WorldWideScience

Sample records for autosomal-recessive cone-rod dystrophy

  1. Mutations in PCDH21 cause autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Elsebet; Batbayli, M; Dunø, Morten; Vilhelmsen, K; Rosenberg, T

    2010-01-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy is a retinal dystrophy with early loss of cone photoreceptors and a parallel or subsequent loss of rod photoreceptors. It may be syndromic, but most forms are non-syndromic with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive inheritance.......Cone-rod dystrophy is a retinal dystrophy with early loss of cone photoreceptors and a parallel or subsequent loss of rod photoreceptors. It may be syndromic, but most forms are non-syndromic with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive inheritance....

  2. Genetics Home Reference: cone-rod dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common cause of autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy , accounting for 30 to 60 percent of cases. At ... 1 ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (21 links) ...

  3. Cone rod dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamel Christian P

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cone rod dystrophies (CRDs (prevalence 1/40,000 are inherited retinal dystrophies that belong to the group of pigmentary retinopathies. CRDs are characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination, predominantly localized to the macular region. In contrast to typical retinitis pigmentosa (RP, also called the rod cone dystrophies (RCDs resulting from the primary loss in rod photoreceptors and later followed by the secondary loss in cone photoreceptors, CRDs reflect the opposite sequence of events. CRD is characterized by primary cone involvement, or, sometimes, by concomitant loss of both cones and rods that explains the predominant symptoms of CRDs: decreased visual acuity, color vision defects, photoaversion and decreased sensitivity in the central visual field, later followed by progressive loss in peripheral vision and night blindness. The clinical course of CRDs is generally more severe and rapid than that of RCDs, leading to earlier legal blindness and disability. At end stage, however, CRDs do not differ from RCDs. CRDs are most frequently non syndromic, but they may also be part of several syndromes, such as Bardet Biedl syndrome and Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7 (SCA7. Non syndromic CRDs are genetically heterogeneous (ten cloned genes and three loci have been identified so far. The four major causative genes involved in the pathogenesis of CRDs are ABCA4 (which causes Stargardt disease and also 30 to 60% of autosomal recessive CRDs, CRX and GUCY2D (which are responsible for many reported cases of autosomal dominant CRDs, and RPGR (which causes about 2/3 of X-linked RP and also an undetermined percentage of X-linked CRDs. It is likely that highly deleterious mutations in genes that otherwise cause RP or macular dystrophy may also lead to CRDs. The diagnosis of CRDs is based on clinical history, fundus examination and electroretinogram. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, genetic counseling is

  4. Vitreous fluorophotometry in patients with cone-rod dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Miyake, Y; Goto, S.; Ota, I; Ichikawa, H.

    1984-01-01

    Eight patients with cone-rod dystrophy were examined by means of vitreous fluorophotometry. The data in three patients with an early stage of retinitis pigmentosa (rod-cone dystrophy) served for comparison. In contrast with the abnormal findings on vitreous fluorophotometry in patients with an early stage of retinitis pigmentosa the value of vitreous fluorophotometry in cone-rod dystrophy was within the normal range in all patients except the two with advanced stages of this disease. Our resu...

  5. The ADAMTS18 gene is responsible for autosomal recessive early onset severe retinal dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Peluso Ivana; Conte Ivan; Testa Francesco; Dharmalingam Gopuraja; Pizzo Mariateresa; Collin Rob WJ; Meola Nicola; Barbato Sara; Mutarelli Margherita; Ziviello Carmela; Barbarulo Anna Maria; Nigro Vincenzo; Melone Mariarosa AB; Simonelli Francesca; Banfi Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Inherited retinal dystrophies, including Retinitis Pigmentosa and Leber Congenital Amaurosis among others, are a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders that lead to variable degrees of visual deficits. They can be caused by mutations in over 100 genes and there is evidence for the presence of as yet unidentified genes in a significant proportion of patients. We aimed at identifying a novel gene for an autosomal recessive form of early onset severe retinal dystrophy i...

  6. Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies in the Czech Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Stehlíková, Kristýna; Skálová, Daniela; Zídková, Jana; Mrázová, Lenka; Vondráček, Petr; Mazanec, Radim; Voháňka, Stanislav; Haberlová, Jana; Hermanová, Markéta; Zámečník, Josef; Souček, Ondřej; Ošlejšková, Hana; Dvořáčková, Nina; Solařová, Pavla; Fajkusová, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    Background Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD2) include a number of disorders with heterogeneous etiology that cause predominantly weakness and wasting of the shoulder and pelvic girdle muscles. In this study, we determined the frequency of LGMD subtypes within a cohort of Czech LGMD2 patients using mutational analysis of the CAPN3, FKRP, SGCA, and ANO5 genes. Methods PCR-sequencing analysis; sequence capture and targeted resequencing. Results Mutations of the CAPN3 ge...

  7. Mutations in MFSD8, encoding a lysosomal membrane protein, are associated with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive macular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosing, S.; Born, L.I. van den; Sangermano, R.; Banfi, S.; Koenekoop, R.K.; Zonneveld-Vrieling, M.N.; Klaver, C.C.; Lith-Verhoeven, J.J. van; Cremers, F.P.M.; Hollander, A.I. den; Hoyng, C.B.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to identify the genetic defects in 2 families with autosomal recessive macular dystrophy with central cone involvement. DESIGN: Case series. PARTICIPANTS: Two families and a cohort of 244 individuals with various inherited maculopathies and cone disorders. METHODS: Genome-w

  8. Identification of two novel mutations in CDHR1 in consanguineous Spanish families with autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinos Nikopoulos; Almudena Avila-Fernandez; Marta Corton; Maria Isabel Lopez-Molina; Raquel Perez-Carro; Lara Bontadelli; Silvio Alessandro Di Gioia; Olga Zurita; Blanca Garcia-Sandoval; Carlo Rivolta; Carmen Ayuso

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies present extensive phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity, posing a challenge for patients’ molecular and clinical diagnoses. In this study, we wanted to clinically characterize and investigate the molecular etiology of an atypical form of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy in two consanguineous Spanish families. Affected members of the respective families exhibited an array of clinical features including reduced visual acuity, photophobia, defective color vision...

  9. Distribution of skeletal muscle involvement in autosomal recessive distal muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distribution of skeletal muscle involvement in 5 cases with autosomal recessive distal muscular dystrophy was studied clinically and by computed tomography (CT). Manual muscle test showed muscle involvement with a predilection for flexors in the lower leg and adductors in the thigh. Flexion and extension of the thigh and the lower leg was impaired to similar degree. In progressed cases, neck flexors and trunk muscles were also affected mildly. CT disclosed more clearly the preferential involvement of flexors in the lower leg, and involvement of both hamstrings · adductors group and extensors group of the thigh to similar degree. However, m. popliteus was curiously well preserved. In addition, there was a stage showing high density and hypertrophy of m. sartorius, m. gracilis, m. adductor, m. biceps femoris, m. semimenbranosus, m. semitendinosus or m. rectus femoris, which in thought to be compensatory hypertrophy. M. gluteus minimus in the pelvic girdle and m. dorsi proprii in the trunk were also liable to be affected. The CT findings are regarded as characteristic features noted clearly before muscle weakness and atrophy become apparent clinically. CT is very useful for distinguishing distal muscular dystrophy from rimmed vacuolar distal myopathy in which m. quadriceps femoris and flexors of the lower leg are usually well preserved without compensatory hypertrophy on CT. (author)

  10. Where do we stand in trial readiness for autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Volker; Bertoli, Marta

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD2) are a group of genetically heterogeneous diseases that are typically characterised by progressive weakness and wasting of the shoulder and pelvic girdle muscles. Many of the more than 20 different conditions show overlapping clinical features with other forms of muscular dystrophy, congenital, myofibrillar or even distal myopathies and also with acquired muscle diseases. Although individually extremely rare, all types of LGMD2 together form an important differential diagnostic group among neuromuscular diseases. Despite improved diagnostics and pathomechanistic insight, a curative therapy is currently lacking for any of these diseases. Medical care consists of the symptomatic treatment of complications, aiming to improve life expectancy and quality of life. Besides well characterised pre-clinical tools like animal models and cell culture assays, the determinants of successful drug development programmes for rare diseases include a good understanding of the phenotype and natural history of the disease, the existence of clinically relevant outcome measures, guidance on care standards, up to date patient registries, and, ideally, biomarkers that can help assess disease severity or drug response. Strong patient organisations driving research and successful partnerships between academia, advocacy, industry and regulatory authorities can also help accelerate the elaboration of clinical trials. All these determinants constitute aspects of translational research efforts and influence patient access to therapies. Here we review the current status of determinants of successful drug development programmes for LGMD2, and the challenges of translating promising therapeutic strategies into effective and accessible treatments for patients. PMID:26810373

  11. The ADAMTS18 gene is responsible for autosomal recessive early onset severe retinal dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peluso Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inherited retinal dystrophies, including Retinitis Pigmentosa and Leber Congenital Amaurosis among others, are a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders that lead to variable degrees of visual deficits. They can be caused by mutations in over 100 genes and there is evidence for the presence of as yet unidentified genes in a significant proportion of patients. We aimed at identifying a novel gene for an autosomal recessive form of early onset severe retinal dystrophy in a patient carrying no previously described mutations in known genes. Methods An integrated strategy including homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing was used to identify the responsible mutation. Functional tests were performed in the medaka fish (Oryzias latipes model organism to gain further insight into the pathogenic role of the ADAMTS18 gene in eye and central nervous system (CNS dysfunction. Results This study identified, in the analyzed patient, a homozygous missense mutation in the ADAMTS18 gene, which was recently linked to Knobloch syndrome, a rare developmental disorder that affects the eye and the occipital skull. In vivo gene knockdown performed in medaka fish confirmed both that the mutation has a pathogenic role and that the inactivation of this gene has a deleterious effect on photoreceptor cell function. Conclusion This study reveals that mutations in the ADAMTS18 gene can cause a broad phenotypic spectrum of eye disorders and contribute to shed further light on the complexity of retinal diseases.

  12. Possible influences on the expression of X chromosome-linked dystrophin abnormalities by heterozygosity for autosomal recessive Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Beggs, A H; Neumann, P E; Arahata, K; Arikawa, E; Nonaka, I; Anderson, M S; Kunkel, L. M.

    1992-01-01

    Abnormalities of dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein of muscle and nerve, are generally considered specific for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. However, several patients have recently been identified with dystrophin deficiency who, before dystrophin testing, were considered to have Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) on the basis of clinical findings. Epidemiologic data suggest that only 1/3500 males with autosomal recessive FCMD should have abnormal dystrophin. To explain th...

  13. Viral-mediated vision rescue of a novel AIPL1 cone-rod dystrophy model

    OpenAIRE

    Ku, Cristy A; Chiodo, Vince A.; Boye, Sanford L.; Hayes, Abigail; Goldberg, Andrew F. X.; Hauswirth, William W; Ramamurthy, Visvanathan

    2014-01-01

    Defects in aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like1 (AIPL1) are associated with blinding diseases with a wide range of severity in humans. We examined the mechanism behind autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy (adCORD) caused by 12 base pair (bp) deletion at proline 351 of hAIPL1 (P351Δ12) mutation in the primate-specific region of human AIPL1. Mutant P351Δ12 human isoform, aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like 1 (hAIPL1) mice demonstrated a CORD phenotype with early d...

  14. Loss of the Metalloprotease ADAM9 Leads to Cone-Rod Dystrophy in Humans and Retinal Degeneration in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Parry, David A.; Toomes, Carmel; Bida, Lina; Danciger, Michael; Towns, Katherine V.; McKibbin, Martin; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Logan, Clare V.; Ali, Manir; Bond, Jacquelyn; Chance, Rebecca; Swendeman, Steven; Daniele, Lauren L.; Springell, Kelly; Adams, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) is an inherited progressive retinal dystrophy affecting the function of cone and rod photoreceptors. By autozygosity mapping, we identified null mutations in the ADAM metallopeptidase domain 9 (ADAM9) gene in four consanguineous families with recessively inherited early-onset CRD. We also found reduced photoreceptor responses in Adam9 knockout mice, previously reported to be asymptomatic. In 12-month-old knockout mice, photoreceptors appear normal, but the apical proc...

  15. Homozygous missense variant in the human CNGA3 channel causes cone-rod dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Rehan S; Reuter, Peggy; Sisk, Robert A; Kausar, Tasleem; Shahzad, Mohsin; Maqsood, Muhammad I; Yousif, Ateeq; Ali, Muhammad; Riazuddin, Saima; Wissinger, Bernd; Ahmed, Zubair M

    2015-04-01

    We assessed a large consanguineous Pakistani family (PKAB157) segregating early onset low vision problems. Funduscopic and electroretinographic evaluation of affected individuals revealed juvenile cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) with maculopathy. Other clinical symptoms included loss of color discrimination, photophobia and nystagmus. Whole-exome sequencing, segregation and haplotype analyses demonstrated that a transition variant (c.955T>C; p.(Cys319Arg)) in CNGA3 co-segregated with the CRD phenotype in family PKAB157. The ability of CNGA3 channel to influx calcium in response to agonist, when expressed either alone or together with the wild-type CNGB3 subunit in HEK293 cells, was completely abolished due to p.Cys319Arg variant. Western blotting and immunolocalization studies suggest that a decreased channel density in the HEK293 cell membrane due to impaired folding and/or trafficking of the CNGA3 protein is the main pathogenic effect of the p.Cys319Arg variant. Mutant alleles of the human cone photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (CNGA3) are frequently associated with achromatopsia. In rare cases, variants in CNGA3 are also associated with cone dystrophy, Leber's congenital amaurosis and oligo cone trichromacy. The identification of predicted p.(Cys319Arg) missense variant in CNGA3 expands the repertoire of the known genetic causes of CRD and phenotypic spectrum of CNGA3 alleles. PMID:25052312

  16. Refinement of the cone-rod retinal dystrophy locus on chromosome 19q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, C.Y.; Evans, K.; Bhattacharya, S.S. [Institute of Ophthalmology, London (United Kingdom); Whittaker, J.L.; Fryer, A. [Institute of Child Health, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Weissenbach, J. [Genethon, Enry (France)

    1994-11-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) is a severe example of an inherited retinal dystrophy: ophthalmic diseases that as a group constitute the commonest causes of blindness in children in the developed world and account for a significant proportion of visual handicap in adults. Two case reports suggested loci for CRD-causing genes on chromosomes 18q and chromosome 17q. Recently, we reported the results of a total genome search that localized an autosomal dominant form of CRD to chromosome 19q in the region 19q13.1-q13.2. Since then, using data from a short tandem repeat-polymorphism linkage map of chromosome 19 and recently developed microsatellite markers in this region, we have been able to further refine the localization of the chromosome 19q CRD-causing gene. Seven new microsatellite markers were used to genotype 34 affected subjects, 22 unaffected subjects, and 15 spouses. Two-point, multipoint, and FASTMAP analyses were performed. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  17. RNA interference gene therapy in dominant retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy mouse models caused by GCAP1 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Baehr

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi knockdown is an efficacious therapeutic strategy for silencing genes causative for dominant retinal dystrophies. To test this, we used self-complementary (sc AAV2/8 vector to develop an RNAi-based therapy in two dominant retinal degeneration mouse models. The allele-specific model expresses transgenic bovine GCAP1(Y99C establishing a rapid RP-like phenotype, whereas the nonallele-specific model expresses mouse GCAP1(L151F producing a slowly progressing cone/rod dystrophy (CORD. The late onset GCAP1(L151F-CORD mimics the dystrophy observed in human GCAP1-CORD patients. Subretinal injection of scAAV2/8 carrying shRNA expression cassettes specific for bovine or mouse GCAP1 showed strong expression at one week post-injection. In both allele-specific (GCAP1(Y99C-RP and nonallele-specific (GCAP1(L151F-CORD models of dominant retinal dystrophy, RNAi-mediated gene silencing enhanced photoreceptor survival, delayed onset of degeneration and improved visual function. Such results provide a “proof of concept” toward effective RNAi-based gene therapy mediated by scAAV2/8 for dominant retinal disease based on GCAP1 mutation. Further, nonallele-specific RNAi knockdown of GCAP1 may prove generally applicable toward the rescue of any human GCAP1-based dominant cone-rod dystrophy.

  18. RNA interference gene therapy in dominant retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy mouse models caused by GCAP1 mutations

    OpenAIRE

    JIANG Li; Frederick, Jeanne M.; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown is an efficacious therapeutic strategy for silencing genes causative for dominant retinal dystrophies. To test this, we used self-complementary (sc) AAV2/8 vector to develop an RNAi-based therapy in two dominant retinal degeneration mouse models. The allele-specific model expresses transgenic bovine GCAP1(Y99C) establishing a rapid RP-like phenotype, whereas the nonallele-specific model expresses mouse GCAP1(L151F) producing a slowly progressing cone-rod dyst...

  19. RNA interference gene therapy in dominant retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy mouse models caused by GCAP1 mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang Baehr

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown is an efficacious therapeutic strategy for silencing genes causative for dominant retinal dystrophies. To test this, we used self-complementary (sc) AAV2/8 vector to develop an RNAi-based therapy in two dominant retinal degeneration mouse models. The allele-specific model expresses transgenic bovine GCAP1(Y99C) establishing a rapid RP-like phenotype, whereas the nonallele-specific model expresses mouse GCAP1(L151F) producing a slowly progressing cone/rod dyst...

  20. Early Detection of Central Visual Function Decline in Cone-RodDystrophy by the use of Macular Focal Cone Electroretinogram

    OpenAIRE

    Resta, Giovanni; Galli-Resta, Lucia; Piccardi, Marco; Ziccardi, Lucia; Fadda, Antonello; Minnella, Angelo; Marangoni, Dario; Placidi, Giorgio; Falsini, Benedetto

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE:To evaluate macular focal cone ERG (fERG) as a tool for reliable and early detection of central retinal function decay in cone-rod dystrophy (CRD).RESULTS:Macular focal cone ERG follow-up allowed a clear-cut identification of CRD patients as stationary or progressive, in agreement with visual acuity follow-up. In all progressive patients, fERG declined whenever visual acuity declined, and--in 50% of the cases--fERG loss anticipated acuity loss of several years.CONCLUSIONS:Macular foca...

  1. A novel CRX mutation by whole-exome sequencing in an autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy pedigree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin-Kang Lu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To identify the disease-causing gene mutation in a Chinese pedigree with autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy (adCORD. METHODS: A southern Chinese adCORD pedigree including 9 affected individuals was studied. Whole-exome sequencing (WES, coupling the Agilent whole-exome capture system to the Illumina HiSeq 2000 DNA sequencing platform was used to search the specific gene mutation in 3 affected family members and 1 unaffected member. After a suggested variant was found through the data analysis, the putative mutation was validated by Sanger DNA sequencing of samples from all available family members. RESULTS: The results of both WES and Sanger sequencing revealed a novel nonsense mutation c.C766T (p.Q256X within exon 5 of CRX gene which was pathogenic for adCORD in this family. The mutation could affect photoreceptor-specific gene expression with a dominant-negative effect and resulted in loss of the OTX tail, thus the mutant protein occupies the CRX-binding site in target promoters without establishing an interaction and, consequently, may block transactivation. CONCLUSION: All modes of Mendelian inheritance in CORD have been observed, and genetic heterogeneity is a hallmark of CORD. Therefore, conventional genetic diagnosis of CORD would be time-consuming and labor-intensive. Our study indicated the robustness and cost-effectiveness of WES in the genetic diagnosis of CORD.

  2. A new family of Greek origin maps to the CRD locus for autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy on 19q.

    OpenAIRE

    Papaioannou, M.; BESSANT, D.; Payne, A.; Bellingham, J.; Rougas, C; Loutradis-Anagnostou, A; Gregory-Evans, C; Balassopoulou, A; Bhattacharya, S.

    1998-01-01

    Retinal photoreceptor dystrophies (RD) are a highly heterogeneous group of genetic disorders of the retina, representing the most frequently inherited form of visual handicap, affecting approximately 1.5 million people world wide. To date, more than 40 genetic loci have been implicated in RD. One of them, the CORD2 locus, for an autosomal dominant form of cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), maps to chromosome 19q and has previously been reported in a single large family of British origin. We now report...

  3. Mutations in CEP78 Cause Cone-Rod Dystrophy and Hearing Loss Associated with Primary-Cilia Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikopoulos, Konstantinos; Farinelli, Pietro; Giangreco, Basilio; Tsika, Chrysanthi; Royer-Bertrand, Beryl; Mbefo, Martial K; Bedoni, Nicola; Kjellström, Ulrika; El Zaoui, Ikram; Di Gioia, Silvio Alessandro; Balzano, Sara; Cisarova, Katarina; Messina, Andrea; Decembrini, Sarah; Plainis, Sotiris; Blazaki, Styliani V; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Micheal, Shazia; Boldt, Karsten; Ueffing, Marius; Moulin, Alexandre P; Cremers, Frans P M; Roepman, Ronald; Arsenijevic, Yvan; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K; Andréasson, Sten; Rivolta, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    Cone-rod degeneration (CRD) belongs to the disease spectrum of retinal degenerations, a group of hereditary disorders characterized by an extreme clinical and genetic heterogeneity. It mainly differentiates from other retinal dystrophies, and in particular from the more frequent disease retinitis pigmentosa, because cone photoreceptors degenerate at a higher rate than rod photoreceptors, causing severe deficiency of central vision. After exome analysis of a cohort of individuals with CRD, we identified biallelic mutations in the orphan gene CEP78 in three subjects from two families: one from Greece and another from Sweden. The Greek subject, from the island of Crete, was homozygous for the c.499+1G>T (IVS3+1G>T) mutation in intron 3. The Swedish subjects, two siblings, were compound heterozygotes for the nearby mutation c.499+5G>A (IVS3+5G>A) and for the frameshift-causing variant c.633delC (p.Trp212Glyfs(∗)18). In addition to CRD, these three individuals had hearing loss or hearing deficit. Immunostaining highlighted the presence of CEP78 in the inner segments of retinal photoreceptors, predominantly of cones, and at the base of the primary cilium of fibroblasts. Interaction studies also showed that CEP78 binds to FAM161A, another ciliary protein associated with retinal degeneration. Finally, analysis of skin fibroblasts derived from affected individuals revealed abnormal ciliary morphology, as compared to that of control cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggest that mutations in CEP78 cause a previously undescribed clinical entity of a ciliary nature characterized by blindness and deafness but clearly distinct from Usher syndrome, a condition for which visual impairment is due to retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:27588451

  4. Confirmation of the 2p locus for the mild autosomal recessive lim-girdle muscular dystrophy gene (LGMD2B) in three families allows refinement of the candidate region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashir, R.; Iughetti, P.; Strachan, T. [Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The mild autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a heterogeneous group of muscle diseases. The first gene to be mapped and associated with this phenotype was a locus on 15q geographic isolate. These results have been confirmed in other populations, but it was shown that there is genetic heterogeneity for this form of LGMD. Recently, a second locus has been mapped to chromosome 2p. The confirmation of the mapping of this second locus in LGMD families from different populations is of utmost importance for the positional cloning of this gene (HGMW-approved symbol LGMD2B). In this publication, haplotypes generated from five chromosome 2 markers from all of the known large families linked to chromosome 2p are reported together with the recombinants that show the current most likely location of the LGMD 2B gene. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Retinal dystrophies caused by mutations in the ABCA4 gene : an evaluation of the clinical spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Klevering, Bert Jeroen

    2004-01-01

    In the past seven years, the ABCA4 gene has emerged as the most prominent gene in inherited retinal disease. Pathogenic ABCA4 mutations are the cause of all cases of Stargardt disease, and a portion of the cases of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy. Moreover, specific heterozygous alterations in this gene have been associated with age-related macular degeneration, although this role has been disputed by others. The papers in this thesis, joined in the six appendi...

  6. Genetic enhancement of cognition in a kindred with cone-rod dystrophy due to RIMS1 mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Sisodiya, S.M.; Thompson, P J; Need, A.; Harris, S.E.; M.E. Weale; Wilkie, S. E.; Michaelides, M.; Free, S.L.; Walley, N; Gumbs, C.; Gerrelli, D.; Ruddle, P.; Whalley, L.J.; Starr, J M; Hunt, D M

    2007-01-01

    Background: The genetic basis of variation in human cognitive abilities is poorly understood. RIMS1 encodes a synapse active- zone protein with important roles in the maintenance of normal synaptic function: mice lacking this protein have greatly reduced learning ability and memory function.Objective: An established paradigm examining the structural and functional effects of mutations in genes expressed in the eye and the brain was used to study a kindred with an inherited retinal dystrophy d...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive hypotrichosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Autosomal recessive hypotrichosis is a condition that affects hair growth. People with this condition have sparse hair ( hypotrichosis ) ... erosions) on the scalp. In areas of poor hair growth, they may also develop bumps called hyperkeratotic follicular ...

  8. Molecular genetics of cone-rod dystrophy in Chinese patients: New data from 61 probands and mutation overview of 163 probands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Xiao, Xueshan; Li, Shiqiang; Jia, Xiaoyun; Wang, Panfeng; Sun, Wenmin; Xu, Yan; Xin, Wei; Guo, Xiangming; Zhang, Qingjiong

    2016-05-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy (CORD) is a common form of inherited retinal degeneration. Previously, we have conducted serial mutational analysis in probands with CORD either by Sanger sequencing or whole exome sequencing (WES). In the current study, variants in all genes from RetNet were selected from the whole exome sequencing data of 108 CORD probands (including 61 probands reported here for the first time) and were analyzed by multistep bioinformatics analysis, followed by Sanger sequencing and segregation validation. Data from the previous studies and new data from this study (163 probands in total) were summarized to provide an overview of the molecular genetics of CORD. The following potentially pathogenic mutations were identified in 93 of the 163 (57.1%) probands: CNGA3 (32.5%), ABCA4 (3.8%), ALMS1 (3.1%), GUCY2D (3.1%), CACNA1F (2.5%), CRX (1.8%), PDE6C (1.8%), CNGB3 (1.8%), GUCA1A (1.2%), UNC119 (0.6%), RPGRIP1 (1.2%), RDH12 (0.6%), KCNV2 (0.6%), C21orf2 (0.6%), CEP290 (0.6%), USH2A (0.6%) and SNRNP200 (0.6%). The 17 genes with mutations included 12 known CORD genes and five genes (ALMS1, RDH12, CEP290, USH2A, and SNRNP200) associated with other forms of retinal degeneration. Mutations in CNGA3 is most common in this cohort. This is a systematic molecular genetic analysis of Chinese patients with CORD. PMID:26992781

  9. Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis in Arab children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Al, Y K; Shabani, I S; Lubani, M M; al-Ghawabi, M A; Ibrahim, M D; al-Mohtaseb, S; Duodin, K I

    1994-01-01

    Nineteen Arab children including six boys and 13 girls in ten sibships were diagnosed as having osteopetrosis over a 5-year period in various hospitals in Kuwait. Eighteen patients had an isolated autosomal recessive form and one had autosomal recessive osteopetrosis associated with renal tubular acidosis. The mean age of diagnosis was 24 months. Parental consanguinity was high amongst them (68%). Anaemia, hepatosplenomegaly, failure to thrive, recurrent infections and neurological manifestations were common. Associated congenital abnormalities were found in 26%. Deafness, hydrocephalus and dental caries were relatively less common. A high mortality (37%) owing to infection was noted. The medical management and recommendations for patient care are discussed briefly. PMID:7516136

  10. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ARCA1 autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 ( ARCA1 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  11. Autosomal recessive diseases among Palestinian Arabs.

    OpenAIRE

    Zlotogora, J

    1997-01-01

    As a consequence of the high consanguinity rate among the Palestinian Arabs, many recessive disorders are present with a relatively high frequency. In a survey of 2000 different Palestinian Arab families who visited our genetic clinic, in 601 an autosomal recessive disease was diagnosed or strongly suspected. The distribution of these disorders was not uniform and some disorders, such as Krabbe disease, were found at high frequency in only a small part of the population. For some other disord...

  12. Genetic linkage studies in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansfield, D.C.; Teague, P.W.; Barber, A. [Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) is a severe retinal dystrophy characterized by night blindness, progressive constriction of the visual fields and loss of central vision in the fourth or fifth decades. The frequency of this form of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) varies in different populations. Mutations within the rhodopsin, cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase-{beta} subunit and cGMP-gated channel genes have been reported in some arRP families. The genetic loci responsible for the majority of cases have yet to be identified. Genetic heterogeneity is likely to be extensive. In order to minimize the amount of genetic heterogenity, a set of arRP families was ascertained within the South-Central Sardinian population, in which 81% of families with a known mode of inheritance show an autosomal recessive form of RP. The Sardinian population is an ethnic {open_quotes}outlier{close_quotes}, having remained relatively isolated from mainland and other cultures. Genetic linkage data has been obtained in a set of 11 Sardinian arRP kindreds containing 26 affected members. Under the assumption of genetic homogeneity, no evidence of linkage was found in the arRP kindreds using 195 markers, which excluded 62% of the genome (Z<-2). Positive lod scores were obtained with D14S80 which showed no recombination in a subset of 5 families. Heterogeneity testing using D14S80 and arRP showed no significant evidence of heterogeneity (p=0.18) but evidence of linkage ({chi}{sup 2}=3.64, p=0.028). We are currently screening the neural retina-specific leucine zipper gene (NRL) in 14q11 for mutations as a candidate locus.

  13. 一个视锥-视杆营养不良大家系致病基因的初步鉴定%Identification of mutated gene in a large pedigree with cone-rod dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈蕾; 顾蕾; 顾鸣敏; 吴星伟

    2016-01-01

    目的:明确一个常染色体显性遗传眼底病大家系中患者的临床特征,找出该家系的致病基因,并进行基因诊断。方法:受累患者接受问诊及各项眼科检查;对先证者进行覆盖372个眼科遗传病基因的外显子测序芯片突变筛查,并对其中的10个可疑突变位点进行Sanger测序及验证。结果:该家系患者均表现出类似进展型视锥-视杆细胞营养不良(cone-rod dystrophy,CORD)的特征,且起病较早,症状较重。外显子测序分析发现,在患者视锥-视杆同源盒(cone-rod homeobox,CRX)基因的第3个外显子上存在一个错义突变(c.238G>A),导致该基因编码蛋白第80位的谷氨酸变成赖氨酸。结论:本研究首次在黄种人中发现一个CRX[c.238G>A(p.E80K)]基因突变的CORD大家系,同时提示由该基因突变所致CORD患者的临床表现比p.E80A及p.E80Q所致患者更为严重。%Objective To investigate the clinical manifestations of a large Chinese family presenting with autosomal dominant hereditary retinopathy, and to identify the pathogenic gene. Methods Interrogation and ophthalmological examinations were performed in all the affected members. Three hundred and seventy-two exons in ophthalmic disease-associated genes were sequenced with Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Ten highly suspected mutation sites were sequenced and verified with Sanger sequencing. Results All affected members presented manifestations of progressive cone-rod dystrophy, with early-onset and serious symptoms. A missense mutation in exon 3 (c.238G>A) of CRX gene was identified, resulting in an amino acid change from glutamic acid to lysine (E80K). Conclusions This is the first report of CRX mutation (p.E80K) pedigree in yellow race, and it revealed that manifestations of patients with mutation in p.E80K were more serious than those with mutation in p.E80A and p.E80Q.

  14. Spectrum of Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström Pigg, Maritta; Bygum, Anette; Gånemo, Agneta; Virtanen, Marie; Brandrup, Flemming; Zimmer, Andreas D; Hotz, Alrun; Vahlquist, Anders; Fischer, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) represents a heterogeneous group of rare disorders of cornification with 3 major subtypes: harlequin ichthyosis (HI), lamellar ichthyosis (LI) and congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE). A 4th subtype has also been proposed: pleomorphic...

  15. Black hair follicular dysplasia, an autosomal recessive condition in dogs.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmutz, S M; Moker, J S; Clark, E.G.; Shewfelt, R

    1998-01-01

    Using histology, a coat color abnormality and the subsequent hair loss were diagnosed as black hair follicular dysplasia. A pedigree analysis of an affected litter and literature review suggests that this is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. The melanocyte stimulating hormone receptor gene is ruled out by using linkage analysis.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ARSACS autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay Enable Javascript to view the ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay , more commonly known as ARSACS , ...

  17. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia with bull's-eye macular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruysberg, J.R.M.; Eerola, K.U.; Vrijland, H.R.; Aandekerk, A.L.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Deutman, A.F.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: In 1980, we published in the American Journal of Ophthalmology two siblings with hereditary ataxia and atrophic maculopathy. The report is cited in the literature as autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia with retinal degeneration. The purpose of the present study is to document the progressi

  18. Caroli′s syndrome with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prithi Shenoy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Caroli′s syndrome (CS is a rare congenital disorder characterized by multiple segmental cystic or saccular dilatations of the intrahepatic bile ducts and congenital hepatic fibrosis. We report a 9-year-old boy who was diagnosed with CS and autosomal recessive poly-cystic kidney disease. On screening, his 5-month-old asymptomatic sister had multiple dilated biliary radicals with multiple bilateral renal cystic lesions. Both the patient and the affected sibling have been advised regular follow-up for monitoring the progression of the disease. In conclusion, patients with CS should be screened for renal cystic lesions and vice versa even if they are asymptomatic. Also, as the disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, it is important to screen family members for early diagnosis and management.

  19. Caroli's syndrome with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Prithi; Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Shanbag, Preeti; Bhongade, Swapnil

    2014-07-01

    Caroli's syndrome (CS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by multiple segmental cystic or saccular dilatations of the intrahepatic bile ducts and congenital hepatic fibrosis. We report a 9-year-old boy who was diagnosed with CS and autosomal recessive poly-cystic kidney disease. On screening, his 5-month-old asymptomatic sister had multiple dilated biliary radicals with multiple bilateral renal cystic lesions. Both the patient and the affected sibling have been advised regular follow-up for monitoring the progression of the disease. In conclusion, patients with CS should be screened for renal cystic lesions and vice versa even if they are asymptomatic. Also, as the disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, it is important to screen family members for early diagnosis and management. PMID:24969198

  20. Caroli′s syndrome with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Prithi Shenoy; Syed Ahmed Zaki; Preeti Shanbag; Swapnil Bhongade

    2014-01-01

    Caroli′s syndrome (CS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by multiple segmental cystic or saccular dilatations of the intrahepatic bile ducts and congenital hepatic fibrosis. We report a 9-year-old boy who was diagnosed with CS and autosomal recessive poly-cystic kidney disease. On screening, his 5-month-old asymptomatic sister had multiple dilated biliary radicals with multiple bilateral renal cystic lesions. Both the patient and the affected sibling have been advised regular follow...

  1. NEW BEST1 MUTATIONS IN AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE BESTROPHINOPATHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    FUNG, ADRIAN T.; YZER, SUZANNE; GOLDBERG, NAOMI; WANG, HAO; NISSEN, MICHAEL; GIOVANNINI, ALFONSO; MERRIAM, JOANNA E.; BUKANOVA, ELENA N.; CAI, CAROLYN; YANNUZZI, LAWRENCE A.; TSANG, STEPHEN H.; ALLIKMETS, RANDO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the ocular phenotype in patients with autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy and carriers, and to describe novel BEST1 mutations. Methods Patients with clinically suspected and subsequently genetically proven autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy underwent full ophthalmic examination and investigation with fundus autofluorescence imaging, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, electroretinography, and electrooculography. Mutation analysis of the BEST1 gene was performed through direct Sanger sequencing. Results Five affected patients from four families were identified. Mean age was 16 years (range, 6–42 years). All affected patients presented with reduced visual acuity and bilateral, hyperautofluorescent subretinal yellowish deposits within the posterior pole. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography demonstrated submacular fluid and subretinal vitelliform material in all patients. A cystoid maculopathy was seen in all but one patient. In 1 patient, the location of the vitelliform material was seen to change over a follow-up period of 3 years despite relatively stable vision. Visual acuity and fundus changes were unresponsive to topical and systemic carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and systemic steroids. Carriers had normal ocular examinations including normal fundus autofluorescence. Three novel mutations were detected. Conclusion Three novel BEST1 mutations are described, suggesting that many deleterious variants in BEST1 resulting in haploinsufficiency are still unknown. Mutations causing autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy are mostly located outside of the exons that usually harbor vitelliform macular dystrophy–associated dominant mutations. PMID:25545482

  2. 常染色体隐性遗传的类Duchenne肌营养不良临床特征及其发生比率的估计值分析%The Proportion and Clinical Feature of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy With Autosomal Recessive Inheritance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麻宏伟; 武盈玉; 王阳; 高薇; 薛燕宁

    2001-01-01

    目的:探讨常染色体隐性遗传的类杜氏肌营养不良(类DMD)临床特点及其在杜氏肌营养不良症(DMD)中的比例。方法:研究8个家系中9例女性类DMD的临床表现、家族史及血清肌酸激酶水平,并估计常染色体隐性遗传的类DMD在DMD中的比例。结果:常染色体隐性遗传的类DMD患者独立行走的平均时间为(1.47±1.00)岁,症状出现的平均时间为(8.11±4.32)岁,血清肌酸激酶平均水平为(2785.10±1500.29)U/L,这种常染色体隐性遗传型类DMD占DMD的9.4%。结论:常染色体隐性遗传的类DMD与DMD在临床上无法区别,部分被认为是性连锁隐性遗传的DMD,实际上是常染色体隐性遗传的类DMD。%Objective:Our aim was to investigate the proportion of autosomal recessive (AR) inheritance among families with patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and clinical feature in patients with AR form of DMD. Methods:A total of 193 families was studied, 8 of them with at least one girl with “DMD - like” phenotype and 185 with only boys with this kind of phenotype. Based on the number of families with at least one affected girl and the number of patients per sibship among these pedigrees, the proportion of families with DMD inherited as an AR trait was estimated. The clinical examination, family history and serum creatine-kinase were studied in 11 patients diagnosed as AR form of DMD. Results: The proportion of families with AR form of DMD was estimated as 9.4%. The average age of being able to walk is (1.47±1.00) year, serum creatine-kinase levels were (2785.10±1500.29) U/L. The clinical symptom occurred at the average age of (8.11±4.32) year in patients with AR form of DMD. Conclusion: The AR form of muscular dystrophy and DMD not be distingushed clinically. Some families with only affected boys diagnosed as typical DMD, in fact, have the AR form of the disease. This study is very useful for genetic consulting.

  3. STIL mutation causes autosomal recessive microcephalic lobar holoprosencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakar, Naseebullah; Ahmad, Jamil; Morris-Rosendahl, Deborah J; Altmüller, Janine; Friedrich, Katrin; Barbi, Gotthold; Nürnberg, Peter; Kubisch, Christian; Dobyns, William B; Borck, Guntram

    2015-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous midline brain malformation associated with neurologic manifestations including developmental delay, intellectual disability and seizures. Although mutations in the sonic hedgehog gene SHH and more than 10 other genes are known to cause holoprosencephaly, many patients remain without a molecular diagnosis. Here we show that a homozygous truncating mutation of STIL not only causes severe autosomal recessive microcephaly, but also lobar holoprosencephaly in an extended consanguineous Pakistani family. STIL mutations have previously been linked to centrosomal defects in primary microcephaly at the MCPH7 locus. Our results thus expand the clinical phenotypes associated with biallellic STIL mutations to include holoprosencephaly. PMID:25218063

  4. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene produce autosomal recessive ocular albinism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, R.A.; Summers, C.G.; Oetting, W.S. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Albinism has historically been divided into ocular (OA) and oculocutaneous (OCA) types based on the presence or absence of clinically apparent skin and hair involvement in an individual with the ocular features of albinism. The major genes for OCA include the tyrosinase gene in OCA1 and the P gene in OCA2. X-linked and autosomal recessive OA have been described and the responsible genes have not been identified. We now present six Caucasian individuals who have the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA but who have OCA1 as shown by the presence of mutations of the tyrosinase. They had white or very light hair and white skin at birth, and cutaneous pigment developed in the first decade of life. At ages ranging from 1.5-23 years, hair color was dark blond to light brown. The skin had generalized pigment and well developed tan was present on the exposed arm and face skin of four. Iris pigment was present and iris translucency varied. Molecular analysis of the tyrosinase gene, using PCR amplification and direct di-deoxy sequencing showed the following mutations: E398Z/E398Q, P406S/g346a, R402E/T373K, ?/D383N, and H211N/T373K. The homozygous individual was not from a known consanguineous mating. T373K is the most common tyrosinase gene mutation in our laboratory. Three of these mutations are associated with a total loss of tyrosinase activity (g346a splice-site, T373K, and D383N), while four are associated with residual enzyme activity (H211N, R402E, E398Q, and P406S). These studies show that mutations of the tyrosinase gene can produce the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA in an individual who has normal amounts of cutaneous pigment and the ability to tan after birth. This extends the phenotypic range of OCA1 to normal cutaneous pigment after early childhood, and suggest that mutations of the tyrosinase gene account for a significant number of individuals with autosomal recessive OA.

  5. Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Diocaretz V

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Polycystic Kidney Disease is a genetic disorder characterized by progressive cystic dilations of the renal ducts, presenting as autosomal dominant or recessive forms with an incidence of 1 in 1.000 and 1 in 20.000 births, respectively, according to international series. The autosomal recessive variety can be lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory failure secondary to pulmonary hypoplasia and can manifest during childhood with hypertension, short stature and complications of portal hypertension. CASE REPORT: 3 years and 11 months old preschoolar with antecedent of fetal growth restriction and oligohydramnios during prenatal period, and a history of asthenia, pallor and progressive feeding difficulty with postprandial vomiting. Physical examination shows cardiac bruit, hypertension, splenomegaly, caput medusae and short stature. Laboratory tests with peripheral pancytopenia; abdominal ultrasonography showed hepatosplenomegaly, findings consistent with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and periportal fibrosis; renal scintigraphy with bilateral kidney failure; a positive fecal occult blood test; an upper endoscopy that shows small esophageal varices; a hand radiography that shows bone age delayed and an echocardiography with cardiomegaly. DISCUSSION: This infrequent disease requires a high degree of suspicion by the clinician and presents with portal hypertension, with platelet count being the best predictor of severity. This condition has no cure and will progress to end-stage renal disease in any moment, so the aim is to minimize and treat renal and hepatic complications.

  6. Connexin 26 and autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Monisha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Prelingual deafness occurs with a frequency of 1 in 1000 live births and is divided into syndromic and non-syndromic forms contributing 40 and 60% respectively. Autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL is responsible for 80% cases of childhood deafness. Nearly all genes localized for ARNSHL cause prelingual, severe to profound, sensorineural hearing impairment. ARNSHL is genetically heterogeneous and at least 39 loci have been identified. The most significant finding to date has been the discovery of mutations in GJB2 gene at the DFNB1 locus on chromosome 13q12 as the major cause of profound prelingual deafness. This was first reported in a Tunisian family in 1994 and thereafter in many different countries. GJB2 gene encodes the gap-junction protein, connexin 26 (Cx26, mutations in which have become the first genetic marker of inherited hearing loss. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR, single stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP and sequencing methods have been developed for the detection of mutations in Cx26 gene. In India as well, the Cx26 mutations are being screened in families with hearing impaired children using these molecular methods. Therefore, in order to create awareness among the clinicians and the affected families; we have attempted to review the Cx26 gene mutations responsible for autosomal recessive type of non-syndromic hearing loss. The efficacy and utility of Cx26 gene analysis might open the path to proper counseling of families for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis. It may even facilitate the development of strategies in future for the treatment of this common genetic disorder.

  7. MR cholangiography in children with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) is a relatively new, non-invasive imaging technique of the biliary tree that has shown good correlation with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The liver manifestation of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF). CHF may be accompanied by Caroli's disease, which is characterised by a non-obstructive dilation of the intrahepatic bile ducts. Objective. A prospective study was conducted to determine the presence and extent of Caroli's disease in children with ARPKD. Materials and methods. Seven children with ARPKD aged from 3.0 to 10.1 years were examined. CHF was confirmed in all biopsied cases (5 of 7). All children had been followed by repeated abdominal US examinations for many years. The MR examination included a morphological imaging study using a T2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequence and a heavily T2-weighted inversion-recovery turbo spin-echo sequence with three-dimensional maximum intensity projection (MIP) reconstructions for MRC. Results. The diagnosis of Caroli's disease could be made in one case by US; in two other children Caroli's disease was suspected, but the differentiation from hepatic cysts was not possible. By MRC, Caroli's disease could be diagnosed in three of seven children. Furthermore, MRC with MIP reconstructions demonstrated the extent of the disease by showing the entire biliary tree from different angles. Conclusions. MRC is a valuable method to establish the diagnosis and demonstrate the extent of Caroli's disease. (orig.)

  8. Autosomal recessive multiple pterygium syndrome: a new variant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Y; Erduran, E; Kutlu, N

    2000-07-31

    Multiple pterygium syndromes include at least 15 different entities characterized by multiple pterygia or webs of the skin and multiple congenital anomalies. We describe a female infant who presented with a distinct constellation of multiple anomalies consisting of pterygia of the inguinal, intercrural and popliteal areas, flexion contractures and arthrogryposis of some joints, craniofacial anomalies including ectropion, medial canthal web, blepharophimosis, hypoplasia of nose, oral and nasopharyngeal cavities, vocal cords and tongue, micrognathia, orolabial synechiae secondary to pterygia, low set ears, alopecia, sad and expressionless face, short neck, asymmetric nipples, anal stenosis, rectal polyp, hypoplastic labia majora, complete syndactyly of all fingers and toes, pes equinovarus, bandlike web between feet, and absence of the nails and phalangeal-palmar creases. Radiological examination showed synostosis, absence or hypoplasia of metacarpal, metatarsal and phalangeal bones on feet and hands, and hypoplasia of pelvic bones and scapulae. This pattern of anomalies does not fit entirely any of the known multiple pterygium syndromes. Autosomal recessive inheritance is most likely due to the presence of three similarly affected siblings and normal parents. PMID:10925380

  9. Isotretinoin treatment of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis complicated by coexisting dysferlinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashiah, J; Harel, A; Bitterman, O; Sagi, L; Gat, A; Fellig, Y; Ben-Shachar, S; Sprecher, E

    2016-06-01

    Consanguinity is known to be associated with an increase in the prevalence of autosomal recessive disorders such as autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI). ARCI often responds well to retinoid treatment. We describe a patient with ARCI who improved under isotretinoin treatment. The patient subsequently developed elevated levels of serum creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), which led to the diagnosis of a second autosomal recessive disorder, dysferlinopathy, a rare myopathy characterized by muscle weakness, decreased tendon reflexes and marked elevation of CPK levels. This report demonstrates the need for physicians to remain alert to the possible coexistence of rare and mutually relevant disorders in populations with a high rate of consanguinity. PMID:26620441

  10. MR cholangiography in children with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, G. [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)]|[Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Heinrich Heine Univ., Duesseldorf (Germany); Benz-Bohm, G.; Kugel, H. [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Keller, K.M. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Querfeld, U. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)

    1999-06-01

    Background. Magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) is a relatively new, non-invasive imaging technique of the biliary tree that has shown good correlation with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The liver manifestation of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF). CHF may be accompanied by Caroli`s disease, which is characterised by a non-obstructive dilation of the intrahepatic bile ducts. Objective. A prospective study was conducted to determine the presence and extent of Caroli`s disease in children with ARPKD. Materials and methods. Seven children with ARPKD aged from 3.0 to 10.1 years were examined. CHF was confirmed in all biopsied cases (5 of 7). All children had been followed by repeated abdominal US examinations for many years. The MR examination included a morphological imaging study using a T2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequence and a heavily T2-weighted inversion-recovery turbo spin-echo sequence with three-dimensional maximum intensity projection (MIP) reconstructions for MRC. Results. The diagnosis of Caroli`s disease could be made in one case by US; in two other children Caroli`s disease was suspected, but the differentiation from hepatic cysts was not possible. By MRC, Caroli`s disease could be diagnosed in three of seven children. Furthermore, MRC with MIP reconstructions demonstrated the extent of the disease by showing the entire biliary tree from different angles. Conclusions. MRC is a valuable method to establish the diagnosis and demonstrate the extent of Caroli`s disease. (orig.) With 1 fig., 1 tab., 18 refs.

  11. A large animal model for CNGB1 autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paige A Winkler

    Full Text Available Retinal dystrophies in dogs are invaluable models of human disease. Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA is the canine equivalent of retinitis pigmentosa (RP. Similar to RP, PRA is a genetically heterogenous condition. We investigated PRA in the Papillon breed of dog using homozygosity mapping and haplotype construction of single nucleotide polymorphisms within a small family group to identify potential positional candidate genes. Based on the phenotypic similarities between the PRA-affected Papillons, mouse models and human patients, CNGB1 was selected as the most promising positional candidate gene. CNGB1 was sequenced and a complex mutation consisting of the combination of a one basepair deletion and a 6 basepair insertion was identified in exon 26 (c.2387delA;2389_2390insAGCTAC leading to a frameshift and premature stop codon. Immunohistochemistry (IHC of pre-degenerate retinal sections from a young affected dog showed absence of labeling using a C-terminal CNGB1 antibody. Whereas an antibody directed against the N-terminus of the protein, which also recognizes the glutamic acid rich proteins arising from alternative splicing of the CNGB1 transcript (upstream of the premature stop codon, labeled rod outer segments. CNGB1 combines with CNGA1 to form the rod cyclic nucleotide gated channel and previous studies have shown the requirement of CNGB1 for normal targeting of CNGA1 to the rod outer segment. In keeping with these previous observations, IHC showed a lack of detectable CNGA1 protein in the rod outer segments of the affected dog. A population study did not identify the CNGB1 mutation in PRA-affected dogs in other breeds and documented that the CNGB1 mutation accounts for ~70% of cases of Papillon PRA in our PRA-affected canine DNA bank. CNGB1 mutations are one cause of autosomal recessive RP making the CNGB1 mutant dog a valuable large animal model of the condition.

  12. Autosomal recessive Stickler syndrome in two families is caused by mutations in the COL9A1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Nikopoulos (Konstantinos); I. Schrauwen (Isabelle); M.E.H. Simon (Marleen); R.W.J. Collin (Rob); M.A.H. Veckeneer (Marc); K. Keymolen (Kathelijn); G. van Camp (Guy); F.P.M. Cremers (Frans); L. Ingeborgh van den Born

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPurpose. To investigate COL9A1 in two families suggestive of autosomal recessive Stickler syndrome and to delineate the associated phenotype. Methods. The probands of two consanguineous autosomal recessive Stickler families were evaluated for homozygosity using SNP microarray in one and

  13. Autosomal recessive Stickler syndrome in two families is caused by mutations in the COL9A1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikopoulos, K.; Schrauwen, I.; Simon, M.; Collin, R.W.J.; Veckeneer, M.; Keymolen, K.; Camp, G. van; Cremers, F.P.M.; Born, L.I. van den

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate COL9A1 in two families suggestive of autosomal recessive Stickler syndrome and to delineate the associated phenotype. METHODS: The probands of two consanguineous autosomal recessive Stickler families were evaluated for homozygosity using SNP microarray in one and haplotype an

  14. An autosomal recessive syndrome of cleft palate, cardiac defect, genital anomalies, and ectrodactyly (CCGE).

    OpenAIRE

    Giannotti, A; Digilio, M C; Mingarelli, R; Dallapiccola, B.

    1995-01-01

    We report a brother and sister affected by a constellation of malformations, including cleft palate, cardiac defect, genital anomalies, and ectrodactyly (CCGE). A similar association has been reported previously by Richieri-Costa and Orquizas in a male patient born to consanguineous parents. An autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance is proposed for this syndrome.

  15. Prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound in pregnancies at risk for autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Reuss (Annette); J.W. Wladimiroff (Juriy); P.A. Stewart (Patricia); M.F. Niermeijer (Martinus)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract In 15 pregnancies at risk of the autosomal recessive type of polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD), there were six recurrences (40%), five of which were diagnosed prenatally between 17 and 26 weeks (mean, 22 weeks). In the remaining affected case, normal kidney size and echoge

  16. Spectrum of mutations in the renin-angiotensin system genes in autosomal recessive renal tubular dysgenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gribouval, Olivier; Morinière, Vincent; Pawtowski, Audrey;

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal recessive renal tubular dysgenesis (RTD) is a severe disorder of renal tubular development characterized by early onset and persistent fetal anuria leading to oligohydramnios and the Potter sequence, associated with skull ossification defects. Early death occurs in most cases from anuri...

  17. Caroli's Syndrome with Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease in a Two Month Old Infant

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Hur, Yoon Jeong; Park, Jee Min; Kim, Myung Joon; Park, Young Nyun; Lee, Jae Seung

    2006-01-01

    Caroli's syndrome is a rare congenital disorder that involves intrahepatic bile duct ectasia and congenital hepatic fibrosis, frequently seen with concomitant autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD). Literature on infants with ARPKD is rare. Here, we present a case of a two month old boy who was diagnosed with Caroli's syndrome and ARPKD.

  18. DJ-1( PARK7), a novel gene for autosomal recessive, early onset parkinsonism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Bonifati (Vincenzo); F. Squitieri (Ferdinando); E. Krieger (Elmar); N. Vanacore (Nicola); J.C. van Swieten; A. Brice; C.M. van Duijn (Cock); G. Meco (Giuseppe); P. Heutink (Peter); B.A. Oostra (Ben); P. Rizzu (Patrizia)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractFour chromosomal loci ( PARK2, PARK6, PARK7, and PARK9) associated with autosomal recessive, early onset parkinsonism are known. We mapped the PARK7 locus to chromosome 1p36 in a large family from a genetically isolated population in the Netherlands, and confirmed this linkage in an Ital

  19. ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 mutations cause autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecchiani, Celeste; Pedace, Lucia; Lo Giudice, Temistocle; Casella, Antonella; Mearini, Marzia; Gaudiello, Fabrizio; Pedroso, José L; Terracciano, Chiara; Caltagirone, Carlo; Massa, Roberto; St George-Hyslop, Peter H; Barsottini, Orlando G P; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Orlacchio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a group of hereditary peripheral neuropathies that share clinical characteristics of progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities, distal sensory loss, as well as diminished tendon reflexes. Hundreds of causative DNA changes have been found, but much of the genetic basis of the disease is still unexplained. Mutations in the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene are a frequent cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and peripheral axonal neuropathy, and account for ∼ 40% of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The overlap of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with both diseases, as well as the common autosomal recessive inheritance pattern of thin corpus callosum and axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in three related patients, prompted us to analyse the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene in affected individuals with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. We investigated 28 unrelated families with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease defined by clinical, electrophysiological, as well as pathological evaluation. Besides, we screened for all the known genes related to axonal autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2A2/HMSN2A2/MFN2, CMT2B1/LMNA, CMT2B2/MED25, CMT2B5/NEFL, ARCMT2F/dHMN2B/HSPB1, CMT2K/GDAP1, CMT2P/LRSAM1, CMT2R/TRIM2, CMT2S/IGHMBP2, CMT2T/HSJ1, CMTRID/COX6A1, ARAN-NM/HINT and GAN/GAN), for the genes related to autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and axonal peripheral neuropathy (SPG7/PGN, SPG15/ZFYVE26, SPG21/ACP33, SPG35/FA2H, SPG46/GBA2, SPG55/C12orf65 and SPG56/CYP2U1), as well as for the causative gene of peripheral neuropathy with or without agenesis of the corpus callosum (SLC12A6). Mitochondrial disorders related to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 were also excluded by sequencing POLG and TYMP genes. An additional locus for autosomal recessive Charcot

  20. Autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease caused by deletion at a dinucleotide repeat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare inherited condition rendering neutrophils incapable of killing invading pathogens. This condition is due to the failure of a multicomponent microbicidal oxidase that normally yields a low-midpoint-potential b cytochrome (cytochrome b245). Although defects in the X chromosome-linked cytochrome account for the majority of CGD patients, as many as 30% of CGD cases are due to an autosomal recessive disease. Of these, >90% have been shown to be defective in the synthesis of a 47-kDa cytosolic component of the oxidase. The authors demonstrate here in three unrelated cases of autosomal recessive CGD that the identical underlying molecular lesion is a dinucleotide deletion at a GTGT tandem repeat, corresponding to the acceptor site of the first intron - exon junction. Slippage of the DNA duplex at this site may contribute to the high frequency of defects in this gene

  1. Infantile variant of Bartter syndrome and sensorineural deafness: A new autosomal recessive disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, D.; Shalev, H.; Carmi, Rivka; Ohaly, M. [Univ. of the Negev, Ashkelon (Israel)

    1995-12-04

    The infantile variant of Bartter syndrome (IBS) is usually associated with maternal polyhydramnios, premature birth, postnatal polyuria and hypokalemic hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis and a typical appearance. IBS is thought to be an autosomal recessive trait. Several congenital tubular defects are associated with sensorineural deafness (SND). However, an association between the IBS and SND has not been reported so far. Here we describe 5 children of an extended consanguineous Bedouin family with IBS and SND. In 3 of the cases, the typical electrolyte imbalance and facial appearance were detected neonatally. SND was detected as early as age 1 month, suggesting either coincidental homozygotization of 2 recessive genes or a pleiotropic effect of one autosomal recessive gene. This association suggests that evaluation of SND is warranted in every case of IBS. 35 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Oculodentodigital dysplasia: study of ophthalmological and clinical manifestations in three boys with probably autosomal recessive inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasson, Maria; Calixto, Nassim; Cronemberger, Sebastião; de Aguiar, Regina Amélia Lopes Pessoa; Leão, Letícia Lima; de Aguiar, Marcos José Burle

    2004-09-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) is a rare inherited disorder affecting the development of the face, eyes, teeth, and limbs. The majority of cases of ODDD are inherited as an autosomal dominant condition. There are few reports of probable autosomal recessive transmission. Affected patients exhibit a distinctive physiognomy with a narrow nose, hypoplastic alae nasi, and anteverted nostrils, bilateral microphthalmos, and microcornea. Sometimes iris anomalies and secondary glaucoma are present. There are malformations of the distal extremities such as syndactyly. In addition, there are defects in the dental enamel with hypoplasia and yellow discoloration of the teeth. Less common features include hypotrichosis, intracranial calcifications, and conductive deafness secondary to recurrent otitis media. We describe three brothers with ODDD. Their parents are first cousins and present no features of ODDD. These data are in favor of autosomal recessive inheritance and suggest genetic heterogeneity for this entity. PMID:15512999

  3. TRPM1 Is Mutated in Patients with Autosomal-Recessive Complete Congenital Stationary Night Blindness

    OpenAIRE

    Audo, Isabelle; Kohl, Susanne; Leroy, Bart P.; Munier, Francis L.; Guillonneau, Xavier; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Bujakowska, Kinga; Nandrot, Emeline F.; Lorenz, Birgit; Preising, Markus; Kellner, Ulrich; Renner, Agnes B.; Bernd, Antje; Antonio, Aline; Moskova-Doumanova, Veselina

    2009-01-01

    Night vision requires signaling from rod photoreceptors to adjacent bipolar cells in the retina. Mutations in the genes NYX and GRM6, expressed in ON bipolar cells, lead to a disruption of the ON bipolar cell response. This dysfunction is present in patients with complete X-linked and autosomal-recessive congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) and can be assessed by standard full-field electroretinography (ERG), showing severely reduced rod b-wave amplitude and slightly altered cone resp...

  4. PNPLA1 mutations cause autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in golden retriever dogs and humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Grall, Anaïs; Guaguère, Eric; Planchais, Sandrine; Grond, Susanne; Bourrat, Emmanuelle; Hausser, Ingrid; Hitte, Christophe; Le Gallo, Matthieu; Derbois, Céline; Kim, Gwang-Jin; Lagoutte, Laëtitia; Degorce-Rubiales, Frédérique; Radner, Franz,; Thomas, Anne; Küry, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    International audience Ichthyoses comprise a heterogeneous group of genodermatoses characterized by abnormal desquamation over the whole body, for which the genetic causes of several human forms remain unknown. We used a spontaneous dog model in the golden retriever breed, which is affected by a lamellar ichthyosis resembling human autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses (ARCI), to carry out a genome-wide association study. We identified a homozygous insertion-deletion (indel) mutation i...

  5. TRPV4 Dysfunction Promotes Renal Cystogenesis in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zaika, Oleg; Mamenko, Mykola; Berrout, Jonathan; Boukelmoune, Nabila; O'Neil, Roger G.; Pochynyuk, Oleh

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of cyst formation and expansion in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is poorly understood, but impaired mechanosensitivity to tubular flow and dysfunctional calcium signaling are important contributors. The activity of the mechanosensitive Ca2+-permeable TRPV4 channel underlies flow-dependent Ca2+ signaling in murine collecting duct (CD) cells, suggesting that this channel may contribute to cystogenesis in ARPKD. Here, we developed a method to isola...

  6. A rare case of respiratory disorders associated with two autosomal recessive diseases and male infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Mendeluk, Gabriela Ruth; Costa, Sergio López; Scigliano, Sergio; Menga, Guillermo; Demiceu, Sergio; Palaoro, Luis Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The study of nasal ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and ultrastructure may contribute to the understanding of pathognomonic cases of male infertility associated with defects in sperm motility. This study was designed to report a particular case of male infertility, characterized by the association of two respiratory autosomal recessive genetic diseases (alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency [AAT-D] and primary ciliary dyskinesia [PCD]). A 39-year-old patient with complete sperm immotility, AAT-D, and br...

  7. A Defect in the TUSC3 Gene Is Associated with Autosomal Recessive Mental Retardation

    OpenAIRE

    Garshasbi, Masoud; Hadavi, Valeh; Habibi, Haleh; Kahrizi, Kimia; Kariminejad, Roxana; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Tzschach, Andreas; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Kuss, Andreas Walter

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that autosomal recessive mental retardation (ARMR) is extremely heterogeneous, and there is reason to believe that the number of underlying gene defects goes into the thousands. To date, however, only four genes have been implicated in nonsyndromic ARMR (NS-ARMR): PRSS12 (neurotrypsin), CRBN (cereblon), CC2D1A, and GRIK2. As part of an ongoing systematic study aiming to identify ARMR genes, we investigated a large consanguineous family comprising seven patients with ...

  8. Improved Structure and Function in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Rat Kidneys with Renal Tubular Cell Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K J Kelly

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a truly catastrophic monogenetic disease, causing death and end stage renal disease in neonates and children. Using PCK female rats, an orthologous model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease harboring mutant Pkhd1, we tested the hypothesis that intravenous renal cell transplantation with normal Sprague Dawley male kidney cells would improve the polycystic kidney disease phenotype. Cytotherapy with renal cells expressing wild type Pkhd1 and tubulogenic serum amyloid A1 had powerful and sustained beneficial effects on renal function and structure in the polycystic kidney disease model. Donor cell engraftment and both mutant and wild type Pkhd1 were found in treated but not control PCK kidneys 15 weeks after the final cell infusion. To examine the mechanisms of global protection with a small number of transplanted cells, we tested the hypothesis that exosomes derived from normal Sprague Dawley cells can limit the cystic phenotype of PCK recipient cells. We found that renal exosomes originating from normal Sprague Dawley cells carried and transferred wild type Pkhd1 mRNA to PCK cells in vivo and in vitro and restricted cyst formation by cultured PCK cells. The results indicate that transplantation with renal cells containing wild type Pkhd1 improves renal structure and function in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and may provide an intra-renal supply of normal Pkhd1 mRNA.

  9. Disease: H01015 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ne-rod dystrophy and amelogenesis imperfecta. It is caused mutations in the CNNM4 gene that encodes a putati...mental disorder CNNM4 [HSA:26504] [KO:K16302] Cone-rod dystrophy and amelogenesis imperfect...consisting of autosomal-recessive cone-rod dystrophy and amelogenesis imperfecta. Am J Hum Genet 84:266-73 (...2009) PMID:20706282 (descritpion) Jalili IK Cone-rod dystrophy and amelogenesis imperfect

  10. THE SYNDROME OF AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE PONTOCEREBELLAR HYPOPLASIA, MICROCEPHALY, AND EXTRAPYRAMIDAL DYSKINESIA (PONTOCEREBELLAR HYPOPLASIA TYPE-2) - COMPILED DATA FROM 10 PEDIGREES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BARTH, PG; BLENNOW, G; LENARD, HG; BEGEER, JH; VANDERKLEY, JM; HANEFELD, F; PETERS, ACB; Valk, J.

    1995-01-01

    The syndrome of autosomal recessive pontocerebellar hypoplasia, microcephaly, severely impaired mental and motor development, and extrapyramidal dyskinesia is a distinct system degeneration, previously designated pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 2 (PCH-2). To further characterize its clinical and neu

  11. Dystrophin analysis in the diagnosis of muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, A M; Hughes, H E; Gardner-Medwin, D; Nicholson, L V

    1989-01-01

    We present a family in which the differential diagnosis between X linked Duchenne muscular dystrophy and autosomal recessive Duchenne-like muscular dystrophy was resolved in favour of the latter by analysis of dystrophin, which is the protein product of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus.

  12. Autosomal recessive ectodermal dysplasia: I. An undescribed dysplasia/malformation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos, T; Simosa, V; Pinto-Cisternas, J; Abramovits, W; Jolay, L; Rodriguez, L; Fernandez, L; Ramela, M

    1991-12-15

    We describe 27 individuals of 7 families related to each other with high probability who showed manifestations of ectodermal dysplasia and other anomalies affecting females as severely as males with variable expressivity. All parents were normal. These families were detected in a relatively isolated and inbred population with very small neighbouring communities from a Caribbean Sea island, Margarita Island, in Northeastern Venezuela (Nueva Esparta State). The clinical picture common to all patients could not be classified within the heterogeneous group of known ectodermal dysplasias and the published cases do not resemble our patients. We believe that this condition constitutes a newly recognized autosomal recessive dysplasia/malformation syndrome of ectodermal dysplasia. PMID:1776626

  13. Orofacial Manifestations of Autosomal Recessive Robinow’s Syndrome: A Rare Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Santosh; Dhokar, Amol; Yadav, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Robinow’s syndrome is a very rare genetic disorder which bears a resemblance to a foetal face. It is characterized by short-limbed dwarfism, defects in vertebral segmentation and abnormalities in the head, face and external genitalia. It has a genetic heterogeneity with autosomal dominant and recessive forms which relates to the severity of phenotype presentation. A rare case of an autosomal recessive form of Robinow’s syndrome is presented with emphasis on, characteristic craniofacial and intraoral manifestations to aid in diagnosis and dental management of this patient.

  14. Birth prevalence and mutation spectrum in danish patients with autosomal recessive albinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønskov, Karen; Ek, Jakob; Sand, Annie; Scheller, Rudolf; Bygum, Anette; Brixen, Kim; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The study was initiated to investigate the mutation spectrum of four OCA genes and to calculate the birth prevalence in patients with autosomal recessive albinism. METHODS: Mutation analysis using dHPLC or direct DNA sequencing of TYR, OCA2, TYRP1, and MATP was performed in 62 patients...... recessive ocular albinism (AROA) based on clinical findings was 55 to 45. CONCLUSIONS: TYR is the major OCA gene in Denmark, but several patients do not have mutations in the investigated genes. A relatively large fraction of patients were observed with AROA, and of those 52% had no mutations compared with...

  15. Mutations in C10orf11, a Melanocyte-Differentiation Gene, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Albinism

    OpenAIRE

    Grønskov, Karen; Dooley, Christopher M.; Østergaard, Elsebet; Kelsh, Robert N.; Hansen, Lars; Levesque, Mitchell P.; Vilhelmsen, Kaj; Møllgård, Kjeld; Stemple, Derek L.; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive albinism is a hypopigmentation disorder with a broad phenotypic range. A substantial fraction of individuals with albinism remain genetically unresolved, and it has been hypothesized that more genes are to be identified. By using homozygosity mapping of an inbred Faroese family, we identified a 3.5 Mb homozygous region (10q22.2–q22.3) on chromosome 10. The region contains five protein-coding genes, and sequencing of one of these, C10orf11, revealed a nonsense mutation that...

  16. A novel deletion mutation in ASPM gene in an Iranian family with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elinaz AKBARIAZAR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Akbarizar E, Ebrahimpour M, Akbari S, Arzhanghi S, Abedini SS, Najmabadi H, Kahrizi K. A Novel Deletion Mutation in ASPM Gene in an Iranian Family with Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly. Iran J Child Neurol.  2013 Spring;7(2:23-30. ObjectiveAutosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH is a neurodevelopmental and genetically heterogeneous disorder with decreased head circumference due to the abnormality in fetal brain growth. To date, nine loci and nine genes responsible for the situation have been identified. Mutations in the ASPM gene (MCPH5 is the most common cause of MCPH. The ASPM gene with 28 exons is essential for normal mitotic spindle function in embryonic neuroblasts.Materials & MethodsWe have ascertained twenty-two consanguineous families withintellectual disability and different ethnic backgrounds from Iran. Ten out of twenty-two families showed primary microcephaly in clinical examination. We investigated MCPH5 locus using homozygosity mapping by microsatellite marker. ResultSequence analysis of exon 8 revealed a deletion of nucleotide (T in donor site of splicing site of ASPM in one family. The remaining nine families were not linked to any of the known loci. More investigation will be needed to detect the causative defect in these families.ConlusionWe detected a novel mutation in the donor splicing site of exon 8 of the ASPM gene. This deletion mutation can alter the ASPM transcript leading to functional impairment of the gene product. References1. Pattison L, Crow YJ, Deeble VJ, Jackson AP, Jafri H, Rashid Y, et al. A Fifth Locus for Primary Autosomal Recessive Microcephaly Maps to Chromosome 1q31. Am J Hum Genet 2000;67(6:1578-80.2. Darvish H, Esmaeeli-Nieh S, Monajemi G, Mohseni M, Ghasemi-Firouzabadi S, Abedini S, et al. A clinical and molecular genetic study of 112 Iranian families with primary microcephaly. Journal of Medical Genetics 2010;47(12:823-8.3. Tolmie JL, M M, JB S, D D, JM C

  17. Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis in American Bulldogs Is Associated With NIPAL4 (ICHTHYIN) Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldin, E A; Wang, P; Evans, E; Cantner, C A; Ferracone, J D; Credille, K M; Casal, M L

    2015-07-01

    A minority of patients with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) display mutations in NIPAL4 (ICHTHYIN). This protein plays a role in epidermal lipid metabolism, although the mechanism is unknown. The study describes a moderate form of ARCI in an extended pedigree of American Bulldogs that is linked to the gene encoding ichthyin. The gross phenotype was manifest as a disheveled pelage shortly after birth, generalized scaling, and adherent brown scale with erythema of the abdominal skin. Pedigree analysis indicated an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Ultrastructurally, the epidermis showed discontinuous lipid bilayers, unprocessed lipid within corneocytes, and abnormal lamellar bodies. Linkage analysis, performed by choosing simple sequence repeat markers and single-nucleotide polymorphisms near genes known to cause ACRI, revealed an association with NIPAL4. NIPAL4 was identified and sequenced using standard methods. No mutation was identified within the gene, but affected dogs had a SINE element 5' upstream of exon 1 in a highly conserved region. Of 545 DNA samples from American Bulldogs, 32 dogs (17 females, 15 males) were homozygous for the polymerase chain reaction fragment. All affected dogs were homozygous, with parents heterozygous for the insertion. Immunolabeling revealed an absence of ichthyin in the epidermis. This is the first description of ARCI associated with decreased expression of NIPAL4 in nonhuman species. PMID:25322746

  18. Mutations in CERS3 cause autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radner, Franz P W; Marrakchi, Slaheddine; Kirchmeier, Peter; Kim, Gwang-Jin; Ribierre, Florence; Kamoun, Bourane; Abid, Leila; Leipoldt, Michael; Turki, Hamida; Schempp, Werner; Heilig, Roland; Lathrop, Mark; Fischer, Judith

    2013-06-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a rare genetic disorder of the skin characterized by abnormal desquamation over the whole body. In this study we report four patients from three consanguineous Tunisian families with skin, eye, heart, and skeletal anomalies, who harbor a homozygous contiguous gene deletion syndrome on chromosome 15q26.3. Genome-wide SNP-genotyping revealed a homozygous region in all affected individuals, including the same microdeletion that partially affects two coding genes (ADAMTS17, CERS3) and abolishes a sequence for a long non-coding RNA (FLJ42289). Whereas mutations in ADAMTS17 have recently been identified in autosomal recessive Weill-Marchesani-like syndrome in humans and dogs presenting with ophthalmologic, cardiac, and skeletal abnormalities, no disease associations have been described for CERS3 (ceramide synthase 3) and FLJ42289 so far. However, analysis of additional patients with non-syndromic ARCI revealed a splice site mutation in CERS3 indicating that a defect in ceramide synthesis is causative for the present skin phenotype of our patients. Functional analysis of patient skin and in vitro differentiated keratinocytes demonstrated that mutations in CERS3 lead to a disturbed sphingolipid profile with reduced levels of epidermis-specific very long-chain ceramides that interferes with epidermal differentiation. Taken together, these data present a novel pathway involved in ARCI development and, moreover, provide the first evidence that CERS3 plays an essential role in human sphingolipid metabolism for the maintenance of epidermal lipid homeostasis. PMID:23754960

  19. Autosomal recessive transmission of MYBPC3 mutation results in malignant phenotype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilu Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM due to mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins is most commonly inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Since nearly 50% of HCM cases occur in the absence of a family history, a recessive inheritance pattern may be involved. METHODS: A pedigree was identified with suspected autosomal recessive transmission of HCM. Twenty-six HCM-related genes were comprehensively screened for mutations in the proband with targeted second generation sequencing, and the identified mutation was confirmed with bi-directional Sanger sequencing in all family members and 376 healthy controls. RESULTS: A novel missense mutation (c.1469G>T, p.Gly490Val in exon 17 of MYBPC3 was identified. Two siblings with HCM were homozygous for this mutation, whereas other family members were either heterozygous or wild type. Clinical evaluation showed that both homozygotes manifested a typical HCM presentation, but none of others, including 5 adult heterozygous mutation carriers up to 71 years of age, had any clinical evidence of HCM. CONCLUSIONS: Our data identified a MYBPC3 mutation in HCM, which appeared autosomal recessively inherited in this family. The absence of a family history of clinical HCM may be due to not only a de novo mutation, but also recessive mutations that failed to produce a clinical phenotype in heterozygous family members. Therefore, consideration of recessive mutations leading to HCM is essential for risk stratification and genetic counseling.

  20. A new autosomal recessive disorder of bilateral frontotemporal pachygyria without microcephaly: Report of a case and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phadke Shubha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pachygyria is a disorder of neuronal migration. We report an Indian family with four siblings with developmental delay, infrequent seizures, normal head size and mild to moderate mental retardation. Two of them had bilaterally symmetrical frontotemporal pachygyria. Dysmorphism and neurological signs were absent in the affected subjects. Affected male and female siblings with normal parents suggests autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. We believe these cases represent a new autosomal recessive disorder of neuronal migration. Other similar cases of lissencephaly are reviewed.

  1. Mutations in c10orf11, a melanocyte-differentiation gene, cause autosomal-recessive albinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønskov, Karen; Dooley, Christopher M; Østergaard, Elsebet;

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive albinism is a hypopigmentation disorder with a broad phenotypic range. A substantial fraction of individuals with albinism remain genetically unresolved, and it has been hypothesized that more genes are to be identified. By using homozygosity mapping of an inbred Faroese family......, we identified a 3.5 Mb homozygous region (10q22.2-q22.3) on chromosome 10. The region contains five protein-coding genes, and sequencing of one of these, C10orf11, revealed a nonsense mutation that segregated with the disease and showed a recessive inheritance pattern. Investigation of additional...... individual originating from Lithuania. Immunohistochemistry showed localization of C10orf11 in melanoblasts and melanocytes in human fetal tissue, but no localization was seen in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Knockdown of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) homolog with the use of morpholinos resulted in...

  2. PNPLA1 mutations cause autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in golden retriever dogs and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grall, Anaïs; Guaguère, Eric; Planchais, Sandrine; Grond, Susanne; Bourrat, Emmanuelle; Hausser, Ingrid; Hitte, Christophe; Le Gallo, Matthieu; Derbois, Céline; Kim, Gwang-Jin; Lagoutte, Laëtitia; Degorce-Rubiales, Frédérique; Radner, Franz P W; Thomas, Anne; Küry, Sébastien; Bensignor, Emmanuel; Fontaine, Jacques; Pin, Didier; Zimmermann, Robert; Zechner, Rudolf; Lathrop, Mark; Galibert, Francis; André, Catherine; Fischer, Judith

    2012-02-01

    Ichthyoses comprise a heterogeneous group of genodermatoses characterized by abnormal desquamation over the whole body, for which the genetic causes of several human forms remain unknown. We used a spontaneous dog model in the golden retriever breed, which is affected by a lamellar ichthyosis resembling human autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses (ARCI), to carry out a genome-wide association study. We identified a homozygous insertion-deletion (indel) mutation in PNPLA1 that leads to a premature stop codon in all affected golden retriever dogs. We subsequently found one missense and one nonsense mutation in the catalytic domain of human PNPLA1 in six individuals with ARCI from two families. Further experiments highlighted the importance of PNPLA1 in the formation of the epidermal lipid barrier. This study identifies a new gene involved in human ichthyoses and provides insights into the localization and function of this yet uncharacterized member of the PNPLA protein family. PMID:22246504

  3. Nephrocalcinosis (Enamel Renal Syndrome) Caused by Autosomal Recessive FAM20A Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaureguiberry, Graciana; De la Dure-Molla, Muriel; Parry, David; Quentric, Mickael; Himmerkus, Nina; Koike, Toshiyasu; Poulter, James; Klootwijk, Enriko; Robinette, Steven L.; Howie, Alexander J.; Patel, Vaksha; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Stanescu, Horia C.; Issler, Naomi; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Laing, Christopher; Walsh, Stephen B.; McCredie, David A.; Povey, Sue; Asselin, Audrey; Picard, Arnaud; Coulomb, Aurore; Medlar, Alan J.; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Verloes, Alain; Le Caignec, Cedric; Roussey, Gwenaelle; Guiol, Julien; Isidor, Bertrand; Logan, Clare; Shore, Roger; Johnson, Colin; Inglehearn, Christopher; Al-Bahlani, Suhaila; Schmittbuhl, Matthieu; Clauss, François; Huckert, Mathilde; Laugel, Virginie; Ginglinger, Emmanuelle; Pajarola, Sandra; Spartà, Giuseppina; Bartholdi, Deborah; Rauch, Anita; Addor, Marie-Claude; Yamaguti, Paulo M.; Safatle, Heloisa P.; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio; dos Santos Netos, Pedro E.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Gruessel, Sandra; Sandmann, Carolin; Ruehmann, Denise; Langman, Craig B.; Scheinman, Steven J.; Ozdemir-Ozenen, Didem; Hart, Thomas C.; Hart, P. Suzanne; Neugebauer, Ute; Schlatter, Eberhard; Houillier, Pascal; Gahl, William A.; Vikkula, Miikka; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès; Bleich, Markus; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Unwin, Robert J.; Mighell, Alan; Berdal, Ariane; Kleta, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Calcium homeostasis requires regulated cellular and interstitial systems interacting to modulate the activity and movement of this ion. Disruption of these systems in the kidney results in nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis, important medical problems whose pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Methods We investigated 25 patients from 16 families with unexplained nephrocalcinosis and characteristic dental defects (amelogenesis imperfecta, gingival hyperplasia, impaired tooth eruption). To identify the causative gene, we performed genome-wide linkage analysis, exome capture, next-generation sequencing, and Sanger sequencing. Results All patients had bi-allelic FAM20A mutations segregating with the disease; 20 different mutations were identified. Conclusions This au-tosomal recessive disorder, also known as enamel renal syndrome, of FAM20A causes nephrocalcinosis and amelogenesis imperfecta. We speculate that all individuals with biallelic FAM20A mutations will eventually show nephrocalcinosis. PMID:23434854

  4. A Linkage Study in 8 Pakistani Families Segregating as Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hassanullah

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The current study was designed to find the most frequent MCPH phenotype in inbred Pakistani families. Primary microcephaly is marked by small brain size and is usually inherited as recessive trait. In the present study, we performed linkage analysis on 8 Pakistani families with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH and linked 6 of them to known MCPH genes/loci like MCPH1 (Microcephalin, MCPH3 (CDK5RAP2 and MCPH5 (ASPM. Majority of the families showed linkage with MCPH5, the most common MCPH locus in Pakistan. The linked families were then subjected to mutational analysis, revealing a previously known G to A transition at nucleotide position 3978 in exon 17 of ASPM gene in three of the families. To decrease its incidence, it is indispensible to train the people of the possible devastating outcome of cousin marriages and to find the carriers through carrier screening programs.

  5. Autosomal recessive PGM3 mutations link glycosylation defects to atopy, immune deficiency, autoimmunity, and neurocognitive impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Xiaomin; Ichikawa, Mie; Lyons, Jonathan J.; Datta, Shrimati; Lamborn, Ian T.; Jing, Huie; Kim, Emily S.; Biancalana, Matthew; Wolfe, Lynne A.; DiMaggio, Thomas; Matthews, Helen F.; Kranick, Sarah M.; Stone, Kelly D.; Holland, Steven M.; Reich, Daniel S.; Hughes, Jason D.; Mehmet, Huseyin; McElwee, Joshua; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Freeze, Hudson H.; Su, Helen C.; Milner, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying genetic syndromes that lead to significant atopic disease can open new pathways for investigation and intervention in allergy. Objective To define a genetic syndrome of severe atopy, elevated serum IgE, immune deficiency, autoimmunity, and motor and neurocognitive impairment. Methods Eight patients from two families who had similar syndromic features were studied. Thorough clinical evaluations, including brain MRI and sensory evoked potentials, were performed. Peripheral lymphocyte flow cytometry, antibody responses, and T cell cytokine production were measured. Whole exome sequencing was performed to identify disease-causing mutations. Immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, enzymatic assays, nucleotide sugar and sugar phosphate analyses along with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry of glycans were used to determine the molecular consequences of the mutations. Results Marked atopy and autoimmunity were associated with increased TH2 and TH17 cytokine production by CD4+ T cells. Bacterial and viral infection susceptibility were noted along with T cell lymphopenia, particularly of CD8+ T cells, and reduced memory B cells. Apparent brain hypomyelination resulted in markedly delayed evoked potentials and likely contributed to neurological abnormalities. Disease segregated with novel autosomal recessive mutations in a single gene, phosphoglucomutase 3 (PGM3). Although PGM3 protein expression was variably diminished, impaired function was demonstrated by decreased enzyme activity and reduced UDP-GlcNAc, along with decreased O- and N-linked protein glycosylation in patients’ cells. These results define a new Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation. Conclusions Autosomal recessive, hypomorphic PGM3 mutations underlie a disorder of severe atopy, immune deficiency, autoimmunity, intellectual disability and hypomyelination. PMID:24589341

  6. Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH: clinical manifestations, genetic heterogeneity and mutation continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Muhammad J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly (MCPH is a rare disorder of neurogenic mitosis characterized by reduced head circumference at birth with variable degree of mental retardation. In MCPH patients, brain size reduced to almost one-third of its original volume due to reduced number of generated cerebral cortical neurons during embryonic neurogensis. So far, seven genetic loci (MCPH1-7 for this condition have been mapped with seven corresponding genes (MCPH1, WDR62, CDK5RAP2, CEP152, ASPM, CENPJ, and STIL identified from different world populations. Contribution of ASPM and WDR62 gene mutations in MCPH World wide is more than 50%. By and large, primary microcephaly patients are phenotypically indistinguishable, however, recent studies in patients with mutations in MCPH1, WDR62 and ASPM genes showed a broader clinical and/or cellular phenotype. It has been proposed that mutations in MCPH genes can cause the disease phenotype by disturbing: 1 orientation of mitotic spindles, 2 chromosome condensation mechanism during embryonic neurogenesis, 3 DNA damage-response signaling, 4 transcriptional regulations and microtubule dynamics, 5 certain unknown centrosomal mechanisms that control the number of neurons generated by neural precursor cells. Recent discoveries of mammalian models for MCPH have open up horizons for researchers to add more knowledge regarding the etiology and pathophysiology of MCPH. High incidence of MCPH in Pakistani population reflects the most probable involvement of consanguinity. Genetic counseling and clinical management through carrier detection/prenatal diagnosis in MCPH families can help reducing the incidence of this autosomal recessive disorder.

  7. A homozygous mutation in a consanguineous family consolidates the role of ALDH1A3 in autosomal recessive microphthalmia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, L; Fang, M; Dali, C; Jensen, H; Christoffersen, N; Wu, B; Zhang, J; Xu, R; Harris, P; Xu, X; Grønskov, K; Tümer, Z

    2013-01-01

    identification of new genes. Very recently, homozygous variations within ALDH1A3 have been associated with autosomal recessive microphthalmia with or without cysts or coloboma, and with variable subphenotypes of developmental delay/autism spectrum disorder in eight families. In a consanguineous family where...

  8. Adaptor Protein Complex 4 Deficiency Causes Severe Autosomal-Recessive Intellectual Disability, Progressive Spastic Paraplegia, Shy Character, and Short Stature

    OpenAIRE

    Abou Jamra, Rami; Philippe, Orianne; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Eck, Sebastian H.; Graf, Elisabeth; Buchert, Rebecca; Borck, Guntram; Ekici, Arif; Brockschmidt, Felix F.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Munnich, Arnold; Strom, Tim M.; Reis, Andre; Colleaux, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Intellectual disability inherited in an autosomal-recessive fashion represents an important fraction of severe cognitive-dysfunction disorders. Yet, the extreme heterogeneity of these conditions markedly hampers gene identification. Here, we report on eight affected individuals who were from three consanguineous families and presented with severe intellectual disability, absent speech, shy character, stereotypic laughter, muscular hypotonia that progressed to spastic paraplegia, microcephaly,...

  9. Hypomorphic mutations in PGAP2, encoding a GPI-anchor-remodeling protein, cause autosomal-recessive intellectual disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Tawamie, Hasan; Murakami, Yoshiko; Mang, Yuan; ur Rehman, Shoaib; Buchert, Rebecca; Schaffer, Stefanie; Muhammad, Safia; Bak, Mads; Nöthen, Markus M; Bennett, Eric P; Maeda, Yusuke; Aigner, Michael; Reis, André; Kinoshita, Taroh; Tommerup, Niels; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Abou Jamra, Rami

    2013-01-01

    alkaline phosphatase (ALP). We performed autozygosity mapping and ultra-deep sequencing followed by stringent filtering and identified two homozygous PGAP2 alterations, p.Tyr99Cys and p.Arg177Pro, in seven offspring with nonspecific autosomal-recessive intellectual disability from two consanguineous...

  10. Park7, a novel locus for autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism, on chromosome 1p36

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. van Duijn (Cock); G.J. Breedveld (Guido); M. Horstink (Marten); L.A. Sandkuijl (Lodewijk); B.A. Oostra (Ben); J.C. van Swieten; V. Bonifati (Vincenzo); R-J.H. Galjaard (Robert-Jan); J.J. Houwing-Duistermaat (Jeanine); L. Testers; M.C.J. Dekker (Marieke); P.J.L.M. Snijders (Pieter); P. Heutink (Peter)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractAlthough the role of genetic factors in the origin of Parkinson disease has long been disputed, several genes involved in autosomal dominant and recessive forms of the disease have been localized. Mutations associated with early-onset autosomal recessive parkinsonism have been identified

  11. Park7, a novel locus for autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism, on chromosome 1p36.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, C.M. van; Dekker, M.C.J.; Bonifati, V.; Galjaard, R.J.; Houwing-Duistermaat, J.J.; Snijders, P.J.L.M.; Testers, L.; Breedveld, G.J.; Horstink, M.W.I.M.; Sandkuijl, L.A.; Swieten, J. van; Oostra, B.A.; Heutink, P.

    2001-01-01

    Although the role of genetic factors in the origin of Parkinson disease has long been disputed, several genes involved in autosomal dominant and recessive forms of the disease have been localized. Mutations associated with early-onset autosomal recessive parkinsonism have been identified in the Park

  12. Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome and Autosomal Recessive Spastic Ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay : A Report of Two Male Sibs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Willem M. A.; Egger, Jos I. M.; Ahmed, Amir I. M.; Kremer, Berry P. H.; Vermeer, Sascha; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the SACS gene (13q12) encoding the protein sacsin. It is characterized by early-onset cerebellar ataxia, lower limb spasticity, sensorimotor axonal polyneuropath

  13. Libyan Boy with Autosomal Recessive Trait (P22-phox Defect of Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilka Schulze

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is a primary immune deficiency disorder of the phagocytes. In this disorder, phagocytic cells (polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes cannot produce active oxygen metabolites, and therefore, cannot destroy the ingested intracellular bacteria. Clinically, patients with CGD usually have recurrent bacterial and fungal infections causing abscess and granuloma formation in the skin, lymph nodes and visceral organs.In this report, we present a boy from Libya with a rare autosomal recessive trait of CGD (defect of p22-phox who has chronic lung disease following multiple severe pneumonia attacks. The case we present suffered from bloody diarrhea since the third month of his life. He also had recurrent episodes of fever, and later, developed persistent cervical lymphadenitis and failure to gain weight. CGD is a very rare condition worldwide. It is also not recognized here in Libya, and usually not in the list of differential diagnosis for chronic pulmonary infections. We advise that pediatricians and general practitioners who treat chronic cases of lung diseases (with or without chronic diarrhea should consider primary immunodeficiency disorders in the hope that early diagnosis and treatment may prevent chronic complications especially of the respiratory tract. Furthermore, we state that, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first documented case of CGD from Libya.

  14. Naturally- and experimentally-designed restorations of the Parkin gene deficit in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, Hirohide; Hirano, Makito; Kiriyama, Takao; Ikeda, Masanori [Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Nara Medical University School of Medicine (Japan); Ueno, Satoshi, E-mail: sueno@naramed-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Nara Medical University School of Medicine (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    Intranuclear events due to mutations in the Parkin gene remain elusive in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP). We identified a mutant PARKIN protein in fibroblast cultures from a pair of siblings with ARJP who were homozygous for the exon 4-deleted Parkin gene. Disease was mild in one patient and debilitating in the other. The detected mutant, encoded by a transcript lacking exon 3 as well as exon 4, is an in-frame deletion that removes 121 aa, resulting in a 344-aa protein (PaDel3,4). Cell culture and transfection studies revealed negative correlations between expression levels of PaDel3,4 and those of cell cycle proteins, including cyclin E, CDK2, ppRb, and E2F-1, and demonstrated that GFP-PaDel3,4 entered nucleus and ubiquitinated cyclin E as a part of SCF{sup hSel-10} ligase complex in the patient cells. In addition, nuclear localization signal-tagged PaDel3,4 expressed in the transfected patient cells most effectively ubiquitinated cyclin E and reduced DNA damage, protecting cells from oxidative stress. Antisense-oligonucleotide treatment promoted skipping of exon 3 and thus generated PaDel3,4, increasing cell survival. Collectively, we propose that naturally- and experimentally-induced exon skipping at least partly restores the mutant Parkin gene deficit, providing a molecular basis for the development of therapeutic exon skipping.

  15. A newly recognized autosomal recessive syndrome affecting neurologic function and vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Mustafa A; Tzschach, Andreas; Oystreck, Darren T; Hassan, Hamdy H; AlDrees, Abdulmajeed; Elmalik, Salah A; El Khashab, Heba Y; Wienker, Thomas F; Abu-Amero, Khaled K; Bosley, Thomas M

    2013-06-01

    Genetic factors represent an important etiologic group in the causation of intellectual disability. We describe a Saudi Arabian family with closley related parents in which four of six children were affected by a congenital cognitive disturbance. The four individuals (aged 18, 16, 13, and 2 years when last examined) had motor and cognitive delay with seizures in early childhood, and three of the four (sparing only the youngest child) had progressive, severe cognitive decline with spasticity. Two affected children had ocular malformations, and the three older children had progressive visual loss. The youngest had normal globes with good functional vision when last examined but exhibited the oculodigital sign, which may signify a subclinical visual deficit. A potentially deleterious nucleotide change (c.1A>G; p.Met1Val) in the C12orf57 gene was homozygous in all affected individuals, heterozygous in the parents, and absent in an unaffected sibling and >350 normal individuals. This gene has no known function. This family manifests a autosomal recessive syndrome with some phenotypic variability that includes abnormal development of brain and eyes, delayed cognitive and motor milestones, seizures, and a severe cognitive and visual decline that is associated with a homozygous variant in a newly identified gene. PMID:23633300

  16. TRPV4 Dysfunction Promotes Renal Cystogenesis in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaika, Oleg; Mamenko, Mykola; Berrout, Jonathan; Boukelmoune, Nabila; O'Neil, Roger G.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of cyst formation and expansion in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is poorly understood, but impaired mechanosensitivity to tubular flow and dysfunctional calcium signaling are important contributors. The activity of the mechanosensitive Ca2+-permeable TRPV4 channel underlies flow-dependent Ca2+ signaling in murine collecting duct (CD) cells, suggesting that this channel may contribute to cystogenesis in ARPKD. Here, we developed a method to isolate CD-derived cysts and studied TRPV4 function in these cysts laid open as monolayers and in nondilated split-open CDs in a rat model of ARPKD. In freshly isolated CD-derived cyst monolayers, we observed markedly impaired TRPV4 activity, abnormal subcellular localization of the channel, disrupted TRPV4 glycosylation, decreased basal [Ca2+]i, and loss of flow-mediated [Ca2+]i signaling. In contrast, nondilated CDs of these rats exhibited functional TRPV4 with largely preserved mechanosensitive properties. Long-term systemic augmentation of TRPV4 activity with a selective TRPV4 activator significantly attenuated the renal manifestations of ARPKD in a time-dependent manner. At the cellular level, selective activation of TRPV4 restored mechanosensitive Ca2+ signaling as well as the function and subcellular distribution of TRPV4. In conclusion, the functional status of TRPV4, which underlies mechanosensitive Ca2+ signaling in CD cells, inversely correlates with renal cystogenesis in ARPKD. Augmenting TRPV4 activity may have therapeutic potential in ARPKD. PMID:23411787

  17. Successful twin pregnancy in a patient with parkin-associated autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takakuwa Koichi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pregnancy in patients with Parkinson disease is a rare occurrence. To the best of our knowledge, the effect of pregnancy as well as treatment in genetically confirmed autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP has never been reported. Here, we report the first case of pregnancy in a patient with ARJP associated with a parkin gene mutation, ARJP/PARK2. Case presentation A 27-year-old woman with ARJP/PARK2 was diagnosed as having a spontaneous dichorionic/diamniotic twin pregnancy. Exacerbation of motor disability was noted between ovulation and menstruation before pregnancy as well as during late pregnancy, suggesting that her parkinsonism might have been influenced by fluctuations in the levels of endogenous sex hormones. During the organogenesis period, she was only treated with levodopa/carbidopa, although she continued to receive inpatient hospital care for assistance in the activities of daily living. After the organogenesis period, she was administered sufficient amounts of antiparkinsonian drugs. She delivered healthy male twins, and psychomotor development of both the babies was normal at the age of 2 years. Conclusion Pregnancy may worsen the symptoms of ARJP/PARK2, although appropriate treatments with antiparkinsonian drugs and adequate assistance in the activities of daily living might enable successful pregnancy and birth of healthy children.

  18. A Novel Autosomal Recessive GJA1 Missense Mutation Linked to Craniometaphyseal Dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ying; Chen, I-Ping; de Almeida, Salome; Tiziani, Valdenize; Do Amaral, Cassio M. Raposo; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Reichenberger, Ernst J.

    2013-01-01

    Craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD) is a rare sclerosing skeletal disorder with progressive hyperostosis of craniofacial bones. CMD can be inherited in an autosomal dominant (AD) trait or occur after de novo mutations in the pyrophosphate transporter ANKH. Although the autosomal recessive (AR) form of CMD had been mapped to 6q21-22 the mutation has been elusive. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing for one subject with AR CMD and identified a novel missense mutation (c.716G>A, p.Arg239Gln) in the C-terminus of the gap junction protein alpha-1 (GJA1) coding for connexin 43 (Cx43). We confirmed this mutation in 6 individuals from 3 additional families. The homozygous mutation cosegregated only with affected family members. Connexin 43 is a major component of gap junctions in osteoblasts, osteocytes, osteoclasts and chondrocytes. Gap junctions are responsible for the diffusion of low molecular weight molecules between cells. Mutations in Cx43 cause several dominant and recessive disorders involving developmental abnormalities of bone such as dominant and recessive oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD; MIM #164200, 257850) and isolated syndactyly type III (MIM #186100), the characteristic digital anomaly in ODDD. However, characteristic ocular and dental features of ODDD as well as syndactyly are absent in patients with the recessive Arg239Gln Cx43 mutation. Bone remodeling mechanisms disrupted by this novel Cx43 mutation remain to be elucidated. PMID:23951358

  19. Naturally- and experimentally-designed restorations of the Parkin gene deficit in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intranuclear events due to mutations in the Parkin gene remain elusive in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP). We identified a mutant PARKIN protein in fibroblast cultures from a pair of siblings with ARJP who were homozygous for the exon 4-deleted Parkin gene. Disease was mild in one patient and debilitating in the other. The detected mutant, encoded by a transcript lacking exon 3 as well as exon 4, is an in-frame deletion that removes 121 aa, resulting in a 344-aa protein (PaDel3,4). Cell culture and transfection studies revealed negative correlations between expression levels of PaDel3,4 and those of cell cycle proteins, including cyclin E, CDK2, ppRb, and E2F-1, and demonstrated that GFP-PaDel3,4 entered nucleus and ubiquitinated cyclin E as a part of SCFhSel-10 ligase complex in the patient cells. In addition, nuclear localization signal-tagged PaDel3,4 expressed in the transfected patient cells most effectively ubiquitinated cyclin E and reduced DNA damage, protecting cells from oxidative stress. Antisense-oligonucleotide treatment promoted skipping of exon 3 and thus generated PaDel3,4, increasing cell survival. Collectively, we propose that naturally- and experimentally-induced exon skipping at least partly restores the mutant Parkin gene deficit, providing a molecular basis for the development of therapeutic exon skipping.

  20. Whole exome analysis identifies frequent CNGA1 mutations in Japanese population with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Katagiri

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate frequent disease-causing gene mutations in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP in the Japanese population. METHODS: In total, 99 Japanese patients with non-syndromic and unrelated arRP or sporadic RP (spRP were recruited in this study and ophthalmic examinations were conducted for the diagnosis of RP. Among these patients, whole exome sequencing analysis of 30 RP patients and direct sequencing screening of all CNGA1 exons of the other 69 RP patients were performed. RESULTS: Whole exome sequencing of 30 arRP/spRP patients identified disease-causing gene mutations of CNGA1 (four patients, EYS (three patients and SAG (one patient in eight patients and potential disease-causing gene variants of USH2A (two patients, EYS (one patient, TULP1 (one patient and C2orf71 (one patient in five patients. Screening of an additional 69 arRP/spRP patients for the CNGA1 gene mutation revealed one patient with a homozygous mutation. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first identification of CNGA1 mutations in arRP Japanese patients. The frequency of CNGA1 gene mutation was 5.1% (5/99 patients. CNGA1 mutations are one of the most frequent arRP-causing mutations in Japanese patients.

  1. Evidence for autosomal recessive inheritance in SPG3A caused by homozygosity for a novel ATL1 missense mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Tahir Naeem; Klar, Joakim; Tariq, Muhammad; Anjum Baig, Shehla; Malik, Naveed Altaf; Yousaf, Raja; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Dahl, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. Autosomal dominant and ‘pure' forms of HSP account for ∼80% of cases in Western societies of whom 10% carry atlastin-1 (ATL1) gene mutations. We report on a large consanguineous family segregating six members with early onset HSP. The pedigree was compatible with both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance. Whole-exome seque...

  2. Founder mutations in the lipase H (LIPH) gene in families with autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shimomura, Yutaka; Wajid, Muhammad; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Lee, Young Jin; Rice, Robert H.; Christiano, Angela M.

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal recessive woolly hair (ARWH)/hypotrichosis is a hereditary hair disorder which is characterized by tightly curled hair, and is occasionally associated with sparse hair. ARWH can be caused by mutations in the P2RY5 or lipase H (LIPH) gene. Disruption of both genes results in phenotypes with features of both WH and hypotrichosis. In this study, we identified two Guyanese families with ARWH. Both families are of recent Indian descent. Mutation analysis resulted in the identification of...

  3. Autosomal recessive woolly hair with hypotrichosis caused by a novel homozygous mutation in the P2RY5 gene

    OpenAIRE

    Shimomura, Yutaka; Garzon, Maria C.; Christiano, Angela M.

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade, several causative genes for hereditary hair diseases have been identified, which have disclosed the molecular mechanisms involved in hair follicle morphogenesis and cycling. We and others recently reported that mutations in the P2RY5 gene, encoding an orphan G protein-coupled receptor, underlie autosomal recessive woolly hair and/or hypotrichosis. Although these findings clearly reveal the involvement of P2RY5 mutations in hereditary hair diseases, the clinical manifes...

  4. A new autosomal recessive disorder of bilateral frontotemporal pachygyria without microcephaly: Report of a case and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Phadke Shubha; Girisha K; Phadke Rajendra

    2007-01-01

    Pachygyria is a disorder of neuronal migration. We report an Indian family with four siblings with developmental delay, infrequent seizures, normal head size and mild to moderate mental retardation. Two of them had bilaterally symmetrical frontotemporal pachygyria. Dysmorphism and neurological signs were absent in the affected subjects. Affected male and female siblings with normal parents suggests autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. We believe these cases represent a new autosomal reces...

  5. Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS: typical clinical and neuroimaging features in a Brazilian family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J L Pedroso

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by late-infantile onset spastic ataxia and other neurological features. ARSACS has a high prevalence in northeastern Quebec, Canada. Several ARSACS cases have been reported outside Canada in recent decades. This is the first report of typical clinical and neuroimaging features in a Brazilian family with probable diagnosis of ARSACS.

  6. Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS): typical clinical and neuroimaging features in a Brazilian family

    OpenAIRE

    Pedroso, J.L.; P Braga-Neto; A Abrahão; R L M Rivero; C Abdalla; N. Abdala; O G P Barsottini

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by late-infantile onset spastic ataxia and other neurological features. ARSACS has a high prevalence in northeastern Quebec, Canada. Several ARSACS cases have been reported outside Canada in recent decades. This is the first report of typical clinical and neuroimaging features in a Brazilian family with probable diagnosis of ARSACS.

  7. Mutation in WNT10A Is Associated with an Autosomal Recessive Ectodermal Dysplasia: The Odonto-onycho-dermal Dysplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Adaimy, Lynn ; Chouery, Eliane ; Mégarbané, Hala ; Mroueh, Salman ; Delague, Valérie ; Nicolas, Elsa ; Belguith, Hanen ; de Mazancourt, Philippe ; Mégarbané, André 

    2007-01-01

    Odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome in which the presenting phenotype is dry hair, severe hypodontia, smooth tongue with marked reduction of fungiform and filiform papillae, onychodysplasia, keratoderma and hyperhidrosis of palms and soles, and hyperkeratosis of the skin. We studied three consanguineous Lebanese Muslim Shiite families that included six individuals affected with odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia. Using a homozygosity-mapping strategy, we assigned...

  8. Park7, a novel locus for autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism, on chromosome 1p36

    OpenAIRE

    Duijn, Cock; Breedveld, Guido; Horstink, Marten; Sandkuijl, Lodewijk; Oostra, Ben; Swieten, J. C.; Bonifati, Vincenzo; Galjaard, Robert-Jan; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine; Testers, L.; Dekker, Marieke; Snijders, Pieter; Heutink, Peter

    2001-01-01

    textabstractAlthough the role of genetic factors in the origin of Parkinson disease has long been disputed, several genes involved in autosomal dominant and recessive forms of the disease have been localized. Mutations associated with early-onset autosomal recessive parkinsonism have been identified in the Parkin gene, and recently a second gene, PARK6, involved in early-onset recessive parkinsonism was localized on chromosome 1p35-36. We identified a family segregating early-onset parkinsoni...

  9. CONSENSUS EXPERT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE: REPORT OF AN INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Guay-Woodford, Lisa M.; Bissler, John J.; Braun, Michael C.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A.; Dell, Katherine M.; Kerecuk, Larissa; Liebau, Max C; Alonso-Peclet, Maria H.; Shneider, Benjamin; Emre, Sukru; Heller, Theo; Kamath, Binita M.; Murray, Karen F.; Moise, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD; MIM 263200) is a severe, typically early onset form of cystic disease that primarily involves the kidneys and biliary tract. Phenotypic expression and age at presentation can be quite variable1. The incidence of ARPKD is 1 in 20,000 live births2, and its pleotropic manifestations are potentially life-threatening. Optimal care requires proper surveillance to limit morbidity and mortality, knowledgeable approaches to diagnosis and treatment,...

  10. Autosomal-Recessive Hearing Impairment Due to Rare Missense Variants within S1PR2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Faridi, Rabia; Rehman, Atteeq U.; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ansar, Muhammad; Wang, Xin; Morell, Robert J.; Isaacson, Rivka; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Dai, Hang; Acharya, Anushree; Qaiser, Tanveer A.; Muhammad, Dost; Ali, Rana Amjad; Shams, Sulaiman; Hassan, Muhammad Jawad; Shahzad, Shaheen; Raza, Syed Irfan; Bashir, Zil-e-Huma; Smith, Joshua D.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ahmad, Wasim; Friedman, Thomas B.; Leal, Suzanne M.

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) are a well-studied class of transmembrane G protein-coupled sphingolipid receptors that mediate multiple cellular processes. However, S1PRs have not been previously reported to be involved in the genetic etiology of human traits. S1PR2 lies within the autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI) locus DFNB68 on 19p13.2. From exome sequence data we identified two pathogenic S1PR2 variants, c.323G>C (p.Arg108Pro) and c.419A>G (p.Tyr140Cys). Each of these variants co-segregates with congenital profound hearing impairment in consanguineous Pakistani families with maximum LOD scores of 6.4 for family DEM4154 and 3.3 for family PKDF1400. Neither S1PR2 missense variant was reported among ∼120,000 chromosomes in the Exome Aggregation Consortium database, in 76 unrelated Pakistani exomes, or in 720 Pakistani control chromosomes. Both DNA variants affect highly conserved residues of S1PR2 and are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools. Molecular modeling predicts that these variants affect binding of sphingosine-1-phosphate (p.Arg108Pro) and G protein docking (p.Tyr140Cys). In the previously reported S1pr2−/− mice, stria vascularis abnormalities, organ of Corti degeneration, and profound hearing loss were observed. Additionally, hair cell defects were seen in both knockout mice and morphant zebrafish. Family PKDF1400 presents with ARNSHI, which is consistent with the lack of gross malformations in S1pr2−/− mice, whereas family DEM4154 has lower limb malformations in addition to hearing loss. Our findings suggest the possibility of developing therapies against hair cell damage (e.g., from ototoxic drugs) through targeted stimulation of S1PR2. PMID:26805784

  11. Next-generation sequencing for molecular diagnosis of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edrees, Burhan M; Athar, Mohammad; Al-Allaf, Faisal A; Taher, Mohiuddin M; Khan, Wajahatullah; Bouazzaoui, Abdellatif; Al-Harbi, Naffaa; Safar, Ramzia; Al-Edressi, Howaida; Alansary, Khawala; Anazi, Abulkareem; Altayeb, Naji; Ahmed, Muawia A; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen

    2016-10-10

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) a rare genetic disorder, described by formation of cysts in the kidney. A targeted customized sequencing of genes implicated in ARPKD phenotype was performed to identify candidate variants using the Ion torrent PGM next-generation sequencing. The results identified likely pathogenic disease causing variants during the validation process. Four potential pathogenic variants [c.4870C>T, p.(Arg1624Trp)], [c.5725C>T, p.(Arg1909Trp)], c.1736C>T, p.(Thr579Met)] and [(c.10628T>G), p.(Leu3543Trp)] were observed in PKHD1 gene among 12 out of 18 samples. The rest of the patient samples also showed few variants in ADPKD (Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease) disease causing genes PKD1 and PKD2 i.e. [c.12433G>A, p.(Val4145Ile)] and [c.1445T>G, p.(Phe482Cys)], respectively. All causative variants were validated by capillary sequencing, confirming the presence of a novel homozygous variants [c.10628T>G, p.(Leu3543Trp)] found in exon 61 of a male proband. All potentially deleterious variants identified in PKHD1, PKD1, and PKD2 gene, also exhibited pathologically or clinically significance based on the computational predictions involved in predicting the impact of non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) on protein function such as Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) and Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen2). SIFT classified 50% of our nsSNPs as "deleterious", while PolyPhen2 identified 45% of our nsSNPs as "Probably damaged" and the results from both programs were largely complementary. Taken together, these results suggest that the NGS strategies provide a fast, accurate and cost-effective molecular diagnostic tool for identifying mutations in targeted genes sequence analysis. PMID:27401137

  12. A Founder Mutation in VPS11 Causes an Autosomal Recessive Leukoencephalopathy Linked to Autophagic Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Adam; Fedick, Anastasia; Kaye, Lauren E.; Liao, Jun; Yachelevich, Naomi; Chu, Mary-Lynn; Boles, Richard G.; Moran, Ellen; Tokita, Mari; Gorman, Elizabeth; Zhang, Wei; Xia, Fan; Leduc, Magalie; Yang, Yaping; Eng, Christine; Wong, Lee-Jun; Schiffmann, Raphael; Diaz, George A.; Kornreich, Ruth; Thummel, Ryan; Wasserstein, Melissa; Yue, Zhenyu; Edelmann, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Genetic leukoencephalopathies (gLEs) are a group of heterogeneous disorders with white matter abnormalities affecting the central nervous system (CNS). The causative mutation in ~50% of gLEs is unknown. Using whole exome sequencing (WES), we identified homozygosity for a missense variant, VPS11: c.2536T>G (p.C846G), as the genetic cause of a leukoencephalopathy syndrome in five individuals from three unrelated Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) families. All five patients exhibited highly concordant disease progression characterized by infantile onset leukoencephalopathy with brain white matter abnormalities, severe motor impairment, cortical blindness, intellectual disability, and seizures. The carrier frequency of the VPS11: c.2536T>G variant is 1:250 in the AJ population (n = 2,026). VPS11 protein is a core component of HOPS (homotypic fusion and protein sorting) and CORVET (class C core vacuole/endosome tethering) protein complexes involved in membrane trafficking and fusion of the lysosomes and endosomes. The cysteine 846 resides in an evolutionarily conserved cysteine-rich RING-H2 domain in carboxyl terminal regions of VPS11 proteins. Our data shows that the C846G mutation causes aberrant ubiquitination and accelerated turnover of VPS11 protein as well as compromised VPS11-VPS18 complex assembly, suggesting a loss of function in the mutant protein. Reduced VPS11 expression leads to an impaired autophagic activity in human cells. Importantly, zebrafish harboring a vps11 mutation with truncated RING-H2 domain demonstrated a significant reduction in CNS myelination following extensive neuronal death in the hindbrain and midbrain. Thus, our study reveals a defect in VPS11 as the underlying etiology for an autosomal recessive leukoencephalopathy disorder associated with a dysfunctional autophagy-lysosome trafficking pathway. PMID:27120463

  13. Elevated c-myc protooncogene expression in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polycystic kidney diseases (PKDs) are a group of disorders characterized by the growth of epithelial cysts from the nephrons and collecting ducts of kidney tubules. The diseases can be inherited or can be provoked by environmental factors. To investigate the molecular basis of the abnormal cell growth associated with PKD, c-myc protooncogene expression was studied in a mouse model for autosomal recessive PKD. Homozygous recessive C57BL/6J (cpk/cpk) mice develop massively enlarged cystic kidneys and die from renal failure shortly after 3 weeks of age. Quantitative dot blot and RNA blot hybridization experiments in which whole kidney poly(A)+ RNA was hybridized with a c-myc RNA probe showed a 2- to 6-fold increase in c-myc mRNA at 2 weeks, and a 25- to 30-fold increase in c-myc mRNA at 3 weeks of age in polycystic mice, as compared to normal littermates. c-myc expression was also examined under two conditions in which kidney cell growth was experimentally induced in normal adult mice: compensatory renal hypertrophy and tubule regeneration following folic acid-induced renal cell injury. While compensatory hypertrophy resulted in only a small increase in c-myc, folic acid treatment gave rise after 24 hr to a 12-fold increase in c-myc RNA. The induction of c-myc by folic acid is consistent with increased cellular proliferation regenerating tubules. In contrast, polycystic kidneys show only a minimal increase in cellular proliferation over that seen in normal kidneys, while c-myc levels were found to be markedly elevated. Thus, the level of c-myc expression in cystic kidneys appears to be out of proportion to the rate of cell division, suggesting that elevated and potentially abnormal c-myc expression may be involved in the pathogenesis of PKD

  14. Novel and recurrent AID mutations underlie prevalent autosomal recessive form of HIGM in consanguineous patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouadani, Hanen; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Ben-ali, Meriem; Ben-khemis, Leila; Larguèche, Beya; Boussoffara, Raoudha; Maalej, Sonia; Fetni, Ilhem; Hassayoun, Saida; Mahfoudh, Abdelmajid; Mellouli, Fethi; Yalaoui, Sadok; Masmoudi, Hatem; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Barbouche, Mohamed-Ridha

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class switch recombination deficiencies (Ig-CSR-D) are characterized by normal or elevated serum IgM level and absence of IgG, IgA, and IgE. Most reported cases are due to X-linked CD40L deficiency. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase deficiency is the most frequent autosomal recessive form, whereas CD40 deficiency is more rare. Herein, we present the first North African study on hyper IgM (HIGM) syndrome including 16 Tunisian patients. Phenotypic and genetic studies allowed us to determine their molecular basis. Three CD40LG mutations have been identified including two novels (c.348_351dup and c.782_*2del) and one already reported mutation (g.6182G>A). No mutation has been found in another patient despite the lack of CD40L expression. Interestingly, three AICDA mutations have been identified in 11 patients. Two mutations were novel (c.91T>C and c.389A>C found in one and five patients respectively), and one previously reported splicing mutation (c.156+1T>G) was found in five patients. Only one CD40-deficient patient, bearing a novel mutation (c.109T>G), has been identified. Thus, unlike previous reports, AID deficiency is the most frequent underlying molecular basis (68%) of Ig-CSR-D in Tunisian patients. This finding and the presence of specific recurrent mutations are probably due to the critical role played by inbreeding in North African populations. PMID:26545377

  15. A defect in the TUSC3 gene is associated with autosomal recessive mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garshasbi, Masoud; Hadavi, Valeh; Habibi, Haleh; Kahrizi, Kimia; Kariminejad, Roxana; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Tzschach, Andreas; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Kuss, Andreas Walter

    2008-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that autosomal recessive mental retardation (ARMR) is extremely heterogeneous, and there is reason to believe that the number of underlying gene defects goes into the thousands. To date, however, only four genes have been implicated in nonsyndromic ARMR (NS-ARMR): PRSS12 (neurotrypsin), CRBN (cereblon), CC2D1A, and GRIK2. As part of an ongoing systematic study aiming to identify ARMR genes, we investigated a large consanguineous family comprising seven patients with nonsyndromic ARMR in four sibships. Genome-wide SNP typing enabled us to map the relevant genetic defect to a 4.6 Mbp interval on chromosome 8. Haplotype analyses and copy-number studies led to the identification of a homozygous deletion partly removing TUSC3 (N33) in all patients. All obligate carriers of this family were heterozygous, but none of 192 unrelated healthy individuals from the same population carried this deletion. We excluded other disease-causing mutations in the coding regions of all genes within the linkage interval by sequencing; moreover, we verified the complete absence of a functional TUSC3 transcript in all patients through RT-PCR. TUSC3 is thought to encode a subunit of the endoplasmic reticulum-bound oligosaccharyltransferase complex that catalyzes a pivotal step in the protein N-glycosylation process. Our data suggest that in contrast to other genetic defects of glycosylation, inactivation of TUSC3 causes nonsyndromic MR, a conclusion that is supported by a separate report in this issue of AJHG. TUSC3 is only the fifth gene implicated in NS-ARMR and the first for which mutations have been reported in more than one family. PMID:18452889

  16. Mutations in the Beta Propeller WDR72 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Hypomaturation Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Walid; Parry, David A.; Shore, Roger C.; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Jafri, Hussain; Rashid, Yasmin; Al-Bahlani, Suhaila; Al Harasi, Sharifa; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Mighell, Alan J.

    2009-01-01

    Healthy dental enamel is the hardest and most highly mineralized human tissue. Though acellular, nonvital, and without capacity for turnover or repair, it can nevertheless last a lifetime. Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a collective term for failure of normal enamel development, covering diverse clinical phenotypes that typically show Mendelian inheritance patterns. One subset, known as hypomaturation AI, is characterised by near-normal volumes of organic enamel matrix but with weak, creamy-brown opaque enamel that fails prematurely after tooth eruption. Mutations in genes critical to enamel matrix formation have been documented, but current understanding of other key events in enamel biomineralization is limited. We investigated autosomal-recessive hypomaturation AI in a consanguineous Pakistani family. A whole-genome SNP autozygosity screen identified a locus on chromosome 15q21.3. Sequencing candidate genes revealed a point mutation in the poorly characterized WDR72 gene. Screening of WDR72 in a panel of nine additional hypomaturation AI families revealed the same mutation in a second, apparently unrelated, Pakistani family and two further nonsense mutations in Omani families. Immunohistochemistry confirmed intracellular localization in maturation-stage ameloblasts. WDR72 function is unknown, but as a putative β propeller is expected to be a scaffold for protein-protein interactions. The nearest homolog, WDR7, is involved in vesicle mobilization and Ca2+-dependent exocytosis at synapses. Vesicle trafficking is important in maturation-stage ameloblasts with respect to secretion into immature enamel and removal of cleaved enamel matrix proteins via endocytosis. This raises the intriguing possibility that WDR72 is critical to ameloblast vesicle turnover during enamel maturation. PMID:19853237

  17. COL11A2 mutation associated with autosomal recessive Weissenbacher-Zweymuller syndrome: molecular and clinical overlap with otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia (OSMED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Tamar; Rabinowitz, Ronen; Hendler, Netta; Galil, Aharon; Flusser, Hagit; Chemke, Juan; Gradstein, Libe; Lifshitz, Tova; Ofir, Rivka; Elbedour, Khalil; Birk, Ohad S

    2005-01-01

    Autosomal recessive Weissenbacher-Zweymuller syndrome (WZS) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by rhizomelic dwarfism and severe hearing loss. Mutations in the COL11A2 gene have been implicated in causing the autosomal dominant form of this syndrome as well as non-ocular Stickler syndrome and the autosomal recessive syndrome otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia (OSMED). In a consanguineous Bedouin tribe living in Southern Israel, five individuals affected by autosomal recessive WZS were available for genetic analysis. Homozygosity of a mutation in the COL11A2 gene was found in all affected individuals. This finding lends molecular support to the clinical notion that autosomal recessive WZS and OSMED are a single entity. PMID:15558753

  18. Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goknur Haliloglu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveUllrich congenital muscular dystrophy is a rather severe type of congenital muscular dystrophy with early onset features related to motor development.In general it is inherited in autosomal recessive principles, however in the Western world mostly seen with de novo dominant mutations in the collagen VI genes. Milder form of the condition is the Bethlem myopathy. There may be overlap forms in the clinic resembling the Ehler-Danlos syndrome. There has been some radical efforts for cure especially through the apoptosis cascades.

  19. Benign muscular dystrophy: risk calculation in families with consanguinity.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolff, G; Müller, C R; Grimm, T

    1989-01-01

    This report concerns two families in which the index patients are sporadic cases of a benign form of muscular dystrophy. In both families the sisters of the patients have married a close relative. The respective risks for a child of these consanguineous marriages being affected with either X linked Becker muscular dystrophy or autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy is calculated using pedigree information, results of serum creatine kinase determinations, and also, in one family, r...

  20. A Case of Autosomal Recessive Woolly Hair/Hypotrichosis with Alternation in Severity: Deterioration and Improvement with Age

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuno, Naoko; Kunisada, Makoto; Kanki, Haruhisa; Simomura, Yutaka; Nishigori, Chikako

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis (ARWH/H) is a nonsyndromic hair abnormality characterized by sparse, short and curly hair (WH/H). We report the case of a 3-year-old female, with no consanguineous ancestry, who exhibited WH/H. Normal hair was observed at birth, but severe hair loss had developed within the first 6 months; however, her hair density had improved somewhat by age 3. Light microscopy showed hair shaft invaginations, and polarized light microscopy suggested complete me...

  1. Inhibitory action of chlorophyllin of autosome recessive lethals induced by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    on the damage caused by the radiation, it was into account the presence of lethal and semi lethals autosomal. One observes this way that even without the use of the radiation the semi lethals frequency is diminished when the chlorophyllin is applied, in this case the decrease was significant and although there was decrease in the case of the irradiated group this it was not significant; in the case of the lethal ones it happened the opposite it was not significant in radiation absence on the contrary elevate the frequency of this type of genes, however, before the radiation and with pre-treatment with chlorophyllin this it reduced the frequency of autosomal recessive lethals significantly. This is important because in the case of bound recessive lethals recessive to the sex this doesn't happen. (Author)

  2. A novel HSF4 gene mutation (p.R405X causing autosomal recessive congenital cataracts in a large consanguineous family from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheema Abdul

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary cataracts are most frequently inherited as autosomal dominant traits, but can also be inherited in an autosomal recessive or X-linked fashion. To date, 12 loci for autosomal recessive cataracts have been mapped including a locus on chromosome 16q22 containing the disease-causing gene HSF4 (Genbank accession number NM_001040667. Here, we describe a family from Pakistan with the first nonsense mutation in HSF4 thus expanding the mutational spectrum of this heat shock transcription factor gene. Methods A large consanguineous Pakistani family with autosomal recessive cataracts was collected from Quetta. Genetic linkage analysis was performed for the common known autosomal recessive cataracts loci and linkage to a locus containing HSF4 (OMIM 602438 was found. All exons and adjacent splice sites of the heat shock transcription factor 4 gene (HSF4 were sequenced. A mutation-specific restriction enzyme digest (HphI was performed for all family members and unrelated controls. Results The disease phenotype perfectly co-segregated with markers flanking the known cataract gene HSF4, whereas other autosomal recessive loci were excluded. A maximum two-point LOD score with a Zmax = 5.6 at θ = 0 was obtained for D16S421. Direct sequencing of HSF4 revealed the nucleotide exchange c.1213C > T in this family predicting an arginine to stop codon exchange (p.R405X. Conclusion We identified the first nonsense mutation (p.R405X in exon 11 of HSF4 in a large consanguineous Pakistani family with autosomal recessive cataract.

  3. Transcription-terminating mutation in telethonin causing autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy type 2G in a European patient

    OpenAIRE

    Olivé, Montse; Shatunov, Alexey; Gonzalez, Laura; Carmona, Olga; Moreno, Dolores; Quereda, Lidia Gonzalez; Martinez-Matos, J.A.; Goldfarb, Lev G.; Ferrer, Isidro

    2008-01-01

    A 27-year-old woman of Moldavian origin presented at the age of 15 with progressive proximal limb weakness and painful cramps in her calf muscles. Clinical examination revealed prominent muscle weakness in proximal muscles of the lower extremities and distal anterior compartment of legs, and mild weakness in shoulder girdle muscles. In addition, she had marked calf hypertrophy, muscle atrophy involving the anterior and posterior compartments of the thighs, and the distal anterior compartment ...

  4. Autozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Pakistani family reveals a novel non-syndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation locus on 11p15-tel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehman, Shoaib ur; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Eiberg, Hans;

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal recessive inherited mental retardation is an extremely heterogeneous disease and accounts for approximately 25% of all non-syndromic mental retardation cases. Autozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Pakistani family revealed a novel locus for non-syndromic autosomal recessive...... mental retardation (NS-ARMR). The affected individuals showed low IQ and cognitive impairment without any neurological, skeletal, and biochemical abnormalities. All known NS-ARMR genes were excluded by STS markers, so autozygosity mapping by microarray single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis were......¿=¿3.31 was calculated for the mapped region. These results suggest a novel genetic locus, MRT17, for NS-ARMR....

  5. Homozygosity mapping in consanguineous families reveals extreme heterogeneity of non-syndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation and identifies 8 novel gene loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najmabadi, Hossein; Motazacker, Mohammad Mahdi; Garshasbi, Masoud; Kahrizi, Kimia; Tzschach, Andreas; Chen, Wei; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Hadavi, Valeh; Nieh, Sahar Esmaeeli; Abedini, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Vazifehmand, Reza; Firouzabadi, Saghar Ghasemi; Jamali, Payman; Falah, Masoumeh; Seifati, Seyed Morteza; Grüters, Annette; Lenzner, Steffen; Jensen, Lars R; Rüschendorf, Franz; Kuss, Andreas W; Ropers, H Hilger

    2007-03-01

    Autosomal recessive gene defects are arguably the most important, but least studied genetic causes of severe cognitive dysfunction. Homozygosity mapping in 78 consanguineous Iranian families with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation (NS-ARMR) has enabled us to determine the chromosomal localization of at least 8 novel gene loci for this condition. Our data suggest that in the Iranian population NS-ARMR is very heterogeneous, and they argue against the existence of frequent gene defects that account for more than a few percent of the cases. PMID:17120046

  6. Familial Clustering of Unexplained Transient Respiratory Distress in 12 Newborns from Three Unrelated Families Suggests an Autosomal-Recessive Inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Guala

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on 12 near-term babies from three families in which an unexplained transient respiratory distress was observed. No known risk factor was present in any family and no sequelae were recorded at follow-up. The most common causes of respiratory distress at birth are Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome (NRD and Transient Tachypnea of the Newborn (TTN, and their cumulative incidence is estimated to be about 2%. Genetic factors have been identified in NRD (surfactant genes or suggested for TTN (genes affecting lung liquid clearance. Survivors from NRD may develop clinically relevant sequelae, while TTN does not cause any problem later in life. Our cases do not immediately fit NRD or TTN, while familial recurrence suggests the existence of a previously unreported subgroup on patients with respiratory distress for which autosomal-recessive inheritance is likely.

  7. The Bowen-Conradi syndrome -- a highly lethal autosomal recessive syndrome of microcephaly, micrognathia, low birth weight, and joint deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, A G; Woerner, S J; Montalvo-Hicks, L D; Fowlow, S B; Haslam, R H; Metcalf, P J; Lowry, R B

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes six Hutterite children from five families who appear to have been affected by the same syndrome that was described in two brothers by Bowen and Conradi [1]. Our additional cases confirm that the major features of the syndrome include porportionate intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, micrognathia, a prominent nose, rocker-bottom feet, joint limitation, and failure to thrive, with death within the first year of life. Bowen-Conradi syndrome is an autosomal recessive trait and pedigree records show that all six families now known are related to each other through two couples born in the late 1700s but that there are additional earlier possible sources of the responsible gene. The differential diagnosis of this syndrome is discussed. PMID:484596

  8. Novel mutations confirm that COL11A2 is responsible for autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss DFNB53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakchouk, Imen; Grati, M'hamed; Bademci, Guney; Bensaid, Mariem; Ma, Qi; Chakroun, Amine; Foster, Joseph; Yan, Denise; Duman, Duygu; Diaz-Horta, Oscar; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Mittal, Rahul; Farooq, Amjad; Tekin, Mustafa; Masmoudi, Saber; Liu, Xue Zhong

    2015-08-01

    Hearing loss (HL) is a major public health issue. It is clinically and genetically heterogeneous.The identification of the causal mutation is important for early diagnosis, clinical follow-up, and genetic counseling. HL due to mutations in COL11A2, encoding collagen type XI alpha-2, can be non-syndromic autosomal-dominant or autosomal-recessive, and also syndromic as in Otospondylomegaepiphyseal Dysplasia, Stickler syndrome type III, and Weissenbacher-Zweymuller syndrome. However, thus far only one mutation co-segregating with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) in a single family has been reported. In this study, whole exome sequencing of two consanguineous families with ARNSHL from Tunisia and Turkey revealed two novel causative COL11A2 mutations, c.109G > T (p.Ala37Ser) and c.2662C > A (p.Pro888Thr). The variants identified co-segregated with deafness in both families. All homozygous individuals in those families had early onset profound hearing loss across all frequencies without syndromic findings. The variants are predicted to be damaging the protein function. The p.Pro888Thr mutation affects a -Gly-X-Y- triplet repeat motif. The novel p.Ala37Ser is the first missense mutation located in the NC4 domain of the COL11A2 protein. Structural model suggests that this mutation will likely obliterate, or at least partially compromise, the ability of NC4 domain to interact with its cognate ligands. In conclusion, we confirm that COL11A2 mutations cause ARNSHL and broaden the mutation spectrum that may shed new light on genotype-phenotype correlation for the associated phenotypes and clinical follow-up. PMID:25633957

  9. Autosomal recessive mental retardation: homozygosity mapping identifies 27 single linkage intervals, at least 14 novel loci and several mutation hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss, Andreas Walter; Garshasbi, Masoud; Kahrizi, Kimia; Tzschach, Andreas; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Darvish, Hossein; Abbasi-Moheb, Lia; Puettmann, Lucia; Zecha, Agnes; Weissmann, Robert; Hu, Hao; Mohseni, Marzieh; Abedini, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Rajab, Anna; Hertzberg, Christoph; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Ullmann, Reinhard; Ghasemi-Firouzabadi, Saghar; Banihashemi, Susan; Arzhangi, Sanaz; Hadavi, Valeh; Bahrami-Monajemi, Gholamreza; Kasiri, Mahboubeh; Falah, Masoumeh; Nikuei, Pooneh; Dehghan, Atefeh; Sobhani, Masoumeh; Jamali, Payman; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2011-02-01

    Mental retardation (MR) has a worldwide prevalence of around 2% and is a frequent cause of severe disability. Significant excess of MR in the progeny of consanguineous matings as well as functional considerations suggest that autosomal recessive forms of MR (ARMR) must be relatively common. To shed more light on the causes of autosomal recessive MR (ARMR), we have set out in 2003 to perform systematic clinical studies and autozygosity mapping in large consanguineous Iranian families with non-syndromic ARMR (NS-ARMR). As previously reported (Najmabadi et al. in Hum Genet 121:43-48, 2007), this led us to the identification of 12 novel ARMR loci, 8 of which had a significant LOD score (OMIM: MRT5-12). In the meantime, we and others have found causative gene defects in two of these intervals. Moreover, as reported here, tripling the size of our cohort has enabled us to identify 27 additional unrelated families with NS-ARMR and single-linkage intervals; 14 of these define novel loci for non-syndromic ARMR. Altogether, 13 out of 39 single linkage intervals observed in our cohort were found to cluster at 6 different loci on chromosomes, i.e., 1p34, 4q27, 5p15, 9q34, 11p11-q13 and 19q13, respectively. Five of these clusters consist of two significantly overlapping linkage intervals, and on chr 1p34, three single linkage intervals coincide, including the previously described MRT12 locus. The probability for this distribution to be due to chance is only 1.14 × 10(-5), as shown by Monte Carlo simulation. Thus, in contrast to our previous conclusions, these novel data indicate that common molecular causes of NS-ARMR do exist, and in the Iranian population, the most frequent ones may well account for several percent of the patients. These findings will be instrumental in the identification of the underlying genes. PMID:21063731

  10. A Register-Based Study of Diseases With an Autosomal Recessive Origin in Small Children in Denmark According to Maternal Country of Origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlund, Anna; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Pedersen, Grete Skøtt;

    2015-01-01

    information on consanguinity is lacking, this suggestion is difficult to test. With an indirect approach, we addressed this question by comparing the risk of diseases with autosomal recessive inheritance in children born in Denmark of Danish-born women and of women born in these five countries, respectively...

  11. Autosomal-recessive posterior microphthalmos is caused by mutations in PRSS56, a gene encoding a trypsin-like serine protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gal, Andreas; Rau, Isabella; El Matri, Leila;

    2011-01-01

    Posterior microphthalmos (MCOP) is a rare isolated developmental anomaly of the eye characterized by extreme hyperopia due to short axial length. The population of the Faroe Islands shows a high prevalence of an autosomal-recessive form (arMCOP) of the disease. Based on published linkage data, we...

  12. Refined localization of an X-linked cone-rod dystrophy (COD1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash-Moi, A. [Univ. of Pitsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Ferrell, R.E.; Gorin, M.B. [Univ. of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Several of us previously reported linkage of a COD1 family to DXS7 and MAOA, assigned to Xp11.3. Two recombination events between COD1 and DXS84 were observed, suggesting that COD1 is not associated with the RP3 locus. The diversity of clinical findings within the family, which include variable rod and cone involvement, suggests that COD1 may be allelic to the RP2 locus. We have conducted additional linkage of this family with markers DXS993 and DXS1003 and have added a smaller family with similar clinical findings and X-linked inheritance. Pairwise linkage analysis gave combined maximum lod scores and {theta}`s for COD1 of 4.41 at {theta}=0 with DXS993 and 2.75 at {theta}=0.05 with DXS1003. One obligate recombinant was observed with DXS1003. The two families were insufficient to test for genetic heterogeneity. The probable order and spacing of markers as determined with the CEPH families is pter-DXS84-(6.6 cM)-DXS993-(0.6 cM)-MAOA-(0.4 cM)-DXS7-(4.4 cM)-DSX1003-ARAF1-TIMP1-cent. These results support the co-localization of COD1 to a 12 cM interval between DXS84 and DXS1003 that includes the CSNB1 and RP2 loci.

  13. Mutations in the histamine N-methyltransferase gene, HNMT, are associated with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Abolfazl; Tongsook, Chanakan; Najafipour, Reza; Musante, Luciana; Vasli, Nasim; Garshasbi, Masoud; Hu, Hao; Mittal, Kirti; McNaughton, Amy J M; Sritharan, Kumudesh; Hudson, Melissa; Stehr, Henning; Talebi, Saeid; Moradi, Mohammad; Darvish, Hossein; Arshad Rafiq, Muhammad; Mozhdehipanah, Hossein; Rashidinejad, Ali; Samiei, Shahram; Ghadami, Mohsen; Windpassinger, Christian; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Tzschach, Andreas; Ahmed, Iltaf; Mikhailov, Anna; Stavropoulos, D James; Carter, Melissa T; Keshavarz, Soraya; Ayub, Muhammad; Najmabadi, Hossein; Liu, Xudong; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Macheroux, Peter; Vincent, John B

    2015-10-15

    Histamine (HA) acts as a neurotransmitter in the brain, which participates in the regulation of many biological processes including inflammation, gastric acid secretion and neuromodulation. The enzyme histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT) inactivates HA by transferring a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to HA, and is the only well-known pathway for termination of neurotransmission actions of HA in mammalian central nervous system. We performed autozygosity mapping followed by targeted exome sequencing and identified two homozygous HNMT alterations, p.Gly60Asp and p.Leu208Pro, in patients affected with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive intellectual disability from two unrelated consanguineous families of Turkish and Kurdish ancestry, respectively. We verified the complete absence of a functional HNMT in patients using in vitro toxicology assay. Using mutant and wild-type DNA constructs as well as in silico protein modeling, we confirmed that p.Gly60Asp disrupts the enzymatic activity of the protein, and that p.Leu208Pro results in reduced protein stability, resulting in decreased HA inactivation. Our results highlight the importance of inclusion of HNMT for genetic testing of individuals presenting with intellectual disability. PMID:26206890

  14. A mutation in the FOXE3 gene causes congenital primary aphakia in an autosomal recessive consanguineous Pakistani family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anjum, Iram; Eiberg, Hans; Baig, Shahid Mahmood;

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Aphakia is the complete absence of any lens in the eye, either due to surgical removal of the lens as a result of a perforating wound or ulcer, or due to a congenital anomaly. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the molecular genetics for a large consanguineous Pakistani family wi...... quite primitive in origin since the same mutation is responsible for the same phenotypic outcome in two families of geographically different descent.......PURPOSE: Aphakia is the complete absence of any lens in the eye, either due to surgical removal of the lens as a result of a perforating wound or ulcer, or due to a congenital anomaly. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the molecular genetics for a large consanguineous Pakistani family with...... a clear aphakia phenotype. METHODS: The initial homozygosity screening of the family was extended to all the known autosomal recessive cataract loci in order to exclude the possibility of surgical cataract removal leading to aphakia. The screening was performed using polymorphic nucleotide repeat...

  15. Mutation in WNT10A is associated with an autosomal recessive ectodermal dysplasia: the odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaimy, Lynn; Chouery, Eliane; Megarbane, Hala; Mroueh, Salman; Delague, Valerie; Nicolas, Elsa; Belguith, Hanen; de Mazancourt, Philippe; Megarbane, Andre

    2007-10-01

    Odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome in which the presenting phenotype is dry hair, severe hypodontia, smooth tongue with marked reduction of fungiform and filiform papillae, onychodysplasia, keratoderma and hyperhidrosis of palms and soles, and hyperkeratosis of the skin. We studied three consanguineous Lebanese Muslim Shiite families that included six individuals affected with odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia. Using a homozygosity-mapping strategy, we assigned the disease locus to an ~9-cM region at chromosome 2q35-q36.2, located between markers rs16853834 and D2S353, with a maximum multipoint LOD score of 5.7. Screening of candidate genes in this region led us to identify the same c.697G-->T (p.Glu233X) homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 3 of the WNT10A gene in all patients. At the protein level, the mutation is predicted to result in a premature truncated protein of 232 aa instead of 417 aa. This is the first report to our knowledge of a human phenotype resulting from a mutation in WNT10A, and it is the first demonstration of an ectodermal dysplasia caused by an altered WNT signaling pathway, expanding the list of WNT-related diseases. PMID:17847007

  16. GPR179 is required for depolarizing bipolar cell function and is mutated in autosomal-recessive complete congenital stationary night blindness

    OpenAIRE

    Peachey, Neal S.; Ray, Thomas A.; Florijn, Ralph; Rowe, Lucy B.; Sjoerdsma, Trijntje; Contreras-Alcantara, Susana; Baba, Kenkichi; Tosini, Gianluca; Pozdeyev, Nikita; Iuvone, P. Michael; Bojang, Pasano; Pearring, Jillian N.; Simonsz, Huibert Jan; van Genderen, Maria; Birch, David G.

    2012-01-01

    textabstractComplete congenital stationary night blindness (cCSNB) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of retinal disorders characterized by nonprogressive impairment of night vision, absence of the electroretinogram (ERG) b-wave, and variable degrees of involvement of other visual functions. We report here that mutations in GPR179, encoding an orphan G protein receptor, underlie a form of autosomal-recessive cCSNB. The Gpr179nob5/nob5mouse model was initially discovered by th...

  17. Loss of VPS13C Function in Autosomal-Recessive Parkinsonism Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Increases PINK1/Parkin-Dependent Mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Suzanne; Drouet, Valérie; Majounie, Elisa; Deramecourt, Vincent; Jacoupy, Maxime; Nicolas, Aude; Cormier-Dequaire, Florence; Hassoun, Sidi Mohamed; Pujol, Claire; Ciura, Sorana; Erpapazoglou, Zoi; Usenko, Tatiana; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Sahbatou, Mourad; Liebau, Stefan; Ding, Jinhui; Bilgic, Basar; Emre, Murat; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan; Guven, Gamze; Tison, François; Tranchant, Christine; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Krack, Paul; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Nalls, Michael A; Hernandez, Dena G; Heutink, Peter; Gibbs, J Raphael; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W; Gasser, Thomas; Durr, Alexandra; Deleuze, Jean-François; Tazir, Meriem; Destée, Alain; Lohmann, Ebba; Kabashi, Edor; Singleton, Andrew; Corti, Olga; Brice, Alexis

    2016-03-01

    Autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The genetic causes of approximately 50% of autosomal-recessive early-onset forms of Parkinson disease (PD) remain to be elucidated. Homozygozity mapping and exome sequencing in 62 isolated individuals with early-onset parkinsonism and confirmed consanguinity followed by data mining in the exomes of 1,348 PD-affected individuals identified, in three isolated subjects, homozygous or compound heterozygous truncating mutations in vacuolar protein sorting 13C (VPS13C). VPS13C mutations are associated with a distinct form of early-onset parkinsonism characterized by rapid and severe disease progression and early cognitive decline; the pathological features were striking and reminiscent of diffuse Lewy body disease. In cell models, VPS13C partly localized to the outer membrane of mitochondria. Silencing of VPS13C was associated with lower mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial fragmentation, increased respiration rates, exacerbated PINK1/Parkin-dependent mitophagy, and transcriptional upregulation of PARK2 in response to mitochondrial damage. This work suggests that loss of function of VPS13C is a cause of autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism with a distinctive phenotype of rapid and severe progression. PMID:26942284

  18. Large deletions of the KCNV2 gene are common in patients with cone dystrophy with supernormal rod response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissinger, Bernd; Schaich, Simone; Baumann, Britta; Bonin, Michael; Jägle, Herbert; Friedburg, Christoph; Varsányi, Balázs; Hoyng, Carel B; Dollfus, Hélène; Heckenlively, John R; Rosenberg, Thomas; Rudolph, Günter; Kellner, Ulrich; Salati, Roberto; Plomp, Astrid; De Baere, Elfride; Andrassi-Darida, Monika; Sauer, Alexandra; Wolf, Christiane; Zobor, Ditta; Bernd, Antje; Leroy, Bart P; Enyedi, Péter; Cremers, Frans P M; Lorenz, Birgit; Zrenner, Eberhart; Kohl, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Cone dystrophy with supernormal rod response (CDSRR) is considered to be a very rare autosomal recessive retinal disorder. CDSRR is associated with mutations in KCNV2, a gene that encodes a modulatory subunit (Kv8.2) of a voltage-gated potassium channel. In this study, we found that KCNV2 mutations...

  19. An easy test but a hard decision: ethical issues concerning non-invasive prenatal testing for autosomal recessive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirton, Heather; Goldsmith, Lesley; Chitty, Lyn S

    2015-08-01

    Prenatal testing based on cell-free fetal DNA in maternal serum is now possible for specific monogenic conditions, and studies have shown that the use of non-invasive testing is supported by prospective parents and health professionals. However, some ethical issues have been raised concerning informed consent and paternal rights. The objective of this study was to explore ethical aspects of the use of non-invasive prenatal diagnostic testing for autosomal recessive disorders. We used a qualitative cross-sectional design, based on Thematic Analysis, and recruited 27 individuals of reproductive age who were carriers of one of four conditions: thalassaemia, sickle cell disease, cystic fibrosis or spinal muscular atrophy. Data were collected via focus groups or interviews. Participants were aware of the potential for such tests to be viewed as routine and suggested that obtaining written consent and allowing time for consideration is needed to facilitate autonomous choice and informed consent. All participants felt that mothers should be able to request such tests, but fathers who declined carrier testing should be made aware that fetal test results may reveal their status. We suggest that a written record of consent for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis should be used as a standard to help reinforce the serious nature of the test results. Where the father's carrier status could be revealed through fetal testing, he should be made aware of this before the results are available. Health professionals should discuss with the pregnant woman the best way to manage unsought information about the father's carrier status to minimise family disruption. PMID:25351779

  20. Telmisartan Ameliorates Fibrocystic Liver Disease in an Orthologous Rat Model of Human Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Daisuke; Kugita, Masanori; Sasaki, Mai; Horie, Shigeo; Nakanishi, Koichi; Abe, Takaaki; Aukema, Harold M.; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Nagao, Shizuko

    2013-01-01

    Human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) produces kidneys which are massively enlarged due to multiple cysts, hypertension, and congenital hepatic fibrosis characterized by dilated bile ducts and portal hypertension. The PCK rat is an orthologous model of human ARPKD with numerous fluid-filled cysts caused by stimulated cellular proliferation in the renal tubules and hepatic bile duct epithelia, with interstitial fibrosis developed in the liver. We previously reported that a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ full agonist ameliorated kidney and liver disease in PCK rats. Telmisartan is an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) used widely as an antihypertensive drug and shows partial PPAR-γ agonist activity. It also has nephroprotective activity in diabetes and renal injury and prevents the effects of drug-induced hepatotoxicity and hepatic fibrosis. In the present study, we determined whether telmisartan ameliorates progression of polycystic kidney and fibrocystic liver disease in PCK rats. Five male and 5 female PCK and normal control (+/+) rats were orally administered 3 mg/kg telmisartan or vehicle every day from 4 to 20 weeks of age. Treatment with telmisartan decreased blood pressure in both PCK and +/+ rats. Blood levels of aspartate amino transferase, alanine amino transferase and urea nitrogen were unaffected by telmisartan treatment. There was no effect on kidney disease progression, but liver weight relative to body weight, liver cystic area, hepatic fibrosis index, expression levels of Ki67 and TGF-β, and the number of Ki67- and TGF-β-positive interstitial cells in the liver were significantly decreased in telmisartan-treated PCK rats. Therefore, telmisartan ameliorates congenital hepatic fibrosis in ARPKD, possibly through the inhibition of signaling cascades responsible for cellular proliferation and interstitial fibrosis in PCK rats. The present results support the potential therapeutic use of ARBs for the

  1. Genetic Linkage Analysis of 15 DFNB Loci in a Group of Iranian Families with Autosomal Recessive Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Tabatabaiefar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Hearing loss (HL is the most frequent sensory birth defect in humans. Autosomal recessive non-syn­dromic HL (ARNSHL is the most common type of hereditary HL. It is extremely heterogeneous and over 70 loci (known as DFNB have been identified. This study was launched to determine the relative contribution of more frequent loci in a cohort of ARNSHL families."nMethods: Thirty-seven Iranian families including 36 ARNSHL families and 1 family with Pendred syndrome each with ≥ 4 affected individuals, from seven provinces of Iran, were ascertained. DFNB1 contribution was initially studied by DNA sequencing of GJB2 and linkage analysis using the relative STR markers. The excluded families were then sub­jected to homozygosity mapping for fifteen ARNSHL loci."nResults: Sixteen families were found to be linked to seven different known loci, including DFNB1 (6 families, DFNB4 (3 families +1 family with Pendred syndrome, DFNB63 (2 families, DFNB2 (1 family, DFNB7/11 (1 family, DFNB9 (1 family and DFNB21 (1 family. DNA sequencing of the corresponding genes is in progress to identify the pathogenic mu­tations. "nConclusion: The genetic causes were clarified in 43.2% of the studied families, giving an overview of the causes of ARNSHL in Iran. DFNB4 is ranked second after DFNB1 in the studied cohort. More genetic and epigenetic investiga­tions will have to be done to reveal the causes in the remaining families.   

  2. CONSENSUS EXPERT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE: REPORT OF AN INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay-Woodford, Lisa M.; Bissler, John J.; Braun, Michael C.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A.; Dell, Katherine M.; Kerecuk, Larissa; Liebau, Max C.; Alonso-Peclet, Maria H.; Shneider, Benjamin; Emre, Sukru; Heller, Theo; Kamath, Binita M.; Murray, Karen F.; Moise, Kenneth; Eichenwald, Eric E.; Evans, Jacquelyn; Keller, Roberta L.; Wilkins-Haug, Louise; Bergmann, Carsten; Gunay-Aygun, Meral; Hooper, Stephen R.; Hardy, Kristina K.; Hartung, Erum A.; Streisand, Randi; Perrone, Ronald; Moxey-Mims, Marva

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD; MIM 263200) is a severe, typically early onset form of cystic disease that primarily involves the kidneys and biliary tract. Phenotypic expression and age at presentation can be quite variable1. The incidence of ARPKD is 1 in 20,000 live births2, and its pleotropic manifestations are potentially life-threatening. Optimal care requires proper surveillance to limit morbidity and mortality, knowledgeable approaches to diagnosis and treatment, and informed strategies to optimize quality of life. Clinical management therefore is ideally directed by multidisciplinary care teams consisting of perinatologists, neonatologists, nephrologists, hepatologists, geneticists, and behavioral specialists to coordinate patient care from the perinatal period to adulthood. In May 2013, an international team of 25 multidisciplinary specialists from the US, Canada, Germany, and the United Kingdom convened in Washington, DC, to review the literature published from 1990 to 2013 and to develop recommendations for diagnosis, surveillance, and clinical management. Identification of the gene PKHD1, and the significant advances in perinatal care, imaging, medical management, and behavioral therapies over the past decade, provide the foundational elements to define diagnostic criteria and establish clinical management guidelines as the first steps towards standardizing the clinical care for ARPKD patients. The key issues discussed included recommendations regarding perinatal interventions, diagnostic criteria, genetic testing, management of renal and biliary-associated morbidities, and behavioral assessment. The meeting was funded by the National Institutes of Health and an educational grant from the Polycystic Kidney Disease Foundation. Here we summarize the discussions and provide an updated set of diagnostic, surveillance, and management recommendations for optimizing the pediatric care of patients with ARPKD. Specialist care of ARPKD

  3. A population study of adult onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Yates, J R; Emery, A E

    1985-01-01

    Complete ascertainment of adult onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophy in the Lothian Region of Scotland was attempted. Ten index cases were identified giving a prevalence of 1.3 per 100 000 (0.9 per 100 000 for cases where the diagnosis of muscular dystrophy was supported by both electromyographic and muscle biopsy findings). In these 10 sibships there had been 11 affected subjects, significantly less than the 16.5 cases expected for autosomal recessive inheritance. Excluding cases suspected o...

  4. Novel insights into the molecular pathogenesis of CYP4V2-associated Bietti's retinal dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Astuti, G.D.N; Sun, V.; Bauwens, M; Zobor, D.; Leroy, B.P.; Omar, A.; Jurklies, B; Lopez, I; Ren, H.; Yazar, V.; Hamel, C; Kellner, U.; Wissinger, B.; Kohl, S; Baere, E. de

    2015-01-01

    Bietti's crystalline dystrophy (BCD) is a rare, autosomal recessive retinal degenerative disease associated with mutations in CYP4V2. In this study, we describe the genetic and clinical findings in 19 unrelated BCD patients recruited from five international retinal dystrophy clinics. Patients underwent ophthalmic examinations and were screened for CYP4V2 mutations by Sanger sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) copy number variation screening. Eight CYP4V2 mutations wer...

  5. Evolution of Cellular Inclusions in Bietti’s Crystalline Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Furusato, Emiko; Cameron, J Douglas; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2010-01-01

    Bietti’s crystalline dystrophy (BCD) consists of small, yellow-white, glistening intraretinal crystals in the posterior pole, tapetoretinal degeneration with atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and “sclerosis” of the choroid; in addition, sparking yellow crystals in the superficial marginal cornea are also found in many patients. BCD is inherited as an autosomal-recessive trait (4q35-tel) and usually has its onset in the third decade of life. This review focuses on the ultrastruct...

  6. Congenital sensorineural deafness in Australian stumpy-tail cattle dogs is an autosomal recessive trait that maps to CFA10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Sommerlad

    -value = 3.64, as was both coat colour and speckling. Fine mapping was then performed on 45 of these 50 dogs and a further 48 dogs (n = 93. Sequencing candidate gene Sox10 in 6 hearing ASCD, 2 unilaterally deaf ASCD and 2 bilaterally deaf ASCD did not reveal any disease-associated mutations. CONCLUSIONS: Deafness in ASCD is an incompletely penetrant autosomal recessive inherited disease that maps to CFA10.

  7. Skeletal Muscle, but not Cardiovascular Function, Is Altered in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Recessive Hypophosphatemic Rickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Michael J.; Touchberry, Chad D.; Silswal, Neerupma; Brotto, Leticia; Elmore, Chris J.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Andresen, Jon; Brotto, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR) is a heritable disorder characterized by hypophosphatemia, osteomalacia, and poor bone development. ARHR results from inactivating mutations in the DMP1 gene with the human phenotype being recapitulated in the Dmp1 null mouse model which displays elevated plasma fibroblast growth factor 23. While the bone phenotype has been well-characterized, it is not known what effects ARHR may also have on skeletal, cardiac, or vascular smooth muscle function, which is critical to understand in order to treat patients suffering from this condition. In this study, the extensor digitorum longus (EDL-fast-twitch muscle), soleus (SOL–slow-twitch muscle), heart, and aorta were removed from Dmp1 null mice and ex-vivo functional tests were simultaneously performed in collaboration by three different laboratories. Dmp1 null EDL and SOL muscles produced less force than wildtype muscles after normalization for physiological cross sectional area of the muscles. Both EDL and SOL muscles from Dmp1 null mice also produced less force after the addition of caffeine (which releases calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum) which may indicate problems in excitation contraction coupling in these mice. While the body weights of the Dmp1 null were smaller than wildtype, the heart weight to body weight ratio was higher. However, there were no differences in pathological hypertrophic gene expression compared to wildtype and maximal force of contraction was not different indicating that there may not be cardiac pathology under the tested conditions. We did observe a decrease in the rate of force development generated by cardiac muscle in the Dmp1 null which may be related to some of the deficits observed in skeletal muscle. There were no differences observed in aortic contractions induced by PGF2α or 5-HT or in endothelium-mediated acetylcholine-induced relaxations or endothelium-independent sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxations. In summary

  8. Skeletal muscle, but not cardiovascular function, is altered in a mouse model of autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Wacker

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR is a heritable disorder characterized by hypophosphatemia, osteomalacia, and poor bone development. ARHR results from inactivating mutations in the DMP1 gene with the human phenotype being recapitulated in the Dmp1 null mouse model which displays elevated plasma fibroblast growth factor 23. While the bone phenotype has been well characterized, it is not known what effects ARHR may also have on skeletal, cardiac, or vascular smooth muscle function, which is critical to understand to treat patients suffering from this condition. In this study, the extensor digitorum longus (EDL- fast-twitch muscle, soleus (SOL- slow-twitch muscle, heart, and aorta were removed from Dmp1 null mice and ex-vivo functional tests were simultaneously performed in collaboration by three different laboratories. Dmp1 null EDL and SOL muscles produced less force than wildtype muscles after normalization for physiological cross sectional area of the muscles. Both EDL and SOL muscles from Dmp1 null mice also produced less force after the addition of caffeine (which releases calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum which may indicate problems in excitation contraction coupling in these mice. While the body weights of the Dmp1 null were smaller than wildtype, the heart weight to body weight ratio was higher. However, there were no differences in pathological hypertrophic gene expression compared to wildtype and maximal force of contraction was not different indicating that there may not be cardiac pathology under the tested conditions. We did observe a decrease in the rate of force development generated by cardiac muscle in the Dmp1 null which may be related to some of the deficits observed in skeletal muscle. There were no differences observed in aortic contractions induced by PGF2a or 5-HT or in endothelium-mediated acetylcholine-induced relaxations or endothelium-independent sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxations. In

  9. Skeletal Muscle, but not Cardiovascular Function, Is Altered in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Recessive Hypophosphatemic Rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Michael J; Touchberry, Chad D; Silswal, Neerupma; Brotto, Leticia; Elmore, Chris J; Bonewald, Lynda F; Andresen, Jon; Brotto, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR) is a heritable disorder characterized by hypophosphatemia, osteomalacia, and poor bone development. ARHR results from inactivating mutations in the DMP1 gene with the human phenotype being recapitulated in the Dmp1 null mouse model which displays elevated plasma fibroblast growth factor 23. While the bone phenotype has been well-characterized, it is not known what effects ARHR may also have on skeletal, cardiac, or vascular smooth muscle function, which is critical to understand in order to treat patients suffering from this condition. In this study, the extensor digitorum longus (EDL-fast-twitch muscle), soleus (SOL-slow-twitch muscle), heart, and aorta were removed from Dmp1 null mice and ex-vivo functional tests were simultaneously performed in collaboration by three different laboratories. Dmp1 null EDL and SOL muscles produced less force than wildtype muscles after normalization for physiological cross sectional area of the muscles. Both EDL and SOL muscles from Dmp1 null mice also produced less force after the addition of caffeine (which releases calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum) which may indicate problems in excitation contraction coupling in these mice. While the body weights of the Dmp1 null were smaller than wildtype, the heart weight to body weight ratio was higher. However, there were no differences in pathological hypertrophic gene expression compared to wildtype and maximal force of contraction was not different indicating that there may not be cardiac pathology under the tested conditions. We did observe a decrease in the rate of force development generated by cardiac muscle in the Dmp1 null which may be related to some of the deficits observed in skeletal muscle. There were no differences observed in aortic contractions induced by PGF2α or 5-HT or in endothelium-mediated acetylcholine-induced relaxations or endothelium-independent sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxations. In summary, these

  10. Highly prevalent LIPH founder mutations causing autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis in Japan and the genotype/phenotype correlations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kana Tanahashi

    Full Text Available Mutations in LIPH cause of autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis (ARWH, and the 2 missense mutations c.736T>A (p.Cys246Ser and c.742C>A (p.His248Asn are considered prevalent founder mutations for ARWH in the Japanese population. To reveal genotype/phenotype correlations in ARWH cases in Japan and the haplotypes in 14 Japanese patients from 14 unrelated Japanese families. 13 patients had woolly hair, and 1 patient had complete baldness since birth. An LIPH mutation search revealed homozygous c.736T>A mutations in 10 of the patients. Compound heterozygous c.736T>A and c.742C>A mutations were found in 3 of the patients, and homozygous c.742C>A mutation in 1 patient. The phenotype of mild hypotrichosis with woolly hair was restricted to the patients with the homozygous c.736T>A mutation. The severe phenotype of complete baldness was seen in only 1 patient with homozygous c.742C>A. Haplotype analysis revealed that the alleles containing the LIPH c.736T>A mutation had a haplotype identical to that reported previously, although 4 alleles out of 5 chromosomes containing the LIPH c.742C>A mutation had a different haplotype from the previously reported founder allele. These alleles with c.742C>A are thought to be the third founder LIPH mutation causing ARWH. To accurately determine the prevalence of the founder mutations, we investigated allele frequencies of those mutations in 819 Japanese controls. Heterozygous c.736T>A mutations were found in 13 controls (allele frequency: 0.0079; carrier rate: 0.016, and heterozygous c.742C>A mutations were found in 2 controls (allele frequency: 0.0012; carrier rate: 0.0024. In conclusion, this study confirms the more accurate allele frequencies of the pathogenic founder mutations of LIPH and shows that there is a third founder mutation in Japan. In addition, the present findings suggest that the mutation patterns of LIPH might be associated with hypotrichosis severity in ARWH.

  11. Recessive mutations in the CYP4V2 gene in East Asian and Middle Eastern patients with Bietti crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, J; Nishiguchi, K.; Nakamura, M.; Dryja, T; Berson, E; Miyake, Y

    2005-01-01

    Background: Bietti crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy (BCD) is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder characterised by tiny yellowish glittering retinal crystals, choroidal sclerosis, and crystals in the peripheral cornea, associated with progressive night blindness. CYP4V2, encoding a member of cytochrome p450 (CYP450) protein family, was recently identified as the causative gene.

  12. Cytochrome b558-negative, autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease: two new mutations in the cytochrome b558 light chain of the NADPH oxidase (p22-phox).

    OpenAIRE

    Boer, M.; Klein, A; Hossle, J P; Seger, R.; Corbeel, L; Weening, R S; Roos, D.

    1992-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is characterized by the failure of activated phagocytes to generate superoxide. Defects in at least four different genes lead to CGD. Patients with the X-linked form of CGD have mutations in the gene for the beta-subunit of cytochrome b558 (gp91-phox). Patients with a rare autosomal recessive form of CGD have mutations in the gene for the alpha-subunit of this cytochrome (p22-phox). Usually, this leads to the absence of cytochrome b558 in the phagocytes (A2...

  13. Structure of the Parkin in-between-ring domain provides insights for E3-ligase dysfunction in autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Beasley, Steven A; Hristova, Ventzislava A.; Shaw, Gary S.

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in Parkin are one of the predominant hereditary factors found in patients suffering from autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinsonism. Parkin is a member of the E3 ubiquitin ligase family that is defined by a tripartite RING1-in-between-ring (IBR)-RING2 motif. In Parkin, the IBR domain has been shown to augment binding of the E2 proteins UbcH7 and UbcH8, and the subsequent ubiquitination of the proteins synphilin-1, Sept5, and SIM2. To facilitate our understanding of Parkin function, t...

  14. The search for mutations in the gene for the beta subunit of the cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDEB) in patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riess, O; Noerremoelle, A; Weber, B; Musarella, M A; Hayden, M R

    1992-01-01

    including 196 bp of the 5' region of the PDEB gene have been assessed for mutations by using single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis in 14 patients from 13 unrelated families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP). No disease-causing mutations were found in this group of affected......The finding of a mutation in the beta subunit of the cyclic GMP (cGMP) phosphodiesterase gene causing retinal degeneration in mice (the Pdeb gene) prompted a search for disease-causing mutations in the human phosphodiesterase gene (PDEB gene) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. All 22 exons...

  15. In vitro and in vivo characterization of histone deacetylase inhibitors as potential therapeutics for autosomal recessive proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)

    OpenAIRE

    Rießland, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a common autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder and the leading hereditary cause of death in early childhood. No cure is available. The disease determining gene for SMA is the survival motor neuron gene 1. SMN1 produces full length transcripts only, whereas the majority of transcripts derived from the copy gene SMN2 lack exon 7 due to alternative splicing. Although the amount of fully-functional SMN2-derived FL-SMN protein is not sufficient to overcome the absen...

  16. A novel c.5308_5311delGAGA mutation in Senataxin in a Cypriot family with an autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamba-Papanicolaou Eleni

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Senataxin (chromosome 9q34 was recently identified as the causative gene for an autosomal recessive form of Ataxia (ARCA, termed as Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia, type 2 (AOA2 and characterized by generalized incoordination, cerebellar atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, "oculomotor apraxia" and increased alpha-fetoprotein (AFP. Here, we report a novel Senataxin mutation in a Cypriot ARCA family. Methods We studied several Cypriot autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia (ARCA families for linkage to known ARCA gene loci. We linked one family (909 to the SETX locus on chromosome 9q34 and screened the proband for mutations by direct sequencing. Results Sequence analysis revealed a novel c.5308_5311delGAGA mutation in exon 11 of the SETX gene. The mutation has not been detected in 204 control chromosomes from the Cypriot population, the remaining Cypriot ARCA families and 37 Cypriot sporadic cerebellar ataxia patients. Conclusion We identified a novel SETX homozygous c.5308_5311delGAGA mutation that co-segregates with ARCA with cerebellar atrophy and raised AFP.

  17. Autosomal Recessive Chronic Granulomatous Disease, IgA Deficiency and Refractory Autoimmune Thrombocytopenia Responding to Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Shamsian Bibi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Immunodeficiency and autoimmune disease may occur concomitantly in the same individual. Some of the immunodeficiency syndromes, especially humoral defects are associated with autoimmune disorders. Hematological manifestations such as thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia are the most common presentations. Persistent antigen stimulation due to an inherent defect in the ability of the immune system to eradicate pathogens is the primary cause leading to autoimmunity in patients with primary immunodeficiency states.We describe a 10 year old Iranian girl with chronic granulomatous disease -the autosomal recessive type with mutation of NCF1 gene P47- associated with selective IgA deficiency, refractory immune thrombocytopenia that showed an excellent response to Rituximab (Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody.Patients with primary immunodeficiencies may have variable autoimmune manifestations. So for early detection and appropriate treatment, autoimmune diseases should always be suspected in such patients.

  18. Autosomal recessive spastic tetraplegia caused by AP4M1 and AP4B1 gene mutation: expansion of the facial and neuroimaging features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Bilguvar, Kaya; Koçer, Naci; Yalçınkaya, Cengiz; Çağlayan, Okay; Gül, Ece; Sahin, Sezgin; Çomu, Sinan; Günel, Murat

    2014-07-01

    Adaptor protein complex-4 (AP4) is a component of intracellular transportation of proteins, which is thought to have a unique role in neurons. Recently, mutations affecting all four subunits of AP4 (AP4M1, AP4E1, AP4S1, and AP4B1) have been found to cause similar autosomal recessive phenotype consisting of tetraplegic cerebral palsy and intellectual disability. The aim of this study was analyzing AP4 genes in three new families with this phenotype, and discussing their clinical findings with an emphasis on neuroimaging and facial features. Using homozygosity mapping followed by whole-exome sequencing, we identified two novel homozygous mutations in AP4M1 and a homozygous deletion in AP4B1 in three pairs of siblings. Spastic tetraplegia, microcephaly, severe intellectual disability, limited speech, and stereotypic laughter were common findings in our patients. All patients also had similar facial features consisting of coarse and hypotonic face, bitemporal narrowing, bulbous nose with broad nasal ridge, and short philtrum which were not described in patients with AP4M1 and AP4B1 mutations previously. The patients presented here and previously with AP4M1, AP4B1, and AP4E1 mutations shared brain abnormalities including asymmetrical ventriculomegaly, thin splenium of the corpus callosum, and reduced white matter volume. The patients also had hippocampal globoid formation and thin hippocampus. In conclusion, disorders due to mutations in AP4 complex have similar neurological, facial, and cranial imaging findings. Thus, these four genes encoding AP4 subunits should be screened in patients with autosomal recessive spastic tetraplegic cerebral palsy, severe intellectual disability, and stereotypic laughter, especially with the described facial and cranial MRI features. PMID:24700674

  19. Association of ectodermal dysplasia, ectrodactyly, and macular dystrophy: the EEM syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohdo, S; Hirayama, K; Terawaki, T

    1983-01-01

    We report five patients with ectodermal dysplasia, ectrodactyly associated with syndactyly or cleft hand or both, and, in addition, macular dystrophy which was presumed to be progressive, in an isolated population on a remote island in Japan. The heredity of this syndrome was thought to be autosomal recessive. Three cases have been reported so far with a combination of the same abnormalities. The parents in these cases were consanguineous.

  20. A Nonsense Variant in COL6A1 in Landseer Dogs with Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, Frank; Bilzer, Thomas; Brands, Jan; Golini, Lorenzo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Wiedmer, Michaela; Drögemüller, Michaela; Drögemüller, Cord; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-01-01

    A novel canine muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs was observed. We had access to five affected dogs from two litters. The clinical signs started at a few weeks of age, and the severe progressive muscle weakness led to euthanasia between 5 and 15 months of age. The pedigrees of the affected dogs suggested a monogenic autosomal-recessive inheritance of the trait. Linkage and homozygosity mapping indicated two potential genome segments for the causative variant on chromosomes 10 and 31 harborin...

  1. A Nonsense Variant in COL6A1 in Landseer Dogs with Muscular Dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, Frank; Bilzer, Thomas; Brands, Jan; Golini, Lorenzo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Wiedmer, Michaela; Drögemüller, Michaela; Drögemüller, Cord; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-01-01

    A novel canine muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs was observed. We had access to five affected dogs from two litters. The clinical signs started at a few weeks of age and the severe progressive muscle weakness led to euthanasia between 5 and 15 months of age. The pedigrees of the affected dogs suggested a monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance of the trait. Linkage and homozygosity mapping indicated two potential genome segments for the causative variant on chromosomes 10 and 31 harboring...

  2. Senior-Løken Syndrome: A syndromic form of retinal dystrophy associated with nephronophthisis

    OpenAIRE

    Ronquillo, C.C.; Bernstein, P S; Baehr, W

    2012-01-01

    Senior-Løken syndrome (SLS) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by development of a retinitis pigmentosa (RP)- or Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA)-like retinal dystrophy and a medullary cystic kidney disease, nephronophthisis. Mutations in several genes (called nephrocystins) have been shown to cause SLS. The proteins encoded by these genes are localized in the connecting cilium of photoreceptor cells and in the primary cilium of kidney cells. Nephrocystins are thought to have a r...

  3. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy with obesity for elective cesarean section: Anesthetic management and brief review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    R V Ranjan; Ramachandran, T. R.; S Manikandan; John, Roshan

    2015-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the pelvic or shoulder girdle musculature is predominantly or primarily involved. We report the management of a 27-year-old primigravida with LGMD associated with obesity posted for elective cesarean section. She was successfully managed with epidural anesthesia assisted with noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. She had an uncomplicated intra- and post-operative course.

  4. Phenotypic variations in a family with retinal dystrophy as result of different mutations in the ABCR gene

    OpenAIRE

    Klevering, B; van Driel, M.; van de Pol, D. J R; Pinckers, A; Cremers, F; Hoyng, C.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To describe two phenotypic variations of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy occurring in a consanguineous family in a pseudodominant pattern, resulting from mutations in the ATP binding cassette transporter (ABCR) gene.
METHODS—Patients of this family underwent an extensive ophthalmic evaluation, including fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, and electroretinography (ERG). Genetic analysis comprised sequence analysis of the retina specific ABCR gene.
RESULTS—Five patients pres...

  5. Validation of a clinical practice-based algorithm for the diagnosis of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias based on NGS identified cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallaret, Martial; Renaud, Mathilde; Redin, Claire; Drouot, Nathalie; Muller, Jean; Severac, Francois; Mandel, Jean Louis; Hamza, Wahiba; Benhassine, Traki; Ali-Pacha, Lamia; Tazir, Meriem; Durr, Alexandra; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Mignot, Cyril; Charles, Perrine; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Chamard, Ludivine; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Laugel, Vincent; Burglen, Lydie; Calvas, Patrick; Fleury, Marie-Céline; Tranchant, Christine; Anheim, Mathieu; Koenig, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Establishing a molecular diagnosis of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) is challenging due to phenotype and genotype heterogeneity. We report the validation of a previously published clinical practice-based algorithm to diagnose ARCA. Two assessors performed a blind analysis to determine the most probable mutated gene based on comprehensive clinical and paraclinical data, without knowing the molecular diagnosis of 23 patients diagnosed by targeted capture of 57 ataxia genes and high-throughput sequencing coming from a 145 patients series. The correct gene was predicted in 61 and 78 % of the cases by the two assessors, respectively. There was a high inter-rater agreement [K = 0.85 (0.55-0.98) p < 0.001] confirming the algorithm's reproducibility. Phenotyping patients with proper clinical examination, imaging, biochemical investigations and nerve conduction studies remain crucial for the guidance of molecular analysis and to interpret next generation sequencing results. The proposed algorithm should be helpful for diagnosing ARCA in clinical practice. PMID:27142713

  6. Mutations in CDC14A, Encoding a Protein Phosphatase Involved in Hair Cell Ciliogenesis, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Severe to Profound Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmaghani, Sedigheh; Aghaie, Asadollah; Bouyacoub, Yosra; El Hachmi, Hala; Bonnet, Crystel; Riahi, Zied; Chardenoux, Sebastien; Perfettini, Isabelle; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Houmeida, Ahmed; Herbomel, Philippe; Petit, Christine

    2016-06-01

    By genetic linkage analysis in a large consanguineous Iranian family with eleven individuals affected by severe to profound congenital deafness, we were able to define a 2.8 Mb critical interval (at chromosome 1p21.2-1p21.1) for an autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic deafness locus (DFNB). Whole-exome sequencing allowed us to identify a CDC14A biallelic nonsense mutation, c.1126C>T (p.Arg376(∗)), which was present in the eight clinically affected individuals still alive. Subsequent screening of 115 unrelated individuals affected by severe or profound congenital deafness of unknown genetic cause led us to identify another CDC14A biallelic nonsense mutation, c.1015C>T (p.Arg339(∗)), in an individual originating from Mauritania. CDC14A encodes a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Immunofluorescence analysis of the protein distribution in the mouse inner ear showed a strong labeling of the hair cells' kinocilia. By using a morpholino strategy to knockdown cdc14a in zebrafish larvae, we found that the length of the kinocilia was reduced in inner-ear hair cells. Therefore, deafness caused by loss-of-function mutations in CDC14A probably arises from a morphogenetic defect of the auditory sensory cells' hair bundles, whose differentiation critically depends on the proper growth of their kinocilium. PMID:27259055

  7. A novel autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing impairment locus (DFNB47) maps to chromosome 2p25.1-p24.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Muhammad Jawad; Santos, Regie Lyn P; Rafiq, Muhammad Arshad; Chahrour, Maria H; Pham, Thanh L; Wajid, Muhammad; Hijab, Nadine; Wambangco, Michael; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ansar, Muhammad; Yan, Kai; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary hearing impairment (HI) displays extensive genetic heterogeneity. Autosomal recessive (AR) forms of prelingual HI account for approximately 75% of cases with a genetic etiology. A novel AR non-syndromic HI locus (DFNB47) was mapped to chromosome 2p25.1-p24.3, in two distantly related Pakistani kindreds. Genome scan and fine mapping were carried out using microsatellite markers. Multipoint linkage analysis resulted in a maximum LOD score of 4.7 at markers D2S1400 and D2S262. The three-unit support interval was bounded by D2S330 and D2S131. The region of homozygosity was found within the three-unit support interval and flanked by markers D2S2952 and D2S131, which corresponds to 13.2 cM according to the Rutgers combined linkage-physical map. This region contains 5.3 Mb according to the sequence-based physical map. Three candidate genes, KCNF1, ID2 and ATP6V1C2 were sequenced, and were found to be negative for functional sequence variants. PMID:16261342

  8. Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD): Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyan, Meenakshi; Gaikwad, Anu N.; Makadia, Ankit; Shah, Harshad

    2015-01-01

    We report a young male of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) with positive family history presented with gradual onset proximal muscle weakness in all four limbs since eight years and thinning of shoulders, arms and thighs. Neurological examination revealed atrophy of both shoulders with wasting of both deltoids thinning of thighs and pseudo hypertrophy of both calves, hypotonia in all four limbs. Gower’s sign was positive. Winging of scapula was present. Power was 3/5 at both shoulders, 4/5 at both elbows, 5/5 at both wrists, 3/5 at both hip joints, 3/5 at both knees, 5/5 at both ankles. All deep tendon reflexes and superficial reflexes were present with plantars bilateral flexors. Electromyography (EMG) showed myopathic pattern. He had elevated creatinine phosphokinase levels and muscle biopsy findings consistent with muscular dystrophy. PMID:25738022

  9. Early mechanical dysfunction of the diaphragm in the muscular dystrophy with myositis (Ttnmdm) model

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Michael A.; Pardo, Patricia S.; Cox, Gregory A.; Boriek, Aladin M.

    2008-01-01

    A complex rearrangement mutation in the mouse titin gene leads to an in-frame 83-amino acid deletion in the N2A region of titin. Autosomal recessive inheritance of the titin muscular dystrophy with myositis (Ttnmdm/mdm) mutation leads to a severe early-onset muscular dystrophy and premature death. We hypothesized that the N2A deletion would negatively impact the force-generating capacity and passive mechanical properties of the mdm diaphragm. We measured in vitro active isometric contractile ...

  10. Evidence for linkage disequilibrium in chromosome 13-linked Duchenne-like muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othmane, K.B.; Speer, M.C.; Stauffer, J. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Duchenne-like muscular dystrophy (DLMD) is an autosomal recessive Limb Girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2C) characterized by late age of onset, proximal muscle weakness leading to disability, high creatine kinase values, normal intelligence and normal dystrophin in muscle biopsy. We have shown previously that three DLMD families from Tunisia are linked to chromosome 13q12. To further localize the LGMD2C gene, we have investigated seven additional families (119 individuals). Both genotyping and two-point linkage analysis were performed as described elsewhere. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Evolution of Cellular Inclusions in Bietti’s Crystalline Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiko Furusato

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Bietti’s crystalline dystrophy (BCD consists of small, yellow-white, glistening intraretinal crystals in the posterior pole, tapetoretinal degeneration with atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and “sclerosis” of the choroid; in addition, sparking yellow crystals in the superficial marginal cornea are also found in many patients. BCD is inherited as an autosomal-recessive trait (4q35-tel and usually has its onset in the third decade of life. This review focuses on the ultrastructure of cellular crystals and lipid inclusions of BCD.

  12. Autosomal recessive transmission of a rare KRT74 variant causes hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia: allelism with dominant woolly hair/hypotrichosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doroteya Raykova

    Full Text Available Pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia (PHNED comprises a heterogeneous group of rare heritable disorders characterized by brittle hair, hypotrichosis, onychodystrophy and micronychia. Autosomal recessive (AR PHNED has previously been associated with mutations in either KRT85 or HOXC13 on chromosome 12p11.1-q14.3. We investigated a consanguineous Pakistani family with AR PHNED linked to the keratin gene cluster on 12p11.1 but without detectable mutations in KRT85 and HOXC13. Whole exome sequencing of affected individuals revealed homozygosity for a rare c.821T>C variant (p.Phe274Ser in the KRT74 gene that segregates AR PHNED in the family. The transition alters the highly conserved Phe274 residue in the coil 1B domain required for long-range dimerization of keratins, suggesting that the mutation compromises the stability of intermediate filaments. Immunohistochemical (IHC analyses confirmed a strong keratin-74 expression in the nail matrix, the nail bed and the hyponychium of mouse distal digits, as well as in normal human hair follicles. Furthermore, hair follicles and epidermis of an affected family member stained negative for Keratin-74 suggesting a loss of function mechanism mediated by the Phe274Ser substitution. Our observations show for the first time that homozygosity for a KRT74 missense variant may be associated with AR PHNED. Heterozygous KRT74 mutations have previously been associated with autosomal dominant woolly hair/hypotrichosis simplex (ADWH. Thus, our findings expand the phenotypic spectrum associated with KRT74 mutations and imply that a subtype of AR PHNED is allelic with ADWH.

  13. Identification, by homozygosity mapping, of a novel locus for autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis on chromosome 17p, and evidence for further genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebsová, A; Küster, W; Lestringant, G G; Schulze, B; Hinz, B; Frossard, P M; Reis, A; Hennies, H C

    2001-07-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) comprises a group of severe disorders of keratinization, characterized by variable erythema and skin scaling. It is known for its high degree of genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Mutations in the gene for keratinocyte transglutaminase (TGM1) on chromosome 14q11 were shown in patients with ARCI, and a second locus was described, on chromosome 2q, in families from northern Africa. Three other loci for ARCI, on chromosomes 3p and 19p, were identified recently. We have embarked on a whole-genome scan for further loci for ARCI in four families from Germany, Turkey, and the United Arab Emirates. A novel ARCI locus was identified on chromosome 17p, between the markers at D17S938 and D17S1856, with a maximum LOD score of 3.38, at maximum recombination fraction 0.00, at D17S945, under heterogeneity. This locus is linked to the disease in the Turkish family and in the German family. Extensive genealogical studies revealed that the parents of the German patients with ARCI were eighth cousins. By homozygosity mapping, the localization of the gene could then be refined to the 8.4-cM interval between D17S938 and D17S1879. It could be shown, however, that ARCI in the two Arab families is linked neither to the new locus on chromosome 17p nor to one of the five loci known previously. Our findings give evidence of further genetic heterogeneity that is not linked to distinctive phenotypes. PMID:11398099

  14. The RIN2 syndrome: a new autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder caused by deficiency of Ras and Rab interactor 2 (RIN2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syx, Delfien; Malfait, Fransiska; Van Laer, Lut; Hellemans, Jan; Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; Willaert, Andy; Benmansour, Abdelmajid; De Paepe, Anne; Verloes, Alain

    2010-07-01

    Defects leading to impaired intracellular trafficking have recently been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of genodermatoses, such as the Ehlers-Danlos and the cutis laxa syndromes. A new genodermatosis, termed macrocephaly, alopecia, cutis laxa and scoliosis (MACS) syndrome has been described, resulting from a homozygous 1-bp deletion in RIN2. RIN2 encodes the Ras and Rab interactor 2, involved in the regulation of Rab5-mediated early endocytosis. We performed a clinical, ultrastructural and molecular study in a consanguineous Algerian family with three siblings affected by a distinctive autosomal recessive genodermatosis, reported in 2005 by Verloes et al. The most striking clinical features include progressive facial coarsening, gingival hypertrophy, severe scoliosis, sparse hair and skin and joint hyperlaxity. Ultrastructural studies of the skin revealed important abnormalities in the collagen fibril morphology, and fibroblasts exhibited a dilated endoplasmic reticulum and an abnormal Golgi apparatus with rarefied and dilated cisternae. Molecular analysis of RIN2 revealed a novel homozygous 2-bp deletion in all affected individuals. The c.1914_1915delGC mutation introduces a frameshift and creates a premature termination codon, leading to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. These findings confirm that RIN2 defects are associated with a distinct genodermatosis and underscore the involvement of RIN2 and its associated pathways in the pathogenesis of connective tissue disorders. The current family displays considerable phenotypic overlap with MACS syndrome. However, our family shows a dermatological and ultrastructural phenotype belonging to the Ehlers-Danlos rather than the cutis laxa spectrum. Therefore, the MACS acronym is not entirely appropriate for the current family. PMID:20424861

  15. Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Myotonic Dystrophy; Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy; Muscular Dystrophy; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2; Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy; PROMM (Proximal Myotonic Myopathy); Steinert's Disease; Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

  16. Alström Syndrome: Genetics and Clinical Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Jan D; Maffei, Pietro; Collin, Gayle B.; Naggert, Jürgen K.

    2011-01-01

    Alström syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by cone-rod dystrophy, hearing loss, childhood truncal obesity, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, short stature in adulthood, cardiomyopathy, and progressive pulmonary, hepatic, and renal dysfunction. Symptoms first appear in infancy and progressive development of multi-organ pathology leads to a reduced life expectancy. Variability in age of onset and severity of clinic...

  17. Disease: H00819 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00819 Stargardt disease (STGD); Fundus flavimaculatus Stargardt disease (STGD) is ...sing STGD, including ABCA4, ELOVL4, PROM1, and CNGB3. Nervous system disease; Eye disease hsa02010(24) ABC t...K06532] ICD-10: H35.5 MeSH: C580470 OMIM: 248200 600110 603786 PMID:12789571 Koenekoop RK The gene for Stargardt disea...se severe progressive autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy presenting as Stargardt disease. Mol Vis 15:638

  18. Novel compound heterozygous NMNAT1 variants associated with Leber congenital amaurosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemiatkowska, Anna M; van den Born, L Ingeborgh; van Genderen, Maria M; Bertelsen, Mette; Zobor, Ditta; Rohrschneider, Klaus; van Huet, Ramon A C; Nurohmah, Siska; Klevering, B Jeroen; Kohl, Susanne; Faradz, Sultana M H; Rosenberg, Thomas; den Hollander, Anneke I; Collin, Rob W J; Cremers, Frans P M

    2014-01-01

    , were screened in 532 additional patients with retinal dystrophies. This cohort encompassed 108 persons with isolated or autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), 271 with isolated or autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and 49 with autosomal dominant RP, as well as 104 persons with LCA in...... whom the causative mutation was previously identified. RESULTS: Compound heterozygous alterations were found in six patients with LCA and in one person with early-onset RP. All except one carried the common p.E257K variant on one allele. Macular atrophy was absent in one patient, who carried this......: Although macular atrophy can occur in LCA and CRD, no NMNAT1 mutations were found in the latter cohort. NMNAT1 variants were also not found in a large group of patients with sporadic or autosomal recessive RP. The enrichment of p.E257K ina heterozygous state in patients with LCA versus controls suggests...

  19. Homeobox Genes and Melatonin Synthesis: Regulatory Roles of the Cone-Rod Homeobox Transcription Factor in the Rodent Pineal Gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Rohde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a cAMP-based induction of Aanat transcription. However, additional transcriptional control mechanisms exist. Homeobox genes, which are generally known to encode transcription factors controlling developmental processes, are also expressed in the mature rodent pineal gland. Among these, the cone-rod homeobox (CRX transcription factor is believed to control pineal-specific Aanat expression. Based on recent advances in our understanding of Crx in the rodent pineal gland, we here suggest that homeobox genes play a role in adult pineal physiology both by ensuring pineal-specific Aanat expression and by facilitating cAMP response element-based circadian melatonin production.

  20. A neuroanatomical and physiological study of the non-image forming visual system of the cone-rod homeobox gene (Crx) knock out mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovsing, Louise; Rath, Martin F; Lund-Andersen, Casper; Klein, David C; Møller, Morten

    2010-01-01

    The anatomy and physiology of the non-image forming visual system was investigated in a visually blind cone-rod homeobox gene (Crx) knock-out mouse (Crx(-)(/)(-)), which lacks the outer segments of the photoreceptors. We show that the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the Crx(-/-) mouse exhibit...

  1. Prevalence and range of GJB2 and SLC26A4 mutations in patients with autosomal recessive non‑syndromic hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hua; Chen, Jia; Shan, Xin-Ji; Li, Ying; He, Jian-Guo; Yang, Bei-Bei

    2014-07-01

    The frequency and distribution of genetic mutations that cause deafness differ significantly according to ethnic group and region. Zhejiang is a province in the southeast of China, with an exceptional racial composition of the population caused by mass migration in ancient China. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and spectrum of gap junction‑β2 (GJB2), solute carrier family 26 (anion exchanger) member 4 (SLC26A4) and GJB3 mutations in patients with autosomal recessive non‑syndromic hearing loss (ARNHL) in this area. A total of 176 unrelated pediatric patients with ARNHL were enrolled in the study. A genomic DNA sample was extracted from the peripheral blood. Polymerase chain reaction was employed, and the products were sequenced to screen for mutations in GJB2. In addition, a SNaPshot sequencing method was utilized to detect four hotspot mutations in SLC26A4 (IVS7‑2A>G and c.2168A>G) and GJB3 (c.538C>T and c.547G>A). All patients were subjected to a temporal bone computed tomography scan to identify enlarged vestibular aqueducts (EVA). In total, 14 different mutations, including two new mutations (p.W44L and p.D66N) of GJB2, were detected. The most common pathogenic mutation of GJB2 was c.235delC (15.1%), followed by c.176_191del16 (1.7%), c.299_300delAT (1.7%), c.508_511dup (0.85%) and c.35delG (0.28%) of the total alleles. Mutation analysis of SLC26A4 demonstrated that 13.6% (24/176) of patients carried at least one mutant allele. The patients with EVA (84.2%) had SLC26A4 mutations, and 31% had homozygous mutations. Only one patient carried a heterozygous mutation of GJB3 (c.538C>T). Compared with the other regions of China, in the present population cohort, the prevalence and spectrum of mutations in GJB2 was unique, and in patients with EVA the frequency of a homozygous mutation in SLC26A4 was significantly lower. These findings may be of benefit in genetic counseling and risk assessment for families from this area of

  2. Al-Aqeel Sewairi Syndrome, a new autosomal recessive disorder with multicentric osteolysis, nodulosis and arthropathy. The first genetic defect of matrix metalloproteinase 2 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a distinctive autosomal recessive multicentric osteolysis in Saudi Arabian families with distal arthropathy of the metacarpal, metatarsal and interphalangeal joints, with ultimate progression to the proximal joints with decreased range of movements and deformities with ankylosis and generalized osteopenia. In addition, they had large, painful to touch palmar and plantar pads. Hirsutism and mild dysmorphic facial features including proptosis, a narrow nasal bridge, bulbous nose and micrognathia. Using a genome-wide search for microsatellite markers from 11 members of the family from the Armed Forces Hospital and King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, localized the disease gene to chromosome 16q12-21. Haplotype analysis with additional markers narrowed the critical region to 1.2cM and identified the matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), (gelatinase A, collagenase type IV, EC 3.4, 24,24) gene as a disease candidate at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, United States of America in April 2000. Some affected individuals were homoallelic for a nonsense mutation (TCA>TAA) in codon 244 of exon 5, predicting the replacement of a tyrosine residue by a stop codon in the first fibronectin type II domain (Y244X). Other affected members had a missense mutation in exon 2 arginine 101-histidine (R101H) leading to no MMP-2 enzyme activity in serum or fibroblast or both of affected individuals. In other affected members, a non-pathogenic homoallelic GT transversion resulted in the substitution of an aspartate with a tyrosine residue in codon 210 of exon 4 (D210Y). The MMP-2-null mouse has no developmental defects, but are small, which may reflect genetic redundancy. The discovery that deficiency of this well-characterized gelatinase/collagenase results in an inherited form of an osteolytic and arthritic disorder provides an invaluable insights for the understanding of osteolysis and arthritis and is the first genetic

  3. Common recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies differential diagnosis: why and how?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cotta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Limb girdle muscular dystrophies are heterogeneous autosomal hereditary neuromuscular disorders. They produce dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy and they are associated with mutations in several genes involved in muscular structure and function. Detailed clinical, laboratorial, imaging, diagnostic flowchart, photographs, tables, and illustrated diagrams are presented for the differential diagnosis of common autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy subtypes diagnosed nowadays at one reference center in Brazil. Preoperative image studies guide muscle biopsy site selection. Muscle involvement image pattern differs depending on the limb girdle muscular dystrophy subtype. Muscle involvement is conspicuous at the posterior thigh in calpainopathy and fukutin-related proteinopathy; anterior thigh in sarcoglycanopathy; whole thigh in dysferlinopathy, and telethoninopathy. The precise differential diagnosis of limb girdle muscular dystrophies is important for genetic counseling, prognostic orientation, cardiac and respiratory management. Besides that, it may probably, in the future, provide specific genetic therapies for each subtype.

  4. Do consanguineous parents of a child affected by an autosomal recessive disease have more DNA identical-by-descent than similarly-related parents with healthy offspring? Design of a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Martina C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The offspring of consanguineous relations have an increased risk of congenital/genetic disorders and early mortality. Consanguineous couples and their offspring account for approximately 10% of the global population. The increased risk for congenital/genetic disorders is most marked for autosomal recessive disorders and depends on the degree of relatedness of the parents. For children of first cousins the increased risk is 2-4%. For individual couples, however, the extra risk can vary from zero to 25% or higher, with only a minority of these couples having an increased risk of at least 25%. It is currently not possible to differentiate between high-and low-risk couples. The quantity of DNA identical-by-descent between couples with the same degree of relatedness shows a remarkable variation. Here we hypothesize that consanguineous partners with children affected by an autosomal recessive disease have more DNA identical-by-descent than similarly-related partners who have only healthy children. The aim of the study is thus to establish whether the amount of DNA identical-by-descent in consanguineous parents of children with an autosomal recessive disease is indeed different from its proportion in consanguineous parents who have healthy children only. Methods/Design This project is designed as a case-control study. Cases are defined as consanguineous couples with one or more children with an autosomal recessive disorder and controls as consanguineous couples with at least three healthy children and no affected child. We aim to include 100 case couples and 100 control couples. Control couples are matched by restricting the search to the same family, clan or ethnic origin as the case couple. Genome-wide SNP arrays will be used to test our hypothesis. Discussion This study contains a new approach to risk assessment in consanguineous couples. There is no previous study on the amount of DNA identical-by-descent in consanguineous

  5. The human intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin: molecular characterization and chromosomal mapping of the gene to 10p within the autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia (MGA1) region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozyraki, R; Kristiansen, M; Silahtaroglu, A;

    1998-01-01

    -5445 on the short arm of chromosome 10. This is within the autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia (MGA1) 6-cM region harboring the unknown recessive-gene locus of juvenile megaloblastic anemia caused by intestinal malabsorption of cobalamin (Imerslund-Gräsbeck's disease). In conclusion, the present...... molecular and genetic information on human cubilin now provides circumstantial evidence that an impaired synthesis, processing, or ligand binding of cubilin is the molecular background of this hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia. Udgivelsesdato: 1998-May-15...

  6. Inhibitory action of chlorophyllin of autosome recessive lethals induced by irradiation; Accion inhibidora de la clorofilina de letales recesivos autosonicos inducidos por irradiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salceda, V.M.; Pimentel, P.A.E.; Cruces, M.P. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: vmss@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    chlorophyllin on the damage caused by the radiation, it was into accothe presence of lethal and semi lethals autosomal. One observes this way that even without the use of the radiation the semi lethals frequency is diminished when the chlorophyllin is applied, in this case the decrease was significant and although there was decrease in the case of the irradiated group this it was not significant; in the case of the lethal ones it happened the opposite it was not significant in radiation absence on the contrary elevate the frequency of this type of genes, however, before the radiation and with pre-treatment with chlorophyllin this it reduced the frequency of autosomal recessive lethals significantly. This is important because in the case of bound recessive lethals recessive to the sex this doesn't happen. (Author)

  7. MRI assessment of fetal autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease%常染色体隐性遗传性多囊肾病胎儿的MRI表现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董素贞; 朱铭; 钟玉敏; 张弘; 潘慧红

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨MRI对常染色体隐性遗传性多囊肾病(ARPKD)胎儿的诊断价值.方法 回顾性分析2005年7月至2013年12月间产前超声检查提示异常,然后行MR检查,并经引产后尸解或病理证实的ARPKD胎儿16例.MR扫描序列主要采用稳态自由进动(SSFP)序列、单次激发快速自旋回波(SSTSE)序列和快速加权序列T1WI.将产前MRI、超声表现与引产后尸解或病理结果进行对照分析.结果 16例ARPKD患儿均表现为双侧肾脏体积明显增大,SSTSE序列肾髓质弥漫性高信号小囊肿.11例合并羊水过少,11例合并双肺发育不良,6例合并肝纤维化.11例双肺发育不良和6例肝脏轻度纤维化超声均未提示,肾脏病变超声误诊1例,MRI诊断均正确.结论 MRI诊断胎儿ARPKD具有明显优势,不受羊水量的影响,能准确评价肾脏及肺异常.%Objective To explore the value of MRI on fetal autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD).Methods Sixteen pregnant women,aged from 28 to 38 years (average 30 years) and with gestation age from 22 to 36 weeks (average 25 weeks) underwent MR scanning with a 1.5 T MR unit within 24 to 48 hours after ultrasound examinations.The imaging sequences included steady-state free-precession (SSFP) sequence,single-shot turbo spin echo (SSTSE) sequence and T1-weighted fast imaging sequence.Prenatal US and MR imaging findings were compared with autopsy or pathological results.Results A total of 16 cases of ARPKD showed bilateral markedly enlarged kidneys and diffuse high signal small cysts in renal medulla on SSTSE sequence.Among the 16 cases,11 cases were with oligohydramnios,1 1 cases were with pulmonary hypoplasia,and 6 cases were with hepatic fibrosis.Eleven cases of pulmonary hypoplasia and 6 cases of hepatic fibrosis were all missed by US.For the diagnosis of the renal anomalies,US missed one case.MRI diagnosis was correct in all these cases.Conclusions MRI shows great advantages on the diagnosis of fetal ARPKD

  8. Genetic and physical mapping at the limb-girdle muscular dystrophy locus (LGMD2B) on chromosome 2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashir, R.; Keers, S.; Strachan, T. [Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, different forms of which have been mapped to at least six distinct genetic loci. We have mapped to at least six distinct genetic loci. We have mapped an autosomal recessive form of LGMD (LGMD2B) to chromosome 2p13. Two other conditions have been shown to map to this region or to the homologous region in mouse: a gene for a form of autosomal recessive distal muscular dystrophy, Miyoshi myopathy, shows linkage to the same markers on chromosome 2p as LGMD2B, and an autosomal recessive mouse mutation mnd2, in which there is rapidly progressive paralysis and muscle atrophy, has been mapped to mouse chromosome 6 to a region showing conserved synteny with human chromosome 2p12-p13. We have assembled a 6-cM YAC contig spanning the LGMD2B locus and have mapped seven genes and 13 anonymous polymorphic microsatellites to it. Using haplotype analysis in the linked families, we have narrowed our region of interest to a 0-cM interval between D2S2113 and D2S145, which does not overlap with the critical region for mnd2 in mouse. Use of these most closely linked markers will help to determine the relationship between LGMD2B and Miyoshi myopathy. YACs selected from our contig will be the starting point for the cloning of the LGMD2B gene and thereby establish the biological basis for this form of muscular dystrophy and its relationship with the other limb-girdle muscular dystrophies. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Pathogenic exon-trapping by SVA retrotransposon and rescue in Fukuyama muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Kanagawa, Motoi; Yu, Chih-Chieh; Mori, Kouhei; Oda, Tetsuya; Kuga, Atsushi; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Akman, Hasan O.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Kaji, Ryuji; Yokota, Toshifumi; Takeda, Shin’ichi; Toda, Tatsushi

    2011-01-01

    Fukuyama muscular dystrophy (FCMD; MIM253800), one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders in Japan, was the first human disease found to result from ancestral insertion of a SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA) retrotransposon into a causative gene 1-3 . In FCMD, the SVA insertion occurs in the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of the fukutin gene. The pathogenic mechanism for FCMD is unknown, and no effective clinical treatments exist. Here we show that aberrant mRNA splicing, induced by SVA exon-trappi...

  10. Inhibition of apoptosis improves outcome in a model of congenital muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Girgenrath, Mahasweta; Dominov, Janice A.; Kostek, Christine A.; Boone Miller, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    The most common form of human congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is caused by mutations in the laminin-α2 gene. Loss of laminin-α2 function in this autosomal recessive type 1A form of CMD results in neuromuscular dysfunction and, often, early death. Laminin-α2–deficient skeletal muscles in both humans and mice show signs of muscle cell death by apoptosis. To examine the significance of apoptosis in CMD1A pathogenesis, we determined whether pathogenesis in laminin-α2–deficient (Lama2–/–) mice...

  11. Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudohypertrophic muscular dystrophy; Muscular dystrophy - Duchenne type ... Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a form of muscular dystrophy . It worsens quickly. Other muscular dystrophies (including Becker's muscular dystrophy ) get ...

  12. Microcefalia primária autossômica recessiva em três famílias pernambucanas: aspectos clínicos e moleculares Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly in three families from Pernambuco: clinical and molecular aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela F. Leal

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: descrever os aspectos clínicos de três famílias pernambucanas com microcefalia primária autossômica recessiva e as análises de ligação em uma delas (família 2. MÉTODOS: três famílias consangüíneas pernambucanas, não relacionadas biologicamente, com microcefalia primária, foram estudadas. Os heredogramas e a história clínica dos afetados foram construídos com base em informações obtidas de seus pais e outros parentes. O exame físico foi realizado em todos os afetados, seus genitores e na quase totalidade dos irmãos normais dos afetados. O DNA genômico dos afetados da família 2 e de seus pais foi usado em reações de PCR (polimerase chain reaction com primers elaborados para amplificar marcadores microssatélites ligados aos locos já conhecidos de microcefalia primária autossômica recessiva. Os marcadores amplificados foram submetidos a eletroforese e seus alelos analisados. RESULTADOS: nas três famílias, os afetados apresentavam perímetro cefálico muito reduzido acompanhado de retardo mental e apenas uma paciente (da família 3 manifestava outras alterações neurológicas, mas sem dismorfias associadas. Estudos moleculares demonstraram que a microcefalia, na família 2, não apresentava ligação com nenhum dos locos associados à microcefalia primária autossômica recessiva já conhecidos. CONCLUSÕES: pelo menos mais um gene associado à microcefalia primária autossômica recessiva existe e aguarda identificação.OBJECTIVES: to describe the clinical findings in three families from Pernambuco with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly, and the linkage analysis in one of them (family 2. METHODS: three consanguineous families from Pernambuco, not related one to another and with primary microcephaly, were studied. The genealogical data and the clinical history of the affected individuals were obtained from their parents and other family members. All the affected subjects, almost all their normal

  13. 家族性高胆固醇血症亚型--隐性遗传性高胆固醇血症研究进展%The subtype of familial hypercholesterolemia--the progression of autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马斐斐; 王绿娅

    2006-01-01

    家族性高胆固醇血症(familial hypercholesterolemia,FH;MIM 143890)是一种常染色体显性遗传性疾病,是脂质代谢疾病中最严重的一种,导致早期发生较为严重的冠心病(coronary artery disease,CAD).FH存在一些亚型,其中常染色体隐性遗传性高胆固醇血症(autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia,ARH;MIM 603813)纯合患者,可表现为胆固醇水平异常升高、皮肤肌腱黄色瘤和早发的冠心病,临床表现与FH极为相似.

  14. Deficient T Cell Receptor Excision Circles (TRECs) in autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome caused by DOCK8 mutation: implications for pathogenesis and potential detection by newborn screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasouki, Majed; Okonkwo, Kingsley C; Ray, Abhishek; Folmsbeel, Caspian K; Gozales, Diana; Keles, Sevgi; Puck, Jennifer M; Chatila, Talal

    2011-11-01

    Loss of function of DOCK8 is the major cause of autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome, a primary immunodeficiency with adaptive and innate immune dysfunction. Patients affected with ARHIES have atopic dermatitis and recurrent, potentially life-threatening viral and bacterial infections. Three consanguineous Pakistani siblings presented with severe atopic dermatitis and superinfection. Direct sequencing of DOCK8 in all three affected siblings demonstrated homozygosity for a deleterious, novel exon 14 frame shift mutation. Current newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome (SCID) and related T cell disorders relies on the quantitation of T Cell Receptor Excision Cells (TRECs) in dried blood spots (DBS). Significantly, both older affected siblings had undetectable TRECs, and TREC copy number was reduced in the youngest sibling. These findings suggest that AR-HIES may be detected by TREC newborn screening, and this diagnosis should be considered in the evaluation of newborns with abnormal TRECs who do not have typical SCID. PMID:21763205

  15. A novel proteotoxic stress associated mechanism for macular corneal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Szalai, Eszter; Smedowski, Adrian; Hegyi, Zoltán; Kivinen, Niko; Viiri, Johanna; Wowra, Bogumil; Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Módis, László; Berta, András; Wylegala, Edward; Felszeghy, Szabolcs

    2015-08-01

    Macular corneal dystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive eye disease affecting primarily the corneal stroma. Abnormal accumulation of proteoglycan aggregates has been observed intra- and extracellularly in the stromal layer. In addition to the stromal keratocytes and corneal lamellae, deposits are also present in the basal epithelial cells, endothelial cells and Descemet's membrane. Misfolding of proteins has a tendency to gather into aggregating deposits. We studied interaction of molecular chaperones and proteasomal clearance in macular dystrophy human samples and in human corneal HCE-2 epithelial cells. Seven cases of macular corneal dystrophy and four normal corneal buttons collected during corneal transplantation were examined for their expression patterns of heat shock protein 70, ubiquitin protein conjugates and SQSTM1/p62. In response to proteasome inhibition the same proteins were analyzed by western blotting. Slit-lamp examination, in vivo confocal cornea microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used for morphological analyses. Heat shock protein 70, ubiquitin protein conjugates and SQSTM1/p62 were upregulated in both the basal corneal epithelial cells and the stromal keratocytes in macular corneal dystrophy samples that coincided with an increased expression of the same molecules under proteasome inhibition in the HCE-2 cells in vitro. We propose a novel regulatory mechanism that connects the molecular chaperone and proteasomal clearance system in the pathogenesis of macular corneal dystrophy. PMID:25597745

  16. Functional characteristics of patients with retinal dystrophy that manifest abnormal parafoveal annuli of high density fundus autofluorescence; a review and update

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, Anthony G.; Michaelides, Michel; Saihan, Zubin; Bird, Alan C.; Webster, Andrew R.; Moore, Anthony T.; Fitzke, Fred W; Holder, Graham E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To examine the presence and functional significance of annular fundus autofluorescence abnormalities in patients with different retinal dystrophies. Methods Eighty one patients were ascertained who had a parafoveal ring of high density on fundus autofluorescence imaging. Sixty two had had a clinical diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or Usher syndrome with normal visual acuity. Others included a case of Leber congenital amaurosis and genetically confirmed cases of cone or cone-rod...

  17. Circadian Dynamics of the Cone-Rod Homeobox (CRX) Transcription Factor in the Rat Pineal Gland and Its Role in Regulation of Arylalkylamine N-Acetyltransferase (AANAT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Kristian; Rovsing, Louise; Ho, Anthony K;

    2014-01-01

    The cone-rod homeobox (Crx) gene encodes a transcription factor in the retina and pineal gland. Crx deficiency influences the pineal transcriptome, including a reduced expression of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (Aanat), a key enzyme in nocturnal pineal melatonin production. However, previou...... the rhythmic nature of pineal CRX protein may directly modulate the daily profile of Aanat expression by inducing nighttime expression of this enzyme, thus facilitating nocturnal melatonin synthesis in addition to its role in ensuring a correct tissue distribution of Aanat expression....

  18. A case of Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy with progressive changes of brain CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy (F-CMD) has been generally recognized as a well delineated subgroup of progressive muscular dystrophy with uniform clinical and pathological features. But the pathogenesis is not yet clear. Two theories have been proposed ; autosomal recessive inheritance and intrauterine infection. We experienced a female case of F-CMD, and tried serial brain CT scanning from the birth to one year of age. Low density changes of white matter were not found at the first day of her life. But marked brain atrophy and low density changes of white matter were found after three months. We propose that CT examination should be repeated from early stage to clarify the pathogenesis of F-CMD. (AUTHOR)

  19. Learning about Myotonic Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How is myotonic dystrophy diagnosed? What is the treatment for myotonic dystrophy? Is myotonic dystrophy inherited? NHGRI Clinical Research on Myotonic Dystrophy Additional Resources on Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy What is myotonic dystrophy? Myotonic dystrophy is ...

  20. 早发型帕金森病DJ-1基因突变的分析%THE MUTATIONAL ANALYSIS OF DJ-1 GENE IN PATIENTS WITH AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE EARLY-ONSET PARKINSON'S DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁志刚; 罗曙光; 窦霄云; 华荣; 谭建强; 胡启平; 马军; 方玲; 舒伟

    2009-01-01

    目的:分析广西地区早发型帕金森病(Parkinsion's disease,PD)患者及常染色体隐性遗传早发型帕金森病(autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinsion's disease,AREP)家系患者DJ-1基因外显子的突变特点,探讨DJ-1基因外显子的突变与广西地区PD关系.方法:应用聚合酶链式反应(PCR)、单链构象多态性(SSCP)及DNA测序等技术查找DJ-1基因缺失突变及点突变.结果:45例早发型散发性PD患者和12例分别来自5个常染色体隐性遗传早发型PD家系的DJ-1基因的2~7号外显子全部被成功扩增,未见大片段缺失.产物经SSCP方法和测序检测,未见点突变与缺失突变.结论:DJ-1基因的突变不是广西地区早发型PD患者的发病的危险因素.

  1. Exome sequencing identifies a founder frameshift mutation in an alternative exon of USH1C as the cause of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa with late-onset hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Khateb

    Full Text Available We used a combined approach of homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing (WES to search for the genetic cause of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP in families of Yemenite Jewish origin. Homozygosity mapping of two arRP Yemenite Jewish families revealed a few homozygous regions. A subsequent WES analysis of the two index cases revealed a shared homozygous novel nucleotide deletion (c.1220delG leading to a frameshift (p.Gly407Glufs*56 in an alternative exon (#15 of USH1C. Screening of additional Yemenite Jewish patients revealed a total of 16 homozygous RP patients (with a carrier frequency of 0.008 in controls. Funduscopic and electroretinography findings were within the spectrum of typical RP. While other USH1C mutations usually cause Usher type I (including RP, vestibular dysfunction and congenital deafness, audiometric screening of 10 patients who are homozygous for c.1220delG revealed that patients under 40 years of age had normal hearing while older patients showed mild to severe high tone sensorineural hearing loss. This is the first report of a mutation in a known USH1 gene that causes late onset rather than congenital sensorineural hearing loss. The c.1220delG mutation of USH1C accounts for 23% of RP among Yemenite Jewish patients in our cohort.

  2. Congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy with progressive sensorineural deafness (Harboyan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramowicz Marc

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Harboyan syndrome is a degenerative corneal disorder defined as congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy (CHED accompanied by progressive, postlingual sensorineural hearing loss. To date, 24 cases from 11 families of various origin (Asian Indian, South American Indian, Sephardi Jewish, Brazilian Portuguese, Dutch, Gypsy, Moroccan, Dominican have been reported. More than 50% of the reported cases have been associated with parental consanguinity. The ocular manifestations in Harboyan syndrome include diffuse bilateral corneal edema occurring with severe corneal clouding, blurred vision, visual loss and nystagmus. They are apparent at birth or within the neonatal period and are indistinguishable from those characteristic of the autosomal recessive CHED (CHED2. Hearing deficit in Harboyan is slowly progressive and typically found in patients 10–25 years old. There are no reported cases with prelinglual deafness, however, a significant hearing loss in children as young as 4 years old has been detected by audiometry, suggesting that hearing may be affected earlier, even at birth. Harboyan syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC4A11 gene located at the CHED2 locus on chromosome 20p13-p12, indicating that CHED2 and Harboyan syndrome are allelic disorders. A total of 62 different SLC4A11 mutations have been reported in 98 families (92 CHED2 and 6 Harboyan. All reported cases have been consistent with autosomal recessive transmission. Diagnosis is based on clinical criteria, detailed ophthalmological assessment and audiometry. A molecular confirmation of the clinical diagnosis is feasible. A variety of genetic, metabolic, developmental and acquired diseases presenting with clouding of the cornea should be considered in the differential diagnosis (Peters anomaly, sclerocornea, limbal dermoids, congenital glaucoma. Audiometry must be performed to differentiate Harboyan syndrome from CHED2. Autosomal recessive types of CHED (CHED2 and

  3. Muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CPK level Genetic testing for some forms of muscular dystrophy Treatment There are no known cures for the various muscular dystrophies. The goal of treatment is to control symptoms. Physical therapy may help ...

  4. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a group of more than 30 inherited diseases. They all cause muscle weakness and ... ability to walk. There is no cure for muscular dystrophy. Treatments can help with the symptoms and prevent ...

  5. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 (DM1) . The International Myotonic Dystrophy Consortium (IDMC). Neurology. Mar 28 2000;54(6):1218-1221. 5. ... Udd B. Distal muscular dystrophies. Handbook of clinical neurology. 2011;101:239-262. 4. Nonaka I. Distal ...

  6. Familial megacalyces with autosomal recessive inheritance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three children with bilateral congenital megacalyces from a consanguinous marriage are reported. No renal abnormality was detected in the parents. Our observation supports the genetic nature of the disease. The ultrasonographic features of congenital megacalyces are described. (orig.)

  7. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive primary microcephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are the most common cause of the disorder, accounting for about half of all cases. The genes ... 7 ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (7 links) ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive congenital methemoglobinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In type II, growth is often slowed. Abnormal facial muscle movements can interfere with swallowing, which can lead ... recessive congenital methemoglobinemia type I typically reduce enzyme activity or stability. As a result, the enzyme cannot ...

  9. Mutation analysis of genes associated with autosomal recessive in early-onset parkinsonism%常染色体隐性遗传早发性帕金森综合征致病基因的突变分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严新翔; 曹立; 沈璐; 江泓; 赵国华; 唐北沙; 张玉虎; 郭纪锋; 李静; 夏昆; 蔡芳; 潘乾; 龙志高; 陈涛

    2005-01-01

    目的研究常染色体隐性遗传早发性帕金森综合征(autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism,AREP)parkin、PINK1及DJ-1基因的突变.方法应用聚合酶链反应、DNA直接测序和限制性核酸内切酶酶切等技术对15个AREP家系进行parkin、PINK1及DJ-1基因的突变分析.结果在3个家系中发现parkin基因3个杂合突变,分别为202-203delAG和新发现的1069-1074delGTGTCC与T1422C突变.在2个家系中发现2个新的PINK1基因突变,分别为C938T及C1474T.未见DJ-1基因突变.3个PARK2家系平均发病年龄(25.2±5.7)岁,临床上肌张力障碍、姿势不稳、腱反射活跃、症状晨轻暮重常见,对多巴制剂反应好,左旋多巴诱导的运动障碍常见;2个PARK6家系平均发病年龄(25.8±10.0)岁,临床特征与PARK2相似,但未见肌张力障碍、姿势不稳及左旋多巴诱导的运动障碍.结论 parkin、PINK1基因突变是AREP的常见病因;DJ-1在我国AREP中可能罕见;PARK2和PARK6具有相似临床表现,但均具有临床异质性.

  10. Late-onset Pompe disease with phenotype of the limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Kurbatov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease, also known as type II glycogenosis, is a rare autosomal recessive disease. Two main types include early-onset Pompe disease – severe, rapidly progressive multisystem deficency, manifestating on the first year of life, and late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD, with the age of onset ranging from the first year till late adulthood. Both types are caused by the deficiency of lysosomal acid-α-glucosidase due to the mutations in GAA gene, leading to an excessive storage of glycogen in body cells. LOPD is a slowly progressive disease with a primary lesion of a skeletal, respiratory and cardiac muscles, affected in different grade, and moderately elevated сreatine kinase. It is often difficult to perform differential diagnosis with a large group of hereditary and non-hereditary myopathies. We present a case report of LOPD with signs of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

  11. Pregnancy and delivery in Leyden-Möbius muscular dystrophy. Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavrinkova, Blanka; Binder, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Leyden-Möbius muscular dystrophy is an autosomal recessive hereditary disease of unknown aetiology; it is a congenital disorder of protein metabolism primarily affecting proximal muscle groups leading to progressive muscular dystrophy. It later spreads to the muscles of the pelvic floor and lower extremities. The estimated incidence is 1:200,000. This paper describe a case of pregnancy and delivery in woman with progressive Leyden-Moebius muscular dystrophy. Cesarean section was performed due to progression of the underlying disease. First postoperative day DIC occure and surgical revision of abdominal cavity was performed. Although the uterine suture was strong, diffuse bleeding was present. Blood was not coagulating. Supravaginal amputation of the uterus was performed including left-sided adnexectomy due to bleeding from the left ovarium. Due to the severity of the condition and assumed necessity of long-term controlled ventilation, the patient was transferred to the intensive medicine department. She was dismissed home after 91 days of hospitalisation. Gravidity in advanced muscular dystrophy is rare and associated with a high risk. Due to muscle weakness, diaphragm weakness, atrophy of individual muscle groups, spine deformities and often dislocation of thoracic organs, these patients cannot avoid the caesarean section to end their pregnancy, followed by prolonged intubation and controlled ventilation. During pregnancy, the growing uterus elevates the diaphragm and impairs breathing. Therefore, pregnancies in such patients will probably always have to be ended prematurely. PMID:26313391

  12. Mild and severe muscular dystrophy caused by a single {gamma}-sarcoglycan mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, E.M.; Boennemann, C.G.; Lidov, H.G.W. [Brigham and Women`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    Autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy is genetically heterogeneous. One form of this disorder, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C (LGMD 2C), is prevalent in northern Africa and has been shown to be associated with a single mutation in the gene encoding the dystrophin-associated protein {gamma}-sarcoglycan. The previous mutation analysis of {gamma}-sarcoglycan required the availability of muscle biopsies. To establish a mutation assay for genomic DNA, the intron-exon structure of the {gamma}-sarcoglycan gene was determined, and primers were designed to amplify each of the exons encoding {gamma}-sarcoglycan. We studied a group of Brazilian muscular dystrophy patients for mutations in the {gamma}-sarcoglycan gene. These patients were selected on the basis of autosomal inheritance and/or the presence of normal dystrophin and/or deficiency of {alpha}-sarcoglycan immunostaining. Four of 19 patients surveyed had a single, homozygous mutation in the {gamma}-sarcoglycan gene. The mutation identified in these patients, all of African-Brazilian descent, is identical to that seen in the North African population, suggesting that even patients of remote African descent may carry this mutation. The phenotype in these patients varied considerably. Of four families with an identical mutation, three have a severe Duchenne-like muscular dystrophy. However, one family has much milder symptoms, suggesting that other loci may be present that modify the severity of the clinical course resulting from {gamma}-sarcoglycan gene mutations. 19 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Late-onset Stargardt-like macular dystrophy maps to chromosome 1p13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, J.; Gerber, S.; Rozet, J.M. [Hopital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Stargardt`s disease (MIM 248200), originally described in 1909, is an autosomal recessive condition of childhood, characterized by a sudden and bilateral loss of central vision. Typically, it has an early onset (7 to 12 years), a rapidly progressive course and a poor final outcome. The central area of the retina (macula) displays pigmentary changes in a ring form with depigmentation and atrophy of the retinal pigmentary epithelium (RPE). Perimacular yellowish spots, termed fundus flavimaculatus, are observed in a high percentage of patients. We have recently reported the genetic mapping of Stargardt`s disease to chromosome 1p13. On the other hand, considering that fundus flavimaculatus (MIM 230100) is another form of fleck fundus disease, with a Stargardt-like retinal aspect but with a late-onset and a more progressive course, we decided to test the hypothesis of allelism between typical Stargardt`s disease and late-onset autosomal recessive fundus flavimaculatus. Significant pairwise lod scores were obtained in each of four multiplex families (11 affected individuals, 12 relatives) with four markers of the 1p13 region (Z = 4.79, 4.64, 3.07, 3.16 at loci D1S435, D1S424, D1S236, and D1S415, respectively at {theta} = 0). Multipoint analysis showed that the best estimate for location of the disease gene is between D1S424 and D1S236 (maximum lod score of 5.20) as also observed in Stargardt`s disease. Our results are consistent with the location of the gene responsible of the late-onset Stargardt-like macular dystrophy in the 1p13 region and raise the hypothesis of either allelic mutational events or contiguous genes in this chromosomal region. The question of possible relationship with some age-related macular dystrophies in now open to debate.

  14. Homozygosity for a missense mutation in the 67 kDa isoform of glutamate decarboxylase in a family with autosomal recessive spastic cerebral palsy: parallels with Stiff-Person Syndrome and other movement disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods C Geoffrey

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral palsy (CP is an heterogeneous group of neurological disorders of movement and/or posture, with an estimated incidence of 1 in 1000 live births. Non-progressive forms of symmetrical, spastic CP have been identified, which show a Mendelian autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. We recently described the mapping of a recessive spastic CP locus to a 5 cM chromosomal region located at 2q24-31.1, in rare consanguineous families. Methods Here we present data that refine this locus to a 0.5 cM region, flanked by the microsatellite markers D2S2345 and D2S326. The minimal region contains the candidate gene GAD1, which encodes a glutamate decarboxylase isoform (GAD67, involved in conversion of the amino acid and excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate to the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA. Results A novel amino acid mis-sense mutation in GAD67 was detected, which segregated with CP in affected individuals. Conclusions This result is interesting because auto-antibodies to GAD67 and the more widely studied GAD65 homologue encoded by the GAD2 gene, are described in patients with Stiff-Person Syndrome (SPS, epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia and Batten disease. Further investigation seems merited of the possibility that variation in the GAD1 sequence, potentially affecting glutamate/GABA ratios, may underlie this form of spastic CP, given the presence of anti-GAD antibodies in SPS and the recognised excitotoxicity of glutamate in various contexts. Table 4 GAD1 single nucleotide substitutions detected on mutation analysis and occurring in sequences submitted to NCBI SNP database and in the literature. This is not a definitive list, but includes those described at the time of the mutational analysis. *Nucleotide positions were not provided by Maestrini et al. [47]. Source SNP position in mRNA, from the translational start site (bp Gene position of SNP(bp Amino acid change (ALappalainen et al. (2002 A(-478Del Exon

  15. Becker muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other family members have been diagnosed with Becker muscular dystrophy Prevention Genetic counseling may be advised if there is a family history of Becker muscular dystrophy. Alternative Names Benign pseudohypertrophic muscular dystrophy; Becker's dystrophy ...

  16. Homozygosity mapping reveals novel and known mutations in Pakistani families with inherited retinal dystrophies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqib, Muhammad Arif Nadeem; Nikopoulos, Konstantinos; Ullah, Ehsan; Sher Khan, Falak; Iqbal, Jamila; Bibi, Rabia; Jarral, Afeefa; Sajid, Sundus; Nishiguchi, Koji M.; Venturini, Giulia; Ansar, Muhammad; Rivolta, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous. This extensive heterogeneity poses a challenge when performing molecular diagnosis of patients, especially in developing countries. In this study, we applied homozygosity mapping as a tool to reduce the complexity given by genetic heterogeneity and identify disease-causing variants in consanguineous Pakistani pedigrees. DNA samples from eight families with autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies were subjected to genome wide homozygosity mapping (seven by SNP arrays and one by STR markers) and genes comprised within the detected homozygous regions were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. All families displayed consistent autozygous genomic regions. Sequence analysis of candidate genes identified four previously-reported mutations in CNGB3, CNGA3, RHO, and PDE6A, as well as three novel mutations: c.2656C > T (p.L886F) in RPGRIP1, c.991G > C (p.G331R) in CNGA3, and c.413-1G > A (IVS6-1G > A) in CNGB1. This latter mutation impacted pre-mRNA splicing of CNGB1 by creating a -1 frameshift leading to a premature termination codon. In addition to better delineating the genetic landscape of inherited retinal dystrophies in Pakistan, our data confirm that combining homozygosity mapping and candidate gene sequencing is a powerful approach for mutation identification in populations where consanguineous unions are common. PMID:25943428

  17. Cone Dystrophy in Patient with Homozygous RP1L1 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Kikuchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether an autosomal recessive cone dystrophy was caused by a homozygous RP1L1 mutation. A family including one subject affected with cone dystrophy and four unaffected members without evidence of consanguinity underwent detailed ophthalmic evaluations. The ellipsoid and interdigitation zones on the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images were disorganized in the proband. The proband had a reduced amplitude of cone and flicker full-field electroretinograms (ERGs. Focal macular ERGs and multifocal ERGs were severely reduced in the proband. A homozygous RP1L1 mutation (c.3628T>C, p.S1210P was identified in the proband. Family members who were heterozygous for the p.S1210P mutation had normal visual acuity and normal results of clinical evaluations. To investigate other putative pathogenic variant(s, a next-generation sequencing (NGS approach was applied to the proband. NGS identified missense changes in the heterozygous state of the PCDH15, RPGRIP1, and GPR98 genes. None of these variants cosegregated with the phenotype and were predicted to be benign reinforcing the putative pathogenicity of the RP1L1 homozygous mutation. The AO images showed a severe reduction of the cone density in the proband. Our findings indicate that a homozygous p.S1210P exchange in the RP1L1 gene can cause cone dystrophy.

  18. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is no cure for muscular dystrophy. Treatments can help with the symptoms and prevent complications. They include physical and speech therapy, orthopedic devices, surgery, and medications. Some people with ...

  19. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy and Miyoshi myopathy in an aboriginal Canadian kindred map to LGMD2B and segregate with the same haplotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiler, T.; Nylen, E.; Wrogemann, K. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    We report the results of our investigations of a large, inbred, aboriginal Canadian kindred with nine muscular dystrophy patients. The ancestry of all but two of the carrier parents could be traced to a founder couple, seven generations back. Seven patients presented with proximal myopathy consistent with limb girdle-type muscular dystrophy (LGMD), whereas two patients manifested predominantly distal wasting and weakness consistent with Miyoshi myopathy (distal autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy) (MM). Age at onset of symptoms, degree of creatine kinase elevation, and muscle histology were similar in both phenotypes. Segregation of LGMD/MM is consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance, and the putative locus is significantly linked (LOD scores >3.0) to six marker loci that span the region of the LGMD2B locus on chromosome 2p. Our initial hypothesis that the affected patients would all be homozygous by descent for microsatellite markers surrounding the disease locus was rejected. Rather, two different core haplotypes, encompassing a 4-cM region spanned by D2S291-D2S145-D2S286, segregated with the disease, indicating that there are two mutant alleles of independent origin in this kindred. There was no association, however, between the two different haplotypes and clinical variability; they do not distinguish between the LGMD and MM phenotypes. Thus, we conclude that LGMD and MM in our population are caused by the same mutation in LGMD2B and that additional factors, both genetic and nongenetic, must contribute to the clinical phenotype. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. A prospective study on the immunophenotypic characterization of limb girdle muscular dystrophies 2 in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atchayaram Nalini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this prospective study conducted over 2 years, 300 nonconsecutive cases of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies (AR-LGMD were characterized, based on phenotypic features, biochemical findings, electrophysiological studies, muscle immunohistochemistry (IHC, and western blot (WB analysis. Methods: Muscle biopsy was performed in 280 index cases. 226 biopsies were subjected for IHC, and, 176 of these for WB analysis. Results: A total of 246 patients were finally analyzed. This figure included 20 affected siblings. LGMD2B was the most common form and comprised of 33.3% (n = 82 of the entire cohort. This was followed by alpha-dystroglycanopathies with 61 (24.79% patients (LGMD2I in 15, 2K in 10 and combined deficiency of both in the remaining. LGMD 2C-F was present in 35 (14.23% cases and LGMD2A in 22 (10.2% cases, and were identified by routine WB, densitometry method and autocatalytic assay. LGMD2G was present in 8 patients (3.25%, and LGMD2H and 2J in 2 cases each, respectively. Conclusions: For the first time, we have identified patients with LGMD2G, 2H, 2I, and 2K by the WB technique. These may be the common forms of autosomal recessive (AR-LGMD′s among Indian patients and need identification for prognostication and appropriate counseling. Although not a nationwide study, our data is sufficient to provide information about the relative proportions of various LGMD2 subtypes in India. Diagnosing LGMD2 based on classical clinical features, IHC and WB is fairly sensitive and specific; however, further genetic studies are required to confirm the diagnosis.

  1. Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leo H; Tawil, Rabi

    2016-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a clinically recognizable and relatively common muscular dystrophy. It is inherited mostly as an autosomal dominant disease or in a minority of cases, in a digenic pattern. The disease manifestation is variable and most likely dependent on genetic and epigenetic factors. We review the history, epidemiology, clinical presentation, and genetics of the disease, present the recently elucidated molecular pathogenesis, discuss the pathology and the possible consequence of the inflammation seen in the muscle biopsies, and consider future treatments. PMID:27215221

  2. New mutations in DYNC2H1 and WDR60 genes revealed by whole-exome sequencing in two unrelated Sardinian families with Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Carla; Incani, Federica; Serra, Maria Luisa; Coiana, Alessandra; Crisponi, Giangiorgio; Boccone, Loredana; Rosatelli, Maria Cristina

    2016-04-01

    Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD; Jeune syndrome, MIM 208500) is a rare autosomal recessive chondrodysplasia, phenotypically overlapping with short-rib polydactyly syndromes (SRPS). JATD typical hallmarks include skeletal abnormalities such as narrow chest, shortened ribs, limbs shortened bones, extra fingers and toes (polydactyly), as well as extraskeletal manifestations (renal, liver and retinal disease). To date, disease-causing mutations have been found in several genes, highlighting a marked genetic heterogeneity that prevents a molecular diagnosis of the disease in most families. Here, we report the results of whole-exome sequencing (WES) carried out in four JATD cases, belonging to three unrelated families of Sardinian origin. The exome analysis allowed to identify mutations not previously reported in the DYNC2H1 (MIM 603297) and WDR60 (MIM 615462) genes, both codifying for ciliary intraflagellar transport components whose mutations are known to cause Jeune syndrome. PMID:26874042

  3. Disease: H00481 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00481 Cone-rod dystrophy and cone dystrophy, including: Cone-rod dystrophy (CORD); Cone dystrop ... Varsanyi B, Hoyng CB, Dollfus H, Heckenlively JR, Rosenberg ... T, Rudolph G, Kellner U, Salati R, Plomp A, De Bae ...

  4. A gene for late-onset fundus flavimaculatus with macular dystrophy maps to chromosome 1p13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S.; Rozet, J.M.; Bonneau, D.; Souied, E.; Camuzat, A.; Munnich, A.; Kaplan, J. [Hopital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Dufier, J.L. [Hopital Laeennec, Paris (France); Amalric, P. [Consultation d`Ophtalmologie, Albi (France); Weissenbach, J. [Genethon, Evry (France)

    1995-02-01

    Fundus flavimaculatus with macular dystrophy is an autosomal recessive disease responsible for a progressive loss of visual acuity in adulthood, with pigmentary changes of the macula, perimacular flecks, and atrophy of the retinal pigmentary epithelium. Since this condition shares several clinical features with Stargardt disease, which has been mapped to chromosome 1p21-p13, we tested the disease for linkage to chromosome 1p. We report the mapping of the disease locus to chromosome 1p13-p21, in the genetic interval defined by loci D1S435 and D1S415, in four multiplex families (maximum lod score 4.79 at recombination fraction 0 for probe AFM217xb2 at locus D1S435). Thus, despite differences in the age at onset, clinical course, and severity, fundus flavimaculatus with macular dystrophy and Stargardt disease are probably allelic disorders. This result supports the view that allelic mutations produce a continuum of macular dystrophies, with onset in early childhood to late adulthood. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Refined mapping of a gene responsible for Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy: Evidence for strong linkage disequilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toda, Tatsushi; Ikegawa, Shiro; Okui, Keiko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kanazawa, Ichiro [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Kondo, Eri; Saito, Kayoko; Fukuyama, Yukio [Tokyo Women`s Medical College (Japan); Yoshioka, Mieko [Kobe General Hospital (Japan); Kumagai, Toshiyuki [Aichi Welfare Center for Persons with Developmental Disabilities, Kasugai (Japan)] [and others

    1994-11-01

    Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), the second most common form of childhood muscular dystrophy in Japan, is an autosomal recessive severe muscular dystrophy associated with an anomaly of the brain. After our initial mapping of the FCMD locus to chromosome 9q31-33, we further defined the locus within a region of {approximately}5 cM between loci D9S127 and CA246, by homozygosity mapping in patients born to consanguineous marriages and by recombination analyses in other families. We also found evidence for strong linkage disequilibrium between FCMD and a polymorphic microsatellite marker, mfd220, which showed no recombination and a lod score of (Z) 17.49. A {open_quotes}111-bp{close_quotes} allele for the mfd220 was observed in 22 (34%) of 64 FCMD chromosomes, but it was present in only 1 of 120 normal chromosomes. This allelic association with FCMD was highly significant ({chi}{sup 2} = 50.7; P < .0001). Hence, we suspect that the FCMD gene could lie within a few hundred kilobases of the mfd220 locus. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Deficiency of merosin in dystrophic dy mouse homologue of congenital muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunada, Y.; Campbell, K.P. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Bernier, S.M. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Merosin (laminin M chain) is the predominant laminin isoform in the basal lamina of striated muscle and peripheral nerve and is a native ligand for {alpha}-dystroglycan, a novel laminin receptor. Merosin is linked to the subsarcolemmal actin cytoskeleton via the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC), which plays an important role for maintenance of normal muscle function. We have mapped the mouse merosin gene, Lamm, to the region containing the dystrophia muscularis (dy) locus on chromosome 10. This suggested the possibility that a mutation in the merosin gene could be responsible for the dy mouse, an animal model for autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy, and prompted us to test this hypothesis. We analyzed the status of merosin expression in dy mouse by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. In dy mouse skeletal and cardiac muscle and peripheral nerve, merosin was reduced greater than 90% as compared to control mice. However, the expression of laminin B1/B2 chains and collagen type IV was smaller to that in control mice. These findings strongly suggest that merosin deficiency may be the primary defect in the dy mouse. Furthermore, we have identified two patients afflicted with congenital muscular dystrophy with merosin deficiency, providing the basis for future studies of molecular pathogenesis and gene therapy.

  7. Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Difference How to Get Involved Donate Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy (MMD) Share print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy (MMD) What is myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD)? Myotonic ...

  8. A possible heterozygous advantage in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, A E H

    2016-01-01

    In certain autosomal recessive disorders there is suggestive evidence that heterozygous carriers may have some selective advantage over normal homozygotes. These include, for example, cystic fibrosis, Tay-Sachs disease and phenylketonuria. The best example so far, however, is that of significant heterozygous advantage in sickle-cell anaemia with increased resistance to falciparum malaria. PMID:27245530

  9. TH gene mutation in Chinese patients with autosomal recessive dopa-responsive dystonia%中国人常染色体隐性遗传性多巴反应性肌张力障碍TH基因突变分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘威; 唐北沙; 曹贵方; 陈涛; 李海燕

    2004-01-01

    目的研究中国人常染色体隐性遗传性(autosomal recessive,AR)多巴反应性肌张力障碍(dopa-responsive dystonia, DRD)患者酪氨酸羟化酶(tyrosine hydroxylase,TH)基因的突变特点.方法应用聚合酶链反应-单链构象多态性技术和DNA序列分析方法对5个AR-DRD家系的先证者和两例散发DRD患者进行TH基因突变分析. 结果 TH基因第1~2、5~11、13~14外显子的扩增产物未见异常电泳条带,DNA直接测序TH基因的第3、4、12外显子,结果未发现异常.结论 TH基因在中国人AR-DRD家系中突变率不高,提示我国AR-DRD患者具有遗传异质性,可能存在新的致病基因.

  10. Mutation analysis of DJ1 gene in patients with autosomal recessive early- onset Parkinsonism%常染色体隐性遗传性早发型帕金森综合征DJ1基因突变研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭纪锋; 严新翔; 曹立; 唐北沙; 张玉虎; 夏昆; 蔡芳; 潘乾; 沈璐; 江泓; 赵国华

    2005-01-01

    目的探讨常染色体隐性遗传性早发型帕金森综合征(autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinsonism,AR-EP)DJ1基因的突变特点.方法应用聚合酶链反应结合DNA直接序列分析方法,对11个常染色体隐性遗传性早发型帕金森综合征家系先证者的DJ1基因进行突变研究.结果本组AR-EP患者未发现DJ1基因的致病突变,在内含子区发现6个多态,分别为IVS1-15T→C、IVS4+30T→G、IVS4+45G→A、IVS4+46G→A、IVS5+31G→A和g.168-185del,其中3个(IVS1-15T→C、IVS4+45G→A、IVS4+46C→A)为新发现的多态.结论中国人常染色体隐性遗传性早发型帕金森综合征患者DJ1基因突变可能罕见.

  11. 三个常染色体隐性遗传早发型帕金森病家系的PARKIN基因研究%A study on PARKIN gene in three pedigrees with autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金淼; 焦劲松; 顾卫红; 王康; 邹海强; 陈彪; 王国相

    2005-01-01

    目的探讨PARKIN基因与中国人常染色体隐性遗传早发型帕金森病(autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson's disease, AREP)家系的关系.方法对3个AREP家系的6例患者和23位成员进行系统的临床检查并进行PARKIN基因PCR扩增,产物通过变性高压液相色谱(denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, DHPLC)进行突变检测,阳性结果标本进行基因测序.结果所有研究对象的PARKIN基因外显子均扩增成功.DHPLC检测和基因测序发现一个家系中存在PARKIN基因杂合Gly284Arg突变,另一个家系中存在PARKIN基因Ser167Asn多态性,且患者均有环境毒物接触史.结论 PARKIN基因杂合Gly284Arg突变在环境因素的协同作用下可能导致发病.PARKIN基因Ser167Asn多态性是帕金森病的易感因素,汞中毒与其共同作用可能导致发病.

  12. Report of limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2a in 6 Iranian patients, one with a novel deletion in CAPN3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaee, Mahsa; Kariminejad, Ariana; Fattahi, Zohreh; Nafissi, Shahriar; Godarzi, Hamed Reza; Beheshtian, Maryam; Vazehan, Raheleh; Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Kahrizi, Kimia; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Calpain3 is a calcium-dependent intracellular protease involved in an autosomal recessive form of muscular dystrophy known as limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A. Many pathogenic mutations have been identified in calpain3, encoded by the CAPN3 gene, which leads to weakness of the pelvic and shoulder girdle muscles. In the present study, whole exome sequencing was performed on six unrelated Iranian families who presented with progressive muscle weakness, with a strong suspicion of Calpainopathies. Genetic analysis of CAPN3 gene revealed five causative variants which had not been reported in the Iranian population before including a novel 6 bp deletion (c.795_800delCATTGA) and four previously reported mutations (c.1939G > T, c.2243G > A, c.2257delGinsAA, and c.2380 + 2T > G). Our findings indicate that exome sequencing can be a very effective and affordable method to diagnose heterogeneous muscular dystrophies, especially in consanguineous populations such as Iran. PMID:27020652

  13. Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy: a late-onset polyalanine disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brais, B

    2003-01-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a muscle disease of late onset associated with progressive ptosis of the eyelids, dysphagia, and unique tubulofilamentous intranuclear inclusions (INIs). OPMD is usually transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait (OMIM 164300). A rarer allelic autosomal recessive form has also been observed (OMIM 257950). Both forms are caused by short (GCG)8-13 expansions in the polyadenylate-binding protein nuclear 1 gene (PABPN1) located on chromosome 14q11.1. The mutations cause the lengthening of an N-terminal polyalanine domain. Both slippage and unequal recombination have been proposed as the mutation mechanisms. The size of the mutation has not yet been conclusively shown to inversely correlate with the severity of the phenotype. Mutated PABPN1 proteins have been shown to be constituents of the INIs. The INIs also contain ubiquitin, proteasome subunits, HSP 40, HSP 70, SKIP, and abundant poly(A)-mRNA. The exact mechanism responsible for polyalanine toxicity in OPMD is unknown. Various intranuclear inclusion dependent and independent mechanisms have been proposed based on the major known function of PABPN1 in polyadenylation of mRNA and its shuttling from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. OPMD is one of the few triplet-repeat diseases for which the function of the mutated gene is known. Because of the increasing number of diseases caused by polyalanine expansions and the pathological overlap with CAG/polyglutamine diseases, what pathological insight is gained by the study of OPMD could lead to a better understanding of a much larger group of developmental and degenerative diseases. PMID:14526187

  14. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy in Brazilian children: clinical, histological and molecular characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. Veloso Albuquerque

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD are a heterogeneous group of genetic muscular dystrophies, involving 16 autosomal recessive subtypes and eight autosomal dominant subtypes. Autosomal recessive dystrophy is far more common than autosomal dominant dystrophy, particularly in children. The clinical course in this group is characterized by progressive proximal weakness, initially in pelvic and after in shoulder-girdle musculature, varying from very mild to severe degree. Significant overlap of clinical phenotypes, with genetic and clinical heterogeneity, constitutes the rule for this group of diseases. Muscle biopsies are useful for histopathologic and immunolabeling studies, and DNA analysis is the gold standard to establish the specific form of muscular dystrophy. Objectives: The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical, histological and molecular aspects in children with LGMD who attend a big public neuromuscular centre in our country to determine the frequency of different forms. Method: Thirty seven patients were classified as LGMD and included in this analysis. The study period extended from 2009-2012. The female to male ratio was 3:1. The age of onset ranged from two to 13 years, mean 7,5 years. Onset in the first decade was seen in 90%. Results: The initial clinical signs included: frequent falls (22 cases, difficulty in climbing stairs (13 cases, walk on tip toes (2 cases, difficulty in rising from the floor (2 cases and difficulty on walking (1 case. The serum CK levels were high in all cases. Among the 37 patients, 15 (40,5% were classified as sarcoglycanopathies (LGMD2C-F, five (13,5% as dysferlinopathy (LGMD2B, five (13,5% as calpainopathy (LGMD2A. Mutations in LMNA gene (LGMD1B, FKRP gene (LGMDI and caveolin gene (LGMD 1C were identified in two (5,5%, two (5,5% and one patient (2,5%, respectively. In seven of 37 cases (19% it was impossible to determine specific diagnosis. Calf hypertrophy, scapular winging and scoliosis

  15. Muscular Dystrophy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 26.2 Miles For a Cure: Runner With Muscular Dystrophy Joins Team Momentum Ahead of Chicago Marathon Michelle ... FAQs Media Careers Contact Us Connect with MDA Muscular Dystrophy Association USA National Office 222 S. Riverside Plaza, Suite ...

  16. Clinical spectrum of early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes: an autosomal recessive ataxia not to be missed Espectro clínico da ataxia cerebelar de início precoce com reflexos mantidos: uma ataxia autossômica recessiva para não ser esquecida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Pedroso

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias are a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders. In 1981, a neurological entity comprised by early onset progressive cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, pyramidal weakness of the limbs and retained or increased upper limb reflexes and knee jerks was described. This disorder is known as early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes. In this article, we aimed to call attention for the diagnosis of early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes as the second most common cause of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias, after Friedreich ataxia, and also to perform a clinical spectrum study of this syndrome. In this data, 12 patients from different families met all clinical features for early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes. Dysarthria and cerebellar atrophy were the most common features in our sample. It is uncertain, however, whether early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes is a homogeneous disease or a group of phenotypically similar syndromes represented by different genetic entities. Further molecular studies are required to provide definitive answers to the questions that remain regarding early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes.As ataxias cerebelares autossômicas recessivas são um grupo heterogêneo de doenças neurológicas. Em 1981, foi descrita uma entidade neurológica incluindo ataxia cerebelar progressiva de início precoce, disartria, liberação piramidal e manutenção ou aumento dos reflexos tendíneos nos membros superiores e inferiores. Essa síndrome é conhecida como ataxia cerebelar de início precoce com reflexos mantidos. Neste artigo, o objetivo foi chamar a atenção para o diagnóstico de ataxia cerebelar de início precoce com reflexos mantidos como a segunda causa mais comum de ataxia cerebelar autossômica recessiva, após a ataxia de Friedreich, e também realizar um estudo do espectro cl

  17. DJ-1 gene rearrangement mutation in patients with autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism using real-time PCR%应用实时荧光定量PCR技术检测常染色体隐性遗传性早发型帕金森综合征的DJ-1基因外显子重排突变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海南; 肖彬; 聂利珞; 郭纪锋; 王春喻; 王磊; 何丹; 严新翔; 唐北沙

    2010-01-01

    目的:建立应用实时荧光定量PCR技术(real-time polymerase chain reaction,real-time PCR)检测DJ-1基因外显子重排突变的技术平台,并应用该技术对常染色体隐性遗传性早发型帕金森综合征(autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinsonism, AREP)DJ-1基因进行外显子重排突变分析.方法:应用实时荧光定量PCR分析方法,对22个AREP家系先证者和30个正常对照的DJ-1基因进行外显子重排突变分析.结果:本研究中获得了扩增效率和特异性均满意的DJ-1基因各编码外显子实时荧光定量PCR反应条件及各外显子引物;本组AREP患者未发现DJ-1基因的外显子重排突变.结论:建立了应用实时荧光定量PCR技术进行DJ-1基因外显子重排突变检测的技术平台;中国人群AREP患者DJ-1基因外显子重排突变可能罕见.

  18. Muscular Dystrophy (MD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Muscular Dystrophy Information Page Clinical Trials Finding the Optimum Regimen ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Muscular Dystrophy? The muscular dystrophies (MD) are a group of ...

  19. Genetic basis of limb-girdle muscular dystrophies: the 2014 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Vincenzo; Savarese, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a highly heterogeneous group of muscle disorders, which first affect the voluntary muscles of the hip and shoulder areas. The definition is highly descriptive and less ambiguous by exclusion: non-Xlinked, non-FSH, non-myotonic, non-distal, nonsyndromic, and non-congenital. At present, the genetic classification is becoming too complex, since the acronym LGMD has also been used for a number of other myopathic disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Today, the list of genes to be screened is too large for the gene-by-gene approach and it is well suited for targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) panels that should include any gene that has been so far associated with a clinical picture of LGMD. The present review has the aim of recapitulating the genetic basis of LGMD ordering and of proposing a nomenclature for the orphan forms. This is useful given the pace of new discoveries. Thity-one loci have been identified so far, eight autosomal dominant and 23 autosomal recessive. The dominant forms (LGMD1) are: LGMD1A (myotilin), LGMD1B (lamin A/C), LGMD1C (caveolin 3), LGMD1D (DNAJB6), LGMD1E (desmin), LGMD1F (transportin 3), LGMD1G (HNRPDL), LGMD1H (chr. 3). The autosomal recessive forms (LGMD2) are: LGMD2A (calpain 3), LGMD2B (dysferlin), LGMD2C (γ sarcoglycan), LGMD2D (α sarcoglycan), LGMD2E (β sarcoglycan), LGMD2F (δ sarcoglycan), LGMD2G (telethonin), LGMD2H (TRIM32), LGMD2I (FKRP), LGMD2J (titin), LGMD2K (POMT1), LGMD2L (anoctamin 5), LGMD2M (fukutin), LGMD2N (POMT2), LGMD2O (POMTnG1), LGMD2P (dystroglycan), LGMD2Q (plectin), LGMD2R (desmin), LGMD2S (TRAPPC11), LGMD2T (GMPPB), LGMD2U (ISPD), LGMD2V (Glucosidase, alpha ), LGMD2W (PINCH2). PMID:24843229

  20. Metabolic Syndrome in Childhood: Rare Case of Alstrom Syndrome with Blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Afzal; D'Souza, Benedicta; Yadav, Charu; Agarwal, Ashish; Kumar, Anand; Nandini, M; D'Souza, Vivian; Poornima, A M; Kamath, Nutan

    2016-10-01

    Alstrom's syndrome (AS) is a rare autosomal recessive ciliopathic condition affecting 1:10,00,000 children. It's a single gene disorder of ALMS1 on chromosome 2 with multisystem involvement with cone-rod retinal dystrophy causing juvenile blindness, obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 Diabetes mellitus, hypogonadism and sensorineural hearing loss. Till now only 800 patients with this disorder has been identified so far. In this report, we describe the case of a 9-year old male boy from south India. He had been initially referred for polyphagia, polyuria, polydipsia, generalized weakness from 1 weeks. On examination he was demonstrated features suggestive of AS, including blindness, obesity, type 2 diabetes, altered lipid profile, hypogonadism, acanthosis nigricans, seborrheic dermatitis, right ear discharge and episodes of respiratory tract infections. So, diagnosis of AS is critical as it can easily be overlooked because of the many features associated with metabolic syndrome starting at age 7, a relatively early age. PMID:27605748

  1. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genet. 2012 Feb 10;90(2):321-30. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2011.12.007. Erratum ... Hum Genet. 2009 Nov;85(5):720-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2009.10.013. Epub ... Hum Genet. 2009 Nov;85(5):711-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2009.10.003. Epub ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neuromyotonia is a disorder that affects the peripheral nerves. Peripheral nerves connect the brain and spinal cord to muscles ... caused by damage to a particular part of peripheral nerves called axons , which are the extensions of nerve ...

  3. Autosomal recessive hypoparathyroidism with renal insufficiency and developmental delay.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, N J; Haigh, D; Lealmann, G T; Karbani, G.; Brocklebank, J. T.; Dillon, M J

    1991-01-01

    Four children (two boys and two girls) with hypoparathyroidism, renal insufficiency, and developmental delay are described. They were the products of consanguineous marriages in three related Asian families presenting over a six year period. All the children died within the first 15 months of life despite treatment. Postmortem examination on one child showed absent parathyroid glands. We believe these children represent a previously undescribed syndrome that appears to be inherited in an auto...

  4. Renal-hepatic-pancreatic dysplasia: an autosomal recessive malformation.

    OpenAIRE

    Torra, R.; Alós, L.; Ramos, J.; Estivill, X

    1996-01-01

    We report two brothers with a cystic malformation of the kidneys, liver, and pancreas. In both cases the malformation was fatal and the children died shortly after birth. The pathological findings, consisting of multicystic dysplastic kidneys, dilated and dysgenetic bile ducts, dilated pancreatic ducts, and polysplenia, correspond to those reported by Ivemark as renal-hepatic-pancreatic dysplasia. Many polymalformation syndromes include cystic affectation of these three organs, so this syndro...

  5. Autosomal recessive limb girdle myasthenia in two sisters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar A

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Limb girdle myasthenic syndromes are rare genetic disorders described under the broad heterogeneous group known as congenital myasthenic syndromes and present with mixed features of myasthenia and myopathy. The familial limb girdle myasthenia has been described as one with selective weakness of pectoral and pelvic girdles, showing a positive response to edrophonium chloride. A report of two sisters affected by this disorder is presented.

  6. TMPRSS3 mutations in autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battelino, Saba; Klancar, Gasper; Kovac, Jernej; Battelino, Tadej; Trebusak Podkrajsek, Katarina

    2016-05-01

    Nonsyndromic genetic deafness is highly heterogeneous in its clinical presentation, pattern of inheritance and underlying genetic causes. Mutations in TMPRSS3 gene encoding transmembrane serine protease account for Slovenia resulting in uniform phenotype with profound congenital hearing loss, and satisfactory hearing and speech recognition outcome after cochlear implantation. Consequently, TMPRSS3 gene analysis should be included in the first tier of genetic investigations of ARNSHL along with GJB2 and GJB6 genes. PMID:26036852

  7. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive hyper-IgE syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with AR-HIES have neurological problems, such as paralysis that affects the face or one side of the body (hemiplegia). Blockage of blood flow in the brain or abnormal bleeding in the brain, both of ...

  8. Sepiapterin reductase deficiency an autosomal recessive DOPA-responsive dystonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.G. Abeling; M. Duran; H.D. Bakker; L. Stroomer; B. Thony; N. Blau; J. Booij; B.T. Poll-The

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of a 14-year-old girl with a new homoallelic mutation in the sepiapterin reductase (SR) gene is reported. Initially she presented at the age of 2 with hypotonia and mild cognitive developmental delay, and was diagnosed as having mild methylmalonic aciduria, which was recently identifie

  9. Autosomal recessive, early-onset Parkinson’s disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Bonifati (Vincenzo)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractParkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer’s disease, with a prevalence of 1-2% in the population aged 65 years.1 The disease is clinically defi ned by the presence of parkinsonism (the combination of akinesia, resting tremor, and muscul

  10. Autosomal recessive, early-onset Parkinson’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bonifati, Vincenzo

    2003-01-01

    textabstractParkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer’s disease, with a prevalence of 1-2% in the population aged 65 years.1 The disease is clinically defi ned by the presence of parkinsonism (the combination of akinesia, resting tremor, and muscular rigidity), and a good response to dopaminergic therapy. These features are associated at pathological level with neuronal loss and gliosis, mainly in the substantia nigra pars compacta but also ...

  11. Distrofia neuroaxonal infantil: relato de dois casos Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROSANA HERMINIA SCOLA

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Descrevemos dois casos de distrofia neuroaxonal infantil ou doença de Seitelberger, que é doença rara, neurodegenerativa, com herança autossômica recessiva. O primeiro caso, sexo masculino, com 8 anos de idade, apresentava atraso do desenvolvimento psicomotor, ataxia e fraqueza muscular. Ao exame físico foi encontrado nistagmo horizontal e vertical com palidez do disco óptico, hipotonia e arreflexia profunda. O segundo caso, sexo masculino, com 1 ano e 6 meses de idade, apresentava atraso do desenvolvimento psicomotor e convulsões. No exame físico, apresentava atrofia de nervo óptico, hipertonia e hiperreflexia. A biópsia de nervo sural de ambos os pacientes mostrou aumento dos axônios, compatível com distrofia neuroaxonal. As características clínicas pleomórficas, bem como os achados neurofisiológicos variáveis tornam difícil firmar o diagnóstico, o qual é ajudado pela confirmação anatomopatológica dos esferóides neuroaxonais.We describe two cases of infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy, which is a rare, neurodegenerative disease, with autosomal recessive inheritance. The first case was an 8 year old boy, with arrested motor and mental development, ataxia and muscle weakness. On physical examination there was horizontal and vertical nystagmus, optic disc atrophy, hypotonia; deep tendon reflexes were absent. The second case was a 1.6 year old boy with arrested motor and mental development, and seizures. On physical examination there was optic atrophy, hypertonia and hyperreflexia. Both patients had on sural nerve biopsy neuronal enlargement, consistent with neuroaxonal dystrophy. Diagnosis without pathological confirmation with neuroaxonal spheroids is very difficult, because the clinical picture is variable and the neurophysiological findings are non specific.

  12. YAC and cosmid contigs encompassing the Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) candidate region on 9q31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, Masashi; Nakahori, Yutaka; Matsushita, Ikumi [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), the second most common form of childhood muscular dystrophy in Japan, is an autosomal recessive severe muscular dystrophy associated with an anomaly of the brain. We had mapped the FCMD gene to an approximately 5-cM interval between D9S127 and D9S2111 on 9q31-q33 and had also found evidence for linkage disequilibrium between FCMD and D9S306 in this candidate region. Through further analysis, we have defined another marker, D9S172, which showed stronger linkage disequilibrium than D9S306. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig spanning 3.5 Mb, which includes this D9S306-D9S172 interval on 9q31, has been constructed by a combination of sequence-tagged site, Alu-PCR, and restriction mapping. Also, cosmid clones subcloned from the YAC were assembled into three contigs, one of which contains D9S2107, which showed the strongest linkage disequilibrium with FCMD. These contigs also allowed us to order the markers as follows: cen-D9S127-({approximately}800 kb)-D9S306 (identical to D9S53)-({approximately}700 kb)-A107XF9-({approximately}500 kb)-D9S172-({approximately}30 kb)-D9S299 (identical to D9S774)-({approximately}120 kb)-WI2269-tel. Thus, we have constructed the first high-resolution physical map of the FCMD candidate region. The YAC and cosmid contigs established here will be a crucial resource for identification of the FCMD gene and other genes in this region. 37 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. FACIOSCAPULOHUMERAL MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

    OpenAIRE

    van der Maarel, Silvère M.; Frants, Rune R; Padberg, George W.

    2008-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a dominantly inherited disorder, is the third most common dystrophy after Duchenne and myotonic muscular dystrophy. No known effective treatments exist for FSHD. The lack of an understanding of the underlying pathophysiology remains an obstacle in the development of targeted therapeutic interventions. The genetic defect is a loss of a critical number of a repetitive element (D4Z4) in the 4q subtelomeric region. The loss of the repeats results in ...

  14. Hypotrichosis and juvenile macular dystrophy caused by CDH3 mutation: A candidate disease for retinal gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mandeep S; Broadgate, Suzanne; Mathur, Ranjana; Holt, Richard; Halford, Stephanie; MacLaren, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Hypotrichosis with juvenile macular dystrophy (HJMD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes childhood visual impairment. HJMD is caused by mutations in CDH3 which encodes cadherin-3, a protein expressed in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells that may have a key role in intercellular adhesion. We present a case of HJMD and analyse its phenotypic and molecular characteristics to assess the potential for retinal gene therapy as a means of preventing severe visual loss in this condition. Longitudinal in vivo imaging of the retina showed the relative anatomical preservation of the macula, which suggested the presence of a therapeutic window for gene augmentation therapy to preserve visual acuity. The coding sequence of CDH3 fits within the packaging limit of recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors that have been shown to be safe in clinical trials and can efficiently target RPE cells. This report expands the number of reported cases of HJMD and highlights the phenotypic characteristics to consider when selecting candidates for retinal gene therapy. PMID:27157923

  15. 应用SYBR GreenⅠ实时荧光定量聚合酶链反应检测常染色体隐性遗传早发性帕金森综合征的parkin基因外显子重排突变%Analysis of exon rearrangements in the parkin gene in patients with autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism using SYBR Green Ⅰ Real-time PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐北沙; 严新翔; 聂利珞; 郭纪锋; 张海南; 张学伟; 王磊; 沈璐; 江泓; 夏昆

    2009-01-01

    目的 建立应用SYBR GreenⅠ实时荧光定量聚合酶链反应(Real-time PCR,RT-PCR)检测parkin基因外显子重排突变的技术平台,应用该技术对常染色体隐性遗传早发型帕金森综合征(autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism,AREP) 家系进行parkin基因外显子重排突变分析.方法 应用SYBR GreenⅠRT-PCR技术对32个中国AREP家系进行parkin基因外显子重排突变分析.结果 14个家系先证者存在parkin基因外显子重排突变,其中3个为纯合缺失突变、3个为复杂杂合缺失突变和8个杂合缺失突变,未发现外显子重复突变,突变主要累及第2~4号外显子.结论 建立了应用SYBR GreenⅠRT-PCR技术检测parkin基因外显子重排突变的基因检测平台;中国AREP 家系的parkin基因外显子重排突变频率为43.8%,与国外报道相似.%Objective To develop a method of detection exon rearrangements in the parkin gene (PARK2) using SYBR Green Ⅰ real-time PCR and to analyze PARK2 exon rearrangement mutations in families with autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism (AREP) using this method. Methods Exon rearrangement in PARK2 was screened by SYBR Green Ⅰ real-time PCR in 32 families with AREP. Results Exon rearrangement mutations were found in 14 families, including 3 compound heterozygous deletions;3 homozygous deletions;and 8 heterozygous deletions. No duplication mutation was found. Hotspot for exon rearrangements clustered in exons 2 through 4. Conclusions We have developed a gene test method using SYBR Green Ⅰ Real-time PCR to detect exon rearrangements in the gene PARK2. The frequency of PARK2 mutation is 43.8% in Chinese families with AREP. This frequency is similar to reported findings in other countries.

  16. Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (UCMD: Clinical and Genetic Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita BOZORGMEHR

    2013-08-01

    Ullrich Syndrome: A Clinical, genetic and Immunohistochemical study. Neurology 2002;58(9:1354-9.5. Lampe AK, Bushby KM. Collagen VI related muscle disorders. J Med Genet 2005;42(9:673-85.6. Mercuri E, Muntoni F. Congenital Muscular Dystrophies. In: Emery AEH, editors. The muscular dystrophies. Oxford: Oxford University Press: 2001. p. 10-38.7. Furukawa T, Toyokura Y. Congenital Hypotonic-Sclerotic muscular dystrophy. J Med Genet 1977;14(6:426-9.8. Nonaka I, Une Y, Ishihara T, Miyoshino S, Nakashima T, Sugita H. A clinical and histological study of Ullrich’s disease (congenital atonic-sclerotic muscular dystrophy. Neuropediatrics 1981; 12(3:197-208.9. Pan TC, Zhang RZ, Sudano DG, Marie SK, Bonnemann CG, Chu ML. New molecular mechanism for Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy: A heterozygous inframe deletion in the COL6A1 gene causes a severe phenotype. Am J Hum Genet 2003;73(2:355-69.10. Baker NL, Morgelin M, Peat R, Goemans N, North KN, Baterman JF, et al. Dominant Collagen VI Mutations are acommon cause of ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. Hum Mol Genet 2005;14(2]:279-93.11. Pace RA, Peat RA, Baker NL, Zamurs L, Morgelin M, Irving M et al. Collagen VI glycine mutations: Perturbed assembly and a spectrum of clinical severity. Ann Neurol 2008;64(3:294-303.12. Bethlem J, Wijngaarden GK. Benign myopathy, with autosomal dominant inheritance. A report on three pedigress. Brain 1976;99(1:91-100.13. Gualandi F, Urciuolo A, Martoni E, Sabatelli P, Squarzoni S, Bovolenta M, et al Auotosomal recessive Bethlem myopath. Neurology 2009;73(22:1883-91.14. Foley AR, Hu Y, Zou Y, Columbus A, Shoffiner J, Dunn DM, et al. Autosomal recessive Bethlam Myopathy. Neuromuscular Disord 2009;19(10:813-7. 

  17. Isolated and Syndromic Retinal Dystrophy Caused by Biallelic Mutations in RCBTB1, a Gene Implicated in Ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppieters, Frauke; Ascari, Giulia; Dannhausen, Katharina; Nikopoulos, Konstantinos; Peelman, Frank; Karlstetter, Marcus; Xu, Mingchu; Brachet, Cécile; Meunier, Isabelle; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K; Tsika, Chrysanthi; Blazaki, Styliani V; Vergult, Sarah; Farinelli, Pietro; Van Laethem, Thalia; Bauwens, Miriam; De Bruyne, Marieke; Chen, Rui; Langmann, Thomas; Sui, Ruifang; Meire, Françoise; Rivolta, Carlo; Hamel, Christian P; Leroy, Bart P; De Baere, Elfride

    2016-08-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (iRDs) are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous conditions resulting from mutations in over 250 genes. Here, homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing (WES) in a consanguineous family revealed a homozygous missense mutation, c.973C>T (p.His325Tyr), in RCBTB1. In affected individuals, it was found to segregate with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), goiter, primary ovarian insufficiency, and mild intellectual disability. Subsequent analysis of WES data in different cohorts uncovered four additional homozygous missense mutations in five unrelated families in whom iRD segregates with or without syndromic features. Ocular phenotypes ranged from typical RP starting in the second decade to chorioretinal dystrophy with a later age of onset. The five missense mutations affect highly conserved residues either in the sixth repeat of the RCC1 domain or in the BTB1 domain. A founder haplotype was identified for mutation c.919G>A (p.Val307Met), occurring in two families of Mediterranean origin. We showed ubiquitous mRNA expression of RCBTB1 and demonstrated predominant RCBTB1 localization in human inner retina. RCBTB1 was very recently shown to be involved in ubiquitination, more specifically as a CUL3 substrate adaptor. Therefore, the effect on different components of the CUL3 and NFE2L2 (NRF2) pathway was assessed in affected individuals' lymphocytes, revealing decreased mRNA expression of NFE2L2 and several NFE2L2 target genes. In conclusion, our study puts forward mutations in RCBTB1 as a cause of autosomal-recessive non-syndromic and syndromic iRD. Finally, our data support a role for impaired ubiquitination in the pathogenetic mechanism of RCBTB1 mutations. PMID:27486781

  18. Evaluation of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-06

    Becker Muscular Dystrophy; Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2A (Calpain-3 Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2B (Miyoshi Myopathy, Dysferlin Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2I (FKRP-deficiency)

  19. Exon rearrangement analysis of parkin gene in patients with autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism using fluorescent semi-quantitative PCR%应用荧光半定量聚合酶链反应方法检测常染色体隐性遗传早发性帕金森综合征parkin基因外显子重排突变分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭纪锋; 蔡芳; 潘乾; 沈璐; 江泓; 唐北沙; 夏昆; 严新翔; 张玉虎; 陈涛; 李静; 张学伟; 曹立

    2006-01-01

    目的探讨常染色体隐性遗传早发性帕金森综合征(autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism,AREP)parkin基因外显子重排突变情况.方法应用荧光半定量聚合酶链反应(PCR)方法对18个AREP家系进行parkin基因外显子重排突变分析.结果9个AREP家系含有parkin基因外显子重排突变,其中2个家系为外显子4纯合缺失,2个家系为外显子4杂合缺失,2个家系为外显子2杂合缺失,1家系为外显子3杂合缺失,1家系为外显子1杂合缺失,此外,1家系为外显子3和外显子4的复合杂合缺失.未见parkin基因外显子重复突变.结论我国AREP患者存在parkin基因外显子重排突变;parkin基因外显子重排突变可能是我国AREP患者的主要致病因素.

  20. Low incidence of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C revealed by a mutation study in Japanese patients clinically diagnosed with DMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruyama Koichi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C (LGMD2C is an autosomal recessive muscle dystrophy that resembles Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Although DMD is known to affect one in every 3500 males regardless of race, a widespread founder mutation causing LGMD2C has been described in North Africa. However, the incidence of LGMD2C in Japanese has been unknown because the genetic background remains uncharacterized in many patients clinically diagnosed with DMD. Methods We enrolled 324 patients referred to the Kobe University Hospital with suspected DMD. Mutations in the dystrophin or the SGCG genes were analyzed using not only genomic DNA but also cDNA. Results In 322 of the 324 patients, responsible mutations in the dystrophin were successfully revealed, confirming DMD diagnosis. The remaining two patients had normal dystrophin expression but absence of γ-sarcoglycan in skeletal muscle. Mutation analysis of the SGCG gene revealed homozygous deletion of exon 6 in one patient, while the other had a novel single nucleotide insertion in exon 7 in one allele and deletion of exon 6 in the other allele. These mutations created a stop codon that led to a γ-sarcoglycan deficiency, and we therefore diagnosed these two patients as having LGMD2C. Thus, the relative incidence of LGMD2C among Japanese DMD-like patients can be calculated as 1 in 161 patients suspected to have DMD (2 of 324 patients = 0.6%. Taking into consideration the DMD incidence for the overall population (1/3,500 males, the incidence of LGMD2C can be estimated as 1 per 560,000 or 1.8 per million. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate a low incidence of LGMD2C in the Japanese population.

  1. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of cases, the parents do not carry the gene. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy affects about 5 out of 100,000 people. ... Treatment There is no ... worse. Physical therapy may help maintain muscle strength. Other possible treatments ...

  2. Downstream effects of plectin mutations in epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Lilli; Türk, Matthias; Harter, Patrick N; Mittelbronn, Michel; Kornblum, Cornelia; Norwood, Fiona; Jungbluth, Heinz; Thiel, Christian T; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Schröder, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the human plectin gene (PLEC) on chromosome 8q24 cause autosomal recessive epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD). In the present study we analyzed the downstream effects of PLEC mutations on plectin protein expression and localization, the structure of the extrasarcomeric desmin cytoskeleton, protein aggregate formation and mitochondrial distribution in skeletal muscle tissue from three EBS-MD patients. PLEC gene analysis in a not previously reported 35-year-old EBS-MD patient with additional disease features of cardiomyopathy and malignant arrhythmias revealed novel compound heterozygous (p.(Phe755del) and p.(Lys1040Argfs*139)) mutations resulting in complete abolition of plectin protein expression. In contrast, the other two patients with different homozygous PLEC mutations showed preserved plectin protein expression with one only expressing rodless plectin variants, and the other markedly reduced protein levels. Analysis of skeletal muscle tissue from all three patients revealed severe disruption of the extrasarcomeric intermediate filament cytoskeleton, protein aggregates positive for desmin, syncoilin, and synemin, degenerative myofibrillar changes, and mitochondrial abnormalities comprising respiratory chain dysfunction and an altered organelle distribution and amount.Our study demonstrates that EBS-MD causing PLEC mutations universally result in a desmin protein aggregate myopathy phenotype despite marked differences in individual plectin protein expression patterns. Since plectin is the key cytolinker protein that regulates the structural and functional organization of desmin filaments, the defective anchorage and spacing of assembled desmin filaments is the key pathogenetic event that triggers the formation of desmin protein aggregates as well as secondary mitochondrial pathology. PMID:27121971

  3. The fatty liver dystrophy (fld) mutation: Developmentally related alterations in hepatic triglyceride metabolism and protein expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reue, K.; Rehnmark, S.; Cohen, R.D.; Leete, T.H.; Doolittle, M.H. [West Los Angeles VA Medical Center, CA (United States). Lipid Research Lab.]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Medicine; Giometti, C.S.; Mishler, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Slavin, B.G. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Fatty liver dystrophy (fld) is an autosomal recessive mutation in mice characterized by hypertriglyceridemia and development of a fatty liver in the early neonatal period. Also associated with the fld phenotype is a tissue-specific deficiency in the expression of lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase, as well as elevations in hepatic apolipoprotein A-IV and apolipoprotein C-II mRNA levels. Although these lipid abnormalities resolve at the age of weaning, adult mutant mice exhibit a peripheral neuropathy associated with abnormal myelin formation. The fatty liver in fld/fld neonates is characterized by the accumulation of large triglyceride droplets within the parenchymal cells, and these droplets persist within isolated hepatocytes maintained in culture for several days. To identify the metabolic defect that leads to lipid accumulation, the authors investigated several aspects of cellular triglyceride metabolism. The mutant mice exhibited normal activity of acid triacylglycerol lipase, an enzyme thought to be responsible for hydrolysis of dietary triglycerides in the liver. Metabolic labeling studies performed with oleic acid revealed that free fatty acids accumulate in the liver of 3 day old fld/fld mice, but not in adults. This accumulation in liver was mirrored by elevated free fatty acid levels in plasma of fld/fld neonates, with levels highest in very young mice and returning to normal by the age of one month. Quantitation of fatty acid oxidation in cells isolated from fld/fld neonates revealed that oxidation rate is reduced 60% in hepatocytes and 40% in fibroblasts; hepatocytes from adult fld/fld mice exhibited an oxidation rate similar to those from wild-type mice.

  4. Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Statland, Jeffrey M; Tawil, Rabi

    2014-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHSD) is one of the most common adult muscular dystrophies and is divided into types 1 and 2 based on genetic mutation. Clinically both FSHD types 1 and 2 demonstrate often asymmetric and progressive muscle weakness affecting initially the face, shoulder, and arms, followed by the distal and then proximal lower extremities later in the disease course. Approximately 95% of patients, termed FSHD1, have a deletion of a key number of repetitive elements on...

  5. Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Yiu Eppie; Kornberg Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an X-linked disorder, is the most common muscular dystrophy in children, presenting in early childhood and characterized by proximal muscle weakness and calf hypertrophy in affected boys. Patients usually become wheelchair-bound by the age of 12 years, and die of cardiorespiratory complications in their late teens to early twenties. Advances in the management of DMD, including treatment with corticosteroids and the use of intermittent positive pressure venti...

  6. How Is Muscular Dystrophy Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How is muscular dystrophy diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content The first step in diagnosing muscular dystrophy (MD) is a visit with a health care ...

  7. Differential immunogold localisation of sulphated and unsulphated keratan sulphate proteoglycans in normal and macular dystrophy cornea using sulphation motif-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert D; Akama, Tomoya O; Liskova, Petra; Ebenezer, Neil D; Allan, Bruce; Kerr, Briedgeen; Caterson, Bruce; Fukuda, Michiko N; Quantock, Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    Keratan sulphate (KS) proteoglycans (PGs) are key molecules in the corneal stroma for tissue organisation and transparency. Macular corneal dystrophy (MCD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disease characterised by disturbances in KS expression. MCD is caused by mutations in CHST6, a gene encoding the enzyme responsible for KS sulphation. Sulphated KS is absent in type I disease causing corneal opacity and loss of vision. Genetic studies have highlighted the mutational heterogeneity in MCD, but supportive immunohistochemical studies on corneal KS have previously been limited by the availability of antibodies mostly reactive only with highly sulphated KS epitopes. In this study, we employed four antibodies against specific KS sulphation patterns, including one against unsulphated KS, to investigate their reactivity in a case of MCD compared with normal cornea using high-resolution immunogold electron microscopy. Mutation analysis indicated type I MCD with deletion of the entire open reading frame of CHST6. Contrast enhanced fixation revealed larger PG structures in MCD than normal. Unlike normal cornea, MCD cornea showed positive labelling with antibody to unsulphated KSPG, but was negative with antibodies to sulphated KSPG. These antibodies will thus facilitate high-resolution investigations of phenotypic heterogeneity in support of genetic studies in this disease. PMID:16944190

  8. Distrofias retinianas da infância: análise retrospectiva Retinal dystrophies in childhood: retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Andrade Maestrini

    2004-12-01

    distrofias retinianas da infância são um grupo heterogêneo de doenças que se manifestam por meio de sintomas inespecíficos. Uma análise cuidadosa dos sintomas, o exame oftalmológico completo e os exames complementares, principalmente ERG, testes de visão de cores e campo visual, podem ser úteis em seu diagnóstico.PURPOSE: To describe the clinical features and the results of diagnostic methods in all patients with diagnosis of one of the following retinal dystrophies: Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA, achromatopsia, cone distrophy or cone-rod distrophy, examined at the Low Vision Department of the Federal University of Minas Gerais, in the period of 1992 to 2003. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of charts of 40 patients. Ten had LCA, 17 had achromatopsia, 6 had cone distrophy and 7 had cone-rod distrophy. RESULTS: Visual acuity was extremely low in patients with LCA, ranging from 20/710 to light perception. The mean value for achromatopsia was 20/200, 20/280 for cone distrophy and 20/260 for cone-rod distrophy. High hyperopia was the most common refractional error in LCA patients. Hyperopia was more frequent in cases of achromatopsia and cone distrophy, while in cone-rod distrophy myopia predominated. Fundoscopy was altered in most cases of LCA, cone distrophy and rod-cone distrophy, and normal in most cases of achromatopsia. Oculodigital sign and enophtalmus were found only in LCA patients while photofobia and color vision defects prevailed in other groups. Nistagmus and strabismus were frequent findings in all groups. There was a high incidence of delayed neuro-psycho-motor development in LCA patients. Two of them had also associated genetic syndromes. Patients presented symptoms very early in life in LCA and achromatopsia, while in cone and cone-rod distrophies symptoms appeared later, but never after the age of 10. Consanguinity and positive familial history were strongly associated in all groups. The ERG was extinct in LCA, showed reduced photopic response in

  9. Central areolar choroidal dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, C.J.F.; Klevering, B.J.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Zonneveld-Vrieling, M.N.; Theelen, T.; Hollander, A.I. den; Hoyng, C.B.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical characteristics, follow-up data and molecular genetic background in a large group of patients with central areolar choroidal dystrophy (CACD). DESIGN: Retrospective case series study. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred three patients with CACD from the Netherlands. METHODS

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Open All Close All Description Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy is an inherited condition that predominantly affects the ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: tibial muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Names for This Condition tardive tibial muscular dystrophy TMD Udd distal myopathy Udd-Markesbery muscular dystrophy Udd ... titin may cause more severe tibial muscular dystrophy (TMD). Neuromuscul Disord. 2008 Dec;18(12):922-8. ...

  12. Disease: H00954 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00954 Macular corneal dystrophy (MCD); Corneal dystrophy Groenouw type II; Fehr corneal dystrop ... strophy (MCD), inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion , is the least common but severe form of stromal dy ...

  13. Therapeutic advances in muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Doris G.; Wagner, Kathryn R.

    2013-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies comprise a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that produce progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting. There has been rapid growth and change in our understanding of these disorders in recent years, and advances in basic science are being translated into increasing numbers of clinical trials. This review will discuss therapeutic developments in 3 of the most common forms of muscular dystrophy: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystr...

  14. Therapeutic approaches to muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Seto, Jane T.; Davies, Kay E.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders characterized by muscle weakness and wasting. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy, and although the molecular mechanisms of the disease have been extensively investigated since the discovery of the gene in 1986, there is currently no effective treatment. However, new gene-based therapies have recently emerged with particular noted advances in using conventional gene repla...

  15. Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiu Eppie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, an X-linked disorder, is the most common muscular dystrophy in children, presenting in early childhood and characterized by proximal muscle weakness and calf hypertrophy in affected boys. Patients usually become wheelchair-bound by the age of 12 years, and die of cardiorespiratory complications in their late teens to early twenties. Advances in the management of DMD, including treatment with corticosteroids and the use of intermittent positive pressure ventilation have provided improvements in function, ambulation, quality of life and life expectancy, although novel therapies still aim to provide a cure for this devastating disorder. The clinical features, investigations, and management of DMD are reviewed, as well as the latest in some of the novel therapies.

  16. Halofuginone and muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Pines, Mark; Halevy, Orna

    2011-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) include different inherited diseases that all result in progressive muscle degeneration, impaired locomotion and often premature death. The major focus of MD research has been on alleviating the primary genetic deficit - using gene therapy and myoblast-transfer approaches to promote expression of the deficient or mutated genes in the muscle fibers. Although promising, these approaches have not yet entered into clinical practice and unfortu...

  17. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it may involve other muscles. Causes Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies are a large group of genetic diseases in which there is muscle weakness and ... or a family member has been diagnosed with muscular dystrophy and you are planning a pregnancy. ... Genetic counseling may help some couples and families learn ...

  18. Orocaecal transit time in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Korman, S H; Bar-Oz, B.; E. Granot; Meyer, S

    1991-01-01

    Smooth muscle degeneration may occur in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We measured fasting orocaecal transit time in patients with advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other muscular dystrophies and in healthy controls. No significant differences were found. In contrast to reports of gastric hypomotility in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we found no evidence of impaired small intestinal motility.

  19. Disease: H00667 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00667 Woolly hair , including: Autosomal-dominant woolly hair ... (ADWH); Autosomal-recessive woolly ... hair ... (ARWH); Autosomal-recessive woolly hair ... with or wi ... thout hypotrichosis Woolly hair ... (WH) is a group of hair ... shaft dystrophies characte ...

  20. Substitution of a conserved cysteine-996 in a cysteine-rich motif of the laminin {alpha}2-chain in congenital muscular dystrophy with partial deficiency of the protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissinen, M.; Xu Zhang; Tryggvason, K. [Univ. of Oulu (Finland)

    1996-06-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are autosomal recessive muscle disorders of early onset. Approximately half of CMD patients present laminin {alpha}2-chain (merosin) deficiency in muscle biopsies, and the disease locus has been mapped to the region of the LAMA2 gene (6q22-23) in several families. Recently, two nonsense mutations in the laminin {alpha}2-chain gene were identified in CMD patients exhibiting complete deficiency of the laminin {alpha}2-chain in muscle biopsies. However, a subset of CMD patients with linkage to LAMA2 show only partial absence of the laminin {alpha}2-chain around muscle fibers, by immunocytochemical analysis. In the present study we have identified a homozygous missense mutation in the {alpha}2-chain gene of a consanguineous Turkish family with partial laminin {alpha}2-chain deficiency. The T{r_arrow}C transition at position 3035 in the cDNA sequence results in a Cys996{r_arrow}Arg substitution. The mutation that affects one of the conserved cysteine-rich repeats in the short arm of the laminin {alpha}2-chain should result in normal synthesis of the chain and in formation and secretion of a heterotrimeric laminin molecule. Muscular dysfunction is possibly caused either by abnormal disulfide cross-links and folding of the laminin repeat, leading to the disturbance of an as yet unknown binding function of the laminin {alpha}2-chain and to shorter half-life of the muscle-specific laminin-2 and laminin-4 isoforms, or by increased proteolytic sensitivity, leading to truncation of the short arm. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Prevalence and novelty of PRPF31 mutations in French autosomal dominant rod-cone dystrophy patients and a review of published reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohand-Saïd Saddek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rod-cone dystrophies are heterogeneous group of inherited retinal disorders both clinically and genetically characterized by photoreceptor degeneration. The mode of inheritance can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked. The purpose of this study was to identify mutations in one of the genes, PRPF31, in French patients with autosomal dominant RP, to perform genotype-phenotype correlations of those patients, to determine the prevalence of PRPF31 mutations in this cohort and to review previously identified PRPF31 mutations from other cohorts. Methods Detailed phenotypic characterization was performed including precise family history, best corrected visual acuity using the ETDRS chart, slit lamp examination, kinetic and static perimetry, full field and multifocal ERG, fundus autofluorescence imaging and optic coherence tomography. For genetic diagnosis, genomic DNA of ninety families was isolated by standard methods. The coding exons and flanking intronic regions of PRPF31 were PCR amplified, purified and sequenced in the index patient. Results We showed for the first time that 6.7% cases of a French adRP cohort have a PRPF31 mutation. We identified in total six mutations, which were all novel and not detected in ethnically matched controls. The mutation spectrum from our cohort comprises frameshift and splice site mutations. Co-segregation analysis in available family members revealed that each index patient and all affected family members showed a heterozygous mutation. In five families incomplete penetrance was observed. Most patients showed classical signs of RP with relatively preserved central vision and visual field. Conclusion Our studies extended the mutation spectrum of PRPF31 and as previously reported in other populations, it is a major cause of adRP in France.

  2. Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Adnan Ayvaz

    2013-01-01

       Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (chronic regional pain syndrome) isn’t frequently encountered in practical pediatrics and childhood. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) is a disorder characterized by widespread localized pain, often along with swelling, discoloration, trophic changes and autonomic abnormalities such as vasomotor disorders. Its etio-pathogenesis hasn’t been completely determined.The disease can form in an area innerved by a partially damaged nerve...

  3. Modifying muscular dystrophy through TGFβ

    OpenAIRE

    Ceco, Ermelinda; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy arises from ongoing muscle degeneration and insufficient regeneration. This imbalance leads to loss of muscle with replacement by scar or fibrosis resulting in muscle weakness and, eventually, loss of muscle function. Human muscular dystrophy is characterized by a wide range of disease severity, even when the same genetic mutation is present. This variability implies that other factors, both genetic and environmental, modify the disease outcome. There has been an ongoing ef...

  4. Duchenne muscular dystrophy carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1 values) of the skeletal muscles were measured in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) carriers and normal controls. The bound water fraction (BWF) was calculated from the T1 values obtained, according to the fast proton diffusion model. In the DMD carriers, T1 values of the gluteus maximus and quadriceps femoris muscles were significantly higher, and BWFs of these muscles were significantly lower than in normal control. Degenerative muscular changes accompanied by interstitial edema were presumed responsible for this abnormality. No correlation was observed between the muscle T1 and serum creatine kinase values. The present study showed that MRI could be a useful method for studying the dynamic state of water in both normal and pathological skeletal muscles. Its possible utility for DMD carrier detection was discussed briefly. (orig.)

  5. Adult foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdir Balarin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Adult foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy is a rare pathology. Less than 1% of the reported cases display perifoveal capillary permeability. The three-year follow-up period of the case revealed a rare form, which had not yet been documented. The patient was a 40-year-old female with normal visual acuity, and a minor complaint of metamorphopsia on the left eye. Retinography showed a perifoveal yellowish subretinal area OS.Angiography showed perifoveal leakage OS. Follow up showed that, over 3 years, capillary incompetence disappeared and the yellow area underwent alterations, becoming atrophic OS. Angiography also showed hyperfluorescence (windows defect. Towards the end, it resembled the appearance of late stage of Best's Disease.

  6. Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Esben; Ivarsen, Anders; Kristensen, Simon; Hjortdal, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    with normal corneas who received cataract surgery (control group). Subjects were recruited between March 2013 and July 2014. Observational procedures included the following: best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), contrast sensitivity (CS), Catquest-9SF questionnaire, Scheimpflug tomography and anterior......PURPOSE: To investigate the determining factors of vision and subjective outcome after Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) for Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy (FECD). METHODS: In a prospective study, 41 FECD patients who received DSAEK were compared to 40 cataract patients...... OCT. Examinations were carried out before surgery and at 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-up. Main outcome measures were associations between corneal optics and visual parameters, as well as subjective improvement (Catquest-9SF effect size) RESULTS: Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) negatively correlated...

  7. What Are the Types of Muscular Dystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources and Publications What are the types of muscular dystrophy? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... Content There are more than 30 forms of muscular dystrophy (MD), with information on the primary types included ...

  8. How Do People Cope with Muscular Dystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Muscular Dystrophy: Other FAQs Skip sharing on social media links ... in this section. How do people cope with muscular dystrophy (MD)? Although MD presents many challenges in many ...

  9. Pigment epithelial pattern dystrophy: a peripheral type.

    OpenAIRE

    Delleman, J W; de Jong, P. T V M

    1985-01-01

    A hitherto undescribed form of pattern dystrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium was found in a patient suffering from mucopolysaccharidosis II or Hunter's disease. We propose the name peripheral pattern dystrophy.

  10. Treatment of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy with Denosumab

    OpenAIRE

    Lefkowitz, Stanley S; Doris L. Lefkowitz; Kethley, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is the 3rd most common form of muscular dystrophy. Effective treatments for any of the muscular dystrophies have yet to be realized. This report describes such a treatment. Case Report: A 66 year old female was diagnosed with osteoporosis. She had been diagnosed with FSHD muscular dystrophy a number of years previously by both genetic and clinical studies. Following a 2 year course with Forteo for osteoporosis, she was given an...

  11. [Reflex sympathetic dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marta; Manuela, Manuela; Cantinho, Guilhermina

    2011-01-01

    Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy is rare in pediatrics. It is a complex regional pain syndrome, of unknown etiology, usually post-traumatic, characterized by dysfunctions of the musculoskeletal, vascular and skin systems: severe persistent pain of a limb, sensory and vascular alterations, associated disability and psychosocial dysfunction. The diagnosis is based in high clinical suspection. In children and adolescents there are aspects that are different from the adult ones. Excessive tests may result in worsening of the clinical symptoms. Bone scintigraphy can help. Pain treatment is difficult, not specific. Physical therapies and relaxation technics give some relief. Depression must be treated. This syndrome includes fibromyalgia and complex regional pain syndrome type I. We present a clinical report of an adolescent girl, referred for pain, cold temperature, pallor and functional disability of an inferior limb, all signals disclosed by a minor trauma. She had been diagnosed depression the year before. The bone scintigraphy was a decisive test. The treatment with gabapentin, C vitamin, physiotherapy and pshycotherapy has been effective. PMID:22713207

  12. Genetics of corneal endothelial dystrophies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chitra Kannabiran

    2009-12-01

    The corneal endothelium maintains the level of hydration in the cornea. Dysfunction of the endothelium results in excess accumulation of water in the corneal stroma, leading to swelling of the stroma and loss of transparency. There are four different corneal endothelial dystrophies that are hereditary, progressive, non-inflammatory disorders involving dysfunction of the corneal endothelium. Each of the endothelial dystrophies is genetically heterogeneous with different modes of transmission and/or different genes involved in each subtype. Genes responsible for disease have been identified for only a subset of corneal endothelial dystrophies. Knowledge of genes involved and their function in the corneal endothelium can aid understanding the pathogenesis of the disorder as well as reveal pathways that are important for normal functioning of the endothelium.

  13. CT findings of muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT scans of muscles in patients with limb girdle type (LG), myotonic type (MYD) and Duchenne type (DMD) dystrophies were obtained at five different body levels: the neck, L3 vertebral body, pelvic girdle, thigh and lower leg. CT numbers, cross sectional areas (CSA) and %CSA of muscle or fat were evaluated in each muscle. The characteristic CT patterns for each type of muscular dystrophy were obtained. Compared with DMD, the gracilis and soleus were more severely damaged in LG and the biceps femoris remained relatively preserved among the hamstrings. In addition, the multifidus of the neck and sternocleidomastoid also were more severely damaged in MYD. This study suggests that CT scan will be useful in the differential diagnosis of these types of muscular dystrophy as well as in planning appropriate rehabilitation and detecting damaged muscles. (author)

  14. Disease: H00971 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available alence of 1 in 33,000 individuals. It is characterized by low visual aquity, photop...H00971 Achromatopsia; Rod monochromacy Achromatopsia is an autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy with a prev

  15. Bardet-Biedl syndrome in Denmark-report of 13 novel sequence variations in six genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortshøj, Tina Duelund; Grønskov, Karen; Philp, Alisdair R; Nishimura, Darryl Y; Riise, Ruth; Sheffield, Val C; Rosenberg, Thomas; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by retinal dystrophy, polydactyly, obesity, learning disabilities, renal involvement, and male hypogenitalism. BBS is genetically heterogeneous with mutations of 14 genes, accounting for approximately 70% of cases...

  16. Wasting Mechanisms in Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Jonghyun; Tajrishi, Marjan M; Ogura, Yuji; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of more than 30 different clinical genetic disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Primary deficiency of specific extracellular matrix, sarcoplasmic, cytoskeletal, or nuclear membrane protein results in several secondary changes such as sarcolemmal instability, calcium influx, fiber necrosis, oxidative stress, inflammatory response, breakdown of extracellular matrix, and eventually fibrosis which leads to loss of ...

  17. Glucocorticoids for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Dubowitz Neuromuscular Centre, Great Ormond Street Hospital, and other centers in the UK, conducted a prospective longitudinal study across 17 neuromuscular centers in the UK of 360 boys aged 3-15 years with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who were treated with daily or intermittent (10 days on/10 days off prednisolone for a mean duration of 4 years.

  18. Prednisone Therapy for Duchenne Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of prednisone on muscle function and the extent of steroid-related adverse effects were studied in 17 ambulant children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD at University Hospital, Groningen; Rehabilitation Centre, Utrecht; and Leiden University Medical Centre, the Netherlands.

  19. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. This disease is modeled by a variety of animal models including several fish models, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially t...

  20. Muscular Dystrophy: Data and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... duration and time to loss of ambulation. J Child Neurol. 2015 Sept;30(10):1275-80. Fox DJ, Kumar A, West N, DiRienzo AG, James KA, Oleszek J; Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network (MD STAR net ). Trends with corticosteroid use in males with ...

  1. Clinical Polymorphism of Stargardt Disease in a Large Consanguineous Tunisian Family; Implications for Nosology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila El Matri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe the polymorphic expression of Stargardt disease in a large Tunisian family with clinical intra- and interfamilial variation of the condition. Methods: Twelve subjects from two related families with autosomal recessive Stargardt disease were enrolled. A detailed clinical examination including visual acuity and visual field measurement, fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, electroretinography (ERG and color vision testing was performed for all subjects. Results: The youngest child from family A manifested typical Stargardt disease while her two brothers presented with Stargardt disease-fundus flavimaculatus (STGD-FFM and her two sisters demonstrated a peculiar phenotype overlapping Stargardt disease and cone-rod dystrophy; their phenotypic manifestation corresponded well with ERG groups I, II and III, respectively. This uncommon occurrence of an age-related decline in ERG amplitude and worsening of fundus changes is suggestive of a grading pattern in Stargardt disease. Their two cousins in family B, displayed the STGD-FFM phenotype. Despite clinically similar STGD-FFM patterns in both families, age of onset and progression of the phenotype in family B differed from family A. Conclusion: This is the first report on phenotypic variation of Stargardt disease in a large Tunisian family. Regarding phenotype and severity of visual symptoms, family A demonstrated Stargardt disease at various stages of progression. In addition, STGDFFM appeared to be an independent clinical entity in family B. These findings imply that further parameters are required to classify Stargardt′s disease.

  2. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the CBS pair of the human metal transporter CNNM4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the CBS-pair regulatory domain of the human ancient domain protein 4 (ACDP4), also known as CNNM4. This work describes the purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the CBS-pair regulatory domain of the human ancient domain protein 4 (ACDP4), also known as CNNM4. ACDP proteins represent the least-studied members of the eight different types of magnesium transporters that have been identified in mammals to date. In humans the ACDP family includes four members: CNNM1–4. CNNM1 acts as a cytosolic copper chaperone and has been associated with urofacial syndrome, whereas CNNM2 and CNNM4 have been identified as magnesium transporters. Interestingly, mutations in the CNNM4 gene have clinical consequences that are limited to retinal function and biomineralization and are considered to be the cause of Jalili syndrome, which consists of autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy and amelogenesis imperfecta. The truncated protein was overexpressed, purified and crystallized in the orthorhombic space group C222. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 3.6 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. Matthews volume calculations suggested the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit, which were likely to correspond to a CBS module of the CBS pair of CNNM4

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Open All Close All Description Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy is a condition that chiefly affects muscles used ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions limb-girdle muscular dystrophy limb-girdle muscular dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Open All Close All Description Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy is a term for a group of diseases ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: LAMA2-related muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions LAMA2-related muscular dystrophy LAMA2-related muscular dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Open All Close All Description LAMA2 -related muscular dystrophy is a disorder that causes weakness and wasting ( ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic conditions characterized by ...

  7. Mutations in BRAT1 cause autosomal recessive progressive encephalopathy: Report of a Spanish patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Jáen, Alberto; Álvarez, Sara; So, Eui Young; Ouchi, Toru; de la Peña, Mar Jiménez; Duat, Anna; Fernández-Mayoralas, Daniel Martín; Fernández-Perrone, Ana Laura; Albert, Jacobo; Calleja-Pérez, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    We describe a 4-year-old male child born to non-consanguineous Spanish parents with progressive encephalopathy (PE), microcephaly, and hypertonia. Whole exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous BRAT1 mutations [c.1564G > A (p.Glu522Lys) and c.638dup (p.Val214Glyfs*189)]. Homozygous and compound heterozygous BRAT1 mutations have been described in patients with lethal neonatal rigidity and multifocal seizure syndrome (MIM# 614498). The seven previously described patients suffered from uncontrolled seizures, and all of those patients died in their first months of life. BRAT1 acts as a regulator of cellular proliferation and migration and is required for mitochondrial function. The loss of these functions may explain the cerebral atrophy observed in this case of PE. This case highlights the extraordinary potential of next generation technologies for the diagnosis of rare genetic diseases, including PE. Making a prompt diagnosis of PE is important for genetic counseling and disease management. PMID:26947546

  8. Loss-of-Function Mutations in HPSE2 Cause the Autosomal Recessive Urofacial Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Junfeng; Zhang, Shu; Yang, Ping; Hawkins-Lee, Bobbilynn; Zhong, Jixin; Zhang, Yushan; Ochoa, Bernardo; Agundez, Jose A.G.; Voelckel, Marie-Antoinette; Fisher, Richard B; Gu, Weikuan; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin; She, Jin-Xiong; Wang, Cong-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we localized the defective gene for the urofacial syndrome (UFS) to a region on chromosome 10q24 by homozygosity mapping. We now report evidence that Heparanse 2 (HPSE2) is the culprit gene for the syndrome. Mutations with a loss of function in the Heparanase 2 (HPSE2) gene were identified in all UFS patients originating from Colombia, the United States, and France. HPSE2 encodes a 592 aa protein that contains a domain showing sequence homology to the glycosyl hydrolase motif in t...

  9. Homozygous mutation of STXBP5L explains an autosomal recessive infantile-onset neurodegenerative disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, R.; Corbett, M.A.; Smith, N.J.; Jolly, L.A.; Tan, C.; Keating, D.J.; Duffield, M.D.; Utsumi, T.; Moriya, K.; Smith, K.R.; Hoischen, A.; Abbott, K.; Harbord, M.G.; Compton, A.G.; Woenig, J.A.; Arts, P.; Kwint, M.; Wieskamp, N.; Gijsen, S.; Veltman, J.A.; Bahlo, M.; Gleeson, J.G.; Haan, E.; Gecz, J.

    2015-01-01

    We report siblings of consanguineous parents with an infantile-onset neurodegenerative disorder manifesting a predominant sensorimotor axonal neuropathy, optic atrophy and cognitive deficit. We used homozygosity mapping to identify an approximately 12-Mbp interval identical by descent (IBD) between

  10. Genetic dissection of two Pakistani families with consanguineous localized autosomal recessive hypotrichosis (LAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyedha Abbas

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion:Both families were tested for linkage by genotyping polymorphic microsatellite markers linked to known alopecia loci. Family A excluded all known diseased regions that is suggestive of some novel chromosomal disorder. However, sequencing of P2RY5 gene in family B showed no pathogenic mutation.

  11. "Dermatoglyphic Observations in an Iranian Girl Affected with Congenital Cutis Laxa (Autosomal Recessive"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Pour-Jafari

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the this work was to determine the finger patterns, Finger Ridge Count (FRC, Total Finger Ridge Count (TFRC, and Asymmetry of Finger Ridge Count (AFRC of an Iranian girl (aged 13 years affected with congenital cutis laxa (CCL.The fingerprints of the first phalanx of both hands were taken by using the standard method (stamp ink. The fingerprints were classified according to the Galton nomenclature. The patterns of palm creases were also studied. Besides, the ridges of fingerprints of all ten fingers were counted, then employing the related formulas, the FRC, TFRC and AFRC were calculated.Results showed that the finger patterns of all ten fingers were radial loop; the major creases of the palms existed but their sizes were not normal. TFRC, which is the sum of all ten FRCs, was 77 (“low”, and AFRC was 10.344, more than that of her normal sister, that was 7.280. It is concluded that in CCL, the TFRC and symmetry of the fingertips ridges count may decrease; also palm pattern may be unusual.

  12. A newly recognized autosomal recessive syndrome affecting neurologic function and vision

    OpenAIRE

    Salih, M.; A. Tzschach; Oystreck, D.; Hassan, H.; AlDrees, A.; Elmalik, S.; El Khashab, H.; Wienker, T; Abu-Amero, K; Bosley, T.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic factors represent an important etiologic group in the causation of intellectual disability. We describe a Saudi Arabian family with closley related parents in which four of six children were affected by a congenital cognitive disturbance. The four individuals (aged 18, 16, 13, and 2 years when last examined) had motor and cognitive delay with seizures in early childhood, and three of the four (sparing only the youngest child) had progressive, severe cognitive decline with spasticity. ...

  13. Familial carnitine deficiency: further evidence for autosomal recessive transmission with variable expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Shahar, E.; Brand, N; Shapira, Y.; Barash, V; Gutman, A

    1988-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency occurring in families has been rarely reported and the genetic transmission has not yet been clearly elucidated. Five members of one family showing marked heterogeneity of carnitine deficiency states are presented. In three patients, there was no correlation between measurable carnitine levels in serum and muscle and the clinical findings. The parents, who are remote relatives from an isolated village in Kurdistan (Iraq), had low muscle carnitine levels; however, they wer...

  14. Vici Syndrome: A Rare Autosomal Recessive Syndrome with Brain Anomalies, Cardiomyopathy, and Severe Intellectual Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Curtis Rogers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The objective of this study was to present and describe two additional patients diagnosed with Vici syndrome. Methods. Clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings of the two siblings are discussed in detail. The two patients' descriptions are compared with the other eleven patients reported in the literature. We also presented detailed autopsy results on the male sibling, which demonstrated cytoplasmic vacuoles of the cardiomyocytes and confirmed the clinical findings. Results. The patients reported here include the 13th and 14th patients reported with Vici syndrome. The summary of findings present in these patients includes postnatal growth retardation, developmental delay, bilateral cataracts, agenesis of the corpus callosum, cerebellar anomalies, gyral abnormalities, seizures, hypotonia, and cardiomyopathy. Conclusion. Vici syndrome should be suspected in any child with agenesis of the corpus callosum and one of the following findings: cardiomyopathy, cataracts, immune deficiency, or cutaneous hypopigmentation.

  15. Screening for homozygosity by descent in families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kota Lalitha; Subhadra Jalali; Tejas Kadakia; Chitra Kannabiran

    2002-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease and an important cause of blindness in the state of Andhra Pradesh in India. In an attempt to identify the disease locus in families with the recessive form of the disease, we used the approach of screening for homozygosity by descent in offspring of consanguineous and nonconsanguineous families with RP. Microsatellite markers closely flanking 21 known candidate genes for RP were genotyped in parents and affected offspring to determine whether there was homozygosity at these loci that was shared by affected individuals of a family. This screening approach may be a rapid preliminary method to test known loci for possible cosegregation with disease.

  16. Aquaporin-2: new mutations responsible for autosomal-recessive nephrogenic diabetes insipidus—update and epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Bichet, Daniel G.; El Tarazi, Abdulah; Matar, Jessica; Lussier, Yoann; Arthus, Marie-Françoise; Lonergan, Michèle; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Bissonnette, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    It is clinically useful to distinguish between two types of hereditary nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI): a ‘pure’ type characterized by loss of water only and a complex type characterized by loss of water and ions. Patients with congenital NDI bearing mutations in the vasopressin 2 receptor gene, AVPR2, or in the aquaporin-2 gene, AQP2, have a pure NDI phenotype with loss of water but normal conservation of sodium, potassium, chloride and calcium. Patients with hereditary hypokalemic salt...

  17. Macrocephaly, epilepsy, autism, dysmorphic features, and mental retardation in two sisters: a new autosomal recessive syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Orstavik, K H; Strømme, P; van Ek, J.; Torvik, A; Skjeldal, O H

    1997-01-01

    We report two sisters with macrocephaly, epilepsy, and severe mental retardation. The first child was a 14 year old girl born at term after a normal pregnancy, with birth weight 3600 g and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC) 36 cm (75th centile). Her head size increased markedly during the first six months of life, and was later stable at 2-3 cm above the 97.5th centile. Her development was characterised by psychomotor delay, epilepsy, and autistic features. Her face appeared mildly dysmorphi...

  18. CLPB Variants Associated with Autosomal-Recessive Mitochondrial Disorder with Cataract, Neutropenia, Epilepsy, and Methylglutaconic Aciduria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Carol; Smith, Laurie; Wibrand, Flemming;

    2015-01-01

    type IV 3-MGA-uria characterized by cataracts, severe psychomotor regression during febrile episodes, epilepsy, neutropenia with frequent infections, and death in early childhood. Four of the individuals were of Greenlandic descent, and one was North American, of Northern European and Asian descent...

  19. New approaches to the autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease patient with dual kidney-liver complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telega, Grzegorz; Cronin, David; Avner, Ellis D

    2013-06-01

    Improved neonatal medical care and renal replacement technology have improved the long-term survival of patients with ARPKD. Ten-yr survival of those surviving the first year of life is reported to be 82% and is continuing to improve further. However, despite increases in overall survival and improved treatment of systemic hypertension and other complications of their renal disease, nearly 50% of survivors will develop ESRD within the first decade of life. In addition to renal pathology, patients with ARPKD develop ductal plate malformations with cystic dilation of intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts resulting in CHF and Caroli syndrome. Many patients with CHF will develop portal hypertension with resulting esophageal varices, splenomegaly, hypersplenism, protein losing enteropathy, and gastrointestinal bleeding. Management of portal hypertension may require EBL of esophageal varices or porto-systemic shunting. Complications of hepatic involvement can include ascending cholangitis, cholestasis with malabsorption of fat-soluble vitamins, and rarely benign or malignant liver tumors. Patients with ARPKD who eventually reach ESRD, and ultimately require kidney transplantation, present a unique set of complications related to their underlying hepato-biliary disease. In this review, we focus on new approaches to these challenging patients, including the indications for liver transplantation in ARPKD patients with severe chronic kidney disease awaiting kidney transplant. While survival in patients with ARPKD and isolated kidney transplant is comparable to that of age-matched pediatric patients who have received kidney transplants due to other primary renal diseases, 64-80% of the mortality occurring in ARPKD kidney transplant patients is attributed to cholangitis/sepsis, which is related to their hepato-biliary disease. Recent data demonstrate that surgical mortality among pediatric liver transplant recipients is decreased to <10% at one yr. The immunosuppressive regimen used for kidney transplant recipients is adequate for most liver transplant recipients. We therefore suggest that in a select group of ARPKD patients with recurrent cholangitis or complications of portal hypertension, combined liver-kidney transplant is a viable option. Although further study is necessary to confirm our approach, we believe that combined liver-kidney transplantation can potentially decrease overall mortality and morbidity in carefully selected ARPKD patients with ESRD and clinically significant CHF. PMID:23593929

  20. Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and congenital hepatic fibrosis (ARPKD/CHF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L. [National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Program, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Ocak, Iclal [National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Program, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Daryanani, Kailash [National Institutes of Health, Clinical Center, Department of Radiology, Bethesda, MD (United States); Font-Montgomery, Esperanza; Lukose, Linda; Bryant, Joy; Tuchman, Maya; Gahl, William A. [National Institutes of Health, National Human Genome Research Institute, Medical Genetics Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States); Mohan, Parvathi [George Washington University, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Washington, DC (United States); Heller, Theo [National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gunay-Aygun, Meral [National Institutes of Health, National Human Genome Research Institute, Medical Genetics Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States); National Institutes of Health, Intramural Program, Office of Rare Diseases, Office of the Directors, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2009-02-15

    ARPKD/CHF is an inherited disease characterized by non-obstructive fusiform dilatation of the renal collecting ducts leading to enlarged spongiform kidneys and ductal plate malformation of the liver resulting in congenital hepatic fibrosis. ARPKD/CHF has a broad spectrum of clinical presentations involving the kidney and liver. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and follow-up of ARPKD/CHF. Combined use of conventional and high-resolution US with MR cholangiography in ARPKD/CHF patients allows detailed definition of the extent of kidney and hepatobiliary manifestations without requiring ionizing radiation and contrast agents. (orig.)

  1. FBXO7 mutations cause autosomal recessive, early-onset parkinsonian-pyramidal syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonzo, A. Di; Dekker, M.C.J.; Montagna, P.; Baruzzi, A.; Yonova, E.H.; Correia Guedes, L.; Szczerbinska, A.; Zhao, T.; Dubbel-Hulsman, L.O.; Wouters, C.H.; Graaff, E. de; Oyen, W.J.G.; Simons, E.J.; Breedveld, G.J.; Oostra, B.A.; Horstink, M.W.I.M.; Bonifati, V.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The combination of early-onset, progressive parkinsonism with pyramidal tract signs has been known as pallido-pyramidal or parkinsonian-pyramidal syndrome since the first description by Davison in 1954. Very recently, a locus was mapped in a single family with an overlapping phenotype, a

  2. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Miyashita A, Yokoseki A, Kawata H, Koyama A, Arima K, Takahashi T, Ikeda M, Shiota H, Tamura ... Oide T, Nakayama H, Yanagawa S, Ito N, Ikeda S, Arima K. Extensive loss of arterial medial smooth muscle ...

  3. Congenital muscular dystrophy with characteristic radiological findings similar to those with Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Garg Ajay; Gulati Sheffali; Gupta Vipul; Kalra Veena

    2004-01-01

    Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) is the most common congenital muscular dystrophy in Japan and there are isolated reports of non-Japanese patients with FCMD. We report an Indian patient with congenital muscular dystrophy and characteristic radiological findings similar to those with FCMD.

  4. Zebrafish orthologs of human muscular dystrophy genes

    OpenAIRE

    Zon Leonard I; Zhou Yi; Pusack Timothy J; Beltre Rosanna; Vogel Emily D; Guyon Jeffrey R; Steffen Leta S; Kunkel Louis M

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Human muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders which cause decreased muscle strength and often result in premature death. There is no known cure for muscular dystrophy, nor have all causative genes been identified. Recent work in the small vertebrate zebrafish Danio rerio suggests that mutation or misregulation of zebrafish dystrophy orthologs can also cause muscular degeneration phenotypes in fish. To aid in the identification of new causative g...

  5. CRB1 mutations in inherited retinal dystrophies.

    OpenAIRE

    Bujakowska, Kinga; Audo, Isabelle; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Antonio, Aline; Germain, Aurore; Léveillard, Thierry; Letexier, Mélanie; Saraiva, Jean-Paul; Lonjou, Christine; Carpentier, Wassila; Sahel, José-Alain; Bhattacharya, Shomi; Zeitz, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the CRB1 gene are associated with variable phenotypes of severe retinal dystrophies, ranging from leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) to rod-cone dystrophy, also called retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Moreover, retinal dystrophies resulting from CRB1 mutations may be accompanied by specific fundus features: preservation of the para-arteriolar retinal pigment epithelium (PPRPE) and retinal telangiectasia with exudation (also referred to as Coats-like vasculopathy). In this publication, we...

  6. Phenotypic variability in Meesmann's dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlers, Niels; Hjortdal, Jesper; Nielsen, Kim;

    2008-01-01

    symptoms often include blurred vision and ocular irritation. Typical cases may be entirely free of complaints. Intermittent pain episodes, such as occur in recurrent erosion syndrome, are not the rule. Genetic sequencing indicated a familial relationship with the originally described Meesmann family......'s dystrophy occurs worldwide. The largest family described is the original German one, now supplemented with a Danish branch. Despite the presence of an identical genetic defect, the clinical phenotype varies. This suggests that non-KRT12-related mechanisms are responsible for the variation.......PURPOSE: To describe the phenotypic variability in Meesmann's microcystic dystrophy of the corneal epithelium based on a review of the literature and the presentation of a Danish family. METHODS: We carried out a clinical examination of the family and genetic sequencing of DNA. RESULTS: Subjective...

  7. Arrhythmias in the Muscular Dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Rajdev, Archana; William J Groh

    2015-01-01

    In patients with muscular dystrophies, cardiac involvement leading to cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias occur with variable prevalence mirroring the phenotypic variability seen among and within the various hereditary myopathies. These patients are at risk for development for bradyarrhythmias and tachyarrhythmias including sudden cardiac death. Knowledge of the incidence of arrhythmias and predictors of sudden death in the various hereditary myopathies can help guide screening and appropriate man...

  8. Dysautonomia, fibromyalgia and reflex dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Eisinger, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Autonomic nervous system dysfunction observed in fibromyalgia, characterized without exception by a sympathetic hyperactivity and hyporeactivity, has been reported. However, several studies demonstrated reduced levels of norepinephrine and neuropeptide Y at rest and after tilt table in some patients, which was improved by beta-stimulating agents. These findings support heterogeneity in fibromyalgia-associated dysautonomia. Fibromyalgia could be a generalized sympathetic dystrophy since both c...

  9. Next-generation sequencing of ABCA4: High frequency of complex alleles and novel mutations in patients with retinal dystrophies from Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ścieżyńska, Aneta; Oziębło, Dominika; Ambroziak, Anna M; Korwin, Magdalena; Szulborski, Kamil; Krawczyński, Maciej; Stawiński, Piotr; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P; Płoski, Rafał; Ołdak, Monika

    2016-04-01

    Variation in the ABCA4 locus has emerged as the most prevalent cause of monogenic retinal diseases. The study aimed to discover causative ABCA4 mutations in a large but not previously investigated cohort with ABCA4-related diseases originating from Central Europe and to refine the genetic relevance of all identified variants based on population evidence. Comprehensive clinical studies were performed to identify patients with Stargardt disease (STGD, n = 76) and cone-rod dystrophy (CRD, n = 16). Next-generation sequencing targeting ABCA4 was applied for a widespread screening of the gene. The results were analyzed in the context of exome data from a corresponding population (n = 594) and other large genomic databases. Our data disprove the pathogenic status of p.V552I and provide more evidence against a causal role of four further ABCA4 variants as drivers of the phenotype under a recessive paradigm. The study identifies 12 novel potentially pathogenic mutations (four of them recurrent) and a novel complex allele p.[(R152*; V2050L)]. In one third (31/92) of our cohort we detected the p.[(L541P; A1038V)] complex allele, which represents an unusually high level of genetic homogeneity for ABCA4-related diseases. Causative ABCA4 mutations account for 79% of STGD and 31% of CRD cases. A combination of p.[(L541P; A1038V)] and/or a truncating ABCA4 mutation always resulted in an early disease onset. Identification of ABCA4 retinopathies provides a specific molecular diagnosis and justifies a prompt introduction of simple precautions that may slow disease progression. The comprehensive, population-specific study expands our knowledge on the genetic landscape of retinal diseases. PMID:26593885

  10. Occurrence of Duchenne dystrophy in Klinefelter's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh, V.; Mountford, R; Kingston, H. M.; Kelsey, A; Noronha, M. J.; Clarke, M A

    1993-01-01

    A boy with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and facial dysmorphism in conjunction with Klinefelter's genotype 47XXY is presented; this is an unusual situation with two genetic errors evolving over two generations. Karyotyping should be considered in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who have unusual features.

  11. Becker muscular dystrophy: an unusual presentation.

    OpenAIRE

    Bush, A; Dubowitz, V

    1993-01-01

    A 15 year old boy who presented with passing painless dark urine was found to have myoglobinuria. His creatine phosphokinase was raised, and a muscle biopsy specimen showed non-specific dystrophic changes. Subsequent DNA analysis led to the diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy. Myoglobinuria may be a presenting symptom of Becker muscular dystrophy.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pancreas , dental abnormalities, and an eye disease called retinal dystrophy that can lead to vision loss. Related Information ... mutations as a common cause of asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (Jeune syndrome) without major polydactyly, renal or retinal involvement. J Med Genet. 2013 May;50(5): ...

  13. Prevalence of generalized retinal dystrophy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Jensen, Hanne; Bregnhøj, Jesper F;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Generalized retinal dystrophy is a frequent cause of visual impairment and blindness in younger individuals and a subject of new clinical intervention trials. Nonetheless, there are few nation-wide population-based epidemiological data of generalized retinal dystrophy. The purpose of thi...

  14. Retinitis pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamel Christian

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is an inherited retinal dystrophy caused by the loss of photoreceptors and characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination. Prevalence of non syndromic RP is approximately 1/4,000. The most common form of RP is a rod-cone dystrophy, in which the first symptom is night blindness, followed by the progressive loss in the peripheral visual field in daylight, and eventually leading to blindness after several decades. Some extreme cases may have a rapid evolution over two decades or a slow progression that never leads to blindness. In some cases, the clinical presentation is a cone-rod dystrophy, in which the decrease in visual acuity predominates over the visual field loss. RP is usually non syndromic but there are also many syndromic forms, the most frequent being Usher syndrome. To date, 45 causative genes/loci have been identified in non syndromic RP (for the autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and digenic forms. Clinical diagnosis is based on the presence of night blindness and peripheral visual field defects, lesions in the fundus, hypovolted electroretinogram traces, and progressive worsening of these signs. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, but is not usually performed due to the tremendous genetic heterogeneity of the disease. Genetic counseling is always advised. Currently, there is no therapy that stops the evolution of the disease or restores the vision, so the visual prognosis is poor. The therapeutic approach is restricted to slowing down the degenerative process by sunlight protection and vitaminotherapy, treating the complications (cataract and macular edema, and helping patients to cope with the social and psychological impact of blindness. However, new therapeutic strategies are emerging from intensive research (gene therapy, neuroprotection, retinal prosthesis.

  15. Terapia gênica em distrofias hereditárias de retina Gene therapy for inherited retinal dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Côco

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available As distrofias hereditárias de retina abrangem um amplo número de doenças caracterizadas por lenta e progressiva degeneração da retina. São o resultado de mutações em genes expressos em fotorreceptores e no epitélio pigmentado da retina. A herança pode ser autossômica dominante, autossômica recessiva, ligada ao X recessiva, digênica ou herança mitocondrial. Atualmente não há tratamento para essas doenças e os pacientes convivem com a perda progressiva da visão. O aconselhamento genético e o suporte para reabilitação têm indicação nestes casos. Pesquisas envolvendo a base molecular e genética dessas doenças está continuamente em expansão e ampliam as perspectivas para novas formas de tratamento. Dessa forma, a terapia gênica, que consiste na inserção de material genético exógeno em células de um indivíduo com finalidade terapêutica, tem sido a principal forma de tratamento para as distrofias hereditárias de retina. O olho é um órgão peculiar para a terapia gênica, pois é anatomicamente dividido em compartimentos, imunologicamente privilegiado e com meios transparentes. A maioria das doenças oculares tem defeitos em genes conhecidos. Além disso, há modelo animal bem caracterizado para algumas condições. Propostas para pesquisa clínica em terapia gênica nas degenerações retinianas hereditárias com defeito no gene RPE65, recentemente tiveram aprovação ética e os resultados preliminares obtidos trouxeram grandes expectativas na melhora da qualidade de vida dos pacientes.The inherited retinal dystrophies comprise a large number of disorders characterized by a slow and progressive retinal degeneration. They are the result of mutations in genes that express in either the photoreceptor cells or the retinal pigment epithelium. The mode of inheritance can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X linked recessive, digenic or mitochondrial DNA inherited. At the moment, there is no treatment for these

  16. Arrhythmias in the muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajdev, Archana; Groh, William J

    2015-06-01

    In patients with muscular dystrophies, cardiac involvement leading to cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias occurs with variable prevalence, mirroring the phenotypic variability seen among and within the various hereditary myopathies. Knowledge of the incidence of arrhythmias and predictors of sudden death in the various hereditary myopathies can help guide screening and appropriate management of these patients, thereby improving survival. The noncardiac manifestations can lead to delayed recognition of symptoms, affect the decision to implant a prophylactic device, and once a decision is made to proceed with device implant, increase peri-procedural respiratory and anesthesia-related complications. PMID:26002394

  17. Natural History of Cardiac and Respiratory Involvement, Prognosis and Predictive Factors for Long-Term Survival in Adult Patients with Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophies Type 2C and 2D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayssoil, Abdallah; Ogna, Adam; Chaffaut, Cendrine; Chevret, Sylvie; Guimarães-Costa, Raquel; Leturcq, France; Wahbi, Karim; Prigent, Helene; Lofaso, Frederic; Nardi, Olivier; Clair, Bernard; Behin, Anthony; Stojkovic, Tanya; Laforet, Pascal; Orlikowski, David; Annane, Djillali

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 2C and 2D limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a group of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies manifested by proximal myopathy, impaired respiratory muscle function and cardiomyopathy. The correlation and the prognostic impact of respiratory and heart impairment are poorly described. We aimed to describe the long-term cardiac and respiratory follow-up of these patients and to determine predictive factors of cardio-respiratory events and mortality in LGMD 2C and 2D. Methods We reviewed the charts of 34 LGMD patients, followed from 2005 to 2015, to obtain echocardiographic, respiratory function and sleep recording data. We considered respiratory events (acute respiratory failure, pulmonary sepsis, atelectasis or pneumothorax), cardiac events (acute heart failure, significant cardiac arrhythmia or conduction block, ischemic stroke) and mortality as outcomes of interest for the present analysis. Results A total of 21 patients had type 2C LGMD and 13 patients had type 2D. Median age was 30 years [IQR 24–38]. At baseline, median pulmonary vital capacity (VC) was 31% of predicted value [20–40]. Median maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) was 31 cmH2O [IQR 20.25–39.75]. Median maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) was 30 cm H2O [20–36]. Median left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 55% [45–64] with 38% of patients with LVEF <50%. Over a median follow-up of 6 years, we observed 38% respiratory events, 14% cardiac events and 20% mortality. Among baseline characteristics, LVEF and left ventricular end diastolic diameter (LVEDD) were associated with mortality, whilst respiratory parameters (VC, MIP, MEP) and the need for home mechanical ventilation (HMV) were associated with respiratory events. Conclusion In our cohort of severely respiratory impaired type 2C and 2D LGMD, respiratory morbidity was high. Cardiac dysfunction was frequent in particular in LGMD 2C and had an impact on long-term mortality. Trial Registration

  18. Valley sign in Becker muscular dystrophy and outliers of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Pradhan Sunil

    2004-01-01

    Valley sign has been described in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). As there are genetic and clinical similarities between DMD and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), this clinical sign is evaluated in this study in BMD and DMD/BMD outliers. To evaluate the sign, 28 patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), 8 DMD/BMD outliers and 44 age-matched male controls with other neuromuscular diseases were studied. The sign was examined after asking patients to abduct their arms to abo...

  19. Vitelliform dystrophy and pattern dystrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium: concomitant presence in a family.

    OpenAIRE

    Giuffrè, G; Lodato, G.

    1986-01-01

    We describe three siblings presenting unusual pigmented dystrophic lesions of the fovea. The first sibling showed macroreticular dystrophy associated with butterfly shaped dystrophy in one eye and associated with vitelliform cyst in the other eye. The second showed the atrophic outcome of a vitelliform cyst with development of subretinal neovascular membrane in one eye and a radial pigmented macular dystrophy in the other eye. The third sibling had bilateral macular vitelliform lesions. This ...

  20. Distrofia retiniana com onda rápida escotópica (DRORE associada à síndrome dos cabelos anágenos frouxos (SCAF. Parte II: Genética Scotopic fast wave retinal dystrophy (SFWRD associated with loose anagen hair syndrome (LAHS. Part II: Genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Teruo Sato

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Propor complementação da atual classificação do eletrorretinograma (ERG com a inclusão deste novo tipo de onda, discutir os possíveis mecanismos para a distrofia retiniana com onda rápida escotópica (DRORE associada à síndrome dos cabelos anágenos frouxos (SCAF e análise do heredograma da família estudada. MÉTODO: Foram descritos na parte I deste trabalho. RESULTADOS: A análise do heredograma da família demonstrou tratar-se de herança autossômica recessiva com expressão parcial no heterozigoto; outros resultados foram descritos na parte I deste trabalho. CONCLUSÕES: Por se tratar do primeiro relato na literatura, os achados descritos sugerem fortemente que a distrofia retiniana com onda rápida escotópica associada à síndrome dos cabelos anágenos frouxos pode ser uma nova entidade nosológica. Neste trabalho propomos uma classificação inédita de todas as distrofias maculares e degenerações retinianas associadas a distúrbios capilares no grupo B das displasias ectodérmicas.PURPOSE: To propose the complementation of present classification of the electroretinogram (ERG with the inclusion of this new kind of wave, to discuss the possible mechanisms for the scotopic fast wave retinal dystrophy (SFWRD associated with the loose anagen hair syndrome (LAHS and to analyze the pedigree of the studied family. METHODS: Were described in part I of this study. RESULTS: The pedigree analysis of the family showed to be an autosomal recessive form of inheritance with partial expression in the heterozygote; other results were described in part I of this study. CONCLUSION: Being the first account in the literature, the described finding strongly suggests that scotopic fast wave retinal dystrophy associated with the loose anagen hair syndrome can be a new nosological entity. In this study, we propose an unpublished classification of all macular dystrophies and retinal degenerations associated with hair disorders in group B

  1. Brain MRI Findings in Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings in 13 patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (MDCIC and Fukutin-related protein (FKRP gene mutations were retrospectively reviewed in a study at Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, and European centers.

  2. Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supported scientists are pursuing several exciting strategies in muscular dystrophy research that have implications for LGMD. These strategies include gene therapy, exon skipping, stop codon-read through and myostatin ...

  3. [Muscular Dystrophies Involving the Retinal Function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jägle, H

    2016-03-01

    Muscular dystrophies are rare disorders, with an incidence of approx. 20 in 100 000. Some dystrophies also affect retinal or optic nerve function. In such cases, the ophthalmological findings may be critical for differential diagnosis or patient counseling. For example in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, where the alteration in retinal function seems to reflect cerebral involvement. Other important forms are mitochondrial and metabolic disorders, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome and the Refsum syndrome. Molecular genetic analysis has become a major tool for differential diagnosis, but may be complex and demanding. This article gives an overview of major muscular dystrophies involving retinal function and their genetic origin, in order to guide differential diagnosis. PMID:27011029

  4. Non-Coding RNAs in Muscle Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ferlini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ncRNAs are the most recently identified class of regulatory RNAs with vital functions in gene expression regulation and cell development. Among the variety of roles they play, their involvement in human diseases has opened new avenues of research towards the discovery and development of novel therapeutic approaches. Important data come from the field of hereditary muscle dystrophies, like Duchenne muscle dystrophy and Myotonic dystrophies, rare diseases affecting 1 in 7000–15,000 newborns and is characterized by severe to mild muscle weakness associated with cardiac involvement. Novel therapeutic approaches are now ongoing for these diseases, also based on splicing modulation. In this review we provide an overview about ncRNAs and their behavior in muscular dystrophy and explore their links with diagnosis, prognosis and treatments, highlighting the role of regulatory RNAs in these pathologies.

  5. Zebrafish models for human FKRP muscular dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahara, Genri; Guyon, Jeffrey R.; Nakamura, Yukio; Kunkel, Louis M

    2009-01-01

    Various muscular dystrophies are associated with the defective glycosylation of α-dystroglycan and are known to result from mutations in genes encoding glycosyltransferases. Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) was identified as a homolog of fukutin, the defective protein in Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), that is thought to function as a glycosyltransferase. Mutations in FKRP have been linked to a variety of phenotypes including Walker–Warburg syndrome (WWS), limb girdle muscul...

  6. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimov, Fedik; Kunkel, Louis M

    2013-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic diseases characterized by progressive degeneration and weakness of skeletal muscle. Since the discovery of the first muscular dystrophy gene encoding dystrophin, a large number of genes have been identified that are involved in various muscle-wasting and neuromuscular disorders. Human genetic studies complemented by animal model systems have substantially contributed to our understanding of the molecular pathomechanisms underlying ...

  7. Obstructive apnoeas in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Y.; Heckmatt, J Z

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--In order to clarify the treatment of sleep hypoxaemias in Duchenne muscular dystrophy polysomnographic studies were performed on patients at home with the purpose of recruiting them into two clinical therapeutic trials. Observations concerning the nature of sleep hypoxaemia in these patients are presented. METHODS--Twenty one non-ambulant patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy aged 13-23 years with no symptoms of sleep hypoventilation or apnoea were studied for two consecutive ...

  8. The Muscular Dystrophies: From Genes to Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Richard M. Lovering; Porter, Neil C; Bloch, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    The genetic basis of many muscular disorders, including many of the more common muscular dystrophies, is now known. Clinically, the recent genetic advances have improved diagnostic capabilities, but they have not yet provided clues about treatment or management. Thanks to better management strategies and therapeutic interventions, however, many patients with a muscular dystrophy are more active and are living longer. Physical therapists, therefore, are more likely to see a patient with a musc...

  9. New therapies for muscular dystrophy: cautious optimism

    OpenAIRE

    Cossu, G.; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2004-01-01

    The quest for a therapy for muscular dystrophy has been the driving force behind the past 40 years of advances in this field. Numerous results, such as the identification of satellite cells and gene mutations that are responsible for most forms of dystrophies, advances in gene transfer and modification technology and, more recently, stem cells, have fueled hopes. However, administering cortical-steroids still remains the only effective treatment available. Several recent advances have uncover...

  10. Hypotrichosis with juvenile macular dystrophy: Portuguese case

    OpenAIRE

    Elfatoiki, Fatima Zahra; Cordoliani, Florance; Pascal Regane, Pascal; Afforitit-Demoge, Aude

    2016-01-01

    Hypotrichosis with juvenile macular dystrophy is a rare congenital disease mainly found in the Druze population of Northern Israel. This disorder is caused by the CDH3 mutation encoding P-cadherin, which is expressed in retinal pigment epithelium and hair follicles. An 11-year-old girl who was born to related Portuguese parents, had hypotrichosis since birth and macular dystrophy diagnosed at age 5. Fundus examination and fluorescein angiography revealed located macular pigmentary abnormaliti...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: lattice corneal dystrophy type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diagnosis & Management These resources address the diagnosis or management of lattice corneal dystrophy type I: American Foundation for the Blind: Living with Vision Loss Genetic Testing Registry: Lattice corneal dystrophy Type ...

  12. [The heartache of muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogerwaard, E M; Ginjaar, H B; Wilde, A A; Leschot, N J; de Voogt, W G; de Visser, M

    2000-11-11

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy are caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene, located on the short arm of the X chromosome. Three so called dystrophinopathy patients, a women aged 54 and two men aged 23 and 21 years, suffered from a severe dilated cardiomyopathy. Such a cardiomyopathy can develop in both carriers and patients. In addition, it is often more important for prognosis than muscle weakness. For these two reasons it is important to screen both groups for (early) cardiological abnormalities. If these are present, regular follow-up is necessary to start timely therapy. When cardiological investigations yield normal results, it is advised to screen carriers with a five-year interval. Dystrophinopathy patients should be checked every year, because the cardiomyopathy sometimes develops and deteriorates over a short period of time. Patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and with a positive family history for dilated cardiomyopathy, muscle weakness or high serum creatine kinase activity should be screened for a mutation in the dystrophin gene. PMID:11103252

  13. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments. PMID:27594988

  14. Other limb-girdle muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Anthony A

    2011-01-01

    The secondary α-dystroglycanopathies usually present in infancy as congenital muscular dystrophies but may manifest later in childhood or adult life (limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) 2I, LGMD2K, LGMD2M, LGMD2N, and LGMD2O). Patients with telethoninopathy (LGMD2B) may present with mainly proximal or distal lower extremity weakness, and notably the muscle biopsies may demonstrate rimmed vacuoles. LGMD2L is caused by newly described mutations in ANO5 and can sometimes present with distal weakness resembling Miyoshi myopathy. PMID:21496628

  15. FHL1 Reduces Dystrophy in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing FSHD Muscular Dystrophy Region Gene 1 (FRG1)

    OpenAIRE

    Feeney, Sandra J.; McGrath, Meagan J.; Absorn Sriratana; Stefan M Gehrig; Gordon S Lynch; Colleen E D'Arcy; John T Price; McLean, Catriona A.; Rossella Tupler; Mitchell, Christina A.

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal-dominant disease with no effective treatment. The genetic cause of FSHD is complex and the primary pathogenic insult underlying the muscle disease is unknown. Several disease candidate genes have been proposed including DUX4 and FRG1. Expression analysis studies of FSHD report the deregulation of genes which mediate myoblast differentiation and fusion. Transgenic mice overexpressing FRG1 recapitulate the FSHD muscular dystrophy phe...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Bietti crystalline dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hayakawa M, Kanai A, Shy Chen M, Alan Lewis R, Heckenlively J, Weleber RG, Traboulsi EI, Zhang Q, Xiao X, Kaiser-Kupfer M, Sergeev YV, Hejtmancik JF. Bietti crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy is caused by mutations in the novel gene CYP4V2. Am J Hum Genet. 2004 May;74( ...

  17. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-06-26

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed. PMID:27354892

  18. Swivel walkers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Sibert, J R; Williams, V; Burkinshaw, R; Sibert, S

    1987-01-01

    Swivel walkers were used to provide low energy ambulation in 11 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in schools for the physically handicapped in South Glamorgan. Our preliminary experience suggests that these walkers improve the quality of life and provide a useful part of the physical treatment of the condition.

  19. Brain Function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of dystrophin disorders in the CNS function of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse, an animal model of DMD, is reviewed at the University of New South Wales, University of Sydney, Australia.

  20. Visuospatial Attention Disturbance in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moura, Maria Clara Drummond Soares; do Valle, Luiz Eduardo Ribeiro; Resende, Maria Bernadete Dutra; Pinto, Katia Osternack

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The cognitive deficits present in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are not yet well characterized. Attention, considered to be the brain mechanism responsible for the selection of sensory stimuli, could be disturbed in DMD, contributing, at least partially, to the observed global cognitive deficit. The aim of this study was to…

  1. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed. PMID:27354892

  2. Merosin/laminin-2 and muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Engvall, E

    1996-01-01

    skin. Merosin is the collective name for laminins that share a common subunit, the laminin alpha 2 chain. Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is caused by mutations in the laminin alpha 2 chain gene. The skin disease Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa is caused by mutations in...

  3. Hereditary muscular dystrophies and the heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.E. Hermans; Y.M. Pinto; I.S.J. Merkies; C.E.M. de Die-Smulders; H.J.G.M. Crijns; C.G. Faber

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac disease is a common clinical manifestation of neuromuscular disorders, particularly of muscular dystrophies. Heart muscle cells as well as specialized conducting myocardial fibres may be affected by the dystrophic process. The incidence and nature of cardiac involvement vary with different t

  4. Genetics Home Reference: facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Padberg GW, Lunt PW, van der Maarel SM. Best practice guidelines on genetic diagnostics of Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy: ... Reviewed : August 2014 Published : August 30, 2016 The resources on this site should not be used as a ... of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  5. Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy-Candidiasis-Ectodermal Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Sonal, Choudhary; Michael, McLeod; Daniele, Torchia; Paolo, Romanelli

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy is a rare autoimmune disorder. The clinical spectrum of symptoms is diverse; the diagnosis relying on the presence of at least two out of the three main conditions defining the syndrome: chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease.

  6. Muscular dystrophies due to glycosylation defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntoni, Francesco; Torelli, Silvia; Brockington, Martin

    2008-10-01

    In the last few years, muscular dystrophies due to reduced glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (ADG) have emerged as a common group of conditions, now referred to as dystroglycanopathies. Mutations in six genes (POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, Fukutin, FKRP and LARGE) have so far been identified in patients with a dystroglycanopathy. Allelic mutations in each of these genes can result in a wide spectrum of clinical conditions, ranging from severe congenital onset with associated structural brain malformations (Walker Warburg syndrome; muscle-eye-brain disease; Fukuyama muscular dystrophy; congenital muscular dystrophy type 1D) to a relatively milder congenital variant with no brain involvement (congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C), and to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2 variants with onset in childhood or adult life (LGMD2I, LGMD2L, and LGMD2N). ADG is a peripheral membrane protein that undergoes multiple and complex glycosylation steps to regulate its ability to effectively interact with extracellular matrix proteins, such as laminin, agrin, and perlecan. Although the precise composition of the glycans present on ADG are not known, it has been demonstrated that the forced overexpression of LARGE, or its paralog LARGE2, is capable of increasing the glycosylation of ADG in normal cells. In addition, its overexpression is capable of restoring dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding properties in primary cell cultures of patients affected by different genetically defined dystroglycanopathy variants. These observations suggest that there could be a role for therapeutic strategies to overcome the glycosylation defect in these conditions via the overexpression of LARGE. PMID:19019316

  7. Descrição de nova distrofia macular associada à síndrome dos cabelos anágenos frouxos New macular dystrophy associated with loose anagen hair syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Teruo Sato

    2002-03-01

    family of seven patients, four of them affected, was examined. The patients underwent a complete ophthalmological examination, color test (Ishihara and Farnsworth D-15, ecography, angiography, laboratory and dermatological tests, sweat test, light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of the hair. Results: In two affected sisters we found on eye fundoscopy pigmentary dispersions in the posterior pole of the retina, with macular staphyloma. In two brothers, the same pigmentary dispersions in the posterior pole was found, with more pigmentation and a yellow coloring in the macular area and without staphyloma. The light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy evaluation of the affected individuals confirmed loose anagen hair syndrome. In a not affected woman and man all examinations were normal, except the light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy that showed some similarities with the affected individuals. As for the way of inheritance, the pedigree is compatible with autosomal recessive inheritance with partial expression of the heterozygote. Conclusions: There is only one report in the international literature of loose anagen hair syndrome association with ocular coloboma. In this study we describe the findings of a new macular dystrophy associated with the loose anagen hair syndrome, a dystrophy whose fundoscopy findings are different between men and women. Since it is the first report in the literature, the described findings strongly suggest that this association can be part of a new nosological entity.

  8. Emerging strategies for cell and gene therapy of the muscular dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Muir, Lindsey A.; Jeffrey S. Chamberlain

    2009-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of over 40 disorders that are characterised by muscle weakness and wasting. The most common are Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Becker muscular dystrophy, which result from mutations within the gene encoding dystrophin; myotonic dystrophy type 1, which results from an expanded trinucleotide repeat in the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene; and facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, which is associated with contractions in the subtelomeric region ...

  9. Phase 3 Study of Ataluren in Patients With Nonsense Mutation Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne; Muscular Dystrophies; Muscular Disorders, Atrophic; Muscular Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Neuromuscular Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Genetic Diseases, X-Linked; Genetic Diseases, Inborn

  10. A novel mutation in the sterol 27-hydroxylase gene of a woman with autosomal recessive cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garuti Rita

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Article abstract Mutations of the gene encoding the mitochondrial enzyme sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1 gene cause defects in the cholesterol pathway to bile acids that lead to the storage of cholestanol and cholesterol in tendons, lenses and the central nervous system. This disorder is the cause of a clinical syndrome known as cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX. Since 1991 several mutations of the CYP27A1 gene have been reported. We diagnosed the clinical features of CTX in a caucasian woman. Serum levels of cholestanol and 7α-hydroxycholesterol were elevated and the concentration of 27-hydroxycholesterol was reduced. Bile alcohols in the urine and faeces were increased. The analysis of the CYP27A1 gene showed that the patient was a compound heterozygote carrying two mutations both located in exon 8. One mutation is a novel four nucleotide deletion (c.1330-1333delTTCC that results in a frameshift and the occurrence of a premature stop codon leading to the formation of a truncated protein of 448 amino acids. The other mutation, previously reported, is a C - > T transition (c. c.1381C > T that converts the glutamine codon at position 461 into a termination codon (p.Q461X. These truncated proteins are expected to have no biological function being devoid of the cysteine residue at position 476 of the normal enzyme that is crucial for heme binding and enzyme activity.

  11. Decreased catalytic activity and altered activation properties of PDE6C mutants associated with autosomal recessive achromatopsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grau, Tanja; Artemyev, Nikolai O; Rosenberg, Thomas; Dollfus, Hélène; Haugen, Olav H; Cumhur Sener, E; Jurklies, Bernhard; Andreasson, Sten; Kernstock, Christoph; Larsen, Michael; Zrenner, Eberhart; Wissinger, Bernd; Kohl, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    characterization of six missense mutations applying the baculovirus system to express recombinant mutant and wildtype chimeric PDE6C/PDE5 proteins in Sf9 insect cells. Purified proteins were analyzed using Western blotting, phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity measurements as well as inhibition assays by zaprinast and...

  12. PLEKHG5 deficiency leads to an intermediate form of autosomal-recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzedine, Hamid; Zavadakova, Petra; Planté-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Vaz Pato, Maria; Pinto, Nuno; Bartesaghi, Luca; Zenker, Jennifer; Poirot, Olivier; Bernard-Marissal, Nathalie; Arnaud Gouttenoire, Estelle; Cartoni, Romain; Title, Alexandra; Venturini, Giulia; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Makowski, Edward; Schöls, Ludger; Claeys, Kristl G; Stendel, Claudia; Roos, Andreas; Weis, Joachim; Dubourg, Odile; Leal Loureiro, José; Stevanin, Giovanni; Said, Gérard; Amato, Anthony; Baraban, Jay; LeGuern, Eric; Senderek, Jan; Rivolta, Carlo; Chrast, Roman

    2013-10-15

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies characterized by progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities and distal sensory loss. Following the analysis of two consanguineous families affected by a medium to late-onset recessive form of intermediate CMT, we identified overlapping regions of homozygosity on chromosome 1p36 with a combined maximum LOD score of 5.4. Molecular investigation of the genes from this region allowed identification of two homozygous mutations in PLEKHG5 that produce premature stop codons and are predicted to result in functional null alleles. Analysis of Plekhg5 in the mouse revealed that this gene is expressed in neurons and glial cells of the peripheral nervous system, and that knockout mice display reduced nerve conduction velocities that are comparable with those of affected individuals from both families. Interestingly, a homozygous PLEKHG5 missense mutation was previously reported in a recessive form of severe childhood onset lower motor neuron disease (LMND) leading to loss of the ability to walk and need for respiratory assistance. Together, these observations indicate that different mutations in PLEKHG5 lead to clinically diverse outcomes (intermediate CMT or LMND) affecting the function of neurons and glial cells. PMID:23777631

  13. Next-generation sequencing confirms the implication of SLC24A1 in autosomal-recessive congenital stationary night blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuillé, M; Malaichamy, S; Vadalà, M; Michiels, C; Condroyer, C; Sachidanandam, R; Srilekha, S; Arokiasamy, T; Letexier, M; Démontant, V; Sahel, J-A; Sen, P; Audo, I; Soumittra, N; Zeitz, C

    2016-06-01

    Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous retinal disorder which represents rod photoreceptor dysfunction or signal transmission defect from photoreceptors to adjacent bipolar cells. Patients displaying photoreceptor dysfunction show a Riggs-electroretinogram (ERG) while patients with a signal transmission defect show a Schubert-Bornschein ERG. The latter group is subdivided into complete or incomplete (ic) CSNB. Only few CSNB cases with Riggs-ERG and only one family with a disease-causing variant in SLC24A1 have been reported. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) in a previously diagnosed icCSNB patient identified a homozygous nonsense variant in SLC24A1. Indeed, re-investigation of the clinical data corrected the diagnosis to Riggs-form of CSNB. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) identified compound heterozygous deletions and a homozygous missense variant in SLC24A1 in two other patients, respectively. ERG abnormalities varied in these three cases but all patients had normal visual acuity, no myopia or nystagmus, unlike in Schubert-Bornschein-type of CSNB. This confirms that SLC24A1 defects lead to CSNB and outlines phenotype/genotype correlations in CSNB subtypes. In case of unclear clinical characteristics, NGS techniques are helpful to clarify the diagnosis. PMID:26822852

  14. A novel AP4M1 mutation in autosomal recessive cerebral palsy syndrome and clinical expansion of AP-4 deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Jameel, Muhammad; Klar, Joakim; Tariq, Muhammad; Moawia, Abubakar; Altaf Malik, Naveed; Seema Waseem, Syeda; Abdullah, Uzma; Naeem Khan, Tahir; Raininko, Raili; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Dahl, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder associated with intellectual disability in one-third of cases. Recent findings support Mendelian inheritance in subgroups of patients with the disease. The purpose of this study was to identify a novel genetic cause of paraplegic CP with intellectual disability in a consanguineous Pakistani family. METHODS: We performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in two brothers with CP and intellectual disability. Analysis of AP...

  15. Autosomal-Recessive Mutations in the tRNA Splicing Endonuclease Subunit TSEN15 Cause Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia and Progressive Microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuss, Martin W; Sultan, Tipu; James, Kiely N; Rosti, Rasim O; Scott, Eric; Musaev, Damir; Furia, Bansri; Reis, André; Sticht, Heinrich; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Reuter, Miriam S; Abou Jamra, Rami; Trotta, Christopher R; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2016-07-01

    The tRNA splicing endonuclease is a highly evolutionarily conserved protein complex, involved in the cleavage of intron-containing tRNAs. In human it consists of the catalytic subunits TSEN2 and TSEN34, as well as the non-catalytic TSEN54 and TSEN15. Recessive mutations in the corresponding genes of the first three are known to cause pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) types 2A-C, 4, and 5. Here, we report three homozygous TSEN15 variants that cause a milder version of PCH2. The affected individuals showed progressive microcephaly, delayed developmental milestones, intellectual disability, and, in two out of four cases, epilepsy. None, however, displayed the central visual failure seen in PCH case subjects where other subunits of the TSEN are mutated, and only one was affected by the extensive motor defects that are typical in other forms of PCH2. The three amino acid substitutions impacted the protein level of TSEN15 and the stoichiometry of the interacting subunits in different ways, but all resulted in an almost complete loss of in vitro tRNA cleavage activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that mutations in any known subunit of the TSEN complex can cause PCH and progressive microcephaly, emphasizing the importance of its function during brain development. PMID:27392077

  16. High Resolution Ultrasonography for Assessment of Renal Cysts in the PCK Rat Model of Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Kapoor

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The PCK rat model of polycystic kidney disease is characterized by the progressive development of renal medullary cysts. Here, we evaluated the suitability of high resolution ultrasonography (HRU to assess the kidney and cyst volume in PCK rats, testing three different ultrasound image analysis methods, and correlating them with kidneys weights and histological examinations. Methods: After inducing anesthesia, PCK rats (n=18 were subjected to HRU to visualize the kidneys, to perform numeric and volumetric measurements of the kidney and any cysts observed, and to generate 3-dimensional images of the cysts within the kidney parenchyma. Results: HRU provided superior information in comparison to microscopic analysis of stained kidney sections. HRU-based kidney volumes correlated strongly with kidney weights (R2=0.809; PConclusion: HRU represents a useful diagnostic tool for kidney and cyst volume measurements in PCK rats. Sequential HRU examinations may be useful to study the effect of drugs on cyst growth without the need to euthanize experimental animals.

  17. A Novel Mutation in the EDAR Gene Causes Severe Autosomal Recessive Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Emil; Svendsen, Mathias Tiedemann; Lildballe, D. L.; Jensen, P. K. A.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a 2-year-old girl presenting with a severe form of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED). The patient presented with hypotrichosis, anodontia, hypohidrosis, frontal bossing, prominent lips and ears, dry, pale skin, and dermatitis. The patient had chronic rhinitis with malodorous na...

  18. Molecular genetic investigations of histone deacetylase inhibitors as potential neurotherapeutics for autosomal recessive proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)

    OpenAIRE

    Brichta, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common neuromuscular disorder causing infant death in 50 percent of all patients. Homozygous absence of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1) is the primary cause of SMA, while SMA severity is mainly determined by the number of SMN2 copies. One SMN2 copy produces only about 10 percent of full-length (FL) protein identical to SMN1, whereas the majority of SMN2 transcripts are aberrantly spliced due to a silent mutation within an exonic splicing enhan...

  19. Biallelic Mutations in GNB3 Cause a Unique Form of Autosomal-Recessive Congenital Stationary Night Blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ajoy; Audo, Isabelle; Tavares, Erika; Maynes, Jason T; Tumber, Anupreet; Wright, Thomas; Li, Shuning; Michiels, Christelle; Condroyer, Christel; MacDonald, Heather; Verdet, Robert; Sahel, José-Alain; Hamel, Christian P; Zeitz, Christina; Héon, Elise

    2016-05-01

    Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is a heterogeneous group of non-progressive inherited retinal disorders with characteristic electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities. Riggs and Schubert-Bornschein are subtypes of CSNB and demonstrate distinct ERG features. Riggs CSNB demonstrates selective rod photoreceptor dysfunction and occurs due to mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in rod phototransduction cascade; night blindness is the only symptom and eye examination is otherwise normal. Schubert-Bornschein CSNB is a consequence of impaired signal transmission between the photoreceptors and bipolar cells. Schubert-Bornschein CSNB is subdivided into complete CSNB with an ON bipolar signaling defect and incomplete CSNB with both ON and OFF pathway involvement. Both subtypes are associated with variable degrees of night blindness or photophobia, reduced visual acuity, high myopia, and nystagmus. Whole-exome sequencing of a family screened negative for mutations in genes associated with CSNB identified biallelic mutations in the guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-3 gene (GNB3). Two siblings were compound heterozygous for a deletion (c.170_172delAGA [p.Lys57del]) and a nonsense mutation (c.1017G>A [p.Trp339(∗)]). The maternal aunt was homozygous for the nonsense mutation (c.1017G>A [p.Trp339(∗)]). Mutational analysis of GNB3 in a cohort of 58 subjects with CSNB identified a sporadic case individual with a homozygous GNB3 mutation (c.200C>T [p.Ser67Phe]). GNB3 encodes the β subunit of G protein heterotrimer (Gαβγ) and is known to modulate ON bipolar cell signaling and cone transducin function in mice. Affected human subjects showed an unusual CSNB phenotype with variable degrees of ON bipolar dysfunction and reduced cone sensitivity. This unique retinal disorder with dual anomaly in visual processing expands our knowledge about retinal signaling. PMID:27063057

  20. The emergence of hepatic fibrosis and portal hypertension in infants and children with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term imaging and clinical findings are reported in six children whose polycystic kidney disease was detected in infancy or early childhood. Over time (2 years to 20 years) all patients developed portal hypertension from hepatic fibrosis, a problem primarily noted in recessive pattern polycystic kidney disease. Mild renal failure (two patients) was accompanied by serious systemic hypertension in the same patients. In one family, one of the babies also showed dilated right hepatic ducts. Imaging studies included urography and CT although recently ultrasonography was the method of choice. The relative renal and hepatic manifestations in these patients so changed with time that it would seem fallacious to attempt to use rigid classifications based on findings at initial diagnosis. (orig.)

  1. Homozygous mutation of VPS16 gene is responsible for an autosomal recessive adolescent-onset primary dystonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiaodong; Chen, Xin; Wu, Song; Liu, Wenlan; Zhang, Xiejun; Zhang, Doudou; He, Sijie; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Mali; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Zongyang; Luo, Kun; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological movement disorder that is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Herein, we report the identification a novel homozygous missense mutation, c.156 C > A in VPS16, co-segregating with disease status in a Chinese consanguineous family with adolescent-onset primary dystonia by whole exome sequencing and homozygosity mapping. To assess the biological role of c.156 C > A homozygous mutation of VPS16, we generated mice with targeted mutation site of Vps16 through CRISPR-Cas9 genome-editing approach. Vps16 c.156 C > A homozygous mutant mice exhibited significantly impaired motor function, suggesting that VPS16 is a new causative gene for adolescent-onset primary dystonia. PMID:27174565

  2. A gene for autosomal recessive symmetrical spastic cerebral palsy maps to chromosome 2q24-25.

    OpenAIRE

    McHale, D P; Mitchell, S.; Bundey, S; Moynihan, L; Campbell, D. A.; Woods, C G; LENCH, N. J.; Mueller, R F; Markham, A F

    1999-01-01

    Cerebral palsy has an incidence of approximately 1/500 births, although this varies between different ethnic groups. Genetic forms of the disease account for approximately 1%-2% of cases in most countries but contribute a larger proportion in populations with extensive inbreeding. We have clinically characterized consanguineous families with multiple children affected by symmetrical spastic cerebral palsy, to locate recessive genes responsible for this condition. The eight families studied we...

  3. Distinct genetic regions modify specific muscle groups in muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Swaggart, Kayleigh A.; Heydemann, Ahlke; Palmer, Abraham A.; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Phenotypic expression in the muscular dystrophies is variable, even with the identical mutation, providing strong evidence that genetic modifiers influence outcome. To identify genetic modifier loci, we used quantitative trait locus mapping in two differentially affected mouse strains with muscular dystrophy. Using the Sgcg model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy that lacks the dystrophin-associated protein γ-sarcoglycan, we evaluated chromosomal regions that segregated with two distinct quan...

  4. Molecular mechanisms in muscular dystrophy: a gene expression profiling study.

    OpenAIRE

    Turk, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of neuromuscular disorders characterized by progres¬sive muscle weakness and wasting. Although the underlying genetic defects of a large number of muscular dystrophies are now know, the molecular mechanisms resulting in the devastating effects of the disease are not yet clear. Furthermore, the muscular dystrophies differ in clinical presentation and severity. The processes responsible for this di¬vergence are largely unknown as well. In this thesis, gene e...

  5. Therapeutic Targeting of Signaling Pathways in Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatnagar, Shephali; Kumar, Ashok

    2009-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy refers to a group of genetic diseases that cause severe muscle weakness and loss of skeletal muscle mass. Although research has helped understanding the molecular basis of muscular dystrophy, there is still no cure for this devastating disorder. Numerous lines of investigation suggest that the primary deficiency of specific proteins causes aberrant activation of several cell signaling pathways in skeletal and cardiac muscle leading to the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy....

  6. Approaching a new age in Duchenne muscular dystrophy treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Kathryn R.

    2008-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy. The cornerstones of current treatment include corticosteroids for skeletal muscle weakness, afterload reduction for cardiomyopathy, and noninvasive ventilation for respiratory failure. With these interventions, patients are walking and living longer. However, the current status is still far from adequate. Increased private and federal funding of studies in Duchenne muscular dystrophy has led to a large numbe...

  7. Cardiac involvement in Emery Dreifuss muscular dystrophy: a case series

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, A.; Dean, J.; Mahy, I

    1999-01-01

    Three patients with Emery Dreifuss muscular dystrophy are reported. Emery Dreifuss muscular dystrophy is an X linked muscular dystrophy, in which locomotor involvement is characteristically mild and slowly progressive. The effect on the heart becomes apparent in the teenage years and is characterised by cardiac conduction defects and infiltration of the myocardium by fibrous and adipose tissue. It first affects the atria, which results in atrial paralysis; treatment with ventricular pacing is...

  8. Stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xiaofeng

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify global research trends in stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy using a bibliometric analysis of Web of Science. DATA RETRIEVAL: We performed a bibliometric analysis of studies on stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy from 2002 to 2011 retrieved from Web of Science. SELECTION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria: (a) peer-reviewed published articles on stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy in...

  9. Gene Therapy for Muscular Dystrophy: Moving the Field Forward

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Zaidy, Samiah; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Mendell, Jerry R.

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy for the muscular dystrophies has evolved as a promising treatment for this progressive group of disorders. While corticosteroids and/or supportive treatments remain standard of care for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), loss of ambulation, respiratory failure and compromised cardiac function is the inevitable outcome. Recent developments in genetically mediated therapies have allowed for personalized treatments that strategically target individual muscular dystrophy subtypes bas...

  10. Acetazolamide for Cystoid Macular Oedema in Bietti Crystalline Retinal Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Broadhead, Geoffrey K.; Chang, Andrew A

    2014-01-01

    Bietti crystalline retinal dystrophy is a rare, inherited disorder whose hallmark is the presence of retinal crystal deposits associated with later chorioretinal degeneration. This condition may rarely be complicated by the development of cystoid macular oedema leading to rapid visual decline. Currently, treatment options for this complication of Bietti dystrophy are limited and the visual prognosis is poor. Here, we present a case of cystoid macular oedema associated with Bietti dystrophy th...

  11. CT finding and cerebrospinal fluid proteins in muscular dystrophy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed the microcomponents of protein fractions in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with various types of muscular dystrophy. The degenerative pattern is characterized by an increase in the prealbumin and a decrease in the γ-globulin fraction is shown in the Duchenne and congenital muscular dystrophy. The increase in CSF IgG, γ-globulin fraction is shown in the myotonic dystrophy. In addition to the abnormality of IQ, EEG, and brain CT, abnormal CSF proteins obviously suggest the presence of CNS involvement in muscular dystrophy. (author)

  12. Anoctamin 5 muscular dystrophy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Duno, Morten; Petri, Helle;

    2013-01-01

    Since the initial description in 2010 of anoctamin 5 deficiency as a cause of muscular dystrophy, a handful of papers have described this disease in cases of mixed populations. We report the first large regional study and present data on new aspects of prevalence, muscular and cardiac phenotypic...... characteristics, and muscle protein expression. All patients in our neuromuscular unit with genetically unclassified, recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2), Miyoshi-type distal myopathy (MMD) or persistent asymptomatic hyperCK-emia (PACK) were assessed for mutations in the ANO5 gene. Genetically...... confirmed patients were evaluated with muscular and cardiopulmonary examination. Among 40 unclassified patients (28 LGMD2, 5 MMD, 7 PACK), 20 were homozygous or compound heterozygous for ANO5 mutations, (13 LGMD2, 5 MMD, 2 PACK). Prevalence of ANO5 deficiency in Denmark was estimated at 1:100.000 and ANO5...

  13. Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) and its role in the pathogenesis of myotonic dystrophy 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, Perla; Llagostera, Esther

    2008-11-01

    Myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1) is an autosomal, dominant inherited, neuromuscular disorder. The DM1 mutation consists in the expansion of an unstable CTG-repeat in the 3'-untranslated region of a gene encoding DMPK (myotonic dystrophy protein kinase). Clinical expression of DM1 is variable, presenting a progressive muscular dystrophy that affects distal muscles more than proximal and is associated with the inability to relax muscles appropriately (myotonia), cataracts, cardiac arrhythmia, testicular atrophy and insulin resistance. DMPK is a Ser/Thr protein kinase homologous to the p21-activated kinases MRCK and ROCK/rho-kinase/ROK. The most abundant isoform of DMPK is an 80 kDa protein mainly expressed in smooth, skeletal and cardiac muscles. Decreased DMPK protein levels may contribute to the pathology of DM1, as revealed by gene target studies. Here we review current understanding of the structural, functional and pathophysiological characteristics of DMPK. PMID:18583094

  14. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    de Greef, Jessica C; Frants, Rune R; van der Maarel, Silvère M.

    2008-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) seems to be caused by a complex epigenetic disease mechanism as a result of contraction of the polymorphic macrosatellite repeat D4Z4 on chromosome 4qter. Currently, the exact mechanism causing the FSHD phenotype is still not elucidated. In this review, we discuss the genetic and epigenetic changes observed in patients with FSHD and the possible disease mechanisms that may be associated with FSHD pathogenesis.

  15. Targeting Latent TGFβ release in muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Ceco, Ermelinda; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Gardner, Brandon; Miller, Tamari; DeJesus, Adam; Earley, Judy U.; Hadhazy, Michele; Smith, Lucas R.; Barton, Elisabeth R; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Latent TGFβ binding proteins (LTBPs) bind to inactive TGFβ in the extracellular matrix. In mice, muscular dystrophy symptoms are intensified by a genetic polymorphism that changes the hinge region of LTBP, leading to increased proteolytic susceptibility and TGFβ release. We have found that the hinge region of human LTBP4 was also readily proteolyzed, and that proteolysis could be blocked by an antibody to the hinge region. Transgenic mice were generated to carry a bacterial artificial chromos...

  16. Genetic counselling in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Lunt, P W; Harper, P S

    1991-01-01

    Clinical data are presented from a survey of 41 families with dominantly inherited facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) in which over 500 family members were examined, including 168 affected subjects. New mutation could account for six isolated cases. Results suggest that 33% of heterozygotes over 40 years are mildly affected and a majority develop significant lower limb weakness; 19% over 40 years require wheelchairs. Presymptomatic testing of serum creatine kinase level (CK) is lim...

  17. Natural history of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    KE, QING; ZHANG Li

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is X-linked recessive hereditary disease. DMD gene mutations result in dystrophin deficiency, which causes not only muscle movement disorders but also scoliosis, cognitive dysfunction, urinary tract diseases, respiratory diseases and heart diseases. Most patients die in early adult for respiratory and circulatory failure. Early multidisciplinary therapies will significantly delay disease progression and improve patients' quality of life. However, DMD diagnosi...

  18. Optimizing Bone Health in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Buckner, Jason L.; Bowden, Sasigarn A.; Mahan, John D

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, with eventual loss of ambulation and premature death. The approved therapy with corticosteroids improves muscle strength, prolongs ambulation, and maintains pulmonary function. However, the osteoporotic impact of chronic corticosteroid use further impairs the underlying reduced bone mass seen in DMD, leading to increased fragility fractures of long bones and vertebrae. These serio...

  19. Left ventricular noncompaction in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Statile, Christopher J; Taylor, Michael D.; Mazur, Wojciech; Cripe, Linda H.; KING, EILEEN; Pratt, Jesse; Benson, D. Woodrow; Hor, Kan N

    2013-01-01

    Background Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) describes deep trabeculations in the left ventricular (LV) endocardium and a thinned epicardium. LVNC is seen both as a primary cardiomyopathy and as a secondary finding in other syndromes affecting the myocardium such as neuromuscular disorders. The objective of this study is to define the prevalence of LVNC in the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) population and characterize its relationship to global LV function. Methods Cardiac magnetic res...

  20. Targeting Fibrosis in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lan; Lu, Haiyan

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common genetic muscle disease affecting 1 in 3,500 live male births. It is an X-linked recessive disease caused by a defective dystrophin gene. The disease is characterized by progressive limb weakness, respiratory and cardiac failure and premature death. Fibrosis is a prominent pathological feature of muscle biopsies from patients with DMD. It directly causes muscle dysfunction and contributes to the lethal DMD phenotype. Although gene therapy an...

  1. Recent advances in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Perkins KJ; Davies KE

    2012-01-01

    Kelly J Perkins,1,2 Kay E Davies21Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, 2MRC Functional Genomics Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UKAbstract: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an allelic X-linked progressive muscle-wasting disease, is one of the most common single-gene disorders in the developed world. Despite knowledge of the underlying genetic causation and resultant pathophysiology from lack of dystrophin protein at the muscle sarcolemma, clinical intervention is currently restricted t...

  2. Pathophysiology of duchenne muscular dystrophy: current hypotheses.

    OpenAIRE

    Deconinck, Nicolas; Dan, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a devastating inherited neuromuscular disorder that affects one in 3300 live male births. Although the responsible gene and its product, dystrophin, have been characterized for more than 15 years, and a mouse model (mdx) has been developed, comprehensive understanding of the mechanism leading from the absence of dystrophin to the muscular degeneration is still debated. First, dystrophin is considered a key structural element in the muscle fiber, and the primary ...

  3. Molecular Therapeutic Strategies Targeting Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Mendell, Jerry R.; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R.; Malik, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Since discovery of the gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy more than 20 years ago, scientists have worked to apply molecular principles for restoration of the dystrophin protein and correction of the underlying physiologic defect that predisposes muscle fibers to injury. Recent studies provide realistic hope that molecular therapies may help patients who have this disorder. At present only corticosteroids can improve walking ability and increase quality of life for boys with this disease. Th...

  4. Severe dystrophy in DiGeorge syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rózsai, Barnabás; Kiss, Ákos; Csábi, Györgyi; Czakó, Márta; Decsi, Tamás

    2009-01-01

    We present the case history of a 3-year-old girl who was examined because of severe dystrophy. In the background, cow’s milk allergy was found, but her body weight was unchanged after eliminating milk from her diet. Other types of malabsorption were excluded. Based on nasal regurgitation and facial dysmorphisms, the possibility of DiGeorge syndrome was suspected and was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The authors suggest a new feature associated with DiGeorge syndrome.

  5. Muscular dystrophies due to glycosylation defects

    OpenAIRE

    Muntoni, Francesco; Torelli, Silvia; Brockington, Martin

    2008-01-01

    In the last few years, muscular dystrophies due to reduced glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (ADG) have emerged as a common group of conditions, now referred to as dystroglycanopathies. Mutations in six genes (POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, Fukutin, FKRP and LARGE) have so far been identified in patients with a dystroglycanopathy. Allelic mutations in each of these genes can result in a wide spectrum of clinical conditions, ranging from severe congenital onset with associated structural brain malfo...

  6. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: From Diagnosis to Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Sofia Falzarano; Chiara Scotton; Chiara Passarelli; Alessandra Ferlini

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited neuromuscular disorder due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. It is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting due to the absence of dystrophin protein that causes degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscle. The molecular diagnostic of DMD involves a deletions/duplications analysis performed by quantitative technique such as microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH), Multiple Ligation Probe Assay ...

  7. North Carolina macular dystrophy: clinicopathologic correlation.

    OpenAIRE

    Small, K. W.; Voo, I; Flannery, J; Udar, N.; Glasgow, B J

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the clinical and histopathologic findings in a 72-year-old woman with North Carolina macular dystrophy. METHODS: Clinical examination was performed by slit-lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, color fundus photography, and focal electroretinography. Histopathologic examination of the enucleated left eye consisted of light microscopy. RESULTS: Light microscopy demonstrated a discrete macular lesion characterized by focal absence of photoreceptor cells and retinal p...

  8. Bietti’ Crystalline Retinal Dystrophy: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammed Şahin; Adnan Yıldırım; Fatih Mehmet Türkcü; Harun Yüksel; Alparslan Şahin

    2016-01-01

    Bietti’ crystalline retinal dystrophy (BCD) is a rare, auto­somal, recessively inherited disorder, characterized by the deposition of yellow crystals in the corneal limbus and retina. In this paper we aimed to present a pediatric case with BCD, with clinical, electrophysiological and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) findings and discuss BCD with the light of the literature. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (1): 94-97

  9. Bietti’ Crystalline Retinal Dystrophy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Şahin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bietti’ crystalline retinal dystrophy (BCD is a rare, auto­somal, recessively inherited disorder, characterized by the deposition of yellow crystals in the corneal limbus and retina. In this paper we aimed to present a pediatric case with BCD, with clinical, electrophysiological and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT findings and discuss BCD with the light of the literature. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (1: 94-97

  10. Management of myocardial damage in muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heart failure (HF) is a fatal complication in many muscular dystrophy cases and has become the most common cause of death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) since 2001. HF deaths in DMD occur in young patients and increase, along with respiratory failure, in older patients. Managing HF, therefore, is the most important component of DMD treatment. Management of HF is necessary in DMD patients of all ages because myocardial damage progresses regardless of age and disability. Electrocardiography, echocardiography, myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and natriuretic peptides are used for the diagnosis of myocardial damage and chronic HF. Tissue Doppler echocardiography is in particularly useful for early detection of minute myocardial damage and dysfunction in DMD. The first-line drugs for chronic HF are angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and the prognosis of DMD patients has been improved using these drugs and beta-blockers. Diuretics are added in the presence of pulmonary congestion. Digoxin is most effective at a blood level of 0.5-0.8 ng/mL because of its pharmacokinetics in DMD. Surgical treatment may be necessary in cases of intractable HF. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (biventricular pacing), a treatment with an artificial pacemaker, is indicated for cases that meet specific criteria, including HF with ventricular dyssynchrony. Applications of partial left ventriculectomy (Batista procedure) and left ventricular assist devices in muscular dystrophy are likely in the near future. (author)

  11. Cardiac involvement in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 and Becker muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveen, Marie-Louise; Thune, Jens Jakob; Køber, Lars;

    2008-01-01

    Rigshospitalet. Patients One hundred one patients with LGMD2A-I and BMD and 29 patients with LGMD2 and no molecular diagnosis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical investigation, echocardiography, and electrocardiographic findings. RESULTS: Cardiac involvement was present in 24 of 100 patients (24%) with LGMD2A-I and......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the extent of cardiac involvement in patients with 1 of the 12 groups of recessively inherited limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 (LGMD2A-L) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). DESIGN: Prospective screening. SETTING: Neuromuscular Clinic and Department of Cardiology at...

  12. Emery dreifuss muscular dystrophy: A clinico-pathological study

    OpenAIRE

    Gayathri N; Taly A; Sinha S; Suresh T; Gorai D

    2006-01-01

    Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is a rare and genetically heterogeneous disorder. We report two patients with emerin deficient X-linked EDMD and two probable patients with EDMD with typical early contractures, progressive muscle weakness and cardiac involvement. Family history was noted in one case. Muscle biopsy revealed features of dystrophy in all.

  13. Purloined Mechanisms of Bacterial Immunity Can Cure Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Tidball, James G.; Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Myriad strategies have been explored to compensate for the lack of dystrophin or to skip mutations that cause the lethal disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). A new study shows that gene editing strategies used by bacteria can be applied in zygotes of a mouse model of DMD to correct the genetic defect that causes muscular dystrophy (Long et al., 2014).

  14. Dysphagia is present but mild in myotonic dystrophy type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, Bert de; Tieleman, A.; Knuijt, S.; Vliet, J. van; Ensink, R.; Engelen, Baziel van

    2009-01-01

    The phenotype of myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) shows similarities as well as differences to that of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Dysphagia, a predominant feature in DM1, has not yet been examined in DM2. In a recent nationwide questionnaire survey of gastrointestinal symptoms in DM2, 12 out of

  15. Mutational spectrum of Korean patients with corneal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, H; Kim, M; Kim, Y; Kim, J; Kwon, A; Choi, H; Park, J; Jang, W; Lee, Y S; Park, S H; Kim, M S

    2016-06-01

    Corneal dystrophy typically refers to a group of rare hereditary disorders with a heterogeneous genetic background. A comprehensive molecular genetic analysis was performed to characterize the genetic spectrum of corneal dystrophies in Korean patients. Patients with various corneal dystrophies underwent thorough ophthalmic examination, histopathologic examination, and Sanger sequencing. A total of 120 probands were included, with a mean age of 50 years (SD = 18 years) and 70% were female. A total of 26 mutations in five genes (14 clearly pathogenic and 12 likely pathogenic) were identified in 49 probands (41%). Epithelial-stromal TGFBI dystrophies, macular corneal dystrophy and Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD) showed 100% mutation detection rates, while endothelial corneal dystrophies showed lower detection rates of 3%. Twenty six non-duplicate mutations including eight novel mutations were identified and mutations associated with SCD were identified genetically for the first time in this population. This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the genetic aberrations in Korean patients and also highlights the diagnostic value of molecular genetic analysis in corneal dystrophies. PMID:26748743

  16. Resistance training in patients with limb-girdle and becker muscular dystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveen, Marie-Louise; Andersen, Søren P; Ingelsrud, Lina H;

    2013-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of strength training in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD).......In this study we investigated the effect of strength training in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD)....

  17. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-21

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  18. [Treatment progress of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smogorzewska, Elzbieta Monika; Weinberg, Kenneth I

    2004-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a common lethal disease for which no effective treatment is currently available. There exists a mouse model of the disease in which the usefulness of gene therapy was established. However, no progress towards human application was made due to the lack of a proper method for gene delivery. During the past several years, researchers acquired data which led them to believe that bone marrow stem cells are capable of generating not only blood cells, but also liver, heart, skin, muscle, and other tissue. Although the term "stem cell plasticity" became very popular, other studies have suggested that bone marrow might contain different types of stem cells that can produce non-hematopoietic cells. For example, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) in bone marrow give rise to osteocytes, chondrocytes, adipocytes, and skeletal muscle. Recently, researchers have been able to show that transplanted bone marrow cells can contribute to muscle cells in a human patient who was diagnosed with two genetic diseases: severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The odds of this happening is estimated at one in seven million. The results of studying this patient's medical history were reported by collaborating researchers at Children's Hospital, Los Angeles and Children's Hospital, Boston in an article titled "Long-term persistence of donor nuclei in a Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patient receiving bone marrow transplantation" published in the September 2002 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. This patient was transplanted 15 years ago at Children's Hospital Los Angeles with paternal HLA-haploidentical T cell-depleted bone marrow. He engrafted and became a hematopoietic chimera having T and NK lymphocytes of donor origin. Studies performed on the muscle biopsy from the patient 13 years after transplantation demonstrated that the muscle showed evidence of donor derived nuclei. In addition, analysis of his bone marrow

  19. A neonate with congenital myotonic dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A boy's neonate with congenital myotonic dystrophy who had difficulty in breathing immediately after birth was reported. A long-term management for artificial breathing was required because of a marked decrease of muscular tone, equinus and the difficulty in sucking milk. Myogenic pattern was seen on EMG and atrophied type I fibers and increased number of type 2 C fibers suggesting the prolongation of differentiation of muscle fibers were seen by muscle biopsy. Cranial CT revealed a marked atrophy of the cerebral cortex and low density area in the white matter, although the latter disappeared 4 months later. (Namekawa, K.)

  20. Dynamic thoracoplasty for asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddoura, I L; Obeid, M Y; Mroueh, S M; Nasser, A A

    2001-11-01

    The life-saving procedures to expand the chests of infants born with Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy provide a static solution incapable of responding to the growth demands of thriving patients. We describe an instrument that provided a dynamic solution for an infant, where an initial methyl methacrylate midsternotomy spacer placed at 4 months of age was followed at 11 months with recurrence of his difficulties. At 8 months after the second operation the patient was stable and thriving with no recurrence of symptoms. The instrument modifications, limitations, and possible complications are described. PMID:11722089

  1. [Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy and related alpha-dystroglycanopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Terumi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2008-10-01

    Alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG) is a glycoprotein that binds to laminin in the basal lamina and helps provide mechanical support. A group of muscular dystrophies are caused by glycosylation defects of alpha-DG and are hence collectively called alpha-dystroglycanopathy (alpha-DGP). Alpha-DGP is clinically characterized by a combination of muscular dystrophies, structural brain anomalies, and ocular involvement. So far, 6 causative genes have been identified: LARGE, POMGNT1, POMT1, POMT2, FKRP, and FKTN. Initially, alpha-DGP was classified under congenital muscular dystrophies; however, the clinical phenotype is now expanded to include a markedly wide spectrum ranging from the most severe, lethal congenital muscular dystrophy with severe brain deformity to the mildest limb girdle muscular dystrophy with minimal muscle weakness. This is exemplified by Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), which is the most prevalent alpha-DGP in Japan, and is caused by mutations in FKTN. FCMD is clinically characterized by a triad of mental retardation, brain deformities, and congenital muscular dystrophy, and a majority of FCMD patients have a homozygous 3-kb retrotransposal insertion in the 3'non-coding region. Typically, they are able to sit but never attain independent ambulation in their lives. Recently, a patient from Turkey harboring homozygous 1-bp insertion reportedly showed a severe brain deformity with hydrocephalus and died 10 days after birth. In contrast, the mildest FKTN phenotype, LGMD2L, was identified in 6 cases from 4 families in Japan. These patients harbored compound heterozygous mutation with 3-kb retrotransposal insertion in the 3'non-coding region and a novel missense mutation in the coding region. Clinically, these patients presented with minimal muscle weakness and dilated cardiomyopathy and had normal intelligence. These data clearly indicate that FKTN mutations can cause a broad spectrum of muscular dystrophies. Therefore, clinicians should always

  2. The superhealing MRL background improves muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heydemann Ahlke

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mice from the MRL or “superhealing” strain have enhanced repair after acute injury to the skin, cornea, and heart. We now tested an admixture of the MRL genome and found that it altered the course of muscle pathology and cardiac function in a chronic disease model of skeletal and cardiac muscle. Mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan (Sgcg, a dystrophin-associated protein, develop muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy similar to their human counterparts with limb girdle muscular dystrophy. With disruption of the dystrophin complex, the muscle plasma membrane becomes leaky and muscles develop increased fibrosis. Methods MRL/MpJ mice were bred with Sgcg mice, and cardiac function was measured. Muscles were assessed for fibrosis and membrane leak using measurements of hydroxyproline and Evans blue dye. Quantitative trait locus mapping was conducted using single nucleotide polymorphisms distinct between the two parental strains. Results Introduction of the MRL genome reduced fibrosis but did not alter membrane leak in skeletal muscle of the Sgcg model. The MRL genome was also associated with improved cardiac function with reversal of depressed fractional shortening and the left ventricular ejection fraction. We conducted a genome-wide analysis of genetic modifiers and found that a region on chromosome 2 was associated with cardiac, diaphragm muscle and abdominal muscle fibrosis. Conclusions These data are consistent with a model where the MRL genome acts in a dominant manner to suppress fibrosis in this chronic disease setting of heart and muscle disease.

  3. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard, Xavier; Garanto, Alejandro; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several technical challenges so far prevent a broad clinical application of this approach for other forms of IRD. Many of the mutations leading to these retinal diseases affect pre-mRNA splicing of the mutated genes . Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated splice modulation appears to be a powerful approach to correct the consequences of such mutations at the pre-mRNA level , as demonstrated by promising results in clinical trials for several inherited disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, hypercholesterolemia and various types of cancer. In this mini-review, we summarize ongoing pre-clinical research on AON-based therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD , speculate on other potential therapeutic targets, and discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead to translate splice modulation therapy for retinal disorders to the clinic. PMID:26427454

  4. Limb girdle muscular dystrophies: The clinicopathological viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urtizberea J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD are characterized by involvement of the pelvic and shoulder girdles, classically with an onset in the second or third decade and a slow progression as opposed to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In fact, there are many clinical variants that are related to this broad definition. For the past 13 years and since the discovery of calpain-3 as the underlying defect in LGMD 2A in 1995, a number of different genes have been found to cause LGMD; some of whose encoding proteins are located either in the sarcolemma, nucleus, cytosol or in the extra-cellular matrix. Very little is known regarding a possible common pathogenesis between all these entities. The current nomenclature of LGMDs, although a bit confusing, is still necessary to continue the establishment of homogeneous cohorts of patients and to look for unknown genes. The diagnosis of LGMD is nowadays based on a complementary clinical, immunocytochemical and genetic approach that is best achieved in specialized myology centers. In this context, India can make a significant contribution to improve the routine diagnosis in LGMD patients and to find new LGMD genes in genetic isolates. Therapeutic prospects in LGMD, although quite exciting, remain at a preliminary stage, especially those with gene-therapy orientation.

  5. Muscle MRI findings in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is characterized by extremely variable degrees of facial, scapular and lower limb muscle involvement. Clinical and genetic determination can be difficult, as molecular analysis is not always definitive, and other similar muscle disorders may have overlapping clinical manifestations. Whole-body muscle MRI examination for fat infiltration, atrophy and oedema was performed to identify specific patterns of muscle involvement in FSHD patients (30 subjects), and compared to a group of control patients (23) affected by other myopathies (NFSHD). In FSHD patients, we detected a specific pattern of muscle fatty replacement and atrophy, particularly in upper girdle muscles. The most frequently affected muscles, including paucisymptomatic and severely affected FSHD patients, were trapezius, teres major and serratus anterior. Moreover, asymmetric muscle involvement was significantly higher in FSHD as compared to NFSHD patients. In conclusion, muscle MRI is very sensitive for identifying a specific pattern of involvement in FSHD patients and in detecting selective muscle involvement of non-clinically testable muscles. Muscle MRI constitutes a reliable tool for differentiating FSHD from other muscular dystrophies to direct diagnostic molecular analysis, as well as to investigate FSHD natural history and follow-up of the disease. (orig.)

  6. Developments in gene therapy for muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan-O'Connor, D; Chamberlain, J S

    Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy (MD) presents significant challenges, including the large amount of muscle tissue in the body, the large size of many genes defective in different muscular dystrophies, and the possibility of a host immune response against the therapeutic gene. Overcoming these challenges requires the development and delivery of suitable gene transfer vectors. Encouraging progress has been made in modifying adenovirus (Ad) vectors to reduce immune response and increase capacity. Recently developed gutted Ad vectors can deliver full-length dystrophin cDNA expression vectors to muscle tissue. Using muscle-specific promoters to drive dystrophin expression, a strong immune response has not been observed in mdx mice. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can deliver small genes to muscle without provocation of a significant immune response, which should allow long-term expression of several MD genes. AAV vectors have also been used to deliver sarcoglycan genes to entire muscle groups. These advances and others reviewed here suggest that barriers to gene therapy for MD are surmountable. PMID:10679969

  7. Muscle MRI findings in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerevini, Simonetta; Caliendo, Giandomenico; Falini, Andrea [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Neuroradiology Unit, Head and Neck Department, Milan (Italy); Scarlato, Marina; Previtali, Stefano Carlo [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Neurology, INSPE and Division of Neuroscience, Milan (Italy); Maggi, Lorenzo; Pasanisi, Barbara; Morandi, Lucia [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico ' ' Carlo Besta' ' , Neuromuscular Diseases and Neuroimmunology Unit, Milan (Italy); Cava, Mariangela [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Radiology and Center for Experimental Imaging, Milan (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is characterized by extremely variable degrees of facial, scapular and lower limb muscle involvement. Clinical and genetic determination can be difficult, as molecular analysis is not always definitive, and other similar muscle disorders may have overlapping clinical manifestations. Whole-body muscle MRI examination for fat infiltration, atrophy and oedema was performed to identify specific patterns of muscle involvement in FSHD patients (30 subjects), and compared to a group of control patients (23) affected by other myopathies (NFSHD). In FSHD patients, we detected a specific pattern of muscle fatty replacement and atrophy, particularly in upper girdle muscles. The most frequently affected muscles, including paucisymptomatic and severely affected FSHD patients, were trapezius, teres major and serratus anterior. Moreover, asymmetric muscle involvement was significantly higher in FSHD as compared to NFSHD patients. In conclusion, muscle MRI is very sensitive for identifying a specific pattern of involvement in FSHD patients and in detecting selective muscle involvement of non-clinically testable muscles. Muscle MRI constitutes a reliable tool for differentiating FSHD from other muscular dystrophies to direct diagnostic molecular analysis, as well as to investigate FSHD natural history and follow-up of the disease. (orig.)

  8. MR imaging of fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy; a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Koo, Hae Soo; Park, Ki Deuk [Ewha Womans Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-11-01

    Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy is a genetic disease and common in Japan. The typical clinical features are hypotonia with an early infantile onset and severe developmental delay. The diagnosis is based on pathologic evidence of muscular dystrophy revealed by biopsy or an increased serum creatine kinase levels. Involvement of the brain is characterized by abnormal cerebral cortical dysplasia, cerebellar dysplasia, and white matter changes. We encountered a case of Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy in which brain MRI findings were typical, and present this case together with a review of the literature.

  9. MR imaging of fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy; a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy is a genetic disease and common in Japan. The typical clinical features are hypotonia with an early infantile onset and severe developmental delay. The diagnosis is based on pathologic evidence of muscular dystrophy revealed by biopsy or an increased serum creatine kinase levels. Involvement of the brain is characterized by abnormal cerebral cortical dysplasia, cerebellar dysplasia, and white matter changes. We encountered a case of Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy in which brain MRI findings were typical, and present this case together with a review of the literature

  10. Atypical vitelliform macular dystrophy in a 5-generation family.

    OpenAIRE

    Hittner, H M; Ferrell, R E; Borda, R. P.; Justice, J

    1984-01-01

    Five generations of a family with autosomal dominant atypical vitelliform macular dystrophy (A-VMD) were studied. This dystrophy is similar to autosomal dominant Best's vitelliform dystrophy (B-VMD) but clinically more closely resembles sporadic pseudovitelliform macular degeneration (P-VMD). Of the family members who were 14 years or older 43 (24 females and 19 males) of the 101 at risk (43%) were affected. Vision varied from 20/20 to 20/200. Field defects and tritan colour defects were inva...

  11. Bilateral cloudy cornea: is the usual suspect congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy or stromal dystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Banu Torun; Bozkurt, Kansu Tahir; Duman, Erkan; Acar, Suphi

    2016-01-01

    We provide the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up period of a patient with cloudy cornea in both eyes from birth. A 4-year-old girl presented with blurring in both eyes. Penetrating keratoplasty (PK) was performed with the preliminary diagnosis of congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy in June 2012. According to the pathology report for extracted host tissue, the Descemet's membrane (DM) and endothelium were healthy and diagnosis was reported to be congenital hereditary stromal dystrophy. Deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty was performed on the left eye. The DM was transparent at follow-up. Cornea transplantation is the only choice to provide visual rehabilitation in children with congenital cloudy cornea. However, it is known that the prognosis of traditional PK in the paediatric age group is not good. Therefore, when using alternative keratoplasty (deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty, Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty) options, pathological examination of the host tissue should be made. PMID:27107055

  12. Microdystrophin Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy in the Canine Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Jin-Hong; Pan, Xiufang; Hakim, Chady H.; Yang, Hsiao T.; Yue, Yongping; Zhang, Keqing; Ronald L Terjung; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Dystrophin deficiency results in lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Substituting missing dystrophin with abbreviated microdystrophin has dramatically alleviated disease in mouse DMD models. Unfortunately, translation of microdystrophin therapy has been unsuccessful in dystrophic dogs, the only large mammalian model. Approximately 70% of the dystrophin-coding sequence is removed in microdystrophin. Intriguingly, loss of ≥50% dystrophin frequently results in severe disease in patients. T...

  13. A range of clinical phenotypes associated with mutations in CRX, a photoreceptor transcription-factor gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Sohocki, M M; Sullivan, L S; Mintz-Hittner, H A; Birch, D.; Heckenlively, J R; Freund, C L; McInnes, R R; Daiger, S P

    1998-01-01

    Mutations in the retinal-expressed gene CRX (cone-rod homeobox gene) have been associated with dominant cone-rod dystrophy and with de novo Leber congenital amaurosis. However, CRX is a transcription factor for several retinal genes, including the opsins and the gene for interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein. Because loss of CRX function could alter the expression of a number of other retinal proteins, we screened for mutations in the CRX gene in probands with a range of degenerative re...

  14. Valley sign in Becker muscular dystrophy and outliers of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradhan Sunil

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Valley sign has been described in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. As there are genetic and clinical similarities between DMD and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD, this clinical sign is evaluated in this study in BMD and DMD/BMD outliers. To evaluate the sign, 28 patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD, 8 DMD/BMD outliers and 44 age-matched male controls with other neuromuscular diseases were studied. The sign was examined after asking patients to abduct their arms to about 90ºwith hands directed upwards; the muscle bulk over the back of the shoulders was observed. The sign was considered positive if the infraspinatus and deltoid muscles were enlarged and between these two muscles, the muscles forming the posterior axillary fold were wasted as if there were a valley between the two mounts. Twenty-five BMD patients and 7 DMD/BMD outliers had positive valley sign. However, it was less remarkable in comparison to DMD. It was absent in all the 44 controls. It was concluded that the presence of valley sign may help in differentiating BMD from other progressive neuromuscular disorders of that age group.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: lattice corneal dystrophy type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diagnosis & Management These resources address the diagnosis or management of lattice corneal dystrophy type II: American Foundation for the Blind: Living with Vision Loss Genetic Testing Registry: Meretoja syndrome Merck Manual ...

  16. Sarcomeric dysfunction contributes to muscle weakness in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lassche, S.; Stienen, G.J.; Irving, T.C.; Maarel, S.M. van der; Voermans, N.C.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Granzier, H.; Engelen, B.G. van; Ottenheijm, C.A.C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether sarcomeric dysfunction contributes to muscle weakness in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). METHODS: Sarcomeric function was evaluated by contractile studies on demembranated single muscle fibers obtained from quadriceps muscle biopsies of 4 patients wit

  17. The importance of genetic diagnosis for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Ginjaar, Ieke B; Bushby, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy are caused by mutations in the dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. Large deletions and duplications are most common, but small mutations have been found as well. Having a correct diagnosis is important for family planning and providing proper care to patients according to published guidelines. With mutation-specific therapies under development for DMD, a correct diagnosis is now also important for assessing whether patients are eligibl...

  18. Annexin A6 modifies muscular dystrophy by mediating sarcolemmal repair

    OpenAIRE

    Swaggart, KA; Demonbreun, AR; Vo, AH; Swanson, KE; Kim, EY; Fahrenbach, JP; Holley-Cuthrell, J; Eskin, A; Z. Chen; Squire, K; Heydemann, A; Palmer, AA; Nelson, SF; McNally, EM

    2014-01-01

    Many monogenic disorders, including the muscular dystrophies, display phenotypic variability despite the same disease-causing mutation. To identify genetic modifiers of muscular dystrophy and its associated cardiomyopathy, we used quantitative trait locus mapping and whole genome sequencing in a mouse model. This approach uncovered a modifier locus on chromosome 11 associated with sarcolemmal membrane damage and heart mass. Whole genome and RNA sequencing identified Anxa6, encoding annexin A6...

  19. Dasatinib as a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Lipscomb, Leanne; Piggott, Robert W.; Emmerson, Tracy; Winder, Steve J.

    2015-01-01

    Identification of a systemically acting and universal small molecule therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy would be an enormous advance for this condition. Based on evidence gained from studies on mouse genetic models, we have identified tyrosine phosphorylation and degradation of β-dystroglycan as a key event in the aetiology of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Thus, preventing tyrosine phosphorylation and degradation of β-dystroglycan presents itself as a potential therapeutic strategy. Using...

  20. Genetic Engineering of Dystroglycan in Animal Models of Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Sciandra; Maria Giulia Bigotti; Bruno Giardina; Manuela Bozzi; Andrea Brancaccio

    2015-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, dystroglycan (DG) is the central component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC), a multimeric protein complex that ensures a strong mechanical link between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. Several muscular dystrophies arise from mutations hitting most of the components of the DGC. Mutations within the DG gene (DAG1) have been recently associated with two forms of muscular dystrophy, one displaying a milder and one a more severe phenotype. This review ...

  1. The fibrinolitys system in muscle regeneration and dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal Iglesias, Berta

    2008-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal degenerative disorder of locomotor and respiratory muscles, in which myofibers are progressively replaced by non-muscular fibrotic tissue. Here, we show that fibrin/ogen accumulates in dystrophic muscles of DMD patients and of the mdx mouse model of DMD. Genetic loss or pharmacological depletion of fibrin/ogen in mdx mice attenuated muscular dystrophy progression and improved locomotor capacity. More importantly, fibrin/ogen depletion reduced fibro...

  2. Comparison of Deflazacort and Prednisone in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Parvaneh KARIMZADEH; Ahad GHAZAVI

    2012-01-01

    How to Cite this Article: Karimzadeh P, Ghazavi A. Comparison of Deflazacort and Prednisone in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. IranianJournal of Child Neurology 2012;6(1):5-12.ObjectiveDuchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a degenerative disease that usually becomes clinically detectable in childhood as progressive proximal weakness. No cure is yet available for DMD, but the use of steroids improves muscle strength and function. This study has been carried out to select the best steroid for the m...

  3. Autophagy as a new therapeutic target in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Palma, C.; F. Morisi; Cheli, S; S. Pambianco; Cappello, V; Vezzoli, M; Rovere-Querini, P; Moggio, M; Ripolone, M.; Francolini, M; Sandri, M.; Clementi, E

    2012-01-01

    A resolutive therapy for Duchene muscular dystrophy, a severe degenerative disease of the skeletal muscle, is still lacking. Because autophagy has been shown to be crucial in clearing dysfunctional organelles and in preventing tissue damage, we investigated its pathogenic role and its suitability as a target for new therapeutic interventions in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Here we demonstrate that autophagy is severely impaired in muscles from patients affected by DMD and mdx mice, a mo...

  4. RESPIRATORY DYSFUNCTION IN UNSEDATED DOGS WITH GOLDEN RETRIEVER MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

    OpenAIRE

    DeVanna, Justin C.; Kornegay, Joe N; Bogan, Daniel J.; Bogan, Janet R; Dow, Jennifer L.; Hawkins, Eleanor C.

    2013-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) is a well-established model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The value of this model would be greatly enhanced with practical tools to monitor progression of respiratory dysfunction during treatment trials. Arterial blood gas analysis, tidal breathing spirometry, and respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) were performed to determine if quantifiable abnormalities could be identified in unsedated, untrained, GRMD dogs. Results from 11 dogs with a ...

  5. Cardiac involvement in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Mavrogeni, Sophie; Markousis-Mavrogenis, George; Papavasiliou, Antigoni; Kolovou, Genovefa

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) are X-linked muscular diseases responsible for over 80% of all muscular dystrophies. Cardiac disease is a common manifestation, not necessarily related to the degree of skeletal myopathy; it may be the predominant manifestation with or without any other evidence of muscular disease. Death is usually due to ventricular dysfunction, heart block or malignant arrhythmias. Not only DMD/BMD patients, but also female carriers may present cardiac invol...

  6. Late gadolinium enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance in Becker muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Varghese, A; Pennell, D J

    2004-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy is a rare cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. A case of Becker muscular dystrophy is reviewed in which cardiovascular magnetic resonance showed previously unreported findings of extensive mid-myocardial late gadolinium enhancement. Similar detection of late gadolinium enhancement in conjunction with other uses of cardiovascular magnetic resonance may contribute significantly to the diagnosis and management of patients with this unusual and important diagnosis.

  7. TRIM Proteins in Therapeutic Membrane Repair of Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Alloush, Jenna; Weisleder, Noah

    2013-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy represents a major unmet medical need as only palliative treatments exist for these debilitating diseases. Since multiple forms of muscular dystrophy arise from compromised sarcolemmal membrane integrity a therapeutic approach that can target this loss of membrane barrier function could be applicable to a number of these distinct genetic diseases. One pathway that presents an excellent opportunity to affect compromised membrane integrity is the process that the cell uses to...

  8. Gene Therapy in Large Animal Models of Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zejing; Jeffrey S. Chamberlain; Tapscott, Stephen J.; Storb, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of genetically and phenotypically heterogeneously inherited diseases characterized by progressive muscle wasting, which can lead to premature death in severe forms such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In many cases they are caused by the absence of proteins that are critical components of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, which links the cytoskeleton and the basal lamina. There is no effective treatment for these disorders at present, but several ...

  9. Gene Therapy for Muscular Dystrophy: Lessons Learned and Path Forward

    OpenAIRE

    Mendell, Jerry R.; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Sahenk, Zarife; Malik, Vinod; Kaspar, Brian K.; Walker, Christopher M.; Clark, K. Reed

    2012-01-01

    Our Translational Gene Therapy Center has used small molecules for exon skipping and mutation suppression and gene transfer to replace or provide surrogate genes as tools for molecular-based approaches for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. Exon skipping is targeted at the pre-mRNA level allowing one or more exons to be omitted to restore the reading frame. In Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), clinical trials have been performed with two different oligomers, a 2′O-methyl-ribo-oligonucleo...

  10. Sands of Sahara after LASIK in Avellino Corneal Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Flavio Mantelli; Alessandro Lambiase; Antonio Di Zazzo; Stefano Bonini

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a patient diagnosed with Avellino corneal dystrophy (ACD) who developed diffuse interstitial keratitis following excimer laser insitu keratomileusis (LASIK). ACD is an autosomal dominant corneal dystrophy characterized by multiple asymmetric stromal opacities that impair vision. Accepted treatments for this condition include corneal transplantation and phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK). Our patient underwent LASIK at another institution to correct myopia. LASIK and phot...

  11. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Mah JK

    2016-01-01

    Jean K Mah Department of Pediatrics and Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Abstract: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the...

  12. Birdshot chorioretinopathy in a male patient with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Papavasileiou, Evangelia; Lobo, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background: We report a case of birdshot chorioretinopathy (BSCR) in a patient with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). A 40-year-old male with history of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy with significant facial diplegia and lagophthalmos presents for an evaluation of bilateral choroiditis with vasculitis and optic disc edema. Clinical examination included fundus and autofluorescence photographs, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography. To our knowledge, thi...

  13. Toxemia of pregnancy pigment epitheliopathy masquerading as a heredomacular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Gass, D M; PAUTLER, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    Patients with toxemia of pregnancy may develop permanent alterations of the pigment epithelium that if first discovered in later life may be mistaken for a heredomacular dystrophy, a diffuse tapetoretinal dystrophy or other diseases. These nonprogressive changes are caused by multifocal areas of fibrous platelet occlusion of the choriocapillaris that usually occur just prior to or following delivery and is usually associated with a transient period of exudative retinal detachment. The pattern...

  14. Birdshot chorioretinopathy in a male patient with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Papavasileiou, Evangelia; Lobo, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background We report a case of birdshot chorioretinopathy (BSCR) in a patient with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). A 40-year-old male with history of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy with significant facial diplegia and lagophthalmos presents for an evaluation of bilateral choroiditis with vasculitis and optic disc edema. Clinical examination included fundus and autofluorescence photographs, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography. To our knowledge, this...

  15. Low Vision Rehabilitation in Patients with Hereditary Retinal Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    İkbal Seza Petriçli; Aysun İdil Merdoğan; Zuhal Özen Tunay; Özdemir Özdemir

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the methods of low vision rehabilitation in patients with hereditary retinal dystrophy. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Ophthalmology Department of Low Vision Rehabilitation and Research Unit between January 2005 and May 2013. The diagnosis of 181 of 1841 patients referred to this unit was determined as hereditary retinal dystrophy (HRD). Patients were grouped according to their distant and near visual a...

  16. Dark adaptation in patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Baca, W.; Fishman, G. A.; Alexander, K. R.; Glenn, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    Psychophysical dark adaptation studies were performed in six patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) using a Goldmann-Weekers dark adaptometer. Prebleach thresholds were determined before obtaining a postbleach full recovery curve. Unlike patients with Stargardt macular dystrophy, all patients with BVMD showed a normal time to reach their baseline dark adapted thresholds after bleaching of their rod visual pigment when tested in clinically normal appearing retina. Although a l...

  17. Sarcopenia and Sarcopenic Obesity in Patients with Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Luciano eMerlini; Alessandro eVagheggini; Daniela eCocchi

    2014-01-01

    Aging sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy are two conditions characterized by lower skeletal muscle quantity, lower muscle strength, and lower physical performance. Aging is associated with a peculiar alteration in body composition called sarcopenic obesity characterized by a decrease in lean body mass and increase in fat mass. To evaluate the presence of sarcopenia and obesity in a cohort of adult patients with muscular dystrophy we have used the measurement techniques considered golden standa...

  18. Bilateral coexistence of keratoconus and macular corneal dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazi Al-Hamdan

    2009-01-01

    The authors hereby report a 21-year-old female who presented with the typical signs and topographic evidence of keratoconus in association with macular corneal dystrophy. Histopathologic evaluation from the excised corneal button after corneal transplant confirmed the diagnosis. To our knowledge, there is only one previous report in the literature linking the association of keratoconus and macular corneal dystrophy in the same eye bilaterally.

  19. Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy: a polyalanine myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brais, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    It has been 10 years since the identification of the first PABPN1 gene (GCN)(n)/polyalanine mutations responsible for oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). These mutations have been found in most cases of OPMD diagnosed in more than 35 countries. Sequence analyses have shown that such mutations have occurred numerous times in human history. Although PABPN1 was found early on to be a component of the classic filamentous intranuclear inclusions (INIs), mRNA and other proteins also have been found to coaggregate in the INIs. It is still unclear if the INIs play a pathologic or a protective role. The generation of numerous cell and animal models of OPMD has led to greater insight into its complex molecular pathophysiology and identified the first candidate therapeutic molecules. This paper reviews basic and clinical research on OPMD, with special emphasis on recent developments in the understanding of its pathophysiology. PMID:19080757

  20. Fibroblast cultures in duchenne muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary skin fibroblast cultures were grown from forearm pinch skin biopsies obtained from 24 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and ten normal controls matched for sex and age. The first subcultures were grown for 7 days and incubated with L-(3H)-proline for 24 hours. Intracellular collagen incoption was significantly decreased (2.2 X) and extracellular collagen incorporation significantly increased (1.8 X) in fibroblast cultures from patients with DMD by both collagenase assay and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The synthesis of noncollagen proteins showed low values from the DMD fibroblast cultures. The alterations in synthesis and secretion of collagen and noncollagen proteins were characteristic only for the log phase of DMD fibroblasts. (author)

  1. Intramuscular degeneration process in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intramuscular degeneration process of Duchenne dystrophy skeletal muscles was investigated by longitudinal skeletal muscle imaging with high-field-strength NMR-CT of 1.5 Tesla. Thigh muscles in 10 cases ranging in age from 4 to 19 years were examined by T1-weighted longitudinal images (TR=215∼505 ms, TE=19∼20 ms). The following results were obtained. Skeletal muscle degeneration was depicted as high signal intensity area reflecting its high fat contents. These high signal intensity areas had a longitudinally streaky appearance in parallel direction with myofibers. These findings were more prominent toward myotendon junction than muscle bellies. Skeletal muscle degeneration progressed rapidly between 7 to 10 years of age, and reached a plateau after that. (author)

  2. Natural history of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing KE

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is X-linked recessive hereditary disease. DMD gene mutations result in dystrophin deficiency, which causes not only muscle movement disorders but also scoliosis, cognitive dysfunction, urinary tract diseases, respiratory diseases and heart diseases. Most patients die in early adult for respiratory and circulatory failure. Early multidisciplinary therapies will significantly delay disease progression and improve patients' quality of life. However, DMD diagnosis and treatment exist significantly time delay now. In this study, we review the natural history of DMD, including motor, cognitive, respiratory and heart function, for improving DMD early recognition, diagnosis and treatment, so as to benefit DMD patients. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.05.004

  3. Recent advances in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perkins KJ

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Kelly J Perkins,1,2 Kay E Davies21Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, 2MRC Functional Genomics Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UKAbstract: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, an allelic X-linked progressive muscle-wasting disease, is one of the most common single-gene disorders in the developed world. Despite knowledge of the underlying genetic causation and resultant pathophysiology from lack of dystrophin protein at the muscle sarcolemma, clinical intervention is currently restricted to symptom management. In recent years, however, unprecedented advances in strategies devised to correct the primary defect through gene- and cell-based therapeutics hold particular promise for treating dystrophic muscle. Conventional gene replacement and endogenous modification strategies have greatly benefited from continued improvements in encapsidation capacity, transduction efficiency, and systemic delivery. In particular, RNA-based modifying approaches such as exon skipping enable expression of a shorter but functional dystrophin protein and rapid progress toward clinical application. Emerging combined gene- and cell-therapy strategies also illustrate particular promise in enabling ex vivo genetic correction and autologous transplantation to circumvent a number of immune challenges. These approaches are complemented by a vast array of pharmacological approaches, in particular the successful identification of molecules that enable functional replacement or ameliorate secondary DMD pathology. Animal models have been instrumental in providing proof of principle for many of these strategies, leading to several recent trials that have investigated their efficacy in DMD patients. Although none has reached the point of clinical use, rapid improvements in experimental technology and design draw this goal ever closer. Here, we review therapeutic approaches to DMD, with particular emphasis on recent progress in strategic development, preclinical evaluation and

  4. Cardiac Dysrhythmias, Cardiomyopathy and Muscular Dystrophy in Patients with Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy and Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 1B

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Jong-Seo; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Jong-Won; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Kim, June Soo; Baek, Kyung Kee; Kim, Byoung Joon; Ahn, Kyoung Ju; Kim, Duk-Kyung

    2005-01-01

    Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1B (LGMD1B) are characterized by cardiac dysrhythmias, late-onset cardiomyopathy, slowly progressive skeletal myopathy and contractures of the neck, elbows and ankles. The causative mutation is either in the emerin gene (X-linked recessive EDMD) or lamin A/C gene (autosomal dominant EDMD2 or LGMD1B). We report three cases of EDMD, EDMD2 and LGMD1B. A 14-yr-old boy showed limitation of cervical flexion and contrac...

  5. Creatine kinase response to high-intensity aerobic exercise in adult-onset muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren P; Sveen, Marie-Louise; Hansen, Regitze S;

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of high-intensity exercise on plasma creatine kinase (CK) in patients with muscular dystrophies.......We investigated the effect of high-intensity exercise on plasma creatine kinase (CK) in patients with muscular dystrophies....

  6. Outcome of Long-Term Corticosteroid Treatment in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The clinical orthopedic effects of chronic daily corticosteroid treatment were evaluated by chart review in boys with genetically confirmed Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD followed at the Ohio State University Muscular Dystrophy Clinic between 2000 and 2003.

  7. Outcome of Long-Term Corticosteroid Treatment in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-01-01

    The clinical orthopedic effects of chronic daily corticosteroid treatment were evaluated by chart review in boys with genetically confirmed Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) followed at the Ohio State University Muscular Dystrophy Clinic between 2000 and 2003.

  8. NIH study shows increased risk for two types of myotonic muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adults with a form of muscular dystrophy called myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD) may be at increased risk of developing cancer, according to a study by investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health.

  9. Muscular Dystrophy Campaign: Putting Some Financial Muscle Behind Finding a Cure

    OpenAIRE

    Pohlschmidt, Marita

    2012-01-01

    The Muscular Dystrophy Campaign, a London-based charitable organization, funds research on muscle function and muscle disease, including the study of muscle stem cells. Dr. Marita Pohlschmidt, the Muscular Dystrophy Campaign's director of research, describes its vision and goals.

  10. A novel homozygous 10 nucleotide deletion in BBS10 causes Bardet-Biedl syndrome in a Pakistani family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agha, Z.; Iqbal, Z.; Azam, M.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Qamar, R.

    2013-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl Syndrome is a multisystem autosomal recessive disorder characterized by central obesity, polydactyly, hypogonadism, learning difficulties, rod-cone dystrophy and renal dysplasia. Bardet-Biedl Syndrome has a prevalence rate ranging from 1 in 100,000 to 1 in 160,000 births although there

  11. Interpretation of "Diagnosis and management of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a guide for families (2011 version)"

    OpenAIRE

    Xi-hua LI

    2015-01-01

    The guideline "Diagnosis and management of Duchenne muscular dystrophy" was supported by a 3-year-long project guided by US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in collaboration with patient advocacy groups [Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA), Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) and United Parent Projects Muscular Dystrophy (UPPMD)] and Translational Research in Europe: Assessment and Treatment of Neuromuscular Disease (TREAT-NMD) network. The main document was published i...

  12. Continuous Infusion Propofol General Anesthesia for Dental Treatment in Patients With Progressive Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka, Kazuho; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2005-01-01

    Progressive muscular dystrophy may produce abnormal reactions to several drugs. There is no consensus of opinion regarding the continuous infusion of propofol in patients with progressive muscular dystrophy. We successfully treated 2 patients with progressive muscular dystrophy who were anesthetized with a continuous infusion of propofol. In case 1, a 19-year-old, 59-kg man with Becker muscular dystrophy and mental retardation was scheduled for dental treatment under general anesthesia. Gener...

  13. FHL1 reduces dystrophy in transgenic mice overexpressing FSHD muscular dystrophy region gene 1 (FRG1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J Feeney

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is an autosomal-dominant disease with no effective treatment. The genetic cause of FSHD is complex and the primary pathogenic insult underlying the muscle disease is unknown. Several disease candidate genes have been proposed including DUX4 and FRG1. Expression analysis studies of FSHD report the deregulation of genes which mediate myoblast differentiation and fusion. Transgenic mice overexpressing FRG1 recapitulate the FSHD muscular dystrophy phenotype. Our current study selectively examines how increased expression of FRG1 may contribute to myoblast differentiation defects. We generated stable C2C12 cell lines overexpressing FRG1, which exhibited a myoblast fusion defect upon differentiation. To determine if myoblast fusion defects contribute to the FRG1 mouse dystrophic phenotype, this strain was crossed with skeletal muscle specific FHL1-transgenic mice. We previously reported that FHL1 promotes myoblast fusion in vitro and FHL1-transgenic mice develop skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In the current study, FRG1 mice overexpressing FHL1 showed an improvement in the dystrophic phenotype, including a reduced spinal kyphosis, increased muscle mass and myofiber size, and decreased muscle fibrosis. FHL1 expression in FRG1 mice, did not alter satellite cell number or activation, but enhanced myoblast fusion. Primary myoblasts isolated from FRG1 mice showed a myoblast fusion defect that was rescued by FHL1 expression. Therefore, increased FRG1 expression may contribute to a muscular dystrophy phenotype resembling FSHD by impairing myoblast fusion, a defect that can be rescued by enhanced myoblast fusion via expression of FHL1.

  14. Successful treatment of murine muscular dystrophy with the proteinase inhibitor leupeptin.

    OpenAIRE

    Sher, J H; Stracher, A.; Shafiq, S A; Hardy-Stashin, J

    1981-01-01

    Mice with genetic muscular dystrophy were treated with intraperitoneal injections of the proteinase inhibitor leupeptin, beginning before the onset of weakness. A significant number of the treated animals failed to develop histological evidence of dystrophy, compared with controls. Leupeptin treatment prevented (or delayed) the onset of muscular dystrophy in this experiment.

  15. The Link Between Stress Disorders and Autonomic Dysfunction in Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Rasna eSabharwal

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease of muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and cardiac dysfunction. Patients afflicted with muscular dystrophy exhibit autonomic dysfunction along with cognitive impairment, severe depression, sadness, and anxiety. Although the psychological aspects of cardiovascular disorders and stress disorders are well known, the physiological mechanism underlying this relationship is not well understood, particularly in muscular dystrophy. Therefore, the goal of this p...

  16. Skin features in myotonic dystrophy type 1: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanati, A; Giannoni, M; Buratti, L; Cagnetti, C; Giuliodori, K; Ganzetti, G; Silvestrini, M; Provinciali, L; Offidani, A

    2015-05-01

    Poor data regarding skin involvement in Myotonic Dystrophy, also named Dystrophia Myotonica type 1, have been reported. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and types of skin disorders in adult patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. Fifty-five patients and one hundred age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were referred to a trained dermatologist for a complete skin examination to check for potential cutaneous hallmarks of disease. No difference in prevalence of preneoplastic, neoplastic, and cutaneous lesions was detected between the two groups. Among morphofunctional, proliferative and inflammatory lesions, focal hyperhidrosis (p androgenic alopecia (p = 0.01), nail pitting (p = 0.003), pedunculus fibromas (p = 0. 01), twisted hair (p = 0.01), seborrheic dermatitis (p = 0.02), macules of hyperpigmentation (p = 0.03) were significantly more frequent in patients compared with controls. In patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 significant differences according to sex were found for: early androgenic alopecia, twisted hair and seborrheic dermatitis, whose prevalence was higher in males (p < 0.0001). Our preliminary results seem to rule out an increased prevalence of pre-neoplastic, and neoplastic skin lesions in Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. On the other hand, an increased prevalence of morphofunctional, inflammatory, and proliferative diseases involving adnexal structures seems to characterize adult patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. PMID:25813338

  17. Morphologic imaging in muscular dystrophies and inflammatory myopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degardin, Adrian; Lacour, Arnaud; Vermersch, Patrick [CHU de Lille, Clinique neurologique, Lille (France); Morillon, David; Cotten, Anne [CHRU de Lille, Service de Radiologie Osteoarticulaire, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille (France); Stojkovic, Tanya [G-H Pitie-Salpetriere, Institut de Myologie, Paris (France)

    2010-12-15

    To determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) is useful in the diagnostic workup of muscular dystrophies and idiopathic inflammatory myopathies for describing the topography of muscle involvement. MR imaging was performed in 31 patients: 8 with dystrophic myotony types 1 (n = 4) or 2 (n = 4); 11 with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, including dysferlinopathy, calpainopathy, sarcoglycanopathy, and dystrophy associated with fukutin-related protein mutation; 3 with Becker muscular dystrophy; and 9 with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, including polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and sporadic inclusion body myositis. Analysis of T1 images enabled us to describe the most affected muscles and the muscles usually spared for each muscular disease. In particular, examination of pelvis, thigh, and leg muscles demonstrated significant differences between the muscular diseases. On STIR images, hyperintensities were present in 62% of our patients with muscular dystrophies. A specific pattern of muscular involvement was established for each muscular disease. Hyperintensities observed on STIR images precede fatty degeneration and are not specific for inflammatory myopathies. (orig.)

  18. Prevalence of cardiomyopathy in duchenne and becker's muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac assessment was not done routinely in Duchenne (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) patients in Northern region of England while evidence was gathering on progressive cardiomyopathy in these patients. We wanted to find out the prevalence, progression and clinical features of cardiac involvement in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. Methods: It is a retrospective review of clinical, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic assessments. The notes of 52 Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients were reviewed out of which 32 had DMD, 6 had Intermediate muscular dystrophy (IMD) and 14 had BMD. Prevalence of preclinical and clinically evident cardiac involvement was 88.4% in DMD and BMD patients. Sixty nine% of patients had clinically evident cardiac involvement but only four patients had cardiac symptoms in the form of palpitations, out of which two were due to respiratory dysfunction and others was due to cardiac failure. Clinical examination of the rest of all of the patients was unremarkable. Electrocardiogram was abnormal in 88.4% of patients. Conduction defects were found in 19.4% of patients. Echocardiogram was abnormal in 80.7% of patients but all were poor echo subjects including those who had normal echocardiogram. Though most patients were asymptomatic, a high percentage had evidence of preclinical and clinically evident cardiac involvement. So in all patients with Xp21 linked muscular dystrophy a routine baseline cardiac assessment should be done at the age of 10 years and reviewed after intervals of one to two years. (author)

  19. Morphologic imaging in muscular dystrophies and inflammatory myopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) is useful in the diagnostic workup of muscular dystrophies and idiopathic inflammatory myopathies for describing the topography of muscle involvement. MR imaging was performed in 31 patients: 8 with dystrophic myotony types 1 (n = 4) or 2 (n = 4); 11 with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, including dysferlinopathy, calpainopathy, sarcoglycanopathy, and dystrophy associated with fukutin-related protein mutation; 3 with Becker muscular dystrophy; and 9 with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, including polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and sporadic inclusion body myositis. Analysis of T1 images enabled us to describe the most affected muscles and the muscles usually spared for each muscular disease. In particular, examination of pelvis, thigh, and leg muscles demonstrated significant differences between the muscular diseases. On STIR images, hyperintensities were present in 62% of our patients with muscular dystrophies. A specific pattern of muscular involvement was established for each muscular disease. Hyperintensities observed on STIR images precede fatty degeneration and are not specific for inflammatory myopathies. (orig.)

  20. [When do you implant a pacemaker in myotonic dystrophy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babuty, Dominique; Lallemand, Bénédicte; Laurent, Valérie; Clémenty, Nicolas; Pierre, Bertrand; Fauchier, Laurent; Raynaud, Martine; Pellieux, Sybille

    2011-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is the most frequent adult form of hereditary muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation on the DMPK gene. Myotonic dystrophy leads to multiple systemic complications related to weakness, respiratory failure, cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac conduction disturbances. Age of death is earlier in myotonic dystrophy patients than in general population with a high frequency of sudden death. Several mechanisms are involved in sudden death: atrio-ventricular block, severe ventricular arrhythmias or non-cardiac mechanism. The high degree of atrio-ventricular block is a well-recognized indication of pacemaker implantation but the prophylactic implantation of pacemaker should be considered to prevent sudden death in asymptomatic myotonic dystrophy patients. A careful clinical evaluation needs to be done for the identification of patients at high risk of sudden death. The resting ECG and SA ECG are non-invasive tools useful to select the patients who need an electrophysiologic study. In presence of prolonged HV interval more than or equal to 70 ms one can discuss the implantation of a prophylactic pacemaker. The choice of an implantable cardiac defibrillator is preferred in presence of spontaneous ventricular tachycardia or an alteration of the left ventricular ejection fraction. PMID:21549556

  1. Serum Creatinine Level: A Supplemental Index to Distinguish Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy from Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huili Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To improve assessment of dystrophinopathy, the aim of this study was to identify whether serum creatinine (Crn level reflects disease severity. Methods. Biochemical, Vignos score, and genetic data were collected on 212 boys with dystrophinopathy. Results. Serum Crn level had a strong inverse correlation with Vignos score by simple correlation (r=-0.793 and partial correlation analysis after adjustment for age, height, and weight (r=-0.791; both P<0.01. Serum Crn level was significantly higher in patients with in-frame than out-of-frame mutations (Z=-4.716, P<0.01 and in Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD patients than Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD patients at ages 4, 5, 7, and 9 yr (all P<0.0125. After adjusting for age, height, and weight, BMD patients still had a significantly higher serum Crn level than DMD patients (β=7.140, t=6.277, P<0.01. Conclusions. Serum Crn level reflected disease severity and may serve as a supplemental index to distinguish DMD from BMD in clinical practice.

  2. Optimizing Bone Health in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason L. Buckner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, with eventual loss of ambulation and premature death. The approved therapy with corticosteroids improves muscle strength, prolongs ambulation, and maintains pulmonary function. However, the osteoporotic impact of chronic corticosteroid use further impairs the underlying reduced bone mass seen in DMD, leading to increased fragility fractures of long bones and vertebrae. These serious sequelae adversely affect quality of life and can impact survival. The current clinical issues relating to bone health and bone health screening methods in DMD are presented in this review. Diagnostic studies, including biochemical markers of bone turnover and bone mineral density by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, as well as spinal imaging using densitometric lateral spinal imaging, and treatment to optimize bone health in patients with DMD are discussed. Treatment with bisphosphonates offers a method to increase bone mass in these children; oral and intravenous bisphosphonates have been used successfully although treatment is typically reserved for children with fractures and/or bone pain with low bone mass by DXA.

  3. The quality of life in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Gholamreza; Heidari, Morteza; Azizi Malamiri, Reza; Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza; Mohammadi, Mahmoud; Shervin Badv, Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Ahmad; Salehi, Soodeh; Shahrokhi, Amin; Qorbani, Mostafa; Fathi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-07-01

    We conducted a study to evaluate the quality of life in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy aged 8-18 years, compared with that in matched healthy controls. A total of 85 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy aged 8-18 years and 136 age, sex and living place matched healthy controls were included in this study. Patients and one of their parents separately completed the 27-item Persian version of KIDSCREEN questionnaire (child and adolescent version and parent version). From the children's perspective, the quality of life in patients was found to be lower in two subclasses: "physical activities and health" (p muscular dystrophy have quite a satisfactory quality of life. A happier and more hopeful life can be promoted through increasing social support and improving the parental knowledge regarding their child's more positive life perspective. PMID:27234309

  4. Jagged 1 Rescues the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Natassia M; Elvers, Ingegerd; Alexander, Matthew S; Moreira, Yuri B; Eran, Alal; Gomes, Juliana P; Marshall, Jamie L; Karlsson, Elinor K; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Kunkel, Louis M; Zatz, Mayana

    2015-11-19

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), caused by mutations at the dystrophin gene, is the most common form of muscular dystrophy. There is no cure for DMD and current therapeutic approaches to restore dystrophin expression are only partially effective. The absence of dystrophin in muscle results in dysregulation of signaling pathways, which could be targets for disease therapy and drug discovery. Previously, we identified two exceptional Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs that are mildly affected, have functional muscle, and normal lifespan despite the complete absence of dystrophin. Now, our data on linkage, whole-genome sequencing, and transcriptome analyses of these dogs compared to severely affected GRMD and control animals reveals that increased expression of Jagged1 gene, a known regulator of the Notch signaling pathway, is a hallmark of the mild phenotype. Functional analyses demonstrate that Jagged1 overexpression ameliorates the dystrophic phenotype, suggesting that Jagged1 may represent a target for DMD therapy in a dystrophin-independent manner. PAPERCLIP. PMID:26582133

  5. Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance Tracking and Research Network (MD STARnet): Case Definition in Surveillance for Childhood-Onset Duchenne/Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Mathews, Katherine D.; Cunniff, Chris; Kantamneni, Jiji R.; Ciafaloni, Emma; Miller, Timothy; Matthews, Dennis; Cwik, Valerie; Druschel, Charlotte; Miller, Lisa; Meaney, F. John; Sladky, John; Romitti, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    The Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance Tracking and Research Network (MD STARnet) is a multisite collaboration to determine the prevalence of childhood-onset Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy and to characterize health care and health outcomes in this population. MD STARnet uses medical record abstraction to identify patients with Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy born January 1, 1982 or later who resided in one of the participating sites. Critical diagnostic elements of each abstracted record...

  6. uPA deficiency exacerbates muscular dystrophy in MDX mice

    OpenAIRE

    Suelves, Mònica; Vidal, Berta; Serrano, Antonio L.; Tjwa, Marc; Roma, Josep; López-Alemany, Roser; Luttun, Aernout; de Lagrán, María Martínez; Díaz, Maria Àngels; Jardí, Mercè; Roig, Manuel; Dierssen, Mara; Dewerchin, Mieke; Carmeliet, Peter; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2007-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal and incurable muscle degenerative disorder. We identify a function of the protease urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in mdx mice, a mouse model of DMD. The expression of uPA is induced in mdx dystrophic muscle, and the genetic loss of uPA in mdx mice exacerbated muscle dystrophy and reduced muscular function. Bone marrow (BM) transplantation experiments revealed a critical function for BM-derived uPA in mdx muscle repair via three mechanisms: (...

  7. Cystic dystrophy of heterotopic pancreas in duodenal wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhi Minesh B

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cystic dystrophy in heterotopic pancreas is a rare, poorly understood benign disease of gastric and duodenal wall, which was described for the first time by the French authors in 1970, who reported the presence of focal pancreatic disease localized in an area comprising the C-loop of duodenum & the head of pancreas. We report a case of 33 years old male patient with complaint of recurrent abdominal pain with the probable diagnosis of groove pancreatitis on the clinoradiological findings. Whipple surgery was done. Diagnosis of cystic dystrophy in heterotopic pancreas in duodenal wall with chronic pancreatitis was given histopathologically

  8. Muscle regeneration and inflammation in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerslev, S; Ørngreen, M C; Hertz, J M;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether inflammation and regeneration are prominent in mildly affected muscles of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1A (FSHD1A). Inflammation in muscle has been suggested by MRI studies in patients with FSHD1A.......The aim of this study was to investigate whether inflammation and regeneration are prominent in mildly affected muscles of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1A (FSHD1A). Inflammation in muscle has been suggested by MRI studies in patients with FSHD1A....

  9. Contact Lens Applications and the Corneal Dystrophies: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Justin T; Dalton, Kristine; Weissman, Barry A

    2016-05-01

    The cornea is precious to sight. Its intricate cellular arrangement and physiology enable it to be transparent and refractive. Corneal dystrophies (CDs) impact vision at various decades of life depending on the dystrophy at hand. Left untreated, visual ramifications ensue. This review article will summarize the current knowledge of the various CDs and the relatively controversial classification based on new genetic knowledge and clinical and histological characteristics. The application of contact lenses, both soft and rigid, has a place in the care and rehabilitation of these unique corneas. PMID:26309025

  10. Analysis of human transforming growth factor β-induced gene mutation in corneal dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杨; 孙旭光; 任慧媛; 董冰; 王智群; 孙秀英

    2004-01-01

    Background Corneal dystrophy is a group of inherited blinding diseases of the cornea. This study was to identify the mutations of the keratoepithelin (KE) gene for proper diagnosis of corneal dystrophy. Methods Three families with corneal dystrophy were analysed. Thirteen individuals at risk for corneal dystrophy in family A, the proband and her son in family B, and the proband in family C were examined after their blood samples were obtained. Mutation screening of human transforming growth factor β-induced gene (BIGH3 gene) was performed. Results Five individuals in family A were found by clinical evaluation to be affected with granular corneal dystrophy and carried the BIGH3 mutation W555R. However, both probands in families B and C, also diagnosed with granular corneal dystrophy, harboured the BIGH3 mutation R124H. Conclusion Molecular genetic analysis can improve accurate diagnosis of corneal dystrophy.

  11. Defective muscle basement membrane and lack of M-laminin in the dystrophic dy/dy mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, H; Christmas, P; Wu, X R;

    1994-01-01

    M-laminin is a major member of the laminin family of basement membrane proteins. It is prominently expressed in striated muscle and peripheral nerve. M-laminin is deficient in patients with the autosomal recessive Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy but is normal in patients with the sex......-linked Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies. We have examined M-laminin expression in mice with autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy caused by the mutation dy. The heavy chain of M-laminin was undetectable in skeletal muscle, heart muscle, and peripheral nerve by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting in...... tissue from dy/dy mice, suggesting that M-laminin heavy-chain mRNA may be produced at very low levels or is unstable. Information about the chromosomal localization of the M heavy-chain in human and mouse suggests that a mutation in the M-chain gene causes the muscular dystrophy in dy/dy mice. The dy...

  12. Gastrointestinal manifestations in myotonic muscular dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Massimo Bellini; Sonia Biagi; Cristina Stasi; Francesco Costa; Maria Gloria Mumolo; Angelo Ricchiuti; Santino Marchi

    2006-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is characterized by myotonic phenomena and progressive muscular weakness.Involvement of the gastrointestinal tract is frequent and may occur at any level. The clinical manifestations have previously been attributed to motility disorders caused by smooth muscle damage, but histologic evidence of alterations has been scarce and conflicting.A neural factor has also been hypothesized. In the upper digestive tract, dysphagia, heartburn, regurgitation and dyspepsia are the most common complaints, while in the lower tract, abdominal pain, bloating and changes in bowel habits are often reported. Digestive symptoms may be the first sign of dystrophic disease and may precede the musculo-skeletal features. The impairment of gastrointestinal function may be sometimes so gradual that the patients adapt to it with little awareness of symptoms. In such cases routine endoscopic and ultrasonographic evaluations are not sufficient and targeted techniques (electrogastrography, manometry,electromyography, functional ultrasonography,scintigraphy, etc.) are needed. There is a low correlation between the degree of skeletal muscle involvement and the presence and severity of gastrointestinal disturbances whereas a positive correlation with the duration of the skeletal muscle disease has been reported.The drugs recommended for treating the gastrointestinal complaints such as prokinetic, antidyspeptic drugs and laxatives, are mainly aimed at correcting the motility disorders.Gastrointestinal involvement in MD remains a complex and intriguing condition since many important problems are still unsolved. Further studies concentrating on genetic aspects, early diagnostic techniques and the development of new therapeutic strategies are needed to improve our management of the gastrointestinal manifestations of MD.

  13. Neuropsychological profile of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal, Anna Roshini; Rajeswaran, Jamuna; Nalini, Atchayaram

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited myogenic disorder characterized by progressive muscle wasting. DMD is a fatal X-linked recessive disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 3,500 male live births. This disease has long been associated with intellectual impairment. Research has shown that boys with DMD have variable intellectual performance, indicating the presence of specific cognitive deficits. The aim of the study was to use a battery of intelligence, learning, and memory tests to identify a neuropsychological profile in boys with DMD. A total of 22 boys diagnosed with DMD in the age range of 6 to 10 years old were evaluated using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition, Rey's Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and the Memory for Designs Test. The data were interpreted using means, standard deviations, percentages, and percentiles. Normative data were also used for further interpretation. The results showed that boys with DMD had a significantly lower IQ (88.5). Verbal IQ (86.59) was found to be lower than Performance IQ (92.64). There was evidence of impaired performance on the Processing Speed, Freedom From Distractibility, and Verbal Comprehension Indexes. Specific deficits in information processing, complex attention, immediate verbal memory span, verbal working memory, verbal comprehension, vocabulary, visuoconstruction ability, and verbal learning and encoding were observed. However, perceptional organization, general fund of information, abstract reasoning, visual discrimination and acuity, visual learning and memory, and verbal memory were adequate. The neuropsychological findings support the hypothesis that these children have specific cognitive deficits as opposed to a global intellectual deficit. PMID:24279481

  14. Computed tomography in Duchenne type muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computed tomography (CT) scan was performed on 91 Duchenne type muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients on the following four levels; (1) at the level of L3 vertebra, (2) 2-3cm above the symphysis pubica, (3) midposition of the thigh, (4) largest-diameter section of the lower leg. The CT of muscles common to most of the DMD patients were as follows: 1. Muscle atrophy: Muscle atrophy was shown as a reduction in the cross-sectional area of the muscles. Very mild muscle atrophy could be detected either by the clearly identified muscle border or by scattered low-density areas of so-called ''moth-eaten'' appearance within muscles. 2. Fat infiltration: The decrease in radio-density of muscles was interpreted as infiltration of fatty tissue. This type of density change was further classified into diffuse, streaked, cobblestone and salt-and-pepper patterns according to the spacial distribution of low-density areas. 3. Selectivity pattern: As the chronological sequence of DMD muscle degeneration is usually different among individual muscles, it may be seen, in some stages, that some of the synergistic muscles are still only slightly involved, while the others are quite severely atrophied with evident fat infiltration. In certain stages of the disease, most of the patients show relative preservation of particular muscles although they assumed a rounded shape. The most resistent muscle was musculus gracilis, followed by the musculus sartorius, musculus semitendinosus (and/or musculus semimembranosus) in that order. According to the severity of the CT changes, 86 of the 91 patients were classed into five stages from A1 to A5. Morphological stages (A1-A5) were well correlated to the functional disability stages by Ueda with a correlation factor of r=0.88. (J.P.N.)

  15. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: From Diagnosis to Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sofia Falzarano

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an X-linked inherited neuromuscular disorder due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. It is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting due to the absence of dystrophin protein that causes degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscle. The molecular diagnostic of DMD involves a deletions/duplications analysis performed by quantitative technique such as microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH, Multiple Ligation Probe Assay MLPA. Since traditional methods for detection of point mutations and other sequence variants require high cost and are time consuming, especially for a large gene like dystrophin, the use of next-generation sequencing (NGS has become a useful tool available for clinical diagnosis. The dystrophin gene is large and finely regulated in terms of tissue expression, and RNA processing and editing includes a variety of fine tuned processes. At present, there are no effective treatments and the steroids are the only fully approved drugs used in DMD therapy able to slow disease progression. In the last years, an increasing variety of strategies have been studied as a possible therapeutic approach aimed to restore dystrophin production and to preserve muscle mass, ameliorating the DMD phenotype. RNA is the most studied target for the development of clinical strategies and Antisense Oligonucleotides (AONs are the most used molecules for RNA modulation. The identification of delivery system to enhance the efficacy and to reduce the toxicity of AON is the main purpose in this area and nanomaterials are a very promising model as DNA/RNA molecules vectors. Dystrophinopathies therefore represent a pivotal field of investigation, which has opened novel avenues in molecular biology, medical genetics and novel therapeutic options.

  16. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: From Diagnosis to Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Scotton, Chiara; Passarelli, Chiara; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited neuromuscular disorder due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. It is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting due to the absence of dystrophin protein that causes degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscle. The molecular diagnostic of DMD involves a deletions/duplications analysis performed by quantitative technique such as microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH), Multiple Ligation Probe Assay MLPA. Since traditional methods for detection of point mutations and other sequence variants require high cost and are time consuming, especially for a large gene like dystrophin, the use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has become a useful tool available for clinical diagnosis. The dystrophin gene is large and finely regulated in terms of tissue expression, and RNA processing and editing includes a variety of fine tuned processes. At present, there are no effective treatments and the steroids are the only fully approved drugs used in DMD therapy able to slow disease progression. In the last years, an increasing variety of strategies have been studied as a possible therapeutic approach aimed to restore dystrophin production and to preserve muscle mass, ameliorating the DMD phenotype. RNA is the most studied target for the development of clinical strategies and Antisense Oligonucleotides (AONs) are the most used molecules for RNA modulation. The identification of delivery system to enhance the efficacy and to reduce the toxicity of AON is the main purpose in this area and nanomaterials are a very promising model as DNA/RNA molecules vectors. Dystrophinopathies therefore represent a pivotal field of investigation, which has opened novel avenues in molecular biology, medical genetics and novel therapeutic options. PMID:26457695

  17. Theoretical considerations on germline mosaicism in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Grimm, T; Müller, B.; Müller, C R; Janka, M

    1990-01-01

    A newly formulated mutation selection equilibrium for lethal X linked recessive traits such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy is presented, which allows for both male and female germline mosaicism. Estimates of the additional parameters used are given, thus allowing the incorporation of germline mosaicism into the calculation of genetic risks.

  18. Protriptyline treatment of sleep hypoxaemia in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, P E; Edwards, R H; Calverley, P. M.

    1989-01-01

    Protriptyline 20 mg daily reduced the total time spent in rapid eye movement sleep in an open study in four subjects with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Sleep related hypoxaemia and episodes of desaturation were reduced. Anticholinergic side effects were prominent, however, in these patients, precluding its use for regular treatment.

  19. Concise Review: Stem Cell Therapy for Muscular Dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Ling, Vivian B.; Bernstein, Harold S.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell therapy holds promise as a treatment for muscular dystrophy by providing cells that can both deliver functional muscle proteins and replenish the stem cell pool. This article reviews the current state of research on myogenic stem cells and identifies the important challenges that must be addressed as stem cell therapy is brought to the clinic.

  20. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: CRISPR/Cas9 treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendell, Jerry R; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R

    2016-05-01

    A novel approach to gene correction by genome editing shows great promise as a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). CRISPR/Cas9 delivered by adeno-associated virus to a mouse model for DMD demonstrated improvement in function and histology. PMID:26926391