WorldWideScience

Sample records for autosomal dominant forms

  1. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Small Text Medium Text Large Text Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease YESTERDAY Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) resulted ...

  2. Autosomal dominant polycystisk nyresygdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naver, Signe Vinsand; Ørskov, Bjarne; Jensen, Anja Møller

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic disorder which causes end stage renal disease. In Denmark, estimated 5,000 patients are living with the disease. Most of the patients are in regular contact with physicians due to the progression of kidney failure...

  3. Autosomal dominant cramping disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, K; Moxley, R T

    1990-07-01

    A family was studied in which four generations (16 of 41 members) suffered from painful recurrent muscle cramping. A clear pattern of autosomal dominant inheritance was noted. The cramping first developed during adolescence or early adulthood. Electromyographic analysis indicated a neurogenic origin. The cramps seemed to be due to dysfunction of the motor neurons. The mechanisms underlying this alteration are unclear and require further investigation.

  4. [Cardiac tamponade as first manifestation in Mediterranean fever with autosomal dominant form].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Ferrer, F; Martinez Villar, M; Fernández Bernal, A; Martín de Lara, I; Paya Elorza, I

    2015-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a hereditary disease characterized by brief, recurring and self-limited episodes of fever and pain with inflammation, of one or several serous (peritoneum, pleura, pericardium, synovial or vaginal tunic of the testicle). Amyloidosis is its more important complication and the principal reason of death in the cases in which it appears. Diagnosis is based on the clinic and is confirmed by genetic tests. The treatment with Colchicine (0,02-0,03 mg/kg/day) prevents the recurrence of FMF attacks and the development of secondary (AA) amyloidosis. We report a case of a 13-year-old child in which FMF was diagnosed after several coincidental episodes with fever, pericarditis and cardiac tamponade. The genetic confirmation showed an autosomal dominant inheritance that is less frecuent than the recesive form, in this disease. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions ADNFLE Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... collapse boxes. Description Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy ( ADNFLE ) is an uncommon form of epilepsy that ...

  6. Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Jens; Henriksen, Kim; Nielsen, Morten Frost Munk

    2013-01-01

    affecting the inhibitory site of LRP5 might stimulate bone formation and inhibit resorption. Thereby, these studies have highlighted several intriguing treatment possibilities, employing novel modes of action, which could provide benefits to the treatment of osteoporosis....... in the first propeller of LRP5, a region of importance for binding inhibitory proteins. Thereby, ADO1 cannot be regarded as a classical form of osteopetrosis but must now be considered a disease of LRP5 activation. ADO (Albers-Schönberg disease, or previously ADO2) is characterized by increased number...... and an expanded life span. Bone formation seems normal despite decreased osteoclast function. Uncoupling of formation from resorption makes ADO of interest for new strategies for treatment of osteoporosis. Recent studies have integrated bone metabolism in whole-body energy homeostasis. Patients with ADO may have...

  7. Autosomal dominant non-epidermolytic palmoplantar hyperkeratosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2013-08-12

    Aug 12, 2013 ... Abstract. Palmoplantar kerato- derma (PPK) is a hereditary cuta- neous disorder characterized by a marked hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles. A variant that was inherited in an autosomal dominant form was highlighted in a 20-month-old girl-child. The proband was brought to the Paedi- atric Outpatient ...

  8. Autosomal dominant adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijssen, Peter C.G.

    2011-01-01

    this thesis investigates a family with autosomal dominant neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, with chapters on clinical neurology, neuropathology, neurogenetics, neurophysiology, auditory and visual aspects.

  9. Mutations in Histone Acetylase Modifier BRPF1 Cause an Autosomal-Dominant Form of Intellectual Disability with Associated Ptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Francesca; Schaefer, Elise; Magee, Alex; Mark, Paul; Mancini, Grazia M; Dieterich, Klaus; Von Allmen, Gretchen; Alders, Marielle; Coutton, Charles; van Slegtenhorst, Marjon; Vieville, Gaëlle; Engelen, Mark; Cobben, Jan Maarten; Juusola, Jane; Pujol, Aurora; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Piton, Amélie

    2017-01-05

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder exhibiting extreme genetic heterogeneity, and more than 500 genes have been implicated in Mendelian forms of ID. We performed exome sequencing in a large family affected by an autosomal-dominant form of mild syndromic ID with ptosis, growth retardation, and hypotonia, and we identified an inherited 2 bp deletion causing a frameshift in BRPF1 (c.1052_1053del) in five affected family members. BRPF1 encodes a protein modifier of two histone acetyltransferases associated with ID: KAT6A (also known as MOZ or MYST3) and KAT6B (MORF or MYST4). The mRNA transcript was not significantly reduced in affected fibroblasts and most likely produces a truncated protein (p.Val351Glyfs ∗ 8). The protein variant shows an aberrant cellular location, loss of certain protein interactions, and decreased histone H3K23 acetylation. We identified BRPF1 deletions or point mutations in six additional individuals with a similar phenotype. Deletions of the 3p25 region, containing BRPF1 and SETD5, cause a defined ID syndrome where most of the clinical features are attributed to SETD5 deficiency. We compared the clinical symptoms of individuals carrying mutations or small deletions of BRPF1 alone or SETD5 alone with those of individuals with deletions encompassing both BRPF1 and SETD5. We conclude that both genes contribute to the phenotypic severity of 3p25 deletion syndrome but that some specific features, such as ptosis and blepharophimosis, are mostly driven by BRPF1 haploinsufficiency. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Non-image-forming light driven functions are preserved in a mouse model of autosomal dominant optic atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Perganta

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA is a slowly progressive optic neuropathy that has been associated with mutations of the OPA1 gene. In patients, the disease primarily affects the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs and causes optic nerve atrophy and visual loss. A subset of RGCs are intrinsically photosensitive, express the photopigment melanopsin and drive non-image-forming (NIF visual functions including light driven circadian and sleep behaviours and the pupil light reflex. Given the RGC pathology in ADOA, disruption of NIF functions might be predicted. Interestingly in ADOA patients the pupil light reflex was preserved, although NIF behavioural outputs were not examined. The B6; C3-Opa1(Q285STOP mouse model of ADOA displays optic nerve abnormalities, RGC dendropathy and functional visual disruption. We performed a comprehensive assessment of light driven NIF functions in this mouse model using wheel running activity monitoring, videotracking and pupillometry. Opa1 mutant mice entrained their activity rhythm to the external light/dark cycle, suppressed their activity in response to acute light exposure at night, generated circadian phase shift responses to 480 nm and 525 nm pulses, demonstrated immobility-defined sleep induction following exposure to a brief light pulse at night and exhibited an intensity dependent pupil light reflex. There were no significant differences in any parameter tested relative to wildtype littermate controls. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the number of melanopsin-expressing RGCs, cell morphology or melanopsin transcript levels between genotypes. Taken together, these findings suggest the preservation of NIF functions in Opa1 mutants. The results provide support to growing evidence that the melanopsin-expressing RGCs are protected in mitochondrial optic neuropathies.

  11. Autosomal dominant hereditary ataxia in Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Sumathipala, Dulika S; Abeysekera, Gayan S; Jayasekara, Rohan W; Tallaksen, Chantal ME; Dissanayake, Vajira HW

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a group of hereditary neurodegenerative disorders. Prevalence of SCA subtypes differ worldwide. Autosomal dominant ataxias are the commonest types of inherited ataxias seen in Sri Lanka. The aim of the study is to determine the genetic etiology of patients with autosomal dominant ataxia in Sri Lanka and to describe the clinical features of each genetic subtype. Methods ...

  12. Autosomal dominant HMSN with proximal involvement: new Brazilian cases

    OpenAIRE

    Patroclo,Cristiane Borges; Lino,Angelina Maria Martins; Marchiori,Paulo Eurípides; Brotto,Mário Wilson Iervolino; Hirata,Maria Teresa Alves

    2009-01-01

    We report four Brazilian siblings with Autosomal Dominant Hereditary Motor Sensory Neuropathy with Proximal Dominant Involvement (HMSN-P), a rare form of HMSN, that was characterized by proximal dominant muscle weakness and atrophy onset after the age of 30 years, fasciculation, arreflexia and sensory disturbances with autosomal dominant inheritance. Electrophysiological study and sural nerve biopsy were in the accordance with axonal sensory motor polyneuropathy and laboratorial analysis disc...

  13. Genetic forms of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI): Vasopressin receptor defect (X-linked) and aquaporin defect (autosomal recessive and dominant).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichet, Daniel G; Bockenhauer, Detlef

    2016-03-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), which can be inherited or acquired, is characterized by an inability to concentrate urine despite normal or elevated plasma concentrations of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Polyuria with hyposthenuria and polydipsia are the cardinal clinical manifestations of the disease. About 90% of patients with congenital NDI are males with X-linked NDI who have mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor (AVPR2) gene encoding the vasopressin V2 receptor. In less than 10% of the families studied, congenital NDI has an autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with mutations in the aquaporin-2 (AQP2) gene. When studied in vitro, most AVPR2 and AQP2 mutations lead to proteins trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum and are unable to reach the plasma membrane. Prior knowledge of AVPR2 or AQP2 mutations in NDI families and perinatal mutation testing is of direct clinical value and can avert the physical and mental retardation associated with repeated episodes of dehydration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant hypocalcemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... low levels of a hormone called parathyroid hormone (hypoparathyroidism). This hormone is involved in the regulation of ... Other Names for This Condition ADH autosomal dominant hypoparathyroidism familial hypercalciuric hypocalcemia familial hypocalcemia Related Information How ...

  15. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease, incidental finding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    N.J. Gildenhuys

    2016-06-30

    Jun 30, 2016 ... Abbreviations: ADPKD, Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease; UPJ, congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction; HK, horseshoe kidney;. RCC, renal cell carcinoma; MVA, motor vehicle accident; PVA, pedestrian vehicle accident; GH, gross haematuria; AP, abdominal pain; FP, flank pain;.

  16. Progress on Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common life threatening hereditary disease of the kidney. It is a systemic disease characterized by multiple, bilateral renal cysts that result in massive renal enlargement and progressive functional impairment. This review discusses the current ...

  17. Cleidocranial Dysplasia with Autosomal Dominant Inheritance Pattern

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disease with a wide range of expression, characterized by clavicular hypoplasia, retarded cranial ossification, delayed bone and teeth development, supernumerary teeth, stomatognathic, craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. This paper presents a case of CCD in ...

  18. MRI of autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K; Nielsen, J E; Fallentin, E

    1997-01-01

    We examined 16 patients with autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia (HSP) and 15 normal controls matched for age and sex using MRI of the brain and spinal cord. Images were assessed qualitatively by two independent radiologists, blinded to the clinical diagnosis. Areas of the brain and corpus...

  19. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease, incidental finding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Pre-existing renal lesions predispose kidneys to effects of otherwise insignificant blunt trauma, and may uncommonly present as an incidental finding in the workup of a suspected renal injury. Observation: This is a case report of a 28-year-old male diagnosed incidentally with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic ...

  20. Autosomal dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy: a true form of spinal muscular atrophy caused by early loss of anterior horn cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Emily C; Reddel, Stephen; Rodriguez, Michael L; Gandolfo, Luke C; Bahlo, Melanie; Hawke, Simon H; Lamandé, Shireen R; Clarke, Nigel F; North, Kathryn N

    2012-06-01

    Autosomal dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy is characterized by predominantly lower limb weakness and wasting, and congenital or early-onset contractures of the hip, knee and ankle. Mutations in TRPV4, encoding a cation channel, have recently been identified in one large dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy kindred, but the genetic basis of dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy in many families remains unknown. It has been hypothesized that differences in the timing and site of anterior horn cell loss in the central nervous system account for the variations in clinical phenotype between different forms of spinal muscular atrophy, but there has been a lack of neuropathological data to support this concept in dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy. We report clinical, electrophysiology, muscle magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology findings in a four generation family with typical dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy features, without mutations in TRPV4, and in whom linkage to other known dominant neuropathy and spinal muscular atrophy genes has been excluded. The autopsy findings in the proband, who died at 14 months of age from an unrelated illness, provided a rare opportunity to study the neuropathological basis of dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy. There was a reduction in anterior horn cell number in the lumbar and, to a lesser degree, the cervical spinal cord, and atrophy of the ventral nerve roots at these levels, in the absence of additional peripheral nerve pathology or abnormalities elsewhere along the neuraxis. Despite the young age of the child at the time of autopsy, there was no pathological evidence of ongoing loss or degeneration of anterior horn cells suggesting that anterior horn cell loss in dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy occurs in early life, and is largely complete by the end of infancy. These findings confirm that dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy is a true form of spinal

  1. Familial muscle cramps with autosomal dominant transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bergh, P; Bulcke, J A; Dom, R

    1980-01-01

    A family is described with generalized muscle cramps inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and with maximal expression during adolescence. The age of onset varies between 10 and 15 years. Muscle enzymes are elevated with a peak level between 15 and 25 years. The complaints seem to disappear after the age of 25 years. EMG and muscle biopsies suggest a neurogenic origin of the cramps.

  2. Clinical neurogenetics: autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakkottai, Vikram G; Fogel, Brent L

    2013-11-01

    The autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias are a diverse and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by degeneration and dysfunction of the cerebellum and its associated pathways. Clinical and diagnostic evaluation can be challenging because of phenotypic overlap among causes, and a stratified and systematic approach is essential. Recent advances include the identification of additional genes causing dominant genetic ataxia, a better understanding of cellular pathogenesis in several disorders, the generation of new disease models that may stimulate development of new therapies, and the use of new DNA sequencing technologies, including whole-exome sequencing, to improve diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Autosomal dominant frontometaphyseal dysplasia: Delineation of the clinical phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wade, Emma M.; Jenkins, Zandra A.; Daniel, Philip B.; Morgan, Tim; Addor, Marie C.; Adés, Lesley C.; Bertola, Debora; Bohring, Axel; Carter, Erin; Cho, Tae-Joon; de Geus, Christa M.; Duba, Hans-Christoph; Fletcher, Elaine; Hadzsiev, Kinga; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Kim, Chong A.; Krakow, Deborah; Morava, Eva; Neuhann, Teresa; Sillence, David; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E.; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wilson, Louise C.; Markie, David M.; Robertson, Stephen P.

    2017-01-01

    Frontometaphyseal dysplasia (FMD) is caused by gain-of-function mutations in the X-linked gene FLNA in approximately 50% of patients. Recently we characterized an autosomal dominant form of FMD (AD-FMD) caused by mutations in MAP3K7, which accounts for the condition in the majority of patients who

  4. Autosomal dominant frontometaphyseal dysplasia : Delineation of the clinical phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wade, Emma M.; Jenkins, Zandra A.; Daniel, Philip B.; Morgan, Tim; Addor, Marie C.; Ades, Lesley C.; Bertola, Debora; Bohring, Axel; Carter, Erin; Cho, Tae-Joon; de Geus, Christa M.; Duba, Hans-Christoph; Fletcher, Elaine; Hadzsiev, Kinga; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Kim, Chong A.; Krakow, Deborah; Morava, Eva; Neuhann, Teresa; Sillence, David; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E.; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wilson, Louise C.; Markie, David M.; Robertson, Stephen P.

    Frontometaphyseal dysplasia (FMD) is caused by gain-of-function mutations in the X-linked gene FLNA in approximately 50% of patients. Recently we characterized an autosomal dominant form of FMD (AD-FMD) caused by mutations in MAP3K7, which accounts for the condition in the majority of patients who

  5. Case report: Autosomal dominant non-epidermolytic palmoplantar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) is a hereditary cutaneous disorder characterized by a marked hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles. A variant that was inherited in an autosomal dominant form was highlighted in a 20-month-old girl-child. The proband was brought to the Paediatric Outpatient Department by her mother ...

  6. Rare form of autosomal dominant familial Cornelia de Lange syndrome due to a novel duplication in SMC3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Elena; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; El-Gharbawy, Areeg

    2017-08-01

    Clinical features are variable in patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS). Milder forms exist with structural maintenance of chromosomes 3 (SMC3) mutations. Inherited milder forms of CdLS are uncommon and may be missed if genetic testing is limited to Nipped-B-like protein (NIPBL) and SMC1A. Parental studies should be pursued if there is a history of learning disabilities and/or dysmorphic features.

  7. Mutations in the 5′ UTR of ANKRD26, the ankirin repeat domain 26 gene, cause an autosomal-dominant form of inherited thrombocytopenia, THC2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Pippucci (Tommaso); A. Savoia (Anna); S. Perrotta (Silverio); N. Pujol-Moix (Nuria); P. Noris (Patrizia); G. Castegnaro (Giovanni); A. Pecci (Alessandro); C. Gnan (Chiara); F. Punzo (Francesca); C. Marconi (Caterina); S. Gherardi (Samuele); G. Loffredo (Giuseppe); D. de Rocco (Daniela); S. Scianguetta; S. Barozzi (Serena); P. Magini (Pamela); V. Bozzi (Valeria); L. Dezzani (Luca); M. di Stazio (Mariateresa); M. Ferraro (Marcella); G. Perini (Giovanni); M. Seri (Marco); C.L. Balduini (Carlo)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractTHC2, an autosomal-dominant thrombocytopenia described so far in only two families, has been ascribed to mutations in MASTL or ACBD5. Here, we show that ANKRD26, another gene within the THC2 locus, and neither MASTL nor ACBD5, is mutated in eight unrelated families. ANKRD26 was also

  8. Autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico

    2016-09-01

    The term 'cortical tremor' was first introduced by Ikeda and colleagues to indicate a postural and action-induced shivering movement of the hands which mimics essential tremor, but presents with the electrophysiological findings of cortical reflex myoclonus. The association between autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus and epilepsy (ADCME) was first recognized in Japanese families and is now increasingly reported worldwide, although it is described using different acronyms (BAFME, FAME, FEME, FCTE and others). The disease usually takes a benign course, although drug-resistant focal seizures or slight intellectual disability occur in some cases. Moreover, a worsening of cortical tremor and myoclonus is common in advanced age. Although not yet recognized by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), this is a well-delineated epilepsy syndrome with remarkable features that clearly distinguishes it from other myoclonus epilepsies. Moreover, genetic studies of these families show heterogeneity and different susceptible chromosomal loci have been identified.

  9. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary renal disease, affecting one in 500 individuals. The cardinal manifestation of ADPKD is progressive cystic dilatation of renal tubules with kidney enlargement and progression to end-stage renal disease in approximately half of cases by 60 years of age. Although previously considered a condition of adults, it is clear that children and young adults are subject to the complications of ADPKD. Recent findings It has been increasingly recognized that interventions early in life are necessary in order to confer the best long-term outcome in this common condition. Therefore, it is imperative for pediatricians to recognize the manifestations and complications of this disease. Until recently ADPKD management focused on general principles of chronic kidney disease. However, several recent clinical trials in children and adults with ADPKD have focused on disease-specific therapies. Summary This review will highlight the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and appropriate management of ADPKD in childhood and will review recent relevant clinical trials in children and adults with this condition. PMID:25635587

  10. MRI of autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krabbe, K.; Fallentin, E.; Herning, M.; Nielsen, J.E.; Fenger, K.

    1997-01-01

    We examined 16 patients with autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia (HSP) and 15 normal controls matched for age and sex using MRI of the brain and spinal cord. Images were assessed qualitatively by two independent radiologists, blinded to the clinical diagnosis. Areas of the brain and corpus callosum on one midsagittal slice and the area of the brain on one axial slice were measured and a ''corpus-callosum index'' expressing the size of the corpus callosum relative to that of the brain was calculated. Cross-sectional areas and anteroposterior and transverse diameters of the spinal cord at the levels of C 2, C 5, T 3, T 6, T 9 and T 11 were measured. No significant differences between patients and controls were found on qualitative evaluation of the images. The patients had a significantly smaller corpus callosum and ''corpus-callosum index'' than controls. This finding, not reported previously, might indicate that the disease process in pure HSP is not confined to the spinal cord. The anteroposterior diameters of the spinal cord at T 3 and T 9 were significantly smaller in patients than in controls. This might correspond to the degeneration of the pyramidal tracts and the dorsal columns described at neuropathological examination. (orig.). With 1 fig., 3 tabs

  11. MRI of autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krabbe, K.; Fallentin, E.; Herning, M. [Danish Research Center of Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre Hospital, Kettegaard alle 30, DK-2650 Hvidovre (Denmark); Nielsen, J.E.; Fenger, K. [Institute of Medical Biochemistry and Genetics, Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Section of Neurogenetics, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    We examined 16 patients with autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia (HSP) and 15 normal controls matched for age and sex using MRI of the brain and spinal cord. Images were assessed qualitatively by two independent radiologists, blinded to the clinical diagnosis. Areas of the brain and corpus callosum on one midsagittal slice and the area of the brain on one axial slice were measured and a ``corpus-callosum index`` expressing the size of the corpus callosum relative to that of the brain was calculated. Cross-sectional areas and anteroposterior and transverse diameters of the spinal cord at the levels of C 2, C 5, T 3, T 6, T 9 and T 11 were measured. No significant differences between patients and controls were found on qualitative evaluation of the images. The patients had a significantly smaller corpus callosum and ``corpus-callosum index`` than controls. This finding, not reported previously, might indicate that the disease process in pure HSP is not confined to the spinal cord. The anteroposterior diameters of the spinal cord at T 3 and T 9 were significantly smaller in patients than in controls. This might correspond to the degeneration of the pyramidal tracts and the dorsal columns described at neuropathological examination. (orig.). With 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A

    2015-04-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary renal disease, affecting one in 500 individuals. The cardinal manifestation of ADPKD is progressive cystic dilatation of renal tubules with kidney enlargement and progression to end-stage renal disease in approximately half of cases by 60 years of age. Although previously considered a condition of adults, it is clear that children and young adults are subject to the complications of ADPKD. It has been increasingly recognized that interventions early in life are necessary in order to confer the best long-term outcome in this common condition. Therefore, it is imperative for pediatricians to recognize the manifestations and complications of this disease. Until recently ADPKD management focused on general principles of chronic kidney disease. However, several recent clinical trials in children and adults with ADPKD have focused on disease-specific therapies. This review will highlight the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and appropriate management of ADPKD in childhood and will review recent relevant clinical trials in children and adults with this condition.

  13. Genetics of dementias, Part 4: A spectrum of mutations responsible for the familial autosomal dominant form of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kowalska

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fifty years ago it was demonstrated that some patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD had an autosomal dominant Mendelian pattern of disease inheritance. Familial and early-onset cases (familial Alzheimer’s disease, FAD are rather rare and account for only a few percent of the total population of patients. Mutations of the genes for amyloid precursor protein (APP, presenilin 1 (PSEN1, and presenilin 2 (PSEN2 are responsible for development of the disease in 50 percent of patients with FAD. The identification of mutations in FAD genes leads to a better understand of the molecular basis of the cellular pathways leading to neurodegeneration. With the detection of genetic defects responsible for FAD, there is considerable interest in the application of this genetic information in medical practice through genetic testing and counseling for families with Alzheimer’s disease.

  14. Autosomal dominant distal myopathy: Linkage to chromosome 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laing, N.G.; Laing, B.A.; Wilton, S.D.; Dorosz, S.; Mastaglia, F.L.; Kakulas, B.A. [Australian Neuromuscular Research Institute, Perth (Australia); Robbins, P.; Meredith, C.; Honeyman, K.; Kozman, H.

    1995-02-01

    We have studied a family segregating a form of autosomal dominant distal myopathy (MIM 160500) and containing nine living affected individuals. The myopathy in this family is closest in clinical phenotype to that first described by Gowers in 1902. A search for linkage was conducted using microsatellite, VNTR, and RFLP markers. In total, 92 markers on all 22 autosomes were run. Positive linkage was obtained with 14 of 15 markers tested on chromosome 14, with little indication of linkage elsewhere in the genome. Maximum two-point LOD scores of 2.60 at recombination fraction .00 were obtained for the markers MYH7 and D14S64 - the family structure precludes a two-point LOD score {ge} 3. Recombinations with D14S72 and D14S49 indicate that this distal myopathy locus, MPD1, should lie between these markers. A multipoint analysis assuming 100% penetrance and using the markers D14S72, D14S50, MYH7, D14S64, D14S54, and D14S49 gave a LOD score of exactly 3 at MYH7. Analysis at a penetrance of 80% gave a LOD score of 2.8 at this marker. This probable localization of a gene for distal myopathy, MPD1, on chromosome 14 should allow other investigators studying distal myopathy families to test this region for linkage in other types of the disease, to confirm linkage or to demonstrate the likely genetic heterogeneity. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Autosomal dominant arteriopathy with sub cortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojeda, Adriana; Tiezzi, Gerardo; Uriarte, Ana M.; Eguren, Leonor

    2002-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with sub cortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CASADIL) is a systemic hereditary, vascular disease that involves small arteries. Recurrent ischemia, pseudo bulbar paralysis and dementia are characteristic. Other manifestations include migraine and depression. We report an Argentine family with VI generations with evidence of disease in IV. MR examinations were performed on 21 family members (both symptomatic and asymptomatic). The main findings on MR on symptomatic and asymptomatic patients were small lesions with high signal on T2 localised in periventricular white matter, brain stem, basal ganglia and thalamus, and confluent patches on white matter although with high signal on T2 images, usually symmetric. In conclusion we can assess that diffuse myelin loss and small infarcts occurring in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy well demonstrated with MR. In addition, some of the abnormalities in pre symptomatic patients can be identified on MR images. (author)

  16. [Polycystic liver disease without autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; González, P; Venegas, J L

    2003-01-01

    Polycystic liver disease is characterized by the presence of multiple bile duct-derived epithelial cysts scattered in the liver parenchyma. The natural history and clinical manifestations of polycystic liver disease are based on the disease as it manifests in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The occurrence of polycystic liver disease independently from polycystic kidney disease has been known for a long time. More recently, a gene for autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease has been identified on chromosome 19p 13.2-13.1. Isolated polycystic liver disease is underdiagnosed and genetically distinct from polycystic liver disease associated with ADPKD but with similar pathogenesis and clinical manifestations. We report here two men with polycystic liver disease no associated with ADPKD. Ultrasound and computed tomography imaging were effective in documenting the underlying lesions non-invasively.

  17. Familial Paroxysmal Exercise-Induced Dystonia: Atypical Presentation of Autosomal Dominant GTP-Cyclohydrolase 1 Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Russell C.; Melchers, Anna; Fung, Victor S. C.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic; Houlden, Henry; Earl, John

    2010-01-01

    Paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia (PED) is one of the rarer forms of paroxysmal dyskinesia, and can occur in sporadic or familial forms. We report a family (male index case, mother and maternal grandfather) with autosomal dominant inheritance of paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia. The dystonia began in childhood and was only ever induced…

  18. Sacral radicular cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Peces, Carlos; Pérez-Dueñas, Virginia; Vega-Cabrera, Cristina; Campos, Isabel

    2009-10-01

    This is the first report of a case of sacral radicular cysts in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). A 46-year-old woman with ADPKD was found to have bilateral sacral radicular cysts discovered incidentally by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cysts arising from arachnoid or spinal meningeal sac should be considered one of the manifestations of a more widespread connective tissue disorder associated with ADPKD.

  19. Autosomal dominant congenital Horner's syndrome in a Dutch family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, G; Ippel, P F; te Nijenhuis, F C

    1992-01-01

    A Dutch family is reported with congenital Horner's syndrome in five cases spanning five generations, with symptoms of varying degree but mainly ptosis and meiosis. Heterochromia iridium, anhidrosis, and enophthalmos were not present. The site of the lesion may be in the region between Gasser's ganglion and the short vertical segment of the internal carotid artery near the siphon. There are only four previous reports showing autosomal dominant inheritance of congenital Horner's syndrome. Images PMID:1548493

  20. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cline Susan D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA, a form of progressive bilateral blindness due to loss of retinal ganglion cells and optic nerve deterioration, arises predominantly from mutations in the nuclear gene for the mitochondrial GTPase, OPA1. OPA1 localizes to mitochondrial cristae in the inner membrane where electron transport chain complexes are enriched. While OPA1 has been characterized for its role in mitochondrial cristae structure and organelle fusion, possible effects of OPA1 on mitochondrial function have not been determined. Results Mitochondria from six ADOA patients bearing OPA1 mutations and ten ADOA patients with unidentified gene mutations were studied for respiratory capacity and electron transport complex function. Results suggest that the nuclear DNA mutations that give rise to ADOA in our patient population do not alter mitochondrial electron transport. Conclusion We conclude that the pathophysiology of ADOA likely stems from the role of OPA1 in mitochondrial structure or fusion and not from OPA1 support of oxidative phosphorylation.

  1. Autosomal dominant familial erythrocytosis due to autonomous erythropoietin production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distelhorst, C.W.; Wagner, D.S.; Goldwasser, E.; Adamson, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    A family is described in which four members spanning three consecutive generations have erythrocytosis associated with a normal hemoglobin oxygen affinity. When bone marrow from one affected family member was cultured in vitro, erythroid colonies formed only when erythropoietin was added to the culture. Serum erythropoietin, measured by radioimmunoassay, was significantly elevated above normal in each of the affected family members. Bioassayable erythropoietin was detected in the urine of two of the three affected family members. In two of the affected family members, erythropoietin was measured in serum by radioimmunoassay and in urine by bioassay before and for 4 days following an isovolemic phlebotomy, which reduced the red cell mass by 20%. Neither serum nor urinary erythropoietin levels changed following phlebotomy. The erythrocytosis in this family appears to be secondary to inappropriately increased erythropoietin production unassociated with a decrease in the blood oxygen-carrying capacity. This is the first instance in which autonomous erythropoietin production appears to be inherited on an autosomal dominant basis

  2. Predictors of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrier, Robert W; Brosnahan, Godela; Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A; Chonchol, Michel; Friend, Keith; Gitomer, Berenice; Rossetti, Sandro

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is a genetic disorder associated with substantial variability in its natural course within and between affected families. Understanding predictors for rapid progression of this disease has become increasingly important with the emergence of potential new treatments. This systematic review of the literature since 1988 evaluates factors that may predict and/or effect autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease progression. Predicting factors associated with early adverse structural and/or functional outcomes are considered. These factors include PKD1 mutation (particularly truncating mutation), men, early onset of hypertension, early and frequent gross hematuria, and among women, three or more pregnancies. Increases in total kidney volume and decreases in GFR and renal blood flow greater than expected for a given age also signify rapid disease progression. Concerning laboratory markers include overt proteinuria, macroalbuminuria, and perhaps, elevated serum copeptin levels in affected adults. These factors and others may help to identify patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease who are most likely to benefit from early intervention with novel treatments. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  3. Autosomal dominant syndrome resembling Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Maureen A; Milunsky, Jeff M

    2006-06-15

    Coffin-Siris syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome with phenotypic variability [OMIM 135900]. The diagnosis is based solely on clinical findings, as there is currently no molecular, biochemical, or cytogenetic analysis available to confirm a diagnosis. Although typically described as an autosomal recessive disorder, autosomal dominant inheritance has also been infrequently reported. We describe a mother and her two daughters who all have features that resemble Coffin-Siris syndrome. However, this is not a completely convincing diagnosis given that hypertelorism is not a feature of Coffin-Siris syndrome and the family is relatively mildly affected. Yet, this family provides further evidence of an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance for a likely variant of Coffin-Siris syndrome (at least in some families). In addition, Sibling 1 had premature thelarche. She is the second reported individual within the spectrum of Coffin-Siris syndrome to have premature thelarche, indicating that it may be a rare clinical feature. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Genomic deletions in OPA1 in Danish patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almind, Gitte J; Grønskov, Karen; Milea, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA, Kjer disease, MIM #165500) is the most common form of hereditary optic neuropathy. Mutations in OPA1 located at chromosome 3q28 are the predominant cause for ADOA explaining between 32 and 89% of cases. Although deletions of OPA1 were recently reported...

  5. RNA Interference Prevents Autosomal-Dominant Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Seiji B; Ranum, Paul T; Moteki, Hideaki; Pan, Bifeng; Goodwin, Alexander T; Goodman, Shawn S; Abbas, Paul J; Holt, Jeffrey R; Smith, Richard J H

    2016-06-02

    Hearing impairment is the most common sensory deficit. It is frequently caused by the expression of an allele carrying a single dominant missense mutation. Herein, we show that a single intracochlear injection of an artificial microRNA carried in a viral vector can slow progression of hearing loss for up to 35 weeks in the Beethoven mouse, a murine model of non-syndromic human deafness caused by a dominant gain-of-function mutation in Tmc1 (transmembrane channel-like 1). This outcome is noteworthy because it demonstrates the feasibility of RNA-interference-mediated suppression of an endogenous deafness-causing allele to slow progression of hearing loss. Given that most autosomal-dominant non-syndromic hearing loss in humans is caused by this mechanism of action, microRNA-based therapeutics might be broadly applicable as a therapy for this type of deafness. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. PENCALC: a program for penetrance estimation in autosomal dominant diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa R.V. Russo Horimoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a computer program developed for estimating penetrance rates in autosomal dominant diseases by means of family kinship and phenotype information contained within the pedigrees. The program also determines the exact 95% credibility interval for the penetrance estimate. Both executable (PenCalc for Windows and web versions (PenCalcWeb of the software are available. The web version enables further calculations, such as heterozygosity probabilities and assessment of offspring risks for all individuals in the pedigrees. Both programs can be accessed and down-loaded freely at the home-page address http://www.ib.usp.br/~otto/software.htm.

  7. Pathogenesis and potential therapy of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.O. Melnyk

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is a hereditary disease characterized by progressive growth of the cyst and an increase in the total volume of the kidneys which leads to kidney failure. The main causes of ADPKD are mutations in the genes PKD1 and PKD2 which encode the formation of polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 proteins. There is a connection between structural and functional defects in the primary cilia with the ADPKD. The most promising drugs for the treatment of ADPKD today are vasopressin-2 receptor antagonists, m-TOR and c-AMP inhibitors.

  8. Autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features: Defining the phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winawer, Melodie R.; Hauser, W. Allen; Pedley, Timothy A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors previously reported linkage to chromosome 10q22-24 for autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features. This study describes seizure semiology in the original linkage family in further detail. Auditory hallucinations were most common, but other sensory symptoms (visual, olfactory, vertiginous, and cephalic) were also reported. Autonomic, psychic, and motor symptoms were less common. The clinical semiology points to a lateral temporal seizure origin. Auditory hallucinations, the most striking clinical feature, are useful for identifying new families with this synome. PMID:10851389

  9. Complex liver cysts in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Zerwa; Behzadi, Ashkan Heshmatzadeh; Blumenfeld, Jon D; Zhao, Yize; Prince, Martin R

    To determine prevalence of complex liver cysts in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD). Abdominal MRI in 186 ADPKD subjects were evaluated by two independent observers to determine prevalence of complex liver cysts. 23 (12%) of subjects, had at least 1 complex cyst. Only 8 (4%) were reported to have a complex cyst prospectively, representing an under-reporting rate of 65%. Median total cyst volume was 66-times greater for subjects with complex cysts compared to subjects without (p<0.0001). Complex hepatic cysts were observed in 12% of ADPKD cases, occurring more frequently in livers with extensive cystic involvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A novel autosomal dominant leukodystrophy with specific MRI pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlobé, A; Taithe, F; Clavelou, P; Pierre, E; Carra-Dallière, C; Ayrignac, X; Mouzat, K; Lumbroso, S; Menjot de Champfleur, N; Koenig, M; Boespflug-Tanguy, O; Labauge, P

    2015-01-01

    Etiologic diagnosis of adulthood leukodystrophy is challenging in neurologic practice. We describe here the clinico-radiological features of a novel autosomal dominant leukodystrophy in a single family. Clinical and MRI features were recorded in a three generation family. Exome sequencing was performed in two affected relatives and one healthy member. Four total relatives (3 women and 1 man, mean age at onset: 45, range 32-59) were followed: 2 for migraine and 2 for cognitive loss. MRI features were homogeneous in the four affected relatives: extensive and symmetrical white matter hyperintensities on T2-weighted images, with a posterior predominance, involvement of the middle cerebellar peduncles, corpus callosum and the posterior limb of the internal capsules. An extensive metabolic screening was negative. In addition, sequencing of pathogenic genes involved in dominant leukodystrophies (NOTCH3, LMNB1, GFAP, CSF1R) was negative. No mutation has been identified yet with exome sequencing. This report is peculiar because of dominant inheritance, adult onset, highly homogeneous white matter hyperintensities on T2-weighted MR images, predominant in the middle cerebellar peduncles and posterior part of internal capsule and absence of mutation of the genes involved in dominant leukodystrophies.

  11. Autosomal dominant inheritance Caffey-Silverman disease hyperostosis corticalis infantum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogoyski, A. (Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education, Warsaw (Poland).); Jakubowska, K. (Paediatric Hospital, Dziekanow Lesny (Poland). Division of Radiology); Tronowska, T.D. (Paediatric Hospital, Dziekanow Lesny (Poland). Infants Division and Laboratory of Clinical Genetics)

    1984-01-01

    A case of Caffey-Silverman disease is described in an infant aged 4.5 months. The case was erroneously diagnosed in the initial stage of the disease as osteitis. The correct diagnosis was established after radiological examination of the skeleton. The pathological lesions involved the mandible, both clavicles, all ribs, left shoulder blade, both radial bones and left ulna. Follow-up radiological examination after 12 months demonstrated nearly complete disappearance of the previously observed skeletal changes. At the age of 18 months the condition of the child was good and its development was normal. Radiological changes indicating past Caffey-Silverman disease were disclosed in the mother and maternal grandmother of the child. This indicates an autosomal dominant type of inheritance of the disease.

  12. Autosomal dominant inheritance Caffey-Silverman disease hyperostosis corticalis infantum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogoyski, A.; Jakubowska, K.; Tronowska, T.D.

    1984-01-01

    A case of Caffey-Silverman disease is described in an infant aged 4.5 months. The case was erroneously diagnosed in the initial stage of the disease as osteitis. The correct diagnosis was established after radiological examination of the skeleton. The pathological lesions involved the mandible, both clavicles, all ribs, left shoulder blade, both radial bones and left ulna. Follow-up radiological examination after 12 months demonstrated nearly complete disappearance of the previously observed skeletal changes. At the age of 18 months the condition of the child was good and its development was normal. Radiological changes indicating past Caffey-Silverman disease were disclosed in the mother and maternal grandmother of the child. This indicates an autosomal dominant type of inheritance of the disease. (Author)

  13. A review on autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Ayasreh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been a reclassification of hereditary tubulointerstitial renal diseases. The old concepts of nephronoptisis or medullary cystic disease have been reordered based on the discovery of new genes. The 2015 KDIGO guidelines proposed a unification of terminology, diagnostic criteria and monitoring. So far 4 genes causing autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease have been described: MUC1, UMOD, HNF1B and REN. Although the mutation in each of them causes distinctive features in how they present, all have in common the progressive tubulointerstitial damage and renal fibrosis. In this article, we present a review of the guidelines and the literature, and some practical recommendations for dealing with this disease.

  14. A Japanese Family With Autosomal Dominant Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Ryoko; Yamada, Kisaburo; Nakano, Satoko; Kimoto, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Ken; Kondo, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Toshiaki

    2017-02-01

    We report the clinical characteristics of a Japanese family with autosomal dominant oculocutaneous albinism and a SLC45A2 gene mutation. A total of 16 members of a Japanese family with general hypopigmentation and foveal hypoplasia underwent detailed clinical examinations. We evaluated the severity of foveal hypoplasia using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and graded it according to the criteria of Thomas et al. DNA was extracted from 17 family members and used for genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping and linkage analysis. Mutational search was performed for the SLC45A2 gene responsible for oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4). All 16 patients exhibited hypopigmentation of their hair and/or iris. They showed foveal hypoplasia, including 3 patients with grade 1 foveal hypoplasia, 7 with grade 2, and 6 with grade 3. No patient had grade 4 foveal hypoplasia. Optical coherence tomography showed macular ganglion cell complex thinning in the temporal area, and a slight reduction of visual field sensitivity in the centrotemporal area. A maximum multipoint parametric logarithm of the odds (LOD) score of approximately 2.00 to 3.56 was obtained on chromosome 5, spanning approximately 7.2 Mb between rs13187570 and rs395967 that included the SLC45A2 gene. All affected members showed a novel heterozygous variant, c.208T>C (p.Y70H), in the SLC45A2 gene, which supported a diagnosis of OCA4. The present study reports a very rare family with autosomal dominant OCA4 whose diagnosis was confirmed by a mutational analysis. Most family members exhibited mild general hypopigmentation and low-grade foveal hypoplasia.

  15. Renal and extrarenal manifestations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Romão

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency of the most common clinical features in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in a sample of the Brazilian population. The medical records of 92 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease attended during the period from 1985 to 2003 were reviewed. The following data were recorded: age at diagnosis, gender, associated clinical manifestations, occurrence of stroke, age at loss of renal function (beginning of dialysis, and presence of a family history. The involvement of abdominal viscera was investigated by ultrasonography. Intracranial alterations were prospectively investigated by magnetic resonance angiography in 42 asymptomatic patients, and complemented with digital subtraction arteriography when indicated. Mean age at diagnosis was 35.1 ± 14.9 years, and mean serum creatinine at referral was 2.4 ± 2.8 mg/dL. The most frequent clinical manifestations during the disease were arterial hypertension (63.3%, lumbar pain (55.4%, an abdominal mass (47.8%, and urinary infection (35.8%. Loss of renal function occurred in 27 patients (mean age: 45.4 ± 9.5 years. The liver was the second organ most frequently affected (39.1%. Stroke occurred in 7.6% of the patients. Asymptomatic intracranial aneurysm was detected in 3 patients and arachnoid cysts in 3 other patients. In conclusion, the most common clinical features were lumbar pain, arterial hypertension, abdominal mass, and urinary infection, and the most serious complications were chronic renal failure and stroke. Both intracranial aneurysms and arachnoid cysts occurred in asymptomatic patients at a frequency of 7.14%.

  16. A truncated form of rod photoreceptor PDE6 β-subunit causes autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness by interfering with the inhibitory activity of the γ-subunit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaël Manes

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness (adCSNB is caused by mutations in three genes of the rod phototransduction cascade, rhodopsin (RHO, transducin α-subunit (GNAT1, and cGMP phosphodiesterase type 6 β-subunit (PDE6B. In most cases, the constitutive activation of the phototransduction cascade is a prerequisite to cause adCSNB. The unique adCSNB-associated PDE6B mutation found in the Rambusch pedigree, the substitution p.His258Asn, leads to rod photoreceptors desensitization. Here, we report a three-generation French family with adCSNB harboring a novel PDE6B mutation, the duplication, c.928-9_940dup resulting in a tyrosine to cysteine substitution at codon 314, a frameshift, and a premature termination (p.Tyr314Cysfs*50. To understand the mechanism of the PDE6β1-314fs*50 mutant, we examined the properties of its PDE6-specific portion, PDE6β1-313. We found that PDE6β1-313 maintains the ability to bind noncatalytic cGMP and the inhibitory γ-subunit (Pγ, and interferes with the inhibition of normal PDE6αβ catalytic subunits by Pγ. Moreover, both truncated forms of the PDE6β protein, PDE6β1-313 and PDE6β1-314fs*50 expressed in rods of transgenic X. laevis are targeted to the phototransduction compartment. We hypothesize that in affected family members the p.Tyr314Cysfs*50 change results in the production of the truncated protein, which binds Pγ and causes constitutive activation of the phototransduction thus leading to the absence of rod adaptation.

  17. Caffeine intake by patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendramini, L.C.; Nishiura, J.L.; Baxmann, A.C.; Heilberg, I.P. [Disciplina de Nefrologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-20

    Because caffeine may induce cyst and kidney enlargement in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), we evaluated caffeine intake and renal volume using renal ultrasound in ADPKD patients. Caffeine intake was estimated by the average of 24-h dietary recalls obtained on 3 nonconsecutive days in 102 ADPKD patients (68 females, 34 males; 39 ± 12 years) and compared to that of 102 healthy volunteers (74 females, 28 males; 38 ± 14 years). The awareness of the need for caffeine restriction was assessed. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical records of the patients. Mean caffeine intake was significantly lower in ADPKD patients versus controls (86 vs 134 mg/day), and 63% of the ADPKD patients had been previously aware of caffeine restriction. Caffeine intake did not correlate with renal volume in ADPKD patients. There were no significant differences between the renal volumes of patients in the highest and lowest tertiles of caffeine consumption. Finally, age-adjusted multiple linear regression revealed that renal volume was associated with hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage 3 and the time since diagnosis, but not with caffeine intake. The present small cross-sectional study indicated a low level of caffeine consumption by ADPKD patients when compared to healthy volunteers, which was most likely due to prior awareness of the need for caffeine restriction. Within the range of caffeine intake observed by ADPKD patients in this study (0-471 mg/day), the renal volume was not directly associated with caffeine intake.

  18. Caffeine intake by patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vendramini, L.C.; Nishiura, J.L.; Baxmann, A.C.; Heilberg, I.P.

    2012-01-01

    Because caffeine may induce cyst and kidney enlargement in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), we evaluated caffeine intake and renal volume using renal ultrasound in ADPKD patients. Caffeine intake was estimated by the average of 24-h dietary recalls obtained on 3 nonconsecutive days in 102 ADPKD patients (68 females, 34 males; 39 ± 12 years) and compared to that of 102 healthy volunteers (74 females, 28 males; 38 ± 14 years). The awareness of the need for caffeine restriction was assessed. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical records of the patients. Mean caffeine intake was significantly lower in ADPKD patients versus controls (86 vs 134 mg/day), and 63% of the ADPKD patients had been previously aware of caffeine restriction. Caffeine intake did not correlate with renal volume in ADPKD patients. There were no significant differences between the renal volumes of patients in the highest and lowest tertiles of caffeine consumption. Finally, age-adjusted multiple linear regression revealed that renal volume was associated with hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage 3 and the time since diagnosis, but not with caffeine intake. The present small cross-sectional study indicated a low level of caffeine consumption by ADPKD patients when compared to healthy volunteers, which was most likely due to prior awareness of the need for caffeine restriction. Within the range of caffeine intake observed by ADPKD patients in this study (0-471 mg/day), the renal volume was not directly associated with caffeine intake

  19. Evaluation of nephrolithiasis in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiura, José L; Neves, Rodrigo F C A; Eloi, Samara R M; Cintra, Susan M L F; Ajzen, Sergio A; Heilberg, Ita P

    2009-04-01

    Nephrolithiasis (LIT) is more prevalent in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) than in the general population. Renal ultrasonography may underdetect renal stones because of difficulties imposed by parenchymal and/or cyst wall calcifications. A total of 125 patients with ADPKD underwent ultrasonography and unenhanced computed tomography (CT) scan, routine blood chemistry, and spot and 24-h urine collections. CT scan detected calculi in 32 patients, including 20 whose previous ultrasonography revealed no calculi. The percentage of hypocitraturia was high but not statistically different between patients with ADPKD+LIT or ADPKD. Hyperuricosuria and distal renal tubular acidosis were less prevalent but also did not differ between groups, whereas hyperoxaluria was significantly higher in the former. Hypercalciuria was not detected. Renal volume was significantly higher in patients with ADPKD+LIT versus ADPKD, and a stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that a renal volume >or=500 ml was a significant predictor of LIT in patients with ADPKD and normal renal function, after adjustments for age and hypertension. CT scan was better than ultrasonography to detect LIT in patients with ADPKD. Larger kidneys from patients with ADPKD were more prone to develop stones, irrespective of the presence of metabolic disturbances.

  20. Ethical considerations in presymptomatic diagnosis of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Gutiérrez, M H; Cervantes-Aragón, I; García-Cruz, D

    2017-09-01

    Information on achieving presymptomatic diagnosis of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) is limited. The advent of molecular diagnosis makes it possible to identify the carriers of different diseases and has also introduced the prospect of detecting diseases even before their onset. This has drawn attention to the ethical implications that must be considered in these subjects with a view to preserving their physical and psychological well-being. SCA is composed of a group of neurodegenerative disorders with autosomal dominant inheritance. Only a few publications have described the genetic counselling processes and guidelines to be followed during the process of presymptomatic diagnosis (PSD). The size of the multidisciplinary teams, their areas of expertise, and the number of counselling sessions are different for each of the studies analysed here. However, the basis of presymptomatic diagnosis originates in common guidelines to which members of our team have contributed recently. Presymptomatic diagnosis should be performed according to guidelines that safeguard the subjects' welfare. The diagnostic process is only recommended for patients over 18 years old with symptoms suggesting SCA, and a minimum risk of 50%. Genetic counselling programmes must be available in all centres that offer presymptomatic diagnosis of SCA. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis: Genetics, phenotype, and natural history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, S.E.; Stephens, K.; Dale, D.C. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis (ADCH; cyclic neutropenia) is a rare disorder manifested by transient neutropenia that recurs every three weeks. To facilitate mapping the ADCH gene by genetic linkage analysis, we studied 9 ADCH families with 42 affected individuals. Pedigrees revealed AD inheritance with no evidence for decreased penetrance. Similar intra- and interfamilial variable expression was observed, with no evidence to support heterogeneity. At least 3 families displayed apparent new mutations. Many adults developed chronic neutropenia, while offspring always cycled during childhood. Children displayed recurrent oral ulcers, gingivitis, lymphadenopathy, fever, and skin and other infections with additional symptoms. Interestingly, there were no cases of neonatal infection. Some children required multiple hospitalizations for treatment. Four males under age 18 died of Clostridium sepsis following necrotizing enterocolitis; all had affected mothers. No other deaths due to ADCH were found; most had improvement of symptoms and infections as adults. Adults experienced increased tooth loss prior to age 30 (16 out of 27 adults, with 9 edentulous). No increase in myelodysplasia, malignancy, or congenital anomalies was observed. Recombinant G-CSF treatment resulted in dramatic improvement of symptoms and infections. The results suggest that ADCH is not a benign disorder, especially in childhood, and abdominal pain requires immediate evaluation. Diagnosis of ADCH requires serial blood counts in the proband and at least one CBC in relatives to exclude similar disorders. Genetic counseling requires specific histories as well as CBCs of each family member at risk to determine status regardless of symptom history, especially to assess apparent new mutations.

  2. Imaging for the prognosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kyongtae T; Grantham, Jared J

    2010-02-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by the unrelenting enlargement of innumerable cysts derived from renal tubules. This cystic growth often leads to a grotesque renal enlargement. Relatively early in life, the cysts trigger secondary complications including pain, hypertension and gross hematuria; renal insufficiency is usually not detected until the fifth or sixth decade of life. Therapies targeted to molecular and pathophysiological abnormalities slow cyst growth and protect renal function in animal models of the disease. Unfortunately, the translation of these treatments into clinical trials is hampered since glomerular filtration rate, the usual biomarker of renal disease progression, does not decrease substantially until extensive and irreversible damage to noncystic parenchyma occurs. Ultrasonography, CT and MRI have been used for many years to quantify the increase in renal volume in patients with ADPKD. Imaging with these techniques has also been used to accurately quantify the rate of increased kidney and total cyst volume in patients. In this Review we discuss the overwhelming evidence in support of the view that imaging is an invaluable tool to monitor the onset and progression of ADPKD and is well-suited to gauge the response of this disease to targeted therapy before renal function begins to decline.

  3. Is Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Becoming a Pediatric Disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie De Rechter

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD affects 1 in 400 to 1,000 live births, making it the most common monogenic cause of renal failure. Although no definite cure is available yet, it is important to affect disease progression by influencing modifiable factors such as hypertension and proteinuria. Besides this symptomatic management, the only drug currently recommended in Europe for selected adult patients with rapid disease progression, is the vasopressin receptor antagonist tolvaptan. However, the question remains whether these preventive interventions should be initiated before extensive renal damage has occurred. As renal cyst formation and expansion begins early in life, frequently in utero, ADPKD should no longer be considered an adult-onset disease. Moreover, the presence of hypertension and proteinuria in affected children has been reported to correlate well with disease severity. Until now, it is controversial whether children at-risk for ADPKD should be tested for the presence of the disease, and if so, how this should be done. Herein, we review the spectrum of pediatric ADPKD and discuss the pro and contra of testing at-risk children and the challenges and unmet needs in pediatric ADPKD care.

  4. Subjective memory complaints in preclinical autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Daniel J; Amariglio, Rebecca; Protas, Hillary; Chen, Kewei; Aguirre-Acevedo, Daniel C; Pulsifer, Brendan; Castrillon, Gabriel; Tirado, Victoria; Munoz, Claudia; Tariot, Pierre; Langbaum, Jessica B; Reiman, Eric M; Lopera, Francisco; Sperling, Reisa A; Quiroz, Yakeel T

    2017-10-03

    To cross-sectionally study subjective memory complaints (SMC) in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD). We examined self-reported and study partner-based SMC in 52 young, cognitively unimpaired individuals from a Colombian kindred with early-onset ADAD. Twenty-six carried the PSEN-1 E280A mutation, averaging 7 years of age younger than the kindred's expected clinical onset. Twenty-six were age-matched noncarriers. Participants also underwent structural MRI and cognitive testing. Self-reported SMC were greater in carriers than noncarriers ( p = 0.02). Study partner-based SMC did not differ between groups ( p = 0.21), but in carriers increased with age ( r = 0.66, p < 0.001) and decreased with hippocampal volume ( r = -0.35, p = 0.08). Cognitively unimpaired PSEN-1 carriers have elevated SMC. Self-reported SMC may be a relatively early indicator of preclinical AD, while partner- reported SMC increases later in preclinical AD, closer to clinical onset. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Unilateral abdominal mass: An unusual presentation of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, T.P.; Boal, D.K.; Rabionowitz, R.

    1984-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is rarely diagnosed in infancy or childhood. The renal involvement is typically bilateral. We describe two children with ADPKD (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease) presenting with a unilateral renal mass. The value of a careful genetic history and the role of sonography will be discussed. (orig.)

  6. Prenatal diagnosis of recurrent autosomal dominant osteogenesis imperfecta associated with unaffected parents and paternal gonadal mosaicism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Recurrent autosomal dominant OI may occur in the offspring of unaffected parents with parental gonadal mosaicism. Genetic counseling of recurrent autosomal dominant OI should include a thorough mutational analysis of the family members, and mutational analysis of the sperm may detect paternal gonadal mosaicism for the mutation.

  7. Molecular and cellular pathogenesis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Bastos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is one of the most common human life-threatening monogenic disorders. The disease is characterized by bilateral, progressive renal cystogenesis and cyst and kidney enlargement, often leading to end-stage renal disease, and may include extrarenal manifestations. ADPKD is caused by mutation in one of two genes, PKD1 and PKD2, which encode polycystin-1 (PC1 and polycystin-2 (PC2, respectively. PC2 is a non-selective cation channel permeable to Ca2+, while PC1 is thought to function as a membrane receptor. The cyst cell phenotype includes increased proliferation and apoptosis, dedifferentiation, defective planar polarity, and a secretory pattern associated with extracellular matrix remodeling. The two-hit model for cyst formation has been recently extended by the demonstration that early gene inactivation leads to rapid and diffuse development of renal cysts, while inactivation in adult life is followed by focal and late cyst formation. Renal ischemia/reperfusion, however, can function as a third hit, triggering rapid cyst development in kidneys with Pkd1 inactivation induced in adult life. The PC1-PC2 complex behaves as a sensor in the primary cilium, mediating signal transduction via Ca2+ signaling. The intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is impaired in ADPKD, being apparently responsible for the cAMP accumulation and abnormal cell proliferative response to cAMP. Activated mammalian target for rapamycin (mTOR and cell cycle dysregulation are also significant features of PKD. Based on the identification of pathways altered in PKD, a large number of preclinical studies have been performed and are underway, providing a basis for clinical trials in ADPKD and helping the design of future trials.

  8. Autosomal Dominant Inheritance of Cardiac Valves Anomalies in Two Families : Extended Spectrum of Left-Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, Maria W.; van de Laar, Ingrid M. B. H.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien; Strikwerda, Sipke; Majoor-Krakauer, Danielle F.; de Vries, Bert B. A.; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S.; Vos, Yvonne J.; de Graaf, Bianca M.; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M.; Willems, Patrick J.

    Only a limited number of families with clear monogenic inheritance of nonsyndromic forms of congenital valve defects have been described. We describe two multiplex pedigrees with a similar nonsyndromic form of heart valve anomalies that segregate as an autosomal dominant condition. The first family

  9. At first sight or second glance: clinical presentation of mosaic manifestations of autosomal dominant skin disorders - a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toberer, F; Happle, R; Schneiderbauer, R; Hausser, I; Kröhl, V; Epple, A; Moog, U; Enk, A H; Lonsdorf, A S

    2017-11-01

    Several autosomal dominant disorders may manifest in mosaic patterns with cutaneous involvement. Genomic mosaicism results from postzygotic autosomal mutations, giving rise to clonal proliferation of two genetically distinct cell groups, which clinically present as lesions following the lines of Blaschko. To increase the awareness of the clinical variability of mosaic manifestations in autosomal dominant skin disorders in order to avoid delayed diagnosis. Clinicopathologic correlation in a case series including three patients with mosaic manifestations of different autosomal dominant skin diseases. Here, we describe a patient with type 1 segmental mosaicism of epidermolytic ichthyosis (case 1) and two patients with either type 1 (case 2) or type 2 (case 3) segmental neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1). Dermatologists should be familiar with mosaic manifestations of autosomal dominant skin diseases to ensure appropriate guidance of the affected patient. Genetic counselling is mandatory as even limited forms of mosaicism may involve the patient's germline with a moderately increased risk to transmit the mutation to their offspring, resulting in a more severe, generalized form of the respective disease. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  10. Genomic deletions in OPA1 in Danish patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almind, Gitte J; Grønskov, Karen; Milea, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA, Kjer disease, MIM #165500) is the most common form of hereditary optic neuropathy. Mutations in OPA1 located at chromosome 3q28 are the predominant cause for ADOA explaining between 32 and 89% of cases. Although deletions of OPA1 were recently reported...... in ADOA, the frequency of OPA1 genomic rearrangements in Denmark, where ADOA has a high prevalence, is unknown. The aim of the study was to identify copy number variations in OPA1 in Danish ADOA patients....

  11. A three-generation family with idiopathic facial palsy suggesting an autosomal dominant inheritance with high penetrance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian Grønhøj; Gyldenløve, Mette; Jønch, Aia Elise

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic facial palsy (IFP), also known as Bell's palsy, is a common neurologic disorder, but recurrent and familial forms are rare. This case series presents a three-generation family with idiopathic facial palsy. The mode of inheritance of IFP has previously been suggested as autosomal dominant...

  12. A newly recognized autosomal dominant limb girdle muscular dystrophy with cardiac involvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi, A. J.; Ledderhof, T. M.; de Voogt, W. G.; Res, C. J.; Bouwsma, G.; Troost, D.; Busch, H. F.; Becker, A. E.; de Visser, M.

    1996-01-01

    Sixty-five members of three families with limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) underwent neurological, cardiological, and ancillary investigations. Thirty-five individuals were diagnosed as having slowly progressive autosomal dominant LGMD. Symmetrical weakness started in the proximal lower limb

  13. Expanded motor and psychiatric phenotype in autosomal dominant Segawa syndrome due to GTP cyclohydrolase deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hove, J.L. van; Steyaert, J.; Matthijs, G.; Legius, E.; Theys, P.; Wevers, R.A.; Romstad, A.; Moller, L.B.; Hedrich, K.; Goriounov, D.; Blau, N.; Klein, C.; Casaer, P.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Segawa syndrome due to GTP cyclohydrolase deficiency is an autosomal dominant disorder with variable expression, that is clinically characterised by l-dopa responsive, diurnally fluctuating dystonia and parkinsonian symptoms. OBJECTIVE: To delineate the neurological and psychiatric

  14. Imaging of the Macula Indicates Early Completion of Structural Deficit in Autosomal-Dominant Optic Atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnbäck, Cecilia; Milea, Dan; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables 3-dimensional imaging of the retina, including the layer of ganglion cells that supplies the optic nerve with its axons. We tested OCT as means of diagnosing and phenotyping autosomal-dominant optic atrophy (ADOA)....

  15. Vertical corneal striae in families with autosomal dominant hearing loss: DFNA9/COCH.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, A.M.L.C.; Pauw, R.J.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Aandekerk, A.L.; Kremer, H.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Investigation of a possible association between vertical corneal striae and mutations in the COCH gene, observed in four DFNA9 families with autosomal dominant hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. DESIGN: Prospective case series. METHODS: Ophthalmologic examinations with photography of

  16. Oculopharyngeal Weakness, Hypophrenia, Deafness, and Impaired Vision: A Novel Autosomal Dominant Myopathy with Rimmed Vacuoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Chen

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: We reported a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles characterized by dysarthria, dysphagia, external ophthalmoplegia, limb weakness, hypophrenia, deafness, and impaired vision, but the causative gene has not been found and needs further study.

  17. Autosomal dominant familial radial luxation, carpal fusion and scapular dysplasia with variable heart defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bever, Y.; Dijkstra, P. F.; Hennekam, R. C.

    1996-01-01

    A family is described with skeletal abnormalities involving the shoulder, elbow, and hand, in combination with variable cardiac defects including conduction defects and anatomical anomalies. The disorder followed an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with apparently full penetrance for the

  18. Autosomal dominant spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance: A recognizable phenotype of BICD2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Deden, Florian; Eggermann, Katja; Eggermann, Thomas; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Sellhaus, Bernd; Yamoah, Alfred; Goswami, Anand; Claeys, Kristl G; Weis, Joachim; Zerres, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    Heterozygous BICD2 gene mutations cause a form of autosomal dominant spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance (SMALED). We analyzed the BICD2 gene in a selected group of 25 index patients with neurogenic muscle atrophy. We identified 2 new BICD2 missense mutations, c.2515G>A, p.Gly839Arg, in a family with autosomal dominant inheritance, and c.2202G>T, p.Lys734Asn, as a de novo mutation in an isolated patient with similar phenotype. The patients had congenital foot contractures, muscle atrophy of the legs, and slowly progressive weakness of the shoulder girdle. There was no apparent sensory or brain dysfunction. One patient died of unrelated reasons at age 52 years. Autopsy revealed no upper motor neuron and only moderate lower motor neuron loss, but there was distal corticospinal tract degeneration and marked neurogenic muscular atrophy. These findings give further insight into the clinical and pathoanatomical consequences of BICD2 mutations. Muscle Nerve 54: 496-500, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Genomic deletions in OPA1 in Danish patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsen Michael

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA, Kjer disease, MIM #165500 is the most common form of hereditary optic neuropathy. Mutations in OPA1 located at chromosome 3q28 are the predominant cause for ADOA explaining between 32 and 89% of cases. Although deletions of OPA1 were recently reported in ADOA, the frequency of OPA1 genomic rearrangements in Denmark, where ADOA has a high prevalence, is unknown. The aim of the study was to identify copy number variations in OPA1 in Danish ADOA patients. Methods Forty unrelated ADOA patients, selected from a group of 100 ADOA patients as being negative for OPA1 point mutations, were tested for genomic rearrangements in OPA1 by multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA. When only one probe was abnormal results were confirmed by additional manually added probes. Segregation analysis was performed in families with detected mutations when possible. Results Ten families had OPA1 deletions, including two with deletions of the entire coding region and eight with intragenic deletions. Segregation analysis was possible in five families, and showed that the deletions segregated with the disease. Conclusion Deletions in the OPA1 gene were found in 10 patients presenting with phenotypic autosomal dominant optic neuropathy. Genetic testing for deletions in OPA1 should be offered for patients with clinically diagnosed ADOA and no OPA1 mutations detected by DNA sequencing analysis.

  20. Novel mutation in the ATL1 with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia presented as dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung-Won; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Moon, Jangsup; Seong, Moon-Woo; Park, Sung Sup; Lee, Sang Kun; Chu, Kon

    2014-10-01

    SPG3A, which is the second most common type of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), is caused by mutations in the atlastin GTPase 1 gene, ATL1. We report a case of a patient who presented as dysautonomia and had a novel splicing mutation c.35-3C>T in exon 2 of the ATL1. Orthostatic intolerance, urinary symptoms, hyperreflexia in the biceps and knee jerk, and decreased proprioception in both limbs were observed on neurological examinations. We tested the autonomic function and performed genetic tests for the SPG4 and SPG3A forms of HSP. This case is a genetically confirmed HSP with a novel mutation in SPG3A, and extends the phenotype of SPG3A. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Late onset autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia a family description and linkage analysis with the hla system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter O. Arruda

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available A family suffering an autosomal dominant form of late onset hereditary cerebellar ataxia is described. Eight affected family members were personally studied, and data from another four were obtained through anamnesis. The mean age of onset was 37.1±5.4 years (27-47 years. The clinical picture consisted basically of a pure ataxic cerebellar syndrome. CT-scan disclosed diffuse cerebellar atrophy with relative sparing of the brainstem (and no involvement of supratentorial structures. Neurophysiological studies (nerve conduction, VEP and BAEP were normal. Twenty-six individuals were typed for HLA histocompatibility antigens. Lod scores were calculated with the computer program LINKMAP. Close linkage of the ataxia gene with the HLA system in this family could be excluded - 0==0,02, z=(-2,17 - and the overall analysis of the lod scores suggest another chromossomal location than chromosome 6.

  2. Mutation in CPT1C Associated With Pure Autosomal Dominant Spastic Paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Carlo; Schmidt, Thomas; Situ, Alan J; Johnson, Janel O; Lee, Philip R; Chen, Ke-Lian; Bott, Laura C; Fadó, Rut; Harmison, George H; Parodi, Sara; Grunseich, Christopher; Renvoisé, Benoît; Biesecker, Leslie G; De Michele, Giuseppe; Santorelli, Filippo M; Filla, Alessandro; Stevanin, Giovanni; Dürr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Casals, Núria; Traynor, Bryan J; Blackstone, Craig; Ulmer, Tobias S; Fischbeck, Kenneth H

    2015-05-01

    The family of genes implicated in hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) is quickly expanding, mostly owing to the widespread availability of next-generation DNA sequencing methods. Nevertheless, a genetic diagnosis remains unavailable for many patients. To identify the genetic cause for a novel form of pure autosomal dominant HSP. We examined and followed up with a family presenting to a tertiary referral center for evaluation of HSP for a decade until August 2014. Whole-exome sequencing was performed in 4 patients from the same family and was integrated with linkage analysis. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm the presence of the candidate variant in the remaining affected and unaffected members of the family and screen the additional patients with HSP. Five affected and 6 unaffected participants from a 3-generation family with pure adult-onset autosomal dominant HSP of unknown genetic origin were included. Additionally, 163 unrelated participants with pure HSP of unknown genetic cause were screened. Mutation in the neuronal isoform of carnitine palmitoyl-transferase (CPT1C) gene. We identified the nucleotide substitution c.109C>T in exon 3 of CPT1C, which determined the base substitution of an evolutionarily conserved Cys residue for an Arg in the gene product. This variant strictly cosegregated with the disease phenotype and was absent in online single-nucleotide polymorphism databases and in 712 additional exomes of control participants. We showed that CPT1C, which localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum, is expressed in motor neurons and interacts with atlastin-1, an endoplasmic reticulum protein encoded by the ATL1 gene known to be mutated in pure HSPs. The mutation, as indicated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies, alters the protein conformation and reduces the mean (SD) number (213.0 [46.99] vs 81.9 [14.2]; P lipid droplets on overexpression in cells. We also observed a reduction of mean (SD) lipid droplets in primary cortical neurons

  3. Familial 22q11.2 deletion syndrome with autosomal dominant inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Gokturk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is the most frequent microdeletion syndrome in humans and caused by hemizygote deletion on only one chromosome. Most of probands have a de novo deletion of 22q11.2, but 8-20% have inherited the 22q11.2 deletion from a parent (autosomal dominant mutation. Genotype-phenotype correlation is weak in this patient group. We aimed to present three members in the same family due to an autosomal dominant inheritance with 22q11.2 deletion and different clinical findings. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 379-385

  4. Management of pain in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and anatomy of renal innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellman, Matthew W; Bahler, Clinton D; Shumate, Ashley M; Bacallao, Robert L; Sundaram, Chandru P

    2015-05-01

    Chronic pain is a prominent feature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease that is difficult to treat and manage, often resulting in a decrease in quality of life. Understanding the underlying anatomy of renal innervation and the various etiologies of pain that occur in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease can help guide proper treatments to manage pain. Reviewing previously studied treatments for pain in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease can help characterize treatment in a stepwise fashion. We performed a literature search of the etiology and management of pain in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and the anatomy of renal innervation using PubMed® and Embase® from January 1985 to April 2014 with limitations to human studies and English language. Pain occurs in the majority of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease due to renal, hepatic and mechanical origins. Patients may experience different types of pain which can make it difficult to clinically confirm its etiology. An anatomical and histological evaluation of the complex renal innervation helps in understanding the mechanisms that can lead to renal pain. Understanding the complex nature of renal innervation is essential for surgeons to perform renal denervation. The management of pain in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease should be approached in a stepwise fashion. Acute causes of renal pain must first be ruled out due to the high incidence in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. For chronic pain, nonopioid analgesics and conservative interventions can be used first, before opioid analgesics are considered. If pain continues there are surgical interventions such as renal cyst decortication, renal denervation and nephrectomy that can target pain produced by renal or hepatic cysts. Chronic pain in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is often refractory to conservative, medical and other noninvasive treatments

  5. A Report of Accelerated Coronary Artery Disease Associated with Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin, Courtney B.; Hahn, Virginia; Kobayashi, Taisei; Litwack, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is the most common heritable form of vascular dementia and it is caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene. The neurologic manifestations of CADASIL syndrome have been well characterized; however, here we report one of the first de novo cases of CADASIL-associated coronary artery disease. A 45-year-old woman with a history of CADASIL and remote tobacco use presented with unstable angina. She was ...

  6. Missense mutations in ITPR1 cause autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Lijia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia is characterized by early gross motor delay, hypotonia, gait ataxia, mild dysarthria and dysmetria. The clinical presentation remains fairly stable and may be associated with cerebellar atrophy. To date, only a few families with autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia have been reported. Linkage to 3pter was demonstrated in one large Australian family and this locus was designated spinocerebellar ataxia type 29. The objective of this study is to describe an unreported Canadian family with autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia and to identify the underlying genetic causes in this family and the original Australian family. Methods and Results Exome sequencing was performed for the Australian family, resulting in the identification of a heterozygous mutation in the ITPR1 gene. For the Canadian family, genotyping with microsatellite markers and Sanger sequencing of ITPR1 gene were performed; a heterozygous missense mutation in ITPR1 was identified. Conclusions ITPR1 encodes inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, type 1, a ligand-gated ion channel that mediates calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Deletions of ITPR1 are known to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 15, a distinct and very slowly progressive form of cerebellar ataxia with onset in adulthood. Our study demonstrates for the first time that, in addition to spinocerebellar ataxia type 15, alteration of ITPR1 function can cause a distinct congenital nonprogressive ataxia; highlighting important clinical heterogeneity associated with the ITPR1 gene and a significant role of the ITPR1-related pathway in the development and maintenance of the normal functions of the cerebellum.

  7. Treatment of autosomal dominant hearing loss by in vivo delivery of genome editing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xue; Tao, Yong; Lamas, Veronica; Huang, Mingqian; Yeh, Wei-Hsi; Pan, Bifeng; Hu, Yu-Juan; Hu, Johnny H; Thompson, David B; Shu, Yilai; Li, Yamin; Wang, Hongyang; Yang, Shiming; Xu, Qiaobing; Polley, Daniel B; Liberman, M Charles; Kong, Wei-Jia; Holt, Jeffrey R; Chen, Zheng-Yi; Liu, David R

    2018-01-11

    Although genetic factors contribute to almost half of all cases of deafness, treatment options for genetic deafness are limited. We developed a genome-editing approach to target a dominantly inherited form of genetic deafness. Here we show that cationic lipid-mediated in vivo delivery of Cas9-guide RNA complexes can ameliorate hearing loss in a mouse model of human genetic deafness. We designed and validated, both in vitro and in primary fibroblasts, genome editing agents that preferentially disrupt the dominant deafness-associated allele in the Tmc1 (transmembrane channel-like gene family 1) Beethoven (Bth) mouse model, even though the mutant Tmc1 Bth allele differs from the wild-type allele at only a single base pair. Injection of Cas9-guide RNA-lipid complexes targeting the Tmc1 Bth allele into the cochlea of neonatal Tmc1 Bth/+ mice substantially reduced progressive hearing loss. We observed higher hair cell survival rates and lower auditory brainstem response thresholds in injected ears than in uninjected ears or ears injected with control complexes that targeted an unrelated gene. Enhanced acoustic startle responses were observed among injected compared to uninjected Tmc1 Bth/+ mice. These findings suggest that protein-RNA complex delivery of target gene-disrupting agents in vivo is a potential strategy for the treatment of some types of autosomal-dominant hearing loss.

  8. A recurring dominant negative mutation causes autosomal dominant growth hormone deficiency - a clinical research center study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogan, J.D.; Prince, M.; Phillips, J. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    Familial isolated GH deficiency type II (IGHD-II) is an autosomal dominant disorder that has been previously shown in some patients to be caused by heterogeneous GH gene defects that affect GH messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing. We report here our findings of multiple G{r_arrow}A transitions of the first base of the donor splice site of IVS 3 (+1G{r_arrow}A) in IGHD II subjects from three nonrelated kindreds from Sweden, North America, and South Africa. This + 1G{r_arrow}A substitution creates an NlaIII site that was used to demonstrate that all affected individuals in all three families were heterozygous for the mutation. To determine the effect of this mutation of GH mRNA processing, HeLa cells were transfected with expression plasmids containing normal or mutant +1G{r_arrow}A alleles, and complementary DNAs from the resulting GH mRNAs were sequenced. The mutation was found to destroy the GH IVS3 donor splice site, causing skipping of exon 3 and loss of the codons for amino acids 32-71 of the mature GH peptide from the mutant GH mRNA. Our finding of exon 3 skipping in transcripts of the +1G{r_arrow}A mutant allele is identical to our previous report of a different sixth base transition (+6T{r_arrow}C) mutation of the IVS 3 donor splice site that also causes IGHD II. Microsatellite analysis of an affected subjects` DNA from each of the three nonrelated kindreds indicates that the +1G{r_arrow}A mutation arose independently in each family. Finding that neither grandparent has the mutation in the first family suggests that it arose de novo in that family. Our data indicate that (1) +1G{r_arrow}A IVS 3 mutations perturb GH mRNA splicing and cause IGHD II; and (2) these mutations can present as de novo GHD cases. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease : the changing face of clinical management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, Albert C M; Devuyst, Olivier; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Walz, Gerd; Knoers, VVAM

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is the most common inherited kidney disease and accounts for 7-10% of all patients on renal replacement therapy worldwide. Although first reported 500 years ago, this disorder is still regarded as untreatable and its pathogenesis is poorly understood

  10. A novel mutation in the ELOVL4 gene causes autosomal dominant Stargardt-like macular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maugeri, A.; Meire, F.; Hoyng, C.B.; Vink, C.W.; Regemorter, N. van; Karan, G.; Yang, Z.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Zhang, K.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To conduct clinical and genetic studies in a European family with autosomal dominant Stargardt-like macular dystrophy (adSTGD-like MD) and to investigate the functional consequences of a novel ELOVL4 mutation. METHODS: Ophthalmic examination and mutation screening by direct sequencing of

  11. Autosomal dominant optic neuropathy and sensorineual hearing loss associated with a novel mutation of WFS1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogewind, B.F.T.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Hol, F.A.; Kunst, H.P.M.; Hoefsloot, E.H.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the phenotype of a novel Wolframin (WFS1) mutation in a family with autosomal dominant optic neuropathy and deafness. The study is designed as a retrospective observational case series. METHODS: Seven members of a Dutch family underwent ophthalmological, otological, and

  12. Bilateral cysts in the choroid plexus in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casteleijn, Niek F.; Spithoven, Edwin M.; Rookmaaker, Maarten B.; Vergouwen, Mervyn D. I.; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetic systemic disorder, which is associated with cyst formation in several organs, renal function decline and a higher prevalence of intracranial aneurysms. We report a 52-year-old, otherwise healthy, man with ADPKD who had asymptomatic,

  13. TBC1D24 Mutation Causes Autosomal-Dominant Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azaiez, H.; Booth, K.T.; Bu, F.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Shibata, S.B.; Shearer, A.E.; Kolbe, D.; Meyer, N.; Black-Ziegelbein, E.A.; Smith, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary hearing loss is extremely heterogeneous. Over 70 genes have been identified to date, and with the advent of massively parallel sequencing, the pace of novel gene discovery has accelerated. In a family segregating progressive autosomal-dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL), we used

  14. A new mutation causing autosomal dominant periodic fever syndrome in a Danish family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weyhreter, Heike; Schwartz, Marianne; Kristensen, Tim D

    2003-01-01

    We describe four members in a family of 8 individuals over 3 generations with the autosomal dominant inherited periodic fever syndrome tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). The patients had recurrent episodes of fever, abdominal pain, arthritis, and rash. We examined...

  15. Prevalence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in Persian cats and related-breeds in Sydney and Brisbane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrs, V R; Gunew, M; Foster, S F; Beatty, J A; Malik, R

    2001-04-01

    A form of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease has been identified in Persian cats and related breeds. Two features make elimination of this disease from future generations an achievable goal: the autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and the availability of a noninvasive technique, renal ultrasonography, to identify affected cats. The aims of this study were; to determine the prevalence of the disease in Persian cats and related breeds in Sydney and Brisbane, to determine any effect of domicile and breed on disease prevalence, to alert veterinary practitioners to the prevalence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and to propose methods of eliminating the disease from future generations of cattery-bred cats. To be included in this scheme, cats had to be of Persian or related breed and be older than 10 months-of-age. Younger cats were excluded because of the increased likelihood of a false negative result. Renal ultrasonography was performed using either a Medison 600 with a 7.5 MHz mechanical sector scanner (n = 228, Brisbane) or using an ATL UltraMark-9 with a 5 to 10 MHz linear array transducer (n = 92, Sydney). The effects of domicile (Sydney versus Brisbane) and breed on the prevalence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease were tested using two-tailed Fisher's Exact tests. A total of 320 cats were tested comprising 230 Persians, 48 Himalayans, 17 Exotics, 14 Burmillas, 6 Ragdolls and 5 Chinchillas. The prevalence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in Sydney (45%) and Brisbane (42%) was comparable and no sex predilection was identified. The disease was not detected in Ragdolls, although only a small number was tested. Two of 14 Burmilla cats were positive (14%), demonstrating that long hair coat and brachycephalic features do not segregate with the polycystic kidney disease trait. These results show that the prevalence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease amongst purebred, long-haired cats in Australia is

  16. Preclinical trials in autosomal dominant AD: implementation of the DIAN-TU trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, S M; Mallmann, J; Santacruz, A M; Fuqua, A; Carril, M; Aisen, P S; Althage, M C; Belyew, S; Benzinger, T L; Brooks, W S; Buckles, V D; Cairns, N J; Clifford, D; Danek, A; Fagan, A M; Farlow, M; Fox, N; Ghetti, B; Goate, A M; Heinrichs, D; Hornbeck, R; Jack, C; Jucker, M; Klunk, W E; Marcus, D S; Martins, R N; Masters, C M; Mayeux, R; McDade, E; Morris, J C; Oliver, A; Ringman, J M; Rossor, M N; Salloway, S; Schofield, P R; Snider, J; Snyder, P; Sperling, R A; Stewart, C; Thomas, R G; Xiong, C; Bateman, R J

    2013-10-01

    The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network Trials Unit (DIAN-TU) was formed to direct the design and management of interventional therapeutic trials of international DIAN and autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (ADAD) participants. The goal of the DIAN-TU is to implement safe trials that have the highest likelihood of success while advancing scientific understanding of these diseases and clinical effects of proposed therapies. The DIAN-TU has launched a trial design that leverages the existing infrastructure of the ongoing DIAN observational study, takes advantage of a variety of drug targets, incorporates the latest results of biomarker and cognitive data collected during the observational study, and implements biomarkers measuring Alzheimer's disease (AD) biological processes to improve the efficiency of trial design. The DIAN-TU trial design is unique due to the sophisticated design of multiple drugs, multiple pharmaceutical partners, academics servings as sponsor, geographic distribution of a rare population and intensive safety and biomarker assessments. The implementation of the operational aspects such as home health research delivery, safety magnetic resonance imagings (MRIs) at remote locations, monitoring clinical and cognitive measures, and regulatory management involving multiple pharmaceutical sponsors of the complex DIAN-TU trial are described. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. A new locus for autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta on chromosome 8q24.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Gustavo; Pemberton, Trevor J; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Scarel-Caminaga, Raquel; Mehrian-Shai, Ruty; Gonzalez-Quevedo, Catalina; Ninis, Vasiliki; Hartiala, Jaana; Allayee, Hooman; Snead, Malcolm L; Leal, Suzanne M; Line, Sergio R P; Patel, Pragna I

    2007-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a collective term used to describe phenotypically diverse forms of defective tooth enamel development. AI has been reported to exhibit a variety of inheritance patterns, and several loci have been identified that are associated with AI. We have performed a genome-wide scan in a large Brazilian family segregating an autosomal dominant form of AI and mapped a novel locus to 8q24.3. A maximum multipoint LOD score of 7.5 was obtained at marker D8S2334 (146,101,309 bp). The disease locus lies in a 1.9 cM (2.1 Mb) region according to the Rutgers Combined Linkage-Physical map, between a VNTR marker (at 143,988,705 bp) and the telomere (146,274,826 bp). Ten candidate genes were identified based on gene ontology and microarray-facilitated gene selection using the expression of murine orthologues in dental tissue, and examined for the presence of a mutation. However, no causative mutation was identified.

  18. A novel missense mutation in the CLCN7 gene linked to benign autosomal dominant osteopetrosis: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Ban Mousa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited genetic disease characterized by sclerosis of the skeleton. The absence or malfunction of osteoclasts is found to be strongly associated with the disease evolution. Currently, four clinically distinct forms of the disease have been recognized: the infantile autosomal recessive osteopetrosis, the malignant and the intermediate forms, and autosomal dominant osteopetrosis, type I and type II forms. The autosomal recessive types are the most severe forms with symptoms in very early childhood, whereas the autosomal dominant classes exhibit a heterogeneous trait with milder symptoms, often at later childhood or adulthood. Case presentation Case 1 is the 12-year-old daughter (index patient of an Iraqi-Kurdish family who, at the age of eight years, was diagnosed clinically to have mild autosomal dominant osteopetrosis. Presently, at 12-years old, she has severe complications due to the disease progression. In addition, the same family previously experienced the death of a female child in her late childhood. The deceased child had been misdiagnosed, at that time, with thalassemia major. In this report, we extended our investigation to identify the type of the inheritance patterns of osteopetrosis using molecular techniques, because consanguineous marriages exist within the family history. We have detected one heterozygous mutation in exon 15 of the Chloride Channel 7 gene in the index patient (Case 1, whereas other mutations were not detected in the associated genes TCIRG1, OSTM1, RANK, and RANKL. The missense mutation (CGG>TGG located in exon 15 (c.1225C>T of the Chloride Channel 7 gene changed the amino acid position 409 from arginine to tryptophan (p.R409W, c.1225C>T. Case 2 is the 16-year-old son (brother of the index patient of the same family who was diagnosed clinically with mild autosomal dominant osteopetrosis. We have identified the same heterozygous mutation in exon 15 of the Chloride

  19. Autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus, and epilepsy (ADCME: Probable first family from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Mohan Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus, and epilepsy (ADCME is an extremely rare syndrome characterized by familial occurrence of postural and action-induced tremors of the hands but showing electrophysiologic findings of cortical reflex myoclonus. Patients also have cognitive decline and tonic-clonic seizures, often precipitated by sleep deprivation or photic stimulation. We describe probably the first family from India of this ill-defined syndrome.

  20. Automated Segmentation of Kidneys from MR Images in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngwoo; Ge, Yinghui; Tao, Cheng; Zhu, Jianbing; Chapman, Arlene B; Torres, Vicente E; Yu, Alan S L; Mrug, Michal; Bennett, William M; Flessner, Michael F; Landsittel, Doug P; Bae, Kyongtae T

    2016-04-07

    Our study developed a fully automated method for segmentation and volumetric measurements of kidneys from magnetic resonance images in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and assessed the performance of the automated method with the reference manual segmentation method. Study patients were selected from the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease. At the enrollment of the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease Study in 2000, patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease were between 15 and 46 years of age with relatively preserved GFRs. Our fully automated segmentation method was on the basis of a spatial prior probability map of the location of kidneys in abdominal magnetic resonance images and regional mapping with total variation regularization and propagated shape constraints that were formulated into a level set framework. T2-weighted magnetic resonance image sets of 120 kidneys were selected from 60 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and divided into the training and test datasets. The performance of the automated method in reference to the manual method was assessed by means of two metrics: Dice similarity coefficient and intraclass correlation coefficient of segmented kidney volume. The training and test sets were swapped for crossvalidation and reanalyzed. Successful segmentation of kidneys was performed with the automated method in all test patients. The segmented kidney volumes ranged from 177.2 to 2634 ml (mean, 885.4±569.7 ml). The mean Dice similarity coefficient ±SD between the automated and manual methods was 0.88±0.08. The mean correlation coefficient between the two segmentation methods for the segmented volume measurements was 0.97 (Pkidneys from abdominal magnetic resonance images in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with varying kidney volumes. The performance of the automated method was in good

  1. Molecular Pathways and Therapies in Autosomal-Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigusa, Takamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most prevalent inherited renal disease, characterized by multiple cysts that can eventually lead to kidney failure. Studies investigating the role of primary cilia and polycystins have significantly advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of PKD. This review will present clinical and basic aspects of ADPKD, review current concepts of PKD pathogenesis, evaluate potential therapeutic targets, and highlight challenges for future clinical studies. PMID:25933820

  2. Cellular Energy Pathways as Novel Targets for the Therapy of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0420 TITLE: Cellular Energy Pathways as Novel Targets for the Therapy of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease...DATES COVERED 1 Sep 2016 - 31 Aug 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Cellular Energy Pathways as Novel Targets for the Therapy of...and dysregulation of cellular energy metabolism. The enzyme AMPK regulates a number of cellular pathways, including these disease-causing features

  3. Acute abdomen and ascites as presenting features of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhary, Sanjay; Qian, Qi

    2012-01-01

    We describe a patient with sudden onset of abdominal pain and ascites, leading to the diagnosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Her presentation was consistent with acute liver cyst rupture as the cause of her acute illness. A review of literature on polycystic liver disease in patients with ADPKD and current management strategies are presented. This case alerts physicians that ADPKD could occasionally present as an acute abdomen; cyst rupture related to ADPKD may be ...

  4. Autosomal dominant optic neuropathy and sensorineual hearing loss associated with a novel mutation of WFS1

    OpenAIRE

    Hogewind, Barend F.T.; Pennings, Ronald J.E.; Hol, Frans A.; Kunst, Henricus P.M.; Hoefsloot, Elisabeth H.; Cruysberg, Johannes R.M.; Cremers, Cor W.R.J.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the phenotype of a novel Wolframin (WFS1) mutation in a family with autosomal dominant optic neuropathy and deafness. The study is designed as a retrospective observational case series. METHODS: Seven members of a Dutch family underwent ophthalmological, otological, and genetical examinations in one institution. Fasting serum glucose was assessed in the affected family members. RESULTS: All affected individuals showed loss of neuroretinal rim of the optic nerve at fundosc...

  5. A recurrent deletion mutation in OPA1 causes autosomal dominant optic atrophy in a Chinese family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liping; Shi, Wei; Song, Liming; Zhang, Xiao; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Ge, Xianglian; Li, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Min, Qingjie; Jin, Zi-Bing; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) is the most frequent form of hereditary optic neuropathy and occurs due to the degeneration of the retinal ganglion cells. To identify the genetic defect in a family with putative ADOA, we performed capture next generation sequencing (CNGS) to screen known retinal disease genes. However, six exons failed to be sequenced by CNGS in optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1). Sequencing of those exons identified a 4 bp deletion mutation (c.2983-1_2985del) in OPA1. Furthermore, we sequenced the transcripts of OPA1 from the patient skin fibroblasts and found there is six-nucleotide deletion (c.2984-c.2989, AGAAAG). Quantitative-PCR and Western blotting showed that OPA1 mRNA and its protein expression have no obvious difference between patient skin fibroblast and control. The analysis of protein structure by molecular modeling suggests that the mutation may change the structure of OPA1 by formation of an alpha helix protruding into an existing pocket. Taken together, we identified an OPA1 mutation in a family with ADOA by filling the missing CNGS data. We also showed that this mutation affects the structural intactness of OPA1. It provides molecular insights for clinical genetic diagnosis and treatment of optic atrophy.

  6. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in Persian and Persian-cross cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, K A; Biller, D S; DiBartola, S P; Radin, M J; Wellman, M L

    1997-03-01

    A form of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) similar in clinical features to human ADPKD occurs in the Persian cat. We characterized the morphologic and immunohistochemical features of this disease in a colony of affected cats. Complete postmortem examinations were performed on 11 normal and 22 affected cats ranging in age from 3 months to 10 years. Kidneys were evaluated by gross and histologic examinations, ultrastructure, lectin staining, bromodeoxyuridine immunochemistry for labeling index and immunochemistry for distribution of Na/K ATPase. Feline ADPKD was characterized by variable numbers of cysts in the renal cortex and medullar. Ultrastructural examination and lectin staining suggested that cysts arose from proximal and distal nephron segments. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling demonstrated increased proliferation of epithelium lining some cysts in young cats. Immunohistochemical staining showed variable translocation of Na/K ATPase from the basolateral membranes of cyst-lining cells to the cytoplasm or luminal membranes. Cystic renal disease commonly was associated with chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis and hepatobiliary hyperplasia and fibrosis. Focal hyperplasia of renal tubular epithelium, hepatic cysts, and cardiac lesions were present in some cats. Feline ADPKD shares many morphologic and pathogenetic features with human ADPKD.

  7. Further evidence for P59L mutation in GJA3 associated with autosomal dominant congenital cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Congenital cataracts are one of the common eye disorders leading to visual impairment or blindness in children worldwide. We found a Chinese family with autosomal dominant pulverulent cataract. Aims: To identify the pathogenic gene mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant inherited pulverulent cataract. Subjects and Methods: After obtained informed consent, detailed ophthalmic examinations were carried out; genomic DNAs were obtained from seven family members in a three-generation Chinese family with three affected. All exons of candidate genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and were sequenced performed by bidirectional sequencing. Results: By sequencing the encoding regions of the candidate genes, a missense mutation (c. 176C>T was detected in gap junction protein alpha 3 genes (GJA3, which resulted in the substitution of highly conserved proline by leucine at codon 59 (p.P59L. The mutation co-segregated with all patients and was absent in 100 normal Chinese controls. Conclusions: The study identified a missense mutation (c. 176C>T in GJA3 gene associated with autosomal dominant congenital pulverulent cataract in a Chinese family. It gave further evidence of phenotype heterogeneity for P59L mutation in GJA3 associated with congenital cataract.

  8. Prenatal diagnosis of autosomal dominant microcephaly and postnatal evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persutte, W H; Kurczynski, T W; Chaudhuri, K; Lenke, R R; Woldenberg, L; Brinker, R A

    1990-10-01

    A case of fetal autosomal dominant microcephaly was prenatally diagnosed with ultrasonography in a woman with previously undiagnosed microcephaly. At the time of initial ultrasonographic assessment, the mother was identified to have a markedly small cranium, consistent with maternal microcephaly. The ultrasonographic examination showed the fetal head size to be four standard deviations below the mean for gestational age. Gestational dating from the other biometric parameters and from the last menstrual period was consistent with 31 weeks' gestation. Neurosonographic evaluation of the fetus revealed no obvious structural abnormalities. Serial ultrasonographic examinations at 35 and 38 weeks' gestation showed no changes in the fetal head size. A 2.64 kg male fetus was delivered at term. Neonatal assessment showed the fetal head circumference to be less than the second percentile for gestational age. Neurologic assessment of the neonate with magnetic resonance imaging showed abnormal development of the brain, with small cerebellar and cerebral hemispheres, and pachygyria. These images are compared with the magnetic resonance images of the mother. Our findings of maternal and fetal microcephaly are consistent with autosomal dominant microcephaly. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the prenatal diagnosis of autosomal dominant microcephaly.

  9. Autosomal Dominant Hypoparathyroidism Caused by Germline Mutation in GNA11: Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Opas, Evan E.; Tuluc, Florin; Metzger, Daniel L.; Hou, Cuiping; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Context: Most cases of autosomal dominant hypoparathyroidism (ADH) are caused by gain-of-function mutations in CASR or dominant inhibitor mutations in GCM2 or PTH. Objective: Our objectives were to identify the genetic basis for ADH in a multigenerational family and define the underlying disease mechanism. Subjects: Here we evaluated a multigenerational family with ADH in which affected subjects had normal sequences in these genes and were shorter than unaffected family members. Methods: We collected clinical and biochemical data from 6 of 11 affected subjects and performed whole-exome sequence analysis on DNA from two affected sisters and their affected father. Functional studies were performed after expression of wild-type and mutant Gα11 proteins in human embryonic kidney-293-CaR cells that stably express calcium-sensing receptors. Results: Whole-exome-sequencing followed by Sanger sequencing revealed a heterozygous mutation, c.179G>T; p.R60L, in GNA11, which encodes the α-subunit of G11, the principal heterotrimeric G protein that couples calcium-sensing receptors to signal activation in parathyroid cells. Functional studies of Gα11 R60L showed increased accumulation of intracellular concentration of free calcium in response to extracellular concentration of free calcium with a significantly decreased EC50 compared with wild-type Gα11. By contrast, R60L was significantly less effective than the oncogenic Q209L form of Gα11 as an activator of the MAPK pathway. Compared to subjects with CASR mutations, patients with GNA11 mutations lacked hypercalciuria and had normal serum magnesium levels. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that the germline gain-of-function mutation of GNA11 is a cause of ADH and implicate a novel role for GNA11 in skeletal growth. PMID:24823460

  10. Increased psychosocial risk, depression and reduced quality of life living with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Roslyn J; Thong, Kah Mean; Dworschak, Gabriel C; Ong, Albert C M

    2016-07-01

    The psychosocial impact of living with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is poorly understood. In this study, we assessed the overall quality of life (QOL), mood, perceived social support and psychosocial risk of having a diagnosis of ADPKD in a patient cohort from a major UK nephrology centre serving a large catchment population. A postal questionnaire was sent to 349 patients registered at the Sheffield Kidney Institute with chronic kidney disease but not on renal replacement therapy (RRT). The questionnaire incorporated three validated forms: kidney disease quality-of-life short form (KDQOL SF1.3) to assess QOL; nine-item patient health questionnaire (PHQ9) to screen for depression; multidimensional scale of perceived social support (MSPSS) to evaluate perceived social support; as well as a novel genetic psychosocial risk instrument (GPRI-ADPKD) designed to study the specific psychosocial impact of coping with a diagnosis of ADPKD. The overall response rate was 53%. Patients with a lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (psychosocial risk. Clinically significant depression was reported in 22% and 62% felt guilty about passing ADPKD on to their children. In multivariate analysis, female gender was associated with overall poorer psychosocial well-being, whereas increasing age, lower kidney function, larger kidneys and loss of a first degree relative from ADPKD were additional risk factors for QOL, depression or psychosocial risk, respectively. Our results reveal a significantly poorer QOL and increasing psychosocial risk with markers of disease progression in patients, particularly women, with ADPKD prior to starting RRT. The future management strategy of ADPKD should address these issues and provide for better individual and family support throughout the patient journey. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  11. Vasopressin, Copeptin, and Renal Concentrating Capacity in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease without Renal Impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zittema, Debbie; Boertien, Wendy E.; van Beek, Andre P.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Franssen, Casper F. M.; de Jong, Paul E.; Meijer, Esther; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    Background and objectives Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most prevalent hereditary renal disease, characterized by cyst formation in the kidneys leading to end stage kidney failure. It is clinically acknowledged that ADPKD patients have impaired urine concentrating

  12. C-terminal truncations in human 3 '-5 ' DNA exonuclease TREX1 cause autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richards, Anna; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Jen, Joanna C.; Kavanagh, David; Bertram, Paula; Spitzer, Dirk; Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Barilla-LaBarca, Maria-Louise; Terwindt, Gisela M.; Kasai, Yumi; McLellan, Mike; Grand, Mark Gilbert; Vanmolkot, Kaate R. J.; de Vries, Boukje; Wan, Jijun; Kane, Michael J.; Mamsa, Hafsa; Schaefer, Ruth; Stam, Anine H.; Haan, Joost; Paulus, T. V. M. de Jong; Storimans, Caroline W.; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; Oosterhuis, Jendo A.; Gschwendter, Andreas; Dichgans, Martin; Kotschet, Katya E.; Hodgkinson, Suzanne; Hardy, Todd A.; Delatycki, Martin B.; Hajj-Ali, Rula A.; Kothari, Parul H.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Frants, Rune R.; Baloh, Robert W.; Ferrari, Michel D.; Atkinson, John P.

    Autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy is a microvascular endotheliopathy with middle- age onset. In nine families, we identified heterozygous C- terminal frameshift mutations in TREX1, which encodes a 3'-5' exonuclease. These truncated proteins retain exonuclease

  13. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: Study of clinical characteristics in an Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Vikrant

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is the most common hereditary form of kidney disease. Clinical data on this multisystem disorder are scarce from developing countries. We conducted a prospective observational study of the clinical profile of ADPKD patients at a single center over a period of six years. A total of 208 patients were studied. Majority were male (60.6% and the mean age was 45.8 ± 14.5 years. About 61.5% had early stage (Stages 1-3 of chronic kidney disease (CKD and 38.5% had advanced CKD (Stages 4 and 5. Clinical features observed included pain abdomen (46.2%, nocturia (65.9%, hematuria (21.6%, nephrolithiasis (38.9%, urinary tract infection (UTI (38.9%, hypertension (69.5%, and raised serum creatinine (54.3%. The prevalence of nocturia, hypertension, and renal dysfunction showed a significant increase with age (P = 0.001. Extrarenal manifestations were polycystic liver disease in 77 patients (37%, cysts in pancreas in two (1%, and stroke in three (1.5% (hemorrhage in 2 and infarct in 1. There was significantly higher prevalence of hypertension (P = 0.027 and nephrolithiasis (P = 0.044 in males compared to females. Ninety-two patients (44.2% had a positive family history for ADPKD. Fifteen (7.2% had kidney failure at the diagnosis of ADPKD, were hospitalized, and underwent emergency dialysis. A total of 20 patients (9.6% developed end-stage kidney disease during the study period. The age at diagnosis was higher, and there was a high prevalence of hypertension, nocturia, abdominal pain, nephrolithiasis, UTI, and renal dysfunction in Indian ADPKD patients.

  14. Immunological loss-of-function due to genetic gain-of-function in humans: autosomal dominance of the third kind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisson, Bertrand; Quartier, Pierre; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-02-01

    All the human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) recognized as such in the 1950s were Mendelian traits and, whether autosomal or X-linked, displayed recessive inheritance. The first autosomal dominant (AD) PID, hereditary angioedema, was recognized in 1963. However, since the first identification of autosomal recessive (AR), X-linked recessive (XR) and AD PID-causing genes in 1985 (ADA; severe combined immunodeficiency), 1986 (CYBB, chronic granulomatous disease) and 1989 (SERPING1; hereditary angioedema), respectively, the number of genetically defined AD PIDs has increased more rapidly than that of any other type of PID. AD PIDs now account for 61 of the 260 known conditions (23%). All known AR PIDs are caused by alleles with some loss-of-function (LOF). A single XR PID is caused by gain-of-function (GOF) mutations (WASP-related neutropenia, 2001). In contrast, only 44 of 61 AD defects are caused by LOF alleles, which exert dominance by haploinsufficiency or negative dominance. Since 2003, up to 17 AD disorders of the third kind, due to GOF alleles, have been described. Remarkably, six of the 17 genes concerned also harbor monoallelic (STAT3), biallelic (C3, CFB, CARD11, PIK3R1) or both monoallelic and biallelic (STAT1) LOF alleles in patients with other clinical phenotypes. Most heterozygous GOF alleles result in auto-inflammation, auto-immunity, or both, with a wide range of immunological and clinical forms. Some also underlie infections and, fewer, allergies, by impairing or enhancing immunity to non-self. Malignancies are also rare. The enormous diversity of immunological and clinical phenotypes is thought provoking and mirrors the diversity and pleiotropy of the underlying genotypes. These experiments of nature provide a unique insight into the quantitative regulation of human immunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Perspective: Is Random Monoallelic Expression a Contributor to Phenotypic Variability of Autosomal Dominant Disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoheng Gui

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Several factors have been proposed as contributors to interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic variability in autosomal dominant disorders, including allelic variation, modifier genes, environmental factors and complex genetic and environmental interactions. However, regardless of the similarity of genetic background and environmental factors, asymmetric limb or trunk anomalies in a single individual and variable manifestation between monozygotic twins have been observed, indicating other mechanisms possibly involved in expressivity of autosomal dominant diseases. One such example is Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS, which is characterized by congenital cardiac defects and forelimb anomalies, mainly attributed to mutations in the TBX5 gene. We hypothesize that monoallelic expression of the TBX5 gene occurs during embryo development, and, in the context of a mutation, random monoallelic expression (RME can create discrepant functions in a proportion of cells and thus contribute to variable phenotypes. A hybrid mouse model was used to investigate the occurrence of RME with the Tbx5 gene, and single-cell reverse transcription PCR and restriction digestion were performed for limb bud cells from developing embryos (E11.5 of the hybrid mice. RME of Tbx5 was observed in approximately two-thirds of limb bud cells. These results indicate that RME of the Tbx5 gene occurs frequently during embryo development, resulting in a mosaic expression signature (monoallelic, biallelic, or null that may provide a potential explanation for the widespread phenotypic variability in HOS. This model will further provide novel insights into the variability of autosomal dominant traits and a better understanding of the complex expressivity of disease conditions.

  16. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: recent advances in clinical management [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguo Mao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The first clinical descriptions of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD go back at least 500 years to the late 16th century. Advances in understanding disease presentation and pathophysiology have mirrored the progress of clinical medicine in anatomy, pathology, physiology, cell biology, and genetics. The identification of PKD1 and PKD2, the major genes mutated in ADPKD, has stimulated major advances, which in turn have led to the first approved drug for this disorder and a fresh reassessment of patient management in the 21st century. In this commentary, we consider how clinical management is likely to change in the coming decade.

  17. Acute abdomen and ascites as presenting features of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Sanjay; Qian, Qi

    2012-12-27

    We describe a patient with sudden onset of abdominal pain and ascites, leading to the diagnosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Her presentation was consistent with acute liver cyst rupture as the cause of her acute illness. A review of literature on polycystic liver disease in patients with ADPKD and current management strategies are presented. This case alerts physicians that ADPKD could occasionally present as an acute abdomen; cyst rupture related to ADPKD may be considered in the differential diagnoses of acute abdomen.

  18. Renal replacement therapy for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spithoven, Edwin M; Kramer, Anneke; Meijer, Esther

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the fourth most common renal disease requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT). Still, there are few epidemiological data on the prevalence of, and survival on RRT for ADPKD. METHODS: This study used data from the ERA-EDTA Registry...... on RRT prevalence and survival on RRT in 12 European countries with 208 million inhabitants. We studied four 5-year periods (1991-2010). Survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method and by Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: From the first to the last study period, the prevalence...

  19. New autosomal dominant syndrome reminiscent of Coffin-Siris syndrome and Brachymorphism-Onychodysplasia-Dysphalangism syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, A M; Teebi, A S

    2000-01-01

    We report a man and his two daughters (one stillborn) with an apparently unique constellation of anomalies including fifth finger/toe terminal phalanx and nail hypoplasia. The craniofacial manifestations include large boxy head, round face, hypertelorism with downslanting palpebral fissures and wide mouth. Other manifestations include brachydactyly, fifth finger clinodactyly and ventricular septal defect. Intelligence is normal. The resemblance to Coffin-Siris, Brachymorphism-Onychodysplasia-Dysphalangism and DOOR syndromes is discussed and we concluded that this family probably represents a new autosomal dominant syndrome.

  20. [Massive inferior vena cava thrombosis in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic hepatorenal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Gil, F; Costero, O; Pobes, A

    2002-01-01

    We report a 68-year-old man with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, who developed multiple venous thromboses (inferior vena cava, left renal vein and iliofemoral veins) caused by local compression of the intrahepatic inferior vena cava by hepatic cysts. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of inferior vena cava thrombosis caused by hepatic cysts compression. Doppler ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging were effective in documenting the venous thromboses and the underlying lesions non-invasively. Long-term anticoagulation was an efficient and safe treatment.

  1. Octreotide reduces hepatic, renal and breast cystic volume in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Cuesta-López, Emilio; Peces, Carlos; Pérez-Dueñas, Virginia; Vega-Cabrera, Cristina; Selgas, Rafael

    2011-06-01

    A 43-year-old woman with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) received octreotide for 12 months, and this was associated with a 6.3% reduction in liver volume, an 8% reduction in total kidney volume and stabilization of renal function. There was also a reduction of cyst size in fibrocystic disease of breast. These data suggest that the cyst fluid accumulation in different organs from patients with ADPKD is a dynamic process which can be reversed by octreotide. This is the first report of a case of simultaneous reduction in hepatic, renal and breast cystic volume with preservation of renal function in a patient with ADPKD receiving octreotide.

  2. Novel CACNA1S mutation causes autosomal dominant hypokalemic periodic paralysis in a Chinese family

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qiufen; Liu, Mugen; Xu, Chunsheng; Tang, Zhaohui; Liao, Yuhua; Du, Rong; Li, Wei; Wu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xu; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Xianqin; Zhu, Jianfang; Ren, Xiang; Ke, Tie; Wang, Qing

    2005-01-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder which is characterized by periodic attacks of muscle weakness associated with a decrease in the serum potassium level. The skeletal muscle calcium channel α-subunit gene CACNA1S is a major disease-causing gene for HypoPP, however, only three specific HypoPP-causing mutations, Arg528His, Arg1,239His and Arg1,239Gly, have been identified in CACNA1S to date. In this study, we studied a four-generation Chinese family with H...

  3. Seizure semiology in autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features, due to novel LGI1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadleir, Lynette G; Agher, Dahbia; Chabrol, Elodie; Elkouby, Léa; Leguern, Eric; Paterson, Sarah J; Harty, Rosie; Bellows, Susannah T; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Baulac, Stéphanie

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in LGI1 are found in 50% of families with autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features (ADEAF). In ADEAF, family members have predominantly lateral temporal lobe seizures but mesial temporal lobe semiology may also occur. We report here three families with novel LGI1 mutations (p.Ile82Thr, p.Glu225*, c.432-2_436del). Seven affected individuals reported an auditory aura and one a visual aura. A 10-year old boy described a cephalic aura followed by an unpleasant taste and oral automatisms without auditory, visual or psychic features. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Association Between Amyloid and Tau Accumulation in Young Adults With Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Yakeel T; Sperling, Reisa A; Norton, Daniel J; Baena, Ana; Arboleda-Velasquez, Joseph F; Cosio, Danielle; Schultz, Aaron; Lapoint, Molly; Guzman-Velez, Edmarie; Miller, John B; Kim, Leo A; Chen, Kewei; Tariot, Pierre N; Lopera, Francisco; Reiman, Eric M; Johnson, Keith A

    2018-02-12

    It is critically important to improve our ability to diagnose and track Alzheimer disease (AD) as early as possible. Individuals with autosomal dominant forms of AD can provide clues as to which and when biological changes are reliably present prior to the onset of clinical symptoms. To characterize the associations between amyloid and tau deposits in the brains of cognitively unimpaired and impaired carriers of presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation. In this cross-sectional imaging study, we leveraged data from a homogeneous autosomal dominant AD kindred, which allowed us to examine measurable tau deposition as a function of individuals' proximity to the expected onset of dementia. Cross-sectional measures of carbon 11-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B positron emission tomography (PET) and flortaucipir F 18 (previously known as AV 1451, T807) PET imaging were assessed in 24 PSEN1 E280A kindred members (age range, 28-55 years), including 12 carriers, 9 of whom were cognitively unimpaired and 3 of whom had mild cognitive impairment, and 12 cognitively unimpaired noncarriers. We compared carbon 11-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B PET cerebral with cerebellar distribution volume ratios as well as flortaucipir F 18 PET cerebral with cerebellar standardized uptake value ratios in mutation carriers and noncarriers. Spearman correlations characterized the associations between age and mean cortical Pittsburgh Compound B distribution volume ratio levels or regional flortaucipir standardized uptake value ratio levels in both groups. Of the 24 individuals, the mean (SD) age was 38.0 (7.4) years, or approximately 6 years younger than the expected onset of clinical symptoms in carriers. Compared with noncarriers, cognitively unimpaired mutation carriers had elevated mean cortical Pittsburgh Compound B distribution volume ratio levels in their late 20s, and 7 of 9 carriers older than 30 years reached the threshold for amyloidosis (distribution volume ratio level > 1.2). Elevated

  5. Profile of epidermal metabolic activity in autosomal dominant ichthyosis and small bowel disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dykes, P.J.; Marks, R.; Smith, P.

    1978-01-01

    The in vitro incorporation of 14 C acetate by the epidermis has been studied in patients with autosomal dominant ichthyosis and in patients with a dry, itchy, slightly scaly skin associated with a disorder of the small bowel. Analysis of 14 C acetate containing lipid moieties by thin layer chromatography has indicated that there are both quantitative and qualitative differences in the uptake of 14 C acetate between autosomal dominant ichthyosis and normal. In particular an increased incorporation into the triglyceride and phosphatidyl choline fractions was noted. No such differences were apparent in those patients with disorders of the small bowel. In addition the in vitro incorporation of radioactively labelled thymidine, proline and histidine has been studied in these patients. In both groups of patients the rate of incorporation of tritiated thymidine and histidine into epidermal macromolecules was found not to differ significantly from normal. On the other hand the rate of incorporation of tritiated proline was increased in both groups of patients. (author)

  6. Oculopharyngeal Weakness, Hypophrenia, Deafness, and Impaired Vision: A Novel Autosomal Dominant Myopathy with Rimmed Vacuoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Lu, Xiang-Hui; Wang, Hui-Fang; Ban, Rui; Liu, Hua-Xu; Shi, Qiang; Wang, Qian; Yin, Xi; Pu, Chuan-Qiang

    2016-08-05

    Myopathies with rimmed vacuoles are a heterogeneous group of muscle disorders with progressive muscle weakness and varied clinical manifestations but similar features in muscle biopsies. Here, we describe a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles in a large family with 11 patients of three generations affected. A clinical study including family history, obstetric, pediatric, and development history was recorded. Clinical examinations including physical examination, electromyography (EMG), serum creatine kinase (CK), bone X-rays, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed in this family. Open muscle biopsies were performed on the proband and his mother. To find the causative gene, the whole-exome sequencing was carried out. Disease onset was from adolescence to adulthood, but the affected patients of the third generation presented an earlier onset and more severe clinical manifestations than the older generations. Clinical features were characterized as dysarthria, dysphagia, external ophthalmoplegia, limb weakness, hypophrenia, deafness, and impaired vision. However, not every patient manifested all symptoms. Serum CK was mildly elevated and EMG indicated a myopathic pattern. Brain MRI showed cerebellum and brain stem mildly atrophy. Rimmed vacuoles and inclusion bodies were observed in muscle biopsy. The whole-exome sequencing was performed, but the causative gene has not been found. We reported a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles characterized by dysarthria, dysphagia, external ophthalmoplegia, limb weakness, hypophrenia, deafness, and impaired vision, but the causative gene has not been found and needs further study.

  7. Autosomal dominant optic neuropathy and sensorineual hearing loss associated with a novel mutation of WFS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogewind, Barend F T; Pennings, Ronald J E; Hol, Frans A; Kunst, Henricus P M; Hoefsloot, Elisabeth H; Cruysberg, Johannes R M; Cremers, Cor W R J

    2010-01-12

    To describe the phenotype of a novel Wolframin (WFS1) mutation in a family with autosomal dominant optic neuropathy and deafness. The study is designed as a retrospective observational case series. Seven members of a Dutch family underwent ophthalmological, otological, and genetical examinations in one institution. Fasting serum glucose was assessed in the affected family members. All affected individuals showed loss of neuroretinal rim of the optic nerve at fundoscopy with enlarged blind spots at perimetry. They showed a red-green color vision defect at color vision tests and deviations at visually evoked response tests. The audiograms of the affected individuals showed hearing loss and were relatively flat. The unaffected individuals showed no visual deviations or hearing impairment. The affected family members had no glucose intolerance. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mitochondrial mutations and mutations in the Optic atrophy-1 gene (OPA1) were excluded. In the affected individuals, a novel missense mutation c.2508G>C (p.Lys836Asn) in exon 8 of WFS1 was identified. This study describes the phenotype of a family with autosomal dominant optic neuropathy and hearing impairment associated with a novel missense mutation in WFS1.

  8. A novel mutation in CRYAB associated with autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Ma, Junjie; Yan, Ming; Mothobi, Maneo Emily; Liu, Yuanyuan; Zheng, Fang

    2009-07-10

    To identify the genetic defects associated with autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in a Chinese family. Clinical data were collected, and the phenotypes of the affected members in this family were recorded by slit-lamp photography. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood. Mutations were screened in cataract-associated candidate genes through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses and sequencing. Structural models of the wild-type and mutant alphaB-crystallin were generated and analyzed by SWISS-MODEL. Mutation screening identified only one heterozygous G-->A transition at nucleotide 32 in the first exon of alphaB-crystallin (CRYAB), resulting in an amino acid change from arginine to histidine at codon 11 (R11H). This mutation segregated in all available affected family members but was not observed in any of the unaffected persons of the family. The putative mutation disrupted a restriction site for the enzyme, Fnu4HI, in the affected family members. The disruption, however, was not found in any of the randomly selected ophthalmologically normal individuals or in 40 unrelated senile cataract patients. Computer-assisted prediction suggested that this mutation affected the biochemical properties as well as the structure of alphaB-crystallin. These results supported the idea that the novel R11H mutation was responsible for the autosomal dominant nuclear congenital cataract in this pedigree.

  9. DGAT2 Mutation in a Family with Autosomal-Dominant Early-Onset Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Young Bin; Kang, Junghee; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jinho; Kwak, Geon; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Hyun Dae; Choi, Yu-Ri; Jung, Sung-Chul; Koo, Heasoo; Lee, Ji Eun; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy and is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder. We examined a Korean family in which two individuals had an autosomal-dominant axonal CMT with early-onset, sensory ataxia, tremor, and slow disease progression. Pedigree analysis and exome sequencing identified a de novo missense mutation (p.Y223H) in the diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2) gene. DGAT2 encodes an endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial-associated membrane protein, acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase, which catalyzes the final step of the triglyceride (TG) biosynthesis pathway. The patient showed consistently decreased serum TG levels, and overexpression of the mutant DGAT2 significantly inhibited the proliferation of mouse motor neuron cells. Moreover, the variant form of human DGAT2 inhibited the axonal branching in the peripheral nervous system of zebrafish. We suggest that mutation of DGAT2 is the novel underlying cause of an autosomal-dominant axonal CMT2 neuropathy. This study will help provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of axonal CMT and contribute to the molecular diagnostics of peripheral neuropathies. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  10. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer's Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Su

    Full Text Available Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network (DIAN, an autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted.

  11. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer’s Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Joseph-Mathurin, Nelly; Wang, Qing; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Ances, Beau M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Cash, Lisa A.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Klunk, William E.; Galasko, Douglas; Brickman, Adam M.; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M.; Thompson, Paul M.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Salloway, Stephen P.; Schofield, Peter R.; Masters, Colin L.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Fox, Nick C.; Förster, Stefan; Chen, Kewei; Reiman, Eric M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Marcus, Daniel S.; Weiner, Michael W.; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.; Benzinger, Tammie L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Network (DIAN), an autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted. PMID:27010959

  12. Real-world costs of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in the Nordics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Daniel; Karlsson, Linda; Eklund, Oskar

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is limited real-world data on the economic burden of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The objective of this study was to estimate the annual direct and indirect costs of patients with ADPKD by severity of the disease: chronic kidney disease (CKD...... to complete a self-administered questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 266 patients were contacted, 243 (91%) of whom provided consent to participate in the study. Results showed that the economic burden of ADPKD was substantial at all levels of the disease. Lost wages due to reduced productivity were large...... in absolute terms across all disease strata. Mean total annual costs were highest in dialysis patients, driven by maintenance dialysis care, while the use of immunosuppressants was the main cost component for transplant care. Costs were twice as high in patients with CKD stages 4-5 compared to CKD stages 1...

  13. Rare co-occurrence of osteogenesis imperfecta type I and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefele, Julia; Mayer, Karin; Marschall, Christoph; Alberer, Martin; Klein, Hanns-Georg; Kirschstein, Martin

    2016-11-01

    There are several clinical reports about the co-occurrence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and connective tissue disorders. A simultaneous occurrence of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I and ADPKD has not been observed so far. This report presents the first patient with OI type I and ADPKD. Mutational analysis of PKD1 and COL1A1 in the index patient revealed a heterozygous mutation in each of the two genes. Mutational analysis of the parents indicated the mother as a carrier of the PKD1 mutation and the father as a carrier of the COL1A1 mutation. The simultaneous occurrence of both disorders has an estimated frequency of 3.5:100 000 000. In singular cases, ADPKD can occur in combination with other rare disorders, e.g. connective tissue disorders.

  14. Recurrent acute pancreatitis and cholangitis in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Yazdanpanah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is an inherited disorder associated with multiple cyst formation in the different organs. Development of pancreatic cyst in ADPKD is often asymptomatic and is associated with no complication. A 38-year-old man with ADPKD was presented with six episodes of acute pancreatitis and two episodes of cholangitis in a period of 12 months. Various imaging studies revealed multiple renal, hepatic and pancreatic cysts, mild ectasia of pancreatic duct, dilation of biliary system and absence of biliary stone. He was managed with conservative treatment for each attack. ADPKD should be considered as a potential risk factor for recurrent acute and/or chronic pancreatitis and cholangitis.

  15. Autosomal dominant inheritance of Caffey-Silverman disease. Hyperostosis corticalis infantum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogóyski, A; Jakubowska, K; Tronowska, T D

    1984-01-01

    A case of Caffey-Silverman disease is described in an infant aged 4.5 months. The case was erroneously diagnosed in the initial stage of the disease as osteitis. The correct diagnosis was established after radiological examination of the skeleton. The pathological lesions involved the mandible, both clavicles, all ribs, left shoulder blade, both radial bones and left ulna. Follow-up radiological examination after 12 months demonstrated nearly complete disappearance of the previously observed skeletal changes. At the age of 18 months the condition of the child was good and its development was normal. Radiological changes indicating past Caffey-Silverman disease were disclosed in the mother and maternal grandmother of the child. This indicates an autosomal dominant type of inheritance of the disease.

  16. Novel LMNA Mutation in a Taiwanese Family with Autosomal Dominant Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chen Liang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD is characterized by early-onset contractures, slowly progressive weakness, and muscle wasting in humeroperoneal muscles, and adult-onset cardiomyopathy with conduction block. We analyzed blood samples from an EDMD family, including a mother and two daughters, and found a novel mutation in codon 520 in exon 9 of the lamin A/C (LMNA gene, resulting in a substitution of tryptophan (W by glycine (G in all three patients. The mother died after a stroke-like episode at the age of 43. The elder sister received pacemaker implantation, which improved symptoms of exercise intolerance and dizziness. These cases illustrate the necessity of correct diagnosis, evaluation, and follow-up of cardiac problems due to the wide clinical spectrum and high prevalence of cardiac conduction block in patients with autosomal dominant EDMD. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(2 Suppl:S27-S31

  17. Autosomal dominant type of endosteal hyperostosis with unusual manifestations of sclerosis of the jaw bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Yamada, Naoyuki; Nonaka, Ryosuke; Sasaki, Motomasa

    1987-01-01

    We report three cases of autosomal dominant type endosteal hyperostosis which occurred in one Japanese family. A new pattern of sclerotic changes in the jaw bones is evident. In all members of the family there was a symmetrical thickening of the diaphyseal cortices of the long bones. The affected bones were only minimally widened and the epiphyses and metaphyses were spared. Endosteal sclerosis of the neurocranium was present with loss of the diploe. The sclerotic changes included enlargement and mottled sclerosis of both the maxilla and mandible, with multiple embedded teeth and odontomas. The ramus of the mandible was spared. Severe sclerosis of the jaw bones was present only in a 28-year-old women. The 2-year-son showed only focal sclerosis in the mandible, and his grandmother had minimal changes in the skeleton. (orig.)

  18. Wolfram gene (WFS1) mutation causes autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Vanita; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl; Emmett, Warren; Waseem, Naushin; Raby, Jacob; Prescott, DeQuincy; Moore, Anthony T; Bhattacharya, Shomi S

    2013-12-01

    Congenital cataracts are an important cause of bilateral visual impairment in infants. Through genome-wide linkage analysis in a four-generation family of Irish descent, the disease-associated gene causing autosomal-dominant congenital nuclear cataract was mapped to chromosome 4p16.1. The maximum logarithm of odds (LOD) score was 2.62 at a recombination fraction θ=0, obtained for marker D4S432 physically close to the Wolfram gene (WFS1). By sequencing the coding regions and intron-exon boundaries of WFS1, we identified a DNA substitution (c.1385A-to-G) in exon 8, causing a missense mutation at codon 462 (E462G) of the Wolframin protein. This is the first report of a mutation in this gene causing an isolated nuclear congenital cataract. These findings suggest that the membrane trafficking protein Wolframin may be important for supporting the developing lens.

  19. [Seminal vesicle cysts and infertility in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Venegas, J L

    2005-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a systemic hereditary disorder characterized by bilateral diffuse renal cysts. Extrarenal involvement is a well known manifestation of ADPKD. Cysts in the liver, pancreas, lung, spleen, oesophagus, ovary, testis, epididymis, prostate, thyroid, bladder, uterus, brain, paraespinal, and seminal vesicle have also been described. The occurrence of seminal vesicle cysts is often unrecognised. We report here a man with seminal vesicle cysts and azoospermia associated with ADPKD. Seminal vesicle cysts are not uncommon in ADPKD and in some cases it is associated with infertility. Ultrasound and computed tomography imaging were effective in documenting the underlying lesions non-invasively. Studies evaluating fertility in patients with seminal vesicle cysts and ADPKD are needed.

  20. Health-related quality of life across all stages of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Daniel; Karlsson, Linda; Eklund, Oskar

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A limited number of studies have assessed health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Results to date have been conflicting and studies have generally focused on patients with later stages of the disease. This study aimed to assess...... stages 4-5 and patients on dialysis. Progressive disease predominately had an impact on physical health, whereas mental health showed less variation between stages of the disease. A substantial loss in quality of life was observed as patients progressed to CKD stages 4-5. CONCLUSIONS: Later stages...... HRQoL in ADPKD across all stages of the disease, from patients with early chronic kidney disease (CKD) to patients with end-stage renal disease. METHODS: A study involving cross-sectional patient-reported outcomes and retrospective clinical data was undertaken April-December 2014 in Denmark, Finland...

  1. The spectrum of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Bharathi V; Chapman, Arlene B

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary renal disorder. It is characterized by the development of renal cysts and kidney enlargement and ultimately leads to renal failure typically in the sixth decade of life. Although most patients are asymptomatic until well into adulthood, renal cysts develop much earlier, often in utero. Significant renal anatomic and cystic expansion typically occurs before clinical manifestations in children and young adults with AKPKD. The cyst burden detected by imaging represents the minority of cyst burden, and renal and cardiovascular abnormalities are the most common manifestations in children with ADPKD. Here we review the molecular pathogenesis of ADPKD, discuss the screening, diagnosis and clinical manifestations of this renal disorder in childhood and adolescents and review treatment options and potential therapies currently being tested.

  2. Comparison of MRI segmentation techniques for measuring liver cyst volumes in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Zerwa; Behzadi, Ashkan Heshmatzadeh; Blumenfeld, Jon D; Zhao, Yize; Prince, Martin R

    To compare MRI segmentation methods for measuring liver cyst volumes in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Liver cyst volumes in 42 ADPKD patients were measured using region growing, thresholding and cyst diameter techniques. Manual segmentation was the reference standard. Root mean square deviation was 113, 155, and 500 for cyst diameter, thresholding and region growing respectively. Thresholding error for cyst volumes below 500ml was 550% vs 17% for cyst volumes above 500ml (p<0.001). For measuring volume of a small number of cysts, cyst diameter and manual segmentation methods are recommended. For severe disease with numerous, large hepatic cysts, thresholding is an acceptable alternative. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: Tight linkage to chromosome 15q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.K.; Wu, C.T.B.; Jones, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) (MIM No.18260) constitutes a clinically and genetically diverse group of disorders that share the primary feature of progressive, severe, lower extremity spasticity. FSP is classified according to the mode of inheritance and whether progressive spasticity occurs in isolation ({open_quotes}uncomplicated FSP{close_quotes}) or with other neurologic abnormalities ({open_quotes}complicated FSP{close_quotes}), including optic neuropathy, retinopathy, extrapyramidal disturbance, dementia, ataxia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, or deafness. Recently, autosomal dominant, uncomplicated FSP was shown to be genetically heterogeneous and tightly linked to a group of microsatellite markers on chromosome 14q in one large kindred. We examined 126 members of a non-consanguineous North American kindred of Irish descent. FSP was diagnosed in 31 living subjects who developed insidiously progressive gait disturbance between ages 12 and 35 years. Using genetic linkage analysis to microsatellite DNA polymorphisms, we showed that the FSP locus on chromosome 14q was exluded from linkage with the disorder in our family. Subsequently, we searched for genetic linkage between the disorder and microsatellite DNA polymorphisms spanning approximately 50% of the genome. We observed significantly positive, two-point maximum lod scores (Z) for markers on chromosome 15q: D15S128 (Z=9.70, {theta}=0.05), D15S165 (Z=3.30, {theta}=0.10), and UT511 (Z=3.86, {theta}=0.10). Our data clearly establishes that one locus for autosomal dominant, uncomplicated FSP is mapped to the pericentric region of chromosome 15q. Identifying genes responsible for chromosome 15q-linked and chromosome 14q-linked FSP will greatly advance our understanding of this condition and hopefully other inherited and degenerative brain and spinal cord disorders that are also characterized by axonal degeneration.

  4. OTX2 mutations cause autosomal dominant pattern dystrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ajoy; Forster, Nicole; Maynes, Jason T; Paton, Tara A; Billingsley, Gail; Roslin, Nicole M; Ali, Arfan; Sutherland, Joanne; Wright, Tom; Westall, Carol A; Paterson, Andrew D; Marshall, Christian R; Héon, Elise

    2014-12-01

    To identify the genetic cause of autosomal-dominant pattern dystrophy (PD) of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in two families. Two families with autosomal-dominant PD were identified. Eight members of family 1 (five affected) were subjected to whole-genome SNP genotyping; multipoint genome-wide linkage analysis identified 7 regions of potential linkage, and genotyping four additional individuals from family 1 resulted in a maximum logarithm of odds score of 2.09 observed across four chromosomal regions. Exome sequencing of two affected family 1 members identified 15 shared non-synonymous rare coding sequence variants within the linked regions; candidate genes were prioritised and further analysed. Sanger sequencing confirmed a novel heterozygous missense variant (E79K) in orthodenticle homeobox 2 (OTX2) that segregated with the disease phenotype. Family 2 with PD (two affected) harboured the same missense variant in OTX2. A shared haplotype of 19.68 cM encompassing OTX2 was identified between affected individuals in the two families. Within the two families, all except one affected demonstrated distinct 'patterns' at the macula. In vivo structural retinal imaging showed discrete areas of RPE-photoreceptor separation at the macula in all cases. Electroretinogram testing showed generalised photoreceptor degeneration in three cases. Mild developmental anomalies were observed, including optic nerve head dysplasia (four cases), microcornea (one case) and Rathke's cleft cyst (one case); pituitary hormone levels were normal. This is the first report implicating OTX2 to underlie PD. The retinal disease resembles conditional mice models that show slow photoreceptor degeneration secondary to loss of Otx2 function in the adult RPE. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Fasting in a 16-year-old girl at-risk of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Sadeghi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is the most common form of inherited kidney disease that results in renal failure. PKD currently has no causative therapy. However, some treatment options are available, ranging from symptomatic therapy to delaying the onset of end-stage renal failure. Early diagnosis of adult polycystic kidney disease is vital in order to prevent its complications. Ultrasonongraphy and genetic testing are the two preferred diagnostic techniques with defined limitations, mainly regarding age. Herein, we report a case of an ADPKD family whom visited the genetic counseling clinic for determining the disease risk in their symptom-free girls aged 16 and 22 years, and discussing other related issues such as their concern about fasting in Ramadan.

  6. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis - an unusual association: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapoor Vinay

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is an inherited disorder that is characterized by the development and growth of cysts in the kidneys and other organs. Urinary protein excretion is usually less than 1 g/24 hours in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, and an association of nephrotic syndrome with this condition is considered rare. There are only anecdotal case reports of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease associated with nephrotic syndrome, with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis being the most commonly reported histopathological diagnosis. Nephrotic-range proteinuria in the presence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, with or without an accompanying decline in renal function, should be investigated by open renal biopsy to exclude coexisting glomerular disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with histologically proven diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis presenting with nephrotic-range proteinuria. No other reports of this could be found in a global electronic search of the literature. Case presentation We report the case of a 35-year-old Indo-Aryan man with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease associated with nephrotic syndrome and a concomitant decline in his glomerular filtration rate. Open renal biopsy revealed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis. An accurate diagnosis enabled us to manage him conservatively with a successful outcome, without the use of corticosteroid which is the standard treatment and the drug most commonly used to treat nephrotic syndrome empirically. Conclusion Despite the reluctance of physicians to carry out a renal biopsy on patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, our case supports the idea that renal biopsy is needed in patients with polycystic kidney disease with nephrotic-range proteinuria to make an accurate diagnosis. It also illustrates the

  7. Clinical results from low-level laser therapy in patients with autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koev, K.; Avramov, L.; Borissova, E.

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study is to examine long-term effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in patients with autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy (CRDs). A He-Ne Laser with continuous emission at 633 nm (01 mW/cm2) was used on five patients with autosomal dominant pedigree of Romani origin with non-syndromic CRDs. The laser radiation was applied transpupillary to the macula six times for three minutes every other day. The experiment was conducted for a period of three years. The clinical evaluation included best corrected visual acuity determination, funduscopy, Humphrey perimetry, Farnsworth Hue-28 color testing, fluorescein angiography, and full-field electroretinogram (ERG). All affected individuals presented reduced visual acuity (0.01 – 0.4) and photophobia. The funduscopic examination and fluorescein angiography revealed advanced changes including bone spicule-like pigment deposits in the midperiphery and the macular area, along with retinal atrophy, narrowing of the vessels, and waxy optic discs. The visual fields demonstrated central scotoma. The electrophysiologic examination of the patients detected an abnormal cone-rod ERG (20 – 30 μV) with photopic amplitudes more markedly reduced than the scotopic. Flicker responses were missing and Farnsworth Hue-28 test found protanopia. There was a statistically significant increase in the visual acuity (p<0.001, end of study versus baseline) for CRDs patients for the period of three years after the treatment with LLLT. Following the LLLT, the central absolute scotoma in CRDs was reduced, as was the prevalence of metamorphopsia in CRDs. This study shows that LLLT may prove be a novel long-lasting therapeutic option for both forms of CRDs. It is a highly effective treatment resulting in a long-term improvement of the visual acuity.

  8. Autosomal dominant cutis laxa with progeroid features due to a novel, de novo mutation in ALDH18A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhola, Priya T; Hartley, Taila; Bareke, Eric; Boycott, Kym M; Nikkel, Sarah M; Dyment, David A

    2017-06-01

    De novo dominant mutations in the aldehyde dehydrogenase 18 family member A1 (ALDH18A1) gene have recently been shown to cause autosomal dominant cutis laxa with progeroid features (MIM 616603). To date, all de novo dominant mutations have been found in a single highly conserved amino acid residue at position p.Arg138. We report an 8-year-old male with a clinical diagnosis of autosomal dominant cutis laxa (ADCL) with progeroid features and a novel de novo missense mutation in ALDH18A1 (NM_002860.3: c.377G>A (p.Arg126His)). This is the first report of an individual with ALDH18A1-ADCL due to a substitution at a residue other than p.Arg138. Knowledge of the complete spectrum of dominant-acting mutations that cause this rare syndrome will have implications for molecular diagnosis and genetic counselling of these families.

  9. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I: A review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujioka Shinsuke

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA characterized by ataxia with other neurological signs, including oculomotor disturbances, cognitive deficits, pyramidal and extrapyramidal dysfunction, bulbar, spinal and peripheral nervous system involvement. The global prevalence of this disease is not known. The most common type I ADCA is SCA3 followed by SCA2, SCA1, and SCA8, in descending order. Founder effects no doubt contribute to the variable prevalence between populations. Onset is usually in adulthood but cases of presentation in childhood have been reported. Clinical features vary depending on the SCA subtype but by definition include ataxia associated with other neurological manifestations. The clinical spectrum ranges from pure cerebellar signs to constellations including spinal cord and peripheral nerve disease, cognitive impairment, cerebellar or supranuclear ophthalmologic signs, psychiatric problems, and seizures. Cerebellar ataxia can affect virtually any body part causing movement abnormalities. Gait, truncal, and limb ataxia are often the most obvious cerebellar findings though nystagmus, saccadic abnormalities, and dysarthria are usually associated. To date, 21 subtypes have been identified: SCA1-SCA4, SCA8, SCA10, SCA12-SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA17-SCA23, SCA25, SCA27, SCA28 and dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA. Type I ADCA can be further divided based on the proposed pathogenetic mechanism into 3 subclasses: subclass 1 includes type I ADCA caused by CAG repeat expansions such as SCA1-SCA3, SCA17, and DRPLA, subclass 2 includes trinucleotide repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding regions of the disease gene including SCA8, SCA10 and SCA12. Subclass 3 contains disorders caused by specific gene deletions, missense mutation, and nonsense mutation and includes SCA13, SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA27 and SCA28. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, physical

  10. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I: A review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) characterized by ataxia with other neurological signs, including oculomotor disturbances, cognitive deficits, pyramidal and extrapyramidal dysfunction, bulbar, spinal and peripheral nervous system involvement. The global prevalence of this disease is not known. The most common type I ADCA is SCA3 followed by SCA2, SCA1, and SCA8, in descending order. Founder effects no doubt contribute to the variable prevalence between populations. Onset is usually in adulthood but cases of presentation in childhood have been reported. Clinical features vary depending on the SCA subtype but by definition include ataxia associated with other neurological manifestations. The clinical spectrum ranges from pure cerebellar signs to constellations including spinal cord and peripheral nerve disease, cognitive impairment, cerebellar or supranuclear ophthalmologic signs, psychiatric problems, and seizures. Cerebellar ataxia can affect virtually any body part causing movement abnormalities. Gait, truncal, and limb ataxia are often the most obvious cerebellar findings though nystagmus, saccadic abnormalities, and dysarthria are usually associated. To date, 21 subtypes have been identified: SCA1-SCA4, SCA8, SCA10, SCA12-SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA17-SCA23, SCA25, SCA27, SCA28 and dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA). Type I ADCA can be further divided based on the proposed pathogenetic mechanism into 3 subclasses: subclass 1 includes type I ADCA caused by CAG repeat expansions such as SCA1-SCA3, SCA17, and DRPLA, subclass 2 includes trinucleotide repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding regions of the disease gene including SCA8, SCA10 and SCA12. Subclass 3 contains disorders caused by specific gene deletions, missense mutation, and nonsense mutation and includes SCA13, SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA27 and SCA28. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, physical examination, genetic molecular

  11. Mutations in POGLUT1, Encoding Protein O-Glucosyltransferase 1, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Dowling-Degos Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basmanav, F Buket; Oprisoreanu, Ana-Maria; Pasternack, Sandra M

    2014-01-01

    Dowling-Degos disease (DDD) is an autosomal-dominant genodermatosis characterized by progressive and disfiguring reticulate hyperpigmentation. We previously identified loss-of-function mutations in KRT5 but were only able to detect pathogenic mutations in fewer than half of our subjects. To ident...

  12. Tolvaptan and Kidney Pain in Patients With Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease : Secondary Analysis From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casteleijn, Niek F.; Blais, Jaime D.; Chapman, Arlene B.; Czerwiec, Frank S.; Devuyst, Olivier; Higashihara, Eiji; Leliveld, Anna M.; Ouyang, John; Perrone, Ronald D.; Torres, Vicente E.; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    Background: Kidney pain is a common complication in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), and data from the TEMPO 3: 4 trial suggested that tolvaptan, a vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist, may have a positive effect on kidney pain in this patient group. Because pain is

  13. Prognostic Enrichment Design in Clinical Trials for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease : The TEMPO 3:4 Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irazabal, Maria V; Blais, Jaime D; Perrone, Ronald D; Gansevoort, Ron T; Chapman, Arlene B; Devuyst, Olivier; Higashihara, Eiji; Harris, Peter C; Zhou, Wen; Ouyang, John; Czerwiec, Frank S; Torres, Vicente E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with slowly progressive autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) are unlikely to experience outcomes during randomized controlled trials (RCTs). An image classification of ADPKD into typical (diffuse cyst distribution) class 1A to E (by age- and height-adjusted

  14. A Dutch family with progressive autosomal dominant non-syndromic sensorineural hearing impairment linked to DFNA13.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensink, R.J.H.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Snoeckx, R.L.; Caethoven, G.; Camp, G. van; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2001-01-01

    We present a Dutch family with autosomal dominantly inherited mid-frequency and high-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment. Genetic linkage analysis in this family indicated linkage to DFNA13 with logarithm of the odds ratio (LOD) scores > +4. The majority of the affected persons presented

  15. A peculiar autosomal dominant macular dystrophy caused by an asparagine deletion at codon 169 in the peripherin/RDS gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lith-Verhoeven, Janneke J. C.; van den Helm, Bellinda; Deutman, August F.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Hoyng, Carel B.; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical and genetic findings in a family with a peculiar autosomal dominant macular dystrophy with peripheral deposits. Methods: All family members underwent an ophthalmic examination, and their genomic DNA was screened for mutations in the human retinal degeneration slow

  16. Autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features : a new LGI1 family including a phenocopy with cortical dysplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Karl Martin; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Cohen, Rony; Appenzeller, Silke; de Kovel, Carolien G.F.; Rosenow, Felix; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor; Sheintuch, Liron; Veksler, Ronel; Friedman, Alon; Afawi, Zaid; Helbig, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    We report a new family with autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features (ADEAF) including focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) in the proband. We aim to identify the molecular cause in this family and clarify the relationship between FCD and ADEAF. A large Iranian Jewish family including 14

  17. Rationale and Design of a Clinical Trial Investigating Tolvaptan Safety and Efficacy in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres, Vicente E.; Devuyst, Olivier; Chapman, Arlene B.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Perrone, Ronald D.; Ouyang, John; Blais, Jaime D.; Czerwiec, Frank S.; Sergeyeva, Olga

    Background: In TEMPO 3: 4, the vasopressin V2-receptor antagonist tolvaptan slowed kidney growth and function decline in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients with relatively preserved kidney function. Methods: Prospective, phase 3b, multi-center, randomized-withdrawal,

  18. A novel syndrome of autosomal-dominant hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia linked to a mutation in the human insulin receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Hansen, Torben; Lajer, Maria

    2004-01-01

    a missense mutation (Arg1174Gln) in the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor gene that cosegregated with the disease phenotype (logarithm of odds [LOD] score 3.21). In conclusion, we report a novel syndrome of autosomal-dominant hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. The findings demonstrate...

  19. Autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease in a family without polycystic kidney disease associated with a novel missense protein kinase C substrate 80K-H mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Drenth, Joost P H; Te Morsche, Rene H M; González, Pedro; Peces, Carlos

    2005-12-28

    Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is characterized by the presence of multiple bile duct-derived epithelial cysts scattered in the liver parenchyma. PLD can manifest itself in patients with severe autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Isolated autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease (ADPLD) is genetically distinct from PLD associated with ADPKD, although it may have similar pathogenesis and clinical manifestations. Recently, mutations in two causative genes for ADPLD, independently from ADPKD, have been identified. We report here a family (a mother and her daughter) with a severe form of ADPLD not associated with ADPKD produced by a novel missense protein kinase C substrate 80K-H (PRKCSH) mutation (R281W). This mutation causes a severe phenotype, since the two affected subjects manifested signs of portal hypertension. Doppler sonography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are effective in documenting the underlying lesions in a non-invasive way.

  20. Fatty Acid Oxidation is Impaired in An Orthologous Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Luis F; Lin, Cheng-Chao; Zhou, Fang; Germino, Gregory G

    2016-03-01

    The major gene mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease was first identified over 20 years ago, yet its function remains poorly understood. We have used a systems-based approach to examine the effects of acquired loss of Pkd1 in adult mouse kidney as it transitions from normal to cystic state. We performed transcriptional profiling of a large set of male and female kidneys, along with metabolomics and lipidomics analyses of a subset of male kidneys. We also assessed the effects of a modest diet change on cyst progression in young cystic mice. Fatty acid oxidation and glycolytic rates were measured in five control and mutant pairs of epithelial cells. We find that females have a significantly less severe kidney phenotype and correlate this protection with differences in lipid metabolism. We show that sex is a major determinant of the transcriptional profile of mouse kidneys and that some of this difference is due to genes involved in lipid metabolism. Pkd1 mutant mice have transcriptional profiles consistent with changes in lipid metabolism and distinct metabolite and complex lipid profiles in kidneys. We also show that cells lacking Pkd1 have an intrinsic fatty acid oxidation defect and that manipulation of lipid content of mouse chow modifies cystic disease. Our results suggest PKD could be a disease of altered cellular metabolism.

  1. Comparison of US, CT, and MR for imaging of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geis, J.R.; Thickman, D.; Davis, K.A.; Gabow, P.A.; Manco-Johnson, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    Fifty subjects with strong family histories of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) were examined with US, CT, and MR imaging to compare their ability to aid in the diagnosis of ADPKD, assess the degree of disease involvement in the kidneys, liver, and pancreas quantity size of involved organs; and detect complications of ADPKD. Twenty-seven subjects (54%) were positive for ADPKD, 20 (40%) were negative, and three (6%) were suspected to have the disease. In 92% of cases all modalities agreed completely on the number of renal cysts. Contrast material-enhanced CT was more sensitive for detection of small cysts than was US or unenhanced CT. In subjects with ADPKD, unenhanced CT showed renal calculi in 52% of kidneys, while no calculi were demonstrated with US or MR imaging. Complex or hemorrhagic cysts were detected in every subject with MR imaging, in 61% with Ct, and never with US. Acutely hemorrhagic cysts were identified on MR images; subsequent aspiration of these cysts produced symptomatic relief of flank pain. No modality demonstrated infected cysts

  2. Liver cysts in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease: clinical and computed tomographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, E.; Cook, L.T.; Grantham, J.J.

    1985-08-01

    Hepatic CT findings were analyzed in 44 patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease and were correlated with liver and renal function tests and liver, splenic, and renal CT volume measurements. CT showed many large liver cysts in 31.8% of patients, small liver cysts in 25%, and no liver cysts in 43.2%. Patients with many large cysts often showed increased liver volumes. There was no correlation between severity of liver involvement and extent of renal cystic disease as determined from urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and renal volumes. Liver function tests were normal except in two patients, one with a cholangiocarcinoma, which may have arisen from a cyst, and the other with an infected liver cyst and chronic active hepatitis. Accordingly, if liver function tests are abnormal, an attempt should be made to identify complications of polycystic liver disease such as tumor cyst infection, and biliary obstruction. CT is a useful method for detecting liver cysts and identifying patients at risk for these complications.

  3. Molecular Typing of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Patients with Autosomal Dominant Hyper IgE Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inka Sastalla

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant hyper IgE syndrome (AD-HIES is a primary immunodeficiency caused by a loss-of-function mutation in the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3. This immune disorder is clinically characterized by increased susceptibility to cutaneous and sinopulmonary infections, in particular with Candida and Staphylococcus aureus. It has recently been recognized that the skin microbiome of patients with AD-HIES is altered with an overrepresentation of certain Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive staphylococci. However, these alterations have not been characterized at the species- and strain-level. Since S. aureus infections are influenced by strain-specific expression of virulence factors, information on colonizing strain characteristics may provide insights into host-pathogen interactions and help guide management strategies for treatment and prophylaxis. The aim of this study was to determine whether the immunodeficiency of AD-HIES selects for unique strains of colonizing S. aureus. Using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST, protein A (spa typing, and PCR-based detection of toxin genes, we performed a detailed analysis of the S. aureus isolates (n = 13 found on the skin of twenty-one patients with AD-HIES. We found a low diversity of sequence types, and an abundance of strains that expressed methicillin resistance, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, and staphylococcal enterotoxins K and Q (SEK, SEQ. Our results indicate that patients with AD-HIES may often carry antibiotic-resistant strains that harbor key virulence factors.

  4. High frequency of potentially pathogenic SORL1 mutations in autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottier, C; Hannequin, D; Coutant, S; Rovelet-Lecrux, A; Wallon, D; Rousseau, S; Legallic, S; Paquet, C; Bombois, S; Pariente, J; Thomas-Anterion, C; Michon, A; Croisile, B; Etcharry-Bouyx, F; Berr, C; Dartigues, J-F; Amouyel, P; Dauchel, H; Boutoleau-Bretonnière, C; Thauvin, C; Frebourg, T; Lambert, J-C; Campion, D

    2012-09-01

    Performing exome sequencing in 14 autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease (ADEOAD) index cases without mutation on known genes (amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin1 (PSEN1) and presenilin2 (PSEN2)), we found that in five patients, the SORL1 gene harbored unknown nonsense (n=1) or missense (n=4) mutations. These mutations were not retrieved in 1500 controls of same ethnic origin. In a replication sample, including 15 ADEOAD cases, 2 unknown non-synonymous mutations (1 missense, 1 nonsense) were retrieved, thus yielding to a total of 7/29 unknown mutations in the combined sample. Using in silico predictions, we conclude that these seven private mutations are likely to have a pathogenic effect. SORL1 encodes the Sortilin-related receptor LR11/SorLA, a protein involved in the control of amyloid beta peptide production. Our results suggest that besides the involvement of the APP and PSEN genes, further genetic heterogeneity, involving another gene of the same pathway is present in ADEOAD.

  5. Novel role of ouabain as a cystogenic factor in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Darren P.

    2013-01-01

    The classic role of the Na-K-ATPase is that of a primary active transporter that utilizes cell energy to establish and maintain transmembrane Na+ and K+ gradients to preserve cell osmotic stability, support cell excitability, and drive secondary active transport. Recent studies have revealed that Na-K-ATPase located within cholesterol-containing lipid rafts serves as a receptor for cardiotonic steroids, including ouabain. Traditionally, ouabain was viewed as a toxin produced only in plants, and it was used in relatively high concentrations to experimentally block the pumping action of the Na-K-ATPase. However, the new and unexpected role of the Na-K-ATPase as a signal transducer revealed a novel facet for ouabain in the regulation of a myriad of cell functions, including cell proliferation, hypertrophy, apoptosis, mobility, and metabolism. The seminal discovery that ouabain is endogenously produced in mammals and circulates in plasma has fueled the interest in this endogenous molecule as a potentially important hormone in normal physiology and disease. In this article, we review the role of the Na-K-ATPase as an ion transporter in the kidney, the experimental evidence for ouabain as a circulating hormone, the function of the Na-K-ATPase as a signal transducer that mediates ouabain's effects, and novel results for ouabain-induced Na-K-ATPase signaling in cystogenesis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. PMID:23761677

  6. Blood Pressure and Intracranial Aneurysms in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Niemczyk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is correlated with an increased frequency of both intracranial aneurysms (ICANs, and arterial hypertension (AH. The aim of our study was to search for the association between blood pressure (BP and ICANs in ADPKD patients. Methods: Sixty-eight adult, pre-dialysis phase ADPKD patients underwent both screening for ICANs with magnetic resonance angiography of the brain, and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM. Results: ICANs were diagnosed in 10 patients (ICAN(+ group, while in 58 were not (ICAN(- group. The nighttime maximum diastolic blood pressure (DBP, maximum increase in DBP from measurement to measurement (positive delta of DBP at night, and the standard deviation of the daytime mean arterial pressure were significantly higher in ICAN(+ compared to ICAN(- patients. Additionally, in a subgroup of patients after 45 years-of-age, ICAN(+ patients had significantly higher maximum 24-hour and daytime systolic blood pressure, maximum 24-hour, daytime, nighttime DBP, maximum daytime and nighttime positive delta of DBP compared to ICAN(- cases. Conclusions: Development of ICANs in hypertensive ADPKD patients is accompanied with higher values of some BP parameters measured by ABPM. Hypertensive ADPKD patients with substantial fluctuations in BP assessed by ABPM, especially those after 45 years-of-age, should become candidates for screening for ICANs.

  7. Genetic linkage of autosomal dominant progressive supranuclear palsy to 1q31.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Raquel; Gómez Garre, Pilar; Hirano, Michio; Tai, Yen F; Ampuero, Israel; Vidal, Lídice; Rojo, Ana; Fontan, Aurora; Vazquez, Ana; Fanjul, Samira; Hernandez, Jaime; Cantarero, Susana; Hoenicka, Janet; Jones, Alison; Ahsan, R Laila; Pavese, Nicola; Piccini, Paola; Brooks, David J; Perez-Tur, Jordi; Nyggard, Torbjorn; de Yébenes, Justo G

    2005-05-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a disorder of unknown pathogenesis. Familial clusters of PSP have been reported related to mutations of protein tau. We report the linkage of a large Spanish family with typical autosomal dominant PSP to a new locus in chromosome 1. Four members of this family had typical PSP, confirmed by neuropathology in one case. At least five ancestors had similar disease. Other members of the family have incomplete phenotypes. The power of the linkage analysis was increased by detecting presymptomatic individuals with 18F-fluoro-dopa and 18F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography. We screened the human genome with 340 polymorphic markers and we enriched the areas of interest with additional markers. The disease status was defined according to the clinical and positron emission tomography data. We excluded linkage to the tau gene in chromosome 17. PSP was linked, in this family, to one area of 3.4 cM in chromosome 1q31.1, with a maximal multipoint < OD score of +3.53. This area contains at least three genes, whose relevance in PSP is unknown. We expect to further define the gene responsible for PSP, which could help to understand the pathogenesis of this disease and to design effective treatment.

  8. Novel autosomal dominant mandibulofacial dysostosis with ptosis: clinical description and exclusion of TCOF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedera, P; Toriello, H V; Petty, E M

    2002-07-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS), the most common type of mandibulofacial dysostosis (MFD), is genetically homogeneous. Other types of MFD are less common and, of these, only the Bauru type of MFD has an autosomal dominant (AD) mode of inheritance established. Here we report clinical features of a kindred with a unique AD MFD with the exclusion of linkage to the TCS locus (TCOF1) on chromosome 5q31-q32. Six affected family members underwent a complete medical genetics physical examination and two affected subjects had skeletal survey. All available medical records were reviewed. Linkage analysis using the markers spanning the TCOF1 locus was performed. One typically affected family member had a high resolution karyotype. Affected subjects had significant craniofacial abnormalities without any significant acral changes and thus had a phenotype consistent with a MFD variant. Distinctive features included hypoplasia of the zygomatic complex, micrognathia with malocclusion, auricular abnormalities with conductive hearing loss, and ptosis. Significantly negative two point lod scores were obtained for markers spanning the TCOF1 locus, excluding the possibility that the disease in our kindred is allelic with TCS. High resolution karyotype was normal. We report a kindred with a novel type of MFD that is not linked to the TCOF1 locus and is also clinically distinct from other types of AD MFD. Identification of additional families will facilitate identification of the gene causing this type of AD MFD and further characterisation of the clinical phenotype.

  9. Treatment of Persistent Gross Hematuria with Tranexamic Acid in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Yao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In this retrospective study we aimed to compare the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA vs etamsylate, two hemostatic agents, on hematuria duration in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD patients with persistent gross hematuria. Methods: This is a retrospective study of 40 patients with ADPKD and macroscopic hematuria. 20 patients receiving TXA and snake venom blood clotting enzyme injection were compared with 20 matched patients receiving etamsylate and snake venom blood clotting enzyme injection. The primary outcome was hematuria duration and the secondary outcomes were blood transfusion requirements and adverse events. Results: The hematuria duration was shorter in the TXA group compared with the etamsylate group (4[3-5] d vs 7[6-10] d, P<0.001. The volume of blood transfusion tended to be less in the TXA group than in the etamsylate group (300±115 ml vs 486±195 ml, P=0.12, and the number of patients needing a blood transfusion also tended to be lower [20% (4/20 vs 35% (7/20, P=0.29]. TXA and etamsylate were equally well tolerated and no serious adverse events were observed in both groups. Conclusions: Our study indicates that TXA treatment was more effective than etamsylate in stopping bleeding in ADPKD patients with persistent gross hematuria.

  10. Clinicians' attitude towards family planning and timing of diagnosis in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rechter, Stéphanie; Kringen, Jonathan; Janssens, Peter; Liebau, Max Christoph; Devriendt, Koenraad; Levtchenko, Elena; Bergmann, Carsten; Jouret, François; Bammens, Bert; Borry, Pascal; Schaefer, Franz; Mekahli, Djalila

    2017-01-01

    Several ethical aspects in the management of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) are still controversial, including family planning and testing for disease presence in at-risk individuals. We performed an online survey aiming to assess the opinion and current clinical practice of European pediatric and adult nephrologists, as well as geneticists. A total of 410 clinicians (53% male, mean (SD) age of 48 (10) years) responded, including 216 pediatric nephrologists, 151 adult nephrologists, and 43 clinical geneticists. While the 3 groups agreed to encourage clinical testing in asymptomatic ADPKD minors and adults, only geneticists would recommend genetic testing in asymptomatic at-risk adults (Pdiagnosis, termination of pregnancy and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for ADPKD. Particularly, PGD is ethically justified according to geneticists (4.48 (1.63)), whereas pediatric (3.08 (1.78); Pplanning, including PGD. The present data highlight the need for a consensus among clinicians, to avoid that ADPKD families are being given conflicting information.

  11. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: What Do We Need To Know For Counselling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgina Barbara Piccoli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the new millennium, few kidney diseases changed their perspectives as much as autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. New diagnostic approaches, including the evaluation of renal or liver volume by computerised tomography (CT scan, the detection of cyst infections by positron emission tomography (PET scan, and new therapeutic approaches (including vaptans, mTOR inhibitors, and somatostatin analogues pose new clinical and ethical dilemmas. Therefore, the analysis of the recent advances offers an occasion for reviewing our counselling policy. The aim of this narrative review is to discuss a few crucial points concerning counselling in ADPKD: should all ADPKD patients undergo genetic testing for characterisation of the involved gene? What is the role of prenatal counselling and preimplantation selection? Should all ADPKD patients be followed in a nephrology clinic? Which imaging to use in which patients? Whom should we treat, when, and by which drugs, and how to communicate the treatment options? The working conclusions highlight the trends towards earlier referral of ADPKD patients, the importance of offering the diet options, including low-salt, high-water intake, difficult to follow, but devoid of side-effects, and the expectancy for the new therapeutic options, alone or in combination, aimed at reduction of cyst volume and/or control of cyst growth.

  12. Novel CACNA1S mutation causes autosomal dominant hypokalemic periodic paralysis in a South American family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Tie; Gomez, Cladelis Rubio; Mateus, Heidi Eliana; Castano, Juan Andres; Wang, Qing Kenneth

    2009-11-01

    Hypokalaemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder, which is characterized by periodic attacks of muscle weakness associated with a decrease in the serum potassium level. A major disease-causing gene for HypoPP has been identified as CACNA1S, which encodes the skeletal muscle calcium channel alpha-subunit with four transmembrane domains (I-IV), each with six transmembrane segments (S1-S6). To date, all CACNA1S mutations identified in HypoPP patients are located within the voltage-sensor S4 segment. In this study we report a novel CACNA1S mutation in a new region of the protein, the S3 segment of domain III. We characterized a four-generation South American family with HypoPP. Genetic analysis identified a novel V876E mutation in all HypoPP patients in the family, but not in normal family members or 160 control people. Clinical analysis indicates that mutation V876E is associated with a severe outcome as characterized by a very early age of onset, complete penetrance and a severe prognosis including death. These results identify a new mutation in CACNA1S and expand the spectrum of CACNA1S mutations associated with HypoPP.

  13. Health-related quality of life across all stages of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Daniel; Karlsson, Linda; Eklund, Oskar; Dieperink, Hans; Honkanen, Eero; Melin, Jan; Selvig, Kristian; Lundberg, Johan

    2017-12-01

    A limited number of studies have assessed health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Results to date have been conflicting and studies have generally focused on patients with later stages of the disease. This study aimed to assess HRQoL in ADPKD across all stages of the disease, from patients with early chronic kidney disease (CKD) to patients with end-stage renal disease. A study involving cross-sectional patient-reported outcomes and retrospective clinical data was undertaken April-December 2014 in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. Patients were enrolled into four mutually exclusive stages of the disease: CKD stages 1-3; CKD stages 4-5; transplant recipients; and dialysis patients. Overall HRQoL was generally highest in patients with CKD stages 1-3, followed by transplant recipients, patients with CKD stages 4-5 and patients on dialysis. Progressive disease predominately had an impact on physical health, whereas mental health showed less variation between stages of the disease. A substantial loss in quality of life was observed as patients progressed to CKD stages 4-5. Later stages of ADPKD are associated with reduced physical health. The value of early treatment interventions that can delay progression of the disease should be considered. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  14. A novel mutation in CRYAA is associated with autosomal dominant suture cataracts in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dongmei; Guo, Yuanyuan; Li, Qian; Guan, Lina; Zhu, Siquan; Ma, Xu

    2012-01-01

    To identify the genetic defect in a three-generation Chinese family with congenital cataracts. The phenotype of a three-generation Chinese family with congenital cataracts was recruited. Detailed family history and clinical data of the family were recorded. Candidate gene sequencing was performed to screen out the disease-causing mutation. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to predict the function of the mutant gene. The phenotype of the family was identified as Y-suture cataract by using slit-lamp photography. Direct sequencing revealed a c.161G>C transversion in exon 1 of crystallin, alpha A (CRYAA). This mutation cosegregated with all affected individuals in the family and was not found in unaffected family members or in the 100 unrelated controls. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the 54th amino acid position was highly conserved and the mutation R54P caused an increase in local hydrophobicity around the substitution site. This study identified a novel disease-causing mutation c.161G>C (p.R54P) in CRYAA in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant Y-suture cataracts. This is the first report relating a G→C mutation in CRYAA leading to congenital Y-suture cataract.

  15. Early renal abnormalities in children with postnatally diagnosed autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selistre, Luciano; de Souza, Vandréa; Ranchin, Bruno; Hadj-Aissa, Aoumeur; Cochat, Pierre; Dubourg, Laurence

    2012-09-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in children is often regarded as a benign condition. However, previous studies pointed out renal-related anomalies which may benefit from early appropriate treatments. This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence and severity of early renal dysfunction in ADPKD children. An extensive renal evaluation was performed in 52 consecutive ADPKD patients diagnosed either from prenatal screening or post-natal ultrasound (US) examination (54 % males, mean age 10 ± 4 years [1-17]). Three patients had both systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure above the 95th percentile, one patient had a "high normal" DBP, and one child was treated with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI). The mean ± SD glomerular filtration rate (GFR ml/min per 1.73 m(2), inulin clearance) was 115 ± 26 [47-168] but six children (12 %) had a GFR 135). Microalbuminuria (2 20 mg/mmol). Early renal manifestations are frequent in ADPKD children, including hypertension in 6 %, albuminuria in 58 %, and decreased GFR in 12 %. In conclusion, renal function in children with ADPKD should be regularly assessed in order to manage early renal dysfunction and even consider further therapeutic intervention.

  16. Age-based ultrasonographic criteria for diagnosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in Persian cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Juliana M; Freitas, Mariana F; Daniel, Alexandre Gt; Pellegrino, Arine; Cardoso, Natália C; Castro, Isac de; Onuchic, Luiz F; Cogliati, Bruno

    2018-04-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to establish ultrasound criteria for the diagnosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in Persian cats. Methods Eighty-two Persian cats were assessed using renal ultrasound and genotyped for the C→A transversion in exon 29 of PKD1. The animals were also submitted to hematological characterization, serum biochemistry analyses and urinalysis. Results Age, sex and neutering status did not differ between ADPKD (n = 12) and non-ADPKD (n = 70) cats. After integrated molecular genetics/ultrasonographic analysis, the presence of at least one renal cyst was sufficient to establish a diagnosis of ADPKD in animals up to 15 months of age. Two or more cysts were required for diagnosis in cats aged 16-32 months, and at least three cysts warranted diagnosis of ADPKD in animals aged 33-49 months. Finally, four or more cysts led to diagnosis in cats aged 50-66 months. Although cats with ADPKD exhibited higher serum calcium levels than non-affected cats, hematological, urinalysis and other biochemical parameters did not differ between the two groups. Conclusions and relevance Integrated analyses of imaging and molecular genetics data enabled, for the first time, the establishment of age-based ultrasonographic criteria for the diagnosis of ADPKD in Persian cats. The development of imaging criteria is particularly relevant and useful in the clinical setting given the current limitations to access and the cost of molecular genetics-based diagnostic tests.

  17. A novel OPA1 mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Juanjuan; Yuan, Yimin; Lin, Bing; Feng, Hao; Li, Yan; Dai, Xianning; Zhou, Huihui; Dong, Xujie; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Guan, Min-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We report the characterization of a four-generation large Chinese family with ADOA. ► We find a new heterozygous mutation c.C1198G in OPA1 gene which may be a novel pathogenic mutation in this pedigree. ► We do not find any mitochondrial DNA mutations associated with optic atrophy. ► Other factors may also contribute to the phenotypic variability of ADOA in this pedigree. -- Abstract: A large four-generation Chinese family with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) was investigated in the present study. Eight of the family members were affected in this pedigree. The affected family members exhibited early-onset and progressive visual impairment, resulting in mild to profound loss of visual acuity. The average age-at-onset was 15.9 years. A new heterozygous mutation c.C1198G was identified by sequence analysis of the 12th exon of the OPA1 gene. This mutation resulted in a proline to alanine substitution at codon 400, which was located in an evolutionarily conserved region. This missense mutation in the GTPase domain was supposed to result in a loss of function for the encoded protein and act through a dominant negative effect. No other mutations associated with optic atrophy were found in our present study. The c.C1198G heterozygous mutation in the OPA1 gene may be a novel key pathogenic mutation in this pedigree with ADOA. Furthermore, additional nuclear modifier genes, environmental factors, and psychological factors may also contribute to the phenotypic variability of ADOA in this pedigree.

  18. Cerebral amyloidosis associated with cognitive decline in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fen; Gordon, Brian A; Ryman, Davis C; Ma, Shengmei; Xiong, Chengjie; Hassenstab, Jason; Goate, Alison; Fagan, Anne M; Cairns, Nigel J; Marcus, Daniel S; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Ghetti, Bernardino; Farlow, Martin R; Sperling, Reisa; Salloway, Steve; Schofield, Peter R; Masters, Colin L; Martins, Ralph N; Rossor, Martin N; Jucker, Mathias; Danek, Adrian; Förster, Stefan; Lane, Christopher A S; Morris, John C; Benzinger, Tammie L S; Bateman, Randall J

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the associations of cerebral amyloidosis with concurrent cognitive performance and with longitudinal cognitive decline in asymptomatic and symptomatic stages of autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD). Two hundred sixty-three participants enrolled in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network observational study underwent neuropsychological evaluation as well as PET scans with Pittsburgh compound B. One hundred twenty-one participants completed at least 1 follow-up neuropsychological evaluation. Four composite cognitive measures representing global cognition, episodic memory, language, and working memory were generated using z scores from a battery of 13 standard neuropsychological tests. General linear mixed-effects models were used to investigate the relationship between baseline cerebral amyloidosis and baseline cognitive performance and whether baseline cerebral amyloidosis predicts cognitive change over time (mean follow-up 2.32 years ± 0.92, range 0.89-4.19) after controlling for estimated years from expected symptom onset, APOE ε4 allelic status, and education. In asymptomatic mutation carriers, amyloid burden was not associated with baseline cognitive functioning but was significantly predictive of longitudinal decline in episodic memory. In symptomatic mutation carriers, cerebral amyloidosis was correlated with worse baseline performance in multiple cognitive composites and predicted greater decline over time in global cognition, working memory, and Mini-Mental State Examination. Cerebral amyloidosis predicts longitudinal episodic memory decline in presymptomatic ADAD and multidomain cognitive decline in symptomatic ADAD. These findings imply that amyloidosis in the brain is an indicator of early cognitive decline and provides a useful outcome measure for early assessment and prevention treatment trials. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. A novel OPA1 mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Juanjuan; Yuan, Yimin; Lin, Bing; Feng, Hao; Li, Yan [School of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325027, Zhejiang (China); Dai, Xianning; Zhou, Huihui [Attardi Institute of Mitochondrial Biomedicine and Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035, Zhejiang (China); Dong, Xujie [School of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325027, Zhejiang (China); Liu, Xiao-Ling, E-mail: lxl@mail.eye.ac.cn [School of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325027, Zhejiang (China); Guan, Min-Xin, E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org [Attardi Institute of Mitochondrial Biomedicine and Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035, Zhejiang (China); Institute of Genetics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310012 (China); Division of Human Genetics, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, OH 45229 (United States)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the characterization of a four-generation large Chinese family with ADOA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find a new heterozygous mutation c.C1198G in OPA1 gene which may be a novel pathogenic mutation in this pedigree. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We do not find any mitochondrial DNA mutations associated with optic atrophy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Other factors may also contribute to the phenotypic variability of ADOA in this pedigree. -- Abstract: A large four-generation Chinese family with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) was investigated in the present study. Eight of the family members were affected in this pedigree. The affected family members exhibited early-onset and progressive visual impairment, resulting in mild to profound loss of visual acuity. The average age-at-onset was 15.9 years. A new heterozygous mutation c.C1198G was identified by sequence analysis of the 12th exon of the OPA1 gene. This mutation resulted in a proline to alanine substitution at codon 400, which was located in an evolutionarily conserved region. This missense mutation in the GTPase domain was supposed to result in a loss of function for the encoded protein and act through a dominant negative effect. No other mutations associated with optic atrophy were found in our present study. The c.C1198G heterozygous mutation in the OPA1 gene may be a novel key pathogenic mutation in this pedigree with ADOA. Furthermore, additional nuclear modifier genes, environmental factors, and psychological factors may also contribute to the phenotypic variability of ADOA in this pedigree.

  20. Progression of autosomal dominant kidney disease: measurement of the stage transitions of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Blanchette

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is a progressive genetic disorder characterized by the development of numerous kidney cysts that result in kidney failure. Little is known regarding the key patient characteristics and utilization of healthcare resources for ADPKD patients along the continuum of disease progression. This observational study was designed to describe the characteristics of ADPKD patients and compare them with those of patients with other chronic kidney diseases. Methods: This retrospective cohort study involved patients with a claim for ADPKD or PKD unspecified from 1/1/2000–2/28/2013 and ≥6 months of previous continuous enrollment (baseline within a large database of administrative claims in the USA. A random sample of chronic kidney disease (CKD patients served as comparators. For a subset of ADPKD patients who had only a diagnosis code of unspecified PKD, abstraction of medical records was undertaken to estimate the proportion of patients who had medical chart-confirmed ADPKD. In patients with linked electronic laboratory data, the estimated glomerular filtration rate was calculated via serum creatinine values to determine CKD stage at baseline and during follow-up. Proportions of patients transitioning to another stage and the mean age at transition were calculated. Results: ADPKD patients were, in general, younger and had fewer physician visits, but had more specific comorbidities at observation start compared with CKD patients. ADPKD patients had a longer time in the milder stages and longer duration before recorded transition to a more severe stage compared with CKD patients. Patients with ADPKD at risk of rapid progression had a shorter time-to-end-stage renal disease than patients with CKD and ADPKD patients not at risk, but stage duration was similar between ADPKD patients at risk and those not at risk. Conclusions: These results suggest that distribution of patients by age at transition

  1. [Co-inheritance of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and sickle cell trait in African Americans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Peces, C; Cuesta-López, E; Vega-Cabrera, C; Azorín, S; Pérez-Dueñas, V; Selgas, R

    2011-01-01

    Macroscopic haematuria secondary to renal cyst rupture is a frequent complication in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Sickle-cell disease is an autosomal recessive haemoglobinopathy that involves a qualitative anomaly of haemoglobin due to substitution of valine for the glutamic acid in the sixth position of 3-globin gene on the short arm of chromosome 11. For the full disease to be manifested, this mutation must be present on both inherited alleles. The severity of the disease is proportional to the quantity of haemoglobin S (Hb S) in the red cells; sickle-cell trait (Hb S 75%). In sickle-cell disease, the abnormal Hb S loses its rheological characteristics and is responsible of the various systemic manifestations including those of the kidney, such as macroscopic haematuria secondary to papilar necrosis. Despite the generally benign nature of the sickle-cell trait, several potentially serious complications have been described. Metabolic or environmental changes such as hypoxia, acidosis, dehydration, hyperosmolality or hyperthermia may transform silent sickle-cell trait into a syndrome resembling sickle-cell disease with vaso-occlusive crisis due to an accumulation of low deformable red blood cells in the microcirculation originating haematuria from papilar necrosis. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated an earlier onset of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), in blacks with ADPKD and sickle-cell trait when compared with blacks with ADPKD without the trait. We studied 2 african-american families (4 patients) which presented with both ADPKD and sickle-cell trait (Hb S <50%). The diagnosis of sickle-cell trait was confirmed by haemoglobin electrophoresis. The renal volume was measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The proband subject in family 1 presented frequent haematuria episodes, associated to increase of renal volume, developed very early ESRD and was dialyzed at the age of 39 years. The other 3 patients in family 2 presented

  2. Autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease in a family without polycystic kidney disease associated with a novel missense protein kinase C substrate 80K-H mutation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peces, R.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Morsche, R.H.M. te; Gonzalez, P.; Peces, C.

    2005-01-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is characterized by the presence of multiple bile duct-derived epithelial cysts scattered in the liver parenchyma. PLD can manifest itself in patients with severe autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Isolated autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease

  3. Novel treatment protocol for ameliorating refractory, chronic pain in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteleijn, Niek F; van Gastel, Maatje D A; Blankestijn, Peter J; Drenth, Joost P H; de Jager, Rosa L; Leliveld, Anna M; Stellema, Ruud; Wolff, Andreas P; Groen, Gerbrand J; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2017-04-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients can suffer from chronic pain that can be refractory to conventional treatment, resulting in a wish for nephrectomy. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a multidisciplinary treatment protocol with sequential nerve blocks on pain relief in ADPKD patients with refractory chronic pain. As a first step a diagnostic, temporary celiac plexus block with local anesthetics was performed. If substantial pain relief was obtained, the assumption was that pain was relayed via the celiac plexus and major splanchnic nerves. When pain recurred, patients were then scheduled for a major splanchnic nerve block with radiofrequency ablation. In cases with no pain relief, it was assumed that pain was relayed via the aortico-renal plexus, and catheter-based renal denervation was performed. Sixty patients were referred, of which 44 were eligible. In 36 patients the diagnostic celiac plexus block resulted in substantial pain relief with a change in the median visual analogue scale (VAS) score pre-post intervention of 50/100. Of these patients, 23 received a major splanchnic nerve block because pain recurred, with a change in median VAS pre-post block of 53/100. In 8 patients without pain relief after the diagnostic block, renal denervation was performed in 5, with a borderline significant change in the median VAS pre-post intervention of 20/100. After a median follow-up of 12 months, 81.8% of the patients experienced a sustained improvement in pain intensity, indicating that our treatment protocol is effective in obtaining pain relief in ADPKD patients with refractory chronic pain. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Screening for Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Survey of 420 Nephrologists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Flahault

    Full Text Available Despite a high prevalence of intracranial aneurysm (ICA in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD, rupture events are rare. The current recommendations for ICA screening are based on expert opinions and studies with low levels of evidence.The aim of our study was to describe the attitudes of practicing nephrologists in Europe towards screening for ICA using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA.We conducted a web-based survey among 1315 European French-speaking nephrologists and nephrology residents. An anonymous, electronic questionnaire including 24 independent questions related to ICA screening modalities, indications and participant profiles was sent by email between September and December 2014. Four hundred and twenty nephrologists (mostly from France participated, including 31 nephrology residents; the response rate was 32%.Systematic screening for ICA was advocated by 28% of the nephrologists. A family history of ICA rupture, sudden death, stroke and migraine were consensual indications for screening (> 90% of the panel. In other clinical situations largely not covered by the recommendations (pregnancy, nephrectomy, kidney transplantation, cardiac or hepatic surgery, uncontrolled hypertension, lack of familial ADPKD history, at-risk activity, tobacco use, the attitudes towards screening were highly divergent. ICA screening was influenced by nephrologists experience with ADPKD and by their practice setting. The majority of participants (57% would not repeat a normal ICA screening. Only a few participants (22% knew that non-contrast MRA was the reference diagnostic tool for ICA screening, whereas most participants thought that contrast enhancement was necessary to screen for ICA. The results from the nephrology residents were analyzed separately and yielded similar results.This practice survey revealed that most nephrologists follow the current recommendations for the initial screening of ICAs. However, more than a quarter of the

  5. Relationship between intracranial aneurysms and the severity of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroki; Higashihara, Eiji; Maruyama, Keisuke; Nutahara, Kikuo; Nitatori, Toshiaki; Miyazaki, Isao; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki

    2017-12-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary kidney disease characterized by the progressive enlargement of innumerable renal cysts. Although the association of intracranial aneurysms (ICANs) with ADPKD is well known, the relationship between the ICAN and the disease severity including total kidney volume (TKV) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is poorly understood. We screened 265 patients with ADPKD (mean age, 48.8 years; range, 14.9-88.3 years) with MR angiography. The patients with a past history related to ICANs were excluded from the study. The incidence and characteristics of ICAN in patients with ADPKD were evaluated. TKV was measured by volumetric analyses of MR imaging. We detected 65 ICANs in 49 patients (37 women and 12 men, mean age, 52.7 years; range, 20.4-86 years). The incidence of ICANs was 18.5% and female patients had was higher incidence (23.1%) than male patients (11.4%) (p = 0.02). An age of those with ICANs was significantly higher than those without (p = 0.006), and the cumulative risk of diagnosis of ICANs increased with age. TKV was significantly larger in those with ICANs than those without (p = 0.001), but eGFR was not different between two groups (p = 0.07). By multivariate analyses, only TKV was significantly related to the development of ICANs (p = 0.02). The incidence of ICANs increased with age, was higher in females, and correlated with kidney enlargement in patients with ADPKD. Necessity of screening ICANs would be particularly high in elderly women with large kidneys.

  6. Kidney volume measurement methods for clinical studies on autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kanishka; Caroli, Anna; Quach, Le Van; Petzold, Katja; Bozzetto, Michela; Serra, Andreas L.; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Remuzzi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Background In autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), total kidney volume (TKV) is regarded as an important biomarker of disease progression and different methods are available to assess kidney volume. The purpose of this study was to identify the most efficient kidney volume computation method to be used in clinical studies evaluating the effectiveness of treatments on ADPKD progression. Methods and findings We measured single kidney volume (SKV) on two series of MR and CT images from clinical studies on ADPKD (experimental dataset) by two independent operators (expert and beginner), twice, using all of the available methods: polyline manual tracing (reference method), free-hand manual tracing, semi-automatic tracing, Stereology, Mid-slice and Ellipsoid method. Additionally, the expert operator also measured the kidney length. We compared different methods for reproducibility, accuracy, precision, and time required. In addition, we performed a validation study to evaluate the sensitivity of these methods to detect the between-treatment group difference in TKV change over one year, using MR images from a previous clinical study. Reproducibility was higher on CT than MR for all methods, being highest for manual and semiautomatic contouring methods (planimetry). On MR, planimetry showed highest accuracy and precision, while on CT accuracy and precision of both planimetry and Stereology methods were comparable. Mid-slice and Ellipsoid method, as well as kidney length were fast but provided only a rough estimate of kidney volume. The results of the validation study indicated that planimetry and Stereology allow using an importantly lower number of patients to detect changes in kidney volume induced by drug treatment as compared to other methods. Conclusions Planimetry should be preferred over fast and simplified methods for accurately monitoring ADPKD progression and assessing drug treatment effects. Expert operators, especially on MR images, are required

  7. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujioka Shinsuke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and SCA31. The subtype SCA6 is the most common. These subtypes are associated with four causative genes and two loci. The severity of symptoms and age of onset can vary between each SCA subtype and even between families with the same subtype. SCA5 and SCA11 are caused by specific gene mutations such as missense, inframe deletions, and frameshift insertions or deletions. SCA6 is caused by trinucleotide CAG repeat expansions encoding large uninterrupted glutamine tracts. SCA31 is caused by repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding region of the disease gene. Currently, there are no specific gene mutations associated with SCA26 or SCA30, though there is a confirmed locus for each subtype. This disease is mainly diagnosed via genetic testing; however, differential diagnoses include pure cerebellar ataxia and non-cerebellar features in addition to ataxia. Although not fatal, ADCA Type III may cause dysphagia and falls, which reduce the quality of life of the patients and may in turn shorten the lifespan. The therapy for ADCA Type III is supportive and includes occupational and speech modalities. There is no cure for ADCA Type III, but a number of recent studies have highlighted novel therapies, which bring hope for future curative treatments.

  8. The role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eBecchetti

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE is a focal epilepsy with attacks typically arising in the frontal lobe during non rapid eye movement (NREM sleep. It is characterized by clusters of complex and stereotyped hypermotor seizures, frequently accompanied by sudden arousals. Cognitive and psychiatric symptoms may be also observed. Approximately 12% of the ADNFLE families carry mutations on genes coding for subunits of the heteromeric neuronal nicotinic receptors (nAChRs. This is consistent with the widespread expression of these receptors, particularly the α4β2* subtype, in the neocortex and thalamus. However, understanding how mutant nAChRs lead to partial frontal epilepsy is far from being straightforward because of the complexity of the cholinergic regulation in both developing and mature brains. The relation with the sleep-waking cycle must be also explained. We discuss some possible pathogenetic mechanisms in the light of recent advances about the nAChR role in prefrontal regions as well as the studies carried out in murine models of ADNFLE. Functional evidence points to alterations in prefrontal GABA release, and the synaptic unbalance probably arises during the cortical circuit maturation. Although most of the available functional evidence concerns mutations on nAChR subunit genes, other genes have been recently implicated in the disease, such as KCNT1 (coding for a Na+-dependent K+ channel, DEPD5 (Dishevelled, Egl-10 and Pleckstrin Domain-containing protein 5, and CRH (Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone. Overall, the uncertainties about both the etiology and the pathogenesis of ADNFLE point to the current gaps in our knowledge the regulation of neuronal networks in the cerebral cortex.

  9. Phenotypic diversity in autosomal-dominant cone-rod dystrophy elucidated by adaptive optics retinal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongxin; Rossi, Ethan A; Stone, Edwin; Latchney, Lisa; Williams, David; Dubra, Alfredo; Chung, Mina

    2018-01-01

    Several genes causing autosomal-dominant cone-rod dystrophy (AD-CRD) have been identified. However, the mechanisms by which genetic mutations lead to cellular loss in human disease remain poorly understood. Here we combine genotyping with high-resolution adaptive optics retinal imaging to elucidate the retinal phenotype at a cellular level in patients with AD-CRD harbouring a defect in the GUCA1A gene. Nine affected members of a four-generation AD-CRD pedigree and three unaffected first-degree relatives underwent clinical examinations including visual acuity, fundus examination, Goldmann perimetry, spectral domain optical coherence tomography and electroretinography. Genome-wide scan followed by bidirectional sequencing was performed on all affected participants. High-resolution imaging using a custom adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) was performed for selected participants. Clinical evaluations showed a range of disease severity from normal fundus appearance in teenaged patients to pronounced macular atrophy in older patients. Molecular genetic testing showed a mutation in in GUCA1A segregating with disease. AOSLO imaging revealed that of the two teenage patients with mild disease, one had severe disruption of the photoreceptor mosaic while the other had a normal cone mosaic. AOSLO imaging demonstrated variability in the pattern of cone and rod cell loss between two teenage cousins with early AD-CRD, who had similar clinical features and had the identical disease-causing mutation in GUCA1A . This finding suggests that a mutation in GUCA1A does not lead to the same degree of AD-CRD in all patients. Modifying factors may mitigate or augment disease severity, leading to different retinal cellular phenotypes. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. A missense mutation in the Ca-sensing receptor gene causes familial autosomal dominant hypoparathyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Y.M.; Finegold, D.N.; Armitage, M.M. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A large family was identified in which hypoparathyroidism was observed to segregate as an autosomal dominant trait in 3 generations. Linkage analysis using short tandem repeat polymorphisms linked the disease phenotype to chromosomal region 3q13. This region contains a newly identified Ca-sensing receptor (PCAR1) gene. This receptor regulates the secretion of parathyroid hormone from parathyroid cells in response to extracellular ionized Ca concentration ([Ca{sup +2}]). PCR-based single stranded conformational analysis of exonic sequences of the PCAR1 gene revealed an abnormal conformer in exon 3 in affected individuals. Direct sequencing of the amplification product from an affected and an unaffected family member showed an A {yields} G transition at nucleotide 770 of the PCAR1 gene [numbering based on the bovine sequence (Genbank accession number S67307)]. This substitution created a Msp1 restriction site which cosegregated with hypoparathyroidism in this family. This substitution was not observed in unaffected family members, unrelated spouses, or unrelated population controls. This substitution is predicted to result in the replacement of a glutamine residue at amino acid 246 by an arginine residue. The Ca-sensing receptor appears to be a member of the family of seven membrane spanning G-protein linked receptors. The extracellular location of this amino acid substitution appears to produce a gain of function mutation increasing the receptor sensitivity to [Ca{sup +2}] and decreasing the calcium {open_quotes}set point{close_quotes}. This is in contrast to the loss of function mutations observed in the PCAR1 gene in pedigrees with familial hypercalcemic hypocalciuria.

  11. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA) Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and SCA31. The subtype SCA6 is the most common. These subtypes are associated with four causative genes and two loci. The severity of symptoms and age of onset can vary between each SCA subtype and even between families with the same subtype. SCA5 and SCA11 are caused by specific gene mutations such as missense, inframe deletions, and frameshift insertions or deletions. SCA6 is caused by trinucleotide CAG repeat expansions encoding large uninterrupted glutamine tracts. SCA31 is caused by repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding region of the disease gene. Currently, there are no specific gene mutations associated with SCA26 or SCA30, though there is a confirmed locus for each subtype. This disease is mainly diagnosed via genetic testing; however, differential diagnoses include pure cerebellar ataxia and non-cerebellar features in addition to ataxia. Although not fatal, ADCA Type III may cause dysphagia and falls, which reduce the quality of life of the patients and may in turn shorten the lifespan. The therapy for ADCA Type III is supportive and includes occupational and speech modalities. There is no cure for ADCA Type III, but a number of recent studies have highlighted novel therapies, which bring hope for future curative treatments. PMID:23331413

  12. Psychiatric comorbidities in patients from seven families with autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus, and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Antonietta; Caccavale, Carmela; Santulli, Lia; Balestrini, Simona; Cagnetti, Claudia; Licchetta, Laura; Esposito, Marcello; Bisulli, Francesca; Tinuper, Paolo; Provinciali, Leandro; Minetti, Carlo; Zara, Federico; Striano, Pasquale; Striano, Salvatore

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this report was to assess the psychiatric comorbidity in a group of patients affected by autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus, and epilepsy (ADCME). Reliable and validated psychodiagnostic scales including the BDI (Beck Depression Inventory), STAI-Y1 and 2 (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - Y; 1 and 2), MMPI-2 (Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory - 2), and QoLIE-31 (Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory - 31) were administered to 20 patients with ADCME, 20 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), and 20 healthy controls. There was a higher prevalence of mood disorders in patients with ADCME compared to patients with JME and healthy controls, particularly depression (p=0.035 and p=0.017, respectively) and state anxiety (p=0.024 and p=0.019, respectively). Trait anxiety was not different from JME (p=0.102) but higher than healthy controls (p=0.017). The myoclonus score positively correlated with both state (rho: 0.58, p=0.042) and trait anxiety (rho: 0.65, p=0.011). These psychiatric features were also often associated with pathological traits of personality: paranoid (OR: 25.7, p=0.003), psychasthenia (OR: 7.0, p=0.023), schizophrenia (OR: 8.5, p=0.011), and hypomania (OR: 5.5, p=0.022). Finally, in patients with ADCME, decreased quality of life correlated with these psychiatric symptoms. Patients with ADCME show a significant psychiatric burden that impairs their quality of life. A comprehensive psychiatric evaluation should be offered at the time of diagnosis to detect these comorbidities and to treat them. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evidence for Bone and Mineral Metabolism Alterations in Children With Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rechter, Stéphanie; Bacchetta, Justine; Godefroid, Nathalie; Dubourg, Laurence; Cochat, Pierre; Maquet, Julie; Raes, Ann; De Schepper, Jean; Vermeersch, Pieter; Van Dyck, Maria; Levtchenko, Elena; D'Haese, Patrick; Evenepoel, Pieter; Mekahli, Djalila

    2017-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary kidney disease. Hypophosphatemia was demonstrated in adult patients with preserved renal function, together with high fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) and low soluble Klotho levels. The latter explained the relative FGF23 hyporesponsiveness in this cohort. Evaluating phosphate and bone mineral metabolism in children with ADPKD compared with what is known in adult ADPKD patients. Observational cross-sectional study. Multicenter study via ambulatory care in tertiary centers. Ninety-two children with ADPKD (52 males; mean ± standard deviation age, 10.2 ± 5.0 years) and 22 healthy controls (HCs, 10 males; mean ± standard deviation age, 10.3 ± 4.1 years). The predictor was early ADPKD stage. Bone mineral metabolism and renal phosphate handling were the main outcome measures. Performed measurements were serum phosphate, tubular maximum phosphorus reabsorption per glomerular filtration rate, FGF23, soluble Klotho, sclerostin, and bone alkaline phosphatase. ADPKD children had significantly lower serum phosphate levels compared with HC. Low tubular maximum phosphorus reabsorption per glomerular filtration rate was observed in 24% of patients, although not significantly different from HC. Serum FGF23 and soluble Klotho levels were comparable between patients and HC. In addition, we showed decreased bone alkaline phosphatase levels in ADPKD children, suggesting suppressed bone formation. This report demonstrates hypophosphatemia and suppressed bone formation in a pediatric ADPKD cohort, with preserved renal function, compared with HC. Although FGF23 levels were not different from controls, they should be considered inappropriate, given the concomitant hypophosphatemia. Further studies are required to elucidate underlying pathophysiology and potential clinical consequences. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  14. Glomerular hyperfiltration and renal progression in children with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Imed; Reed, Berenice; McFann, Kim; Yan, Xiang-Dong; Fick-Brosnahan, Godela M; Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa; Schrier, Robert W

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether glomerular hyperfiltration (GH) occurring early in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is indicative of more rapid disease progression in children. One hundred eighty children with ADPKD (ages 4 to 18 years) with normal renal function were examined by renal ultrasound. Renal volume was calculated using a standard formula for a modified ellipsoid. Creatinine clearance was calculated from serum creatinine and 24-hour urine creatinine. GH was defined as creatinine clearance ≥140 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). Thirty-two children had GH (mean age 11.4 ± 3.6 years) and 148 had normal renal function (mean age 10.8 ± 3.9 years). Patients with GH at baseline demonstrated an increased rate of total renal volume growth (β: rate of change = +19.3 ± 10.8 cm(3)/year) over 5 years compared with those without GH at baseline (β = -4.3 ± 7.7 cm(3)/year), P = 0.008. Those with GH at baseline experienced a faster decline in creatinine clearance in subsequent years (β = -5.0 ± 0.8 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year) compared with those without GH at baseline (β = +1.0 ± 0.4 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year), P children is associated with a significantly faster decline in renal function and higher rate of kidney enlargement over time. GH combined with the increased renal volume may therefore be used as an early marker for a more severe progression of ADPKD in children.

  15. Nephrotic syndrome and idiopathic membranous nephropathy associated with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Martínez-Ara, Jorge; Peces, Carlos; Picazo, Mariluz; Cuesta-López, Emilio; Vega, Cristina; Azorín, Sebastián; Selgas, Rafael

    2011-05-05

    We report the case of a 38-year-old male with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and concomitant nephrotic syndrome secondary to membranous nephropathy (MN). A 3-month course of prednisone 60 mg daily and losartan 100 mg daily resulted in resistance. Treatment with chlorambucil 0.2 mg/kg daily, low-dose prednisone, plus an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) and an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) for 6 weeks resulted in partial remission of his nephrotic syndrome for a duration of 10 months. After relapse of the nephrotic syndrome, a 13-month course of mycophenolate mofetil (MFM) 2 g daily and low-dose prednisone produced complete remission for 44 months. After a new relapse, a second 24-month course of MFM and low-dose prednisone produced partial to complete remission of proteinuria with preservation of renal function. Thirty-six months after MFM withdrawal, complete remission of nephrotic-range proteinuria was maintained and renal function was preserved. This case supports the idea that renal biopsy is needed for ADPKD patients with nephrotic-range proteinuria in order to exclude coexisting glomerular disease and for appropriate treatment/prevention of renal function deterioration. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of nephrotic syndrome due to MN in a patient with ADPKD treated with MFM, with remission of proteinuria and preservation of renal function after more than 10 years. Findings in this patient also suggest that MFM might reduce cystic cell proliferation and fibrosis, preventing progressive renal scarring with preservation of renal function.

  16. Novel CACNA1S mutation causes autosomal dominant hypokalemic periodic paralysis in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiufen; Liu, Mugen; Xu, Chunsheng; Tang, Zhaohui; Liao, Yuhua; Du, Rong; Li, Wei; Wu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xu; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Xianqin; Zhu, Jianfang; Ren, Xiang; Ke, Tie; Wang, Qing; Yang, Junguo

    2005-03-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder which is characterized by periodic attacks of muscle weakness associated with a decrease in the serum potassium level. The skeletal muscle calcium channel alpha-subunit gene CACNA1S is a major disease-causing gene for HypoPP, however, only three specific HypoPP-causing mutations, Arg528His, Arg1,239His and Arg1,239Gly, have been identified in CACNA1S to date. In this study, we studied a four-generation Chinese family with HypoPP with 43 living members and 19 affected individuals. Linkage analysis showed that the causative mutation in the family is linked to the CACNA1S gene with a LOD score of 6.7. DNA sequence analysis revealed a heterozygous C to G transition at nucleotide 1,582, resulting in a novel 1,582C-->G (Arg528Gly) mutation. The Arg528Gly mutation co-segregated with all affected individuals in the family, and was not present in 200 matched normal controls. The penetrance of the Arg528Gly mutation was complete in male mutation carriers, however, a reduced penetrance of 83% (10/12) was observed in female carriers. No differences were detected for age-at-onset and severity of the disease (frequency of symptomatic attacks per year) between male and female patients. Oral intake of KCl is effective in blocking the symptomatic attacks. This study identifies a novel Arg528Gly mutation in the CACNA1S gene that causes HypoPP in a Chinese family, expands the spectrum of mutations causing HypoPP, and demonstrates a gender difference in the penetrance of the disease.

  17. Identification of novel mutations in Chinese Hans with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

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    Yu Chaowen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is the most common inherited renal disease with an incidence of 1 in 400 to 1000. The disease is genetically heterogeneous, with two genes identified: PKD1 (16p13.3 and PKD2 (4q21. Molecular diagnosis of the disease in at-risk individuals is complicated due to the structural complexity of PKD1 gene and the high diversity of the mutations. This study is the first systematic ADPKD mutation analysis of both PKD1 and PKD2 genes in Chinese patients using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC. Methods Both PKD1 and PKD2 genes were mutation screened in each proband from 65 families using DHPLC followed by DNA sequencing. Novel variations found in the probands were checked in their family members available and 100 unrelated normal controls. Then the pathogenic potential of the variations of unknown significance was examined by evolutionary comparison, effects of amino acid substitutions on protein structure, and effects of splice site alterations using online mutation prediction resources. Results A total of 92 variations were identified, including 27 reported previously. Definitely pathogenic mutations (ten frameshift, ten nonsense, two splicing defects and one duplication were identified in 28 families, and probably pathogenic mutations were found in an additional six families, giving a total detection level of 52.3% (34/65. About 69% (20/29 of the mutations are first reported with a recurrent mutation rate of 31%. Conclusions Mutation study of PKD1 and PKD2 genes in Chinese Hans with ADPKD may contribute to a better understanding of the genetic diversity between different ethnic groups and enrich the mutation database. Besides, evaluating the pathogenic potential of novel variations should also facilitate the clinical diagnosis and genetic counseling of the disease.

  18. Effec Of Low Protein Diet On Chronic Renal Failure Due To Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terukuni Ideura

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There are few reports about therapeutic effects of low protein diet on the progression of chronic renal failure due to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD, although the disease is common.The annual incidence rate for end-stage renal disease caused by ADPKD is around 6 per million.In this retrospective study in one center, ten chronic renal failure patients due to ADPKD with creatinine clearnce of 17.0±3.3 mL/min /1.73 m2 and serum creatinine (Cr level of 4.4±0.7 mg/dL were studied for 40 months after the introduction of severe low protein diet (SLPD (0.48±0.03 g/kgBW/day without supplementation of essential amino acids or keto-analogues. Dietary protein intake was estimated by urea appearance rate from 24hr urine sample according to Mitch-Maroni's formula. The results clearly showed that ▵1/Cr/month(×10−3 was significantly suppressed from 5.8±0.9 to 2.0±0.6 following the introduction of SLPD (p<0.02. Furthermore, BUN/Cr ratio decreased from 10.4±0.02 to 7.3±0.02 (p<0.01. Mean blood pressure (mmHg remained unchanged; 92±3 vs 89±3 (ns, and urinary protein excretion (g/day did not change; 0.6±0.2 vs 0.6±0.1 (ns. There were no significant differences between body mass index, serum albumin, transferrin and hemoglobin levels as the indices of nutritional state before and after the introduction of SLPD.In conclusion, SLPD was effective in suppressing the progression of further decline in renal function due to ADPKD under nutritionally safety condition in this cohort.

  19. A novel retinal oscillation mechanism in an autosomal dominant photoreceptor degeneration mouse model

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    Hung-Ya eTu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown in rd1 and rd10 models of photoreceptor degeneration (PD that inner retinal neurons display spontaneous and rhythmic activities. Furthermore, the rhythmic activity has been shown to require the gap junction protein connexin 36, which is likely located in AII amacrine cells (AII-ACs. In the present study, an autosomal dominant PD model called rhoΔCTA, whose rods overexpress a C-terminally truncated mutant rhodopsin and degenerate with a rate similar to that of rd1, was used to investigate the generality and mechanisms of heightened inner retinal activity following PD. To fluorescently identify cholinergic starburst amacrine cells (SACs, the rhoΔCTA mouse was introduced into a combined ChAT-IRES-Cre and Ai9 background. In this mouse, we observed large amplitude excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs oscillations and non-rhythmic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs in both ON- and OFF-SACs. The IPSCs were more noticeable in OFF- than in ON-SACs. Similar to reported retinal ganglion cell (RGC oscillation in rd1 mice, EPSC oscillation was synaptically driven by glutamate and sensitive to blockade of NaV channels and gap junctions. These data suggest that akin to rd1 mice, AII-AC is a prominent oscillator in rhoΔCTA mice. Surprisingly, OFF-SAC but not ON-SAC EPSC oscillation could readily be enhanced by GABAergic blockade. More importantly, weakening the AII-AC gap junction network by activating retinal dopamine receptors abolished oscillations in ON-SACs but not in OFF-SACs. Furthermore, the latter persisted in the presence of flupirtine, an M-type potassium channel activator recently reported to dampen intrinsic AII-AC bursting. These data suggest the existence of a novel oscillation mechanism in mice with PD.

  20. Radiologic and clinical bronchiectasis associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

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    Teng Moua

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polycystin 1 and 2, the protein abnormalities associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD, are also found in airway cilia and smooth muscle cells. There is evidence of increased radiologic bronchiectasis associated with ADPKD, though the clinical and functional implications of this association are unknown. We hypothesized an increased prevalence of both radiologic and clinical bronchiectasis is associated with APDKD as compared to non-ADPKD chronic kidney disease (CKD controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective case-control study was performed at our institution involving consecutive ADPKD and non-ADPKD chronic kidney disease (CKD patients seen over a 13 year period with both chest CT and PFT. CTs were independently reviewed by two blinded thoracic radiologists. Manually collected clinical data included symptoms, smoker status, transplant history, and PFT findings. RESULTS: Ninety-two ADPKD and 95 non-ADPKD CKD control patients were compared. Increased prevalence of radiologic bronchiectasis, predominantly mild lower lobe disease, was found in ADPKD patients compared to CKD control (19 vs. 9%, P = 0.032, OR 2.49 (CI 1.1-5.8. After adjustment for covariates, ADPKD was associated with increased risk of radiologic bronchiectasis (OR 2.78 (CI 1.16-7.12. Symptomatic bronchiectasis occurred in approximately a third of ADPKD patients with radiologic disease. Smoking was associated with increased radiologic bronchiectasis in ADPKD patients (OR 3.59, CI 1.23-12.1. CONCLUSIONS: Radiological bronchiectasis is increased in patients with ADPKD particularly those with smoking history as compared to non-ADPKD CKD controls. A third of such patients have symptomatic disease. Bronchiectasis should be considered in the differential in ADPKD patients with respiratory symptoms and smoking history.

  1. Distintas formas de presentación clínica de un raquitismo hipofosfatémico autosómico dominante por mutación del factor de crecimiento fibroblástico 23 en una familia Different forms of clinical presentation of an autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets caused by a FGF 23 mutation in one family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Luis Negri

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Describimos distintas formas de presentación clínica de un raquitismo hipofosfatémico autosómico dominante en 4 miembros de una misma familia y su respuesta al tratamiento. Paciente N° 1: de sexo femenino de 60 años que consultó por dolores costales y pélvicos, con osteoporosis densitométrica, hipofosfatemia con bajo umbral renal de fósforo, PTH intacta normal y calcemia normal. Tratada con fósforo neutro y calcitriol logró la normalización bioquímica y una notable mejoría de la densitometría en menos de un año. Paciente N° 2: su nieta, consultó al año y ocho meses de edad por presentar talla en percentil 3 y genu varum. En el laboratorio mostró hipofosfatemia y fosfatasa alcalina total muy elevada y en la Rx de mano, ensanchamiento y deflecamiento epifisario compatible con raquitismo. Tratada con fósforo neutro y calcitriol, normalizó los parámetros bioquímicos y logró un ascenso en el percentil de talla de 3 a 50 a los 20 meses de tratamiento. Paciente N° 3: la madre de la paciente N° 2, quien sin ninguna manifestación clínica y con densitometría ósea normal presentó hipofosfatemia que se normalizó con tratamiento con fosfato neutro. Paciente N° 4: el tío de la paciente N° 2, tuvo raquitismo hipofosfatémico de niño, y luego de los 5 años normalizó el fósforo sin tratamiento. Estudiado a los 29 años presentó fósforo normal y densitometría ósea normal. El análisis del ADN genómico de la paciente N° 3 mostró una mutación con sentido erróneo en el gen del factor de crecimiento fifroblástico 23 (sustitución de arginina por una glutamina en posición 179. Por lo tanto se llegó al diagnóstico de raquitismo/osteomalacia hipofosfatémico autosómico dominante.In this report we describe different forms of clinical presentation of an autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR in 4 members of the same family as well as the treatment used in these patients and their response to it. Patient N

  2. Autosomal dominant hypercalciuria in a mouse model due to a mutation of the epithelial calcium channel, TRPV5.

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    Nellie Y Loh

    Full Text Available Hypercalciuria is a major cause of nephrolithiasis, and is a common and complex disorder involving genetic and environmental factors. Identification of genetic factors for monogenic forms of hypercalciuria is hampered by the limited availability of large families, and to facilitate such studies, we screened for hypercalciuria in mice from an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis programme. We identified a mouse with autosomal dominant hypercalciuria (HCALC1. Linkage studies mapped the Hcalc1 locus to a 11.94 Mb region on chromosome 6 containing the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, members 5 (Trpv5 and 6 (Trpv6 genes. DNA sequence analysis of coding regions, intron-exon boundaries and promoters of Trpv5 and Trpv6 identified a novel T to C transition in codon 682 of TRPV5, mutating a conserved serine to a proline (S682P. Compared to wild-type littermates, heterozygous (Trpv5(682P/+ and homozygous (Trpv5(682P/682P mutant mice had hypercalciuria, polyuria, hyperphosphaturia and a more acidic urine, and ∼10% of males developed tubulointerstitial nephritis. Trpv5(682P/682P mice also had normal plasma parathyroid hormone but increased 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3 concentrations without increased bone resorption, consistent with a renal defect for the hypercalciuria. Expression of the S682P mutation in human embryonic kidney cells revealed that TRPV5-S682P-expressing cells had a lower baseline intracellular calcium concentration than wild-type TRPV5-expressing cells, suggesting an altered calcium permeability. Immunohistological studies revealed a selective decrease in TRPV5-expression from the renal distal convoluted tubules of Trpv5(682P/+ and Trpv5(682P/682P mice consistent with a trafficking defect. In addition, Trpv5(682P/682P mice had a reduction in renal expression of the intracellular calcium-binding protein, calbindin-D(28K, consistent with a specific defect in TRPV5-mediated renal calcium reabsorption. Thus, our findings

  3. Mutations in POGLUT1, Encoding Protein O-Glucosyltransferase 1, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Dowling-Degos Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Basmanav, F. Buket; Oprisoreanu, Ana-Maria; Pasternack, Sandra M.; Thiele, Holger; Fritz, Günter; Wenzel, Jörg; Größer, Leopold; Wehner, Maria; Wolf, Sabrina; Fagerberg, Christina; Bygum, Anette; Altmüller, Janine; Rütten, Arno; Parmentier, Laurent; El Shabrawi-Caelen, Laila

    2014-01-01

    Dowling-Degos disease (DDD) is an autosomal-dominant genodermatosis characterized by progressive and disfiguring reticulate hyperpigmentation. We previously identified loss-of-function mutations in KRT5 but were only able to detect pathogenic mutations in fewer than half of our subjects. To identify additional causes of DDD, we performed exome sequencing in five unrelated affected individuals without mutations in KRT5. Data analysis identified three heterozygous mutations from these individua...

  4. A New Therapeutic Strategy for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: Activation of AMP Kinase by Metformin. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    KS, Abrahamson DR, De Lisle RC, Wallace DP, Maser RL, Grantham JJ, and Calvet JP. Early embryonic renal tubules of wild-type and polycystic kidney ...embryonic renal tubules of wild-type and polycystic kidney disease kidneys respond to cAMP stimulation with cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0504 TITLE: A New Therapeutic Strategy for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: Activation

  5. A Report of Accelerated Coronary Artery Disease Associated with Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Courtney B; Hahn, Virginia; Kobayashi, Taisei; Litwack, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is the most common heritable form of vascular dementia and it is caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene. The neurologic manifestations of CADASIL syndrome have been well characterized; however, here we report one of the first de novo cases of CADASIL-associated coronary artery disease. A 45-year-old woman with a history of CADASIL and remote tobacco use presented with unstable angina. She was found to have diffuse and irregular narrowing of the left anterior descending artery and a drug eluting stent was deployed. Months later, she developed two subsequent episodes of unstable angina, requiring stent placement in the distal left anterior descending artery and the right coronary artery. Though the neurologic manifestations of CADASIL have been well described, these patients may also be predisposed to developing premature coronary artery disease. Patients with CADASIL and their physicians should be aware of this possible association because these patients may not be identified as high risk by traditional cardiovascular risk estimators. These patients may benefit from more aggressive interventions to reduce cardiac risk.

  6. A Report of Accelerated Coronary Artery Disease Associated with Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy

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    Courtney B. Rubin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL is the most common heritable form of vascular dementia and it is caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene. The neurologic manifestations of CADASIL syndrome have been well characterized; however, here we report one of the first de novo cases of CADASIL-associated coronary artery disease. A 45-year-old woman with a history of CADASIL and remote tobacco use presented with unstable angina. She was found to have diffuse and irregular narrowing of the left anterior descending artery and a drug eluting stent was deployed. Months later, she developed two subsequent episodes of unstable angina, requiring stent placement in the distal left anterior descending artery and the right coronary artery. Though the neurologic manifestations of CADASIL have been well described, these patients may also be predisposed to developing premature coronary artery disease. Patients with CADASIL and their physicians should be aware of this possible association because these patients may not be identified as high risk by traditional cardiovascular risk estimators. These patients may benefit from more aggressive interventions to reduce cardiac risk.

  7. Berberine slows cell growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonon, Anna; Mangolini, Alessandra [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Pinton, Paolo [Department of Morphology, Surgery and Experimental Medicine, Section of General Pathology, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Senno, Laura del [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Aguiari, Gianluca, E-mail: dsn@unife.it [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy)

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •Berberine at appropriate doses slows cell proliferation in ADPKD cystic cells. •Reduction of cell growth by berberine occurs by inhibition of ERK and p70-S6 kinase. •Higher doses of berberine cause an overall cytotoxic effect. •Berberine overdose induces apoptotic bodies formation and DNA fragmentation. •Antiproliferative properties of this drug make it a new candidate for ADPKD therapy. -- Abstract: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary monogenic disorder characterized by development and enlargement of kidney cysts that lead to loss of renal function. It is caused by mutations in two genes (PKD1 and PKD2) encoding for polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 proteins which regulate different signals including cAMP, mTOR and EGFR pathways. Abnormal activation of these signals following PC1 or PC2 loss of function causes an increased cell proliferation which is a typical hallmark of this disease. Despite the promising findings obtained in animal models with targeted inhibitors able to reduce cystic cell growth, currently, no specific approved therapy for ADPKD is available. Therefore, the research of new more effective molecules could be crucial for the treatment of this severe pathology. In this regard, we have studied the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline quaternary alkaloid, on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human and mouse ADPKD cystic cell lines. Berberine treatment slows cell proliferation of ADPKD cystic cells in a dose-dependent manner and at high doses (100 μg/mL) it induces cell death in cystic cells as well as in normal kidney tubule cells. However, at 10 μg/mL, berberine reduces cell growth in ADPKD cystic cells only enhancing G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of cell cycle and inhibiting ERK and p70-S6 kinases. Our results indicate that berberine shows a selected antiproliferative activity in cellular models for ADPKD, suggesting that this molecule and similar natural compounds could open new

  8. FDG-PET/CT in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients with suspected cyst infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijl, Jordy Pieter; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Slart, Riemer H J A; Kwee, Thomas Christian

    2018-04-13

    Purpose: To determine the value of 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for diagnosing renal or hepatic cyst infection in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Methods: This retrospective single-center study included all patients with ADPKD who underwent FDG-PET/CT because of suspected cyst infection between 2010 and 2017. Results: Thirty FDG-PET/CT scans of thirty individual patients were included, of which 19 were positive for cyst infection. According to a previously established clinical and biochemical reference standard, FDG-PET/CT achieved sensitivity of 88.9%, specificity of 75.0%, positive predictive value of 84.2%, and negative predictive value of 81.8% for the diagnosis of cyst infection. In 5 cases, FDG-PET/CT suggested a different pathologic process that explained the symptoms, including pneumonia ( n = 1), generalized peritonitis ( n = 1), pancreatitis ( n = 1), colitis ( n = 1), and cholangitis ( n = 1). Total duration of hospital stay and duration between FDG-PET/CT scan and hospital discharge of patients with an FDG-PET/CT scan positive for cyst infection were significantly longer than those with a negative scan ( P = 0.005 and P = 0.009, respectively). Creatinine levels were significantly higher in patients with an FDG-PET/CT scan positive for cyst infection than in patients with a negative scan ( P = 0.015). Other comparisons of clinical parameters (age, gender, presence of fever (>38.5°C) for more than 3 days, abdominal pain, history of solid organ transplantation and nephrectomy, immune status), laboratory values (C-reactive protein level (CRP), leukocyte count, estimated glomerular filtration rate), and microbiologic results (blood and urine cultures) were not significantly different ( P = 0.13-1.00) between FDG-PET/CT-positive and -negative patients. Conclusion: FDG-PET/CT is a useful and recommendable (upfront) imaging modality for the evaluation of

  9. Medical therapy with tranexamic acid in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients with severe haematuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Aguilar, Ana; Vega, Cristina; Cuesta, Emilio; Peces, Carlos; Selgas, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Gross haematuria is a common manifestation of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). It can be spontaneous or the result of trauma, renal calculi, tumour, or infection. Spontaneous cyst bleeding is important in this particular group of patients, since it can be prolonged by local activation of fibrinolysis by urokinase. The management of haematuria in ADPKD is usually conservative, including bed rest, blood transfusion, correction of blood disorders, and use of vasopressin and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. In some patients, the management of gross or life-threatening haematuria may require embolisation and/or nephrectomy. Nonetheless, other methods have been tried to avoid prolonged hospitalisation and nephrectomy and preserve kidney function, such as the use of anti-fibrinolytics. Tranexamic acid was recently suggested as a tool to treat gross haematuria in ADPKD in isolated cases. The aim of this study was to evaluate prospectively the response to tranexamic acid in a group of 8 patients with ADPKD and gross haematuria unresponsive to conventional treatment. The massive bleeding stopped within 2 to 5 days in all patients. The haemoglobin level and renal function subsequently stabilised. There were no side effects or thromboembolic events. In this case series, the largest prospective study so far published and the only one including different degrees of renal function, tranexamic acid is confirmed as a promising tool for treating haematuria due to intracystic bleeding in ADPKD. In summary, tranexamic acid can be used safely in ADPKD patients with chronic renal impairment or preserved renal function to treat severe haematuria poorly responsive to conventional therapy. Tranexamic acid can be administered orally or IV; and dose adjustment for renal impairment is important. Tranexamic acid therapy may preserve renal function in ADPKD directly, by stopping haematuria episodes, or indirectly, by preventing embolisation and/or nephrectomy. The major

  10. Renal volume and cardiovascular risk assessment in normotensive autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sans, Laia; Pascual, Julio; Radosevic, Aleksandar; Quintian, Claudia; Ble, Mireia; Molina, Lluís; Mojal, Sergi; Ballarin, José A.; Torra, Roser; Fernández-Llama, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular disease, closely related to an early appearance of hypertension, is the most common mortality cause among autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients (ADPKD). The development of hypertension is related to an increase in renal volume. Whether the increasing in the renal volume before the onset of hypertension leads to a major cardiovascular risk in ADPKD patients remains unknown. Observational and cross-sectional study of 62 normotensive ADPKD patients with normal renal function and a group of 28 healthy controls. Renal volume, blood pressure, and renal (urinary albumin excretion), blood vessels (carotid intima media thickness and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity), and cardiac (left ventricular mass index and diastolic dysfunction parameters) asymptomatic organ damage were determined and were considered as continuous variables. Correlations between renal volume and the other parameters were studied in the ADPKD population, and results were compared with the control group. Blood pressure values and asymptomatic organ damage were used to assess the cardiovascular risk according to renal volume tertiles. Even though in the normotensive range, ADPKD patients show higher blood pressure and major asymptomatic organ damage than healthy controls. Asymptomatic organ damage is not only related to blood pressure level but also to renal volume. Multivariate regression analysis shows that microalbuminuria is only associated with height adjusted renal volume (htTKV). An htTKV above 480 mL/m represents a 10 times higher prevalence of microalbuminuria (4.8% vs 50%, P renal volume group (htTKV > 336 mL/m) show higher urinary albumin excretion, but the 3rd tertile htTKV (htTKV > 469 mL/m) group shows the worst cardiovascular risk profile. Normotensive ADPKD patients show in the early stages of the disease with slight increase in renal volume, higher cardiovascular risk than healthy controls. An htTKV above 468 mL/m is associated

  11. Bethlem myopathy: An autosomal dominant myopathy with flexion contractures, keloids, and follicular hyperkeratosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aralikatte Onkarappa Saroja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy form a spectrum of collagenopathies caused by genetic mutations encoding for any of the three subunits of collagen VI. Bethlem phenotype is relatively benign and is characterized by proximal dominant myopathy, keloids, contractures, distal hyperextensibility, and follicular hyperkeratosis. Three patients from a single family were diagnosed to have Bethlem myopathy based on European Neuromuscular Centre Bethlem Consortium criteria. Affected father and his both sons had slowly progressive proximal dominant weakness and recurrent falls from the first decade. Both children aged 18 and 20 years were ambulant at presentation. All had flexion contractures, keloids, and follicular hyperkeratosis without muscle hypertrophy. Creatinine kinase was mildly elevated and electromyography revealed myopathic features. Muscle imaging revealed severe involvement of glutei and vasti with "central shadow" in rectus femoris. Muscle biopsy in the father showed dystrophic changes with normal immmunostaining for collagen VI, sarcoglycans, and dysferlin.

  12. Post transplant urinary tract infection in Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease a perpetual diagnostic dilema - 18-fluorodeoxyglucose - Positron emission computerized tomography - A valuable tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainaresh, VV; Jain, SH; Patel, HV; Shah, PR; Vanikar, AV; Trivedi, HL

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection contracted by renal allograft recipients. In patients of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), cyst infection presents a complex diagnostic and therapeutic challenge especially in the post transplant period. Accurate diagnosis forms the cornerstone in salvaging the graft from potentially catastrophic outcome. We describe a case of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XPN) in the native kidney in a patient of post transplant ADPKD which presented as frequently relapsing UTI with graft dysfunction where in accurate diagnosis was made possible with the aid of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) - Positron emission computerized tomography (PET/CT)

  13. Cognitive Decline in a Colombian Kindred With Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Acevedo, Daniel C.; Lopera, Francisco; Henao, Eliana; Tirado, Victoria; Muñoz, Claudia; Giraldo, Margarita; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I.; Reiman, Eric M.; Tariot, Pierre N.; Langbaum, Jessica B.; Quiroz, Yakeel T.; Jaimes, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Data from an autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) kindred were used to track the longitudinal trajectory of cognitive decline associated with preclinical ADAD and explore factors that may modify the rate of cognitive decline. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the onset and rate of cognitive decline during preclinical ADAD and the effect of socioeconomic, vascular, and genetic factors on the cognitive decline. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We performed a retrospective cohort study from January 1, 1995, through June 31, 2012, of individuals from Antioquia, Colombia, who tested positive for the ADAD-associated PSEN1 E280A mutation. Data analysis was performed from August 20, 2014, through November 30, 2015. A mixed-effects model was used to estimate annual rates of change in cognitive test scores and to mark the onset of cognitive decline. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Memory, language, praxis, and total scores from the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer Disease test battery. Chronologic age was used as a time scale in the models. We explore the effects of sex; educational level; socioeconomic status; residence area; occupation type; marital status; history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia; tobacco and alcohol use; and APOE ε4 on the rates of cognitive decline. RESULTS A total of 493 carriers met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. A total of 256 carriers had 2 or more assessments. At the time of the initial assessment, participants had a mean (SD) age of 33.4 (11.7) years and a mean (SD) educational level of 7.2 (4.2) years. They were predominantly female (270 [54.8%]), married (293 [59.4%]), and of low socioeconomic status (322 [65.3%]). Word list recall scores provided the earliest indicator of preclinical cognitive decline at 32 years of age, 12 and 17 years before the kindred’s respective median ages at mild cognitive impairment and dementia onset. After the change point, carriers had a statistically significant

  14. Rationale and design of the RESOLVE trial: lanreotide as a volume reducing treatment for polycystic livers in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gevers, T.J.G.; Chrispijn, M.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A large proportion of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) suffers from polycystic liver disease. Symptoms arise when liver volume increases. The somatostatin analogue lanreotide has proven to reduce liver volume in patients with polycystic liver disease.

  15. Rationale and Design of the TEMPO (Tolvaptan Efficacy and Safety in Management of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease and Its Outcomes) 3-4 Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres, Vicente E.; Meijer, Esther; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Chapman, Arlene B.; Devuyst, Olivier; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Grantham, Jared J.; Higashihara, Eiji; Perrone, Ronald D.; Krasa, Holly B.; Ouyang, John J.; Czerwiec, Frank S.

    Background: Current management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is focused on treating disease complications, not on slowing cyst development or preventing progression to kidney failure. Tolvaptan, a selective vasopressin V2 (vasopressin 2) receptor antagonist, has been proved

  16. Type II autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (Albers-Schönberg disease): clinical and radiological manifestations in 42 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénichou, O D; Laredo, J D; de Vernejoul, M C

    2000-01-01

    Type II autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO II, Albers-Schonberg disease) is a genetic condition characterized by generalized osteosclerosis predominating in some skeletal sites such as the spine and pelvis. ADO II is rare, and most available clinical descriptions are based on small numbers of patients. We report the clinical and radiological manifestations in 42 ADO II patients. To our knowledge, this is the largest series reported so far. Our inclusion criterion was presence on radiographs of the spine of vertebral endplate thickening, producing the classic sandwich vertebra appearance. We found various patterns of sandwich vertebra, of which we provide a description to assist physicians in diagnosing ADO II. The classic bone-within-bone appearance was present in most but not all skeletal sites. The radiological penetrance of the disease was high (90%) and increased after 20 years of age. As many as 81% of our patients experienced clinical manifestations. Fractures were common (78% of patients) and healed slowly. Hip osteoarthritis developed in 27% of patients and required arthroplasty in 9 of the 16 affected hips. Nonmandibular osteomyelitis occurred in 4 cases (11%). Twenty-four percent of patients had thoracic or lumbar scoliosis. Orthopedic surgery was performed in 52.8% of patients, of whom half had at least three surgical procedures for internal fracture fixation, arthroplasty, limb deformity correction, or treatment of surgical complications. There was a high rate of surgical complications including nonunion, infection, prosthesis loosening, and intraoperative fractures. Nearly two-thirds of patients (64%) had stomatologic manifestations, including mandibular osteomyelitis in 4 patients (11%). Cranial nerve involvement responsible for hearing loss, bilateral optic atrophy, and/or facial palsy was present in 14 patients but was clearly attributable to ADO II in only 6 cases (16%). This large series sheds new light on several aspects of ADO II, most

  17. Novel BICD2 mutation in a Japanese family with autosomal dominant lower extremity-predominant spinal muscular atrophy-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Mieko; Morisada, Naoya; Toyoshima, Daisaku; Yoshimura, Hajime; Nishio, Hisahide; Iijima, Kazumoto; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Tomoko; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2018-04-01

    The most common form of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a recessive disorder caused by SMN1 mutations in 5q13, whereas the genetic etiologies of non-5q SMA are very heterogenous and largely remain to be elucidated. We present a father and son with atrophy and weakness of the lower leg muscles since infancy. Genetic studies in this family revealed a novel BICD2 mutation causing autosomal dominant lower extremity-predominant SMA type 2. The proband was the father, aged 30, and the son was aged 3. Both of them were born uneventfully to nonconsanguineous parents. While the father first walked at the age of 19 months, the son was unable to walk at age 3 years. In both, knee and ankle reflexes were absent and sensation was intact. Serum creatine kinase levels were normal. The son showed congenital arthrogryposis and underwent orthopedic corrections for talipes calcaneovalgus. Investigation of the father at the age of 5 years revealed normal results on nerve conduction studies and sural nerve biopsy. Electromyography showed chronic neurogenic change, and muscle biopsy showed features suggestive of denervation. The father was diagnosed clinically with a sporadic distal SMA. Follow-up studies showed very slow progression. Next-generation and Sanger sequencing revealed a deleterious mutation in BICD2: c.1667A>G, p.Tyr556Cys, in this family. BICD2 is a cytoplasmic conserved motor-adaptor protein involved in anterograde and retrograde transport along the microtubules. Next-generation sequencing will further clarify the genetic basis of non-5q SMA. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Application of Next-Generation Sequencing for Mutation Detection in Autosomal-Dominant Hereditary Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürtler, Nicolas; Röthlisberger, Benno; Ludin, Katja; Schlegel, Christoph; Lalwani, Anil K

    2017-07-01

    Identification of the causative mutation using next-generation sequencing in autosomal-dominant hereditary hearing impairment, as mutation analysis in hereditary hearing impairment by classic genetic methods, is hindered by the high heterogeneity of the disease. Two Swiss families with autosomal-dominant hereditary hearing impairment. Amplified DNA libraries for next-generation sequencing were constructed from extracted genomic DNA, derived from peripheral blood, and enriched by a custom-made sequence capture library. Validated, pooled libraries were sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq instrument, 300 cycles and paired-end sequencing. Technical data analysis was performed with SeqMonk, variant analysis with GeneTalk or VariantStudio. The detection of mutations in genes related to hearing loss by next-generation sequencing was subsequently confirmed using specific polymerase-chain-reaction and Sanger sequencing. Mutation detection in hearing-loss-related genes. The first family harbored the mutation c.5383+5delGTGA in the TECTA-gene. In the second family, a novel mutation c.2614-2625delCATGGCGCCGTG in the WFS1-gene and a second mutation TCOF1-c.1028G>A were identified. Next-generation sequencing successfully identified the causative mutation in families with autosomal-dominant hereditary hearing impairment. The results helped to clarify the pathogenic role of a known mutation and led to the detection of a novel one. NGS represents a feasible approach with great potential future in the diagnostics of hereditary hearing impairment, even in smaller labs.

  19. DVL1 frameshift mutations clustering in the penultimate exon cause autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Janson; Mazzeu, Juliana F; Hoischen, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    -canonical signaling gene WNT5A underlie a subset of autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome (DRS) cases, but most individuals with DRS remain without a molecular diagnosis. We performed whole-exome sequencing in four unrelated DRS-affected individuals without coding mutations in WNT5A and found heterozygous DVL1 exon 14...... in our study suggest that truncation of the C-terminal domain of DVL1, a protein hypothesized to have a downstream role in the Wnt-5a non-canonical pathway, is a common cause of DRS....

  20. Familial ossification of the stylohyoid ligament in a three generation family--a new clinical entity displaying autosomal dominant inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, P J; Morrison, R J; McKinstry, C S

    2012-04-01

    Ossification of the stylohyoid ligament is very common in the Caucasian population. More than 9000 descriptions of apparently isolated case reports on PubMed have been cited over the last 20 years, often associated with an incidental finding on imaging after neck trauma. No cases of familial ossification have been described. We document a family with several affected members, each with an ossified stylohyoid ligament, confirming that ossification may be hereditary in some families and is most likely due to an autosomal dominant gene.

  1. Mutation detection in autosomal dominant Hirschsprung disease: SSCP analysis of the RET proto-oncogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angrist, M.; Bolk, S.; Chakravarti, A. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or congenital aganglionic megacolon, is the most common cause of congenital bowel obstruction, with an incidence of 1 in 5000. Recently, linkage of an incompletely penetrant, dominant form of HSCR to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 10 was reported, followed by identification of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in HSCR patients. RET mutations have also been reported in both sporadic and familial forms of three neuroendrocrine tumor syndromes. Unlike the clustered RET mutations observed in these syndromes, the 18 reported HSCR mutations are distributed throughout the extracellular and tryosine kinase domains of RET. In an effort to determine the frequency of RET mutations in HSCR and correlate genotype with phenotype, we have begun to screen for mutations among 80 HSCR probands representing a wide range of phenotypes and pedigree structures. Non-isotopic single strand conformation of polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was carried out using the Pharmacia PhastSystem{trademark}. Initial screening of exons 2 through 6 detected variants in 11 patients not seen in 24 controls. One additional band shift in exon 6 has been observed in both patients and controls. Preliminary sequence analysis has revealed two putative familial mutations in exon 2: a single base pair deletion (49Pro del C 296) and a point mutation that leads to a conservative amino acid substitution (93Gly{r_arrow}Ser). These results suggest that HSCR may be associated with a range of alterations in the coding sequence of the RET extracellular domain. Additional mutations will be described.

  2. The effect of piracetam on ataxia: clinical observations in a group of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince Gunal, D; Agan, K; Afsar, N; Borucu, D; Us, O

    2008-04-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias are clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders. There is no known treatment to prevent neuronal cell death in these disorders. Current treatment is purely symptomatic; ataxia is one of the most disabling symptoms and represents the main therapeutic challenge. A previous case report suggesting benefit from administration of high dose piracetam inspired the present study of the efficacy of this agent in patients with cerebellar ataxia. Piracetam is a low molecular weight derivative of gamma-aminobutyric acid. Although little is known of its mode of action, its efficacy has been documented in a wide range of clinical indications, such as cognitive disorders, dementia, vertigo and dyslexia, as well as cortical myoclonus. The present report investigated the role of high dose piracetam in patients with cerebellar ataxia. Eight patients with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia were given intravenous piracetam 60 g/day by a structured protocol for 14 days. The baseline and end-of-the study evaluations were based on the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale. Statistical analysis demonstrated a significant improvement in the patients' total score (P = 0.018) and a subscale analysis showed statistical significance for only the posture and gait disturbances item (P = 0.018). This study is providing good clinical observation in favour of high dose piracetam infusion to reduce the disability of the patients by improving their gait ataxia.

  3. Renal hemodynamic effects of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zand, Ladan; Torres, Vicente E; Larson, Timothy S; King, Bernard F; Sethi, Sanjeev; Bergstralh, Eric J; Angioi, Andrea; Fervenza, Fernando C

    2016-08-01

    To determine the effect of statins on renal hemodynamics in normal volunteers and those with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease either with mild or moderate renal dysfunction. Thirty-two study subjects were enrolled in this study: 11 normal volunteers, 11 study subjects with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and mild kidney disease and 10 study subjects with ADPKD and moderate kidney disease. Subjects in each group received simvastatin 40 mg once daily for a period of 4 weeks. Renal blood flow was measured based on para-amino-hippurate (PAH) clearance and with the use of a magnetic resonance (MR) scanner at the beginning and following 4 weeks of therapy with statins. At the end of the study, except for the lipid profile, which was significantly lower in all groups, other laboratory results showed no change. Four weeks of therapy with simvastatin resulted in no change in serum creatinine, 24-h urinary protein, sodium, iothalamate clearance, PAH clearance or renal blood flow as measured by MRI or based on PAH clearance. Four weeks of therapy with simvastatin did not change renal blood flow in the study subjects with ADPKD with mild-to-moderate renal dysfunction or in healthy volunteers. NCT02511418. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  4. Autosomal dominant HMSN with proximal involvement: new Brazilian cases HMSN autossômica dominante com envolvimento proximal: novos casos brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Borges Patroclo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We report four Brazilian siblings with Autosomal Dominant Hereditary Motor Sensory Neuropathy with Proximal Dominant Involvement (HMSN-P, a rare form of HMSN, that was characterized by proximal dominant muscle weakness and atrophy onset after the age of 30 years, fasciculation, arreflexia and sensory disturbances with autosomal dominant inheritance. Electrophysiological study and sural nerve biopsy were in the accordance with axonal sensory motor polyneuropathy and laboratorial analysis disclosed serum lipids and muscle enzymes abnormalities. Our report is the first done by a group outside Japan, where the disease initially seemed to be restricted and stressed the phenotypic variability from the original report.Relatamos os casos de quatro irmãos brasileiros com Neuropatia Sensitivo Motora Hereditária com Envolvimento Proximal Dominante (HMSN-P, uma forma rara de HMSN caracterizada por fraqueza muscular de predomínio proximal e atrofia de instalação após os 30 anos, fasciculações, arreflexia, distúrbios sensitivos e padrão de herança autossômica dominante. Os estudos eletrofisiológicos e de biópsia do nervo sural confirmaram o diagnóstico de polineuropatia sensitivo-motora com padrão lesional axonal. Laboratorialmente foram constatadas anormalidades séricas no metabolismo lipídico e enzimas musculares. Nosso relato é o primeiro feito por um grupo fora do Japão, onde a doença parecia restrita até então e ressalta a variabilidade fenotípica apresentada nos casos Brasileiros.

  5. Clinical and molecular analysis of the enamelin gene ENAM in Colombian families with autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Gutiérrez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we analyzed the phenotype, clinical characteristics and presence of mutations in the enamelin gene ENAM in five Colombian families with autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (ADAI. 22 individuals (15 affected and seven unaffected belonging to five Colombian families with ADAI and eight individuals (three affected and five unaffected belonging to three Colombian families with autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta (ARAI that served as controls for molecular alterations and inheritance patterns were studied. Clinical, radiographic and genetic evaluations were done in all individuals. Eight exons and three intron-exon boundaries were sequenced for mutation analysis. Two of the five families with ADAI had the hypoplasic phenotype, two had the hypocalcified phenotype and one had the hypomaturative phenotype. Anterior open bite and mandibular retrognathism were the most frequent skeletal abnormalities in the families with ADAI. No mutations were found. These findings suggest that ADAI in these Colombian families was unrelated to previously described mutations in the ENAM gene. These results also indicate that other regions not included in this investigation, such as the promoter region, introns and other genes should be considered as potential ADAI candidates.

  6. The French series of autosomal dominant early onset Alzheimer's disease cases: mutation spectrum and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallon, David; Rousseau, Stéphane; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne; Quillard-Muraine, Muriel; Guyant-Maréchal, Lucie; Martinaud, Olivier; Pariente, Jérémie; Puel, Michèle; Rollin-Sillaire, Adeline; Pasquier, Florence; Le Ber, Isabelle; Sarazin, Marie; Croisile, Bernard; Boutoleau-Bretonnière, Claire; Thomas-Antérion, Catherine; Paquet, Claire; Moreaud, Olivier; Gabelle, Audrey; Sellal, François; Sauvée, Mathilde; Laquerrière, Annie; Duyckaerts, Charles; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Lannes, Béatrice; Frebourg, Thierry; Hannequin, Didier; Campion, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    We describe 56 novel autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease (ADEOAD) families with PSEN1, PSEN2, and AβPP mutations or duplications, raising the total of families with mutations on known genes to 111 (74 PSEN1, 8 PSEN2, 16 AβPP, and 13 AβPP duplications) in the French series. In 33 additional families (23% of the series), the genetic determinism remained uncharacterized after this screening. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker levels were obtained for patients of 58 families (42 with known mutations and 16 without genetic characterization). CSF biomarkers profile was consistent with an AD diagnosis in 90% of families carrying mutations on known genes. In families without mutation, CSF biomarkers were consistent with AD diagnosis in 14/16 cases. Overall, these results support further genetic heterogeneity in the determinism of ADEOAD and suggest that other major genes remain to be characterized.

  7. Aromatase excess syndrome: a rare autosomal dominant disorder leading to pre- or peri-pubertal onset gynecomastia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Maki; Miyado, Mami; Nagasaki, Keisuke; Shozu, Makio; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2014-03-01

    Overexpression of CYP19A1 encoding aromatase results in a rare genetic disorder referred to as aromatase excess syndrome (AEXS). Male patients with AEXS manifest pre- or peri-pubertal onset gynecomastia, gonadotropin deficiency, and advanced bone age, while female patients are mostly asymptomatic. To date, 30 male patients with molecularly confirmed AEXS have been reported. A total of 12 types of submicroscopic rearrangements, i.e., two simple duplications, four simple deletions, two simple inversions, and four complex rearrangements, have been implicated in AEXS. Clinical severity of AEXS primarily depends on the types of the rearrangements. AEXS appears to account for a small number of cases of pre- or peri-pubertal onset gynecomastia, and should be suspected particularly when gynecomastia is associated with an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, characteristic hormone abnormalities and/or advanced bone age. Treatment with an aromatase inhibitor appears to benefit patients with AEXS, although long-term safety of this class of drugs remains unknown.

  8. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: a potential mistake in the interpretation of radioiodine whole-body scintigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Kalhor, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available There are a few case reports of renal cysts demonstrating radioiodine uptake on scintigraphy. In this case, we report a 49-year-old man who had undergone total thyroidectomy and had been treated with radioiodine. After conventional levothyroxine withdrawal, the patient underwent thyroid remnant ablation by oral administration of 125 mci 131I. Seven days later, post-therapy whole-body scan demonstrated thyroid remnant tissue and bilaterally multifocal radioiodine uptake in the upper abdomen. By ultrasonography and abdominal computed tomography scan, the iodine uptake was proven to be due to the accumulation of 131I in bilateral polycystic kidney disease. Keywords: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD, Whole-body scintigraphy, Iodine-131

  9. Autosomal dominant mesomandibular fibro-osseous dysplasia: a self-resolving inherited fibro-osseous lesion of the jaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutlas, Ioannis G; Forsman, Cynthia L; Kyrkanides, Stephanos; Oetting, William S; Petryk, Anna

    2012-01-01

    A hereditary congenital condition characterized by a fibro-osseous lesion sharing some features with fibrous dysplasia and affecting the middle aspect of the mandible is presented. The condition was initially described as congenital monostotic fibrous dysplasia in two siblings, a male and a female. However, there is sufficient evidence that the disorder is autosomal dominant since it has been encountered in two of four children, both males, of the female propositus and one child, a boy, of the male propositus. All patients presented at birth or right after birth with enlargement of the middle part of the mandible. Radiographs from affected individuals have shown mesomandibular enlargement with irregular trabeculation akin of "ground-glass" appearance. Histologically, samples from all patients revealed woven bone proliferation in a cellular fibroblastic stroma. Interestingly, the originally described siblings, now in their 30s, have no evidence of jaw lesions either radiographically or clinically, thus indicating that the condition is self-limiting or self-resolving. An autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with apparent male predilection is favored. The molecular basis of this condition is currently unknown. However, the location of the lesions in the middle aspect of the mandible suggests dysregulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling since BMPs regulate mandibular morphogenesis in utero, particularly in the medial region as well as postnatal bone remodeling. Immunohistochemical evaluation for a BMP-binding protein Twisted Gastrulation (TWSG1) revealed mosaic pattern of staining, with some cells, including osteoclasts, strongly stained and others exhibiting faint or no staining, thus supporting active regulation of BMP signaling within the lesion. Future investigations will determine if dysregulation of BMP signaling plays a causative role or rather reflects secondary activation of repair mechanisms and/or bone remodeling.

  10. Autosomal dominant mesomandibular fibro-osseous dysplasia: a self-resolving inherited fibro-osseous lesion of the jaws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis eKoutlas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A hereditary congenital condition characterized by a fibro-osseous lesion sharing some features with fibrous dysplasia and affecting the middle aspect of the mandible is presented. The condition was initially described as congenital monostotic fibrous dysplasia in two siblings, a male and a female. However, there is sufficient evidence that the disorder is autosomal dominant since it has been encountered in two of four children, both males, of the female propositus and one child, a boy, of the male propositus. All patients presented at birth or right after birth with enlargement of the middle part of the mandible. Radiographs from affected individuals have shown mesomandibular enlargement with irregular trabeculation akin of ground-glass appearance. Histologically, samples from all patients revealed woven bone proliferation in a cellular fibroblastic stroma. Interestingly, the originally described siblings, now in their 30s, have no evidence of jaw lesions either radiographically or clinically, thus indicating that the condition is self-limiting or self-resolving. An autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with apparent male predilection is favored. The molecular basis of this condition is currently unknown. However, the location of the lesions in the middle aspect of the mandible suggests dysregulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein signaling since BMPs regulate mandibular morphogenesis in utero, particularly in the medial region as well as postnatal bone remodeling. Immunohistochemical evaluation for a BMP-binding protein Twisted Gastrulation revealed mosaic pattern of staining, with some cells, including osteoclasts, strongly stained and others exhibiting faint or no staining, thus supporting active regulation of BMP signaling within the lesion. Future investigations will determine if dysregulation of BMP signaling plays a causative role or rather reflects secondary activation of repair mechanisms and/or bone remodeling.

  11. Grayscale ultrasound characteristics of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease severity – an adult and pediatric cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Strzelczyk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most common hereditary kidney condition is autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. It is the cause of 5–10% of end-stage renal disease. Its symptoms are generally late-onset, typically leading to development of hypertension and chronic kidney disease. Ultrasonography is the imaging modality of choice in its diagnosis and management. The aim of this study is to determine the diagnostic value of grayscale ultrasound imaging in evaluating disease severity. Materials and methods: The study group consisted of 81 patients diagnosed with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, 35 adults and 46 children. Inclusion criterion for adults was the presence of at least 10 large cysts in each kidney; children included into the study had developed at least 1 large renal cyst in each kidney. The number of large cysts, echogenicity of kidney parenchyma, cortical thickness and presentation of cortex/medulla boundary were assessed with the use of Logiq E9 apparatus (GE Healthcare, Netherlands. Patients were divided into groups, based on these morphological parameters. Kidney function was assessed according to serum creatinine concentration and creatinine clearance. Statistical analysis was performed, with p-value lower than 0.05 considered as significant. Results: The number of cysts and the degree of parenchymal dysfunction were the determinants of creatinine level and creatinine clearance, with the second predictor proving stronger. Conclusions: We recommend that an ultrasound kidney examination in patients with polycystic kidney disease should include evaluating renal parenchyma and the number of cysts for better assessment of disease severity.

  12. Sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation in a dominantly inherited form of xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imray, F.P.; Relf, W.; Ramsay, R.G.; Kidson, C.; Hockey, A.

    1986-01-01

    An Australian family is described in which a mild form of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Studies of lymphoblastoid cells and fibroblasts from affected person demonstrated sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) light as judged by diminished clonogenicity and higher frequencies of UV induced chromosome aberrations compared to normal controls. After UV irradiation of dominant XP cells, replicative DNA synthesis was depressed to a greater extent than normal and the level of UV induced DNA repair synthesis was lower than that in normal cells. The level of sister chromatid exchanges and the numbers of 6-thioguanine resistant mutants induced by UV irradiation were equal to those found in normal controls. Although two subjects in the family had skin cancers, this dominant form of XP is not apparently associated with high risk, or large numbers of skin cancers in affected persons. (author)

  13. Atrofia óptica hereditaria autosómica dominante: A propósito de una familia Dominant autosomal hereditary optical atrophy: Apropos of a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Taboada Lugo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Entre las causas de pérdida insidiosa, bilateral y simétrica de la visión central se deben tener siempre presente las atrofias ópticas heredo degenerativas. La atrofia óptica hereditaria autosómica dominante es la forma más frecuente de atrofia óptica heredofamiliar simple o monosintomática. Se realizó la caracterización clínica de una familia con el diagnóstico de esta discapacidad visual.Among the causes of insidious, bilateral and symmetric loss of the central vision, the hereditary and degenerative optical atrophies should always be taken into account. The dominant autosomal hereditary optical atrophy is the most frequent form of simple or monosymptomatic hereditary family optical atrophy. The clinical characterization of a family with the diagnosis of this visual impairment was made.

  14. WHITE ANNULAR RETINAL DYSTROPHY WITH SEVERE GLAUCOMA: A New Autosomal Dominant Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morizot, Rodrigo; van Schooneveld, Mary J; Morizot, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    To report a family with a previously unreported characteristic retinal dystrophy and glaucoma. Seven family members were diagnosed with an atypical retinal dystrophy and open-angle glaucoma with rapid evolution. Ophthalmic examination, fluorescein angiography, color photography, optic coherence tomography, central visual-field examination, and ultrasonography were performed. Of the 7 patients, 3 had 360° of peripheral white retina and a broad white ring around the optic disc. In three others, it was not possible to observe the peripheral retina, but they also showed a white retinal ring around the optic disc. One patient showed posterior synechiae and iris neovascularization in one eye. The 37-year-old uncle of the proband had a probably related maculopathy. Five patients had severe glaucoma, and the youngest showed borderline intraocular pressure. The authors report a new dominant retinal dystrophy associated with open-angle glaucoma. The early onset and rapidly progressive glaucoma of the patients is atypical.

  15. A novel CRX mutation by whole-exome sequencing in an autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy pedigree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin-Kang Lu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To identify the disease-causing gene mutation in a Chinese pedigree with autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy (adCORD. METHODS: A southern Chinese adCORD pedigree including 9 affected individuals was studied. Whole-exome sequencing (WES, coupling the Agilent whole-exome capture system to the Illumina HiSeq 2000 DNA sequencing platform was used to search the specific gene mutation in 3 affected family members and 1 unaffected member. After a suggested variant was found through the data analysis, the putative mutation was validated by Sanger DNA sequencing of samples from all available family members. RESULTS: The results of both WES and Sanger sequencing revealed a novel nonsense mutation c.C766T (p.Q256X within exon 5 of CRX gene which was pathogenic for adCORD in this family. The mutation could affect photoreceptor-specific gene expression with a dominant-negative effect and resulted in loss of the OTX tail, thus the mutant protein occupies the CRX-binding site in target promoters without establishing an interaction and, consequently, may block transactivation. CONCLUSION: All modes of Mendelian inheritance in CORD have been observed, and genetic heterogeneity is a hallmark of CORD. Therefore, conventional genetic diagnosis of CORD would be time-consuming and labor-intensive. Our study indicated the robustness and cost-effectiveness of WES in the genetic diagnosis of CORD.

  16. A4 see-saw models and form dominance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, M-C; King, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the idea of Form Dominance in the (type I) see-saw mechanism, according to which a particular right-handed neutrino mass eigenstate is associated with a particular physical neutrino mass eigenstate, leading to a form diagonalizable effective neutrino mass matrix. Form Dominance, which allows an arbitrary neutrino mass spectrum, may be regarded as a generalization of Constrained Sequential Dominance which only allows strongly hierarchical neutrino masses. We consider alternative implementations of the see-saw mechanism in minimal A 4 see-saw models and show that such models satisfy Form Dominance, leading to neutrino mass sum rules which predict closely spaced neutrino masses with a normal or inverted neutrino mass ordering. To avoid the partial cancellations inherent in such models we propose Natural Form Dominance, in which a different flavon is associated with each physical neutrino mass eigenstate.

  17. Missense mutations of CACNA1A are a frequent cause of autosomal dominant nonprogressive congenital ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaglini, Lorena; Nardella, Marta; Bellacchio, Emanuele; D'Amico, Adele; Capuano, Alessandro; Frusciante, Roberto; Di Capua, Matteo; Cusmai, Raffaella; Barresi, Sabina; Morlino, Silvia; Fernández-Fernández, José M; Trivisano, Marina; Specchio, Nicola; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Vigevano, Federico; Bertini, Enrico; Zanni, Ginevra

    2017-05-01

    Mutations in the CACNA1A gene, encoding the pore-forming CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) channel α1A subunit, localized at presynaptic terminals of brain and cerebellar neurons, result in clinically variable neurological disorders including hemiplegic migraine (HM) and episodic or progressive adult-onset ataxia (EA2, SCA6). Most recently, CACNA1A mutations have been identified in patients with nonprogressive congenital ataxia (NPCA). We performed targeted resequencing of known genes involved in cerebellar dysfunction, in 48 patients with congenital or early onset ataxia associated with cerebellar and/or vermis atrophy. De novo missense mutations of CACNA1A were found in four patients (4/48, ∼8.3%). Three of them developed migraine before or after the onset of ataxia. Seizures were present in half of the cases. Our results expand the clinical and mutational spectrum of CACNA1A-related phenotype in childhood and suggest that CACNA1A screening should be implemented in this subgroup of ataxias. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Estimating glomerular filtration rate using the new CKD-EPI equation and other equations in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orskov, Bjarne; Borresen, Malene L; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No studies have compared the performance of equations for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), where the declining GFR typically is followed for many years or even decades. This was the purpose of the present...

  19. Induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus caused by a variant in the AVP gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toustrup, Lise Bols; Zhou, Yan; Kvistgaard, Helene

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI) is caused by variants in the arginine vasopressin (AVP) gene. Here we report the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a 42-year-old man carrying an adFNDI causing variant in exon 1 of the AVP gene using...

  20. Chronic Kidney Pain in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease : A Case Report of Successful Treatment by Catheter-Based Renal Denervation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casteleijn, Niek F.; de Jager, Rosa L.; Neeleman, M. Peer; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    Chronic pain is a common concern in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We report what to our knowledge is the first catheter-based renal denervation procedure in a patient with ADPKD resulting in successful management of chronic pain. The patient was a 43-year-old

  1. C-terminal truncations in human 3'-5' DNA exonuclease TREX1 cause autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richards, Anna; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Jen, Joanna C.; Kavanagh, David; Bertram, Paula; Spitzer, Dirk; Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Barilla-LaBarca, Maria-Louise; Terwindt, Gisela M.; Kasai, Yumi; McLellan, Mike; Grand, Mark Gilbert; Vanmolkot, Kaate R. J.; de Vries, Boukje; Wan, Jijun; Kane, Michael J.; Mamsa, Hafsa; Schäfer, Ruth; Stam, Anine H.; Haan, Joost; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Storimans, Caroline W.; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; Oosterhuis, Jendo A.; Gschwendter, Andreas; Dichgans, Martin; Kotschet, Katya E.; Hodgkinson, Suzanne; Hardy, Todd A.; Delatycki, Martin B.; Hajj-Ali, Rula A.; Kothari, Parul H.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Frants, Rune R.; Baloh, Robert W.; Ferrari, Michel D.; Atkinson, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy is a microvascular endotheliopathy with middle-age onset. In nine families, we identified heterozygous C-terminal frameshift mutations in TREX1, which encodes a 3'-5' exonuclease. These truncated proteins retain exonuclease

  2. Identification of mutations in the gene encoding lamins A/C in autosomal dominant limb girdle muscular dystrophy with atrioventricular conduction disturbances (LGMD1B)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muchir, A.; Bonne, G.; van der Kooi, A. J.; van Meegen, M.; Baas, F.; Bolhuis, P. A.; de Visser, M.; Schwartz, K.

    2000-01-01

    LGMD1B is an autosomal dominantly inherited, slowly progressive limb girdle muscular dystrophy, with age-related atrioventricular cardiac conduction disturbances and the absence of early contractures. The disease has been linked to chromosome 1q11-q21. Within this locus another muscular dystrophy,

  3. Effect of tolvaptan on renal handling of water and sodium, GFR and central hemodynamics in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease during inhibition of the nitric oxide system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therwani, Safa; Malmberg, My Emma Sofie; Rosenbaek, Jeppe Bakkestroem

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tolvaptan slows progression of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) by antagonizing the vasopressin-cAMP axis. Nitric oxide (NO) stimulates natriuresis and diuresis, but its role is unknown during tolvaptan treatment in ADPKD. Methods: Eighteen patients with ADPKD rece...

  4. Identification and functional analysis of GJA8 mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant perinuclear cataracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Su

    Full Text Available Congenital cataract is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of eye disorders that causes visual impairment and childhood blindness. The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic defect associated with autosomal dominant congenital perinuclear cataract in a Chinese family. A detailed family history and clinical data of the family were recorded, and candidate gene sequencing was performed to screen for mutation-causing disease in our study. Direct sequencing revealed a c.601G>A (p.E201K transversion in exon 2 of GJA8. This mutation co-segregated with all affected individuals in the family and was not found in unaffected family members or 100 unrelated controls. The function and mechanism of novel GJA8 point mutation E201K in Chinese patients were then investigated in this study. We found E201K aberrantly located in cytoplasm and prevented its location in the plasma membrane. Induction of E201K expression led to a decrease in cell growth and viability by MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Our study provides important evidence that GJA8 is a disease-causing gene for congenital cataract and that mutation of GJA8 has a potential causative effect.

  5. Autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features: a new LGI1 family including a phenocopy with cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Karl Martin; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Cohen, Rony; Appenzeller, Silke; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Rosenow, Felix; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor; Sheintuch, Liron; Veksler, Ronel; Friedman, Alon; Afawi, Zaid; Helbig, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    We report a new family with autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features (ADEAF) including focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) in the proband. We aim to identify the molecular cause in this family and clarify the relationship between FCD and ADEAF. A large Iranian Jewish family including 14 individuals with epileptic seizures was phenotyped including high-resolution 3-T MRI. We performed linkage analysis and exome sequencing. LGI1, KANK1 and RELN were Sanger sequenced. Seizure semiology of 11 individuals was consistent with ADEAF. The proband underwent surgery for right mesiotemporal FCD. 3-T MRIs in four individuals were unremarkable. Linkage analysis revealed peaks on chromosome 9p24 (LOD 2.43) and 10q22-25 (LOD 2.04). A novel heterozygous LGI1 mutation was identified in all affected individuals except for the proband indicating a phenocopy. Exome sequencing did not reveal variants within the chromosome 9p24 region. Closely located variants in KANK1 and a RELN variant did not segregate with the phenotype. We provide detailed description of the phenotypic spectrum within a large ADEAF family with a novel LGI1 mutation that was conspicuously absent in the proband with FCD, demonstrating that despite identical clinical symptoms, phenocopies in ADEAF families may exist. This family illustrates that rare epilepsy syndromes within a single family can have both genetic and structural etiologies.

  6. Long-term follow up of a boy with unilateral autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and contralateral renal agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzemień, Grażyna; Turczyn, Agnieszka; Pańczyk-Tomaszewska, Małgorzata; Jakimów-Kostrzewa, Aleksandra; Szmigielska, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    In patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) coexisting abnormalities of the urinary tract are considered rare. Only a few patients with ADPKD and congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract- renal agenesis, hypoplasia, aplasia, horseshoe kidney, ectopic multicystic dysplasic kidney, or subpelvic junction obstruction were reported. Renal agenesis occurs in approximately 1 in 1.500.000-3.000.000 patients with ADPKD. We report a boy with ADPKD and renal agenesis diagnosed at the age of 12 years. ADPKD was diagnosed in some other members of the family. Additionally to kidney changes, mitral valve prolapse was found on echocardiography. At the age of 18 years high normal blood pressure was recognized and laboratory tests demonstrated: serum creatinine 1.0 mg/dl, glomerular filtrate rate 97.9 ml/min/1.73m2 , isotopic creatinine clearance (Tc-99mDTPA) 99 ml/min/1.73m2 , normal urinalysis, no microalbuminuria. In children with positive family history of ADPKD, screening ultrasonography of the kidney performed at the request of the family, allows the early diagnosis of sporadic present abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract.

  7. An elastin gene mutation producing abnormal tropoelastin and abnormal elastic fibres in a patient with autosomal dominant cutis laxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassabehji, M; Metcalfe, K; Hurst, J; Ashcroft, G S; Kielty, C; Wilmot, C; Donnai, D; Read, A P; Jones, C J

    1998-06-01

    Elastin is the protein responsible for the characteristic elastic properties of many tissues including the skin, lungs and large blood vessels. Loss-of-function mutations in the elastin gene are known to cause the heart defect supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). We and others have identified deletions, nonsense mutations and splice site mutations in SVAS patients that abolish the function of one elastin gene. We have now identified an elastin mutation in a patient with a completely different phenotype, the rare autosomal dominant condition cutis laxa. A frameshift mutation in exon 32 of the elastin gene is predicted to replace 37 amino acids at the C-terminus of elastin by a novel sequence of 62 amino acids. mRNA and immunoprecipitation studies show that the mutant allele is expressed. Electron microscopy of skin sections shows abnormal branching and fragmentation in the amorphous elastin component, and immunocytochemistry shows reduced elastin deposition in the elastic fibres and fewer microfibrils in the dermis. These findings suggest that the mutant tropoelastin protein is synthesized, secreted and incorporated into the elastic matrix, where it alters the architecture of elastic fibres. Interference with cross-linking would reduce elastic recoil in affected tissues and explain the cutis laxa phenotype.

  8. Clinical and genetic description of a family with a high prevalence of autosomal dominant restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jessica E; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Lin, Siong-Chi; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Farrer, Matthew J

    2009-02-01

    To conduct clinical and molecular genetic analyses of the members of an extended family in Central Indiana with a high prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS). From February 1, 2006, through August 31, 2008, we collected data from members of this family, which is of English descent. Genealogical methods were used to expand the family tree, and family members were screened with an RLS questionnaire. Telephone interviews and personal examinations were performed at Mayo Clinic and during a field trip to Central Indiana. Blood samples were collected for molecular genetic analysis. A follow-up telephone interview was conducted 1 year later. The family tree spans 7 generations with 88 living members, 30 of whom meet the criteria for diagnosis of RLS established by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group. Three affected family members also have Parkinson disease or essential tremor. The mode of RLS inheritance is compatible with an autosomal dominant pattern. The affected family members do not exhibit linkage to the 5 known RLS loci or mutations in the RLS susceptibility genes MEIS1 and BTBD9. Of 88 members of this single extended family in Central Indiana, 30 were diagnosed as having RLS. Because our analysis shows that the disease is not linked to any of the known RLS loci or risk-associated genes, we postulate that members of this family may carry a gene mutation in a novel genetic locus.

  9. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: Is it Different from Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy in Normal Kidney?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vishwajeet; Sinha, Rahul Janak; Gupta, Dheeraj Kumar

    2013-08-01

    Nephrolithiasis has been reported in 20-28% of patients, of whom 50% are symptomatic for stone disease and 20% require definite urologic intervention. The management of nephrolithiasis includes oral alkali dissolution therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and surgical treatment. In such patients, percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) as a method of stone treatment has been reported in few cases with limited experience. The aim of this study is to present our experience of PNL in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and assessing the outcome results. From 2002 to 2011, 22 patients (26 renal units) suffering from ADPKD with stone were managed by PNL. Demographic characteristics, operative parameters and postoperative complications were recorded and analysed. The overall success rate of PNL was 82.1% and PNL with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for clinically significant residual fragments was 92.85% respectively. The hematuria required blood transfusion (n = 9), postoperative fever due to cyst infection (n = 4) and paralytic ileus (n = 3) were recorded. The PNL in ADPKD PNL is safe and effective but have more postoperative complications such as bleeding requiring transfusions, fever due to cyst infection and paralytic ileus.

  10. Germline mutations in ABL1 cause an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by congenital heart defects and skeletal malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Charng, Wu-Lin; Chen, Chun-An; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Shamsi, Aisha Al; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; McGuire, Marianne; Mew, Nicholas Ah; Arnold, Georgianne L.; Qu, Chunjing; Ding, Yan; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Xia, Fan; Plon, Sharon E.; Lupski, James R.; Schaaf, Christian P.; Yang, Yaping

    2017-01-01

    ABL1 is a proto-oncogene well known as part of the fusion gene BCR-ABL in the Philadelphia chromosome of leukemia cancer cells1. Inherited germline ABL1 changes have not been associated with genetic disorders. Here we report ABL1 germline variants co-segregating with an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by congenital heart disease, skeletal abnormalities, and failure to thrive. The variant c.734A>G (p.Tyr245Cys) was found as de novo or co-segregating with disease in five individuals (families 1-3). Additionally, a de novo c.1066G>A (p.Ala356Thr) variant was identified in the sixth individual (family 4). We overexpressed the mutant constructs in HEK 293T cells and observed increased tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting increased ABL1 kinase activities associated with both p.Tyr245Cys and p.Ala356Thr substitutions. Our clinical and laboratory findings, together with previously reported teratogenic effects of selective BCR-ABL inhibitors in humans2-5 and developmental defects in Abl1 knock-out mice6,7, suggest ABL1 plays an important role during organismal development. PMID:28288113

  11. A longitudinal study of a family with adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy: Clinical, autonomic and neuropsychological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlizzi, Rossana; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Zanigni, Stefano; Barletta, Giorgio; Capellari, Sabina; Guaraldi, Pietro; Donadio, Vincenzo; Cason, Ernesto; Contin, Manuela; Poda, Roberto; Tonon, Caterina; Sambati, Luisa; Gallassi, Roberto; Liguori, Rocco; Lodi, Raffaele; Cortelli, Pietro

    2016-02-01

    Adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) is a rare progressive neurological disorder caused by Lamin B1 duplication (LMNB1). Our aim was to investigate longitudinally the pattern of the autonomic dysfunction and the degree of neuropsychological involvement. Three related ADLD patients and one asymptomatic carrier of LMNB1 duplication underwent a standardized evaluation of autonomic nervous system, including cardiovascular reflexes, pharmacological testing, microneurography, skin biopsy, Metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy and a complete neuropsychological battery. An early neurogenic orthostatic hypotension was detected in all patients and confirmed by a low rise in noradrenaline levels on Tilt Test. However infusion of noradrenaline resulted in normal blood pressure rise as well as the infusion of clonidine. At the insulin tolerance test the increase in adrenaline resulted pathological in two out three patients. Microneurography failed to detect muscle sympathetic nerve activity bursts. Skin biopsy revealed a poor adrenergic innervation, while cardiac sympathetic nerves were normal. None of ADLD patients showed a global cognitive deficit but a selective impairment in the executive functions. Autonomic disorder in ADLD involves selectively the postganglionic sympathetic system including the sympatho-adrenal response. Cognitive involvement consisting in an early impairment of executive tasks that might precede brain MR abnormalities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Autosomal dominant restless legs syndrome maps to chromosome 20p13 (RLS-5) in a Dutch kindred.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sas, Antonetta M G; Di Fonzo, Alessio; Bakker, Stef L M; Simons, Erik J; Oostra, Ben A; Maat-Kievit, Anneke J; Boon, Agnita J W; Bonifati, Vincenzo

    2010-08-15

    Six chromosomal loci have been mapped for restless legs syndrome (RLS) through family-based linkage analysis (RLS-1 to RLS-6), but confirmation has met with limited success, and causative mutations have not yet been identified. We ascertained a large multigenerational Dutch family with RLS of early onset (average 18 years-old). The clinical study included a follow-up of 2 years. To map the underlying genetic defect, we performed a genome-wide scan for linkage using high-density SNP microarrays. A single, strong linkage peak was detected on chromosome 20p13, under an autosomal-dominant model, in the region of the RLS-5 locus (maximum multipoint LOD score 3.02). Haplotype analysis refined the RLS-5 critical region from 5.2 to 4.5 megabases. In conclusion, we provide the first confirmation of the RLS-5 locus, and we reduce its critical region. The identification of the underlying mutation might reveal an important susceptibility gene for this common movement disorder.

  13. Type II autosomal dominant osteopetrosis: radiological features in two families containing five members with asymptomatic and uncomplicated disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotiadou, Anastasia; Kiriakou, Vera; Tsitouridis, Ioannis [Papageorgiou Hospital, Radiology Department, Thessaloniki (Greece); Arvaniti, Maria [Genimatas Hospital, Radiology Department, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2009-10-15

    In this study we analysed the imaging patterns in two families containing five members with asymptomatic and uncomplicated autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO II), and we report new and uncommon radiological manifestations. These findings might be useful in the context of reducing the incidence of fractures and other orthopaedic complications. Diffuse pelvic sclerosis on radiographs was observed incidentally in two patients. Both cases were asymptomatic, and the patients had never suffered a fracture. The suggestion of ADO II was raised. A detailed medical history, an imaging survey, and a haematological study were obtained so that other rare causes of osteosclerosis could be ruled out. No genetic study was conducted. All their first-degree relatives were also examined. Bony sclerosis was observed in five patients, and the radiological findings were analysed. A not previously reported thickening of the skull base without cranial nerve palsy or optic nerve atrophy was revealed in all patients. Scoliosis was present in three of them. This has been reported previously only once in ADO II. No lower limb deformity was detected. This study provided information on the pattern of radiological features in familial asymptomatic ADO II. These data on new and rare imaging findings will increase the diagnostic awareness of physicians and will guide a thorough investigation of the entire family. This might result in a consequent decrease in the incidence of fractures and other orthopaedic complications. (orig.)

  14. The Value of Pre-Screening in the Alzheimer's Prevention Initiative (API) Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer's Disease Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Romenets, S; Giraldo-Chica, M; López, H; Piedrahita, F; Ramos, C; Acosta-Baena, N; Muñoz, C; Ospina, P; Tobón, C; Cho, W; Ward, M; Langbaum, J B; Tariot, P N; Reiman, E M; Lopera, F

    2018-01-01

    The Alzheimer's Prevention Initiative (API) Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer's Disease (ADAD) trial evaluates the anti-amyloid-β antibody crenezumab in cognitively unimpaired persons who, based on genetic background and age, are at high imminent risk of clinical progression, and provides a powerful test of the amyloid hypothesis. The Neurosciences Group of Antioquia implemented a pre-screening process with the goals of decreasing screen failures and identifying participants most likely to adhere to trial requirements of the API ADAD trial in cognitively unimpaired members of Presenilin1 E280A mutation kindreds. The pre-screening failure rate was 48.2%: the primary reason was expected inability to comply with the protocol, chiefly due to work requirements. More carriers compared to non-carriers, and more males compared to females, failed pre-screening. Carriers with illiteracy or learning/comprehension difficulties failed pre-screening more than non-carriers. With the Colombian API Registry and our prescreening efforts, we randomized 169 30-60 year-old cognitively unimpaired carriers and 83 non-carriers who agreed to participate in the trial for at least 60 months. Our findings suggest multiple benefits of implementing a pre-screening process for enrolling prevention trials in ADAD.

  15. Albuminuria and tolvaptan in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease: results of the TEMPO 3:4 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansevoort, Ron T; Meijer, Esther; Chapman, Arlene B; Czerwiec, Frank S; Devuyst, Olivier; Grantham, Jared J; Higashihara, Eiji; Krasa, Holly B; Ouyang, John; Perrone, Ronald D; Torres, Vicente E

    2016-11-01

    The TEMPO 3:4 Trial results suggested that tolvaptan had no effect compared with placebo on albuminuria in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients. However, the use of categorical 'albuminuria events' may have resulted in a loss of sensitivity to detect changes. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of tolvaptan on albuminuria as a continuous variable. Post hoc analysis of a 3-year prospective, blinded randomized controlled trial, including 1375 ADPKD patients. Albuminuria was measured in a spot morning urine sample prior to tolvaptan dosing and expressed as albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR). Baseline median (interquartile range) ACR was 3.2 (1.7-7.1) mg/mmol. Of note, 47.9% of ADPKD patients had normal, 48.7% moderately increased and 3.4% severely increased ACR. Subjects with higher baseline ACR had higher blood pressure and total kidney volume (TKV) and lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). During follow-up, higher baseline ACR was associated with more rapid eGFR loss (P albuminuria was associated with more eGFR loss. Tolvaptan decreased albuminuria compared with placebo, independent of blood pressure. Treatment efficacy of tolvaptan on changes in TKV and eGFR was more readily detected in patients with higher albuminuria. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  16. Insights into cellular and molecular basis for urinary tract infection in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chao; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Ye; Wallace, Darren P; Lopez-Soler, Reynold I; Higgins, Paul J; Zhang, Wenzheng

    2017-11-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a broad term referring to an infection of the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and/or urethra. Because of its prevalence, frequent recurrence, and rising resistance to antibiotics, UTI has become a challenge in clinical practice. Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common monogenic disorder of the kidney and is characterized by the growth of fluid-filled cysts in both kidneys. Progressive cystic enlargement, inflammation, and interstitial fibrosis result in nephron loss with subsequent decline in kidney function. ADPKD patients frequently develop UTI; however, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the high UTI incidence in ADPKD patients remain virtually unaddressed. Emerging evidence suggests that α-intercalated cells (α-ICs) of the collecting ducts function in the innate immune defense against UTI. α-ICs inhibit bacterial growth by acidifying urine and secreting neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) that chelates siderophore-containing iron. It is necessary to determine, therefore, if ADPKD patients with recurrent UTI have a reduced number and/or impaired function of α-ICs. Identification of the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms may lead to the development of novel strategies to reduce UTI in ADPKD. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Opposing effects of inhibitors of Aurora-A and EGFR in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD

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    Anna S Nikonova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aurora-A kinase (AURKA overexpression in numerous tumors induces aneuploidy, in part because of cytokinetic defects. Alisertib and other small-molecule inhibitors targeting AURKA are effective in some patients as monotherapies or combination therapies. EGFR pro-proliferative signaling activity is commonly elevated in cancer, and the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib is commonly used as a standard of care agent for cancer. An erlotinib/alisertib combination therapy is currently under assessment in clinical trials, following pre-clinical studies that indicated synergy of these drugs in cancer. We were interested in further exploring the activity of this drug combination. Beyond well-established functions for AURKA in mitotic progression, additional non-mitotic AURKA functions include control of ciliary stability and calcium signaling. Interestingly, alisertib exacerbates the disease phenotype in mouse models for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD, a common inherited syndrome induced by aberrant signaling from PKD1 and PKD2, cilia-localized proteins that have calcium channel activity. EGFR is also more active in ADPKD, making erlotinib also of potential interest in this disease setting. In this study, we have explored the interaction of alisertib and erlotinib in an ADPKD model. These experiments indicated erlotinib restrained cystogenesis, opposing alisertib action. Erlotinib also interacted with alisertib to regulate proliferative signaling proteins, albeit in a complicated manner. Results suggest a nuanced role of AURKA signaling in different pathogenic conditions and inform the clinical use of AURKA inhibitors in cancer patients with comorbidities.

  18. SDOCT Thickness Measurements of Various Retinal Layers in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy due to OPA1 Mutations

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    Andrea M. Schild

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To specify thickness values of various retinal layers on macular spectral domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SDOCT scans in patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA compared to healthy controls. Methods. SDOCT volume scans of 7 patients with ADOA (OPA-1 mutation and 14 healthy controls were quantitatively analyzed using manual grading software. Mean thickness values for the ETDRS grid subfields 5–8 were calculated for the spaces neurosensory retina, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL, ganglion cell layer (GCL, a combined space of inner plexiform layer/outer plexiform layer/inner nuclear layer (IPL+INL+OPL, and a combined space of outer nuclear layer/photoreceptor layers (ONL+PL. Results. ADOA patients showed statistically significant lower retinal thickness values than controls (. RNFL ( and GCL thicknesses ( were significantly lower in ADOA patients. There was no difference in IPL+INL+OPL and in ONL+PL thickness. Conclusion. Manual subanalysis of macular SDOCT volume scans allowed detailed subanalysis of various retinal layers. Not only RNFL but also GCL thicknesses are reduced in the macular area of ADOA patients whereas subjacent layers are not involved. Together with clinical findings, macular SDOCT helps to identify patients with suspicion for hereditary optic neuropathy before genetic analysis confirms the diagnosis.

  19. Clinical characterization of a novel calcium sensing receptor genetic alteration in a Greek patient with autosomal dominant hypocalcemia type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Anna; Gole, Evangelia; Melachroinou, Katerina; Trangas, Theoni; Bountouvi, Evaggelia; Papadimitriou, Anastasios

    2017-04-01

    Autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH) is a rare familial or sporadic syndrome associated with activating mutations in the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) gene. The aim of this study was to assess the functional significance of a novel CaSR mutation and, moreover, to present the clinical characteristics and the bone mineral density (BMD) progression from early childhood to late puberty in a patient with ADH. Genetic analysis of the CaSR gene was performed in a patient who presented in the neonatal period with hypocalcemic seizures and biochemical features of ADH. The functional impact of the novel mutation identified was assessed in cultured HEK 293T cells, transfected with either the wild type (WT) or mutant CaSR, by evaluating intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) influx after stimulation with extracellular calcium (Ca2+). Several BMD measurements were performed during the patient's follow-up until late puberty. A novel CaSR mutation (p.L123S) was identified, which, as demonstrated by functional analysis, renders CaSR more sensitive to extracellular changes of Ca2+ compared with the WT, although the difference is not statistically significant. BMD measurements, from early childhood to late puberty, revealed high normal to elevated BMD. We present the first Greek patient, to our knowledge, with sporadic ADH due to a novel gain-of-function mutation of the CaSR gene.

  20. Effects of Lacunar Infarctions on Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Cerebral Autosomal-Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy

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    Choi, Jay Chol; Kang, Sa-Yoon; Kang, Ji-Hoon; Na, Hae Ri; Park, Ji-Kang

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an inherited microangiopathy caused by mutations in the Notch3 gene. Although previous studies have shown an association between lacunar infarction and cognitive impairment, the relationship between MRI parameters and cognition remains unclear. In this study we investigated the influence of MRI parameters on cognitive impairment in CADASIL. Methods We applied a prospective protocol to 40 patients. MRI analysis included the normalized volume of white-matter hyperintensities (nWMHs), number of lacunes, and number of cerebral microbleeds. Cognition was assessed with the aid of psychometric tests [Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognition (ADAS-cog), Trail-Making Test, and Stroop interference (Stroop IF)]. Results A multivariate regression analysis revealed that the total number of lacunes influenced the performance in the MMSE, ADAS-cog, and Stroop IF, while nWMHs had a strong univariate association with ADAS-cog and Stroop IF scores. However, this association disappeared in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that the number of lacunes is the main predictive factor of cognitive impairment in CADASIL. PMID:22259617

  1. Type II autosomal dominant osteopetrosis: radiological features in two families containing five members with asymptomatic and uncomplicated disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotiadou, Anastasia; Kiriakou, Vera; Tsitouridis, Ioannis; Arvaniti, Maria

    2009-01-01

    In this study we analysed the imaging patterns in two families containing five members with asymptomatic and uncomplicated autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO II), and we report new and uncommon radiological manifestations. These findings might be useful in the context of reducing the incidence of fractures and other orthopaedic complications. Diffuse pelvic sclerosis on radiographs was observed incidentally in two patients. Both cases were asymptomatic, and the patients had never suffered a fracture. The suggestion of ADO II was raised. A detailed medical history, an imaging survey, and a haematological study were obtained so that other rare causes of osteosclerosis could be ruled out. No genetic study was conducted. All their first-degree relatives were also examined. Bony sclerosis was observed in five patients, and the radiological findings were analysed. A not previously reported thickening of the skull base without cranial nerve palsy or optic nerve atrophy was revealed in all patients. Scoliosis was present in three of them. This has been reported previously only once in ADO II. No lower limb deformity was detected. This study provided information on the pattern of radiological features in familial asymptomatic ADO II. These data on new and rare imaging findings will increase the diagnostic awareness of physicians and will guide a thorough investigation of the entire family. This might result in a consequent decrease in the incidence of fractures and other orthopaedic complications. (orig.)

  2. High-Resolution En Face Images of Microcystic Macular Edema in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy

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    Kiyoko Gocho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of microcystic macular edema (MME determined from the en face images obtained by an adaptive optics (AO fundus camera in patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA and to try to determine the mechanisms underlying the degeneration of the inner retinal cells and RNFL by using the advantage of AO. Six patients from 4 families with ADOA underwent detailed ophthalmic examinations including spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. Mutational screening of all coding and flanking intron sequences of the OPA1 gene was performed by DNA sequencing. SD-OCT showed a severe reduction in the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness in all patients. A new splicing defect and two new frameshift mutations with premature termination of the Opa1 protein were identified in three families. A reported nonsense mutation was identified in one family. SD-OCT of one patient showed MME in the inner nuclear layer (INL of the retina. AO images showed microcysts in the en face images of the INL. Our data indicate that AO is a useful method to identify MME in neurodegenerative diseases and may also help determine the mechanisms underlying the degeneration of the inner retinal cells and RNFL.

  3. Automatic Segmentation of Kidneys using Deep Learning for Total Kidney Volume Quantification in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kanishka; Rupprecht, Christian; Caroli, Anna; Aparicio, Maria Carolina; Remuzzi, Andrea; Baust, Maximilian; Navab, Nassir

    2017-05-17

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited disorder of the kidneys. It is characterized by enlargement of the kidneys caused by progressive development of renal cysts, and thus assessment of total kidney volume (TKV) is crucial for studying disease progression in ADPKD. However, automatic segmentation of polycystic kidneys is a challenging task due to severe alteration in the morphology caused by non-uniform cyst formation and presence of adjacent liver cysts. In this study, an automated segmentation method based on deep learning has been proposed for TKV computation on computed tomography (CT) dataset of ADPKD patients exhibiting mild to moderate or severe renal insufficiency. The proposed method has been trained (n = 165) and tested (n = 79) on a wide range of TKV (321.2-14,670.7 mL) achieving an overall mean Dice Similarity Coefficient of 0.86 ± 0.07 (mean ± SD) between automated and manual segmentations from clinical experts and a mean correlation coefficient (ρ) of 0.98 (p < 0.001) for segmented kidney volume measurements in the entire test set. Our method facilitates fast and reproducible measurements of kidney volumes in agreement with manual segmentations from clinical experts.

  4. [Periodontal disease as an early clinical sign of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Maldonado, E; Aguirre-Acevedo, D C; García-Ospina, G P; Lopera, F

    The clinical signs of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) are expressed mainly in the nervous system and recently reports also situate them in the retina. To determine the prevalence and risk of periodontal disease in subjects from families with a history of CADASIL mutation in the department of Antioquia, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted, with subjects being assigned to the CADASIL group or a control group according to genotyping for the R1031C and C455R mutation in Notch3. Each participant voluntarily signed the informed consent document and was submitted to neurological, neuropsychological and periodontal evaluation. No significant differences were found between the two groups according to age, sex, schooling, tobacco smoking, cognitive status, functional status and the presence of natural teeth. The frequency of soft plaque, gingivitis and periodontal disease was significantly higher in the group of carriers of the CADASIL mutation than in the control group. The CADASIL group had six times more risk of having soft plaque above or equal to 20% than the control group. Prevalence of gingivitis above or equal to 10% was observed in all the members of the CADASIL group. The people in the CADASIL group had five times more risk of suffering periodontal disease than the control group. Carriers of the CADASIL mutation displayed a higher prevalence and risk of periodontal disease.

  5. Mutations in POGLUT1, encoding protein O-glucosyltransferase 1, cause autosomal-dominant Dowling-Degos disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basmanav, F Buket; Oprisoreanu, Ana-Maria; Pasternack, Sandra M; Thiele, Holger; Fritz, Günter; Wenzel, Jörg; Größer, Leopold; Wehner, Maria; Wolf, Sabrina; Fagerberg, Christina; Bygum, Anette; Altmüller, Janine; Rütten, Arno; Parmentier, Laurent; El Shabrawi-Caelen, Laila; Hafner, Christian; Nürnberg, Peter; Kruse, Roland; Schoch, Susanne; Hanneken, Sandra; Betz, Regina C

    2014-01-02

    Dowling-Degos disease (DDD) is an autosomal-dominant genodermatosis characterized by progressive and disfiguring reticulate hyperpigmentation. We previously identified loss-of-function mutations in KRT5 but were only able to detect pathogenic mutations in fewer than half of our subjects. To identify additional causes of DDD, we performed exome sequencing in five unrelated affected individuals without mutations in KRT5. Data analysis identified three heterozygous mutations from these individuals, all within the same gene. These mutations, namely c.11G>A (p.Trp4*), c.652C>T (p.Arg218*), and c.798-2A>C, are within POGLUT1, which encodes protein O-glucosyltransferase 1. Further screening of unexplained cases for POGLUT1 identified six additional mutations, as well as two of the above described mutations. Immunohistochemistry of skin biopsies of affected individuals with POGLUT1 mutations showed significantly weaker POGLUT1 staining in comparison to healthy controls with strong localization of POGLUT1 in the upper parts of the epidermis. Immunoblot analysis revealed that translation of either wild-type (WT) POGLUT1 or of the protein carrying the p.Arg279Trp substitution led to the expected size of about 50 kDa, whereas the c.652C>T (p.Arg218*) mutation led to translation of a truncated protein of about 30 kDa. Immunofluorescence analysis identified a colocalization of the WT protein with the endoplasmic reticulum and a notable aggregating pattern for the truncated protein. Recently, mutations in POFUT1, which encodes protein O-fucosyltransferase 1, were also reported to be responsible for DDD. Interestingly, both POGLUT1 and POFUT1 are essential regulators of Notch activity. Our results furthermore emphasize the important role of the Notch pathway in pigmentation and keratinocyte morphology. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tolvaptan and Kidney Pain in Patients With Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: Secondary Analysis From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteleijn, Niek F.; Blais, Jaime D.; Chapman, Arlene B.; Czerwiec, Frank S.; Devuyst, Olivier; Higashihara, Eiji; Leliveld, Anna M.; Ouyang, John; Perrone, Ronald D.; Torres, Vicente E.; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    2017-01-01

    Background Kidney pain is a common complication in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), and data from the TEMPO 3:4 trial suggested that tolvaptan, a vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist, may have a positive effect on kidney pain in this patient group. Because pain is difficult to measure, the incidence of kidney pain leading to objective medical interventions was used in the present study to assess pain. Study Design Secondary analysis from a randomized controlled trial. Setting & Participants Patients with ADPKD with preserved kidney function. Intervention Tolvaptan or placebo. Outcomes Kidney pain events defined by objective medical interventions. Measurements Kidney pain events were recorded and independently adjudicated. Incidence of a first kidney pain event was assessed overall and categorized into 5 subgroups according to severity. Results Of 1,445 participating patients (48.4% women; mean age, 39 ± 7 [SD] years; mean estimated glomerular filtration rate, 81 ± 22 mL/min/1.73 m2; median total kidney volume, 1,692 [IQR, 750–7,555] mL), 50.9% reported a history of kidney pain at baseline. History of urinary tract infections, kidney stones, or hematuria (all P kidney pain. Tolvaptan use resulted in a significantly lower incidence of kidney pain events when compared to placebo: 10.1% versus 16.8% (P 0.05). The effect of tolvaptan was explained at least in part by a decrease in incidence of urinary tract infections, kidney stones, and hematuria when compared to placebo. Limitations Trial has specific inclusion criteria for total kidney volume and kidney function. Conclusions Tolvaptan decreased the incidence of kidney pain events independent of patient characteristics predisposing for kidney pain and possibly in part due to reductions in ADPKD-related complications. PMID:27856088

  7. AVP-NPII gene mutations and clinical characteristics of the patients with autosomal dominant familial central diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkkahraman, Doga; Saglar, Emel; Karaduman, Tugce; Mergen, Hatice

    2015-12-01

    Familial central diabetes insipidus (DI), usually an autosomal dominant disorder, is caused by mutations in arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NPII) gene that leads to aberrant preprohormone processing and gradual destruction of AVP-secreting cells. To determine clinical and molecular characteristics of patients with familial central DI from two different Turkish families. The diagnosis of central DI was established by 24-h urine collection, water deprivation test, and desmopressin challenge. To confirm the diagnosis of familial central DI, the entire coding region of AVP-NPII gene was amplified and sequenced. A total of eight affected patients and three unaffected healthy relatives from two families were studied. Genetic analysis revealed a previously reported heterozygous mutation (p.C98X) in family A, and a heterozygous novel mutation (p.G45C) in family B, both detected in exon 2 of AVP-NPII gene. When we compared the clinical characteristics of the two families, it was noticed that as the age of onset of symptoms in family A ranges between 4 and 7 years, it was <1 year in family B. Additionally, pituitary bright spot was present in the affected siblings, but absent in their affected parents. Familial central DI is a progressive disease, and age of onset of symptoms can differ depending on the mutation. Bright spot on pituitary MRI might be present at onset, but become invisible over time. Genetic testing and appropriate counseling should be given in familial cases of central DI to ensure adequate treatment, and to avoid chronic water deprivation that might result in growth retardation in childhood.

  8. Cerebral Microbleeds and the Risk of Incident Ischemic Stroke in CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy With Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puy, Laurent; De Guio, François; Godin, Ophélia; Duering, Marco; Dichgans, Martin; Chabriat, Hugues; Jouvent, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Cerebral microbleeds are associated with an increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. Recent data suggest that microbleeds may also predict the risk of incident ischemic stroke. However, these results were observed in elderly individuals undertaking various medications and for whom causes of microbleeds and ischemic stroke may differ. We aimed to test the relationship between the presence of microbleeds and incident stroke in CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy With Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy)-a severe monogenic small vessel disease known to be responsible for both highly prevalent microbleeds and a high incidence of ischemic stroke in young patients. We assessed microbleeds on baseline MRI in all 378 patients from the Paris-Munich cohort study. Incident ischemic strokes were recorded during 54 months. Survival analyses were used to test the relationship between microbleeds and incident ischemic stroke. Three hundred sixty-nine patients (mean age, 51.4±11.4 years) were followed-up during a median time of 39 months (interquartile range, 19 months). The risk of incident ischemic stroke was higher in patients with microbleeds than in patients without (35.8% versus 19.6%, hazard ratio, 1.87; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-3.01; P =0.009). These results persisted after adjustment for history of ischemic stroke, age, sex, vascular risk factors, and antiplatelet agents use (hazard ratio, 1.89; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-3.26; P =0.02). The presence of microbleeds is an independent risk marker of incident ischemic stroke in CADASIL, emphasizing the need to carefully interpret MRI data. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Somatotroph Pituitary Adenoma with Acromegaly and Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease – SSTR5 polymorphism and PKD1 mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syro, Luis V.; Sundsbak, Jamie L.; Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Toledo, Rodrigo A.; Camargo, Mauricio; Heyer, Christina M.; Sekiya, Tomoko; Uribe, Humberto; Escobar, Jorge I.; Vasquez, Martin; Rotondo, Fabio; Toledo, Sergio P. A.; Kovacs, Kalman; Horvath, Eva; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Harris, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) presented with acromegaly and a pituitary macroadenoma. There was a family history of this renal disorder. She had undergone surgery for pituitary adenoma 6 years prior. Physical examination disclosed bitemporal hemianopsia and elevation of both basal growth hormone (GH) 106 ng/mL (normal 0–5) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) 811 ng/mL (normal 48–255) blood levels. A magnetic resonance imaging scan disclosed a 3.0 cm sellar and suprasellar mass with both optic chiasm compression and left cavernous sinus invasion. Histologic, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies of the lesion disclosed a sparsely granulated somatotroph adenoma. Standard chromosome analysis on the blood sample showed no abnormality. Sequence analysis of the coding regions of PKD1 and PKD2 employing DNA from both peripheral leukocytes and the tumor revealed the most common PKD1 mutation, 5014_5015delAG. Analysis of the entire SSTR5 gene disclosed the variant c.143C>A (p.L48M, rs4988483) change in the heterozygous state in both blood and tumor, while no pathogenic mutations were noted in the MEN1, AIP, p27Kip1 and SSTR2 genes. To our knowledge, this is the fourth reported case of a GH-producing pituitary adenoma associated with ADPKD, but the first subject to extensive morphological, ultrastructural, cytogenetic and molecular studies. The question arises whether the physical proximity of the PKD1 and SSTR5 genes on chromosome 16 indicates a causal relationship between ADPKD and the somatotroph adenoma. PMID:21744088

  10. Discovery of MYH14 as an important and unique deafness gene causing prelingually severe autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong Jik; Kim, Ah Reum; Han, Jin Hee; Lee, Chung; Oh, Doo Yi; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2017-04-01

    Pathogenic variants of MYH14 are known to be associated (in either a syndromic or nonsyndromic manner) with hearing loss. Interestingly, all reported cases to date of MYH14-related nonsyndromic hearing loss with detailed phenotypes have demonstrated mild-to-moderate progressive hearing loss with postlingual onset. In the present study, targeted resequencing (TRS) of known deafness genes was performed to identify the causative variant in two multiplex families segregating autosomal dominant (AD) inherited hearing loss. TRS uncovered two novel variants of MYH14 (c.A572G: p.Asp191Gly in the myosin head domain and c.C73T:p.Gln25* in exon 2) from two multiplex deafness Korean families. Notably, both probands showed phenotypes of congenital or prelingual severe hearing loss. It is remarkably uncommon to encounter such a severe-to-profound, prelingual, AD hearing loss. Given that the first variant, p. Asp191Gly, was the first documented missense allele discovered in the myosin head domain of this gene related to either congenital or prelingual severe nonsyndromic hearing loss, and also that the second variant, p. Gln25*, lead to a null allele, more severe phenotypes from our probands may have been the result of either genotype-phenotype correlation or genetic backgrounds, or both. In the present study, we report that MYH14 can manifest as nonsyndromic prelingual severe sensorineural hearing loss in an AD fashion in Koreans. The results of the present study suggest that further genetic studies of similar patients should consider MYH14 as a causative gene, and cochlear implantation during infant or early childhood should be indicated for those patients with certain MYH14 pathogenic variants. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF SIROLIMUS IN REDUCING CYST VOLUME IN PATIENTS WITH AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreelatha Melemadathil

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Autosomal-Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease is by far the most frequent inherited kidney disease. In White populations, its prevalence ranges from one in 400 to one in 1000 (Gabow 1993. Though the corresponding figure in Blacks is not yet available, the incidence of ESRD due to ADPKD is similar in American Blacks and Whites (Yium et al, 1994. Renoprotective interventions in ADPKD are maximal reduction of blood pressure and proteinuria and limit the effects of additional potential promoters of disease progression such as dyslipidaemia, chronic hyperglycaemia or smoking. At present, there is no definitive treatment for reducing cyst volume and hence disease progression. Sirolimus (Rapamycin is an immunosuppressant mostly used for the management of kidney transplant recipients. This drug by specifically and effectively inhibiting mTOR, exerts antiproliferative and growth inhibiting effects and could be important for the inhibition of cyst progression in ADPKD. MATERIALS AND METHODS It is an interventional randomised open label, active control study for six months. ADPKD type 1 patients between the age of 18 to 60 years with a GFR > 40 mL/min/1.73 m2 were included in the study. RESULTS Total number of subjects enrolled – 60. Patients enrolled in sirolimus arm – 40. Patients enrolled in conventional treatment arm - 20. Patients dropped out due to sirolimus side effects - 5. Patients lost to followup - 1. Patients completed treatment in conventional treatment arm - 20. CONCLUSION Treatment with mTOR inhibitor sirolimus for 6 months was effective in reducing total kidney volume, total renal cyst volume and volume of the largest cyst in patients with ADPKD. There was a small, but significant increase in renal parenchymal volume on treatment with sirolimus. Extending the duration of treatment to one year caused further significant reduction in total kidney volume and cyst volume. Major side effect of sirolimus in our patients was

  12. European ADPKD Forum multidisciplinary position statement on autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease care: European ADPKD Forum and Multispecialist Roundtable participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Tess; Sandford, Richard; de Coninck, Brenda; Devuyst, Olivier; Drenth, Joost P H; Ecder, Tevfik; Kent, Alastair; Gansevoort, Ron T; Górriz, José Luis; Ong, Albert C M; Pirson, Yves; Torres, Vicente E; Budde, Klemens; Clément, Denis; Derchi, Lorenzo E; Eleftheroudi, Marianna; Levtchenko, Elena; Peters, Dorien; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Vanholder, Raymond

    2017-12-22

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a chronic, progressive condition characterized by the development and growth of cysts in the kidneys and other organs and by additional systemic manifestations. Individuals with ADPKD should have access to lifelong, multidisciplinary, specialist and patient-centred care involving: (i) a holistic and comprehensive assessment of the manifestations, complications, prognosis and impact of the disease (in physical, psychological and social terms) on the patient and their family; (ii) access to treatment to relieve symptoms, manage complications, preserve kidney function, lower the risk of cardiovascular disease and maintain quality of life; and (iii) information and support to help patients and their families act as fully informed and active partners in care, i.e. to maintain self-management approaches, deal with the impact of the condition and participate in decision-making regarding healthcare policies, services and research. Building on discussions at an international roundtable of specialists and patient advocates involved in ADPKD care, this article sets out (i) the principles for a patient-centred, holistic approach to the organization and delivery of ADPKD care in practice, with a focus on multispecialist collaboration and shared-decision making, and (ii) the rationale and knowledge base for a route map for ADPKD care intended to help patients navigate the services available to them and to help stakeholders and decision-makers take practical steps to ensure that all patients with ADPKD can access the comprehensive multispecialist care to which they are entitled. Further multispecialty collaboration is encouraged to design and implement these services, and to work with patient organizations to promote awareness building, education and research. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  13. Extended Follow-Up of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms Detected by Presymptomatic Screening in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irazabal, Maria V.; Huston, John; Kubly, Vickie; Rossetti, Sandro; Sundsbak, Jamie L.; Hogan, Marie C.; Harris, Peter C.; Brown, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients have an increased risk for intracranial aneurysms (IAs). The importance of screening for unruptured IAs (UIAs) depends on their risks for growth and rupture. Design, setting, participants, & measurements ADPKD patients with UIAs found by presymptomatic screening with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) during 1989 to 2009 were followed initially at 6 months and annually, and less frequently after demonstration of stability. Results Forty-five saccular aneurysms were detected in 38 patients from 36 families. Most were small (median diameter 3.5 mm) and in the anterior circulation (84%). Median age at diagnosis was 49 years. During cumulative imaging follow-up of 243 years, one de novo UIA was detected and increased in size from 2 to 4.4 mm over 144 months and two UIAs grew from 4.5 to 5.9 mm and 4.7 to 6.2 mm after 69 and 184 months, respectively. Seven patients did not have imaging follow-up. No change was detected in the remaining 28 patients. During cumulative clinical follow-up of 316 years, no aneurysm ruptured. Five patients died from unrelated causes and two were lost to follow-up after 8 and 120 months. Three patients underwent surgical clipping. Conclusions Most UIAs detected by presymptomatic screening in ADPKD patients are small and in the anterior circulation. Growth and rupture risks are not higher than those of UIAs in the general population. These data support very selective screening for UIAs in ADPKD patients, and widespread screening is not indicated. PMID:21551026

  14. Cantu syndrome in a woman and her two daughters: Further confirmation of autosomal dominant inheritance and review of the cardiac manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, Dorothy K; Lorch, Steven M; Cole, Patricia L; Singh, Gautam K

    2006-08-01

    Cantu syndrome, or hypertrichosis-osteodysplasia-cardiomegaly syndrome, is a rare disorder of unknown etiology, associated with hypertrichosis, characteristic facial features, skeletal abnormalities, cardiomegaly, and occasional pericardial effusions. Although autosomal recessive inheritance was originally proposed, a man with three affected children has been reported, making autosomal dominant inheritance likely. We report on a woman and her two daughters with Cantu syndrome, further confirming dominant inheritance. All three of our patients have cardiac involvement, and symptomatic pericardial effusions requiring surgical intervention occurred in the mother and one of her daughters. Chromosome microarray analysis was normal in one of the girls. The etiology of the cardiomegaly and pericardial effusions in Cantu syndrome is unknown. We review all previously reported cases of Cantu syndrome and the associated cardiac manifestations. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Identification of p.A684V missense mutation in the WFS1 gene as a frequent cause of autosomal dominant optic atrophy and hearing impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rendtorff, Nanna D; Lodahl, Marianne; Boulahbel, Houda

    2011-01-01

    Optic atrophy (OA) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) are key abnormalities in several syndromes, including the recessively inherited Wolfram syndrome, caused by mutations in WFS1. In contrast, the association of autosomal dominant OA and SNHL without other phenotypic abnormalities is rare...... that patients who are heterozygous for WFS1 missense mutations should be carefully clinically examined for OA and other manifestations of Wolfram syndrome....

  16. First report of OPA1 screening in Greek patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy and identification of a previously undescribed OPA1 mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Kamakari, Smaragda; Koutsodontis, George; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis; Fitsios, Athanasios; Chrousos, Georgia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the genotype–phenotype correlation in four Greek pedigrees with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) and OPA1 mutations. Methods Seven patients from four unrelated families (F1, F2, F3, F4) were clinically assessed for visual acuity, color vision, ptosis, afferent pupillary defects, and visual fields and underwent orthoptic assessment, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and fundus examination to establish their clinical status. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samp...

  17. Increased urinary Angiotensinogen/Creatinine (AGT/Cr) ratio may be associated with reduced renal function in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hayne Cho; Kang, Ah-Young; Jang, Joon Young; Kim, Hyunsuk; Han, Miyeun; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Kim, Seung Hyup; Noh, Jung Woo; Cheong, Hae Il; Hwang, Young-Hwan; Ahn, Curie

    2015-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of the most common hereditary kidney diseases that frequently result in renal failure. In this cross-sectional observational cohort study, we evaluated urinary angiotensinogen (AGT) as a potential biomarker to assess renal function in ADPKD. Methods Urinary AGT was measured in 233 ADPKD patients and its association with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and height-adjusted total kidney volume (htTKV) were evaluat...

  18. Characterization of osteoclasts from patients harboring a G215R mutation in ClC-7 causing autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Kim; Gram, Jeppe; Schaller, Sophie

    2004-01-01

    Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis II (ADOII) is a relatively benign disorder caused by a missense mutation in the ClCN7 gene. In this study, we characterize the osteoclasts from patients with ADOII, caused by a G215R mutation, and investigate the effect on osteoclast function in vitro. Osteoclasts...... osteoclastogenesis in ADOII osteoclasts. However, the residual activity of the ClC-7 channel in ADOII osteoclasts does not allow sufficient acidification and thereby resorption....

  19. Autosomal dominant Marfan-like connective-tissue disorder with aortic dilation and skeletal anomaslies not linked to the Fibrillin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boileau, C.; Coulon, M.; Alexandre, J.-A.; Junien, C. (Laboratorie Central de Biochimie et de Genetique Moleculaire (France)); Jondeau, G.; Delorme, G.; Dubourg, O.; Bourdarias, J.-P. (CHU Ambroise Pare, Boulogne (France)); Babron, M.-C.; Bonaieti-Pellie, C. (INSERM, Chateau de Longchamp, Paris (France)); Sakai, L. (Shriners' Hospital for Crippled Children, Portland, OR (United States)); Melki, J. (Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris (France))

    1993-07-01

    The authors describe a large family with a connective-tissue disorder that exhibits some of the skeletal and cardiovascular features seen in Marfan syndrome. However, none of the 19 affected individuals displayed ocular abnormalities and therefore did not comply with recognized criteria for this disease. These patients could alternatively be diagnosed as MASS (mitral valve, aorta, skeleton, and skin) phenotype patients or represent a distinct clinical entity, i.e., a new autosomal dominant connective-tissue disorder. The fibrillin genes located on chromosomes 15 and 5 are clearly involved in the classic form of Marfan syndrome and a clinically related disorder (congenital contractural arachnodactyly), respectively. To test whether one of these genes was also implicated in this French family, the authors performed genetic analyses. Blood samples were obtained for 56 family members, and four polymorphic fibrillin gene markers, located on chromosomes 15 (Fib15) and 5 (Fib5), respectively, were tested. Linkage between the disease allele and the markers of these two genes was excluded with lod scores of [minus]11.39 (for Fib15) and [minus]13.34 (for Fib5), at 0 = .001, indicating that the mutation is at a different locus. This phenotype thus represents a new connective-tissue disorder, overlapping but different from classic Marfan syndrome. 33 refs., 1 fig. 2 tabs.

  20. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Missense Variant in EFEMP1 Co-Segregating in a Family with Autosomal Dominant Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna S Mackay

    Full Text Available Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG is a clinically important and genetically heterogeneous cause of progressive vision loss as a result of retinal ganglion cell death. Here we have utilized trio-based, whole-exome sequencing to identify the genetic defect underlying an autosomal dominant form of adult-onset POAG segregating in an African-American family. Exome sequencing identified a novel missense variant (c.418C>T, p.Arg140Trp in exon-5 of the gene coding for epidermal growth factor (EGF containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1 that co-segregated with disease in the family. Linkage and haplotype analyses with microsatellite markers indicated that the disease interval overlapped a known POAG locus (GLC1H on chromosome 2p. The p.Arg140Trp substitution was predicted in silico to have damaging effects on protein function and transient expression studies in cultured cells revealed that the Trp140-mutant protein exhibited increased intracellular accumulation compared with wild-type EFEMP1. In situ hybridization of the mouse eye with oligonucleotide probes detected the highest levels of EFEMP1 transcripts in the ciliary body, cornea, inner nuclear layer of the retina, and the optic nerve head. The recent finding that a common variant near EFEMP1 was associated with optic nerve-head morphology supports the possibility that the EFEMP1 variant identified in this POAG family may be pathogenic.

  1. A novel mutation of EYA4 in a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant middle-frequency sensorineural hearing loss by targeted exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Zhang, Zhao; Cheng, Jing; Lu, Yu; Yang, Chang-Liang; Luo, Yan-Yun; Yang, Guang; Yang, Hui; Zhu, Li; Zhou, Jia; Yao, Hang-Qi

    2015-06-01

    The middle-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (MFSNHL) is rare among hereditary non-syndromic hearing loss. To date, only three genes are reported to be associated with MFSNHL, including TECTA, EYA4 and COL11A2. In this report, we analyzed and explored the clinical audiological characteristics and the causative gene of a Chinese family named HG-Z087 with non-syndromic autosomal dominant inherited MFSNHL. Clinical audiological characteristics and inheritance pattern of a family were evaluated, and pedigree was drawn based on medical history investigation. Our results showed that the Chinese family was characterized by late onset, progressive, non-sydromic autosomal dominant MFSNHL. Targeted exome sequencing, conducted using DNA samples of an affected member in this family, revealed a novel heterozygous missense mutation c.1643C>G in exon 18 of EYA4, causing amino-acid (aa) substitution Arg for Thr at a conserved position aa-548. The p.T548R mutation related to hearing loss in the selected Chinese family was validated by Sanger sequencing. However, the mutation was absent in control group containing 100 DNA samples from normal Chinese families. In conclusion, we identified the pathogenic gene and found that the novel missense mutation c.1643C>G (p.T548R) in EYA4 might have caused autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing impairment in the selected Chinese family.

  2. Characteristics of Intracranial Aneurysms in the Else Kröner-Fresenius Registry of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Hartmut P.H.; Malinoc, Angelica; Bacher, Janina; Nabulsi, Zinaida; Ivanovas, Vera; Bruechle, Nadine Ortiz; Mader, Irina; Hoffmann, Michael M.; Riegler, Peter; Kraemer-Guth, Annette; Burchardi, Christian; Schaeffner, Elke; Martin, Rodolfo S.; Azurmendi, Pablo J.; Zerres, Klaus; Jilg, Cordula; Eng, Charis; Gläsker, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients who harbor intracranial aneurysms (IAs) run a risk for aneurysm rupture and subsequent subarachnoid hemorrhage which frequently results in permanent deficits or death. Prophylactic treatment of unruptured aneurysms is possible and recommended depending on the size and location of the aneurysm as well as patient age and condition. IAs are major manifestations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Current guidelines do not suggest surveillance of IAs in ADPKD except in the setting of family history if IA was known in any relative with ADPKD. Management of IAs in ADPKD is problematic because limited data exist from large studies. Methods We established the Else Kröner-Fresenius Registry for ADPKD in Germany. Clinical data were assessed for age at diagnosis of IAs, stage of renal insufficiency, and number, location and size of IAs as well as family history of cerebral events. Patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic IAs were included. All patients with ADPKD-related IAs were offered mutation scanning of the susceptibility genes for ADPKD, the PKD1 and PKD2 genes. Results Of 463 eligible ADPKD patients from the population base of Germany, 32 (7%) were found to have IAs, diagnosed at the age of 2–71 years, 19 females and 13 males. Twenty (63%) of these 32 patients were symptomatic, whereas IAs were detected in an asymptomatic stage in 12 patients. IAs were multifocal in 12 and unifocal in 20 patients. In 26 patients (81%), IAs were diagnosed before end-stage renal failure. Twenty-five out of 27 unrelated index cases (93%) had no IAs or cerebral events documented in their relatives with ADPKD. In 16 unrelated index patients and 3 relatives, we detected germline mutations. The mutations were randomly distributed across the PKD1 gene in 14 and the PKD2 gene in 2 index cases. Questionnaires answered for 320/441 ADPKD patients without IAs revealed that only 45/320 (14%) had MR angiography. Conclusion In ADPKD, rupture of IAs occurs

  3. Chronic asymptomatic pyuria precedes overt urinary tract infection and deterioration of renal function in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Jin Ho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary tract infection (UTI occurs in 30%-50% of individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. However, the clinical relevance of asymptomatic pyuria in ADPKD patients remains unknown. Methods We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 256 ADPKD patients who registered to the ADPKD clinic at Seoul National University Hospital from Aug 1999 to Aug 2010. We defined the asymptomatic pyuria as more than 5-9 white blood cells in high-power field with no related symptoms or signs of overt UTI. Patients were categorized into 2 groups depending on its duration and frequency: Group A included non-pyuria and transient pyuria patients; Group B included recurrent and persistent pyuria patients. The association between asymptomatic pyuria and both the development of overt UTI and the deterioration of renal function were examined. Results With a mean follow-up duration of 65.3 months, 176 (68.8% out of 256 patients experienced 681 episodes of asymptomatic pyuria and 50 episodes of UTI. The annual incidence of asymptomatic pyuria was 0.492 episodes/patient/year. The patients in group B showed female predominance (58.5% vs. 42.0%, P=0.01 and experienced an upper UTI more frequently (hazard ratio: 4.612, 95% confidence interval: 1.735-12.258; P=0.002, adjusted for gender and hypertension. The annual change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (ΔeGFR was significantly larger in magnitude in group B than in group A (-2.7��4.56 vs. -1.17±5.8, respectively; P=0.01. Age and Group B found to be the independent variables for ΔeGFR and developing end-stage renal disease (16.0% vs. 4.3%, respectively; P=0.001. Conclusions Chronic asymptomatic pyuria may increase the risk of developing overt UTI and may contribute to declining renal function in ADPKD.

  4. Diagnostic Algorithm in the Management of Acute Febrile Abdomen in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Neuville

    Full Text Available Acute febrile abdomen represents a diagnostic challenge in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. Although criteria have been proposed for cyst infection (CyI and hemorrhage (CyH, there is a lack of comparative assessments. Furthermore, distinguishing cystic from non-cystic complications remains problematic.ADPKD patients presenting with abdominal pain and/or fever between 01/2005 and 06/2015 were retrospectively identified in a systematic computerized billing database. CyH was defined as spontaneous intracystic density above 50 Hounsfield units on computed tomography (CT. CyI was definite if confirmed by cyst puncture, and probable if 4 criteria were met: 3-day fever, loin/liver tenderness, C-reactive protein (CRP plasma levels >50mg/L and no CT evidence for CyH. Other episodes were grouped as inflammation of unknown origin (IUO.Among a cohort of 173 ADPKD patients, 101 presented with 205 episodes of abdominal pain (n = 172 and/or fever (n = 33. 20 patients experienced 30 CyH, whereas 16 presented 23 episodes of definite (n = 11 or probable (n = 12 CyI. 35 IUO were observed in 31 patients. Clinically, fever was observed in 7% vs. 100% vs. 66% of CyH, CyI and IUO, respectively. Biologically, CRP cut-off at 70 mg/dl showed 92% sensitivity and 81% specificity in CyI diagnosis. Urine or blood cultures remained sterile in >90% of CyH, but were contributive in 53.4% of CyI and IUO, with a 74.2% prevalence for E. coli. Radiologically, ultrasounds, CT and magnetic resonance diagnosed CyI in 2.6%, 20% and 16.7% of cases, respectively. 18F-FDG positron-emission tomography (PET/CT was done within a median period of 7 days post antibiotics, and significantly changed patient management in 71.4%.This retrospective single-center series underscores the usefulness of clinical-fever-and biological-CRP-parameters, but emphasizes the limitations of bacteriological and radiological investigations in cases of acute febrile abdomen in

  5. Characteristics of Intracranial Aneurysms in the Else Kröner-Fresenius Registry of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmut P.H. Neumann

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients who harbor intracranial aneurysms (IAs run a risk for aneurysm rupture and subsequent subarachnoid hemorrhage which frequently results in permanent deficits or death. Prophylactic treatment of unruptured aneurysms is possible and recommended depending on the size and location of the aneurysm as well as patient age and condition. IAs are major manifestations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. Current guidelines do not suggest surveillance of IAs in ADPKD except in the setting of family history if IA was known in any relative with ADPKD. Management of IAs in ADPKD is problematic because limited data exist from large studies. Methods: We established the Else Kröner-Fresenius Registry for ADPKD in Germany. Clinical data were assessed for age at diagnosis of IAs, stage of renal insufficiency, and number, location and size of IAs as well as family history of cerebral events. Patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic IAs were included. All patients with ADPKD-related IAs were offered mutation scanning of the susceptibility genes for ADPKD, the PKD1 and PKD2 genes. Results: Of 463 eligible ADPKD patients from the population base of Germany, 32 (7% were found to have IAs, diagnosed at the age of 2–71 years, 19 females and 13 males. Twenty (63% of these 32 patients were symptomatic, whereas IAs were detected in an asymptomatic stage in 12 patients. IAs were multifocal in 12 and unifocal in 20 patients. In 26 patients (81%, IAs were diagnosed before end-stage renal failure. Twenty-five out of 27 unrelated index cases (93% had no IAs or cerebral events documented in their relatives with ADPKD. In 16 unrelated index patients and 3 relatives, we detected germline mutations. The mutations were randomly distributed across the PKD1 gene in 14 and the PKD2 gene in 2 index cases. Questionnaires answered for 320/441 ADPKD patients without IAs revealed that only 45/320 (14% had MR angiography. Conclusion: In ADPKD

  6. Genotype and Phenotype Studies in Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa (adRP) of the French Canadian Founder Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coussa, Razek Georges; Chakarova, Christina; Ajlan, Radwan; Taha, Mohammed; Kavalec, Conrad; Gomolin, Julius; Khan, Ayesha; Lopez, Irma; Ren, Huanan; Waseem, Naushin; Kamenarova, Kunka; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Koenekoop, Robert K

    2015-12-01

    The French Canadian population of Quebec is a unique, well-known founder population with religious, linguistic, and geographic isolation. The genetics of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in Quebec is not well studied thus far. The purpose of our study was to establish the genetic architecture of autosomal dominant RP (adRP) and to characterize the phenotypes associated with new adRP mutations in Quebec. Sanger sequencing of the commonly mutated currently known adRP genes was performed in a clinically well-characterized cohort of 60 adRP French Canadian families. Phenotypes were analyzed by projected visual acuity (best corrected), Goldmann visual fields, optical coherence tomography (OCT), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and ERG. The potential effect of the novel mutations was assessed using in silico bioinformatic tools. The pathogenicity of all variants was then confirmed by segregation analysis within the families, when available. We identified the causal mutation/gene in 24 of our adRP families, as 24 (40%) of 60 patients had adRP mutations in six known adRP genes. Eleven (46%) of these mutations were in RHO, four mutations (17%) were found in SNRNP200, three mutations (12.5%) in PRPH2/RDS, three mutations (12.5%) in TOPORS, two mutations (8%) in PRPF31, and one mutation (4%) in IMPDH1. Four mutations were novel. We identified new mutations in RHO (p.S270I), PRPF31 (p.R288W), IMPDH1 (p.Q318H), and TOPORS (p.H889R); the rest were previously reported. We present the genotype-phenotype characteristics of the four novel missense mutations. This is the first large screening of adRP genes in the founder population of Quebec. Our prevalence of known adRP genes is 40% in the French Canadian population, which is lower than in other adRP populations around the world, illustrating the uniqueness of the French Canadian population. Our findings are crucial in expanding the current understanding of the genotypic-phenotypic spectrum of RP and documenting the genetic architecture of

  7. Functional characteristics of three new germline mutations of the thyrotropin receptor gene causing autosomal dominant toxic thyroid hyperplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonacchera, M.; Van Sande, J.; Cetani, F. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    We report three unrelated families in which hyperthyroidism associated with thyroid hyperplasia was transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion, in the absence of signs of autoimmunity. Exon 10 of the TSH receptor gene was directly sequenced after PCR amplification from DNA of peripheral leukocytes. In one family, a C to A transversion resulted in an S505R substitution in the third transmembrane segment; in the second, an A to T transversion caused an N650Y substitution in the sixth transmembrane segment; and in the third family, an A to G transition resulted in an N670S substitution in the seventh transmembrane segment. When expressed by transfection in COS-7 cells, each mutated receptor displayed an increase in constitutive stimulation of cAMP production; no effect on basal accumulation of inositol phosphates (IP) could be detected. In binding studies, cells transfected with wild-type of mutated receptors showed similar levels of expression, with the mutated receptors displaying similar or slightly increased affinity for bovine TSH (bTSH) binding. Cells transfected with S505R and N650Y mutants showed a similar cAMP maximal TSH-stimulated accumulation over the cells transfected with the wild type, whereas N670S transfectants showed a blunted response with an increase in EC{sub 50}. A higher IP response to 100 mU/mL bTSH over that obtained with the wild-type receptor was obtained in cells transfected with N650Y; in contrast, cells transfected with S505R showed a blunted IP production (50% less), and the N670S mutant completely lost the ability to stimulate IP accumulation in response to bTSH. The differential effects of individual mutations on stimulation by bTSH of cAMP or IP accumulation suggest that individual mutant receptors may achieve different active conformations with selective abilities to couple to G{sub s}{alpha} and to G{sub q}{alpha}. 17 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Diagnostic Algorithm in the Management of Acute Febrile Abdomen in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuville, Marie; Hustinx, Roland; Jacques, Jessica; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie; Jouret, François

    2016-01-01

    Acute febrile abdomen represents a diagnostic challenge in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Although criteria have been proposed for cyst infection (CyI) and hemorrhage (CyH), there is a lack of comparative assessments. Furthermore, distinguishing cystic from non-cystic complications remains problematic. ADPKD patients presenting with abdominal pain and/or fever between 01/2005 and 06/2015 were retrospectively identified in a systematic computerized billing database. CyH was defined as spontaneous intracystic density above 50 Hounsfield units on computed tomography (CT). CyI was definite if confirmed by cyst puncture, and probable if 4 criteria were met: 3-day fever, loin/liver tenderness, C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels >50mg/L and no CT evidence for CyH. Other episodes were grouped as inflammation of unknown origin (IUO). Among a cohort of 173 ADPKD patients, 101 presented with 205 episodes of abdominal pain (n = 172) and/or fever (n = 33). 20 patients experienced 30 CyH, whereas 16 presented 23 episodes of definite (n = 11) or probable (n = 12) CyI. 35 IUO were observed in 31 patients. Clinically, fever was observed in 7% vs. 100% vs. 66% of CyH, CyI and IUO, respectively. Biologically, CRP cut-off at 70 mg/dl showed 92% sensitivity and 81% specificity in CyI diagnosis. Urine or blood cultures remained sterile in >90% of CyH, but were contributive in 53.4% of CyI and IUO, with a 74.2% prevalence for E. coli. Radiologically, ultrasounds, CT and magnetic resonance diagnosed CyI in 2.6%, 20% and 16.7% of cases, respectively. 18F-FDG positron-emission tomography (PET)/CT was done within a median period of 7 days post antibiotics, and significantly changed patient management in 71.4%. This retrospective single-center series underscores the usefulness of clinical-fever-and biological-CRP-parameters, but emphasizes the limitations of bacteriological and radiological investigations in cases of acute febrile abdomen in ADPKD

  9. POU4F3 mutation screening in Japanese hearing loss patients: Massively parallel DNA sequencing-based analysis identified novel variants associated with autosomal dominant hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Tomohiro; Miyagawa, Maiko; Nishio, Shin-Ya; Moteki, Hideaki; Oda, Kiyoshi; Ohyama, Kenji; Miyazaki, Hiromitsu; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Ken-Ichi; Murata, Takaaki; Matsuoka, Rina; Ohta, Yoko; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kumakawa, Kozo; Furutate, Sakiko; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Yamada, Takechiyo; Ohta, Yumi; Uehara, Natsumi; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    A variant in a transcription factor gene, POU4F3, is responsible for autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hereditary hearing loss, DFNA15. To date, 14 variants, including a whole deletion of POU4F3, have been reported to cause HL in various ethnic groups. In the present study, genetic screening for POU4F3 variants was carried out for a large series of Japanese hearing loss (HL) patients to clarify the prevalence and clinical characteristics of DFNA15 in the Japanese population. Massively parallel DNA sequencing of 68 target candidate genes was utilized in 2,549 unrelated Japanese HL patients (probands) to identify genomic variations responsible for HL. The detailed clinical features in patients with POU4F3 variants were collected from medical charts and analyzed. Novel 12 POU4F3 likely pathogenic variants (six missense variants, three frameshift variants, and three nonsense variants) were successfully identified in 15 probands (2.5%) among 602 families exhibiting autosomal dominant HL, whereas no variants were detected in the other 1,947 probands with autosomal recessive or inheritance pattern unknown HL. To obtain the audiovestibular configuration of the patients harboring POU4F3 variants, we collected audiograms and vestibular symptoms of the probands and their affected family members. Audiovestibular phenotypes in a total of 24 individuals from the 15 families possessing variants were characterized by progressive HL, with a large variation in the onset age and severity with or without vestibular symptoms observed. Pure-tone audiograms indicated the most prevalent configuration as mid-frequency HL type followed by high-frequency HL type, with asymmetry observed in approximately 20% of affected individuals. Analysis of the relationship between age and pure-tone average suggested that individuals with truncating variants showed earlier onset and slower progression of HL than did those with non-truncating variants. The present study showed that variants in POU4F3 were a

  10. POU4F3 mutation screening in Japanese hearing loss patients: Massively parallel DNA sequencing-based analysis identified novel variants associated with autosomal dominant hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Kitano

    Full Text Available A variant in a transcription factor gene, POU4F3, is responsible for autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hereditary hearing loss, DFNA15. To date, 14 variants, including a whole deletion of POU4F3, have been reported to cause HL in various ethnic groups. In the present study, genetic screening for POU4F3 variants was carried out for a large series of Japanese hearing loss (HL patients to clarify the prevalence and clinical characteristics of DFNA15 in the Japanese population. Massively parallel DNA sequencing of 68 target candidate genes was utilized in 2,549 unrelated Japanese HL patients (probands to identify genomic variations responsible for HL. The detailed clinical features in patients with POU4F3 variants were collected from medical charts and analyzed. Novel 12 POU4F3 likely pathogenic variants (six missense variants, three frameshift variants, and three nonsense variants were successfully identified in 15 probands (2.5% among 602 families exhibiting autosomal dominant HL, whereas no variants were detected in the other 1,947 probands with autosomal recessive or inheritance pattern unknown HL. To obtain the audiovestibular configuration of the patients harboring POU4F3 variants, we collected audiograms and vestibular symptoms of the probands and their affected family members. Audiovestibular phenotypes in a total of 24 individuals from the 15 families possessing variants were characterized by progressive HL, with a large variation in the onset age and severity with or without vestibular symptoms observed. Pure-tone audiograms indicated the most prevalent configuration as mid-frequency HL type followed by high-frequency HL type, with asymmetry observed in approximately 20% of affected individuals. Analysis of the relationship between age and pure-tone average suggested that individuals with truncating variants showed earlier onset and slower progression of HL than did those with non-truncating variants. The present study showed that variants

  11. Brain Imaging and Blood Biomarker Abnormalities in Children With Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Yakeel T; Schultz, Aaron P; Chen, Kewei; Protas, Hillary D; Brickhouse, Michael; Fleisher, Adam S; Langbaum, Jessica B; Thiyyagura, Pradeep; Fagan, Anne M; Shah, Aarti R; Muniz, Martha; Arboleda-Velasquez, Joseph F; Munoz, Claudia; Garcia, Gloria; Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Giraldo, Margarita; Tirado, Victoria; Ramírez, Dora L; Tariot, Pierre N; Dickerson, Bradford C; Sperling, Reisa A; Lopera, Francisco; Reiman, Eric M

    2015-08-01

    Brain imaging and fluid biomarkers are characterized in children at risk for autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD). To characterize and compare structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), resting-state and task-dependent functional MRI, and plasma amyloid-β (Aβ) measurements in presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation-carrying and noncarrying children with ADAD. Cross-sectional measures of structural and functional MRI and plasma Aβ assays were assessed in 18 PSEN1 E280A carriers and 19 noncarriers aged 9 to 17 years from a Colombian kindred with ADAD. Recruitment and data collection for this study were conducted at the University of Antioquia and the Hospital Pablo Tobon Uribe in Medellín, Colombia, between August 2011 and June 2012. All participants had blood sampling, structural MRI, and functional MRI during associative memory encoding and resting-state and cognitive assessments. Outcome measures included plasma Aβ1-42 concentrations and Aβ1-42:Aβ1-40 ratios, memory encoding-dependent activation changes, resting-state connectivity, and regional gray matter volumes. Structural and functional MRI data were compared using automated brain mapping algorithms and search regions related to AD. Similar to findings in adult mutation carriers, in the later preclinical and clinical stages of ADAD, mutation-carrying children were distinguished from control individuals by significantly higher plasma Aβ1-42 levels (mean [SD]: carriers, 18.8 [5.1] pg/mL and noncarriers, 13.1 [3.2] pg/mL; P < .001) and Aβ1-42:Aβ1-40 ratios (mean [SD]: carriers, 0.32 [0.06] and noncarriers, 0.21 [0.03]; P < .001), as well as less memory encoding task-related deactivation in parietal regions (eg, mean [SD] parameter estimates for the right precuneus were -0.590 [0.50] for noncarriers and -0.087 [0.38] for carriers; P < .005 uncorrected). Unlike carriers in the later stages, mutation-carrying children demonstrated increased functional connectivity of the posterior

  12. Imaging features of tuberous sclerosis complex with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease: a contiguous gene syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Susan J. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Andronikou, Savvas [University of the Witwatersrand, Radiology Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Johannesburg (South Africa); Kilborn, Tracy [University of Cape Town, Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Kaplan, Bernard S. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Nephrology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Darge, Kassa [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Genes for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) type 2 and autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) type 1 are both encoded over a short segment of chromosome 16. When deletions involve both genes, an entity known as the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome, variable phenotypes of TSC and ADPKD are exhibited. This syndrome has not been reviewed in the radiology literature. Unlike renal cysts in TSC, cystic disease in TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome results in hypertension and renal failure. A radiologist might demonstrate polycystic kidney disease before the patient develops other stigmata of TSC. Conversely, in patients with known TSC, enlarged and polycystic kidneys should signal the possibility of the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome and not simply TSC. Distinguishing these diagnoses has implications in prognosis, treatment and genetic counseling. To describe the clinical and imaging findings of tuberous sclerosis complex and polycystic kidney disease in seven pediatric patients. We retrospectively reviewed renal and brain imaging of children and young adults with genetically proven or high clinical suspicion for TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome. We included seven pediatric patients from two referral institutions. Ages ranged from birth to 21 years over the course of imaging. The mean follow-up period was 9 years 8 months (4 years 6 months to 20 years 6 months). No child progressed to end-stage renal disease during this period. Three patients were initially imaged for stigmata of TSC, three for abdominal distension and one for elevated serum creatinine concentration. All patients developed enlarged, polycystic kidneys. The latest available imaging studies demonstrated that in 12 of the 14 kidneys 50% or more of the parenchyma was ultimately replaced by >15 cysts, resulting in significant cortical thinning. The largest cysts in each kidney ranged from 2.4 cm to 9.3 cm. Echogenic lesions were present in 13 of the 14 kidneys, in keeping with

  13. Imaging features of tuberous sclerosis complex with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease: a contiguous gene syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, Susan J.; Andronikou, Savvas; Kilborn, Tracy; Kaplan, Bernard S.; Darge, Kassa

    2015-01-01

    Genes for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) type 2 and autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) type 1 are both encoded over a short segment of chromosome 16. When deletions involve both genes, an entity known as the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome, variable phenotypes of TSC and ADPKD are exhibited. This syndrome has not been reviewed in the radiology literature. Unlike renal cysts in TSC, cystic disease in TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome results in hypertension and renal failure. A radiologist might demonstrate polycystic kidney disease before the patient develops other stigmata of TSC. Conversely, in patients with known TSC, enlarged and polycystic kidneys should signal the possibility of the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome and not simply TSC. Distinguishing these diagnoses has implications in prognosis, treatment and genetic counseling. To describe the clinical and imaging findings of tuberous sclerosis complex and polycystic kidney disease in seven pediatric patients. We retrospectively reviewed renal and brain imaging of children and young adults with genetically proven or high clinical suspicion for TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome. We included seven pediatric patients from two referral institutions. Ages ranged from birth to 21 years over the course of imaging. The mean follow-up period was 9 years 8 months (4 years 6 months to 20 years 6 months). No child progressed to end-stage renal disease during this period. Three patients were initially imaged for stigmata of TSC, three for abdominal distension and one for elevated serum creatinine concentration. All patients developed enlarged, polycystic kidneys. The latest available imaging studies demonstrated that in 12 of the 14 kidneys 50% or more of the parenchyma was ultimately replaced by >15 cysts, resulting in significant cortical thinning. The largest cysts in each kidney ranged from 2.4 cm to 9.3 cm. Echogenic lesions were present in 13 of the 14 kidneys, in keeping with

  14. Endothelin 1 gene is not a major modifier of chronic kidney disease advancement among the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapareddy Shiva Nagendra Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is characterized by the presence of numerous cysts in the kidney and manifest with various renal and extra-renal complications leading to ESRD. Endothelin may contribute to various renal and extra-renal manifestations pointing to genetic and environmental modifying factors that alter the risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD in ADPKD. In the present study we investigated six genes coding for endothelin 1 (EDN1 tagging-single nucleotide polymorphisms (tag-SNPs to unravel the EDN1 gene modifier effect for renal disease progression in ADPKD. Materials and Methods: The tag-SNPs were genotyped using FRET-based KASPar method in 108 ADPKD patients and 119 healthy subjects. Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to determine the association between ADPKD and EDN1 tag-SNPs. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of tag-SNPs on CKD progression. The relationship between different CKD stages and hypertension and their interaction Mantel-Haenszel stratified analysis was performed. Results: All loci are polymorphic and followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Distribution of EDN1 genotypes and haplotypes in control and ADPKD is not statistically significant. Five SNPs covering 3.4 kb forming single LD block, but the LD was not strong between SNPs. The EDN1 genotypes are not contributing to the CKD advancement among the ADPKD patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that the EDN1 gene is not a major modifier of CKD advancement among ADPKD patients.

  15. Genotype-phenotype correlation for DFNA22: characterization of non-syndromic, autosomal dominant, progressive sensorineural hearing loss due to MYO6 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topsakal, Vedat; Hilgert, Nele; van Dinther, Joost

    2010-01-01

    Clinical and audiological examination was done in 2 Belgian families with autosomal dominant sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) linked to DFNA22. Nineteen subjects in family 1 had mild to moderate SNHL starting in the third decade. The hearing loss was characterized by a flat audiogram affecting all...... tested frequencies with statistically significant progression. In family 2 eleven subjects were affected with mild to moderate SNHL starting in the second decade. Most of them showed a flat audiogram, but some had mid-frequency hearing loss. Significant progression of thresholds was present at 4 and 8 k...

  16. Phenotypic variability in a seven-generation Swedish family segregating autosomal dominant hearing impairment due to a novel EYA4 frameshift mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frykholm, Carina; Klar, Joakim; Arnesson, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Linkage to an interval overlapping the DFNA10 locus on chromosome 6q22-23 was found through genome wide linkage analysis in a seven-generation Swedish family segregating postlingual, autosomal dominant nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing impairment. A novel heterozygous frame-shift mutation (c.579......-sectional and longitudinal deterioration of pure tone average (PTA) once the process of hearing deterioration had started, and no gender, parent-of-origin or family branch differences on PTA could be found. Age at onset varied between the family branches. In summary, this is the ninth published genetically verified DFNA10...

  17. Rhodopsin mutations are scarcely implicated in autosomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... wide scale studies are needed to determine the genetic variations involved in RP and particularly in the autosomal recessive inheritance. KEYWORDS: Retinitis pigmentosa; Rhodopsin mutations; Autosomal recessive retinitispigmentosa; Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa; Genetic counseling; Electroretinogram ...

  18. Application of Whole Exome Sequencing in Six Families with an Initial Diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa: Lessons Learned.

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    Berta Almoguera

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the genetics underlying dominant forms of inherited retinal dystrophies using whole exome sequencing (WES in six families extensively screened for known mutations or genes. Thirty-eight individuals were subjected to WES. Causative variants were searched among single nucleotide variants (SNVs and insertion/deletion variants (indels and whenever no potential candidate emerged, copy number variant (CNV analysis was performed. Variants or regions harboring a candidate variant were prioritized and segregation of the variant with the disease was further assessed using Sanger sequencing in case of SNVs and indels, and quantitative PCR (qPCR for CNVs. SNV and indel analysis led to the identification of a previously reported mutation in PRPH2. Two additional mutations linked to different forms of retinal dystrophies were identified in two families: a known frameshift deletion in RPGR, a gene responsible for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and p.Ser163Arg in C1QTNF5 associated with Late-Onset Retinal Degeneration. A novel heterozygous deletion spanning the entire region of PRPF31 was also identified in the affected members of a fourth family, which was confirmed with qPCR. This study allowed the identification of the genetic cause of the retinal dystrophy and the establishment of a correct diagnosis in four families, including a large heterozygous deletion in PRPF31, typically considered one of the pitfalls of this method. Since all findings in this study are restricted to known genes, we propose that targeted sequencing using gene-panel is an optimal first approach for the genetic screening and that once known genetic causes are ruled out, WES might be used to uncover new genes involved in inherited retinal dystrophies.

  19. Clinical proof-of-concept trial to assess the therapeutic effect of sirolimus in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: SUISSE ADPKD study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wüthrich Rudolf P

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently there is no effective treatment available to retard cyst growth and to prevent the progression to end-stage renal failure in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. Evidence has recently been obtained from animal experiments that activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway plays a crucial role in cyst growth and renal volume expansion, and that the inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin (sirolimus markedly slows cyst development and renal functional deterioration. Based on these promising results in animals we have designed and initiated the first randomized controlled trial (RCT to examine the effectiveness, safety and tolerability of sirolimus to retard disease progression in ADPKD. Method/design This single center, randomised controlled, open label trial assesses the therapeutic effect, safety and tolerability of the mTOR inhibitor sirolimus (Rapamune® in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and preserved renal function. The primary outcome will be the inhibition of kidney volume growth measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI volumetry. Secondary outcome parameters will be preservation of renal function, safety and tolerability of sirolimus. Discussion The results from this proof-of-concept RCT will for the first time show whether treatment with sirolimus effectively retards cyst growth in patients with ADPKD. Trial registration NCT00346918

  20. Mapping of the locus for autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (AIH2) to a 4-Mb YAC contig on chromosome 4q11-q21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerrman, C.; Holmgren, G.; Forsman, K. [Univ. Hospital, Umea (Sweden)]|[Univ. of Umea (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-01-15

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (Al) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited enamel defects. We recently mapped a locus for autosomal dominant local hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AIH2) to the long arm of chromosome 4. The disease gene was localized to a 17.6-cM region between the markers D4S392 and D4S395. The albumin gene (ALB), located in the same interval, was a candidate gene for autosomal dominant AI (ADAI) since albumin has a potential role in enamel maturation. Here we describe refined mapping of the AIH2 locus and the construction of marker maps by radiation hybrid mapping and yeast artificial chromosome (YAC)-based sequence tagged site-content mapping. A radiation hybrid map consisting of 11 microsatellite markers in the 5-cM interval between D4S409 and D4S1558 was constructed. Recombinant haplotypes in six Swedish ADAI families suggest that the disease gene is located in the interval between D4S2421 and ALB. ALB is therefore not likely to be the disease-causing gene. Affected members in all six families share the same allele haplotypes, indicating a common ancestral mutation in all families. The AIH2 critical region is less than 4 cM and spans a physical distance of approximately 4 Mb as judged from radiation hybrid maps. A YAC contig over the AIH2 critical region including several potential candidate genes was constructed. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Changes in causes of death and risk of cancer in Danish patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney didease and end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørskov, Bjarne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo Friis; Strandgaard, Svend Valdemar

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background. With the improved prognosis in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), causes of death and the risk of cancer might have changed. This was investigated in a Danish population with ADPKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) between 1 January 1993 and 31...... December 2008. Methods. Data were retrieved from three Danish national registries and a total of 823 patients were identified of which 431 had died during the study period. The 16 years were divided into two 8-year periods and the causes of death were divided into six categories: cancer, cardiovascular...... (HR) 0.65, P = 0.008] and deaths from cerebrovascular disease decreased by 69% (HR 0.31, P = 0.0003) from the first to the second time period. There were no significant changes between the time periods in death from cancer, infection, other or unknown. From the first to the second 8-year interval...

  2. Rapamycin reduces kidney volume and delays the loss of renal function in a patient with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Peces, Carlos; Pérez-Dueñas, Virginia; Cuesta-López, Emilio; Azorín, Sebastián; Selgas, Rafael

    2009-04-01

    This is the first report of a case of a reduction in kidney volume and preservation of renal function in a patient with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) receiving rapamycin. A 42-year-old man with ADPKD and a severe persistent bleeding from his solitary left kidney was successfully treated with tranexamic acid (TXA). He also received low-dose rapamycin for 8 months, and this was associated with a 23.5% reduction in kidney volume, improvement and stabilization of renal function, and normalization of haemoglobin levels. When treatment with rapamycin was interrupted, renal function deteriorated within an 8-month period and haemodialysis (HD) became necessary. Kidney volume increased at once, and life-threatening bleeding prompted a nephrectomy 4 months after the onset of HD. These data suggest that the reduction in kidney volume and preservation of renal function with rapamycin could be the result of the antiangiogenic, antiproliferative effects of rapamycin.

  3. Urinary N-acetyl-β-D glucosaminidase as a surrogate marker for renal function in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: 1 year prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hayne

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal failure is one of the most serious complications associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. To date, early markers have failed to predict renal function deterioration at the early stages. This 1-year prospective study evaluated N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG as a new surrogate marker for renal function in ADPKD. Methods A total of 270 patients were enrolled in the study, and we measured urinary NAG, β2-microglobulin, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1 prospectively for 1 year to compare their predictive values for renal function. Results Baseline urinary NAG/Cr was negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR (r2 = 0.153, P r2 = 0.113, P  Conclusions Urinary NAG/Cr may be a useful surrogate marker for renal function in ADPKD patients.

  4. Examination of the presynaptic dopaminergic system using positron emission tomography in a family with autosomal dominant parkinsonism and dementia due to pallido-ponto-nigral degeneration (PPNO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, M. [Neurodegenerative Disorders Centre, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]|[Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany); Wszolek, Z.K. [Neurodegenerative Disorders Centre, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]|[Section of Neurology, Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Pfeiffer, R.F. [Section of Neurology, Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Calne, D.B. [Neurodegenerative Disorders Centre, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    1993-12-31

    We report positron emission tomography (PET) examinations of presynaptic nigrostriatal dopaminergic function in a large family with an autosomal dominant neuro-degenerative disorder characterized pathologically by pallido-ponto-nigral degeneration, and clinically by parkinsonism, dystonia, paresis of conjugate gaze, apraxia of eyelid opening and closing, pyramidal tract dysfunction, and urinary incontinence. Dopaminergic function was studied and quantified with [{sup 18}F]-L-6-fluorodopa (6 FD) and PET in five affected patients, 13 individuals at-risk, and 15 similarly aged controls. The rate constant K{sub i} (mL/striatum/min) for 6 FD was decreased in all patients. None of the individuals at risk had reduced 6 FD uptake. In fact, three of them had increased values. Repeat scans have revealed a fall in 6 FD uptake in two out of the three with initially high constants. This may reflect a preclinical stage of involvement, but longer observation is necessary. (orig.) [Deutsch] Wir berichten ueber Untersuchungen der praesynaptischen dopaminergen Funktion mit der Positronenemissionstomographie bei einer grossen Familie mit autosomal-dominant vererbtem Parkinsonismus und Demenz. Die Erkrankung ist pathologisch-anatomisch gekennzeichnet durch eine pallido-ponto-nigrale Degeneration. Klinisch bestehen ein Parkinsonismus, Dystonien, eine Apraxie der Augenoeffnung und -schliessung, pyramidale Dysfunktionen und eine Harninkontinenz. Die praesynaptische dopaminerge Funktion wurde untersucht und quantifiziert mittels [{sup 18}F]-L-6-Fluorodopa (6FD) PET bei fuenf erkrankten Patienten, 13 Risikopatienten und 15 Kontrollpersonen vergleichbaren Alters. Die Transportkonstante K{sub i} (ml/Striatum/min) fuer die striatale Aufnahme des Radiotracers war bei allen erkrankten Patienten erniedrigt. Von den 13 Risikopatienten hatte keiner eine reduzierte Aufnahme von 6FD. Drei Risikopatienten zeigten sogar Werte fuer K{sub i}, die oberhalb des Referenzbereiches der Kontrollpersonen lagen

  5. Targeted deletion of the Nesp55 DMR defines another Gnas imprinting control region and provides a mouse model of autosomal dominant PHP-Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Leopold F; Mrakovcic, Maria; Steinborn, Ralf; Chung, Ung-Il; Bastepe, Murat; Jüppner, Harald

    2010-05-18

    Approximately 100 genes undergo genomic imprinting. Mutations in fewer than 10 imprinted genetic loci, including GNAS, are associated with complex human diseases that differ phenotypically based on the parent transmitting the mutation. Besides the ubiquitously expressed Gsalpha, which is of broad biological importance, GNAS gives rise to an antisense transcript and to several Gsalpha variants that are transcribed from the nonmethylated parental allele. We previously identified two almost identical GNAS microdeletions extending from exon NESP55 to antisense (AS) exon 3 (delNESP55/delAS3-4). When inherited maternally, both deletions are associated with erasure of all maternal GNAS methylation imprints and autosomal-dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib, a disorder characterized by parathyroid hormone-resistant hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. As for other imprinting disorders, the mechanisms resulting in abnormal GNAS methylation are largely unknown, in part because of a paucity of suitable animal models. We now showed in mice that deletion of the region equivalent to delNESP55/delAS3-4 on the paternal allele (DeltaNesp55(p)) leads to healthy animals without Gnas methylation changes. In contrast, mice carrying the deletion on the maternal allele (DeltaNesp55(m)) showed loss of all maternal Gnas methylation imprints, leading in kidney to increased 1A transcription and decreased Gsalpha mRNA levels, and to associated hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Besides representing a murine autosomal-dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib model and one of only few animal models for imprinted human disorders, our findings suggest that the Nesp55 differentially methylated region is an additional principal imprinting control region, which directs Gnas methylation and thereby affects expression of all maternal Gnas-derived transcripts.

  6. Expanding the clinical phenotype associated with ELOVL4 mutation: study of a large French-Canadian family with autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia and erythrokeratodermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadieux-Dion, Maxime; Turcotte-Gauthier, Maude; Noreau, Anne; Martin, Caroline; Meloche, Caroline; Gravel, Micheline; Drouin, Christian Allen; Rouleau, Guy A; Nguyen, Dang Khoa; Cossette, Patrick

    2014-04-01

    The autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a complex group of neurodegenerative disorders with significant genetic heterogeneity. Despite the identification of 20 SCA genes, the cause of the disorder in a significant proportion of families with SCA remains unexplained. In 1972, a French-Canadian family segregating a combination of SCA and erythrokeratodermia variabilis (EKV) in an autosomal dominant fashion was described. To map and identify the causative gene in this large family with SCA and EKV using a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing. A total of 32 individuals from the family have undergone complete neurologic and dermatologic examinations. Mutations in ELOVL4 have been reported in families with macular degeneration. Recently, homozygous mutations were found in patients with ichthyosis, spastic paraplegia, and severe neurodevelopmental defects. In the present study, we report on a heterozygote mutation in ELOVL4 in affected individuals from the family with SCA and EKV. The mutation segregates with a milder phenotype consisting of early-onset patches of erythema and hyperkeratosis, as well as SCA manifesting in the fourth or fifth decade of life. We describe the mapping and the identification of a c.504G>C transversion in ELOVL4 resulting in the p.L168F substitution. We also provide clinical characterization of the phenotypes in 19 mutation carriers. We report, to our knowledge, the first mutation in ELOVL4 that is associated with SCA and EKV. This gene encodes a member of the elongase family, which is responsible for the elongation of very long-chain fatty acids (at least 26 carbons). These fatty acids participate in a wide variety of physiological functions, including skin barrier formation and peroxisome β-oxidation. Overall, these results provide additional insight into the pathogenesis of these complex neurodegenerative disorders.

  7. Generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell line, IBMS-iPSC-014-05, from a female autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patient carrying a common mutation of R803X in PKD2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ching Ho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is one of the most commonly inherited forms of polycystic kidney disease, and is characterized by the growth of numerous cysts in both kidneys. Here we generated an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of a 63-year-old female ADPKD patient carrying an R803X mutation in the PKD2 gene using the Sendai-virus delivery system. Downstream characterization of these iPSCs showed that they possessed normal karyotyping, were free of genomic integration, retained the disease-causing PKD2 mutation, expressed pluripotency markers and could differentiate into three germ layers.

  8. Complex Segregation Analysis Provides Evidence for Autosomal Dominant Transmission in the Chinese Han Families with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutong Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Familial aggregation of ankylosing spondylitis (AS has been frequently noticed. However, the mode of inheritance in AS remains poorly understood. Our aim was to determine the mode of inheritance best fitting the observed transmission pattern of AS families. Methods. Families with 5 or more AS patients diagnosed with 1984 modified New York criteria were recruited. We performed complex segregation analysis for a binary trait in regressive multivariate logistic models. The inheritance models, including sporadic, major gene, environmental, general, and other 9 models, were compared by likelihood ratio tests and Akaike’s Information Criterion. Results. This research included 9 Chinese Han AS families with a total number of 315 persons, including 74 patients. First, familial association was determined. Sporadic with familial association model was rejected when compared with either the general model or the homogeneous general model (p<0.001. The environmental model was also rejected when compared with general models (p<0.02. Mendelian dominate mode fitted best in 5 AS families, while Tau AB free model best explained the mode of inheritance in these AS families. Conclusion. This study provided evidence in support of Mendelian dominant mode and firstly discovered a non-Mendelian mode called tau AB free inheritance mode in AS.

  9. A Mutation in LIPN, Encoding Epidermal Lipase N, Causes a Late-Onset Form of Autosomal-Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israeli, Shirli; Khamaysi, Ziyad; Fuchs-Telem, Dana; Nousbeck, Janna; Bergman, Reuven; Sarig, Ofer; Sprecher, Eli

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive congenital ichthyoses represent a large and heterogeneous group of disorders of epidermal cornification. Recent data suggest that most of these disorders might result from defective lipid transport and metabolism. In the present study, we describe a late-onset form of recessive ichthyosis in a large consanguineous pedigree. By using a combination of homozygosity mapping and positional candidate-gene screening, we identified a 2 bp deletion in LIPN that segregated with the disease phenotype throughout the family. LIPN encodes one of six acid lipases known to be involved in triglyceride metabolism in mammals . LIPN was found to be exclusively expressed in the epidermis and to be strongly induced during keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:21439540

  10. Mutations in PCDH21 cause autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Elsebet; Batbayli, M; Dunø, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy is a retinal dystrophy with early loss of cone photoreceptors and a parallel or subsequent loss of rod photoreceptors. It may be syndromic, but most forms are non-syndromic with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive inheritance.......Cone-rod dystrophy is a retinal dystrophy with early loss of cone photoreceptors and a parallel or subsequent loss of rod photoreceptors. It may be syndromic, but most forms are non-syndromic with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive inheritance....

  11. Autosomal recessive transmission of a rare KRT74 variant causes hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia: allelism with dominant woolly hair/hypotrichosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykova, Doroteya; Klar, Joakim; Azhar, Aysha; Khan, Tahir Naeem; Malik, Naveed Altaf; Iqbal, Muhammad; Tariq, Muhammad; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Dahl, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    Pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia (PHNED) comprises a heterogeneous group of rare heritable disorders characterized by brittle hair, hypotrichosis, onychodystrophy and micronychia. Autosomal recessive (AR) PHNED has previously been associated with mutations in either KRT85 or HOXC13 on chromosome 12p11.1-q14.3. We investigated a consanguineous Pakistani family with AR PHNED linked to the keratin gene cluster on 12p11.1 but without detectable mutations in KRT85 and HOXC13. Whole exome sequencing of affected individuals revealed homozygosity for a rare c.821T>C variant (p.Phe274Ser) in the KRT74 gene that segregates AR PHNED in the family. The transition alters the highly conserved Phe274 residue in the coil 1B domain required for long-range dimerization of keratins, suggesting that the mutation compromises the stability of intermediate filaments. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses confirmed a strong keratin-74 expression in the nail matrix, the nail bed and the hyponychium of mouse distal digits, as well as in normal human hair follicles. Furthermore, hair follicles and epidermis of an affected family member stained negative for Keratin-74 suggesting a loss of function mechanism mediated by the Phe274Ser substitution. Our observations show for the first time that homozygosity for a KRT74 missense variant may be associated with AR PHNED. Heterozygous KRT74 mutations have previously been associated with autosomal dominant woolly hair/hypotrichosis simplex (ADWH). Thus, our findings expand the phenotypic spectrum associated with KRT74 mutations and imply that a subtype of AR PHNED is allelic with ADWH.

  12. Autosomal recessive transmission of a rare KRT74 variant causes hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia: allelism with dominant woolly hair/hypotrichosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doroteya Raykova

    Full Text Available Pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia (PHNED comprises a heterogeneous group of rare heritable disorders characterized by brittle hair, hypotrichosis, onychodystrophy and micronychia. Autosomal recessive (AR PHNED has previously been associated with mutations in either KRT85 or HOXC13 on chromosome 12p11.1-q14.3. We investigated a consanguineous Pakistani family with AR PHNED linked to the keratin gene cluster on 12p11.1 but without detectable mutations in KRT85 and HOXC13. Whole exome sequencing of affected individuals revealed homozygosity for a rare c.821T>C variant (p.Phe274Ser in the KRT74 gene that segregates AR PHNED in the family. The transition alters the highly conserved Phe274 residue in the coil 1B domain required for long-range dimerization of keratins, suggesting that the mutation compromises the stability of intermediate filaments. Immunohistochemical (IHC analyses confirmed a strong keratin-74 expression in the nail matrix, the nail bed and the hyponychium of mouse distal digits, as well as in normal human hair follicles. Furthermore, hair follicles and epidermis of an affected family member stained negative for Keratin-74 suggesting a loss of function mechanism mediated by the Phe274Ser substitution. Our observations show for the first time that homozygosity for a KRT74 missense variant may be associated with AR PHNED. Heterozygous KRT74 mutations have previously been associated with autosomal dominant woolly hair/hypotrichosis simplex (ADWH. Thus, our findings expand the phenotypic spectrum associated with KRT74 mutations and imply that a subtype of AR PHNED is allelic with ADWH.

  13. A novel DFNA36 mutation in TMC1 orthologous to the Beethoven (Bth) mouse associated with autosomal dominant hearing loss in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yali; Wang, Dayong; Zong, Liang; Zhao, Feifan; Guan, Liping; Zhang, Peng; Shi, Wei; Lan, Lan; Wang, Hongyang; Li, Qian; Han, Bing; Yang, Ling; Jin, Xin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Wang, Qiuju

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the transmembrane channel-like gene 1 (TMC1) can cause both DFNA36 and DFNB7/11 hearing loss. More than thirty DFNB7/11 mutations have been reported, but only three DFNA36 mutations were reported previously. In this study, we found a large Chinese family with 222 family members showing post-lingual, progressive sensorineural hearing loss which were consistent with DFNA36 hearing loss. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) test of the youngest patient showed a special result with nearly normal threshold but prolonged latency, decreased amplitude, and the abnormal waveform morphology. Exome sequencing of the proband found four candidate variants in known hearing loss genes. Sanger sequencing in all family members found a novel variant c.1253T>A (p.M418K) in TMC1 at DFNA36 that co-segregated with the phenotype. This mutation in TMC1 is orthologous to the mutation found in the hearing loss mouse model named Bth ten years ago. In another 51 Chinese autosomal dominant hearing loss families, we screened the segments containing the dominant mutations of TMC1 and no functional variants were found. TMC1 is expressed in the hair cells in inner ear. Given the already known roles of TMC1 in the mechanotransduction in the cochlea and its expression in inner ear, our results may provide an interesting perspective into its function in inner ear.

  14. Novel resistance to Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV in codling moth shows autosomal and dominant inheritance and confers cross-resistance to different CpGV genome groups.

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    Annette J Sauer

    Full Text Available Commercial Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV products have been successfully applied to control codling moth (CM in organic and integrated fruit production for more than 30 years. Since 2005, resistance against the widely used isolate CpGV-M has been reported from different countries in Europe. The inheritance of this so-called type I resistance is dominant and linked to the Z chromosome. Recently, a second form (type II of CpGV resistance in CM was reported from a field population (NRW-WE in Germany. Type II resistance confers reduced susceptibility not only to CpGV-M but to most known CpGV isolates and it does not follow the previously described Z-linked inheritance of type I resistance. To further analyze type II resistance, two CM strains, termed CpR5M and CpR5S, were generated from parental NRW-WE by repeated mass crosses and selection using the two isolates CpGV-M and CpGV-S, respectively. Both CpR5M and CpR5S were considered to be genetically homogeneous for the presence of the resistance allele(s. By crossing and backcrossing experiments with a susceptible CM strain, followed by resistance testing of the offspring, an autosomal dominant inheritance of resistance was elucidated. In addition, cross-resistance to CpGV-M and CpGV-S was detected in both strains, CpR5M and CpR5S. To test the hypothesis that the autosomal inheritance of type II resistance was caused by a large interchromosomal rearrangement involving the Z chromosome, making type I resistance appear to be autosomal in these strains; fluorescence in situ hybridization with bacterial artificial chromosome probes (BAC-FISH was used to physically map the Z chromosomes of different CM strains. Conserved synteny of the Z-linked genes in CpR5M and other CM strains rejects this hypothesis and argues for a novel genetic and functional mode of resistance in CM populations with type II resistance.

  15. Novel resistance to Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV) in codling moth shows autosomal and dominant inheritance and confers cross-resistance to different CpGV genome groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Annette J; Fritsch, Eva; Undorf-Spahn, Karin; Nguyen, Petr; Marec, Frantisek; Heckel, David G; Jehle, Johannes A

    2017-01-01

    Commercial Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV) products have been successfully applied to control codling moth (CM) in organic and integrated fruit production for more than 30 years. Since 2005, resistance against the widely used isolate CpGV-M has been reported from different countries in Europe. The inheritance of this so-called type I resistance is dominant and linked to the Z chromosome. Recently, a second form (type II) of CpGV resistance in CM was reported from a field population (NRW-WE) in Germany. Type II resistance confers reduced susceptibility not only to CpGV-M but to most known CpGV isolates and it does not follow the previously described Z-linked inheritance of type I resistance. To further analyze type II resistance, two CM strains, termed CpR5M and CpR5S, were generated from parental NRW-WE by repeated mass crosses and selection using the two isolates CpGV-M and CpGV-S, respectively. Both CpR5M and CpR5S were considered to be genetically homogeneous for the presence of the resistance allele(s). By crossing and backcrossing experiments with a susceptible CM strain, followed by resistance testing of the offspring, an autosomal dominant inheritance of resistance was elucidated. In addition, cross-resistance to CpGV-M and CpGV-S was detected in both strains, CpR5M and CpR5S. To test the hypothesis that the autosomal inheritance of type II resistance was caused by a large interchromosomal rearrangement involving the Z chromosome, making type I resistance appear to be autosomal in these strains; fluorescence in situ hybridization with bacterial artificial chromosome probes (BAC-FISH) was used to physically map the Z chromosomes of different CM strains. Conserved synteny of the Z-linked genes in CpR5M and other CM strains rejects this hypothesis and argues for a novel genetic and functional mode of resistance in CM populations with type II resistance.

  16. Medical resource utilization and costs associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in the USA: a retrospective matched cohort analysis of private insurer data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knight T

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Tyler Knight,1 Caroline Schaefer,1 Holly Krasa,2 Dorothee Oberdhan,2 Arlene Chapman,3 Ronald D Perrone4 1Covance Market Access Services Inc., Gaithersburg, MD, 2Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development and Commercialization, Inc., Rockville, MD, 3Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 4Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Background: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD results in kidney cyst development and enlargement, resulting in chronic kidney disease (CKD leading to renal failure. This study sought to determine if ADPKD patients in the early stages of CKD contribute to a sizable economic burden for the US health care system. Methods: This was a retrospective, matched cohort study, reviewing medical resource utilization (MRU and costs for adults in a US private-payer claims database with a diagnosis code of ADPKD (ICD-9-CM 753.13. ADPKD patients were matched by age grouping (0–17, 18–34, 35–44, 45–54, 55–64, and 65+ years and sex to controls to understand the burden of ADPKD. Descriptive statistics on 6-month MRU and costs were assessed by CKD stages, dialysis use, or previous renal transplant. Results: The analysis included ADPKD patients in CKD stages 1–5 (n=316 to n=860, dialysis (n=586, and post-transplant (n=615. Mean ages did not differ across CKD stages (range 43–56 years. Men were the majority in the later stages but the minority in the early stages. The proportion of patients with at least one hospitalization increased with CKD stage, (12% to >40% CKD stage 2 to stage 5, dialysis or post-transplant. The majority had at least one hospital outpatient visit and at least one pharmacy claim. Total 6-month per-patient costs were greater among ADPKD patients than in age-matched and sex-matched healthy non-ADPKD controls (P<0.001 for all comparisons. Conclusion: ADPKD patients with normal kidney function are associated with a significant economic burden to the health care system

  17. Associations Between Biomarkers and Age in the Presenilin 1 E280A Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease Kindred A Cross-sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, Adam S.; Chen, Kewei; Quiroz, Yakeel T.; Jakimovich, Laura J.; Gomez, Madelyn Gutierrez; Langois, Carolyn M.; Langbaum, Jessica B. S.; Roontiva, Auttawut; Thiyyagura, Pradeep; Lee, Wendy; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Lopez, Liliana; Moreno, Sonia; Muñoz, Claudia; Tirado, Victoria; Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Fagan, Anne M.; Giraldo, Margarita; Garcia, Gloria; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Tariot, Pierre N.; Lopera, Francisco; Reiman, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Age-associated changes in brain imaging and fluid biomarkers are characterized and compared in presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation carriers and noncarriers from the world’s largest known autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (AD) kindred. OBJECTIVE To characterize and compare age-associated changes in brain imaging and fluid biomarkers in PSEN1 E280A mutation carriers and noncarriers. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional measures of 18F-florbetapir positron emission tomography, 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, structural magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and plasma biomarkers of AD were assessed from 54 PSEN1 E280A kindred members (age range, 20-59 years). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We used brain mapping algorithms to compare regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose and gray matter volumes in cognitively unimpaired mutation carriers and noncarriers. We used regression analyses to characterize associations between age and the mean cortical to pontine 18F-florbetapir standard uptake value ratios, precuneus cerebral metabolic rates for glucose, hippocampal gray matter volume, CSF Aβ1-42, total tau and phosphorylated tau181, and plasma Aβ measurements. Age at onset of progressive biomarker changes that distinguish carriers from noncarriers was estimated using best-fitting regression models. RESULTS Compared with noncarriers, cognitively unimpaired mutation carriers had significantly lower precuneus cerebral metabolic rates for glucose, smaller hippocampal volume, lower CSF Aβ1-42, higher CSF total tau and phosphorylated tau181, and higher plasma Aβ1-42 measurements. Sequential changes in biomarkers were seen at age 20 years (95% CI, 14-24 years) for CSF Aβ1-42, age 16 years (95% CI, 11-24 years) for the mean cortical 18F-florbetapir standard uptake value ratio, age 15 years (95% CI, 10-24 years) for precuneus cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, age 15 years (95% CI, 7-20 years) for CSF total tau

  18. Rationale and design of the TEMPO (Tolvaptan Efficacy and Safety in Management of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease and its Outcomes) 3-4 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Vicente E; Meijer, Esther; Bae, Kyongtae T; Chapman, Arlene B; Devuyst, Olivier; Gansevoort, Ron T; Grantham, Jared J; Higashihara, Eiji; Perrone, Ronald D; Krasa, Holly B; Ouyang, John J; Czerwiec, Frank S

    2011-05-01

    Current management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is focused on treating disease complications, not on slowing cyst development or preventing progression to kidney failure. Tolvaptan, a selective vasopressin V2 (vasopressin 2) receptor antagonist, has been proved to inhibit kidney cyst growth and preserve kidney function in multiple animal models of polycystic kidney disease. The TEMPO (Tolvaptan Efficacy and Safety in Management of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease and Its Outcomes) 3-4 Study will examine the long-term effectiveness and safety of tolvaptan in patients with ADPKD. We report baseline characteristics and revised power calculations for the trial. A prospective, 3-year, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of tolvaptan, a selective V2 receptor antagonist. Primary outcome is total kidney volume percentage of change from baseline for tolvaptan relative to placebo. Secondary outcome parameters include time to ADPKD-associated complications (kidney function decrease, blood pressure control, renal pain, and albuminuria) and safety end points. This trial includes patients with ADPKD with relatively preserved kidney function (baseline estimated creatinine clearance ≥60 mL/min), aged 50 years or younger, and with total kidney volume measured using magnetic resonance imaging ≥750 mL. Administration of placebo or tolvaptan, dose titrated to tolerance. Number of subjects enrolled and baseline characteristics. Total kidney volume, kidney function, albuminuria, kidney pain, and vital signs. 1,445 patients with ADPKD were enrolled between March 2007 and January 2009. Preliminary baseline median total kidney volume was 1.46 L, and estimated creatinine clearance was 105 ± 34 mL/min. A prespecified blinded sample-size recalculation at two-thirds enrollment confirmed the likely power of the study to detect 20% differences from placebo in the primary and key secondary end points at P < 0.05. This is a preselected

  19. Relationship of Copeptin, a Surrogate Marker for Arginine Vasopressin, With Change in Total Kidney Volume and GFR Decline in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease : Results From the CRISP Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boertien, Wendy E.; Meijer, Esther; Li, Jie; Bost, James E.; Struck, Joachim; Flessner, Michael F.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Torres, Vicente E.

    Background: Experimental studies indicate that arginine vasopressin (AVP) may have deleterious effects in the pathogenesis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). However, the significance of AVP in human ADPKD is unclear. Study Design: Longitudinal observational study with 8.5

  20. Mandibulofacial syndrome with growth and mental retardation, microcephaly, ear anomalies with skin tags, and cleft palate in a mother and her son: autosomal dominant or X-linked syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guion-Almeida, Maria Leine; Vendramini-Pittoli, Siulan; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita Santos; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli Maria

    2009-12-01

    We report on a Brazilian mother and her son affected with mandibulofacial dysostosis, growth and mental retardation, microcephaly, first branchial arch anomalies, and cleft palate. To date only three males and one female, all sporadic cases, with a similar condition have been reported. This article describes the first familial case with this rare condition indicating autosomal dominant or X-linked inheritance.

  1. Recommendations for the use of tolvaptan in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease : a position statement on behalf of the ERA-EDTA Working Groups on Inherited Kidney Disorders and European Renal Best Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gansevoort, Ron T; Arici, Mustafa; Benzing, Thomas; Birn, Henrik; Capasso, Giovambattista; Covic, Adrian; Devuyst, Olivier; Drechsler, Christiane; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Emma, Francesco; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Le Meur, Yannick; Massy, Ziad A; Ong, Albert C M; Ortiz, Alberto; Schaefer, Franz; Torra, Roser; Vanholder, Raymond; Więcek, Andrzej; Zoccali, Carmine; Van Biesen, Wim

    Recently, the European Medicines Agency approved the use of the vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist tolvaptan to slow the progression of cyst development and renal insufficiency of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in adult patients with chronic kidney disease stages 1-3 at

  2. CTGF Is Expressed During Cystic Remodeling in the PKD/Mhm (cy/+) Rat Model for Autosomal-Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauer, Stefan; Holzmann, Yvonne; Kränzlin, Bettina; Hoffmann, Sigrid C; Gretz, Norbert; Hauser, Ingeborg A; Goppelt-Struebe, Margarete; Geiger, Helmut; Obermüller, Nicholas

    2017-12-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, also named CCN2) plays an important role in the development of tubulointerstitial fibrosis, which most critically determines the progression to end-stage renal failure in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), the most common genetically caused renal disease. We determined CTGF expression in a well-characterized animal model of human ADPKD, the PKD/Mhm (cy/+) rat. Kidneys of 12 weeks old (cy/+) as well as (+/+) non-affected rats were analyzed for CTGF RNA and protein expression by RT-PCR, Northern and Western blot analyses, in situ hybridization, and IHC. Besides the established expression of CTGF in glomerular cells in kidneys of wild-type (+/+) animals, in (cy/+) rats, CTGF mRNA and protein were robustly expressed in interstitial, stellate-shaped cells, located in a scattered pattern underlying the cystic epithelium and in focal areas of advanced tubulointerstitial remodeling. Renal CTGF mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly higher in (cy/+) rats compared with their (+/+) littermates. Detection of CTGF expression in cells adjacent to cystic epithelium and in areas of marked fibrosis suggests a role in the local response to cyst development and indicates that CTGF may be a relevant factor contributing to tubulointerstitial fibrosis in polycystic kidney disease.

  3. A missense mutation in the alpha-actinin 1 gene (ACTN1 is the cause of autosomal dominant macrothrombocytopenia in a large French family.

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    Paul Guéguen

    Full Text Available Inherited thrombocytopenia is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by a reduced number of blood platelets. Despite the identification of nearly 20 causative genes in the past decade, approximately half of all subjects with inherited thrombocytopenia still remain unexplained in terms of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. Here we report a six-generation French pedigree with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and the identification of its genetic basis. Of the 55 subjects available for analysis, 26 were diagnosed with isolated macrothrombocytopenia. Genome-wide linkage analysis mapped a 10.9 Mb locus to chromosome 14 (14q22 with a LOD score of 7.6. Candidate gene analysis complemented by targeted next-generation sequencing identified a missense mutation (c.137GA; p.Arg46Gln in the alpha-actinin 1 gene (ACTN1 that segregated with macrothrombocytopenia in this large pedigree. The missense mutation occurred within actin-binding domain of alpha-actinin 1, a functionally critical domain that crosslinks actin filaments into bundles. The evaluation of cultured mutation-harboring megakaryocytes by electron microscopy and the immunofluorescence examination of transfected COS-7 cells suggested that the mutation causes disorganization of the cellular cytoplasm. Our study concurred with a recently published whole-exome sequence analysis of six small Japanese families with congenital macrothrombocytopenia, adding ACTN1 to the growing list of thrombocytopenia genes.

  4. SPM analysis of brain perfusion SPECT and F-18 FDG PET in the Korean autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Kyoung Sook; Zeon, Seok Kil

    2004-01-01

    This study attempted to investigate the specific pattern of brain perfusion and glucose metabolism in the Korean autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) family. Using Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT. we assessed brain perfusion in 6 patients at interictal period and 5 patients at ictal period. Interictal F-18 FDG PET was performed on 6 affected family members. The scans were statistically analyzed by using statistical parametric mapping (SPM99). The data of the affected family members were compared to those of the control subjects. Interictal F-18 FDG PET SPM group analysis showed decreased glucose metabolism over the left middle and superior frontal gyri and the left central regions including the anterior parietal lobe. There was a less pronounced decrease in glucose uptake in the right anterior superior frontal gyrus. Interictal brain perfusion SPECT SPM group analysis showed similar pattern of decreased perfusion compared to those of interictal F-18 FDG PET. Ictal brain perfusion SPECT SPM group analysis revealed increased perfusion over the left pre-and postcentral gyri and less pronounced increased perfusion in the right postcentral gyrus. lnterictal F -18 PET and brain perfusion SPECT SPM group analysis suggest that major abnormalities of ADNFLE family are in the left frontal lobe. These findings may be helpful to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanism of this rare disease entity

  5. Effect of long period treatment with erythropoiesis stimulating agents on clinically and laboratory parameters in hemodialysis autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients

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    Orăsan Olga Hilda

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The study of dialysis patients not needing erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA for long periods of time has gained interest lately. The aim of this study was to compare laboratory and clinical parameters in hemodialysis patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD treated or not with ESA. Methods. Forty-six hemodialysis ADPKD patients were studied for 8 months and they were divided into: group 1- 29 patients who received ESA during the study period and group 2- 17 patients with no ESA treatment. The following parameters were determined: weekly treatment time, body mass index (BMI, pre-session diastolic blood pressure (DBP, pre-session systolic blood pressure (SBP, blood volume processed (BVD, interdialytic body weight gain (IBWG, spKt/V -K/DOQI formula (Kt/V, urea distribution volume (UDV, hemoglobin (Hb, ferritin, transferrin saturation (TSAT, serum phosphate, total serum calcium, normalized protein catabolic ratio (nPCR, albumin, and intact parathormone (PTH. Results. Patients not requiring ESA were more likely to be men, had higher Hb, albumin, total serum calcium levels, IBWG, UDV, BVP, and weekly treatment time. They had lower ferritin, TSAT, SBP. There was no difference regarding DBP, BMI, serum phosphate, PTH, Kt/V, and nPCR. Conclusion. Hemodialysis ADPKD patients not treated with ESA seem to be better nourished, with a slightly better SBP control, with longer dialysis time and increased Hb (despite lower iron loading markers, compared to hemodialysis ADPKD patients treated with ESA.

  6. Whole exome sequencing identifies a pathogenic mutation in WFS1 in two large Chinese families with autosomal dominant all-frequency hearing loss and prenatal counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hongbo; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Wenbin; Meng, Qingxia; Wang, Fuxin; Liu, Minjuan; Mao, Jun; Shi, Yichao; Wang, Wei; Li, Hong

    2018-03-01

    To identify the pathogenic mutation and provide prenatal counseling and diagnosis in two large Chinese families with autosomal dominant all-frequency hearing loss. Whole exome sequencing technology was used to identify the pathogenic mutation of the two families. In addition, 298 patients with sporadic hearing loss and 400 normal controls were studied to verify the mutation/polymorphism nature of the identified variant. Prenatal diagnosis was carried out. A rare missense mutation c.2389G > A (p.D572N) in the Wolframin syndrome 1 (WFS1) gene was identified. It was reported in only one previous Chinese study, and never in other populations/ethnicities. The mutation was also found in one patient with sporadic hearing loss (1/298, 0.3%). A healthy baby was born after prenatal diagnosis. Our findings strongly suggest that the c.2389G > A mutation in WFS1 is associated with all-frequency hearing loss, rather than low- or high-frequency loss. So far, the mutation is only reported in Chinese. Prenatal diagnosis and prenatal counseling is available for these two Chinese families. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Atypical Association of Ethmoidal Encephalocele and Hydrocephalus in an Adult Patient with Autosomal-Dominant Osteopetrosis Type I (ADO-I): A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, Zefferino; Castellani, Carlotta; Borsa, Stefano; Carrabba, Giorgio; Locatelli, Marco; Di Cristofori, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Osteopetroses are a heterogeneous group of heritable disorders characterized by increased bone density as the result of defective osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. The autosomal-dominant osteopetrosis type I (ADO-I) is defined by the presence of osteosclerosis involving mainly the skull bones, variably associated with compression of the foramina of cranial nerves and vascular structures, hypertelorism, exophthalmos, and less commonly with hydrocephalus, pseudotumor, and Chiari malformation type I. We describe an adult patient with ADO-I presenting with an atypical association of clinical manifestations that required a tailored management. On admission, the patient complained about chronic headache, recurrent sinusitis, and postnasal drip. Findings of the examination didn't show clear signs of increased intracranial pressure, whereas imaging studies revealed thickening of the skull bones and an unexpected fistula associated with anterior ethmoidal meningoencephalocele. Some days after endoscopic transnasal closure of the fistula, a severe hypertensive hydrocephalus developed, which required a prompt ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement, complicated by a diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage. The 6-month follow-up showed complete recovery. After reviewing the literature, we can confirm that ours was the second case of an adult ADO-I patient associated with anterior ethmoidal meningoencephalocele, the first one needing a combined treatment of the encephalocele and hydrocephalus. Because ADO-I is a rare disease with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, our case can represent a prototype for the future management of similar cases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Aldosterone synthase gene is not a major susceptibility gene for progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

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    Gnanasambandan Ramanathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is the most common heritable kidney disease and is characterized by bilateral renal cysts. Hypertension is a frequent cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD and mortality in patients with ADPKD. The aldosterone synthase gene polymorphisms of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system have been extensively studied as hypertension candidate genes. The present study is aimed to investigate the potential modifier effect of CYP11B2 gene on the progression of CKD in ADPKD. One hundred and two ADPKD patients and 106 healthy controls were recruited based on Ravine inclusion and exclusion criteria. The three tag-SNPs within CYP11B2 gene (rs3802230, rs4543, and rs4544 were genotyped using FRET-based KASPar method. Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to assess the potential associations between these polymorphisms and CKD stages. Mantel- Haenszel stratified analysis was used to explore confounding and interaction effects of these polymorphisms. Of the three tag-SNPs genotyped, rs4544 polymorphism was monomorphic and rs3802230 deviated Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The CYP11B2 tag-SNPs did not show significant association with ADPKD or CKD. Further, these polymorphisms did not exhibit confounding effect on the relationship between CKD progression and hypertension. Our results suggest that aldosterone synthase gene is not a major susceptibility gene for progression of CKD in South Indian ADPKD patients.

  9. Rationale and design of the RESOLVE trial: lanreotide as a volume reducing treatment for polycystic livers in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevers Tom JG

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large proportion of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD suffers from polycystic liver disease. Symptoms arise when liver volume increases. The somatostatin analogue lanreotide has proven to reduce liver volume in patients with polycystic liver disease. However, this study also included patients with isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD. The RESOLVE trial aims to assess the efficacy of lanreotide treatment in ADPKD patients with symptomatic polycystic livers. In this study we present the design of the RESOLVE trial. Methods/design This open-label clinical trial evaluates the effect of 6 months of lanreotide in ADPKD patients with symptomatic polycystic livers. Primary outcome is change in liver volume determined by computerised tomography-volumetry. Secondary outcomes are changes in total kidney volume, kidney intermediate volume and renal function. Furthermore, urinary (NGAL, α1-microglobulin, KIM-1, H-FABP, MCP-1 and serum (fibroblast growth factor 23 biomarkers associated with ADPKD disease severity are assessed to investigate whether these biomarkers predict treatment responses to lanreotide. Moreover, safety and tolerability of the drug in ADPKD patients will be assessed. Discussion We anticipate that lanreotide is an effective therapeutic option for ADPKD patients with symptomatic polycystic livers and that this trial aids in the identification of patient related factors that predict treatment response. Trial registration number Clinical trials.gov NCT01354405

  10. Regional association of pCASL-MRI with FDG-PET and PiB-PET in people at risk for autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lirong; Liu, Collin Y; Wong, Koon-Pong; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Mack, Wendy J; Jann, Kay; Coppola, Giovanni; Ringman, John M; Wang, Danny J J

    2018-01-01

    Autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (ADAD) is a small subset of Alzheimer's disease that is genetically determined with 100% penetrance. It provides a valuable window into studying the course of pathologic processes that leads to dementia. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI is a potential AD imaging marker that non-invasively measures cerebral perfusion. In this study, we investigated the relationship of cerebral blood flow measured by pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) MRI with measures of cerebral metabolism (FDG PET) and amyloid deposition (Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET). Thirty-one participants at risk for ADAD (age 39 ± 13 years, 19 females) were recruited into this study, and 21 of them received both MRI and FDG and PiB PET scans. Considerable variability was observed in regional correlations between ASL-CBF and FDG across subjects. Both regional hypo-perfusion and hypo-metabolism were associated with amyloid deposition. Cross-sectional analyses of each biomarker as a function of the estimated years to expected dementia diagnosis indicated an inverse relationship of both perfusion and glucose metabolism with amyloid deposition during AD development. These findings indicate that neurovascular dysfunction is associated with amyloid pathology, and also indicate that ASL CBF may serve as a sensitive early biomarker for AD. The direct comparison among the three biomarkers provides complementary information for understanding the pathophysiological process of AD.

  11. Detection of the single nucleotide polymorphism causing feline autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease in Persians from the UK using a novel real-time PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helps, Chris R; Tasker, Séverine; Barr, Frances J; Wills, Sheila J; Gruffydd-Jones, Timothy J

    2007-02-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (AD-PKD) is the most prevalent inherited genetic disease of cats, particularly affecting Persians. Until recently the condition has been diagnosed by renal ultrasound screening. With the identification of the genetic mutation responsible for AD-PKD it is now possible to use advanced molecular techniques to screen for the disease. We have developed a rapid, sensitive and specific real-time PCR genotyping assay that can detect the single nucleotide polymorphism responsible for AD-PKD. Of 72 UK Persian and Exotic Shorthair cats submitted for AD-PKD ultrasound screening, 29 were found to have the disease, 41 were negative and 2 were equivocal. The recently published PCR-RFLP method showed the AD-PKD mutation to be present in all 29 diseased cats and absent in the 41 negative and 2 equivocal cats. Our real-time PCR genotyping assay was in complete agreement with the PCR-RFLP results. Of 600 blood or buccal swabs analysed from April 2005 to January 2006, 165 were found to be AD-PKD positive and 435 were negative, giving a prevalence of 27.5%. All 194 cats with AD-PKD were found to be heterozygous for the mutation.

  12. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy under Ultrasound Guidance in Patients with Renal Calculi and Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Report of 11 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrolithiasis accelerates the renal failure in the patients with ADPKD. In order to evaluate the role of percutaneous nephrolithotomy in management of calculus in these patients, 11 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and renal stones were included in the study. Two patients had bilateral renal stones. All patients were treated by percutaneous nephrolithotomy under ultrasound guidance. 13 percutaneous nephrolithotomy procedures were performed in 1 stage by the urology team under ultrasound guidance. 5 people received second operation with flexible nephroscopy in lateral position. The success rate and morbidity and mortality of the technique and hospital stay were recorded. Results. The puncture procedure was fully successful in all cases. The renal function improved in these patients. 5 patients had moderate fever after the surgery. 5 patients received flexible nephroscopy to take out the residual calculi. 2 persons had ESWL therapy after the surgery. Conclusion. PCNL is an ideal, safe, and effective method to remove the stones from those patients with no definite increase in the risk of complication. The outcome and stone-free rate are satisfactory comparable to the PCNL in the patients without ADPKD.

  13. Feasibility of measuring renal blood flow by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spithoven, E.M.; Meijer, E.; Boertien, W.E.; Gaillard, C.A.J.M.; Jong, P.E. de; Gansevoort, R.T. [University of Groningen, Department of Nephrology, Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, PO Box 30.001, RB Groningen (Netherlands); Borns, C.; Kappert, P.; Greuter, M.J.W.; Jagt, E. van der [University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Vart, P. [University of Groningen, Department of Health Sciences, Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    Renal blood flow (RBF) has been shown to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We investigated the feasibility and accuracy of phase-contrast RBF by MRI (RBF{sub MRI}) in ADPKD patients with a wide range of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values. First, we validated RBF{sub MRI} measurement using phantoms simulating renal artery hemodynamics. Thereafter, we investigated in a test-set of 21 patients intra- and inter-observer coefficient of variation of RBF{sub MRI}. After validation, we measured RBF{sub MRI} in a cohort of 91 patients and compared the variability explained by characteristics indicative for disease severity for RBF{sub MRI} and RBF measured by continuous hippuran infusion. The correlation in flow measurement using phantoms by phase-contrast MRI was high and fluid collection was high (CCC=0.969). Technical problems that precluded RBF{sub MRI} measurement occurred predominantly in patients with a lower eGFR (34% vs. 16%). In subjects with higher eGFRs, variability in RBF explained by disease characteristics was similar for RBF{sub MRI} compared to RBF{sub Hip,} whereas in subjects with lower eGFRs, this was significantly less for RBF{sub MRI}. Our study shows that RBF can be measured accurately in ADPKD patients by phase-contrast, but this technique may be less feasible in subjects with a lower eGFR. (orig.)

  14. Expression of differentiation antigens and growth-related genes in normal kidney, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, and renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingel, R; Dippold, W; Störkel, S; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H; Köhler, H

    1992-01-01

    Cellular differentiation and mRNA levels of genes involved in kidney growth were investigated in normal kidney cells, cyst-lining epithelial cells of polycystic kidney disease, and renal carcinoma cells (RCC). All cells comparatively studied exhibited an antigenic phenotype of proximal tubular cells as shown by the expression of a panel of brush border membrane enzymes and kidney-associated cell surface antigens. The epithelial developmental antigen Exo-1 was expressed in 50% to 80% of cyst-lining epithelia in polycystic kidney tissue and in 20% to 30% of polycystic kidney cells cultured in vitro. Normal kidney cells and RCC were negative under identical culture conditions. The expression of antigen Exo-1 is associated with hyperproliferation in an epithelial tissue compartment composed of cells which have not yet reached their terminal differentiation state. Increased amounts of mRNA of the growth factor receptor system of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and its ligand transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha were associated with the malignant phenotype of RCC. Increased expression of EGF receptor and TGF-alpha, although less prominent, were also observed in polycystic kidney cells compared with normal kidney cells. In conclusion, the expression of Exo-1 in cyst-lining epithelial cells of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and the altered regulation of TGF-alpha and EGF receptor in these cells contribute to the hypothesis that hyperproliferation is an underlying pathogenic mechanism of ADPKD.

  15. Increased urinary Angiotensinogen/Creatinine (AGT/Cr) ratio may be associated with reduced renal function in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hayne Cho; Kang, Ah-Young; Jang, Joon Young; Kim, Hyunsuk; Han, Miyeun; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Kim, Seung Hyup; Noh, Jung Woo; Cheong, Hae Il; Hwang, Young-Hwan; Ahn, Curie

    2015-06-20

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of the most common hereditary kidney diseases that frequently result in renal failure. In this cross-sectional observational cohort study, we evaluated urinary angiotensinogen (AGT) as a potential biomarker to assess renal function in ADPKD. Urinary AGT was measured in 233 ADPKD patients and its association with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and height-adjusted total kidney volume (htTKV) were evaluated. The localization of AGT and other renin-angiotensin system (RAS)-related molecules were identified using immunohistochemistry in human ADPKD tissues. Baseline urinary AGT/Cr was negatively correlated with CKD-EPI eGFR (r(2) = 0.162, P urinary AGT/Cr and plasma renin activity levels were significantly elevated in hypertensive ADPKD patients. Among hypertensive subjects, urinary AGT/Cr was significantly increased in the advanced CKD stages (III-V) compared to early CKD stages (I-II) (28.6 ± 60.3 vs. 93.2 ± 139.3 μg/g, P lining epithelial cells as well as the nearby compressed tubular epithelial cells. Our results suggested that urinary AGT/Cr may be a valuable biomarker for renal damage in ADPKD since intrarenal ischemic insults induced by cyst growth and subsequent intrarenal RAS activation may play a potential role in the development of hypertension and renal dysfunction in ADPKD.

  16. Similar clinical, pathological, and genetic features in Chinese patients with autosomal recessive and dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jun; Dai, Shixu; Lu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Rui; Wang, Zhaoxia; Yuan, Yun; Lv, He

    2017-08-01

    Mutations in the ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 1 gene (GDAP1) cause rare subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2K and CMT4A). CMT2K is an axonal neuropathy while CMT4A is a demyelinating type. In a series of 169 Chinese CMT patients (79 CMT1, 52 CMT2 and 38 unclassified), four unrelated patients (2.37%) were identified with GDAP1 mutations, including two with autosomal recessive CMT2K (AR-CMT2K) and two dominant CMT2K (AD-CMT2K). All patients had disease onset before 5 years of age, and presented with muscle weakness, atrophy, and mild sensory disturbance in distal limbs. Motor nerve conduction velocities of the median nerve were within normal ranges, and compound muscle action potential ranged from 1.5 to 3.8 mV. Sural nerve biopsy revealed loss of large myelinated fibers with regeneration clusters and a few onion bulbs. Electron microscopy showed mitochondrial aggregation in both axons and Schwann cells, and neurofilament accumulation in giant unmyelinated fibers. The p.H256R mutation was found in all patients with GDAP1 compound heterozygous mutations, suggesting that it might be a common mutation in Chinese patients. This study observed no difference in the disease onset, phenotype severity, electrophysiological findings, or pathological changes between AR-CMT2K and AD-CMT2K patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of a rare COCH mutation by whole-exome sequencing : Implications for personalized therapeutic rehabilitation in an Austrian family with non-syndromic autosomal dominant late-onset hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzefall, Thomas; Frohne, Alexandra; Koenighofer, Martin; Kirchnawy, Andreas; Streubel, Berthold; Schoefer, Christian; Gstoettner, Wolfgang; Frei, Klemens; Lucas, Trevor

    2017-07-21

    Non-syndromic autosomal dominant hearing impairment is characteristically postlingual in onset. Genetic diagnostics are essential for genetic counselling, disease prognosis and understanding of the molecular mechanisms of disease. To date, 36 causative genes have been identified, many in only individual families. Gene selection for genetic screening by traditional methods and genetic diagnosis in autosomal dominant patients has therefore been fraught with difficulty. Whole-exome sequencing provides a powerful tool to analyze all protein-coding genomic regions in parallel, thus allowing the comprehensive screening of all known genes and associated alterations. In this study, a previously undiagnosed late-onset progressive autosomal dominant hearing loss in an Austrian family was investigated by means of whole-exome sequencing. Results were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. A previously described c.151C>T missense (p.Pro51Ser) mutation in the LCCL (limulus factor C, cochlin, late gestation lung protein Lgl1) domain of the cochlin gene (COCH) was identified as causative and segregated with disease in five members of the family. Molecular diagnostics led to the decision to perform cochlear implantation in an index patient who subsequently showed excellent postoperative auditory performance. The c.151C>T mutation was not found in 18 screened Austrian families with autosomal dominant hearing loss but was represented alongside other known pathogenic mutant COCH alleles in the Genome Aggregation Database (gnomAD) in European populations. A combined allele frequency of 0.000128 implies an orphan disease frequency for COCH-induced hearing loss of 1:3900 in Europe. Exome sequencing successfully resolved the genetic diagnosis in a family suffering from autosomal dominant hearing impairment and allowed prediction of purported auditory outcome after cochlear implantation in an index patient. Personalized treatment approaches based on the molecular mechanisms of disease may

  18. Identification of p.A684V missense mutation in the WFS1 gene as a frequent cause of autosomal dominant optic atrophy and hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendtorff, Nanna D; Lodahl, Marianne; Boulahbel, Houda; Johansen, Ida R; Pandya, Arti; Welch, Katherine O; Norris, Virginia W; Arnos, Kathleen S; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Emery, Sarah B; Mets, Marilyn B; Fagerheim, Toril; Eriksson, Kristina; Hansen, Lars; Bruhn, Helene; Möller, Claes; Lindholm, Sture; Ensgaard, Stefan; Lesperance, Marci M; Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth

    2011-06-01

    Optic atrophy (OA) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) are key abnormalities in several syndromes, including the recessively inherited Wolfram syndrome, caused by mutations in WFS1. In contrast, the association of autosomal dominant OA and SNHL without other phenotypic abnormalities is rare, and almost exclusively attributed to mutations in the Optic Atrophy-1 gene (OPA1), most commonly the p.R445H mutation. We present eight probands and their families from the US, Sweden, and UK with OA and SNHL, whom we analyzed for mutations in OPA1 and WFS1. Among these families, we found three heterozygous missense mutations in WFS1 segregating with OA and SNHL: p.A684V (six families), and two novel mutations, p.G780S and p.D797Y, all involving evolutionarily conserved amino acids and absent from 298 control chromosomes. Importantly, none of these families harbored the OPA1 p.R445H mutation. No mitochondrial DNA deletions were detected in muscle from one p.A684V patient analyzed. Finally, wolframin p.A684V mutant ectopically expressed in HEK cells showed reduced protein levels compared to wild-type wolframin, strongly indicating that the mutation is disease-causing. Our data support OA and SNHL as a phenotype caused by dominant mutations in WFS1 in these additional eight families. Importantly, our data provide the first evidence that a single, recurrent mutation in WFS1, p.A684V, may be a common cause of ADOA and SNHL, similar to the role played by the p.R445H mutation in OPA1. Our findings suggest that patients who are heterozygous for WFS1 missense mutations should be carefully clinically examined for OA and other manifestations of Wolfram syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Localization of a gene for an autosomal recessive form of juvenile Parkinsonism to chromosome 6q25.2-27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumine, Hiroto; Shimoda-Matsubayashi, Satoe; Nakagawa-Hattori, Yuko [Tokyo Metropolitan Ebara Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    An autosomal recessive form of juvenile Parkinsonism (AR-JP) (MIM 600116) is a levodopa-responsive Parkinsonism whose pathological finding is a highly selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the zona compacta of the substantia nigra. By linkage analysis of diallelic polymorphism of the Mn-superoxide dismutase gene (SOD2), we found a family with AR-JP showing perfect segregation of the disease with the SOD2 locus. By extending the linkage analysis to 13 families with AR-JP, we discovered strong evidence for the localization of the AR-JP gene at chromosome 6q25.2-27, including the SOD2 locus, with the maximal cumulative pairwise LOD scores of 7.26 and 7.71 at D6S305 ({theta} = .03) and D6S253 ({theta} = .02), respectively. Observation of obligate recombination events, as well as multipoint linkage analysis, placed the AR-JP gene in a 17-cM interval between D6S437 and D6S264. Delineation of the AR-JP gene will be an important step toward our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying selective degeneration of the nigral neurons. 38 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. The dominant form of the pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinidis, J; Wisniewski, T M

    1991-01-01

    The present report documents a family with three cases in two successive generations of pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD). The clinical features of these cases and histochemical and ultrastructural investigations of two of the brains from successive generations are discussed. A review of the familial cases of POLD reported in the literature is also presented. Transmission of these cases was by a dominant inheritance. Onset of the clinical symptoms occurred at 42 to 54 years of age; duration of the disease was from 2-11 years, and death occurred at 45 to 57 years of age. Clinical manifestations of all three cases were severe headaches; bilateral pyramidal, pseudobulbar, cerebellar, and frontal release signs; gait disturbances; euphoria, or apathy; epileptic seizures; and dementia. The neuropathological pattern consists of slight cerebral atrophy, brownish discoloration of the cerebral white matter with demyelination and severe gliosis, sparing the sub-cortical U fibers; presence in the macrophages of lipid pigment granules that are sudanophilic, non metachromatic, and PAS and iron positive. The electron microscopic pattern of the lipid pigment in the macrophages is that of ceroid: electron-dense, membrane-bound intracytoplasmic lysosomes with curvilinear and/or fingerprint profiles.

  1. Cyst Ablation Using a Mixture of N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate and Iodized Oil in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: the Long-Term Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, See Hyung; Kim, Seung Hyup; Cho, Jeong Yeon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    We wanted to assess the long-term results of cyst ablation with using N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) and iodized oil in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and symptomatic cysts. Cyst ablation using a mixture of NBCA and iodized oil was performed in 99 cysts from 21 patients who had such symptoms as abdominal distension and pain. The collapse or reaccumulation of the ablated cysts after the procedure was assessed during the follow-up period of 36 to 90 months. The treatment effects, including symptom relief, and the clinical data such as the blood pressure and serum creatinine levels were also assessed, together with the complications. The procedure was technically successful in all 99 cysts from the 21 patients. Any procedure-related significant complications were not detected. Seventy-seven of 99 cysts (78%) were successfully collapsed on the follow-up CT. Twenty-two cysts showed reaccumulation during long-term follow-up period. The clinical symptoms were relieved in 17 of the 21 patients (76%). Four of 12 patients (33%) with hypertension and two of six patients (33%) with azotemia were improved. End stage renal disease (ESRD) occurred in six of the 21 patients (28%) during the follow-up period. The mean age of ESRD in our patients was 57 years. The mean time interval for the development of ESRD was 19 months. Ablation using a mixture of NBCA and iodized oil may be an effective, safe method for obtaining symptom relief in patients with ADPKD.

  2. Identification and characterization of C106R, a novel mutation in the DNA-binding domain of GCMB, in a family with autosomal-dominant hypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hyon-Seung; Eom, Young Sil; Park, Ie Byung; Lee, Sangho; Hong, Suntaek; Jüppner, Harald; Mannstadt, Michael; Lee, Sihoon

    2012-05-01

    Glial cells missing B (GCMB) is a transcription factor that is expressed in the parathyroid hormone (PTH)-secreting cells of the parathyroid glands. Several mutations in GCMB have been reported to cause hypoparathyroidism (HP). We identified a family with two individuals in two generations (mother and son), who are affected by autosomal-dominant hypoparathyroidism (AD-HP). A novel heterozygous mutation in exon 2 of GCMB was identified in both affected individuals that changes cysteine at position 106 of the putative DNA-binding domain of GCMB to arginine (C106R). We performed mutational analysis of the genes encoding GCMB, pre-pro PTH, GATA3 and CaSR using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified genomic DNA. The identified GCMB mutant was characterized by functional studies including nuclear localization, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and luciferase reporter assays, and homology modelling was performed to generate a three-dimensional structural model for the DNA-binding domain of GCMB to predict the structural consequences of the identified mutation. The C106R mutant of GCMB failed to interact with the DNA consensus recognition motif, as determined by EMSA. Furthermore, in comparison with wild-type GCMB, the C106R mutant demonstrated reduced transactivation in luciferase reporter assays; however, the mutant GCMB failed to reduce the activity of the wild-type protein. Consistent with the EMSA findings, homology modelling analysis suggested that replacement of cysteine 106 with arginine would interfere with DNA binding. We have identified a novel GCMB mutation that may explain AD-HP in our family. However, the exact mechanism by which this heterozygous mutation leads to the disease in the described family remains to be elucidated. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Identification and characterization of C106R, a novel mutation in the DNA-binding domain of GCMB, in a family with autosomal-dominant hypoparathyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hyon-Seung; Eom, Young Sil; Park, Ie Byung; Lee, Sangho; Hong, Suntaek; Jüppner, Harald; Mannstadt, Michael; Lee, Sihoon

    2013-01-01

    Summary Overview Glial cells missing B (GCMB) is a transcription factor that is expressed in the parathyroid hormone (PTH)-secreting cells of the parathyroid glands. Several mutations in GCMB have been reported to cause hypoparathyroidism (HP). We identified a family with two individuals in two generations (mother and son), who are affected by autosomal-dominant hypoparathyroidism (AD-HP). A novel heterozygous mutation in exon 2 of GCMB was identified in both affected individuals that changes cysteine at position 106 of the putative DNA-binding domain of GCMB to arginine (C106R). Methods We performed mutational analysis of the genes encoding GCMB, pre-pro PTH, GATA3 and CaSR using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified genomic DNA. The identified GCMB mutant was characterized by functional studies including nuclear localization, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and luciferase reporter assays, and homology modelling was performed to generate a three-dimensional structural model for the DNA-binding domain of GCMB to predict the structural consequences of the identified mutation. Results The C106R mutant of GCMB failed to interact with the DNA consensus recognition motif, as determined by EMSA. Furthermore, in comparison with wild-type GCMB, the C106R mutant demonstrated reduced transactivation in luciferase reporter assays; however, the mutant GCMB failed to reduce the activity of the wild-type protein. Consistent with the EMSA findings, homology modelling analysis suggested that replacement of cysteine 106 with arginine would interfere with DNA binding. Conclusions We have identified a novel GCMB mutation that may explain AD-HP in our family. However, the exact mechanism by which this heterozygous mutation leads to the disease in the described family remains to be elucidated. PMID:22066718

  4. Profiling conserved biological pathways in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disorder (ADPKD) to elucidate key transcriptomic alterations regulating cystogenesis: A cross-species meta-analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Shatakshee; Verma, Srikant Prasad; Pandey, Priyanka

    2017-09-05

    Initiation and progression of fluid filled cysts mark Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD). Thus, improved therapeutics targeting cystogenesis remains a constant challenge. Microarray studies in single ADPKD animal models species with limited sample sizes tend to provide scattered views on underlying ADPKD pathogenesis. Thus we aim to perform a cross species meta-analysis to profile conserved biological pathways that might be key targets for therapy. Nine ADPKD microarray datasets on rat, mice and human fulfilled our study criteria and were chosen. Intra-species combined analysis was performed after considering removal of batch effect. Significantly enriched GO biological processes and KEGG pathways were computed and their overlap was observed. For the conserved pathways, biological modules and gene regulatory networks were observed. Additionally, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) using Molecular Signature Database (MSigDB) was performed for genes found in conserved pathways. We obtained 28 modules of significantly enriched GO processes and 5 major functional categories from significantly enriched KEGG pathways conserved in human, mice and rats that in turn suggest a global transcriptomic perturbation affecting cyst - formation, growth and progression. Significantly enriched pathways obtained from up-regulated genes such as Genomic instability, Protein localization in ER and Insulin Resistance were found to regulate cyst formation and growth whereas cyst progression due to increased cell adhesion and inflammation was suggested by perturbations in Angiogenesis, TGF-beta, CAMs, and Infection related pathways. Additionally, networks revealed shared genes among pathways e.g. SMAD2 and SMAD7 in Endocytosis and TGF-beta. Our study suggests cyst formation and progression to be an outcome of interplay between a set of several key deregulated pathways. Thus, further translational research is warranted focusing on developing a combinatorial therapeutic

  5. Heterozygosity analysis of polycystic kidney disease 1 gene microsatellite markers for linkage analysis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease type 1 in the iranian population

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    Razieh Fatehi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is the most common genetic cause of end-stage renal disease. Although imaging techniques are a means of accurate diagnosis when the cysts appear in the third or fourth decades of the patient's life, they are of little value for early diagnosis. Genetic tests are required for preimplantation genetic diagnosis, decision-making for kidney donation to an affected relative. Although mutation of the polycystic kidney disease (PKD1 gene is solely responsible for the most cases of ADPKD, direct genetic testing is limited by the large size of this gene and the presence of many mutations without hot spots. Therefore, indirect diagnosis with linkage analysis using informative microsatellite markers has been suggested. Materials and Methods: In this study, we assessed the informativeness of the PKD1 gene markers D16S475, D16S291, and D16S3252 in Iranian population. Using specific primers, fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (PCR was performed on genomic DNA extracted from fifty unrelated individuals. PCR products were analyzed by the ALFexpress DNA sequencer system, and the number and frequency of alleles were determined to calculate the heterozygosity (HET and polymorphism information content (PIC values. Results: We found that the HET and PIC values for the D16S475 marker are 0.92 and 0.91, respectively. These two values are 0.82 and 0.80 for D16S291 and 0.50 and 0.47 for D16S3252, respectively. Conclusion: Based on this data, D16S475 and D16S291 are highly and D16S3252 is moderately informative for indirect genetic diagnosis of PKD1 mutations in this population.

  6. Identification of Two Disease-causing Genes TJP2 and GJB2 in a Chinese Family with Unconditional Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Hereditary Hearing Impairment

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    Hong-Yang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are more than 300 genetic loci that have been found to be related to hereditary hearing impairment (HHI, including 92 causative genes for nonsyndromic hearing loss, among which 34 genes are related to autosomal dominant nonsyndromic HHI (ADNSHHI. Traditional linkage analysis and candidate gene sequencing are not effective at detecting the ADNSHHI, especially for the unconditional families that may have more than one pathogenic cause. This study identified two disease-causing genes TJP2 and GJB2 in a Chinese family with unconditional ADNSHHI. Methods: To decipher the genetic code of a Chinese family (family 686 with ADNSHHI, different gene screening techniques have been performed, including linkage analysis, candidate genes screening, high-throughput sequencing and Sanger sequencing. These techniques were done on samples obtained from this family over a period of 10 years. Results: We identified a pathogenic missense mutation, c. 2081G>A (p.G694E, in TJP2, a gene that plays a crucial role in apoptosis and age-related hearing loss (ARHL. The mutation was co-segregated in this pedigree in all, but not in the two patients who presented with different phenotypes from the other affected family members. In one of the two patients, we confirmed that the compound heterozygosity for p.Y136FNx01 and p.G45E in the GJB2 gene may account for the phenotype shown in this patient. Conclusions: We identified the co-occurrence of two genetic causes in family 686. The possible disease-causing missense mutation of TJP2 in family 686 presents an opportunity for further investigation into ARHL. It is necessary to combine various genes screening methods, especially for some unconventional cases.

  7. First report of OPA1 screening in Greek patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy and identification of a previously undescribed OPA1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakari, Smaragda; Koutsodontis, George; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis; Fitsios, Athanasios; Chrousos, Georgia

    2014-01-01

    To describe the genotype-phenotype correlation in four Greek pedigrees with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) and OPA1 mutations. Seven patients from four unrelated families (F1, F2, F3, F4) were clinically assessed for visual acuity, color vision, ptosis, afferent pupillary defects, and visual fields and underwent orthoptic assessment, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and fundus examination to establish their clinical status. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples from all participants. The coding region (exons 1-28), including the intron-exon boundaries of the OPA1 gene, was screened in the probands of the four families, as well as in seven additional family members (four affected and three unaffected) with PCR and direct DNA sequencing. All patients presented bilateral decrease in best-corrected visual acuity and temporal pallor of the optic disc. The visual fields of the adult patients showed characteristic scotomata. Other signs were present in some patients such as decreased color discrimination and a gray crescent within the neuroretinal rim. After the OPA1 gene was sequenced, a previously undescribed heterozygous splice-site mutation c.784-1G>T in intron 7 was detected in family F2. In families F1, F3, and F4, a previously reported in-frame deletion c.876_878delTGT/p.(Val294del), the frameshift c.2366delA/p.(Asn789Metfs*11), and splice-site c.1140+5G>C mutations were detected, respectively. This is the first report of molecular characterization of Greek patients with ADOA. Our findings provide additional information regarding the genotype-phenotype correlation and establish the role of the OPA1 gene in Greek patients with ADOA.

  8. Autosomal Dominant STAT3 Deficiency and Hyper-IgE Syndrome Molecular, Cellular, and Clinical Features From a French National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Melki, Isabelle; Natividad, Angels; Puel, Anne; Fieschi, Claire; Yun, Ling; Thumerelle, Caroline; Oksenhendler, Eric; Boutboul, David; Thomas, Caroline; Hoarau, Cyrille; Lebranchu, Yvon; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Cazorla, Celine; Aladjidi, Nathalie; Micheau, Marguerite; Tron, Fran[cedil]cois; Baruchel, Andre; Barlogis, Vincent; Palenzuela, Gilles; Mathey, Catherine; Dominique, Stephane; Body, Gerard; Munzer, Martine; Fouyssac, Fanny; Jaussaud, Rolland; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Blanche, Stephane; Debre, Marianne; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Gandemer, Virginie; Lambert, Nathalie; Grandin, Virginie; Ndaga, Stephanie; Jacques, Corinne; Harre, Chantal; Forveille, Monique; Alyanakian, Marie-Alexandra; Durandy, Anne; Bodemer, Christine; Suarez, Felipe; Hermine, Olivier; Lortholary, Olivier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Fischer, Alain; Picard, Capucine

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant deficiency of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is the main genetic etiology of hyper-immunoglobulin (Ig) E syndrome. We documented the molecular, cellular, and clinical features of 60 patients with heterozygous STAT3 mutations from 47 kindreds followed in France. We identified 11 known and 13 new mutations of STAT3. Low levels of interleukin (IL)-6-dependent phosphorylation and nuclear translocation (or accumulation) of STAT3 were observed in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B lymphocytes (EBV-B cells) from all STAT3-deficient patients tested. The immunologic phenotype was characterized by high serum IgE levels (96% of the patients), memory B-cell lymphopenia (94.5%), and hypereosinophilia (80%). A low proportion of IL-17A-producing circulating T cells was found in 14 of the 15 patients tested. Mucocutaneous infections were the most frequent, typically caused by Staphylococcus aureus (all patients) and Candida albicans (85%). Up to 90% of the patients had pneumonia, mostly caused by Staph. aureus (31%) or Streptococcus pneumoniae (30%). Recurrent pneumonia was associated with secondary bronchiectasis and pneumatocele (67%), as well as secondary aspergillosis (22%). Up to 92% of the patients had dermatitis and connective tissue abnormalities, with facial dysmorphism (95%), retention of decidual teeth (65%), osteopenia (50%), and hyperextensibility (50%). Four patients developed non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The clinical outcome was favorable, with 56 patients, including 43 adults, still alive at the end of study (mean age, 21 yr; range, 1 mo to 46 yr). Only 4 patients died, 3 from severe bacterial infection (aged 1, 15, and 29 yr, respectively). Antibiotic prophylaxis (90% of patients), antifungal prophylaxis (50%), and IgG infusions (53%) improved patient health, as demonstrated by the large decrease in pneumonia recurrence. Overall, the prognosis of STAT3 deficiency may be considered good, provided that multiple prophylactic

  9. Three novel and the common Arg677Ter RP1 protein truncating mutations causing autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in a Spanish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antiñolo Guillermo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinitis pigmentosa (RP, a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of retinal degeneration disorders affecting the photoreceptor cells, is one of the leading causes of genetic blindness. Mutations in the photoreceptor-specific gene RP1 account for 3–10% of cases of autosomal dominant RP (adRP. Most of these mutations are clustered in a 500 bp region of exon 4 of RP1. Methods Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analysis and direct genomic sequencing were used to evaluate the 5' coding region of exon 4 of the RP1 gene for mutations in 150 unrelated index adRP patients. Ophthalmic and electrophysiological examination of RP patients and relatives according to pre-existing protocols were carried out. Results Three novel disease-causing mutations in RP1 were detected: Q686X, K705fsX712 and K722fsX737, predicting truncated proteins. One novel missense mutation, Thr752Met, was detected in one family but the mutation does not co-segregate in the family, thereby excluding this amino acid variation in the protein as a cause of the disease. We found the Arg677Ter mutation, previously reported in other populations, in two independent families, confirming that this mutation is also present in a Spanish population. Conclusion Most of the mutations reported in the RP1 gene associated with adRP are expected to encode mutant truncated proteins that are approximately one third or half of the size of wild type protein. Patients with mutations in RP1 showed mild RP with variability in phenotype severity. We also observed several cases of non-penetrant mutations.

  10. Localization of a gene (CMT2A) for autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 to chromosome 1p and evidence of genetic heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othmane, K.B.; Loprest, L.J.; Wilkinson, K.M. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)); Middleton, L.T. (Cyprus Institute of Neurology and Genetics, Nicosia (Cyprus)) (and others)

    1993-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 2 (CMT2) is an inherited peripheral neuropathy characterized by variable age of onset and normal or slightly diminished nerve conduction velocity. CMT2 is pathologically and genetically distinct from CMT type 1 (CMT1). While CMT1 has been shown to be genetically heterogeneous, no chromosomal localization has been established for CMT2. The authors have performed pedigree linkage analysis in six large autosomal dominant CMT2 families and have demonstrated linkage and heterogeneity to a series of microsatellites (D1S160, D1S170, D1S244, D1S228 and D1S199) in the distal region of the short arm of chromosome 1. Significant evidence for heterogeneity was found using admixture analyses and the two-point lod scores. Admixture analyses using the multipoint results for the markers D1S244, D1S228, and D1S199 supported the two-point findings. Three families, DUK662, DUK1241, and 1523 gave posterior probabilities of 1.0, 0.98, and 0.88 of being of the linked type. Multipoint analysis examining the [open quotes]linked[close quotes] families showed that the most favored location for the CMT2A gene is within the interval flanked by D1S244 and D1S228 (odds approximately 70:1 of lying within versus outside that interval). These findings suggest that the CMT2 phenotype is secondary to at least two different genes and demonstrate further heterogeneity in the CMT phenotype.

  11. Exclusion of the GNAS locus in PHP-Ib patients with broad GNAS methylation changes: evidence for an autosomal recessive form of PHP-Ib?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rebollo, Eduardo; Pérez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Lecumberri, Beatriz; Turan, Serap; Anda, Emma; Pérez-Nanclares, Gustavo; Feig, Denice; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Bastepe, Murat; Jüppner, Harald

    2011-08-01

    Most patients with autosomal dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (AD-PHP-Ib) carry maternally inherited microdeletions upstream of GNAS that are associated with loss of methylation restricted to GNAS exon A/B. Only few AD-PHP-Ib patients carry microdeletions within GNAS that are associated with loss of all maternal methylation imprints. These epigenetic changes are often indistinguishable from those observed in patients affected by an apparently sporadic PHP-Ib form that has not yet been defined genetically. We have now investigated six female patients affected by PHP-Ib (four unrelated and two sisters) with complete or almost complete loss of GNAS methylation, whose healthy children (11 in total) showed no epigenetic changes at this locus. Analysis of several microsatellite markers throughout the 20q13 region made it unlikely that PHP-Ib is caused in these patients by large deletions involving GNAS or by paternal uniparental isodisomy or heterodisomy of chromosome 20 (patUPD20). Microsatellite and single-nucleotide variation (SNV) data revealed that the two affected sisters share their maternally inherited GNAS alleles with unaffected relatives that lack evidence for abnormal GNAS methylation, thus excluding linkage to this locus. Consistent with these findings, healthy children of two unrelated sporadic PHP-Ib patients had inherited different maternal GNAS alleles, also arguing against linkage to this locus. Based on our data, it appears plausible that some forms of PHP-Ib are caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutation(s) in an unknown gene involved in establishing or maintaining GNAS methylation. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  12. Variable phenotypic expressivity in a Swiss family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa due to a T494M mutation in the PRPF3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaclavik, Veronika; Gaillard, Marie-Claire; Tiab, L; Schorderet, Daniel F; Munier, Francis L

    2010-03-19

    To characterize the clinical, psychophysical, and electrophysiological phenotypes in a five-generation Swiss family with dominantly inherited retinitis pigmentosa caused by a T494M mutation in the Precursor mRNA-Processing factor 3 (PRPF3) gene, and to relate the phenotype to the underlying genetic mutation. Eleven affected patients were ascertained for phenotypic and genotypic characterization. Ophthalmologic evaluations included color vision testing, Goldmann perimetry, and digital fundus photography. Some patients had autofluorescence imaging, Optical Coherence Tomography, and ISCEV-standard full-field electroretinography. All affected patients had genetic testing. The age of onset of night blindness and the severity of the progression of the disease varied between members of the family. Some patients reported early onset of night blindness at age three, with subsequent severe deterioration of visual acuity, which was 0.4 in the best eye after their fifties. The second group of patients had a later onset of night blindness, in the mid-twenties, with a milder disease progression and a visual acuity of 0.8 at age 70. Fundus autofluorescence imaging and electrophysiological and visual field abnormalities also showed some degree of varying phenotypes. The autofluorescence imaging showed a large high-density ring bilaterally. Myopia (range: -0.75 to -8) was found in 10/11 affected subjects. Fundus findings showed areas of atrophy along the arcades. A T494M change was found in exon 11 of the PRPF3 gene. The change segregates with the disease in the family. A mutation in the PRPF3 gene is rare compared to other genes causing autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). Although a T494M change has been reported, the family in our study is the first with variable expressivity. Mutations in the PRPF3 gene can cause a variable ADRP phenotype, unlike in the previously described Danish, English, and Japanese families. Our report, based on one of the largest affected

  13. Positive Predictive Values of International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision Coding Algorithms to Identify Patients With Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinusha Kalatharan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision codes (ICD-10 for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is used within several administrative health care databases. It is unknown whether these codes identify patients who meet strict clinical criteria for ADPKD. Objective: The objective of this study is (1 to determine whether different ICD-10 coding algorithms identify adult patients who meet strict clinical criteria for ADPKD as assessed through medical chart review and (2 to assess the number of patients identified with different ADPKD coding algorithms in Ontario. Design: Validation study of health care database codes, and prevalence. Setting: Ontario, Canada. Patients: For the chart review, 201 adult patients with hospital encounters between April 1, 2002, and March 31, 2014, assigned either ICD-10 codes Q61.2 or Q61.3. Measurements: This study measured positive predictive value of the ICD-10 coding algorithms and the number of Ontarians identified with different coding algorithms. Methods: We manually reviewed a random sample of medical charts in London, Ontario, Canada, and determined whether or not ADPKD was present according to strict clinical criteria. Results: The presence of either ICD-10 code Q61.2 or Q61.3 in a hospital encounter had a positive predictive value of 85% (95% confidence interval [CI], 79%-89% and identified 2981 Ontarians (0.02% of the Ontario adult population. The presence of ICD-10 code Q61.2 in a hospital encounter had a positive predictive value of 97% (95% CI, 86%-100% and identified 394 adults in Ontario (0.003% of the Ontario adult population. Limitations: (1 We could not calculate other measures of validity; (2 the coding algorithms do not identify patients without hospital encounters; and (3 coding practices may differ between hospitals. Conclusions: Most patients with ICD-10 code Q61.2 or Q61.3 assigned during their hospital encounters have ADPKD according to the clinical

  14. Cyst infection in hospital-admitted autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients is predominantly multifocal and associated with kidney and liver volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbo, B.E.P. [Divisão de Nefrologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sapienza, M.T.; Ono, C.R. [Divisão de Medicina Nuclear, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Jayanthi, S.K. [Divisão de Radiologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Dettoni, J.B. [Divisão de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Castro, I.; Onuchic, L.F. [Divisão de Nefrologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-06-13

    Positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has improved cyst infection (CI) management in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The determinants of kidney and/or liver involvement, however, remain uncertain. In this study, we evaluated clinical and imaging factors associated with CI in kidney (KCI) and liver (LCI) in ADPKD. A retrospective cohort study was performed in hospital-admitted ADPKD patients with suspected CI. Clinical, imaging and surgical data were analyzed. Features of infected cysts were evaluated by PET/CT. Total kidney (TKV) and liver (TLV) volumes were measured by CT-derived multiplanar reconstruction. CI was detected in 18 patients who experienced 24 episodes during an interval of 30 months (LCI in 12, KCI in 10 and concomitant infection in 2). Sensitivities of CT, magnetic resonance imaging and PET/CT were 25.0, 71.4, and 95.0%. Dysuria (P<0.05), positive urine culture (P<0.01), and previous hematuria (P<0.05) were associated with KCI. Weight loss (P<0.01) and increased C-reactive protein levels (P<0.05) were associated with LCI. PET/CT revealed that three or more infected cysts were present in 70% of the episodes. TKV was higher in kidney-affected than in LCI patients (AUC=0.91, P<0.05), with a cut-off of 2502 mL (72.7% sensitivity, 100.0% specificity). TLV was higher in liver-affected than in KCI patients (AUC=0.89, P<0.01) with a cut-off of 2815 mL (80.0% sensitivity, 87.5% specificity). A greater need for invasive procedures was observed in LCI (P<0.01), and the overall mortality was 20.8%. This study supports PET/CT as the most sensitive imaging method for diagnosis of cyst infection, confirms the multifocal nature of most hospital-admitted episodes, and reveals an association of kidney and liver volumes with this complication.

  15. Automatic total kidney volume measurement on follow-up magnetic resonance images to facilitate monitoring of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Timothy L; Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Edwards, Marie E; Warner, Joshua D; Irazabal, Maria V; King, Bernard F; Torres, Vicente E; Erickson, Bradley J

    2016-02-01

    Renal imaging examinations provide high-resolution information about the anatomic structure of the kidneys and are used to measure total kidney volume (TKV) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients. TKV has become the gold-standard image biomarker for ADPKD progression at early stages of the disease and is used in clinical trials to characterize treatment efficacy. Automated methods to segment the kidneys and measure TKV are desirable because of the long time requirement for manual approaches such as stereology or planimetry tracings. However, ADPKD kidney segmentation is complicated by a number of factors, including irregular kidney shapes and variable tissue signal at the kidney borders. We describe an image processing approach that overcomes these problems by using a baseline segmentation initialization to provide automatic segmentation of follow-up scans obtained years apart. We validated our approach using 20 patients with complete baseline and follow-up T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. Both manual tracing and stereology were used to calculate TKV, with two observers performing manual tracings and one observer performing repeat tracings. Linear correlation and Bland-Altman analysis were performed to compare the different approaches. Our automated approach measured TKV at a level of accuracy (mean difference ± standard error = 0.99 ± 0.79%) on par with both intraobserver (0.77 ± 0.46%) and interobserver variability (1.34 ± 0.70%) of manual tracings. All approaches had excellent agreement and compared favorably with ground-truth manual tracing with interobserver, stereological and automated approaches having 95% confidence intervals ∼ ± 100 mL. Our method enables fast, cost-effective and reproducible quantification of ADPKD progression that will facilitate and lower the costs of clinical trials in ADPKD and other disorders requiring accurate, longitudinal kidney quantification. In addition, it will hasten the routine use of

  16. A gene in the region of the autosomal dominant torsion dystonia locus on 9q34 contains SH3 signal transduction and binding motifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, G.F.; Kunkel, L.M.; Khurana, T. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    In a search to identify cytoskeletal proteins which might be involved in neuromuscular diseases, we identified an expressed tag (EST) that exhibited distant sequence homology to dystrophia and which mapped to 9q24-ter in somatic cell hybrids. A dinucleotide repeat polymorphism from a genomic clone of the EST showed complete co-segregation without recombination to the DYT1 locus on the 9q34 in families with autosomal dominant torsion dystonia. cDNAs were obtained from the brain cDNA libraries and these contained parts of trapped exons from the 9q34 region. Northern blotting reveals two distinct transcripts, 6-7 kb and 3 kb, which differ primarily in their 3{prime} untranslated regions. The transcripts are co-expressed at highest levels in brain and thymus, but are found in most other tissues as well. A comparison of cDNA sequences derived from this gene reveals a high degree of alternate processing in both the coding and 3{prime} untranslated regions. Antibodies raised against synthetic peptides from the ORF recognize a doublet of bands at approximately 50-55 kd in brain by Western blotting. In contrast to the Northern tissue distribution, the protein is detected only in small amounts in peripheral nerve and muscle and not at all in several other tissues, with the amount in thymus yet to be determined. A Genbank search of amino acid sequence homologies has revealed several interesting features, including: aN src homology 3 (SH3) domain that is a common feature of proteins involved in the tyrosine kinase signal transduction pathway and is found in some cytoskeletal proteins; a proline-rich region that may function as an intra- or intermolecular SH3 binding site; and weak homologies to the rod domains of dystrophin, myosin, and spectrin. These findings raise the possibility of a defect in signal transduction or the cytoskeleton as a cause of torsion dystonia. Mutation analysis of the gene and biochemical characterization of the protein are in progress.

  17. Identification and Functional Characterization of a Novel Mutation in the Human Calcium-Sensing Receptor That Co-Segregates With Autosomal-Dominant Hypocalcemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Qvist Rasmussen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The human calcium-sensing receptor (CASR is the key controller of extracellular Cao2+ homeostasis, and different mutations in the CASR gene have been linked to different calcium diseases, such as familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, severe hyperparathyroidism, autosomal-dominant hypocalcemia (ADH, and Bartter’s syndrome type V. In this study, two generations of a family with biochemically and clinically confirmed ADH who suffered severe muscle pain, arthralgia, tetany, abdominal pain, and fatigue were evaluated for mutations in the CASR gene. The study comprises genotyping of all family members, functional characterization of a potential mutant receptor by in vitro analysis related to the wild-type receptor to reveal an association between the genotype and phenotype in the affected family members. The in vitro analysis of functional characteristics includes measurements of inositol trisphosphate accumulation, Ca2+ mobilization in response to [Ca2+]o-stimulation and receptor expression. The results reveal a significant leftward shift of inositol trisphosphate accumulation as a result of the “gain-of-function” mutant receptor and surprisingly a normalization of the response in (Ca2+i release in the downstream pathway and additionally the maximal response of (Ca2+i release was significantly decreased compared to the wild type. However, no gross differences were seen in D126V and the D126V/WT CASR dimeric >250 kDa band expression compared to the WT receptor, however, the D126V and D126V/WT CASR immature ~140 kDa species appear to have reduced expression compared to the WT receptor. In conclusion, in this study, a family with a clinical diagnosis of ADH in two generations was evaluated to identify a mutation in the CASR gene and reveal an association between genotype and phenotype in the affected family members. The clinical condition was caused by a novel, activating, missense mutation (D126V in the CASR gene and the in vitro functional

  18. Monoallelic expression on autosomes may explain an unusual heritable form of pigmentary mosaicism: a historical case revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happle, R

    2009-10-01

    A peculiar observation published in 1971 by Chernosky et al. is revisited in this paper. An African American mother and three of her four children (two girls and one boy) had hyperpigmented skin areas arranged along Blaschko's lines. According to the current knowledge of formal genetics, a mendelian mode of transmission can be excluded, and paradominant inheritance is likewise highly unlikely. The unusual family constellation of pigmentary mosaicism can be best explained as an example of monoallelic autosomal expression, a concept that is now well established in the genetics of plants and animals but so far unexplored in human skin disorders. Either the paternal or the maternal allele is randomly inactivated, therefore this mechanism can be taken as an autosomal counterpart of X-chromosome inactivation. Recent studies suggest that 5-10% of autosomal human genes are monoallelically expressed. This theory opens a new field of research in dermatology. Clinicians should consider this new aetiological concept when observing cases of hereditary cutaneous mosaicism that cannot be explained by X-linkage.

  19. Case Report: Novel mutations in TBC1D24 are associated with autosomal dominant tonic-clonic and myoclonic epilepsy and recessive Parkinsonism, psychosis, and intellectual disability [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Banuelos

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations disrupting presynaptic protein TBC1D24 are associated with a variable neurological phenotype, including DOORS syndrome, myoclonic epilepsy, early-infantile epileptic encephalopathy, and non-syndromic hearing loss. In this report, we describe a family segregating autosomal dominant epilepsy, and a 37-year-old Caucasian female with a severe neurological phenotype including epilepsy, Parkinsonism, psychosis, visual and auditory hallucinations, gait ataxia and intellectual disability. Whole exome sequencing revealed two missense mutations in the TBC1D24 gene segregating within this family (c.1078C>T; p.Arg360Cys and c.404C>T; p.Pro135Leu. The female proband who presents with a severe neurological phenotype carries both of these mutations in a compound heterozygous state. The p.Pro135Leu variant, however, is present in the proband’s mother and sibling as well, and is consistent with an autosomal dominant pattern linked to tonic-clonic and myoclonic epilepsy. In conclusion, we describe a single family in which TBC1D24 mutations cause expanded dominant and recessive phenotypes. In addition, we discuss and highlight that some variants in TBC1D24 might cause a dominant susceptibility to epilepsy

  20. Sex-linked dominant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inheritance - sex-linked dominant; Genetics - sex-linked dominant; X-linked dominant; Y-linked dominant ... can be either an autosomal chromosome or a sex chromosome. It also depends on whether the trait ...

  1. The burden of gestational diabetes mellitus in Jamaican women with a family history of autosomal dominant type 2 diabetes La carga de la diabetes mellitus gestacional en mujeres de Jamaica con antecedentes familiares de diabetes autosómica dominante tipo 2

    OpenAIRE

    Rachael R. Irving; James L. Mills; Eric G. Choo-Kang; Errol Y. Morrison; Santosh Kulkarni; Rosemarie Wright-Pascoe; Wayne Mclaughlin

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine if Jamaican women of African descent with a family history of early onset autosomal dominant type 2 diabetes have greater odds of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) than those without a family history of the disease. METHODS: A comparative study was conducted of two groups of pregnant Jamaican women: the first with a family history of early onset autosomal dominant type 2 diabetes; the second with no history of the disease. Incidence, odds for developing G...

  2. Theoretical preconditions of the realization of principle of domination of essence over form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Osadcha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Organization and accounting should be based on accounting principles, which must ensure qualitative preparation of the financial statements. In this case an important role is played by the principle of domination of essence over form. Here is analyzed the main factors of its development and dissemination. Also it is determined the role of IFRS in the spreading of the principle of domination of essence over form in the world and its fixation on the level of normative regulation of accounting in certain countries, including Ukraine. It is defined theoretical preconditions for identifying and removing the existing obstacles in the application of the principle of domination of essence over form in the practice of management, which will ensure qualitative preparation of the financial statements. It is offered to use the principle of property rights theory, the theory of rent and the agency theory to solve the problem of disseverance between owner and manager.

  3. Adolescent male chimpanzees do not form a dominance hierarchy with their peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandel, Aaron A; Reddy, Rachna B; Mitani, John C

    2017-01-01

    Dominance hierarchies are a prominent feature of the lives of many primate species. These hierarchies have important fitness consequences, as high rank is often positively correlated with reproduction. Although adult male chimpanzees strive for status to gain fitness benefits, the development of dominance relationships is not well understood. While two prior studies found that adolescent males do not display dominance relationships with peers, additional research at Ngogo in Kibale National Park, Uganda, indicates that adolescents there form a linear dominance hierarchy. These conflicting findings could reflect different patterns of rank acquisition across sites. An alternate possibility arises from a recent re-evaluation of age estimates at Ngogo and suggests that the report describing decided dominance relationships between adolescent males may have been due to the accidental inclusion of young adult males in the sample. To investigate these issues, we conducted a study of 23 adolescent male chimpanzees of known age during 12 months at Ngogo. Adolescent male chimpanzees exchanged pant grunts, a formal signal of submission, only 21 times. Recipients of pant grunts were late adolescent males, ranging between 14 and 16 years old. In contrast, younger adolescent males never received pant grunts from other males. Aggression between adolescent males was also rare. Analysis of pant grunts and aggressive interactions did not produce a linear dominance hierarchy among adolescent males. These data indicate that adolescent male chimpanzees do not form decided dominance relationships with their peers and are consistent with the hypothesis that the hierarchy described previously at Ngogo resulted from inaccurate age estimates of male chimpanzees. Because dominance relationships develop before adulthood in other primates, our finding that adolescent male chimpanzees do not do so is surprising. We offer possible explanations for why this is the case and suggest future studies

  4. Subordination and domination in the work spaces. Study on the discipline and its forms of expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Montes Cató

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about domination in the workplace, focussing on discipline as a means, available to capital, of subordinating labour. Such domination is the key to understanding how employment relations have been affected by the profound transformation in the labour market over recent decades. This article is based on the case of the telecommunications industry in Argentina. The objective is to show how discipline operates in a modern commercial company, focussing not only on direct control, but on its symbolic "modern" forms.

  5. An application of almost marginal conditional stochastic dominance (AMCSD) on forming efficient portfolios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamet, Isnandar; Mardiana Putri Carissa, Siska; Pratiwi, Hasih

    2017-10-01

    Investors always seek an efficient portfolio which is a portfolio that has a maximum return on specific risk or minimal risk on specific return. Almost marginal conditional stochastic dominance (AMCSD) criteria can be used to form the efficient portfolio. The aim of this research is to apply the AMCSD criteria to form an efficient portfolio of bank shares listed in the LQ-45. This criteria is used when there are areas that do not meet the criteria of marginal conditional stochastic dominance (MCSD). On the other words, this criteria can be derived from quotient of areas that violate the MCSD criteria with the area that violate and not violate the MCSD criteria. Based on the data bank stocks listed on LQ-45, it can be stated that there are 38 efficient portfolios of 420 portfolios where each portfolio comprises of 4 stocks and 315 efficient portfolios of 1710 portfolios with each of portfolio has 3 stocks.

  6. PLEKHG5 deficiency leads to an intermediate form of autosomal-recessive Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzedine, Hamid; Zavadakova, Petra; Planté-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Vaz Pato, Maria; Pinto, Nuno; Bartesaghi, Luca; Zenker, Jennifer; Poirot, Olivier; Bernard-Marissal, Nathalie; Arnaud Gouttenoire, Estelle; Cartoni, Romain; Title, Alexandra; Venturini, Giulia; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Makowski, Edward; Schöls, Ludger; Claeys, Kristl G.; Stendel, Claudia; Roos, Andreas; Weis, Joachim; Dubourg, Odile; Leal Loureiro, José; Stevanin, Giovanni; Said, Gérard; Amato, Anthony; Baraban, Jay; LeGuern, Eric; Senderek, Jan; Rivolta, Carlo; Chrast, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease (CMT) comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies characterized by progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities and distal sensory loss. Following the analysis of two consanguineous families affected by a medium to late-onset recessive form of intermediate CMT, we identified overlapping regions of homozygosity on chromosome 1p36 with a combined maximum LOD score of 5.4. Molecular investigation of the genes from this region allowed identification of two homozygous mutations in PLEKHG5 that produce premature stop codons and are predicted to result in functional null alleles. Analysis of Plekhg5 in the mouse revealed that this gene is expressed in neurons and glial cells of the peripheral nervous system, and that knockout mice display reduced nerve conduction velocities that are comparable with those of affected individuals from both families. Interestingly, a homozygous PLEKHG5 missense mutation was previously reported in a recessive form of severe childhood onset lower motor neuron disease (LMND) leading to loss of the ability to walk and need for respiratory assistance. Together, these observations indicate that different mutations in PLEKHG5 lead to clinically diverse outcomes (intermediate CMT or LMND) affecting the function of neurons and glial cells. PMID:23777631

  7. Ant-egg cataract. A study of a family with dominantly inherited congenital (ant-egg) cataract, including a histological examination of the formed elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Steffen; Schrøder, H D

    1979-01-01

    A family with "ant-egg" cataract in three generations is described. The cataract is congenital, probably of autosomal dominant inheritance. Light microscopy of the ant-eggs showed that they are made up of a peripheral zone of lens material and a large almost homogenous centre. Element analysis by X...

  8. Dominant Form of Congenital Hyperinsulinism Maps to HK1 Region on 10q

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinney, Sara E.; Ganapathy, Karthik; Bradfield, Jonathan; Stokes, David; Sasson, Ariella; Mackiewicz, Katarzyna; Boodhansingh, Kara; Hughes, Nkecha; Becker, Susan; Givler, Stephanie; Macmullen, Courtney; Monos, Dimitrios; Ganguly, Arupa; Hakonarson, Hakon; Stanley, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims In a family with congenital hyperinsulinism (HI), first described in the 1950s by MacQuarrie, we examined the genetic locus and clinical phenotype of a novel form of dominant HI. Methods We surveyed 25 affected individuals, 7 of whom participated in tests of insulin dysregulation (24-hour fasting, oral glucose and protein tolerance tests). To identify the disease locus and potential disease-associated mutations we performed linkage analysis, whole transcriptome sequencing, whole genome sequencing, gene capture, and next generation sequencing. Results Most affecteds were diagnosed with HI before age one and 40% presented with a seizure. All affecteds responded well to diazoxide. Affecteds failed to adequately suppress insulin secretion following oral glucose tolerance test or prolonged fasting; none had protein-sensitive hypoglycemia. Linkage analysis mapped the HI locus to Chr10q21–22, a region containing 48 genes. Three novel non-coding variants were found in hexokinase 1 (HK1) and one missense variant in the coding region of DNA2. Conclusion Dominant, diazoxide-responsive HI in this family maps to a novel locus on Chr10q21–22. HK1 is the more attractive disease gene candidate since a mutation interfering with the normal suppression of HK1 expression in beta-cells could readily explain the hypoglycemia phenotype of this pedigree. PMID:23859901

  9. Florbetapir PET analysis of amyloid-β deposition in the presenilin 1 E280A autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease kindred: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, Adam S; Chen, Kewei; Quiroz, Yakeel T; Jakimovich, Laura J; Gomez, Madelyn Gutierrez; Langois, Carolyn M; Langbaum, Jessica B S; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Roontiva, Auttawut; Thiyyagura, Pradeep; Lee, Wendy; Mo, Hua; Lopez, Liliana; Moreno, Sonia; Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Giraldo, Margarita; Garcia, Gloria; Reiman, Rebecca A; Huentelman, Matthew J; Kosik, Kenneth S; Tariot, Pierre N; Lopera, Francisco; Reiman, Eric M

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ) is thought to begin accumulating in the brain many years before the onset of clinical impairment in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. By assessing the accumulation of Aβ in people at risk of genetic forms of Alzheimer’s disease, we can identify how early preclinical changes start in individuals certain to develop dementia later in life. We sought to characterise the age-related accumulation of Aβ deposition in presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation carriers across the spectrum of preclinical disease. Methods Between Aug 1 and Dec 6, 2011, members of the familial Alzheimer’s disease Colombian kindred aged 18–60 years were recruited from the Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative’s registry at the University of Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia. Cross-sectional assessment using florbetapir PET was done in symptomatic mutation carriers with mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia, asymptomatic carriers, and asymptomatic non-carriers. These assessments were done at the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute in Phoenix, AZ, USA. A cortical grey matter mask consisting of six predefined regions. was used to measure mean cortical florbetapir PET binding. Cortical-to-pontine standard-uptake value ratios were used to characterise the cross-sectional accumulation of fibrillar Aβ deposition in carriers and non-carriers with regression analysis and to estimate the trajectories of fibrillar Aβ deposition. Findings We enrolled a cohort of 11 symptomatic individuals, 19 presymptomatic mutation carriers, and 20 asymptomatic non-carriers, ranging in age from 20 to 56 years. There was greater florbetapir binding in asymptomatic PSEN1 E280A mutation carriers than in age matched non-carriers. Fibrillar Aβ began to accumulate in PSEN 1E280A mutation carriers at a mean age of 28·2 years (95% CI 27·3–33·4), about 16 years and 21 years before the predicted median ages at mild cognitive impairment and dementia onset, respectively. 18F

  10. Dissociation of Pupillary Post-Illumination Responses from Visual Function in Confirmed OPA1 c.983A > G and c.2708_2711delTTAG Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Claus; Rönnbäck, Cecilia; Sander, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    the c.983A > G (n = 14) or the c.2708_ 2711delTTAG mutation (n = 15) were examined with monochromatic pupillometry, using isoluminant (300 cd/m(2)), red (660 nm) or blue (470 nm) light, optical coherence tomography, automated visual field analysis, and with determination of best corrected visual acuity......PURPOSE: To test whether the melanopsin-containing, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), as evaluated by examination of the pupillary light reflex (PLR), are preserved in genetically confirmed autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA). METHOD: Twenty-nine patients with either...... significantly from those of healthy controls (blue, p = 0.45, red, p = 0.49, t-test), and no statistically significant effect was noted of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thickness, or age. CONCLUSION: The PLR to blue light of high luminance (300 cd/m(2...

  11. Síndrome das pernas inquietas com herança autossômica dominante piorada pelo uso de mirtazapina: relato de caso Worsening of autosomal dominant restless legs syndrome after use of mirtazapine: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A.G. Teive

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos o caso de uma paciente de 78 anos, com diagnóstico estabelecido de síndrome das pernas inquietas (SPI, de etiologia primária com herança autossômica dominante. A paciente apresentava quadro depressivo associado. Enfatiza-se a piora do quadro clínico da SPI após o uso de anti-depressivo com ação inibidora seletiva da recaptação de serotonina (mirtazapina, com atenuação dos sintomas após a retirada da droga, e a excelente resposta terapêutica com o uso de agonista dopaminérgico (pramipexol em baixa dose.We report the case of a 78 years old female patient with primary restless legs syndrome (RLS with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. In addition, the patient also had depression. We emphasize the worsening of symptoms of RLS after the use of a selective serotonin uptake inhibitor (mirtazapine, with improvement after the drug was discontinued, and an excellent recovery with the use of low dose dopaminergic agonist (pramipexol.

  12. Recommendations for the use of tolvaptan in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: a position statement on behalf of the ERA-EDTA Working Groups on Inherited Kidney Disorders and European Renal Best Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansevoort, Ron T; Arici, Mustafa; Benzing, Thomas; Birn, Henrik; Capasso, Giovambattista; Covic, Adrian; Devuyst, Olivier; Drechsler, Christiane; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Emma, Francesco; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Le Meur, Yannick; Massy, Ziad A; Ong, Albert C M; Ortiz, Alberto; Schaefer, Franz; Torra, Roser; Vanholder, Raymond; Więcek, Andrzej; Zoccali, Carmine; Van Biesen, Wim

    2016-03-01

    Recently, the European Medicines Agency approved the use of the vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist tolvaptan to slow the progression of cyst development and renal insufficiency of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in adult patients with chronic kidney disease stages 1-3 at initiation of treatment with evidence of rapidly progressing disease. In this paper, on behalf of the ERA-EDTA Working Groups of Inherited Kidney Disorders and European Renal Best Practice, we aim to provide guidance for making the decision as to which ADPKD patients to treat with tolvaptan. The present position statement includes a series of recommendations resulting in a hierarchical decision algorithm that encompasses a sequence of risk-factor assessments in a descending order of reliability. By examining the best-validated markers first, we aim to identify ADPKD patients who have documented rapid disease progression or are likely to have rapid disease progression. We believe that this procedure offers the best opportunity to select patients who are most likely to benefit from tolvaptan, thus improving the benefit-to-risk ratio and cost-effectiveness of this treatment. It is important to emphasize that the decision to initiate treatment requires the consideration of many factors besides eligibility, such as contraindications, potential adverse events, as well as patient motivation and lifestyle factors, and requires shared decision-making with the patient. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  13. A novel point mutation in the translation initiation codon of the pre-pro-vasopressin-neurophysin II gene: Cosegregation with morphological abnormalities and clinical symptoms in autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutishauser, J.; Boeni-Schnetzler, M.; Froesch, E.R.; Wichmann, W.; Huisman, T. [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (ADNDI) is a rare variant of idiopathic central diabetes insipidus. Several different mutations in the human vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NP II) gene have been described. We studied nine family members from three generations of an ADNDI pedigree at the clinical, morphological, and molecular levels. AVP concentrations were measured during diagnostic fluid restriction tests. Coronal and sagittal high resolution T1-weighted images of the pituitary were obtained from affected and healthy family members. PCR was used to amplify the AVP-NP II precursor gene, and PCR products were directly sequenced. Under maximal osmotic stimulation, AVP serum levels were close to or below the detection limit in affected individuals. Magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed the characteristic hyperintense ({open_quotes}bright spot{close_quotes}) appearance of the posterior pituitary in two healthy family members. This signal was absent in all four ADNDI patients examined. The coding sequences of AVP and its carrier protein, neurophysin II, were normal in all family members examined. Affected individuals showed a novel single base deletion (G 227) in the translation initiation codon of the AVP-NP II signal peptide on one allele. The mutation in the AVP-NP II leader sequence appears to be responsible for the disease in this kindred, possibly by interfering with protein translocation. The absence of the hyperintense posterior pituitary signal in affected individuals could reflect deficient posterior pituitary function. 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Risk of Japanese carriers of hyperphosphorylated paratarg-7, the first autosomal-dominantly inherited risk factor for hematological neoplasms, to develop monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grass, Sandra; Iida, Shinsuke; Wikowicz, Aleksandra; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Inagaki, Atsushi; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Ziepert, Marita; Ueda, Ryuzo; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Hyperphosphorylated paratarg-7 (pP-7) is a frequent target of paraproteins in German patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS)/multiple myeloma (MM). The frequency of MGUS/MM is lower in Japan than in Europe. As pP-7, the first molecularly defined autosomal-dominant risk factor for any hematological neoplasm, is inherited in a dominant fashion, we determined the incidence of the pP-7 carrier state in a Japanese population, and compared the frequency of pP-7-specific paraproteins and the pP-7 carrier state in Japanese and German patients with MGUS/MM. Peripheral blood from 111 Japanese patients with MGUS/MM and 278 healthy blood donors was analyzed for the pP-7 carrier state by isoelectric focusing and for pP-7-specific antibodies by ELISA. The Japanese group was compared with 252 German MGUS/MM patients and 200 healthy controls. Five of 111 (4.5%) Japanese and 35/252 (13.9%) German IgA/IgG MGUS/MM patients had a pP-7-specific paraprotein (P=0.009). The prevalence of healthy pP-7 carriers in the Japanese study group was 1/278 (0.36%), whereas it was 4/200 in the German group (P=0.166). The relative risk for pP-7 carriers developing MGUS/MM had an odds ratio of 13.1 in the Japanese and 7.9 in the German group. In conclusion, the fraction of pP-7 carriers with a pP-7-specific paraprotein is lower among Japanese than in German patients with MGUS/MM, but pP-7 carriers in both ethnic groups have a high risk of developing MGUS/MM. © 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

  15. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palau Francesc

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000, ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000 and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000. Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder, ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, α-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED, aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1, and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2. Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning, electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... functions as a channel that transports charged chlorine atoms (chloride ions) across the cell membrane. Mutations in ... How We See University of Arizona College of Medicine: Vitreoretinochoroidopathy Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) ...

  17. Progress on Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cysts of the seminal vesicles, pancreas, and arachnoid ..... AVP = arginine vasopressin; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; cAMP = cyclic adenosine monophosphate; ERK = extracellular signal- regulated ... MAP = mean arterial pressure; MEK = mitogen extracellular kinase; mTOR = mammalian target of rapamycin; NA = data not.

  18. Cleidocranial Dysplasia with Autosomal Dominant Inheritance Pattern

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 26-year-old female reported to dental out-patient department with the chief complaint ... the clinical findings a provisional diagnosis of CCD, localized periodontitis with 12 was ... Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, NIMS Dental College and Hospital, NIMS University, 1Mansarovar Dental. Clinic, Madhyam Marg ...

  19. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new finding, to our knowledge, was the normality of visual, somatosensory and auditory evoked potentials. Conclusion. Our study confirms the existence of CADASIL in. South Africa, and also suggests that skin electron microscopy is useful, despite recent reports of its low sensitivity, and that evoked potentials in CADASIL ...

  20. Prenatal diagnosis of autosomal recessive Robinow syndrome using 3D ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Bolette F.; Buciek, Hanne Hove; Kreiborg, Sven

    2017-01-01

    This article hypothesizes that it is possible to detect and diagnose both the autosomal recessive and dominant forms prenatally using ultrasound. By focusing on the characteristic phenotypical presentation, the examinator is able to diagnose the syndrome prenatally, which is of clinical importance...

  1. Extended vector meson dominance model for the baryon octet electromagnetic form factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.A.; Puckett-Truman, C.

    1996-01-01

    An unresolved issue in the present understanding of nucleon structure is the effect of hidden strangeness on electromagnetic observables such as G n E (q 2 ). Previously, we have shown that G n E (q 2 ) is sensitive to small φNN couplings. A complementary approach for understanding effects due to strangeness content and the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka (OZI) rule is to investigate the electromagnetic structure of hyperons. We apply Sakurai close-quote s universality limit of the SU(3) F symmetry relations and a prescription based on the OZI rule to calculate the electromagnetic form factors of the baryon octet states (p,n,Λ,Σ + ,Σ 0 ,Σ - ,Ξ 0 ,Ξ - ) within the framework of an extended vector meson dominance model. To provide additional motivation for experimental investigation, we discuss the possibility of extracting the ratio G M Λ (q 2 )/G M ΣΛ (q 2 ) from the Λ/Σ polarization ratio in kaon electroproduction experiments. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  2. A follow-up study of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with intracranial aneurysms using 3.0 T three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Tao; Wang, Peng; Qian, Yi [Department of Radiology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Zheng, Xuan [Clinical Nutrition Department of Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Xiao, Liaoyuan [Department of Nephrology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Yu, Shengqiang, E-mail: yushengqiang_cz@163.com [Department of Nephrology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Liu, Shiyuan, E-mail: laijiangtaotao@163.com [Department of Radiology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2013-11-01

    Objective: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients have an increased risk for intracranial aneurysms (IAs). Our aim was to screen and follow up the unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) detected by 3.0 T three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF MRA) in patients with ADPKD in order to evaluate the growth of UIAs and the value of 3D-TOF MRA. Methods: From 2011 to 2012, we followed up UIAs detected in 40 ADPKD patients who had MRA examinations with an interval of at least 36 months. All MRA examinations were performed on a 3 T system (Achieva X-Series, Philips Medical Systems) with a Sense-Head-8 receiver head coil. The acquired data sets were transferred to a workstation (EWS, Philips Medical) to perform maximum intensity projection (MIP) and volume rendering (VR) with a specialized software package (Philips Medical). The size of UIAs was determined as the longest diameter in transverse or vertical measurement. UIAs that grew more than 20% were considered as enlarged. Results: Fifty UIAs were found in 40 previously examined ADPKD patients who underwent 3.0 T 3D-TOF MRA follow-ups. No patients ever had treatment before the second examination. The longest diameter of all follow-up UIAs was less than 10 mm and mean diameter was 3.64 ± 2.25 mm. UIAs in only 4 patients (10%) were considered as enlarged. None of the 50 IAs in the 40 ADPKD patients ruptured during the MRA follow-up period. Conclusion: 3.0 T 3D-TOF MRA was feasible for UIAs follow-up in ADPKD patients. The chance of enlargement and rupture of UIAs in ADPKD patients was not higher than in the general population.

  3. Homophone Dominance at the Whole-Word and Sub-Word Levels: Spelling Errors Suggest Full-Form Storage of Regularly Inflected Verb Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandra, Dominiek

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments and two corpus studies focus on homophone dominance in the spelling of regularly inflected verb forms, the phenomenon that the higher-frequency homophone causes more intrusion errors on the lower-frequency one than vice versa. Experiment 1 was a speeded dictation task focusing on the Dutch imperative, a verb form whose formation…

  4. Familial co-segregation of Coffin-Lowry syndrome inherited from the mother and autosomal dominant Waardenburg type IV syndrome due to deletion of EDNRB inherited from the father.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loupe, Jacob; Sampath, Srirangan; Lacassie, Yves

    2014-10-01

    We report an African-American family that was identified after the proposita was referred for diagnostic evaluation at 4½ months with a history of Hirschsprung and dysmorphic features typical of Waardenburg syndrome (WS). Family evaluation revealed that the father had heterochromidia irides and hypertelorism supporting the clinical diagnosis of WS; however, examination of the mother revealed characteristic facial and digital features of Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS). Molecular testing of the mother identified a novel 2 bp deletion (c.865_866delCA) in codon 289 of RPS6KA3 leading to a frame-shift and premature termination of translation 5 codons downstream (NM_004586.2:p.Gln289ValfsX5). This deletion also was identified in the proposita and her three sisters with a clinical suspicion of CLS, all of whom as carriers for this X-linked disorder had very subtle manifestations. The molecular confirmation of WS type 4 (Shah-Waardenburg; WS4) was not as straightforward. To evaluate WS types 1-4, multiple sequential molecular tests were requested, including Sanger sequencing of all exons, and deletion/duplication analysis using MLPA for PAX3, MITF, SOX10, EDN3 and EDNRB. Although sequencing did not identify any disease causing variants, MLPA identified a heterozygous deletion of the entire EDNRB in the father. This deletion was also found in the proposita and the oldest child. Since the heterozygous deletion was the only change identified in EDNRB, this family represents one of the few cases of an autosomal dominant inheritance of WS4 involving the endothelin pathway. Altogether, clinical evaluation of the family revealed one child to be positive for WS4 and two positive for CLS, while two children were positive for both diseases simultaneously (including the proposita) while another pair test negative for either disease. This kinship is an example of the coincidence of two conditions co-segregating in one family, with variable phenotypes requiring molecular testing to

  5. Proton electromagnetic form factor in the vector dominance model modified at short distances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilenkaya, S.I.; Skachkov, N.B.; Solovtsov, I.L.

    1977-01-01

    Predictions of a vector dominance model modified at short distances are compared with the experimental data available on ep elastic scattering. It is shown that the consideration of the proton central part with the radius equal to its Compton wave length give a better description

  6. Transformation of iron forms during pedogenesis after tree uprooting in a natural beech-dominated forest

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tejnecký, V.; Šamonil, P.; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Vašát, R.; Ash, C.; Drahota, P.; Šebek, O.; Němeček, K.; Drábek, O.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 132, SEP (2015), s. 12-20 ISSN 0341-8162 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Soil formation * Iron forms * Tree uprooting * Pit–mound microtopography * Cambisols * Old-growth temperate forest Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science Impact factor: 2.612, year: 2015

  7. An IL-17-dominant immune profile is shared across the major orphan forms of ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paller, Amy S; Renert-Yuval, Yael; Suprun, Maria; Esaki, Hitokazu; Oliva, Margeaux; Huynh, Thy Nhat; Ungar, Benjamin; Kunjravia, Norma; Friedland, Rivka; Peng, Xiangyu; Zheng, Xiuzhong; Estrada, Yeriel D; Krueger, James G; Choate, Keith A; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2017-01-01

    The ichthyoses are rare genetic disorders associated with generalized scaling, erythema, and epidermal barrier impairment. Pathogenesis-based therapy is largely lacking because the underlying molecular basis is poorly understood. We sought to characterize molecularly cutaneous inflammation and its correlation with clinical and barrier characteristics. We analyzed biopsy specimens from 21 genotyped patients with ichthyosis (congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, n = 6; lamellar ichthyosis, n = 7; epidermolytic ichthyosis, n = 5; and Netherton syndrome, n = 3) using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR and compared them with specimens from healthy control subjects, patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), and patients with psoriasis. Clinical measures included the Ichthyosis Area Severity Index (IASI), which integrates erythema (IASI-E) and scaling (IASI-S); transepidermal water loss; and pruritus. Ichthyosis samples showed increased epidermal hyperplasia (increased thickness and keratin 16 expression) and T-cell and dendritic cell infiltrates. Increases of general inflammatory (IL-2), innate (IL-1β), and some T H 1/interferon (IFN-γ) markers in patients with ichthyosis were comparable with those in patients with psoriasis or AD. TNF-α levels in patients with ichthyosis were increased only in those with Netherton syndrome but were much lower than in patients with psoriasis and those with AD. Expression of T H 2 cytokines (IL-13 and IL-31) was similar to that seen in control subjects. The striking induction of IL-17-related genes or markers synergistically induced by IL-17 and TNF-α (IL-17A/C, IL-19, CXCL1, PI3, CCL20, and IL36G; P ichthyosis was similar to that seen in patients with psoriasis. IASI and IASI-E scores strongly correlated with IL-17A (r = 0.74, P ichthyosis. Our data associate a shared T H 17/IL-23 immune fingerprint with the major orphan forms of ichthyosis and raise the possibility of IL-17-targeting strategies. Copyright © 2016 American

  8. Organic forms dominate hydrologic nitrogen export from a lowland tropical watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Philip G; Wieder, William R; Weintraub, Samantha; Cohen, Sagy; Cleveland, Cory C; Townsend, Alan R

    2015-05-01

    Observations of high dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations in stream water have reinforced the notion that primary tropical rain forests cycle nitrogen (N) in relative excess compared to phosphorus. Here we test this notion by evaluating hydrologic N export from a small watershed on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica, where prior research has shown multiple indicators of conservative N cycling throughout the ecosystem. We repeatedly measured a host of factors known to influence N export for one year, including stream water chemistry and upslope litterfall, soil N availability and net N processing rates, and soil solution chemistry at the surface, 15- and 50-cm depths. Contrary to prevailing assumptions about the lowland N cycle, we find that dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) averaged 85% of dissolved N export for 48 of 52 consecutive weeks. For most of the year stream water nitrate (NO3-) export was very low, which reflected minimal net N processing and DIN leaching from upslope soils. Yet, for one month in the dry season, NO3- was the major component of N export due to a combination of low flows and upslope nitrification that concentrated NO3- in stream water. Particulate organic N (PON) export was much larger than dissolved forms at 14.6 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1), driven by soil erosion during storms. At this rate, PON export was slightly greater than estimated inputs from free-living N fixation and atmospheric N deposition, which suggests that erosion-driven PON export could constrain ecosystem level N stocks over longer timescales. This phenomenon is complimentary to the "DON leak" hypothesis, which postulates that the long-term accumulation of ecosystem N in unpolluted ecosystems is constrained by the export of organic N independently of biological N demand. Using an established global sediment generation model, we illustrate that PON erosion may be an important vector for N loss in tropical landscapes that are geomorphically active. This study supports an

  9. A free-form lensing model of A370 revealing stellar mass dominated BCGs, in Hubble Frontier Fields images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego, Jose M.; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Broadhurst, Tom; Lam, Daniel; Vega-Ferrero, Jesús; Zheng, Wei; Lee, Slanger; Morishita, Takahiro; Bernstein, Gary; Lim, Jeremy; Silk, Joseph; Ford, Holland

    2018-02-01

    We derive a free-form mass distribution for the unrelaxed cluster A370 (z = 0.375), using the first release of the Hubble Frontier Fields images (76 orbits) and GLASS spectroscopy. Starting from a reliable set of 10 multiply lensed systems, we produce a free-form lens model that identifies ≈80 multiple images. Good consistency is found between models using independent subsamples of these lensed systems, with detailed agreement for the well-resolved arcs. The mass distribution has two very similar concentrations centred on the two prominent brightest cluster galaxies (or BCGs), with mass profiles that are accurately constrained by a uniquely useful system of long radially lensed images centred on both BCGs. We show that the lensing mass profiles of these BCGs are mainly accounted for by their stellar mass profiles, with a modest contribution from dark matter within r normal galaxies for which dark matter should dominate over stars. Growth via merging between BCGs is, however, consistent with this finding, so that stars still dominate over dark matter. We do not observe any significant offset between the positions of the peaks of the dark matter distribution and the light distribution.

  10. The burden of gestational diabetes mellitus in Jamaican women with a family history of autosomal dominant type 2 diabetes La carga de la diabetes mellitus gestacional en mujeres de Jamaica con antecedentes familiares de diabetes autosómica dominante tipo 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael R. Irving

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine if Jamaican women of African descent with a family history of early onset autosomal dominant type 2 diabetes have greater odds of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM than those without a family history of the disease. METHODS: A comparative study was conducted of two groups of pregnant Jamaican women: the first with a family history of early onset autosomal dominant type 2 diabetes; the second with no history of the disease. Incidence, odds for developing GDM, and metabolic profiles in first and second trimesters were assessed using SPSS 11.5 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, United States. RESULTS: The incidence of GDM was 12.0 % in women with a family history of early onset autosomal dominant type 2 diabetes and 1.5% in women without a family history of the disease (P OBJETIVOS: Determinar si las mujeres jamaicanas de ascendencia africana con antecedentes familiares de inicio temprano de diabetes autosómica dominante tipo 2 tienen mayor probabilidad de desarrollar diabetes mellitus gestacional (DMG que las que no tienen esos antecedentes familiares. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio comparativo con dos grupos de mujeres jamaicanas embarazadas: el primero con mujeres que tenían antecedentes familiares de inicio temprano de diabetes autosómica dominante tipo 2 y el segundo con mujeres sin antecedentes familiares de esa enfermedad. Se empleó el programa SPSS v. 11.5 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, Estados Unidos de América para analizar los resultados y calcular la incidencia, la probabilidad de desarrollar DMG y los perfiles metabólicos en el primer y el segundo trimestres de gestación. RESULTADOS: La incidencia de DMG fue de 12,0% en las mujeres con antecedentes familiares de inicio temprano de diabetes autosómica dominante tipo 2 y de 1,5% en las mujeres sin antecedentes familiares de esa enfermedad (P < 0,05. Las mujeres del primer grupo tuvieron nueve veces más probabilidades de desarrollar DMG que las

  11. Confirmation of ADAMTSL4 mutations for autosomal recessive isolated bilateral ectopia lentis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, V Bennouna; Stoetzel, C; Pelletier, V; Perdomo-Trujillo, Y; Liebermann, L; Marion, V; De Korvin, H; Boileau, C; Dufier, J L; Dollfus, H

    2010-03-01

    Ectopia lentis (EL) is a zonular disease where alteration of the zonular fibers leads progressively to lens dislocation. It is most often associated with systemic diseases such as Marfan syndrome, Weill-Marchesani syndrome or homocystinuria. Isolated non syndromic ectopia lentis (IEL) is reported in families with autosomal inheritance, with dominant forms being more common than recessive. LTBP2 truncating mutations have been described as a cause of autosomal recessive ectopia lentis as a primary or secondary feature in patients showing ocular (eg, glaucoma) or extraocular manifestations (eg, Marfanoid habitus). Recently, ADAMTSL4 has been shown to be responsible for isolated autosomal recessive ectopia lentis in an inbred family. Herein we show a consanguineous family that carries a novel homozygous splice mutation IVS4-1G>A/IVS4-1G>A in ADAMTSL4 responsible for isolated autosomal recessive EL, thus confirming the involvement of this gene in this condition and underlining the major role of ADAMTS proteases in zonular fibers homeostasis.

  12. The infrared-radio correlation of spheroid- and disc-dominated star-forming galaxies to z ˜ 1.5 in the COSMOS field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Dániel Cs; Sargent, Mark T.; Delhaize, Jacinta; Delvecchio, Ivan; Smolčić, Vernesa; Novak, Mladen; Schinnerer, Eva; Zamorani, Giovanni; Bondi, Marco; Herrera-Ruiz, Noelia; Murphy, Eric J.; Vardoulaki, Eleni; Karim, Alexander; Leslie, Sarah; Magnelli, Benjamin; Carollo, C. Marcella; Middelberg, Enno

    2018-03-01

    Using infrared data from the Herschel Space Observatory and Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array 3 GHz observations in the COSMOS field, we investigate the redshift evolution of the infrared-radio correlation (IRRC) for star-forming galaxies (SFGs) we classify as either spheroid- or disc-dominated based on their morphology. The sample predominantly consists of disc galaxies with stellar mass ≳ 1010 M⊙, and residing on the star-forming main sequence (MS). After the removal of AGN using standard approaches, we observe a significant difference between the redshift evolution of the median IR/radio ratio \\overline{q}_{TIR} of (i) a sample of ellipticals, plus discs with a substantial bulge component (`spheroid-dominated' SFGs) and, (ii) virtually pure discs and irregular systems (`disc-dominated' SFGs). The spheroid-dominated population follows a declining \\overline{q}_{TIR} versus z trend similar to that measured in recent evolutionary studies of the IRRC. However, for disc-dominated galaxies, where radio and IR emission should be linked to star formation in the most straightforward way, we measure very little change in \\overline{q}_{TIR}. This suggests that low-redshift calibrations of radio emission as a star formation rate (SFR) tracer may remain valid out to at least z ≃ 1-1.5 for pure star-forming systems. We find that the different redshift evolution of qTIR for the spheroid- and disc-dominated sample is mainly due to an increasing radio excess for spheroid-dominated galaxies at z ≳ 0.8, hinting at some residual AGN activity in these systems. This finding demonstrates that in the absence of AGN, the IRRC is independent of redshift, and that radio observations can therefore be used to estimate SFRs at all redshifts for genuinely star-forming galaxies.

  13. Different Phenotypes of the Two Chinese Probands with the Same c.889G>A (p.C162Y Mutation in COCH Gene Verify Different Mechanisms Underlying Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Deafness 9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    Full Text Available By analyzing the different phenotypes of two Chinese DFNA9 families with the same mutation located in the intervening region between the LCCL and vWFA domains of cochlin and testing the functional changes in the mutant cochlin, we investigated the different pathogeneses for mutations in LCCL and vWFA domains.Targeted next-generation sequencing for deafness-related genes was used to identify the mutation in the proband in family #208. The probands of family #208 and family #32 with the same p.C162Y mutation were followed for more than 3 years to evaluate the progression of hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction using pure-tone audiometry, caloric testing, electrocochleogram, vestibular-evoked myogenic potential, and video head-impulse test. The disruption of normal cleavage to produce secreted LCCL domain fragments and the tendency to form aggregations of mutant cochlins were tested by in vitro cell experiments.The two families showed different clinical symptoms. Family #32 was identified as having early-onset, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, similar to the symptoms in DFNA9 patients with cochlin mutations in the vWFA domain. The proband of family #208 endured late-onset recurrent paroxysmal vertigo attacks and progressively deteriorating hearing, similar to symptoms in those with cochlin mutations in the LCCL domain. We therefore suggest that the disrupted cleavage of the LCCL domain fragment is likely to cause vestibular dysfunction, and aggregation of mutant cochlin caused by mutations in the vWFA domain is responsible for early-onset hearing loss. The p.C162Y mutation causes either disruption of LCCL domain fragment cleavage or aggregation of mutant cochlin, resulting in the different phenotypes in the two families.This study demonstrates that DFNA9 families with the same genotype may have significantly different phenotypes. The mutation site in cochlin is related to the pathological mechanism underlying the different phenotypes.

  14. Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa with RP1 mutations is associated with myopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chassine, T.; Bocquet, B.; Daien, V.; Avila-Fernandez, A.; Ayuso, C.; Collin, R.W.J.; Corton, M.; Hejtmancik, J.F.; Born, L.I. van den; Klevering, B.J.; Riazuddin, S.A.; Sendon, N.; Lacroux, A.; Meunier, I.; Hamel, C.P.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the refractive error in patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) caused by RP1 mutations and to compare it with that of other genetic subtypes of RP. METHODS: Twenty-six individuals had arRP with RP1 mutations, 25 had autosomal dominant RP (adRP) with RP1

  15. Progeria (Hutchison - Gilford syndrome in siblings: In an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu Tanjore

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is an autosomal dominant, premature aging syndrome. Six and three year old female siblings had sclcrodermatous changes over the extremities, alopecia, beaked nose, prominent veins and bird-like facies. Radiological features were consistent with features of progeria. The present case highlights rarity of progeria in siblings with a possible autosomal recessive pattern.

  16. Global Activism and Social Transformation vis-à-vis Dominant Forms of Economic Organization: Critical Education within Afro-Brazilian and Transnational Pedagogical Praxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossatto, César

    2015-01-01

    Masses of colonial workers are situating their free-for-all labor efforts in a global context due to dominant forms of organization based on a neoliberalist and corporate market economy. New social movements that show concern for democracy and human rights are challenging capitalist priorities of "efficiency" and exploitation. In some…

  17. A rare case of a familial form of nonsyndromic trigonocephaly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The psychomotor development of patients is usually normal and the majority of cases are mild. Most cases are sporadic but familial forms with apparently autosomal dominant transmission have been reported (7-8%). However, the concordance rate of isolated trigonocephaly in monozygotic twins is 43%, suggesting that ...

  18. Spelling Errors in Adults with a Form of Familial Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Bruce F.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Compares the spelling errors on the Wide Range Achievement Test II made by adults with an apparent autosomal dominant form of dyslexia to those made by their normal adult relatives and by spelling-age matched normal controls using a computerized error evaluation program. (HOD)

  19. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness, and narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... loss of muscle tone in response to strong emotion (such as excitement, surprise, or anger). These episodes ... these mutations, methylation is abnormal, which affects the expression of multiple genes. Maintenance of the neurons that ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant leukodystrophy with autonomic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need a cane, walker, or wheelchair for assistance. Intelligence is usually unaffected; however, people who have had ... lamin B1 is found in cells throughout the body, it appears that cells in the brain are ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain, which do not affect a person's intelligence. Related Information What does it mean if a ... protein that plays an important role in several body systems. To carry out its roles, the STAT3 ...

  2. Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infacts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asprin is used in patients who have other risk factors for stroke such as diabetes and heart disease as a ... Smoking and use of birth control pills are risk factors for stroke. We encourage patients with CADASIL to limit their ...

  3. Autosomal Dominant Aniridia in A Nigerian Family: A Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 54year old man brought his son to our clinic because of large eyeballs and poor vision from birth. Family history revealed that father and another child had poor vision and used to squeeze their faces especially in bright light. Examination of the boy revealed bilateral aniridia with congenital glaucoma. The father, the other ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain, leading to a lack of visual perception in low light. Learn more about the genes ... for Links Data Files & API Site Map Subscribe Customer Support USA.gov Copyright Privacy Accessibility FOIA Viewers & ...

  5. Genotype-Phenotype Correlations in Autosomal Dominant Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Mouna Ben Amor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta, discussed in Baldridge et al. 2008 is an inherited bone fragility disorder with a wide range of clinical severity that in the majority of cases is caused by mutations in COL1A1 or COL1A2, the genes that encode the two collagen type I alpha chains. Here we describe genotype-phenotype correlations in OI patients who have mutations affecting collagen type I. This paper is based on findings in a large single-centre OI population and a review of the literature.

  6. Pain determinants of pain in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Nishiura

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pain is the most common symptom reported by ADPKD patients, afflicting approximately 60% of cases and may result from renal hemorrhage, calculi, urinary tract infections, cyst rupture, or due to stretching of the capsule or traction of the renal pedicle. We have recently investigated pain patterns in AD-PKD patients using a translated version of a pain questionnaire specific for AD-PKD population. The questionnaire revealed that 67% patients with ADPKD exhibited some type of pain. The findings of that study emphasized that pain appeared early in the course of ADPKD, when patients still exhibited preserved renal function. In the present study, a multivariate logistic regression analysis disclosed that renal volume (9-fold increased risk and nephrolithiasis (4-fold increased risk were the most important determinant factors for pain in ADPKD patients with preserved renal function, after adjustments for the presence of hypertension and duration of the disease.

  7. Completeness of catalogs of autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Kate, L P

    1992-06-01

    The completeness of McKusick's catalogs of Mendelian Inheritance in Man (MIM) as to the number of phenotypes included was studied by estimating the degree of concordance with the Dutch Gene Catalog of the Department of Medical Genetics of the University of Groningen, The Netherlands. On a total of 355 Mendelian phenotypes described in persons living in The Netherlands or originating from this country, there were nine disease entities which were not present in MIM. As judged from this comparison MIM attains 97.5% completeness (95% CI: 95.3-98.7%). Similar comparisons with data from other countries are needed before a final conclusion can be reached. Corresponding contributors in different countries or linguistic areas might further improve MIM's completeness.

  8. COMPLETENESS OF CATALOGS OF AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT, AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE, AND X-LINKED PHENOTYPES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TENKATE, LP

    1992-01-01

    The completeness of McKusick's catalogs of Mendelian Inheritance in Man (MIM) as to the number of phenotypes included was studied by estimating the degree of concordance with the Dutch Gene Catalog of the Department of Medical Genetics of the University of Groningen, The Netherlands. On a total of

  9. Combined Occurrence of Autosomal Dominant Aniridia and Autosomal Recessive Albinism in Several Members of a Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahalom, Claudia; Sharon, Dror; Dalia, Eli; Simhon, Shiran Ben; Shemesh, Efrat; Blumenfeld, Anat

    2015-06-01

    To characterize clinical and genetic aspects of a family with a unique combination of two hereditary blinding eye diseases. Comprehensive eye examination of proband and family members. Molecular analyses of the TYR and PAX6 genes. A young couple, both legally blind, requested genetic counselling regarding their ocular condition. The female was previously diagnosed with oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1A) and her spouse was diagnosed with Peters anomaly. A comprehensive clinical examination revealed that the female had OCA1A combined with signs of another ocular disease, showing some similarity to aniridia. A complete ocular examination of her family members revealed that her brother also suffered from the same combined phenotype, her father had typical OCA1A signs, and her mother and sister had aniridia-like phenotype, without clinical diagnosis until the time of presentation. Molecular analysis identified two compound heterozygous TYR mutations known to cause OCAIA and cosegregate with oculocutaneous albinism. In addition, we identified a novel heterozygous PAX6 mutation confirming the atypical aniridia phenotype. We report here a unique and rare clinical phenotype that is explained by the segregation of two severe inherited eye diseases. The clinical and genetic analysis in this family allowed them to receive accurate genetic counseling.

  10. A novel autosomal recessive GJA1 missense mutation linked to Craniometaphyseal dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Hu

    Full Text Available Craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD is a rare sclerosing skeletal disorder with progressive hyperostosis of craniofacial bones. CMD can be inherited in an autosomal dominant (AD trait or occur after de novo mutations in the pyrophosphate transporter ANKH. Although the autosomal recessive (AR form of CMD had been mapped to 6q21-22 the mutation has been elusive. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing for one subject with AR CMD and identified a novel missense mutation (c.716G>A, p.Arg239Gln in the C-terminus of the gap junction protein alpha-1 (GJA1 coding for connexin 43 (Cx43. We confirmed this mutation in 6 individuals from 3 additional families. The homozygous mutation cosegregated only with affected family members. Connexin 43 is a major component of gap junctions in osteoblasts, osteocytes, osteoclasts and chondrocytes. Gap junctions are responsible for the diffusion of low molecular weight molecules between cells. Mutations in Cx43 cause several dominant and recessive disorders involving developmental abnormalities of bone such as dominant and recessive oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD; MIM #164200, 257850 and isolated syndactyly type III (MIM #186100, the characteristic digital anomaly in ODDD. However, characteristic ocular and dental features of ODDD as well as syndactyly are absent in patients with the recessive Arg239Gln Cx43 mutation. Bone remodeling mechanisms disrupted by this novel Cx43 mutation remain to be elucidated.

  11. Aneurisma gigante do segmento intracavernoso da carótida interna associado a doença renal policística autossômica dominante: relato de caso Giant aneurysm of the intracavernous internal carotid artery associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keven F. Ponte

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Apresenta-se o caso de mulher de 60 anos com doença renal policística autossômica dominante (DRPAD que desenvolveu quadro de cefaléia e oftalmoplegia completa à direita. A TC levantou a hipótese de um aneurisma gigante do segmento intracavernoso da carótida interna direita, o que foi confirmado pela arteriografia. Realizou-se, então, tratamento endovascular por oclusão do vaso parental com molas destacáveis no segmento supraclinóideo. A paciente evoluiu com a interrupção da cefaléia e com redução parcial da ptose e da oftalmoplegia. Neste artigo, enfatiza-se a relação entre DRPAD e aneurismas intracranianos. Comenta-se a história natural dos aneurismas originados no segmento intracavernoso da artéria carótida interna e comparam-se as opções terapêuticas no manejo destas lesões.We report the case of a 60 years-old woman with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD that presented with headache and right complete ophthalmoplegia. The CT scan raised the possibility of a giant aneurysm of the right intracavernous internal carotid artery, confirmed by angiography. The patient underwent endovascular occlusion of parent vessel with detachable coils, then she presented interruption of headache and partial recovery of ptosis and ophthalmoplegia. We emphasize the relationship between ADPKD and intracranial aneurysms. We also discuss the natural history and compare the therapeutic options for the management of giant aneurysms of the cavernous portion of the carotid artery.

  12. Canopy-forming seaweeds in urchin-dominated systems in eastern Canada: structuring forces or simple prey for keystone grazers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin Blain

    Full Text Available Models of benthic community dynamics for the extensively studied, shallow rocky ecosystems in eastern Canada emphasize kelp-urchin interactions. These models may bias the perception of factors and processes that structure communities, for they largely overlook the possible contribution of other seaweeds to ecosystem resilience. We examined the persistence of the annual, acidic (H2SO4, brown seaweed Desmarestia viridis in urchin barrens at two sites in Newfoundland (Canada throughout an entire growth season (February to October. We also compared changes in epifaunal assemblages in D. viridis and other conspicuous canopy-forming seaweeds, the non-acidic conspecific Desmarestia aculeata and kelp Agarum clathratum. We show that D. viridis can form large canopies within the 2-to-8 m depth range that represent a transient community state termed "Desmarestia bed". The annual resurgence of Desmarestia beds and continuous occurrence of D. aculeata and A. clathratum, create biological structure for major recruitment pulses in invertebrate and fish assemblages (e.g. from quasi-absent gastropods to >150,000 recruits kg(-1 D. viridis. Many of these pulses phase with temperature-driven mass release of acid to the environment and die-off in D. viridis. We demonstrate experimentally that the chemical makeup of D. viridis and A. clathratum helps retard urchin grazing compared to D. aculeata and the highly consumed kelp Alaria esculenta. In light of our findings and related studies, we propose fundamental changes to the study of community shifts in shallow, rocky ecosystems in eastern Canada. In particular, we advocate the need to regard certain canopy-forming seaweeds as structuring forces interfering with top-down processes, rather than simple prey for keystone grazers. We also propose a novel, empirical model of ecological interactions for D. viridis. Overall, our study underscores the importance of studying organisms together with cross-scale environmental

  13. Canopy-Forming Seaweeds in Urchin-Dominated Systems in Eastern Canada: Structuring Forces or Simple Prey for Keystone Grazers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Caitlin; Gagnon, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Models of benthic community dynamics for the extensively studied, shallow rocky ecosystems in eastern Canada emphasize kelp-urchin interactions. These models may bias the perception of factors and processes that structure communities, for they largely overlook the possible contribution of other seaweeds to ecosystem resilience. We examined the persistence of the annual, acidic (H2SO4), brown seaweed Desmarestia viridis in urchin barrens at two sites in Newfoundland (Canada) throughout an entire growth season (February to October). We also compared changes in epifaunal assemblages in D. viridis and other conspicuous canopy-forming seaweeds, the non-acidic conspecific Desmarestia aculeata and kelp Agarum clathratum. We show that D. viridis can form large canopies within the 2-to-8 m depth range that represent a transient community state termed “Desmarestia bed”. The annual resurgence of Desmarestia beds and continuous occurrence of D. aculeata and A. clathratum, create biological structure for major recruitment pulses in invertebrate and fish assemblages (e.g. from quasi-absent gastropods to >150 000 recruits kg−1 D. viridis). Many of these pulses phase with temperature-driven mass release of acid to the environment and die-off in D. viridis. We demonstrate experimentally that the chemical makeup of D. viridis and A. clathratum helps retard urchin grazing compared to D. aculeata and the highly consumed kelp Alaria esculenta. In light of our findings and related studies, we propose fundamental changes to the study of community shifts in shallow, rocky ecosystems in eastern Canada. In particular, we advocate the need to regard certain canopy-forming seaweeds as structuring forces interfering with top-down processes, rather than simple prey for keystone grazers. We also propose a novel, empirical model of ecological interactions for D. viridis. Overall, our study underscores the importance of studying organisms together with cross-scale environmental variability

  14. Dominant optic atrophy in Denmark - report of 15 novel mutations in OPA1, using a strategy with a detection rate of 90%

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almind, Gitte J; Ek, Jakob; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of the OPA1 mutation spectrum in autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) in Denmark.......Investigation of the OPA1 mutation spectrum in autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) in Denmark....

  15. Exome Sequencing Reveals De Novo WDR45 Mutations Causing a Phenotypically Distinct, X-Linked Dominant Form of NBIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Tobias B.; Hogarth, Penelope; Kruer, Michael C.; Gregory, Allison; Wieland, Thomas; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Graf, Elisabeth; Sanford, Lynn; Meyer, Esther; Kara, Eleanna; Cuno, Stephan M.; Harik, Sami I.; Dandu, Vasuki H.; Nardocci, Nardo; Zorzi, Giovanna; Dunaway, Todd; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Skinner, Steven; Frucht, Steven; Hanspal, Era; Schrander-Stumpel, Connie; Héron, Delphine; Mignot, Cyril; Garavaglia, Barbara; Bhatia, Kailash; Hardy, John; Strom, Tim M.; Boddaert, Nathalie; Houlden, Henry H.; Kurian, Manju A.; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Hayflick, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a group of genetic disorders characterized by abnormal iron deposition in the basal ganglia. We report that de novo mutations in WDR45, a gene located at Xp11.23 and encoding a beta-propeller scaffold protein with a putative role in autophagy, cause a distinctive NBIA phenotype. The clinical features include early-onset global developmental delay and further neurological deterioration (parkinsonism, dystonia, and dementia developing by early adulthood). Brain MRI revealed evidence of iron deposition in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus. Males and females are phenotypically similar, an observation that might be explained by somatic mosaicism in surviving males and germline or somatic mutations in females, as well as skewing of X chromosome inactivation. This clinically recognizable disorder is among the more common forms of NBIA, and we suggest that it be named accordingly as beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration. PMID:23176820

  16. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive primary microcephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disorders ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific Articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (7 links) MICROCEPHALY 1, PRIMARY, AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE MICROCEPHALY 2, PRIMARY, AUTOSOMAL ...

  17. Holocene evolution of the Liaohe Delta, a tide-dominated delta formed by multiple rivers in Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lei; Xue, Chunting; Ye, Siyuan; Laws, Edward Allen; Yuan, Hongming; Yang, Shixiong; Du, Xiaolei

    2018-02-01

    The Liaohe Delta in Northeast China is one of the ecologically important estuarine deltas in China. It has been formed via the accumulation of sediment discharged by four rivers in the Liaohe Plain that enter Liaodong Bay. Twenty-seven 30-40 m long cores recovered from the Liaohe Plain and Liaodong Bay were analyzed for sedimentary characteristics, grain size, foraminifera species, and ages determined by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C to document the stratigraphical sequence and the spatio-temporal evolution of the Liaohe Delta. Our results revealed that the sedimentary environments have evolved from fluvial, tidal flat/estuarine, to neritic and finally to a deltaic environment since the Late Pleistocene. The Holocene transgression arrived at the present coastline at ∼8500 cal a BP and flooded the maximum area of land at ∼7000 cal a BP. A deltaic environment prevailed in this area after 7000 cal a BP. Bounded by the modern Liaohe River mouth, the present deltaic sedimentary system can be divided into the eastern and western components. The rate of seaward progradation of the eastern paleocoastline was estimated to be ∼8.6 m/a since 7000 cal a BP; the eastern cores in the present coastline began receiving the deltaic sediments at ∼5000 cal a BP. The rate of seaward progradation of the western paleocoastline was estimated to be only ∼2.8 m/a since 7000 cal a BP. The coastline on the western side began accumulating deltaic sediments about 2000 years later than the eastern coastline. Depocenter shifting was hypothesized to be the reason for the spatial differences in the sedimentary processes. However, the change of sediment fluxes of the western rivers due to climate changes and ancient human impacts might be the reason for the differences of the temporal evolution of the eastern and western sedimentary systems in the Liaohe Delta.

  18. The population genetics of X-autosome synthetic lethals and steriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance, Joseph; Johnson, Norman A; True, John R

    2011-11-01

    Epistatic interactions are widespread, and many of these interactions involve combinations of alleles at different loci that are deleterious when present in the same individual. The average genetic environment of sex-linked genes differs from that of autosomal genes, suggesting that the population genetics of interacting X-linked and autosomal alleles may be complex. Using both analytical theory and computer simulations, we analyzed the evolutionary trajectories and mutation-selection balance conditions for X-autosome synthetic lethals and steriles. Allele frequencies follow a set of fundamental trajectories, and incompatible alleles are able to segregate at much higher frequencies than single-locus expectations. Equilibria exist, and they can involve fixation of either autosomal or X-linked alleles. The exact equilibrium depends on whether synthetic alleles are dominant or recessive and whether fitness effects are seen in males, females, or both sexes. When single-locus fitness effects and synthetic incompatibilities are both present, population dynamics depend on the dominance of alleles and historical contingency (i.e., whether X-linked or autosomal mutations occur first). Recessive synthetic lethality can result in high-frequency X-linked alleles, and dominant synthetic lethality can result in high-frequency autosomal alleles. Many X-autosome incompatibilities in natural populations may be cryptic, appearing to be single-locus effects because one locus is fixed. We also discuss the implications of these findings with respect to standing genetic variation and the origins of Haldane's rule.

  19. Genetic forms of neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, Jonas; Spiess, Martin; Kopp, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is characterized by polyuria and polydipsia owing to partial or complete deficiency of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Although in most patients non-hereditary causes underlie the disorder, genetic forms have long been recognized and studied both in vivo and in vitro. In most affected families, the disease is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner, whereas autosomal recessive forms are much less frequent. Both phenotypes can be caused by mutations in the vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP) gene. In transfected cells expressing dominant mutations, the mutated hormone precursor is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, where it forms fibrillar aggregates. Autopsy studies in humans and a murine knock-in model suggest that the dominant phenotype results from toxicity to vasopressinergic neurons, but the mechanisms leading to cell death remain unclear. Recessive transmission results from AVP with reduced biologic activity or the deletion of the locus. Genetic neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus occurring in the context of diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness is termed DIDMOAD or Wolfram syndrome, a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the wolframin (WFS 1) gene. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Defects of intergenomic communication: autosomal disorders that cause multiple deletions and depletion of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, M; Marti, R; Ferreiro-Barros, C; Vilà, M R; Tadesse, S; Nishigaki, Y; Nishino, I; Vu, T H

    2001-12-01

    Depletion and multiple deletions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been associated with a growing number of autosomal diseases that have been classified as defects of intergenomic communication. MNGIE, an autosomal recessive disorder associated with mtDNA alterations is due to mutations in thymidine phosphorylase that may cause imbalance of the mitochondrial nucleotide pool. Subsequently, mutations in the mitochondrial proteins adenine nucleotide translocator 1, Twinkle, and polymerase gamma have been found to cause autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia with multiple deletions of mtDNA. Uncovering the molecular bases of intergenomic communication defects will enhance our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for maintaining mtDNA integrity. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  1. Adult-onset cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy presenting as multiple system atrophy: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogaki, Kotaro; Koga, Shunsuke; Aoki, Naoya; Lin, Wenlang; Suzuki, Kinuko; Ross, Owen A; Dickson, Dennis W

    2016-02-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most common peroxisomal disorder and is caused by ABCD1 mutations. A cerebello-brainstem dominant form that mainly involves the cerebellum and brainstem is summarized in a review of the literature, with autopsy-confirmed cases exceedingly rare. We report a 69-year-old White man who was diagnosed with this rare disorder and describe neuropathologic, ultrastructural and genetic analyses. He did not have adrenal insufficiency or a family history of X-ALD or Addison's disease. His initial symptom was temporary loss of eyesight at age 34 years. His major symptoms were chronic and progressive gait disorder, weakness in his lower extremities and spasticity, as well as autonomic failure and cerebellar ataxia suggesting possible multiple system atrophy (MSA). He also had seizures, hearing loss and sensory disturbances. His brain MRI showed no obvious atrophy or significant white matter pathology in cerebrum, brainstem or cerebellum. He died at age 69 years with a diagnosis of MSA. Microscopic analysis showed mild, patchy myelin rarefaction with perivascular clusters of PAS-positive, CD68-positive macrophages in the white matter most prominent in the cerebellum and occipital lobe, but also affecting the optic tract and internal capsule. Electron microscopy of cerebellar white matter showed cleft-like trilamellar cytoplasmic inclusions in macrophages typical of X-ALD, which prompted genetic analysis that revealed a novel ABCD1 mutation, p.R163G. Given the relatively mild pathological findings and long disease duration, it is likely that the observed pathology was the result of a slow and indolent disease process. We described a patient who had sporadic cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-ALD with long clinical course, mild pathological findings, and an ABCD1 p.R163G substitution. We also review a total of 34 cases of adult-onset cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-ALD. Although rare, X-ALD should be considered in the

  2. The Star Formation Rate Efficiency of Neutral Atomic-Dominated Hydrogen Gas in the Ooutskirts of Star-Forming Galaxies From z approx. 1 to z approx. 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafelski, Marc; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Fumagalli, Michele; Neeleman, Marcel; Teplitz, Harry I.; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Scarlata, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Current observational evidence suggests that the star formation rate (SFR)efficiency of neutral atomic hydrogen gas measured in damped Ly(alpha) systems (DLAs) at z approx. 3 is more than 10 times lower than predicted by the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS)relation. To understand the origin of this deficit, and to investigate possible evolution with redshift and galaxy properties, we measure the SFR efficiency of atomic gas at z approx. 1, z approx. 2, and z approx. 3 around star-forming galaxies. We use new robust photometric redshifts in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field to create galaxy stacks in these three redshift bins, and measure the SFR efficiency by combining DLA absorber statistics with the observed rest-frame UV emission in the galaxies' outskirts. We find that the SFR efficiency of H I gas at z > 1 is approx. 1%-3% of that predicted by the KS relation. Contrary to simulations and models that predict a reduced SFR efficiency with decreasing metallicity and thus with increasing redshift, we find no significant evolution in the SFR efficiency with redshift. Our analysis instead suggests that the reduced SFR efficiency is driven by the low molecular content of this atomic-dominated phase, with metallicity playing a secondary effect in regulating the conversion between atomic and molecular gas. This interpretation is supported by the similarity between the observed SFR efficiency and that observed in local atomic-dominated gas, such as in the outskirts of local spiral galaxies and local dwarf galaxies.

  3. Discriminative Features in Three Autosomal Recessive Cutis Laxa Syndromes: Cutis Laxa IIA, Cutis Laxa IIB, and Geroderma Osteoplastica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Kariminejad

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cutis laxa is a heterogeneous condition characterized by redundant, sagging, inelastic, and wrinkled skin. The inherited forms of this disease are rare and can have autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked inheritance. Three of the autosomal recessive cutis laxa syndromes, namely cutis laxa IIA (ARCL2A, cutis laxa IIB (ARCL2B, and geroderma osteodysplastica (GO, have very similar clinical features, complicating accurate diagnosis. Individuals with these conditions often present with cutis laxa, progeroid features, and hyperextensible joints. These conditions also share additional features, such as short stature, hypotonia, and congenital hip dislocation, but the severity and frequency of these findings are variable in each of these cutis laxa syndromes. The characteristic features for ARCL2A are abnormal isoelectric focusing and facial features, including downslanting palpebral fissures and a long philtrum. Rather, the clinical phenotype of ARCL2B includes severe wrinkling of the dorsum of the hands and feet, wormian bones, athetoid movements, lipodystrophy, cataract and corneal clouding, a thin triangular face, and a pinched nose. Normal cognition and osteopenia leading to pathological fractures, maxillary hypoplasia, and oblique furrowing from the outer canthus to the lateral border of the supraorbital ridge are discriminative features for GO. Here we present 10 Iranian patients who were initially diagnosed clinically using the respective features of each cutis laxa syndrome. Each patient’s clinical diagnosis was then confirmed with molecular investigation of the responsible gene. Review of the clinical features from the cases reported from the literature also supports our conclusions.

  4. Spatial variability and response to anthropogenic pressures of assemblages dominated by a habitat forming seaweed sensitive to pollution (northern coast of Alboran Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, Ricardo; de la Fuente, Gina; Ramírez-Romero, Eduardo; Vergara, Juan J; Hernández, Ignacio

    2016-04-15

    The Cystoseira ericaefolia group is conformed by three species: C. tamariscifolia, C. mediterranea and C. amentacea. These species are among the most important habitat forming species of the upper sublittoral rocky shores of the Mediterranean Sea and adjacent Atlantic coast. This species group is sensitive to human pressures and therefore is currently suffering important losses. This study aimed to assess the influence of anthropogenic pressures, oceanographic conditions and local spatial variability in assemblages dominated by C. ericaefolia in the Alboran Sea. The results showed the absence of significant effects of anthropogenic pressures or its interactions with environmental conditions in the Cystoseira assemblages. This fact was attributed to the high spatial variability, which is most probably masking the impact of anthropogenic pressures. The results also showed that most of the variability occurred on at local levels. A relevant spatial variability was observed at regional level, suggesting a key role of oceanographic features in these assemblages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A novel approach identifying hybrid sterility QTL on the autosomes of Drosophila simulans and D. mauritiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher T D Dickman

    Full Text Available When species interbreed, the hybrid offspring that are produced are often sterile. If only one hybrid sex is sterile, it is almost always the heterogametic (XY or ZW sex. Taking this trend into account, the predominant model used to explain the genetic basis of F1 sterility involves a deleterious interaction between recessive sex-linked loci from one species and dominant autosomal loci from the other species. This model is difficult to evaluate, however, as only a handful of loci influencing interspecies hybrid sterility have been identified, and their autosomal genetic interactors have remained elusive. One hindrance to their identification has been the overwhelming effect of the sex chromosome in mapping studies, which could 'mask' the ability to accurately map autosomal factors. Here, we use a novel approach employing attached-X chromosomes to create reciprocal backcross interspecies hybrid males that have a non-recombinant sex chromosome and recombinant autosomes. The heritable variation in phenotype is thus solely caused by differences in the autosomes, thereby allowing us to accurately identify the number and location of autosomal sterility loci. In one direction of backcross, all males were sterile, indicating that sterility could be entirely induced by the sex chromosome complement in these males. In the other direction, we identified nine quantitative trait loci that account for a surprisingly large amount (56% of the autosome-induced phenotypic variance in sterility, with a large contribution of autosome-autosome epistatic interactions. These loci are capable of acting dominantly, and thus could contribute to F1 hybrid sterility.

  6. A dominant negative form of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor induces metacyclogenesis and increases mitochondrial density in Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Muneaki, E-mail: muneaki@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421 (Japan); Nara, Takeshi, E-mail: tnara@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421 (Japan); Enomoto, Masahiro, E-mail: menomoto@uhnres.utoronto.ca [Laboratory for Developmental Neurobiology, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, M5G1L7, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kurebayashi, Nagomi, E-mail: nagomik@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421 (Japan); Yoshida, Mitsutaka, E-mail: myoshida@juntendo.ac.jp [Laboratoly of Morphology and Image Analysis, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421 (Japan); Sakurai, Takashi, E-mail: tsakurai@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421 (Japan); Mita, Toshihiro, E-mail: tmita@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421 (Japan); Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko, E-mail: mikosiba@brain.riken.jp [Laboratory for Developmental Neurobiology, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Calcium Oscillation Project, International Cooperative Research Project and Solution-Oriented Research for Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama, 332-0012 (Japan)

    2015-10-23

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP{sub 3}R) is a key regulator of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration that release Ca{sup 2+} from Ca{sup 2+} stores in response to various external stimuli. IP{sub 3}R also works as a signal hub which form a platform for interacting with various proteins involved in diverse cell signaling. Previously, we have identified an IP{sub 3}R homolog in the parasitic protist, Trypanosoma cruzi (TcIP{sub 3}R). Parasites expressing reduced or increased levels of TcIP{sub 3}R displayed defects in growth, transformation, and infectivity. In the present study, we established parasitic strains expressing a dominant negative form of TcIP{sub 3}R, named DN-TcIP{sub 3}R, to further investigate the physiological role(s) of TcIP{sub 3}R. We found that the growth of epimastigotes expressing DN-TcIP{sub 3}R was significantly slower than that of parasites with TcIP{sub 3}R expression levels that were approximately 65% of wild-type levels. The expression of DN-TcIP{sub 3}R in epimastigotes induced metacyclogenesis even in the normal growth medium. Furthermore, these epimastigotes showed the presence of dense mitochondria under a transmission electron microscope. Our findings confirm that TcIP{sub 3}R is crucial for epimastigote growth, as previously reported. They also suggest that a strong inhibition of the IP{sub 3}R-mediated signaling induces metacyclogenesis and that mitochondrial integrity is closely associated with this signaling. - Highlights: • We established T. cruzi strains expressing a dominant negative form of the TcIP{sub 3}R. • DN-TcIP{sub 3}R expression inhibits epimastigote growth and induces metacyclogenesis. • Microscopic analysis indicated TcIP{sub 3}R role in maintaining mitochondrial integrity. • Growth, but not microbial density, was altered by mammalian IP{sub 3}R inhibitor (2-APB).

  7. Endogenous interleukin-22 protects against inflammatory bowel disease but not autoimmune cholangitis in dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, G-X; Sun, Y; Tsuneyama, K; Zhang, W; Leung, P S C; He, X-S; Ansari, A A; Bowlus, C; Ridgway, W M; Gershwin, M E

    2016-08-01

    During chronic inflammation, interleukin (IL)-22 expression is up-regulated in both CD4 and CD8 T cells, exerting a protective role in infections. However, in autoimmunity, IL-22 appears to have either a protective or a pathogenic role in a variety of murine models of autoimmunity and, by extrapolation, in humans. It is not clear whether IL-22 itself mediates inflammation or is a by-product of inflammation. We have taken advantage of the dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II (dnTGF-βRII) mice that develop both inflammatory bowel disease and autoimmune cholangitis and studied the role and the biological function of IL-22 by generating IL-22(-/-) dnTGF-βRII mice. Our data suggest that the influence of IL-22 on autoimmunity is determined in part by the local microenvironment. In particular, IL-22 deficiency exacerbates tissue injury in inflammatory bowel disease, but has no influence on either the hepatocytes or cholangiocytes in the same model. These data take on particular significance in the previously defined effects of IL-17A, IL-12p40 and IL-23p19 deficiency and emphasize that, in colitis, there is a dominant role of IL-23/T helper type 17 (Th17) signalling. Furthermore, the levels of IL-22 are IL-23-dependent. The use of cytokine therapy in patients with autoimmune disease has significant potential, but must take into account the overlapping and often promiscuous effects that can theoretically exacerbate inflammation. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  8. The Dominant Snow-forming Process in Warm and Cold Mixed-phase Orographic Clouds: Effects of Cloud Condensation Nuclei and Ice Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Leung, L. R.; DeMott, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosols often observed over California in winter and spring from long-range transport can be efficient ice nuclei (IN) and enhance snow precipitation in mixed-phase orographic clouds. On the other hand, local pollution particles can serve as good CCN and suppress warm rain, but their impacts on cold rain processes are uncertain. The main snow-forming mechanism in warm and cold mixed-phase orographic clouds (refer to as WMOC and CMOC, respectively) could be very different, leading to different precipitation response to CCN and IN. We have conducted 1-km resolution model simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model for WMOC and CMOC cases from CalWater2011. We investigated the response of cloud microphysical processes and precipitation to CCN and IN with extremely low to extremely high concentrations using ice nucleation parameterizations that connect with dust and implemented based on observational evidences. We find that riming is the dominant process for producing snow in WMOC while deposition plays a more important role than riming in CMOC. Increasing IN leads to much more snow precipitation mainly due to an increase of deposition in CMOC and increased rimming in WMOC. Increasing CCN decreases precipitation in WMOC by efficiently suppressing warm rain, although snow is increased. In CMOC where cold rain dominates, increasing CCN significantly increases snow, leading to a net increase in precipitation. The sensitivity of supercooled liquid to CCN and IN has also been analyzed. The mechanism for the increased snow by CCN and caveats due to uncertainties in ice nucleation parameterizations will be discussed.

  9. Co-dominant expression of the HLA-G gene and various forms of alternatively spliced HLA-G mRNA in human first trimester trophoblast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, T V; Møller, C; Sørensen, S

    1998-01-01

    Genes may be silenced at the transcriptional level by 'genomic imprinting' in such a way that only one of the parental alleles is expressed. Imprinting may be tissue-specific and in some cases it seems also to be time-dependent during development. The phenomenon has been studied in pre- and post-...... investigated the different alternatively spliced forms of HLA-G mRNA in first trimester trophoblast and found the full-length transcript to be the far most abundant....... Transcription (RT) Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) products of HLA-G mRNA to examine the expression of maternal and paternal alleles. Our results demonstrate that HLA-G is co-dominantly expressed in first trimester trophoblast cells. A "new" non-synonymous base substitution in exon 4 was detected. We also......Genes may be silenced at the transcriptional level by 'genomic imprinting' in such a way that only one of the parental alleles is expressed. Imprinting may be tissue-specific and in some cases it seems also to be time-dependent during development. The phenomenon has been studied in pre- and post...

  10. Human Colon Tumors Express a Dominant-Negative Form of SIGIRR That Promotes Inflammation and Colitis-Associated Colon Cancer in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junjie; Bulek, Katarzyna; Gulen, Muhammet F; Zepp, Jarod A; Karagkounis, Georgio; Martin, Bradley N; Zhou, Hao; Yu, Minjia; Liu, Xiuli; Huang, Emina; Fox, Paul L; Kalady, Matthew F; Markowitz, Sanford D; Li, Xiaoxia

    2015-12-01

    Single immunoglobulin and toll-interleukin 1 receptor (SIGIRR), a negative regulator of the Toll-like and interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling pathways, controls intestinal inflammation and suppresses colon tumorigenesis in mice. However, the importance of SIGIRR in human colorectal cancer development has not been determined. We investigated the role of SIGIRR in development of human colorectal cancer. We performed RNA sequence analyses of pairs of colon tumor and nontumor tissues, each collected from 68 patients. Immunoblot and immunofluorescence analyses were used to determine levels of SIGIRR protein in primary human colonic epithelial cells, tumor tissues, and colon cancer cell lines. We expressed SIGIRR and mutant forms of the protein in Vaco cell lines. We created and analyzed mice that expressed full-length (control) or a mutant form of Sigirr (encoding SIGIRR(N86/102S), which is not glycosylated) specifically in the intestinal epithelium. Some mice were given azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulfate sodium to induce colitis-associated cancer. Intestinal tissues were collected and analyzed by immunohistochemical and gene expression profile analyses. RNA sequence analyses revealed increased expression of a SIGIRR mRNA isoform, SIGIRR(ΔE8), in colorectal cancer tissues compared to paired nontumor tissues. SIGIRR(ΔE8) is not modified by complex glycans and is therefore retained in the cytoplasm-it cannot localize to the cell membrane or reduce IL1R signaling. SIGIRR(ΔE8) interacts with and has a dominant-negative effect on SIGIRR, reducing its glycosylation, localization to the cell surface, and function. Most SIGIRR detected in human colon cancer tissues was cytoplasmic, whereas in nontumor tissues it was found at the cell membrane. Mice that expressed SIGIRR(N86/102S) developed more inflammation and formed larger tumors after administration of azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium than control mice; colon tissues from these mutant mice expressed

  11. Dominant white spotting in the Chinese hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henwood, C; Henwood, J; Robinson, R

    1987-01-01

    An autosomal dominant white spotting mutant is described for the Chinese hamster. The mutant gene is designated as dominant spot (symbol Ds). The homozygote DsDs is a prenatal lethal while the heterozygote Ds + displays white spotting. The expression of white is variable, ranging from a white forehead spot to extensive white on the body. The venter is invariably white. Growth appears to be normal and the fertility of both sizes shows no impairment.

  12. Autosomal recessive progressive myoclonus epilepsy due to impaired ceramide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Striano, Pasquale; Italiano, Domenico; Calarese, Tiziana; Gasparini, Sara; Vanni, Nicola; Fruscione, Floriana; Genton, Pierre; Zara, Federico

    2016-09-01

    Autosomal recessive progressive myoclonus epilepsy due to impaired ceramide synthesis is an extremely rare condition, so far reported in a single family of Algerian origin presenting an unusual, severe form of progressive myoclonus epilepsy characterized by myoclonus, generalized tonic-clonic seizures and moderate to severe cognitive impairment, with probable autosomal recessive inheritance. Disease onset was between 6 and 16 years of age. Genetic study allowed to identify a homozygous nonsynonymous mutation in CERS1, the gene encoding ceramide synthase 1, a transmembrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), catalyzes the biosynthesis of C18-ceramides. The mutation decreased C18-ceramide levels. In addition, downregulation of CerS1 in neuroblastoma cell line showed activation of ER stress response and induction of proapoptotic pathways. This observation demonstrates that impairment of ceramide biosynthesis underlies neurodegeneration in humans.

  13. Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis with a unique imaging finding: multiple encephaloceles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saglam, Dilek; Bilgici, Meltem Ceyhan; Bekci, Tuemay; Albayrak, Canan; Albayrak, Davut

    2017-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a hereditary form of sclerosing bone dysplasia with various radiological and clinical presentations. The autosomal recessive type, also known as malignant osteopetrosis, is the most severe type, with the early onset of manifestations. A 5-month-old infant was admitted to our hospital with recurrent respiratory tract infections. Chest X-ray and skeletal survey revealed the classic findings of osteopetrosis, including diffuse osteosclerosis and bone within a bone appearance. At follow-up, the patient presented with, thickened calvarium, multiple prominent encephaloceles, and dural calcifications leading to the intracranial clinical manifestations with bilateral hearing and sight loss. Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis is one of the causes of encephaloceles and this finding may become dramatic if untreated. (orig.)

  14. Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis with a unique imaging finding: multiple encephaloceles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saglam, Dilek; Bilgici, Meltem Ceyhan; Bekci, Tuemay [Ondokuz Mayis University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kurupelit, Samsun (Turkey); Albayrak, Canan; Albayrak, Davut [Ondokuz Mayis University, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Kurupelit, Samsun (Turkey)

    2017-05-15

    Osteopetrosis is a hereditary form of sclerosing bone dysplasia with various radiological and clinical presentations. The autosomal recessive type, also known as malignant osteopetrosis, is the most severe type, with the early onset of manifestations. A 5-month-old infant was admitted to our hospital with recurrent respiratory tract infections. Chest X-ray and skeletal survey revealed the classic findings of osteopetrosis, including diffuse osteosclerosis and bone within a bone appearance. At follow-up, the patient presented with, thickened calvarium, multiple prominent encephaloceles, and dural calcifications leading to the intracranial clinical manifestations with bilateral hearing and sight loss. Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis is one of the causes of encephaloceles and this finding may become dramatic if untreated. (orig.)

  15. Autosomal recessive long QT syndrome, type 1 in eight families from Saudi Arabia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bdier, Amnah Y.; Al-Ghamdi, Saleh; Verma, Prashant K.; Dagriri, Khalid; Alshehri, Bandar; Jiman, Omamah A.; Ahmed, Sherif E.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Al-Aama, Jumana Y.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most common primary cardiac arrhythmia syndromes is autosomal dominant long QT syndrome, type 1 (LQT1), chiefly caused by mono-allelic mutations in the KCNQ1 gene. Bi-allelic mutations in the KCNQ1 gene are causal to Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS), characterized by severe and

  16. Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa caused by mutations in the MAK gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Edwin M; Luo, Xunda; Héon, Elise; Lam, Byron L; Weleber, Richard G; Halder, Jennifer A; Affatigato, Louisa M; Goldberg, Jacqueline B; Sumaroka, Alexander; Schwartz, Sharon B; Cideciyan, Artur V; Jacobson, Samuel G

    2011-12-28

    To determine the disease expression in autosomal recessive (ar) retinitis pigmentosa (RP) caused by mutations in the MAK (male germ cell-associated kinase) gene. Patients with RP and MAK gene mutations (n = 24; age, 32-77 years at first visit) were studied by ocular examination, perimetry, and optical coherence tomography (OCT). All but one MAK patient were homozygous for an identical truncating mutation in exon 9 and had Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. The carrier frequency of this mutation among 1207 unrelated Ashkenazi control subjects was 1 in 55, making it the most common cause of heritable retinal disease in this population and MAK-associated RP the sixth most common Mendelian disease overall in this group. Visual acuities could be normal into the eighth decade of life. Kinetic fields showed early loss in the superior-temporal quadrant. With more advanced disease, superior and midperipheral function was lost, but the nasal field remained. Only a central island was present at late stages. Pigmentary retinopathy was less prominent in the superior nasal quadrant. Rod-mediated vision was abnormal but detectable in the residual field; all patients had rod>cone dysfunction. Photoreceptor layer thickness was normal centrally but decreased with eccentricity. At the stages studied, there was no evidence of photoreceptor ciliary elongation. The patterns of disease expression in the MAK form of arRP showed some resemblance to patterns described in autosomal dominant RP, especially the form caused by RP1 mutations. The similarity in phenotypes is of interest, considering that there is experimental evidence of interaction between Mak and RP1 in the photoreceptor cilium.

  17. Case report of intrafamilial variability in autosomal recessive centronuclear myopathy associated to a novel BIN1 stop mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurul Semra

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Centronuclear myopathies (CNM describe a group of rare muscle diseases typically presenting an abnormal positioning of nuclei in muscle fibers. To date, three genes are known to be associated to a classical CNM phenotype. The X-linked neonatal form (XLCNM is due to mutations in MTM1 and involves a severe and generalized muscle weakness at birth. The autosomal dominant form results from DNM2 mutations and has been described with early childhood and adult onset (ADCNM. Autosomal recessive centronuclear myopathy (ARCNM is less characterized and has recently been associated to mutations in BIN1, encoding amphiphysin 2. Here we present the first clinical description of intrafamilal variability in two first-degree cousins with a novel BIN1 stop mutation. In addition to skeletal muscle defects, both patients have mild mental retardation and the more severely affected male also displays abnormal ventilation and cardiac arrhythmia, thus expanding the phenotypic spectrum of BIN1-related CNM to non skeletal muscle defects. We provide an up-to-date review of all previous cases with ARCNM and BIN1 mutations.

  18. Targeted next-generation sequencing of a 12.5 Mb homozygous region reveals ANO10 mutations in patients with autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, S.; Hoischen, A.; Meijer, R.P.; Gilissen, C.F.H.A.; Neveling, K.; Wieskamp, N.A.W.; Brouwer, A.; Koenig, M.; Anheim, M.; Assoum, M.; Drouot, N.; Todorovic, S.; Milic-Rasic, V.; Lochmuller, H.; Stevanin, G.; Goizet, C.; David, A.; Durr, A.; Brice, A.; Kremer, B.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Schijvenaars, M.M.V.A.P.; Heister, A.; Kwint, M.P.; Arts, P.J.W.; Wijst, J.A.J. van der; Veltman, J.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Scheffer, H.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias comprise a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to their dominant counterparts, unraveling the molecular background of these ataxias has proven to be more complicated and the currently known mutations

  19. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing of a 12.5 Mb Homozygous Region Reveals ANO10 Mutations in Patients with Autosomal-Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, Sascha; Hoischen, Alexander; Meijer, Rowdy P. P.; Gilissen, Christian; Neveling, Kornelia; Wieskamp, Nienke; de Brouwer, Arjan; Koenig, Michel; Anheim, Mathieu; Assoum, Mirna; Drouot, Nathalie; Todorovic, Slobodanka; Milic-Rasic, Vedrana; Lochmueller, Hanns; Stevanin, Giovanni; Goizet, Cyril; David, Albert; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Kremer, Berry; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Schijvenaars, Mascha M. V. A. P.; Heister, Angelien; Kwint, Michael; Arts, Peer; van der Wijst, Jenny; Veltman, Joris; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Scheffer, Hans; Knoers, Nine

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias comprise a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to their dominant counterparts, unraveling the molecular background of these ataxias has proven to be more complicated and the currently known mutations

  20. Chromosomal localization of autosomal mutations in Drosophila ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    1Drosophila Stock Centre, Department of Studies in Zoology, University of Mysore,. Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006, ... of genetic markers. In the present study, we have exploited the differences in karyotypic composition between these two subspecies, and their cross-fertility, in order to localize some autosomal genes.

  1. Co-dominant expression of the HLA-G gene and various forms of alternatively spliced HLA-G mRNA in human first trimester trophoblast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F.; Møller, Charlotte; Sørensen, Steen

    1998-01-01

    -implantation developmental processes. Animal studies of genomic imprinting of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens in the placenta have shown discordant results. To address this issue in the human placenta, we examined the expression of the non-classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I gene, HLA-G. Genomic...... imprinting of the HLA-G locus could have implications for the interaction in the feto-maternal relationship. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP), allele-specific amplification and Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP) analysis followed by DNA sequencing were performed on Reverse...... Transcription (RT) Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) products of HLA-G mRNA to examine the expression of maternal and paternal alleles. Our results demonstrate that HLA-G is co-dominantly expressed in first trimester trophoblast cells. A "new" non-synonymous base substitution in exon 4 was detected. We also...

  2. A PHOTON-DOMINATED REGION MODEL FOR THE FIR MID-J CO LADDER WITH UNIVERSAL ROTATIONAL TEMPERATURE IN STAR FORMING REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seokho; Park, Yong-Sun; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-01-01

    A photon-dominated region (PDR) is one of the leading candidate mechanisms for the origin of warm CO gas with near universal ∼300 K rotational temperature inferred from the CO emission detected toward embedded protostars by Herschel/PACS. We have developed a PDR model in general coordinates, where we can use the most adequate coordinate system for an embedded protostar having outflow cavity walls, to solve chemistry and gas energetics self-consistently for given UV radiation fields with different spectral shapes. Simple one-dimensional tests and applications show that FIR mid-J (14 ≤ J ≤ 24) CO lines are emitted from close to the surface of a dense region exposed to high UV fluxes. We apply our model to HH46 and find that the UV-heated outflow cavity wall can reproduce the mid-J CO transitions observed by Herschel/PACS. A model with UV radiation corresponding to a blackbody of 10,000 K results in a rotational temperature lower than 300 K, while models with the Draine interstellar radiation field and the 15,000 K blackbody radiation field predict a rotational temperature similar to the observed one

  3. Tumor Cell Clone Expressing the Membrane-bound Form of IL-12p35 Subunit Stimulates Antitumor Immune Responses Dominated by CD8(+) T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hoyong; Do, Seon Ah; Park, Sang Min; Kim, Young Sang

    2013-04-01

    IL-12 is a secretory heterodimeric cytokine composed of p35 and p40 subunits. IL-12 p35 and p40 subunits are sometimes produced as monomers or homodimers. IL-12 is also produced as a membrane-bound form in some cases. In this study, we hypothesized that the membrane-bound form of IL-12 subunits may function as a costimulatory signal for selective activation of TAA-specific CTL through direct priming without involving antigen presenting cells and helper T cells. MethA fibrosarcoma cells were transfected with expression vectors of membrane-bound form of IL-12p35 (mbIL-12p35) or IL-12p40 subunit (mbIL-12p40) and were selected under G418-containing medium. The tumor cell clones were analyzed for the expression of mbIL-12p35 or p40 subunit and for their stimulatory effects on macrophages. The responsible T-cell subpopulation for antitumor activity of mbIL-12p35 expressing tumor clone was also analyzed in T cell subset-depleted mice. Expression of transfected membrane-bound form of IL-12 subunits was stable during more than 3 months of in vitro culture, and the chimeric molecules were not released into culture supernatants. Neither the mbIL-12p35-expressing tumor clones nor mbIL-12p40-expressing tumor clones activated macrophages to secrete TNF-α. Growth of mbIL-12p35-expressing tumor clones was more accelerated in the CD8(+) T cell-depleted mice than in CD4(+) T cell-depleted or normal mice. These results suggest that CD8(+) T cells could be responsible for the rejection of mbIL-12p35-expressing tumor clone, which may bypass activation of antigen presenting cells and CD4(+) helper T cells.

  4. Loss of VPS13C Function in Autosomal-Recessive Parkinsonism Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Increases PINK1/Parkin-Dependent Mitophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lesage, S.; Drouet, V.; Majounie, E.; Deramecourt, V.; Jacoupy, M.; Nicolas, A.; Cormier-Dequaire, F.; Hassoun, S.M.; Pujol, C.; Ciura, S.; Erpapazoglou, Z.; Usenko, T.; Maurage, C.A.; Sahbatou, M.; Liebau, S.; Ding, J.; Bilgic, B.; Emre, M.; Erginel-Unaltuna, N.; Guven, G.; Tison, F.; Tranchant, C.; Vidailhet, M.; Corvol, J.C.; Krack, P.; Leutenegger, A.L.; Nalls, M.A.; Hernandez, D.G.; Heutink, P.; Gibbs, J.R.; Hardy, J.; Wood, N.W.; Gasser, T.; Durr, A.; Deleuze, J.F.; Tazir, M.; Destee, A.; Lohmann, E.; Kabashi, E.; Singleton, A.; Corti, O.; Brice, A.; Scheffer, H.; Bloem, B.R.; et al.,

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The genetic causes of approximately 50% of autosomal-recessive early-onset forms of Parkinson disease (PD) remain to be elucidated. Homozygozity mapping and exome sequencing in 62 isolated individuals with

  5. Axonal loss occurs early in dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milea, Dan; Sander, Birgit; Wegener, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study set out to investigate retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in relation to age in healthy subjects and patients with OPA1 autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional investigation of RNFL...

  6. Domination, Eternal Domination, and Clique Covering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klostermeyer William F.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eternal and m-eternal domination are concerned with using mobile guards to protect a graph against infinite sequences of attacks at vertices. Eternal domination allows one guard to move per attack, whereas more than one guard may move per attack in the m-eternal domination model. Inequality chains consisting of the domination, eternal domination, m-eternal domination, independence, and clique covering numbers of graph are explored in this paper.

  7. Dominant versus recessive traits conveyed by allelic mutations - to what extent is nonsense-mediated decay involved?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ben-Shachar, S.; Khajavi, M.; Withers, M.A.; Shaw, C.A.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Brunner, H.G.; Lupski, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in ROR2, encoding a receptor tyrosine kinase, can cause autosomal recessive Robinow syndrome (RRS), a severe skeletal dysplasia with limb shortening, brachydactyly, and a dysmorphic facial appearance. Other mutations in ROR2 result in the autosomal dominant disease, brachydactyly type B

  8. Dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenaers, Guy; Hamel, Christian; Delettre, Cécile

    2012-01-01

    DEFINITION OF THE DISEASE: Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA) is a neuro-ophthalmic condition characterized by a bilateral degeneration of the optic nerves, causing insidious visual loss, typically starting during the first decade of life. The disease affects primary the retinal ganglion cells (RGC) an......) and their axons forming the optic nerve, which transfer the visual information from the photoreceptors to the lateral geniculus in the brain....

  9. Dominance Hierarchies in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Murray S.; Omark, Donald R.

    1973-01-01

    This study uses the ethological approach of seeking species characteristics and phylogenetic continuities in an investigation of human behavior. Among primates a striking consistency is the presence of some form of dominance hierarchy in many species. The present study examines peer group dominance hierarchies as they are perceived by children in…

  10. A New Therapeutic Strategy for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: Activation of AMP Kinase by Metformin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    of the enzyme’s allosteric activator AMP. Renal ischemia produces energy deprivation in renal tubules and is a powerful stimulus leading to the...Magenheimer BS, et al. (2006) Early embryonic renal tubules of wild-type and polycystic kidney disease kidneys respond to cAMP stimulation with cystic...cells, and Pkd1 flox/ and Pkd1/ temperature-sensitive SV40 large T antigen renal proximal tubule cells (Joly et al., 2006; Shibazaki et al., 2008

  11. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano A Hawkes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available CADASIL is the most common cause of hereditary stroke and vascular dementia. Published information about this disease in South America is scant. We describe clinical and demographic characteristics of 13 patients (10 families with CADASIL from Argentina.Methods Medical records, diagnostic tests and family history of patients with CADASIL were reviewed.Results Thirteen patients with CADASIL (10 families were included. All patients had European ancestry. Initial presentation was stroke in most patients (n = 11. Stroke patients later developed cognitive complaints (n = 9, migraine with aura (n = 1, apathy (n = 4 and depression (n = 6. External capsule and temporal lobe involvement on MRI were characteristic imaging findings. Two patients died after intracerebral hemorrhage.Conclusion This is the first report of non-related patients with CADASIL in South America addressing ancestry. Since European ancestry is not highly prevalent in all South American countries, there may be variable incidence of CADASIL within this region.

  12. Vasopressin in chronic kidney disease and its effects in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boertien, Wendy Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Vasopressine, het antidiuretisch hormoon, is een belangrijk hormoon voor het in balans houden van de waterhuishouding in het menselijk lichaam. In deel 1 van dit proefschrift blijkt dat vasopressine ook een rol heeft in de progressie van chronische nierziekten. Vasopressine (of copeptin, een deel

  13. Cellular Energy Pathways as Novel Targets for the Therapy of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    of patient urine specimens. Metabolite measurements will be correlated with disease severity parameters. 95 banked , coded ADPKD patient urine...metabolite measurements on the banked ADPKD patient samples by MS for further correlation once the most relevant ones are identified in the earlier in vitro...secretion, and dysregulation of cellular energy metabolism. The enzyme AMPK regulates a number of cellular pathways, including these disease-causing

  14. The myosin chaperone UNC45B is involved in lens development and autosomal dominant juvenile cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Comyn, Sophie; Mang, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    in this region, in ACACA and UNC45B. As alterations of the UNC45B protein have been shown to affect eye development in model organisms, effort was focused on the heterozygous UNC45B missense mutation. UNC45B encodes a myosin-specific chaperone that, together with the general heat shock protein HSP90, is involved...... in myosin assembly. The mutation changes p.Arg805 to Trp in the UCS domain, an amino acid that is highly conserved from yeast to human. UNC45B is strongly expressed in the heart and skeletal muscle tissue, but here we show expression in human embryo eye and zebrafish lens. The zebrafish mutant steif......, carrying an unc45b nonsense mutation, has smaller eyes than wild-type embryos and shows accumulation of nuclei in the lens. Injection of RNA encoding the human wild-type UNC45B protein into the steif homozygous embryo reduced the nuclei accumulation and injection of human mutant UNC45B cDNA in wild...

  15. Psychological distress in applicants for predictive DNA testing for autosomal dominant, heritable, late onset disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DudokdeWit, AC; Tibben, A; Duivenvoorden, HJ; Frets, PG; Zoeteweij, MW; Losekoot, M; vanHaeringen, A; Niermeijer, MF; Passchier, J; Lindhout, D; MeijersHeijboer, EJ; Lodder, LN; Trijsburg, RW; Klijn, JGM; BrockerVriends, A; Helderman, ATJM; HilhorstHofstee, Y; Kant, S; MaatKievit, JA; Oosterwijk, JC; vanderSmagt, JJ; VegtervanderVlis, M; VriesvanderWeerd, MACS; Bakker, E; Cornelisse, CJ; Devilee, P; Tops, C; Vasen, HFA

    In a comparative study on the effects of predictive DNA testing for late onset disorders, pre-test psychological distress was assessed in people at risk for Huntington's disease (HD, n=41), cerebral haemorrhage (HCHWA-D, n=9), breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC, n=24), and polyposis coli (FAP, n=45).

  16. Four Copies of SNCA Responsible for Autosomal Dominant Parkinson’s Disease in Two Italian Siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosangela Ferese

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Parkinson’s disease (PD is mostly characterized by alpha-synuclein (SNCA aggregation and loss of nigrostriatal dopamine-containing neurons. In this study a novel SNCA multiplication is described in two siblings affected by severe parkinsonism featuring early onset dyskinesia, psychiatric symptoms, and cognitive deterioration. Methods. SNCA dosage was performed using High-Density Comparative Genomic Hybridization Array (CGH-Array, Multiple Ligation Dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA, and Quantitative PCR (qPCR. Genetic analysis was associated with clinical evaluation. Results. Genetic analysis of siblings showed for the first time a 351 Kb triplication containing SNCA gene along with 6 exons of MMRN1 gene in 4q22.1 and a duplication of 1,29 Mb of a genomic region flanking the triplication. Conclusions. The identification of this family indicates a novel mechanism of SNCA gene multiplication, which confirms the genomic instability in this region and provides data on the genotype-phenotype correlation in PD patients.

  17. Focal palmoplantar keratoderma caused by an autosomal dominant inherited mutation in the desmoglein 1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milingou, M; Wood, P; Masouye, [No Value; McLean, WH; Borradori, L

    2006-01-01

    Background: Palmoplantar keratodermas (PPK) encompass a large genetically heterogeneous group of diseases associated with hyperkeratosis of the soles and/or palms that occur either isolated or in association with other cutaneous and extracutaneous manifestations. Pathogenic mutations in the

  18. Bone Status Among Patients With Nonsurgical Hypoparathyroidism, Autosomal Dominant Hypocalcaemia, and Pseudohypoparathyroidism: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underbjerg, Line; Malmstroem, Sofie; Sikjaer, Tanja; Rejnmark, Lars

    2018-03-01

    Nonsurgical hypoparathyroidism (Ns-HypoPT) and pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) are both rare diseases, characterized by hypocalcemia. In Ns-HypoPT, PTH levels are low, whereas patients with PHP often have very high levels due to receptor-insensitivity to PTH (PTH-resistance). Accordingly, we hypothesized that indices of bone turnover and bone mineralization/architecture are similar in Ns-HypoPT and PHP despite marked differences in PTH levels. We studied 62 patients with Ns-HypoPT and 31 with PHP as well as a group of age- and sex-matched healthy controls. We found a significantly higher areal BMD (aBMD) by DXA among patients with Ns-HypoPT, both compared with PHP and the background population. Compared with Ns-HypoPT, PHP patients had significantly lower total and trabecular volumetric BMD (vBMD) assessed by quantitative computed tomography (QCT) scans at the spine and hip. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) scans showed a lower trabecular area and vBMD as well as a lower trabecular number at the tibia in PHP compared to Ns-HypoPT and matched controls. In PHP, PTH levels correlated with levels of markers of bone formation (osteocalcin, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, P1NP), and bone resorption (CTx). In adult males, levels of bone markers were significantly higher in PHP compared with Ns-HypoPT. Levels of procalcitonin and calcitonin were significantly higher in PHP compared with Ns-HypoPT. In conclusion, indices of bone turnover, density, and microarchitecture differ between patients with Ns-HypoPT and PHP. Our data suggest that patients with PHP do not have a complete skeletal resistance to PTH and that the effects of chronically high PTH levels in PHP are mostly confined to the trabecular tissue. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  19. Novel autosomal dominant mandibulofacial dysostosis with ptosis: clinical description and exclusion of TCOF1

    OpenAIRE

    Hedera, P; Toriello, H; Petty, E

    2002-01-01

    Methods: Six affected family members underwent a complete medical genetics physical examination and two affected subjects had skeletal survey. All available medical records were reviewed. Linkage analysis using the markers spanning the TCOF1 locus was performed. One typically affected family member had a high resolution karyotype.

  20. Autosomal Dominant PTH Gene Signal Sequence Mutation in a Family With Familial Isolated Hypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinque, Luigia; Sparaneo, Angelo; Penta, Laura; Mencarelli, Amedea; Rogaia, Daniela; Esposito, Susanna; Fabrizio, Federico Pio; Baorda, Filomena; Verrotti, Alberto; Falorni, Alberto; Stangoni, Gabriela; Hendy, Geoffrey N; Guarnieri, Vito; Prontera, Paolo

    2017-11-01

    Familial isolated hypoparathyroidism (FIH) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder due to mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR), glial cells missing-2 (GCM2), guanine nucleotide binding protein α11 (GNA11), or parathyroid hormone (PTH) genes. Thus far, only four cases with homozygous and two cases with heterozygous mutations in the PTH gene have been reported. To clinically describe an FIH family and identify and characterize the causal gene mutation. Genomic DNA of the family members was subjected to CASR, GCM2, GNA11, and PTH gene mutational analysis. Functional assays were performed on the variant identified. Six subjects of a three-generation FIH family with three affected individuals having severe hypocalcemia and inappropriately low serum PTH. No mutations were detected in the CASR, GCM2, and GNA11 genes. A heterozygous variant that segregated with the disease was identified in PTH gene exon 2 (c.41T>A; p.M14K). This missense variant, in the hydrophobic core of the signal sequence, was predicted in silico to impair cleavage of preproPTH to proPTH. Functional assays in HEK293 cells demonstrated much greater retention intracellularly but impaired secretion into the medium of the M14K mutant relative to wild type. The addition of the pharmacological chaperone, 4-phenylbutyric acid, led to a reduction of cellular retention and increased accumulation in the cell medium of the M14K mutant. We report a heterozygous PTH mutation in an FIH family and demonstrate accumulation of the mutant intracellularly and its impaired secretion. An accurate genetic diagnosis in such hypoparathyroid patients is critical for appropriate treatment and genetic counseling. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  1. Linkage of autosomal-dominant common variable immunodeficiency to chromosome 4q.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finck, A.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Schaffer, A.A.; Pfannstiel, J.; Fieschi, C.; Plebani, A.; Webster, A.D.; Hammarstrom, L.; Grimbacher, B.

    2006-01-01

    The phenotype of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is characterized by recurrent infections owing to hypogammaglobulinemia, with deficiency in immunoglobulin (Ig)G and at least one of IgA or IgM. Family studies have shown a genetic association between CVID and selective IgA deficiency (IgAD),

  2. Macular sensitivity and fixation patterns in patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnbäck, Cecilia; Larsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    in the nasal macula (13.6 (± 5.7) dB versus 19.7 (± 0.7) dB) and in the central macula (14.2 (± 5.1) dB versus 19.9 (± 0.3) dB). The average sensitivity decreased with decreasing BCVA in ADOA (p ... fixation was observed in 35% of ADOA patients versus 14% of controls. Unstable fixation was found only in ADOA, where its prevalence was 7%. CONCLUSION: ADOA was associated with unstable fixation and subnormal microperimetric sensitivity, especially in the central and nasal macula where the ganglion cell...

  3. Ultrabiomicroscopic-Histopathologic Correlations in Individuals with Autosomal Dominant Congenital Microcoria: Three-Generation Family Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Ramirez-Miranda

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital microcoria (CMC is due to a maldevelopment of the dilator pupillae muscle of the iris, with a pupil diameter of less than 2 mm. It is associated with juvenile open angle glaucoma and myopia. We report on a three-generation Mexican-Mestizo family with CMC. The eldest member’s iris biopsy proved muscle anomalies. Further, we analyzed novel ultrasound biomicroscopy findings in the family members who did not require surgery. Patients and Methods: A 62-year-old woman, her 41-year-old son and her 9-year-old grandson affected with microcoria since birth, documented by clinical examination and ultrasound biomicroscopy. The eldest member underwent phacoemulsification, and a biopsy of the iris and the anterior capsule of the lens was taken. Results: Ultrasound biomicroscopy confirmed the CMC diagnosis showing iris thinning and a pupil diameter of less than 2 mm. Histopathology of the iris showed a significant reduction of smooth muscle cells, but no alterations of the anterior lens capsule. Discussion: Although CMC is a rare disorder, which is due to a maldevelopment of the dilator pupillae muscle of the iris, it could be associated with juvenile open angle glaucoma and myopia; therefore, precise diagnosis is required. Ultrasound biomicroscopy could be a great option to confirm the disorder.

  4. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Patients May Be Predisposed to Various Cardiomyopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad T. Chebib

    2017-09-01

    Discussion: Coexistence of ADPKD and cardiomyopathy in our tertiary referral center cohort appears to be higher than expected by chance. We suggest that PKD1 and PKD2 mutations may predispose to primary cardiomyopathies and that genetic interactions may account for the observed coexistence of ADPKD and cardiomyopathies.

  5. Mutations in DNMT1 cause autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkelmann, Juliane; Lin, Ling; Schormair, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    to HDAC2. It is also highly expressed in immune cells and required for the differentiation of CD4+ into T regulatory cells. Mutations in exon 20 of this gene were recently reported to cause hereditary sensory neuropathy with dementia and hearing loss (HSAN1). Our mutations are all located in exon 21...

  6. Potential Deleterious Effects of Vasopressin in Chronic Kidney Disease and Particularly Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, E.; Boertien, W. E.; Zietse, R.; Gansevoort, R. T.

    2011-01-01

    The antidiuretic hormone vasopressin is crucial for regulating free water clearance in normal physiology. However, it has also been hypothesized that vasopressin has deleterious effects on the kidney. Vasopressin is elevated in animals and patients with chronic kidney disease. Suppression of

  7. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of CADASIL GeneReview: CADASIL MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Multi-Infarct Dementia General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related Information How are genetic ...

  8. Bilineal inheritance of type 1 autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and recurrent fetal loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Peces, Carlos; Coto, Eliecer; Selgas, Rafael

    2008-10-01

    We report for the first time a family with type 1 ADPKD in which the marriage between affected non-consanguinous individuals resulted in two live-born heterozygous offspring and two fetuses lost in mid-pregnancy. Given a 25% chance for mutant compound heterozygosity in the offspring of this family, our findings suggest that compound heterozygosity of PKD1 mutations in humans may be embryonically lethal.

  9. Macular sensitivity and fixation patterns in patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnbäck, Cecilia; Larsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    with exon 28 (2826 delT) mutation in OPA1 (age 11.7-71.5 years, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) 20/24-20/13). The patients and 49 mutation-free first-degree relatives (BCVA 20/25-20/10) underwent ophthalmic examination including macular microperimetry out to 12° eccentricity with registration...

  10. A New Therapeutic Strategy for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: Activation of AMP Kinase by Metformin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    demonstrated that the succinate receptor, GPR91, is highly expressed in the kidney, and that succinate induces a GPR91-dependent hypertensive response in animals...Kokrashvili Z, et al. T1R3 and gustducin in gut sense sugars to regulate expression of Naþ-glucose cotransporter 1. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2007; 104:15075

  11. WHITE ANNULAR RETINAL DYSTROPHY WITH SEVERE GLAUCOMA A New Autosomal Dominant Condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morizot, Rodrigo; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; Morizot, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose:To report a family with a previously unreported characteristic retinal dystrophy and glaucoma.Methods:Seven family members were diagnosed with an atypical retinal dystrophy and open-angle glaucoma with rapid evolution. Ophthalmic examination, fluorescein angiography, color photography, optic

  12. Autosomal dominant stapes fixation, syndactyly, and symphalangism in a family with NOG mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard-Nielsen, Marie; Amstrup, Tine; Wanscher, Jens Højberg

    2018-01-01

    bilateral conductive hearing loss. Three patients were treated with stapedectomy, on one or both ears, due to fixation of stapes. All the affected members had syndactyly and symphalangism. A not previously reported mutation in the NOG gene (c.688_699del, p.Cys230_Cys232delins11) was found to segregate...

  13. Sclerostin─A Debutant on the Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Scene?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Jankowska

    2017-05-01

    Discussion: Circulating sclerostin levels are increased in ADPKD, possibly reflecting impaired mechanosensation. The clinical relevance of this finding, especially with regard to bone health, remains to be investigated. Our finding draws attention to the etiology of kidney disease as an important, yet neglected, confounder of the association between renal failure and mineral and bone disease.

  14. Domination versus disjunctive domination in graphs | Henning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A dominating set in a graph G is a set S of vertices of G such that every vertex not in S is adjacent to a vertex of S. The domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a dominating set of G. For a positive integer b, a set S of vertices in a graph G is a b-disjunctive dominating set in G if every vertex v not in S is adjacent ...

  15. Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin Kexin Type 9 Inhibition for Autosomal Recessive Hypercholesterolemia-Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thedrez, Aurélie; Sjouke, Barbara; Passard, Maxime; Prampart-Fauvet, Simon; Guédon, Alexis; Croyal, Mikael; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje; Peter, Jorge; Blom, Dirk; Ciccarese, Milco; Cefalù, Angelo B; Pisciotta, Livia; Santos, Raul D; Averna, Maurizio; Raal, Frederick; Pintus, Paolo; Cossu, Maria; Hovingh, Kees; Lambert, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in the vast majority of patients with autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia. Will PCSK9 inhibition with monoclonal antibodies, in particular alirocumab, be of therapeutic value for patients with autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH)? Primary lymphocytes were obtained from 28 genetically characterized ARH patients and 11 controls. ARH lymphocytes treated with mevastatin were incubated with increasing doses of recombinant PCSK9 with or without saturating concentrations of alirocumab. Cell surface LDL receptor expression measured by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy was higher in ARH than in control lymphocytes. PCSK9 significantly reduced LDL receptor expression in ARH lymphocytes albeit to a lower extent than in control lymphocytes (25% versus 76%, respectively), an effect reversed by alirocumab. Fluorescent LDL cellular uptake, also measured by flow cytometry, was reduced in ARH lymphocytes compared with control lymphocytes. PCSK9 significantly lowered LDL cellular uptake in ARH lymphocytes, on average by 18%, compared with a 46% reduction observed in control lymphocytes, an effect also reversed by alirocumab. Overall, the effects of recombinant PCSK9, and hence of alirocumab, on LDL receptor expression and function were significantly less pronounced in ARH than in control cells. PCSK9 inhibition with alirocumab on top of statin treatment has the potential to lower LDL cholesterol in some autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia patients. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Autosomal recessive transmission of MYBPC3 mutation results in malignant phenotype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilu Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM due to mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins is most commonly inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Since nearly 50% of HCM cases occur in the absence of a family history, a recessive inheritance pattern may be involved. METHODS: A pedigree was identified with suspected autosomal recessive transmission of HCM. Twenty-six HCM-related genes were comprehensively screened for mutations in the proband with targeted second generation sequencing, and the identified mutation was confirmed with bi-directional Sanger sequencing in all family members and 376 healthy controls. RESULTS: A novel missense mutation (c.1469G>T, p.Gly490Val in exon 17 of MYBPC3 was identified. Two siblings with HCM were homozygous for this mutation, whereas other family members were either heterozygous or wild type. Clinical evaluation showed that both homozygotes manifested a typical HCM presentation, but none of others, including 5 adult heterozygous mutation carriers up to 71 years of age, had any clinical evidence of HCM. CONCLUSIONS: Our data identified a MYBPC3 mutation in HCM, which appeared autosomal recessively inherited in this family. The absence of a family history of clinical HCM may be due to not only a de novo mutation, but also recessive mutations that failed to produce a clinical phenotype in heterozygous family members. Therefore, consideration of recessive mutations leading to HCM is essential for risk stratification and genetic counseling.

  17. Enfermedad poliquística autosómica recesiva Recessive autosomal polycystic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandalio Durán Álvarez

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Como enfermedades renales poliquísticas hereditarias se describen clásicamente la autosómica recesiva y la autosómica dominante, mal llamadas enfermedad poliquística de tipo infantily de;tipo adulto, respectivamente, pues ambas pueden verse tanto en una como en otra edad. Los conceptos cambiantes en cuanto a la enfermedad autosómica recesiva, dados por los progresos en el tratamiento de los recién nacidos con la enfermedad, y la localización del gen, que por su mutación la produce, nos motivan hacer esta breve revisión con la finalidad de contribuir a la comprensión de la enfermedad por los estudiantes de medicina y el médico general básico.Recessive autosomal and dominant autosomal polycystic kidney diseases are classically described as hereditary illnesses; they are also called polycystic disease of child type” and of adult typerespectively since both may be seen in any of these two life stages. The changing concepts of recessive autosomal disease, given the advances made in the treatment of newborns with this disease, and the location of the gen, the mutation of which causes it, encouraged us to make a brief literature review to help medical students and general practitioners to understand this disease.

  18. Carrier testing for autosomal-recessive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallance, Hilary; Ford, Jason

    2003-08-01

    The aim of carrier testing is to identify carrier couples at risk of having offspring with a serious genetic (autosomal recessive) disorder. Carrier couples are offered genetic consultation where their reproductive options, including prenatal diagnosis, are explained. The Ashkenazi Jewish population is at increased risk for several recessively inherited disorders (Tay-Sachs disease, Cystic fibrosis, Canavan disease, Gaucher disease, Familial Dysautonomia, Niemann-Pick disease, Fanconi anemia, and Bloom syndrome). Unlike Tay-Sachs disease, there is no simple biochemical or enzymatic test to detect carriers for these other disorders. However, with the rapid identification of disease-causing genes in recent years, DNA-based assays are increasingly available for carrier detection. Approximately 5% of the world's population carries a mutation affecting the globin chains of the hemoglobin molecule. Among the most common of these disorders are the thalassemias. The global birth rate of affected infants is at least 2 per 1000 (in unscreened populations), with the greatest incidence in Southeast Asian, Indian, Mediterranean, and Middle Eastern ethnic groups. Carriers are detected by evaluation of red cell indices and morphology, followed by more sophisticated hematological testing and molecular analyses. The following issues need to be considered in the development of a carrier screening program: (1) test selection based on disease severity and test accuracy; (2) funding for testing and genetic counselling; (3) definition of the target population to be screened; (4) development of a public and professional education program; (5) informed consent for screening; and (6) awareness of community needs.

  19. Política e economia como formas de dominação: o trabalho intelectual em Marx Politics and economy as form of domination: intellectual labor in Marx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedi Hirano

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Este ensaio procura sistematizar a análise teórica que Marx faz do pré-capitalismo e do capitalismo como estruturas sociais de poder, predominando naquele as relações políticas e neste as relações econômicas como formas de dominação. Procura-se demonstrar que no pré-capitalismo o poder político e o exercício monopolizado da violência física, social e psicológica são determinados pela forma como os agentes sociais se apropriam das condições objetivas, materiais e simbólicas da produção social. No capitalismo, a produção, quando já é comandada pelo capital, além de produzir a mais-valia, também produz um sistema de exploração geral das propriedades naturais e humanas tendo como suporte a ciência. Ou seja, ela realiza a apropriação através da ciência, e não da violência e do poder pessoal, colocando o saber científico ao seu serviço, na espécie de capital fixo. Essa extração da mais-valia assume, apesar de ser resultante da relação econômica, a forma de atividade científica. É dentro desse contexto que se analisa a questão do trabalho intelectual não só como produtor de valor mas, também, como produtor de concepções justificadoras da forma histórica de poder e de dominação capitalista.This essay aims at systematizing the theoretical analysis that Marx makes of pre-capitalism and of capitalism as social structures of power, bearing in mind that political relations predominate in the former and economic relations in the latter as forms of domination. In pre-capitalism, political power and the monopolized exercise of physical, social and psychological violence are determined by the manner in which social agents appropriate objective, material and symbolic conditions of social production. In capitalism, production, when it is already commanded by capital, on top of producing surplus value, it also produces a system of general exploitation of the natural and human properties with the support of

  20. Loss of VPS13C Function in Autosomal-Recessive Parkinsonism Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Increases PINK1/Parkin-Dependent Mitophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Lesage, S.; Drouet, V.; Majounie, E.; Deramecourt, V.; Jacoupy, M.; Nicolas, A.; Cormier-Dequaire, F.; Hassoun, S.M.; Pujol, C.; Ciura, S.; Erpapazoglou, Z.; Usenko, T.; Maurage, C.A.; Sahbatou, M.; Liebau, S.

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The genetic causes of approximately 50% of autosomal-recessive early-onset forms of Parkinson disease (PD) remain to be elucidated. Homozygozity mapping and exome sequencing in 62 isolated individuals with early-onset parkinsonism and confirmed consanguinity followed by data mining in the exomes of 1,348 PD-affected individuals identified, in three isolated subjects, homozygous or compound heterozygous t...

  1. X Chromosome and Autosome Dosage Responses in Drosophila melanogaster Heads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen-Xia; Oliver, Brian

    2015-01-01

    X chromosome dosage compensation is required for male viability in Drosophila. Dosage compensation relative to autosomes is two-fold, but this is likely to be due to a combination of homeostatic gene-by-gene regulation and chromosome-wide regulation. We have baseline values for gene-by-gene dosage compensation on autosomes, but not for the X chromosome. Given the evolutionary history of sex chromosomes, these baseline values could differ. We used a series of deficiencies on the X and autosomes, along with mutations in the sex-determination gene transformer-2, to carefully measure the sex-independent X-chromosome response to gene dosage in adult heads by RNA sequencing. We observed modest and indistinguishable dosage compensation for both X chromosome and autosome genes, suggesting that the X chromosome is neither inherently more robust nor sensitive to dosage change. PMID:25850426

  2. SCA13 causes dominantly inherited non-progressive myoclonus ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaut, Solveig; Apartis, Emmanuelle; Chanson, Jean-Baptiste; Ewenczyk, Claire; Renaud, Mathilde; Guissart, Claire; Muller, Jean; Legrand, André Pierre; Durr, Alexandra; Laugel, Vincent; Koenig, Michel; Tranchant, Christine; Anheim, Mathieu

    2017-05-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 13 (SCA13) is a rare autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia. To our knowledge, its association to movement disorders has never been described. We aimed at reporting 8 new SCA13 cases with a focus on movement disorders especially myoclonus. We performed a detailed neurological examination and neurophysiological recording in 8 patients consecutively diagnosed with SCA13 between December 2013 and October 2015 and followed up in two French tertiary centers. We identified mild subcortical myoclonus in all patients, with a homogenous clinical and electrophysiological pattern. Myoclonus ataxia was very slowly progressive, like the other symptoms of the disease, whatever the age of onset. Patients with R423H mutation had an earlier age of onset than patients with R420H mutation. Myoclonus appears to be frequent in SCA13. SCA13 should be considered facing non-progressive autosomal dominant myoclonus ataxia, and polymyographic recording should be included in the diagnosis work. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular evolution of a Y chromosome to autosome gene duplication in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Kelly A; White, Brooke E; Bray, Michael J; Piqué, Daniel G; Betancourt, Andrea J

    2011-03-01

    In contrast to the rest of the genome, the Y chromosome is restricted to males and lacks recombination. As a result, Y chromosomes are unable to respond efficiently to selection, and newly formed Y chromosomes degenerate until few genes remain. The rapid loss of genes from newly formed Y chromosomes has been well studied, but gene loss from highly degenerate Y chromosomes has only recently received attention. Here, we identify and characterize a Y to autosome duplication of the male fertility gene kl-5 that occurred during the evolution of the testacea group species of Drosophila. The duplication was likely DNA based, as other Y-linked genes remain on the Y chromosome, the locations of introns are conserved, and expression analyses suggest that regulatory elements remain linked. Genetic mapping reveals that the autosomal copy of kl-5 resides on the dot chromosome, a tiny autosome with strongly suppressed recombination. Molecular evolutionary analyses show that autosomal copies of kl-5 have reduced polymorphism and little recombination. Importantly, the rate of protein evolution of kl-5 has increased significantly in lineages where it is on the dot versus Y linked. Further analyses suggest this pattern is a consequence of relaxed purifying selection, rather than adaptive evolution. Thus, although the initial fixation of the kl-5 duplication may have been advantageous, slightly deleterious mutations have accumulated in the dot-linked copies of kl-5 faster than in the Y-linked copies. Because the dot chromosome contains seven times more genes than the Y and is exposed to selection in both males and females, these results suggest that the dot suffers the deleterious effects of genetic linkage to more selective targets compared with the Y chromosome. Thus, a highly degenerate Y chromosome may not be the worst environment in the genome, as is generally thought, but may in fact be protected from the accumulation of deleterious mutations relative to other nonrecombining

  4. Co-Roman domination in graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The basic complexity question of the decision problem for the co-Roman domination number takes the following form: Co-Roman Domination (CRDM). Instance. A nontrivial connected graph G = (V,E) and a positive integer k. Question. Does G have a co-Roman dominating function f with w(f ) ≤ k? We proceed to prove that ...

  5. Isolate domination in graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sahul Hamid

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A set D of vertices of a graph G is called a dominating set of G if every vertex in V(G−D is adjacent to a vertex in D. A dominating set S such that the subgraph 〈S〉 induced by S has at least one isolated vertex is called an isolate dominating set. An isolate dominating set none of whose proper subset is an isolate dominating set is a minimal isolate dominating set. The minimum and maximum cardinality of a minimal isolate dominating set are called the isolate domination number γ0 and the upper isolate domination number Γ0 respectively. In this paper we initiate a study on these parameters.

  6. Genetic Causes of Putative Autosomal Recessive Intellectual Disability Cases in Hamedan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad Bastami

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic causes of autosomal recessive intellectual disabilities (AR-ID in Hamadan province of Iran. Materials & Methods: In this descriptive-analytical cross-sectional study, 25 families with more than one affected with putative autosomal recessive intellectual disability were chosen with collaboration of Welfare Organization of Hamadan province. Families were included a total of 60 patients (39 male and 21 female whose intellectual disability had been confirmed by Raven IQ test. Each family was asked for clinical examination and getting consent form. Blood sample was collected from each family. One proband from each family was tested for CGG repeat expansion in FMR1 gene, chromosomal abnormalities and inborn errors of metabolism. We also performed homozygosity mapping based on STR markers for seven known MCPH loci in families with primary microcephaly and AR-ID. Results: Five families had full mutation of Fragile X syndrome. No chromosomal abnormalities were identified. Metabolic screening revealed one family with Medium Chain Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase deficiency. None of three families with primary microcephaly and AR-ID showed linkage to any of known seven MCPH loci. Conclusion: The main causes of ID in Hamadan province were Fragile X syndrome and Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly with the frequencies of 20% and 12%, respectively.

  7. Topics on domination

    CERN Document Server

    Hedetniemi, ST

    1991-01-01

    The contributions in this volume are divided into three sections: theoretical, new models and algorithmic. The first section focuses on properties of the standard domination number &ggr;(G), the second section is concerned with new variations on the domination theme, and the third is primarily concerned with finding classes of graphs for which the domination number (and several other domination-related parameters) can be computed in polynomial time.

  8. Total well dominated trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finbow, Arthur; Frendrup, Allan; Vestergaard, Preben D.

    cardinality then G is a total well dominated graph. In this paper we study composition and decomposition of total well dominated trees. By a reversible process we prove that any total well dominated tree can both be reduced to and constructed from a family of three small trees....

  9. Dominating Sets and Domination Polynomials of Paths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Alikhani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Let G=(V,E be a simple graph. A set S⊆V is a dominating set of G, if every vertex in V\\S is adjacent to at least one vertex in S. Let 𝒫ni be the family of all dominating sets of a path Pn with cardinality i, and let d(Pn,j=|𝒫nj|. In this paper, we construct 𝒫ni, and obtain a recursive formula for d(Pn,i. Using this recursive formula, we consider the polynomial D(Pn,x=∑i=⌈n/3⌉nd(Pn,ixi, which we call domination polynomial of paths and obtain some properties of this polynomial.

  10. Long-term follow-up of a family with dominant X-linked retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, DM; Khanna, H; Atmaca-Sonmez, P; Sieving, PA; Branham, K; Othman, M; Swaroop, A; Daiger, SP; Heckenlively, JR

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To document the progression of disease in male and female members of a previously described family with X-linked dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP) caused by a de novo insertion after nucleotide 173 in exon ORF15 of RPGR. Methods The clinical records of 19 members of family UTAD054 were reviewed. Their evaluations consisted of confirmation of family history, standardised electroretinograms (ERGs), Goldmann visual fields, and periodic ophthalmological examinations over a 23-year period. Results Male members of family UTAD054 had non-recordable to barely recordable ERGs from early childhood. The males showed contracted central fields and developed more severe retinopathy than the females. The female members showed a disease onset delayed to teenage years, recordable but diminishing photopic and scotopic ERG amplitudes in a cone-rod pattern, progressive loss and often asymmetric visual fields, and diffuse atrophic retinopathy with fewer pigment deposits compared with males. Conclusions This insertion mutation in the RPGR exon ORF15 is associated with a RP phenotype that severely affects males early and females by 30 years of age, and is highly penetrant in female members. Families with dominant-acting RPGR mutations may be mistaken to have an autosomal mode of inheritance resulting in an incorrect prediction of recurrence risk and prognosis. Broader recognition of X-linked RP forms with dominant inheritance is necessary to facilitate appropriate counselling of these patients. PMID:19893586

  11. Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease: Antenatal Diagnosis and Histopathological Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayananda Kumar Rajanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD is one of the most common inheritable disease manifesting in infancy and childhood with a frequency of 1:6,000 to 1:55,000 births. The patient in her second trimester presented with a history of amenorrhea. Ultrasound examination revealed bilateral, enlarged, hyperechogenic kidneys, placentomegaly, and severe oligohydramnios. The pregnancy was terminated. An autopsy was performed on the fetus. Both the kidneys were found to be enlarged and the cut surface showed numerous cysts. The liver sections showed changes due to fibrosis. The final diagnosis of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease was made based on these findings. In this article, we correlate the ante-natal ultrasound and histopathological findings in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

  12. The efficacy of microarray screening for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Huet, Ramon A C; Pierrache, Laurence H M; Meester-Smoor, Magda A; Klaver, Caroline C W; van den Born, L Ingeborgh; Hoyng, Carel B; de Wijs, Ilse J; Collin, Rob W J; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Klevering, B Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of multiple versions of a commercially available arrayed primer extension (APEX) microarray chip for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). We included 250 probands suspected of arRP who were genetically analyzed with the APEX microarray between January 2008 and November 2013. The mode of inheritance had to be autosomal recessive according to the pedigree (including isolated cases). If the microarray identified a heterozygous mutation, we performed Sanger sequencing of exons and exon-intron boundaries of that specific gene. The efficacy of this microarray chip with the additional Sanger sequencing approach was determined by the percentage of patients that received a molecular diagnosis. We also collected data from genetic tests other than the APEX analysis for arRP to provide a detailed description of the molecular diagnoses in our study cohort. The APEX microarray chip for arRP identified the molecular diagnosis in 21 (8.5%) of the patients in our cohort. Additional Sanger sequencing yielded a second mutation in 17 patients (6.8%), thereby establishing the molecular diagnosis. In total, 38 patients (15.2%) received a molecular diagnosis after analysis using the microarray and additional Sanger sequencing approach. Further genetic analyses after a negative result of the arRP microarray (n = 107) resulted in a molecular diagnosis of arRP (n = 23), autosomal dominant RP (n = 5), X-linked RP (n = 2), and choroideremia (n = 1). The efficacy of the commercially available APEX microarray chips for arRP appears to be low, most likely caused by the limitations of this technique and the genetic and allelic heterogeneity of RP. Diagnostic yields up to 40% have been reported for next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques that, as expected, thereby outperform targeted APEX analysis.

  13. DOCK6 mutations are responsible for a distinct autosomal-recessive variant of Adams-Oliver syndrome associated with brain and eye anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukalo, Maja; Tilsen, Felix; Kayserili, Hülya; Müller, Dietmar; Tüysüz, Beyhan; Ruddy, Deborah M; Wakeling, Emma; Ørstavik, Karen Helene; Snape, Katie M; Trembath, Richard; De Smedt, Maryse; van der Aa, Nathalie; Skalej, Martin; Mundlos, Stefan; Wuyts, Wim; Southgate, Laura; Zenker, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS) is characterized by the association of aplasia cutis congenita with terminal transverse limb defects, often accompanied by additional cardiovascular or neurological features. Both autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive disease transmission have been observed, with recent gene discoveries indicating extensive genetic heterogeneity. Mutations of the DOCK6 gene were first described in autosomal-recessive cases of AOS and only five DOCK6-related families have been reported to date. Recently, a second type of autosomal-recessive AOS has been attributed to EOGT mutations in three consanguineous families. Here, we describe the identification of 13 DOCK6 mutations, the majority of which are novel, across 10 unrelated individuals from a large cohort comprising 47 sporadic cases and 31 AOS pedigrees suggestive of autosomal-recessive inheritance. DOCK6 mutations were strongly associated with structural brain abnormalities, ocular anomalies, and intellectual disability, thus suggesting that DOCK6-linked disease represents a variant of AOS with a particularly poor prognosis. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  14. Novel SOX9 Gene Mutation in Campomelic Dysplasia with Autosomal Sex Reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Pin Hsiao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Campomelic dysplasia (CD; OMIM #114290 is an autosomal dominant, frequently lethal dysplasia syndrome whose primary features include angular bowing and shortening of the limbs, and sex reversal in the majority of affected XY individuals. Most CD cases have heterozygous de novo mutations in the coding region of the transcription factor gene SOX9 (SRY-related high-mobility group [HMG] box 9 in chromosome 17q. Here, we report a novel mutation of SOX9 in a female neonate with CD with autosomal sex reversal. Respiratory distress and cyanosis were noted at birth, and endotracheal intubation with mechanical ventilation was performed due to respiratory failure. The presenting phenotypes included dysmorphic face with macrocephaly prominent forehead, low nasal bridge, cleft palate and micrognathia. Skeletal deformities characteristic of CD were observed, including narrow thoracic cage, hypoplastic scapulae, scoliosis and short limbs with anterolateral femoral and tibial bowing. The karyotype was 46,XY despite female external genitalia. SOX9 gene analysis revealed frameshift mutation (at nucleotide position 1095G →AT in the open reading frame, resulting in a frameshift with 211 new amino acids.

  15. Dominant inherited distal spinal muscular atrophy with atrophic and hypertrophic calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, R J; Sie, O G; van Weerden, T W

    The clinical, electrophysiological, radiological and morphological data of 3 members of a family with autosomal dominant distal spinal muscular atrophy (DSMA) are reported. One patient has the clinical picture of peroneal muscular atrophy with atrophic calves. His father and sister suffer from

  16. Prenatal detection of rare chromosomal autosomal abnormalities in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baena, N; De Vigan, C; Cariati, E; Clementi, M; Stoll, C; Caballin, MR; Guitart, M

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prenatal detection of rare chromosomal autosomal abnormalities by ultrasound (US) examination. Data were obtained from 19 congenital malformation registries from 11 European countries, between 01/07/96 and 31/12/98. A total of 664,340 births were

  17. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive hyper-IgE syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases Health Topic: Pneumonia Health Topic: Skin Infections Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome Additional NIH Resources (2 links) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: DOCK8 Deficiency National Institute of Allergy and ...

  18. 3. Pattern of Inheritance of Autosome and Sex. Chromosome Linked ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 10. Teaching and Learning Genetics with Drosophila – Pattern of Inheritance of Autosome and Sex Chro-mosome Linked Genes/Characters. H A Ranganath M T Tanuja. Classroom Volume 4 Issue 10 October 1999 pp 78-87 ...

  19. Two novel mutations in ILDR1 gene cause autosomal recessive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table 1. Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss loci and related genes. STR-markers and primers used for screening the loci are listed. Repeated sequence. Locus. Gene STR marker. Position. Forward primer. Reverse primer. Length (bp). DFNB2 MYOTA D11s911 77448582-77448892 CA. D11S937. 77854318- ...

  20. Exome Sequencing and Directed Clinical Phenotyping Diagnose Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease Presenting as Autosomal Recessive Hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stitziel, Nathan O.; Fouchier, Sigrid W.; Sjouke, Barbara; Peloso, Gina M.; Moscoso, Alessa M.; Auer, Paul L.; Goel, Anuj; Gigante, Bruna; Barnes, Timothy A.; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Duga, Stefano; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Nikpay, Majid; Martinelli, Nicola; Girelli, Domenico; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kooperberg, Charles; Lange, Leslie A.; Ardissino, Diego; McPherson, Ruth; Farrall, Martin; Watkins, Hugh; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rader, Daniel J.; de Faire, Ulf; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J.; Charnas, Lawrence; Altshuler, David; Gabriel, Stacey; Kastelein, John J. P.; Defesche, Joep C.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hovingh, G. Kees

    2013-01-01

    Objective Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia is a rare inherited disorder, characterized by extremely high total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, that has been previously linked to mutations in LDLRAP1. We identified a family with autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia not