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Sample records for autosomal-recessive neurodegenerative disorder

  1. Homozygous mutation of STXBP5L explains an autosomal recessive infantile-onset neurodegenerative disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, R.; Corbett, M.A.; Smith, N.J.; Jolly, L.A.; Tan, C.; Keating, D.J.; Duffield, M.D.; Utsumi, T.; Moriya, K.; Smith, K.R.; Hoischen, A.; Abbott, K.; Harbord, M.G.; Compton, A.G.; Woenig, J.A.; Arts, P.; Kwint, M.; Wieskamp, N.; Gijsen, S.; Veltman, J.A.; Bahlo, M.; Gleeson, J.G.; Haan, E.; Gecz, J.

    2015-01-01

    We report siblings of consanguineous parents with an infantile-onset neurodegenerative disorder manifesting a predominant sensorimotor axonal neuropathy, optic atrophy and cognitive deficit. We used homozygosity mapping to identify an approximately 12-Mbp interval identical by descent (IBD) between

  2. A new autosomal recessive disorder of bilateral frontotemporal pachygyria without microcephaly: Report of a case and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phadke Shubha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pachygyria is a disorder of neuronal migration. We report an Indian family with four siblings with developmental delay, infrequent seizures, normal head size and mild to moderate mental retardation. Two of them had bilaterally symmetrical frontotemporal pachygyria. Dysmorphism and neurological signs were absent in the affected subjects. Affected male and female siblings with normal parents suggests autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. We believe these cases represent a new autosomal recessive disorder of neuronal migration. Other similar cases of lissencephaly are reviewed.

  3. A new autosomal recessive disorder of bilateral frontotemporal pachygyria without microcephaly: Report of a case and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Phadke Shubha; Girisha K; Phadke Rajendra

    2007-01-01

    Pachygyria is a disorder of neuronal migration. We report an Indian family with four siblings with developmental delay, infrequent seizures, normal head size and mild to moderate mental retardation. Two of them had bilaterally symmetrical frontotemporal pachygyria. Dysmorphism and neurological signs were absent in the affected subjects. Affected male and female siblings with normal parents suggests autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. We believe these cases represent a new autosomal reces...

  4. Infantile variant of Bartter syndrome and sensorineural deafness: A new autosomal recessive disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, D.; Shalev, H.; Carmi, Rivka; Ohaly, M. [Univ. of the Negev, Ashkelon (Israel)

    1995-12-04

    The infantile variant of Bartter syndrome (IBS) is usually associated with maternal polyhydramnios, premature birth, postnatal polyuria and hypokalemic hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis and a typical appearance. IBS is thought to be an autosomal recessive trait. Several congenital tubular defects are associated with sensorineural deafness (SND). However, an association between the IBS and SND has not been reported so far. Here we describe 5 children of an extended consanguineous Bedouin family with IBS and SND. In 3 of the cases, the typical electrolyte imbalance and facial appearance were detected neonatally. SND was detected as early as age 1 month, suggesting either coincidental homozygotization of 2 recessive genes or a pleiotropic effect of one autosomal recessive gene. This association suggests that evaluation of SND is warranted in every case of IBS. 35 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. A rare case of respiratory disorders associated with two autosomal recessive diseases and male infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Mendeluk, Gabriela Ruth; Costa, Sergio López; Scigliano, Sergio; Menga, Guillermo; Demiceu, Sergio; Palaoro, Luis Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The study of nasal ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and ultrastructure may contribute to the understanding of pathognomonic cases of male infertility associated with defects in sperm motility. This study was designed to report a particular case of male infertility, characterized by the association of two respiratory autosomal recessive genetic diseases (alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency [AAT-D] and primary ciliary dyskinesia [PCD]). A 39-year-old patient with complete sperm immotility, AAT-D, and br...

  6. An easy test but a hard decision: ethical issues concerning non-invasive prenatal testing for autosomal recessive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirton, Heather; Goldsmith, Lesley; Chitty, Lyn S

    2015-08-01

    Prenatal testing based on cell-free fetal DNA in maternal serum is now possible for specific monogenic conditions, and studies have shown that the use of non-invasive testing is supported by prospective parents and health professionals. However, some ethical issues have been raised concerning informed consent and paternal rights. The objective of this study was to explore ethical aspects of the use of non-invasive prenatal diagnostic testing for autosomal recessive disorders. We used a qualitative cross-sectional design, based on Thematic Analysis, and recruited 27 individuals of reproductive age who were carriers of one of four conditions: thalassaemia, sickle cell disease, cystic fibrosis or spinal muscular atrophy. Data were collected via focus groups or interviews. Participants were aware of the potential for such tests to be viewed as routine and suggested that obtaining written consent and allowing time for consideration is needed to facilitate autonomous choice and informed consent. All participants felt that mothers should be able to request such tests, but fathers who declined carrier testing should be made aware that fetal test results may reveal their status. We suggest that a written record of consent for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis should be used as a standard to help reinforce the serious nature of the test results. Where the father's carrier status could be revealed through fetal testing, he should be made aware of this before the results are available. Health professionals should discuss with the pregnant woman the best way to manage unsought information about the father's carrier status to minimise family disruption. PMID:25351779

  7. Autosomal recessive diseases among Palestinian Arabs.

    OpenAIRE

    Zlotogora, J

    1997-01-01

    As a consequence of the high consanguinity rate among the Palestinian Arabs, many recessive disorders are present with a relatively high frequency. In a survey of 2000 different Palestinian Arab families who visited our genetic clinic, in 601 an autosomal recessive disease was diagnosed or strongly suspected. The distribution of these disorders was not uniform and some disorders, such as Krabbe disease, were found at high frequency in only a small part of the population. For some other disord...

  8. Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome and Autosomal Recessive Spastic Ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay : A Report of Two Male Sibs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Willem M. A.; Egger, Jos I. M.; Ahmed, Amir I. M.; Kremer, Berry P. H.; Vermeer, Sascha; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the SACS gene (13q12) encoding the protein sacsin. It is characterized by early-onset cerebellar ataxia, lower limb spasticity, sensorimotor axonal polyneuropath

  9. Spectrum of Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström Pigg, Maritta; Bygum, Anette; Gånemo, Agneta; Virtanen, Marie; Brandrup, Flemming; Zimmer, Andreas D; Hotz, Alrun; Vahlquist, Anders; Fischer, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) represents a heterogeneous group of rare disorders of cornification with 3 major subtypes: harlequin ichthyosis (HI), lamellar ichthyosis (LI) and congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE). A 4th subtype has also been proposed: pleomorphic...

  10. Mucolipidosis Type IV: A Subtle Pediatric Neurodegenerative Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Geer, Joseph S.; Skinner, Steve A.; Goldin, Ehud; Holden, Kenton R.

    2010-01-01

    The mucolipidoses are a heterogenous group of autosomal recessive neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorders. Mucolipidosis type IV is rare, is seen predominantly in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, and usually presents with global neurodevelopmental delays in infancy, subtle corneal opacifications or clouding, and very slowly progressive neurodegeneration over many years. Elevation of serum gastrin is reported while x-rays of bone and joints and lysosomal studies are normal. We report two...

  11. Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS: typical clinical and neuroimaging features in a Brazilian family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J L Pedroso

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by late-infantile onset spastic ataxia and other neurological features. ARSACS has a high prevalence in northeastern Quebec, Canada. Several ARSACS cases have been reported outside Canada in recent decades. This is the first report of typical clinical and neuroimaging features in a Brazilian family with probable diagnosis of ARSACS.

  12. Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS): typical clinical and neuroimaging features in a Brazilian family

    OpenAIRE

    Pedroso, J.L.; P Braga-Neto; A Abrahão; R L M Rivero; C Abdalla; N. Abdala; O G P Barsottini

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by late-infantile onset spastic ataxia and other neurological features. ARSACS has a high prevalence in northeastern Quebec, Canada. Several ARSACS cases have been reported outside Canada in recent decades. This is the first report of typical clinical and neuroimaging features in a Brazilian family with probable diagnosis of ARSACS.

  13. The RIN2 syndrome: a new autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder caused by deficiency of Ras and Rab interactor 2 (RIN2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syx, Delfien; Malfait, Fransiska; Van Laer, Lut; Hellemans, Jan; Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; Willaert, Andy; Benmansour, Abdelmajid; De Paepe, Anne; Verloes, Alain

    2010-07-01

    Defects leading to impaired intracellular trafficking have recently been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of genodermatoses, such as the Ehlers-Danlos and the cutis laxa syndromes. A new genodermatosis, termed macrocephaly, alopecia, cutis laxa and scoliosis (MACS) syndrome has been described, resulting from a homozygous 1-bp deletion in RIN2. RIN2 encodes the Ras and Rab interactor 2, involved in the regulation of Rab5-mediated early endocytosis. We performed a clinical, ultrastructural and molecular study in a consanguineous Algerian family with three siblings affected by a distinctive autosomal recessive genodermatosis, reported in 2005 by Verloes et al. The most striking clinical features include progressive facial coarsening, gingival hypertrophy, severe scoliosis, sparse hair and skin and joint hyperlaxity. Ultrastructural studies of the skin revealed important abnormalities in the collagen fibril morphology, and fibroblasts exhibited a dilated endoplasmic reticulum and an abnormal Golgi apparatus with rarefied and dilated cisternae. Molecular analysis of RIN2 revealed a novel homozygous 2-bp deletion in all affected individuals. The c.1914_1915delGC mutation introduces a frameshift and creates a premature termination codon, leading to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. These findings confirm that RIN2 defects are associated with a distinct genodermatosis and underscore the involvement of RIN2 and its associated pathways in the pathogenesis of connective tissue disorders. The current family displays considerable phenotypic overlap with MACS syndrome. However, our family shows a dermatological and ultrastructural phenotype belonging to the Ehlers-Danlos rather than the cutis laxa spectrum. Therefore, the MACS acronym is not entirely appropriate for the current family. PMID:20424861

  14. Al-Aqeel Sewairi Syndrome, a new autosomal recessive disorder with multicentric osteolysis, nodulosis and arthropathy. The first genetic defect of matrix metalloproteinase 2 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a distinctive autosomal recessive multicentric osteolysis in Saudi Arabian families with distal arthropathy of the metacarpal, metatarsal and interphalangeal joints, with ultimate progression to the proximal joints with decreased range of movements and deformities with ankylosis and generalized osteopenia. In addition, they had large, painful to touch palmar and plantar pads. Hirsutism and mild dysmorphic facial features including proptosis, a narrow nasal bridge, bulbous nose and micrognathia. Using a genome-wide search for microsatellite markers from 11 members of the family from the Armed Forces Hospital and King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, localized the disease gene to chromosome 16q12-21. Haplotype analysis with additional markers narrowed the critical region to 1.2cM and identified the matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), (gelatinase A, collagenase type IV, EC 3.4, 24,24) gene as a disease candidate at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, United States of America in April 2000. Some affected individuals were homoallelic for a nonsense mutation (TCA>TAA) in codon 244 of exon 5, predicting the replacement of a tyrosine residue by a stop codon in the first fibronectin type II domain (Y244X). Other affected members had a missense mutation in exon 2 arginine 101-histidine (R101H) leading to no MMP-2 enzyme activity in serum or fibroblast or both of affected individuals. In other affected members, a non-pathogenic homoallelic GT transversion resulted in the substitution of an aspartate with a tyrosine residue in codon 210 of exon 4 (D210Y). The MMP-2-null mouse has no developmental defects, but are small, which may reflect genetic redundancy. The discovery that deficiency of this well-characterized gelatinase/collagenase results in an inherited form of an osteolytic and arthritic disorder provides an invaluable insights for the understanding of osteolysis and arthritis and is the first genetic

  15. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive hypotrichosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Autosomal recessive hypotrichosis is a condition that affects hair growth. People with this condition have sparse hair ( hypotrichosis ) ... erosions) on the scalp. In areas of poor hair growth, they may also develop bumps called hyperkeratotic follicular ...

  16. Isotretinoin treatment of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis complicated by coexisting dysferlinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashiah, J; Harel, A; Bitterman, O; Sagi, L; Gat, A; Fellig, Y; Ben-Shachar, S; Sprecher, E

    2016-06-01

    Consanguinity is known to be associated with an increase in the prevalence of autosomal recessive disorders such as autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI). ARCI often responds well to retinoid treatment. We describe a patient with ARCI who improved under isotretinoin treatment. The patient subsequently developed elevated levels of serum creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), which led to the diagnosis of a second autosomal recessive disorder, dysferlinopathy, a rare myopathy characterized by muscle weakness, decreased tendon reflexes and marked elevation of CPK levels. This report demonstrates the need for physicians to remain alert to the possible coexistence of rare and mutually relevant disorders in populations with a high rate of consanguinity. PMID:26620441

  17. Caroli′s syndrome with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Prithi Shenoy; Syed Ahmed Zaki; Preeti Shanbag; Swapnil Bhongade

    2014-01-01

    Caroli′s syndrome (CS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by multiple segmental cystic or saccular dilatations of the intrahepatic bile ducts and congenital hepatic fibrosis. We report a 9-year-old boy who was diagnosed with CS and autosomal recessive poly-cystic kidney disease. On screening, his 5-month-old asymptomatic sister had multiple dilated biliary radicals with multiple bilateral renal cystic lesions. Both the patient and the affected sibling have been advised regular follow...

  18. Caroli′s syndrome with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prithi Shenoy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Caroli′s syndrome (CS is a rare congenital disorder characterized by multiple segmental cystic or saccular dilatations of the intrahepatic bile ducts and congenital hepatic fibrosis. We report a 9-year-old boy who was diagnosed with CS and autosomal recessive poly-cystic kidney disease. On screening, his 5-month-old asymptomatic sister had multiple dilated biliary radicals with multiple bilateral renal cystic lesions. Both the patient and the affected sibling have been advised regular follow-up for monitoring the progression of the disease. In conclusion, patients with CS should be screened for renal cystic lesions and vice versa even if they are asymptomatic. Also, as the disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, it is important to screen family members for early diagnosis and management.

  19. Caroli's syndrome with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Prithi; Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Shanbag, Preeti; Bhongade, Swapnil

    2014-07-01

    Caroli's syndrome (CS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by multiple segmental cystic or saccular dilatations of the intrahepatic bile ducts and congenital hepatic fibrosis. We report a 9-year-old boy who was diagnosed with CS and autosomal recessive poly-cystic kidney disease. On screening, his 5-month-old asymptomatic sister had multiple dilated biliary radicals with multiple bilateral renal cystic lesions. Both the patient and the affected sibling have been advised regular follow-up for monitoring the progression of the disease. In conclusion, patients with CS should be screened for renal cystic lesions and vice versa even if they are asymptomatic. Also, as the disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, it is important to screen family members for early diagnosis and management. PMID:24969198

  20. Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis in Arab children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Al, Y K; Shabani, I S; Lubani, M M; al-Ghawabi, M A; Ibrahim, M D; al-Mohtaseb, S; Duodin, K I

    1994-01-01

    Nineteen Arab children including six boys and 13 girls in ten sibships were diagnosed as having osteopetrosis over a 5-year period in various hospitals in Kuwait. Eighteen patients had an isolated autosomal recessive form and one had autosomal recessive osteopetrosis associated with renal tubular acidosis. The mean age of diagnosis was 24 months. Parental consanguinity was high amongst them (68%). Anaemia, hepatosplenomegaly, failure to thrive, recurrent infections and neurological manifestations were common. Associated congenital abnormalities were found in 26%. Deafness, hydrocephalus and dental caries were relatively less common. A high mortality (37%) owing to infection was noted. The medical management and recommendations for patient care are discussed briefly. PMID:7516136

  1. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ARCA1 autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 ( ARCA1 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  2. Autophagy and neurodegenerative disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Evangelia Kesidou; Roza Lagoudaki; Olga Touloumi; Kyriaki-Nefeli Poulatsidou; Constantina Simeonidou

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of aberrant proteins and inclusion bodies are hallmarks in most neurodegenerative diseases. Consequently, these aggregates within neurons lead to toxic effects, overproduction of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress. Autophagy is a significant intracel ular mechanism that removes damaged organelles and misfolded proteins in order to maintain cel homeostasis. Excessive or insufficient autophagic activity in neurons leads to altered homeostasis and influences their survival rate, causing neurodegeneration. The review article provides an update of the role of autophagic process in representative chronic and acute neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Diocaretz V

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Polycystic Kidney Disease is a genetic disorder characterized by progressive cystic dilations of the renal ducts, presenting as autosomal dominant or recessive forms with an incidence of 1 in 1.000 and 1 in 20.000 births, respectively, according to international series. The autosomal recessive variety can be lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory failure secondary to pulmonary hypoplasia and can manifest during childhood with hypertension, short stature and complications of portal hypertension. CASE REPORT: 3 years and 11 months old preschoolar with antecedent of fetal growth restriction and oligohydramnios during prenatal period, and a history of asthenia, pallor and progressive feeding difficulty with postprandial vomiting. Physical examination shows cardiac bruit, hypertension, splenomegaly, caput medusae and short stature. Laboratory tests with peripheral pancytopenia; abdominal ultrasonography showed hepatosplenomegaly, findings consistent with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and periportal fibrosis; renal scintigraphy with bilateral kidney failure; a positive fecal occult blood test; an upper endoscopy that shows small esophageal varices; a hand radiography that shows bone age delayed and an echocardiography with cardiomegaly. DISCUSSION: This infrequent disease requires a high degree of suspicion by the clinician and presents with portal hypertension, with platelet count being the best predictor of severity. This condition has no cure and will progress to end-stage renal disease in any moment, so the aim is to minimize and treat renal and hepatic complications.

  4. Addressing key issues in the consanguinity-related risk of autosomal recessive disorders in consanguineous communities: lessons from a qualitative study of British Pakistanis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darr, A; Small, N; Ahmad, W I U; Atkin, K; Corry, P; Modell, B

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no consensus regarding services required to help families with consanguineous marriages manage their increased genetic reproductive risk. Genetic services for communities with a preference for consanguineous marriage in the UK remain patchy, often poor. Receiving two disparate explanations of the cause of recessive disorders (cousin marriage and recessive inheritance) leads to confusion among families. Further, the realisation that couples in non-consanguineous relationships have affected children leads to mistrust of professional advice. British Pakistani families at-risk for recessive disorders lack an understanding of recessive disorders and their inheritance. Such an understanding is empowering and can be shared within the extended family to enable informed choice. In a three-site qualitative study of British Pakistanis, we explored family and health professional perspectives on recessively inherited conditions. Our findings suggest, firstly, that family networks hold strong potential for cascading genetic information, making the adoption of a family-centred approach an efficient strategy for this community. However, this is dependent on provision of high-quality and timely information from health care providers. Secondly, families' experience was of ill-coordinated and time-starved services, with few having access to specialist provision from Regional Genetics Services; these perspectives were consistent with health professionals' views of services. Thirdly, we confirm previous findings that genetic information is difficult to communicate and comprehend, further complicated by the need to communicate the relationship between cousin marriage and recessive disorders. A communication tool we developed and piloted is described and offered as a useful resource for communicating complex genetic information. PMID:26363620

  5. Spectrum of mutations in the renin-angiotensin system genes in autosomal recessive renal tubular dysgenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gribouval, Olivier; Morinière, Vincent; Pawtowski, Audrey;

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal recessive renal tubular dysgenesis (RTD) is a severe disorder of renal tubular development characterized by early onset and persistent fetal anuria leading to oligohydramnios and the Potter sequence, associated with skull ossification defects. Early death occurs in most cases from anuri...

  6. Caroli's Syndrome with Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease in a Two Month Old Infant

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Hur, Yoon Jeong; Park, Jee Min; Kim, Myung Joon; Park, Young Nyun; Lee, Jae Seung

    2006-01-01

    Caroli's syndrome is a rare congenital disorder that involves intrahepatic bile duct ectasia and congenital hepatic fibrosis, frequently seen with concomitant autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD). Literature on infants with ARPKD is rare. Here, we present a case of a two month old boy who was diagnosed with Caroli's syndrome and ARPKD.

  7. Connexin 26 and autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Monisha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Prelingual deafness occurs with a frequency of 1 in 1000 live births and is divided into syndromic and non-syndromic forms contributing 40 and 60% respectively. Autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL is responsible for 80% cases of childhood deafness. Nearly all genes localized for ARNSHL cause prelingual, severe to profound, sensorineural hearing impairment. ARNSHL is genetically heterogeneous and at least 39 loci have been identified. The most significant finding to date has been the discovery of mutations in GJB2 gene at the DFNB1 locus on chromosome 13q12 as the major cause of profound prelingual deafness. This was first reported in a Tunisian family in 1994 and thereafter in many different countries. GJB2 gene encodes the gap-junction protein, connexin 26 (Cx26, mutations in which have become the first genetic marker of inherited hearing loss. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR, single stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP and sequencing methods have been developed for the detection of mutations in Cx26 gene. In India as well, the Cx26 mutations are being screened in families with hearing impaired children using these molecular methods. Therefore, in order to create awareness among the clinicians and the affected families; we have attempted to review the Cx26 gene mutations responsible for autosomal recessive type of non-syndromic hearing loss. The efficacy and utility of Cx26 gene analysis might open the path to proper counseling of families for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis. It may even facilitate the development of strategies in future for the treatment of this common genetic disorder.

  8. ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 mutations cause autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecchiani, Celeste; Pedace, Lucia; Lo Giudice, Temistocle; Casella, Antonella; Mearini, Marzia; Gaudiello, Fabrizio; Pedroso, José L; Terracciano, Chiara; Caltagirone, Carlo; Massa, Roberto; St George-Hyslop, Peter H; Barsottini, Orlando G P; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Orlacchio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a group of hereditary peripheral neuropathies that share clinical characteristics of progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities, distal sensory loss, as well as diminished tendon reflexes. Hundreds of causative DNA changes have been found, but much of the genetic basis of the disease is still unexplained. Mutations in the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene are a frequent cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and peripheral axonal neuropathy, and account for ∼ 40% of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The overlap of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with both diseases, as well as the common autosomal recessive inheritance pattern of thin corpus callosum and axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in three related patients, prompted us to analyse the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene in affected individuals with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. We investigated 28 unrelated families with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease defined by clinical, electrophysiological, as well as pathological evaluation. Besides, we screened for all the known genes related to axonal autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2A2/HMSN2A2/MFN2, CMT2B1/LMNA, CMT2B2/MED25, CMT2B5/NEFL, ARCMT2F/dHMN2B/HSPB1, CMT2K/GDAP1, CMT2P/LRSAM1, CMT2R/TRIM2, CMT2S/IGHMBP2, CMT2T/HSJ1, CMTRID/COX6A1, ARAN-NM/HINT and GAN/GAN), for the genes related to autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and axonal peripheral neuropathy (SPG7/PGN, SPG15/ZFYVE26, SPG21/ACP33, SPG35/FA2H, SPG46/GBA2, SPG55/C12orf65 and SPG56/CYP2U1), as well as for the causative gene of peripheral neuropathy with or without agenesis of the corpus callosum (SLC12A6). Mitochondrial disorders related to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 were also excluded by sequencing POLG and TYMP genes. An additional locus for autosomal recessive Charcot

  9. Homozygosity for a missense mutation in the 67 kDa isoform of glutamate decarboxylase in a family with autosomal recessive spastic cerebral palsy: parallels with Stiff-Person Syndrome and other movement disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods C Geoffrey

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral palsy (CP is an heterogeneous group of neurological disorders of movement and/or posture, with an estimated incidence of 1 in 1000 live births. Non-progressive forms of symmetrical, spastic CP have been identified, which show a Mendelian autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. We recently described the mapping of a recessive spastic CP locus to a 5 cM chromosomal region located at 2q24-31.1, in rare consanguineous families. Methods Here we present data that refine this locus to a 0.5 cM region, flanked by the microsatellite markers D2S2345 and D2S326. The minimal region contains the candidate gene GAD1, which encodes a glutamate decarboxylase isoform (GAD67, involved in conversion of the amino acid and excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate to the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA. Results A novel amino acid mis-sense mutation in GAD67 was detected, which segregated with CP in affected individuals. Conclusions This result is interesting because auto-antibodies to GAD67 and the more widely studied GAD65 homologue encoded by the GAD2 gene, are described in patients with Stiff-Person Syndrome (SPS, epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia and Batten disease. Further investigation seems merited of the possibility that variation in the GAD1 sequence, potentially affecting glutamate/GABA ratios, may underlie this form of spastic CP, given the presence of anti-GAD antibodies in SPS and the recognised excitotoxicity of glutamate in various contexts. Table 4 GAD1 single nucleotide substitutions detected on mutation analysis and occurring in sequences submitted to NCBI SNP database and in the literature. This is not a definitive list, but includes those described at the time of the mutational analysis. *Nucleotide positions were not provided by Maestrini et al. [47]. Source SNP position in mRNA, from the translational start site (bp Gene position of SNP(bp Amino acid change (ALappalainen et al. (2002 A(-478Del Exon

  10. Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies in the Czech Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Stehlíková, Kristýna; Skálová, Daniela; Zídková, Jana; Mrázová, Lenka; Vondráček, Petr; Mazanec, Radim; Voháňka, Stanislav; Haberlová, Jana; Hermanová, Markéta; Zámečník, Josef; Souček, Ondřej; Ošlejšková, Hana; Dvořáčková, Nina; Solařová, Pavla; Fajkusová, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    Background Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD2) include a number of disorders with heterogeneous etiology that cause predominantly weakness and wasting of the shoulder and pelvic girdle muscles. In this study, we determined the frequency of LGMD subtypes within a cohort of Czech LGMD2 patients using mutational analysis of the CAPN3, FKRP, SGCA, and ANO5 genes. Methods PCR-sequencing analysis; sequence capture and targeted resequencing. Results Mutations of the CAPN3 ge...

  11. The ADAMTS18 gene is responsible for autosomal recessive early onset severe retinal dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Peluso Ivana; Conte Ivan; Testa Francesco; Dharmalingam Gopuraja; Pizzo Mariateresa; Collin Rob WJ; Meola Nicola; Barbato Sara; Mutarelli Margherita; Ziviello Carmela; Barbarulo Anna Maria; Nigro Vincenzo; Melone Mariarosa AB; Simonelli Francesca; Banfi Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Inherited retinal dystrophies, including Retinitis Pigmentosa and Leber Congenital Amaurosis among others, are a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders that lead to variable degrees of visual deficits. They can be caused by mutations in over 100 genes and there is evidence for the presence of as yet unidentified genes in a significant proportion of patients. We aimed at identifying a novel gene for an autosomal recessive form of early onset severe retinal dystrophy i...

  12. Oculodentodigital dysplasia: study of ophthalmological and clinical manifestations in three boys with probably autosomal recessive inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasson, Maria; Calixto, Nassim; Cronemberger, Sebastião; de Aguiar, Regina Amélia Lopes Pessoa; Leão, Letícia Lima; de Aguiar, Marcos José Burle

    2004-09-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) is a rare inherited disorder affecting the development of the face, eyes, teeth, and limbs. The majority of cases of ODDD are inherited as an autosomal dominant condition. There are few reports of probable autosomal recessive transmission. Affected patients exhibit a distinctive physiognomy with a narrow nose, hypoplastic alae nasi, and anteverted nostrils, bilateral microphthalmos, and microcornea. Sometimes iris anomalies and secondary glaucoma are present. There are malformations of the distal extremities such as syndactyly. In addition, there are defects in the dental enamel with hypoplasia and yellow discoloration of the teeth. Less common features include hypotrichosis, intracranial calcifications, and conductive deafness secondary to recurrent otitis media. We describe three brothers with ODDD. Their parents are first cousins and present no features of ODDD. These data are in favor of autosomal recessive inheritance and suggest genetic heterogeneity for this entity. PMID:15512999

  13. Black hair follicular dysplasia, an autosomal recessive condition in dogs.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmutz, S M; Moker, J S; Clark, E.G.; Shewfelt, R

    1998-01-01

    Using histology, a coat color abnormality and the subsequent hair loss were diagnosed as black hair follicular dysplasia. A pedigree analysis of an affected litter and literature review suggests that this is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. The melanocyte stimulating hormone receptor gene is ruled out by using linkage analysis.

  14. Mutations in MFSD8, encoding a lysosomal membrane protein, are associated with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive macular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosing, S.; Born, L.I. van den; Sangermano, R.; Banfi, S.; Koenekoop, R.K.; Zonneveld-Vrieling, M.N.; Klaver, C.C.; Lith-Verhoeven, J.J. van; Cremers, F.P.M.; Hollander, A.I. den; Hoyng, C.B.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to identify the genetic defects in 2 families with autosomal recessive macular dystrophy with central cone involvement. DESIGN: Case series. PARTICIPANTS: Two families and a cohort of 244 individuals with various inherited maculopathies and cone disorders. METHODS: Genome-w

  15. A homozygous mutation in a consanguineous family consolidates the role of ALDH1A3 in autosomal recessive microphthalmia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, L; Fang, M; Dali, C; Jensen, H; Christoffersen, N; Wu, B; Zhang, J; Xu, R; Harris, P; Xu, X; Grønskov, K; Tümer, Z

    2013-01-01

    identification of new genes. Very recently, homozygous variations within ALDH1A3 have been associated with autosomal recessive microphthalmia with or without cysts or coloboma, and with variable subphenotypes of developmental delay/autism spectrum disorder in eight families. In a consanguineous family where...

  16. Adaptor Protein Complex 4 Deficiency Causes Severe Autosomal-Recessive Intellectual Disability, Progressive Spastic Paraplegia, Shy Character, and Short Stature

    OpenAIRE

    Abou Jamra, Rami; Philippe, Orianne; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Eck, Sebastian H.; Graf, Elisabeth; Buchert, Rebecca; Borck, Guntram; Ekici, Arif; Brockschmidt, Felix F.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Munnich, Arnold; Strom, Tim M.; Reis, Andre; Colleaux, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Intellectual disability inherited in an autosomal-recessive fashion represents an important fraction of severe cognitive-dysfunction disorders. Yet, the extreme heterogeneity of these conditions markedly hampers gene identification. Here, we report on eight affected individuals who were from three consanguineous families and presented with severe intellectual disability, absent speech, shy character, stereotypic laughter, muscular hypotonia that progressed to spastic paraplegia, microcephaly,...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ARSACS autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay Enable Javascript to view the ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay , more commonly known as ARSACS , ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive primary microcephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are the most common cause of the disorder, accounting for about half of all cases. The genes ... 7 ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (7 links) ...

  19. NEW BEST1 MUTATIONS IN AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE BESTROPHINOPATHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    FUNG, ADRIAN T.; YZER, SUZANNE; GOLDBERG, NAOMI; WANG, HAO; NISSEN, MICHAEL; GIOVANNINI, ALFONSO; MERRIAM, JOANNA E.; BUKANOVA, ELENA N.; CAI, CAROLYN; YANNUZZI, LAWRENCE A.; TSANG, STEPHEN H.; ALLIKMETS, RANDO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the ocular phenotype in patients with autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy and carriers, and to describe novel BEST1 mutations. Methods Patients with clinically suspected and subsequently genetically proven autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy underwent full ophthalmic examination and investigation with fundus autofluorescence imaging, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, electroretinography, and electrooculography. Mutation analysis of the BEST1 gene was performed through direct Sanger sequencing. Results Five affected patients from four families were identified. Mean age was 16 years (range, 6–42 years). All affected patients presented with reduced visual acuity and bilateral, hyperautofluorescent subretinal yellowish deposits within the posterior pole. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography demonstrated submacular fluid and subretinal vitelliform material in all patients. A cystoid maculopathy was seen in all but one patient. In 1 patient, the location of the vitelliform material was seen to change over a follow-up period of 3 years despite relatively stable vision. Visual acuity and fundus changes were unresponsive to topical and systemic carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and systemic steroids. Carriers had normal ocular examinations including normal fundus autofluorescence. Three novel mutations were detected. Conclusion Three novel BEST1 mutations are described, suggesting that many deleterious variants in BEST1 resulting in haploinsufficiency are still unknown. Mutations causing autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy are mostly located outside of the exons that usually harbor vitelliform macular dystrophy–associated dominant mutations. PMID:25545482

  20. Orofacial Manifestations of Autosomal Recessive Robinow’s Syndrome: A Rare Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Santosh; Dhokar, Amol; Yadav, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Robinow’s syndrome is a very rare genetic disorder which bears a resemblance to a foetal face. It is characterized by short-limbed dwarfism, defects in vertebral segmentation and abnormalities in the head, face and external genitalia. It has a genetic heterogeneity with autosomal dominant and recessive forms which relates to the severity of phenotype presentation. A rare case of an autosomal recessive form of Robinow’s syndrome is presented with emphasis on, characteristic craniofacial and intraoral manifestations to aid in diagnosis and dental management of this patient.

  1. Mutations in C10orf11, a Melanocyte-Differentiation Gene, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Albinism

    OpenAIRE

    Grønskov, Karen; Dooley, Christopher M.; Østergaard, Elsebet; Kelsh, Robert N.; Hansen, Lars; Levesque, Mitchell P.; Vilhelmsen, Kaj; Møllgård, Kjeld; Stemple, Derek L.; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive albinism is a hypopigmentation disorder with a broad phenotypic range. A substantial fraction of individuals with albinism remain genetically unresolved, and it has been hypothesized that more genes are to be identified. By using homozygosity mapping of an inbred Faroese family, we identified a 3.5 Mb homozygous region (10q22.2–q22.3) on chromosome 10. The region contains five protein-coding genes, and sequencing of one of these, C10orf11, revealed a nonsense mutation that...

  2. STIL mutation causes autosomal recessive microcephalic lobar holoprosencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakar, Naseebullah; Ahmad, Jamil; Morris-Rosendahl, Deborah J; Altmüller, Janine; Friedrich, Katrin; Barbi, Gotthold; Nürnberg, Peter; Kubisch, Christian; Dobyns, William B; Borck, Guntram

    2015-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous midline brain malformation associated with neurologic manifestations including developmental delay, intellectual disability and seizures. Although mutations in the sonic hedgehog gene SHH and more than 10 other genes are known to cause holoprosencephaly, many patients remain without a molecular diagnosis. Here we show that a homozygous truncating mutation of STIL not only causes severe autosomal recessive microcephaly, but also lobar holoprosencephaly in an extended consanguineous Pakistani family. STIL mutations have previously been linked to centrosomal defects in primary microcephaly at the MCPH7 locus. Our results thus expand the clinical phenotypes associated with biallellic STIL mutations to include holoprosencephaly. PMID:25218063

  3. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene produce autosomal recessive ocular albinism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, R.A.; Summers, C.G.; Oetting, W.S. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Albinism has historically been divided into ocular (OA) and oculocutaneous (OCA) types based on the presence or absence of clinically apparent skin and hair involvement in an individual with the ocular features of albinism. The major genes for OCA include the tyrosinase gene in OCA1 and the P gene in OCA2. X-linked and autosomal recessive OA have been described and the responsible genes have not been identified. We now present six Caucasian individuals who have the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA but who have OCA1 as shown by the presence of mutations of the tyrosinase. They had white or very light hair and white skin at birth, and cutaneous pigment developed in the first decade of life. At ages ranging from 1.5-23 years, hair color was dark blond to light brown. The skin had generalized pigment and well developed tan was present on the exposed arm and face skin of four. Iris pigment was present and iris translucency varied. Molecular analysis of the tyrosinase gene, using PCR amplification and direct di-deoxy sequencing showed the following mutations: E398Z/E398Q, P406S/g346a, R402E/T373K, ?/D383N, and H211N/T373K. The homozygous individual was not from a known consanguineous mating. T373K is the most common tyrosinase gene mutation in our laboratory. Three of these mutations are associated with a total loss of tyrosinase activity (g346a splice-site, T373K, and D383N), while four are associated with residual enzyme activity (H211N, R402E, E398Q, and P406S). These studies show that mutations of the tyrosinase gene can produce the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA in an individual who has normal amounts of cutaneous pigment and the ability to tan after birth. This extends the phenotypic range of OCA1 to normal cutaneous pigment after early childhood, and suggest that mutations of the tyrosinase gene account for a significant number of individuals with autosomal recessive OA.

  4. Autosomal recessive, early-onset Parkinson’s disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Bonifati (Vincenzo)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractParkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer’s disease, with a prevalence of 1-2% in the population aged 65 years.1 The disease is clinically defi ned by the presence of parkinsonism (the combination of akinesia, resting tremor, and muscul

  5. Evidence for autosomal recessive inheritance in SPG3A caused by homozygosity for a novel ATL1 missense mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Tahir Naeem; Klar, Joakim; Tariq, Muhammad; Anjum Baig, Shehla; Malik, Naveed Altaf; Yousaf, Raja; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Dahl, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. Autosomal dominant and ‘pure' forms of HSP account for ∼80% of cases in Western societies of whom 10% carry atlastin-1 (ATL1) gene mutations. We report on a large consanguineous family segregating six members with early onset HSP. The pedigree was compatible with both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance. Whole-exome seque...

  6. Founder mutations in the lipase H (LIPH) gene in families with autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shimomura, Yutaka; Wajid, Muhammad; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Lee, Young Jin; Rice, Robert H.; Christiano, Angela M.

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal recessive woolly hair (ARWH)/hypotrichosis is a hereditary hair disorder which is characterized by tightly curled hair, and is occasionally associated with sparse hair. ARWH can be caused by mutations in the P2RY5 or lipase H (LIPH) gene. Disruption of both genes results in phenotypes with features of both WH and hypotrichosis. In this study, we identified two Guyanese families with ARWH. Both families are of recent Indian descent. Mutation analysis resulted in the identification of...

  7. Mutations in CERS3 cause autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radner, Franz P W; Marrakchi, Slaheddine; Kirchmeier, Peter; Kim, Gwang-Jin; Ribierre, Florence; Kamoun, Bourane; Abid, Leila; Leipoldt, Michael; Turki, Hamida; Schempp, Werner; Heilig, Roland; Lathrop, Mark; Fischer, Judith

    2013-06-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a rare genetic disorder of the skin characterized by abnormal desquamation over the whole body. In this study we report four patients from three consanguineous Tunisian families with skin, eye, heart, and skeletal anomalies, who harbor a homozygous contiguous gene deletion syndrome on chromosome 15q26.3. Genome-wide SNP-genotyping revealed a homozygous region in all affected individuals, including the same microdeletion that partially affects two coding genes (ADAMTS17, CERS3) and abolishes a sequence for a long non-coding RNA (FLJ42289). Whereas mutations in ADAMTS17 have recently been identified in autosomal recessive Weill-Marchesani-like syndrome in humans and dogs presenting with ophthalmologic, cardiac, and skeletal abnormalities, no disease associations have been described for CERS3 (ceramide synthase 3) and FLJ42289 so far. However, analysis of additional patients with non-syndromic ARCI revealed a splice site mutation in CERS3 indicating that a defect in ceramide synthesis is causative for the present skin phenotype of our patients. Functional analysis of patient skin and in vitro differentiated keratinocytes demonstrated that mutations in CERS3 lead to a disturbed sphingolipid profile with reduced levels of epidermis-specific very long-chain ceramides that interferes with epidermal differentiation. Taken together, these data present a novel pathway involved in ARCI development and, moreover, provide the first evidence that CERS3 plays an essential role in human sphingolipid metabolism for the maintenance of epidermal lipid homeostasis. PMID:23754960

  8. A novel deletion mutation in ASPM gene in an Iranian family with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elinaz AKBARIAZAR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Akbarizar E, Ebrahimpour M, Akbari S, Arzhanghi S, Abedini SS, Najmabadi H, Kahrizi K. A Novel Deletion Mutation in ASPM Gene in an Iranian Family with Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly. Iran J Child Neurol.  2013 Spring;7(2:23-30. ObjectiveAutosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH is a neurodevelopmental and genetically heterogeneous disorder with decreased head circumference due to the abnormality in fetal brain growth. To date, nine loci and nine genes responsible for the situation have been identified. Mutations in the ASPM gene (MCPH5 is the most common cause of MCPH. The ASPM gene with 28 exons is essential for normal mitotic spindle function in embryonic neuroblasts.Materials & MethodsWe have ascertained twenty-two consanguineous families withintellectual disability and different ethnic backgrounds from Iran. Ten out of twenty-two families showed primary microcephaly in clinical examination. We investigated MCPH5 locus using homozygosity mapping by microsatellite marker. ResultSequence analysis of exon 8 revealed a deletion of nucleotide (T in donor site of splicing site of ASPM in one family. The remaining nine families were not linked to any of the known loci. More investigation will be needed to detect the causative defect in these families.ConlusionWe detected a novel mutation in the donor splicing site of exon 8 of the ASPM gene. This deletion mutation can alter the ASPM transcript leading to functional impairment of the gene product. References1. Pattison L, Crow YJ, Deeble VJ, Jackson AP, Jafri H, Rashid Y, et al. A Fifth Locus for Primary Autosomal Recessive Microcephaly Maps to Chromosome 1q31. Am J Hum Genet 2000;67(6:1578-80.2. Darvish H, Esmaeeli-Nieh S, Monajemi G, Mohseni M, Ghasemi-Firouzabadi S, Abedini S, et al. A clinical and molecular genetic study of 112 Iranian families with primary microcephaly. Journal of Medical Genetics 2010;47(12:823-8.3. Tolmie JL, M M, JB S, D D, JM C

  9. Autosomal recessive, early-onset Parkinson’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bonifati, Vincenzo

    2003-01-01

    textabstractParkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer’s disease, with a prevalence of 1-2% in the population aged 65 years.1 The disease is clinically defi ned by the presence of parkinsonism (the combination of akinesia, resting tremor, and muscular rigidity), and a good response to dopaminergic therapy. These features are associated at pathological level with neuronal loss and gliosis, mainly in the substantia nigra pars compacta but also ...

  10. Genetic linkage studies in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansfield, D.C.; Teague, P.W.; Barber, A. [Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) is a severe retinal dystrophy characterized by night blindness, progressive constriction of the visual fields and loss of central vision in the fourth or fifth decades. The frequency of this form of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) varies in different populations. Mutations within the rhodopsin, cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase-{beta} subunit and cGMP-gated channel genes have been reported in some arRP families. The genetic loci responsible for the majority of cases have yet to be identified. Genetic heterogeneity is likely to be extensive. In order to minimize the amount of genetic heterogenity, a set of arRP families was ascertained within the South-Central Sardinian population, in which 81% of families with a known mode of inheritance show an autosomal recessive form of RP. The Sardinian population is an ethnic {open_quotes}outlier{close_quotes}, having remained relatively isolated from mainland and other cultures. Genetic linkage data has been obtained in a set of 11 Sardinian arRP kindreds containing 26 affected members. Under the assumption of genetic homogeneity, no evidence of linkage was found in the arRP kindreds using 195 markers, which excluded 62% of the genome (Z<-2). Positive lod scores were obtained with D14S80 which showed no recombination in a subset of 5 families. Heterogeneity testing using D14S80 and arRP showed no significant evidence of heterogeneity (p=0.18) but evidence of linkage ({chi}{sup 2}=3.64, p=0.028). We are currently screening the neural retina-specific leucine zipper gene (NRL) in 14q11 for mutations as a candidate locus.

  11. Transmission of Neurodegenerative Disorders Through Blood Transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Rostgaard, Klaus;

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aggregation of misfolded proteins in the brain occurs in several neurodegenerative disorders. Aberrant protein aggregation is inducible in rodents and primates by intracerebral inoculation. Possible transfusion transmission of neurodegenerative diseases has important public health...... implications. Objective: To investigate possible transfusion transmission of neurodegenerative disorders. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting: Nationwide registers of transfusions in Sweden and Denmark. Participants: 1 465 845 patients who received transfusions between 1968 and 2012. Measurements......: Observational study design, underascertainment of the outcome, and possible insufficient statistical power. Conclusion: The data provide no evidence for the transmission of neurodegenerative diseases and suggest that if transmission does occur, it is rare. Primary Funding Source: Swedish Research Council...

  12. Mutations in c10orf11, a melanocyte-differentiation gene, cause autosomal-recessive albinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønskov, Karen; Dooley, Christopher M; Østergaard, Elsebet;

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive albinism is a hypopigmentation disorder with a broad phenotypic range. A substantial fraction of individuals with albinism remain genetically unresolved, and it has been hypothesized that more genes are to be identified. By using homozygosity mapping of an inbred Faroese family......, we identified a 3.5 Mb homozygous region (10q22.2-q22.3) on chromosome 10. The region contains five protein-coding genes, and sequencing of one of these, C10orf11, revealed a nonsense mutation that segregated with the disease and showed a recessive inheritance pattern. Investigation of additional...... individual originating from Lithuania. Immunohistochemistry showed localization of C10orf11 in melanoblasts and melanocytes in human fetal tissue, but no localization was seen in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Knockdown of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) homolog with the use of morpholinos resulted in...

  13. Nephrocalcinosis (Enamel Renal Syndrome) Caused by Autosomal Recessive FAM20A Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaureguiberry, Graciana; De la Dure-Molla, Muriel; Parry, David; Quentric, Mickael; Himmerkus, Nina; Koike, Toshiyasu; Poulter, James; Klootwijk, Enriko; Robinette, Steven L.; Howie, Alexander J.; Patel, Vaksha; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Stanescu, Horia C.; Issler, Naomi; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Laing, Christopher; Walsh, Stephen B.; McCredie, David A.; Povey, Sue; Asselin, Audrey; Picard, Arnaud; Coulomb, Aurore; Medlar, Alan J.; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Verloes, Alain; Le Caignec, Cedric; Roussey, Gwenaelle; Guiol, Julien; Isidor, Bertrand; Logan, Clare; Shore, Roger; Johnson, Colin; Inglehearn, Christopher; Al-Bahlani, Suhaila; Schmittbuhl, Matthieu; Clauss, François; Huckert, Mathilde; Laugel, Virginie; Ginglinger, Emmanuelle; Pajarola, Sandra; Spartà, Giuseppina; Bartholdi, Deborah; Rauch, Anita; Addor, Marie-Claude; Yamaguti, Paulo M.; Safatle, Heloisa P.; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio; dos Santos Netos, Pedro E.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Gruessel, Sandra; Sandmann, Carolin; Ruehmann, Denise; Langman, Craig B.; Scheinman, Steven J.; Ozdemir-Ozenen, Didem; Hart, Thomas C.; Hart, P. Suzanne; Neugebauer, Ute; Schlatter, Eberhard; Houillier, Pascal; Gahl, William A.; Vikkula, Miikka; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès; Bleich, Markus; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Unwin, Robert J.; Mighell, Alan; Berdal, Ariane; Kleta, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Calcium homeostasis requires regulated cellular and interstitial systems interacting to modulate the activity and movement of this ion. Disruption of these systems in the kidney results in nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis, important medical problems whose pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Methods We investigated 25 patients from 16 families with unexplained nephrocalcinosis and characteristic dental defects (amelogenesis imperfecta, gingival hyperplasia, impaired tooth eruption). To identify the causative gene, we performed genome-wide linkage analysis, exome capture, next-generation sequencing, and Sanger sequencing. Results All patients had bi-allelic FAM20A mutations segregating with the disease; 20 different mutations were identified. Conclusions This au-tosomal recessive disorder, also known as enamel renal syndrome, of FAM20A causes nephrocalcinosis and amelogenesis imperfecta. We speculate that all individuals with biallelic FAM20A mutations will eventually show nephrocalcinosis. PMID:23434854

  14. Autosomal recessive PGM3 mutations link glycosylation defects to atopy, immune deficiency, autoimmunity, and neurocognitive impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Xiaomin; Ichikawa, Mie; Lyons, Jonathan J.; Datta, Shrimati; Lamborn, Ian T.; Jing, Huie; Kim, Emily S.; Biancalana, Matthew; Wolfe, Lynne A.; DiMaggio, Thomas; Matthews, Helen F.; Kranick, Sarah M.; Stone, Kelly D.; Holland, Steven M.; Reich, Daniel S.; Hughes, Jason D.; Mehmet, Huseyin; McElwee, Joshua; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Freeze, Hudson H.; Su, Helen C.; Milner, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying genetic syndromes that lead to significant atopic disease can open new pathways for investigation and intervention in allergy. Objective To define a genetic syndrome of severe atopy, elevated serum IgE, immune deficiency, autoimmunity, and motor and neurocognitive impairment. Methods Eight patients from two families who had similar syndromic features were studied. Thorough clinical evaluations, including brain MRI and sensory evoked potentials, were performed. Peripheral lymphocyte flow cytometry, antibody responses, and T cell cytokine production were measured. Whole exome sequencing was performed to identify disease-causing mutations. Immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, enzymatic assays, nucleotide sugar and sugar phosphate analyses along with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry of glycans were used to determine the molecular consequences of the mutations. Results Marked atopy and autoimmunity were associated with increased TH2 and TH17 cytokine production by CD4+ T cells. Bacterial and viral infection susceptibility were noted along with T cell lymphopenia, particularly of CD8+ T cells, and reduced memory B cells. Apparent brain hypomyelination resulted in markedly delayed evoked potentials and likely contributed to neurological abnormalities. Disease segregated with novel autosomal recessive mutations in a single gene, phosphoglucomutase 3 (PGM3). Although PGM3 protein expression was variably diminished, impaired function was demonstrated by decreased enzyme activity and reduced UDP-GlcNAc, along with decreased O- and N-linked protein glycosylation in patients’ cells. These results define a new Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation. Conclusions Autosomal recessive, hypomorphic PGM3 mutations underlie a disorder of severe atopy, immune deficiency, autoimmunity, intellectual disability and hypomyelination. PMID:24589341

  15. Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH: clinical manifestations, genetic heterogeneity and mutation continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Muhammad J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly (MCPH is a rare disorder of neurogenic mitosis characterized by reduced head circumference at birth with variable degree of mental retardation. In MCPH patients, brain size reduced to almost one-third of its original volume due to reduced number of generated cerebral cortical neurons during embryonic neurogensis. So far, seven genetic loci (MCPH1-7 for this condition have been mapped with seven corresponding genes (MCPH1, WDR62, CDK5RAP2, CEP152, ASPM, CENPJ, and STIL identified from different world populations. Contribution of ASPM and WDR62 gene mutations in MCPH World wide is more than 50%. By and large, primary microcephaly patients are phenotypically indistinguishable, however, recent studies in patients with mutations in MCPH1, WDR62 and ASPM genes showed a broader clinical and/or cellular phenotype. It has been proposed that mutations in MCPH genes can cause the disease phenotype by disturbing: 1 orientation of mitotic spindles, 2 chromosome condensation mechanism during embryonic neurogenesis, 3 DNA damage-response signaling, 4 transcriptional regulations and microtubule dynamics, 5 certain unknown centrosomal mechanisms that control the number of neurons generated by neural precursor cells. Recent discoveries of mammalian models for MCPH have open up horizons for researchers to add more knowledge regarding the etiology and pathophysiology of MCPH. High incidence of MCPH in Pakistani population reflects the most probable involvement of consanguinity. Genetic counseling and clinical management through carrier detection/prenatal diagnosis in MCPH families can help reducing the incidence of this autosomal recessive disorder.

  16. MR cholangiography in children with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) is a relatively new, non-invasive imaging technique of the biliary tree that has shown good correlation with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The liver manifestation of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF). CHF may be accompanied by Caroli's disease, which is characterised by a non-obstructive dilation of the intrahepatic bile ducts. Objective. A prospective study was conducted to determine the presence and extent of Caroli's disease in children with ARPKD. Materials and methods. Seven children with ARPKD aged from 3.0 to 10.1 years were examined. CHF was confirmed in all biopsied cases (5 of 7). All children had been followed by repeated abdominal US examinations for many years. The MR examination included a morphological imaging study using a T2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequence and a heavily T2-weighted inversion-recovery turbo spin-echo sequence with three-dimensional maximum intensity projection (MIP) reconstructions for MRC. Results. The diagnosis of Caroli's disease could be made in one case by US; in two other children Caroli's disease was suspected, but the differentiation from hepatic cysts was not possible. By MRC, Caroli's disease could be diagnosed in three of seven children. Furthermore, MRC with MIP reconstructions demonstrated the extent of the disease by showing the entire biliary tree from different angles. Conclusions. MRC is a valuable method to establish the diagnosis and demonstrate the extent of Caroli's disease. (orig.)

  17. Autosomal recessive multiple pterygium syndrome: a new variant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Y; Erduran, E; Kutlu, N

    2000-07-31

    Multiple pterygium syndromes include at least 15 different entities characterized by multiple pterygia or webs of the skin and multiple congenital anomalies. We describe a female infant who presented with a distinct constellation of multiple anomalies consisting of pterygia of the inguinal, intercrural and popliteal areas, flexion contractures and arthrogryposis of some joints, craniofacial anomalies including ectropion, medial canthal web, blepharophimosis, hypoplasia of nose, oral and nasopharyngeal cavities, vocal cords and tongue, micrognathia, orolabial synechiae secondary to pterygia, low set ears, alopecia, sad and expressionless face, short neck, asymmetric nipples, anal stenosis, rectal polyp, hypoplastic labia majora, complete syndactyly of all fingers and toes, pes equinovarus, bandlike web between feet, and absence of the nails and phalangeal-palmar creases. Radiological examination showed synostosis, absence or hypoplasia of metacarpal, metatarsal and phalangeal bones on feet and hands, and hypoplasia of pelvic bones and scapulae. This pattern of anomalies does not fit entirely any of the known multiple pterygium syndromes. Autosomal recessive inheritance is most likely due to the presence of three similarly affected siblings and normal parents. PMID:10925380

  18. Molecular diagnostics of neurodegenerative disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Megha; Biswas, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics provide a powerful method to detect and diagnose various neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The confirmation of such diagnosis allows early detection and subsequent medical counseling that help specific patients to undergo clinically important drug trials. This provides a medical pathway to have better insight of neurogenesis and eventual cure of the neurodegenerative diseases. In this short review, we present recent advances in molecular ...

  19. MR cholangiography in children with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, G. [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)]|[Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Heinrich Heine Univ., Duesseldorf (Germany); Benz-Bohm, G.; Kugel, H. [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Keller, K.M. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Querfeld, U. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)

    1999-06-01

    Background. Magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) is a relatively new, non-invasive imaging technique of the biliary tree that has shown good correlation with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The liver manifestation of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF). CHF may be accompanied by Caroli`s disease, which is characterised by a non-obstructive dilation of the intrahepatic bile ducts. Objective. A prospective study was conducted to determine the presence and extent of Caroli`s disease in children with ARPKD. Materials and methods. Seven children with ARPKD aged from 3.0 to 10.1 years were examined. CHF was confirmed in all biopsied cases (5 of 7). All children had been followed by repeated abdominal US examinations for many years. The MR examination included a morphological imaging study using a T2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequence and a heavily T2-weighted inversion-recovery turbo spin-echo sequence with three-dimensional maximum intensity projection (MIP) reconstructions for MRC. Results. The diagnosis of Caroli`s disease could be made in one case by US; in two other children Caroli`s disease was suspected, but the differentiation from hepatic cysts was not possible. By MRC, Caroli`s disease could be diagnosed in three of seven children. Furthermore, MRC with MIP reconstructions demonstrated the extent of the disease by showing the entire biliary tree from different angles. Conclusions. MRC is a valuable method to establish the diagnosis and demonstrate the extent of Caroli`s disease. (orig.) With 1 fig., 1 tab., 18 refs.

  20. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. Thus, oxidative stress elicits various neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, chemotherapy could result in severe side effects on the CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS of cancer patients, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates the involvement of ROS in drug-induced neurotoxicities as well. Therefore, development of antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs is a potentially beneficial strategy for clinical therapy. In this review, we summarize the source, balance maintenance and physiologic functions of ROS, oxidative stress and its toxic mechanisms underlying a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and the possible involvement of ROS in chemotherapy-induced toxicity to the CNS and PNS. We ultimately assess the value for antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs and provide our comments on the unmet needs.

  1. Genetically modified pig models for neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Ida E; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Luo, Yonglun

    2016-01-01

    Increasing incidence of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease has become one of the most challenging health issues in ageing humans. One approach to combat this is to generate genetically modified animal models of neurodegenerative disorders for studying pathogenesis, prognosis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Owing to the genetic, anatomic, physiologic, pathologic, and neurologic similarities between pigs and humans, genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders have been attractive large animal models to bridge the gap of preclinical investigations between rodents and humans. In this review, we provide a neuroanatomical overview in pigs and summarize and discuss the generation of genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's diseases, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, and ataxia-telangiectasia. We also highlight how non-invasive bioimaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET), computer tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and behavioural testing have been applied to characterize neurodegenerative pig models. We further propose a multiplex genome editing and preterm recloning (MAP) approach by using the rapid growth of the ground-breaking precision genome editing technology CRISPR/Cas9 and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). With this approach, we hope to shorten the temporal requirement in generating multiple transgenic pigs, increase the survival rate of founder pigs, and generate genetically modified pigs that will more closely resemble the disease-causing mutations and recapitulate pathological features of human conditions. PMID:26446984

  2. Dopamine transporter imaging in neurodegenerative disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is responsible for the re-uptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft and is located on dopaminergic nerve terminals only. DAT single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, therefore, offer the unique opportunity to study via striatal uptake the integrity of presynaptic dopaminergic nerve terminals in vivo. In recent years SPECT and PET using specific ligands binding to DAT have evolved as an useful tool for diagnosing and monitoring progression of neurodegenerative disorders affecting dopaminergic systems. This article briefly reviews the literature dealing with DTA SPECT and PET imaging in Parkinsonism and other neurodegenerative disorders

  3. Niemann-Pick C disease gene mutations and age-related neurodegenerative disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Zech

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick type C (NPC disease is a rare autosomal-recessively inherited lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in NPC1 (95% or NPC2. Given the highly variable phenotype, diagnosis is challenging and particularly late-onset forms with predominantly neuropsychiatric presentations are likely underdiagnosed. Pathophysiologically, genetic alterations compromising the endosomal/lysosomal system are linked with age-related neurodegenerative disorders. We sought to examine a possible association of rare sequence variants in NPC1 and NPC2 with Parkinson's disease (PD, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP, and to genetically determine the proportion of potentially misdiagnosed NPC patients in these neurodegenerative conditions. By means of high-resolution melting, we screened the coding regions of NPC1 and NPC2 for rare genetic variation in a homogenous German sample of patients clinically diagnosed with PD (n = 563, FTLD (n = 133 and PSP (n = 94, and 846 population-based controls. The frequencies of rare sequence variants in NPC1/2 did not differ significantly between patients and controls. Disease-associated NPC1/2 mutations were found in six PD patients (1.1% and seven control subjects (0.8%, but not in FTLD or PSP. All rare variation was detected in the heterozygous state and no compound heterozygotes were observed. Our data do not support the hypothesis that rare NPC1/2 variants confer susceptibility for PD, FTLD, or PSP in the German population. Misdiagnosed NPC patients were not present in our samples. However, further assessment of NPC disease genes in age-related neurodegeneration is warranted.

  4. Libyan Boy with Autosomal Recessive Trait (P22-phox Defect of Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilka Schulze

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is a primary immune deficiency disorder of the phagocytes. In this disorder, phagocytic cells (polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes cannot produce active oxygen metabolites, and therefore, cannot destroy the ingested intracellular bacteria. Clinically, patients with CGD usually have recurrent bacterial and fungal infections causing abscess and granuloma formation in the skin, lymph nodes and visceral organs.In this report, we present a boy from Libya with a rare autosomal recessive trait of CGD (defect of p22-phox who has chronic lung disease following multiple severe pneumonia attacks. The case we present suffered from bloody diarrhea since the third month of his life. He also had recurrent episodes of fever, and later, developed persistent cervical lymphadenitis and failure to gain weight. CGD is a very rare condition worldwide. It is also not recognized here in Libya, and usually not in the list of differential diagnosis for chronic pulmonary infections. We advise that pediatricians and general practitioners who treat chronic cases of lung diseases (with or without chronic diarrhea should consider primary immunodeficiency disorders in the hope that early diagnosis and treatment may prevent chronic complications especially of the respiratory tract. Furthermore, we state that, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first documented case of CGD from Libya.

  5. The ADAMTS18 gene is responsible for autosomal recessive early onset severe retinal dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peluso Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inherited retinal dystrophies, including Retinitis Pigmentosa and Leber Congenital Amaurosis among others, are a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders that lead to variable degrees of visual deficits. They can be caused by mutations in over 100 genes and there is evidence for the presence of as yet unidentified genes in a significant proportion of patients. We aimed at identifying a novel gene for an autosomal recessive form of early onset severe retinal dystrophy in a patient carrying no previously described mutations in known genes. Methods An integrated strategy including homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing was used to identify the responsible mutation. Functional tests were performed in the medaka fish (Oryzias latipes model organism to gain further insight into the pathogenic role of the ADAMTS18 gene in eye and central nervous system (CNS dysfunction. Results This study identified, in the analyzed patient, a homozygous missense mutation in the ADAMTS18 gene, which was recently linked to Knobloch syndrome, a rare developmental disorder that affects the eye and the occipital skull. In vivo gene knockdown performed in medaka fish confirmed both that the mutation has a pathogenic role and that the inactivation of this gene has a deleterious effect on photoreceptor cell function. Conclusion This study reveals that mutations in the ADAMTS18 gene can cause a broad phenotypic spectrum of eye disorders and contribute to shed further light on the complexity of retinal diseases.

  6. Role of metabolism in neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procaccini, Claudio; Santopaolo, Marianna; Faicchia, Deriggio; Colamatteo, Alessandra; Formisano, Luigi; de Candia, Paola; Galgani, Mario; De Rosa, Veronica; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Along with the increase in life expectancy over the last century, the prevalence of age-related disorders, such as neurodegenerative diseases continues to rise. This is the case of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's diseases and Multiple sclerosis, which are chronic disorders characterized by neuronal loss in motor, sensory or cognitive systems. Accumulating evidence has suggested the presence of a strong correlation between metabolic changes and neurodegeneration. Indeed epidemiologic studies have shown strong associations between obesity, metabolic dysfunction, and neurodegeneration, while animal models have provided insights into the complex relationships between these conditions. In this context, hormones such as leptin, ghrelin, insulin and IGF-1 seem to play a key role in the regulation of neuronal damage, toxic insults and several other neurodegenerative processes. This review aims to presenting the most recent evidence supporting the crosstalk linking energy metabolism and neurodegeneration, and will focus on metabolic manipulation as a possible therapeutic tool in the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27506744

  7. A Novel Autosomal Recessive GJA1 Missense Mutation Linked to Craniometaphyseal Dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ying; Chen, I-Ping; de Almeida, Salome; Tiziani, Valdenize; Do Amaral, Cassio M. Raposo; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Reichenberger, Ernst J.

    2013-01-01

    Craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD) is a rare sclerosing skeletal disorder with progressive hyperostosis of craniofacial bones. CMD can be inherited in an autosomal dominant (AD) trait or occur after de novo mutations in the pyrophosphate transporter ANKH. Although the autosomal recessive (AR) form of CMD had been mapped to 6q21-22 the mutation has been elusive. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing for one subject with AR CMD and identified a novel missense mutation (c.716G>A, p.Arg239Gln) in the C-terminus of the gap junction protein alpha-1 (GJA1) coding for connexin 43 (Cx43). We confirmed this mutation in 6 individuals from 3 additional families. The homozygous mutation cosegregated only with affected family members. Connexin 43 is a major component of gap junctions in osteoblasts, osteocytes, osteoclasts and chondrocytes. Gap junctions are responsible for the diffusion of low molecular weight molecules between cells. Mutations in Cx43 cause several dominant and recessive disorders involving developmental abnormalities of bone such as dominant and recessive oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD; MIM #164200, 257850) and isolated syndactyly type III (MIM #186100), the characteristic digital anomaly in ODDD. However, characteristic ocular and dental features of ODDD as well as syndactyly are absent in patients with the recessive Arg239Gln Cx43 mutation. Bone remodeling mechanisms disrupted by this novel Cx43 mutation remain to be elucidated. PMID:23951358

  8. GPR179 is required for depolarizing bipolar cell function and is mutated in autosomal-recessive complete congenital stationary night blindness

    OpenAIRE

    Peachey, Neal S.; Ray, Thomas A.; Florijn, Ralph; Rowe, Lucy B.; Sjoerdsma, Trijntje; Contreras-Alcantara, Susana; Baba, Kenkichi; Tosini, Gianluca; Pozdeyev, Nikita; Iuvone, P. Michael; Bojang, Pasano; Pearring, Jillian N.; Simonsz, Huibert Jan; van Genderen, Maria; Birch, David G.

    2012-01-01

    textabstractComplete congenital stationary night blindness (cCSNB) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of retinal disorders characterized by nonprogressive impairment of night vision, absence of the electroretinogram (ERG) b-wave, and variable degrees of involvement of other visual functions. We report here that mutations in GPR179, encoding an orphan G protein receptor, underlie a form of autosomal-recessive cCSNB. The Gpr179nob5/nob5mouse model was initially discovered by th...

  9. Brain drug delivery systems for neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbayo, E; Ansorena, E; Blanco-Prieto, M J

    2012-09-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders (NDs) are rapidly increasing as population ages. However, successful treatments for NDs have so far been limited and drug delivery to the brain remains one of the major challenges to overcome. There has recently been growing interest in the development of drug delivery systems (DDS) for local or systemic brain administration. DDS are able to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of conventional drugs and reduce their side effects. The present review provides a concise overview of the recent advances made in the field of brain drug delivery for treating neurodegenerative disorders. Examples include polymeric micro and nanoparticles, lipidic nanoparticles, pegylated liposomes, microemulsions and nanogels that have been tested in experimental models of Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. Overall, the results reviewed here show that DDS have great potential for NDs treatment. PMID:23016644

  10. Mutations in PCDH21 cause autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Elsebet; Batbayli, M; Dunø, Morten; Vilhelmsen, K; Rosenberg, T

    2010-01-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy is a retinal dystrophy with early loss of cone photoreceptors and a parallel or subsequent loss of rod photoreceptors. It may be syndromic, but most forms are non-syndromic with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive inheritance.......Cone-rod dystrophy is a retinal dystrophy with early loss of cone photoreceptors and a parallel or subsequent loss of rod photoreceptors. It may be syndromic, but most forms are non-syndromic with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive inheritance....

  11. A Founder Mutation in VPS11 Causes an Autosomal Recessive Leukoencephalopathy Linked to Autophagic Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Adam; Fedick, Anastasia; Kaye, Lauren E.; Liao, Jun; Yachelevich, Naomi; Chu, Mary-Lynn; Boles, Richard G.; Moran, Ellen; Tokita, Mari; Gorman, Elizabeth; Zhang, Wei; Xia, Fan; Leduc, Magalie; Yang, Yaping; Eng, Christine; Wong, Lee-Jun; Schiffmann, Raphael; Diaz, George A.; Kornreich, Ruth; Thummel, Ryan; Wasserstein, Melissa; Yue, Zhenyu; Edelmann, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Genetic leukoencephalopathies (gLEs) are a group of heterogeneous disorders with white matter abnormalities affecting the central nervous system (CNS). The causative mutation in ~50% of gLEs is unknown. Using whole exome sequencing (WES), we identified homozygosity for a missense variant, VPS11: c.2536T>G (p.C846G), as the genetic cause of a leukoencephalopathy syndrome in five individuals from three unrelated Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) families. All five patients exhibited highly concordant disease progression characterized by infantile onset leukoencephalopathy with brain white matter abnormalities, severe motor impairment, cortical blindness, intellectual disability, and seizures. The carrier frequency of the VPS11: c.2536T>G variant is 1:250 in the AJ population (n = 2,026). VPS11 protein is a core component of HOPS (homotypic fusion and protein sorting) and CORVET (class C core vacuole/endosome tethering) protein complexes involved in membrane trafficking and fusion of the lysosomes and endosomes. The cysteine 846 resides in an evolutionarily conserved cysteine-rich RING-H2 domain in carboxyl terminal regions of VPS11 proteins. Our data shows that the C846G mutation causes aberrant ubiquitination and accelerated turnover of VPS11 protein as well as compromised VPS11-VPS18 complex assembly, suggesting a loss of function in the mutant protein. Reduced VPS11 expression leads to an impaired autophagic activity in human cells. Importantly, zebrafish harboring a vps11 mutation with truncated RING-H2 domain demonstrated a significant reduction in CNS myelination following extensive neuronal death in the hindbrain and midbrain. Thus, our study reveals a defect in VPS11 as the underlying etiology for an autosomal recessive leukoencephalopathy disorder associated with a dysfunctional autophagy-lysosome trafficking pathway. PMID:27120463

  12. Autosomal recessive Stickler syndrome in two families is caused by mutations in the COL9A1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Nikopoulos (Konstantinos); I. Schrauwen (Isabelle); M.E.H. Simon (Marleen); R.W.J. Collin (Rob); M.A.H. Veckeneer (Marc); K. Keymolen (Kathelijn); G. van Camp (Guy); F.P.M. Cremers (Frans); L. Ingeborgh van den Born

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPurpose. To investigate COL9A1 in two families suggestive of autosomal recessive Stickler syndrome and to delineate the associated phenotype. Methods. The probands of two consanguineous autosomal recessive Stickler families were evaluated for homozygosity using SNP microarray in one and

  13. Autosomal recessive Stickler syndrome in two families is caused by mutations in the COL9A1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikopoulos, K.; Schrauwen, I.; Simon, M.; Collin, R.W.J.; Veckeneer, M.; Keymolen, K.; Camp, G. van; Cremers, F.P.M.; Born, L.I. van den

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate COL9A1 in two families suggestive of autosomal recessive Stickler syndrome and to delineate the associated phenotype. METHODS: The probands of two consanguineous autosomal recessive Stickler families were evaluated for homozygosity using SNP microarray in one and haplotype an

  14. An autosomal recessive syndrome of cleft palate, cardiac defect, genital anomalies, and ectrodactyly (CCGE).

    OpenAIRE

    Giannotti, A; Digilio, M C; Mingarelli, R; Dallapiccola, B.

    1995-01-01

    We report a brother and sister affected by a constellation of malformations, including cleft palate, cardiac defect, genital anomalies, and ectrodactyly (CCGE). A similar association has been reported previously by Richieri-Costa and Orquizas in a male patient born to consanguineous parents. An autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance is proposed for this syndrome.

  15. Prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound in pregnancies at risk for autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Reuss (Annette); J.W. Wladimiroff (Juriy); P.A. Stewart (Patricia); M.F. Niermeijer (Martinus)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract In 15 pregnancies at risk of the autosomal recessive type of polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD), there were six recurrences (40%), five of which were diagnosed prenatally between 17 and 26 weeks (mean, 22 weeks). In the remaining affected case, normal kidney size and echoge

  16. DJ-1( PARK7), a novel gene for autosomal recessive, early onset parkinsonism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Bonifati (Vincenzo); F. Squitieri (Ferdinando); E. Krieger (Elmar); N. Vanacore (Nicola); J.C. van Swieten; A. Brice; C.M. van Duijn (Cock); G. Meco (Giuseppe); P. Heutink (Peter); B.A. Oostra (Ben); P. Rizzu (Patrizia)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractFour chromosomal loci ( PARK2, PARK6, PARK7, and PARK9) associated with autosomal recessive, early onset parkinsonism are known. We mapped the PARK7 locus to chromosome 1p36 in a large family from a genetically isolated population in the Netherlands, and confirmed this linkage in an Ital

  17. Next-generation sequencing for molecular diagnosis of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edrees, Burhan M; Athar, Mohammad; Al-Allaf, Faisal A; Taher, Mohiuddin M; Khan, Wajahatullah; Bouazzaoui, Abdellatif; Al-Harbi, Naffaa; Safar, Ramzia; Al-Edressi, Howaida; Alansary, Khawala; Anazi, Abulkareem; Altayeb, Naji; Ahmed, Muawia A; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen

    2016-10-10

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) a rare genetic disorder, described by formation of cysts in the kidney. A targeted customized sequencing of genes implicated in ARPKD phenotype was performed to identify candidate variants using the Ion torrent PGM next-generation sequencing. The results identified likely pathogenic disease causing variants during the validation process. Four potential pathogenic variants [c.4870C>T, p.(Arg1624Trp)], [c.5725C>T, p.(Arg1909Trp)], c.1736C>T, p.(Thr579Met)] and [(c.10628T>G), p.(Leu3543Trp)] were observed in PKHD1 gene among 12 out of 18 samples. The rest of the patient samples also showed few variants in ADPKD (Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease) disease causing genes PKD1 and PKD2 i.e. [c.12433G>A, p.(Val4145Ile)] and [c.1445T>G, p.(Phe482Cys)], respectively. All causative variants were validated by capillary sequencing, confirming the presence of a novel homozygous variants [c.10628T>G, p.(Leu3543Trp)] found in exon 61 of a male proband. All potentially deleterious variants identified in PKHD1, PKD1, and PKD2 gene, also exhibited pathologically or clinically significance based on the computational predictions involved in predicting the impact of non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) on protein function such as Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) and Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen2). SIFT classified 50% of our nsSNPs as "deleterious", while PolyPhen2 identified 45% of our nsSNPs as "Probably damaged" and the results from both programs were largely complementary. Taken together, these results suggest that the NGS strategies provide a fast, accurate and cost-effective molecular diagnostic tool for identifying mutations in targeted genes sequence analysis. PMID:27401137

  18. Elevated c-myc protooncogene expression in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polycystic kidney diseases (PKDs) are a group of disorders characterized by the growth of epithelial cysts from the nephrons and collecting ducts of kidney tubules. The diseases can be inherited or can be provoked by environmental factors. To investigate the molecular basis of the abnormal cell growth associated with PKD, c-myc protooncogene expression was studied in a mouse model for autosomal recessive PKD. Homozygous recessive C57BL/6J (cpk/cpk) mice develop massively enlarged cystic kidneys and die from renal failure shortly after 3 weeks of age. Quantitative dot blot and RNA blot hybridization experiments in which whole kidney poly(A)+ RNA was hybridized with a c-myc RNA probe showed a 2- to 6-fold increase in c-myc mRNA at 2 weeks, and a 25- to 30-fold increase in c-myc mRNA at 3 weeks of age in polycystic mice, as compared to normal littermates. c-myc expression was also examined under two conditions in which kidney cell growth was experimentally induced in normal adult mice: compensatory renal hypertrophy and tubule regeneration following folic acid-induced renal cell injury. While compensatory hypertrophy resulted in only a small increase in c-myc, folic acid treatment gave rise after 24 hr to a 12-fold increase in c-myc RNA. The induction of c-myc by folic acid is consistent with increased cellular proliferation regenerating tubules. In contrast, polycystic kidneys show only a minimal increase in cellular proliferation over that seen in normal kidneys, while c-myc levels were found to be markedly elevated. Thus, the level of c-myc expression in cystic kidneys appears to be out of proportion to the rate of cell division, suggesting that elevated and potentially abnormal c-myc expression may be involved in the pathogenesis of PKD

  19. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neuromyotonia is a disorder that affects the peripheral nerves. Peripheral nerves connect the brain and spinal cord to muscles ... caused by damage to a particular part of peripheral nerves called axons , which are the extensions of nerve ...

  20. Autosomal recessive limb girdle myasthenia in two sisters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar A

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Limb girdle myasthenic syndromes are rare genetic disorders described under the broad heterogeneous group known as congenital myasthenic syndromes and present with mixed features of myasthenia and myopathy. The familial limb girdle myasthenia has been described as one with selective weakness of pectoral and pelvic girdles, showing a positive response to edrophonium chloride. A report of two sisters affected by this disorder is presented.

  1. DNA triplex structures in neurodegenerative disorder, Friedreich's ataxia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moganty R Rajeswari

    2012-07-01

    It is now established that a small fraction of genomic DNA does adopt the non-canonical B-DNA structure or ‘unusual’ DNA structure. The unusual DNA structures like DNA-hairpin, cruciform, Z-DNA, triplex and tetraplex are represented as hotspots of chromosomal breaks, homologous recombination and gross chromosomal rearrangements since they are prone to the structural alterations. Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA), the autosomal recessive degenerative disorder of nervous and muscles tissue, is caused by the massive expansion of (GAA) repeats that occur in the first intron of Frataxin gene X25 on chromosome 9q13-q21.1. The purine strand of the DNA in the expanded (GAA) repeat region folds back to form the (R∙R*Y) type of triplex, which further inhibits the frataxin gene expression, and this clearly suggests that the shape of DNA is the determining factor in the cellular function. FRDA is the only disease known so far to be associated with DNA triplex. Structural characterization of GAA-containing DNA triplexes using some simple biophysical methods like UV melting, UV absorption, circular dichroic spectroscopy and electrophoretic mobility shift assay are discussed. Further, the clinical aspects and genetic analysis of FRDA patients who carry (GAA) repeat expansions are presented. The potential of some small molecules that do not favour the DNA triplex formation as therapeutics for FRDA are also briefly discussed.

  2. Antisense Gene Silencing: Therapy for Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troels T. Nielsen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the first reports that double-stranded RNAs can efficiently silence gene expression in C. elegans, the technology of RNA interference (RNAi has been intensively exploited as an experimental tool to study gene function. With the subsequent discovery that RNAi could also be applied to mammalian cells, the technology of RNAi expanded from being a valuable experimental tool to being an applicable method for gene-specific therapeutic regulation, and much effort has been put into further refinement of the technique. This review will focus on how RNAi has developed over the years and how the technique is exploited in a pre-clinical and clinical perspective in relation to neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease caused by deletion at a dinucleotide repeat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare inherited condition rendering neutrophils incapable of killing invading pathogens. This condition is due to the failure of a multicomponent microbicidal oxidase that normally yields a low-midpoint-potential b cytochrome (cytochrome b245). Although defects in the X chromosome-linked cytochrome account for the majority of CGD patients, as many as 30% of CGD cases are due to an autosomal recessive disease. Of these, >90% have been shown to be defective in the synthesis of a 47-kDa cytosolic component of the oxidase. The authors demonstrate here in three unrelated cases of autosomal recessive CGD that the identical underlying molecular lesion is a dinucleotide deletion at a GTGT tandem repeat, corresponding to the acceptor site of the first intron - exon junction. Slippage of the DNA duplex at this site may contribute to the high frequency of defects in this gene

  4. TRPM1 Is Mutated in Patients with Autosomal-Recessive Complete Congenital Stationary Night Blindness

    OpenAIRE

    Audo, Isabelle; Kohl, Susanne; Leroy, Bart P.; Munier, Francis L.; Guillonneau, Xavier; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Bujakowska, Kinga; Nandrot, Emeline F.; Lorenz, Birgit; Preising, Markus; Kellner, Ulrich; Renner, Agnes B.; Bernd, Antje; Antonio, Aline; Moskova-Doumanova, Veselina

    2009-01-01

    Night vision requires signaling from rod photoreceptors to adjacent bipolar cells in the retina. Mutations in the genes NYX and GRM6, expressed in ON bipolar cells, lead to a disruption of the ON bipolar cell response. This dysfunction is present in patients with complete X-linked and autosomal-recessive congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) and can be assessed by standard full-field electroretinography (ERG), showing severely reduced rod b-wave amplitude and slightly altered cone resp...

  5. PNPLA1 mutations cause autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in golden retriever dogs and humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Grall, Anaïs; Guaguère, Eric; Planchais, Sandrine; Grond, Susanne; Bourrat, Emmanuelle; Hausser, Ingrid; Hitte, Christophe; Le Gallo, Matthieu; Derbois, Céline; Kim, Gwang-Jin; Lagoutte, Laëtitia; Degorce-Rubiales, Frédérique; Radner, Franz,; Thomas, Anne; Küry, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    International audience Ichthyoses comprise a heterogeneous group of genodermatoses characterized by abnormal desquamation over the whole body, for which the genetic causes of several human forms remain unknown. We used a spontaneous dog model in the golden retriever breed, which is affected by a lamellar ichthyosis resembling human autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses (ARCI), to carry out a genome-wide association study. We identified a homozygous insertion-deletion (indel) mutation i...

  6. TRPV4 Dysfunction Promotes Renal Cystogenesis in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zaika, Oleg; Mamenko, Mykola; Berrout, Jonathan; Boukelmoune, Nabila; O'Neil, Roger G.; Pochynyuk, Oleh

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of cyst formation and expansion in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is poorly understood, but impaired mechanosensitivity to tubular flow and dysfunctional calcium signaling are important contributors. The activity of the mechanosensitive Ca2+-permeable TRPV4 channel underlies flow-dependent Ca2+ signaling in murine collecting duct (CD) cells, suggesting that this channel may contribute to cystogenesis in ARPKD. Here, we developed a method to isola...

  7. A Defect in the TUSC3 Gene Is Associated with Autosomal Recessive Mental Retardation

    OpenAIRE

    Garshasbi, Masoud; Hadavi, Valeh; Habibi, Haleh; Kahrizi, Kimia; Kariminejad, Roxana; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Tzschach, Andreas; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Kuss, Andreas Walter

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that autosomal recessive mental retardation (ARMR) is extremely heterogeneous, and there is reason to believe that the number of underlying gene defects goes into the thousands. To date, however, only four genes have been implicated in nonsyndromic ARMR (NS-ARMR): PRSS12 (neurotrypsin), CRBN (cereblon), CC2D1A, and GRIK2. As part of an ongoing systematic study aiming to identify ARMR genes, we investigated a large consanguineous family comprising seven patients with ...

  8. Improved Structure and Function in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Rat Kidneys with Renal Tubular Cell Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K J Kelly

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a truly catastrophic monogenetic disease, causing death and end stage renal disease in neonates and children. Using PCK female rats, an orthologous model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease harboring mutant Pkhd1, we tested the hypothesis that intravenous renal cell transplantation with normal Sprague Dawley male kidney cells would improve the polycystic kidney disease phenotype. Cytotherapy with renal cells expressing wild type Pkhd1 and tubulogenic serum amyloid A1 had powerful and sustained beneficial effects on renal function and structure in the polycystic kidney disease model. Donor cell engraftment and both mutant and wild type Pkhd1 were found in treated but not control PCK kidneys 15 weeks after the final cell infusion. To examine the mechanisms of global protection with a small number of transplanted cells, we tested the hypothesis that exosomes derived from normal Sprague Dawley cells can limit the cystic phenotype of PCK recipient cells. We found that renal exosomes originating from normal Sprague Dawley cells carried and transferred wild type Pkhd1 mRNA to PCK cells in vivo and in vitro and restricted cyst formation by cultured PCK cells. The results indicate that transplantation with renal cells containing wild type Pkhd1 improves renal structure and function in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and may provide an intra-renal supply of normal Pkhd1 mRNA.

  9. In vitro and in vivo characterization of histone deacetylase inhibitors as potential therapeutics for autosomal recessive proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)

    OpenAIRE

    Rießland, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a common autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder and the leading hereditary cause of death in early childhood. No cure is available. The disease determining gene for SMA is the survival motor neuron gene 1. SMN1 produces full length transcripts only, whereas the majority of transcripts derived from the copy gene SMN2 lack exon 7 due to alternative splicing. Although the amount of fully-functional SMN2-derived FL-SMN protein is not sufficient to overcome the absen...

  10. THE SYNDROME OF AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE PONTOCEREBELLAR HYPOPLASIA, MICROCEPHALY, AND EXTRAPYRAMIDAL DYSKINESIA (PONTOCEREBELLAR HYPOPLASIA TYPE-2) - COMPILED DATA FROM 10 PEDIGREES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BARTH, PG; BLENNOW, G; LENARD, HG; BEGEER, JH; VANDERKLEY, JM; HANEFELD, F; PETERS, ACB; Valk, J.

    1995-01-01

    The syndrome of autosomal recessive pontocerebellar hypoplasia, microcephaly, severely impaired mental and motor development, and extrapyramidal dyskinesia is a distinct system degeneration, previously designated pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 2 (PCH-2). To further characterize its clinical and neu

  11. Autosomal recessive ectodermal dysplasia: I. An undescribed dysplasia/malformation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos, T; Simosa, V; Pinto-Cisternas, J; Abramovits, W; Jolay, L; Rodriguez, L; Fernandez, L; Ramela, M

    1991-12-15

    We describe 27 individuals of 7 families related to each other with high probability who showed manifestations of ectodermal dysplasia and other anomalies affecting females as severely as males with variable expressivity. All parents were normal. These families were detected in a relatively isolated and inbred population with very small neighbouring communities from a Caribbean Sea island, Margarita Island, in Northeastern Venezuela (Nueva Esparta State). The clinical picture common to all patients could not be classified within the heterogeneous group of known ectodermal dysplasias and the published cases do not resemble our patients. We believe that this condition constitutes a newly recognized autosomal recessive dysplasia/malformation syndrome of ectodermal dysplasia. PMID:1776626

  12. Birth prevalence and mutation spectrum in danish patients with autosomal recessive albinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønskov, Karen; Ek, Jakob; Sand, Annie; Scheller, Rudolf; Bygum, Anette; Brixen, Kim; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The study was initiated to investigate the mutation spectrum of four OCA genes and to calculate the birth prevalence in patients with autosomal recessive albinism. METHODS: Mutation analysis using dHPLC or direct DNA sequencing of TYR, OCA2, TYRP1, and MATP was performed in 62 patients...... recessive ocular albinism (AROA) based on clinical findings was 55 to 45. CONCLUSIONS: TYR is the major OCA gene in Denmark, but several patients do not have mutations in the investigated genes. A relatively large fraction of patients were observed with AROA, and of those 52% had no mutations compared with...

  13. Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis in American Bulldogs Is Associated With NIPAL4 (ICHTHYIN) Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldin, E A; Wang, P; Evans, E; Cantner, C A; Ferracone, J D; Credille, K M; Casal, M L

    2015-07-01

    A minority of patients with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) display mutations in NIPAL4 (ICHTHYIN). This protein plays a role in epidermal lipid metabolism, although the mechanism is unknown. The study describes a moderate form of ARCI in an extended pedigree of American Bulldogs that is linked to the gene encoding ichthyin. The gross phenotype was manifest as a disheveled pelage shortly after birth, generalized scaling, and adherent brown scale with erythema of the abdominal skin. Pedigree analysis indicated an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Ultrastructurally, the epidermis showed discontinuous lipid bilayers, unprocessed lipid within corneocytes, and abnormal lamellar bodies. Linkage analysis, performed by choosing simple sequence repeat markers and single-nucleotide polymorphisms near genes known to cause ACRI, revealed an association with NIPAL4. NIPAL4 was identified and sequenced using standard methods. No mutation was identified within the gene, but affected dogs had a SINE element 5' upstream of exon 1 in a highly conserved region. Of 545 DNA samples from American Bulldogs, 32 dogs (17 females, 15 males) were homozygous for the polymerase chain reaction fragment. All affected dogs were homozygous, with parents heterozygous for the insertion. Immunolabeling revealed an absence of ichthyin in the epidermis. This is the first description of ARCI associated with decreased expression of NIPAL4 in nonhuman species. PMID:25322746

  14. Autosomal recessive transmission of MYBPC3 mutation results in malignant phenotype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilu Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM due to mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins is most commonly inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Since nearly 50% of HCM cases occur in the absence of a family history, a recessive inheritance pattern may be involved. METHODS: A pedigree was identified with suspected autosomal recessive transmission of HCM. Twenty-six HCM-related genes were comprehensively screened for mutations in the proband with targeted second generation sequencing, and the identified mutation was confirmed with bi-directional Sanger sequencing in all family members and 376 healthy controls. RESULTS: A novel missense mutation (c.1469G>T, p.Gly490Val in exon 17 of MYBPC3 was identified. Two siblings with HCM were homozygous for this mutation, whereas other family members were either heterozygous or wild type. Clinical evaluation showed that both homozygotes manifested a typical HCM presentation, but none of others, including 5 adult heterozygous mutation carriers up to 71 years of age, had any clinical evidence of HCM. CONCLUSIONS: Our data identified a MYBPC3 mutation in HCM, which appeared autosomal recessively inherited in this family. The absence of a family history of clinical HCM may be due to not only a de novo mutation, but also recessive mutations that failed to produce a clinical phenotype in heterozygous family members. Therefore, consideration of recessive mutations leading to HCM is essential for risk stratification and genetic counseling.

  15. Interaction between -Synuclein and Other Proteins in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt A. Jellinger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation is a common characteristic of many neurodegenerative disorders, and the interaction between pathological/toxic proteins to cause neurodegeneration is a hot topic of current neuroscience research. Despite clinical, genetic, and experimental differences, evidence increasingly indicates considerable overlap between synucleinopathies and tauopathies or other protein-misfolding diseases. Inclusions, characteristics of these disorders, also occurring in other neurodegenerative diseases, suggest interactions of pathological proteins engaging common downstream pathways. Novel findings that have shifted our understanding in the role of pathologic proteins in the pathogenesis of Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases have confirmed correlations/overlaps between these and other neurodegenerative disorders. The synergistic effects of α-synuclein, hyperphosphorylated tau, amyloid-β, and other pathologic proteins, and the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms, including induction and spread of protein aggregates, are critically reviewed, suggesting a dualism or triad of neurodegeneration in protein-misfolding disorders, although the etiology of most of these processes is still mysterious.

  16. Ghrelin: a link between ageing, metabolism and neurodegenerative disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoyanova, I.I.

    2014-01-01

    Along with the increase in life expectancy over the last century comes the increased risk for development of age-related disorders, including metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. These chronic disorders share two main characteristics: 1

  17. PNPLA1 mutations cause autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in golden retriever dogs and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grall, Anaïs; Guaguère, Eric; Planchais, Sandrine; Grond, Susanne; Bourrat, Emmanuelle; Hausser, Ingrid; Hitte, Christophe; Le Gallo, Matthieu; Derbois, Céline; Kim, Gwang-Jin; Lagoutte, Laëtitia; Degorce-Rubiales, Frédérique; Radner, Franz P W; Thomas, Anne; Küry, Sébastien; Bensignor, Emmanuel; Fontaine, Jacques; Pin, Didier; Zimmermann, Robert; Zechner, Rudolf; Lathrop, Mark; Galibert, Francis; André, Catherine; Fischer, Judith

    2012-02-01

    Ichthyoses comprise a heterogeneous group of genodermatoses characterized by abnormal desquamation over the whole body, for which the genetic causes of several human forms remain unknown. We used a spontaneous dog model in the golden retriever breed, which is affected by a lamellar ichthyosis resembling human autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses (ARCI), to carry out a genome-wide association study. We identified a homozygous insertion-deletion (indel) mutation in PNPLA1 that leads to a premature stop codon in all affected golden retriever dogs. We subsequently found one missense and one nonsense mutation in the catalytic domain of human PNPLA1 in six individuals with ARCI from two families. Further experiments highlighted the importance of PNPLA1 in the formation of the epidermal lipid barrier. This study identifies a new gene involved in human ichthyoses and provides insights into the localization and function of this yet uncharacterized member of the PNPLA protein family. PMID:22246504

  18. A Linkage Study in 8 Pakistani Families Segregating as Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hassanullah

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The current study was designed to find the most frequent MCPH phenotype in inbred Pakistani families. Primary microcephaly is marked by small brain size and is usually inherited as recessive trait. In the present study, we performed linkage analysis on 8 Pakistani families with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH and linked 6 of them to known MCPH genes/loci like MCPH1 (Microcephalin, MCPH3 (CDK5RAP2 and MCPH5 (ASPM. Majority of the families showed linkage with MCPH5, the most common MCPH locus in Pakistan. The linked families were then subjected to mutational analysis, revealing a previously known G to A transition at nucleotide position 3978 in exon 17 of ASPM gene in three of the families. To decrease its incidence, it is indispensible to train the people of the possible devastating outcome of cousin marriages and to find the carriers through carrier screening programs.

  19. Hypomorphic mutations in PGAP2, encoding a GPI-anchor-remodeling protein, cause autosomal-recessive intellectual disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Tawamie, Hasan; Murakami, Yoshiko; Mang, Yuan; ur Rehman, Shoaib; Buchert, Rebecca; Schaffer, Stefanie; Muhammad, Safia; Bak, Mads; Nöthen, Markus M; Bennett, Eric P; Maeda, Yusuke; Aigner, Michael; Reis, André; Kinoshita, Taroh; Tommerup, Niels; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Abou Jamra, Rami

    2013-01-01

    alkaline phosphatase (ALP). We performed autozygosity mapping and ultra-deep sequencing followed by stringent filtering and identified two homozygous PGAP2 alterations, p.Tyr99Cys and p.Arg177Pro, in seven offspring with nonspecific autosomal-recessive intellectual disability from two consanguineous...

  20. Park7, a novel locus for autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism, on chromosome 1p36

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. van Duijn (Cock); G.J. Breedveld (Guido); M. Horstink (Marten); L.A. Sandkuijl (Lodewijk); B.A. Oostra (Ben); J.C. van Swieten; V. Bonifati (Vincenzo); R-J.H. Galjaard (Robert-Jan); J.J. Houwing-Duistermaat (Jeanine); L. Testers; M.C.J. Dekker (Marieke); P.J.L.M. Snijders (Pieter); P. Heutink (Peter)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractAlthough the role of genetic factors in the origin of Parkinson disease has long been disputed, several genes involved in autosomal dominant and recessive forms of the disease have been localized. Mutations associated with early-onset autosomal recessive parkinsonism have been identified

  1. Park7, a novel locus for autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism, on chromosome 1p36.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, C.M. van; Dekker, M.C.J.; Bonifati, V.; Galjaard, R.J.; Houwing-Duistermaat, J.J.; Snijders, P.J.L.M.; Testers, L.; Breedveld, G.J.; Horstink, M.W.I.M.; Sandkuijl, L.A.; Swieten, J. van; Oostra, B.A.; Heutink, P.

    2001-01-01

    Although the role of genetic factors in the origin of Parkinson disease has long been disputed, several genes involved in autosomal dominant and recessive forms of the disease have been localized. Mutations associated with early-onset autosomal recessive parkinsonism have been identified in the Park

  2. Autosomal Recessive Chronic Granulomatous Disease, IgA Deficiency and Refractory Autoimmune Thrombocytopenia Responding to Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Shamsian Bibi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Immunodeficiency and autoimmune disease may occur concomitantly in the same individual. Some of the immunodeficiency syndromes, especially humoral defects are associated with autoimmune disorders. Hematological manifestations such as thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia are the most common presentations. Persistent antigen stimulation due to an inherent defect in the ability of the immune system to eradicate pathogens is the primary cause leading to autoimmunity in patients with primary immunodeficiency states.We describe a 10 year old Iranian girl with chronic granulomatous disease -the autosomal recessive type with mutation of NCF1 gene P47- associated with selective IgA deficiency, refractory immune thrombocytopenia that showed an excellent response to Rituximab (Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody.Patients with primary immunodeficiencies may have variable autoimmune manifestations. So for early detection and appropriate treatment, autoimmune diseases should always be suspected in such patients.

  3. Melatonin for Sleep Disorders in Patients with Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotti, Lynn Marie; Karroum, Elias G

    2016-07-01

    In patients with neurodegenerative diseases, sleep disorders are common; they impair the quality of life for patients and caregivers and are associated with poorer clinical outcomes. Melatonin has circadian, hypnotic, and free radical-scavenging effects, and preclinical data suggest benefits of melatonin on neurodegeneration. However, randomized, controlled trials of melatonin in patients with neurodegenerative diseases have not shown strong effects. Trials in Alzheimer's patients demonstrate a lack of benefit on sleep quantity. Subjective measures of sleep quality are mixed, with possible symptomatic improvements seen only on some measures or at some time points. Benefits on cognition have not been observed across several studies. In Parkinson's patients, there may be minimal benefit on objective sleep measures, but a suggestion of subjective benefit in few, small studies. Effective treatments for the sleep disorders associated with neurodegenerative diseases are urgently needed, but current data are insufficient to establish melatonin as such a treatment. PMID:27180068

  4. Autosomal recessive spastic tetraplegia caused by AP4M1 and AP4B1 gene mutation: expansion of the facial and neuroimaging features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Bilguvar, Kaya; Koçer, Naci; Yalçınkaya, Cengiz; Çağlayan, Okay; Gül, Ece; Sahin, Sezgin; Çomu, Sinan; Günel, Murat

    2014-07-01

    Adaptor protein complex-4 (AP4) is a component of intracellular transportation of proteins, which is thought to have a unique role in neurons. Recently, mutations affecting all four subunits of AP4 (AP4M1, AP4E1, AP4S1, and AP4B1) have been found to cause similar autosomal recessive phenotype consisting of tetraplegic cerebral palsy and intellectual disability. The aim of this study was analyzing AP4 genes in three new families with this phenotype, and discussing their clinical findings with an emphasis on neuroimaging and facial features. Using homozygosity mapping followed by whole-exome sequencing, we identified two novel homozygous mutations in AP4M1 and a homozygous deletion in AP4B1 in three pairs of siblings. Spastic tetraplegia, microcephaly, severe intellectual disability, limited speech, and stereotypic laughter were common findings in our patients. All patients also had similar facial features consisting of coarse and hypotonic face, bitemporal narrowing, bulbous nose with broad nasal ridge, and short philtrum which were not described in patients with AP4M1 and AP4B1 mutations previously. The patients presented here and previously with AP4M1, AP4B1, and AP4E1 mutations shared brain abnormalities including asymmetrical ventriculomegaly, thin splenium of the corpus callosum, and reduced white matter volume. The patients also had hippocampal globoid formation and thin hippocampus. In conclusion, disorders due to mutations in AP4 complex have similar neurological, facial, and cranial imaging findings. Thus, these four genes encoding AP4 subunits should be screened in patients with autosomal recessive spastic tetraplegic cerebral palsy, severe intellectual disability, and stereotypic laughter, especially with the described facial and cranial MRI features. PMID:24700674

  5. Naturally- and experimentally-designed restorations of the Parkin gene deficit in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, Hirohide; Hirano, Makito; Kiriyama, Takao; Ikeda, Masanori [Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Nara Medical University School of Medicine (Japan); Ueno, Satoshi, E-mail: sueno@naramed-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Nara Medical University School of Medicine (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    Intranuclear events due to mutations in the Parkin gene remain elusive in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP). We identified a mutant PARKIN protein in fibroblast cultures from a pair of siblings with ARJP who were homozygous for the exon 4-deleted Parkin gene. Disease was mild in one patient and debilitating in the other. The detected mutant, encoded by a transcript lacking exon 3 as well as exon 4, is an in-frame deletion that removes 121 aa, resulting in a 344-aa protein (PaDel3,4). Cell culture and transfection studies revealed negative correlations between expression levels of PaDel3,4 and those of cell cycle proteins, including cyclin E, CDK2, ppRb, and E2F-1, and demonstrated that GFP-PaDel3,4 entered nucleus and ubiquitinated cyclin E as a part of SCF{sup hSel-10} ligase complex in the patient cells. In addition, nuclear localization signal-tagged PaDel3,4 expressed in the transfected patient cells most effectively ubiquitinated cyclin E and reduced DNA damage, protecting cells from oxidative stress. Antisense-oligonucleotide treatment promoted skipping of exon 3 and thus generated PaDel3,4, increasing cell survival. Collectively, we propose that naturally- and experimentally-induced exon skipping at least partly restores the mutant Parkin gene deficit, providing a molecular basis for the development of therapeutic exon skipping.

  6. A newly recognized autosomal recessive syndrome affecting neurologic function and vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Mustafa A; Tzschach, Andreas; Oystreck, Darren T; Hassan, Hamdy H; AlDrees, Abdulmajeed; Elmalik, Salah A; El Khashab, Heba Y; Wienker, Thomas F; Abu-Amero, Khaled K; Bosley, Thomas M

    2013-06-01

    Genetic factors represent an important etiologic group in the causation of intellectual disability. We describe a Saudi Arabian family with closley related parents in which four of six children were affected by a congenital cognitive disturbance. The four individuals (aged 18, 16, 13, and 2 years when last examined) had motor and cognitive delay with seizures in early childhood, and three of the four (sparing only the youngest child) had progressive, severe cognitive decline with spasticity. Two affected children had ocular malformations, and the three older children had progressive visual loss. The youngest had normal globes with good functional vision when last examined but exhibited the oculodigital sign, which may signify a subclinical visual deficit. A potentially deleterious nucleotide change (c.1A>G; p.Met1Val) in the C12orf57 gene was homozygous in all affected individuals, heterozygous in the parents, and absent in an unaffected sibling and >350 normal individuals. This gene has no known function. This family manifests a autosomal recessive syndrome with some phenotypic variability that includes abnormal development of brain and eyes, delayed cognitive and motor milestones, seizures, and a severe cognitive and visual decline that is associated with a homozygous variant in a newly identified gene. PMID:23633300

  7. Distribution of skeletal muscle involvement in autosomal recessive distal muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distribution of skeletal muscle involvement in 5 cases with autosomal recessive distal muscular dystrophy was studied clinically and by computed tomography (CT). Manual muscle test showed muscle involvement with a predilection for flexors in the lower leg and adductors in the thigh. Flexion and extension of the thigh and the lower leg was impaired to similar degree. In progressed cases, neck flexors and trunk muscles were also affected mildly. CT disclosed more clearly the preferential involvement of flexors in the lower leg, and involvement of both hamstrings · adductors group and extensors group of the thigh to similar degree. However, m. popliteus was curiously well preserved. In addition, there was a stage showing high density and hypertrophy of m. sartorius, m. gracilis, m. adductor, m. biceps femoris, m. semimenbranosus, m. semitendinosus or m. rectus femoris, which in thought to be compensatory hypertrophy. M. gluteus minimus in the pelvic girdle and m. dorsi proprii in the trunk were also liable to be affected. The CT findings are regarded as characteristic features noted clearly before muscle weakness and atrophy become apparent clinically. CT is very useful for distinguishing distal muscular dystrophy from rimmed vacuolar distal myopathy in which m. quadriceps femoris and flexors of the lower leg are usually well preserved without compensatory hypertrophy on CT. (author)

  8. TRPV4 Dysfunction Promotes Renal Cystogenesis in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaika, Oleg; Mamenko, Mykola; Berrout, Jonathan; Boukelmoune, Nabila; O'Neil, Roger G.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of cyst formation and expansion in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is poorly understood, but impaired mechanosensitivity to tubular flow and dysfunctional calcium signaling are important contributors. The activity of the mechanosensitive Ca2+-permeable TRPV4 channel underlies flow-dependent Ca2+ signaling in murine collecting duct (CD) cells, suggesting that this channel may contribute to cystogenesis in ARPKD. Here, we developed a method to isolate CD-derived cysts and studied TRPV4 function in these cysts laid open as monolayers and in nondilated split-open CDs in a rat model of ARPKD. In freshly isolated CD-derived cyst monolayers, we observed markedly impaired TRPV4 activity, abnormal subcellular localization of the channel, disrupted TRPV4 glycosylation, decreased basal [Ca2+]i, and loss of flow-mediated [Ca2+]i signaling. In contrast, nondilated CDs of these rats exhibited functional TRPV4 with largely preserved mechanosensitive properties. Long-term systemic augmentation of TRPV4 activity with a selective TRPV4 activator significantly attenuated the renal manifestations of ARPKD in a time-dependent manner. At the cellular level, selective activation of TRPV4 restored mechanosensitive Ca2+ signaling as well as the function and subcellular distribution of TRPV4. In conclusion, the functional status of TRPV4, which underlies mechanosensitive Ca2+ signaling in CD cells, inversely correlates with renal cystogenesis in ARPKD. Augmenting TRPV4 activity may have therapeutic potential in ARPKD. PMID:23411787

  9. Successful twin pregnancy in a patient with parkin-associated autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takakuwa Koichi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pregnancy in patients with Parkinson disease is a rare occurrence. To the best of our knowledge, the effect of pregnancy as well as treatment in genetically confirmed autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP has never been reported. Here, we report the first case of pregnancy in a patient with ARJP associated with a parkin gene mutation, ARJP/PARK2. Case presentation A 27-year-old woman with ARJP/PARK2 was diagnosed as having a spontaneous dichorionic/diamniotic twin pregnancy. Exacerbation of motor disability was noted between ovulation and menstruation before pregnancy as well as during late pregnancy, suggesting that her parkinsonism might have been influenced by fluctuations in the levels of endogenous sex hormones. During the organogenesis period, she was only treated with levodopa/carbidopa, although she continued to receive inpatient hospital care for assistance in the activities of daily living. After the organogenesis period, she was administered sufficient amounts of antiparkinsonian drugs. She delivered healthy male twins, and psychomotor development of both the babies was normal at the age of 2 years. Conclusion Pregnancy may worsen the symptoms of ARJP/PARK2, although appropriate treatments with antiparkinsonian drugs and adequate assistance in the activities of daily living might enable successful pregnancy and birth of healthy children.

  10. Where do we stand in trial readiness for autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Volker; Bertoli, Marta

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD2) are a group of genetically heterogeneous diseases that are typically characterised by progressive weakness and wasting of the shoulder and pelvic girdle muscles. Many of the more than 20 different conditions show overlapping clinical features with other forms of muscular dystrophy, congenital, myofibrillar or even distal myopathies and also with acquired muscle diseases. Although individually extremely rare, all types of LGMD2 together form an important differential diagnostic group among neuromuscular diseases. Despite improved diagnostics and pathomechanistic insight, a curative therapy is currently lacking for any of these diseases. Medical care consists of the symptomatic treatment of complications, aiming to improve life expectancy and quality of life. Besides well characterised pre-clinical tools like animal models and cell culture assays, the determinants of successful drug development programmes for rare diseases include a good understanding of the phenotype and natural history of the disease, the existence of clinically relevant outcome measures, guidance on care standards, up to date patient registries, and, ideally, biomarkers that can help assess disease severity or drug response. Strong patient organisations driving research and successful partnerships between academia, advocacy, industry and regulatory authorities can also help accelerate the elaboration of clinical trials. All these determinants constitute aspects of translational research efforts and influence patient access to therapies. Here we review the current status of determinants of successful drug development programmes for LGMD2, and the challenges of translating promising therapeutic strategies into effective and accessible treatments for patients. PMID:26810373

  11. Naturally- and experimentally-designed restorations of the Parkin gene deficit in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intranuclear events due to mutations in the Parkin gene remain elusive in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP). We identified a mutant PARKIN protein in fibroblast cultures from a pair of siblings with ARJP who were homozygous for the exon 4-deleted Parkin gene. Disease was mild in one patient and debilitating in the other. The detected mutant, encoded by a transcript lacking exon 3 as well as exon 4, is an in-frame deletion that removes 121 aa, resulting in a 344-aa protein (PaDel3,4). Cell culture and transfection studies revealed negative correlations between expression levels of PaDel3,4 and those of cell cycle proteins, including cyclin E, CDK2, ppRb, and E2F-1, and demonstrated that GFP-PaDel3,4 entered nucleus and ubiquitinated cyclin E as a part of SCFhSel-10 ligase complex in the patient cells. In addition, nuclear localization signal-tagged PaDel3,4 expressed in the transfected patient cells most effectively ubiquitinated cyclin E and reduced DNA damage, protecting cells from oxidative stress. Antisense-oligonucleotide treatment promoted skipping of exon 3 and thus generated PaDel3,4, increasing cell survival. Collectively, we propose that naturally- and experimentally-induced exon skipping at least partly restores the mutant Parkin gene deficit, providing a molecular basis for the development of therapeutic exon skipping.

  12. Whole exome analysis identifies frequent CNGA1 mutations in Japanese population with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Katagiri

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate frequent disease-causing gene mutations in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP in the Japanese population. METHODS: In total, 99 Japanese patients with non-syndromic and unrelated arRP or sporadic RP (spRP were recruited in this study and ophthalmic examinations were conducted for the diagnosis of RP. Among these patients, whole exome sequencing analysis of 30 RP patients and direct sequencing screening of all CNGA1 exons of the other 69 RP patients were performed. RESULTS: Whole exome sequencing of 30 arRP/spRP patients identified disease-causing gene mutations of CNGA1 (four patients, EYS (three patients and SAG (one patient in eight patients and potential disease-causing gene variants of USH2A (two patients, EYS (one patient, TULP1 (one patient and C2orf71 (one patient in five patients. Screening of an additional 69 arRP/spRP patients for the CNGA1 gene mutation revealed one patient with a homozygous mutation. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first identification of CNGA1 mutations in arRP Japanese patients. The frequency of CNGA1 gene mutation was 5.1% (5/99 patients. CNGA1 mutations are one of the most frequent arRP-causing mutations in Japanese patients.

  13. Evidence-based therapy for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Ling

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of the treatments for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases so as to provide the best therapeutic regimens for the evidence-based treatment. Methods Search PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Wanfang Data and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI databases with "sleep disorder or sleep disturbance", "neurodegenerative diseases", "Parkinson's disease or PD", "Alzheimer's disease or AD", "multiple system atrophy or MSA" as retrieval words. The quality of the articles were evaluated with Jadad Scale. Results A total of 35 articles, including 2 systematic reviews, 5 randomized controlled trials, 13 clinical controlled trials, 13 case series and 2 epidemiological investigation studies were included for evaluation, 13 of which were high grade and 22 were low grade articles. Clinical evidences showed that: 1 advice on sleep hygiene, careful use of dopaminergic drugs and hypnotic sedative agents should be considered for PD. Bright light therapy (BLT may improve circadian rhythm sleep disorders and clonazepam may be effective for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD. However, to date, very few controlled studies are available to make a recommendation for the management of sleep disorders in PD; 2 treatments for sleep disorders in AD include drug therapy (e.g. melatonin, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, antipsychotic drugs, antidepressants and non-drug therapy (e.g. BLT, behavior therapy, but very limited evidence shows the effectiveness of these treatments; 3 the first line treatment for sleep-related breathing disorder in MSA is nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP, and clonazepam is effective for RBD in MSA; 4 there is rare evidence related to the treatment of sleep disorders in dementia with Lewy body (DLB and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Conclusion Evidence-based medicine can provide the best clinical evidence on sleep disorders' treatment in neurodegenerative

  14. Autosomal recessive woolly hair with hypotrichosis caused by a novel homozygous mutation in the P2RY5 gene

    OpenAIRE

    Shimomura, Yutaka; Garzon, Maria C.; Christiano, Angela M.

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade, several causative genes for hereditary hair diseases have been identified, which have disclosed the molecular mechanisms involved in hair follicle morphogenesis and cycling. We and others recently reported that mutations in the P2RY5 gene, encoding an orphan G protein-coupled receptor, underlie autosomal recessive woolly hair and/or hypotrichosis. Although these findings clearly reveal the involvement of P2RY5 mutations in hereditary hair diseases, the clinical manifes...

  15. Identification of two novel mutations in CDHR1 in consanguineous Spanish families with autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinos Nikopoulos; Almudena Avila-Fernandez; Marta Corton; Maria Isabel Lopez-Molina; Raquel Perez-Carro; Lara Bontadelli; Silvio Alessandro Di Gioia; Olga Zurita; Blanca Garcia-Sandoval; Carlo Rivolta; Carmen Ayuso

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies present extensive phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity, posing a challenge for patients’ molecular and clinical diagnoses. In this study, we wanted to clinically characterize and investigate the molecular etiology of an atypical form of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy in two consanguineous Spanish families. Affected members of the respective families exhibited an array of clinical features including reduced visual acuity, photophobia, defective color vision...

  16. Mutation in WNT10A Is Associated with an Autosomal Recessive Ectodermal Dysplasia: The Odonto-onycho-dermal Dysplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Adaimy, Lynn ; Chouery, Eliane ; Mégarbané, Hala ; Mroueh, Salman ; Delague, Valérie ; Nicolas, Elsa ; Belguith, Hanen ; de Mazancourt, Philippe ; Mégarbané, André 

    2007-01-01

    Odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome in which the presenting phenotype is dry hair, severe hypodontia, smooth tongue with marked reduction of fungiform and filiform papillae, onychodysplasia, keratoderma and hyperhidrosis of palms and soles, and hyperkeratosis of the skin. We studied three consanguineous Lebanese Muslim Shiite families that included six individuals affected with odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia. Using a homozygosity-mapping strategy, we assigned...

  17. Park7, a novel locus for autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism, on chromosome 1p36

    OpenAIRE

    Duijn, Cock; Breedveld, Guido; Horstink, Marten; Sandkuijl, Lodewijk; Oostra, Ben; Swieten, J. C.; Bonifati, Vincenzo; Galjaard, Robert-Jan; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine; Testers, L.; Dekker, Marieke; Snijders, Pieter; Heutink, Peter

    2001-01-01

    textabstractAlthough the role of genetic factors in the origin of Parkinson disease has long been disputed, several genes involved in autosomal dominant and recessive forms of the disease have been localized. Mutations associated with early-onset autosomal recessive parkinsonism have been identified in the Parkin gene, and recently a second gene, PARK6, involved in early-onset recessive parkinsonism was localized on chromosome 1p35-36. We identified a family segregating early-onset parkinsoni...

  18. CONSENSUS EXPERT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE: REPORT OF AN INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Guay-Woodford, Lisa M.; Bissler, John J.; Braun, Michael C.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A.; Dell, Katherine M.; Kerecuk, Larissa; Liebau, Max C; Alonso-Peclet, Maria H.; Shneider, Benjamin; Emre, Sukru; Heller, Theo; Kamath, Binita M.; Murray, Karen F.; Moise, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD; MIM 263200) is a severe, typically early onset form of cystic disease that primarily involves the kidneys and biliary tract. Phenotypic expression and age at presentation can be quite variable1. The incidence of ARPKD is 1 in 20,000 live births2, and its pleotropic manifestations are potentially life-threatening. Optimal care requires proper surveillance to limit morbidity and mortality, knowledgeable approaches to diagnosis and treatment,...

  19. Global warming and neurodegenerative disorders: speculations on their linkage

    OpenAIRE

    Laleh Habibi; George Perry; Morteza Mahmoudi

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is having considerable impact on biological systems. Eras of ice ages and warming shaped the contemporary earth and origin of creatures including humans. Warming forces stress conditions on cells. Therefore, cells evolved elaborate defense mechanisms, such as creation of heat shock proteins, to combat heat stress. Global warming is becoming a crisis and this process would yield an undefined increasing rate of neurodegenerative disorders in future decades. S...

  20. Localization of Axonal Motor Molecules Machinery in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Florenzano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Axonal transport and neuronal survival depend critically on active transport and axon integrity both for supplying materials and communication to different domains of the cell body. All these actions are executed through cytoskeleton, transport and regulatory elements that appear to be disrupted in neurodegenerative diseases. Motor-driven transport both supplies and clears distal cellular portions with proteins and organelles. This transport is especially relevant in projection and motor neurons, which have long axons to reach the farthest nerve endings. Thus, any disturbance of axonal transport may have severe consequences for neuronal function and survival. A growing body of literature indicates the presence of alterations to the motor molecules machinery, not only in expression levels and phosphorylation, but also in their subcellular distribution within populations of neurons, which are selectively affected in the course of neurodegenerative diseases. The implications of this altered subcellular localization and how this affects axon survival and neuronal death still remain poorly understood, although several hypotheses have been suggested. Furthermore, cytoskeleton and transport element localization can be selectively disrupted in some disorders suggesting that specific loss of the axonal functionality could be a primary hallmark of the disorder. This can lead to axon degeneration and neuronal death either directly, through the functional absence of essential axonal proteins, or indirectly, through failures in communication among different cellular domains. This review compares the localization of cytoskeleton and transport elements in some neurodegenerative disorders to ask what aspects may be essential for axon survival and neuronal death.

  1. Autosomal-Recessive Hearing Impairment Due to Rare Missense Variants within S1PR2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Faridi, Rabia; Rehman, Atteeq U.; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ansar, Muhammad; Wang, Xin; Morell, Robert J.; Isaacson, Rivka; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Dai, Hang; Acharya, Anushree; Qaiser, Tanveer A.; Muhammad, Dost; Ali, Rana Amjad; Shams, Sulaiman; Hassan, Muhammad Jawad; Shahzad, Shaheen; Raza, Syed Irfan; Bashir, Zil-e-Huma; Smith, Joshua D.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ahmad, Wasim; Friedman, Thomas B.; Leal, Suzanne M.

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) are a well-studied class of transmembrane G protein-coupled sphingolipid receptors that mediate multiple cellular processes. However, S1PRs have not been previously reported to be involved in the genetic etiology of human traits. S1PR2 lies within the autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI) locus DFNB68 on 19p13.2. From exome sequence data we identified two pathogenic S1PR2 variants, c.323G>C (p.Arg108Pro) and c.419A>G (p.Tyr140Cys). Each of these variants co-segregates with congenital profound hearing impairment in consanguineous Pakistani families with maximum LOD scores of 6.4 for family DEM4154 and 3.3 for family PKDF1400. Neither S1PR2 missense variant was reported among ∼120,000 chromosomes in the Exome Aggregation Consortium database, in 76 unrelated Pakistani exomes, or in 720 Pakistani control chromosomes. Both DNA variants affect highly conserved residues of S1PR2 and are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools. Molecular modeling predicts that these variants affect binding of sphingosine-1-phosphate (p.Arg108Pro) and G protein docking (p.Tyr140Cys). In the previously reported S1pr2−/− mice, stria vascularis abnormalities, organ of Corti degeneration, and profound hearing loss were observed. Additionally, hair cell defects were seen in both knockout mice and morphant zebrafish. Family PKDF1400 presents with ARNSHI, which is consistent with the lack of gross malformations in S1pr2−/− mice, whereas family DEM4154 has lower limb malformations in addition to hearing loss. Our findings suggest the possibility of developing therapies against hair cell damage (e.g., from ototoxic drugs) through targeted stimulation of S1PR2. PMID:26805784

  2. A large animal model for CNGB1 autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paige A Winkler

    Full Text Available Retinal dystrophies in dogs are invaluable models of human disease. Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA is the canine equivalent of retinitis pigmentosa (RP. Similar to RP, PRA is a genetically heterogenous condition. We investigated PRA in the Papillon breed of dog using homozygosity mapping and haplotype construction of single nucleotide polymorphisms within a small family group to identify potential positional candidate genes. Based on the phenotypic similarities between the PRA-affected Papillons, mouse models and human patients, CNGB1 was selected as the most promising positional candidate gene. CNGB1 was sequenced and a complex mutation consisting of the combination of a one basepair deletion and a 6 basepair insertion was identified in exon 26 (c.2387delA;2389_2390insAGCTAC leading to a frameshift and premature stop codon. Immunohistochemistry (IHC of pre-degenerate retinal sections from a young affected dog showed absence of labeling using a C-terminal CNGB1 antibody. Whereas an antibody directed against the N-terminus of the protein, which also recognizes the glutamic acid rich proteins arising from alternative splicing of the CNGB1 transcript (upstream of the premature stop codon, labeled rod outer segments. CNGB1 combines with CNGA1 to form the rod cyclic nucleotide gated channel and previous studies have shown the requirement of CNGB1 for normal targeting of CNGA1 to the rod outer segment. In keeping with these previous observations, IHC showed a lack of detectable CNGA1 protein in the rod outer segments of the affected dog. A population study did not identify the CNGB1 mutation in PRA-affected dogs in other breeds and documented that the CNGB1 mutation accounts for ~70% of cases of Papillon PRA in our PRA-affected canine DNA bank. CNGB1 mutations are one cause of autosomal recessive RP making the CNGB1 mutant dog a valuable large animal model of the condition.

  3. Novel and recurrent AID mutations underlie prevalent autosomal recessive form of HIGM in consanguineous patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouadani, Hanen; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Ben-ali, Meriem; Ben-khemis, Leila; Larguèche, Beya; Boussoffara, Raoudha; Maalej, Sonia; Fetni, Ilhem; Hassayoun, Saida; Mahfoudh, Abdelmajid; Mellouli, Fethi; Yalaoui, Sadok; Masmoudi, Hatem; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Barbouche, Mohamed-Ridha

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class switch recombination deficiencies (Ig-CSR-D) are characterized by normal or elevated serum IgM level and absence of IgG, IgA, and IgE. Most reported cases are due to X-linked CD40L deficiency. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase deficiency is the most frequent autosomal recessive form, whereas CD40 deficiency is more rare. Herein, we present the first North African study on hyper IgM (HIGM) syndrome including 16 Tunisian patients. Phenotypic and genetic studies allowed us to determine their molecular basis. Three CD40LG mutations have been identified including two novels (c.348_351dup and c.782_*2del) and one already reported mutation (g.6182G>A). No mutation has been found in another patient despite the lack of CD40L expression. Interestingly, three AICDA mutations have been identified in 11 patients. Two mutations were novel (c.91T>C and c.389A>C found in one and five patients respectively), and one previously reported splicing mutation (c.156+1T>G) was found in five patients. Only one CD40-deficient patient, bearing a novel mutation (c.109T>G), has been identified. Thus, unlike previous reports, AID deficiency is the most frequent underlying molecular basis (68%) of Ig-CSR-D in Tunisian patients. This finding and the presence of specific recurrent mutations are probably due to the critical role played by inbreeding in North African populations. PMID:26545377

  4. A defect in the TUSC3 gene is associated with autosomal recessive mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garshasbi, Masoud; Hadavi, Valeh; Habibi, Haleh; Kahrizi, Kimia; Kariminejad, Roxana; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Tzschach, Andreas; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Kuss, Andreas Walter

    2008-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that autosomal recessive mental retardation (ARMR) is extremely heterogeneous, and there is reason to believe that the number of underlying gene defects goes into the thousands. To date, however, only four genes have been implicated in nonsyndromic ARMR (NS-ARMR): PRSS12 (neurotrypsin), CRBN (cereblon), CC2D1A, and GRIK2. As part of an ongoing systematic study aiming to identify ARMR genes, we investigated a large consanguineous family comprising seven patients with nonsyndromic ARMR in four sibships. Genome-wide SNP typing enabled us to map the relevant genetic defect to a 4.6 Mbp interval on chromosome 8. Haplotype analyses and copy-number studies led to the identification of a homozygous deletion partly removing TUSC3 (N33) in all patients. All obligate carriers of this family were heterozygous, but none of 192 unrelated healthy individuals from the same population carried this deletion. We excluded other disease-causing mutations in the coding regions of all genes within the linkage interval by sequencing; moreover, we verified the complete absence of a functional TUSC3 transcript in all patients through RT-PCR. TUSC3 is thought to encode a subunit of the endoplasmic reticulum-bound oligosaccharyltransferase complex that catalyzes a pivotal step in the protein N-glycosylation process. Our data suggest that in contrast to other genetic defects of glycosylation, inactivation of TUSC3 causes nonsyndromic MR, a conclusion that is supported by a separate report in this issue of AJHG. TUSC3 is only the fifth gene implicated in NS-ARMR and the first for which mutations have been reported in more than one family. PMID:18452889

  5. Mutations in the Beta Propeller WDR72 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Hypomaturation Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Walid; Parry, David A.; Shore, Roger C.; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Jafri, Hussain; Rashid, Yasmin; Al-Bahlani, Suhaila; Al Harasi, Sharifa; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Mighell, Alan J.

    2009-01-01

    Healthy dental enamel is the hardest and most highly mineralized human tissue. Though acellular, nonvital, and without capacity for turnover or repair, it can nevertheless last a lifetime. Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a collective term for failure of normal enamel development, covering diverse clinical phenotypes that typically show Mendelian inheritance patterns. One subset, known as hypomaturation AI, is characterised by near-normal volumes of organic enamel matrix but with weak, creamy-brown opaque enamel that fails prematurely after tooth eruption. Mutations in genes critical to enamel matrix formation have been documented, but current understanding of other key events in enamel biomineralization is limited. We investigated autosomal-recessive hypomaturation AI in a consanguineous Pakistani family. A whole-genome SNP autozygosity screen identified a locus on chromosome 15q21.3. Sequencing candidate genes revealed a point mutation in the poorly characterized WDR72 gene. Screening of WDR72 in a panel of nine additional hypomaturation AI families revealed the same mutation in a second, apparently unrelated, Pakistani family and two further nonsense mutations in Omani families. Immunohistochemistry confirmed intracellular localization in maturation-stage ameloblasts. WDR72 function is unknown, but as a putative β propeller is expected to be a scaffold for protein-protein interactions. The nearest homolog, WDR7, is involved in vesicle mobilization and Ca2+-dependent exocytosis at synapses. Vesicle trafficking is important in maturation-stage ameloblasts with respect to secretion into immature enamel and removal of cleaved enamel matrix proteins via endocytosis. This raises the intriguing possibility that WDR72 is critical to ameloblast vesicle turnover during enamel maturation. PMID:19853237

  6. Do consanguineous parents of a child affected by an autosomal recessive disease have more DNA identical-by-descent than similarly-related parents with healthy offspring? Design of a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Martina C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The offspring of consanguineous relations have an increased risk of congenital/genetic disorders and early mortality. Consanguineous couples and their offspring account for approximately 10% of the global population. The increased risk for congenital/genetic disorders is most marked for autosomal recessive disorders and depends on the degree of relatedness of the parents. For children of first cousins the increased risk is 2-4%. For individual couples, however, the extra risk can vary from zero to 25% or higher, with only a minority of these couples having an increased risk of at least 25%. It is currently not possible to differentiate between high-and low-risk couples. The quantity of DNA identical-by-descent between couples with the same degree of relatedness shows a remarkable variation. Here we hypothesize that consanguineous partners with children affected by an autosomal recessive disease have more DNA identical-by-descent than similarly-related partners who have only healthy children. The aim of the study is thus to establish whether the amount of DNA identical-by-descent in consanguineous parents of children with an autosomal recessive disease is indeed different from its proportion in consanguineous parents who have healthy children only. Methods/Design This project is designed as a case-control study. Cases are defined as consanguineous couples with one or more children with an autosomal recessive disorder and controls as consanguineous couples with at least three healthy children and no affected child. We aim to include 100 case couples and 100 control couples. Control couples are matched by restricting the search to the same family, clan or ethnic origin as the case couple. Genome-wide SNP arrays will be used to test our hypothesis. Discussion This study contains a new approach to risk assessment in consanguineous couples. There is no previous study on the amount of DNA identical-by-descent in consanguineous

  7. COL11A2 mutation associated with autosomal recessive Weissenbacher-Zweymuller syndrome: molecular and clinical overlap with otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia (OSMED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Tamar; Rabinowitz, Ronen; Hendler, Netta; Galil, Aharon; Flusser, Hagit; Chemke, Juan; Gradstein, Libe; Lifshitz, Tova; Ofir, Rivka; Elbedour, Khalil; Birk, Ohad S

    2005-01-01

    Autosomal recessive Weissenbacher-Zweymuller syndrome (WZS) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by rhizomelic dwarfism and severe hearing loss. Mutations in the COL11A2 gene have been implicated in causing the autosomal dominant form of this syndrome as well as non-ocular Stickler syndrome and the autosomal recessive syndrome otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia (OSMED). In a consanguineous Bedouin tribe living in Southern Israel, five individuals affected by autosomal recessive WZS were available for genetic analysis. Homozygosity of a mutation in the COL11A2 gene was found in all affected individuals. This finding lends molecular support to the clinical notion that autosomal recessive WZS and OSMED are a single entity. PMID:15558753

  8. Skeletal Muscle, but not Cardiovascular Function, Is Altered in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Recessive Hypophosphatemic Rickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Michael J.; Touchberry, Chad D.; Silswal, Neerupma; Brotto, Leticia; Elmore, Chris J.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Andresen, Jon; Brotto, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR) is a heritable disorder characterized by hypophosphatemia, osteomalacia, and poor bone development. ARHR results from inactivating mutations in the DMP1 gene with the human phenotype being recapitulated in the Dmp1 null mouse model which displays elevated plasma fibroblast growth factor 23. While the bone phenotype has been well-characterized, it is not known what effects ARHR may also have on skeletal, cardiac, or vascular smooth muscle function, which is critical to understand in order to treat patients suffering from this condition. In this study, the extensor digitorum longus (EDL-fast-twitch muscle), soleus (SOL–slow-twitch muscle), heart, and aorta were removed from Dmp1 null mice and ex-vivo functional tests were simultaneously performed in collaboration by three different laboratories. Dmp1 null EDL and SOL muscles produced less force than wildtype muscles after normalization for physiological cross sectional area of the muscles. Both EDL and SOL muscles from Dmp1 null mice also produced less force after the addition of caffeine (which releases calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum) which may indicate problems in excitation contraction coupling in these mice. While the body weights of the Dmp1 null were smaller than wildtype, the heart weight to body weight ratio was higher. However, there were no differences in pathological hypertrophic gene expression compared to wildtype and maximal force of contraction was not different indicating that there may not be cardiac pathology under the tested conditions. We did observe a decrease in the rate of force development generated by cardiac muscle in the Dmp1 null which may be related to some of the deficits observed in skeletal muscle. There were no differences observed in aortic contractions induced by PGF2α or 5-HT or in endothelium-mediated acetylcholine-induced relaxations or endothelium-independent sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxations. In summary

  9. Skeletal muscle, but not cardiovascular function, is altered in a mouse model of autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Wacker

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR is a heritable disorder characterized by hypophosphatemia, osteomalacia, and poor bone development. ARHR results from inactivating mutations in the DMP1 gene with the human phenotype being recapitulated in the Dmp1 null mouse model which displays elevated plasma fibroblast growth factor 23. While the bone phenotype has been well characterized, it is not known what effects ARHR may also have on skeletal, cardiac, or vascular smooth muscle function, which is critical to understand to treat patients suffering from this condition. In this study, the extensor digitorum longus (EDL- fast-twitch muscle, soleus (SOL- slow-twitch muscle, heart, and aorta were removed from Dmp1 null mice and ex-vivo functional tests were simultaneously performed in collaboration by three different laboratories. Dmp1 null EDL and SOL muscles produced less force than wildtype muscles after normalization for physiological cross sectional area of the muscles. Both EDL and SOL muscles from Dmp1 null mice also produced less force after the addition of caffeine (which releases calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum which may indicate problems in excitation contraction coupling in these mice. While the body weights of the Dmp1 null were smaller than wildtype, the heart weight to body weight ratio was higher. However, there were no differences in pathological hypertrophic gene expression compared to wildtype and maximal force of contraction was not different indicating that there may not be cardiac pathology under the tested conditions. We did observe a decrease in the rate of force development generated by cardiac muscle in the Dmp1 null which may be related to some of the deficits observed in skeletal muscle. There were no differences observed in aortic contractions induced by PGF2a or 5-HT or in endothelium-mediated acetylcholine-induced relaxations or endothelium-independent sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxations. In

  10. Skeletal Muscle, but not Cardiovascular Function, Is Altered in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Recessive Hypophosphatemic Rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Michael J; Touchberry, Chad D; Silswal, Neerupma; Brotto, Leticia; Elmore, Chris J; Bonewald, Lynda F; Andresen, Jon; Brotto, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR) is a heritable disorder characterized by hypophosphatemia, osteomalacia, and poor bone development. ARHR results from inactivating mutations in the DMP1 gene with the human phenotype being recapitulated in the Dmp1 null mouse model which displays elevated plasma fibroblast growth factor 23. While the bone phenotype has been well-characterized, it is not known what effects ARHR may also have on skeletal, cardiac, or vascular smooth muscle function, which is critical to understand in order to treat patients suffering from this condition. In this study, the extensor digitorum longus (EDL-fast-twitch muscle), soleus (SOL-slow-twitch muscle), heart, and aorta were removed from Dmp1 null mice and ex-vivo functional tests were simultaneously performed in collaboration by three different laboratories. Dmp1 null EDL and SOL muscles produced less force than wildtype muscles after normalization for physiological cross sectional area of the muscles. Both EDL and SOL muscles from Dmp1 null mice also produced less force after the addition of caffeine (which releases calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum) which may indicate problems in excitation contraction coupling in these mice. While the body weights of the Dmp1 null were smaller than wildtype, the heart weight to body weight ratio was higher. However, there were no differences in pathological hypertrophic gene expression compared to wildtype and maximal force of contraction was not different indicating that there may not be cardiac pathology under the tested conditions. We did observe a decrease in the rate of force development generated by cardiac muscle in the Dmp1 null which may be related to some of the deficits observed in skeletal muscle. There were no differences observed in aortic contractions induced by PGF2α or 5-HT or in endothelium-mediated acetylcholine-induced relaxations or endothelium-independent sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxations. In summary, these

  11. Need to improve clinical trials in rare neurodegenerative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Puopolo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rare neurodegenerative diseases are fatal and no therapy is available to cure or slow down the progression of disease. We report possibly weaknesses in the management of clinical studies in these diseases, ranging from poor preclinical studies, difficulties in the recruitment of patients, delay in the onset of treatment because of lack in early disease-specific biomarkers, and suboptimal design of Phase II clinical trials. The adoption of innovative statistical approaches in early Phase II trials might improve the screening of drugs in rare neurodegenerative disorders, but this implicates efforts from clinical researchers, statisticians, and regulatory people to the development of new strategies that should maintain rigorous scientific integrity together with a more ethical approach to human experimentations.

  12. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy pathology in a neurodegenerative disorders brain bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniek, Kevin F; Ross, Owen A; Cormier, Kerry A; Walton, Ronald L; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra; Johnston, Amelia E; DeSaro, Pamela; Boylan, Kevin B; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Rademakers, Rosa; Boeve, Bradley F; McKee, Ann C; Dickson, Dennis W

    2015-12-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder linked to repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI) and characterized by deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau at the depths of sulci. We sought to determine the presence of CTE pathology in a brain bank for neurodegenerative disorders for individuals with and without a history of contact sports participation. Available medical records of 1721 men were reviewed for evidence of past history of injury or participation in contact sports. Subsequently, cerebral cortical samples were processed for tau immunohistochemistry in cases with a documented history of sports exposure as well as age- and disease-matched men and women without such exposure. For cases with available frozen tissue, genetic analysis was performed for variants in APOE, MAPT, and TMEM106B. Immunohistochemistry revealed 21 of 66 former athletes had cortical tau pathology consistent with CTE. CTE pathology was not detected in 198 individuals without exposure to contact sports, including 33 individuals with documented single-incident TBI sustained from falls, motor vehicle accidents, domestic violence, or assaults. Among those exposed to contact sports, those with CTE pathology did not differ from those without CTE pathology with respect to noted clinicopathologic features. There were no significant differences in genetic variants for those with CTE pathology, but we observed a slight increase in MAPT H1 haplotype, and there tended to be fewer homozygous carriers of the protective TMEM106B rs3173615 minor allele in those with sports exposure and CTE pathology compared to those without CTE pathology. In conclusion, this study has identified a small, yet significant, subset of individuals with neurodegenerative disorders and concomitant CTE pathology. CTE pathology was only detected in individuals with documented participation in contact sports. Exposure to contact sports was the greatest risk factor for CTE pathology. Future

  13. Neurodegenerative changes in patients with clinical history of bipolar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioya, Ayako; Saito, Yuko; Arima, Kunimasa; Kakuta, Yukio; Yuzuriha, Takefumi; Tanaka, Noriko; Murayama, Shigeo; Tamaoka, Akira

    2015-06-01

    Neurodegeneration in bipolar disorder (BPD) is poorly understood. Therefore, the current study was designed to assess the immunohistochemical changes in neurodegenerative markers in patients with BPD. Eleven consecutive autopsy cases diagnosed with BPD were analyzed. Sections were obtained from archival paraffin blocks of representative areas and stained using conventional methods, as well as immunostained with several antibodies to screen for neurodegenerative diseases. Age- and non-argyrophilic grains (AGs) degeneration matched controls were selected for each case. Clinical information was retrospectively collected from medical charts. All patients were men, and the average age of death was 70 years. Neuropathological diagnoses included dementia with grains (2), argyrophilic grain disease (2), corticobasal degeneration (CBD, 1), Lewy body disease (1), hypoxic encephalopathy (1) and cerebral infarction (1). All cases showed AGs to various degrees. Three patients died in their 50s; one demonstrated dementia with Lewy bodies, while the other two showed abundant AGs in the thalamus and amygdala. Of the three patients who died in their 60s, one showed AGs preferentially in the thalamus and amygdala, while the others demonstrated limbic predominance. The patients who died in/after their 70s demonstrated AGs similar to controls, except for the patient with CBD. Our data provides potentiality that neurodegenerative diseases may be an underlying pathology in certain cases of BPD. PMID:25819679

  14. CLPB Variants Associated with Autosomal-Recessive Mitochondrial Disorder with Cataract, Neutropenia, Epilepsy, and Methylglutaconic Aciduria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Carol; Smith, Laurie; Wibrand, Flemming;

    2015-01-01

    type IV 3-MGA-uria characterized by cataracts, severe psychomotor regression during febrile episodes, epilepsy, neutropenia with frequent infections, and death in early childhood. Four of the individuals were of Greenlandic descent, and one was North American, of Northern European and Asian descent...

  15. A Case of Autosomal Recessive Woolly Hair/Hypotrichosis with Alternation in Severity: Deterioration and Improvement with Age

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuno, Naoko; Kunisada, Makoto; Kanki, Haruhisa; Simomura, Yutaka; Nishigori, Chikako

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis (ARWH/H) is a nonsyndromic hair abnormality characterized by sparse, short and curly hair (WH/H). We report the case of a 3-year-old female, with no consanguineous ancestry, who exhibited WH/H. Normal hair was observed at birth, but severe hair loss had developed within the first 6 months; however, her hair density had improved somewhat by age 3. Light microscopy showed hair shaft invaginations, and polarized light microscopy suggested complete me...

  16. Inhibitory action of chlorophyllin of autosome recessive lethals induced by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    on the damage caused by the radiation, it was into account the presence of lethal and semi lethals autosomal. One observes this way that even without the use of the radiation the semi lethals frequency is diminished when the chlorophyllin is applied, in this case the decrease was significant and although there was decrease in the case of the irradiated group this it was not significant; in the case of the lethal ones it happened the opposite it was not significant in radiation absence on the contrary elevate the frequency of this type of genes, however, before the radiation and with pre-treatment with chlorophyllin this it reduced the frequency of autosomal recessive lethals significantly. This is important because in the case of bound recessive lethals recessive to the sex this doesn't happen. (Author)

  17. Alterations of Eye Movement Control in Neurodegenerative Movement Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gorges

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the fovea centralis, the most central part of the retina and the area of the highest visual accuracy, requires humans to shift their gaze rapidly (saccades to bring some object of interest within the visual field onto the fovea. In addition, humans are equipped with the ability to rotate the eye ball continuously in a highly predicting manner (smooth pursuit to hold a moving target steadily upon the retina. The functional deficits in neurodegenerative movement disorders (e.g., Parkinsonian syndromes involve the basal ganglia that are critical in all aspects of movement control. Moreover, neocortical structures, the cerebellum, and the midbrain may become affected by the pathological process. A broad spectrum of eye movement alterations may result, comprising smooth pursuit disturbance (e.g., interrupting saccades, saccadic dysfunction (e.g., hypometric saccades, and abnormal attempted fixation (e.g., pathological nystagmus and square wave jerks. On clinical grounds, videooculography is a sensitive noninvasive in vivo technique to classify oculomotion function alterations. Eye movements are a valuable window into the integrity of central nervous system structures and their changes in defined neurodegenerative conditions, that is, the oculomotor nuclei in the brainstem together with their directly activating supranuclear centers and the basal ganglia as well as cortical areas of higher cognitive control of attention.

  18. The link between type 2 diabetes and neurodegenerative disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changqing Liu; Jake Hoekstra; Kangping Xiong; Jing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Various age-associated diseases are becoming more prominent as a greater percentage of the population reaches old age.Neurodegenerative disorders,e.g.Alzheimer's disease (AD)and Parkinson's disease (PD),and diabetes,in particular type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM),are the diseases that represent a large proportion of diagnoses amongst this group.These dis-eases have long been regarded as separate and each has distinct pathologies,symptoms,and treatments.Recent studies in epide-miology and pathology,however,have shown that T2DM may share a common mechanism of disease with AD and PD, which could allow for a therapeutic intervention capable of managing each disease.This review will discuss evidence implicating connections between these diseases,potential shared mechanisms,and possible treatments.

  19. REM behaviour disorder detection associated with neurodegenerative diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kempfner, Jacob; Sorensen, Gertrud; Zoetmulder, Marielle;

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal skeleton muscle activity during REM sleep is characterized as REM Behaviour Disorder (RBD), and may be an early marker for different neurodegenerative diseases. Early detection of RBD is therefore highly important, and in this ongoing study a semi-automatic method for RBD detection is...... proposed by analyzing the motor activity during sleep. Method: A total number of twelve patients have been involved in this study, six normal controls and six patients diagnosed with Parkinsons Disease (PD) with RBD. All subjects underwent at least one ambulant polysomnographic (PSG) recording. The sleep...... computerized algorithm has been attempted implemented. By analysing the REM and non-REM EMG activity, using advanced signal processing tools combined with a statistical classifier, it is possible to discriminate normal and abnormal EMG activity. Due to the small number of patients, the overall performance of...

  20. Support system and method for detecting neurodegenerative disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    during REM sleep comprising the steps of: performing polysomnographic recordings of a sleeping subject, thereby obtaining one or more electromyography (EMG) derivations, preferably surface EMG recordings, and one or more EEG derivations, and/or one or more electrooculargraphy (EOG) derivations, detecting......The present invention relates to a system and a method for detection of abnormal motor activity during REM sleep, and further to systems and method for assisting in detecting neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's. One embodiment relates to a method for detection of abnormal motor activity...... one or more REM sleep stages, preferably based on the one or more EEG and/or EOG derivations, determining the level of muscle activity during the one or more REM sleep stages based on the one or more EMG derivations, wherein a subject having an increased level of muscle activity during REM sleep...

  1. Apolipoprotein E: from cardiovascular disease to neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahley, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E was initially described as a lipid transport protein and major ligand for low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors with a role in cholesterol metabolism and cardiovascular disease. It has since emerged as a major risk factor (causative gene) for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Detailed understanding of the structural features of the three isoforms (apoE2, apoE3, and apoE4), which differ by only a single amino acid interchange, has elucidated their unique functions. ApoE2 and apoE4 increase the risk for heart disease: apoE2 increases atherogenic lipoprotein levels (it binds poorly to LDL receptors), and apoE4 increases LDL levels (it binds preferentially to triglyceride-rich, very low density lipoproteins, leading to downregulation of LDL receptors). ApoE4 also increases the risk for neurodegenerative diseases, decreases their age of onset, or alters their progression. ApoE4 likely causes neurodegeneration secondary to its abnormal structure, caused by an interaction between its carboxyl- and amino-terminal domains, called domain interaction. When neurons are stressed or injured, they synthesize apoE to redistribute cholesterol for neuronal repair or remodeling. However, because of its altered structure, neuronal apoE4 undergoes neuron-specific proteolysis, generating neurotoxic fragments (12-29 kDa) that escape the secretory pathway and cause mitochondrial dysfunction and cytoskeletal alterations, including tau phosphorylation. ApoE4-associated pathology can be prevented by small-molecule structure correctors that block domain interaction by converting apoE4 to a molecule that resembles apoE3 both structurally and functionally. Structure correctors are a potential therapeutic approach to reduce apoE4 pathology in both cardiovascular and neurological disorders. PMID:27277824

  2. Epigenetic Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders: Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Michael H; Moos, Walter H; Faller, Douglas V; Steliou, Kosta; Pinkert, Carl A

    2016-05-01

    Preclinical Research In this review, we discuss epigenetic-driven methods for treating neurodegenerative disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, focusing on carnitinoid antioxidant-histone deacetylase inhibitors that show an ability to reinvigorate synaptic plasticity and protect against neuromotor decline in vivo. Aging remains a major risk factor in patients who progress to dementia, a clinical syndrome typified by decreased mental capacity, including impairments in memory, language skills, and executive function. Energy metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction are viewed as determinants in the aging process that may afford therapeutic targets for a host of disease conditions, the brain being primary in such thinking. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a core feature in the pathophysiology of both Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and rare mitochondrial diseases. The potential of new therapies in this area extends to glaucoma and other ophthalmic disorders, migraine, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, systemic exertion intolerance disease, and chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment. An emerging and hopefully more promising approach to addressing these hard-to-treat diseases leverages their sensitivity to activation of master regulators of antioxidant and cytoprotective genes, antioxidant response elements, and mitophagy. Drug Dev Res 77 : 109-123, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26899010

  3. A novel HSF4 gene mutation (p.R405X causing autosomal recessive congenital cataracts in a large consanguineous family from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheema Abdul

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary cataracts are most frequently inherited as autosomal dominant traits, but can also be inherited in an autosomal recessive or X-linked fashion. To date, 12 loci for autosomal recessive cataracts have been mapped including a locus on chromosome 16q22 containing the disease-causing gene HSF4 (Genbank accession number NM_001040667. Here, we describe a family from Pakistan with the first nonsense mutation in HSF4 thus expanding the mutational spectrum of this heat shock transcription factor gene. Methods A large consanguineous Pakistani family with autosomal recessive cataracts was collected from Quetta. Genetic linkage analysis was performed for the common known autosomal recessive cataracts loci and linkage to a locus containing HSF4 (OMIM 602438 was found. All exons and adjacent splice sites of the heat shock transcription factor 4 gene (HSF4 were sequenced. A mutation-specific restriction enzyme digest (HphI was performed for all family members and unrelated controls. Results The disease phenotype perfectly co-segregated with markers flanking the known cataract gene HSF4, whereas other autosomal recessive loci were excluded. A maximum two-point LOD score with a Zmax = 5.6 at θ = 0 was obtained for D16S421. Direct sequencing of HSF4 revealed the nucleotide exchange c.1213C > T in this family predicting an arginine to stop codon exchange (p.R405X. Conclusion We identified the first nonsense mutation (p.R405X in exon 11 of HSF4 in a large consanguineous Pakistani family with autosomal recessive cataract.

  4. Autozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Pakistani family reveals a novel non-syndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation locus on 11p15-tel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehman, Shoaib ur; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Eiberg, Hans;

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal recessive inherited mental retardation is an extremely heterogeneous disease and accounts for approximately 25% of all non-syndromic mental retardation cases. Autozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Pakistani family revealed a novel locus for non-syndromic autosomal recessive...... mental retardation (NS-ARMR). The affected individuals showed low IQ and cognitive impairment without any neurological, skeletal, and biochemical abnormalities. All known NS-ARMR genes were excluded by STS markers, so autozygosity mapping by microarray single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis were......¿=¿3.31 was calculated for the mapped region. These results suggest a novel genetic locus, MRT17, for NS-ARMR....

  5. Homozygosity mapping in consanguineous families reveals extreme heterogeneity of non-syndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation and identifies 8 novel gene loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najmabadi, Hossein; Motazacker, Mohammad Mahdi; Garshasbi, Masoud; Kahrizi, Kimia; Tzschach, Andreas; Chen, Wei; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Hadavi, Valeh; Nieh, Sahar Esmaeeli; Abedini, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Vazifehmand, Reza; Firouzabadi, Saghar Ghasemi; Jamali, Payman; Falah, Masoumeh; Seifati, Seyed Morteza; Grüters, Annette; Lenzner, Steffen; Jensen, Lars R; Rüschendorf, Franz; Kuss, Andreas W; Ropers, H Hilger

    2007-03-01

    Autosomal recessive gene defects are arguably the most important, but least studied genetic causes of severe cognitive dysfunction. Homozygosity mapping in 78 consanguineous Iranian families with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation (NS-ARMR) has enabled us to determine the chromosomal localization of at least 8 novel gene loci for this condition. Our data suggest that in the Iranian population NS-ARMR is very heterogeneous, and they argue against the existence of frequent gene defects that account for more than a few percent of the cases. PMID:17120046

  6. Familial Clustering of Unexplained Transient Respiratory Distress in 12 Newborns from Three Unrelated Families Suggests an Autosomal-Recessive Inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Guala

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on 12 near-term babies from three families in which an unexplained transient respiratory distress was observed. No known risk factor was present in any family and no sequelae were recorded at follow-up. The most common causes of respiratory distress at birth are Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome (NRD and Transient Tachypnea of the Newborn (TTN, and their cumulative incidence is estimated to be about 2%. Genetic factors have been identified in NRD (surfactant genes or suggested for TTN (genes affecting lung liquid clearance. Survivors from NRD may develop clinically relevant sequelae, while TTN does not cause any problem later in life. Our cases do not immediately fit NRD or TTN, while familial recurrence suggests the existence of a previously unreported subgroup on patients with respiratory distress for which autosomal-recessive inheritance is likely.

  7. The Bowen-Conradi syndrome -- a highly lethal autosomal recessive syndrome of microcephaly, micrognathia, low birth weight, and joint deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, A G; Woerner, S J; Montalvo-Hicks, L D; Fowlow, S B; Haslam, R H; Metcalf, P J; Lowry, R B

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes six Hutterite children from five families who appear to have been affected by the same syndrome that was described in two brothers by Bowen and Conradi [1]. Our additional cases confirm that the major features of the syndrome include porportionate intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, micrognathia, a prominent nose, rocker-bottom feet, joint limitation, and failure to thrive, with death within the first year of life. Bowen-Conradi syndrome is an autosomal recessive trait and pedigree records show that all six families now known are related to each other through two couples born in the late 1700s but that there are additional earlier possible sources of the responsible gene. The differential diagnosis of this syndrome is discussed. PMID:484596

  8. Novel mutations confirm that COL11A2 is responsible for autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss DFNB53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakchouk, Imen; Grati, M'hamed; Bademci, Guney; Bensaid, Mariem; Ma, Qi; Chakroun, Amine; Foster, Joseph; Yan, Denise; Duman, Duygu; Diaz-Horta, Oscar; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Mittal, Rahul; Farooq, Amjad; Tekin, Mustafa; Masmoudi, Saber; Liu, Xue Zhong

    2015-08-01

    Hearing loss (HL) is a major public health issue. It is clinically and genetically heterogeneous.The identification of the causal mutation is important for early diagnosis, clinical follow-up, and genetic counseling. HL due to mutations in COL11A2, encoding collagen type XI alpha-2, can be non-syndromic autosomal-dominant or autosomal-recessive, and also syndromic as in Otospondylomegaepiphyseal Dysplasia, Stickler syndrome type III, and Weissenbacher-Zweymuller syndrome. However, thus far only one mutation co-segregating with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) in a single family has been reported. In this study, whole exome sequencing of two consanguineous families with ARNSHL from Tunisia and Turkey revealed two novel causative COL11A2 mutations, c.109G > T (p.Ala37Ser) and c.2662C > A (p.Pro888Thr). The variants identified co-segregated with deafness in both families. All homozygous individuals in those families had early onset profound hearing loss across all frequencies without syndromic findings. The variants are predicted to be damaging the protein function. The p.Pro888Thr mutation affects a -Gly-X-Y- triplet repeat motif. The novel p.Ala37Ser is the first missense mutation located in the NC4 domain of the COL11A2 protein. Structural model suggests that this mutation will likely obliterate, or at least partially compromise, the ability of NC4 domain to interact with its cognate ligands. In conclusion, we confirm that COL11A2 mutations cause ARNSHL and broaden the mutation spectrum that may shed new light on genotype-phenotype correlation for the associated phenotypes and clinical follow-up. PMID:25633957

  9. Autosomal recessive mental retardation: homozygosity mapping identifies 27 single linkage intervals, at least 14 novel loci and several mutation hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss, Andreas Walter; Garshasbi, Masoud; Kahrizi, Kimia; Tzschach, Andreas; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Darvish, Hossein; Abbasi-Moheb, Lia; Puettmann, Lucia; Zecha, Agnes; Weissmann, Robert; Hu, Hao; Mohseni, Marzieh; Abedini, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Rajab, Anna; Hertzberg, Christoph; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Ullmann, Reinhard; Ghasemi-Firouzabadi, Saghar; Banihashemi, Susan; Arzhangi, Sanaz; Hadavi, Valeh; Bahrami-Monajemi, Gholamreza; Kasiri, Mahboubeh; Falah, Masoumeh; Nikuei, Pooneh; Dehghan, Atefeh; Sobhani, Masoumeh; Jamali, Payman; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2011-02-01

    Mental retardation (MR) has a worldwide prevalence of around 2% and is a frequent cause of severe disability. Significant excess of MR in the progeny of consanguineous matings as well as functional considerations suggest that autosomal recessive forms of MR (ARMR) must be relatively common. To shed more light on the causes of autosomal recessive MR (ARMR), we have set out in 2003 to perform systematic clinical studies and autozygosity mapping in large consanguineous Iranian families with non-syndromic ARMR (NS-ARMR). As previously reported (Najmabadi et al. in Hum Genet 121:43-48, 2007), this led us to the identification of 12 novel ARMR loci, 8 of which had a significant LOD score (OMIM: MRT5-12). In the meantime, we and others have found causative gene defects in two of these intervals. Moreover, as reported here, tripling the size of our cohort has enabled us to identify 27 additional unrelated families with NS-ARMR and single-linkage intervals; 14 of these define novel loci for non-syndromic ARMR. Altogether, 13 out of 39 single linkage intervals observed in our cohort were found to cluster at 6 different loci on chromosomes, i.e., 1p34, 4q27, 5p15, 9q34, 11p11-q13 and 19q13, respectively. Five of these clusters consist of two significantly overlapping linkage intervals, and on chr 1p34, three single linkage intervals coincide, including the previously described MRT12 locus. The probability for this distribution to be due to chance is only 1.14 × 10(-5), as shown by Monte Carlo simulation. Thus, in contrast to our previous conclusions, these novel data indicate that common molecular causes of NS-ARMR do exist, and in the Iranian population, the most frequent ones may well account for several percent of the patients. These findings will be instrumental in the identification of the underlying genes. PMID:21063731

  10. A Register-Based Study of Diseases With an Autosomal Recessive Origin in Small Children in Denmark According to Maternal Country of Origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlund, Anna; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Pedersen, Grete Skøtt;

    2015-01-01

    information on consanguinity is lacking, this suggestion is difficult to test. With an indirect approach, we addressed this question by comparing the risk of diseases with autosomal recessive inheritance in children born in Denmark of Danish-born women and of women born in these five countries, respectively...

  11. Autosomal-recessive posterior microphthalmos is caused by mutations in PRSS56, a gene encoding a trypsin-like serine protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gal, Andreas; Rau, Isabella; El Matri, Leila;

    2011-01-01

    Posterior microphthalmos (MCOP) is a rare isolated developmental anomaly of the eye characterized by extreme hyperopia due to short axial length. The population of the Faroe Islands shows a high prevalence of an autosomal-recessive form (arMCOP) of the disease. Based on published linkage data, we...

  12. Deficient T Cell Receptor Excision Circles (TRECs) in autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome caused by DOCK8 mutation: implications for pathogenesis and potential detection by newborn screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasouki, Majed; Okonkwo, Kingsley C; Ray, Abhishek; Folmsbeel, Caspian K; Gozales, Diana; Keles, Sevgi; Puck, Jennifer M; Chatila, Talal

    2011-11-01

    Loss of function of DOCK8 is the major cause of autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome, a primary immunodeficiency with adaptive and innate immune dysfunction. Patients affected with ARHIES have atopic dermatitis and recurrent, potentially life-threatening viral and bacterial infections. Three consanguineous Pakistani siblings presented with severe atopic dermatitis and superinfection. Direct sequencing of DOCK8 in all three affected siblings demonstrated homozygosity for a deleterious, novel exon 14 frame shift mutation. Current newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome (SCID) and related T cell disorders relies on the quantitation of T Cell Receptor Excision Cells (TRECs) in dried blood spots (DBS). Significantly, both older affected siblings had undetectable TRECs, and TREC copy number was reduced in the youngest sibling. These findings suggest that AR-HIES may be detected by TREC newborn screening, and this diagnosis should be considered in the evaluation of newborns with abnormal TRECs who do not have typical SCID. PMID:21763205

  13. Autosomal recessive transmission of a rare KRT74 variant causes hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia: allelism with dominant woolly hair/hypotrichosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doroteya Raykova

    Full Text Available Pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia (PHNED comprises a heterogeneous group of rare heritable disorders characterized by brittle hair, hypotrichosis, onychodystrophy and micronychia. Autosomal recessive (AR PHNED has previously been associated with mutations in either KRT85 or HOXC13 on chromosome 12p11.1-q14.3. We investigated a consanguineous Pakistani family with AR PHNED linked to the keratin gene cluster on 12p11.1 but without detectable mutations in KRT85 and HOXC13. Whole exome sequencing of affected individuals revealed homozygosity for a rare c.821T>C variant (p.Phe274Ser in the KRT74 gene that segregates AR PHNED in the family. The transition alters the highly conserved Phe274 residue in the coil 1B domain required for long-range dimerization of keratins, suggesting that the mutation compromises the stability of intermediate filaments. Immunohistochemical (IHC analyses confirmed a strong keratin-74 expression in the nail matrix, the nail bed and the hyponychium of mouse distal digits, as well as in normal human hair follicles. Furthermore, hair follicles and epidermis of an affected family member stained negative for Keratin-74 suggesting a loss of function mechanism mediated by the Phe274Ser substitution. Our observations show for the first time that homozygosity for a KRT74 missense variant may be associated with AR PHNED. Heterozygous KRT74 mutations have previously been associated with autosomal dominant woolly hair/hypotrichosis simplex (ADWH. Thus, our findings expand the phenotypic spectrum associated with KRT74 mutations and imply that a subtype of AR PHNED is allelic with ADWH.

  14. Identification, by homozygosity mapping, of a novel locus for autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis on chromosome 17p, and evidence for further genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebsová, A; Küster, W; Lestringant, G G; Schulze, B; Hinz, B; Frossard, P M; Reis, A; Hennies, H C

    2001-07-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) comprises a group of severe disorders of keratinization, characterized by variable erythema and skin scaling. It is known for its high degree of genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Mutations in the gene for keratinocyte transglutaminase (TGM1) on chromosome 14q11 were shown in patients with ARCI, and a second locus was described, on chromosome 2q, in families from northern Africa. Three other loci for ARCI, on chromosomes 3p and 19p, were identified recently. We have embarked on a whole-genome scan for further loci for ARCI in four families from Germany, Turkey, and the United Arab Emirates. A novel ARCI locus was identified on chromosome 17p, between the markers at D17S938 and D17S1856, with a maximum LOD score of 3.38, at maximum recombination fraction 0.00, at D17S945, under heterogeneity. This locus is linked to the disease in the Turkish family and in the German family. Extensive genealogical studies revealed that the parents of the German patients with ARCI were eighth cousins. By homozygosity mapping, the localization of the gene could then be refined to the 8.4-cM interval between D17S938 and D17S1879. It could be shown, however, that ARCI in the two Arab families is linked neither to the new locus on chromosome 17p nor to one of the five loci known previously. Our findings give evidence of further genetic heterogeneity that is not linked to distinctive phenotypes. PMID:11398099

  15. Environmental Pollutants as Risk Factors for Neurodegenerative Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel eChin-Chan; Juliana eNavarro-Yepes; Betzabet eQuintanilla-Vega

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer (AD) and Parkinson (PD) have attracted attention in last decades due to their high incidence worldwide. The etiology of these diseases is still unclear; however the role of the environment, from diet to the new nanomaterials as putative risk factors has gained importance. More worryingly is the evidence that pre- and post-natal exposures to environmental factors predispose to the onset of neurodegenerative diseases in later life. Neurotoxic metal...

  16. Genetic dissection of two Pakistani families with consanguineous localized autosomal recessive hypotrichosis (LAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyedha Abbas

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion:Both families were tested for linkage by genotyping polymorphic microsatellite markers linked to known alopecia loci. Family A excluded all known diseased regions that is suggestive of some novel chromosomal disorder. However, sequencing of P2RY5 gene in family B showed no pathogenic mutation.

  17. Mutations in the histamine N-methyltransferase gene, HNMT, are associated with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Abolfazl; Tongsook, Chanakan; Najafipour, Reza; Musante, Luciana; Vasli, Nasim; Garshasbi, Masoud; Hu, Hao; Mittal, Kirti; McNaughton, Amy J M; Sritharan, Kumudesh; Hudson, Melissa; Stehr, Henning; Talebi, Saeid; Moradi, Mohammad; Darvish, Hossein; Arshad Rafiq, Muhammad; Mozhdehipanah, Hossein; Rashidinejad, Ali; Samiei, Shahram; Ghadami, Mohsen; Windpassinger, Christian; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Tzschach, Andreas; Ahmed, Iltaf; Mikhailov, Anna; Stavropoulos, D James; Carter, Melissa T; Keshavarz, Soraya; Ayub, Muhammad; Najmabadi, Hossein; Liu, Xudong; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Macheroux, Peter; Vincent, John B

    2015-10-15

    Histamine (HA) acts as a neurotransmitter in the brain, which participates in the regulation of many biological processes including inflammation, gastric acid secretion and neuromodulation. The enzyme histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT) inactivates HA by transferring a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to HA, and is the only well-known pathway for termination of neurotransmission actions of HA in mammalian central nervous system. We performed autozygosity mapping followed by targeted exome sequencing and identified two homozygous HNMT alterations, p.Gly60Asp and p.Leu208Pro, in patients affected with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive intellectual disability from two unrelated consanguineous families of Turkish and Kurdish ancestry, respectively. We verified the complete absence of a functional HNMT in patients using in vitro toxicology assay. Using mutant and wild-type DNA constructs as well as in silico protein modeling, we confirmed that p.Gly60Asp disrupts the enzymatic activity of the protein, and that p.Leu208Pro results in reduced protein stability, resulting in decreased HA inactivation. Our results highlight the importance of inclusion of HNMT for genetic testing of individuals presenting with intellectual disability. PMID:26206890

  18. A mutation in the FOXE3 gene causes congenital primary aphakia in an autosomal recessive consanguineous Pakistani family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anjum, Iram; Eiberg, Hans; Baig, Shahid Mahmood;

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Aphakia is the complete absence of any lens in the eye, either due to surgical removal of the lens as a result of a perforating wound or ulcer, or due to a congenital anomaly. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the molecular genetics for a large consanguineous Pakistani family wi...... quite primitive in origin since the same mutation is responsible for the same phenotypic outcome in two families of geographically different descent.......PURPOSE: Aphakia is the complete absence of any lens in the eye, either due to surgical removal of the lens as a result of a perforating wound or ulcer, or due to a congenital anomaly. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the molecular genetics for a large consanguineous Pakistani family with...... a clear aphakia phenotype. METHODS: The initial homozygosity screening of the family was extended to all the known autosomal recessive cataract loci in order to exclude the possibility of surgical cataract removal leading to aphakia. The screening was performed using polymorphic nucleotide repeat...

  19. Mutation in WNT10A is associated with an autosomal recessive ectodermal dysplasia: the odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaimy, Lynn; Chouery, Eliane; Megarbane, Hala; Mroueh, Salman; Delague, Valerie; Nicolas, Elsa; Belguith, Hanen; de Mazancourt, Philippe; Megarbane, Andre

    2007-10-01

    Odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome in which the presenting phenotype is dry hair, severe hypodontia, smooth tongue with marked reduction of fungiform and filiform papillae, onychodysplasia, keratoderma and hyperhidrosis of palms and soles, and hyperkeratosis of the skin. We studied three consanguineous Lebanese Muslim Shiite families that included six individuals affected with odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia. Using a homozygosity-mapping strategy, we assigned the disease locus to an ~9-cM region at chromosome 2q35-q36.2, located between markers rs16853834 and D2S353, with a maximum multipoint LOD score of 5.7. Screening of candidate genes in this region led us to identify the same c.697G-->T (p.Glu233X) homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 3 of the WNT10A gene in all patients. At the protein level, the mutation is predicted to result in a premature truncated protein of 232 aa instead of 417 aa. This is the first report to our knowledge of a human phenotype resulting from a mutation in WNT10A, and it is the first demonstration of an ectodermal dysplasia caused by an altered WNT signaling pathway, expanding the list of WNT-related diseases. PMID:17847007

  20. Possible influences on the expression of X chromosome-linked dystrophin abnormalities by heterozygosity for autosomal recessive Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Beggs, A H; Neumann, P E; Arahata, K; Arikawa, E; Nonaka, I; Anderson, M S; Kunkel, L. M.

    1992-01-01

    Abnormalities of dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein of muscle and nerve, are generally considered specific for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. However, several patients have recently been identified with dystrophin deficiency who, before dystrophin testing, were considered to have Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) on the basis of clinical findings. Epidemiologic data suggest that only 1/3500 males with autosomal recessive FCMD should have abnormal dystrophin. To explain th...

  1. Genetics Underlying Atypical Parkinsonism and Related Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Sonja W; Bras, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Atypical parkinsonism syndromes, such as dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration, are neurodegenerative diseases with complex clinical and pathological features. Heterogeneity in clinical presentations, possible secondary determinants as well as mimic syndromes pose a major challenge to accurately diagnose patients suffering from these devastating conditions. Over the last two decades, significant advancements in genomic technologies have provided us with increasing insights into the molecular pathogenesis of atypical parkinsonism and their intriguing relationships to related neurodegenerative diseases, fueling new hopes to incorporate molecular knowledge into our diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches towards managing these conditions. In this review article, we summarize the current understanding of genetic mechanisms implicated in atypical parkinsonism syndromes. We further highlight mimic syndromes relevant to differential considerations and possible future directions. PMID:26501269

  2. Genetics Underlying Atypical Parkinsonism and Related Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja W. Scholz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Atypical parkinsonism syndromes, such as dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration, are neurodegenerative diseases with complex clinical and pathological features. Heterogeneity in clinical presentations, possible secondary determinants as well as mimic syndromes pose a major challenge to accurately diagnose patients suffering from these devastating conditions. Over the last two decades, significant advancements in genomic technologies have provided us with increasing insights into the molecular pathogenesis of atypical parkinsonism and their intriguing relationships to related neurodegenerative diseases, fueling new hopes to incorporate molecular knowledge into our diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches towards managing these conditions. In this review article, we summarize the current understanding of genetic mechanisms implicated in atypical parkinsonism syndromes. We further highlight mimic syndromes relevant to differential considerations and possible future directions.

  3. Loss of VPS13C Function in Autosomal-Recessive Parkinsonism Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Increases PINK1/Parkin-Dependent Mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Suzanne; Drouet, Valérie; Majounie, Elisa; Deramecourt, Vincent; Jacoupy, Maxime; Nicolas, Aude; Cormier-Dequaire, Florence; Hassoun, Sidi Mohamed; Pujol, Claire; Ciura, Sorana; Erpapazoglou, Zoi; Usenko, Tatiana; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Sahbatou, Mourad; Liebau, Stefan; Ding, Jinhui; Bilgic, Basar; Emre, Murat; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan; Guven, Gamze; Tison, François; Tranchant, Christine; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Krack, Paul; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Nalls, Michael A; Hernandez, Dena G; Heutink, Peter; Gibbs, J Raphael; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W; Gasser, Thomas; Durr, Alexandra; Deleuze, Jean-François; Tazir, Meriem; Destée, Alain; Lohmann, Ebba; Kabashi, Edor; Singleton, Andrew; Corti, Olga; Brice, Alexis

    2016-03-01

    Autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The genetic causes of approximately 50% of autosomal-recessive early-onset forms of Parkinson disease (PD) remain to be elucidated. Homozygozity mapping and exome sequencing in 62 isolated individuals with early-onset parkinsonism and confirmed consanguinity followed by data mining in the exomes of 1,348 PD-affected individuals identified, in three isolated subjects, homozygous or compound heterozygous truncating mutations in vacuolar protein sorting 13C (VPS13C). VPS13C mutations are associated with a distinct form of early-onset parkinsonism characterized by rapid and severe disease progression and early cognitive decline; the pathological features were striking and reminiscent of diffuse Lewy body disease. In cell models, VPS13C partly localized to the outer membrane of mitochondria. Silencing of VPS13C was associated with lower mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial fragmentation, increased respiration rates, exacerbated PINK1/Parkin-dependent mitophagy, and transcriptional upregulation of PARK2 in response to mitochondrial damage. This work suggests that loss of function of VPS13C is a cause of autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism with a distinctive phenotype of rapid and severe progression. PMID:26942284

  4. Prions and Prion-Like Pathogens in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Caterina Peggion; Maria Catia Sorgato; Alessandro Bertoli

    2014-01-01

    Prions are unique elements in biology, being able to transmit biological information from one organism to another in the absence of nucleic acids. They have been identified as self-replicating proteinaceous agents responsible for the onset of rare and fatal neurodegenerative disorders—known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, or prion diseases—which affect humans and other animal species. More recently, it has been proposed that other proteins associated with common neurodegenerati...

  5. Telmisartan Ameliorates Fibrocystic Liver Disease in an Orthologous Rat Model of Human Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Daisuke; Kugita, Masanori; Sasaki, Mai; Horie, Shigeo; Nakanishi, Koichi; Abe, Takaaki; Aukema, Harold M.; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Nagao, Shizuko

    2013-01-01

    Human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) produces kidneys which are massively enlarged due to multiple cysts, hypertension, and congenital hepatic fibrosis characterized by dilated bile ducts and portal hypertension. The PCK rat is an orthologous model of human ARPKD with numerous fluid-filled cysts caused by stimulated cellular proliferation in the renal tubules and hepatic bile duct epithelia, with interstitial fibrosis developed in the liver. We previously reported that a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ full agonist ameliorated kidney and liver disease in PCK rats. Telmisartan is an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) used widely as an antihypertensive drug and shows partial PPAR-γ agonist activity. It also has nephroprotective activity in diabetes and renal injury and prevents the effects of drug-induced hepatotoxicity and hepatic fibrosis. In the present study, we determined whether telmisartan ameliorates progression of polycystic kidney and fibrocystic liver disease in PCK rats. Five male and 5 female PCK and normal control (+/+) rats were orally administered 3 mg/kg telmisartan or vehicle every day from 4 to 20 weeks of age. Treatment with telmisartan decreased blood pressure in both PCK and +/+ rats. Blood levels of aspartate amino transferase, alanine amino transferase and urea nitrogen were unaffected by telmisartan treatment. There was no effect on kidney disease progression, but liver weight relative to body weight, liver cystic area, hepatic fibrosis index, expression levels of Ki67 and TGF-β, and the number of Ki67- and TGF-β-positive interstitial cells in the liver were significantly decreased in telmisartan-treated PCK rats. Therefore, telmisartan ameliorates congenital hepatic fibrosis in ARPKD, possibly through the inhibition of signaling cascades responsible for cellular proliferation and interstitial fibrosis in PCK rats. The present results support the potential therapeutic use of ARBs for the

  6. Genetic Linkage Analysis of 15 DFNB Loci in a Group of Iranian Families with Autosomal Recessive Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Tabatabaiefar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Hearing loss (HL is the most frequent sensory birth defect in humans. Autosomal recessive non-syn­dromic HL (ARNSHL is the most common type of hereditary HL. It is extremely heterogeneous and over 70 loci (known as DFNB have been identified. This study was launched to determine the relative contribution of more frequent loci in a cohort of ARNSHL families."nMethods: Thirty-seven Iranian families including 36 ARNSHL families and 1 family with Pendred syndrome each with ≥ 4 affected individuals, from seven provinces of Iran, were ascertained. DFNB1 contribution was initially studied by DNA sequencing of GJB2 and linkage analysis using the relative STR markers. The excluded families were then sub­jected to homozygosity mapping for fifteen ARNSHL loci."nResults: Sixteen families were found to be linked to seven different known loci, including DFNB1 (6 families, DFNB4 (3 families +1 family with Pendred syndrome, DFNB63 (2 families, DFNB2 (1 family, DFNB7/11 (1 family, DFNB9 (1 family and DFNB21 (1 family. DNA sequencing of the corresponding genes is in progress to identify the pathogenic mu­tations. "nConclusion: The genetic causes were clarified in 43.2% of the studied families, giving an overview of the causes of ARNSHL in Iran. DFNB4 is ranked second after DFNB1 in the studied cohort. More genetic and epigenetic investiga­tions will have to be done to reveal the causes in the remaining families.   

  7. CONSENSUS EXPERT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE: REPORT OF AN INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay-Woodford, Lisa M.; Bissler, John J.; Braun, Michael C.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A.; Dell, Katherine M.; Kerecuk, Larissa; Liebau, Max C.; Alonso-Peclet, Maria H.; Shneider, Benjamin; Emre, Sukru; Heller, Theo; Kamath, Binita M.; Murray, Karen F.; Moise, Kenneth; Eichenwald, Eric E.; Evans, Jacquelyn; Keller, Roberta L.; Wilkins-Haug, Louise; Bergmann, Carsten; Gunay-Aygun, Meral; Hooper, Stephen R.; Hardy, Kristina K.; Hartung, Erum A.; Streisand, Randi; Perrone, Ronald; Moxey-Mims, Marva

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD; MIM 263200) is a severe, typically early onset form of cystic disease that primarily involves the kidneys and biliary tract. Phenotypic expression and age at presentation can be quite variable1. The incidence of ARPKD is 1 in 20,000 live births2, and its pleotropic manifestations are potentially life-threatening. Optimal care requires proper surveillance to limit morbidity and mortality, knowledgeable approaches to diagnosis and treatment, and informed strategies to optimize quality of life. Clinical management therefore is ideally directed by multidisciplinary care teams consisting of perinatologists, neonatologists, nephrologists, hepatologists, geneticists, and behavioral specialists to coordinate patient care from the perinatal period to adulthood. In May 2013, an international team of 25 multidisciplinary specialists from the US, Canada, Germany, and the United Kingdom convened in Washington, DC, to review the literature published from 1990 to 2013 and to develop recommendations for diagnosis, surveillance, and clinical management. Identification of the gene PKHD1, and the significant advances in perinatal care, imaging, medical management, and behavioral therapies over the past decade, provide the foundational elements to define diagnostic criteria and establish clinical management guidelines as the first steps towards standardizing the clinical care for ARPKD patients. The key issues discussed included recommendations regarding perinatal interventions, diagnostic criteria, genetic testing, management of renal and biliary-associated morbidities, and behavioral assessment. The meeting was funded by the National Institutes of Health and an educational grant from the Polycystic Kidney Disease Foundation. Here we summarize the discussions and provide an updated set of diagnostic, surveillance, and management recommendations for optimizing the pediatric care of patients with ARPKD. Specialist care of ARPKD

  8. Therapeutic application of neural stem cells and adult neurogenesis for neurodegenerative disorders: regeneration and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Latchney, Sarah E.; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2012-01-01

    With the growth of the aging population and increasing life expectancy, the diagnosis of age-related neurodegenerative diseases is predicted to increase 12% by 2030. There is urgent need to develop better and novel treatments for disorders like Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s, and Parkinson’s diseases. As these neurodegenerative diseases are customarily defined by the progressive loss of neurons, treatment strategies have traditionally focused on replacing neurons lost during disease progression. T...

  9. Prions, prion-like prionoids, and neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the aggregation and deposition of the misfolded prion protein in the brain. α-synuclein (α-syn)-associated multiple system atrophy has been recently shown to be caused by a bona fide α-syn prion strain. Several other misfolded native proteins such as β-amyloid, tau and TDP-43 share some aspects of prions although none of them is shown to be transmissible in nature or in experimental animals. However, these prion-like "prionoids" are causal to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The remarkable recent discovery of at least two new α-syn prion strains and their transmissibility in transgenic mice and in vitro cell models raises a distinct question as to whether some specific strain of other prionoids could have the capability of disease transmission in a manner similar to prions. In this overview, we briefly describe human and other mammalian prion diseases and comment on certain similarities between prion and prionoid and the possibility of prion-like transmissibility of some prionoid strains. PMID:27293325

  10. Prions, prion-like prionoids, and neurodegenerative disordersVacancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the aggregation and deposition of the misfolded prion protein in the brain. α-synuclein (α-syn-associated multiple system atrophy has been recently shown to be caused by a bona fide α-syn prion strain. Several other misfolded native proteins such as β-amyloid, tau and TDP-43 share some aspects of prions although none of them is shown to be transmissible in nature or in experimental animals. However, these prion-like “prionoids” are causal to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The remarkable recent discovery of at least two new α-syn prion strains and their transmissibility in transgenic mice and in vitro cell models raises a distinct question as to whether some specific strain of other prionoids could have the capability of disease transmission in a manner similar to prions. In this overview, we briefly describe human and other mammalian prion diseases and comment on certain similarities between prion and prionoid and the possibility of prion-like transmissibility of some prionoid strains.

  11. Biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders:How good are they?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Varun RACHAKONDA; Tian Hong PAN; Wei Dong LE

    2004-01-01

    Biomarkers are very important indicators of normal and abnormal biological processes. Specific changes in pathologies,biochemistries and genetics can give us comprehensive information regarding the nature of any particular disease. A good biomarker should be precise and reliable, distinguishable between normal and interested disease, and differentiable between different diseases. It is believed that biomarkers have great potential in predicting chances for diseases, aiding in early diagnosis, and setting standards for the development of new remedies to treat diseases. New technologies have enabled scientists to identify biomarkers of several different neurodegenerative diseases. The followings, for instance,are only a few of the many new biomarkers that have been recently identified: the phosphorylated tau protein and aggregated β-amyloid peptide for Alzheimer's disease (AD), α-synuclein contained Lewy bodies and altered dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging for Parkinson's disease (PD), SOD mutations for familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and CAG repeats resulted from Huntington's gene mutations in Huntington's disease (HD). This article will focus on the most-recent findings of biomarkers belonging to the four mentioned neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Lessons Learned From Nocebo Effects in Clinical Trials for Pain Conditions and Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanzio, Martina; Palermo, Sara; Skyt, Ina; Vase, Lene

    2016-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that patients in the placebo arm of a clinical trial may experience adverse events (AEs), which may lead to nonadherence and dropout. However, so far, it is unknown to which extent this phenomenon is observed consistently across different diseases such as pain and neurodegenerative disorders.The current review shows for the first time that different diseases share a common risk for patients in terms of a negative outcome: a large percentage of placebo-treated patients experience AEs in pain conditions (up to 59%) and neurodegenerative disorders (up to 66%). In addition, the rate of patients who discontinue because of AEs is up to 10% and 11% in pain conditions and neurodegenerative disorders, respectively.We highlight methodological shortcomings with the aim of suggesting how the detection and reporting of AEs can be improved in future trials. The insights from the current review should be taken into consideration when designing clinical trials to tailor individualized treatments. PMID:27580494

  13. Congenital sensorineural deafness in Australian stumpy-tail cattle dogs is an autosomal recessive trait that maps to CFA10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Sommerlad

    -value = 3.64, as was both coat colour and speckling. Fine mapping was then performed on 45 of these 50 dogs and a further 48 dogs (n = 93. Sequencing candidate gene Sox10 in 6 hearing ASCD, 2 unilaterally deaf ASCD and 2 bilaterally deaf ASCD did not reveal any disease-associated mutations. CONCLUSIONS: Deafness in ASCD is an incompletely penetrant autosomal recessive inherited disease that maps to CFA10.

  14. Highly prevalent LIPH founder mutations causing autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis in Japan and the genotype/phenotype correlations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kana Tanahashi

    Full Text Available Mutations in LIPH cause of autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis (ARWH, and the 2 missense mutations c.736T>A (p.Cys246Ser and c.742C>A (p.His248Asn are considered prevalent founder mutations for ARWH in the Japanese population. To reveal genotype/phenotype correlations in ARWH cases in Japan and the haplotypes in 14 Japanese patients from 14 unrelated Japanese families. 13 patients had woolly hair, and 1 patient had complete baldness since birth. An LIPH mutation search revealed homozygous c.736T>A mutations in 10 of the patients. Compound heterozygous c.736T>A and c.742C>A mutations were found in 3 of the patients, and homozygous c.742C>A mutation in 1 patient. The phenotype of mild hypotrichosis with woolly hair was restricted to the patients with the homozygous c.736T>A mutation. The severe phenotype of complete baldness was seen in only 1 patient with homozygous c.742C>A. Haplotype analysis revealed that the alleles containing the LIPH c.736T>A mutation had a haplotype identical to that reported previously, although 4 alleles out of 5 chromosomes containing the LIPH c.742C>A mutation had a different haplotype from the previously reported founder allele. These alleles with c.742C>A are thought to be the third founder LIPH mutation causing ARWH. To accurately determine the prevalence of the founder mutations, we investigated allele frequencies of those mutations in 819 Japanese controls. Heterozygous c.736T>A mutations were found in 13 controls (allele frequency: 0.0079; carrier rate: 0.016, and heterozygous c.742C>A mutations were found in 2 controls (allele frequency: 0.0012; carrier rate: 0.0024. In conclusion, this study confirms the more accurate allele frequencies of the pathogenic founder mutations of LIPH and shows that there is a third founder mutation in Japan. In addition, the present findings suggest that the mutation patterns of LIPH might be associated with hypotrichosis severity in ARWH.

  15. Epigenetic targets of HDAC inhibition in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Abel, Ted; Zukin, R. Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Epigenetic chromatin remodeling and modifications of DNA represent central mechanisms for regulation of gene expression during brain development and in memory formation. Emerging evidence implicates epigenetic modifications in disorders of synaptic plasticity and cognition. This review focuses on recent findings that HDAC inhibitors can ameliorate deficits in synaptic plasticity, cognition and stress-related behaviors in a wide range of neurologic and psychiatric disorders including Huntingto...

  16. The cytoskeleton as a novel therapeutic target for old neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eira, Jessica; Silva, Catarina Santos; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Liz, Márcia Almeida

    2016-06-01

    Cytoskeleton defects, including alterations in microtubule stability, in axonal transport as well as in actin dynamics, have been characterized in several unrelated neurodegenerative conditions. These observations suggest that defects of cytoskeleton organization may be a common feature contributing to neurodegeneration. In line with this hypothesis, drugs targeting the cytoskeleton are currently being tested in animal models and in human clinical trials, showing promising effects. Drugs that modulate microtubule stability, inhibitors of posttranslational modifications of cytoskeletal components, specifically compounds affecting the levels of tubulin acetylation, and compounds targeting signaling molecules which regulate cytoskeleton dynamics, constitute the mostly addressed therapeutic interventions aiming at preventing cytoskeleton damage in neurodegenerative disorders. In this review, we will discuss in a critical perspective the current knowledge on cytoskeleton damage pathways as well as therapeutic strategies designed to revert cytoskeleton-related defects mainly focusing on the following neurodegenerative disorders: Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, Huntington's Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease. PMID:27095262

  17. Cytochrome b558-negative, autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease: two new mutations in the cytochrome b558 light chain of the NADPH oxidase (p22-phox).

    OpenAIRE

    Boer, M.; Klein, A; Hossle, J P; Seger, R.; Corbeel, L; Weening, R S; Roos, D.

    1992-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is characterized by the failure of activated phagocytes to generate superoxide. Defects in at least four different genes lead to CGD. Patients with the X-linked form of CGD have mutations in the gene for the beta-subunit of cytochrome b558 (gp91-phox). Patients with a rare autosomal recessive form of CGD have mutations in the gene for the alpha-subunit of this cytochrome (p22-phox). Usually, this leads to the absence of cytochrome b558 in the phagocytes (A2...

  18. Structure of the Parkin in-between-ring domain provides insights for E3-ligase dysfunction in autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Beasley, Steven A; Hristova, Ventzislava A.; Shaw, Gary S.

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in Parkin are one of the predominant hereditary factors found in patients suffering from autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinsonism. Parkin is a member of the E3 ubiquitin ligase family that is defined by a tripartite RING1-in-between-ring (IBR)-RING2 motif. In Parkin, the IBR domain has been shown to augment binding of the E2 proteins UbcH7 and UbcH8, and the subsequent ubiquitination of the proteins synphilin-1, Sept5, and SIM2. To facilitate our understanding of Parkin function, t...

  19. The search for mutations in the gene for the beta subunit of the cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDEB) in patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riess, O; Noerremoelle, A; Weber, B; Musarella, M A; Hayden, M R

    1992-01-01

    including 196 bp of the 5' region of the PDEB gene have been assessed for mutations by using single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis in 14 patients from 13 unrelated families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP). No disease-causing mutations were found in this group of affected......The finding of a mutation in the beta subunit of the cyclic GMP (cGMP) phosphodiesterase gene causing retinal degeneration in mice (the Pdeb gene) prompted a search for disease-causing mutations in the human phosphodiesterase gene (PDEB gene) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. All 22 exons...

  20. Neurodegenerative Disorders with Hair Abnormalities: An Emergency Room Consultation for Dermatologists

    OpenAIRE

    Inamadar, Arun C.; Palit, Aparna

    2009-01-01

    Menke′s syndrome and Elejalde disease are the two neurodegenerative disorders of dermatological interest. These patients present with characteristic hair changes which may be of diagnostic value in resource-poor setup where facilities for specific genetic analysis are not available. Simple light microscopic examination of hair may be a helpful diagnostic tool to pick up such cases.

  1. Abnormal red cell features associated with hereditary neurodegenerative disorders: the neuroacanthocytosis syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franceschi, L. De; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Mohandas, N.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review discusses the mechanisms involved in the generation of thorny red blood cells (RBCs), known as acanthocytes, in patients with neuroacanthocytosis, a heterogenous group of neurodegenerative hereditary disorders that include chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc) and McLeod syndro

  2. Pathophysiological Role of Neuroinflammation in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Psychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Brain diseases and disorders such as Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, depression, schizophrenia, autism, and addiction lead to reduced quality of daily life through abnormal thoughts, perceptions, emotional states, and behavior. While the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood, human and animal studies have supported a role of neuroinflammation in the etiology of these diseases. In the central nervous system, an increased inflammatory response is capable of activating microglial cells, leading to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α. In turn, the pro-inflammatory cytokines aggravate and propagate neuroinflammation, degenerating healthy neurons and impairing brain functions. Therefore, activated microglia may play a key role in neuroinflammatory processes contributing to the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders and neurodegeneration. PMID:27230456

  3. Role of Neurotrophic Factor alterations in the neurodegenerative process in HIV associated neurocognitive disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Fields, Jerel; Dumaop, Wilmar; Langford, T. D.; Rockenstein, Edward; Masliah, E.

    2014-01-01

    Migration of HIV infected cells into the CNS is associated with a spectrum of neurological disorders, ranging from milder forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) to HIV-associated dementia (HAD). These neuro-psychiatric syndromes are related to the neurodegenerative pathology triggered by the release of HIV proteins and cytokine/chemokines from monocytes/macrophages into the CNS –a condition known as HIV encephalitis (HIVE). As a result of more effective combined anti-retrovir...

  4. The Genes Involved in Hearing and Endocrine Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkinson, Emma

    2012-01-01

    The Genes Involved in Hearing and Endocrine Disorders.Emma Mary Jenkinson, the University of Manchester, PhD in Developmental Biomedicine, submitted 2012In recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in rare autosomal recessive disorders. This project entitled ‘The Genes Involved in Hearing and Endocrine Disorders’ focuses on a group of autosomal recessive phenotypes which include symptoms such as sensorineural hearing loss, ovarian dysgenesis, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, short s...

  5. A novel c.5308_5311delGAGA mutation in Senataxin in a Cypriot family with an autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamba-Papanicolaou Eleni

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Senataxin (chromosome 9q34 was recently identified as the causative gene for an autosomal recessive form of Ataxia (ARCA, termed as Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia, type 2 (AOA2 and characterized by generalized incoordination, cerebellar atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, "oculomotor apraxia" and increased alpha-fetoprotein (AFP. Here, we report a novel Senataxin mutation in a Cypriot ARCA family. Methods We studied several Cypriot autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia (ARCA families for linkage to known ARCA gene loci. We linked one family (909 to the SETX locus on chromosome 9q34 and screened the proband for mutations by direct sequencing. Results Sequence analysis revealed a novel c.5308_5311delGAGA mutation in exon 11 of the SETX gene. The mutation has not been detected in 204 control chromosomes from the Cypriot population, the remaining Cypriot ARCA families and 37 Cypriot sporadic cerebellar ataxia patients. Conclusion We identified a novel SETX homozygous c.5308_5311delGAGA mutation that co-segregates with ARCA with cerebellar atrophy and raised AFP.

  6. Role of nucleolar dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders: a game of genes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Parlato

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Within the cell nucleus the nucleolus is the site of rRNA transcription and ribosome biogenesis and its activity is clearly essential for a correct cell function, however its specific role in neuronal homeostasis remains mainly unknown. Here we review recent evidence that impaired nucleolar activity is a common mechanism in different neurodegenerative disorders. We focus on the specific causes and consequences of impaired nucleolar activity to better understand the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, Huntington's disease (HD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia (ALS/FTD. In particular, we discuss the genetic and epigenetic factors that might regulate nucleolar function in these diseases. In addition, we describe novel animal models enabling the dissection of the context-specific series of events triggered by nucleolar disruption, also known as nucleolar stress. Finally, we suggest how this novel mechanism could help to identify strategies to treat these still incurable disorders.

  7. The clinical and pathophysiological relevance of REM sleep behavior disorder in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranzo, Alex; Santamaria, Joan; Tolosa, Eduard

    2009-12-01

    REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by vigorous movements associated with unpleasant dreams and increased electromyographic activity during REM sleep. Polysomnography with audiovisual recording is needed to confirm the diagnosis of RBD and to exclude other sleep disorders that can mimic its symptoms including obstructive sleep apnea, nocturnal hallucinations and confusional awakenings. RBD may be idiopathic or related to neurodegenerative diseases, particularly multiple system atrophy, Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. RBD may be the first manifestation of these disorders, antedating the onset of parkinsonism, cerebellar syndrome, dysautonomia, and dementia by several years. RBD should thus be considered an integral part of the disease process. When effective, neuroprotective strategies should be considered in subjects with idiopathic RBD. Patients with other neurodegenerative diseases, though, such as spinocerebellar ataxias, may also present with RBD. When clinically required, clonazepam at bedtime is effective in decreasing the intensity of dream-enacting behaviors and unpleasant dreams in both the idiopathic and secondary forms. When part of a neurodegenerative disorder the development of RBD is thought to reflect the location and extent of the underlying lesions involving the REM sleep centers of the brain (e.g., locus subceruleus, amygdala, etc.), leading to a complex multiple neurotransmitter dysfunction that involves GABAergic, glutamatergic and monoaminergic systems. RBD is mediated neither by direct abnormal alpha-synuclein inclusions nor by striatonigral dopaminergic deficiency alone. PMID:19362028

  8. Hydrogel-Based Nanocomposites and Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Promising Synergistic Strategy for Neurodegenerative Disorders Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Albani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogel-based materials are widely employed in the biomedical field. With regard to central nervous system (CNS neurodegenerative disorders, the design of injectable nanocomposite hydrogels for in situ drug or cell release represents an interesting and minimally invasive solution that might play a key role in the development of successful treatments. In particular, biocompatible and biodegradable hydrogels can be designed as specific injectable tools and loaded with nanoparticles (NPs, to improve and to tailor their viscoelastic properties upon injection and release profile. An intriguing application is hydrogel loading with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs that are a very promising therapeutic tool for neurodegenerative or traumatic disorders of the CNS. This multidisciplinary review will focus on the basic concepts to design acellular and cell-loaded materials with specific and tunable rheological and functional properties. The use of hydrogel-based nanocomposites and mesenchymal stem cells as a synergistic strategy for nervous tissue applications will be then discussed.

  9. The Pediatric Cerebellum in Inherited Neurodegenerative Disorders: A Pattern-recognition Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaser, Susan I; Steinlin, Maja; Al-Maawali, Almundher; Yoon, Grace

    2016-08-01

    Evaluation of imaging studies of the cerebellum in inherited neurodegenerative disorders is aided by attention to neuroimaging patterns based on anatomic determinants, including biometric analysis, hyperintense signal of structures, including the cerebellar cortex, white matter, dentate nuclei, brainstem tracts, and nuclei, the presence of cysts, brain iron, or calcifications, change over time, the use of diffusion-weighted/diffusion tensor imaging and T2*-weighted sequences, magnetic resonance spectroscopy; and, in rare occurrences, the administration of contrast material. PMID:27423800

  10. Considering Valproate as a Risk Factor for Rapid Exacerbation of Complex Movement Disorder in Progressed Stages of Late-Infantile CLN2 Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen, Jessika; Nickel, Miriam; Schulz, Angela; Denecke, Jonas

    2016-06-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis type 2 (CLN2 disease, OMIM 204500) is a rare autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disorder. It is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders in childhood. Symptoms include epilepsy, rapid motor and language regression, dementia, visual loss, and a complex movement disorder in later stages of the disease. We report on two children with genetically confirmed late-infantile CLN2 disease who developed a severe exacerbation of their complex movement disorder leading to hyperthermia, hyper-CK-emia and decreased level of consciousness over several weeks despite different therapeutic approaches. Both patients were on long-term antiepileptic treatment with valproate and only after the withdrawal of valproate, the movement disorder disappeared and level of consciousness improved. These observations emphasize that valproate has to be considered as a possible risk factor in patients in later stages of late-infantile CLN2 disease who develop a rapidly progressive complex movement disorder. PMID:27043294

  11. Recent Updates in the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders Using Natural Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Rasool

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by protein aggregates and inflammation as well as oxidative stress in the central nervous system (CNS. Multiple biological processes are linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as depletion or insufficient synthesis of neurotransmitters, oxidative stress, abnormal ubiquitination. Furthermore, damaging of blood brain barrier (BBB in the CNS also leads to various CNS-related diseases. Even though synthetic drugs are used for the management of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, autism, and many other chronic illnesses, they are not without side effects. The attentions of researchers have been inclined towards the phytochemicals, many of which have minimal side effects. Phytochemicals are promising therapeutic agents because many phytochemicals have anti-inflammatory, antioxidative as well as anticholinesterase activities. Various drugs of either synthetic or natural origin applied in the treatment of brain disorders need to cross the BBB before they can be used. This paper covers various researches related to phytochemicals used in the management of neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. Hippocampal-Prefrontal Circuit and Disrupted Functional Connectivity in Psychiatric and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In rodents, the hippocampus has been studied extensively as part of a brain system responsible for learning and memory, and the prefrontal cortex (PFC participates in numerous cognitive functions including working memory, flexibility, decision making, and rewarding learning. The neuronal projections from the hippocampus, either directly or indirectly, to the PFC, referred to as the hippocampal-prefrontal cortex (Hip-PFC circuit, play a critical role in cognitive and emotional regulation and memory consolidation. Although in certain psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, structural connectivity viewed by imaging techniques has been consistently found to be associated with clinical phenotype and disease severity, the focus has moved towards the investigation of connectivity correlates of molecular pathology and coupling of oscillation. Moreover, functional and structural connectivity measures have been emerging as potential intermediate biomarkers for neuronal disorders. In this review, we summarize progress on the anatomic, molecular, and electrophysiological characters of the Hip-PFC circuit in cognition and emotion processes with an emphasis on oscillation and functional connectivity, revealing a disrupted Hip-PFC connectivity and electrical activity in psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders as a promising candidate of neural marker for neuronal disorders.

  13. Correlation of auditory brain stem response and the MRI measurements in neuro-degenerative disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Hidekazu (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1989-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate correlations of several MRI measurements of the cranium and brain, functioning as a volume conductor, to the auditory brain stem response (ABR) in neuro-degenerative disorders. The subjects included forty-seven patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and sixteen of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Statistically significant positive correlations were found between I-V and III-V interpeak latencies (IPLs) and the area of cranium and brain in the longitudinal section of SCD patients, and between I-III and III-V IPLs and the area in the longitudinal section of those with ALS. And, also there were statistically significant correlations between the amplitude of the V wave and the area of brain stem as well as that of the cranium in the longitudinal section of SCD patients, and between the amplitude of the V wave and the area of the cerebrum in the longitudinal section of ALS. In conclusion, in the ABR, the IPLs were prolonged and the amplitude of the V wave was decreased while the MRI size of the cranium and brain increased. When the ABR is applied to neuro-degenerative disorders, it might be important to consider not only the conduction of the auditory tracts in the brain stem, but also the correlations of the size of the cranium and brain which act as a volume conductor. (author).

  14. Modifiers and mechanisms of multi-system polyglutamine neurodegenerative disorders: lessons from fly models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moushami Mallik; Subhash C. Lokhotia

    2010-12-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases, resulting from a dynamic expansion of glutamine repeats in a polypeptide, are a class of genetically inherited late onset neurodegenerative disorders which, despite expression of the mutated gene widely in brain and other tissues, affect defined subpopulations of neurons in a disease-specific manner. We briefly review the different poly Q-expansion-induced neurodegenerative disorders and the advantages of modelling them in Drosophila. Studies using the fly models have successfully identified a variety of genetic modifiers and have helped in understanding some of the molecular events that follow expression of the abnormal polyQ proteins. Expression of the mutant polyQ proteins causes, as a consequence of intra-cellular and inter-cellular networking, mis-regulation at multiple steps like transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations, cell signalling, protein quality control systems (protein folding and degradation networks), axonal transport machinery etc., in the sensitive neurons, resulting ultimately in their death. The diversity of genetic modifiers of polyQ toxicity identified through extensive genetic screens in fly and other models clearly reflects a complex network effect of the presence of the mutated protein. Such network effects pose a major challenge for therapeutic applications.

  15. Correlation of auditory brain stem response and the MRI measurements in neuro-degenerative disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate correlations of several MRI measurements of the cranium and brain, functioning as a volume conductor, to the auditory brain stem response (ABR) in neuro-degenerative disorders. The subjects included forty-seven patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and sixteen of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Statistically significant positive correlations were found between I-V and III-V interpeak latencies (IPLs) and the area of cranium and brain in the longitudinal section of SCD patients, and between I-III and III-V IPLs and the area in the longitudinal section of those with ALS. And, also there were statistically significant correlations between the amplitude of the V wave and the area of brain stem as well as that of the cranium in the longitudinal section of SCD patients, and between the amplitude of the V wave and the area of the cerebrum in the longitudinal section of ALS. In conclusion, in the ABR, the IPLs were prolonged and the amplitude of the V wave was decreased while the MRI size of the cranium and brain increased. When the ABR is applied to neuro-degenerative disorders, it might be important to consider not only the conduction of the auditory tracts in the brain stem, but also the correlations of the size of the cranium and brain which act as a volume conductor. (author)

  16. Current Neurogenic and Neuroprotective Strategies to Prevent and Treat Neurodegenerative and Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, I M; Coelho, P B; Costa, P C; Marques, C S; Oliveira, R S; Ferreira, D C

    2015-12-01

    The adult central nervous system is commonly known to have a very limited regenerative capacity. The presence of functional stem cells in the brain can therefore be seen as a paradox, since in other organs these are known to counterbalance cell loss derived from pathological conditions. This fact has therefore raised the possibility to stimulate neural stem cell differentiation and proliferation or survival by either stem cell replacement therapy or direct administration of neurotrophic factors or other proneurogenic molecules, which in turn has also originated regenerative medicine for the treatment of otherwise incurable neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders that take a huge toll on society. This may be facilitated by the fact that many of these disorders converge on similar pathophysiological pathways: excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, mitochondrial failure, excessive intracellular calcium and apoptosis. This review will therefore focus on the most promising achievements in promoting neuroprotection and neuroregeneration reported to date. PMID:26374113

  17. New strategies for the treatment of Parkinson's disease hold considerable promise for future management of neurodegenerative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarkam, Carsten Reidies; Sørensen, Jens Christian; Sunde, Niels Å;

    2001-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are often consideredincurable with no efficient therapies to modifyor halt the progress of disease, and ultimatelylead to reduced quality of life and to death.Our knowledge of the nervous system in healthand disease has, however, increasedconsiderably during the last...... fifty years andtoday, neuroscience reveals promising newstrategies to deal with disorders of thenervous system.Some of these results have been implementedwith success in the treatment of Parkinson'sdisease, a common neurodegenerative illnessaffecting approximately 1% of the populationaged seventy or...

  18. A novel AP4M1 mutation in autosomal recessive cerebral palsy syndrome and clinical expansion of AP-4 deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Jameel, Muhammad; Klar, Joakim; Tariq, Muhammad; Moawia, Abubakar; Altaf Malik, Naveed; Seema Waseem, Syeda; Abdullah, Uzma; Naeem Khan, Tahir; Raininko, Raili; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Dahl, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder associated with intellectual disability in one-third of cases. Recent findings support Mendelian inheritance in subgroups of patients with the disease. The purpose of this study was to identify a novel genetic cause of paraplegic CP with intellectual disability in a consanguineous Pakistani family. METHODS: We performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in two brothers with CP and intellectual disability. Analysis of AP...

  19. Validation of a clinical practice-based algorithm for the diagnosis of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias based on NGS identified cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallaret, Martial; Renaud, Mathilde; Redin, Claire; Drouot, Nathalie; Muller, Jean; Severac, Francois; Mandel, Jean Louis; Hamza, Wahiba; Benhassine, Traki; Ali-Pacha, Lamia; Tazir, Meriem; Durr, Alexandra; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Mignot, Cyril; Charles, Perrine; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Chamard, Ludivine; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Laugel, Vincent; Burglen, Lydie; Calvas, Patrick; Fleury, Marie-Céline; Tranchant, Christine; Anheim, Mathieu; Koenig, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Establishing a molecular diagnosis of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) is challenging due to phenotype and genotype heterogeneity. We report the validation of a previously published clinical practice-based algorithm to diagnose ARCA. Two assessors performed a blind analysis to determine the most probable mutated gene based on comprehensive clinical and paraclinical data, without knowing the molecular diagnosis of 23 patients diagnosed by targeted capture of 57 ataxia genes and high-throughput sequencing coming from a 145 patients series. The correct gene was predicted in 61 and 78 % of the cases by the two assessors, respectively. There was a high inter-rater agreement [K = 0.85 (0.55-0.98) p < 0.001] confirming the algorithm's reproducibility. Phenotyping patients with proper clinical examination, imaging, biochemical investigations and nerve conduction studies remain crucial for the guidance of molecular analysis and to interpret next generation sequencing results. The proposed algorithm should be helpful for diagnosing ARCA in clinical practice. PMID:27142713

  20. Mutations in CDC14A, Encoding a Protein Phosphatase Involved in Hair Cell Ciliogenesis, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Severe to Profound Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmaghani, Sedigheh; Aghaie, Asadollah; Bouyacoub, Yosra; El Hachmi, Hala; Bonnet, Crystel; Riahi, Zied; Chardenoux, Sebastien; Perfettini, Isabelle; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Houmeida, Ahmed; Herbomel, Philippe; Petit, Christine

    2016-06-01

    By genetic linkage analysis in a large consanguineous Iranian family with eleven individuals affected by severe to profound congenital deafness, we were able to define a 2.8 Mb critical interval (at chromosome 1p21.2-1p21.1) for an autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic deafness locus (DFNB). Whole-exome sequencing allowed us to identify a CDC14A biallelic nonsense mutation, c.1126C>T (p.Arg376(∗)), which was present in the eight clinically affected individuals still alive. Subsequent screening of 115 unrelated individuals affected by severe or profound congenital deafness of unknown genetic cause led us to identify another CDC14A biallelic nonsense mutation, c.1015C>T (p.Arg339(∗)), in an individual originating from Mauritania. CDC14A encodes a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Immunofluorescence analysis of the protein distribution in the mouse inner ear showed a strong labeling of the hair cells' kinocilia. By using a morpholino strategy to knockdown cdc14a in zebrafish larvae, we found that the length of the kinocilia was reduced in inner-ear hair cells. Therefore, deafness caused by loss-of-function mutations in CDC14A probably arises from a morphogenetic defect of the auditory sensory cells' hair bundles, whose differentiation critically depends on the proper growth of their kinocilium. PMID:27259055

  1. A novel autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing impairment locus (DFNB47) maps to chromosome 2p25.1-p24.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Muhammad Jawad; Santos, Regie Lyn P; Rafiq, Muhammad Arshad; Chahrour, Maria H; Pham, Thanh L; Wajid, Muhammad; Hijab, Nadine; Wambangco, Michael; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ansar, Muhammad; Yan, Kai; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary hearing impairment (HI) displays extensive genetic heterogeneity. Autosomal recessive (AR) forms of prelingual HI account for approximately 75% of cases with a genetic etiology. A novel AR non-syndromic HI locus (DFNB47) was mapped to chromosome 2p25.1-p24.3, in two distantly related Pakistani kindreds. Genome scan and fine mapping were carried out using microsatellite markers. Multipoint linkage analysis resulted in a maximum LOD score of 4.7 at markers D2S1400 and D2S262. The three-unit support interval was bounded by D2S330 and D2S131. The region of homozygosity was found within the three-unit support interval and flanked by markers D2S2952 and D2S131, which corresponds to 13.2 cM according to the Rutgers combined linkage-physical map. This region contains 5.3 Mb according to the sequence-based physical map. Three candidate genes, KCNF1, ID2 and ATP6V1C2 were sequenced, and were found to be negative for functional sequence variants. PMID:16261342

  2. Pathological Propagation through Cell-to-Cell Transmission of Non-Prion Protein Aggregates in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Desplats, Paula; Sigurdson, Christina; Tsigelny, Igor; Masliah, Eliezer

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, fronto-temporal dementia, Huntington's Disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) are characterized by progressive accumulation of protein aggregates in selected brain regions. Protein misfolding and templated assembly into aggregates might result from an imbalance between protein synthesis, aggregation and clearance. While protein misfolding and aggregation occur in most neurodegenerative disorders, the concept of spreading and infectivity of aggregates in the CNS has been reserved to prion diseases such as CJD and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Emerging evidence suggests that prion-like spreading may occur in other neurodegenerative disorders, taking place with secreted proteins, such as amyloid-β,) and cytosolic proteins, such as tau, huntingtin and α-synuclein. Underlying molecular mechanisms and therapeutic implications are discussed. PMID:21045796

  3. Molecular genetic investigations of histone deacetylase inhibitors as potential neurotherapeutics for autosomal recessive proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)

    OpenAIRE

    Brichta, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common neuromuscular disorder causing infant death in 50 percent of all patients. Homozygous absence of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1) is the primary cause of SMA, while SMA severity is mainly determined by the number of SMN2 copies. One SMN2 copy produces only about 10 percent of full-length (FL) protein identical to SMN1, whereas the majority of SMN2 transcripts are aberrantly spliced due to a silent mutation within an exonic splicing enhan...

  4. Cancer and neurodegenerative disorders: pathogenic convergence through microRNA regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liqin Du; Alexander Pertsemlidis

    2011-01-01

    Although cancer and neurodegenerative disease are two distinct pathological disorders, emerging evidence indicates that these two types of disease share common mechanisms of genetic and molecular abnormalities. Recent studies show that individual microRNAs (miRNAs) could be involved in the pathology of both diseases, indicating that the mechanisms of these two seemingly dichotomous diseases converge in the dysregulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Given the increasing evidence showing that miRNA-based therapeutic strategies that modulate the activity of one or more miRNAs are potentially effective for a wide range of pathological conditions, the involvement of miRNAs in the common pathways of leading both diseases suggests a bright future for developing common therapeutic approaches for both diseases. Moreover, the miRNAs that are dysregulated in both diseases may hold promise as uniquely informative diagnostic markers. Here, we review recent studies on the miRNAs that have been implicated in both cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Homozygous mutation of VPS16 gene is responsible for an autosomal recessive adolescent-onset primary dystonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiaodong; Chen, Xin; Wu, Song; Liu, Wenlan; Zhang, Xiejun; Zhang, Doudou; He, Sijie; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Mali; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Zongyang; Luo, Kun; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological movement disorder that is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Herein, we report the identification a novel homozygous missense mutation, c.156 C > A in VPS16, co-segregating with disease status in a Chinese consanguineous family with adolescent-onset primary dystonia by whole exome sequencing and homozygosity mapping. To assess the biological role of c.156 C > A homozygous mutation of VPS16, we generated mice with targeted mutation site of Vps16 through CRISPR-Cas9 genome-editing approach. Vps16 c.156 C > A homozygous mutant mice exhibited significantly impaired motor function, suggesting that VPS16 is a new causative gene for adolescent-onset primary dystonia. PMID:27174565

  6. Biallelic Mutations in GNB3 Cause a Unique Form of Autosomal-Recessive Congenital Stationary Night Blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ajoy; Audo, Isabelle; Tavares, Erika; Maynes, Jason T; Tumber, Anupreet; Wright, Thomas; Li, Shuning; Michiels, Christelle; Condroyer, Christel; MacDonald, Heather; Verdet, Robert; Sahel, José-Alain; Hamel, Christian P; Zeitz, Christina; Héon, Elise

    2016-05-01

    Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is a heterogeneous group of non-progressive inherited retinal disorders with characteristic electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities. Riggs and Schubert-Bornschein are subtypes of CSNB and demonstrate distinct ERG features. Riggs CSNB demonstrates selective rod photoreceptor dysfunction and occurs due to mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in rod phototransduction cascade; night blindness is the only symptom and eye examination is otherwise normal. Schubert-Bornschein CSNB is a consequence of impaired signal transmission between the photoreceptors and bipolar cells. Schubert-Bornschein CSNB is subdivided into complete CSNB with an ON bipolar signaling defect and incomplete CSNB with both ON and OFF pathway involvement. Both subtypes are associated with variable degrees of night blindness or photophobia, reduced visual acuity, high myopia, and nystagmus. Whole-exome sequencing of a family screened negative for mutations in genes associated with CSNB identified biallelic mutations in the guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-3 gene (GNB3). Two siblings were compound heterozygous for a deletion (c.170_172delAGA [p.Lys57del]) and a nonsense mutation (c.1017G>A [p.Trp339(∗)]). The maternal aunt was homozygous for the nonsense mutation (c.1017G>A [p.Trp339(∗)]). Mutational analysis of GNB3 in a cohort of 58 subjects with CSNB identified a sporadic case individual with a homozygous GNB3 mutation (c.200C>T [p.Ser67Phe]). GNB3 encodes the β subunit of G protein heterotrimer (Gαβγ) and is known to modulate ON bipolar cell signaling and cone transducin function in mice. Affected human subjects showed an unusual CSNB phenotype with variable degrees of ON bipolar dysfunction and reduced cone sensitivity. This unique retinal disorder with dual anomaly in visual processing expands our knowledge about retinal signaling. PMID:27063057

  7. In Vivo Profiling Reveals a Competent Heat Shock Response in Adult Neurons: Implications for Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisia Carnemolla

    Full Text Available The heat shock response (HSR is the main pathway used by cells to counteract proteotoxicity. The inability of differentiated neurons to induce an HSR has been documented in primary neuronal cultures and has been proposed to play a critical role in ageing and neurodegeneration. However, this accepted dogma has not been demonstrated in vivo. We used BAC transgenic mice generated by the Gene Expression Nervous System Atlas project to investigate the capacity of striatal medium sized spiny neurons to induce an HSR as compared to that of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. We found that all cell populations were competent to induce an HSR upon HSP90 inhibition. We also show the presence and relative abundance of heat shock-related genes and proteins in these striatal cell populations. The identification of a competent HSR in adult neurons supports the development of therapeutics that target the HSR pathway as treatments for neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Adult Bone Marrow: Which Stem Cells for Cellular Therapy Protocols in Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Wislet-Gendebien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crests (NCSCs might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. In this paper, we will review all information available concerning NCSC from adult tissues and their possible use in regenerative medicine. Moreover, as multiple recent studies showed the beneficial effect of bone marrow stromal cells in neurodegenerative diseases, we will discuss which stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow should be more suitable for cell replacement therapy.

  9. Adult bone marrow: which stem cells for cellular therapy protocols in neurodegenerative disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine; Laudet, Emerence; Neirinckx, Virginie; Rogister, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crests (NCSCs) might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this paper, we will review all information available concerning NCSC from adult tissues and their possible use in regenerative medicine. Moreover, as multiple recent studies showed the beneficial effect of bone marrow stromal cells in neurodegenerative diseases, we will discuss which stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow should be more suitable for cell replacement therapy. PMID:22319243

  10. [Signaling molecules in the brain and epigenetic factors in neurodegenerative and mental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomazkov, O A

    2015-01-01

    The literature on a role of signaling molecules in the organization of memory and cognitive functions is analyzed basing on mechanisms of memory physiology determined by a complex of biochemical processes initiated by the transmission of the signal to the synapse and completed by the synthesis of functionally significant molecules in the neuronal genetic apparatus. The center of these processes is a coordinated system of signal transduction, transcription, epigenetic and neurotrophic molecules. The dissonance of signal mechanisms is a prime cause of memory impairment and cognitive dysfunction as social maladaptation factors. The results of experimental and clinical studies of a role of the multilevel signaling system in age-related, neurodegenerative (Alzheimer’s disease) and mental (depression) disorders are discussed. At the same time, signaling molecules may be considered as particular targets for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26649375

  11. Tool use disorders in neurodegenerative diseases: Roles of semantic memory and technical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumard, Josselin; Lesourd, Mathieu; Jarry, Christophe; Merck, Catherine; Etcharry-Bouyx, Frédérique; Chauviré, Valérie; Belliard, Serge; Moreaud, Olivier; Croisile, Bernard; Osiurak, François; Le Gall, Didier

    2016-09-01

    In the field of apraxia, it has been suggested that the ability to use tools and objects in daily life depends not only on semantic knowledge about tool function and context of use but also on technical reasoning about mechanical properties of tools and objects. The aim of the present work was to assess tool use abilities regarding these hypotheses in patients with neurodegenerative diseases and reduced autonomy. Performance of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n = 31), semantic dementia (SD) (n = 16) and corticobasal syndrome (CBS) (n = 7) was compared to that of healthy control participants (n = 31) in familiar tool use tasks, functional/contextual associations and mechanical problem solving (MPS). A conversion method was applied to data in order to avoid ceiling effects. Tool use disorders were found in all patient groups but the underlying reasons were different. Patients with SD had difficulties in imagining and selecting familiar tools due to the semantic loss but they performed in normal range in MPS tasks. Interestingly, they performed better with only one tool and its corresponding object, which is interpreted as a partial compensation of semantic loss by spared technical reasoning. Patients with CBS exhibited the reverse pattern, that is, MPS deficits without semantic loss. However, additional qualitative research is needed to disentangle the relative contributions of motor and technical reasoning deficits to this pattern. Both of these profiles were found in patients with AD. For all that, these patients did not commit the same errors as stroke patients with left brain-damage documented in previous works. Several hypotheses are proposed to account for the specificity of tool use disorders in neurodegenerative diseases, and recommendations are provided to caregivers. PMID:27376932

  12. A novel mutation in the sterol 27-hydroxylase gene of a woman with autosomal recessive cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garuti Rita

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Article abstract Mutations of the gene encoding the mitochondrial enzyme sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1 gene cause defects in the cholesterol pathway to bile acids that lead to the storage of cholestanol and cholesterol in tendons, lenses and the central nervous system. This disorder is the cause of a clinical syndrome known as cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX. Since 1991 several mutations of the CYP27A1 gene have been reported. We diagnosed the clinical features of CTX in a caucasian woman. Serum levels of cholestanol and 7α-hydroxycholesterol were elevated and the concentration of 27-hydroxycholesterol was reduced. Bile alcohols in the urine and faeces were increased. The analysis of the CYP27A1 gene showed that the patient was a compound heterozygote carrying two mutations both located in exon 8. One mutation is a novel four nucleotide deletion (c.1330-1333delTTCC that results in a frameshift and the occurrence of a premature stop codon leading to the formation of a truncated protein of 448 amino acids. The other mutation, previously reported, is a C - > T transition (c. c.1381C > T that converts the glutamine codon at position 461 into a termination codon (p.Q461X. These truncated proteins are expected to have no biological function being devoid of the cysteine residue at position 476 of the normal enzyme that is crucial for heme binding and enzyme activity.

  13. Next-generation sequencing confirms the implication of SLC24A1 in autosomal-recessive congenital stationary night blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuillé, M; Malaichamy, S; Vadalà, M; Michiels, C; Condroyer, C; Sachidanandam, R; Srilekha, S; Arokiasamy, T; Letexier, M; Démontant, V; Sahel, J-A; Sen, P; Audo, I; Soumittra, N; Zeitz, C

    2016-06-01

    Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous retinal disorder which represents rod photoreceptor dysfunction or signal transmission defect from photoreceptors to adjacent bipolar cells. Patients displaying photoreceptor dysfunction show a Riggs-electroretinogram (ERG) while patients with a signal transmission defect show a Schubert-Bornschein ERG. The latter group is subdivided into complete or incomplete (ic) CSNB. Only few CSNB cases with Riggs-ERG and only one family with a disease-causing variant in SLC24A1 have been reported. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) in a previously diagnosed icCSNB patient identified a homozygous nonsense variant in SLC24A1. Indeed, re-investigation of the clinical data corrected the diagnosis to Riggs-form of CSNB. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) identified compound heterozygous deletions and a homozygous missense variant in SLC24A1 in two other patients, respectively. ERG abnormalities varied in these three cases but all patients had normal visual acuity, no myopia or nystagmus, unlike in Schubert-Bornschein-type of CSNB. This confirms that SLC24A1 defects lead to CSNB and outlines phenotype/genotype correlations in CSNB subtypes. In case of unclear clinical characteristics, NGS techniques are helpful to clarify the diagnosis. PMID:26822852

  14. Posterior spinal instrumented fusion for idiopathic scoliosis in patients with multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, K W; Chan, C Yw; Chiu, C K; Bin Hasan, M S; Kwan, M K

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke (MELAS) syndrome is a progressive multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder. MELAS syndrome impairs oxidative phosphorylation and predisposes patients to lactic acidosis, particularly under metabolic stress. We report 2 siblings with MELAS-associated idiopathic scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal instrumented fusion with measures taken to minimise anaesthetic and surgical stress, blood loss, and operating time. PMID:27574278

  15. Mitochondria, metabolic disturbances, oxidative stress and the kynurenine system, with focus on neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sas, Katalin; Robotka, Hermina; Toldi, József; Vécsei, László

    2007-06-15

    The mitochondria have several important functions in the cell. A mitochondrial dysfunction causes an abatement in ATP production, oxidative damage and the induction of apoptosis, all of which are involved in the pathogenesis of numerous disorders. This review focuses on mitochondrial dysfunctions and discusses their consequences and potential roles in the pathomechanism of neurodegenerative disorders. Other pathogenetic factors are also briefly surveyed. The second part of the review deals with the kynurenine metabolic pathway, its alterations and their potential association with cellular energy impairment in certain neurodegenerative diseases. During energy production, most of the O(2) consumed by the mitochondria is reduced fully to water, but 1-2% of the O(2) is reduced incompletely to give the superoxide anion (O(2)(-)). If the function of one or more respiratory chain complexes is impaired for any reason, the enhanced production of free radicals further worsens the mitochondrial function by causing oxidative damage to macromolecules, and by opening the mitochondrial permeability transition pores thereby inducing apoptosis. These high-conductance pores offer a pathway which can open in response to certain stimuli, leading to the induction of the cells' own suicide program. This program plays an essential role in regulating growth and development, in the differentiation of immune cells, and in the elimination of abnormal cells from the organism. Both failure and exaggeration of apoptosis in a human body can lead to disease. The increasing amount of superoxide anions can react with nitric oxide to yield the highly toxic peroxynitrite anion, which can destroy cellular macromolecules. The roles of oxidative, nitrative and nitrosative damage are discussed. Senescence is accompanied by a higher degree of reactive oxygen species production, and by diminished functions of the endoplasmic reticulum and the proteasome system, which are responsible for maintenance of the

  16. Pharmacological Alternatives for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders: Wasp and Bee Venoms and Their Components as New Neuroactive Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are relentlessly progressive, severely impacting affected patients, families and society as a whole. Increased life expectancy has made these diseases more common worldwide. Unfortunately, available drugs have insufficient therapeutic effects on many subtypes of these intractable diseases, and adverse effects hamper continued treatment. Wasp and bee venoms and their components are potential means of managing or reducing these effects and provide new alternatives for the control of neurodegenerative diseases. These venoms and their components are well-known and irrefutable sources of neuroprotectors or neuromodulators. In this respect, the present study reviews our current understanding of the mechanisms of action and future prospects regarding the use of new drugs derived from wasp and bee venom in the treatment of major neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, Epilepsy, Multiple Sclerosis and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

  17. Pharmacological Alternatives for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders: Wasp and Bee Venoms and Their Components as New Neuroactive Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Juliana; Monge-Fuentes, Victoria; Gomes, Flávia; Lopes, Kamila; dos Anjos, Lilian; Campos, Gabriel; Arenas, Claudia; Biolchi, Andréia; Gonçalves, Jacqueline; Galante, Priscilla; Campos, Leandro; Mortari, Márcia

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are relentlessly progressive, severely impacting affected patients, families and society as a whole. Increased life expectancy has made these diseases more common worldwide. Unfortunately, available drugs have insufficient therapeutic effects on many subtypes of these intractable diseases, and adverse effects hamper continued treatment. Wasp and bee venoms and their components are potential means of managing or reducing these effects and provide new alternatives for the control of neurodegenerative diseases. These venoms and their components are well-known and irrefutable sources of neuroprotectors or neuromodulators. In this respect, the present study reviews our current understanding of the mechanisms of action and future prospects regarding the use of new drugs derived from wasp and bee venom in the treatment of major neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, Epilepsy, Multiple Sclerosis and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. PMID:26295258

  18. Old Things New View: Ascorbic Acid Protects the Brain in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Covarrubias-Pinto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ascorbic acid is a key antioxidant of the Central Nervous System (CNS. Under brain activity, ascorbic acid is released from glial reservoirs to the synaptic cleft, where it is taken up by neurons. In neurons, ascorbic acid scavenges reactive oxygen species (ROS generated during synaptic activity and neuronal metabolism where it is then oxidized to dehydroascorbic acid and released into the extracellular space, where it can be recycled by astrocytes. Other intrinsic properties of ascorbic acid, beyond acting as an antioxidant, are important in its role as a key molecule of the CNS. Ascorbic acid can switch neuronal metabolism from glucose consumption to uptake and use of lactate as a metabolic substrate to sustain synaptic activity. Multiple evidence links oxidative stress with neurodegeneration, positioning redox imbalance and ROS as a cause of neurodegeneration. In this review, we focus on ascorbic acid homeostasis, its functions, how it is used by neurons and recycled to ensure antioxidant supply during synaptic activity and how this antioxidant is dysregulated in neurodegenerative disorders.

  19. Cannabinoids in Neurodegenerative Disorders and Stroke/Brain Trauma: From Preclinical Models to Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Moro, María A; Martínez-Orgado, José

    2015-10-01

    Cannabinoids form a singular family of plant-derived compounds (phytocannabinoids), endogenous signaling lipids (endocannabinoids), and synthetic derivatives with multiple biological effects and therapeutic applications in the central and peripheral nervous systems. One of these properties is the regulation of neuronal homeostasis and survival, which is the result of the combination of a myriad of effects addressed to preserve, rescue, repair, and/or replace neurons, and also glial cells against multiple insults that may potentially damage these cells. These effects are facilitated by the location of specific targets for the action of these compounds (e.g., cannabinoid type 1 and 2 receptors, endocannabinoid inactivating enzymes, and nonendocannabinoid targets) in key cellular substrates (e.g., neurons, glial cells, and neural progenitor cells). This potential is promising for acute and chronic neurodegenerative pathological conditions. In this review, we will collect all experimental evidence, mainly obtained at the preclinical level, supporting that different cannabinoid compounds may be neuroprotective in adult and neonatal ischemia, brain trauma, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's chorea, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This increasing experimental evidence demands a prompt clinical validation of cannabinoid-based medicines for the treatment of all these disorders, which, at present, lack efficacious treatments for delaying/arresting disease progression, despite the fact that the few clinical trials conducted so far with these medicines have failed to demonstrate beneficial effects. PMID:26260390

  20. Prevalence and range of GJB2 and SLC26A4 mutations in patients with autosomal recessive non‑syndromic hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hua; Chen, Jia; Shan, Xin-Ji; Li, Ying; He, Jian-Guo; Yang, Bei-Bei

    2014-07-01

    The frequency and distribution of genetic mutations that cause deafness differ significantly according to ethnic group and region. Zhejiang is a province in the southeast of China, with an exceptional racial composition of the population caused by mass migration in ancient China. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and spectrum of gap junction‑β2 (GJB2), solute carrier family 26 (anion exchanger) member 4 (SLC26A4) and GJB3 mutations in patients with autosomal recessive non‑syndromic hearing loss (ARNHL) in this area. A total of 176 unrelated pediatric patients with ARNHL were enrolled in the study. A genomic DNA sample was extracted from the peripheral blood. Polymerase chain reaction was employed, and the products were sequenced to screen for mutations in GJB2. In addition, a SNaPshot sequencing method was utilized to detect four hotspot mutations in SLC26A4 (IVS7‑2A>G and c.2168A>G) and GJB3 (c.538C>T and c.547G>A). All patients were subjected to a temporal bone computed tomography scan to identify enlarged vestibular aqueducts (EVA). In total, 14 different mutations, including two new mutations (p.W44L and p.D66N) of GJB2, were detected. The most common pathogenic mutation of GJB2 was c.235delC (15.1%), followed by c.176_191del16 (1.7%), c.299_300delAT (1.7%), c.508_511dup (0.85%) and c.35delG (0.28%) of the total alleles. Mutation analysis of SLC26A4 demonstrated that 13.6% (24/176) of patients carried at least one mutant allele. The patients with EVA (84.2%) had SLC26A4 mutations, and 31% had homozygous mutations. Only one patient carried a heterozygous mutation of GJB3 (c.538C>T). Compared with the other regions of China, in the present population cohort, the prevalence and spectrum of mutations in GJB2 was unique, and in patients with EVA the frequency of a homozygous mutation in SLC26A4 was significantly lower. These findings may be of benefit in genetic counseling and risk assessment for families from this area of

  1. Neurotransmitter, peptide and cytokine processes in relation to depressive disorder: comorbidity between depression and neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisman, Hymie; Merali, Zul; Hayley, Shawn

    2008-05-01

    Given the array of biological changes induced by stressors, it is not surprising that these experiences may provoke a variety of illnesses. Among others things, stressors promote functional changes of neuropeptide and classical neurotransmitter systems. The peptidergic changes, for instance, include alterations of corticotropin releasing hormone, arginine vasopressin, and bombesin-like peptides at specific brain sites. Similarly some of the neurotransmitter systems influenced by stressors include GABAergic and monoamine functioning. Variations of these processes may limit neurogenesis (and dysregulation of growth factors such as BDNF) and influence cellular viability (through NFkappaB and MAP kinase pathways). As well, stressors activate the inflammatory immune system, notably the release of signaling molecules (cytokines), which may provoke many of the same neuropeptide (and other neurotransmitter) changes. By virtue of their actions on neuronal functioning, inflammatory processes may influence stress-related illness, such as depression, and may be a common denominator for the comorbidity that exists between depression and neurological conditions, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, as well as cardiovascular-related pathology. The present report provides an overview of biological endophenotypes associated with stressors that are thought to be related to major depressive disorder and related comorbid conditions. The view is taken that synergy between stressors and inflammatory factors may promote pathological outcomes through their actions on neuropeptides and several neurotransmitters. As well, stressful events may result in the sensitization of neurochemical and cytokine processes, so that later re-exposure to these stimuli may promote rapid and exaggerated responses that favor illness recurrence. PMID:18346832

  2. The human intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin: molecular characterization and chromosomal mapping of the gene to 10p within the autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia (MGA1) region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozyraki, R; Kristiansen, M; Silahtaroglu, A;

    1998-01-01

    -5445 on the short arm of chromosome 10. This is within the autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia (MGA1) 6-cM region harboring the unknown recessive-gene locus of juvenile megaloblastic anemia caused by intestinal malabsorption of cobalamin (Imerslund-Gräsbeck's disease). In conclusion, the present...... molecular and genetic information on human cubilin now provides circumstantial evidence that an impaired synthesis, processing, or ligand binding of cubilin is the molecular background of this hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia. Udgivelsesdato: 1998-May-15...

  3. The Low-Frequency Oscillation Model of Hallucinations in Neurodegenerative Disorders and in Delirium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz R. Juszczak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG found in dementia with Lewy bodies, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and delirium, is characterized by increased power of delta and theta frequencies with the degree of EEG slowing parallel to the frequency of hallucinations occurrence. According to the proposed model of hallucination, pathological low-frequency oscillations may interfere with information processing in two different ways leading to hallucinations. First, pathological low-frequency oscillations may be a source of signal noise, which is next transformed into emotionally charged signal. The filtering of the signal noise may depend on differences in synaptic weights between networks storing representations of emotionally charged and neutral objects. Initially filtered signal can be next reinforced by attention leading to hallucinations. Second, there is growing body of evidence that theta oscillations in distributed cortical networks participate in mechanism of working memory. Therefore, pathological low-frequency oscillations may interfere with the mechanisms of working memory leading to excessive activation of memory traces and to the intrusion of memories into consciousness. The assumption that neuronal representations of emotionally relevant and neutral objects differ in synaptic strengths is supported by studies showing enhanced memory for emotional stimuli. The model is also supported by experiments showing that perception of feared object is facilitated by stimulus-driven, involuntary and automatic recruitment of attention. Consistently with the model, hallucinations are most often unpleasant and emotionally irrelevant objects are rarely hallucinated in neurodegenerative disorders. Proposed disturbances of visual working memory are consistent with the high incidence of palinopsia (perseveration of previously viewed objects after a certain time in demented patients. The significance of the model for understanding hallucinations that occur in

  4. Inhibitory action of chlorophyllin of autosome recessive lethals induced by irradiation; Accion inhibidora de la clorofilina de letales recesivos autosonicos inducidos por irradiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salceda, V.M.; Pimentel, P.A.E.; Cruces, M.P. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: vmss@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    chlorophyllin on the damage caused by the radiation, it was into accothe presence of lethal and semi lethals autosomal. One observes this way that even without the use of the radiation the semi lethals frequency is diminished when the chlorophyllin is applied, in this case the decrease was significant and although there was decrease in the case of the irradiated group this it was not significant; in the case of the lethal ones it happened the opposite it was not significant in radiation absence on the contrary elevate the frequency of this type of genes, however, before the radiation and with pre-treatment with chlorophyllin this it reduced the frequency of autosomal recessive lethals significantly. This is important because in the case of bound recessive lethals recessive to the sex this doesn't happen. (Author)

  5. MRI assessment of fetal autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease%常染色体隐性遗传性多囊肾病胎儿的MRI表现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董素贞; 朱铭; 钟玉敏; 张弘; 潘慧红

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨MRI对常染色体隐性遗传性多囊肾病(ARPKD)胎儿的诊断价值.方法 回顾性分析2005年7月至2013年12月间产前超声检查提示异常,然后行MR检查,并经引产后尸解或病理证实的ARPKD胎儿16例.MR扫描序列主要采用稳态自由进动(SSFP)序列、单次激发快速自旋回波(SSTSE)序列和快速加权序列T1WI.将产前MRI、超声表现与引产后尸解或病理结果进行对照分析.结果 16例ARPKD患儿均表现为双侧肾脏体积明显增大,SSTSE序列肾髓质弥漫性高信号小囊肿.11例合并羊水过少,11例合并双肺发育不良,6例合并肝纤维化.11例双肺发育不良和6例肝脏轻度纤维化超声均未提示,肾脏病变超声误诊1例,MRI诊断均正确.结论 MRI诊断胎儿ARPKD具有明显优势,不受羊水量的影响,能准确评价肾脏及肺异常.%Objective To explore the value of MRI on fetal autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD).Methods Sixteen pregnant women,aged from 28 to 38 years (average 30 years) and with gestation age from 22 to 36 weeks (average 25 weeks) underwent MR scanning with a 1.5 T MR unit within 24 to 48 hours after ultrasound examinations.The imaging sequences included steady-state free-precession (SSFP) sequence,single-shot turbo spin echo (SSTSE) sequence and T1-weighted fast imaging sequence.Prenatal US and MR imaging findings were compared with autopsy or pathological results.Results A total of 16 cases of ARPKD showed bilateral markedly enlarged kidneys and diffuse high signal small cysts in renal medulla on SSTSE sequence.Among the 16 cases,11 cases were with oligohydramnios,1 1 cases were with pulmonary hypoplasia,and 6 cases were with hepatic fibrosis.Eleven cases of pulmonary hypoplasia and 6 cases of hepatic fibrosis were all missed by US.For the diagnosis of the renal anomalies,US missed one case.MRI diagnosis was correct in all these cases.Conclusions MRI shows great advantages on the diagnosis of fetal ARPKD

  6. Peroxisome Biogenesis Disorders: Biological, Clinical and Pathophysiological Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Nancy E.; D'Agostino, Maria Daniela; MacLean, Gillian E.

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBD) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders in which peroxisome assembly is impaired, leading to multiple peroxisome enzyme deficiencies, complex developmental sequelae and progressive disabilities. Mammalian peroxisome assembly involves the protein products of 16 "PEX" genes;…

  7. Pig Models of Neurodegenerative Disorders: Utilization in Cell Replacement-Based Preclinical Safety and Efficacy Studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležalová, D.; Hruška-Plocháň, M.; Bjarkam, C. R.; Sorensen, J. C. H.; Cunningham, M.; Weingarten, D.; Ciacci, J. D.; Juhás, Štefan; Juhásová, Jana; Motlík, Jan; Hefferan, M. P.; Hazel, T.; Johe, K.; Carromeu, C.; Muotri, A.; Bui, J. D.; Strnádel, J.; Marsala, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 522, č. 12 (2014), s. 2784-2801. ISSN 0021-9967 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA01011466; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : pig * neurodegenerative models * stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.225, year: 2014

  8. Combination Comprising Parthenolide For Use In The Treatment Of Alzheimer's Disease And Other Neurodegenerative Disorders

    KAUST Repository

    Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-06-18

    The present invention generally concerns particular methods and compositions for treatment of a neurodegenerative disease, such as Alzheimer\\'s Disease. In particular embodiments, there is a composition comprising Parthenolide and a second agent, including an inhibitor of TLR4/MD-2/CD14, nAChR agonist, Resatorvid, Curcumin, Tilorone or a Tilorone analog, or a combination thereof.

  9. Redox Proteomics in Selected Neurodegenerative Disorders: From Its Infancy to Future Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Butterfield, D. Allan; Perluigi, Marzia; Reed, Tanea; Muharib, Tasneem; Hughes, Christopher P.; Robinson, Renã A. S.; Sultana, Rukhsana

    2012-01-01

    Several studies demonstrated that oxidative damage is a characteristic feature of many neurodegenerative diseases. The accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins may disrupt cellular functions by affecting protein expression, protein turnover, cell signaling, and induction of apoptosis and necrosis, suggesting that protein oxidation could have both physiological and pathological significance. For nearly two decades, our laboratory focused particular attention on studying oxidative damage o...

  10. Mutations in SLC33A1 cause a lethal autosomal-recessive disorder with congenital cataracts, hearing loss, and low serum copper and ceruloplasmin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huppke, Peter; Brendel, Cornelia; Kalscheuer, Vera;

    2012-01-01

    compound heterozygous mutations for all affected subjects in SLC33A1 encoding a highly conserved acetylCoA transporter (AT-1) required for acetylation of multiple gangliosides and glycoproteins. The mutations were found to cause reduced or absent AT-1 expression and abnormal intracellular localization of...... the protein. We also showed that AT-1 knockdown in HepG2 cells leads to reduced ceruloplasmin secretion, indicating that the low copper in serum is due to reduced ceruloplasmin levels and is not a sign of copper deficiency. The severity of the phenotype implies an essential role of AT-1 in proper...

  11. Changes in mitochondrial function are pivotal in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders: How important is BDNF?

    OpenAIRE

    Markham, A.; Bains, R; Franklin, P; Spedding, M.

    2014-01-01

    The brain is at the very limit of its energy supply and has evolved specific means of adapting function to energy supply, of which mitochondria form a crucial link. Neurotrophic and inflammatory processes may not only have opposite effects on neuroplasticity, but also involve opposite effects on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and glycolytic processes, respectively, modulated by stress and glucocorticoids, which also have marked effects on mood. Neurodegenerative processes show marked...

  12. Yoga as Therapy for Neurodegenerative Disorders: A Case Report of Therapeutic Yoga for Adrenomyeloneuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad, Charlene Marie; Moonaz, Steffany Haaz

    2014-01-01

    Yoga is a promising therapeutic modality for neurodegenerative diseases. This case study presents a therapeutic yoga protocol for adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) and its effect on a patient’s quality of life (QOL), agility, balance, and peripheral dexterity. A 61-y-old man diagnosed with AMN who was experiencing (1) peripheral neuropathy in his legs and feet, (2) lower-back pain (LBP), and (3) osteoarthritis received 60-min weekly therapeutic yoga sessions for a 10-mo period. Yoga therapy include...

  13. Comparative quantitative study of 'signature' pathological lesions in the hippocampus and adjacent gyri of 12 neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Richard A; Cairns, Nigel J

    2015-10-01

    The hippocampus (HC) and adjacent gyri are implicated in dementia in several neurodegenerative disorders. To compare HC pathology among disorders, densities of 'signature' pathological lesions were measured at a standard location in eight brain regions of 12 disorders. Principal components analysis of the data suggested that the disorders could be divided into three groups: (1) Alzheimer's disease (AD), Down's syndrome (DS), sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in which either β-amyloid (Aβ) or prion protein deposits were distributed in all sectors of the HC and adjacent gyri, with high densities being recorded in the parahippocampal gyrus and subiculum; (2) Pick's disease, sporadic frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 immunoreactive inclusions, and neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease in which relatively high densities of neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions were present in the dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells; and (3) Parkinson's disease dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, and multiple system atrophy in which densities of signature lesions were relatively low. Variation in density of signature lesions in DG granule cells and CA1 were the most important sources of neuropathological variation among disorders. Hence, HC and adjacent gyri are differentially affected in dementia reflecting either variation in vulnerability of hippocampal neurons to specific molecular pathologies or in the spread of pathological proteins to the HC. Information regarding the distribution of pathology could ultimately help to explain variations in different cognitive domains, such as memory, observed in various disorders. PMID:25929331

  14. High-speed video gait analysis reveals early and characteristic locomotor phenotypes in mouse models of neurodegenerative movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisig, Daniel F; Kulic, Luka; Krüger, Maik; Wirth, Fabian; McAfoose, Jordan; Späni, Claudia; Gantenbein, Pascal; Derungs, Rebecca; Nitsch, Roger M; Welt, Tobias

    2016-09-15

    Neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system frequently affect the locomotor system resulting in impaired movement and gait. In this study we performed a whole-body high-speed video gait analysis in three different mouse lines of neurodegenerative movement disorders to investigate the motor phenotype. Based on precise computerized motion tracking of all relevant joints and the tail, a custom-developed algorithm generated individual and comprehensive locomotor profiles consisting of 164 spatial and temporal parameters. Gait changes observed in the three models corresponded closely to the classical clinical symptoms described in these disorders: Muscle atrophy due to motor neuron loss in SOD1 G93A transgenic mice led to gait characterized by changes in hind-limb movement and positioning. In contrast, locomotion in huntingtin N171-82Q mice modeling Huntington's disease with basal ganglia damage was defined by hyperkinetic limb movements and rigidity of the trunk. Harlequin mutant mice modeling cerebellar degeneration showed gait instability and extensive changes in limb positioning. Moreover, model specific gait parameters were identified and were shown to be more sensitive than conventional motor tests. Altogether, this technique provides new opportunities to decipher underlying disease mechanisms and test novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27233823

  15. Driving and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Uc, Ergun Y.; Rizzo, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    The proportion of elderly in the general population is rising, resulting in greater numbers of drivers with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). These neurodegenerative disorders impair cognition, visual perception, and motor function, leading to reduced driver fitness and greater crash risk. Yet medical diagnosis or age alone is not reliable enough to predict driver safety or crashes, or revoke the driving privileges of these drivers. Dri...

  16. Microcefalia primária autossômica recessiva em três famílias pernambucanas: aspectos clínicos e moleculares Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly in three families from Pernambuco: clinical and molecular aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela F. Leal

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: descrever os aspectos clínicos de três famílias pernambucanas com microcefalia primária autossômica recessiva e as análises de ligação em uma delas (família 2. MÉTODOS: três famílias consangüíneas pernambucanas, não relacionadas biologicamente, com microcefalia primária, foram estudadas. Os heredogramas e a história clínica dos afetados foram construídos com base em informações obtidas de seus pais e outros parentes. O exame físico foi realizado em todos os afetados, seus genitores e na quase totalidade dos irmãos normais dos afetados. O DNA genômico dos afetados da família 2 e de seus pais foi usado em reações de PCR (polimerase chain reaction com primers elaborados para amplificar marcadores microssatélites ligados aos locos já conhecidos de microcefalia primária autossômica recessiva. Os marcadores amplificados foram submetidos a eletroforese e seus alelos analisados. RESULTADOS: nas três famílias, os afetados apresentavam perímetro cefálico muito reduzido acompanhado de retardo mental e apenas uma paciente (da família 3 manifestava outras alterações neurológicas, mas sem dismorfias associadas. Estudos moleculares demonstraram que a microcefalia, na família 2, não apresentava ligação com nenhum dos locos associados à microcefalia primária autossômica recessiva já conhecidos. CONCLUSÕES: pelo menos mais um gene associado à microcefalia primária autossômica recessiva existe e aguarda identificação.OBJECTIVES: to describe the clinical findings in three families from Pernambuco with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly, and the linkage analysis in one of them (family 2. METHODS: three consanguineous families from Pernambuco, not related one to another and with primary microcephaly, were studied. The genealogical data and the clinical history of the affected individuals were obtained from their parents and other family members. All the affected subjects, almost all their normal

  17. Confirmation of the 2p locus for the mild autosomal recessive lim-girdle muscular dystrophy gene (LGMD2B) in three families allows refinement of the candidate region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashir, R.; Iughetti, P.; Strachan, T. [Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The mild autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a heterogeneous group of muscle diseases. The first gene to be mapped and associated with this phenotype was a locus on 15q geographic isolate. These results have been confirmed in other populations, but it was shown that there is genetic heterogeneity for this form of LGMD. Recently, a second locus has been mapped to chromosome 2p. The confirmation of the mapping of this second locus in LGMD families from different populations is of utmost importance for the positional cloning of this gene (HGMW-approved symbol LGMD2B). In this publication, haplotypes generated from five chromosome 2 markers from all of the known large families linked to chromosome 2p are reported together with the recombinants that show the current most likely location of the LGMD 2B gene. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. 家族性高胆固醇血症亚型--隐性遗传性高胆固醇血症研究进展%The subtype of familial hypercholesterolemia--the progression of autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马斐斐; 王绿娅

    2006-01-01

    家族性高胆固醇血症(familial hypercholesterolemia,FH;MIM 143890)是一种常染色体显性遗传性疾病,是脂质代谢疾病中最严重的一种,导致早期发生较为严重的冠心病(coronary artery disease,CAD).FH存在一些亚型,其中常染色体隐性遗传性高胆固醇血症(autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia,ARH;MIM 603813)纯合患者,可表现为胆固醇水平异常升高、皮肤肌腱黄色瘤和早发的冠心病,临床表现与FH极为相似.

  19. The interplay between iron accumulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation during the execution step of neurodegenerative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MarcoTulioNunez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A growing set of observations points to mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, oxidative damage and chronic inflammation as common pathognomonic signs of a number of neurodegenerative diseases that includes Alzheimer's disease, Huntington disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedrich’s ataxia and Parkinson’s disease. Particularly relevant for neurodegenerative processes is the relationship between mitochondria and iron. The mitochondrion upholds the synthesis of iron-sulfur clusters and heme, the most abundant iron-containing prosthetic groups in a large variety of proteins, so a fraction of incoming iron must go through this organelle before reaching its final destination. In turn, the mitochondrial respiratory chain is the source of reactive oxygen species (ROS derived from leaks in the electron transport chain. The co-existence of both iron and ROS in the secluded space of the mitochondrion makes this organelle particularly prone to hydroxyl radical-mediated damage. In addition, a connection between the loss of iron homeostasis and inflammation is starting to emerge; thus, inflammatory cytokines like TNF-alpha and IL-6 induce the synthesis of the divalent metal transporter 1 and promote iron accumulation in neurons and microglia. Here, we review the recent literature on mitochondrial iron homeostasis and the role of inflammation on mitochondria dysfunction and iron accumulation on the neurodegenerative process that lead to cell death in Parkinson’s disease. We also put forward the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation and inflammation are part of a synergistic self-feeding cycle that ends in apoptotic cell death, once the antioxidant cellular defense systems are finally overwhelmed.

  20. Development and validation of brain and spinal cord vector and cell-delivery techniques in pre-clinical minipig models of neurodegenerative disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Juhás, Štefan; Juhásová, Jana; Klíma, Jiří; Maršala, M.; Maršala, S.; Atsushi, Y.; Johe, K.; Motlík, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 78, Suppl 2 (2015), s. 9-10. ISSN 1210-7859. [Conference on Animal Models for neurodegenerative Diseases /3./. 08.11.2015-10.11.2015, Liblice] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14308 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : minipig models of neurodegenerative disorders * brin and spinal cord cell delivery techniques Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  1. Sleep in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranzo, Alex

    2016-03-01

    Disorders of sleep are an integral part of neurodegenerative diseases and include insomnia, sleep-wake cycle disruption, excessive daytime sleepiness that may be manifested as persistent somnolence or sudden onset of sleep episodes, obstructive and central sleep apnea, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, and restless legs syndrome. The origin of these sleep disorders is multifactorial including degeneration of the brain areas that modulate sleep, the symptoms of the disease, and the effect of medications. Treatment of sleep disorders in patients with neurodegenerative diseases should be individualized and includes behavioral therapy, sleep hygiene, bright light therapy, melatonin, hypnotics, waking-promoting agents, and continuous positive airway pressure. PMID:26972029

  2. S-Nitrosylation and uncompetitive/fast off-rate (UFO) drug therapy in neurodegenerative disorders of protein misfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T; Lipton, S A

    2007-07-01

    Although activation of glutamate receptors is essential for normal brain function, excessive activity leads to a form of neurotoxicity known as excitotoxicity. Key mediators of excitotoxic damage include overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, resulting in excessive Ca(2+) influx with production of free radicals and other injurious pathways. Overproduction of free radical nitric oxide (NO) contributes to acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. NO can react with cysteine thiol groups to form S-nitrosothiols and thus change protein function. S-nitrosylation can result in neuroprotective or neurodestructive consequences depending on the protein involved. Many neurodegenerative diseases manifest conformational changes in proteins that result in misfolding and aggregation. Our recent studies have linked nitrosative stress to protein misfolding and neuronal cell death. Molecular chaperones - such as protein-disulfide isomerase, glucose-regulated protein 78, and heat-shock proteins - can provide neuroprotection by facilitating proper protein folding. Here, we review the effect of S-nitrosylation on protein function under excitotoxic conditions, and present evidence that NO contributes to degenerative conditions by S-nitrosylating-specific chaperones that would otherwise prevent accumulation of misfolded proteins and neuronal cell death. In contrast, we also review therapeutics that can abrogate excitotoxic damage by preventing excessive NMDA receptor activity, in part via S-nitrosylation of this receptor to curtail excessive activity. PMID:17431424

  3. Lower urinary tract dysfunction in patients with parkinsonism and other neurodegenerative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, Kristian

    LUTS and patient quality of life. Nocturia, incontinence, and urgency as well as poor bladder emptying are the most common symptoms. These symptoms may interact with the core symptoms of the disorders, increasing the risk of incontinence and infection. In rarer neurogenerative disorder LUTS may be...

  4. Low-dose, continuous enzyme replacement therapy ameliorates brain pathology in the neurodegenerative lysosomal disorder mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Barbara; Hassiotis, Sofia; Rozaklis, Tina; Beard, Helen; Trim, Paul J; Snel, Marten F; Hopwood, John J; Hemsley, Kim M

    2016-05-01

    Repeated replacement of sulphamidase via cerebrospinal fluid injection is an effective treatment for pathological changes in the brain in mice and dogs with the lysosomal storage disorder, mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS IIIA). Investigational trials of this approach are underway in children with this condition, however, infusions require attendance at a specialist medical facility. We sought to comprehensively evaluate the effectiveness of sustained-release (osmotic pump-delivered) enzyme replacement therapy in murine MPS IIIA as this method, if applied to humans, would require only subcutaneous administration of enzyme once the pump was installed. Six-week-old MPS IIIA and unaffected mice were implanted with subcutaneous mini-osmotic pumps connected to an infusion cannula directed at the right lateral ventricle. Either recombinant human sulphamidase or vehicle were infused over the course of 7 weeks, with pumps replaced part-way through the experimental period. We observed near-normalisation of primarily stored substrate (heparan sulphate) in both hemispheres of the MPS IIIA brain and cervical spinal cord, as determined using tandem mass spectrometry. Immunohistochemistry indicated a reduction in secondarily stored GM 3 ganglioside and neuroinflammatory markers. A bias towards the infusion side was seen in some, but not all outcomes. The recombinant enzyme appears stable under pump-like conditions for at least 1 month. Given that infusion pumps are in clinical use in other nervous system disorders, e.g. for treatment of spasticity or brain tumours, this treatment method warrants consideration for testing in large animal models of MPS IIIA and other lysosomal storage disorders that affect the brain. Clinical trials of repeated injection of replacement enzyme into CSF are underway in patients with the inherited neurodegenerative disorder mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA. In this pre-clinical study, we examined an alternative approach - slow, continual

  5. Clinical spectrum of early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes: an autosomal recessive ataxia not to be missed Espectro clínico da ataxia cerebelar de início precoce com reflexos mantidos: uma ataxia autossômica recessiva para não ser esquecida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Pedroso

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias are a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders. In 1981, a neurological entity comprised by early onset progressive cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, pyramidal weakness of the limbs and retained or increased upper limb reflexes and knee jerks was described. This disorder is known as early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes. In this article, we aimed to call attention for the diagnosis of early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes as the second most common cause of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias, after Friedreich ataxia, and also to perform a clinical spectrum study of this syndrome. In this data, 12 patients from different families met all clinical features for early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes. Dysarthria and cerebellar atrophy were the most common features in our sample. It is uncertain, however, whether early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes is a homogeneous disease or a group of phenotypically similar syndromes represented by different genetic entities. Further molecular studies are required to provide definitive answers to the questions that remain regarding early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes.As ataxias cerebelares autossômicas recessivas são um grupo heterogêneo de doenças neurológicas. Em 1981, foi descrita uma entidade neurológica incluindo ataxia cerebelar progressiva de início precoce, disartria, liberação piramidal e manutenção ou aumento dos reflexos tendíneos nos membros superiores e inferiores. Essa síndrome é conhecida como ataxia cerebelar de início precoce com reflexos mantidos. Neste artigo, o objetivo foi chamar a atenção para o diagnóstico de ataxia cerebelar de início precoce com reflexos mantidos como a segunda causa mais comum de ataxia cerebelar autossômica recessiva, após a ataxia de Friedreich, e também realizar um estudo do espectro cl

  6. CNTNAP2 and NRXN1 are mutated in autosomal-recessive Pitt-Hopkins-like mental retardation and determine the level of a common synaptic protein in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zweier, Christiane; de Jong, Eiko K; Zweier, Markus;

    2009-01-01

    Heterozygous copy-number variants and SNPs of CNTNAP2 and NRXN1, two distantly related members of the neurexin superfamily, have been repeatedly associated with a wide spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as developmental language disorders, autism spectrum disorders, epilepsy, and...... neuropsychiatric disorders and to severe MR as reported here, evidence for a synaptic role of the CNTNAP2-encoded protein CASPR2 has so far been lacking. Using Drosophila as a model, we now show that, as known for fly Nrx-I, the CASPR2 ortholog Nrx-IV might also localize to synapses. Overexpression of either...

  7. Application of PIXE in medical study. Environmental minerals and neurodegenerative disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, S. [Department of Neurology, Wakayama Medical College, Wakayama (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Comparative study on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and parkinsonism-dementia (PDC) in the Kii Peninsula of Japan and Guam was conducted to evaluate the participatory role of environmental minerals in the pathogenesis of the above neurodegenerative diseases, using particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) spectrometry and morphometric-statistical analysis. A significantly high content of Al in the hippocampus and spinal cord or Kii and Guamanian ALS/PD cases was found with a positive correlation for Fe and Cu, and a negative correlation for Zn. The numbers of hippocampal neurons in Guamanian PDC, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease were significantly decreased with a high Al content. Al content significantly and positively correlated with the number of Alzheimer's neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the hippocampus of ALS cases and controls in both foci, especially in Guamanian cases. The slope of best linear regression of Guamanian cases was markedly steeper than that of Japanese cases (p < 0,001), Morin staining for Al showed green fluorescence on the nucleolus, cytoplasm, and NFT in the hippocampus of Kii ALS cases. These findings suggest that Guamanian and Kii people have a predisposition to develop ALS/PDC precipitated by their geological/geochemical environmental status, i.e., a prolonged low intake or Ca and Mg together with excess exposure to Al and other environmental minerals. (author)

  8. Changes in the mitochondrial antioxidant systems in neurodegenerative diseases and acute brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszkiewicz, Joanna; Albrecht, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative and nitrosative stress (ONS) contributes to the pathogenesis of most brain maladies, and the magnitude of ONS is related to the ability of cellular antioxidants to neutralize the accumulating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). While the major ROS/RNS scavengers and regenerators of bio-oxidized molecules, superoxide dysmutases (SODs), glutathione (GSH), thioredoxin (Trx) and peroxiredoxin (Prx), are distributed in all cellular compartments. This review specifically focuses on the role of the systems operating in mitochondria. There is a growing consensus that the mitochondrial SOD isoform - SOD2 and GSH are critical for the cellular antioxidant defense. Variable changes of the expression or activities of one or more of the mitochondrial antioxidant systems have been documented in the brains derived from human patients and/or in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease), cerebral ischemia, toxic brain cell damage associated with overexposure to mercury or excitotoxins, or hepatic encephalopathy. In many cases, ambiguity of the responses of the different antioxidant systems in one and the same disease needs to be more conclusively evaluated before the balance of the changes is viewed as beneficial or detrimental. Modulation of the mitochondrial antioxidant systems may in the future become a target of antioxidant therapy. PMID:25576182

  9. Optogenetics for neurodegenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann, Kiara T; Xiong, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are devastating conditions that lead to progressive degeneration of neurons. Neurodegeneration may result in ataxia, dementia, and muscle atrophies, etc. Despite enormous research efforts that have been made, there is lack of effective therapeutic interventions for most of these diseases. Optogenetics is a recently developed novel technique that combines optics and genetics to modulate the activity of specific neurons. Optogenetics has been implemented in various studies including neuropsychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on the recent advance in using this technique for the studies of common neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27186317

  10. Inflammatory events at blood–brain barrier in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders: Implications for clinical disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Helga E.; Kooij, Gijs; Frenkel, Dan; Georgopoulos, Spiros; Monsonego, Alon; Janigro, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Summary Proper function of the neurovasculature is required for optimal brain function and preventing neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Within this review, we discuss alterations of the function of the blood–brain barrier in neurologic disorders such as multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, and Alzheimer’s disease and address potential underlying mechanisms. PMID:23134495

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells-based therapy as a potential treatment in neurodegenerative disorders: is the escape from senescence an answer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Castorina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is the most prominent risk factor contributing to the development of neurodegenerative disorders. In the United States, over 35 million of elderly people suffer from age-related diseases. Aging impairs the self-repair ability of neuronal cells, which undergo progressive deterioration.Once initiated, this process hampers the already limited regenerative power of the central nervous system, making the search for new therapeutic strategies particularly difficult in elderly affected patients. So far, mesenchymal stem cells have proven to be a viable option to ameliorate certain aspects of neurodegeneration, as they possess high proliferative rate and differentiate in vitro into multiple lineages. However, accumulating data have demonstrated that during long-term culture, mesenchymal stem cells undergo spontaneous transformation. Transformed mesenchymal stem cells show typical features of senescence, including the progressive shortening of telomers, which results in cell loss and, as a consequence, hampered regenerative potential. These evidences, in line with those observed in mesenchymal stem cells isolated from old donors, suggest that senescence may represent a limit to mesenchymal stem cells exploitation in therapy, prompting scholars to either find alternative sources of pluripotent cells or to arrest the age-related transformation. In the present review, we summarize findings from recent literature, and critically discuss some of the major hurdles encountered in the search of appropriate sources of mesenchymal stem cells, as well as benefits arising from their use in neurodegenerative diseases. Finally, we provide some insights that may aid in the development of strategies to arrest or, at least, delay the aging of mesenchymal stem cells to improve their therapeutic potential.

  12. Adult Bone Marrow: Which Stem Cells for Cellular Therapy Protocols in Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    OpenAIRE

    Sabine Wislet-Gendebien; Emerence Laudet; Virginie Neirinckx; Bernard Rogister

    2012-01-01

    The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crests (NCSCs) might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In th...

  13. Beyond the Cherry-Red Spot: Ocular Manifestations of Sphingolipid-mediated Neurodegenerative and Inflammatory Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Hui; Chan, Annie Y.; Stone, Donald U.; Nawajes A Mandal

    2013-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a ubiquitous membrane lipid present in every cell and found most abundantly in neural tissues. Disorders such as Tay Sachs or Niemann Pick disease are the most familiar examples of dysfunction in sphingolipid metabolism and are typically associated with neurodegeneration and ocular findings such as blindness. More recently, the role of bioactive sphingolipids has been established in a multitude of cellular events, including cell survival, growth, senescence and apoptosis, in...

  14. Does PGC1α/FNDC5/BDNF Elicit the Beneficial Effects of Exercise on Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodeiri Farshbaf, Mohammad; Ghaedi, Kamran; Megraw, Timothy L; Curtiss, Jennifer; Shirani Faradonbeh, Mahsa; Vaziri, Pooneh; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-03-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases have high prevalence among the elderly. Many strategies have been established to alleviate the symptoms experienced by affected individuals. Recent studies have shown that exercise helps patients with neurological disorders to regain lost physical abilities. PGC1α/FNDC5/BDNF has emerged recently as a critical pathway for neuroprotection. PGC1α is a highly conserved co-activator of transcription factors that preserves and protects neurons against destruction. PGC1α regulates FNDC5 and its processed and secreted peptide Irisin, which has been proposed to play a critical role in energy expenditure and to promote neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells. FNDC5 may also increase the expression of the neurotrophic factor BDNF, a neuroprotective agent, in the hippocampus. BDNF is secreted from hippocampus, amygdala, cerebral cortex and hypothalamus neurons and initiates intracellular signaling pathways through TrkB receptors. These pathways have positive feedback on CREB activities and lead to enhancement in PGC1α expression in neurons. Therefore, FNDC5 could behave as a key regulator in neuronal survival and development. This review presents recent findings on the PGC1α/FNDC5/BDNF pathway and its role in neuroprotection, and discusses the controversial promise of irisin as a mediator of the positive benefits of exercise. PMID:26611102

  15. Beyond the cherry-red spot: Ocular manifestations of sphingolipid-mediated neurodegenerative and inflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Chan, Annie Y; Stone, Donald U; Mandal, Nawajes A

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a ubiquitous membrane lipid present in every cell and found most abundantly in neural tissues. Disorders such as Tay-Sachs or Niemann-Pick disease are the most familiar examples of dysfunction in sphingolipid metabolism and are typically associated with neurodegeneration and ocular findings such as blindness. More recently, the role of bioactive sphingolipids has been established in a multitude of cellular events, including cell survival, growth, senescence and apoptosis, inflammation, and neovascularization. We discuss our current knowledge and understanding of sphingolipid metabolism and signaling in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases. PMID:24011710

  16. GPR179 is required for depolarizing bipolar cell function and is mutated in autosomal-recessive complete congenital stationary night blindness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.S. Peachey (Neal ); T.A. Ray (Thomas A.); R.J. Florijn (Ralph); L.B. Rowe (Lucy ); T. Sjoerdsma (Trijntje); S. Contreras-Alcantara (Susana); K. Baba (Kenkichi); G. Tosini (Gianluca); N. Pozdeyev (Nikita); P.M. Iuvone (P. Michael); P. Bojang Jr. (Pasano); J.N. Pearring (Jillian ); H.J. Simonsz (Huib); M.M. van Genderen (Maria); D.G. Birch (David ); E.I. Traboulsi (Elias); A. Dorfman (Allison); I. Lopez (Irma); H. Ren (Huanan); A.F.X. Goldberg (Andrew ); P.M. Nishina (Patsy); P. Lachapelle (Pierre); M.A. McCall (Maureen ); R.K. Koenekoop (Robert); A.A.B. Bergen (Arthur); M. Kamermans; R.G. Gregg (Ronald)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractComplete congenital stationary night blindness (cCSNB) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of retinal disorders characterized by nonprogressive impairment of night vision, absence of the electroretinogram (ERG) b-wave, and variable degrees of involvement of other visual f

  17. 早发型帕金森病DJ-1基因突变的分析%THE MUTATIONAL ANALYSIS OF DJ-1 GENE IN PATIENTS WITH AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE EARLY-ONSET PARKINSON'S DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁志刚; 罗曙光; 窦霄云; 华荣; 谭建强; 胡启平; 马军; 方玲; 舒伟

    2009-01-01

    目的:分析广西地区早发型帕金森病(Parkinsion's disease,PD)患者及常染色体隐性遗传早发型帕金森病(autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinsion's disease,AREP)家系患者DJ-1基因外显子的突变特点,探讨DJ-1基因外显子的突变与广西地区PD关系.方法:应用聚合酶链式反应(PCR)、单链构象多态性(SSCP)及DNA测序等技术查找DJ-1基因缺失突变及点突变.结果:45例早发型散发性PD患者和12例分别来自5个常染色体隐性遗传早发型PD家系的DJ-1基因的2~7号外显子全部被成功扩增,未见大片段缺失.产物经SSCP方法和测序检测,未见点突变与缺失突变.结论:DJ-1基因的突变不是广西地区早发型PD患者的发病的危险因素.

  18. Exome sequencing identifies a founder frameshift mutation in an alternative exon of USH1C as the cause of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa with late-onset hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Khateb

    Full Text Available We used a combined approach of homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing (WES to search for the genetic cause of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP in families of Yemenite Jewish origin. Homozygosity mapping of two arRP Yemenite Jewish families revealed a few homozygous regions. A subsequent WES analysis of the two index cases revealed a shared homozygous novel nucleotide deletion (c.1220delG leading to a frameshift (p.Gly407Glufs*56 in an alternative exon (#15 of USH1C. Screening of additional Yemenite Jewish patients revealed a total of 16 homozygous RP patients (with a carrier frequency of 0.008 in controls. Funduscopic and electroretinography findings were within the spectrum of typical RP. While other USH1C mutations usually cause Usher type I (including RP, vestibular dysfunction and congenital deafness, audiometric screening of 10 patients who are homozygous for c.1220delG revealed that patients under 40 years of age had normal hearing while older patients showed mild to severe high tone sensorineural hearing loss. This is the first report of a mutation in a known USH1 gene that causes late onset rather than congenital sensorineural hearing loss. The c.1220delG mutation of USH1C accounts for 23% of RP among Yemenite Jewish patients in our cohort.

  19. TrkB Receptor Signalling: Implications in Neurodegenerative, Psychiatric and Proliferative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart L. Graham

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Trk family of receptors play a wide variety of roles in physiological and disease processes in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues. Amongst these the TrkB receptor in particular has attracted major attention due to its critical role in signalling for brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, neurotrophin-3 (NT3 and neurotrophin-4 (NT4. TrkB signalling is indispensable for the survival, development and synaptic plasticity of several subtypes of neurons in the nervous system. Substantial evidence has emerged over the last decade about the involvement of aberrant TrkB signalling and its compromise in various neuropsychiatric and degenerative conditions. Unusual changes in TrkB signalling pathway have also been observed and implicated in a range of cancers. Variations in TrkB pathway have been observed in obesity and hyperphagia related disorders as well. Both BDNF and TrkB have been shown to play critical roles in the survival of retinal ganglion cells in the retina. The ability to specifically modulate TrkB signalling can be critical in various pathological scenarios associated with this pathway. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying TrkB signalling, disease implications and explore plausible ameliorative or preventive approaches.

  20. Up-regulation of neurotrophic factors by cinnamon and its metabolite sodium benzoate: therapeutic implications for neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Arundhati; Modi, Khushbu K; Roy, Avik; Anderson, John A; van Breemen, Richard B; Pahan, Kalipada

    2013-06-01

    This study underlines the importance of cinnamon, a widely-used food spice and flavoring material, and its metabolite sodium benzoate (NaB), a widely-used food preservative and a FDA-approved drug against urea cycle disorders in humans, in increasing the levels of neurotrophic factors [e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3)] in the CNS. NaB, but not sodium formate (NaFO), dose-dependently induced the expression of BDNF and NT-3 in primary human neurons and astrocytes. Interestingly, oral administration of ground cinnamon increased the level of NaB in serum and brain and upregulated the levels of these neurotrophic factors in vivo in mouse CNS. Accordingly, oral feeding of NaB, but not NaFO, also increased the level of these neurotrophic factors in vivo in the CNS of mice. NaB induced the activation of protein kinase A (PKA), but not protein kinase C (PKC), and H-89, an inhibitor of PKA, abrogated NaB-induced increase in neurotrophic factors. Furthermore, activation of cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein, but not NF-κB, by NaB, abrogation of NaB-induced expression of neurotrophic factors by siRNA knockdown of CREB and the recruitment of CREB and CREB-binding protein to the BDNF promoter by NaB suggest that NaB exerts its neurotrophic effect through the activation of CREB. Accordingly, cinnamon feeding also increased the activity of PKA and the level of phospho-CREB in vivo in the CNS. These results highlight a novel neutrophic property of cinnamon and its metabolite NaB via PKA - CREB pathway, which may be of benefit for various neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23475543

  1. ATP6V0A2 mutations present in two Mexican Mestizo children with an autosomal recessive cutis laxa syndrome type IIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bahena-Bahena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with ARCL-IIA harbor mutations in ATP6V0A2 that codes for an organelle proton pump. The ARCL-IIA syndrome characteristically presents a combined glycosylation defect affecting N-linked and O-linked glycosylations, differentiating it from other cutis laxa syndromes and classifying it as a Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation (ATP6V0A2-CDG. We studied two Mexican Mestizo patients with a clinical phenotype corresponding to an ARCL-IIA syndrome. Both patients presented abnormal transferrin (N-linked glycosylation but Patient 1 had a normal ApoCIII (O-linked glycosylation profile. Mutational screening of ATP6V0A2 using cDNA and genomic DNA revealed in Patient 1 a previously reported homozygous nonsense mutation c.187C>T (p.R63X associated with a novel clinical finding of a VSD. In Patient 2 we found a homozygous c.2293C>T (p.Q765X mutation that had been previously reported but found that it also altered RNA processing generating a novel transcript not previously identified (r.2176_2293del; p.F726Sfs*10. This is the first report to describe Mestizo patients with molecular diagnosis of ARCL-IIA/ATP6V0A2-CDG and to establish that their mutations are the first to be found in patients from different regions of the world and with different genetic backgrounds.

  2. Inflammatory mediators leading to protein misfolding and uncompetitive/fast off-rate drug therapy for neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Stuart A; Gu, Zezong; Nakamura, Tomohiro

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators, including free radicals such as nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), can contribute to neurodegenerative diseases in part by triggering protein misfolding. In this chapter, we will discuss a newly discovered pathway for this phenomenon and possible novel treatments. Excitotoxicity, defined as overstimulation of glutamate receptors, has been implicated in a final common pathway contributing to neuronal injury and death in a wide range of acute and chronic neurological disorders, ranging from Parkinson's disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease (AD) to stroke and trauma. Excitotoxic cell death is due, at least in part, to excessive activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptors, leading to excessive Ca(2+) influx through the receptor's associated ion channel and subsequent free radical production, including NO and ROS. These free radicals can trigger a variety of injurious pathways, but newly discovered evidence suggests that some proteins are S-nitrosylated (transfer of NO to a critical thiol group), and this reaction can mimic the effect of rare genetic mutations. This posttranslational modification can contribute to protein misfolding, triggering neurodegenerative diseases. One such molecule affected is protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an enzyme responsible for normal protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We found that when PDI is S-nitrosylation (forming SNO-PDI), the function of the enzyme is compromised, leading to misfolded proteins and contributing to neuronal cell injury and loss. Moreover, SNO-PDI occurs at pathological levels in several human diseases, including AD and PD. This discovery thus links protein misfolding to excitotoxicity and free radical formation in a number of neurodegenerative disorders. Another molecule whose S-nitrosylation can lead to abnormal protein accumulation is the E3 ubiquitin ligase, parkin, which

  3. Invited Review: Decoding the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie RNA dysregulation in neurodegenerative disorders: a review of the current state of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, M J; Cooper-Knock, J; Dodd, J E; Stopford, M J; Mihaylov, S R; Kirby, J; Shaw, P J; Hautbergue, G M

    2015-01-01

    Altered RNA metabolism is a key pathophysiological component causing several neurodegenerative diseases. Genetic mutations causing neurodegeneration occur in coding and noncoding regions of seemingly unrelated genes whose products do not always contribute to the gene expression process. Several pathogenic mechanisms may coexist within a single neuronal cell, including RNA/protein toxic gain-of-function and/or protein loss-of-function. Genetic mutations that cause neurodegenerative disorders disrupt healthy gene expression at diverse levels, from chromatin remodelling, transcription, splicing, through to axonal transport and repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation. We address neurodegeneration in repeat expansion disorders [Huntington's disease, spinocerebellar ataxias, C9ORF72-related amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)] and in diseases caused by deletions or point mutations (spinal muscular atrophy, most subtypes of familial ALS). Some neurodegenerative disorders exhibit broad dysregulation of gene expression with the synthesis of hundreds to thousands of abnormal messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules. However, the number and identity of aberrant mRNAs that are translated into proteins – and how these lead to neurodegeneration – remain unknown. The field of RNA biology research faces the challenge of identifying pathophysiological events of dysregulated gene expression. In conclusion, we discuss current research limitations and future directions to improve our characterization of pathological mechanisms that trigger disease onset and progression. PMID:25319671

  4. Glutamate and Neurodegenerative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Eric; Duplantier, Allen

    As the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, glutamate is critically involved in most aspects of CNS function. Given this critical role, it is not surprising that glutamatergic dysfunction is associated with many CNS disorders. In this chapter, we review the literature that links aberrant glutamate neurotransmission with CNS pathology, with a focus on neurodegenerative diseases. The biology and pharmacology of the various glutamate receptor families are discussed, along with data which links these receptors with neurodegenerative conditions. In addition, we review progress that has been made in developing small molecule modulators of glutamate receptors and transporters, and describe how these compounds have helped us understand the complex pharmacology of glutamate in normal CNS function, as well as their potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Familial megacalyces with autosomal recessive inheritance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three children with bilateral congenital megacalyces from a consanguinous marriage are reported. No renal abnormality was detected in the parents. Our observation supports the genetic nature of the disease. The ultrasonographic features of congenital megacalyces are described. (orig.)

  6. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive congenital methemoglobinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In type II, growth is often slowed. Abnormal facial muscle movements can interfere with swallowing, which can lead ... recessive congenital methemoglobinemia type I typically reduce enzyme activity or stability. As a result, the enzyme cannot ...

  7. Disorders of GABA metabolism: SSADH and GABA-transaminase deficiencies

    OpenAIRE

    Parviz, Mahsa; Vogel, Kara; Gibson, K Michael; Pearl, Phillip L.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical disorders known to affect inherited gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) metabolism are autosomal recessively inherited succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase and GABA-transaminase deficiency. The clinical presentation of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency includes intellectual disability, ataxia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and epilepsy with a nonprogressive course in typical cases, although a progressive form in early childhood as well as deterioration in adulthood with worse...

  8. Consanguinity and genetic disorders: Profile from Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With 20-30% of all marriages occurring between first cousins, increasing attention in Jordan is now given to role of consanguinity in the occurrence of genetic diseases. The objective of this study is to define the specific categories of genetic disorders associated with consanguineous marriages. Etiological categories and consanguinity rates were studied among 623 families with genetic syndromes, congenital anomalies or mental retardation, or both, seen at the National Center for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Genetics for the period August 2002 to August 2006. Comparisons were made for first cousin marriage rates in the study group and that for the general population. First cousin marriages constituted 69%, 22% and 41.7% of marriages among families with autosomal recessive conditions (group 1), dominant, X-linked and chromosomal conditions (group 2) and sporadic undiagnosed conditions (group 3) respectively. The differences in the rates of the first cousin matings were highly significant when comparing known figures in the general population with group 1 and 3, but not significant with group 2. Two messages to the public and health care personnel regarding consanguinity can be derived from this study. The first message is that among genetic disorders, only autosomal recessive disorders are strongly associated with consanguinity. The second message is that approximately 30% of sporadic undiagnosed cases of mental retardation, congenital anomalies and dimorphism may have an autosomal recessive etiology with risks of recurrence in future pregnancies. (author)

  9. Cellular stress response: a novel target for chemoprevention and nutritional neuroprotection in aging, neurodegenerative disorders and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Vittorio; Cornelius, Carolin; Mancuso, Cesare; Pennisi, Giovanni; Calafato, Stella; Bellia, Francesco; Bates, Timothy E; Giuffrida Stella, Anna Maria; Schapira, Tony; Dinkova Kostova, Albena T; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2008-12-01

    curcumin, acetyl-L-carnitine and carnosine have been demonstrated through the activation of these redox-sensitive intracellular pathways. Although the notion that stress proteins are neuroprotective is broadly accepted, still much work needs to be done in order to associate neuroprotection with specific pattern of stress responses. In this review the importance of vitagenes in the cellular stress response and the potential use of dietary antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders is discussed. PMID:18629638

  10. Mutation analysis of genes associated with autosomal recessive in early-onset parkinsonism%常染色体隐性遗传早发性帕金森综合征致病基因的突变分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严新翔; 曹立; 沈璐; 江泓; 赵国华; 唐北沙; 张玉虎; 郭纪锋; 李静; 夏昆; 蔡芳; 潘乾; 龙志高; 陈涛

    2005-01-01

    目的研究常染色体隐性遗传早发性帕金森综合征(autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism,AREP)parkin、PINK1及DJ-1基因的突变.方法应用聚合酶链反应、DNA直接测序和限制性核酸内切酶酶切等技术对15个AREP家系进行parkin、PINK1及DJ-1基因的突变分析.结果在3个家系中发现parkin基因3个杂合突变,分别为202-203delAG和新发现的1069-1074delGTGTCC与T1422C突变.在2个家系中发现2个新的PINK1基因突变,分别为C938T及C1474T.未见DJ-1基因突变.3个PARK2家系平均发病年龄(25.2±5.7)岁,临床上肌张力障碍、姿势不稳、腱反射活跃、症状晨轻暮重常见,对多巴制剂反应好,左旋多巴诱导的运动障碍常见;2个PARK6家系平均发病年龄(25.8±10.0)岁,临床特征与PARK2相似,但未见肌张力障碍、姿势不稳及左旋多巴诱导的运动障碍.结论 parkin、PINK1基因突变是AREP的常见病因;DJ-1在我国AREP中可能罕见;PARK2和PARK6具有相似临床表现,但均具有临床异质性.

  11. Pharmacological Alternatives for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders: Wasp and Bee Venoms and Their Components as New Neuroactive Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana Silva; Victoria Monge-Fuentes; Flávia Gomes; Kamila Lopes; Lilian dos Anjos; Gabriel Campos; Claudia Arenas; Andréia Biolchi; Jacqueline Gonçalves; Priscilla Galante; Leandro Campos; Márcia Mortari

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are relentlessly progressive, severely impacting affected patients, families and society as a whole. Increased life expectancy has made these diseases more common worldwide. Unfortunately, available drugs have insufficient therapeutic effects on many subtypes of these intractable diseases, and adverse effects hamper continued treatment. Wasp and bee venoms and their components are potential means of managing or reducing these effects and provide new alternatives for...

  12. Clinical and molecular features of Joubert syndrome and related disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Parisi, Melissa A.

    2009-01-01

    Joubert syndrome (JBTS; OMIM 213300) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a specific congenital malformation of the hindbrain and a broad spectrum of other phenotypic findings that is now known to be caused by defects in the structure and/or function of the primary cilium. The complex hindbrain malformation that is characteristic of JBTS can be identified on axial magnetic resonance imaging and is known as the molar tooth sign (MTS); other diagnostic criteria include intel...

  13. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Johri, Ashu; Beal, M. Flint

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a large group of disabling disorders of the nervous system, characterized by the relative selective death of neuronal subtypes. In most cases, there is overwhelming evidence of impaired mitochondrial function as a causative factor in these diseases. More recently, evidence has emerged for impaired mitochondrial dynamics (shape, size, fission-fusion, distribution, movement etc.) in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyo...

  14. Molecular Pathology of Rare Bleeding Disorders (RBDs) in India: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Bipin P.; Nair, Sona B.; Vijapurkar, Manasi; Mota, Leenam; Shanbhag, Sharda; Ali, Shehnaz; Shetty, Shrimati D.; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2014-01-01

    Background Though rare in occurrence, patients with rare bleeding disorders (RBDs) are highly heterogeneous and may manifest with severe bleeding diathesis. Due to the high rate of consanguinity in many caste groups, these autosomal recessive bleeding disorders which are of rare occurrence in populations across the world, may not be as rare in India. Objectives To comprehensively analyze the frequency and nature of mutations in Indian patients with RBDs. Methods Pubmed search was used (www.pu...

  15. PARKINSON’S DISEASE: A BRIEF REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    . Adinarayana; Ajay Babu; Karuna Devi

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder affecting many people in the world. Several gene mutations have shed light on the mechanisms of pathogenesis of PD. The parkinsonian syndrome is associated with several other degenerative and non-degenerative diseases. Genes linked to PD are synuclein, Parkinson's disease autosomal recessive, juvenile 2, Parkinson's disease autosomal recessive, early onset 7, PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 and leucine-rich repeat kinase 2. ...

  16. DNA damage in neurodegenerative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppedè, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.coppede@med.unipi.it; Migliore, Lucia, E-mail: lucia.migliore@med.unipi.it

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in the neurodegenerative process. • The mitochondrial DNA is more vulnerable to oxidative attack than the nuclear DNA. • Cytogenetic damage has been largely documented in Alzheimer's disease patients. • The question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of neurodegeneration is still open. • Increasing evidence links DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena. - Abstract: Following the observation of increased oxidative DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA extracted from post-mortem brain regions of patients affected by neurodegenerative diseases, the last years of the previous century and the first decade of the present one have been largely dedicated to the search of markers of DNA damage in neuronal samples and peripheral tissues of patients in early, intermediate or late stages of neurodegeneration. Those studies allowed to demonstrate that oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in neurodegeneration, but also revealed cytogenetic damage in neurodegenerative conditions, such as for example a tendency towards chromosome 21 malsegregation in Alzheimer's disease. As it happens for many neurodegenerative risk factors the question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of the neurodegenerative process is still open, and probably both is true. The research interest in markers of oxidative stress was shifted, in recent years, towards the search of epigenetic biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders, following the accumulating evidence of a substantial contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to learning, memory processes, behavioural disorders and neurodegeneration. Increasing evidence is however linking DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena, thereby opening the way to a very attractive and timely research topic in neurodegenerative diseases. We will address those issues in the context of Alzheimer's disease

  17. DNA damage in neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in the neurodegenerative process. • The mitochondrial DNA is more vulnerable to oxidative attack than the nuclear DNA. • Cytogenetic damage has been largely documented in Alzheimer's disease patients. • The question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of neurodegeneration is still open. • Increasing evidence links DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena. - Abstract: Following the observation of increased oxidative DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA extracted from post-mortem brain regions of patients affected by neurodegenerative diseases, the last years of the previous century and the first decade of the present one have been largely dedicated to the search of markers of DNA damage in neuronal samples and peripheral tissues of patients in early, intermediate or late stages of neurodegeneration. Those studies allowed to demonstrate that oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in neurodegeneration, but also revealed cytogenetic damage in neurodegenerative conditions, such as for example a tendency towards chromosome 21 malsegregation in Alzheimer's disease. As it happens for many neurodegenerative risk factors the question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of the neurodegenerative process is still open, and probably both is true. The research interest in markers of oxidative stress was shifted, in recent years, towards the search of epigenetic biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders, following the accumulating evidence of a substantial contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to learning, memory processes, behavioural disorders and neurodegeneration. Increasing evidence is however linking DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena, thereby opening the way to a very attractive and timely research topic in neurodegenerative diseases. We will address those issues in the context of Alzheimer's disease

  18. Whole exome sequencing in neurodevelopmental disorders: study of 10 families of Sardinian origin

    OpenAIRE

    Perria, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) represents a large and heterogeneous group of disorders with variable phenotypes and severity. The genetic aetiology of the 60% forms remains unexplained. Here we aimed to identify new genetic causes of autosomal recessive ID forms by using the Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) approach. We selected 10 Sardinian families, with at least 2 patients affected by Multiple Congenital Anomalies and ID. The clinical description of each patient was reported using the termin...

  19. Different molecular pathologies result in similar spatial patterns of cellular inclusions in neurodegenerative disease: a comparative study of eight disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Richard A.; Cairns, Nigel J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent research suggests cell-to-cell transfer of pathogenic proteins such as tau and α-synuclein may play a role in neurodegeneration. Pathogenic spread along neural pathways may give rise to specific spatial patterns of the neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCI) characteristic of these disorders. Hence, the spatial patterns of NCI were compared in four tauopathies, viz., Alzheimer’s disease, Pick’s disease, corticobasal degeneration, and progressive supranuclear palsy, two synucleinopathies,...

  20. Inferior olivary nucleus involvement in pediatric neurodegenerative disorders: does it play a role in neuroimaging pattern-recognition approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabelli-Badenier, Marisol; Morana, Giovanni; Bruno, Claudio; Di Rocco, Maja; Striano, Pasaquale; De Grandis, Eusa; Veneselli, Edvige; Rossi, Andrea; Biancheri, Roberta

    2015-04-01

    The diagnostic work up of neurometabolic/degenerative disorders is complex. In such context, identification of neuroradiological features suggestive of specific diagnoses is useful to prompt further diagnostic tests. Involvement of the inferior olivary nucleus (ION) has been reported in several pathologic conditions, either as a primary manifestation of disease or secondary to hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD). In this study, we analyzed a cohort of 95 children with different neurometabolic/degenerative diseases involving the brainstem and cerebellum, with the aim to evaluate whether ION involvement plays a role in a neuroimaging-based pattern-recognition approach. A total of 13 patients (13.7%) showed bilateral high-signal intensity and enlargement of the ION on T2-weighted images, while 16 (16.8%) had ION T2-hyperintensity without olivary nucleus enlargement. Our study demonstrates that ION involvement is not rare in children with neurometabolic/degenerative disorders. Two main neuroradiological patterns, that is, "T2-hyperintense signal" and "T2-hyperintense signal with enlargement" are found. These patterns can be related to different etiologies, and do not suggest specific diagnoses. Primary ION lesion can be characterized by olivary swelling, and the differentiation from typical secondary HOD may be difficult. PMID:25686202

  1. Prenatal diagnosis of Pena-Shokeir syndrome as a rare lethal disorder influencing fetal neuromusculary system: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Nuri Danışman; Esra Şükran Çakar; Hatice Bayramoğlu; Pınar Aydoğan; Serkan Kahyaoğlu

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Pena-Shokeir syndrome type I (fetal akinesia deformation sequence, FADS) is a mostly autosomal recessive lethal disorder characterised by combination of abnormal limb position, restrictive fetal movement with reduced or absent response to acoustic stimulation, growth restriction, polyhydramnios, and pulmonary hypoplasia. Limb defects like camptodactyly, rocker bottom feet and clubfoot are other prominents of the syndrome. Obstetric ultrasonographic examination of a 24-year-old pregna...

  2. Automatic sleep scoring in normals and in individuals with neurodegenerative disorders according to new international sleep scoring criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter S.; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing; Jennum, P. J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Reliable polysomnographic classification is the basis for evaluation of sleep disorders in neurological diseases. Aim: To develop a fully automatic sleep scoring algorithm on the basis of a reproduction of new international sleep scoring criteria from the American Academy of Sleep...... Medicine (AASM). Methods: A biomedical signal processing algorithm was developed, allowing for automatic sleep depth quantification of routine polysomnographic (PSG) recordings through feature extraction, supervised probabilistic Bayesian classification, and heuristic rule-based smoothing. The performance...... abnormal group. Conclusion: The developed algorithm was capable of scoring normal sleep with an accuracy around the manual inter-scorer reliability, it failed in accurately scoring abnormal sleep as encountered for the PD/MSA patients, which is due to the abnormal micro- and macrostructure pattern in these...

  3. Sirtuin deacetylases in neurodegenerative diseases of aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adrianna Z Herskovits; Leonard Guarente

    2013-01-01

    Sirtuin enzymes are a family of highly conserved protein deacetylases that depend on nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) for their activity.There are seven sirtuins in mammals and these proteins have been linked with caloric restriction and aging by modulating energy metabolism,genomic stability and stress resistance.Sirtuin enzymes are potential therapeutic targets in a variety of human diseases including cancer,diabetes,inflammatory disorders and neurodegenerative disease.Modulation of sirtuin activity has been shown to impact the course of several aggregate-forming neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease,Parkinson's disease,Huntington's disease,amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.Sirtuins can influence the progression of neurodegenerative disorders by modulating transcription factor activity and directly deacetylating proteotoxic species.Here,we describe sirtuin protein targets in several aggregate-forming neurodegenerative diseases and discuss the therapeutic potential of compounds that modulate sirtuin activity in these disorders.

  4. Depressive symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquero, Miquel; Martín, Nuria

    2015-08-16

    Depressive symptoms are very common in chronic conditions. This is true so for neurodegenerative diseases. A number of patients with cognitive decline and dementia due to Alzheimer's disease and related conditions like Parkinson's disease, Lewy body disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal degeneration amongst other entities, experience depressive symptoms in greater or lesser grade at some point during the course of the illness. Depressive symptoms have a particular significance in neurological disorders, specially in neurodegenerative diseases, because brain, mind, behavior and mood relationship. A number of patients may develop depressive symptoms in early stages of the neurologic disease, occurring without clear presence of cognitive decline with only mild cognitive deterioration. Classically, depression constitutes a reliable diagnostic challenge in this setting. However, actually we can recognize and evaluate depressive, cognitive or motor symptoms of neurodegenerative disease in order to establish their clinical significance and to plan some therapeutic strategies. Depressive symptoms can appear also lately, when the neurodegenerative disease is fully developed. The presence of depression and other neuropsychiatric symptoms have a negative impact on the quality-of-life of patients and caregivers. Besides, patients with depressive symptoms also tend to further decrease function and reduce cognitive abilities and also uses to present more affected clinical status, compared with patients without depression. Depressive symptoms are treatable. Early detection of depressive symptoms is very important in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, in order to initiate the most adequate treatment. We review in this paper the main neurodegenerative diseases, focusing in depressive symptoms of each other entities and current recommendations of management and treatment. PMID:26301229

  5. Evidence-based therapy for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases%神经变性疾病相关睡眠障碍的循证治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林雪; 李娟; 刘凌

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of the treatments for sleep disorders in neurodegeuerative diseases so as to provide the best therapeutic regimens for the evidence-based treatment.Methods Search PubMed,MEDLINE,Cochrane Library,Wanfang Data and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases with "sleep disorder or sleep disturbance","neurodegenerative diseases","Parkinson's disease or PD","Alzheimer's disease or AD","multiple system atrophy or MSA" as retrieval words.The quality of the articles were evaluated with Jadad Scale.Results A total of 35 articles,including 2 systematic reviews,5 randomized controlled trials,13 clinical controlled trials,13 case series and 2 epidemiological investigation studies were included for evaluation,13 of which were high grade and 22 were low grade articles.Clinical evidences showed that:1) advice on sleep hygiene,careful use of dopaminergic drugs and hypnotic sedative agents should be considered for PD.Bright light therapy (BLT)may improve circadian rhythm sleep disorders and clonazepam may be effective for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD).However,to date,very few controlled studies are available to make a recommendation for the management of sleep disorders in PD; 2) treatments for sleep disorders in AD include drug therapy (e.g.melatonin,acetylcholinesterase inhibitors,antipsychotic drugs,antidepressants)and non-drug therapy (e.g.BLT,behavior therapy),but very limited evidence shows the effectiveness of these treatments; 3) the first line treatment for sleep-related breathing disorder in MSA is nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP),and clonazepam is effective for RBD in MSA; 4) there is rare evidence related to the treatment of sleep disorders in dementia with Lewy body (DLB) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).Conclusion Evidence-based medicine can provide the best clinical evidence on sleep disorders' treatment in neurodegenerative diseases.%目的 评价神经变性疾病相

  6. Fractality of sensations and the brain health: the theory linking neurodegenerative disorder with distortion of spatial and temporal scale-invariance and fractal complexity of the visible world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Vladimirovna Zueva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The theory that ties normal functioning and pathology of the brain and visual system with the spatial-temporal structure of the visual and other sensory stimuli is described for the first time in the present study. The deficit of fractal complexity of environmental influences can lead to the distortion of fractal complexity in the visual pathways of the brain and abnormalities of development or aging. The use of fractal light stimuli and fractal stimuli of other modalities can help to restore the functions of the brain, particularly in the elderly and in patients with neurodegenerative disorders or amblyopia. Nonlinear dynamics of these physiological processes have a strong base of evidence, which is seen in the impaired fractal regulation of rhythmic activity in aged and diseased brains. From birth to old age, we live in a nonlinear world, in which objects and processes with the properties of fractality and non-linearity surround us. Against this background, the evolution of man took place and all periods of life unfolded. Works of art created by man may also have fractal properties. The positive influence of music on cognitive functions is well-known. Insufficiency of sensory experience is believed to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of amblyopia and age-dependent diseases. The brain is very plastic in its early development, and the plasticity decreases throughout life. However, several studies showed the possibility to reactivate the adult's neuroplasticity in a variety of ways. We propose that a non-linear structure of sensory information on many spatial and temporal scales is crucial to the brain health and fractal regulation of physiological rhythms. Theoretical substantiation of the author's theory is presented. Possible applications and the future research that can experimentally confirm or refute the theoretical concept are considered.

  7. Fractality of sensations and the brain health: the theory linking neurodegenerative disorder with distortion of spatial and temporal scale-invariance and fractal complexity of the visible world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zueva, Marina V

    2015-01-01

    The theory that ties normal functioning and pathology of the brain and visual system with the spatial-temporal structure of the visual and other sensory stimuli is described for the first time in the present study. The deficit of fractal complexity of environmental influences can lead to the distortion of fractal complexity in the visual pathways of the brain and abnormalities of development or aging. The use of fractal light stimuli and fractal stimuli of other modalities can help to restore the functions of the brain, particularly in the elderly and in patients with neurodegenerative disorders or amblyopia. Non-linear dynamics of these physiological processes have a strong base of evidence, which is seen in the impaired fractal regulation of rhythmic activity in aged and diseased brains. From birth to old age, we live in a non-linear world, in which objects and processes with the properties of fractality and non-linearity surround us. Against this background, the evolution of man took place and all periods of life unfolded. Works of art created by man may also have fractal properties. The positive influence of music on cognitive functions is well-known. Insufficiency of sensory experience is believed to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of amblyopia and age-dependent diseases. The brain is very plastic in its early development, and the plasticity decreases throughout life. However, several studies showed the possibility to reactivate the adult's neuroplasticity in a variety of ways. We propose that a non-linear structure of sensory information on many spatial and temporal scales is crucial to the brain health and fractal regulation of physiological rhythms. Theoretical substantiation of the author's theory is presented. Possible applications and the future research that can experimentally confirm or refute the theoretical concept are considered. PMID:26236232

  8. Hyperhomocysteinemia: Impact on Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Tiwari, Manisha; Tiwari, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are the diseases of the central nervous system with various aetiology and symptoms. Dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and autism are some examples of neurodegenerative diseases. Hyperhomocysteinemia (Hhcy) is considered to be an independent risk factor for numerous pathological conditions under neurodegenerative diseases. Along with genetic factors that are the prime cause of homocysteine (Hcy) imbalance, the nutritional and hormonal factors are also contributing to high Hcy levels in the body. Numerous clinical and epidemiological data confirm the direct correlation of Hcy levels in the body and generation of different types of central nervous system disorders, cardiovascular diseases, cancer and others. Till now, it is difficult to say whether homocysteine is the cause of the disease or whether it is one of the impacts of the diseases. However, Hhcy is a surrogate marker of vitamin B deficiency and is a neurotoxic agent. This Mini Review will give an overview of how far research has gone into understanding the homocysteine imbalance with prognostic, causative and preventive measures in treating neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26036286

  9. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Li; Wuliji O; Wei Li; Zhi-Gang Jiang; Ghanbari, Hossein A.

    2013-01-01

    Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. T...

  10. CYP7B1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, P; Svenstrup, K; Danielsen, E R;

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The SPG5A subtype of Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the CYP7B1 gene, which encodes a steroid cytochrome P450 7α-hydroxylase. This enzyme provides the primary metabolic route for neurosteroids. Clinica......UNLABELLED: The SPG5A subtype of Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the CYP7B1 gene, which encodes a steroid cytochrome P450 7α-hydroxylase. This enzyme provides the primary metabolic route for neurosteroids...

  11. Coenzyme Q10 effects in neurodegenerative disease

    OpenAIRE

    Henchcliffe, Claire

    2009-01-01

    Meredith Spindler1, M Flint Beal1,2, Claire Henchcliffe1,21Department of Neurology, 2Department of Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an essential cofactor in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and as a dietary supplement it has recently gained attention for its potential role in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. Evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders derives from animal model...

  12. TH gene mutation in Chinese patients with autosomal recessive dopa-responsive dystonia%中国人常染色体隐性遗传性多巴反应性肌张力障碍TH基因突变分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘威; 唐北沙; 曹贵方; 陈涛; 李海燕

    2004-01-01

    目的研究中国人常染色体隐性遗传性(autosomal recessive,AR)多巴反应性肌张力障碍(dopa-responsive dystonia, DRD)患者酪氨酸羟化酶(tyrosine hydroxylase,TH)基因的突变特点.方法应用聚合酶链反应-单链构象多态性技术和DNA序列分析方法对5个AR-DRD家系的先证者和两例散发DRD患者进行TH基因突变分析. 结果 TH基因第1~2、5~11、13~14外显子的扩增产物未见异常电泳条带,DNA直接测序TH基因的第3、4、12外显子,结果未发现异常.结论 TH基因在中国人AR-DRD家系中突变率不高,提示我国AR-DRD患者具有遗传异质性,可能存在新的致病基因.

  13. Mutation analysis of DJ1 gene in patients with autosomal recessive early- onset Parkinsonism%常染色体隐性遗传性早发型帕金森综合征DJ1基因突变研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭纪锋; 严新翔; 曹立; 唐北沙; 张玉虎; 夏昆; 蔡芳; 潘乾; 沈璐; 江泓; 赵国华

    2005-01-01

    目的探讨常染色体隐性遗传性早发型帕金森综合征(autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinsonism,AR-EP)DJ1基因的突变特点.方法应用聚合酶链反应结合DNA直接序列分析方法,对11个常染色体隐性遗传性早发型帕金森综合征家系先证者的DJ1基因进行突变研究.结果本组AR-EP患者未发现DJ1基因的致病突变,在内含子区发现6个多态,分别为IVS1-15T→C、IVS4+30T→G、IVS4+45G→A、IVS4+46G→A、IVS5+31G→A和g.168-185del,其中3个(IVS1-15T→C、IVS4+45G→A、IVS4+46C→A)为新发现的多态.结论中国人常染色体隐性遗传性早发型帕金森综合征患者DJ1基因突变可能罕见.

  14. 三个常染色体隐性遗传早发型帕金森病家系的PARKIN基因研究%A study on PARKIN gene in three pedigrees with autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金淼; 焦劲松; 顾卫红; 王康; 邹海强; 陈彪; 王国相

    2005-01-01

    目的探讨PARKIN基因与中国人常染色体隐性遗传早发型帕金森病(autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson's disease, AREP)家系的关系.方法对3个AREP家系的6例患者和23位成员进行系统的临床检查并进行PARKIN基因PCR扩增,产物通过变性高压液相色谱(denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, DHPLC)进行突变检测,阳性结果标本进行基因测序.结果所有研究对象的PARKIN基因外显子均扩增成功.DHPLC检测和基因测序发现一个家系中存在PARKIN基因杂合Gly284Arg突变,另一个家系中存在PARKIN基因Ser167Asn多态性,且患者均有环境毒物接触史.结论 PARKIN基因杂合Gly284Arg突变在环境因素的协同作用下可能导致发病.PARKIN基因Ser167Asn多态性是帕金森病的易感因素,汞中毒与其共同作用可能导致发病.

  15. Coenzyme Q10 effects in neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Spindler

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Meredith Spindler1, M Flint Beal1,2, Claire Henchcliffe1,21Department of Neurology, 2Department of Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 is an essential cofactor in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and as a dietary supplement it has recently gained attention for its potential role in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. Evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders derives from animal models, studies of mitochondria from patients, identification of genetic defects in patients with neurodegenerative disease, and measurements of markers of oxidative stress. Studies of in vitro models of neuronal toxicity and animal models of neurodegenerative disorders have demonstrated potential neuroprotective effects of CoQ10. With this data in mind, several clinical trials of CoQ10 have been performed in Parkinson’s disease and atypical Parkinson’s syndromes, Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer disease, Friedreich’s ataxia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with equivocal findings. CoQ10 is widely available in multiple formulations and is very well tolerated with minimal adverse effects, making it an attractive potential therapy. Phase III trials of high-dose CoQ10 in large sample sizes are needed to further ascertain the effects of CoQ10 in neurodegenerative diseases.Keywords: coenzyme Q10, neurodegenerative disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, mitochondrial dysfunction

  16. Biology and genetics of oculocutaneous albinism and vitiligo - common pigmentation disorders in southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Prashiela; Kerr, Robyn; Ramsay, Michèle; Kromberg, Jennifer G R

    2013-12-01

    Pigmentation disorders span the genetic spectrum from single-gene autosomal recessive disorders such as oculocutaneous albinism (OCA), the autosomal dominant disorder piebaldism to X-linked ocular albinism and multifactorial vitiligo. OCA connotes a group of disorders that result in hypopigmented skin due to decreased melanin production in melanocytes and loss of visual acuity. There are four non-syndromic forms, OCA1-4, which are classified based on the gene that is mutated (tyrosinase, OCA2, tyrosinase-related protein 1 and SLC45A2, respectively). Despite the fact that multiple genes account for the various forms of OCA, the phenotypes of all four forms result from disruption in the maturation and trafficking of the enzyme tyrosinase. OCA2 is the most prevalent autosomal recessive disorder among southern African blacks, affecting 1/3 900 individuals; while OCA3, although rare, is most prevalent in southern Africa. Another common pigmentation disorder in southern Africa is vitiligo, which affects 1 - 2% of people worldwide. Vitiligo is a complex, acquired disorder in which melanocytes are destroyed due to an autoimmune response. The aetiology underlying this disorder is poorly understood, although recent genetic association studies have begun to shed light on the contributing factors. Pigmentation disorders have significant psychosocial implications and co-morbidities, yet therapies are still lacking. Recent progress in our understanding of the pathobiology of both albinism and vitiligo may herald novel treatment strategies for these disorders.  PMID:24300644

  17. Studying neurodegenerative diseases in culture models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes C.M. Schlachetzki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are pathological conditions that have an insidious onset and chronic progression. Different models have been established to study these diseases in order to understand their underlying mechanisms and to investigate new therapeutic strategies. Although various in vivo models are currently in use, in vitro models might provide important insights about the pathogenesis of these disorders and represent an interesting approach for the screening of potential pharmacological agents. In the present review, we discuss various in vitro and ex vivo models of neurodegenerative disorders in mammalian cells and tissues.

  18. Alstrom syndrome: A rare genetic disorder and its anaesthetic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh Tiwari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alstrom syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that was first described in 1959, by Carl Henry Alstrom, characterised by multiorgan system involvement ranging from ocular, aural, endocrinal, hepatorenal, gastrointestinal, respiratory and cardiac to the musculoskeletal system, among many others. It exposes the patient to various risks ranging from pulmonary aspiration and increased cardiac morbidity to separational anxiety, and may necessitate postoperative elective ventilation. We hereby present the successful management of one such diagnosed case in a 12-year-old boy, who presented to us for incision and drainage of an abscess present over the nape of his neck, along with foreign body removal from his right ear.

  19. DJ-1 gene rearrangement mutation in patients with autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism using real-time PCR%应用实时荧光定量PCR技术检测常染色体隐性遗传性早发型帕金森综合征的DJ-1基因外显子重排突变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海南; 肖彬; 聂利珞; 郭纪锋; 王春喻; 王磊; 何丹; 严新翔; 唐北沙

    2010-01-01

    目的:建立应用实时荧光定量PCR技术(real-time polymerase chain reaction,real-time PCR)检测DJ-1基因外显子重排突变的技术平台,并应用该技术对常染色体隐性遗传性早发型帕金森综合征(autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinsonism, AREP)DJ-1基因进行外显子重排突变分析.方法:应用实时荧光定量PCR分析方法,对22个AREP家系先证者和30个正常对照的DJ-1基因进行外显子重排突变分析.结果:本研究中获得了扩增效率和特异性均满意的DJ-1基因各编码外显子实时荧光定量PCR反应条件及各外显子引物;本组AREP患者未发现DJ-1基因的外显子重排突变.结论:建立了应用实时荧光定量PCR技术进行DJ-1基因外显子重排突变检测的技术平台;中国人群AREP患者DJ-1基因外显子重排突变可能罕见.

  20. Human DNA methylomes of neurodegenerative diseases show common epigenomic patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Mut, J V; Heyn, H; Vidal, E; Moran, S; Sayols, S; Delgado-Morales, R; Schultz, M D; Ansoleaga, B; Garcia-Esparcia, P; Pons-Espinal, M; de Lagran, M M; Dopazo, J; Rabano, A; Avila, J; Dierssen, M; Lott, I; Ferrer, I; Ecker, J R; Esteller, M

    2016-01-01

    Different neurodegenerative disorders often show similar lesions, such as the presence of amyloid plaques, TAU-neurotangles and synuclein inclusions. The genetically inherited forms are rare, so we wondered whether shared epigenetic aberrations, such as those affecting DNA methylation, might also exist. The studied samples were gray matter samples from the prefrontal cortex of control and neurodegenerative disease-associated cases. We performed the DNA methylation analyses of Alzheimer's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer-like neurodegenerative profile associated with Down's syndrome samples. The DNA methylation landscapes obtained show that neurodegenerative diseases share similar aberrant CpG methylation shifts targeting a defined gene set. Our findings suggest that neurodegenerative disorders might have similar pathogenetic mechanisms that subsequently evolve into different clinical entities. The identified aberrant DNA methylation changes can be used as biomarkers of the disorders and as potential new targets for the development of new therapies. PMID:26784972

  1. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genet. 2012 Feb 10;90(2):321-30. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2011.12.007. Erratum ... Hum Genet. 2009 Nov;85(5):720-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2009.10.013. Epub ... Hum Genet. 2009 Nov;85(5):711-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2009.10.003. Epub ...

  2. Autosomal recessive hypoparathyroidism with renal insufficiency and developmental delay.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, N J; Haigh, D; Lealmann, G T; Karbani, G.; Brocklebank, J. T.; Dillon, M J

    1991-01-01

    Four children (two boys and two girls) with hypoparathyroidism, renal insufficiency, and developmental delay are described. They were the products of consanguineous marriages in three related Asian families presenting over a six year period. All the children died within the first 15 months of life despite treatment. Postmortem examination on one child showed absent parathyroid glands. We believe these children represent a previously undescribed syndrome that appears to be inherited in an auto...

  3. Renal-hepatic-pancreatic dysplasia: an autosomal recessive malformation.

    OpenAIRE

    Torra, R.; Alós, L.; Ramos, J.; Estivill, X

    1996-01-01

    We report two brothers with a cystic malformation of the kidneys, liver, and pancreas. In both cases the malformation was fatal and the children died shortly after birth. The pathological findings, consisting of multicystic dysplastic kidneys, dilated and dysgenetic bile ducts, dilated pancreatic ducts, and polysplenia, correspond to those reported by Ivemark as renal-hepatic-pancreatic dysplasia. Many polymalformation syndromes include cystic affectation of these three organs, so this syndro...

  4. TMPRSS3 mutations in autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battelino, Saba; Klancar, Gasper; Kovac, Jernej; Battelino, Tadej; Trebusak Podkrajsek, Katarina

    2016-05-01

    Nonsyndromic genetic deafness is highly heterogeneous in its clinical presentation, pattern of inheritance and underlying genetic causes. Mutations in TMPRSS3 gene encoding transmembrane serine protease account for Slovenia resulting in uniform phenotype with profound congenital hearing loss, and satisfactory hearing and speech recognition outcome after cochlear implantation. Consequently, TMPRSS3 gene analysis should be included in the first tier of genetic investigations of ARNSHL along with GJB2 and GJB6 genes. PMID:26036852

  5. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive hyper-IgE syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with AR-HIES have neurological problems, such as paralysis that affects the face or one side of the body (hemiplegia). Blockage of blood flow in the brain or abnormal bleeding in the brain, both of ...

  6. Sepiapterin reductase deficiency an autosomal recessive DOPA-responsive dystonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.G. Abeling; M. Duran; H.D. Bakker; L. Stroomer; B. Thony; N. Blau; J. Booij; B.T. Poll-The

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of a 14-year-old girl with a new homoallelic mutation in the sepiapterin reductase (SR) gene is reported. Initially she presented at the age of 2 with hypotonia and mild cognitive developmental delay, and was diagnosed as having mild methylmalonic aciduria, which was recently identifie

  7. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia with bull's-eye macular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruysberg, J.R.M.; Eerola, K.U.; Vrijland, H.R.; Aandekerk, A.L.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Deutman, A.F.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: In 1980, we published in the American Journal of Ophthalmology two siblings with hereditary ataxia and atrophic maculopathy. The report is cited in the literature as autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia with retinal degeneration. The purpose of the present study is to document the progressi

  8. Mutation analysis of the WFS1 gene in seven Danish Wolfram syndrome families; four new mutations identified

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Eiberg, Hans Rudolf Lytchoff; Barrett, Timothy;

    2005-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a neuro-degenerative autosomal recessive (AR) disorder (OMIM #222300) caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene on 4p16.1. More than 120 mutations have been identified in WFS1 associated with AR WS, as well as autosomal dominant nonsyndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing...

  9. Erythrocyte membrane changes of chorea-acanthocytosis are the result of altered Lyn kinase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franceschi, L. de; Tomelleri, C.; Matte, A.; Brunati, A.M.; Bovee-Geurts, P.H.M.; Bertoldi, M.; Lasonder, E.; Tibaldi, E.; Danek, A.; Walker, R.H.; Jung, H.H.; Bader, B.; Siciliano, A.; Ferru, E.; Mohandas, N.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Acanthocytic RBCs are a peculiar diagnostic feature of chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc), a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder. Although recent years have witnessed some progress in the molecular characterization of ChAc, the mechanism(s) responsible for generation of acanthocytes in ChA

  10. Oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueping Chen; Chunyan Guo; Jiming Kong

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are constantly produced in aerobic organisms as by-products of normal oxygen metabolism and include free radicals such as superoxide anion (O2-) and hydroxyl radical (OH-), and non-radical hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The mitochondrial respiratory chain and enzymatic reactions by various enzymes are endogenous sources of reactive oxygen species. Exogenous reactive oxygen species -inducing stressors include ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and divergent oxidizing chemicals. At low concentrations, reactive oxygen species serve as an important second messenger in cell signaling; however, at higher concentrations and long-term exposure, reactive oxygen species can damage cellular macromolecules such as DNA, proteins, and lipids, which leads to necrotic and apoptotic cell death. Oxidative stress is a condition of imbalance between reactive oxygen species formation and cellular antioxidant capacity due to enhanced ROS generation and/or dysfunction of the antioxidant system. Biochemical alterations in these macromolecular components can lead to various pathological conditions and human diseases, especially neurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases are morphologically featured by progressive cell loss in specific vulnerable neuronal cells, often associated with cytoskeletal protein aggregates forming inclusions in neurons and/or glial cells. Deposition of abnormal aggregated proteins and disruption of metal ions homeostasis are highly associated with oxidative stress. The main aim of this review is to present as much detailed information as possible that is available on various neurodegenerative disorders and their connection with oxidative stress. A variety of therapeutic strategies designed to address these pathological processes are also described. For the future therapeutic direction, one specific pathway that involves the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 is receiving considerable attention.

  11. Stem cells and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the neurodegenerative changes or apoptosis of neurons involved in networks, which are important to specific physiological functions. With the de-velopment of old-aging society, the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases is on the increase. How-ever, it is difficult to diagnose for most of neurodegenerative diseases. At present, there are too few effective therapies. Advances in stem cell biology have raised the hope and possibility for the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, stem cells have been widely attempted to treat neurodegen-erative diseases of animal model. Here we review the progress and prospects of various stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cell and neural stem cells and so on, for the treatments of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Hunt-ington’s disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Lou Gehrig’s disease.

  12. Deep sequencing reveals 50 novel genes for recessive cognitive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najmabadi, Hossein; Hu, Hao; Garshasbi, Masoud; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Abedini, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Chen, Wei; Hosseini, Masoumeh; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Haas, Stefan; Jamali, Payman; Zecha, Agnes; Mohseni, Marzieh; Püttmann, Lucia; Vahid, Leyla Nouri; Jensen, Corinna; Moheb, Lia Abbasi; Bienek, Melanie; Larti, Farzaneh; Mueller, Ines; Weissmann, Robert; Darvish, Hossein; Wrogemann, Klaus; Hadavi, Valeh; Lipkowitz, Bettina; Esmaeeli-Nieh, Sahar; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Kariminejad, Roxana; Firouzabadi, Saghar Ghasemi; Cohen, Monika; Fattahi, Zohreh; Rost, Imma; Mojahedi, Faezeh; Hertzberg, Christoph; Dehghan, Atefeh; Rajab, Anna; Banavandi, Mohammad Javad Soltani; Hoffer, Julia; Falah, Masoumeh; Musante, Luciana; Kalscheuer, Vera; Ullmann, Reinhard; Kuss, Andreas Walter; Tzschach, Andreas; Kahrizi, Kimia; Ropers, H Hilger

    2011-10-01

    Common diseases are often complex because they are genetically heterogeneous, with many different genetic defects giving rise to clinically indistinguishable phenotypes. This has been amply documented for early-onset cognitive impairment, or intellectual disability, one of the most complex disorders known and a very important health care problem worldwide. More than 90 different gene defects have been identified for X-chromosome-linked intellectual disability alone, but research into the more frequent autosomal forms of intellectual disability is still in its infancy. To expedite the molecular elucidation of autosomal-recessive intellectual disability, we have now performed homozygosity mapping, exon enrichment and next-generation sequencing in 136 consanguineous families with autosomal-recessive intellectual disability from Iran and elsewhere. This study, the largest published so far, has revealed additional mutations in 23 genes previously implicated in intellectual disability or related neurological disorders, as well as single, probably disease-causing variants in 50 novel candidate genes. Proteins encoded by several of these genes interact directly with products of known intellectual disability genes, and many are involved in fundamental cellular processes such as transcription and translation, cell-cycle control, energy metabolism and fatty-acid synthesis, which seem to be pivotal for normal brain development and function. PMID:21937992

  13. Pediatric neurodegenerative white matter processes: leukodystrophies and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pediatric neurodegenerative white matter processes are complex, numerous and result from a vast array of causes ranging from white matter injury or inflammation to congenital metabolic disorders. When faced with a neurodegenerative white matter process on neuroimaging, the first step for the radiologist is to determine whether the findings represent a congenital metabolic leukodystrophy or one of various other white matter processes. In this review we first describe a general approach to neurodegenerative white matter disorders. We will briefly describe a few white matter diseases that mimic metabolic leukodystrophies. In the second half of the review we discuss an approach to distinguishing and classifying white matter leukodystrophies. (orig.)

  14. Neuronal Network Oscillations in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmrich, Volker; Draguhn, Andreas; Axmacher, Nikolai

    2015-09-01

    Cognitive and behavioral acts go along with highly coordinated spatiotemporal activity patterns in neuronal networks. Most of these patterns are synchronized by coherent membrane potential oscillations within and between local networks. By entraining multiple neurons into a common time regime, such network oscillations form a critical interface between cellular activity and large-scale systemic functions. Synaptic integrity is altered in neurodegenerative diseases, and it is likely that this goes along with characteristic changes of coordinated network activity. This notion is supported by EEG recordings from human patients and from different animal models of such disorders. However, our knowledge about the pathophysiology of network oscillations in neurodegenerative diseases is surprisingly incomplete, and increased research efforts are urgently needed. One complicating factor is the pronounced diversity of network oscillations between different brain regions and functional states. Pathological changes must, therefore, be analyzed separately in each condition and affected area. However, cumulative evidence from different diseases may result, in the future, in more unifying "oscillopathy" concepts of neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we report present evidence for pathological changes of network oscillations in Alzheimer's disease (AD), one of the most prominent and challenging neurodegenerative disorders. The heterogeneous findings from AD are contrasted to Parkinson's disease, where motor-related changes in specific frequency bands do already fulfill criteria of a valid biomarker. PMID:25920466

  15. Stem cells and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU LingLing; HONG Tao

    2008-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the neurodegenerative changes or apoptosis of neurons involved in networks, which are important to specific physiological functions. With the development of old-aging society, the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases is on the increase. However, it is difficult to diagnose for most of neurodegenerative diseases. At present, there are too few effective therapies. Advances in stem cell biology have raised the hope and possibility for the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, stem cells have been widely attempted to treat neurodegenerative diseases of animal model. Here we review the progress and prospects of various stem cells,including embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cell and neural stem cells and so on, for the treatments of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Lou Gehrig's disease.

  16. Synthetic prions and other human neurodegenerative proteinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nhat Tran Thanh; Narkiewicz, Joanna; Aulić, Suzana; Salzano, Giulia; Tran, Hoa Thanh; Scaini, Denis; Moda, Fabio; Giachin, Gabriele; Legname, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. The common feature of these diseases is the pathological conversion of the normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into a β-structure-rich conformer-termed PrP(Sc). The latter can induce a self-perpetuating process leading to amplification and spreading of pathological protein assemblies. Much evidence suggests that PrP(Sc) itself is able to recruit and misfold PrP(C) into the pathological conformation. Recent data have shown that recombinant PrP(C) can be misfolded in vitro and the resulting synthetic conformers are able to induce the conversion of PrP(C) into PrP(Sc)in vivo. In this review we describe the state-of-the-art of the body of literature in this field. In addition, we describe a cell-based assay to test synthetic prions in cells, providing further evidence that synthetic amyloids are able to template conversion of PrP into prion inclusions. Studying prions might help to understand the pathological mechanisms governing other neurodegenerative diseases. Aggregation and deposition of misfolded proteins is a common feature of several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other disorders. Although the proteins implicated in each of these diseases differ, they share a common prion mechanism. Recombinant proteins are able to aggregate in vitro into β-rich amyloid fibrils, sharing some features of the aggregates found in the brain. Several studies have reported that intracerebral inoculation of synthetic aggregates lead to unique pathology, which spread progressively to distal brain regions and reduced survival time in animals. Here, we review the prion-like features of different proteins involved in neurodegenerative disorders, such as α-synuclein, superoxide dismutase-1, amyloid-β and tau. PMID:25449570

  17. 应用SYBR GreenⅠ实时荧光定量聚合酶链反应检测常染色体隐性遗传早发性帕金森综合征的parkin基因外显子重排突变%Analysis of exon rearrangements in the parkin gene in patients with autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism using SYBR Green Ⅰ Real-time PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐北沙; 严新翔; 聂利珞; 郭纪锋; 张海南; 张学伟; 王磊; 沈璐; 江泓; 夏昆

    2009-01-01

    目的 建立应用SYBR GreenⅠ实时荧光定量聚合酶链反应(Real-time PCR,RT-PCR)检测parkin基因外显子重排突变的技术平台,应用该技术对常染色体隐性遗传早发型帕金森综合征(autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism,AREP) 家系进行parkin基因外显子重排突变分析.方法 应用SYBR GreenⅠRT-PCR技术对32个中国AREP家系进行parkin基因外显子重排突变分析.结果 14个家系先证者存在parkin基因外显子重排突变,其中3个为纯合缺失突变、3个为复杂杂合缺失突变和8个杂合缺失突变,未发现外显子重复突变,突变主要累及第2~4号外显子.结论 建立了应用SYBR GreenⅠRT-PCR技术检测parkin基因外显子重排突变的基因检测平台;中国AREP 家系的parkin基因外显子重排突变频率为43.8%,与国外报道相似.%Objective To develop a method of detection exon rearrangements in the parkin gene (PARK2) using SYBR Green Ⅰ real-time PCR and to analyze PARK2 exon rearrangement mutations in families with autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism (AREP) using this method. Methods Exon rearrangement in PARK2 was screened by SYBR Green Ⅰ real-time PCR in 32 families with AREP. Results Exon rearrangement mutations were found in 14 families, including 3 compound heterozygous deletions;3 homozygous deletions;and 8 heterozygous deletions. No duplication mutation was found. Hotspot for exon rearrangements clustered in exons 2 through 4. Conclusions We have developed a gene test method using SYBR Green Ⅰ Real-time PCR to detect exon rearrangements in the gene PARK2. The frequency of PARK2 mutation is 43.8% in Chinese families with AREP. This frequency is similar to reported findings in other countries.

  18. Sleep disturbance in mental health problems and neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson KN

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kirstie N Anderson1 Andrew J Bradley2,3 1Department of Neurology, Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Trust, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK; 2Eli Lilly and Company Limited, Lilly House, Basingstoke, UK; 3Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK Abstract: Sleep has been described as being of the brain, by the brain, and for the brain. This fundamental neurobiological behavior is controlled by homeostatic and circadian (24-hour processes and is vital for normal brain function. This review will outline the normal sleep–wake cycle, the changes that occur during aging, and the specific patterns of sleep disturbance that occur in association with both mental health disorders and neurodegenerative disorders. The role of primary sleep disorders such as insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, and REM sleep behavior disorder as potential causes or risk factors for particular mental health or neurodegenerative problems will also be discussed. Keywords: sleep, mental health, neurodegenerative disorders, cognition

  19. Walking the tightrope: proteostasis and neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerbury, Justin J; Ooi, Lezanne; Dillin, Andrew; Saunders, Darren N; Hatters, Danny M; Beart, Philip M; Cashman, Neil R; Wilson, Mark R; Ecroyd, Heath

    2016-05-01

    A characteristic of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is the aggregation of specific proteins into protein inclusions and/or plaques in degenerating brains. While much of the aggregated protein consists of disease specific proteins, such as amyloid-β, α-synuclein, or superoxide dismutase1 (SOD1), many other proteins are known to aggregate in these disorders. Although the role of protein aggregates in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases remains unknown, the ubiquitous association of misfolded and aggregated proteins indicates that significant dysfunction in protein homeostasis (proteostasis) occurs in these diseases. Proteostasis is the concept that the integrity of the proteome is in fine balance and requires proteins in a specific conformation, concentration, and location to be functional. In this review, we discuss the role of specific mechanisms, both inside and outside cells, which maintain proteostasis, including molecular chaperones, protein degradation pathways, and the active formation of inclusions, in neurodegenerative diseases associated with protein aggregation. A characteristic of many neurodegenerative diseases is the aggregation of specific proteins, which alone provides strong evidence that protein homeostasis is disrupted in these disease states. Proteostasis is the maintenance of the proteome in the correct conformation, concentration, and location by functional pathways such as molecular chaperones and protein degradation machinery. Here, we discuss the potential roles of quality control pathways, both inside and outside cells, in the loss of proteostasis during aging and disease. PMID:26872075

  20. 常染色体隐性遗传的类Duchenne肌营养不良临床特征及其发生比率的估计值分析%The Proportion and Clinical Feature of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy With Autosomal Recessive Inheritance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麻宏伟; 武盈玉; 王阳; 高薇; 薛燕宁

    2001-01-01

    目的:探讨常染色体隐性遗传的类杜氏肌营养不良(类DMD)临床特点及其在杜氏肌营养不良症(DMD)中的比例。方法:研究8个家系中9例女性类DMD的临床表现、家族史及血清肌酸激酶水平,并估计常染色体隐性遗传的类DMD在DMD中的比例。结果:常染色体隐性遗传的类DMD患者独立行走的平均时间为(1.47±1.00)岁,症状出现的平均时间为(8.11±4.32)岁,血清肌酸激酶平均水平为(2785.10±1500.29)U/L,这种常染色体隐性遗传型类DMD占DMD的9.4%。结论:常染色体隐性遗传的类DMD与DMD在临床上无法区别,部分被认为是性连锁隐性遗传的DMD,实际上是常染色体隐性遗传的类DMD。%Objective:Our aim was to investigate the proportion of autosomal recessive (AR) inheritance among families with patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and clinical feature in patients with AR form of DMD. Methods:A total of 193 families was studied, 8 of them with at least one girl with “DMD - like” phenotype and 185 with only boys with this kind of phenotype. Based on the number of families with at least one affected girl and the number of patients per sibship among these pedigrees, the proportion of families with DMD inherited as an AR trait was estimated. The clinical examination, family history and serum creatine-kinase were studied in 11 patients diagnosed as AR form of DMD. Results: The proportion of families with AR form of DMD was estimated as 9.4%. The average age of being able to walk is (1.47±1.00) year, serum creatine-kinase levels were (2785.10±1500.29) U/L. The clinical symptom occurred at the average age of (8.11±4.32) year in patients with AR form of DMD. Conclusion: The AR form of muscular dystrophy and DMD not be distingushed clinically. Some families with only affected boys diagnosed as typical DMD, in fact, have the AR form of the disease. This study is very useful for genetic consulting.

  1. Exon rearrangement analysis of parkin gene in patients with autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism using fluorescent semi-quantitative PCR%应用荧光半定量聚合酶链反应方法检测常染色体隐性遗传早发性帕金森综合征parkin基因外显子重排突变分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭纪锋; 蔡芳; 潘乾; 沈璐; 江泓; 唐北沙; 夏昆; 严新翔; 张玉虎; 陈涛; 李静; 张学伟; 曹立

    2006-01-01

    目的探讨常染色体隐性遗传早发性帕金森综合征(autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism,AREP)parkin基因外显子重排突变情况.方法应用荧光半定量聚合酶链反应(PCR)方法对18个AREP家系进行parkin基因外显子重排突变分析.结果9个AREP家系含有parkin基因外显子重排突变,其中2个家系为外显子4纯合缺失,2个家系为外显子4杂合缺失,2个家系为外显子2杂合缺失,1家系为外显子3杂合缺失,1家系为外显子1杂合缺失,此外,1家系为外显子3和外显子4的复合杂合缺失.未见parkin基因外显子重复突变.结论我国AREP患者存在parkin基因外显子重排突变;parkin基因外显子重排突变可能是我国AREP患者的主要致病因素.

  2. Recent advances in using Drosophila to model neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Bingwei

    2009-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are progressive disorders of the nervous system that affect the function and maintenance of specific neuronal populations. Most disease cases are sporadic with no known cause. The identification of genes associated with familial cases of these diseases has enabled the development of animal models to study disease mechanisms. The model organism Drosophila has been successfully used to study pathogenic mechanisms of a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases. Recent g...

  3. Reprogramming therapeutics: iPS cell prospects for neurodegenerative disease

    OpenAIRE

    Abeliovich, Asa; Doege, Claudia A.

    2009-01-01

    The recent description of somatic cell reprogramming to an embryonic stem (ES) cell-like phenotype, termed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology, presents an exciting potential venue towards cell-based therapeutics and disease models for neurodegenerative disorders Two recent studies from Dimos et al. (Dimos et al., 2008) and Ebert et al. (Ebert et al., 2008) describe the initial characterization of neurodegenerative disease patient-derived iPS cell cultures as proof-of-concept for t...

  4. A case report of primary ciliary dyskinesia, laterality defects and developmental delay caused by the co-existence of a single gene and chromosome disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casey, Jillian P

    2015-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by abnormal ciliary motion and impaired mucociliary clearance, leading to recurrent respiratory infections, sinusitis, otitis media and male infertility. Some patients also have laterality defects. We recently reported the identification of three disease-causing PCD genes in the Irish Traveller population; RSPH4A, DYX1C1 and CCNO. We have since assessed an additional Irish Traveller family with a complex phenotype involving PCD who did not have any of the previously identified PCD mutations.

  5. Molecular chaperones and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the accumulation of intracellular or extracellular protein aggregates that result from conformational changes in proteins. These diseases may result from an imbalance between the production of misfolded proteins and normal chaperone capacity. Molecular chaperones provide a first line of defence against misfolded, aggregation-prone proteins and are, therefore, promising therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Dendritic Spine Pathology in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herms, Jochen; Dorostkar, Mario M

    2016-05-23

    Substantial progress has been made toward understanding the neuropathology, genetic origins, and epidemiology of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease; tauopathies, such as frontotemporal dementia; α-synucleinopathies, such as Parkinson's disease or dementia with Lewy bodies; Huntington's disease; and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with dementia, as well as prion diseases. Recent evidence has implicated dendritic spine dysfunction as an important substrate of the pathogenesis of dementia in these disorders. Dendritic spines are specialized structures, extending from the neuronal processes, on which excitatory synaptic contacts are formed, and the loss of dendritic spines correlates with the loss of synaptic function. We review the literature that has implicated direct or indirect structural alterations at dendritic spines in the pathogenesis of major neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on those that lead to dementias such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases, as well as frontotemporal dementia and prion diseases. We stress the importance of in vivo studies in animal models. PMID:26907528

  7. Hemichannels in neurodegenerative diseases: is there a link to pathology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Bosch

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Although originally considered a structural component of gap junctions, connexin hemichannels (HCs are now recognized as functional entities capable of influencing metabolic gradients within the CNS, allowing direct communication between the intra- and extracellular milieus. Besides connexins, HCs can also be formed by pannexins, which are not capable of gap junction assembly. Both positive and negative effects have been attributed to HC activity in the context of neurodegenerative diseases. For example, HCs can exert neuroprotective effects by promoting the uptake of neurotoxic molecules, whereas chronic HC opening can disrupt molecular gradients leading to cellular dysfunction and death. The latter scenario has been suggested for multiple neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s Disease and more recently, lysosomal storage disorders, which are the focus of this review. Currently available evidence suggests a complex role for HCs in neurodegenerative disorders, which sets the stage for future studies to determine whether targeting HC action may improve disease outcomes.

  8. Polar Body Diagnosis for Monogenic Disorders in Regensburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hehr A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polar body diagnosis (PBD is currently the only legal option to perform a preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD in Germany. The results of PBD for monogenic disorders performed at our center in Regensburg since 2001 are reported. Our data show that PBD can be safely performed on first and second polar bodies within the tight timeframe provided by the German Embryo Protection Act. It requires extensive interdisciplinary counseling of the couple, good and close cooperation between the IVF center and the genetics laboratory as well as meticulous development, validation, and performance of the individual genetic assay. Provided that these prerequisites are met, PBD can today be an acceptable option for German couples at high risk for a particular monogenic disorder in their offspring. Main arguments pro PBD usually include a decline of both conventional prenatal diagnosis and subsequently induced abortion of an affected offspring as well as the birth of an affected child. Major disadvantages of PBD in this situation include the requirement of assisted reproduction for couples in the absence of any obvious fertility problems with their immanent obstacles like pregnancy rate, remaining recurrence risk for the particular monogenic disorder, costs etc. Furthermore, PBD can only be offered for mutations, which are passed on by the female partner with her nuclear DNA (autosomal dominant, X-chromosomal as well as autosomal recessive traits. For heterozygous female mutation carriers of autosomal recessive or X-chromosomal inherited disorders PBD requires discarding all oocytes carrying the mutation, although they may result in healthy offspring if the sperm does not carry the mutation or the Y chromosome, respectively. Finally, both PBD as well as PGD can substantially reduce the recurrence risk for a particular monogenic disorder but not diminish it entirely. Therefore, conventional prenatal diagnosis (PND should still be offered and in fact has been

  9. The cytoskeleton in neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Cairns, Nigel J.; Lee, Virginia M-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2004-01-01

    Abundant abnormal aggregates of cytoskeletal proteins are neuropathological signatures of many neurodegenerative diseases that are broadly classified by filamentous aggregates of neuronal intermediate filament (IF) proteins, or by inclusions containing the microtubule-associated protein (MAP) tau. The discovery of mutations in neuronal IF and tau genes firmly establishes the importance of neuronal IF proteins and tau in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Multiple IF gene mutation...

  10. The lysosome and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lisha Zhang; Rui Sheng; Zhenghong Qin

    2009-01-01

    It has long been believed that the lysosome is an important digestive organelle. There is increasing evidence that the lysosome is also involved in pathogenesis of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Abnormal protein degradation and deposition induced by lysosoreal dysfunction may be the primary contributor to age-related neurodegeneration. In this review, the possible relationship between lysosome and various neurodegenerative diseases is described.

  11. Chronic sleep disturbance and neural injury: links to neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbott SM

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sabra M Abbott,1 Aleksandar Videnovic21Department of Neurology, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Sleep–wake disruption is frequently observed and often one of the earliest reported symptoms of many neurodegenerative disorders. This provides insight into the underlying pathophysiology of these disorders, as sleep–wake abnormalities are often accompanied by neurodegenerative or neurotransmitter changes. However, in addition to being a symptom of the underlying neurodegenerative condition, there is also emerging evidence that sleep disturbance itself may contribute to the development and facilitate the progression of several of these disorders. Due to its impact both as an early symptom and as a potential factor contributing to ongoing neurodegeneration, the sleep–wake cycle is an ideal target for further study for potential interventions not only to lessen the burden of these diseases but also to slow their progression. In this review, we will highlight the sleep phenotypes associated with some of the major neurodegenerative disorders, focusing on the circadian disruption associated with Alzheimer’s disease, the rapid eye movement behavior disorder and sleep fragmentation associated with Parkinson’s disease, and the insomnia and circadian dysregulation associated with Huntington’s disease. Keywords: sleep, neurodegeneration, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease

  12. Diagnosis of Neurodegenerative Diseases: The Clinical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Río, Manuel; Caballero, Manuel Moreno; Górriz Sáez, Juan Manuel; Mínguez-Castellanos, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of clinical questions for which there are no easy answers, even for welltrained doctors. The diagnostic tool commonly used to assess cognitive impairment in neurodegenerative diseases is based on established clinical criteria. However, the differential diagnosis between disorders can be difficult, especially in early phases or atypical variants. This takes on particular importance when it is still possible to use an appropriate treatment. To solve this problem, physicians need to have access to an arsenal of diagnostic tests, such as neurofunctional imaging, that allow higher specificity in clinical assessment. However, the reliability of diagnostic tests may vary from one to the next, so the diagnostic validity of a given investigation must be estimated by comparing the results obtained from "true" criteria to the "gold standard" or reference test. While pathological analysis is considered to be the gold standard in a wide spectrum of diseases, it cannot be applied to neurological processes. Other approaches could provide solutions, including clinical patient follow-up, creation of a data bank or use of computer-aided diagnostic algorithms. In this article, we discuss the development of different methodological procedures related to analysis of diagnostic validity and present an example from our own experience based on the use of I-123-ioflupane-SPECT in the study of patients with movement disorders. The aim of this chapter is to approach the problem of diagnosis from the point of view of the clinician, taking into account specific aspects of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26567736

  13. Apraxias in neurodegenerative dementias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Apraxia is a state of inability to carry out a learned motor act in the absence of motor, sensory or cerebellar defect on command processed through the Praxis circuit. Breakdown in default networking is one of the early dysfunction in cortical dementias and result in perplexity, awkwardness, omission, substitution errors, toying behavior and unrecognizable gestures in response to command with voluntary reflex dissociation where, when unobserved patient will carry out reflex movements normally. Awareness into the organicity of these phenomenas will help in early diagnosis, which will help in initiating appropriate treatment and slowing down the progression of the disease. Aims and Objectives: The aim was to look for the various kinds of apraxias in patients with dementia using appropriate simple tests. Patients and Methods: Three hundred patients satisfying Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for dementia were evaluated in detail with mandatory investigations for dementia followed by testing for ideational, ideomotor, limb-kinetic, buccopharyngeal, dressing apraxia, constructional apraxia and gait apraxias in addition to recording of rare apraxias when present. Results: Alzheimer′s disease showed maximum association with apraxias in all the phases of the disease ideational, ideomotor, dressing and constructional apraxias early and buccopharyngeal and gait apraxia late. Frontotemporal lobe dementia showed buccopharyngeal and gait apraxias late into the disease. Cortical basal ganglionic degeneration showed limb apraxias and diffuse Lewy body disease showed more agnosias and less apraxias common apraxias seen was Ideational and Ideomotor. Conclusion: Recognition of the apraxias help in establishing organicity, categorization, caregiver education, early strategies for treatment, avoiding anti-psychotics and introducing disease modifying pharmacotherapeutic agents and also prognosticating.

  14. Anaesthetic management of a child with congenital afibrinogenemia - A rare inherited coagulation disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sham Sunder Goyal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital afibrinogenemia is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder, results from mutation that affects plasma fibrinogen concentration. It is frequently associated with bleeding diathesis of varying severity. We describe the case of a 10-year-old child diagnosed of congenital afibrinogenemia who presented to hospital with subperiosteal haematoma and was posted for incision and drainage. Replacement therapy is the mainstay of treatment of bleeding episodes in this patient and plasma-derived fibrinogen concentrate is the agent of choice. Cryoprecipitate and fresh frozen plasma are alternative treatments. Appropriate amount of cryoprecipitate were transfused pre-operatively to the child. Individuals with congenital afibrinogenemia should be managed by a comprehensive bleeding disorder care team experienced in diagnosing and managing inherited bleeding disorders. Anaesthesiologist, surgeons and haematologist should work like a unit to manage the surgical emergencies.

  15. Neurodegenerative Diseases: Multifactorial Conformational Diseases and Their Therapeutic Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Sheikh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are multifactorial debilitating disorders of the nervous system that affect approximately 30 millionindividuals worldwide. Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis diseases are the consequence of misfolding and dysfunctional trafficking of proteins. Beside that, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and/or environmental factors strongly associated with age have also been implicated in causing neurodegeneration. After years of intensive research, considerable evidence has accumulated that demonstrates an important role of these factors in the etiology of common neurodegenerative diseases. Despite the extensive efforts that have attempted to define the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration, many aspects of these pathologies remain elusive. However, in order to explore the therapeutic interventions directed towards treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, neuroscientists are now fully exploiting the data obtained from studies of these basic mechanisms that have gone awry. The novelty of these mechanisms represents a challenge to the identification of viable drug targets and biomarkers for early diagnosis of the diseases. In this paper, we are reviewing various aspects associated with the disease and the recent trends that may have an application for the treatment of the neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Targeting New Candidate Genes by Small Molecules Approaching Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hueng-Chuen Fan; Ching-Shiang Chi; Shin-Nan Cheng; Hsiu-Fen Lee; Jeng-Dau Tsai; Shinn-Zong Lin; Horng-Jyh Harn

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) are among the most feared of the disorders that afflict humankind for the lack of specific diagnostic tests and effective treatments. Understanding the molecular, cellular, biochemical changes of NDs may hold therapeutic promise against debilitating central nerve system (CNS) disorders. In the present review, we summarized the clinical presentations and biology backgrounds of NDs, including Parkinson’s disease (PD), Huntington’s disease (HD), and Alzheimer’s d...

  17. Chronic sleep disturbance and neural injury: links to neurodegenerative disease

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott SM; Videnovic A

    2016-01-01

    Sabra M Abbott,1 Aleksandar Videnovic21Department of Neurology, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Sleep–wake disruption is frequently observed and often one of the earliest reported symptoms of many neurodegenerative disorders. This provides insight into the underlying pathophysiology of these disorders, as sleep–wake abnormalities are often accomp...

  18. Chronic sleep disturbance and neural injury: links to neurodegenerative disease

    OpenAIRE

    Videnovic, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Sabra M Abbott,1 Aleksandar Videnovic21Department of Neurology, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Sleep–wake disruption is frequently observed and often one of the earliest reported symptoms of many neurodegenerative disorders. This provides insight into the underlying pathophysiology of these disorders, as sleep–wake abnormalities are ofte...

  19. A RARE METABOLIC DISORDER: POMPE’S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazeer Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by the buildup of a sugar called glycogen in the body’s cells.1,2 It is caused by an accumulation of glycogen in the lysosome due to deficiency or absence of the enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA. The enzyme GAA is used to breakdown glycogen into a simpler sugar, glucose.3 It is characterised by progressive weakness in the muscles used for mobility and breathing. In infants with Pompe disease, the heart muscles are often severely affected as well.4,7 The cells of the heart and skeletal muscles are affected the most.It is caused by a mutation in a gene (Acid alpha-glucosidase: also known as acid maltase on long arm of chromosome 17 at 17q25.2-q25.3.. Without treatment the disease is particularly lethal in infants and young children.8

  20. Diagnosing Lysosomal Storage Disorders: The GM2 Gangliosidoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Patricia; Minnich, Sara; Teigen, Claire; Raymond, Kimiyo

    2014-01-01

    The GM2 gangliosidoses are a group of autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorders caused by defective β-hexosaminidase. There are three clinical conditions in this group: Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), Sandhoff disease (SD), and hexosaminidase activator deficiency. The three conditions are clinically indistinguishable. TSD and SD have been identified with infantile, juvenile, and adult onset forms. The activator deficiency is only known to present with infantile onset. Diagnosis of TSD and SD is based on decreased hexosaminidase activity and a change in the percentage of activity between isoforms. There are no biochemical tests currently available for activator deficiency. This unit provides a detailed procedure for identifying TSD and SD in affected individuals and carriers from leukocyte samples, the most robust sample type available. PMID:25271840

  1. Role of autophagy in prion protein-induced neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Yao; Deming Zhao; Sher Hayat Khan; Lifeng Yang

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases,characterized by spongiform degeneration and the accumulation of misfolded and aggregated PrPSc in the central nervous system,are one of fatal neurodegenerative and infectious disorders of humans and animals.In earlier studies,autophagy vacuoles in neurons were frequently observed in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's,Parkinson's,and Huntington's diseases as well as prion diseases.Autophagy is a highly conserved homeostatic process by which several cytoplasmic components (proteins or organelles) are sequestered in a doublemembrane-bound vesicle termed 'autophagosome' and degraded upon their fusion with lysosome.The pathway of intercellular self-digestion at basal physiological levels is indispensable for maintaining the healthy status of tissues and organs.In case of prion infection,increasing evidence indicates that autophagy has a crucial ability of eliminating pathological PrPSc accumulated within neurons.In contrast,autophagy dysfunction in affected neurons may contribute to the formation of spongiform changes.In this review,we summarized recent findings about the effect of mammalian autophagy in neurodegenerative disorders,particularly in prion diseases.We also summarized the therapeutic potential of some small molecules (such as lithium,rapamycin,Sirtuin 1 and resveratrol) targets to mitigate such diseases on brain function.Furthermore,we discussed the controversial role of autophagy,whether it mediates neuronal toxicity or serves a protective function in neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. Stem Cells for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by neurodegenerative changes or apoptosis of neurons involved in networks, leading to permanent paralysis and loss of sensation below the site of the injury. Cell replacement therapy has provided the basis for the development of potentially powerful new therapeutic strategies for a broad spectrum of human neurological diseases. In recent years, neurons and glial cells have successfully been generated from stem cells, and extensive efforts by investigators to develop stem cell-based brain transplantation therapies have been carried out. We review here notable previously published experimental and preclinical studies involving stem cell-based cell for neurodegenerative diseases and discuss the future prospects for stem cell therapy of neurological disorders in the clinical setting. Steady and solid progress in stem cell research in both basic and preclinical settings should support the hope for development of stem cell-based cell therapies for neurological diseases.

  3. Redox Imbalance and Viral Infections in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Limongi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are essential molecules for many physiological functions and act as second messengers in a large variety of tissues. An imbalance in the production and elimination of ROS is associated with human diseases including neurodegenerative disorders. In the last years the notion that neurodegenerative diseases are accompanied by chronic viral infections, which may result in an increase of neurodegenerative diseases progression, emerged. It is known in literature that enhanced viral infection risk, observed during neurodegeneration, is partly due to the increase of ROS accumulation in brain cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of viral infection, occurring during the progression of neurodegeneration, remain unclear. In this review, we discuss the recent knowledge regarding the role of influenza, herpes simplex virus type-1, and retroviruses infection in ROS/RNS-mediated Parkinson’s disease (PD, Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS.

  4. Resurrection of Neurodegenerative diseases via Stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siranjeevi Nagaraj

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs are complex disorders that degenerates central nervous system. To this end, we have achieved only palliative treatments and their success is limited. Emerging studies suggest stem cells could be an alternative to recover lost neural network. Transplanting stem cells for replacing damaged neurons is a pivotal step in cell replacement therapies. In this article, NDDs and their pathology, current methods of combating NDDs and potentiality of stem cells in treating NDDs have been reviewed briefly. In addition to this , technical issues that hamper clinical applications of stem cells in creating cellular models and grafted cells for neuron resurrection have been discussed. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(7.000: 699-706

  5. Quantitative interaction proteomics of neurodegenerative disease proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosp, Fabian; Vossfeldt, Hannes; Heinig, Matthias; Vasiljevic, Djordje; Arumughan, Anup; Wyler, Emanuel; Landthaler, Markus; Hubner, Norbert; Wanker, Erich E; Lannfelt, Lars; Ingelsson, Martin; Lalowski, Maciej; Voigt, Aaron; Selbach, Matthias

    2015-05-19

    Several proteins have been linked to neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs), but their molecular function is not completely understood. Here, we used quantitative interaction proteomics to identify binding partners of Amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) and Presenilin-1 (PSEN1) for Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntingtin (HTT) for Huntington's disease, Parkin (PARK2) for Parkinson's disease, and Ataxin-1 (ATXN1) for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1. Our network reveals common signatures of protein degradation and misfolding and recapitulates known biology. Toxicity modifier screens and comparison to genome-wide association studies show that interaction partners are significantly linked to disease phenotypes in vivo. Direct comparison of wild-type proteins and disease-associated variants identified binders involved in pathogenesis, highlighting the value of differential interactome mapping. Finally, we show that the mitochondrial protein LRPPRC interacts preferentially with an early-onset AD variant of APP. This interaction appears to induce mitochondrial dysfunction, which is an early phenotype of AD. PMID:25959826

  6. Knock-down of pantothenate kinase 2 severely affects the development of the nervous and vascular system in zebrafish, providing new insights into PKAN disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zizioli, Daniela; Tiso, Natascia; Guglielmi, Adele; Saraceno, Claudia; Busolin, Giorgia; Giuliani, Roberta; Khatri, Deepak; Monti, Eugenio; Borsani, Giuseppe; Argenton, Francesco; Finazzi, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Pantothenate Kinase Associated Neurodegeneration (PKAN) is an autosomal recessive disorder with mutations in the pantothenate kinase 2 gene (PANK2), encoding an essential enzyme for Coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. The molecular connection between defects in this enzyme and the neurodegenerative phenotype observed in PKAN patients is still poorly understood. We exploited the zebrafish model to study the role played by the pank2 gene during embryonic development and get new insight into PKAN pat...

  7. Oxidative Stress and Regulation of Pink1 in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    OpenAIRE

    Priyadarshini, Madhusmita; Orosco, Lori A; Panula, Pertti J.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress-mediated neuronal dysfunction is characteristic of several neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson’s disease (PD). The enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the formation of L-DOPA, the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of dopamine. A lack of dopamine in the striatum is the most characteristic feature of PD, and the cause of the most dominant symptoms. Loss of function mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase (PINK1) gene cause autosomal recessive PD. ...

  8. Elucidating the functional interplay between Parkinson’s disease-related proteins and the mitochondrion

    OpenAIRE

    Bertolin, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder of unknown etiology, affecting nearly 5% of the world population over the age of 80. Nearly 10% of PD cases are familial forms with Mendelian inheritance pattern. Mitochondrial dysfunction has long been suspected to play a role in the physiopathology of sporadic PD. This possibility has been recently corroborated by major discoveries in the field of autosomal recessive PD. Parkin and PINK1, the products of two genes associated wi...

  9. Electrophysiological and Histological Characterization of Rod-Cone Retinal Degeneration and Microglia Activation in a Mouse Model of Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB

    OpenAIRE

    Tse, Dennis Y; Parisa Lotfi; Simons, David L.; Marco Sardiello; Wu, Samuel M.

    2015-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome Type B or Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB (MPS IIIB) is a neurodegenerative autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder in which patients suffer severe vision loss from associated retinopathy. Here we sought to study the underlying retinal functional and morphological changes associated with MPS IIIB disease progression using the established model of MPS IIIB, the B6.129S6-Naglu(tm1Efn)/J mouse line. Electroretinogram (ERG) was recorded from MPS IIIB and wild-type (WT) mice ...

  10. Friedreich Ataxia and Diabetes Mellitus: family study

    OpenAIRE

    Melo, M; Fagulha, A; Barros, L.; Guimarães, J; Carrilho, F; Carvalheiro, M

    2005-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FA) is one of the genetic syndromes sometimes associated with diabetes and the most common hereditary ataxia. It is a autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease, caused by a mutation in the FRDA gene, which originates decreased expression of frataxin, a mitochondrial protein involved in iron metabolism. The disorder is usually manifest in childhood and is characterised by ataxia, dysarthria, scoliosis and feet deformity. About two thirds of patients have hypertrophic c...

  11. Ataksi-Telenjiektazi: İki Kardeş Olgunun Sunumu

    OpenAIRE

    Çatal, Ferhat; Aslan, Mahmut; Topal, Erdem; Ermiştekin, Halime; Sinanoğlu, M. Selçuk

    2014-01-01

    Characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, cutaneous and conjuctival telangiectasia, ocular apraxy, immunodeficiency, and increased risk of malignancy, ataxia-telangiectasia is a rare neurodegenerative disorder that shows signs of autosomal recessive transmission. The ataxia-telangiectasia gene is located in chromosome 11q22-23. Various degrees of abnormalities in T and B cell immunities have also been described. It is known that the incidence of both T cell and B cell leukemia and lymph...

  12. Uncovering the roles of PINK1 and parkin in mitophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, Noriyuki; Tanaka, Keiji

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder, and thus elucidation of the pathogenic mechanism and establishment of a fundamental cure is essential in terms of public welfare. Fortunately, our understanding of the pathogenesis of two types of recessive familial PDs—early-onset familial PD caused by dysfunction of the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) gene and autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinsonism (ARJP) caused by a mutation in the Parkin gene—has evo...

  13. Exclusion of PINK1 as candidate gene for the late-onset form of Parkinson's disease in two European populations

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller Thomas; Woitalla Dirk; Larsen Jan P; Kurz Martin; Schlitter Anna; Epplen Joerg T; Dekomien Gabriele

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. Recently, mutations in the PINK1 (PARK6) gene were shown to rarely cause autosomal-recessively transmitted, early-onset parkinsonism. In order to evaluate whether PINK1 contributes to the risk of common late-onset PD we analysed PINK1 sequence variations. A German (85 patients) and a Norwegian cohort (90 patients) suffering from late-onset PD were screened for mutations and single nucleotide pol...

  14. Hepatic but not brain iron is rapidly chelated by deferasirox in aceruloplasminemia due to a novel gene mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Finkenstedt, Armin; Wolf, Elisabeth; Höfner, Elmar; Gasser, Bethina Isasi; Bösch, Sylvia; Bakry, Rania; Creus, Marc; Kremser, Christian; Schocke, Michael; Theurl, Milan; Moser, Patrizia; Schranz, Melanie; Bonn, Guenther; Poewe, Werner; Vogel, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Aceruloplasminemia is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease associated with brain and liver iron accumulation which typically presents with movement disorders, retinal degeneration, and diabetes mellitus. Ceruloplasmin is a multi-copper ferroxidase that is secreted into plasma and facilitates cellular iron export and iron binding to transferrin. Results A novel homozygous ceruloplasmin gene mutation, c.2554+1G>T, was identified as the cause of aceruloplasminem...

  15. GM2 gangliosidosis AB variant: novel mutation from India – a case report with a review

    OpenAIRE

    Sheth, Jayesh; Datar, Chaitanya; Mistri, Mehul; Bhavsar, Riddhi; Sheth, Frenny; Shah, Krati

    2016-01-01

    Background GM2 gangliosidosis-AB variants a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder occurring due to deficiency of GM2 activator protein resulting from the mutation in GM2A gene. Only seven mutations in nine cases have been reported from different population except India. Case presentation Present case is a one year old male born to 3rd degree consanguineous Indian parents from Maharashtra. He was presented with global developmental delay, hypotonia and sensitive to hyperacusis. H...

  16. Three Novel Mutations in Iranian Patients with Tay-Sachs Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jamali, Solmaz; Eskandari, Nasim; Aryani, Omid; Salehpour, Shadab; Zaman, Talieh; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Houshmand, Massoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), or GM2 gangliosidosis, is a lethal autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, which is caused by a deficiency of beta-hexosaminidase A (HEXA), resulting in lysosomal accumulation of GM2 ganglioside. The aim of this study was to identify the TSD-causing mutations in an Iranian population. Methods: In this study, we examined 31 patients for TSD-causing mutations using PCR, followed by restriction enzyme digestion. Results: Molecular genetics analysis of...

  17. Mucolipidosis Type IV: an Update

    OpenAIRE

    Wakabayashi, Kazuyo; Gustafson, Ann Marie; Sidransky, Ellen; Goldin, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is a neurodevelopmental as well as neurodegenerative disorder with severe psychomotor developmental delay, progressive visual impairment, and achlorydria. It is characterized by the presence of lysosomal inclusions in many cell types in patients. MLIV is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in MCOLN1, which encodes for mucolipin-1, a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel family. Although approximately 70-80% of patients iden...

  18. Transgenic nonhuman primates for neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Anthony WS

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Animal models that represent human diseases constitute an important tool in understanding the pathogenesis of the diseases, and in developing effective therapies. Neurodegenerative diseases are complex disorders involving neuropathologic and psychiatric alterations. Although transgenic and knock-in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD and Huntington's disease (HD have been created, limited representation in clinical aspects has been recognized and the rodent models lack true neurodegeneration. Chemical induction of HD and PD in nonhuman primates (NHP has been reported, however, the role of intrinsic genetic factors in the development of the diseases is indeterminable. Nonhuman primates closely parallel humans with regard to genetic, neuroanatomic, and cognitive/behavioral characteristics. Accordingly, the development of NHP models for neurodegenerative diseases holds greater promise for success in the discovery of diagnoses, treatments, and cures than approaches using other animal species. Therefore, a transgenic NHP carrying a mutant gene similar to that of patients will help to clarify our understanding of disease onset and progression. Additionally, monitoring disease onset and development in the transgenic NHP by high resolution brain imaging technology such as MRI, and behavioral and cognitive testing can all be carried out simultaneously in the NHP but not in other animal models. Moreover, because of the similarity in motor repertoire between NHPs and humans, it will also be possible to compare the neurologic syndrome observed in the NHP model to that in patients. Understanding the correlation between genetic defects and physiologic changes (e.g. oxidative damage will lead to a better understanding of disease progression and the development of patient treatments, medications and preventive approaches for high risk individuals. The impact of the transgenic NHP model in understanding the role which

  19. Protective effects of isolecanoric acid on neurodegenerative in vitro models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pedro, Nuria; Cantizani, Juan; Ortiz-López, Francisco Javier; González-Menéndez, Victor; Cautain, Bastien; Rodríguez, Lorena; Bills, Gerald F; Reyes, Fernando; Genilloud, Olga; Vicente, Francisca

    2016-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), are neurodegenerative disorders characterized by loss of dopaminergic or motor neurons, respectively. Although understanding of the PD and ALS pathogenesis remains incomplete, increasing evidence from human and animal studies has suggested that aberrant GSK3β, oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage are involved in their pathogenesis. Using two different molecular models, treatment with L-BMAA for ALS and rotenone for PD the effect of isolecanoric acid, a natural product isolated from a fungal culture, was evaluated. Pre-treatment with this molecule caused inhibition of GSK3β and CK1, and a decrease in oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, apoptosis and cell death. Taken together, these results indicated that isolecanoric acid might have a protective effect against the development of these neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26455662

  20. Neurofilament proteins in axonal regeneration and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haitao Wang; Minfei Wu; Chuanjun Zhan; Enyuan Ma; Maoguang Yang; Xiaoyu Yang; Yingpu Li

    2012-01-01

    Neurofilament protein is a component of the mature neuronal cytoskeleton, and it interacts with the zygosome, which is mediated by neurofilament-related proteins. Neurofilament protein regulates enzyme function and the structure of linker proteins. In addition, neurofilament gene expression plays an important role in nervous system development. Previous studies have shown that neurofilament gene transcriptional regulation is crucial for neurofilament protein expression, especially in axonal regeneration and degenerative diseases. Post-transcriptional regulation increased neurofilament protein gene transcription during axonal regeneration, ultimately resulting in a pattern of neurofilament protein expression. An expression imbalance of post-transcriptional regulatory proteins and other disorders could lead to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or other neurodegenerative diseases. These findings indicated that after transcription, neurofilament protein regulated expression of related proteins and promoted regeneration of damaged axons, suggesting that regulation disorders could lead to neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Neurodegenerative diseases: exercising towards neurogenesis and neuroregeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eng-Tat Ang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is still no effective therapy for neurodegenerative diseases (NDD such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD and Parkinson’s disease (PD despite intensive research and on-going clinical trials. Collectively, these diseases account for the bulk of health care burden associated with age-related neurodegenerative disorders. There is therefore an urgent need to further research into the molecular pathogenesis, histological differentiation, and clinical management of NDD. Importantly, there is also an urgency to understand the similarities and differences between these two diseases so as to identify the common or different upstream and downstream signaling pathways. In this review, the role iron play in NDD will be highlighted, as iron is key to a common underlying pathway in the production of oxidative stress. There is increasing evidence to suggest that oxidative stress predisposed cells to undergo damage to DNA, protein and lipid, and as such a common factor involved in the pathogenesis of AD and PD. The challenge then is to minimize elevated and uncontrolled oxidative stress levels while not affecting basal iron metabolism, as iron plays vital roles in sustaining cellular function. However, overload of iron results in increased oxidative stress due to the Fenton reaction. We discuss evidence to suggest that sustained exercise and diet restriction may be ways to slow the rate of neurodegeneration, by perhaps promoting neurogenesis or antioxidant-related pathways. It is also our intention to cover NDD in a broad sense, in the context of basic and clinical sciences to cater for both clinician’s and the scientist’s needs, and to highlight current research investigating exercise as a therapeutic or preventive measure.

  2. Two siblings with immunodeficiency, facial abnormalities and chromosomal instability without mutation in DNMT3B gene but liability towards malignancy; a new chromatin disorder delineation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neitzel Heidemarie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ICF syndrome (standing for Immunodeficiency, Centromere instability and Facial anomalies syndrome is a very rare autosomal recessive immune disorder caused by mutations of the gene de novo DNA-methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B. However, in the literature similar clinical cases without such mutations are reported, as well. Results We report on a family in which the unrelated spouses had two female siblings sharing similar phenotypic features resembling ICF-syndrome, i.e. congenital abnormalities, immunodeficiency, developmental delay and high level of chromosomal instability, including high frequency of centromeric/pericentromeric rearrangements and breaks, chromosomal fragments despiralization or pulverization. However, mutations in DNMT3B could not be detected. Conclusion The discovery of a new so-called 'chromatin disorder' is suggested. Clinical, molecular genetic and cytogenetic characteristics are reported and compared to other 'chromatin disorders'.

  3. Clinicopathologic assessment and imaging of tauopathies in neurodegenerative dementias

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Melissa E.; Kouri, Naomi; Lin, Wen-Lang; Jack, Clifford R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Vemuri, Prashanthi

    2014-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau encoded by the MAPT gene binds to microtubules and is important for maintaining neuronal morphology and function. Alternative splicing of MAPT pre-mRNA generates six major tau isoforms in the adult central nervous system resulting in tau proteins with three or four microtubule-binding repeat domains. In a group of neurodegenerative disorders called tauopathies, tau becomes aberrantly hyperphosphorylated and dissociates from microtubules, resulting in a progr...

  4. Tau imaging in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, M; Brooks, D J; Edison, P

    2016-06-01

    Aggregated tau protein is a major neuropathological substrate central to the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. In AD, it has been shown that the density of hyperphosphorylated tau tangles correlates closely with neuronal dysfunction and cell death, unlike β-amyloid. Until now, diagnostic and pathologic information about tau deposition has only been available from invasive techniques such as brain biopsy or autopsy. The recent development of selective in-vivo tau PET imaging ligands including [(18)F]THK523, [(18)F]THK5117, [(18)F]THK5105 and [(18)F]THK5351, [(18)F]AV1451(T807) and [(11)C]PBB3 has provided information about the role of tau in the early phases of neurodegenerative diseases, and provided support for diagnosis, prognosis, and imaging biomarkers to track disease progression. Moreover, the spatial and longitudinal relationship of tau distribution compared with β - amyloid and other pathologies in these diseases can be mapped. In this review, we discuss the role of aggregated tau in tauopathies, the challenges posed in developing selective tau ligands as biomarkers, the state of development in tau tracers, and the new clinical information that has been uncovered, as well as the opportunities for improving diagnosis and designing clinical trials in the future. PMID:26572762

  5. Tau imaging in neurodegenerative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dani, M.; Edison, P. [Imperial College London, Neurology Imaging Unit, Division of Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom); Brooks, D.J. [Imperial College London, Neurology Imaging Unit, Division of Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom); Aarhus University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2016-06-15

    Aggregated tau protein is a major neuropathological substrate central to the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. In AD, it has been shown that the density of hyperphosphorylated tau tangles correlates closely with neuronal dysfunction and cell death, unlike β-amyloid. Until now, diagnostic and pathologic information about tau deposition has only been available from invasive techniques such as brain biopsy or autopsy. The recent development of selective in-vivo tau PET imaging ligands including [{sup 18}F]THK523, [{sup 18}F]THK5117, [{sup 18}F]THK5105 and [{sup 18}F]THK5351, [{sup 18}F]AV1451(T807) and [{sup 11}C]PBB3 has provided information about the role of tau in the early phases of neurodegenerative diseases, and provided support for diagnosis, prognosis, and imaging biomarkers to track disease progression. Moreover, the spatial and longitudinal relationship of tau distribution compared with β - amyloid and other pathologies in these diseases can be mapped. In this review, we discuss the role of aggregated tau in tauopathies, the challenges posed in developing selective tau ligands as biomarkers, the state of development in tau tracers, and the new clinical information that has been uncovered, as well as the opportunities for improving diagnosis and designing clinical trials in the future. (orig.)

  6. Cerebrotendinous Xanthomatosis with Psychiatric Disorders: Report of Three Siblings and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lee

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX, a rare familial lipid metabolic disease inheritedvia an autosomal recessive trait, is caused by mutations of the sterol 27-hydroxylase gene.Psychiatric disorders may occur in patients with CTX. In Taiwan, Chang et al presentedpatients with CTX. However, there has not been a case presented about CTX with psychiatricdisorders in Taiwan. We present three siblings in one family with CTX combined withmoderate mental retardation. One of the siblings had long-term depressed mood, irritability,poor appetite, insomnia, fatigability, and pessimistic thinking and was diagnosed as dysthymicdisorder. After 2.5 years of antidepressant treatment at our outpatient clinic, thedepressive symptoms of the dysthymic sibling improved greatly. However, the results of theIQ tests of the three siblings did not change after effective treatments for physical manifestationsof CTX. In addition, the authors reviewed the literature of CTX combined with psychiatricdisorders.

  7. Quantitative analysis on electrooculography (EOG) for neurodegenerative disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Chia; Chaovalitwongse, W. Art; Pardalos, Panos M.; Seref, Onur; Xanthopoulos, Petros; Sackellares, J. C.; Skidmore, Frank M.

    2007-11-01

    Many studies have documented abnormal horizontal and vertical eye movements in human neurodegenerative disease as well as during altered states of consciousness (including drowsiness and intoxication) in healthy adults. Eye movement measurement may play an important role measuring the progress of neurodegenerative diseases and state of alertness in healthy individuals. There are several techniques for measuring eye movement, Infrared detection technique (IR). Video-oculography (VOG), Scleral eye coil and EOG. Among those available recording techniques, EOG is a major source for monitoring the abnormal eye movement. In this real-time quantitative analysis study, the methods which can capture the characteristic of the eye movement were proposed to accurately categorize the state of neurodegenerative subjects. The EOG recordings were taken while 5 tested subjects were watching a short (>120 s) animation clip. In response to the animated clip the participants executed a number of eye movements, including vertical smooth pursued (SVP), horizontal smooth pursued (HVP) and random saccades (RS). Detection of abnormalities in ocular movement may improve our diagnosis and understanding a neurodegenerative disease and altered states of consciousness. A standard real-time quantitative analysis will improve detection and provide a better understanding of pathology in these disorders.

  8. Reverse engineering human neurodegenerative disease using pluripotent stem cell technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Deng, Wenbin

    2016-05-01

    With the technology of reprogramming somatic cells by introducing defined transcription factors that enables the generation of "induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)" with pluripotency comparable to that of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), it has become possible to use this technology to produce various cells and tissues that have been difficult to obtain from living bodies. This advancement is bringing forth rapid progress in iPSC-based disease modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine. More and more studies have demonstrated that phenotypes of adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders could be rather faithfully recapitulated in iPSC-derived neural cell cultures. Moreover, despite the adult-onset nature of the diseases, pathogenic phenotypes and cellular abnormalities often exist in early developmental stages, providing new "windows of opportunity" for understanding mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders and for discovering new medicines. The cell reprogramming technology enables a reverse engineering approach for modeling the cellular degenerative phenotypes of a wide range of human disorders. An excellent example is the study of the human neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using iPSCs. ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of upper and lower motor neurons (MNs), culminating in muscle wasting and death from respiratory failure. The iPSC approach provides innovative cell culture platforms to serve as ALS patient-derived model systems. Researchers have converted iPSCs derived from ALS patients into MNs and various types of glial cells, all of which are involved in ALS, to study the disease. The iPSC technology could be used to determine the role of specific genetic factors to track down what׳s wrong in the neurodegenerative disease process in the "disease-in-a-dish" model. Meanwhile, parallel experiments of targeting the same specific genes in human ESCs could also be performed to

  9. A Comparative Survey of the Topographical Distribution of Signature Molecular Lesions in Major Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Steven E.; Toledo, Jon B.; Appleby, Dina H; Xie, Sharon X.; Wang, Li-San; Baek, Young; David A Wolk; Lee, Edward B.; Miller, Bruce L.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of the anatomic distributions of major neurodegenerative disease lesions is important to appreciate the differential clinical profiles of these disorders and to serve as neuropathological standards for emerging molecular neuroimaging methods. To address these issues, here we present a comparative survey of the topographical distribution of the defining molecular neuropathological lesions among ten neurodegenerative diseases from a large and uniformly assessed brain collection...

  10. Genistein Improves Neuropathology and Corrects Behaviour in a Mouse Model of Neurodegenerative Metabolic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelina Malinowska; Wilkinson, Fiona L.; Langford-Smith, Kia J; Alex Langford-Smith; Brown, Jillian R.; Crawford, Brett E.; Marie T Vanier; Grzegorz Grynkiewicz; Rob F Wynn; J Ed Wraith; Grzegorz Wegrzyn; Bigger, Brian W.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neurodegenerative metabolic disorders such as mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB (MPSIIIB or Sanfilippo disease) accumulate undegraded substrates in the brain and are often unresponsive to enzyme replacement treatments due to the impermeability of the blood brain barrier to enzyme. MPSIIIB is characterised by behavioural difficulties, cognitive and later motor decline, with death in the second decade of life. Most of these neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases lack effective treatm...

  11. Computed tomography of neurodegenerative disease in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serial computed tomographic scans were performed on seven children with neurodegenerative disorders. In two cases of white-matter diseases (Krabbe's disease and metachromatic leukodystrophy), diffuse, low-density lesions of white matter were visible in the early stage of the diseases. In one case of adrenoleukodystrophy, regional low-density lesions of the white matter around the posterior horns and peculiar high-density strip lesions were visible in the early stage. In two cases of storage-type gray-matter diseases (Tay-Sachs' and infantile Gaucher's disease), there were no abnormalities in the early stage, but diffuse cortical atrophies in the late stage. In one case of Leigh's disease, there were small, low-density lesions of the basal ganglia and multiple low-density lesions of the gray matter in the early stage. In one case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, there were no abnormalities in the early stage, but small, low-density lesions of the basal ganglia and diffuse cerebral atrophies in the late stage. Diagnostic values were recognized dominantly in two cases of adrenoleukodystrophy and Leigh's disease. In the other cases, however, serial CT scans were useful in the diagnostic process. (author)

  12. Quantitative Interaction Proteomics of Neurodegenerative Disease Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Hosp

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Several proteins have been linked to neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs, but their molecular function is not completely understood. Here, we used quantitative interaction proteomics to identify binding partners of Amyloid beta precursor protein (APP and Presenilin-1 (PSEN1 for Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Huntingtin (HTT for Huntington’s disease, Parkin (PARK2 for Parkinson’s disease, and Ataxin-1 (ATXN1 for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1. Our network reveals common signatures of protein degradation and misfolding and recapitulates known biology. Toxicity modifier screens and comparison to genome-wide association studies show that interaction partners are significantly linked to disease phenotypes in vivo. Direct comparison of wild-type proteins and disease-associated variants identified binders involved in pathogenesis, highlighting the value of differential interactome mapping. Finally, we show that the mitochondrial protein LRPPRC interacts preferentially with an early-onset AD variant of APP. This interaction appears to induce mitochondrial dysfunction, which is an early phenotype of AD.

  13. cNEUPRO: Novel Biomarkers for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Spitzer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available “clinical NEUroPROteomics of neurodegenerative diseases” (cNEUPRO is a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP within the sixth framework program of the European Commission dedicated to the search for novel biomarker candidates for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. The ultimate goal of cNEUPRO is to identify one or more valid biomarker(s in blood and CSF applicable to support the early and differential diagnosis of dementia disorders. The consortium covers all steps required for the discovery of novel biomarker candidates such as acquisition of high quality CSF and blood samples from relevant patient groups and controls, analysis of body fluids by various methods, and finally assay development and assay validation. Here we report the standardized procedures for diagnosis and preanalytical sample-handling within the project, as well as the status of the ongoing research activities and some first results.

  14. Prenatal diagnosis of Pena-Shokeir syndrome as a rare lethal disorder influencing fetal neuromusculary system: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Danışman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pena-Shokeir syndrome type I (fetal akinesia deformation sequence, FADS is a mostly autosomal recessive lethal disorder characterised by combination of abnormal limb position, restrictive fetal movement with reduced or absent response to acoustic stimulation, growth restriction, polyhydramnios, and pulmonary hypoplasia. Limb defects like camptodactyly, rocker bottom feet and clubfoot are other prominents of the syndrome. Obstetric ultrasonographic examination of a 24-year-old pregnant woman, consanguineous with her husband, revealed a single male fetus with contractures of the upper and the lower limbs and polyhydramnios due to the absence of swallowing, persistent flexion of the bilateral wrist, elbow joints and the knee joints consistent with Pena Shokeir syndrome phenotype. The parents were informed about the diagnosis and its poor prognosis. Fetus had no viability, therefore the termination of the pregnancy was offered to the parents and they accepted. We report the prenatal and postnatal sonographic, pathologic and genetic diagnostic features of a Pena-Shokeir syndrome case.

  15. Amyloidosis in Retinal Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzzo, Ambra; Dinet, Virginie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Mascarelli, Frederic; Krantic, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    As a part of the central nervous system, the retina may reflect both physiological processes and abnormalities related to pathologies that affect the brain. Amyloidosis due to the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) was initially regarded as a specific and exclusive characteristic of neurodegenerative alterations seen in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. More recently, it was discovered that amyloidosis-related alterations, similar to those seen in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients, also occur in the retina. Remarkably, these alterations were identified not only in primary retinal pathologies, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma, but also in the retinas of Alzheimer’s patients. In this review, we first briefly discuss the biogenesis of Aβ, a peptide involved in amyloidosis. We then discuss some pathological aspects (synaptic dysfunction, mitochondrial failure, glial activation, and vascular abnormalities) related to the neurotoxic effects of Aβ. We finally highlight common features shared by AD, AMD, and glaucoma in the context of Aβ amyloidosis and further discuss why the retina, due to the transparency of the eye, can be considered as a “window” to the brain. PMID:27551275

  16. Disease: H00449 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00449 Oculodentodigital dysplasia Oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) is an inherited disorder i ... thalmological and clinical manifestations in three boys ... with probably autosomal recessive inheritance. Oph ...

  17. Neuroimaging diagnosis in neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dementia affects about 8% of people age 65 years and older. Identification of dementia is particularly difficult in its early phases when family members and physicians often incorrectly attribute the patients symptoms to normal aging. The most frequently occurring ailments that are connected with neuro degeneration are: Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and multiple sclerosis. A variety of powerful techniques that have allowed visualization of organ structure and function with exact detail have been introduced in the last twenty-five years. One such neuroimaging technique is positron emission tomography (PET), which measures in detail the functioning of distinct areas of the human brain and as a result plays a critical role in clinical and research applications. Radiotracer-based functional imaging provides a sensitive means of recognizing and characterizing the regional changes in brain metabolism and receptor binding associated with cognitive disorders. The next functional imaging technique widely used in the diagnosis of cognitive disorders is single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). New radiotracers are being developed and promise to expand further the list of indications for PET. Prospects for developing new tracers for imaging other organ diseases also appear to be very promising. In this review, we present current opportunities of neuroimaging techniques in the diagnosis and differentiation of neuro degenerative disorders. (authors)

  18. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and neurodegenerative diseases****

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyan Guo; Li Sun; Xueping Chen; Danshen Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Oxidative stress is characterized by the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which can induce mitochondrial DNA mutations, damage the mitochondrial respiratory chain, alter membrane permeability, and influence Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial defense systems. Al these changes are implicated in the development of these neurodegenerative diseases, mediating or amplifying neuronal dysfunction and triggering neurodegeneration. This paper summarizes the contribution of oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage to the onset of neurodegenerative eases and discusses strategies to modify mitochondrial dysfunction that may be attractive thera-peutic interventions for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Corruption and Spread of Pathogenic Proteins in Neurodegenerative Diseases*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lary C.; LeVine, Harry

    2012-01-01

    With advancing age, the brain becomes increasingly susceptible to neurodegenerative diseases, most of which are characterized by the misfolding and errant aggregation of certain proteins. The induction of aggregation involves a crystallization-like seeding mechanism by which a specific protein is structurally corrupted by its misfolded conformer. The latest research indicates that, once formed, proteopathic seeds can spread from one locale to another via cellular uptake, transport, and release. Impeding this process could represent a unified therapeutic strategy for slowing the progression of a wide range of currently intractable disorders. PMID:22879600

  20. Mitochondrial Medicine and the Neurodegenerative Mitochondriopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell H. Swerdlow

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are a common late-life scourge for which diseasemodifying treatments are sorely needed. Mitochondrial perturbation is commonly observed in these diseases, so pursuing treatment development strategies that target mitochondria or processes affected by mitochondria seems reasonable. This review discusses the rationale underlying past and current efforts to treat neurodegenerative diseases using mitochondrial medicine, and tries to predict how future efforts might proceed.

  1. Visual Spatial Cognition in Neurodegenerative Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Possin, Katherine L.

    2010-01-01

    Visual spatial impairment is often an early symptom of neurodegenerative disease; however, this multi-faceted domain of cognition is not well-assessed by most typical dementia evaluations. Neurodegenerative diseases cause circumscribed atrophy in distinct neural networks, and accordingly, they impact visual spatial cognition in different and characteristic ways. Anatomically-focused visual spatial assessment can assist the clinician in making an early and accurate diagnosis. This article will...

  2. Autonomic Function in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    and REM sleep control, indicating that the disorder may serve as a human model for the sleep-wake and REM sleep flip-flop switches. The increased frequency of transitions may cause increased sympathetic activity during sleep and thereby increased heart rate, or the increased heart rate could be caused...... confirm that hypocretin deficiency affects the autonomic nervous system of patients with narcolepsy and that the hypocretin system is important for proper heart rate modulation at rest.Furthermore, it was shown that hypocretin deficiency and cataplexy are associated with signs of destabilized sleep-wake...

  3. Mutations in BRAT1 cause autosomal recessive progressive encephalopathy: Report of a Spanish patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Jáen, Alberto; Álvarez, Sara; So, Eui Young; Ouchi, Toru; de la Peña, Mar Jiménez; Duat, Anna; Fernández-Mayoralas, Daniel Martín; Fernández-Perrone, Ana Laura; Albert, Jacobo; Calleja-Pérez, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    We describe a 4-year-old male child born to non-consanguineous Spanish parents with progressive encephalopathy (PE), microcephaly, and hypertonia. Whole exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous BRAT1 mutations [c.1564G > A (p.Glu522Lys) and c.638dup (p.Val214Glyfs*189)]. Homozygous and compound heterozygous BRAT1 mutations have been described in patients with lethal neonatal rigidity and multifocal seizure syndrome (MIM# 614498). The seven previously described patients suffered from uncontrolled seizures, and all of those patients died in their first months of life. BRAT1 acts as a regulator of cellular proliferation and migration and is required for mitochondrial function. The loss of these functions may explain the cerebral atrophy observed in this case of PE. This case highlights the extraordinary potential of next generation technologies for the diagnosis of rare genetic diseases, including PE. Making a prompt diagnosis of PE is important for genetic counseling and disease management. PMID:26947546

  4. Loss-of-Function Mutations in HPSE2 Cause the Autosomal Recessive Urofacial Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Junfeng; Zhang, Shu; Yang, Ping; Hawkins-Lee, Bobbilynn; Zhong, Jixin; Zhang, Yushan; Ochoa, Bernardo; Agundez, Jose A.G.; Voelckel, Marie-Antoinette; Fisher, Richard B; Gu, Weikuan; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin; She, Jin-Xiong; Wang, Cong-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we localized the defective gene for the urofacial syndrome (UFS) to a region on chromosome 10q24 by homozygosity mapping. We now report evidence that Heparanse 2 (HPSE2) is the culprit gene for the syndrome. Mutations with a loss of function in the Heparanase 2 (HPSE2) gene were identified in all UFS patients originating from Colombia, the United States, and France. HPSE2 encodes a 592 aa protein that contains a domain showing sequence homology to the glycosyl hydrolase motif in t...

  5. "Dermatoglyphic Observations in an Iranian Girl Affected with Congenital Cutis Laxa (Autosomal Recessive"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Pour-Jafari

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the this work was to determine the finger patterns, Finger Ridge Count (FRC, Total Finger Ridge Count (TFRC, and Asymmetry of Finger Ridge Count (AFRC of an Iranian girl (aged 13 years affected with congenital cutis laxa (CCL.The fingerprints of the first phalanx of both hands were taken by using the standard method (stamp ink. The fingerprints were classified according to the Galton nomenclature. The patterns of palm creases were also studied. Besides, the ridges of fingerprints of all ten fingers were counted, then employing the related formulas, the FRC, TFRC and AFRC were calculated.Results showed that the finger patterns of all ten fingers were radial loop; the major creases of the palms existed but their sizes were not normal. TFRC, which is the sum of all ten FRCs, was 77 (“low”, and AFRC was 10.344, more than that of her normal sister, that was 7.280. It is concluded that in CCL, the TFRC and symmetry of the fingertips ridges count may decrease; also palm pattern may be unusual.

  6. A newly recognized autosomal recessive syndrome affecting neurologic function and vision

    OpenAIRE

    Salih, M.; A. Tzschach; Oystreck, D.; Hassan, H.; AlDrees, A.; Elmalik, S.; El Khashab, H.; Wienker, T; Abu-Amero, K; Bosley, T.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic factors represent an important etiologic group in the causation of intellectual disability. We describe a Saudi Arabian family with closley related parents in which four of six children were affected by a congenital cognitive disturbance. The four individuals (aged 18, 16, 13, and 2 years when last examined) had motor and cognitive delay with seizures in early childhood, and three of the four (sparing only the youngest child) had progressive, severe cognitive decline with spasticity. ...

  7. Familial carnitine deficiency: further evidence for autosomal recessive transmission with variable expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Shahar, E.; Brand, N; Shapira, Y.; Barash, V; Gutman, A

    1988-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency occurring in families has been rarely reported and the genetic transmission has not yet been clearly elucidated. Five members of one family showing marked heterogeneity of carnitine deficiency states are presented. In three patients, there was no correlation between measurable carnitine levels in serum and muscle and the clinical findings. The parents, who are remote relatives from an isolated village in Kurdistan (Iraq), had low muscle carnitine levels; however, they wer...

  8. Vici Syndrome: A Rare Autosomal Recessive Syndrome with Brain Anomalies, Cardiomyopathy, and Severe Intellectual Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Curtis Rogers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The objective of this study was to present and describe two additional patients diagnosed with Vici syndrome. Methods. Clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings of the two siblings are discussed in detail. The two patients' descriptions are compared with the other eleven patients reported in the literature. We also presented detailed autopsy results on the male sibling, which demonstrated cytoplasmic vacuoles of the cardiomyocytes and confirmed the clinical findings. Results. The patients reported here include the 13th and 14th patients reported with Vici syndrome. The summary of findings present in these patients includes postnatal growth retardation, developmental delay, bilateral cataracts, agenesis of the corpus callosum, cerebellar anomalies, gyral abnormalities, seizures, hypotonia, and cardiomyopathy. Conclusion. Vici syndrome should be suspected in any child with agenesis of the corpus callosum and one of the following findings: cardiomyopathy, cataracts, immune deficiency, or cutaneous hypopigmentation.

  9. Screening for homozygosity by descent in families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kota Lalitha; Subhadra Jalali; Tejas Kadakia; Chitra Kannabiran

    2002-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease and an important cause of blindness in the state of Andhra Pradesh in India. In an attempt to identify the disease locus in families with the recessive form of the disease, we used the approach of screening for homozygosity by descent in offspring of consanguineous and nonconsanguineous families with RP. Microsatellite markers closely flanking 21 known candidate genes for RP were genotyped in parents and affected offspring to determine whether there was homozygosity at these loci that was shared by affected individuals of a family. This screening approach may be a rapid preliminary method to test known loci for possible cosegregation with disease.

  10. Aquaporin-2: new mutations responsible for autosomal-recessive nephrogenic diabetes insipidus—update and epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Bichet, Daniel G.; El Tarazi, Abdulah; Matar, Jessica; Lussier, Yoann; Arthus, Marie-Françoise; Lonergan, Michèle; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Bissonnette, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    It is clinically useful to distinguish between two types of hereditary nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI): a ‘pure’ type characterized by loss of water only and a complex type characterized by loss of water and ions. Patients with congenital NDI bearing mutations in the vasopressin 2 receptor gene, AVPR2, or in the aquaporin-2 gene, AQP2, have a pure NDI phenotype with loss of water but normal conservation of sodium, potassium, chloride and calcium. Patients with hereditary hypokalemic salt...

  11. Macrocephaly, epilepsy, autism, dysmorphic features, and mental retardation in two sisters: a new autosomal recessive syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Orstavik, K H; Strømme, P; van Ek, J.; Torvik, A; Skjeldal, O H

    1997-01-01

    We report two sisters with macrocephaly, epilepsy, and severe mental retardation. The first child was a 14 year old girl born at term after a normal pregnancy, with birth weight 3600 g and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC) 36 cm (75th centile). Her head size increased markedly during the first six months of life, and was later stable at 2-3 cm above the 97.5th centile. Her development was characterised by psychomotor delay, epilepsy, and autistic features. Her face appeared mildly dysmorphi...

  12. New approaches to the autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease patient with dual kidney-liver complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telega, Grzegorz; Cronin, David; Avner, Ellis D

    2013-06-01

    Improved neonatal medical care and renal replacement technology have improved the long-term survival of patients with ARPKD. Ten-yr survival of those surviving the first year of life is reported to be 82% and is continuing to improve further. However, despite increases in overall survival and improved treatment of systemic hypertension and other complications of their renal disease, nearly 50% of survivors will develop ESRD within the first decade of life. In addition to renal pathology, patients with ARPKD develop ductal plate malformations with cystic dilation of intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts resulting in CHF and Caroli syndrome. Many patients with CHF will develop portal hypertension with resulting esophageal varices, splenomegaly, hypersplenism, protein losing enteropathy, and gastrointestinal bleeding. Management of portal hypertension may require EBL of esophageal varices or porto-systemic shunting. Complications of hepatic involvement can include ascending cholangitis, cholestasis with malabsorption of fat-soluble vitamins, and rarely benign or malignant liver tumors. Patients with ARPKD who eventually reach ESRD, and ultimately require kidney transplantation, present a unique set of complications related to their underlying hepato-biliary disease. In this review, we focus on new approaches to these challenging patients, including the indications for liver transplantation in ARPKD patients with severe chronic kidney disease awaiting kidney transplant. While survival in patients with ARPKD and isolated kidney transplant is comparable to that of age-matched pediatric patients who have received kidney transplants due to other primary renal diseases, 64-80% of the mortality occurring in ARPKD kidney transplant patients is attributed to cholangitis/sepsis, which is related to their hepato-biliary disease. Recent data demonstrate that surgical mortality among pediatric liver transplant recipients is decreased to <10% at one yr. The immunosuppressive regimen used for kidney transplant recipients is adequate for most liver transplant recipients. We therefore suggest that in a select group of ARPKD patients with recurrent cholangitis or complications of portal hypertension, combined liver-kidney transplant is a viable option. Although further study is necessary to confirm our approach, we believe that combined liver-kidney transplantation can potentially decrease overall mortality and morbidity in carefully selected ARPKD patients with ESRD and clinically significant CHF. PMID:23593929

  13. Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and congenital hepatic fibrosis (ARPKD/CHF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L. [National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Program, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Ocak, Iclal [National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Program, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Daryanani, Kailash [National Institutes of Health, Clinical Center, Department of Radiology, Bethesda, MD (United States); Font-Montgomery, Esperanza; Lukose, Linda; Bryant, Joy; Tuchman, Maya; Gahl, William A. [National Institutes of Health, National Human Genome Research Institute, Medical Genetics Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States); Mohan, Parvathi [George Washington University, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Washington, DC (United States); Heller, Theo [National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gunay-Aygun, Meral [National Institutes of Health, National Human Genome Research Institute, Medical Genetics Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States); National Institutes of Health, Intramural Program, Office of Rare Diseases, Office of the Directors, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2009-02-15

    ARPKD/CHF is an inherited disease characterized by non-obstructive fusiform dilatation of the renal collecting ducts leading to enlarged spongiform kidneys and ductal plate malformation of the liver resulting in congenital hepatic fibrosis. ARPKD/CHF has a broad spectrum of clinical presentations involving the kidney and liver. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and follow-up of ARPKD/CHF. Combined use of conventional and high-resolution US with MR cholangiography in ARPKD/CHF patients allows detailed definition of the extent of kidney and hepatobiliary manifestations without requiring ionizing radiation and contrast agents. (orig.)

  14. FBXO7 mutations cause autosomal recessive, early-onset parkinsonian-pyramidal syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonzo, A. Di; Dekker, M.C.J.; Montagna, P.; Baruzzi, A.; Yonova, E.H.; Correia Guedes, L.; Szczerbinska, A.; Zhao, T.; Dubbel-Hulsman, L.O.; Wouters, C.H.; Graaff, E. de; Oyen, W.J.G.; Simons, E.J.; Breedveld, G.J.; Oostra, B.A.; Horstink, M.W.I.M.; Bonifati, V.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The combination of early-onset, progressive parkinsonism with pyramidal tract signs has been known as pallido-pyramidal or parkinsonian-pyramidal syndrome since the first description by Davison in 1954. Very recently, a locus was mapped in a single family with an overlapping phenotype, a

  15. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Miyashita A, Yokoseki A, Kawata H, Koyama A, Arima K, Takahashi T, Ikeda M, Shiota H, Tamura ... Oide T, Nakayama H, Yanagawa S, Ito N, Ikeda S, Arima K. Extensive loss of arterial medial smooth muscle ...

  16. Alkaptonuria: a very rare metabolic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquaron, Robert

    2013-10-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder of tyrosine metabolism in the liver due to deficiency of homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase (HGD) activity, resulting in the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Circulating HGA pass into various tissues through-out the body, mainly in cartilage and connective tissues, where its oxidation products polymerize and deposit as a melanin-like pigment. Gram quantities of HGA are excreted in the urine. AKU is a progressive disease and the three main features, according the chronology of appearance, are: darkening of the urine at birth, then ochronosis (blue-dark pigmentation of the connective tissue) clinically visible at around 30 yrs in the ear and eye, and finally a severe ochronotic arthropathy at around 50 yrs with spine and large joints involvements. Cardiovascular and renal complications have been described in numerous case report studies. A treatment now is available in the form of a drug nitisinone, which decreases the production of HGA. The enzymatic defect in AKU is caused by the homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations within the HGD gene. This disease has a very low prevalence (1:100,000-250,000) in most of the ethnic groups, except Slovakia and Dominican Republic, where the incidence has shown increase up to 1:19,000. This review highlights classical and recent findings on this very rare disease. PMID:24772955

  17. Vitagenes, dietary antioxidants and neuroprotection in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Vittorio; Cornelius, Carolin; Mancuso, Cesare; Barone, Eugenio; Calafato, Stella; Bates, Timothy; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Kostova, Albena T Dinkova

    2009-01-01

    The ability of a cell to counteract stressful conditions, known as cellular stress response, requires the activation of pro-survival pathways and the production of molecules with anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic or pro-apoptotic activities. Among the cellular pathways conferring protection against oxidative stress, a key role is played by vitagenes, which include heat shock proteins (Hsps) heme oxygenase-1 and Hsp70, as well as the thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system. Heat shock response contributes to establish a cytoprotective state in a wide variety of human diseases, including inflammation, cancer, aging and neurodegenerative disorders. Given the broad cytoprotective properties of the heat shock response there is now strong interest in discovering and developing pharmacological agents capable of inducing stress responses. Dietary antioxidants, such as curcumin, L-carnitine/acetyl-L-carnitine and carnosine have recently been demonstrated in vitro to be neuroprotective through the activation of hormetic pathways, including vitagenes. In the present review we discuss the importance of vitagenes in the cellular stress response and analyse, from a pharmacological point of view, the potential use of dietary antioxidants in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders in humans. PMID:19273073

  18. Targeting New Candidate Genes by Small Molecules Approaching Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hueng-Chuen Fan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs are among the most feared of the disorders that afflict humankind for the lack of specific diagnostic tests and effective treatments. Understanding the molecular, cellular, biochemical changes of NDs may hold therapeutic promise against debilitating central nerve system (CNS disorders. In the present review, we summarized the clinical presentations and biology backgrounds of NDs, including Parkinson’s disease (PD, Huntington’s disease (HD, and Alzheimer’s disease (AD and explored the role of molecular mechanisms, including dys-regulation of epigenetic control mechanisms, Ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated protein kinase (ATM, and neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of NDs. Targeting these mechanisms may hold therapeutic promise against these devastating diseases.

  19. Oligonucleotide-based therapy for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen, Iddo; Hornstein, Eran

    2014-10-10

    Molecular genetics insight into the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer׳s disease, Parkinson׳s disease, Huntington׳s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, encourages direct interference with the activity of neurotoxic genes or the molecular activation of neuroprotective pathways. Oligonucleotide-based therapies are recently emerging as an efficient strategy for drug development and these can be employed as new treatments of neurodegenerative states. Here we review advances in this field in recent years which suggest an encouraging assessment that oligonucleotide technologies for targeting of RNAs will enable the development of new therapies and will contribute to preservation of brain integrity. PMID:24727531

  20. Role of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Xia; Huang, Wen-Juan

    2016-04-01

    Neurodegeneration is a phenomenon that occurs in the central nervous system through the hallmarks associating the loss of neuronal structure and function. Neurodegeneration is observed after viral insult and mostly in various so-called 'neurodegenerative diseases', generally observed in the elderly, such as Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis that negatively affect mental and physical functioning. Causative agents of neurodegeneration have yet to be identified. However, recent data have identified the inflammatory process as being closely linked with multiple neurodegenerative pathways, which are associated with depression, a consequence of neurodegenerative disease. Accordingly, pro‑inflammatory cytokines are important in the pathophysiology of depression and dementia. These data suggest that the role of neuroinflammation in neurodegeneration must be fully elucidated, since pro‑inflammatory agents, which are the causative effects of neuroinflammation, occur widely, particularly in the elderly in whom inflammatory mechanisms are linked to the pathogenesis of functional and mental impairments. In this review, we investigated the role played by the inflammatory process in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26935478

  1. The incidence of genetic disorders in children and young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current estimates of the genetic risks from exposure to ionizing radiation are based on two kinds of data: a) incidence rates in humans for the genetic diseases that are believed to be present in the population due to mutations of natural origin, and b) radiation induced mutation rates. One necessary prerequisite before any possible increase in genetic load from mutagens can be estimated is baseline information on the magnitude of genetically-caused ill health already present in the population. The present study utilizes the data base of an ongoing population-based Registry with multiple sources of ascertainment to estimate the present population load from genetic disease. It was found that 4.9% of liveborn individuals below 25 can be expected to have genetic or partly genetic diseases. This was composed of single-gene disorders (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and X-linked recessive), chromosomal anomalies and multifactorial disorders (including those present at birth and those later in onset). Since previous studies have usually considered all congenital anomalies (ICD 740-759) as part of the genetic load, data are also presented separately for this category to facilitate comparison with earlier studies. These new data should represent a better estimate of the genetic load in the population than previous studies

  2. Amnestic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, R.P.C.; Savage, G.

    2015-01-01

    Amnestic disorders may involve deficits in the encoding or storage of information in memory, or in retrieval of information from memory. Etiologies vary and include traumatic brain injury, neurodegenerative disease, and psychiatric illness. Different forms of amnesia can be distinguished: anterograd

  3. Non-coding RNA and pseudogenes in neurodegenerative diseases: "The (unUsual Suspects"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio eCosta

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative disorders and cancer are severe diseases threatening human health. The glaring differences between neurons and cancer cells mask the processes involved in their pathogenesis. Defects in cell cycle, DNA repair and cell differentiation can determine unlimited proliferation in cancer, or conversely, compromise neuronal plasticity, leading to cell death and neurodegeneration.Alteration in regulatory networks affecting gene expression contribute to human diseases' onset, including neurodegenerative disorders, and deregulation of non-coding RNAs - particularly microRNAs - is supposed to have a significant impact.Recently, competitive endogenous RNAs - acting as sponges - have been identified in cancer, indicating a new and intricate regulatory network. Given that neurodegenerative disorders and cancer share altered genes and pathways, and considering the emerging role of microRNAs in neurogenesis, we hypothesize competitive endogenous RNAs may be implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we propose, and computationally predict, such regulatory mechanism may be shared between the diseases. It is predictable that similar regulation occurs in other complex diseases, and further investigation is needed.

  4. Endogenously Nitrated Proteins in Mouse Brain: Links To Neurodegenerative Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacksteder, Colette A.; Qian, Weijun; Knyushko, Tanya V.; Wang, Haixing H.; Chin, Mark H.; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2006-07-04

    Increased nitrotyrosine modification of proteins has been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types; emerging evidence suggests its additional role in redox regulation of normal metabolism. In order to identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic dataset identifying 7,792 proteins from whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. Over half of the nitrated proteins identified have been reported to be involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces increased nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, characteristics consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. More striking is the five-fold greater nitration of tyrosines having nearby basic sidechains, suggesting electrostatic attraction of basic groups with the negative charge of peroxynitrite. Together, these results suggest that elevated peroxynitrite generation plays a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain and provides a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration.

  5. Disease: H00144 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00144 Mucolipidosis IV Mucolipidosis IV (ML IV) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative lys ... 0 PMID:18708002 Heese BA Current strategies in the management ... of lysosomal storage diseases. Semin Pediatr Neuro ...

  6. Disease: H00981 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available xia with isolated vitamin E deficiency (AVED) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused... by mutations in the alpha tocopherol transfer protein (TTPA) gene. It causes ataxia and peripheral neuropat

  7. Thiol redox homeostasis in neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gethin J. McBean

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This review provides an overview of the biochemistry of thiol redox couples and the significance of thiol redox homeostasis in neurodegenerative disease. The discussion is centred on cysteine/cystine redox balance, the significance of the xc− cystine–glutamate exchanger and the association between protein thiol redox balance and neurodegeneration, with particular reference to Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and glaucoma. The role of thiol disulphide oxidoreductases in providing neuroprotection is also discussed.

  8. Mitochondrial Medicine for Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria are key cytoplasmic organelles, responsible for generating cellular energy, regulating intracellular calcium levels, altering the reduction-oxidation potential of cells, and regulating cell death. Increasing evidence suggests that mitochondria play a central role in aging and in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Freidriech ataxia. Further, several lines of evidence suggest that mi...

  9. Nutritional and biochemical therapies for neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Barreto, George E.

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, Huntington and Alzheimer’s disease are characterized by neuronal death and loss in different areas of the brain. Downstream signaling mechanisms associated to cellular death/survival are altered, where mitochondrial damage and inflammation, dysfunctional autophagy process, and accumulation of toxins proteins play a central role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. The disabling effects of these diseases on health system are high and gr...

  10. : REM sleep behavior disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Arnulf, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Patients with REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) enact violent dreams during REM sleep in the absence of normal muscle atonia. This disorder is highly frequent in patients with synucleinopathies (60%-100% of patients) and rare in patients with other neurodegenerative disorders. The disorder is detected by interview plus video and sleep monitoring. Abnormal movements expose the patients and bed partners to a high risk of injury and sleep disruption. The disorder is usually alleviated with melat...

  11. MicroRNAs in cancers and neurodegenerative disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Yoshimasa; Saito, Hidetsugu

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs which function as endogenous silencers of various target genes. miRNAs are expressed in a tissue-specific manner and playing important roles in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation during mammalian development. Links between miRNAs and the initiation and progression of human diseases including cancer are becoming increasingly apparent. Recent studies have revealed that some miRNAs such as miR-9, miR-29 family, and miR-34 family are di...

  12. Polymer Drug Conjugates for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Conejos Sánchez, Inmaculada

    2013-01-01

    Nanociencia y nanotecnología son la base de técnicas innovadoras para el transporte de fármacos con beneficios potenciales para el paciente y nuevos mercados para la industria. La obtención de nuevos sistemas de transporte de fármacos más efectivos es uno de los principales retos actuales, junto con la mejora del diagnóstico tanto in vitro como in vivo y el desarrollo de tecnologías para la ingeniería tisular y la medicina regenerativa. Además de ser necesario disponer de moléculas con activi...

  13. Sleep Spindles as Biomarker for Early Detection of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to the use of sleep spindles as a novel biomarker for early diagnosis of synucleinopathies, in particular Parkinson's disease (PD). The method is based on automatic detection of sleep spindles. The method may be combined with measurements of one or more further...

  14. Biomarkers in Rare Disorders: The Experience with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Brahe

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by homozygous mutations of the SMN1 gene. Based on clinical severity, three forms of SMA are recognized (type I–III. All patients have at least one (usually 2–4 copies of a highly homologous gene (SMN2 which produces insufficient levels of functional SMN protein, due to alternative splicing of exon7. Recently, evidence has been provided that SMN2 expression can be enhanced by different strategies. The availability of potential candidates to treat SMA has raised a number of issues, including the availability of data on the natural history of the disease, the reliability and sensitivity of outcome measures, the duration of the studies, and the number and clinical homogeneity of participating patients. Equally critical is the availability of reliable biomarkers. So far, different tools have been proposed as biomarkers in SMA, classifiable into two groups: instrumental (the Compound Motor Action Potential, the Motor Unit Number Estimation, and the Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and molecular (SMN gene products dosage, either transcripts or protein. However, none of the biomarkers available so far can be considered the gold standard. Preclinical studies on SMA animal models and double-blind, placebo-controlled studies are crucial to evaluate the appropriateness of biomarkers, on the basis of correlations with clinical outcome.

  15. PPAR-γ agonists in polycystic kidney disease with frequent development of cardiovascular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Shizuko; Yamaguchi, Tamio

    2012-06-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common of the monogenic disorders and is characterized by bilateral renal cysts; cysts in other organs including liver, pancreas, spleen, testis and ovary; vascular abnormalities including intracranial aneurysms and subarachnoid hemorrhage; and cardiac disorders such as left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), mitral valve regurgitation, mitral valve prolapse and aortic regurgitation. Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is an early-onset multisystem disorder characterized by polycysts divided from the renal collecting ducts, congenital hepatic fibrosis, and ductal plate malformation complicated by pulmonary hyperplasia and systemic hypertension. In these polycystic kidney diseases (PKD), progressive enlargement of the cysts results from the aberrant proliferation of tubule epithelial cells and trans-epithelial fluid secretion leading to extensive nephron loss and interstitial fibrosis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ), a member of the ligand-dependent nuclear receptor superfamily, is expressed in a variety of tissues, including kidneys and liver, and plays important roles in cell proliferation, fibrosis, and inflammation. PPAR-γ agonists ameliorate polycystic kidney, polycystic liver and cardiac defects through β-catenin, c-Myc, CFTR, MCP-1, S6, ERK, and TGF-β signaling pathways in animal models of PKD. In this review, we describe the possible therapeutic value of PPAR-γ agonists in the treatment of renal and hepatic manifestations, and cardiac defects in progressive PKD. PMID:22122459

  16. Hereditary early-onset Parkinsonism : the role of the FBXO7 protein

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Tianna

    2012-01-01

    textabstractParkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, which affects ~1-2% of the population above the age of 60 years old. We identified pathogenic mutations in the FBXO7 gene in two families with early-onset, progressive parkinsonism and pyramidal tract dysfunctions. This finding provided the conclusive evidence that FBXO7 is the disease-causing gene in this newly-identified autosomal recessive form, which we termed PARK15. Very little was known about th...

  17. Expanding the spectrum of HEXA mutations in Indian patients with Tay–Sachs disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jayesh Sheth; Mehul Mistri; Chaitanya Datar; Umesh Kalane; Shekhar Patil; Mahesh Kamate; Harshuti Shah; Sheela Nampoothiri; Sarita Gupta; Frenny Sheth

    2014-01-01

    Tay–Sachs disease is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder occurring due to impaired activity of β-hexosaminidase-A (EC 3.2.1.52), resulting from the mutation in HEXA gene. Very little is known about the molecular pathology of TSD in Indian children except for a few mutations identified by us. The present study is aimed to determine additional mutations leading to Tay–Sachs disease in nine patients confirmed by the deficiency of β-hexosaminidase-A (C (D175A) and c.805G>C (p.G269R)...

  18. Disease: H01351 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H01351 Spastic ataxia (SPAX) Spastic ataxia is a heterogeneous group of progressive... neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by lower-limb spasticity and generalized ataxia with dysarthria,...O:K18060] (SPAX5) AFG3L2 [HSA:10939] [KO:K08956] (SPAX6/ARSACS) SACS [HSA:26278] [KO:K17592] About Spastic ataxia... Stefanelli MG, Ives EJ, Rouleau GA A locus for autosomal dominant hereditary spastic ataxia, SAX1, maps to ..., Bouchard JP, Lesage J, Brais B A new autosomal recessive spastic ataxia associated with frequent white mat

  19. Potential of cystamine and cysteamine in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibrat, C; Cicchetti, F

    2011-03-30

    Neurodegenerative disorders are a subset of disabling pathologies characterized, in part, by a progressive and specific loss of certain brain cell populations. Current therapeutic approaches for the treatment of these disorders are mainly designed towards symptom management and do not manifestly block their typified neuronal loss. However, research conducted over the past decade has reflected the increasing interest and need to find disease-modifying molecules. Among the several neuroprotective agents emerging from experimental animal work, cystamine, as well as its reduced form cysteamine, have been identified as potential candidate drugs. Given the significant benefits observed in a Huntington's disease (HD) model, cysteamine has recently leaped to clinical trial. Here, we review the beneficial properties of these compounds as reported in animal studies, their mechanistic underpinnings, and their potential implications for the future treatment of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases, and more specifically for HD and Parkinson's disease (PD). PMID:21111020

  20. Major Congenital Metabolic Disorders in the First 12 years of Life in 79,100 Consecutively Born Children in Qazvin Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Movafagh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveDeficient enzyme activity may cause congenital metabolic defects. These defectsare inherited in an autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, and X-linkedpatterns. This study was aimed at investigating the occurrence of metabolicdiseases in Qazvin Province.Materials & MethodsThis cross-sectional study was performed on 79,100 children aged 12 years orless between 2000 and 2010. Clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and allother essential information were assessed to precisely diagnose the metabolicdiseases. The sorted information on congenital metabolic defects of the patients,information included in a checklist, and data were analyzed usnig SPSS.ResultsA total of 57 metabolic disorders were recorded. The difference in the prevalenceof metabolic disorders between male (29 cases and female (28 cases wasnot statistically significant. The most frequent congenital metabolic disorderamong our patients was phenylketonuria (PKU; 5 per 1,000 cases, and the leastcommon disorder was galactosemia (3 per 1,000 cases.ConclusionTimely detection and management of congenital metabolic disorders canhelp save the affected children. Prenatal screening programs, molecular genetherapy, and counseling for consanguineous marriage can play important rolesin reducing the rate of metabolic disorders in this province.Keywords: Congenital metabolic disorders; prevalence; population; Qazvin

  1. Does neuroinflammation fan the flame in neurodegenerative diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McAlpine Fiona E

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While peripheral immune access to the central nervous system (CNS is restricted and tightly controlled, the CNS is capable of dynamic immune and inflammatory responses to a variety of insults. Infections, trauma, stroke, toxins and other stimuli are capable of producing an immediate and short lived activation of the innate immune system within the CNS. This acute neuroinflammatory response includes activation of the resident immune cells (microglia resulting in a phagocytic phenotype and the release of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and chemokines. While an acute insult may trigger oxidative and nitrosative stress, it is typically short-lived and unlikely to be detrimental to long-term neuronal survival. In contrast, chronic neuroinflammation is a long-standing and often self-perpetuating neuroinflammatory response that persists long after an initial injury or insult. Chronic neuroinflammation includes not only long-standing activation of microglia and subsequent sustained release of inflammatory mediators, but also the resulting increased oxidative and nitrosative stress. The sustained release of inflammatory mediators works to perpetuate the inflammatory cycle, activating additional microglia, promoting their proliferation, and resulting in further release of inflammatory factors. Neurodegenerative CNS disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS, Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, Huntington's disease (HD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, tauopathies, and age-related macular degeneration (ARMD, are associated with chronic neuroinflammation and elevated levels of several cytokines. Here we review the hallmarks of acute and chronic inflammatory responses in the CNS, the reasons why microglial activation represents a convergence point for diverse stimuli that may promote or compromise neuronal survival, and the epidemiologic, pharmacologic and genetic evidence implicating neuroinflammation in the

  2. Role of Epigenetics in Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation: Implications for Treating Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Bhairavi Srinageshwar; Panchanan Maiti; Gary L. Dunbar; Julien Rossignol

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of this review are to survey the current literature on the role of epigenetics in determining the fate of stem cells and to assess how this information can be used to enhance the treatment strategies for some neurodegenerative disorders, like Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Some of these epigenetic mechanisms include DNA methylation and histone modifications, which have a direct impact on the way that genes are expressed in stem cells and...

  3. Dysregulation of cholesterol balance in the brain: contribution to neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Vance, Jean E.

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of cholesterol homeostasis in the brain is increasingly being linked to chronic neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Huntington’s disease (HD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease and Smith-Lemli Opitz syndrome (SLOS). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the correlation between altered cholesterol metabolism and the neurological deficits are, for the most part, not clear. NPC disease and SLOS are caused by mutations in...

  4. Molecular Modeling Studies of Piperidine Derivatives as New Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors against Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are related to the progressive loss of structure or function and, eventually, death of neurons. These processes are responsible for diseases like Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and Huntington’s, and the main molecular target for the drug design against these illnesses today is the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Following this line, in the present work, we applied docking techniques to study some piperidine derivative inhibitors of AChE and further propose structure...

  5. Heat shock protein 90 in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodina Anna

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone with important roles in regulating pathogenic transformation. In addition to its well-characterized functions in malignancy, recent evidence from several laboratories suggests a role for Hsp90 in maintaining the functional stability of neuronal proteins of aberrant capacity, whether mutated or over-activated, allowing and sustaining the accumulation of toxic aggregates. In addition, Hsp90 regulates the activity of the transcription factor heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1, the master regulator of the heat shock response, mechanism that cells use for protection when exposed to conditions of stress. These biological functions therefore propose Hsp90 inhibition as a dual therapeutic modality in neurodegenerative diseases. First, by suppressing aberrant neuronal activity, Hsp90 inhibitors may ameliorate protein aggregation and its associated toxicity. Second, by activation of HSF-1 and the subsequent induction of heat shock proteins, such as Hsp70, Hsp90 inhibitors may redirect neuronal aggregate formation, and protect against protein toxicity. This mini-review will summarize our current knowledge on Hsp90 in neurodegeneration and will focus on the potential beneficial application of Hsp90 inhibitors in neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and other neurodegenerative proteinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carmela Tartaglia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available “Chronic traumatic encephalopathy” (CTE is described as a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease believed to result from multiple concussions. Traditionally, concussions were considered benign events and although most people recover fully, about 10% develop a post-concussive syndrome with persisting neurological, cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms. CTE was once thought to be unique to boxers, but it has now been observed in many different athletes having suffered multiple concussions as well as in military personal after repeated blast injuries. Much remains unknown about the development of CTE but its pathological substrate is usually tau, similar to that seen in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. The aim of this “perspective” is to compare and contrast clinical and pathological CTE with the other neurodegenerative proteinopathies and highlight that there is an urgent need for understanding the relationship between concussion and the development of CTE as it may provide a window into the development of a proteinopathy and thus new avenues for treatment.

  7. MRI features of neurodegenerative Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CNS complications of LCH include ''space occupying'' lesions corresponding to histiocytic granulomas and ''neurodegenerative'' presentation (ND-LCH) characterized by a progressive cerebellar ataxia. Studies analyzing specifically the MRI presentation of ND-LCH are scarce. We present here the MRIs of 13 patients registered as isolated ND-LCH. Posterior fossa was involved in 12 patients (92%), showing a symmetrical T2 hyperintensity of the cerebellar white matter areas in seven cases with a circumscribed T1 hyperintensity of the dentate nuclei in five cases, definite hyperintense T2 areas in the adjacent pontine tegmentum white matter in nine cases associated with a hyperintensity of the pontine pyramidal tracts in four cases. A cerebellar atrophy was noted in eight cases. The supratentorial region was involved in 11 patients, showing T2 hyperintense lesions in the cerebral white matter in eight cases and a discrete symmetrical T1 hyperintense signal in the globus pallidus in eight patients. A diffuse cortical atrophy was present in three cases and a marked focal atrophy of the corpus callosum in three cases. This series allows us to establish a not previously reported evocative semeiologic MR presentation to precisely orientate to the diagnosis of the pure neurodegenerative form of LCH. (orig.)

  8. [The role of thiamine in neurodegenerative diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubko, Irena; Gruber, Beata M; Anuszewska, Elżbieta L

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B1 (thiamine) plays an important role in metabolism. It is indispensable for normal growth and development of the organism. Thiamine has a favourable impact on a number of systems, including the digestive, cardiovascular and nervous systems. It also stimulates the brain and improves the psycho-emotional state. Hence it is often called the vitamin of "reassurance of the spirit". Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin. It can be present in the free form as thiamine or as its phosphate esters: mono-, di- or triphosphate. The main source of thiamine as an exogenous vitamin is certain foodstuffs, but trace amounts can be synthesised by microorganisms of the large intestine. The recommended daily intake of thiamine is about 2.0 mg. Since vitamin B1 has no ability to accumulate in the organism, manifestations of its deficiency begin to appear very quickly. The chronic state of thiamine deficiency, to a large extent, because of its function, contributes to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. It was proved that supporting vitamin B1 therapy not only constitutes neuroprotection but can also have a favourable impact on advanced neurodegenerative diseases. This article presents the current state of knowledge as regards the effects of thiamine exerted through this vitamin in a number of diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Wernicke's encephalopathy or Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and Huntington's disease. PMID:26400895

  9. MRI features of neurodegenerative Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Duverneuil, N.; Guillevin, R.; Chiras, J. [GH Pitie-Salpetriere, 47 Bd de l' Hopital, Department of Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Idbaih, A.; Hoang-Xuan, K. [GH Pitie-Salpetriere, 47 Bd de l' Hopital, Department of Neurology, Paris (France); Donadieu, J. [GH Trousseau, Department of Hematology/Oncology Pediatrics, Paris (France); Genereau, T. [Groupe d' etude des Histiocytoses langerhansiennes, Nantes (France)

    2006-09-15

    CNS complications of LCH include ''space occupying'' lesions corresponding to histiocytic granulomas and ''neurodegenerative'' presentation (ND-LCH) characterized by a progressive cerebellar ataxia. Studies analyzing specifically the MRI presentation of ND-LCH are scarce. We present here the MRIs of 13 patients registered as isolated ND-LCH. Posterior fossa was involved in 12 patients (92%), showing a symmetrical T2 hyperintensity of the cerebellar white matter areas in seven cases with a circumscribed T1 hyperintensity of the dentate nuclei in five cases, definite hyperintense T2 areas in the adjacent pontine tegmentum white matter in nine cases associated with a hyperintensity of the pontine pyramidal tracts in four cases. A cerebellar atrophy was noted in eight cases. The supratentorial region was involved in 11 patients, showing T2 hyperintense lesions in the cerebral white matter in eight cases and a discrete symmetrical T1 hyperintense signal in the globus pallidus in eight patients. A diffuse cortical atrophy was present in three cases and a marked focal atrophy of the corpus callosum in three cases. This series allows us to establish a not previously reported evocative semeiologic MR presentation to precisely orientate to the diagnosis of the pure neurodegenerative form of LCH. (orig.)

  10. Isoprostanes and Neuroprostanes as Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Miller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating data shows that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in neurodegenerative disorders. The literature data indicate that in vivo or postmortem cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue levels of F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs especially F4-neuroprotanes (F4-NPs are significantly increased in some neurodegenerative diseases: multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Central nervous system is the most metabolically active organ of the body characterized by high requirement for oxygen and relatively low antioxidative activity, what makes neurons and glia highly susceptible to destruction by reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and neurodegeneration. The discovery of F2-IsoPs and F4-NPs as markers of lipid peroxidation caused by the free radicals has opened up new areas of investigation regarding the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of human neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on the relationship between F2-IsoPs and F4-NPs as biomarkers of oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases. We summarize the knowledge of these novel biomarkers of oxidative stress and the advantages of monitoring their formation to better define the involvement of oxidative stress in neurological diseases.

  11. Major Congenital Metabolic Disorders in the First 12 years of Life in 79,100 Consecutively Born Children in Qazvin Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Movafagh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveDeficient enzyme activity may cause congenital metabolic defects. These defectsare inherited in an autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, and X-linkedpatterns. This study was aimed at investigating the occurrence of metabolicdiseases in Qazvin Province.Materials & MethodsThis cross-sectional study was performed on 79,100 children aged 12 years orless between 2000 and 2010. Clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and allother essential information were assessed to precisely diagnose the metabolicdiseases. The sorted information on congenital metabolic defects of the patients,information included in a checklist, and data were analyzed usnig SPSS.ResultsA total of 57 metabolic disorders were recorded. The difference in the prevalenceof metabolic disorders between male (29 cases and female (28 cases wasnot statistically significant. The most frequent congenital metabolic disorderamong our patients was phenylketonuria (PKU; 5 per 1,000 cases, and the leastcommon disorder was galactosemia (3 per 1,000 cases.ConclusionTimely detection and management of congenital metabolic disorders canhelp save the affected children. Prenatal screening programs, molecular genetherapy, and counseling for consanguineous marriage can play important rolesin reducing the rate of metabolic disorders in this province.

  12. Females with a disorder phenotypically identical to X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conley, M.E. (Univ. of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis (United States)); Sweinberg, S.K. (Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1992-03-01

    Clinical and laboratory findings in two girls with a disorder phenotypically indistinguishable from typical X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) are described. To examine the possibility that subtle defects in the X chromosome might explain the findings, detailed genetic studies were performed on one of these patients. Cytogenetic studies showed a normal 46XX karyotype. Southern blot analysis of her DNA showed that she had inherited a maternal and a paternal allele at sites flanking the locus for typical XLA at Xq22, making a microdeletion or uniparental disomy unlikely. To determine whether both of her X chromosomes could function as the active X, somatic-cell hybrids that selectively retained the active X were produced from her activated T cells. A normal random pattern of X inactivation was seen. Of 21 T-cell hybrids, 3 retained both X chromosomes, 7 had one X as the active X, and 11 had the other X as the active X. The authors have interpreted these studies as indicating that there is an autosomal recessive disorder that is phenotypically identical to XLA.

  13. Structural basis for early-onset neurological disorders caused by mutations in human selenocysteine synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puppala, Anupama K; French, Rachel L; Matthies, Doreen; Baxa, Ulrich; Subramaniam, Sriram; Simonović, Miljan

    2016-01-01

    Selenocysteine synthase (SepSecS) catalyzes the terminal reaction of selenocysteine, and is vital for human selenoproteome integrity. Autosomal recessive inheritance of mutations in SepSecS-Ala239Thr, Thr325Ser, Tyr334Cys and Tyr429*-induced severe, early-onset, neurological disorders in distinct human populations. Although harboring different mutant alleles, patients presented remarkably similar phenotypes typified by cerebellar and cerebral atrophy, seizures, irritability, ataxia, and extreme spasticity. However, it has remained unclear how these genetic alterations affected the structure of SepSecS and subsequently elicited the development of a neurological pathology. Herein, our biophysical and structural characterization demonstrates that, with the exception of Tyr429*, pathogenic mutations decrease protein stability and trigger protein misfolding. We propose that the reduced stability and increased propensity towards misfolding are the main causes for the loss of SepSecS activity in afflicted patients, and that these factors contribute to disease progression. We also suggest that misfolding of enzymes regulating protein synthesis should be considered in the diagnosis and study of childhood neurological disorders. PMID:27576344

  14. “Systems-level G protein-coupled receptor therapy across a neurodegenerative continuum by the GLP-1 receptor system”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    StuartMaudsley

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available With our increasing appreciation of the true complexity of diseases and pathophysiologies it is clear that this knowledge needs to inform the future development of pharmacotherapeutics. For many disorders the disease mechanism itself is a complex process spanning multiple signaling networks, tissues and organ systems. Identifying the precise nature and locations of the pathophysiology is crucial for the creation of systemically-effective drugs. Diseases once considered constrained to a limited range of organ systems, e.g. central neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and Huntington’ disease (HD, the role of multiple central and peripheral organ systems in the etiology of such diseases is now widely accepted. With this knowledge, it is increasingly clear that these seemingly distinct neurodegenerative disorders (AD, PD and HD possess multiple pathophysiological similarities thereby demonstrating an inter-related continuum of disease-related molecular alterations. With this systems-level appreciation of neurodegenerative disease it is now imperative to consider that pharmacotherapeutics should be developed specifically to address the systemic imbalances that create the disorders. Identification of potential systems-level signaling axes may facilitate the generation of therapeutic agents with synergistic remedial activity across multiple tissues, organ systems and even diseases. Here we discuss the potentially therapeutic systems-level interaction of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 ligand-receptor axis with multiple aspects of the AD, PD and HD neurodegenerative continuum.

  15. A Potential Alternative against Neurodegenerative Diseases: Phytodrugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Hernández, Jesús; Zaldívar-Machorro, Víctor Javier; Villanueva-Porras, David; Vega-Ávila, Elisa; Chavarría, Anahí

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (ND) primarily affect the neurons in the human brain secondary to oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. ND are more common and have a disproportionate impact on countries with longer life expectancies and represent the fourth highest source of overall disease burden in the high-income countries. A large majority of the medicinal plant compounds, such as polyphenols, alkaloids, and terpenes, have therapeutic properties. Polyphenols are the most common active compounds in herbs and vegetables consumed by man. The biological bioactivity of polyphenols against neurodegeneration is mainly due to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiamyloidogenic effects. Multiple scientific studies support the use of herbal medicine in the treatment of ND; however, relevant aspects are still pending to explore such as metabolic analysis, pharmacokinetics, and brain bioavailability. PMID:26881043

  16. Propionic Acidemia: Diagnosis and Neuroimaging Findings of This Neurometabolic Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh KARIMZADEH

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract How to Cite This Article: Karimzadeh P, Jafari N, Ahmad Abadi F, Jabbehdari S, Taghdiri MM, Alaee MR, Ghofrani M, Tonekaboni SH, Nejad Biglari H. Propionic Acidemia: Diagnosis and Neuroimaging Findings of This Neurometabolic Disorder. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:58-61. Objective Propionic acidemia is one of the rare congenital neurometabolic disorders with autosomal recessive inheritance. This disorder is caused by a defect in the propionyl-CoA carboxylase enzyme and can be presented with life-threatening ketoacidosis, lethargy, failure to thrive, and developmental delay. Materials & Methods The patients diagnosed as having propionic acidemia in Neurology Department of Mofid Children’s Hospital in Tehran, Iran, between 2002 and 2012 were include in our study. This disorder was confirmed by clinical manifestations, neuroimaging findings, and neurometabolic assessment in the reference laboratory in Germany. Our study was conducted to define the sex, age, gender, past medical history, developmental status, clinical findings, and neuroimaging manifestations in 10 patients with propionic acidemia. Results Seventy percent of patients were offspring of consanguineous marriages. In this study, only one patient had microcephaly at birth, but at detection time, 30% of patients had head circumference and weight below the 3rd percentile. The patients were followed for approximately 5 years and this follow-up showed that the patients with early diagnosis had a more favorable clinical response. Neuroimaging findings included brain atrophy, white matter and globus pallidus involvement. Conclusion Finally we suggest that early diagnosis and treatment have an important role in the prevention of disease progression.

  17. Histochemical approaches to assess cell-to-cell transmission of misfolded proteins in neurodegenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, G.; Pompili, E.; Biagioni, F.; Paparelli, S.; Lenzi, P.; Fornai, F.

    2013-01-01

    Formation, aggregation and transmission of abnormal proteins are common features in neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington's disease. The mechanisms underlying protein alterations in neurodegenerative diseases remain controversial. Novel findings highlighted altered protein clearing systems as common biochemical pathways which generate protein misfolding, which in turn causes protein aggregation and protein spreading. In fact, proteinaceous aggregates are prone to cell-tocell propagation. This is reminiscent of what happens in prion disorders, where the prion protein misfolds thus forming aggregates which spread to neighbouring cells. For this reason, the term prionoids is currently used to emphasize how several misfolded proteins are transmitted in neurodegenerative diseases following this prion-like pattern. Histochemical techniques including the use of specific antibodies covering both light and electron microscopy offer a powerful tool to describe these phenomena and investigate specific molecular steps. These include: prion like protein alterations; glycation of prion-like altered proteins to form advanced glycation end-products (AGEs); mechanisms of extracellular secretion; interaction of AGEs with specific receptors placed on neighbouring cells (RAGEs). The present manuscript comments on these phenomena aimed to provide a consistent scenario of the available histochemical approaches to dissect each specific step. PMID:23549464

  18. Histochemical approaches to assess cell-to-cell transmission of misfolded proteins in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Natale

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Formation, aggregation and transmission of abnormal proteins are common features in neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington’s disease. The mechanisms underlying protein alterations in neurodegenerative diseases remain controversial. Novel findings highlighted altered protein clearing systems as common biochemical pathways which generate protein misfolding, which in turn causes protein aggregation and protein spreading. In fact, proteinaceous aggregates are prone to cell-to-cell propagation. This is reminiscent of what happens in prion disorders, where the prion protein misfolds thus forming aggregates which spread to neighbouring cells. For this reason, the term prionoids is currently used to emphasize how several misfolded proteins are transmitted in neurodegenerative diseases following this prion-like pattern. Histochemical techniques including the use of specific antibodies covering both light and electron microscopy offer a powerful tool to describe these phenomena and investigate specific molecular steps. These include: prion like protein alterations; glycation of prion-like altered proteins to form advanced glycation end-products (AGEs; mechanisms of extracellular secretion; interaction of AGEs with specific receptors placed on neighbouring cells (RAGEs. The present manuscript comments on these phenomena aimed to provide a consistent scenario of the available histochemical approaches to dissect each specific step.

  19. The Role of Copper in Neurodegenerative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Francis M.

    My research concerns the fundamental atomistic mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases and the methodologies by which they may be discerned. This thesis consists of three primary parts. The introductory material is the raison d'etre for this work and a critical overview of the specific physics, mathematics and algorithms used in this research. The methods are presented along with specific details in order to facilitate future replication and enhancement. With the groundwork of mechanisms and methods out of the way, we then explore a nouveau atomistic mechanism describing the onset of Parkinson's disease, a disease that has been closely linked to misfolded metalloproteins. Further exploration of neurodegeneration takes place in the following chapter, where a remedial approach to Alzheimer's disease via a simulated chelation of a metalloprotein is undertaken. Altogether, the methods and techniques applied here allow for simulated exploration of both the atomistic mechanisms of neurodegeneration and their potential remediation strategies. The beginning portion of the research efforts explore protein misfolding dynamics in the presence a copper ion. Misfolding of the human alpha-synuclein (aS) protein has been implicated as a central constituent in neurodegenerative disease. In Parkinson's disease (PD) in particular, aS is thought to be the causative participant when found concentrated into neuritic plaques. Here we propose a scenario involving the metal ion Cu2+ as the protein misfolding initiator of fibrillized aS, the chief component of neuritic plaques. From experimental results we know these misfolded proteins have a rich beta--sheet signature, a marker that we reproduce with our simulated model. This model identifies a process of structural modifications to a natively unfolded alpha-synuclein resulting in a partially folded intermediate with a well defined nucleation site. It serves as a precursor to the fully misfolded protein. Understanding the nucleation

  20. Granulovacuolar degeneration: a neurodegenerative change that accompanies tau pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Granule-containing vacuoles in the cytoplasm of hippocampal neurons are a neuropathological feature of Alzheimer's disease. Granulovacuolar degeneration (GVD) is not disease-specific and can be observed in other neurodegenerative disorders and even in the brains of non-demented elderly people. However, several studies have reported much higher numbers of neurons undergoing GVD in the hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease cases. Recently, a neuropathological staging system for GVD has facilitated neuropathological assessment. Data obtained by electron microscopy and immunolabeling suggest that GVD inclusions are a special form of autophagic vacuole. GVD frequently occurs together with pathological changes of the microtubule-associated protein tau, but to date, the relationship between the two lesions remains elusive. Originally identified in hematoxylin- and silver-stained sections, immunolabeling has shown that the granules are composed of a variety of proteins, including those related to tau pathology, autophagy, diverse signal transduction pathways, cell stress and apoptosis. Several of these proteins serve as markers of GVD. Most researchers and authors have interpreted the sequestration of proteins into GVD inclusions as either a cellular defense mechanism or one that leads to the impairment of important cellular functions. This review provides a detailed overview of the various aspects of GVD and focuses on the relationship between tau pathology and GVD. PMID:27062260

  1. THE MITOCHONDRIAL DERANGEMENTS IN NEURONAL DEGENER ATION AND NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue, Qi-ming; Gao, Feng; Chen, Qin-tang

    2000-01-01

    @@There are diverse concepts on the pathogenesis of neuronal degeneration and the neurodegenerative diseases. Among them there are different factors which might influence the initiation of neuronal degeneration as well as the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer′s disease, Parkinson′s disease, motor neuron disease, and so on.

  2. Joubert Syndrome and related disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brancati Francesco

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Joubert syndrome (JS and related disorders (JSRD are a group of developmental delay/multiple congenital anomalies syndromes in which the obligatory hallmark is the molar tooth sign (MTS, a complex midbrain-hindbrain malformation visible on brain imaging, first recognized in JS. Estimates of the incidence of JSRD range between 1/80,000 and 1/100,000 live births, although these figures may represent an underestimate. The neurological features of JSRD include hypotonia, ataxia, developmental delay, intellectual disability, abnormal eye movements, and neonatal breathing dysregulation. These may be associated with multiorgan involvement, mainly retinal dystrophy, nephronophthisis, hepatic fibrosis and polydactyly, with both inter- and intra-familial variability. JSRD are classified in six phenotypic subgroups: Pure JS; JS with ocular defect; JS with renal defect; JS with oculorenal defects; JS with hepatic defect; JS with orofaciodigital defects. With the exception of rare X-linked recessive cases, JSRD follow autosomal recessive inheritance and are genetically heterogeneous. Ten causative genes have been identified to date, all encoding for proteins of the primary cilium or the centrosome, making JSRD part of an expanding group of diseases called "ciliopathies". Mutational analysis of causative genes is available in few laboratories worldwide on a diagnostic or research basis. Differential diagnosis must consider in particular the other ciliopathies (such as nephronophthisis and Senior-Loken syndrome, distinct cerebellar and brainstem congenital defects and disorders with cerebro-oculo-renal manifestations. Recurrence risk is 25% in most families, although X-linked inheritance should also be considered. The identification of the molecular defect in couples at risk allows early prenatal genetic testing, whereas fetal brain neuroimaging may remain uninformative until the end of the second trimester of pregnancy. Detection of the MTS should be

  3. Radiographic features of the skeleton in disorders of post-squalene cholesterol biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Massimiliano; Edery, Patrick [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Genetic Department, Referral Centre for Developmental Abnormalities, Femme-Mere-Enfant Hospital, Bron (France); INSERM U1028 UMR CNRS 5,292, UCBL, CRNL TIGER Team, CH le Vinater, Bron (France); Hall, Christine M. [Retired from Department of Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Bouvier, Raymonde; Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Pathology, CBPE, Bron (France); Le Breton, Frederique [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Pathology, Croix-Rousse Hospital, Lyon (France); Bucourt, Martine [AP-HP, Foetopathology Unit, Jean Verdier Hospital, Bondy (France); Cordier, Marie Pierre [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Genetic Department, Referral Centre for Developmental Abnormalities, Femme-Mere-Enfant Hospital, Bron (France); Vianey-Saban, Christine [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Inborn Errors of Metabolism and Neonatal Screening, CBPE, Bron (France); Parenti, Giancarlo; Andria, Generoso [Federico II University, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Section of Pediatrics, Naples (Italy); Le Merrer, Martine [AP-HP, Genetic Department, Referal Centre for Skeletal Dysplasias, Institut Imagine, Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital, Paris (United Kingdom); Offiah, Amaka C. [Stephenson Wing Sheffield Children' s NHS Foundation Trust Western Bank, Radiology Department, Children' s Hospital, Academic Unit of Child Health Room C4, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Disorders of post-squalene cholesterol biosynthesis are inborn errors of metabolism characterised by multiple congenital abnormalities, including significant skeletal involvement. The most frequent and best-characterised example is the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Nine other disorders are known, namely autosomal-recessive Antley-Bixler syndrome, Greenberg dysplasia, X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata, X-linked recessive male emopamil-binding protein deficiency, CHILD syndrome, CK syndrome, sterol C4 methyloxidase-like deficiency, desmosterolosis and lathosterolosis. This study provides an overview of the radiologic features observed in these diseases. A common pattern of limb abnormalities is recognisable, including polydactyly, which is typically post-axial and rarely interdigital and can involve all four limbs, and syndactyly of the toes. Chondrodysplasia punctata is specifically associated with a subgroup of disorders of cholesterol biosynthesis (Greenberg dysplasia, CHILD syndrome, X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata, male emopamil-binding protein deficiency). The possible occurrence of epiphyseal stippling in the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, initially reported, does not appear to be confirmed. Stippling is also associated with other congenital disorders such as chromosomal abnormalities, brachytelephalangic chondrodysplasia punctata (X-linked recessive chondrodysplasia punctata, disruptions of vitamin K metabolism, maternal autoimmune diseases), rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (peroxisomal disorders) and lysosomal storage disorders. In the differential diagnosis of epiphyseal stippling, a moth-eaten appearance of bones, asymmetry, or presence of a common pattern of limb abnormalities indicate inborn errors of cholesterol biosynthesis. We highlight the specific differentiating radiologic features of disorders of post-squalene cholesterol biosynthesis. (orig.)

  4. Radiographic features of the skeleton in disorders of post-squalene cholesterol biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disorders of post-squalene cholesterol biosynthesis are inborn errors of metabolism characterised by multiple congenital abnormalities, including significant skeletal involvement. The most frequent and best-characterised example is the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Nine other disorders are known, namely autosomal-recessive Antley-Bixler syndrome, Greenberg dysplasia, X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata, X-linked recessive male emopamil-binding protein deficiency, CHILD syndrome, CK syndrome, sterol C4 methyloxidase-like deficiency, desmosterolosis and lathosterolosis. This study provides an overview of the radiologic features observed in these diseases. A common pattern of limb abnormalities is recognisable, including polydactyly, which is typically post-axial and rarely interdigital and can involve all four limbs, and syndactyly of the toes. Chondrodysplasia punctata is specifically associated with a subgroup of disorders of cholesterol biosynthesis (Greenberg dysplasia, CHILD syndrome, X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata, male emopamil-binding protein deficiency). The possible occurrence of epiphyseal stippling in the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, initially reported, does not appear to be confirmed. Stippling is also associated with other congenital disorders such as chromosomal abnormalities, brachytelephalangic chondrodysplasia punctata (X-linked recessive chondrodysplasia punctata, disruptions of vitamin K metabolism, maternal autoimmune diseases), rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (peroxisomal disorders) and lysosomal storage disorders. In the differential diagnosis of epiphyseal stippling, a moth-eaten appearance of bones, asymmetry, or presence of a common pattern of limb abnormalities indicate inborn errors of cholesterol biosynthesis. We highlight the specific differentiating radiologic features of disorders of post-squalene cholesterol biosynthesis. (orig.)

  5. Peripheral arterial endothelial dysfunction of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Yusuke; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Shang, Jingwei; Sato, Kota; Nakano, Yumiko; Morihara, Ryuta; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Toru; Abe, Koji

    2016-07-15

    This study evaluates endothelial functions of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA) and spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). The reactive hyperemia index (RHI) of peripheral arterial tonometry and serological data were compared between age- and gender-matched normal controls (n=302) and five disease groups (ALS; n=75, PD; n=180, PSP; n=30, MSA; n=35, SCA; n=53). Correlation analyses were performed in ALS with functional rating scale-revised (FRS-R), and in PD with the Hehn-Yahr scale (H-Y) and a heart to mediastinum ratio using (123)I-MIBG scintigraphy (MIBG). The RHI of ALS and PD, but not of PSP, MSA or SCA, were significantly lower than normal controls (p<0.01). ALS showed a negative correlation of RHI with serum triglycerides (TG) and immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels, but not with disease severity (FRS-R) or rates of disease progression (∆FRS-R). On the other hand, PD showed a negative correlation of RHI with a progressive disease severity (H-Y) and a positive correlation of RHI with early/delayed MIBG scintigraphy, but not with serological data. The present study demonstrated significant declines of peripheral arterial endothelial functions in ALS and PD. The RHI of ALS was more correlated with disease duration and serum parameters while the RHI of PD was more correlated with disease severity and MIBG, suggesting different mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27288784

  6. Association between environmental exposure to pesticides and neurodegenerative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parron, Tesifon [University of Almeria, Department of Neurosciences and Health Sciences, Almeria (Spain); Andalusian Council of Health at Almeria province, Almeria (Spain); Requena, Mar [Andalusian Council of Health at Almeria province, Almeria (Spain); Hernandez, Antonio F., E-mail: ajerez@ugr.es [University of Granada School of Medicine, Granada (Spain); Alarcon, Raquel [Andalusian Council of Health at Almeria province, Almeria (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    Preliminary studies have shown associations between chronic pesticide exposure in occupational settings and neurological disorders. However, data on the effects of long-term non-occupational exposures are too sparse to allow any conclusions. This study examines the influence of environmental pesticide exposure on a number of neuropsychiatric conditions and discusses their underlying pathologic mechanisms. An ecological study was conducted using averaged prevalence rates of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, cerebral degeneration, polyneuropathies, affective psychosis and suicide attempts in selected Andalusian health districts categorized into areas of high and low environmental pesticide exposure based on the number of hectares devoted to intensive agriculture and pesticide sales per capita. A total of 17,429 cases were collected from computerized hospital records (minimum dataset) between 1998 and 2005. Prevalence rates and the risk of having Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and suicide were significantly higher in districts with greater pesticide use as compared to those with lower pesticide use. The multivariate analyses showed that the population living in areas with high pesticide use had an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease and suicide attempts and that males living in these areas had increased risks for polyneuropathies, affective disorders and suicide attempts. In conclusion, this study supports and extends previous findings and provides an indication that environmental exposure to pesticides may affect the human health by increasing the incidence of certain neurological disorders at the level of the general population. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental exposure to pesticides and neurodegenerative-psychiatric disorders. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased risk for Alzheimer's disease and suicide attempts in high exposure areas. Black

  7. Mutation update and uncommon phenotypes in a French cohort of 96 patients with WFS1-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaussenot, A; Rouzier, C; Quere, M; Plutino, M; Ait-El-Mkadem, S; Bannwarth, S; Barth, M; Dollfus, H; Charles, P; Nicolino, M; Chabrol, B; Vialettes, B; Paquis-Flucklinger, V

    2015-05-01

    WFS1 mutations are responsible for Wolfram syndrome (WS) characterized by juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy, and for low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL). Our aim was to analyze the French cohort of 96 patients with WFS1-related disorders in order (i) to update clinical and molecular data with 37 novel affected individuals, (ii) to describe uncommon phenotypes and, (iii) to precise the frequency of large-scale rearrangements in WFS1. We performed quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 13 patients, carrying only one heterozygous variant, to identify large-scale rearrangements in WFS1. Among the 37 novel patients, 15 carried 15 novel deleterious putative mutations, including one large deletion of 17,444 base pairs. The analysis of the cohort revealed unexpected phenotypes including (i) late-onset symptoms in 13.8% of patients with a probable autosomal recessive transmission; (ii) two siblings with recessive optic atrophy without diabetes mellitus and, (iii) six patients from four families with dominantly-inherited deafness and optic atrophy. We highlight the expanding spectrum of WFS1-related disorders and we show that, even if large deletions are rare events, they have to be searched in patients with classical WS carrying only one WFS1 mutation after sequencing. PMID:24890733

  8. A rare genetic disorder causing persistent severe neonatal hypoglycaemia the diagnostic workup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francescato, Gaia; Salvatoni, Alessandro; Persani, Luca; Agosti, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD), a rare genetic autosomal-recessive disorder with typical hyperpigmentation of the skin and mucous membranes, severe hypoglycaemia, occasionally leading to seizures and coma, feeding difficulties, failure to thrive and infections. A newborn child was admitted, on his second day of life, to our neonatal intensive care unit because of seizures and respiratory insufficiency. Hyperpigmentation was not evident due to his Senegalese origin. The clinical presentation led us to consider a wide range of diagnostic hypothesis. Laboratory findings brought us to the diagnosis of FGD that was confirmed by molecular analysis showing an MC2R:p.Y254C mutation previously reported as causative of type 1 FGD and two novel heterozygous non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms in exon 2 and 3 of melanocortin 2 receptor accessory protein-α, whose role in the disease is currently unknown. The importance of an early collection and storage of blood samples during hypoglycaemic event is emphasised. PMID:22814974

  9. Trichothiodystrophy, a human DNA repair disorder with heterogeneity in the cellular response to ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by brittle hair with reduced sulfur content, ichthyosis, peculiar face, and mental and physical retardation. Some patients are photosensitive. A previous study by Stefanini et al. showed that cells from four photosensitive patients with TTD had a molecular defect in DNA repair, which was not complemented by cells from xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group D. In a detailed molecular and cellular study of the effects of UV light on cells cultured from three further TTD patients who did not exhibit photosensitivity we have found an array of different responses. In cells from the first patient, survival, excision repair, and DNA and RNA synthesis following UV irradiation were all normal, whereas in cells from the second patient all these responses were similar to those of excision-defective xeroderma pigmentosum (group D) cells. With the third patient, cell survival measured by colony-forming ability was normal following UV irradiation, even though repair synthesis was only 50% of normal and RNA synthesis was severely reduced. The excision-repair defect in these cells was not complemented by other TTD cell strains. These cellular characteristics of patient 3 have not been described previously for any other cell line. The normal survival may be attributed to the finding that the deficiency in excision-repair is confined to early times after irradiation. Our results pose a number of questions about the relationship between the molecular defect in DNA repair and the clinical symptoms of xeroderma pigmentosum and TTD

  10. Friedreich ataxia is not only a GAA repeats expansion disorder: implications for molecular testing and counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Mazurczak, Tomasz; Zajkowski, Tomasz; Tataj, Renata; Górka-Skoczylas, Paulina; Połatyńska, Katarzyna; Kępczyński, Łukasz; Stasiołek, Mariusz; Bal, Jerzy

    2016-08-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most common hereditary ataxia. It is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the FXN gene, mainly the biallelic expansion of the (GAA)n repeats in its first intron. Heterozygous expansion/point mutations or deletions are rare; no patients with two point mutations or a point mutation/deletion have been described, suggesting that loss of the FXN gene product, frataxin, is lethal. This is why routine FRDA molecular diagnostics is focused on (GAA)n expansion analysis. Additional tests are considered only in cases of heterozygous expansion carriers and an atypical clinical picture. Analyses of the parent's carrier status, together with diagnostic tests, are performed in rare cases, and, because of that, we may underestimate the frequency of deletions. Even though FXN deletions are characterised as 'exquisitely rare,' we were able to identify one case (2.4 %) of a (GAA)n expansion/exonic deletion in a group of 41 probands. This was a patient with very early onset of disease with rapid progression of gait instability and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We compared the patient's clinical data to expansion/deletion carriers available in the literature and suggest that, in clinical practice, the FXN deletion test should be taken into account in patients with early-onset, rapid progressive ataxia and severe scoliosis. PMID:26906906

  11. Epigenetics and etiology of neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata M. Gruber

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Determination of specific gene profile expression is essential for morphological and functional differentiation of cells in the human organism. The human genome consists of 25–30 thousands genes but only some of them are expressed in each cell. Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation, histone and chromatin modifications or non-coding RNA functions are also responsible for the unique gene expression patterns. It is suggested that transcriptional gene activation is related to hypomethylation and the transcriptionally non-active sequences are hypermethylated. Covalent histone modifications and DNA methylation are correlated and interacting. Chromatin modeling is regulated not only by specific enzymes but also by protein kinases or phosphatases and coactivators, such as CBP. Such interaction makes the “histone code” which with the chromatin proteins determines gene expression patterns as the response to external agents. Evidence of a major role for epigenetic modifications in neurological disease has come from three converging lines of enquiry: high conservation throughout evolution of the histone residues that are the target for epigenetic modifications; association between mutations in epigenetic components and multisystem disease syndrome in the nervous system; and broad efficacy of small-molecule epigenetic modulators, e.g. histone deacetylase inhibitors, in models of neurological diseases incurable up to now, such as Huntington’s disease, (HD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. This article is a survey of the literature concerning the characterization of gene expression patterns correlated with some neurodegenerative diseases. The processes of DNA hypomethylation and histone acetylation are emphasized. The histone deacetylases are indicated as the basis for design of potential drugs.

  12. Brainstem: neglected locus in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeaTGrinberg

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent neurodegenerative diseases (NDs are Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration associated with protein TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP. Neuropathologically, NDs are characterized by abnormal intracellular and extracellular protein deposits and by disease-specific neuronal death. Practically all terminal stages of NDs are clinically associated with dementia. Therefore, major attention was directed to protein deposits and neuron loss in supratentorial (telencephalic brain regions in the course of NDs. This was also true for PD, although the pathological hallmark of PD is degeneration of pigmented neurons of the brainstem’s substantia nigra. However, PD pathophysiology was explained by dopamine depletion in the telencephalic basal ganglia due to insufficiency and degeneration of the projection neurons located in substantia nigra. In a similar line of argumentation AD- and FTLD-related clinical deficits were exclusively explained by supratentorial allo- and neocortical laminar neuronal necrosis. Recent comprehensive studies in AD and PD early stages found considerable and unexpected involvement of brainstem nuclei, which could have the potential to profoundly change our present concepts on origin, spread, and early clinical diagnosis of these diseases. In contrast with PD and AD, few studies addressed brainstem involvement in the course of the different types of FTLD-TDP. Some of the results, including ours, disclosed a higher and more widespread pathology than anticipated. The present review will focus mainly on the impact of brainstem changes during the course of the most frequent NDs including PD, AD, and FTLD-TDP, with special emphasis on the need for more comprehensive research on FTLDs.

  13. Neurodegenerative diseases: From available treatments to prospective herbal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Isha; Parihar, Priyanka; Parihar, Mordhwaj Singh

    2016-05-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and many others represent a relevant health problem with age worldwide. Efforts have been made in recent years to discover the mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases and prospective therapy that can help to slow down the effects of the aging and prevent these diseases. Since pathogenesis of these diseases involves multiple factors therefore the important task for neuroscientists is to identify such multiple factors and prevent age-associated neurodegenerative diseases. For these neurodegenerative diseases yet we have only palliative therapies and none of them significantly capable to slow down or halt the underlying pathology. Polyphenolic compounds such as flavonoids present in vegetables and fruits are believed to have anti-aging properties and reduce the risk of neurodegenerative diseases. Despite their abundance, investigations into the benefits of these polyphenolic compounds in human health have only recently begun. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated the potential beneficial effects of flavonoids in neurons. Although clinical trials on the effectiveness of dietary flavonoids to treat human diseases are limited but various animal models and cell culture studies have shown a great promise in developing these compounds as suitable therapeutic targets. In this review, we elaborate the neuroprotective properties of flavonoids especially their applications in prevention and intervention of different neurodegenerative diseases. Their multi-target properties may allow them to be potential dietary supplement in prevention and treatment of the age-associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26550708

  14. Neuroprotective effects of berry fruits on neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Selvaraju Subash; Musthafa Mohamed Essa; Samir Al-Adawi; Mushtaq A.Memon; hTamilarasan Manivasagam; Mohammed Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Recent clinical research has demonstrated that berry fruits can prevent age-related neurodegen-erative diseases and improve motor and cognitive functions. The berry fruits are also capable of modulating signaling pathways involved in inflammation, cell survival, neurotransmission and enhancing neuroplasticity. The neuroprotective effects of berry fruits on neurodegenerative diseases are related to phytochemicals such as anthocyanin, caffeic acid, catechin, quercetin, kae-mpferol and tannin. In this review, we made an attempt to clearly describe the beneifcial effects of various types of berries as promising neuroprotective agents.

  15. Disease: H01346 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H01346 Bloom syndrome Bloom syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder due to mutat ... terized. Recently, the role of BLM as a DNA damage sensor ... has been revealed. Congenital disorder of DNA repa ...

  16. Disease: H00143 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available idosis type III (ML III) are autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorders caused by the deficiency of N-a...iency, mucolipidosis II/III and Niemann-Pick C1 disease - Lysosomal storage disorders

  17. Disease: H00849 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tellectual disability and seizures are common to all three disorders. GAMT deficiency and AGAT deficiency ar...e creatine biosynthesis disorders and inherited in an autosomal recessive manner.

  18. Genistein Improves Neuropathology and Corrects Behaviour in a Mouse Model of Neurodegenerative Metabolic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford-Smith, Kia J.; Langford-Smith, Alex; Brown, Jillian R.; Crawford, Brett E.; Vanier, Marie T.; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz; Wynn, Rob F.; Wraith, J. Ed; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Bigger, Brian W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Neurodegenerative metabolic disorders such as mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB (MPSIIIB or Sanfilippo disease) accumulate undegraded substrates in the brain and are often unresponsive to enzyme replacement treatments due to the impermeability of the blood brain barrier to enzyme. MPSIIIB is characterised by behavioural difficulties, cognitive and later motor decline, with death in the second decade of life. Most of these neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases lack effective treatments. We recently described significant reductions of accumulated heparan sulphate substrate in liver of a mouse model of MPSIIIB using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. Methodology/Principal Findings We report here that high doses of genistein aglycone, given continuously over a 9 month period to MPSIIIB mice, significantly reduce lysosomal storage, heparan sulphate substrate and neuroinflammation in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, resulting in correction of the behavioural defects observed. Improvements in synaptic vesicle protein expression and secondary storage in the cerebral cortex were also observed. Conclusions/Significance Genistein may prove useful as a substrate reduction agent to delay clinical onset of MPSIIIB and, due to its multimodal action, may provide a treatment adjunct for several other neurodegenerative metabolic diseases. PMID:21152017

  19. Genistein improves neuropathology and corrects behaviour in a mouse model of neurodegenerative metabolic disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelina Malinowska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurodegenerative metabolic disorders such as mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB (MPSIIIB or Sanfilippo disease accumulate undegraded substrates in the brain and are often unresponsive to enzyme replacement treatments due to the impermeability of the blood brain barrier to enzyme. MPSIIIB is characterised by behavioural difficulties, cognitive and later motor decline, with death in the second decade of life. Most of these neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases lack effective treatments. We recently described significant reductions of accumulated heparan sulphate substrate in liver of a mouse model of MPSIIIB using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report here that high doses of genistein aglycone, given continuously over a 9 month period to MPSIIIB mice, significantly reduce lysosomal storage, heparan sulphate substrate and neuroinflammation in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, resulting in correction of the behavioural defects observed. Improvements in synaptic vesicle protein expression and secondary storage in the cerebral cortex were also observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Genistein may prove useful as a substrate reduction agent to delay clinical onset of MPSIIIB and, due to its multimodal action, may provide a treatment adjunct for several other neurodegenerative metabolic diseases.

  20. The Role of MAPT in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Genetics, Mechanisms and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng-Cheng; Xing, Ang; Tan, Meng-Shan; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2016-09-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) is a gene responsible for encoding tau protein, which is tightly implicated in keeping the function of microtubules and axonal transport. Hyperphosphorylated tau protein participates in the formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), which characterize many neurodegenerative disorders termed tauopathies. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have demonstrated numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in MAPT associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, it has been presumed that MAPT plays a crucial role in pathogenesis of neurodegeneration via affecting the structure and function of tau. Here, we review the advanced studies to summarize the biochemical properties of MAPT and its encoded protein, as well as the genetics and epigenetics of MAPT in neurodegeneration. Finally, given the potential mechanisms of MAPT to neurodegeneration pathogenesis, targeting MAPT and tau might present significant treatments of MAPT mutation-related neurodegeneration. Affirmatively, the identification of MAPT is extremely beneficial for improving our understanding of the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases and developing the mechanism-based therapies. PMID:26363795

  1. Nrf2 activation in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases: a focus on its role in mitochondrial bioenergetics and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteras, Noemí; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Abramov, Andrey Y

    2016-05-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2 (NF-E2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor well-known for its function in controlling the basal and inducible expression of a variety of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes. As part of its cytoprotective activity, increasing evidence supports its role in metabolism and mitochondrial bioenergetics and function. Neurodegenerative diseases are excellent candidates for Nrf2-targeted treatments. Most neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal dementia and Friedreich's ataxia are characterized by oxidative stress, misfolded protein aggregates, and chronic inflammation, the common targets of Nrf2 therapeutic strategies. Together with them, mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in the pathogenesis of most neurodegenerative disorders. The recently recognized ability of Nrf2 to regulate intermediary metabolism and mitochondrial function makes Nrf2 activation an attractive and comprehensive strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. This review aims to focus on the potential therapeutic role of Nrf2 activation in neurodegeneration, with special emphasis on mitochondrial bioenergetics and function, metabolism and the role of transporters, all of which collectively contribute to the cytoprotective activity of this transcription factor. PMID:26812787

  2. The 5-HT2A serotonin receptor in executive function: Implications for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Susana; Hervig, Mona El-Sayed

    2016-05-01

    Executive function entails the interplay of a group of cognitive processes enabling the individual to anticipate consequences, attain self-control, and undertake appropriate goal-directed behaviour. Serotonin signalling at serotonin 2A receptors (5-HT2AR) has important effects on these behavioural and cognitive pathways, with the prefrontal cortex (PFC) as the central actor. Indeed, the 5-HT2ARs are highly expressed in PFC, where they modulate cortical activity and local network oscillations (brain waves). Numerous psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases result in disrupted executive function. Animal and human studies have linked these disorders with alterations in the 5-HT2AR system, making this an important pharmacological target for the treatment of disorders with impaired cognitive function. This review aims to describe the current state of knowledge on the role of 5-HT2AR signalling in components of executive function, and how 5-HT2AR systems may relate to executive dysfunctions occurring in psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. We hope thereby to provide insight into how pharmacotherapy targeting the 5-HT2AR may ameliorate (or exacerbate) aspects of these disorders. PMID:26891819

  3. Decreased catalytic activity and altered activation properties of PDE6C mutants associated with autosomal recessive achromatopsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grau, Tanja; Artemyev, Nikolai O; Rosenberg, Thomas; Dollfus, Hélène; Haugen, Olav H; Cumhur Sener, E; Jurklies, Bernhard; Andreasson, Sten; Kernstock, Christoph; Larsen, Michael; Zrenner, Eberhart; Wissinger, Bernd; Kohl, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    characterization of six missense mutations applying the baculovirus system to express recombinant mutant and wildtype chimeric PDE6C/PDE5 proteins in Sf9 insect cells. Purified proteins were analyzed using Western blotting, phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity measurements as well as inhibition assays by zaprinast and...

  4. PLEKHG5 deficiency leads to an intermediate form of autosomal-recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzedine, Hamid; Zavadakova, Petra; Planté-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Vaz Pato, Maria; Pinto, Nuno; Bartesaghi, Luca; Zenker, Jennifer; Poirot, Olivier; Bernard-Marissal, Nathalie; Arnaud Gouttenoire, Estelle; Cartoni, Romain; Title, Alexandra; Venturini, Giulia; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Makowski, Edward; Schöls, Ludger; Claeys, Kristl G; Stendel, Claudia; Roos, Andreas; Weis, Joachim; Dubourg, Odile; Leal Loureiro, José; Stevanin, Giovanni; Said, Gérard; Amato, Anthony; Baraban, Jay; LeGuern, Eric; Senderek, Jan; Rivolta, Carlo; Chrast, Roman

    2013-10-15

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies characterized by progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities and distal sensory loss. Following the analysis of two consanguineous families affected by a medium to late-onset recessive form of intermediate CMT, we identified overlapping regions of homozygosity on chromosome 1p36 with a combined maximum LOD score of 5.4. Molecular investigation of the genes from this region allowed identification of two homozygous mutations in PLEKHG5 that produce premature stop codons and are predicted to result in functional null alleles. Analysis of Plekhg5 in the mouse revealed that this gene is expressed in neurons and glial cells of the peripheral nervous system, and that knockout mice display reduced nerve conduction velocities that are comparable with those of affected individuals from both families. Interestingly, a homozygous PLEKHG5 missense mutation was previously reported in a recessive form of severe childhood onset lower motor neuron disease (LMND) leading to loss of the ability to walk and need for respiratory assistance. Together, these observations indicate that different mutations in PLEKHG5 lead to clinically diverse outcomes (intermediate CMT or LMND) affecting the function of neurons and glial cells. PMID:23777631

  5. Transcription-terminating mutation in telethonin causing autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy type 2G in a European patient

    OpenAIRE

    Olivé, Montse; Shatunov, Alexey; Gonzalez, Laura; Carmona, Olga; Moreno, Dolores; Quereda, Lidia Gonzalez; Martinez-Matos, J.A.; Goldfarb, Lev G.; Ferrer, Isidro

    2008-01-01

    A 27-year-old woman of Moldavian origin presented at the age of 15 with progressive proximal limb weakness and painful cramps in her calf muscles. Clinical examination revealed prominent muscle weakness in proximal muscles of the lower extremities and distal anterior compartment of legs, and mild weakness in shoulder girdle muscles. In addition, she had marked calf hypertrophy, muscle atrophy involving the anterior and posterior compartments of the thighs, and the distal anterior compartment ...

  6. Autosomal-Recessive Mutations in the tRNA Splicing Endonuclease Subunit TSEN15 Cause Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia and Progressive Microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuss, Martin W; Sultan, Tipu; James, Kiely N; Rosti, Rasim O; Scott, Eric; Musaev, Damir; Furia, Bansri; Reis, André; Sticht, Heinrich; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Reuter, Miriam S; Abou Jamra, Rami; Trotta, Christopher R; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2016-07-01

    The tRNA splicing endonuclease is a highly evolutionarily conserved protein complex, involved in the cleavage of intron-containing tRNAs. In human it consists of the catalytic subunits TSEN2 and TSEN34, as well as the non-catalytic TSEN54 and TSEN15. Recessive mutations in the corresponding genes of the first three are known to cause pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) types 2A-C, 4, and 5. Here, we report three homozygous TSEN15 variants that cause a milder version of PCH2. The affected individuals showed progressive microcephaly, delayed developmental milestones, intellectual disability, and, in two out of four cases, epilepsy. None, however, displayed the central visual failure seen in PCH case subjects where other subunits of the TSEN are mutated, and only one was affected by the extensive motor defects that are typical in other forms of PCH2. The three amino acid substitutions impacted the protein level of TSEN15 and the stoichiometry of the interacting subunits in different ways, but all resulted in an almost complete loss of in vitro tRNA cleavage activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that mutations in any known subunit of the TSEN complex can cause PCH and progressive microcephaly, emphasizing the importance of its function during brain development. PMID:27392077

  7. High Resolution Ultrasonography for Assessment of Renal Cysts in the PCK Rat Model of Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Kapoor

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The PCK rat model of polycystic kidney disease is characterized by the progressive development of renal medullary cysts. Here, we evaluated the suitability of high resolution ultrasonography (HRU to assess the kidney and cyst volume in PCK rats, testing three different ultrasound image analysis methods, and correlating them with kidneys weights and histological examinations. Methods: After inducing anesthesia, PCK rats (n=18 were subjected to HRU to visualize the kidneys, to perform numeric and volumetric measurements of the kidney and any cysts observed, and to generate 3-dimensional images of the cysts within the kidney parenchyma. Results: HRU provided superior information in comparison to microscopic analysis of stained kidney sections. HRU-based kidney volumes correlated strongly with kidney weights (R2=0.809; PConclusion: HRU represents a useful diagnostic tool for kidney and cyst volume measurements in PCK rats. Sequential HRU examinations may be useful to study the effect of drugs on cyst growth without the need to euthanize experimental animals.

  8. A Novel Mutation in the EDAR Gene Causes Severe Autosomal Recessive Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Emil; Svendsen, Mathias Tiedemann; Lildballe, D. L.; Jensen, P. K. A.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a 2-year-old girl presenting with a severe form of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED). The patient presented with hypotrichosis, anodontia, hypohidrosis, frontal bossing, prominent lips and ears, dry, pale skin, and dermatitis. The patient had chronic rhinitis with malodorous na...

  9. The emergence of hepatic fibrosis and portal hypertension in infants and children with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term imaging and clinical findings are reported in six children whose polycystic kidney disease was detected in infancy or early childhood. Over time (2 years to 20 years) all patients developed portal hypertension from hepatic fibrosis, a problem primarily noted in recessive pattern polycystic kidney disease. Mild renal failure (two patients) was accompanied by serious systemic hypertension in the same patients. In one family, one of the babies also showed dilated right hepatic ducts. Imaging studies included urography and CT although recently ultrasonography was the method of choice. The relative renal and hepatic manifestations in these patients so changed with time that it would seem fallacious to attempt to use rigid classifications based on findings at initial diagnosis. (orig.)

  10. A gene for autosomal recessive symmetrical spastic cerebral palsy maps to chromosome 2q24-25.

    OpenAIRE

    McHale, D P; Mitchell, S.; Bundey, S; Moynihan, L; Campbell, D. A.; Woods, C G; LENCH, N. J.; Mueller, R F; Markham, A F

    1999-01-01

    Cerebral palsy has an incidence of approximately 1/500 births, although this varies between different ethnic groups. Genetic forms of the disease account for approximately 1%-2% of cases in most countries but contribute a larger proportion in populations with extensive inbreeding. We have clinically characterized consanguineous families with multiple children affected by symmetrical spastic cerebral palsy, to locate recessive genes responsible for this condition. The eight families studied we...

  11. Differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases using structural MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koikkalainen, Juha; Rhodius-Meester, Hanneke; Tolonen, Antti; Barkhof, Frederik; Tijms, Betty; Lemstra, Afina W; Tong, Tong; Guerrero, Ricardo; Schuh, Andreas; Ledig, Christian; Rueckert, Daniel; Soininen, Hilkka; Remes, Anne M; Waldemar, Gunhild; Hasselbalch, Steen; Mecocci, Patrizia; van der Flier, Wiesje; Lötjönen, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    Different neurodegenerative diseases can cause memory disorders and other cognitive impairments. The early detection and the stratification of patients according to the underlying disease are essential for an efficient approach to this healthcare challenge. This emphasizes the importance of differential diagnostics. Most studies compare patients and controls, or Alzheimer's disease with one other type of dementia. Such a bilateral comparison does not resemble clinical practice, where a clinician is faced with a number of different possible types of dementia. Here we studied which features in structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans could best distinguish four types of dementia, Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia, and dementia with Lewy bodies, and control subjects. We extracted an extensive set of features quantifying volumetric and morphometric characteristics from T1 images, and vascular characteristics from FLAIR images. Classification was performed using a multi-class classifier based on Disease State Index methodology. The classifier provided continuous probability indices for each disease to support clinical decision making. A dataset of 504 individuals was used for evaluation. The cross-validated classification accuracy was 70.6% and balanced accuracy was 69.1% for the five disease groups using only automatically determined MRI features. Vascular dementia patients could be detected with high sensitivity (96%) using features from FLAIR images. Controls (sensitivity 82%) and Alzheimer's disease patients (sensitivity 74%) could be accurately classified using T1-based features, whereas the most difficult group was the dementia with Lewy bodies (sensitivity 32%). These results were notable better than the classification accuracies obtained with visual MRI ratings (accuracy 44.6%, balanced accuracy 51.6%). Different quantification methods provided complementary information, and consequently, the best results were obtained by

  12. Differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases using structural MRI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koikkalainen, Juha; Rhodius-Meester, Hanneke; Tolonen, Antti; Barkhof, Frederik; Tijms, Betty; Lemstra, Afina W.; Tong, Tong; Guerrero, Ricardo; Schuh, Andreas; Ledig, Christian; Rueckert, Daniel; Soininen, Hilkka; Remes, Anne M.; Waldemar, Gunhild; Hasselbalch, Steen; Mecocci, Patrizia; van der Flier, Wiesje; Lötjönen, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    Different neurodegenerative diseases can cause memory disorders and other cognitive impairments. The early detection and the stratification of patients according to the underlying disease are essential for an efficient approach to this healthcare challenge. This emphasizes the importance of differential diagnostics. Most studies compare patients and controls, or Alzheimer's disease with one other type of dementia. Such a bilateral comparison does not resemble clinical practice, where a clinician is faced with a number of different possible types of dementia. Here we studied which features in structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans could best distinguish four types of dementia, Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia, and dementia with Lewy bodies, and control subjects. We extracted an extensive set of features quantifying volumetric and morphometric characteristics from T1 images, and vascular characteristics from FLAIR images. Classification was performed using a multi-class classifier based on Disease State Index methodology. The classifier provided continuous probability indices for each disease to support clinical decision making. A dataset of 504 individuals was used for evaluation. The cross-validated classification accuracy was 70.6% and balanced accuracy was 69.1% for the five disease groups using only automatically determined MRI features. Vascular dementia patients could be detected with high sensitivity (96%) using features from FLAIR images. Controls (sensitivity 82%) and Alzheimer's disease patients (sensitivity 74%) could be accurately classified using T1-based features, whereas the most difficult group was the dementia with Lewy bodies (sensitivity 32%). These results were notable better than the classification accuracies obtained with visual MRI ratings (accuracy 44.6%, balanced accuracy 51.6%). Different quantification methods provided complementary information, and consequently, the best results were obtained by

  13. Cell ageing: a flourishing field for neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Brites

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence is viewed as an irreversible cell-cycle arrest mechanism involving a complexity of biological progressive processes and the acquisition of diverse cellular phenotypes. Several cell-intrinsic and extrinsic causes (stresses may lead to diverse cellular signaling cascades that include oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA damage, excessive accumulation of misfolded proteins, impaired microRNA processing and inflammation. Here we review recent advances in the causes and consequences of brain cell ageing, including the senescence of endothelial cells at the central nervous system barriers, as well as of neurons and glial cells. We address what makes ageing an important risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and cerebrovascular disease. In particular, we highlight the importance of defects in mitochondrial dynamics, in the cathepsin activity imbalance, in cell-cell communication, in the accumulation of misfolded and unfolded proteins and in the microRNA profiling as having potential impact on cellular ageing processes. Another important aspect is that the absence of specific senescence biomarkers has hampered the characterization of senescent cells in ageing and age-associated diseases. In accordance, the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP or secretome was shown to vary in distinct cell types and upon different stressors, and SASP heterogeneity is believed to create subsets of senenescent cells. In addition to secreted proteins, we then place extracellular vesicles (exosomes and ectosomes as important mediators of intercellular communication with pathophysiological roles in disease spreading, and as emerging targets for therapeutic intervention. We also discuss the application of engineered extracellular vesicles as vehicles for drug delivery. Finally, we summarize current knowledge on methods to rejuvenate senescent cells

  14. Mitochondria as a Therapeutic Target for Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra; Reddy, Tejaswini P.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are cytoplasmic organelles responsible for life and death. Extensive evidence from animal models, postmortem brain studies of and clinical studies of aging and neurodegenerative diseases suggests that mitochondrial function is defective in aging and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Several lines of research suggest that mitochondrial abnormalities, including defects in oxidative ...

  15. Neuroprotective and Neurotherapeutic Effects of Bee Venom on Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Miran K. Rakha

    2013-01-01

    Acute and chronic neurodegenerative diseases are illnesses associated with high morbidity and mortality, and few or no effective options are available for their treatment. A characteristic of many neurodegenerative diseases — which include stroke, brain trauma, spinal cord injury, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease — is neuronal cell death. Given that central nervous system tissue has very limited, if any, regenerative capacity, i...

  16. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge eLandgrave-Gómez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS and its regulation in diseases is one of the most interesting processes of contemporary neuroscience. In the last decade, a growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with CNS´s regulation and neurological disorders are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure.Epigenetics, introduced for the first time by Waddington in the early 1940s, has been traditionally referred to a variety of mechanisms that allow heritable changes in gene expression even in the absence of DNA mutation. However, new definitions acknowledge that many of these mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are used by neurons to control a variety of functions dependent on gene expression. Indeed, in the recent years these mechanisms have shown their importance in the maintenance of a healthy CNS. Moreover, environmental inputs that have shown effects in CNS diseases, such as nutrition, that can modulate the concentration of a variety of metabolites such as acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ and beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB, regulates some of these epigenetic modifications, linking in a precise way environment with gene expression.This manuscript will portray what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the CNS and their participation in a variety of neurological disorders. We will discuss how the machinery that controls these modifications plays an important role in processes involved in neurological disorders such as neurogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, we will discuss how environmental inputs modulate these modifications producing metabolic and physiological alterations that could exert beneficial effects on neurological diseases. Finally, we will highlight possible future directions in the field of

  17. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argye E. Hillis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We review rationale, challenges, study designs, reported results, and future directions in the use of transcranial direct cranial stimulation (tDCS in neurodegenerative disease, focusing on treatment of spelling in primary progressive aphasia (PPA. Rationale Evidence from both animal studies and human studies indicates that anodal and cathodal tDCS over the brain result in a temporary change in membrane potentials, reducing the threshold for long-term potentiation of neurons in the affected area. This may allow unaffected brain regions to assume functions of diseased regions. Challenges Special challenges in treating individuals with progressive conditions include altered goals of treatment and the possibility that participants may accumulate new deficits over the course of the treatment program that interfere with their ability to understand, retain, or cooperate with aspects of the program. The most serious challenge – particularly for single case designs - is that there may be no stable baseline against which to measure change with treatment. Thus, it is essential to demonstrate that treatment results in a statistically significant change in the slope of decline or improvement. Therefore, demonstration of a significant difference between tDCS and control (sham requires either a large number of participants or a large effect size. Designs The choice of a treatment design reflects these limitations. Group studies with a randomized, double-blind, sham control trial design (without cross-over provide the greatest power to detect a difference between intervention and control conditions, with the fewest participants. A cross-over design, in which all participants (from 1 to many receive both active and sham conditions, in randomized order, requires a larger effect size for the active condition relative to the control condition (or little to no maintenance of treatment gains or carry-over effect to show significant differences between treatment

  18. Brain Cholesterol Metabolism and Its Defects: Linkage to Neurodegenerative Diseases and Synaptic Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A M; Kasimov, M R; Zefirov, A L

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important constituent of cell membranes and plays a crucial role in the compartmentalization of the plasma membrane and signaling. Brain cholesterol accounts for a large proportion of the body's total cholesterol, existing in two pools: the plasma membranes of neurons and glial cells and the myelin membranes . Cholesterol has been recently shown to be important for synaptic transmission, and a link between cholesterol metabolism defects and neurodegenerative disorders is now recognized. Many neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by impaired cholesterol turnover in the brain. However, at which stage the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is perturbed and how this contributes to pathogenesis remains unknown. Cognitive deficits and neurodegeneration may be associated with impaired synaptic transduction. Defects in cholesterol biosynthesis can trigger dysfunction of synaptic transmission. In this review, an overview of cholesterol turnover under physiological and pathological conditions is presented (Huntington's, Niemann-Pick type C diseases, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome). We will discuss possible mechanisms by which cholesterol content in the plasma membrane influences synaptic processes. Changes in cholesterol metabolism in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and autistic disorders are beyond the scope of this review and will be summarized in our next paper. PMID:27099785

  19. [Changes in olfaction during ageing and in certain neurodegenerative diseases: up-to-date].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, A-J; Guépet-Sordet, H; Manckoundia, P

    2015-01-01

    Olfaction is a complex sensory system, and increasing interest is being shown in the link between olfaction and cognition, notably in the elderly. In this literature review, we revisit the specific neurophysiological features of the olfactory system and odorants that lead to a durable olfactory memory and an emotional memory, for which the implicit component produces subconscious olfactory conditioning. Olfaction is known to affect cognitive abilities and mood. We also consider the impairment of olfactory function due to ageing and to neurodegenerative diseases, in particular Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, through anatomopathological changes in the peripheral and central olfactory structures. The high frequency of these olfactory disorders as well as their early occurrence in Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease are in favour of their clinical detection in subjects suffering from these two neurodegenerative diseases. Finally, we analyse the impact of olfactory stimulation on cognitive performance and attention. Current observational data from studies in elderly patients with Alzheimer-type dementia are limited to multiple sensory stimulation methods, such as the Snoezelen method, and aromatherapy. These therapies have shown benefits for dementia-related mood and behaviour disorders in the short term, with few side effects. Since olfactory chemosensory stimulation may be beneficial, it may be proposed in patients with dementia, especially Alzheimer-type dementia, as a complementary or even alternative therapy to existing medical strategies. PMID:25304170

  20. The causative role and therapeutic potential of the kynurenine pathway in neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Marta; Outeiro, Tiago F; Scrutton, Nigel S; Giorgini, Flaviano

    2013-06-01

    Metabolites of the kynurenine pathway (KP), which arise from the degradation of tryptophan, have been studied in detail for over a century and garnered the interest of the neuroscience community in the late 1970s and early 1980s with work uncovering the neuromodulatory potential of this pathway. Much research in the following decades has found that perturbations in the levels of KP metabolites likely contribute to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. More recently, it has become apparent that targeting KP enzymes, in particular kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), may hold substantial therapeutic potential for these disorders. Here we provide an overview of the KP, the neuroactive properties of KP metabolites and their role in neurodegeneration. We also discuss KMO as a therapeutic target for these disorders, and our recent resolution of the crystallographic structure of KMO, which will permit the development of new and improved KMO inhibitors which may ultimately expedite clinical application of these compounds. PMID:23636512

  1. Midkine and Pleiotrophin in the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alguacil, Luis F; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) and Midkine (MK) are neurotrophines with documented protective actions in experimental models of neurodegenerative diseases and beneficial effects on toxicity and addictive behaviours related to drug abuse. Concerning the latter, both PTN and MK prevent the neurotoxic effects of amphetamine on nigrostriatal pathways and endogenous PTN also limits amphetamine reward. Moreover, endogenous PTN overexpression in the prefontral cortex abolishes alcohol- induced conditioned place preference. This review summarizes the existing patents for using PTN and MK in the treatment and diagnosis of neuropsychiatric disorders with a focus on neurotoxicity, neurodegeneration and substance use disorders. We have also reviewed the mechanism of action of PTN and MK and summarized existing patents on downstream modulators in their signaling pathways for the same indications. PMID:25808239

  2. The Enemy within: Innate Surveillance-Mediated Cell Death, the Common Mechanism of Neurodegenerative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Robert I.; Robertson, Sarah A.; O'Keefe, Louise V.; Fornarino, Dani; Scott, Andrew; Lardelli, Michael; Baune, Bernhard T.

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases comprise an array of progressive neurological disorders all characterized by the selective death of neurons in the central nervous system. Although, rare (familial) and common (sporadic) forms can occur for the same disease, it is unclear whether this reflects several distinct pathogenic pathways or the convergence of different causes into a common form of nerve cell death. Remarkably, neurodegenerative diseases are increasingly found to be accompanied by activation of the innate immune surveillance system normally associated with pathogen recognition and response. Innate surveillance is the cell's quality control system for the purpose of detecting such danger signals and responding in an appropriate manner. Innate surveillance is an “intelligent system,” in that the manner of response is relevant to the magnitude and duration of the threat. If possible, the threat is dealt with within the cell in which it is detected, by degrading the danger signal(s) and restoring homeostasis. If this is not successful then an inflammatory response is instigated that is aimed at restricting the spread of the threat by elevating degradative pathways, sensitizing neighboring cells, and recruiting specialized cell types to the site. If the danger signal persists, then the ultimate response can include not only the programmed cell death of the original cell, but the contents of this dead cell can also bring about the death of adjacent sensitized cells. These responses are clearly aimed at destroying the ability of the detected pathogen to propagate and spread. Innate surveillance comprises intracellular, extracellular, non-cell autonomous and systemic processes. Recent studies have revealed how multiple steps in these processes involve proteins that, through their mutation, have been linked to many familial forms of neurodegenerative disease. This suggests that individuals harboring these mutations may have an amplified response to innate

  3. Oxidative stress treatment for clinical trials in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ienco, Elena Caldarazzo; LoGerfo, Annalisa; Carlesi, Cecilia; Orsucci, Daniele; Ricci, Giulia; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a metabolic condition arising from imbalance between the production of potentially reactive oxygen species and the scavenging activities. Mitochondria are the main providers but also the main scavengers of cell oxidative stress. The role of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases is well documented. Therefore, therapeutic approaches targeting mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage hold great promise in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite this evidence, human experience with antioxidant neuroprotectants has generally been negative with regards to the clinical progress of disease, with unclear results in biochemical assays. Here we review the antioxidant approaches performed so far in neurodegenerative diseases and the future challenges in modern medicine. PMID:21422516

  4. Xeroderma pigmentosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xeroderma pigmentosum is a rare condition passed down through families in which the skin and tissue covering the ... Xeroderma pigmentosum is an autosomal recessive disorder . This means you must have 2 copies of an abnormal gene ...

  5. VARIED MALIGNANT PRESENTATIONS IN A SINGLE CASE OF XERODERMA PIGMENTOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Shetty

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum is a autosomal recessive genetic disorder in which cutaneous malignancies are very common. We report a rare case where four different varieties of cutaneous malignancies were seen in the same patient..

  6. VARIED MALIGNANT PRESENTATIONS IN A SINGLE CASE OF XERODERMA PIGMENTOS

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul Shetty; Aashish Sashidharan; Elvino Barreto; Kingsly M Paul

    2013-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum is a autosomal recessive genetic disorder in which cutaneous malignancies are very common. We report a rare case where four different varieties of cutaneous malignancies were seen in the same patient..

  7. Disease: H00941 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g tendency, FXII is an important protease that plays a major role in the initiation of the intrinsic pathway...y is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Although FXII deficiency is not associated with a clinical bleedin

  8. Disease: H01289 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H01289 Mulibrey nanism Mulibrey nanism is an autosomal recessive growth disorder characterized b ... nvolving constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy . Mutations in the TRIM37 gene have been reported i ...

  9. Disease: H00159 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00159 Tangier disease Tangier disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutation of ... sease: still more questions than answers. Cell Mol Life ... Sci 62:2150-60 (2005) PMID:11927274 Oram JF Molecu ...

  10. 75 FR 41501 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... cholesterol biosynthesis. Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome (SLOS) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by an... synthesis: Identification of altered metabolic pathways in DHCR7 and SC5D deficiency. Mol Cell...

  11. Hennekam syndrome: a rare cause of primary lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    Elmansour, Imane; Chiheb, Soumia; Benchikhi, Hakima

    2014-01-01

    Hennekam syndrome (HS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the association of lymphedema, intestinal lymphangiectasia, moderate mental retardation, and facial dysmorphism. We describe a 14-year-old girl affected with Hennekam syndrome.

  12. Pantethine treatment is effective in recovering the disease phenotype induced by ketogenic diet in a pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Giordano, Carla; Lamperti, Costanza; Morbin, Michela; Fugnanesi, Valeria; Marchet, Silvia; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Sibon, Ody; Moggio, Maurizio; d'Amati, Giulia; Tiranti, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, caused by mutations in the PANK2 gene, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity, pigmentary retinal degeneration and brain iron accumulation. PANK2 encodes the mitochondrial enzyme pantothenate kinase type 2,

  13. Disease: H00766 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available betes appears during the first months of life in most patients and major skeletal m...ome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neonatal insulin-requiring diabetes and spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia. Dia

  14. Disease: H00218 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00218 Cystic fibrosis (CF) Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder of the exocr ... ride channel whose failure causes cystic fibrosis. Nature ... 440:477-83 (2006) ...

  15. Disease: H01161 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorders of monoamine neurotransmitter metabolism, clinical...arma R, De Vivo DC Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency: clinical features, treatment, and prognos

  16. Disease: H00999 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available festations, including pure myopathy, myopathy with encephalopathy, cerebellar atrop...H00999 Coenzyme Q10 deficiency Coenzyme Q10 deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder with variable mani

  17. Disease: H01183 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erized by megaloblastic anemia, diabetes mellitus, and progressive sensorineural deafness, due to mutations ...astic anemia (TRMA), also known as Rogers syndrome, is a rare autosomal recessive inherited disorder charact

  18. Mitochondrial abnormalities drive cell death in Wolfram syndrome 2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomotake Kanki; Daniel J Klionsky

    2009-01-01

    @@ Wolfram syndrome (WFS; MIM 222300) is an autosomal recessive disorder with highly variable clinical manifestations. It is characterized by di-abetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness (thus, known as DIDMOAD syndrome) [1].

  19. Disease: H01003 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available atine kinase. Dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (DMGDH) is a mitochondrial matrix enzym...ase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by fish odor, and unusual muscle fatigue with increased serum cre

  20. Disease: H00235 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00235 Methemoglobinemia Hereditary methemoglobinemia is an autosomal recessive disorder charact ... ficiency. Hematologic disease hsa00520(1727) Amino sugar ... and nucleotide sugar ... metabolism CYB5R3 [HSA:1727] ...