one should set the individual schedule and rest pauses duration during mental activity.

  11. School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegria, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to…

  12. Teacher Candidate Mental Health and Mental Health Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dods, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Providing teacher candidates with a strong foundation in mental health literacy during their teacher education program is crucial in ensuring novice teachers are prepared to support the mental health needs of their students. In addition to responding to students, teacher candidates are typically at an age when mental health disorders are common…

  13. Mental Illness in Persons with Mental Retardation: ARC Facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Linda R.; Wimmer, Sharon

    This brief factsheet presents information on mental illness in mentally retarded persons. The most prevalent disorders found in this population are schizophrenia, organic brain syndrome, adjustment disorders, personality disorders, depression, and behavioral problems. Few standardized methods of assessment exist for the diagnosis of mental illness…

  14. Dystonia: Emotional and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support Frequently Asked Questions Faces of Dystonia Emotional & Mental Health Although dystonia is a movement disorder that impacts ... emotion as well as muscle movement. For years, mental health professionals have recognized that coping with a chronic ...

  15. Cities and Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruebner, Oliver; Rapp, Michael A; Adli, Mazda; Kluge, Ulrike; Galea, Sandro; Heinz, Andreas

    2017-02-24

    More than half of the global population currently lives in cities, with an increasing trend for further urbanization. Living in cities is associated with increased population density, traffic noise and pollution, but also with better access to health care and other commodities. This review is based on a selective literature search, providing an overview of the risk factors for mental illness in urban centers. Studies have shown that the risk for serious mental illness is generally higher in cities compared to rural areas. Epidemiological studies have associated growing up and living in cities with a considerably higher risk for schizophrenia. However, correlation is not causation and living in poverty can both contribute to and result from impairments associated with poor mental health. Social isolation and discrimination as well as poverty in the neighborhood contribute to the mental health burden while little is known about specific interactions between such factors and the built environment. Further insights on the interaction between spatial heterogeneity of neighborhood resources and socio-ecological factors is warranted and requires interdisciplinary research.

  16. Help for Mental Illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that participate with your plan. Mental Health and Addiction Insurance Help : This website from the U.S. Department ... in the Health & Education section. The website is mobile and print-friendly. Printed ... eastern time, M-F Phone: 1-866-615-6464 TTY: 1-301-443- ...

  17. Mental retirement and schooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingley, Paul; Martinello, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We assess the validity of differences in eligibility ages for early and old age pension benefits as instruments for estimating the effect of retirement on cognitive functioning. Because differences in eligibility ages across country and gender are correlated with differences in years of schooling...... of the “mental retirement” effects which have recently been found...

  18. Recovery from mental illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kirsten Schultz; Friis, Vivi Soegaard; Haxholm, Birthe Lodahl

    2015-01-01

    Mental health services strive to implement a recovery-oriented approach to rehabilitation. Little is known about service users' perception of the recovery approach. The aim is to explore the service user's perspectives on facilitators and barriers associated with recovery. Twelve residents living...

  19. Mini mental state examination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kørner, Ejnar Alex; Lauritzen, Lise; Wang, August

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) is widely used in Denmark, but often in non-validated versions. In 2000 a cross-sectional workgroup decided on a new common version of the MMSE with a corresponding manual, which is validated for the first time in the present study. MATERIALS...

  20. Mental sundhed i skolen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen

    Baggrund: Skolebørns opfattelse af sundhed har i høj grad noget med deres selvbilleder, trivsel og sociale inklusion at gøre. Det viser en lang række nyere undersøgelser, der alle peger på, at det er nødvendigt at skærpe opmærksomheden på børn og unges mentale sundhed. Internationalt er der...... udviklet og afprøvet en række pædagogiske programmer, der kan bruges til at igangsætte aktiviteter, der fremmer børn og unges mentale sundhed i skolen. Især i USA, Australien og Storbritannien har der været fokus på evidensbaseret praksis og praksisbaseret evidens i denne sammenhæng. I Danmark har man ikke...... på sammen måde tilgængelig systematiseret viden herom. Sundhedsstyrelsen har gennem de senere år prioriteret indsatser og fremskrivning af evidensgrundlag til fremme af mental sundhed højt. Betydningen af børns mentale sundhed og overvejelser om, hvilken slags evidens der er behov for på dette område...

  1. Mental Recreation in Wonderland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendlebury, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The author argues that children's books are not, as commonly held, either didactic or entertaining and that successful juvenile literature teaches what Lewis Carroll, who wrote "Alice in Wonderland," termed "mental recreation." Pendlebury contends that learning and play, far from being opposites, can closely resemble one…

  2. Nations for Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available La Organización Mundial de la Salud ha establecido un programa especial denominado "Naciones unidas para la salud mental" con el fin de fomentar la salud mental en poblaciones subatendidas, con particular énfasis en las mujeres, los niños, los adolescentes, los refugiados y los pueblos indígenas. Uno de los objetivos del programa es crear una mayor conciencia entre el público y los gobiernos acerca del costo social y económico de los trastornos mentales y del abuso de sustancias. Un segundo objetivo es identificar y promover estrategias de colaboración para mejorar la salud mental que se puedan poner en práctica por medio de proyectos de cooperación técnica de nivel nacional dirigidos por las organizaciones del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, en colaboración con otras organizaciones internacionales gubernamentales y no gubernamentales. Ya están en marcha varios proyectos de demostración y otros se están planificando.

  3. Nations for Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available La Organización Mundial de la Salud ha establecido un programa especial denominado "Naciones unidas para la salud mental" con el fin de fomentar la salud mental en poblaciones subatendidas, con particular énfasis en las mujeres, los niños, los adolescentes, los refugiados y los pueblos indígenas. Uno de los objetivos del programa es crear una mayor conciencia entre el público y los gobiernos acerca del costo social y económico de los trastornos mentales y del abuso de sustancias. Un segundo objetivo es identificar y promover estrategias de colaboración para mejorar la salud mental que se puedan poner en práctica por medio de proyectos de cooperación técnica de nivel nacional dirigidos por las organizaciones del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, en colaboración con otras organizaciones internacionales gubernamentales y no gubernamentales. Ya están en marcha varios proyectos de demostración y otros se están planificando.

  4. Carga Mental e Ergonomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Corrêa

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo investiga a utilidade e a possibilidade de uso da base teórica de Carga Mental no trabalho, em uma situação de trabalho específica no que se refere aos seus aspectos ergonômicos.

  5. [Neuroscience of mental flexibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janka, Zoltán

    2017-11-01

    Mental flexibility enabling shifts from the usual prepotent behaviour to new strategies and solutions is a significant factor in the successful adaptation to the changing environment. Components of mental flexibility comprise attention, salience detection, inhibition, working memory and switch processes which can be measured by neurocognitive tests. Data derived from examinations by the methods of cognitive neuroscience can be compared to the features, observed under resting state and during task performance, of brain structures and functions. Studying central nervous system correlates of mental flexibility by imaging, neurobiological, and pharmacological techniques revealed that certain cerebral regions (prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate and insula, striatum, inferior parietal lobule) with their network connectivities, and some neurotransmitters (e.g. dopamine) have profound roles in this respect. Flexibility shares some similarities with artistic/scientific/everyday creativity and openness as a personality trait and this is also reflected in neurobiological parameters. According to precedents in art history, the public reception and acceptance of nonconform avant-garde artistic products are also dependent on flexibility and openness. Alterations of mental flexibility have been found in diseases (psychiatric and others), and in stress situations. Although flexible switch is generally considered as positive and beneficial, under certain conditions advantages might arise from keeping stability maintaining customs, conventions, and traditions. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(45): 1771-1786.

  6. Teen Mothers' Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SmithBattle, Lee; Freed, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Psychological distress is common in teen mothers. High rates of distress are attributed to teen mothers' childhood adversities and the challenges of parenting in the context of chronic stress, cumulative disadvantage, and limited social support. We describe the prevalence of psychological distress in teen mothers; what is known about its origins and impact on mothers and children; factors that promote teen mothers' mental health and resilience; and the many barriers that make it difficult to obtain traditional mental healthcare. We also briefly review the few studies that test interventions to improve teen mothers' mental health. Because barriers to traditional mental health treatment are ubiquitous and difficult to remedy, the second article in this two-part series calls for nurses in healthcare settings, schools, and home visiting programs to screen pregnant and parenting teens for adverse childhood experiences and psychological distress, and to integrate strength-based and trauma-based principles into their practice. Creating a supportive setting where past traumas and psychological distress are addressed with skill and sensitivity builds upon teen mothers' strengths and their aspirations to be the best parents they can be. These approaches facilitate the long-term health and development of mother and child.

  7. Mentalization-Based Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Anthony; Fonagy, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The concept of mentalizing has captured the interest and imagination of an astonishing range of people-from psychoanalysts to neuroscientists, from child development researchers to geneticists, from existential philosophers to phenomenologists-all of whom seem to have found it useful. According to the Thompson Reuter maintained Web of Science, the use of the term in titles and abstracts of scientific papers increased from 10 to 2,750 between 1991 and 2011. Clinicians in particular have enthusiastically embraced the idea, and have put it to innovative use in their practices. Mentalization-based treatment (MBT)-making mentalizing a core focus of therapy-was initially developed for the treatment of borderline personality disorder (BPD) in routine clinical services delivered in group and individual modalities. Therapy with mentalizing as a central component is currently being developed for treatment of numerous groups, including people with antisocial personality disorder, substance abuse, eating disorders, and at-risk mothers with infants and children (A. Bateman & Fonagy, 2011). It is also being used with families and adolescents, in schools, and in managing social groups (Asen & Fonagy, 2011; Fonagy et al., 2009; Twemlow, Fonagy, & Sacco, 2005a, 2005b). In this article, we focus on MBT in the treatment of BPD.

  8. Mental health and housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari-Koskinen, O; Karvonen, P

    1976-01-01

    With the present trend away from the designing of individual buildings and towards the systematic planning of whole residential communities, it should be possible to take mental health requirements into account at the planning stage. At present, sociologists are all too seldom consulted on matters of residential planning. When discussing the relationship between housing and mental health one cannot restrict oneself only to the external aspects of the house, but rather one must also consider the opportunities available for the members of the family to satisfy their own needs, both within the home and in its immediate surroundings. Factors which may affect residential requirements include geographical location, type and standard of dwelling and time and continuity of occupation. A move between two districts or groups representing different housing norms and values may lead to withdrawal symptoms in the individual. This may arise equally well from the remoteness of the country districts as from the conflicting pressures brought on by the abundance of contacts available in the large towns. Town life tends to heighten susceptibility to neuroses and personality conflicts. The character of a residential area may affect the mental health of its occupants. Faris & Dunham (4), in studying the incidence of various types of mental illness with an urban population, observed that schizophrenia was most common among people who were in some way isolated from social involvement. The striving for spaciousness in residential areas and the creation of a "summer city" or "garden city" image or a "family-centred way of life" may lead to unexpected problems and have a variety of social consequences. Mental health difficulties have been noted, for example, among housewives in "dormitory" towns or suburbs (11). The institutions required by a community may be grouped into four categories, representing the basic needs of its members. These are (1) economic institutions, (2) social and

  9. Promoting mental health in men

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad, M.

    2013-01-01

    Health promotion is essential to improve the health status and quality of life of individuals. Promoting mental health at an individual, community and policy level is central to reducing the incidence of mental health problems, including self-harm and suicide. Men may be particularly vulnerable to mental health problems, in part because they are less likely to seek help from healthcare professionals. Although this article discusses mental health promotion and related strategies in general, th...

  10. Assessment of Mental Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Glen R; Minagar, Alireza; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2016-02-01

    Assessing the mental status of patients with a neurobehavioral disorder is a critical element in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. This assessment should always be performed after the patient's history it taken and a general physical as well as a neurologic examination is completed. The mental status examination commences with observing the patient's appearance and level of consciousness. The examiner should also pay attention to patient's social behavior, emotional state and mood. There are 3 major means of assessing a patient's mental status. One type attempts to determine if the patient is demented and the severity of the dementia as it pertains to their ability to perform activities of daily living as well as instrumental activities. A second type of assessment utilizes what may be termed as "screening tests" or "omnibus tests". These brief tests are performed independent of the patient's history and examination. The two most frequently used screening tests are the Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). The third means of assessing a patient's mental status is by using specific neuropsychological tests that focus on specific domains of cognition, such as frontal executive functions, attention, episodic verbal and visuospatial memory, declarative knowledge such as language (speech, reading and writing) and arithmetical, as well as visuospatial and perceptual abilities. These neurobehavioral, neuropsychiatric and neuropsychological assessments of patients with a cognitive decline and behavioral abnormalities should often be accompanied by laboratory tests, and neuroimaging that can help determine the underlying pathologic process so that effective therapeutic and management approaches can be provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mental Accounting and Economic Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonides, Gerrit; Ranyard, Rob

    2017-01-01

    This chapter first presents an overview of research into mental accounting and its effects on economic behaviour. It then considers mental accounts posited to broadly categorize financial resources across the life-cycle, and those constructed for specific transactions. Mental accounting has several

  12. Improving Mental Health in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossen, Eric; Cowan, Katherine C.

    2015-01-01

    Students do not leave their mental health at the front door when they come to school. From wellness to serious illness, a student's mental health status is integral to how they think, feel, interact, behave, and learn. Decades of research and experience have laid a solid foundation and framework for effectively providing mental health…

  13. What Is Infant Mental Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osofsky, Joy D.; Thomas, Kandace

    2012-01-01

    Unfortunately, the term "infant mental health" can be confusing for some people because it may be understood as translating into "mental illness." Others may not appreciate that babies and toddlers have the capacity to experience complex emotions. The Guest Editors of this issue of the Journal explore the meaning of infant mental health.

  14. Mental health: More than neurobiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fried, E.; Tuerlinckx, F.; Borsboom, D.

    2014-01-01

    The decision by the US National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to fund only research into the neurobiological roots of mental disorders (Nature 507, 288; 2014) presumes that these all result from brain abnormalities. But this is not the case for many people with mental-health issues and we fear

  15. Cannabis use and mental health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gastel, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Cannabis use has been implicated as a risk factor for mental health problems, (subclinical) psychotic symptoms in particular. If cannabis use was a cause of these problems, cessation would lead to improved public mental health. If cannabis use was a mere consequence of a predisposition for mental

  16. GENETIC DETERMINATIONS OF MENTALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Osadcha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article is devoted to clarifying the role of physicality and psycho-physical characteristics of a person as a preconditions of the mentality forming. It is conducted a retrospective analysis of discourse on the mentality, the history of the concept, its temporal characteristics and collective conditioning. The concept of mentality has been widely studied in various fields of socio-humanities such as: history, psychology, and even marginal context of scientific discourses, including the esoteric. This study attempted to analyse the mentality phenomenon through the prism of the concept of experience. Methodology. The concept of experience was acquired by essential justification through the representatives of the phenomenological approach - the late Edmund Husserl, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Bernhard Valdenfels. On the other hand the concept of mentality as a form of collective unconscious experience was entered to the scientific vocabulary by the representatives of the French historical science - M. Bloch, L. Febvre, J. Le Goff and others. At the intersection of these two methods, historical and phenomenological, the genetic method has been established – as a history of coverage and experience of internalization. Thanks to the application of genetic method the transition of phenomenon into the concept was examined. Novelty. The problem of change dynamics of mental phenomenon, in particular psycho-physical nature of a person, which has been only mentioned in F. Braudel works but has not received the adequate theoretical coverage, is analysed. To explain the practices of physicality and causality of this factor the action component of the cultural the overview of developments of such authors as V. Rozin (2005, M. Epstein (2005, N. Brunov (2003, A. Soares, M. Farhangmehr, A. Shoham (2007, D. Vaskul, F. Vannini Hospital (2012 was committed. Conclusions. The transition to paradoxical behaviour that is oriented on sign, and not on signalling

  17. Contemporary mental health rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killaspy, H

    2014-09-01

    In the United Kingdom, contemporary mental health rehabilitation services evolved during the period of deinstitutionalisation. They focus on people with complex psychosis, a "low volume, high needs" group which is at risk of social exclusion. Without these specialist services, this group is at risk of becoming stuck in a hospital or in other facilities that do not enable them to achieve their optimal level of autonomy. When a "whole system" of rehabilitative care is provided, including specialist inpatient facilities and supported accommodation, the majority are able to progress in their recovery and live successfully in the community. Rehabilitation is a complex intervention; current and further research is needed to identify the specific aspects of treatment and support it delivers that are most effective in enabling recovery and social inclusion for those with the most complex and long-term mental health needs.

  18. The genocidal mentality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifton, R.J.; Markusen, E.

    1990-01-01

    Since the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the world has witnessed the insidious growth of a genocidal system-a constellation of men, weapons, and war-fighting plans which, if implemented, could put an end to life on this planet. In this book, the cast of mind that created and maintains this threat is examined and an alternative, more hopeful direction is suggested. This book draws on the lessons of the Holocaust- and presents a picture of the genocidal mentality. If we are to survive this genocidal mentality must give way to a species self, to a deepened awareness of belonging to a single species. This shift in mind-set would enable us to renounce nuclearism and to envision a genuine human future

  19. Mental illness: psychiatry's phlogiston.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, T

    2001-10-01

    In physics, we use the same laws to explain why airplanes fly, and why they crash. In psychiatry, we use one set of laws to explain sane behaviour, which we attribute to reasons (choices), and another set of laws to explain insane behaviour, which we attribute to causes (diseases). God, man's idea of moral perfection, judges human deeds without distinguishing between sane persons responsible for their behaviour and insane persons deserving to be excused for their evil deeds. It is hubris to pretend that the insanity defence is compassionate, just, or scientific. Mental illness is to psychiatry as phlogiston was to chemistry. Establishing chemistry as a science of the nature of matter required the recognition of the non-existence of phlogiston. Establishing psychiatry as a science of the nature of human behaviour requires the recognition of the non-existence of mental illness.

  20. The genocidal mentality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lifton, R.J.; Markusen, E.

    1990-01-01

    Since the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the world has witnessed the insidious growth of a genocidal system-a constellation of men, weapons, and war-fighting plans which, if implemented, could put an end to life on this planet. In this book, the cast of mind that created and maintains this threat is examined and an alternative, more hopeful direction is suggested. This book draws on the lessons of the Holocaust- and presents a picture of the genocidal mentality. If we are to survive this genocidal mentality must give way to a species self, to a deepened awareness of belonging to a single species. This shift in mind-set would enable us to renounce nuclearism and to envision a genuine human future.

  1. Mental Representations of Weekdays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Ellis

    Full Text Available Keeping social appointments involves keeping track of what day it is. In practice, mismatches between apparent day and actual day are common. For example, a person might think the current day is Wednesday when in fact it is Thursday. Here we show that such mismatches are highly systematic, and can be traced to specific properties of their mental representations. In Study 1, mismatches between apparent day and actual day occurred more frequently on midweek days (Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday than on other days, and were mainly due to intrusions from immediately neighboring days. In Study 2, reaction times to report the current day were fastest on Monday and Friday, and slowest midweek. In Study 3, participants generated fewer semantic associations for "Tuesday", "Wednesday" and "Thursday" than for other weekday names. Similarly, Google searches found fewer occurrences of midweek days in webpages and books. Analysis of affective norms revealed that participants' associations were strongly negative for Monday, strongly positive for Friday, and graded over the intervening days. Midweek days are confusable because their mental representations are sparse and similar. Mondays and Fridays are less confusable because their mental representations are rich and distinctive, forming two extremes along a continuum of change.

  2. Rehabilitation of the Mentally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špela Zgonc

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The Slovenian Association for Mental Health (Šent helps the mentally ill to lead a better life than that possible during hospitalization. In Slovenia, the most frequent mental illness is schizophrenia. People from 18 to 42 years of age come to Šent in need of help but it is a fact causing most anxiety that almost one half of them is aged between 28 and 32 years which means that they are in the most active stage of life. Only a short visit to a psychiatric hospital tells one that this environment is highly non- stimulating and even discouraging for a patient, who sees him- /herself in the mirror of others living in a stigmatizing environ­ ment, which causes him/her to change the con­ sciousness about his/her own abilities. At Šent various activities are provided for them, e. g. foreign language courses, cultural events, excursions, sport activities, etc. For our members residential groups are organized in order to include persons unable to live by themselves. Each year a couple of campings and longer excursions are carried out, there is a group for self-help active, and our members are also being trained for easier jobs.

  3. Exercise Prevents Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnomo, K. I.; Doewes, M.; Giri, M. K. W.; Setiawan, K. H.; Wibowo, I. P. A.

    2017-03-01

    Multiple current studies show that neuroinflammation may contribute to mental illness such as depression, anxiety, and mood disorder. Chronic inflammation in peripheral tissues is indicated by the increase of inflammatory marker like cytokine IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β. Pro-inflammatory cytokine in peripheral tissues can reach brain tissues and activate microglia and it causes neuroinflammation. Psychological stress may led peripheral and central inflammation. Activated microglia will produce pro-inflammatory cytokine, ROS, RNS, and tryptophan catabolizes. This neuroinflammation can promote metabolism changes of any neurotransmitter, such as serotonin, dopamine, and glutamate that will influence neurocircuit in the brain including basal ganglia and anterior cingulated cortex. It leads to mental illness. Exercise give contribution to reduce tissue inflammation. When muscle is contracting in an exercise, muscle will produce the secretion of cytokine like IL-6, IL-1ra, and IL-10. It will react as anti-inflammation and influence macrophage, T cell, monosit, protein Toll-Like Receptor (TLR), and then reduce neuroinflammation, characterised by the decrease of pro-inflammatory cytokine and prevent the activation of microglia in the brain. The objective of the present study is to review scientific articles in the literature related to the contribution of exercise to prevent and ease mental illness.

  4. Congenital Insensitivity to Pain with Anhidrosis (CIPA Manifested with Chronic Osteomyelitis; A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Kucukdurmaz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available      Chronic osteomyelitis is a very rare entity among children. Also congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA is a very rare autosomal-recessive disease  of the nervous system which is one of the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN. Loss of pain, fever due to anhidrosis, recurrent fractures, chronic osteomyelitis, mental retardation, self mutilation, wound ulcers can be seen. We present a 10-year-old boy with loss of generalized pain sensation, chronic osteomyelitis on his right distal femur, bilateral corneal opacities, and decreased mental capacity.

  5. Stigmatization and mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulsum Ozge Doganavsargil Baysal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Stigmatizasyon represent a chronic negative interaction with the environment that most of people with a of diagnosis mental disorders. Different types of stigma may have harmful effects. Poor psychological well being, poor quality of life and poor self esteem are related stigmatization. In this article, definition and mechanism of stigmatization, influenced factors and consequences of stigmatization are reviewed. Stigmatization is a modifiable environmental risk factor. Integrating approaches against stigma in treatment may represent cost-effective way to reduce the risk of relapse and poor outcome occasioned by chronic exposure to stigma. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 239-251

  6. Mindfulness og mental sundhed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen

    2011-01-01

    . In the beginning, cognitive approaches were central, but these have been gradually replaced by spiritual, phenomenological or existential perspectives. The article takes a historical point of departure in Williams James’ (1902) groundbreaking study of spiritual experiences related to 'healthy-mindedness' and 'mind......-cure' and explains a series of characteristics and documented effects of contemporary Buddhist psychological or spiritual inspired practice of mindfulness. It is concluded that mindfulness challenges established health education and the outlined understandings of mental health by breaking with the action orientation...

  7. Chile mental health country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Carmen López

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes main facts about Chile starting with key socio-demographic, socio-economic, political, environmental, epidemiological, social support and social pathology aspects that characterize the context in which current mental and neurological policy and programmes have been put in place since 2000, as part of the National Health Plan and Health Sector Strategy Plan. The 'National Plan for Mental Health and Psychiatry', using a community psychiatry approach, has been partially implemented for people covered by the Public Health Insurance, which comprises 62% of the Chilean population (people with lower income). This paper also describes: the management, population needs and demands, financial resources, human resources in primary care, mental health specialist care and community-based care, physical capital, social capital, provision and processes, and outcomes of the plan. Strengths are analyzed, like the health reform, including its values and principles, the active participation of consumer and family groups as well as mental health NGOs, access to mental health services through primary care, quality assurance of the mental health services delivered to the population and progressive development of a culture of respect for human rights, including those of people with mental illnesses. Finally, difficulties for the advance of mental health care are also enumerated: the low priority still given to mental health compared with physical health by the country's leaders, the insufficient emphasis on mental health in both undergraduate and postgraduate professional training, the strong stigma and discrimination associated with mental illness in the general population and the advocacy by some mental health professionals of the traditional model of care (role of the psychiatric hospital).

  8. Genetics Home Reference: nonbullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... red (erythroderma) and covered with fine, white scales (ichthyosis). Infants with NBCIE may develop infections, an excessive ... 8 links) Genetic Testing Registry: Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis 2 Genetic Testing Registry: Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis ...

  9. EST Table: BY921544 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ar to Low density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) ... similar to Low density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) isoform 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS929848 ovS0 ...

  10. EST Table: FS936166 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ar to Low density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) ... similar to Low density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) isoform 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS929848 fwgP ...

  11. EST Table: FS929848 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DICTED: similar to Low density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia...1| PREDICTED: similar to Low density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) isoform 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS929848 fwgP ...

  12. EST Table: DC540266 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ar to Low density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) ... similar to Low density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) isoform 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS929848 dpe- ...

  13. Rhodopsin mutations are scarcely implicated in autosomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... wide scale studies are needed to determine the genetic variations involved in RP and particularly in the autosomal recessive inheritance. KEYWORDS: Retinitis pigmentosa; Rhodopsin mutations; Autosomal recessive retinitispigmentosa; Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa; Genetic counseling; Electroretinogram ...

  14. Mental models of the operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stary, I.

    2004-01-01

    A brief explanation is presented of the mental model concept, properties of mental models and fundamentals of mental models theory. Possible applications of such models in nuclear power plants are described in more detail. They include training of power plant operators, research into their behaviour and design of the operator-control process interface. The design of a mental model of an operator working in abnormal conditions due to power plant malfunction is outlined as an example taken from the literature. The model has been created based on analysis of experiments performed on a nuclear power plant simulator, run by a training center. (author)

  15. Thailand mental health country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwanarangsan, Porntep; Liknapichitkul, Dusit; Khandelwal, Sudhir K

    2004-01-01

    Thailand, a constitutional monarchy, has undergone a rapid shift in its demography and economy in last two decades. This has put a great burden on the health services, including mental health care of the country. The current emphasis of the Ministry of Public Health is to change its role from health care provider to policymaker and regulator of standards, and to provide technical support to health facilities under its jurisdiction as well as in the private sector. The Department of Mental Health, established in 1994, has laid down a mental health policy that aims to promote mental health care within the community with the help of people's participation in health programmes. Focus has been placed on developing suitable and efficient technology by seeking cooperation both within and outside the Ministry of Public Health. Consequently, the Department of Mental Health has been receiving increasing budgetary allocations. Since there is a paucity of trained manpower, the emphasis is being laid on the utilization of general health care for mental health care. Some of the specific interventions are community services, prison services, psychiatric rehabilitation, and use of media in mental health operations. There have been active efforts towards international cooperation for developing technologies for specific programmes. Private and non-governmental organizations are supported and encouraged to provide mental health care to the marginalized sections of society. Efforts have also been made by the Department of Mental Health to inspect and raise the efficiency of its operations to result in quality service.

  16. Breakfast and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A P

    1998-09-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to study the relationship between breakfast consumption and subjective reports of mental health and health-related behaviours in a general population sample (126 subjects aged between 20 and 79 years). Individuals who consumed a cereal breakfast each day were less depressed, less emotionally distressed and had lower levels of perceived stress than those who did not eat breakfast each day. Those who consumed breakfast had a healthier lifestyle than the others in that they were less likely to be smokers, drank less alcohol and had a healthier diet. However, the relationship between cereal breakfast consumption and mental health did not reflect these differences in the smoking, alcohol consumption and diet. In conclusion, there is an association between breakfast consumption and well-being which cannot entirely be accounted for by differences in other aspects of diet or smoking and alcohol consumption. Further intervention studies are now needed to establish whether causal relationships and mechanisms underlie the associations seen in this study.

  17. Teaching Mental Abacus Calculation to Students with Mental Retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hong

    2006-01-01

    The abacus is a calculating tool that has been used in Asia for thousands of years. Mental abacus calculation is a skill in which an abacus image in the mind is used without the actual physical manipulation of the abacus. Using this method, people can perform extremely rapid and accurate mental calculations. Research indicates that abacus training…

  18. Acute mental health care according to recent mental health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute mental health care according to recent mental health legislation. Part II. Activity-based costing. ABR Janse van Rensburg1, W Jassat2. 1Division of Psychiatry, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. 2School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Abstract.

  19. Acute mental health care and South African mental health legislation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This is the first of three reports on a follow-up review of mental health care at Helen Joseph Hospital (HJH). In this first part, qualitative and quantitative descriptions were made of the services and of demographic and clinical data on acute mental health care users managed at HJH, in a retrospective review of ...

  20. Acute mental health care and South African mental health legislation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mental illness in the regional population HJH is supposed to serve. Therefore, only an analysis of trends for specific cohorts of in-patient users was possible. Both studies - the current review as well as the previous pilot, were retrospective descriptive clinical record reviews of mental health service delivery, training.

  1. Sterilization of the Mentally Ill and the Mentally Retarded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors, Washington, DC.

    Reported were the results of a survey on the sterilization of the mentally ill and the mentally retarded. Thirty-three states responded to the survey. It was found that 17 states have a sterilization statute, but the existence of the statute was explained not to mean that the procedure was used. Sixteen states responded that they did not have a…

  2. Acute mental health care and South African mental health legislation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Reliable data is necessary to facilitate the effective planning, management and restructuring of mental health care facilities. Access to accurate information on clinical conditions, treatment outcomes and expenditure is essential to ensure accountability, quality and cost-effective mental health care. This article is ...

  3. Development of Mental Health Indicators in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyeree; Ahn, Dong Hyun; Song, Jinhee; Hwang, Tae Yeon

    2012-01-01

    Objective Promoting mental health and preventing mental health problems are important tasks for international organizations and nations. Such goals entail the establishment of active information networks and effective systems and indicators to assess the mental health of populations. This being said, there is a need in Korea develop ways to measure the state of mental health in Korea. Methods This paper reviews the mental health indicator development policies and practices of seven organizations, countries, and regions: WHO, OECD, EU, United States, Australia, UK, and Scotland. Using Delphi method, we conducted two surveys of mental health indicators for experts in the field of mental health. The survey questionnaire included 5 domains: mental health status, mental health factor, mental health system, mental health service, and quality of mental health services. We considered 124 potential mental health indicators out of more than 600 from indicators of international organizations and foreign countries. Results We obtained the top 30 mental health indicators from the surveys. Among them, 10 indicators belong to the mental health system. The most important five mental health indicators are suicide rate, rate of increase in mental disorder treatment, burden caused by mental disorders, adequacy of identifying problems of mental health projects and deriving solutions, and annual prevalence of mental disorders. Conclusion Our study provides information about the process for indicator development and the use of survey results to measure the mental health status of the Korean population. The aim of mental health indicator development is to improve the mental health system by better grasping the current situation. We suggest these mental health indicators can monitor progress in efforts to implement reform policies, provide community services, and involve users, families and other stakeholders in mental health promotion, prevention, care and rehabilitation. PMID:23251193

  4. What Do Mental Terms Mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Psychologists and philosophers have long been interested in two questions: (a) What do mental terms mean? and (b) what role do mental terms play in explanations of behavior? In the current sketch I review how mediational neobehaviorism, cognitive psychology, and the radical behaviorism of B. F. Skinner address these questions. In so doing, I seek…

  5. Teenage Pregnancy and Mental Health

    OpenAIRE

    Jacqueline Corcoran

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the intersection between adolescent pregnancy and mental health. The research involving mental health risks for adolescent pregnancy and for parents who are teenagers are discussed. Depression and conduct disorder have emerged with the most attention. Research-based treatment of these disorders in adolescents is presented.

  6. Teenage Pregnancy and Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Corcoran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the intersection between adolescent pregnancy and mental health. The research involving mental health risks for adolescent pregnancy and for parents who are teenagers are discussed. Depression and conduct disorder have emerged with the most attention. Research-based treatment of these disorders in adolescents is presented.

  7. Substance Use and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Alcohol Tobacco Learn More Substance Use and Mental Health Drugs and Alcohol Did you know that addiction ... Plus – also en Español Treatment Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA): SAMHSA’s National Helpline: 1-800-662- ...

  8. Crossing borders via mental bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Dirk

    administration, and in specific on the attempt to initiate and promote cross-border regional integration via the building of mental bridges between Danish and German parts of the Femern Belt Region. Here one of the first projects aiming primarily at building mental bridges in the Femern Belt Region...

  9. The Nevada mental health courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, George B

    2010-01-01

    The deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill which started in the 1960s greatly contributed to the overcrowding of judicial systems throughout the world. In the ensuing years, the actors involved in the adversarial system present in United States courts, a system that is primarily interested in assessing the culpability of the offender, have come to realize that the system is lacking therapeutic and reintegrative approaches to offenders, especially those who are mentally ill. Therapeutic jurisprudence, an interdisciplinary science, addresses this problematic situation of the mentally ill. It offers a fresh insight into the potentially beneficial and detrimental effects of legal decisions and views one of the roles of law as that of a healing agent. At present, many states have instituted mental health courts based on these concepts, incorporating previous drug court experiences. Their goal is to avoid the criminalization of the mentally ill and their recidivism through the creation of special programs. This article describes the mental health court programs of Washoe County and Clark County, Nevada, their organization, their therapeutic goals, and their success in keeping mentally ill offenders out of the correctional system, while improving their mental condition. In so doing, the program has lightened the load of the overburdened courts and has greatly diminished the financial burden incurred for court trials and jail and prison stays. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. International Students and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes-Mewett, Helen; Sawyer, Anne-Maree

    2016-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, reports of increased rates of mental ill health among young people worldwide have received much attention. Several studies indicate a greater incidence of mental health problems among tertiary students, compared with the general population, and higher levels of anxiety, in particular, among international students compared…

  11. Mental Models: A Robust Definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rook, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The concept of a mental model has been described by theorists from diverse disciplines. The purpose of this paper is to offer a robust definition of an individual mental model for use in organisational management. Design/methodology/approach: The approach adopted involves an interdisciplinary literature review of disciplines, including…

  12. X-linked mental retardation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ropers, H.H.; Hamel, B.C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Genetic factors have an important role in the aetiology of mental retardation. However, their contribution is often underestimated because in developed countries, severely affected patients are mainly sporadic cases and familial cases are rare. X-chromosomal mental retardation is the exception to

  13. School Mental Health Consultation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, John A.

    The goals of the School Mental Health Consultation Program, a cooperative effort of the Children and Youth Service at High Plains Mental Health Center and the Unified School District 489 in Hays, Kansas, are to evaluate students' behavioral problems, to assess how students' difficulties affect teachers, and to help the consultee assess the…

  14. VA National Mental Health Statistics - 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — VAMC-level statistics on the prevalence, mental health utilization, non-mental health utilization, mental health workload, and psychological testing of Veterans with...

  15. Mental Health Concerns: Veterans & Active Duty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dialing 1-800-273-8255 and pressing 1. Mental Health Concerns There are three primary mental health concerns ... care or call 911. How Will Asking for Mental Health Treatment Affect My Career? Military personnel have always ...

  16. Cultural diversity and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalkrishnan, Narayan; Babacan, Hurriyet

    2015-12-01

    Cultural diversity and its impact on mental health has become an increasingly important issue in a globalised world where the interactions between cultures continue to grow exponentially. This paper presents critical areas in which culture impacts on mental health, such as how health and illness are perceived, coping styles, treatment-seeking patterns, impacts of history, racism, bias and stereotyping, gender, family, stigma and discrimination. While cultural differences provide a number of challenges to mental health policy and practice they also provide a number of opportunities to work in unique and effective ways towards positive mental health. Ethno-specific approaches to mental health that incorporate traditional and community-based systems can provide new avenues for working with culturally diverse populations. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  17. [Mentalization and theory of mind].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyl, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    Both concepts, mentalization and the theory of mind, describe metacognitive processes. Mentalization mainly concerns the reflection of affective mental states. In contrast, theory of mind focuses on epistemic states such as beliefs, intentions and persuasions. Gender differences have proved to be relevant for both, the development of mentalization and the theory of mind. However, there are few studies and findings are inconsistent. In an own study, we investigated the relationship between early competences in metacognition (tested in a false-belief-task second order) and narrative skills of kindergarten children. Results show that children who had successfully passed the theory of mind test tended to face conflicts more directly in the stories. In consequence, these children showed less narrative avoidance. However, differences were only found in girls and not in boys. The precise understanding of developmental differences in metacognition between girls and boys may be an important aspect with regards to improving mentalization based therapy of children.

  18. Disaster medicine. Mental care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haginoya, Masato; Shimoda, Kazutaka

    2012-01-01

    Described are 5 essential comments of view concerning the post-disaster psychiatric care through authors' experience at the aid of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami including Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident. Firstly, at the acute phase of disaster, the ensured safe place, sleep and rest are necessary as a direct aid of sufferers and their family. Insomnia is seen in many of them and can partly be a prodrome of disorders like post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). US Psychological First Aid (PFA) is useful for a guide of the initial aid for disaster, and translated Japanese version is available free. Public anxiety as a psychological effect can be caused even out of the disaster-stricken area by such factors as on-site news reports (inducing identification), internet information, economical and social confusion, forecasted radiation hazard, etc. Cool-headed understanding is required for them and particularly for complicated radiological information. The system for psychiatric treatment is needed as exemplified by its temporary lack due to the radiation disaster near the Plant and consequent prompt dispatch of psychiatrists from Dokkyo Medical University. Survived sufferers' grief and bereavement are said to tend to last long, to be complicated and deteriorated, indicating the necessity of management of continuous mental health. Alcoholism as a result to avoid those feelings should be noted. Finally, pointed out is the mental care for supporters working for recovery from the disaster, like policeman, Self-Defense Force member, fireman, doctor, nurse, officer, volunteer and many others concerned, because PTSD prevalence is reported to amount to 12.4% of rescue and recovery workers of US World Trade Center Disaster (9.11) even 2-3 years after. (T.T.)

  19. Smartphone Applications for Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovic, Ana; Vona, Pamela L; Santostefano, Antonella M; Ciaravino, Samantha; Miller, Elizabeth; Stein, Bradley D

    2016-07-01

    Many adolescents and adults do not seek treatment for mental health symptoms. Smartphone applications (apps) may assist individuals with mental health concerns in alleviating symptoms or increasing understanding. This study seeks to characterize apps readily available to smartphone users seeking mental health information and/or support. Ten key terms were searched in the Apple iTunes and Google Play stores: mental health, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, bipolar, trauma, trauma in schools, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), child trauma, and bullying. A content analysis of the first 20 application descriptions retrieved per category was conducted. Out of 300 nonduplicate applications, 208 (70%) were relevant to search topic, mental health or stress. The most common purported purpose for the apps was symptom relief (41%; n = 85) and general mental health education (18%; n = 37). The most frequently mentioned approaches to improving mental health were those that may benefit only milder symptoms such as relaxation (21%; n = 43). Most app descriptions did not include information to substantiate stated effectiveness of the application (59%; n = 123) and had no mention of privacy or security (89%; n = 185). Due to uncertainty of the helpfulness of readily available mental health applications, clinicians working with mental health patients should inquire about and provide guidance on application use, and patients should have access to ways to assess the potential utility of these applications. Strategic policy and research developments are likely needed to equip patients with applications for mental health, which are patient centered and evidence based.

  20. How to be Brilliant at Mental Arithmetic

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, Beryl

    2010-01-01

    How to be Brilliant at Mental Arithmetic addresses the twin pillars of mental arithmetic - mental recall and mental agility. Mental recall depends on familiarity with number bonds and plenty of opportunity to practise. Mental agility depends more on confidence with the number system and the four operations. Using the worksheets in this book, students will learn about: tens and units; addition, subtraction, multiplication and division; addition shortcuts; product squares; quick recall; number se

  1. Mental Health Treatment and Criminal Justice Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Frank; Thomas G. McGuire

    2010-01-01

    Are many prisoners in jail or prison because of their mental illness? And if so, is mental health treatment a cost-effective way to reduce crime and lower criminal justice costs? This paper reviews and evaluates the evidence assessing the potential of expansion of mental health services for reducing crime. Mental illness and symptoms of mental illness are highly prevalent among adult and child criminal justice populations. The association between serious mental illness and violence and arrest...

  2. Mental Illness, Healthcare, and Homelessness in Mississippi

    OpenAIRE

    Tamara Stewart

    2017-01-01

    Mental illness is prevalent among the homeless population and the rate of mentally ill homeless individuals has increased since deinstitutionalization. There is little information about homeless population mental health and access to mental healthcare. This study sought to describe the mental health status and utilization of mental healthcare services among homeless individuals in Mississippi. This is a cross-sectional study with 3,375 adults participants. There were 58% males, 42% females, 4...

  3. HUMAN CELLS IN CULTURE: REVISlTED*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    advantages, e.g. the generation time is reduced to about. 1/10000 that of the ... or less reflects the cellular biology of the donor tissut:'Y .... X-linked. Autosomal recessive. Autosomal recessive. Autosomal recessive mothers of affected males, however, show that only 50% of the cell population is defective, which furnishes an.

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-1207 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .1| polycystic kidney and hepatic disease 1 (autosomal recessive) [Homo sapiens] emb|CAH72782.1| polycystic ...kidney and hepatic disease 1 (autosomal recessive) [Homo sapiens] emb|CAI16677.1| polycystic kidney and hepatic disease 1 (autos...ney and hepatic disease 1 (autosomal recessive) [Homo sapiens] NP_733842.2 0.0 87% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FCAT-01-1153 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .1| polycystic kidney and hepatic disease 1 (autosomal recessive) [Homo sapiens] emb|CAH72782.1| polycystic ...kidney and hepatic disease 1 (autosomal recessive) [Homo sapiens] emb|CAI16677.1| polycystic kidney and hepatic disease 1 (autos...ney and hepatic disease 1 (autosomal recessive) [Homo sapiens] NP_733842.2 0.0 76% ...

  6. Disaster Management: Mental Health Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Math, Suresh Bada; Nirmala, Maria Christine; Moirangthem, Sydney; Kumar, Naveen C.

    2015-01-01

    Disaster mental health is based on the principles of ‘preventive medicine’ This principle has necessitated a paradigm shift from relief centered post-disaster management to a holistic, multi-dimensional integrated community approach of health promotion, disaster prevention, preparedness and mitigation. This has ignited the paradigm shift from curative to preventive aspects of disaster management. This can be understood on the basis of six ‘R’s such as Readiness (Preparedness), Response (Immediate action), Relief (Sustained rescue work), Rehabilitation (Long term remedial measures using community resources), Recovery (Returning to normalcy) and Resilience (Fostering). Prevalence of mental health problems in disaster affected population is found to be higher by two to three times than that of the general population. Along with the diagnosable mental disorders, affected community also harbours large number of sub-syndromal symptoms. Majority of the acute phase reactions and disorders are self-limiting, whereas long-term phase disorders require assistance from mental health professionals. Role of psychotropic medication is very limited in preventing mental health morbidity. The role of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in mitigating the mental health morbidity appears to be promising. Role of Psychological First Aid (PFA) and debriefing is not well-established. Disaster management is a continuous and integrated cyclical process of planning, organising, coordinating and implementing measures to prevent and to manage disaster effectively. Thus, now it is time to integrate public health principles into disaster mental health. PMID:26664073

  7. Disaster Management: Mental Health Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Math, Suresh Bada; Nirmala, Maria Christine; Moirangthem, Sydney; Kumar, Naveen C

    2015-01-01

    Disaster mental health is based on the principles of 'preventive medicine' This principle has necessitated a paradigm shift from relief centered post-disaster management to a holistic, multi-dimensional integrated community approach of health promotion, disaster prevention, preparedness and mitigation. This has ignited the paradigm shift from curative to preventive aspects of disaster management. This can be understood on the basis of six 'R's such as Readiness (Preparedness), Response (Immediate action), Relief (Sustained rescue work), Rehabilitation (Long term remedial measures using community resources), Recovery (Returning to normalcy) and Resilience (Fostering). Prevalence of mental health problems in disaster affected population is found to be higher by two to three times than that of the general population. Along with the diagnosable mental disorders, affected community also harbours large number of sub-syndromal symptoms. Majority of the acute phase reactions and disorders are self-limiting, whereas long-term phase disorders require assistance from mental health professionals. Role of psychotropic medication is very limited in preventing mental health morbidity. The role of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in mitigating the mental health morbidity appears to be promising. Role of Psychological First Aid (PFA) and debriefing is not well-established. Disaster management is a continuous and integrated cyclical process of planning, organising, coordinating and implementing measures to prevent and to manage disaster effectively. Thus, now it is time to integrate public health principles into disaster mental health.

  8. Students′ perception about mental illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Mahto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In developing countries like India, there are evidences that stigma associated with mental illness is increasing. As in parts of the developing world, with advancement of urbanization and rapid industrialization, people tend to react in a very peculiar and biased way when they confront a mentally ill person. Materials and Methods: The present study aimed to find out students′ opinion about mental illness. A total of 100 students (50 male and 50 female from Ranchi University were purposively recruited for the study, and the 51-item Opinion about Mental Illness (OMI Scale was administered. Results: Majority of the students were from Hindu families, of whom 42 (84% were males and 38 (68% were females. With regard to OMI scale, the item, viz., ′The law should allow a woman to divorce her husband as soon as he has been confined in mental hospital with a severe mental illness′, both male (46% and female (56% students were neutral (significant at 0.014, P < 0.05. Conclusion: Overall no significant level of difference emerged between male and female students with regard to opinion about mental illness.

  9. Competencies for disaster mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Richard V; Burkle, Frederick M; Walsh, Lauren E; North, Carol S

    2015-03-01

    Competencies for disaster mental health are essential to domestic and international disaster response capabilities. Numerous consensus-based competency sets for disaster health workers exist, but no prior study identifies and discusses competency sets pertaining specifically to disaster mental health. Relevant competency sets were identified via MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EBSCO, and Google Scholar searches. Sixteen competency sets are discussed, some providing core competencies for all disaster responders and others for specific responder groups within particular professions or specialties. Competency sets specifically for disaster mental health professionals are lacking, with the exception of one set that focused only on cultural competence. The identified competency sets provide guidance for educators in developing disaster mental health curricula and for disaster health workers seeking education and training in disaster mental health. Valid, criterion-based competencies are required to guide selection and training of mental health professionals for the disaster mental health workforce. In developing these competencies, consideration should be given to the requirements of both domestic and international disaster response efforts.

  10. Cognitive mapping in mental time travel and mental space navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Baptiste; van Wassenhove, Virginie

    2016-09-01

    The ability to imagine ourselves in the past, in the future or in different spatial locations suggests that the brain can generate cognitive maps that are independent of the experiential self in the here and now. Using three experiments, we asked to which extent Mental Time Travel (MTT; imagining the self in time) and Mental Space Navigation (MSN; imagining the self in space) shared similar cognitive operations. For this, participants judged the ordinality of real historical events in time and in space with respect to different mental perspectives: for instance, participants mentally projected themselves in Paris in nine years, and judged whether an event occurred before or after, or, east or west, of where they mentally stood. In all three experiments, symbolic distance effects in time and space dimensions were quantified using Reaction Times (RT) and Error Rates (ER). When self-projected, participants were slower and were less accurate (absolute distance effects); participants were also faster and more accurate when the spatial and temporal distances were further away from their mental viewpoint (relative distance effects). These effects show that MTT and MSN require egocentric mapping and that self-projection requires map transformations. Additionally, participants' performance was affected when self-projection was made in one dimension but judgements in another, revealing a competition between temporal and spatial mapping (Experiment 2 & 3). Altogether, our findings suggest that MTT and MSN are separately mapped although they require comparable allo- to ego-centric map conversion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Sufism and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamie, S Haque; Katshu, Mohammad Zia Ul Haq; Uvais, N A

    2013-01-01

    Human experience in, health and disease, always has a spiritual dimension. pirituality is accepted as one of the defining determinants of health and it no more remains a sole preserve of religion and mysticism. In recent years, pirituality has been an area of research in neurosciences and both in the nderstanding of psychiatric morbidity and extending therapeutic interventions it seems to be full of promises. Sufism has been a prominent spiritual tradition in Islam deriving influences from major world religions, such as, Christianity and Hinduism and contributing substantially toward spiritual well-being of a large number of people within and outside Muslim world. Though Sufism started in early days of Islam and had many prominent Sufis, it is in the medieval period it achieved great height culminating in many Sufi orders and their major proponents. The Sufism aims communion with God through spiritual realization; soul being the agency of this communion, and propounding the God to be not only the cause of all existence but the only real existence. It may provide a vital link to understand the source of religious experience and its impact on mental health.

  12. Developing Iraq's mental health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Hamada I; Everett, Anita

    2007-10-01

    As Iraq faces the challenge of securing a sustainable resolution to the current violence, the burden of mental illness is likely to increase dramatically. The impact of Saddam Hussein's dictatorship, the Iran-Iraq war, U.S.-led economic sanctions, the Persian Gulf wars, and the U.S. invasion and subsequent violent insurgency have devastated Iraq's governmental and social infrastructure. Health care delivery across sectors has suffered greatly. During the reconstruction phase, the United States and coalition forces allocated resources to restructure Iraq's health care system. Many multinational organizations, governments, and policy makers had the political will as well as the financial and human resources to greatly influence Iraq's mental health program. However, the lack of an existing mental health plan stifled these efforts. Applying Kingdon's model for policy development, which includes political analysis, problem defining, and proposal drafting, the authors describe the development of Iraq's current mental health policy.

  13. Evolutionary Processes and Mental Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, Herman H.

    1973-01-01

    The author hypothesizes that central nervous system damage of deficiency associated with mental retardation affects primarily those cortical processes which developed at a late stage in man's evolutionary history. (Author)

  14. Bulgaria mental health country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Toma; Mladenova, Maya; Lazarova, Irina; Sotirov, Vladimir; Okoliyski, Mihail

    2004-01-01

    The mental health profile of Bulgaria has been compiled and following analysis of both the factual findings and the process of data collection a report has been prepared. The subject of discussion in the paper concerns several major findings: the discrepancy between what the policy documents state and the actual situation in mental health; the organizational culture, which alienates; and the peculiarities of the process of change and how it is driven under political pressure from outside the country. Analysis extends to encompass the influence of the general health reform on the mental health sector, the deficits of the leadership and how they impact on the effectiveness of the system, and the interdependence between the country's economy and the health sector. A conclusion is made about the need to consolidate the public health approach using the lever of international collaboration in the field of mental health.

  15. Student Attitudes Toward Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare-Mustin, Rachel T.; Garvine, Richard

    1974-01-01

    Inquiry into the initial attitudes toward mental illness of students taking an abnormal psychology class indicates students' concerns and preconceptions and provides a basis for shaping the course to respond to student needs. (JH)

  16. Mentalization and Dialectical Behavior Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Charles R; Choi-Kain, Lois W

    2015-01-01

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) and Mentalization-Based Treatment (MBT) are two approaches to the treatment of borderline personality disorder (BPD). While DBT has the most empirical support, MBT has a small but significant evidence base. Dialectical behavior therapy synthesizes behaviorism, mindfulness, and dialectics, while MBT is conceptually anchored in psychoanalysis, attachment theory, cognitive neuroscience, and developmental psychopathology. While coming from strikingly different orientations, DBT and MBT therapists share more interventions and stances than one might suppose. The central purported active ingredient of MBT is the capacity to mentalize, which is crucial for the formation of secure attachment, and this ability is thought to be weak and unstable in individuals with borderline personality disorder. This article explores the question of whether or not mentalizing is already present in DBT practice, whether it would be compatible with DBT conceptually and practically, and whether a focus on mentalizing would be of use to the DBT therapists and their patients.

  17. Information for global mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Lora, A.; Sharan, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Information is needed for development of mental health (MH) services; and particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LAMICs), where the MH systems are relatively weak. World Health Organization (WHO) has worked intensively during the last 15 years for developing a strategy in the field of MH information. Methods. The paper analyzes WHO instruments developed in this area [MH Atlas series and WHO Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems (WHO-AIMS)]. Results. Data from ...

  18. Mental health in Tamil cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangala, R; Thara, R

    2009-06-01

    Tamil cinema is a vibrant part of the lives of many in south India. A chequered history and a phenomenal growth have made this medium highly influential not only in Tamil Nadu politics, but also in the social lives of the viewers. This paper provides an overview of the growth of Tamil cinema, and discusses in detail the way mental health has been handled by Tamil films. Cinema can be used very effectively to improve awareness about mental health issues.

  19. Konseling Islami Dan Pendidikan Mental

    OpenAIRE

    Lubis, Saiful Akhyar

    2010-01-01

    Islamic Counseling and Mental Education. This paper analyzes the nature of Islamic counseling and its relation to mental education. It isundeniable that due to problems faced in this life man may be hindered from realizing his goals. In reality, however, not every individual is capable of solving his own problem but he needs assistance of others instead. In this context, this paper discusses an approach of what is the so called Islamic counseling. The writer tries to build a paradigm that, as...

  20. Indices of Community Mental Health. A Proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Martin K.

    One of the major problems in measuring community mental health status is the lack of consensus among mental health workers in psychiatry, psychology, sociology, and epidemiology as to what constitutes mental illness. Additionally, changing social mores preclude a definition of mental illness in behavioral terms. An operational definition of mental…

  1. 14 CFR 67.307 - Mental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mental. 67.307 Section 67.307 Aeronautics... STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.307 Mental. Mental standards for a... itself by overt acts. (2) A psychosis. As used in this section, “psychosis” refers to a mental disorder...

  2. 14 CFR 67.207 - Mental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mental. 67.207 Section 67.207 Aeronautics... STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.207 Mental. Mental standards for a... itself by overt acts. (2) A psychosis. As used in this section, “psychosis” refers to a mental disorder...

  3. 14 CFR 67.107 - Mental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mental. 67.107 Section 67.107 Aeronautics... STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.107 Mental. Mental standards for a... itself by overt acts. (2) A psychosis. As used in this section, “psychosis” refers to a mental disorder...

  4. Relationship between mental toughness and physical endurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crust, Lee; Clough, Peter J

    2005-02-01

    This study tested the criterion validity of the inventory, Mental Toughness 48, by assessing the correlation between mental toughness and physical endurance for 41 male undergraduate sports students. A significant correlation of .34 was found between scores for overall mental toughness and the time a relative weight could be held suspended. Results support the criterion-related validity of the Mental Toughness 48.

  5. Mental life in the space of reasons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    2006-01-01

    This paper argues the Wittgensteinian point that we can undo the psychologizing of psychology by conceiving of mental life as lived in the space of reasons. It is argued that mental life - human action, feeling and thinking - is constituted by normative connections and necessities rather than...... that it violates our conception of mental illness as something mental, yet outside the space of reasons...

  6. Combating the Stigma of Mental Illness. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    Many former mental patients see their biggest problem in resuming community life to be their inability to be accepted by other people. The National Institute of Mental Health has worked to remove the stigma associated with mental illness and research has unraveled many of the mysteries about the origins of mental illness. Deinstitutionalization,…

  7. Mental disorder in Canada: an epidemiological perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Streiner, David L; Cairney, John

    2010-01-01

    ..., and analyses the prevalence of several significant mental disorders in the population. The collection also includes essays on stigma, mental disorder and the criminal justice system, and mental health among women, children, workers, and other demographic groups. Focusing on Canadian scholarship, yet wide-reaching in scope, Mental Disorder in C...

  8. Dangerousness and mental health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, J L

    2008-04-01

    Mental health policy development in the UK has become increasingly dominated by the assumed need to prevent violence and alleviate public concerns about the dangers of the mentally ill living in the community. Risk management has become the expected focus of contemporary mental health services, and responsibility has increasingly been devolved to individual service professionals when systems fail to prevent violence. This paper analyses the development of mental health legislation and its impact on services users and mental health professionals at the micro level of service delivery. Historical precedence, media influence and public opinion are explored, and the reification of risk is questioned in practical and ethical terms. The government's newest proposals for compulsory treatment in the community are discussed in terms of practical efficacy and therapeutic impact. Dangerousness is far from being an objectively observable phenomenon arising from clinical pathology, but is a formulation of what is partially knowable through social analysis and unknowable by virtue of its situation in individual psychic motivation. Risk assessment can therefore never be completely accurate, and the solution of a 'better safe than sorry' approach to mental health policy is ethically and pragmatically flawed.

  9. Evolving society and mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipesh Bhagabati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerous issues related to culture, occupation, gender, caste, and health, to name a few, have faced harshness of society from time immemorial. Reasons are debatable, ranging from somewhat understandable to completely unacceptable. There is no doubt that society is dynamic and it has changed its view on many of the issues with passing time. Mental health is one such issue which society has neglected for quite a long time. Even today, mental health and mentally ill people face stigma and discrimination in their family, society, and at their workplace. People do not feel comfortable talking about mental health, even if they know that there cannot be any health without a healthy mind. But, as Albert Einstein has said “learn from yesterday, live for today, and hope for tomorrow”, everything is not lost. The mentally ill patients who were once abandoned and left on their own have now started to get humane care and attention. This article discusses this very pertinent topic of changing society and mental health.

  10. Joubert syndrome: large clinical variability and a unique neuroimaging aspect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leao, Emilia Katiane Embirucu; Lima, Marcilia Martyn; Kok, Fernando; Parizotto, Juliana [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Clinical Hospital. Dept. of Child Neurology; Maia Junior, Otacilio de Oliveira [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Clinical Hospital. Dept. of Child Ophthalmology

    2010-04-15

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by hypotonia, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, ocular abnormalities (e.g. pigmentary retinopathy, oculomotor apraxia and nystagmus), renal cysts and hepatic fibrosis. Respiratory abnormalities, as apnoea and hyperpnoea, may be present, as well as mental retardation. At least seven JS loci have been determined and five genes identified. Herein, we report five children, belonging to independent families, with JS: they shared the same typical MRI abnormality, known as molar tooth sign, but had an otherwise quite variable phenotype, regarding mostly their cognitive performance, visual abilities and extra-neurological compromise. (author)

  11. Cryptophthalmos and Bilateral Renal Agenesis with Cleft Lip and Palate: Fraser Syndrome: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Pabuçcu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder consisting of multiple anomalies including variable expression of cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, abnormal genitalia, malformations of the nose, ear and larynx, renal agenesis, oro-facial clefts, skeletal defects, umbilical hernia and mental retardation. Antenatally detected multiple congenital fetal anomalies during 22nd week of gestation is reported in this paper. Fraser Syndrome was diagnosed according to major and minor criteria. Early antenatal detection is mandatory and clinician should be awere of the high recurrence rates of this syndrome among siblings threatening subsequent pregnancies and should inform affected families.

  12. Paralysis Episodes in Carbonic Anhydrase II Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ibrahim, Alia; Al-Harbi, Mosa; Al-Musallam, Sulaiman

    2003-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder manifest by osteopetrosis, renal tubular acidosis, and cerebral calcification. Other features include growth failure and mental retardation. Complications of the osteopetrosis include frequent bone fractures, cranial nerve compression, and dental mal-occlusion. A hyper-chloremic metabolic acidosis, sometimes with hypokalemia, occurs due to renal tubular acidosis that may be proximal, distal, or more commonly, the combined type. Such patients may present with global hypotonia, muscle weakness or paralysis. We report a case of CA II deficiency with recurrent attacks of acute paralysis which was misdiagnosed initially as Guillian-Barre syndrome.

  13. Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyadev Vadapalli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis is a rare autosomal recessive lipid storage disorder affecting the biosynthetic pathway of bile acids, leading to increased cholestanol formation and its accumulation in various tissues. Patients can present with tendon xanthomas, gait abnormalities, osteoporosis with or without a pathological fracture, diminished vision, intractable diarrhoea, seizures, ataxia, psychosis, and mental retardation. We report a 20-year-old man who presented with multiple recurrent tendon swellings and seizures. The earlier diagnosis and treatment helps in preventing the devastating neurological sequalae of this sinister condition. Treatment with chenodeoxycholic acid is crucial in preventing the progression of this rare disorder.

  14. Genetic Analysis for Two Italian Siblings with Usher Syndrome and Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Domanico

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome is a group of autosomal recessive genetic disorders characterized by deafness, retinitis pigmentosa, and sometimes vestibular areflexia. The relationship between Usher syndrome and mental disorders, most commonly a “schizophrenia-like” psychosis, is sometimes described in the literature. The etiology of psychiatric expression of Usher syndrome is still unclear. We reported a case of two natural siblings with congenital hypoacusis, retinitis pigmentosa, and psychiatric symptoms. Clinical features and genetic analysis were also reported. We analyzed possible causes to explain the high prevalence of psychiatric manifestations in Usher syndrome: genetic factors, brain damage, and “stress-related” hypothesis.

  15. Phenylketonuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearsen, K.D.; Gean-Marton, A.D.; Levy, H.L.; Davis, K.R.

    1989-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal, recessive, inborn error of phenylalanine metabolism. Without diet treatment, PKU leads to mental retardation as well as demyelimation, gliosis, and spongiosis of the white matter. This paper reports cerebral MR imaging prospectively performed on 16 PKU patients (ages, 8-35; IQ levels, 20-120; diet-history range, treated since infancy to no treatment). MR images revealed a spectrum of subtle to advanced demyelination of the posterior periventricular white matter, with frontal lobe involvement in severe cases, but no structural or posterior fossa abnormalities in any cases. No reliable correlation was found, either between MR abnormalities and intelligence or between MR abnormalities and diet history

  16. Chromosomal deletion unmasking a recessive disease: 22q13 deletion syndrome and metachromatic leukodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, A-M; Kirchhoff, M; Nielsen, J E

    2008-01-01

    A deletion on one chromosome and a mutant allele on the other may cause an autosomal recessive disease. We report on two patients with mental retardation, dysmorphic features and low catalytic activity of arylsulfatase A. One patient had a pathogenic mutation in the arylsulfatase A gene (ARSA......) and succumbed to metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD). The other patient had a pseudoallele, which does not lead to MLD. The presenting clinical features and low arylsulfatase A activity were explained, in each patients, by a deletion of 22q13 and, thereby, of one allele of ARSA....

  17. Joubert syndrome: large clinical variability and a unique neuroimaging aspect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leao, Emilia Katiane Embirucu; Lima, Marcilia Martyn; Kok, Fernando; Parizotto, Juliana; Maia Junior, Otacilio de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by hypotonia, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, ocular abnormalities (e.g. pigmentary retinopathy, oculomotor apraxia and nystagmus), renal cysts and hepatic fibrosis. Respiratory abnormalities, as apnoea and hyperpnoea, may be present, as well as mental retardation. At least seven JS loci have been determined and five genes identified. Herein, we report five children, belonging to independent families, with JS: they shared the same typical MRI abnormality, known as molar tooth sign, but had an otherwise quite variable phenotype, regarding mostly their cognitive performance, visual abilities and extra-neurological compromise. (author)

  18. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flodmark, P.; Wattsgaard, C.

    2001-01-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by rib malformations, various degrees of cerebral maldevelopment, mental deficiency, palatal defects, and micrognatia. This syndrome was first described in 1966. The majority of cases are sporadic, but a few instances of familial occurrence have been reported, some with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. Mortality in early age has been high, probably mostly due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to rib abnormalities and flail chest. We report a mother and son with this disorder, suggesting autosomal dominant transmission. (orig.)

  19. Familial dysautonomy (Riley-Day syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward R. Tonholo Silva

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available Familial dysautonomia, also known as Riley-Day syndrome, is a disorder of autonomic nervous system with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Reduction and/or loss of unmyelinated and small myelinated fibers is found, as reduction of dopamine beta-hydroxylase in blood. The diagnosis is based on clinical features: diminished lacrimation, insensitivity to pain, poor temperature control, abolished deep tendon reflexes, postural hypotension, vomiting attacks, poor motor coordenation, and mental retardation. The treatment is symptomatic and many children die during the first years of life, usually as a result of repeated aspiration pneumonia. We report the case of a 1 year-old child with familial dysautonomia.

  20. Bardet-Biedl syndrome presenting with steroid sensitive nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K K Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by postaxial polydactyly, retinitis pigmentosa, central obesity, mental retardation, hypogonadism, and renal involvement. Renal involvement in various forms has been seen in BBS. Cases with nephrotic range proteinuria not responding to steroid have been described in this syndrome. Here we report a case of BBS who presented with nephrotic range proteinuria. The biopsy findings were suggestive of minimal change disease. The child responded well to steroid therapy and remains in remission.

  1. Mental Retardation. Fact Sheet = El Retraso Mental. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet on mental retardation is written in both English and Spanish. It begins with a vignette of a 15-year-old boy with mental retardation. Mental retardation is briefly explained as are some causes of mental retardation. It notes that a diagnosis of mental retardation looks at two things: first, the ability of a person's brain to learn,…

  2. Mentalization based treatment for borderline personality disorder

    OpenAIRE

    BATEMAN, ANTHONY; FONAGY, PETER

    2010-01-01

    Mentalizing is the process by which we make sense of each other and ourselves, implicitly and explicitly, in terms of subjective states and mental processes. It is a profoundly social construct in the sense that we are attentive to the mental states of those we are with, physically or psychologically. Given the generality of this definition, most mental disorders will inevitably involve some difficulties with mentalization, but it is the application of the concept to the tre...

  3. Mental illness disclosure in Chinese immigrant communities

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Fang-pei; Ying-Chi Lai, Grace; Yang, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Support from social networks is imperative to mental health recovery of persons with mental illness. However, disclosing mental illness may damage a person’s participation in networks due to mental illness stigma, especially in Chinese-immigrant communities where social networks (the guanxi network) has specific social-cultural significance. This study focused on mental illness disclosure in Chinese-immigrant communities in New York City. Fifty-three Chinese psychiatric patients were recruite...

  4. Television and the promotion of mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Milošević Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Current media campaigns, realized within national campaigns and actions on mental health prevention and promotion, are considered in this paper, in the context of expert public relation, as well as the whole society, towards mental health. Mental health promotion is determined as a range of activities by which individuals, community and society are being enabled to take control over mental health determinants and to improve it, but also as an action for improvement of mental health posi...

  5. Malaysia mental health country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameshvara Deva, M

    2004-01-01

    Malaysia is a tropical country in the heart of south east Asia with a population of 24 million people of diverse ethnic, cultural and religious backgrounds living in harmony in 330,000 km(2) of land on the Asian mainland and Borneo. Malaysia, which lies on the crossroads of trade between east and west Asia, has an ancient history as a centre of trading attracting commerce between Europe, west Asia, India and China. It has had influences from major powers that dominated the region throughout its history. Today the country, after independence in 1957, has embarked on an ambitious development project to make it a developed country by 2020. In this effort the economy has changed from one producing raw material to one manufacturing consumer goods and services and the colonial health system has been overhauled and social systems strengthened to provide better services for its people. The per capita income, which was under 1,000 US dollars at independence, has now passed 4,000 US dollars and continues to grow, with the economy largely based on strong exports that amount to over 100 billion US dollars. The mental health system that was based on institutional care in four mental hospitals at independence from British colonial rule in 1957 with no Malaysian psychiatrists is today largely based on over 30 general hospital psychiatric units spread throughout the country. With three local postgraduate training programmes in psychiatry and 12 undergraduate departments of psychiatry in the country--all started after independence--there is now a healthy development of mental health services. This is being supplemented by a newly established primary care mental health service that covers community mental health by integrating mental health into primary health care. Mental health care at the level of psychiatrists rests with about 140 psychiatrists most of whom had undertaken a four-year masters course in postgraduate psychiatry in Malaysia since 1973. However, there continues to be

  6. Mental Retardation and Parenting Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Siamaga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Backround: The presence, upbringing and looking after of a mentally retarded child in the family, can become a threat to the mental health of its parents and is the main predisposing factor of stress for the parents.Aim: The purpose of this systematic review is (a to document the contemporary research bibliography related to the stress of parents with mentally retarded children, (b to aggregate the factors and secondary parameters based on the contemporary research related to the influence of the (child’s mental retardation on the parents and (c to show an intercultural aspect regarding the presence of stress to parents with mentally retarded children.Methods: Systematic review of research articles published in scientific journals included in the international academic databases HEAL-LING, SAGE, ELSEVIER, WILSON, SCIENCEDIRECT, MEDLINE, PUBMED, PsycINFO, Cochrane, EMBASE, SCIRUS and CINAHL having as search criteria and key words the terms («parental stress and mental retardation» [MeSH], «parenting stress and persons with special needs» [MeSH], «mental retardation and family problems» [MeSH], «stress and parents» [MeSH], «parenting and stress» [MeSH], «mental delay and parents» [MeSH], «developmental disabilities and family stress» [MeSH], «intellectual handicap and parenting» [MeSH], «maternal stress and child with disabilities» [MeSH].Discussion: The review has proven that all forms of mental retardation have an important -from a statistic point of viewimpacton the parents’ mental health. Anxiety, stress and depression are common symptoms mentioned by the parents.Additionally, there are individual variables such as the husband-wife relationship, the parents’ approach to their child’s disability, the parental strategies used in order to cope with the daily life of the child’s disability and the behavioural problems of their child, all of which contribute to the increase of the level of parental stress

  7. Sports psychiatry: mental health and mental disorders in athletes and exercise treatment of mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströhle, Andreas

    2018-03-21

    Sports psychiatry has developed for the past 3 decades as an emerging field within psychiatry and sports medicine. An International society has been established in 1994 and also national interest groups were implemented, mostly within the national organizations for psychiatry, some also containing the topic of exercise treatment of mental disorders. Where are we now 30 years later? We systematically but also selectively review the medical literature on exercise, sport, psychiatry, mental health and mental disorders and related topics. The number of publications in the field has increased exponentially. Most topics keep remaining on the agenda, e.g., head trauma and concussion, drug abuse and doping, performance enhancement, overtraining, ADHD or eating disorders. Supported by the growing literature, evidence-based recommendations have become available now in many clinical areas. A relatively new phenomenon is muscle dysmorphia, observed in weightlifters, bodybuilders but also in college students and gym users. Further, sports therapy of mental disorders has been studied by more and more high-quality randomized controlled clinical trials. Mostly as a complementary treatment, however, for some disorders already with a 1a evidence level, e.g., depression, dementia or MCI but also post-traumatic stress disorder. Being grown up and accepted nowadays, sports psychiatry still represents a fast-developing field. The reverse side of the coin, sport therapy of mental disorders has received a scientific basis now. Who else than sports psychiatry could advance sport therapy of mental disorders? We need this enthusiasm for sports and psychiatry for our patients with mental disorders and it is time now for a broadening of the scope. Optimized psychiatric prevention and treatment of athletes and ideal sport-related support for individuals with mental disorders should be our main purpose and goal.

  8. Mental Illness, Healthcare, and Homelessness in Mississippi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Stewart

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mental illness is prevalent among the homeless population and the rate of mentally ill homeless individuals has increased since deinstitutionalization. There is little information about homeless population mental health and access to mental healthcare. This study sought to describe the mental health status and utilization of mental healthcare services among homeless individuals in Mississippi. This is a cross-sectional study with 3,375 adults participants. There were 58% males, 42% females, 45% Caucasian, 54% African Americans, and 1% other minorities (Asian, Indian, and Pacific Islander at intake into Mississippi United to End Homelessness' (MUTEH Homeless Management Information System (HMIS program. The data was collected during the initial screening of homeless individuals. The screening documented mental illness and utilization of healthcare. Frequency tables and Chi-SQ was used to test the relationship between mental illness and utilization of mental healthcare among the homeless in Mississippi. The result of the analysis revealed that 83% of the chronically homeless individual had a mental illness, and 78% of the chronically homeless participants were not receiving mental healthcare. Mental health services were successful in connecting mentally ill homeless individuals to mental healthcare in lieu of institutionalization. However, chronically homeless mentally ill individuals struggle with obtaining appropriate care.

  9. Nutritional therapies for mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieira Karen F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4 out of the 10 leading causes of disability in the US and other developed countries are mental disorders. Major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD are among the most common mental disorders that currently plague numerous countries and have varying incidence rates from 26 percent in America to 4 percent in China. Though some of this difference may be attributable to the manner in which individual healthcare providers diagnose mental disorders, this noticeable distribution can be also explained by studies which show that a lack of certain dietary nutrients contribute to the development of mental disorders. Notably, essential vitamins, minerals, and omega-3 fatty acids are often deficient in the general population in America and other developed countries; and are exceptionally deficient in patients suffering from mental disorders. Studies have shown that daily supplements of vital nutrients often effectively reduce patients' symptoms. Supplements that contain amino acids also reduce symptoms, because they are converted to neurotransmitters that alleviate depression and other mental disorders. Based on emerging scientific evidence, this form of nutritional supplement treatment may be appropriate for controlling major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders, eating disorders, attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD, addiction, and autism. The aim of this manuscript is to emphasize which dietary supplements can aid the treatment of the four most common mental disorders currently affecting America and other developed countries: major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD. Most antidepressants and other prescription drugs cause severe side effects, which usually discourage patients from taking their medications. Such

  10. Population mental health: evidence, policy, and public health practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cohen, Neal L; Galea, Sandro

    2011-01-01

    ... on population mental health with public mental health policy and practice. Issues covered in the book include the influence of mental health policies on the care and well-­ being of individuals with mental illness, the interconnectedness of physical and mental disorders, the obstacles to adopting a public health orientation to mental health/mental ill...

  11. Does mental exertion alter maximal muscle activation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vianney eRozand

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mental exertion is known to impair endurance performance, but its effects on neuromuscular function remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mental exertion reduces torque and muscle activation during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors. Ten subjects performed in a randomized order three separate mental exertion conditions lasting 27 minutes each: i high mental exertion (incongruent Stroop task, ii moderate mental exertion (congruent Stroop task, iii low mental exertion (watching a movie. In each condition, mental exertion was combined with ten intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensor muscles (one maximal voluntary contraction every 3 minutes. Neuromuscular function was assessed using electrical nerve stimulation. Maximal voluntary torque, maximal muscle activation and other neuromuscular parameters were similar across mental exertion conditions and did not change over time. These findings suggest that mental exertion does not affect neuromuscular function during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors.

  12. Mental health training program for community mental health staff in Guangzhou, China: effects on knowledge of mental illness and stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Li, Juan; Huang, Yuanguang; Thornicroft, Graham

    2014-01-01

    In order to reduce the huge treatment gap in mental health, WHO has called for integrating mental health into primary care. The purposes of this study are to provide a training course to improve the community mental health staff's knowledge of mental health and reduce stigma related to mental illness, as well as to evaluate the impact of this training on knowledge and stigma. The training intervention was a one day course for community mental health staff in Guangzhou, China. Evaluation questionnaires were given before and after the training session. Mental health knowledge was assessed using two vignettes. Stigma was evaluated by the Mental Illness: Clinicians' Attitudes Scale (MICA) and the Reported and Intended Behavior Scale (RIBS). A total of 99 community mental health staff from eight regions in Guangzhou, China were recruited for the study. The training course did not lead to a significant improvement of participants' levels of mental health knowledge. The mean score of MICA decreased from 47.92 ± 8.63 to 43.53 ± 9.61 after the training (t = 6.64, P training course is an effective way to improve community mental health staff's attitudes toward people with mental illness in the short term, as well as to lessen the social distance between staff and people with mental illness.

  13. Adult Neurogenesis and Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Timothy J; Cameron, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that adult neurogenesis, the production of new neurons in adulthood, may play a role in psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia. Medications and other treatments for mental disorders often promote the proliferation of new neurons; the time course for maturation and integration of new neurons in circuitry parallels the delayed efficacy of psychiatric therapies; adverse and beneficial experiences similarly affect development of mental illness and neurogenesis; and ablation of new neurons in adulthood alters the behavioral impact of drugs in animal models. At present, the links between adult neurogenesis and depression seem stronger than those suggesting a relationship between new neurons and anxiety or schizophrenia. Yet, even in the case of depression there is currently no direct evidence for a causative role. This article reviews the data relating adult neurogenesis to mental illness and discusses where research needs to head in the future. PMID:25178407

  14. [Occupational stress and mental health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigantesco, Antonella; Lega, Ilaria

    2013-01-01

    One fifth of workers reports experiencing stress in the work environment in Europe. A number of studies show that psychosocial stressors in the workplace are associated with adverse physical and mental health outcomes, including symptoms of anxiety and depression. The present paper: briefly describes the characteristics of occupational stress and the main psychosocial stressful risk factors in the work environment; reports the main results of studies on psychosocial risk factors in the work environment as risk factor for common mental disorders; presents findings from an Italian study aimed at assessing prevalence of common mental disorders and workplace psychosocial stressors in a sample of hospital employees; provides the "Working conditions Questionnaire", a validated self-administered instrument to assess perceived stress in the workplace; this questionnaire includes the assessment of organizational justice.

  15. Mental toughness: progress and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucciardi, Daniel F

    2017-08-01

    Mental toughness (MT) has become a popular area of investigation and practice within sport and exercise psychology over the past two decades. Since the turn of the twenty first century, there have been hundreds of studies published on mental toughness, yet concerns remain about the conceptualisation and measurement of mental toughness. In this paper, I take stock of past work with the goal of clarifying and elaborating the most fundamental and common aspects of MT. I also look to the future and outline key substantive and methodological issues that may offer the greatest potential for refining the conceptualisation of MT and contributing to theory building on this concept. My hope is that this information will provide a platform from which to foster coherent and systematic scholarly work on MT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Positive Mental Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Stephen; Wood, Lisa; Marais, Ida; Rosenberg, Michael; Ferguson, Renee; Pettigrew, Simone

    2017-04-01

    This study presents a Rasch-derived short form of the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale for use as a screening tool in the general population. Data from 2,005 18- to 69-year-olds revealed problematic discrimination at specific thresholds. Estimation of model fit also deviated from Rasch model expectations. Following deletion of 4 items, the 10 remaining items indicated the data fitted the model. No items showed differential item functioning, thereby making comparisons of overall positive mental well-being for the different age, gender, and income groups valid and accurate. Cronbach's alpha and Rasch Person Separation Index indicated a strong degree of reliability. Overall, the 10-item scale challenges researchers and clinicians to reconsider the assessment of positive mental well-being.

  17. Mental models and user training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Zupanič

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the functions of the reference service is user training which means teaching users how to use the library and it's information sorces (nowadays mainly computerized systems. While the scientific understanding of teaching/learning process is shifting, changes also affect the methods of user training in libraries.Human-computer interaction (HCI is an interdisciplinary and a very active research area which studies how humans use computers - their mental and behavioral characteristics. The application of psychological theories to HCI are especially great on three areas: psychological (mental, conceptual models, individual differences, and error behavior.The mental models theory is powerful tool for understanding the ways in which users interact with an information system. Claims, based on this theory can affect the methods (conceptualization of user training and the overall design of information systems.

  18. Error adaptation in mental arithmetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, Charlotte; Imbo, Ineke; De Brauwer, Jolien; Brass, Marcel; Fias, Wim; Notebaert, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Until now, error and conflict adaptation have been studied extensively using simple laboratory tasks. A common finding is that responses slow down after errors. According to the conflict monitoring theory, performance should also improve after an error. However, this is usually not observed. In this study, we investigated whether the characteristics of the experimental paradigms normally used could explain this absence. More precisely, these paradigms have in common that behavioural adaptation has little room to be expressed. We therefore studied error and conflict adaptation effects in a task that encounters the richness of everyday life's behavioural adaptation--namely, mental arithmetic, where multiple solution strategies are available. In accordance with our hypothesis, we observed that post-error accuracy increases after errors in mental arithmetic. No support for conflict adaptation in mental arithmetic was found. Implications for current theories of conflict and error monitoring are discussed.

  19. Zambia mental health country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeya, John; Chazulwa, Roy; Mayeya, Petronella Ntambo; Mbewe, Edward; Magolo, Lonia Mwape; Kasisi, Friday; Bowa, Annel Chishimba

    2004-01-01

    This country profile for Zambia was compiled between 1998 and 2002. The objectives of the exercise were to first of all avail policymakers, other key decision makers and leaders in Zambia, information about mental health in Zambia in order to assist policy and services development. Secondly, to facilitate comparative analyses of mental health services between countries. The work involved formation of a core group of experts who coordinated the collection of information from the various organizations in Zambia. The information was later shared to a broad spectrum of stakeholders for consensus. A series of focus group discussions (FGDs) supplemented the information collected. There are various factors that contribute to mental health in Zambia. It is clear from the Zambian perspective that social, demographic, economic, political, environmental, cultural and religious influences affect the mental health of the people. With a population of 10.3 million and annual growth rate of 2.9%, Zambia is one of the most urbanized countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Poverty levels stood at 72.9% in 1998. In terms of unemployment, the most urbanized provinces, Lusaka (the capital city), and the copper-belt are the most affected. The gross domestic product (GDP) is US$3.09 billion dollars while per capita income is US$300. The total budget allocation for health in the year 2002 was 15% while the proportion of the GDP per capita expenditure for health was 5.6%. The HIV/AIDS prevalence rates stand at 20% among the reproductive age group 15-49 years. Political instability and wars in neighbouring states has resulted in an influx of refugees. Environmental factors affecting the country include natural and man-made disasters such as floods and drought, mine accidents, and deforestation. To a large extent in Zambia, people who are mentally ill are stigmatized, feared, scorned at, humiliated and condemned. However, caring for mental ill health in old age is positively perceived. It is

  20. Mild mental stress in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, P; Mehlsen, J; Sestoft, L

    1985-01-01

    A TV-game of tennis of 20 min duration was used to study the influence of mild mental stress on subcutaneous blood-flow (SBF), blood-pressure and heart rate in nine insulin-dependent diabetics and nine healthy subjects. SBF was measured on the thigh by local clearance of xenon-133. Measurements......--increase in blood-pressure was observed in both groups. In conclusion, we found that even mild mental strain influences SBF in both normal subjects and in diabetics. The induced alterations in the two groups are different, probably because of a slight parasympathetic dysfunction in the diabetics....