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Sample records for autophagy regulates adipose

  1. Altered autophagy in human adipose tissues in obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Context: Autophagy is a housekeeping mechanism, involved in metabolic regulation and stress response, shown recently to regulate lipid droplets biogenesis/breakdown and adipose tissue phenotype. Objective: We hypothesized that in human obesity autophagy may be altered in adipose tissue in a fat d...

  2. Autophagy activity is up-regulated in adipose tissue of obese individuals and modulates proinflammantory cytokine expression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.J.; Essen, van P.; Koenen, T.; Joosten, L.A.; Netea, M.G.; Tack, C.J.; Stienstra, R.

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy, an evolutionary conserved process aimed at recycling damaged organelles and protein aggregates in the cell, also modulates proinflammatory cytokine production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Because adipose tissue inflammation accompanied by elevated levels of proinflammatory cytok

  3. Autophagy activity is up-regulated in adipose tissue of obese individuals and modulates proinflammatory cytokine expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.J.; Essen, P. van; Koenen, T.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Netea, M.G.; Tack, C.J.J.; Stienstra, R.

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy, an evolutionary conserved process aimed at recycling damaged organelles and protein aggregates in the cell, also modulates proinflammatory cytokine production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Because adipose tissue inflammation accompanied by elevated levels of proinflammatory cytok

  4. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda, E-mail: alakananda.basu@unthsc.edu [Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology, Institute for Cancer Research, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2011-06-09

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets.

  5. Feedback regulation between autophagy and PKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Quiroz, Francisco; Filteau, Marie; Landry, Christian R

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) controls diverse cellular processes and homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Many processes and substrates of PKA have been described and among them are direct regulators of autophagy. The mechanisms of PKA regulation and how they relate to autophagy remain to be fully understood. We constructed a reporter of PKA activity in yeast to identify genes affecting PKA regulation. The assay systematically measures relative protein-protein interactions between the regulatory and catalytic subunits of the PKA complex in a systematic set of genetic backgrounds. The candidate PKA regulators we identified span multiple processes and molecular functions (autophagy, methionine biosynthesis, TORC signaling, protein acetylation, and DNA repair), which themselves include processes regulated by PKA. These observations suggest the presence of many feedback loops acting through this key regulator. Many of the candidate regulators include genes involved in autophagy, suggesting that not only does PKA regulate autophagy but that autophagy also sends signals back to PKA.

  6. Feedback regulation between autophagy and PKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Quiroz, Francisco; Filteau, Marie; Landry, Christian R

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) controls diverse cellular processes and homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Many processes and substrates of PKA have been described and among them are direct regulators of autophagy. The mechanisms of PKA regulation and how they relate to autophagy remain to be fully understood. We constructed a reporter of PKA activity in yeast to identify genes affecting PKA regulation. The assay systematically measures relative protein-protein interactions between the regulatory and catalytic subunits of the PKA complex in a systematic set of genetic backgrounds. The candidate PKA regulators we identified span multiple processes and molecular functions (autophagy, methionine biosynthesis, TORC signaling, protein acetylation, and DNA repair), which themselves include processes regulated by PKA. These observations suggest the presence of many feedback loops acting through this key regulator. Many of the candidate regulators include genes involved in autophagy, suggesting that not only does PKA regulate autophagy but that autophagy also sends signals back to PKA. PMID:26046386

  7. Molecular mechanism and regulation of autophagy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-ping YANG; Zhong-qin LIANG; Zhen-lun GU; Zheng-hong QIN

    2005-01-01

    Autophagy is a major cellular pathway for the degradation of long-lived proteins and cytoplasmic organelles in eukaryotic cells. A large number of intracellular/extracellular stimuli, including amino acid starvation and invasion of microorganisms, are able to induce the autophagic response in cells. The discovery of the ATG genes in yeast has greatly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms participating in autophagy and the genes involved in regulating the autophagic pathway. Many yeast genes have mammalian homologs,suggesting that the basic machinery for autophagy has been evolutionarily conserved along the eukaryotic phylum. The regulation of autophagy is a very complex process. Many signaling pathways, including target of rapamycin (TOR) or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-I (PI3K-I)/PKB, GTPases, calcium and protein synthesis all play important roles in regulating autophagy. The molecular mechanisms and regulation of autophagy are discussed in this review.

  8. Regulation of cardiomyocyte autophagy by calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Soni; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Criollo, Alfredo; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; García, Lorena; Morselli, Eugenia; Cifuentes, Mariana; Quest, Andrew F G; Hill, Joseph A; Lavandero, Sergio

    2016-04-15

    Calcium signaling plays a crucial role in a multitude of events within the cardiomyocyte, including cell cycle control, growth, apoptosis, and autophagy. With respect to calcium-dependent regulation of autophagy, ion channels and exchangers, receptors, and intracellular mediators play fundamental roles. In this review, we discuss calcium-dependent regulation of cardiomyocyte autophagy, a lysosomal mechanism that is often cytoprotective, serving to defend against disease-related stress and nutrient insufficiency. We also highlight the importance of the subcellular distribution of calcium and related proteins, interorganelle communication, and other key signaling events that govern cardiomyocyte autophagy.

  9. Autophagy: Regulation by Energy Sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Meijer; P. Codogno

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is inhibited by the mTOR signaling pathway, which is stimulated by increased amino acid levels. When cellular energy production is compromised, AMP-activated protein kinase is activated, mTOR is inhibited and autophagy is stimulated. Two recent studies have shed light on the molecular mech

  10. Autophagy activator promotes neuronal differentiation of adult adipose-derived stromal cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhui Lu; Xiaodong Yuan; Qiaoyu Sun; Ya Ou

    2013-01-01

    Preliminary research from our group found altered autophagy intensity during adipose-derived stromal cell differentiation into neuronal-like cells, and that this change was associated with morphological changes in differentiated cells. This study aimed to verify the role of rapamycin, an autophagy activator, in the process of adipose-derived stromal cell differentiation into neuronal-like cells. Immunohistochemical staining showed that expression of neuron-specific enolase and neurofilament-200 were gradually upregulated in adipose-derived stromal cells after 5 mM β-mercaptoethanol induction, and the differentiation rate gradually increased with induction time. Using transmission electron microscopy, induced cells were shown to exhibit cytoplasmic autophagosomes, with bilayer membranes, and autolysosomes. After rapamycin (200μg/L) induction for 1 hour, adipose-derived stromal cells began to extend long processes, similar to the morphology of neuronal-like cells, while untreated cells did not exhibit similar morphologies until 3 hours after induction. Moreover, the differentiation rate was significantly increased after rapamycin treatment. Compared with untreated cells, expression of LC3, an autophagy protein, was also significantly upregulated. Positive LC3 expression tended to concentrate at cell nuclei with increasing induction times. Our experimental findings indicate that autophagy can significantly increase the speed of adipose-derived stromal cell differentiation into neuronal-like cells.

  11. MicroRNA regulation of Autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Lisa B; Lund, Anders H

    2012-01-01

    recently contributed to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the autophagy machinery, yet several gaps remain in our knowledge of this process. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) established a new paradigm of post-transcriptional gene regulation and during the past decade these small non......-coding RNAs have been closely linked to virtually all known fundamental biological pathways. Deregulation of miRNAs can contribute to the development of human diseases, including cancer, where they can function as bona fide oncogenes or tumor suppressors.In this review, we highlight recent advances linking miRNAs...... perspective, but also from a therapeutic view, where miRNAs can be harnessed experimentally to alter autophagy levels in human tumors, affecting parameters such as tumor survival and treatment sensitivity....

  12. Regulation of autophagy by nucleoporin Tpr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funasaka, Tatsuyoshi; Tsuka, Eriko; Wong, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) consists of a conserved set of ~30 different proteins, termed nucleoporins, and serves as a gateway for the exchange of materials between the cytoplasm and nucleus. Tpr (translocated promoter region) is a component of NPC that presumably localizes at intranuclear filaments. Here, we show that Tpr knockdown caused a severe reduction in the number of nuclear pores. Furthermore, our electron microscopy studies indicated a significant reduction in the number of inner nuclear filaments. In addition, Tpr siRNA treatment impaired cell growth and proliferation compared to control siRNA-treated cells. In Tpr-depleted cells, the levels of p53 and p21 proteins were enhanced. Surprisingly, Tpr depletion increased p53 nuclear accumulation and facilitated autophagy. Our study demonstrates for the first time that Tpr plays a role in autophagy through controlling HSP70 and HSF1 mRNA export, p53 trafficking with karyopherin CRM1, and potentially through direct transcriptional regulation of autophagy factors.

  13. Regulation of autophagy by cytoplasmic p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, M Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan; D'Amelio, Marcello; Criollo, Alfredo; Morselli, Eugenia; Zhu, Changlian; Harper, Francis; Nannmark, Ulf; Samara, Chrysanthi; Pinton, Paolo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Carnuccio, Rosa; Moll, Ute M; Madeo, Frank; Paterlini-Brechot, Patrizia; Rizzuto, Rosario; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Pierron, Gérard; Blomgren, Klas; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Codogno, Patrice; Cecconi, Francesco; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-06-01

    Multiple cellular stressors, including activation of the tumour suppressor p53, can stimulate autophagy. Here we show that deletion, depletion or inhibition of p53 can induce autophagy in human, mouse and nematode cells subjected to knockout, knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of p53. Enhanced autophagy improved the survival of p53-deficient cancer cells under conditions of hypoxia and nutrient depletion, allowing them to maintain high ATP levels. Inhibition of p53 led to autophagy in enucleated cells, and cytoplasmic, not nuclear, p53 was able to repress the enhanced autophagy of p53(-/-) cells. Many different inducers of autophagy (for example, starvation, rapamycin and toxins affecting the endoplasmic reticulum) stimulated proteasome-mediated degradation of p53 through a pathway relying on the E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2. Inhibition of p53 degradation prevented the activation of autophagy in several cell lines, in response to several distinct stimuli. These results provide evidence of a key signalling pathway that links autophagy to the cancer-associated dysregulation of p53.

  14. Redox regulation of autophagy in healthy brain and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Kenneth; Harris-White, Marni E

    2015-12-01

    Autophagy and redox biochemistry are two major sub disciplines of cell biology which are both coming to be appreciated for their paramount importance in the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thus far, however, there has been relatively little exploration of the interface between autophagy and redox biology. Autophagy normally recycles macro-molecular aggregates produced through oxidative-stress mediated pathways, and also may reduce the mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species through recycling of old and damaged mitochondria. Conversely, dysfunction in autophagy initiation, progression or clearance is evidenced to increase aggregation-prone proteins in neural and extraneural tissues. Redox mechanisms of autophagy regulation have been documented at the level of cross-talk between the Nrf2/Keap1 oxidant and electrophilic defense pathway and p62/sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1)-associated autophagy, at least in extraneural tissue; but other mechanisms of redox autophagy regulation doubtless remain to be discovered and the relevance of such processes to maintenance of neural homeostasis remains to be determined. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the relationship of redox signaling, autophagy control, and oxidative stress as these phenomena relate to neurodegenerative disease. AD is specifically addressed as an example of the theme and as a promising indication for new therapies that act through engagement of autophagy pathways. To exemplify one such novel therapeutic entity, data is presented that the antioxidant and neurotrophic agent lanthionine ketimine-ethyl ester (LKE) affects autophagy pathway proteins including beclin-1 in the 3xTg-AD model of Alzheimer's disease where the compound has been shown to reduce pathological features and cognitive dysfunction.

  15. The Regulation of Autophagy by Influenza A Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus is a dreadful pathogen of animals and humans, causing widespread infection and severe morbidity and mortality. It is essential to characterize the influenza A virus-host interaction and develop efficient counter measures against the viral infection. Autophagy is known as a catabolic process for the recycling of the cytoplasmic macromolecules. Recently, it has been shown that autophagy is a critical mechanism underlying the interaction between influenza A virus and its host. Autophagy can be induced by the infection with influenza A virus, which is considered as a necessary process for the viral proliferation, including the accumulation of viral elements during the replication of influenza A virus. On the other hand, influenza A virus can inhibit the autophagic formation via interaction with the autophagy-related genes (Atg and signaling pathways. In addition, autophagy is involved in the influenza virus-regulated cell deaths, leading to significant changes in host apoptosis. Interestingly, the high pathogenic strains of influenza A virus, such as H5N1, stimulate autophagic cell death and appear to interplay with the autophagy in distinct ways as compared with low pathogenic strains. This review discusses the regulation of autophagy, an influenza A virus driven process.

  16. TOR-dependent post-transcriptional regulation of autophagy.

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    Hu, Guowu; McQuiston, Travis; Bernard, Amélie; Park, Yoon-Dong; Qiu, Jin; Vural, Ali; Zhang, Nannan; Waterman, Scott R; Blewett, Nathan H; Myers, Timothy G; Maraia, Richard J; Kehrl, John H; Uzel, Gulbu; Klionsky, Daniel J; Williamson, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of autophagy is required to maintain cellular equilibrium and prevent disease. While extensive study of post-translational mechanisms has yielded important insights into autophagy induction, less is known about post-transcriptional mechanisms that could potentiate homeostatic control. In our study, we showed that the RNA-binding protein, Dhh1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Vad1 in the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans is involved in recruitment and degradation of key autophagy mRNAs. In addition, phosphorylation of the decapping protein Dcp2 by the target of rapamycin (TOR), facilitates decapping and degradation of autophagy-related mRNAs, resulting in repression of autophagy under nutrient-replete conditions. The post-transcriptional regulatory process is conserved in both mouse and human cells and plays a role in autophagy-related modulation of the inflammasome product IL1B. These results were then applied to provide mechanistic insight into autoimmunity of a patient with a PIK3CD/p110δ gain-of-function mutation. These results thus identify an important new post-transcriptional mechanism of autophagy regulation that is highly conserved between yeast and mammals.

  17. Independent Stem Cell Lineages Regulate Adipose Organogenesis and Adipose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei Jiang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissues have striking plasticity, highlighted by childhood and adult obesity. Using adipose lineage analyses, smooth muscle actin (SMA-mural cell-fate mapping, and conditional PPARγ deletion to block adipocyte differentiation, we find two phases of adipocyte generation that emanate from two independent adipose progenitor compartments: developmental and adult. These two compartments are sequentially required for organ formation and maintenance. Although both developmental and adult progenitors are specified during the developmental period and express PPARγ, they have distinct microanatomical, functional, morphogenetic, and molecular profiles. Furthermore, the two compartments derive from different lineages; whereas adult adipose progenitors fate-map from an SMA+ mural lineage, developmental progenitors do not. Remarkably, the adult progenitor compartment appears to be specified earlier than the developmental cells and then enters the already developmentally formed adipose depots. Thus, two distinct cell compartments control adipose organ development and organ homeostasis, which may provide a discrete therapeutic target for childhood and adult obesity.

  18. Resveratrol regulates lipolysis via adipose triglyceride lipase.

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    Lasa, Arrate; Schweiger, Martina; Kotzbeck, Petra; Churruca, Itziar; Simón, Edurne; Zechner, Rudolf; Portillo, María del Puy

    2012-04-01

    Resveratrol has been reported to increase adrenaline-induced lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The general aim of the present work was to gain more insight concerning the effects of trans-resveratrol on lipid mobilization. The specific purpose was to assess the involvement of the two main lipases: adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), in the activation of lipolysis induced by this molecule. For lipolysis experiments, 3T3-L1 and human SGBS adipocytes as well as adipose tissue from wild-type, ATGL knockout and HSL knockout mice were used. Moreover, gene and protein expressions of these lipases were analyzed. Resveratrol-induced free fatty acids release but not glycerol release in 3T3-L1 under basal and isoproterenol-stimulating conditions and under isoproterenol-stimulating conditions in SGBS adipocytes. When HSL was blocked by compound 76-0079, free fatty acid release was still induced by resveratrol. By contrast, in the presence of the compound C, an inhibitor of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, resveratrol effect was totally blunted. Resveratrol increased ATGL gene and protein expressions, an effect that was not observed for HSL. Resveratrol increased fatty acids release in epididymal adipose tissue from wild-type and HSL knockout mice but not in that adipose tissue from ATGL knockout mice. Taking as a whole, the present results provide novel evidence that resveratrol regulates lipolytic activity in human and murine adipocytes, as well as in white adipose tissue from mice, acting mainly on ATGL at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Enzyme activation seems to be induced via adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase.

  19. Autophagy Regulatory Network - a systems-level bioinformatics resource for studying the mechanism and regulation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türei, Dénes; Földvári-Nagy, László; Fazekas, Dávid; Módos, Dezső; Kubisch, János; Kadlecsik, Tamás; Demeter, Amanda; Lenti, Katalin; Csermely, Péter; Vellai, Tibor; Korcsmáros, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a complex cellular process having multiple roles, depending on tissue, physiological, or pathological conditions. Major post-translational regulators of autophagy are well known, however, they have not yet been collected comprehensively. The precise and context-dependent regulation of autophagy necessitates additional regulators, including transcriptional and post-transcriptional components that are listed in various datasets. Prompted by the lack of systems-level autophagy-related information, we manually collected the literature and integrated external resources to gain a high coverage autophagy database. We developed an online resource, Autophagy Regulatory Network (ARN; http://autophagy-regulation.org), to provide an integrated and systems-level database for autophagy research. ARN contains manually curated, imported, and predicted interactions of autophagy components (1,485 proteins with 4,013 interactions) in humans. We listed 413 transcription factors and 386 miRNAs that could regulate autophagy components or their protein regulators. We also connected the above-mentioned autophagy components and regulators with signaling pathways from the SignaLink 2 resource. The user-friendly website of ARN allows researchers without computational background to search, browse, and download the database. The database can be downloaded in SQL, CSV, BioPAX, SBML, PSI-MI, and in a Cytoscape CYS file formats. ARN has the potential to facilitate the experimental validation of novel autophagy components and regulators. In addition, ARN helps the investigation of transcription factors, miRNAs and signaling pathways implicated in the control of the autophagic pathway. The list of such known and predicted regulators could be important in pharmacological attempts against cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of autophagy in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, Louis R; Kumsta, Caroline; Sandri, Marco; Ballabio, Andrea; Hansen, Malene

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a major intracellular degradation process recognized as playing a central role in cell survival and longevity. This multistep process is extensively regulated at several levels, including post-translationally through the action of conserved longevity factors such as the nutrient sensor TOR. More recently, transcriptional regulation of autophagy genes has emerged as an important mechanism for ensuring the somatic maintenance and homeostasis necessary for a long life span. Autophagy is increased in many long-lived model organisms and contributes significantly to their longevity. In turn, conserved transcription factors, particularly the helix-loop-helix transcription factor TFEB and the forkhead transcription factor FOXO, control the expression of many autophagy-related genes and are important for life-span extension. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding the contribution of these transcription factors to macroautophagy regulation in the context of aging. We also review current research on epigenetic changes, such as histone modification by the deacetylase SIRT1, that influence autophagy-related gene expression and additionally affect aging. Understanding the molecular regulation of macroautophagy in relation to aging may offer new avenues for the treatment of age-related diseases.

  1. SIRT5 regulation of ammonia-induced autophagy and mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polletta, Lucia; Vernucci, Enza; Carnevale, Ilaria; Arcangeli, Tania; Rotili, Dante; Palmerio, Silvia; Steegborn, Clemens; Nowak, Theresa; Schutkowski, Mike; Pellegrini, Laura; Sansone, Luigi; Villanova, Lidia; Runci, Alessandra; Pucci, Bruna; Morgante, Emanuela; Fini, Massimo; Mai, Antonello; Russo, Matteo A; Tafani, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In liver the mitochondrial sirtuin, SIRT5, controls ammonia detoxification by regulating CPS1, the first enzyme of the urea cycle. However, while SIRT5 is ubiquitously expressed, urea cycle and CPS1 are only present in the liver and, to a minor extent, in the kidney. To address the possibility that SIRT5 is involved in ammonia production also in nonliver cells, clones of human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and mouse myoblast C2C12, overexpressing or silenced for SIRT5 were produced. Our results show that ammonia production increased in SIRT5-silenced and decreased in SIRT5-overexpressing cells. We also obtained the same ammonia increase when using a new specific inhibitor of SIRT5 called MC3482. SIRT5 regulates ammonia production by controlling glutamine metabolism. In fact, in the mitochondria, glutamine is transformed in glutamate by the enzyme glutaminase, a reaction producing ammonia. We found that SIRT5 and glutaminase coimmunoprecipitated and that SIRT5 inhibition resulted in an increased succinylation of glutaminase. We next determined that autophagy and mitophagy were increased by ammonia by measuring autophagic proteolysis of long-lived proteins, increase of autophagy markers MAP1LC3B, GABARAP, and GABARAPL2, mitophagy markers BNIP3 and the PINK1-PARK2 system as well as mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. We observed that autophagy and mitophagy increased in SIRT5-silenced cells and in WT cells treated with MC3482 and decreased in SIRT5-overexpressing cells. Moreover, glutaminase inhibition or glutamine withdrawal completely prevented autophagy. In conclusion we propose that the role of SIRT5 in nonliver cells is to regulate ammonia production and ammonia-induced autophagy by regulating glutamine metabolism.

  2. mir-30d Regulates multiple genes in the autophagy pathway and impairs autophagy process in human cancer cells

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    Yang, Xiaojun [Ovarian Cancer Research Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of General Surgery, Gansu Provincial Hospital, Lanzhou, Gansu 710000 (China); Zhong, Xiaomin [Ovarian Cancer Research Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Female Reproductive Endocrine Related Diseases, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200011 (China); Tanyi, Janos L.; Shen, Jianfeng [Ovarian Cancer Research Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Xu, Congjian [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Female Reproductive Endocrine Related Diseases, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200011 (China); Gao, Peng [Department of General Surgery, Gansu Provincial Hospital, Lanzhou, Gansu 710000 (China); Zheng, Tim M. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); DeMichele, Angela [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Zhang, Lin, E-mail: linzhang@mail.med.upenn.edu [Ovarian Cancer Research Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Gene set enrichment analysis indicated mir-30d might regulate the autophagy pathway. ► mir-30d represses the expression of BECN1, BNIP3L, ATG12, ATG5 and ATG2. ► BECN1, BNIP3L, ATG12, ATG5 and ATG2 are direct targets of mir-30d. ► mir-30d inhibits autophagosome formation and LC3B-I conversion to LC3B-II. ► mir-30d regulates the autophagy process. -- Abstract: In human epithelial cancers, the microRNA (miRNA) mir-30d is amplified with high frequency and serves as a critical oncomir by regulating metastasis, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. Autophagy, a degradation pathway for long-lived protein and organelles, regulates the survival and death of many cell types. Increasing evidence suggests that autophagy plays an important function in epithelial tumor initiation and progression. Using a combined bioinformatics approach, gene set enrichment analysis, and miRNA target prediction, we found that mir-30d might regulate multiple genes in the autophagy pathway including BECN1, BNIP3L, ATG12, ATG5, and ATG2. Our further functional experiments demonstrated that the expression of these core proteins in the autophagy pathway was directly suppressed by mir-30d in cancer cells. Finally, we showed that mir-30d regulated the autophagy process by inhibiting autophagosome formation and LC3B-I conversion to LC3B-II. Taken together, our results provide evidence that the oncomir mir-30d impairs the autophagy process by targeting multiple genes in the autophagy pathway. This result will contribute to understanding the molecular mechanism of mir-30d in tumorigenesis and developing novel cancer therapy strategy.

  3. VMP1 related autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells: VMP1 regulates cell death

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    Qian, Qinyi [Department of Ultrasonograph, Changshu No. 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu (China); Zhou, Hao; Chen, Yan [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Shen, Chenglong [Department of General Surgery, Changshu No. 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu (China); He, Songbing; Zhao, Hua; Wang, Liang [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Wan, Daiwei, E-mail: 372710369@qq.com [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Gu, Wen, E-mail: 505339704@qq.com [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •This research confirmed VMP1 as a regulator of autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We proved the pro-survival role of VMP1-mediated autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We found the interaction between VMP1 and BECLIN1 also existing in colorectal cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1) is an autophagy-related protein and identified as a key regulator of autophagy in recent years. In pancreatic cell lines, VMP1-dependent autophagy has been linked to positive regulation of apoptosis. However, there are no published reports on the role of VMP1 in autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancers. Therefore, to address this gap of knowledge, we decided to interrogate regulation of autophagy and apoptosis by VMP1. We have studied the induction of autophagy by starvation and rapamycin treatment in colorectal cell lines using electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting. We found that starvation-induced autophagy correlated with an increase in VMP1 expression, that VMP1 interacted with BECLIN1, and that siRNA mediated down-regulation of VMP1-reduced autophagy. Next, we examined the relationship between VMP1-dependent autophagy and apoptosis and found that VMP1 down-regulation sensitizes cells to apoptosis and that agents that induce apoptosis down-regulate VMP1. In conclusion, similar to its reported role in other cell types, VMP1 is an important regulator of autophagy in colorectal cell lines. However, in contrast to its role in pancreatic cell lines, in colorectal cancer cells, VMP1-dependent autophagy appears to be pro-survival rather than pro-cell death.

  4. Regulation of systemic energy homeostasis by serotonin in adipose tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang-Myung; Namkung, Jun; Go, Younghoon; Shong, Ko Eun; Kim, Kyuho; Kim, Hyeongseok; Park, Bo-Yoon; Lee, Ho Won; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Song, Junghan; Shong, Minho; Yadav, Vijay K; Karsenty, Gerard; Kajimura, Shingo; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, Sangkyu; Kim, Hail

    2015-04-13

    Central serotonin (5-HT) is an anorexigenic neurotransmitter in the brain. However, accumulating evidence suggests peripheral 5-HT may affect organismal energy homeostasis. Here we show 5-HT regulates white and brown adipose tissue function. Pharmacological inhibition of 5-HT synthesis leads to inhibition of lipogenesis in epididymal white adipose tissue (WAT), induction of browning in inguinal WAT and activation of adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Mice with inducible Tph1 KO in adipose tissues exhibit a similar phenotype as mice in which 5-HT synthesis is inhibited pharmacologically, suggesting 5-HT has localized effects on adipose tissues. In addition, Htr3a KO mice exhibit increased energy expenditure and reduced weight gain when fed a high-fat diet. Treatment with an Htr2a antagonist reduces lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These data suggest important roles for adipocyte-derived 5-HT in controlling energy homeostasis.

  5. ARP101 inhibits α-MSH-stimulated melanogenesis by regulation of autophagy in melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Sung; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Park, So Jung; Chang, Huikyoung; Shin, Ji Hyun; Choi, Eun Sun; Kim, Jun Bum; Seok, Su Hyeon; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Jeong Su; Kim, Myoung-Hwan; Lee, Eunjoo H; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2013-12-11

    Autophagy is a cooperative process between autophagosomes and lysosomes that degrades cellular organelles. Although autophagy regulates the turnover of cellular components, its role in melanogenesis is not clearly established. Previously, we reported that ARP101 induces autophagy in various cancer cells. Here, we show that ARP101 inhibits melanogenesis by regulation of autophagy. ARP101 inhibited α-MSH-stimulated melanin synthesis and suppressed the expression of tyrosinase and TRP1 in immortalized mouse melanocytes. ARP101 also induced autophagy in melanocytes. Knockdown of ATG5 reduced both anti-melanogenic activity and autophagy mediated by ARP101 in α-MSH treated melanocytes. Electron microscopy analysis further revealed that autophagosomes engulf melanin or melanosome in α-MSH and ARP101-treated cells. Collectively, our results suggest that ARP101 inhibits α-MSH-stimulated melanogenesis through the activation of autophagy in melanocytes.

  6. Hepatic oleate regulates adipose tissue lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhans, Maggie S; Flowers, Matthew T; Harrington, Kristin R; Bond, Laura M; Guo, Chang-An; Anderson, Rozalyn M; Ntambi, James M

    2015-02-01

    Hepatic steatosis is associated with detrimental metabolic phenotypes including enhanced risk for diabetes. Stearoyl-CoA desaturases (SCDs) catalyze the synthesis of MUFAs. In mice, genetic ablation of SCDs reduces hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and protects against diet-induced hepatic steatosis and adiposity. To understand the mechanism by which hepatic MUFA production influences adipose tissue stores, we created two liver-specific transgenic mouse models in the SCD1 knockout that express either human SCD5 or mouse SCD3, that synthesize oleate and palmitoleate, respectively. We demonstrate that hepatic de novo synthesized oleate, but not palmitoleate, stimulate hepatic lipid accumulation and adiposity, reversing the protective effect of the global SCD1 knockout under lipogenic conditions. Unexpectedly, the accumulation of hepatic lipid occurred without induction of the hepatic DNL program. Changes in hepatic lipid composition were reflected in plasma and in adipose tissue. Importantly, endogenously synthesized hepatic oleate was associated with suppressed DNL and fatty acid oxidation in white adipose tissue. Regression analysis revealed a strong correlation between adipose tissue lipid fuel utilization and hepatic and adipose tissue lipid storage. These data suggest an extrahepatic mechanism where endogenous hepatic oleate regulates lipid homeostasis in adipose tissues.

  7. Adipose Natural Killer Cells Regulate Adipose Tissue Macrophages to Promote Insulin Resistance in Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Cheol; Kim, Myung-Sunny; Pae, Munkyong; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Eberlé, Delphine; Shimada, Takeshi; Kamei, Nozomu; Park, Hee-Sook; Sasorith, Souphatta; Woo, Ju Rang; You, Jia; Mosher, William; Brady, Hugh J M; Shoelson, Steven E; Lee, Jongsoon

    2016-04-12

    Obesity-induced inflammation mediated by immune cells in adipose tissue appears to participate in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. We show that natural killer (NK) cells in adipose tissue play an important role. High-fat diet (HFD) increases NK cell numbers and the production of proinflammatory cytokines, notably TNFα, in epididymal, but not subcutaneous, fat depots. When NK cells were depleted either with neutralizing antibodies or genetic ablation in E4bp4(+/-) mice, obesity-induced insulin resistance improved in parallel with decreases in both adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) numbers, and ATM and adipose tissue inflammation. Conversely, expansion of NK cells following IL-15 administration or reconstitution of NK cells into E4bp4(-/-) mice increased both ATM numbers and adipose tissue inflammation and exacerbated HFD-induced insulin resistance. These results indicate that adipose NK cells control ATMs as an upstream regulator potentially by producing proinflammatory mediators, including TNFα, and thereby contribute to the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance.

  8. The transcription factor p8 regulates autophagy during diapause embryo formation in Artemia parthenogenetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng; Jia, Sheng-Nan; Yang, Fan; Jia, Wen-Huan; Yu, Xiao-Jian; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Autophagy is an essential homeostatic process by which cytoplasmic components, including macromolecules and organelles, are degraded by lysosome. Increasing evidence suggests that phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK) and target of rapamycin (TOR) play key roles in the regulation of autophagy. However, the regulation of autophagy in quiescent cells remains unclear, despite the fact that autophagy is known to be critical for normal development, regeneration, and degenerative diseases. Here, crustacean Artemia parthenogenetica was used as a model system because they produced and released encysted embryos that enter a state of obligate dormancy in cell quiescence to withstand various environmental threats. We observed that autophagy was increased before diapause stage but dropped to extremely low level in diapause cysts in Artemia. Western blot analyses indicated that the regulation of autophagy was AMPK/TOR independent during diapause embryo formation. Importantly, the level of p8 (Ar-p8), a stress-inducible transcription cofactor, was elevated at the stage just before diapause and was absent in encysted embryos, indicating that Ar-p8 may regulate autophagy. The results of Ar-p8 knockdown revealed that Ar-p8 regulated autophagy during diapause formation in Artemia. Moreover, we observed that activating transcription factors 4 and 6 (ATF4 and ATF6) responded to Ar-p8-regulated autophagy, indicating that autophagy targeted endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during diapause formation in Artemia. Additionally, AMPK/TOR-independent autophagy was validated in human gastric cancer MKN45 cells overexpressing Ar-p8. The findings presented here may provide insights into the role of p8 in regulating autophagy in quiescent cells.

  9. Exercise Regulation of Marrow Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel M Pagnotti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite association with low bone density and skeletal fractures, marrow adipose tissue (MAT remains poorly understood. The marrow adipocyte originates from the mesenchymal stem cell pool (MSC that gives rise also to osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and myocytes among other cell types. To date, the presence of MAT has been attributed to preferential biasing of MSC into the adipocyte rather than osteoblast lineage, thus negatively impacting bone formation. Here we focus on understanding the physiology of MAT in the setting of exercise, dietary interventions and pharmacologic agents that alter fat metabolism. The beneficial effect of exercise on musculoskeletal strength is known: exercise induces bone formation, encourages growth of skeletally-supportive tissues, inhibits bone resorption and alters skeletal architecture through direct and indirect effects on a multiplicity of cells involved in skeletal adaptation. MAT is less well studied due to the lack of reproducible quantification techniques. In recent work, osmium-based 3D quantification shows a robust response of MAT to both dietary and exercise intervention in that MAT is elevated in response to high fat diet and can be suppressed following daily exercise. Exercise-induced bone formation correlates with suppression of MAT, such that exercise effects might be due to either calorie expenditure from this depot, or from mechanical biasing of MSC lineage away from fat and toward bone, or a combination thereof. Following treatment with the anti-diabetes drug rosiglitazone - a PPARγ-agonist known to increase MAT and fracture risk - mice demonstrate a 5-fold higher femur MAT volume compared to the controls. In addition to preventing MAT accumulation in control mice, exercise intervention significantly lowers MAT accumulation in rosiglitazone-treated mice. Importantly, exercise induction of trabecular bone volume is unhindered by rosiglitazone. Thus, despite rosiglitazone augmentation of MAT, exercise

  10. Exercise Regulation of Marrow Adipose Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnotti, Gabriel M.; Styner, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Despite association with low bone density and skeletal fractures, marrow adipose tissue (MAT) remains poorly understood. The marrow adipocyte originates from the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) pool that also gives rise to osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and myocytes, among other cell types. To date, the presence of MAT has been attributed to preferential biasing of MSC into the adipocyte rather than osteoblast lineage, thus negatively impacting bone formation. Here, we focus on understanding the physiology of MAT in the setting of exercise, dietary interventions, and pharmacologic agents that alter fat metabolism. The beneficial effect of exercise on musculoskeletal strength is known: exercise induces bone formation, encourages growth of skeletally supportive tissues, inhibits bone resorption, and alters skeletal architecture through direct and indirect effects on a multiplicity of cells involved in skeletal adaptation. MAT is less well studied due to the lack of reproducible quantification techniques. In recent work, osmium-based 3D quantification shows a robust response of MAT to both dietary and exercise intervention in that MAT is elevated in response to high-fat diet and can be suppressed following daily exercise. Exercise-induced bone formation correlates with suppression of MAT, such that exercise effects might be due to either calorie expenditure from this depot or from mechanical biasing of MSC lineage away from fat and toward bone, or a combination thereof. Following treatment with the anti-diabetes drug rosiglitazone – a PPARγ-agonist known to increase MAT and fracture risk – mice demonstrate a fivefold higher femur MAT volume compared to the controls. In addition to preventing MAT accumulation in control mice, exercise intervention significantly lowers MAT accumulation in rosiglitazone-treated mice. Importantly, exercise induction of trabecular bone volume is unhindered by rosiglitazone. Thus, despite rosiglitazone augmentation of MAT, exercise

  11. Autophagy is involved in mouse kidney development and podocyte differentiation regulated by Notch signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuyue; Li, Wen; Wen, Junkai; Yang, Zhuo

    2017-02-03

    Podocyte dysfunction results in glomerular diseases accounted for 90% of end-stage kidney disease. The evolutionarily conserved Notch signalling makes a crucial contribution in podocyte development and function. However, the underlying mechanism of Notch pathway modulating podocyte differentiation remains less obvious. Autophagy, reported to be related with Notch signalling pathways in different animal models, is regarded as a possible participant during podocyte differentiation. Here, we found the dynamic changes of Notch1 were coincided with autophagy: they both increased during kidney development and podocyte differentiation. Intriguingly, when Notch signalling was down-regulated by DAPT, autophagy was greatly diminished, and differentiation was also impaired. Further, to better understand the relationship between Notch signalling and autophagy in podocyte differentiation, rapamycin was added to enhance autophagy levels in DAPT-treated cells, and as a result, nephrin was recovered and DAPT-induced injury was ameliorated. Therefore, we put forward that autophagy is involved in kidney development and podocyte differentiation regulated by Notch signalling.

  12. Hkat, a novel nutritionally regulated transmembrane protein in adipose tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ren

    2012-01-01

    White adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ regulating many aspects of whole body physiology and pathology. Adipogenesis, a process in which premature cells differentiate into adipocytes, is a complex process that includes orchestrated changes in gene expression and cell morphology in response to various nutritional and hormonal stimuli. To profile transcriptome changes in response to nutritional stimulation, we performed RNA-seq on fat in mice treated with either a high-fat diet or fasting. We identified a novel nutritionally regulated gene, Gm12824, named Hkat (heart, kidney, adipose-enriched transmembrane protein). We show that both fasting and obesity dramatically reduce Hkat in white adipose tissue, and that fasting reduces while obesity increases its expression in brown fat. Hkat is localized to the plasma membrane and induced during adipogenesis. Therefore, Hkat is a novel nutritionally regulated gene that is potentially involved in metabolism.

  13. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase modulates inflammation and autophagy in obese adipose tissue and liver: Role for omega-3 epoxides

    OpenAIRE

    López-Vicario, Cristina; Alcaraz-Quiles, José; García-Alonso, Verónica; Rius, Bibiana; Hwang, Sung H.; Titos, Esther; Lopategi, Aritz; Hammock, Bruce D.; Arroyo, Vicente; Clària, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Our study demonstrates that stabilization of cytochrome P-450 epoxides derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids through inhibition of the inactivating enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) exerts beneficial actions in counteracting metabolic disorders associated with obesity. In addition, our study sheds more light on the role of sEH in cellular homeostasis by providing evidence that omega-3 epoxides and sEH inhibition regulate autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum stress in insulin-se...

  14. Longevity-relevant regulation of autophagy at the level of the acetylproteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariño, Guillermo; Morselli, Eugenia; Bennetzen, Martin V

    2011-01-01

    The acetylase inhibitor, spermidine and the deacetylase activator, resveratrol, both induce autophagy and prolong life span of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans in an autophagydependent fashion. Based on these premises, we investigated the differences and similarities in spermidine and re...... that subtle and concerted alterations in the acetylproteome regulate autophagy at multiple levels....

  15. Regulation of autophagy by the inositol trisphosphate receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criollo, A; Maiuri, M C; Tasdemir, E; Vitale, I; Fiebig, A A; Andrews, D; Molgó, J; Díaz, J; Lavandero, S; Harper, F; Pierron, G; di Stefano, D; Rizzuto, R; Szabadkai, G; Kroemer, G

    2007-05-01

    The reduction of intracellular 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)) levels stimulates autophagy, whereas the enhancement of IP(3) levels inhibits autophagy induced by nutrient depletion. Here, we show that knockdown of the IP(3) receptor (IP(3)R) with small interfering RNAs and pharmacological IP(3)R blockade is a strong stimulus for the induction of autophagy. The IP(3)R is known to reside in the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as within ER-mitochondrial contact sites, and IP(3)R blockade triggered the autophagy of both ER and mitochondria, as exactly observed in starvation-induced autophagy. ER stressors such as tunicamycin and thapsigargin also induced autophagy of ER and, to less extent, of mitochondria. Autophagy triggered by starvation or IP(3)R blockade was inhibited by Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L) specifically targeted to ER but not Bcl-2 or Bcl-X(L) proteins targeted to mitochondria. In contrast, ER stress-induced autophagy was not inhibited by Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L). Autophagy promoted by IP(3)R inhibition could not be attributed to a modulation of steady-state Ca(2+) levels in the ER or in the cytosol, yet involved the obligate contribution of Beclin-1, autophagy-related gene (Atg)5, Atg10, Atg12 and hVps34. Altogether, these results strongly suggest that IP(3)R exerts a major role in the physiological control of autophagy.

  16. Androgenic Regulation of White Adipose Tissue-Prostate Cancer Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    oncogenes; inactivation of tumor suppression genes; and interaction between cancer cells and tumor-associated stroma and tumor- associated macrophages ...into inflamed tissue and dif- ferentiate into macrophages , which coordinate inflammatory re- sponses by producing chemokines and clearing debris by...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-1-0275 TITLE: Androgenic Regulation of White Adipose Tissue-Prostate Cancer Interactions PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

  17. Id transcriptional regulators in adipogenesis and adipose tissue metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Mallikarjun; Sharma, Bal Krishan; Satyanarayana, Ande

    2014-06-01

    Id proteins (Id1-Id4) are helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcriptional regulators that lack a basic DNA binding domain. They act as negative regulators of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors by forming heterodimers and inhibit their DNA binding and transcriptional activity. Id proteins are implicated in the regulation of various cellular mechanisms such as cell proliferation, cellular differentiation, cell fate determination, angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. A handful of recent studies also disclosed that Id proteins have critical functions in adipocyte differentiation and adipose tissue metabolism. Here, we reviewed the progress made thus far in understanding the specific functions of Id proteins in adipose tissue differentiation and metabolism. In addition to reviewing the known mechanisms of action, we also discuss possible additional mechanisms in which Id proteins might participate in regulating adipogenic and metabolic pathways.

  18. There is more to autophagy than induction: regulating the roller coaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klionsky, Daniel J; Nemchenko, Andriy

    2011-08-01

    Considerable attention has been paid to the topic of autophagy induction. In part, this is because of the potential for modulating this process for therapeutic purposes. Of course we know that induced autophagy can also be problematic--for example, when trying to eliminate an established tumor that might be relying on autophagy for its own cytoprotective uses. Accordingly, inhibitory mechanisms have been considered; however, the corresponding studies have tended to focus on the pathways that block autophagy under non-inducing conditions, such as when nutrients are available. In contrast, relatively little is known about the mechanisms for inhibiting autophagy under inducing conditions. Yet, this type of regulation must be occurring on a routine basis. We know that dysregulation of autophagy, e.g., due to improper activation of Beclin 1 leading to excessive autophagy activity, can cause cell death. Accordingly, we assume that during starvation or other inducing conditions there must be a mechanism to modulate autophagy. That is, once you turn it on, you do not want to let it continue unchecked. But how is autophagy downregulated when the inducing conditions still exist?

  19. Reciprocal regulation of cilia and autophagy via the MTOR and proteasome pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shixuan; Livingston, Man J; Su, Yunchao; Dong, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Primary cilium is an organelle that plays significant roles in a number of cellular functions ranging from cell mechanosensation, proliferation, and differentiation to apoptosis. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular function in biology and indispensable for cellular homeostasis. Both cilia and autophagy have been linked to different types of genetic and acquired human diseases. Their interaction has been suggested very recently, but the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. We examined autophagy in cells with suppressed cilia and measured cilium length in autophagy-activated or -suppressed cells. It was found that autophagy was repressed in cells with short cilia. Further investigation showed that MTOR activation was enhanced in cilia-suppressed cells and the MTOR inhibitor rapamycin could largely reverse autophagy suppression. In human kidney proximal tubular cells (HK2), autophagy induction was associated with cilium elongation. Conversely, autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ) as well as bafilomycin A1 (Baf) led to short cilia. Cilia were also shorter in cultured atg5-knockout (KO) cells and in atg7-KO kidney proximal tubular cells in mice. MG132, an inhibitor of the proteasome, could significantly restore cilium length in atg5-KO cells, being concomitant with the proteasome activity. Together, the results suggest that cilia and autophagy regulate reciprocally through the MTOR signaling pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  20. [Regulation of autophagy on dendritic cells during rat liver regeneration by IPA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiwen, Wang; Wei, Jin; Cuifang, Chang; Cunshuan, Xu

    2015-03-01

    To understand the mechanism underlying autophagy in regulating dendritic cells during rat liver regeneration, we used the method of percoll density gradient centrifugation combined with immunomagnetic bead to isolate dendritic cells, the Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array to determine the expression changes of autophagy-related genes, and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis 9.0 (IPA) to determine the autophagy activities. The results indicated that LC3, BECN1, ATG7 and SQSTM1 genes had significant expression changes during rat liver regeneration. There were 593 genes related to autophagy, among which 210 genes were identified as significant. We also showed that the activity of autophagy was enhanced in the priming phase and teminal phase of liver regeneration, weakened in the proliferative stage by comparative analysis method of IPA. The autophagy-related physiological activities mainly included RNA expression, RNA transcription, cell differentiation and proliferation, involving in PPARα/RXRα activation, acute phase response signaling, TREM1 signaling, IL-6 signaling, IL-8 signaling and IL-1 signaling, whose activities were increased or decreased in liver regeneration. Cluster analysis found that P53 and AMPK signaling participated in the regulation of dendritic cells autophagy, with AMPK signaling in the priming phase of liver regeneration, and both signaling pathways in the terminal phase. We conclude that dendritic cells autophagy played an important role in initiation of the immune response in priming phase and depletion of dendritic cells in late phase during rat liver regeneration.

  1. Reciprocal regulation of autophagy and dNTP pools in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Lisheng; Zhang, Keqiang; Zhou, Bingsen; Kuo, Mei-Ling; Hu, Shuya; Chen, Linling; Tang, Michelle; Chen, Yun-Ru; Yang, Lixin; Ann, David K; Yen, Yun

    2014-07-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) plays a critical role in catalyzing the biosynthesis and maintaining the intracellular concentration of 4 deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs). Unbalanced or deficient dNTP pools cause serious genotoxic consequences. Autophagy is the process by which cytoplasmic constituents are degraded in lysosomes to maintain cellular homeostasis and bioenergetics. However, the role of autophagy in regulating dNTP pools is not well understood. Herein, we reported that starvation- or rapamycin-induced autophagy was accompanied by a decrease in RNR activity and dNTP pools in human cancer cells. Furthermore, downregulation of the small subunit of RNR (RRM2) by siRNA or treatment with the RNR inhibitor hydroxyurea substantially induced autophagy. Conversely, cancer cells with abundant endogenous intracellular dNTPs or treated with dNTP precursors were less responsive to autophagy induction by rapamycin, suggesting that autophagy and dNTP pool levels are regulated through a negative feedback loop. Lastly, treatment with si-RRM2 caused an increase in MAP1LC3B, ATG5, BECN1, and ATG12 transcript abundance in xenografted Tu212 tumors in vivo. Together, our results revealed a previously unrecognized reciprocal regulation between dNTP pools and autophagy in cancer cells.

  2. Autophagy regulates keratin 8 homeostasis in mammary epithelial cells and in breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongara, Sameera; Kravchuk, Olga; Teplova, Irina; Lozy, Fred; Schulte, Jennifer; Moore, Dirk; Barnard, Nicola; Neumann, Carola A.; White, Eileen; Karantza, Vassiliki

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is activated in response to cellular stressors and mediates lysosomal degradation and recycling of cytoplasmic material and organelles as a temporary cell survival mechanism. Defective autophagy is implicated in human pathology, as disruption of protein and organelle homeostasis enables disease-promoting mechanisms such as toxic protein aggregation, oxidative stress, genomic damage and inflammation. We previously showed that autophagy-defective immortalized mouse mammary epithelial cells (iMMECs) are susceptible to metabolic stress, DNA damage and genomic instability. We now report that autophagy deficiency was associated with ER and oxidative stress, and deregulation of p62-mediated keratin homeostasis in mammary cells and allograft tumors and in mammary tissues from genetically engineered mice. In human breast tumors, high phospho(Ser73)-K8 levels inversely correlated with Beclin 1 expression. Thus, autophagy preserves cellular fitness by limiting ER and oxidative stress, a function potentially important in autophagy-mediated suppression of mammary tumorigenesis. Furthermore, autophagy regulates keratin homeostasis in the mammary gland via a p62-dependent mechanism. High phospho(Ser73)-K8 expression may be a marker of autophagy functional status in breast tumors and, as such, could have therapeutic implications for breast cancer patients. PMID:20530580

  3. MiR-30-regulated autophagy mediates angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wei; Zhong, Yun; Cheng, Chuanfang; Liu, Benrong; Wang, Li; Li, Aiqun; Xiong, Longgen; Liu, Shiming

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulated autophagy may lead to the development of disease. Role of autophagy and the diagnostic potential of microRNAs that regulate the autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy have not been evaluated. A rat model of cardiac hypertrophy was established using transverse abdominal aortic constriction (operation group). Cardiomyocyte autophagy was enhanced in rats from the operation group, compared with those in the sham operation group. Moreover, the operation group showed up-regulation of beclin-1 (an autophagy-related gene), and down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiac tissue. The effects of inhibition and over-expression of the beclin-1 gene on the expression of hypertrophy-related genes and on autophagy were assessed. Angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy was found to be mediated by over-expression of the beclin-1 gene. A dual luciferase reporter assay confirmed that beclin-1 was a target gene of miR-30a. miR-30a induced alterations in beclin-1 gene expression and autophagy in cardiomyocytes. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with miR-30a mimic attenuated the Angiotensin II-induced up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and decreased in the cardiomyocyte surface area. Conversely, treatment with miR-30a inhibitor enhanced the up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and increased the surface area of cardiomyocytes induced by Angiotensin II. In addition, circulating miR-30 was elevated in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, and circulating miR-30 was positively associated with left ventricular wall thickness. Collectively, these above-mentioned results suggest that Angiotensin II induces down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiomyocytes, which in turn promotes myocardial hypertrophy through excessive autophagy. Circulating miR-30 may be an important marker for the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy.

  4. MiR-30-regulated autophagy mediates angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Pan

    Full Text Available Dysregulated autophagy may lead to the development of disease. Role of autophagy and the diagnostic potential of microRNAs that regulate the autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy have not been evaluated. A rat model of cardiac hypertrophy was established using transverse abdominal aortic constriction (operation group. Cardiomyocyte autophagy was enhanced in rats from the operation group, compared with those in the sham operation group. Moreover, the operation group showed up-regulation of beclin-1 (an autophagy-related gene, and down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiac tissue. The effects of inhibition and over-expression of the beclin-1 gene on the expression of hypertrophy-related genes and on autophagy were assessed. Angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy was found to be mediated by over-expression of the beclin-1 gene. A dual luciferase reporter assay confirmed that beclin-1 was a target gene of miR-30a. miR-30a induced alterations in beclin-1 gene expression and autophagy in cardiomyocytes. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with miR-30a mimic attenuated the Angiotensin II-induced up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and decreased in the cardiomyocyte surface area. Conversely, treatment with miR-30a inhibitor enhanced the up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and increased the surface area of cardiomyocytes induced by Angiotensin II. In addition, circulating miR-30 was elevated in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, and circulating miR-30 was positively associated with left ventricular wall thickness. Collectively, these above-mentioned results suggest that Angiotensin II induces down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiomyocytes, which in turn promotes myocardial hypertrophy through excessive autophagy. Circulating miR-30 may be an important marker for the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy.

  5. Cannabinoid-induced autophagy regulates suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 in intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koay, Luan C; Rigby, Rachael J; Wright, Karen L

    2014-07-15

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involved in homeostatic and regulated cellular protein recycling and degradation via the lysosomal degradation pathway. Emerging data associate impaired autophagy, increased activity in the endocannabinoid system, and upregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3) protein expression during intestinal inflammation. We have investigated whether these three processes are linked. By assessing the impact of the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD), the synthetic cannabinoid arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA), and the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA) on autophagosome formation, we explored whether these actions were responsible for cyclic SOCS3 protein levels. Our findings show that all three cannabinoids induce autophagy in a dose-dependent manner in fully differentiated Caco-2 cells, a model of mature intestinal epithelium. ACEA and AEA induced canonical autophagy, which was cannabinoid type 1 receptor-mediated. In contrast, CBD was able to bypass the cannabinoid type 1 receptor and the canonical pathway to induce autophagy, albeit to a lesser extent. Functionally, all three cannabinoids reduced SOCS3 protein expression, which was reversed by blocking early and late autophagy. In conclusion, the regulatory protein SOCS3 is regulated by autophagy, and cannabinoids play a role in this process, which could be important when therapeutic applications for the cannabinoids in inflammatory conditions are considered.

  6. Prolactin (PRL) in adipose tissue: regulation and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Jonathan, Nira; Hugo, Eric

    2015-01-01

    New information concerning the effects of prolactin (PRL) on metabolic processes warrants reevaluation of its overall metabolic actions. PRL affects metabolic homeostasis by regulating key enzymes and transporters associated with glucose and lipid metabolism in several target organs. In the lactating mammary gland, PRL increases the production of milk proteins, lactose, and lipids. In adipose tissue, PRL generally suppresses lipid storage and adipokine release and affect adipogenesis. A specific case is made for PRL in the human breast and adipose tissues, where it acts as a circulating hormone and an autocrine/paracrine factor. Although its overall effects on body composition are both modest and species-specific, PRL may be involved in the manifestation of insulin resistance.

  7. IL13 activates autophagy to regulate secretion in airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, John D; Alevy, Yael; Malvin, Nicole P; Patel, Khushbu K; Gunsten, Sean P; Holtzman, Michael J; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Brody, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Cytokine modulation of autophagy is increasingly recognized in disease pathogenesis, and current concepts suggest that type 1 cytokines activate autophagy, whereas type 2 cytokines are inhibitory. However, this paradigm derives primarily from studies of immune cells and is poorly characterized in tissue cells, including sentinel epithelial cells that regulate the immune response. In particular, the type 2 cytokine IL13 (interleukin 13) drives the formation of airway goblet cells that secrete excess mucus as a characteristic feature of airway disease, but whether this process is influenced by autophagy was undefined. Here we use a mouse model of airway disease in which IL33 (interleukin 33) stimulation leads to IL13-dependent formation of airway goblet cells as tracked by levels of mucin MUC5AC (mucin 5AC, oligomeric mucus/gel forming), and we show that these cells manifest a block in mucus secretion in autophagy gene Atg16l1-deficient mice compared to wild-type control mice. Similarly, primary-culture human tracheal epithelial cells treated with IL13 to stimulate mucus formation also exhibit a block in MUC5AC secretion in cells depleted of autophagy gene ATG5 (autophagy-related 5) or ATG14 (autophagy-related 14) compared to nondepleted control cells. Our findings indicate that autophagy is essential for airway mucus secretion in a type 2, IL13-dependent immune disease process and thereby provide a novel therapeutic strategy for attenuating airway obstruction in hypersecretory inflammatory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis lung disease. Taken together, these observations suggest that the regulation of autophagy by Th2 cytokines is cell-context dependent.

  8. Regulation of autophagy and chloroquine sensitivity by oncogenic RAS in vitro is context-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Michael J; Gamez, Graciela; Menke, Christina; Hernandez, Ariel; Thorburn, Jacqueline; Gidan, Freddi; Staskiewicz, Leah; Morgan, Shellie; Cummings, Christopher; Maycotte, Paola; Thorburn, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is an antimalarial drug and late-stage inhibitor of autophagy currently FDA-approved for use in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. Based primarily on its ability to inhibit autophagy, CQ and its derivative, hydroxychloroquine, are currently being investigated as primary or adjuvant therapy in multiple clinical trials for cancer treatment. Oncogenic RAS has previously been shown to regulate autophagic flux, and cancers with high incidence of RAS mutations, such as pancreatic cancer, have been described in the literature as being particularly susceptible to CQ treatment, leading to the hypothesis that oncogenic RAS makes cancer cells dependent on autophagy. This autophagy "addiction" suggests that the mutation status of RAS in tumors could identify patients who would be more likely to benefit from CQ therapy. Here we show that RAS mutation status itself is unlikely to be beneficial in such a patient selection because oncogenic RAS does not always promote autophagy addiction. Moreover, oncogenic RAS can have opposite effects on both autophagic flux and CQ sensitivity in different cells. Finally, for any given cell type, the positive or negative effect of oncogenic RAS on autophagy does not necessarily predict whether RAS will promote or inhibit CQ-mediated toxicity. Thus, although our results confirm that different tumor cell lines display marked differences in how they respond to autophagy inhibition, these differences can occur irrespective of RAS mutation status and, in different contexts, can either promote or reduce chloroquine sensitivity of tumor cells.

  9. Autophagy contributes to regulation of the hypoxia response during submergence in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Liao, Bin; Qi, Hua; Xie, Li-Juan; Huang, Li; Tan, Wei-Juan; Zhai, Ning; Yuan, Li-Bing; Zhou, Ying; Yu, Lu-Jun; Chen, Qin-Fang; Shu, Wensheng; Xiao, Shi

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy involves massive degradation of intracellular components and functions as a conserved system that helps cells to adapt to adverse conditions. In mammals, hypoxia rapidly stimulates autophagy as a cell survival response. Here, we examine the function of autophagy in the regulation of the plant response to submergence, an abiotic stress that leads to hypoxia and anaerobic respiration in plant cells. In Arabidopsis thaliana, submergence induces the transcription of autophagy-related (ATG) genes and the formation of autophagosomes. Consistent with this, the autophagy-defective (atg) mutants are hypersensitive to submergence stress and treatment with ethanol, the end product of anaerobic respiration. Upon submergence, the atg mutants have increased levels of transcripts of anaerobic respiration genes (alcohol dehydrogenase 1, ADH1 and pyruvate decarboxylase 1, PDC1), but reduced levels of transcripts of other hypoxia- and ethylene-responsive genes. Both submergence and ethanol treatments induce the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the rosettes of atg mutants more than in the wild type. Moreover, the production of ROS by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases is necessary for plant tolerance to submergence and ethanol, submergence-induced expression of ADH1 and PDC1, and activation of autophagy. The submergence- and ethanol-sensitive phenotypes in the atg mutants depend on a complete salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway. Together, our findings demonstrate that submergence-induced autophagy functions in the hypoxia response in Arabidopsis by modulating SA-mediated cellular homeostasis.

  10. EVA1A/TMEM166 Regulates Embryonic Neurogenesis by Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengtao; Lu, Guang; Hu, Jia; Shen, Xue; Ju, Jiabao; Gao, Yuanxu; Qu, Liujing; Xia, Yan; Chen, Yingyu; Bai, Yun

    2016-03-08

    Self-renewal and differentiation of neural stem cells is essential for embryonic neurogenesis, which is associated with cell autophagy. However, the mechanism by which autophagy regulates neurogenesis remains undefined. Here, we show that Eva1a/Tmem166, an autophagy-related gene, regulates neural stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Eva1a depletion impaired the generation of newborn neurons, both in vivo and in vitro. Conversely, overexpression of EVA1A enhanced newborn neuron generation and maturation. Moreover, Eva1a depletion activated the PIK3CA-AKT axis, leading to the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin and the subsequent inhibition of autophagy. Furthermore, addition of methylpyruvate to the culture during neural stem cell differentiation rescued the defective embryonic neurogenesis induced by Eva1a depletion, suggesting that energy availability is a significant factor in embryonic neurogenesis. Collectively, these data demonstrated that EVA1A regulates embryonic neurogenesis by modulating autophagy. Our results have potential implications for understanding the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders caused by autophagy dysregulation.

  11. Notch1 regulated autophagy controls survival and suppressor activity of activated murine T-regulatory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcel, Nimi; Sarin, Apurva

    2016-01-01

    Cell survival is one of several processes regulated by the Notch pathway in mammalian cells. Here we report functional outcomes of non-nuclear Notch signaling to activate autophagy, a conserved cellular response to nutrient stress, regulating survival in murine natural T-regulatory cells (Tregs), an immune subset controlling tolerance and inflammation. Induction of autophagy required ligand-dependent, Notch intracellular domain (NIC) activity, which controlled mitochondrial organization and survival of activated Tregs. Consistently, NIC immune-precipitated Beclin and Atg14, constituents of the autophagy initiation complex. Further, ectopic expression of an effector of autophagy (Atg3) or recombinant NIC tagged to a nuclear export signal (NIC-NES), restored autophagy and suppressor function in Notch1-/- Tregs. Furthermore, Notch1 deficiency in the Treg lineage resulted in immune hyperactivity, implicating Notch activity in Treg homeostasis. Notch1 integration with autophagy, revealed in these experiments, holds implications for Notch regulated cell-fate decisions governing differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14023.001 PMID:27267497

  12. FLCN, a novel autophagy component, interacts with GABARAP and is regulated by ULK1 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Elaine A; Seifan, Sara; Claessens, Tijs; Behrends, Christian; Kamps, Miriam Af; Rozycka, Ewelina; Kemp, Alain J; Nookala, Ravi K; Blenis, John; Coull, Barry J; Murray, James T; van Steensel, Maurice Am; Wilkinson, Simon; Tee, Andrew R

    2014-10-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant condition caused by mutations in the FLCN gene and characterized by benign hair follicle tumors, pneumothorax, and renal cancer. Folliculin (FLCN), the protein product of the FLCN gene, is a poorly characterized tumor suppressor protein, currently linked to multiple cellular pathways. Autophagy maintains cellular homeostasis by removing damaged organelles and macromolecules. Although the autophagy kinase ULK1 drives autophagy, the underlying mechanisms are still being unraveled and few ULK1 substrates have been identified to date. Here, we identify that loss of FLCN moderately impairs basal autophagic flux, while re-expression of FLCN rescues autophagy. We reveal that the FLCN complex is regulated by ULK1 and elucidate 3 novel phosphorylation sites (Ser406, Ser537, and Ser542) within FLCN, which are induced by ULK1 overexpression. In addition, our findings demonstrate that FLCN interacts with a second integral component of the autophagy machinery, GABA(A) receptor-associated protein (GABARAP). The FLCN-GABARAP association is modulated by the presence of either folliculin-interacting protein (FNIP)-1 or FNIP2 and further regulated by ULK1. As observed by elevation of GABARAP, sequestome 1 (SQSTM1) and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP1LC3B) in chromophobe and clear cell tumors from a BHD patient, we found that autophagy is impaired in BHD-associated renal tumors. Consequently, this work reveals a novel facet of autophagy regulation by ULK1 and substantially contributes to our understanding of FLCN function by linking it directly to autophagy through GABARAP and ULK1.

  13. Negative regulators of brown adipose tissue (BAT)-mediated thermogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bal Krishan; Patil, Mallikarjun; Satyanarayana, Ande

    2014-12-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is specialized for energy expenditure, a process called adaptive thermogenesis. PET-CT scans recently demonstrated the existence of metabolically active BAT in adult humans, which revitalized our interest in BAT. Increasing the amount and/or activity of BAT holds tremendous promise for the treatment of obesity and its associated diseases. PGC1α is the master regulator of UCP1-mediated thermogenesis in BAT. A number of proteins have been identified to influence thermogenesis either positively or negatively through regulating the expression or transcriptional activity of PGC1α. Therefore, BAT activation can be achieved by either inducing the expression of positive regulators of PGC1α or by inhibiting the repressors of the PGC1α/UCP1 pathway. Here, we review the most important negative regulators of PGC1α/UCP1 signaling and their mechanism of action in BAT-mediated thermogenesis.

  14. Complex regulation of autophagy in cancer - integrated approaches to discover the networks that hold a double-edged sword.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubisch, János; Türei, Dénes; Földvári-Nagy, László; Dunai, Zsuzsanna A; Zsákai, Lilian; Varga, Máté; Vellai, Tibor; Csermely, Péter; Korcsmáros, Tamás

    2013-08-01

    Autophagy, a highly regulated self-degradation process of eukaryotic cells, is a context-dependent tumor-suppressing mechanism that can also promote tumor cell survival upon stress and treatment resistance. Because of this ambiguity, autophagy is considered as a double-edged sword in oncology, making anti-cancer therapeutic approaches highly challenging. In this review, we present how systems-level knowledge on autophagy regulation can help to develop new strategies and efficiently select novel anti-cancer drug targets. We focus on the protein interactors and transcriptional/post-transcriptional regulators of autophagy as the protein and regulatory networks significantly influence the activity of core autophagy proteins during tumor progression. We list several network resources to identify interactors and regulators of autophagy proteins. As in silico analysis of such networks often necessitates experimental validation, we briefly summarize tractable model organisms to examine the role of autophagy in cancer. We also discuss fluorescence techniques for high-throughput monitoring of autophagy in humans. Finally, the challenges of pharmacological modulation of autophagy are reviewed. We suggest network-based concepts to overcome these difficulties. We point out that a context-dependent modulation of autophagy would be favored in anti-cancer therapy, where autophagy is stimulated in normal cells, while inhibited only in stressed cancer cells. To achieve this goal, we introduce the concept of regulo-network drugs targeting specific transcription factors or miRNA families identified with network analysis. The effect of regulo-network drugs propagates indirectly through transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation of autophagy proteins, and, as a multi-directional intervention tool, they can both activate and inhibit specific proteins in the same time. The future identification and validation of such regulo-network drug targets may serve as novel intervention

  15. Acetyl-coenzyme A: a metabolic master regulator of autophagy and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Sabrina; Pendl, Tobias; Zimmermann, Andreas; Eisenberg, Tobias; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Mariño, Guillermo; Pietrocola, Federico; Harger, Alexandra; Magnes, Christoph; Sinner, Frank; Pieber, Thomas R; Dengjel, Jörn; Sigrist, Stephan J; Kroemer, Guido; Madeo, Frank

    2014-07-01

    As the major lysosomal degradation pathway, autophagy represents the guardian of cellular homeostasis, removing damaged and potentially harmful material and replenishing energy reserves in conditions of starvation. Given its vast physiological importance, autophagy is crucially involved in the process of aging and associated pathologies. Although the regulation of autophagy strongly depends on nutrient availability, specific metabolites that modulate autophagic responses are poorly described. Recently, we revealed nucleo-cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A (AcCoA) as a phylogenetically conserved inhibitor of starvation-induced and age-associated autophagy. AcCoA is the sole acetyl-group donor for protein acetylation, explaining why pharmacological or genetic manipulations that modify the concentrations of nucleo-cytosolic AcCoA directly affect the levels of protein acetylation. The acetylation of histones and cytosolic proteins inversely correlates with the rate of autophagy in yeast and mammalian cells, respectively, despite the fact that the routes of de novo AcCoA synthesis differ across phyla. Thus, we propose nucleo-cytosolic AcCoA to act as a conserved metabolic rheostat, linking the cellular metabolic state to the regulation of autophagy via effects on protein acetylation.

  16. O-GlcNAcylation of ATG4B positively regulates autophagy by increasing its hydroxylase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Yoon Kyung; Park, Na Yeon; Park, So Jung; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Shin, Ji Hyun; Jo, Doo Sin; Bae, Dong-Jun; Suh, Young-Ah; Chang, Jeong Ho; Lee, Eun Kyung; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Kim, Jin Cheon; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2016-08-30

    Autophagy is a catabolic degradation process and maintains cellular homeostasis. And autophagy is activated in response to various stress conditions. Although O-GlcNAcylation functions a sensor for nutrient and stress, the relationship between O-GlcNAcylation and autophagy is largely unknown. Here, we identified that ATG4B is novel target for O-GlcNAcylation under metabolic stress condition. Treatment with PugNAc, an O-GlcNAcase inhibitor increased activation of autophagy in SH-SY5Y cells. Both bimolecular fluorescence complementation and immunoprecipitation assay indicated that OGT directly interacts with ATG4B in SH-SY5Y cells. We also found that the O-GlcNAcylated ATG4B was increased in autophagy activation conditions, and down-regulation of OGT reduces O-GlcNAcylation of ATG4B under low glucose condition. Furthermore, the proteolytic activity of ATG4B for LC3 cleavage was enhanced in PugNAc-treated cells. Taken together, these results imply that O-GlcNAcylation of ATG4B regulates autophagy activation by increasing its proteolytic activity under metabolic stress condition.

  17. Autophagy-mediated Regulation of BACE1 Protein Trafficking and Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tuancheng; Tammineni, Prasad; Agrawal, Chanchal; Jeong, Yu Young; Cai, Qian

    2017-02-03

    β-Site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is the major neuronal β-secretase for amyloid-β generation and is degraded in lysosomes. The autophagy-lysosomal system plays a key role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis in neurons. Recent studies established that nascent autophagosomes in distal axons move predominantly in the retrograde direction toward the soma, where mature lysosomes are mainly located. However, it remains unknown whether autophagy plays a critical role in regulation of BACE1 trafficking and degradation. Here, we report that induction of neuronal autophagy enhances BACE1 turnover, which is suppressed by lysosomal inhibition. A significant portion of BACE1 is recruited to the autophagy pathway and co-migrates robustly with autophagic vacuoles along axons. Moreover, we reveal that autophagic vacuole-associated BACE1 is accumulated in the distal axon of Alzheimer's disease-related mutant human APP transgenic neurons and mouse brains. Inducing autophagy in mutant human APP neurons augments autophagic retention of BACE1 in distal axons, leading to enhanced β-cleavage of APP. This phenotype can be reversed by Snapin-enhanced retrograde transport, which facilitates BACE1 trafficking to lysosomes for degradation. Therefore, our study provides new insights into autophagy-mediated regulation of BACE1 turnover and APP processing, thus building a foundation for future development of potential Alzheimer's disease therapeutic strategies.

  18. Autophagy regulates chlorpyrifos-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hyeon [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Eun [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, In Chul [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Hyun Chul, E-mail: hckoh@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that up-regulation of autophagy may be a tractable therapeutic intervention for clearing disease-causing proteins, including α-synuclein, ubiquitin, and other misfolded or aggregated proteins in pesticide-induced neurodegeneration. In a previous study, we reported that chlorpyrifos (CPF)-induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis is mediated through reactive oxygen species in SH-SY5Y cells. In this study, we explored a novel pharmacotherapeutic approach to prevent CPF neurotoxicity involving the regulation of autophagy. We investigated the modulation of CPF-induced apoptosis according to autophagy regulation. We found that CPF induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells, as demonstrated by the activation of caspase-3 and nuclear condensation. In addition, we observed that cells treated with CPF underwent autophagic cell death by monitoring the expression of LC3-II and p62. Pretreatment with the autophagy inducer rapamycin significantly enhanced the cell viability of CPF-exposed cells, and the enhancement of cell viability was partially due to alleviation of CPF-induced apoptosis via a decrease in levels of cleaved caspase-3. Specifically, rapamycin pretreatment decreased Bax and increased Bcl-2 expression in mitochondria. In addition, rapamycin significantly decreased cytochrome c release in from mitochondria into the cytosol. However, pretreatment of cells with the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3MA), remarkably increased CPF toxicity in these cells; this with correlated with increased expression of Bax and decreased expression of Bcl-2 in mitochondria. Our results suggest that CPF-induced cytotoxicity is modified by autophagy regulation and that rapamycin protects against CPF-induced apoptosis by enhancing autophagy. Pharmacologic induction of autophagy by rapamycin may be a useful treatment strategy in neurodegenerative disorders. - Highlights: ► Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is cytotoxic to SH-SY5Y cells ► CPF-induced cytotoxicity is mediated by

  19. PtdIns(4,5)P2 signaling regulates ATG14 and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaojun; Thapa, Narendra; Liao, Yihan; Choi, Suyong; Anderson, Richard A

    2016-09-27

    Autophagy is a regulated self-digestion pathway with fundamental roles in cell homeostasis and diseases. Autophagy is regulated by coordinated actions of a series of autophagy-related (ATG) proteins. The Barkor/ATG14(L)-VPS34 (a class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase) complex and its product phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PtdIns(3)P] play key roles in autophagy initiation. ATG14 contains a C-terminal Barkor/ATG14(L) autophagosome-targeting sequence (BATS) domain that senses the curvature of PtdIns(3)P-containing membrane. The BATS domain also strongly binds PtdIns(4,5)P2, but the functional significance has been unclear. Here we show that ATG14 specifically interacts with type Iγ PIP kinase isoform 5 (PIPKIγi5), an enzyme that generates PtdIns(4,5)P2 in mammalian cells. Autophagosomes have associated PIPKIγi5 and PtdIns(4,5)P2 that are colocalized with late endosomes and the endoplasmic reticulum. PtdIns(4,5)P2 generation at these sites requires PIPKIγi5. Loss of PIPKIγi5 results in a loss of ATG14, UV irradiation resistance-associated gene, and Beclin 1 and a block of autophagy. PtdIns(4,5)P2 binding to the ATG14-BATS domain regulates ATG14 interaction with VPS34 and Beclin 1, and thus plays a key role in ATG14 complex assembly and autophagy initiation. This study identifies an unexpected role for PtdIns(4,5)P2 signaling in the regulation of ATG14 complex and autophagy.

  20. Mevalonate cascade regulation of airway mesenchymal cell autophagy and apoptosis: a dual role for p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Ghavami

    Full Text Available Statins inhibit the proximal steps of cholesterol biosynthesis, and are linked to health benefits in various conditions, including cancer and lung disease. We have previously investigated apoptotic pathways triggered by statins in airway mesenchymal cells, and identified reduced prenylation of small GTPases as a primary effector mechanism leading to p53-mediated cell death. Here, we extend our studies of statin-induced cell death by assessing endpoints of both apoptosis and autophagy, and investigating their interplay and coincident regulation. Using primary cultured human airway smooth muscle (HASM and human airway fibroblasts (HAF, autophagy, and autophagosome formation and flux were assessed by transmission electron microscopy, cytochemistry (lysosome number and co-localization with LC3 and immunoblotting (LC3 lipidation and Atg12-5 complex formation. Chemical inhibition of autophagy increased simvastatin-induced caspase activation and cell death. Similarly, Atg5 silencing with shRNA, thus preventing Atg5-12 complex formation, increased pro-apoptotic effects of simvastatin. Simvastatin concomitantly increased p53-dependent expression of p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA, NOXA, and damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM. Notably both mevalonate cascade inhibition-induced autophagy and apoptosis were p53 dependent: simvastatin increased nuclear p53 accumulation, and both cyclic pifithrin-α and p53 shRNAi partially inhibited NOXA, PUMA expression and caspase-3/7 cleavage (apoptosis and DRAM expression, Atg5-12 complex formation, LC3 lipidation, and autophagosome formation (autophagy. Furthermore, the autophagy response is induced rapidly, significantly delaying apoptosis, suggesting the existence of a temporally coordinated p53 regulation network. These findings are relevant for the development of statin-based therapeutic approaches in obstructive airway disease.

  1. Methylprednisolone exerts neuroprotective effects by regulating autophagy and apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Gao; Shu-rui Chen; Meng-yao Wu; Kai Gao; Yuan-long Li; Hong-yu Wang; Chen-yuan Li; Hong Li

    2016-01-01

    Methylprednisolone markedly reduces autophagy and apoptosis after secondary spinal cord injury. Here, we investigated whether pretreat-ment of cells with methylprednisolone would protect neuron-like cells from subsequent oxidative damagevia suppression of autophagy and apoptosis. Cultured N2a cells were pretreated with 10 µM methylprednisolone for 30 minutes, then exposed to 100 µM H2O2 for 24 hours. Inverted phase contrast microscope images, MTT assay, lfow cytometry and western blot results showed that, compared to cells ex-posed to 100 µM H2O2 alone, cells pretreated with methylprednisolone had a signiifcantly lower percentage of apoptotic cells, maintained a healthy morphology, and showed downregulation of autophagic protein light chain 3B and Beclin-1 protein expression. These ifndings indicate that methylprednisolone exerted neuroprotective effects against oxidative damage by suppressing autophagy and apoptosis.

  2. Age-regulated function of autophagy in the mouse inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Iriarte Rodríguez, Rocío; Pulido, Sara; Rodríguez-de la Rosa, Lourdes; Magariños, Marta; Varela-Nieto, Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved catabolic process essential for embryonic development and adult homeostasis. The autophagic machinery supplies energy by recycling intracellular components and facilitates the removal of apoptotic cells. In the inner ear, autophagy has been reported to play roles during early development in the chicken embryo and in the response to otic injury in the adult mouse. However, there are no studies on the expression of the autophagy machinery in the postnatal and adult inner ear. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is one of the factors that regulate both otic development and cochlear postnatal maturation and function. Here, we hypothesised that autophagy could be one of the processes involved in the cochlear development and functional maturation. We report that autophagy-related genes (ATG) Becn1, Atg4g and Atg5 are expressed in the mouse cochlea, vestibular system and brainstem cochlear nuclei from late developmental stages to adulthood. Atg9 was studied in the mouse cochlea and showed a similar pattern. The presence of autophagic flux was confirmed by decreased sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1/p62) and increased relative levels of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II). Inner ear autophagy flux is developmentally regulated and is lower at perinatal stages than in the adult mouse, where an expression plateau is reached at the age of two-months, coinciding with the age at which full functional activity is reached. Expression is maintained in adult mice and declines after the age of twelve months. LC3B labelling showed that autophagy was primarily associated with spiral ganglion neurons. Over time, Igf1 wild type mice showed lower expression of genes coding for IGF-1 high affinity receptor and the family factor IGF-2 than null mice. Parallel analysis of autophagy machinery gene expression showed no significant differences between the genotypes over the lifespan of the null mice. Taken together, these results show that the

  3. Longevity-relevant regulation of autophagy at the level of the acetylproteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Guillermo; Morselli, Eugenia; Bennetzen, Martin V; Eisenberg, Tobias; Megalou, Evgenia; Schroeder, Sabrina; Cabrera, Sandra; Bénit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre; Criollo, Alfredo; Kepp, Oliver; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Shen, Shensi; Malik, Shoaib A; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Horio, Yoshiyuki; López-Otín, Carlos; Andersen, Jens S; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-06-01

    The acetylase inhibitor, spermidine and the deacetylase activator, resveratrol, both induce autophagy and prolong life span of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans in an autophagydependent fashion. Based on these premises, we investigated the differences and similarities in spermidine and resveratrol-induced autophagy. The deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and its orthologs are required for the autophagy induction by resveratrol but dispensable for autophagy stimulation by spermidine in human cells, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. elegans. SIRT1 is also dispensable for life-span extension by spermidine. Mass spectrometry analysis of the human acetylproteome revealed that resveratrol and/or spermidine induce changes in the acetylation of 560 peptides corresponding to 375 different proteins. Among these, 170 proteins are part of the recently elucidated human autophagy protein network. Importantly, spermidine and resveratrol frequently affect the acetylation pattern in a similar fashion. In the cytoplasm, spermidine and resveratrol induce convergent protein de-acetylation more frequently than convergent acetylation, while in the nucleus, acetylation is dominantly triggered by both agents. We surmise that subtle and concerted alterations in the acetylproteome regulate autophagy at multiple levels.

  4. The inhibition of lung cancer cell migration by AhR-regulated autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chi-Hao; Li, Ching-Hao; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Lee, Chen-Chen; Liao, Po-Lin; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Huang, Shih-Hsuan; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2017-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is highly expressed in multiple organs and tissues. Whereas AhR mediates the metabolism of xenobiotic and endogenous compounds, its novel function in cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) remains controversial. Autophagy also participates in tumour progression through its functions in cell homeostasis and facilitates adaptation to EMT progression. In the present study, we found that AhR-regulated autophagy positively modulates EMT in non-small cell lung cancer cells. The motility of A549, H1299, and CL1-5 cells were correlated with different AhR expression levels. Invasive potential and cell morphology also changed when AhR protein expression was altered. Moreover, AhR levels exerted a contrasting effect on autophagy potential. Autophagy was higher in CL1-5 and H1299 cells with lower AhR levels than in A549 cells. Both AhR overexpression and autophagy inhibition decreased CL1-5 metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, AhR promoted BNIP3 ubiquitination for proteasomal degradation. AhR silencing in A549 cells also reduced BNIP3 ubiquitination. Taken together, these results provide a novel insight into the cross-linking between AhR and autophagy, we addressed the mechanistic BNIP3 modulation by endogenous AhR, which affect cancer cell EMT progression. PMID:28195146

  5. Role and regulation of autophagy in heat stress responses of tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Wang, Jian; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2014-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants are constantly exposed to a wide spectrum of stress conditions such as high temperature, which causes protein misfolding. Misfolded proteins are highly toxic and must be efficiently removed to reduce cellular proteotoxic stress if restoration of native conformations is unsuccessful. Although selective autophagy is known to function in protein quality control by targeting degradation of misfolded and potentially toxic proteins, its role and regulation in heat stress responses have not been analyzed in crop plants. In the present study, we found that heat stress induced expression of autophagy-related (ATG) genes and accumulation of autophagosomes in tomato plants. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of tomato ATG5 and ATG7 genes resulted in increased sensitivity of tomato plants to heat stress based on both increased development of heat stress symptoms and compromised photosynthetic parameters of heat-stressed leaf tissues. Silencing of tomato homologs for the selective autophagy receptor NBR1, which targets ubiquitinated protein aggregates, also compromised tomato heat tolerance. To better understand the regulation of heat-induced autophagy, we found that silencing of tomato ATG5, ATG7, or NBR1 compromised heat-induced expression of not only the targeted genes but also other autophagy-related genes. Furthermore, we identified two tomato genes encoding proteins highly homologous to Arabidopsis WRKY33 transcription factor, which has been previously shown to interact physically with an autophagy protein. Silencing of tomato WRKY33 genes compromised tomato heat tolerance and reduced heat-induced ATG gene expression and autophagosome accumulation. Based on these results, we propose that heat-induced autophagy in tomato is subject to cooperative regulation by both WRKY33 and ATG proteins and plays a critical role in tomato heat tolerance, mostly likely through selective removal of heat-induced protein aggregates.

  6. Role and Regulation of Autophagy in Heat Stress Responses of Tomato Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie eZhou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available As sessile organisms, plants are constantly exposed to a wide spectrum of stress conditions such as high temperature, which causes protein misfolding. Misfolded proteins are highly toxic and must be efficiently removed to reduce cellular proteotoxic stress if restoration of native conformations is unsuccessful. Although selective autophagy is known to function in protein quality control by targeting degradation of misfolded and potentially toxic proteins, its role and regulation in heat stress responses have not been analyzed in crop plants. In the present study, we found that heat stress induced expression of autophagy-related (ATG genes and accumulation of autophagosomes in tomato plants. Virus-induced gene silencing of tomato ATG5 and ATG7 genes resulted in increased sensitivity of tomato plants to heat stress based on both increased development of heat stress symptoms and compromised photosynthetic parameters of heat-stressed leaf tissues. Silencing of tomato homologs for the selective autophagy receptor NBR1, which targets ubiquitinated protein aggregates, also compromised tomato heat tolerance. To better understand the regulation of heat-induced autophagy, we found that silencing of tomato ATG5, ATG7 or NBR1 compromised heat-induced expression of not only the targeted genes but also other autophagy-related genes. Furthermore, we identified two tomato genes encoding proteins highly homologous to Arabidopsis WRKY33 transcription factor, which has been previously shown to interact physically with an autophagy protein. Silencing of tomato WRKY33 genes compromised tomato heat tolerance and reduced heat-induced ATG gene expression and autophagosome accumulation. Based on these results, we propose that heat-induced autophagy in tomato is subject to cooperative regulation by both WRKY33 and ATG proteins and plays a critical role in tomato heat tolerance, mostly likely through selective removal of heat-induced protein aggregates.

  7. GABA in Paraventricular Nucleus Regulates Adipose Afferent Reflex in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ding

    Full Text Available Chemical stimulation of white adipose tissue (WAT induces adipose afferent reflex (AAR, and thereby causes a general sympathetic activation. Paraventricular nucleus (PVN is important in control of sympathetic outflow. This study was designed to investigate the role of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA in PVN in regulating the AAR.Experiments were carried out in anesthetized rats. Renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA and mean arterial pressure (MAP were continuously recorded. AAR was evaluated by the RSNA and MAP responses to electrical stimulation of the right epididymal WAT (eWAT afferent nerve. Electrical stimulation of eWAT afferent nerve increase RSNA. Bilateral microinjection of the GABAA receptor agonist isoguvacine or the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen attenuated the AAR. The effect of isoguvacine on the AAR was greater than that of baclofen. The GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine enhanced the AAR, while the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP-35348 had no significant effect on the AAR. Bilateral PVN microinjection of vigabatrin, a selective GABA-transaminase inhibitor, to increase endogenous GABA levels in the PVN abolished the AAR. The inhibitory effect of vigabatrin on the AAR was attenuated by the pretreatment with gabazine or CGP-35348. Pretreatment with combined gabazine and CGP-35348 abolished the effects of vigabatrin.Activation of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the PVN inhibits the AAR. Blockade of GABAA receptors in the PVN enhances the AAR. Endogenous GABA in the PVN plays an important role in regulating the AAR.

  8. Protein kinase B/Akt1 inhibits autophagy by down-regulating UVRAG expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wonseok; Ju, Ji-hyun; Lee, Kyung-min; Nam, KeeSoo; Oh, Sunhwa [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Incheol, E-mail: incheol@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-01

    Autophagy, or autophagocytosis, is a selective intracellular degradative process involving the cell's own lysosomal apparatus. An essential component in cell development, homeostasis, repair and resistance to stress, autophagy may result in either cell death or survival. The targeted region of the cell is sequestered within a membrane structure, the autophagosome, for regulation of the catabolic process. A key factor in both autophagosome formation and autophagosome maturation is a protein encoded by the ultraviolet irradiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG). Conversely, the serine/threonine-specific protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt), which regulates survival in various cancers, inhibits autophagy through mTOR activation. We found that Akt1 may also directly inhibit autophagy by down-regulating UVRAG both in a 293T transient transfection system and breast cancer cells stably expressing Akt1. The UVRAG with mutations at putative Akt1-phosphorylation sites were still inhibited by Akt1, and dominant-negative Akt1 also inhibited UVRAG expression, suggesting that Akt1 down-regulates UVRAG by a kinase activity-independent mechanism. We showed that Akt1 overexpression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells down-regulated UVRAG transcription. Cells over-expressing Akt1 were more resistant than control cells to ultraviolet light-induced autophagy and exhibited the associated reduction in cell viability. Levels of the autophagosome indicator protein LC3B-II and mRFP-GFP-LC3 were reduced in cells that over-expressing Akt1. Inhibiting Akt1 by siRNA or reintroducing UVRAG gene rescued the level of LC3B-II in UV-irradiation. Altogether, these data suggest that Akt1 may inhibit autophagy by decreasing UVRAG expression, which also sensitizes cancer cells to UV irradiation.

  9. Berberine attenuates autophagy in adipocytes by targeting BECN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yujie; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jian; Zhang, Di; Huang, Jian; Lv, Pengfei; Shen, Weili; Yang, Ying

    2014-10-01

    The lysosomal degradation pathway, autophagy, is essential for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Recently, autophagy has been demonstrated to be required in the process of adipocyte conversion. However, its role in mature adipocytes under physiological and pathological conditions remains unclear. Here, we report a major function of BECN1 in the regulation of basal autophagy in mature adipocytes. We also show that berberine, a natural plant alkaloid, inhibits basal autophagy in adipocytes and adipose tissue of mice fed a high-fat diet via downregulation of BECN1 expression. We further demonstrate that berberine has a pronounced effect on the stability of Becn 1 mRNA through the Mir30 family. These findings explore the potential of BECN1 as a key molecule and a drug target for regulating autophagy in mature adipocytes.

  10. Hypothalamic regulation of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis and energy homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eZhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes are increasing at an alarming rate worldwide, but the strategies for the prevention and treatment of these disorders remain inadequate. Brown adipose tissue (BAT is important for cold protection by producing heat using lipids and glucose as metabolic fuels. This thermogenic action causes increased energy expenditure and significant lipid/glucose disposal. In addition, BAT in white adipose tissue (WAT or beige cells have been found and they also exhibit the thermogenic action similar to BAT. These data provide evidence indicating BAT/beige cells as a potential target for combating obesity and diabetes. Recent discoveries of active BAT and beige cells in adult humans have further highlighted this potential. Growing studies have also shown the importance of central nervous system in the control of BAT thermogenesis and WAT browning using animal models. This review is focused on central neural thermoregulation, particularly addressing our current understanding of the importance of hypothalamic neural signaling in the regulation of BAT/beige thermogenesis and energy homeostasis.

  11. Effects of autophagy regulation of tumor-associated macrophages on radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Le-Ning; Zhu, Bao-Song; Xing, Chun-Gen; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Young, Wu; Cao, Jian-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Tumor‑associated macrophages (TAMs), a major component of the tumor microenvironment, are crucial to the processes of tumor growth, infiltration and metastasis, and contribute to drug resistance. The importance of TAMs in radiation resistance of colorectal cancer remains unclear. To investigate the effects of autophagy regulation of TAMs on the radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells, the current study induced TAM formation from THP‑1 monocyte cells. Sequential treatment of THP‑1 cells with PMA for 72 h and human recombinant interleukin‑4 for 24 h was used to stimulate THP‑1 differentiation to TAMs. Expression of the cell surface markers CD68, CD204 and CD206, and changes to cell morphology were used to confirm successful differentiation. The TAMs were stimulated to promote or inhibit autophagy during co‑culture with LoVo colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. The cells were irradiated, with subsequent measurement of LoVo colony formation and apoptosis. Additionally, the expression of p53, Bcl‑2, survivin and Smac proteins was assessed by western blotting. Monodansylcadaverin staining was used to analyze the presence of autophagic vacuoles in TAM, and western blot analysis was used to assess the expression of Beclin‑1, LC3B I and II, ATG‑3, ‑5 and ‑7. The results demonstrated TAM autophagy to be markedly altered by rapamycin and bafilomycin A1 treatment. Following co‑culture with TAMs, the colony formation rate and survival fraction of LoVo cells were significantly higher than those in the control group (PLoVo colorectal cancer cells. Upregulation of TAM autophagy using rapamycin exhibited more effective inhibition of LoVo colony formation than autophagy downregulation. Notably, apoptosis was significantly increased in LoVo cells when co‑cultured with TAMs only, or with rapamycin‑mediated autophagy upregulated TAMs, compared with LoVo cells cultured alone (PLoVo cells co‑cultured with TAMs, compared with the control group (P<0

  12. Hypothalamus-adipose tissue crosstalk: neuropeptide Y and the regulation of energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Cline, Mark A; Gilbert, Elizabeth R

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an orexigenic neuropeptide that plays a role in regulating adiposity by promoting energy storage in white adipose tissue and inhibiting brown adipose tissue activation in mammals. This review describes mechanisms underlying NPY's effects on adipose tissue energy metabolism, with an emphasis on cellular proliferation, adipogenesis, lipid deposition, and lipolysis in white adipose tissue, and brown fat activation and thermogenesis. In general, NPY promotes adipocyte differentiation and lipid accumulation, leading to energy storage in adipose tissue, with effects mediated mainly through NPY receptor sub-types 1 and 2. This review highlights hypothalamus-sympathetic nervous system-adipose tissue innervation and adipose tissue-hypothalamus feedback loops as pathways underlying these effects. Potential sources of NPY that mediate adipose effects include the bloodstream, sympathetic nerve terminals that innervate the adipose tissue, as well as adipose tissue-derived cells. Understanding the role of central vs. peripherally-derived NPY in whole-body energy balance could shed light on mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of obesity. This information may provide some insight into searching for alternative therapeutic strategies for the treatment of obesity and associated diseases.

  13. Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum turnover by selective autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaminets, Aliaksandr; Heinrich, Theresa; Mari, Muriel; Grumati, Paolo; Huebner, Antje K; Akutsu, Masato; Liebmann, Lutz; Stolz, Alexandra; Nietzsche, Sandor; Koch, Nicole; Mauthe, Mario; Katona, Istvan; Qualmann, Britta; Weis, Joachim; Reggiori, Fulvio; Kurth, Ingo; Hübner, Christian A; Dikic, Ivan

    2015-06-18

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular endomembrane system, enabling protein and lipid synthesis, ion homeostasis, quality control of newly synthesized proteins and organelle communication. Constant ER turnover and modulation is needed to meet different cellular requirements and autophagy has an important role in this process. However, its underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unexplained. Here we show that members of the FAM134 reticulon protein family are ER-resident receptors that bind to autophagy modifiers LC3 and GABARAP, and facilitate ER degradation by autophagy ('ER-phagy'). Downregulation of FAM134B protein in human cells causes an expansion of the ER, while FAM134B overexpression results in ER fragmentation and lysosomal degradation. Mutant FAM134B proteins that cause sensory neuropathy in humans are unable to act as ER-phagy receptors. Consistently, disruption of Fam134b in mice causes expansion of the ER, inhibits ER turnover, sensitizes cells to stress-induced apoptotic cell death and leads to degeneration of sensory neurons. Therefore, selective ER-phagy via FAM134 proteins is indispensable for mammalian cell homeostasis and controls ER morphology and turnover in mice and humans.

  14. SYK regulates macrophage MHC-II expression via activation of autophagy in response to oxidized LDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Gonen, Ayelet; Diehl, Cody J; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Witztum, Joseph L; Miller, Yury I

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, which plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, is mediated by major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-dependent antigen presentation. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages constitute an important class of antigen-presenting cells that activate adaptive immune responses to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL). It has been reported that autophagy regulates adaptive immune responses by enhancing antigen presentation to MHC class II (MHC-II). In a previous study, we have demonstrated that SYK (spleen tyrosine kinase) regulates generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of MAPK8/JNK1 in macrophages. Because ROS and MAPK8 are known to regulate autophagy, in this study we investigated the role of SYK in autophagy, MHC-II expression and adaptive immune response to OxLDL. We demonstrate that OxLDL induces autophagosome formation, MHC-II expression, and phosphorylation of SYK in macrophages. Gene knockout and pharmacological inhibitors of NOX2 and MAPK8 reduced OxLDL-induced autophagy. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from wild-type and myeloid-specific SYK knockout mice, we demonstrate that SYK regulates OxLDL-induced ROS generation, MAPK8 activation, BECN1-BCL2 dissociation, autophagosome formation and presentation of OxLDL-derived antigens to CD4+ T cells. ldlr−/− syk−/− mice fed a high-fat diet produced lower levels of IgG to malondialdehyde (MDA)-LDL, malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA)-LDL, and OxLDL compared to ldlr−/− mice. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which SYK regulates MHC-II expression via autophagy in macrophages and may contribute to regulation of adaptive immune responses in atherosclerosis. PMID:25946330

  15. SYK regulates macrophage MHC-II expression via activation of autophagy in response to oxidized LDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Gonen, Ayelet; Diehl, Cody J; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Witztum, Joseph L; Miller, Yury I

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, which plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, is mediated by major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-dependent antigen presentation. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages constitute an important class of antigen-presenting cells that activate adaptive immune responses to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL). It has been reported that autophagy regulates adaptive immune responses by enhancing antigen presentation to MHC class II (MHC-II). In a previous study, we have demonstrated that SYK (spleen tyrosine kinase) regulates generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of MAPK8/JNK1 in macrophages. Because ROS and MAPK8 are known to regulate autophagy, in this study we investigated the role of SYK in autophagy, MHC-II expression and adaptive immune response to OxLDL. We demonstrate that OxLDL induces autophagosome formation, MHC-II expression, and phosphorylation of SYK in macrophages. Gene knockout and pharmacological inhibitors of NOX2 and MAPK8 reduced OxLDL-induced autophagy. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from wild-type and myeloid-specific SYK knockout mice, we demonstrate that SYK regulates OxLDL-induced ROS generation, MAPK8 activation, BECN1-BCL2 dissociation, autophagosome formation and presentation of OxLDL-derived antigens to CD4(+) T cells. ldlr(-/-) syk(-/-) mice fed a high-fat diet produced lower levels of IgG to malondialdehyde (MDA)-LDL, malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA)-LDL, and OxLDL compared to ldlr(-/-) mice. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which SYK regulates MHC-II expression via autophagy in macrophages and may contribute to regulation of adaptive immune responses in atherosclerosis.

  16. Histone deacetylases 1 and 2 regulate autophagy flux and skeletal muscle homeostasis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresi, Viviana; Carrer, Michele; Grueter, Chad E.; Rifki, Oktay F.; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James A.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance of skeletal muscle structure and function requires efficient and precise metabolic control. Autophagy plays a key role in metabolic homeostasis of diverse tissues by recycling cellular constituents, particularly under conditions of caloric restriction, thereby normalizing cellular metabolism. Here we show that histone deacetylases (HDACs) 1 and 2 control skeletal muscle homeostasis and autophagy flux in mice. Skeletal muscle-specific deletion of both HDAC1 and HDAC2 results in perinatal lethality of a subset of mice, accompanied by mitochondrial abnormalities and sarcomere degeneration. Mutant mice that survive the first day of life develop a progressive myopathy characterized by muscle degeneration and regeneration, and abnormal metabolism resulting from a blockade to autophagy. HDAC1 and HDAC2 regulate skeletal muscle autophagy by mediating the induction of autophagic gene expression and the formation of autophagosomes, such that myofibers of mice lacking these HDACs accumulate toxic autophagic intermediates. Strikingly, feeding HDAC1/2 mutant mice a high-fat diet from the weaning age releases the block in autophagy and prevents myopathy in adult mice. These findings reveal an unprecedented and essential role for HDAC1 and HDAC2 in maintenance of skeletal muscle structure and function and show that, at least in some pathological conditions, myopathy may be mitigated by dietary modifications. PMID:22307625

  17. New Potential Pharmacological Functions of Chinese Herbal Medicines via Regulation of Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty Yuen Kwan Law

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a universal catabolic cellular process for quality control of cytoplasm and maintenance of cellular homeostasis upon nutrient deprivation and environmental stimulus. It involves the lysosomal degradation of cellular components such as misfolded proteins or damaged organelles. Defects in autophagy are implicated in the pathogenesis of diseases including cancers, myopathy, neurodegenerations, infections and cardiovascular diseases. In the recent decade, traditional drugs with new clinical applications are not only commonly found in Western medicines, but also highlighted in Chinese herbal medicines (CHM. For instance, pharmacological studies have revealed that active components or fractions from Chaihu (Radix bupleuri, Hu Zhang (Rhizoma polygoni cuspidati, Donglingcao (Rabdosia rubesens, Hou po (Cortex magnoliae officinalis and Chuan xiong (Rhizoma chuanxiong modulate cancers, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular disease via autophagy. These findings shed light on the potential new applications and formulation of CHM decoctions via regulation of autophagy. This article reviews the roles of autophagy in the pharmacological actions of CHM and discusses their new potential clinical applications in various human diseases.

  18. SIRT1 positively regulates autophagy and mitochondria function in embryonic stem cells under oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Xuan; Lee, Man Ryul; Huang, Xinxin; Messina-Graham, Steven; Broxmeyer, Hal E

    2014-05-01

    SIRT1, an NAD-dependent deacetylase, plays a role in regulation of autophagy. SIRT1 increases mitochondrial function and reduces oxidative stress, and has been linked to age-related reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which is highly dependent on mitochondrial metabolism. H2O2 induces oxidative stress and autophagic cell death through interference with Beclin 1 and the mTOR signaling pathways. We evaluated connections between SIRT1 activity and induction of autophagy in murine (m) and human (h) embryonic stem cells (ESCs) upon ROS challenge. Exogenous H2 O2 (1 mM) induced apoptosis and autophagy in wild-type (WT) and Sirt1-/- mESCs. High concentrations of H2O2 (1 mM) induced more apoptosis in Sirt1-/-, than in WT mESCs. However, addition of 3-methyladenine, a widely used autophagy inhibitor, in combination with H2O2 induced more cell death in WT than in Sirt1-/- mESCs. Decreased induction of autophagy in Sirt1-/- mESCs was demonstrated by decreased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, lowered expression of Beclin-1, and decreased LC3 punctae and LysoTracker staining. H2O2 induced autophagy with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and disruption of mitochondrial dynamics in Sirt1-/- mESCs. Increased phosphorylation of P70/85-S6 kinase and ribosomal S6 was noted in Sirt1-/- mESCs, suggesting that SIRT1 regulates the mTOR pathway. Consistent with effects in mESCs, inhibition of SIRT1 using Lentivirus-mediated SIRT1 shRNA in hESCs demonstrated that knockdown of SIRT1 decreased H2O2-induced autophagy. This suggests a role for SIRT1 in regulating autophagy and mitochondria function in ESCs upon oxidative stress, effects mediated at least in part by the class III PI3K/Beclin 1 and mTOR pathways.

  19. Induction of autophagy by Imatinib sequesters Bcr-Abl in autophagosomes and down-regulates Bcr-Abl protein.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Elzinga, Baukje M

    2013-06-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) is a disease of hematopoietic stem cells which harbor the chimeric gene Bcr-Abl. Expression levels of this constitutively active tyrosine kinase are critical for response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment and also disease progression, yet the regulation of protein stability is poorly understood. We have previously demonstrated that imatinib can induce autophagy in Bcr-Abl expressing cells. Autophagy has been associated with the clearance of large macromolecular signaling complexes and abnormal proteins, however, the contribution of autophagy to the turnover of Bcr-Abl protein in imatinib treated cells is unknown. In this study, we show that following imatinib treatment, Bcr-Abl is sequestered into vesicular structures that co-localize with the autophagy marker LC3 or GABARAP. This association is inhibited by siRNA mediated knockdown of autophagy regulators (Beclin 1\\/ATG7). Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy also reduced Bcr-Abl\\/LC3 co-localization in both K562 and CML patient cells. Bcr-Abl protein expression was reduced with imatinib treatment. Inhibition of both autophagy and proteasome activity in imatinib treated cells was required to restore Bcr-Abl protein levels to those of untreated cells. This ability to down-regulate Bcr-Abl protein levels through the induction of autophagy may be an additional and important feature of the activity of imatinib.

  20. Oxygen-glucose deprivation regulates BACE1 expression through induction of autophagy in Neuro-2a/APP695 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong-Fu; Zhang, Ting; Sun, Yin-Yi; Sun, Ya-Meng; Chen, Wen-Qi; Shi, Nan; Shen, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Kang-Yong; Sun, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Our previous findings have demonstrated that autophagy regulation can alleviate the decline of learning and memory by eliminating deposition of extracellular beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in the brain after stroke, but the exact mechanism is unclear. It is presumed that the regulation of beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), the rate-limiting enzyme in metabolism of Aβ, would be a key site. Neuro-2a/amyloid precursor protein 695 (APP695) cell models of cerebral ischemia were established by oxygen-glucose deprivation to investigate the effects of Rapamycin (an autophagy inducer) or 3-methyladenine (an autophagy inhibitor) on the expression of BACE1. Either oxygen-glucose deprivation or Rapamycin down-regulated the expression of BACE1 while 3-methyladenine up-regulated BACE1 expression. These results confirm that oxygen-glucose deprivation down-regulates BACE1 expression in Neuro-2a/APP695 cells through the introduction of autophagy.

  1. Novel functional roles of caspase-related genes in the regulation of apoptosis and autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ju-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Caspases, a family of cysteine proteases, cleave substrates and play significant roles in apoptosis, autophagy, and development. Recently, our group identified 72 genes that interact with Death Caspase-1 (DCP-1) proteins in Drosophila by genetic screening of 15,000 EP lines. However, the cellular functions and molecular mechanisms of the screened genes, such as their involvement in apoptosis and autophagy, are poorly understood in mammalian cells. In order to study the functional characterizations of the genes in human cells, we investigated 16 full-length human genes in mammalian expression vectors and tested their effects on apoptosis and autophagy in human cell lines. Our studies revealed that ALFY, BIRC4, and TAK1 induced autophagy, while SEC61A2, N-PAC, BIRC4, WIPI1, and FALZ increased apoptotic cell death. BIRC4 was involved in both autophagy and apoptosis. Western blot analysis and luciferase reporter activity indicated that ALFY, BIRC4, PDGFA, and TAK1 act in a p53-dependent manner, whereas CPSF1, SEC61A2, N-PAC, and WIPI1 appear to be p53-independent. Overexpression of BIRC4 and TAK1 caused upregulation of p53 and accumulation of its target proteins as well as an increase in p53 mRNA levels, suggesting that these genes are involved in p53 transcription and expression of its target genes followed by p53 protein accumulation. In conclusion, apoptosis and/or autophagy mediated by BIRC4 and TAK1 may be regulated by p53 and caspase activity. These novel findings may provide valuable information that will aid in a better understanding of the roles of caspase-related genes in human cell lines and be useful for the process of drug discovery. PMID:27847434

  2. Poly-ADP-ribosylation of HMGB1 regulates TNFSF10/TRAIL resistance through autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minghua; Liu, Liying; Xie, Min; Sun, Xiaofang; Yu, Yan; Kang, Rui; Yang, Liangchun; Zhu, Shan; Cao, Lizhi; Tang, Daolin

    2015-01-01

    Both apoptosis ("self-killing") and autophagy ("self-eating") are evolutionarily conserved processes, and their crosstalk influences anticancer drug sensitivity and cell death. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that HMGB1 (high mobility group box 1), normally a nuclear protein, is a crucial regulator of TNFSF10/TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor [ligand] superfamily, member 10)-induced cancer cell death. Activation of PARP1 (poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1) was required for TNFSF10-induced ADP-ribosylation of HMGB1 in cancer cells. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of PARP1 activity or knockdown of PARP1 gene expression significantly inhibited TNFSF10-induced HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation and subsequent HMGB1-BECN1 complex formation. Furthermore, suppression of the PARP1-HMGB1 pathway diminished autophagy, increased apoptosis, and enhanced the anticancer activity of TNFSF10 in vitro and in a subcutaneous tumor model. These results indicate that PARP1 acts as a prominent upstream regulator of HMGB1-mediated autophagy and maintains a homeostatic balance between apoptosis and autophagy, which provides new insight into the mechanism of TNFSF10 resistance.

  3. Matrine-induced autophagy regulated by p53 through AMP-activated protein kinase in human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shan-Bu; He, Xing-Xing; Yao, Shu-Kun

    2015-08-01

    Matrine, one of the main extract components of Sophora flavescens, has been shown to exhibit inhibitory effects on some tumors through autophagy. However, the mechanism underlying the effect of matrine remains unclear. The cultured human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 and SMMC‑7721 were treated with matrine. Signal transduction and gene expression profile were determined. Matrine stimulated autophagy in SMMC‑7721 cells in a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent manner, but in an mTOR-independent manner in HepG2 cells. Next, in HepG2 cells, autophagy induced by matrine was regulated by p53 inactivation through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling transduction, then AMPK suppression switched autophagy to apoptosis. Furthermore, the interferon (IFN)-inducible genes, including interferon α-inducible protein 27 (IFI27) and interferon induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1), which are downstream effector of p53, might be modulated by matrine-induced autophagy. In addition, we found that the p53 protein isoforms, p53β, p53γ, ∆133p53, and ∆133p53γ, due to alternative splicing of intron 9, might be regulated by the p53-mediated autophagy. These results show that matrine induces autophagy in human hepatoma cells through a novel mechanism, which is p53/AMPK signaling pathway involvement in matrine-promoted autophagy.

  4. Leptin differentially regulate STAT3 activation in ob/ob mouse adipose mesenchymal stem cells

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    Zhou Zhou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leptin-deficient ob/ob mice exhibit adipocyte hypertrophy and hyperplasia as well as elevated adipose tissue and systemic inflammation. Multipotent stem cells isolated from adult adipose tissue can differentiate into adipocytes ex vivo and thereby contribute toward increased adipocyte cell numbers, obesity, and inflamm ation. Currently, information is lacking regarding regulation of adipose stem cell numbers as well as leptin-induced inflammation and its signaling pathway in ob/ob mice. Methods Using leptin deficient ob/ob mice, we investigated whether leptin injection into ob/ob mice increases adipose stem cell numbers and adipose tissue inflammatory marker MCP-1 mRNA and secretion levels. We also determined leptin mediated signaling pathways in the adipose stem cells. Results We report here that adipose stem cell number is significantly increased following leptin injection in ob/ob mice and with treatment of isolated stem cells with leptin in vitro. Leptin also up-regulated MCP-1 secretion in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We further showed that increased MCP-1 mRNA levels were due to increased phosphorylation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3 Ser727 but not STAT3 Tyr705 phosphorylation, suggesting differential regulation of MCP-1 gene expression under basal and leptin-stimulated conditions in adipose stem cells. Conclusions Taken together, these studies demonstrate that leptin increases adipose stem cell number and differentially activates STAT3 protein resulting in up-regulation of MCP-1 gene expression. Further studies of mechanisms mediating adipose stem cell hyperplasia and leptin signaling in obesity are warranted and may help identify novel anti-obesity target strategies.

  5. Vitamin D receptor regulates autophagy in the normal mammary gland and in luminal breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavera-Mendoza, Luz E; Westerling, Thomas; Libby, Eric; Marusyk, Andriy; Cato, Laura; Cassani, Raymundo; Cameron, Lisa A; Ficarro, Scott B; Marto, Jarrod A; Klawitter, Jelena; Brown, Myles

    2017-03-14

    Women in North America have a one in eight lifetime risk of developing breast cancer (BC), and a significant proportion of these individuals will develop recurrent BC and will eventually succumb to the disease. Metastatic, therapy-resistant BC cells are refractory to cell death induced by multiple stresses. Here, we document that the vitamin D receptor (VDR) acts as a master transcriptional regulator of autophagy. Activation of the VDR by vitamin D induces autophagy and an autophagic transcriptional signature in BC cells that correlates with increased survival in patients; strikingly, this signature is present in the normal mammary gland and is progressively lost in patients with metastatic BC. A number of epidemiological studies have shown that sufficient vitamin D serum levels might be protective against BC. We observed that dietary vitamin D supplementation in mice increases basal levels of autophagy in the normal mammary gland, highlighting the potential of vitamin D as a cancer-preventive agent. These findings point to a role of vitamin D and the VDR in modulating autophagy and cell death in both the normal mammary gland and BC cells.

  6. MCOLN1 is a ROS sensor in lysosomes that regulates autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Cheng, Xiping; Yu, Lu; Yang, Junsheng; Calvo, Raul; Patnaik, Samarjit; Hu, Xin; Gao, Qiong; Yang, Meimei; Lawas, Maria; Delling, Markus; Marugan, Juan; Ferrer, Marc; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-06-30

    Cellular stresses trigger autophagy to remove damaged macromolecules and organelles. Lysosomes 'host' multiple stress-sensing mechanisms that trigger the coordinated biogenesis of autophagosomes and lysosomes. For example, transcription factor (TF)EB, which regulates autophagy and lysosome biogenesis, is activated following the inhibition of mTOR, a lysosome-localized nutrient sensor. Here we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) activate TFEB via a lysosomal Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism independent of mTOR. Exogenous oxidants or increasing mitochondrial ROS levels directly and specifically activate lysosomal TRPML1 channels, inducing lysosomal Ca(2+) release. This activation triggers calcineurin-dependent TFEB-nuclear translocation, autophagy induction and lysosome biogenesis. When TRPML1 is genetically inactivated or pharmacologically inhibited, clearance of damaged mitochondria and removal of excess ROS are blocked. Furthermore, TRPML1's ROS sensitivity is specifically required for lysosome adaptation to mitochondrial damage. Hence, TRPML1 is a ROS sensor localized on the lysosomal membrane that orchestrates an autophagy-dependent negative-feedback programme to mitigate oxidative stress in the cell.

  7. Autophagy regulates cytoplasmic remodeling during cell reprogramming in a zebrafish model of muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saera-Vila, Alfonso; Kish, Phillip E; Louie, Ke'ale W; Grzegorski, Steven J; Klionsky, Daniel J; Kahana, Alon

    2016-10-02

    Cell identity involves both selective gene activity and specialization of cytoplasmic architecture and protein machinery. Similarly, reprogramming differentiated cells requires both genetic program alterations and remodeling of the cellular architecture. While changes in genetic and epigenetic programs have been well documented in dedifferentiating cells, the pathways responsible for remodeling the cellular architecture and eliminating specialized protein complexes are not as well understood. Here, we utilize a zebrafish model of adult muscle regeneration to study cytoplasmic remodeling during cell dedifferentiation. We describe activation of autophagy early in the regenerative response to muscle injury, while blocking autophagy using chloroquine or Atg5 and Becn1 knockdown reduced the rate of regeneration with accumulation of sarcomeric and nuclear debris. We further identify Casp3/caspase 3 as a candidate mediator of cellular reprogramming and Fgf signaling as an important activator of autophagy in dedifferentiating myocytes. We conclude that autophagy plays a critical role in cell reprogramming by regulating cytoplasmic remodeling, facilitating the transition to a less differentiated cell identity.

  8. Autophagy regulator BECN1 suppresses mammary tumorigenesis driven by WNT1 activation and following parity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchini, Michelle; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Kongara, Sameera; Price, Sandy; Nahar, Ritu; Lozy, Fred; Zhong, Hua; Vazquez, Alexei; Kang, Yibin; Karantza, Vassiliki

    2014-01-01

    Earlier studies reported allelic deletion of the essential autophagy regulator BECN1 in breast cancers implicating BECN1 loss, and likely defective autophagy, in tumorigenesis. Recent studies have questioned the tumor suppressive role of autophagy, as autophagy-related gene (Atg) defects generally suppress tumorigenesis in well-characterized mouse tumor models. We now report that, while it delays or does not alter mammary tumorigenesis driven by Palb2 loss or ERBB2 and PyMT overexpression, monoallelic Becn1 loss promotes mammary tumor development in 2 specific contexts, namely following parity and in association with wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 1 (WNT1) activation. Our studies demonstrate that Becn1 heterozygosity, which results in immature mammary epithelial cell expansion and aberrant TNFRSF11A/TNR11/RANK (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 11a, NFKB activator) signaling, promotes mammary tumorigenesis in multiparous FVB/N mice and in cooperation with the progenitor cell-transforming WNT1 oncogene. Similar to our Becn1(+/-);MMTV-Wnt1 mouse model, low BECN1 expression and an activated WNT pathway gene signature correlate with the triple-negative subtype, TNFRSF11A axis activation and poor prognosis in human breast cancers. Our results suggest that BECN1 may have nonautophagy-related roles in mammary development, provide insight in the seemingly paradoxical roles of BECN1 in tumorigenesis, and constitute the basis for further studies on the pathophysiology and treatment of clinically aggressive triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs).

  9. Salinomycin activates AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent autophagy in cultured osteoblastoma cells: a negative regulator against cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun-qing Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The malignant osteoblastoma has poor prognosis, thus the search for novel and more efficient chemo-agents against this disease is urgent. Salinomycin induces broad anti-cancer effects both in vivo and in vitro, however, its role in osteoblastoma is still not clear. KEY FINDINGS: Salinomycin induced both apoptosis and autophagy in cultured U2OS and MG-63 osteoblastoma cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA, or by RNA interference (RNAi of light chain 3B (LC3B, enhanced salinomycin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Salinomycin induced a profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation, which was required for autophagy induction. AMPK inhibition by compound C, or by AMPKα RNAi prevented salinomycin-induced autophagy activation, while facilitating cancer cell death and apoptosis. On the other hand, the AMPK agonist AICAR promoted autophagy activation in U2OS cells. Salinomycin-induced AMPK activation was dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS production in osteoblastoma cells. Antioxidant n-acetyl cysteine (NAC significantly inhibited salinomycin-induced AMPK activation and autophagy induction. CONCLUSIONS: Salinomycin activates AMPK-dependent autophagy in osteoblastoma cells, which serves as a negative regulator against cell apoptosis. AMPK-autophagy inhibition might be a novel strategy to sensitize salinomycin's effect in cancer cells.

  10. Exercise induces autophagy in peripheral tissues and in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Congcong; Sumpter, Rhea; Levine, Beth

    2012-10-01

    We recently identified physical exercise as a newly defined inducer of autophagy in vivo. Exercise induced autophagy in multiple organs involved in metabolic regulation, such as muscle, liver, pancreas and adipose tissue. To study the physiological role of exercise-induced autophagy, we generated mice with a knock-in nonphosphorylatable mutation in BCL2 (Thr69Ala, Ser70Ala and Ser84Ala) (BCL2 AAA) that are defective in exercise- and starvation-induced autophagy but not in basal autophagy. We found that BCL2 AAA mice could not run on a treadmill as long as wild-type mice, and did not undergo exercise-mediated increases in skeletal glucose muscle uptake. Unlike wild-type mice, the BCL2 AAA mice failed to reverse high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance after 8 weeks of exercise training, possibly due to defects in signaling pathways that regulate muscle glucose uptake and metabolism during exercise. Together, these findings suggested a hitherto unknown important role of autophagy in mediating exercise-induced metabolic benefits. In the present addendum, we show that treadmill exercise also induces autophagy in the cerebral cortex of adult mice. This observation raises the intriguing question of whether autophagy may in part mediate the beneficial effects of exercise in neurodegeneration, adult neurogenesis and improved cognitive function.

  11. Regulation of chlamydial infection by host autophagy and vacuolar ATPase-bearing organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasir, Muhammad; Pachikara, Niseema D; Bao, Xiaofeng; Pan, Zui; Fan, Huizhou

    2011-10-01

    As arguably the most successful parasite, Chlamydia is an obligate intracellular bacterium replicating inside a vacuole of eukaryotic host cells. The chlamydial vacuole does not fuse with the defense cell organelle lysosome. We previously showed that chlamydial infection increases markers of autophagy, an innate antimicrobial activity requiring lysosomal function. However, the work presented here demonstrates that p62, an autophagy protein that is degraded in lysosomes, either remained unchanged or increased in chlamydia-infected human epithelial, mouse fibroblast, and mouse macrophage cell lines. In addition, the activities of three lysosomal enzymes analyzed were diminished in chlamydia-infected macrophages. Bafilomycin A1 (BafA), a specific inhibitor of vacuolar ATPase (vATPase) required for lysosomal function, increased the growth of the human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis (L2) in wild-type murine fibroblasts and macrophages but inhibited growth in the autophagy-deficient ATG5(-/-) fibroblasts. BafA exhibited only slight inhibition or no effect on L2 growth in multiple human genital epithelial cell lines. In contrast to L2, the mouse pathogen Chlamydia muridarum (MoPn) was consistently inhibited by BafA in all cell lines examined, regardless of species origin and autophagy status. Finally, L2 but not MoPn grew more efficiently in the ATG5(-/-) cells than in wild-type cells. These results suggest that there are two types of vATPase-bearing organelles that regulate chlamydial infection: one supports chlamydial infection, while the other plays a defensive role through autophagy when cells are artificially infected with certain chlamydiae that have not been adapted to the host species.

  12. C-myb Regulates Autophagy for Pulp Vitality in Glucose Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y H; Kim, H S; Kim, J S; Yu, M K; Cho, S D; Jeon, J G; Yi, H K

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is closely related to oral-complicated diseases by oxidative stress. This study investigates whether cellular myeloblastosis (c-myb) could protect human dental pulp cells against glucose oxidative stress and regulate autophagy activity for pulp vitality. Diabetes mellitus was induced by streptozotocin in Sprague-Dawley rats, and their pulp tissue in teeth was analyzed in terms of pulp cavity and molecules by hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemistry staining. Human dental pulp cells were serially subcultured and treated with glucose oxidase in the presence of elevated glucose to generate glucose oxidative stress. The replication-deficient adenovirus c-myb and small interfering RNA c-myb were introduced for c-myb expression. The pulp tissue from the diabetic rats was structurally different from normal tissue in terms of narrow pulp capacity, reduced c-myb, and dentinogenesis molecules. Glucose oxidase treatment decreased c-myb and dentinogenesis molecules (bone morphogenetic protein 2 and 7, dentin matrix protein 1, and dentin sialophosphoprotein) in human dental pulp cells. However, overexpression of c-myb by adenovirus c-myb increased dentinogenesis, autophagy molecules (autophagy protein 5, microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3, and Beclin-1), and cell survival via p-AMPK/AKT signaling even with glucose oxidative stress. In contrast, the lack of c-myb decreased the above molecules and cell survival by downregulating p-AMPK/AKT signaling. The results indicate that diabetes leads to irreversible damage to dental pulp, which is related to downexpression of autophagy via the p-AMPK/AKT pathway by decline of c-myb. The findings of this study provide a new insight that c-myb could ameliorate autophagy activity and that it is applicable for monitoring complicated diseases of dental pulp. The involvement of c-myb in pulp pathology could serve a therapeutic target in oral-complicated diseases.

  13. The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor regulates autophagy through its interaction with Beclin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicencio, J M; Ortiz, C; Criollo, A; Jones, A W E; Kepp, O; Galluzzi, L; Joza, N; Vitale, I; Morselli, E; Tailler, M; Castedo, M; Maiuri, M C; Molgó, J; Szabadkai, G; Lavandero, S; Kroemer, G

    2009-07-01

    The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R) is a major regulator of apoptotic signaling. Through interactions with members of the Bcl-2 family of proteins, it drives calcium (Ca(2+)) transients from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to mitochondria, thereby establishing a functional and physical link between these organelles. Importantly, the IP(3)R also regulates autophagy, and in particular, its inhibition/depletion strongly induces macroautophagy. Here, we show that the IP(3)R antagonist xestospongin B induces autophagy by disrupting a molecular complex formed by the IP(3)R and Beclin 1, an interaction that is increased or inhibited by overexpression or knockdown of Bcl-2, respectively. An effect of Beclin 1 on Ca(2+) homeostasis was discarded as siRNA-mediated knockdown of Beclin 1 did not affect cytosolic or luminal ER Ca(2+) levels. Xestospongin B- or starvation-induced autophagy was inhibited by overexpression of the IP(3)R ligand-binding domain, which coimmunoprecipitated with Beclin 1. These results identify IP(3)R as a new regulator of the Beclin 1 complex that may bridge signals converging on the ER and initial phagophore formation.

  14. HSF-1 is involved in attenuating the release of inflammatory cytokines induced by LPS through regulating autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhongyi; Jiang, Bimei; Zhang, Lingli; Liu, Yanjuan; Gao, Min; Jiang, Yu; Li, Yuanbin; Lu, Qinglan; Yao, Yongming; Xiao, Xianzhong

    2014-05-01

    Autophagy plays a protective role in endotoxemic mice. Heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) also plays a crucial protective role in endotoxemic mice by decreasing inflammatory cytokines. The purpose of this study was to determine whether HSF-1 is involved in attenuating the release of inflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated mice and peritoneal macrophages (PMs) through regulating autophagy activity. Autophagosome formation in HSF-1(+/+) and HSF-1(-/-) mice and PMs stimulated by LPS was examined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Lipopolysaccharide-induced autophagy and inflammatory cytokines were examined in HSF-1(+/+) and HSF-1(-/-) PMs treated with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or rapamycin. Results showed that LPS-induced autophagy was elevated transiently at 12 h but declined at 24 h in the livers and lungs of mice. Higher levels of inflammatory cytokines and lower autophagy activity were detected in HSF-1(-/-) mice and PMs compared with HSF-1(+/+) mice and PMs. Interestingly, LPS-induced release of inflammatory cytokines did not further increase in HSF-1(-/-) PMs treated with 3-MA but aggravated in HSF-1(+/+) PMs. Lipopolysaccharide-induced autophagy did not decrease in HSF-1(-/-) PMs treated with 3-MA but decreased in HSF-1 PMs(+/+). Taken together, our results suggested that HSF-1 attenuated the release of inflammatory cytokines induced by LPS by regulating autophagy activity.

  15. miR-153 regulates apoptosis and autophagy of cardiomyocytes by targeting Mcl-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuhai; Liu, Wenting; Zhang, Jinxia; Xiang, Dingcheng

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are a class of important regulators, which are involved in the regulation of apoptosis. Oxidative stress‑induced apoptosis is the predominant factor accounting for cardiac ischemia‑reperfusion injury. miR‑153 has been previously shown to have an antitumor effect in cancer. However, whether miR‑153 is involved in oxidative stress‑induced apoptosis in the heart remains to be elucidated. To this end, the present study used reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction to detect miR-153 levels upon oxidative stress, and evaluated apoptosis, autophagy and expression of critical genes by western blotting. A luciferase assay was also used to confirm the potential target gene. In the present study, it was found that the expression of miR‑153 was significantly increased upon H2O2 stimulation, and the inhibition of endogenous miR‑153 decreased apoptosis. To further identify the mechanism underlying the pro‑apoptotic effect of miR‑153, the present study analyzed the 3'untranslated region of myeloid cell leukemia‑1 (Mcl‑1), and found that Mcl‑1 was potentially targeted by miR‑153. The forced expression of miR‑153 inhibited the expression of Mcl‑1 and luciferase activity, which was reversed by its antisense inhibitor. Furthermore, it was shown that the inhibition of miR‑153 induced autophagy during oxidative stress, and that its effects of autophagy induction and apoptosis inhibition were efficiently abrogated by Mcl‑1 small interfering RNA. In conclusion, the results of the present study elucidated a novel mechanism by which miR‑153 regulates the survival of cardimyocytes during oxidative stress through the modulation of apoptosis and autophagy. These effects may be mediated directly by targeting Mcl‑1. These finding revealed the potential clinical value of miR‑153 in the treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  16. Multiplex image-based autophagy RNAi screening identifies SMCR8 as ULK1 kinase activity and gene expression regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jennifer; Nayak, Arnab; Schaeffer, Véronique; Starzetz, Tatjana; Kirsch, Achim K; Müller, Stefan; Dikic, Ivan; Mittelbronn, Michel; Behrends, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular recycling and degradation pathway that depends on membrane trafficking. Rab GTPases are central for autophagy but their regulation especially through the activity of Rab GEFs remains largely elusive. We employed a RNAi screen simultaneously monitoring different populations of autophagosomes and identified 34 out of 186 Rab GTPase, GAP and GEF family members as potential autophagy regulators, amongst them SMCR8. SMCR8 uses overlapping binding regions to associate with C9ORF72 or with a C9ORF72-ULK1 kinase complex holo-assembly, which function in maturation and formation of autophagosomes, respectively. While focusing on the role of SMCR8 during autophagy initiation, we found that kinase activity and gene expression of ULK1 are increased upon SMCR8 depletion. The latter phenotype involved association of SMCR8 with the ULK1 gene locus. Global mRNA expression analysis revealed that SMCR8 regulates transcription of several other autophagy genes including WIPI2. Collectively, we established SMCR8 as multifaceted negative autophagy regulator. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23063.001 PMID:28195531

  17. Effector caspase Dcp-1 and IAP protein Bruce regulate starvation-induced autophagy during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ying-Chen Claire; Chittaranjan, Suganthi; Barbosa, Sharon González; McCall, Kimberly; Gorski, Sharon M

    2008-09-22

    A complex relationship exists between autophagy and apoptosis, but the regulatory mechanisms underlying their interactions are largely unknown. We conducted a systematic study of Drosophila melanogaster cell death-related genes to determine their requirement in the regulation of starvation-induced autophagy. We discovered that six cell death genes--death caspase-1 (Dcp-1), hid, Bruce, Buffy, debcl, and p53-as well as Ras-Raf-mitogen activated protein kinase signaling pathway components had a role in autophagy regulation in D. melanogaster cultured cells. During D. melanogaster oogenesis, we found that autophagy is induced at two nutrient status checkpoints: germarium and mid-oogenesis. At these two stages, the effector caspase Dcp-1 and the inhibitor of apoptosis protein Bruce function to regulate both autophagy and starvation-induced cell death. Mutations in Atg1 and Atg7 resulted in reduced DNA fragmentation in degenerating midstage egg chambers but did not appear to affect nuclear condensation, which indicates that autophagy contributes in part to cell death in the ovary. Our study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms that coordinately regulate autophagic and apoptotic events in vivo.

  18. IL-6 regulates exercise and training-induced adaptations in subcutaneous adipose tissue in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Claus; Jakobsen, Anne Hviid; Hassing, Helle Adser

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that IL-6 regulates exercise-induced gene responses in subcutaneous adipose tissue in mice. Methods: Four months old male IL-6 whole body knockout (KO) mice and C57B wild-type (WT) mice performed 1h of treadmill exercise, where subcutaneous...... adipose tissue (AT) was removed either immediately after, 4h or 10h after exercise as well as from mice not running acutely. Moreover, AT was sampled at resting conditions after 5 weeks of exercise training. Results: AT leptin mRNA decreased immediately after a single running exercise bout in both...... in regulating exercise and training-induced leptin and PPAR¿ expression in adipose tissue. In addition, while IL-6 is required for TNF-a mRNA reduction in response to acute exercise, IL-6 does not appear to be mandatory for anti-inflammatory effects of exercise training in adipose tissue....

  19. Plac8 Links Oncogenic Mutations to Regulation of Autophagy and Is Critical to Pancreatic Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conan Kinsey

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in p53 and RAS potently cooperate in oncogenic transformation, and correspondingly, these genetic alterations frequently coexist in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA and other human cancers. Previously, we identified a set of genes synergistically activated by combined RAS and p53 mutations as frequent downstream mediators of tumorigenesis. Here, we show that the synergistically activated gene Plac8 is critical for pancreatic cancer growth. Silencing of Plac8 in cell lines suppresses tumor formation by blocking autophagy, a process essential for maintaining metabolic homeostasis in PDA, and genetic inactivation in an engineered mouse model inhibits PDA progression. We show that Plac8 is a critical regulator of the autophagic machinery, localizing to the lysosomal compartment and facilitating lysosome-autophagosome fusion. Plac8 thus provides a mechanistic link between primary oncogenic mutations and the induction of autophagy, a central mechanism of metabolic reprogramming, during PDA progression.

  20. Regulation of Autophagy-Related Protein and Cell Differentiation by High Mobility Group Box 1 Protein in Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanhuan Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1 is a molecule related to the development of inflammation. Autophagy is vital to maintain cellular homeostasis and protect against inflammation of adipocyte injury. Our recent work focused on the relationship of HMGB1 and autophagy in 3T3-L1 cells. In vivo experimental results showed that, compared with the normal-diet group, the high-fat diet mice displayed an increase in adipocyte size in the epididymal adipose tissues. The expression levels of HMGB1 and LC3II also increased in epididymal adipose tissues in high-fat diet group compared to the normal-diet mice. The in vitro results indicated that HMGB1 protein treatment increased LC3II formation in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in contrast to that in the control group. Furthermore, LC3II formation was inhibited through HMGB1 knockdown by siRNA. Treatment with the HMGB1 protein enhanced LC3II expression after 2 and 4 days but decreased the expression after 8 and 10 days among various differentiation stages of adipocytes. By contrast, FABP4 expression decreased on the fourth day and increased on the eighth day. Hence, the HMGB1 protein modulated autophagy-related proteins and lipid-metabolism-related genes in adipocytes and could be a new target for treatment of obesity and related metabolic diseases.

  1. Upregulated TLR3 Promotes Neuropathic Pain by Regulating Autophagy in Rat With L5 Spinal Nerve Ligation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijia; Lu, Zhijun

    2016-12-21

    Microglia, rapidly activated following peripheral nerve injury (PNI), accumulate within the spinal cord and adopt inflammation that contributes to development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Microglia express functional Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which play pivotal roles in regulating inflammatory processes. However, little is known about the role of TLR3 in regulating neuropathic pain after PNI. Here TLR3 expression and autophagy activation was assayed in dorsal root ganglions and in microglia following PNI by using realtime PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. The role of TLR3/autophagy signaling in regulating tactile allodynia was evaluated by assaying paw mechanical withdrawal threshold and cold allodynia after intrathecal administration of Poly (I:C) and 3-methyladenine (3-MA). We found that L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) induces the expression of TLR3 in dorsal root ganglions and in primary rat microglia at the mRNA and protein level. Meanwhile, L5 SNL results in an increased activation of autophagy, which contributes to microglial activation and subsequent inflammatory response. Intrathecal administration of Poly (I:C), a TLR3 agonist, significantly increases the activation of microglial autophagy, whereas TLR3 knockdown markedly inhibits L5 SNL-induced microglial autophagy. Poly (I:C) treatment promotes the expression of proinflammatory mediators, whereas 3-MA (a specific inhibitor of autophagy) suppresses Poly (I:C)-induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Autophagy inhibition further inhibits TLR3-mediated mechanical and cold hypersensitivity following SNL. These results suggest that inhibition of TLR3/autophagy signaling contributes to alleviate neurophathic pain triggered by SNL.

  2. Regulation of brown adipose tissue by stress and sex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. van den Beukel (Anneke)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractDue to the increasing incidence of obesity, more means of treating obesity are necessary. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a potential target tissue via which obesity can be treated due to its unique ability to use energy to produce heat. Not much is known however about the mechanisms via w

  3. Ghrelin receptor regulates adipose tissue inflammation in aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging is commonly associated with low-grade adipose inflammation, which is closely linked to insulin resistance. Ghrelin is the only circulating orexigenic hormone which is known to increase obesity and insulin resistance. We previously reported that the expression of the ghrelin receptor, growth ho...

  4. Sirtuin 1 Regulates Dendritic Cell Activation and Autophagy during Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Induced Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarczyk, Anna B; Schaller, Matthew A; Reed, Michelle; Rasky, Andrew J; Lombard, David B; Lukacs, Nicholas W

    2015-08-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children worldwide. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, has been associated with the induction of autophagy and the regulation of inflammatory mediators. We found that Sirt1 was upregulated in mouse lung after RSV infection. Infected animals that received EX-527, a selective SIRT1 inhibitor, displayed exacerbated lung pathology, with increased mucus production, elevated viral load, and enhanced Th2 cytokine production. Gene expression analysis of isolated cell populations revealed that Sirt1 was most highly upregulated in RSV-treated dendritic cells (DCs). Upon RSV infection, EX-527-treated DCs, Sirt1 small interfering RNA-treated DCs, or DCs from conditional knockout (Sirt1(f/f)-CD11c-Cre(+)) mice showed downregulated inflammatory cytokine gene expression and attenuated autophagy. Finally, RSV infection of Sirt1(f/f)-CD11c-Cre(+) mice resulted in altered lung and lymph node cytokine responses, leading to exacerbated pathology. These data indicate that SIRT1 promotes DC activation associated with autophagy-mediated processes during RSV infection, thereby directing efficient antiviral immune responses.

  5. Electroacupuncture Ameliorates Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Regulation of Autophagy and Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Shi; Li, Chun-Ming; You, Yan-Li; Qian, Xiao-Lu

    2016-01-01

    Background. The therapeutic mechanisms of cerebral ischemia treatment by acupuncture are yet not well addressed. Objective. We investigated the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) at GV26 observing the expression of autophagy-related proteins Beclin-1 and LC3B and proportion of apoptotic cells and Bcl-2 positive cells in MCAO/R model rats. Methods. Sprague-Dawley (SD) male rats were randomly assigned to 7 groups: model groups (M6h, M24h, and M72h), EA treatment groups (T6h, T24h, and T72h), and sham operation group (S). Neurological deficit and cerebral infarction volume were measured to assess the improvement effect, while the expression of Beclin-1 and LC3B and proportion of Tunel-positive and Bcl-2 positive cells were examined to explore EA effect on autophagy and apoptosis. Results. EA significantly decreased neurological deficit scores and the volume of cerebral infarction. Beclin-1 was significantly decreased in T24h, while LC3B-II/LC3B-I ratio markedly reduced in 6th hour. EA groups markedly reduced the number of Tunel positive cells, especially in T24h. Meanwhile, the number of Bcl-2 positive cells obviously increased after EA treatment, especially in T6h and T24h. Conclusions. The alleviation of inadequate autophagy and apoptosis may be a key mechanism involved in the reflex regulation of EA at GV26 to treat cerebral ischemia.

  6. Hinokitiol protects primary neuron cells against prion peptide-induced toxicity via autophagy flux regulated by hypoxia inducing factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ji-Hong; Lee, Ju-Hee; Lee, You-Jin; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-05-24

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders that are derived from structural changes of the native PrPc. Recent studies indicated that hinokitiol induced autophagy known to major function that keeps cells alive under stressful conditions. We investigated whether hinokitiol induces autophagy and attenuates PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity. We observed increase of LC3-II protein level, GFP-LC3 puncta by hinokitiol in neuronal cells. Addition to, electron microscopy showed that hinokitiol enhanced autophagic vacuoles in neuronal cells. We demonstrated that hinokitiol protects against PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity via autophagy by using autophagy inhibitor, wortmannin and 3MA, and ATG5 small interfering RNA (siRNA). We checked hinokitiol activated the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and identified that hinokitiol-induced HIF-1α regulated autophagy. Taken together, this study is the first report demonstrating that hinokitiol protected against prion protein-induced neurotoxicity via autophagy regulated by HIF-1α. We suggest that hinokitiol is a possible therapeutic strategy in neuronal disorders including prion disease.

  7. A C9ORF72/SMCR8-containing complex regulates ULK1 and plays a dual role in autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei; Liang, Chen; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Herrlinger, Stephanie; Lai, Fan; Shiekhattar, Ramin; Chen, Jian-Fu

    2016-01-01

    The intronic GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) is a prevalent genetic abnormality identified in both frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Smith-Magenis syndrome chromosomal region candidate gene 8 (SMCR8) is a protein with unclear functions. We report that C9ORF72 is a component of a multiprotein complex containing SMCR8, WDR41, and ATG101 (an important regulator of autophagy). The C9ORF72 complex displays guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activity and acts as a guanosine diphosphate–guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GDP-GTP) exchange factor (GEF) for RAB39B. We created Smcr8 knockout mice and found that Smcr8 mutant cells exhibit impaired autophagy induction, which is similarly observed in C9orf72 knockdown cells. Mechanistically, SMCR8/C9ORF72 interacts with the key autophagy initiation ULK1 complex and regulates expression and activity of ULK1. The complex has an additional role in regulating later stages of autophagy. Whereas autophagic flux is enhanced in C9orf72 knockdown cells, depletion of Smcr8 results in a reduced flux with an abnormal expression of lysosomal enzymes. Thus, C9ORF72 and SMCR8 have similar functions in modulating autophagy induction by regulating ULK1 and play distinct roles in regulating autophagic flux. PMID:27617292

  8. Hormonal regulation of lipoprotein lipase in adipose tissue (studies in the rat and in humans)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G.A. Baggen (Marinus)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractCurrent data strongly suggest the most important role for insulin in the hormonal regulation of adipose tissue LPL activity. It is not clear from the literature what the role is of glucocorticoids in the regulation of the enzyme. Stress hormones as ACTH and adrenalin for example seem to

  9. Autophagy-related proteins are functionally active in human spermatozoa and may be involved in the regulation of cell survival and motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, I. M.; Espino, J.; Bejarano, I.; Gallardo-Soler, A.; Campo, M. L.; Salido, G. M.; Pariente, J. A.; Peña, F. J.; Tapia, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) is an evolutionarily highly conserved cellular process that participates in the maintenance of intracellular homeostasis through the degradation of most long-lived proteins and entire organelles. Autophagy participates in some reproductive events; however, there are not reports regarding the role of autophagy in the regulation of sperm physiology. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate whether autophagy-related proteins are present and functionally active in human spermatozoa. Proteins related to autophagy/mitophagy process (LC3, Atg5, Atg16, Beclin 1, p62, m-TOR, AMPKα 1/2, and PINK1) were present in human spermatozoa. LC3 colocalized with p62 in the middle piece of the spermatozoa. Autophagy activation induced a significant increase in motility and a decrease in PINK1, TOM20 expression and caspase 3/7 activation. In contrast, autophagy inhibition resulted in decreased motility, viability, ATP and intracellular calcium concentration whereas PINK1, TOM20 expression, AMPK phosphorylation and caspase 3/7 activation were significantly increased. In conclusion our results show that autophagy related proteins and upstream regulators are present and functional in human spermatozoa. Modification of mitochondrial proteins expression after autophagy activation/inhibition may be indicating that a specialized form of autophagy named mitophagy may be regulating sperm function such as motility and viability and may be cooperating with apoptosis. PMID:27633131

  10. GADD45A inhibits autophagy by regulating the interaction between BECN1 and PIK3C3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Zhang, Weimin; Li, Dan; Fu, Ming; Chen, Runsheng; Zhan, Qimin

    2015-01-01

    GADD45A is a TP53-regulated and DNA damage-inducible tumor suppressor protein, which regulates cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and DNA repair, and inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis. However, the function of GADD45A in autophagy remains unknown. In this report, we demonstrate that GADD45A plays an important role in regulating the process of autophagy. GADD45A is able to decrease LC3-II expression and numbers of autophagosomes in mouse tissues and different cancer cell lines. Using bafilomycin A1 treatment, we have observed that GADD45A regulates autophagosome initiation. Likely, GADD45A inhibition of autophagy is through its influence on the interaction between BECN1 and PIK3C3. Immunoprecipitation and GST affinity isolation assays exhibit that GADD45A directly interacts with BECN1, and in turn dissociates the BECN1-PIK3C3 complex. Furthermore, we have mapped the 71 to 81 amino acids of the GADD45A protein that are necessary for the GADD45A interaction with BECN1. Knockdown of BECN1 can abolish autophagy alterations induced by GADD45A. Taken together, these findings provide the novel evidence that GADD45A inhibits autophagy via impairing the BECN1-PIK3C3 complex formation.

  11. Impaired macrophage autophagy increases the immune response in obese mice by promoting proinflammatory macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kun; Zhao, Enpeng; Ilyas, Ghulam; Lalazar, Gadi; Lin, Yu; Haseeb, Muhammad; Tanaka, Kathryn E; Czaja, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence that excessive lipid accumulation can decrease cellular levels of autophagy and that autophagy regulates immune responsiveness suggested that impaired macrophage autophagy may promote the increased innate immune activation that underlies obesity. Primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and peritoneal macrophages from high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice had decreased levels of autophagic flux indicating a generalized impairment of macrophage autophagy in obese mice. To assess the effects of decreased macrophage autophagy on inflammation, mice with a Lyz2-Cre-mediated knockout of Atg5 in macrophages were fed a HFD and treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knockout mice developed systemic and hepatic inflammation with HFD feeding and LPS. This effect was liver specific as knockout mice did not have increased adipose tissue inflammation. The mechanism by which the loss of autophagy promoted inflammation was through the regulation of macrophage polarization. BMDM and Kupffer cells from knockout mice exhibited abnormalities in polarization with both increased proinflammatory M1 and decreased anti-inflammatory M2 polarization as determined by measures of genes and proteins. The heightened hepatic inflammatory response in HFD-fed, LPS-treated knockout mice led to liver injury without affecting steatosis. These findings demonstrate that autophagy has a critical regulatory function in macrophage polarization that downregulates inflammation. Defects in macrophage autophagy may underlie inflammatory disease states such as the decrease in macrophage autophagy with obesity that leads to hepatic inflammation and the progression to liver injury.

  12. Leucine Supplementation Protects from Insulin Resistance by Regulating Adiposity Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Elke; Bermúdez-Silva, Francisco J.; André, Caroline; Elie, Melissa; Romero-Zerbo, Silvana Y.; Leste-Lasserre, Thierry; Belluomo, llaria; Duchampt, Adeline; Clark, Samantha; Aubert, Agnes; Mezzullo, Marco; Fanelli, Flaminia; Pagotto, Uberto; Layé, Sophie; Mithieux, Gilles; Cota, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Background Leucine supplementation might have therapeutic potential in preventing diet-induced obesity and improving insulin sensitivity. However, the underlying mechanisms are at present unclear. Additionally, it is unclear whether leucine supplementation might be equally efficacious once obesity has developed. Methodology/Principal Findings Male C57BL/6J mice were fed chow or a high-fat diet (HFD), supplemented or not with leucine for 17 weeks. Another group of HFD-fed mice (HFD-pairfat group) was food restricted in order to reach an adiposity level comparable to that of HFD-Leu mice. Finally, a third group of mice was exposed to HFD for 12 weeks before being chronically supplemented with leucine. Leucine supplementation in HFD-fed mice decreased body weight and fat mass by increasing energy expenditure, fatty acid oxidation and locomotor activity in vivo. The decreased adiposity in HFD-Leu mice was associated with increased expression of uncoupling protein 3 (UCP-3) in the brown adipose tissue, better insulin sensitivity, increased intestinal gluconeogenesis and preservation of islets of Langerhans histomorphology and function. HFD-pairfat mice had a comparable improvement in insulin sensitivity, without changes in islets physiology or intestinal gluconeogenesis. Remarkably, both HFD-Leu and HFD-pairfat mice had decreased hepatic lipid content, which likely helped improve insulin sensitivity. In contrast, when leucine was supplemented to already obese animals, no changes in body weight, body composition or glucose metabolism were observed. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that leucine improves insulin sensitivity in HFD-fed mice by primarily decreasing adiposity, rather than directly acting on peripheral target organs. However, beneficial effects of leucine on intestinal gluconeogenesis and islets of Langerhans's physiology might help prevent type 2 diabetes development. Differently, metabolic benefit of leucine supplementation is lacking in

  13. Leucine supplementation protects from insulin resistance by regulating adiposity levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Binder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leucine supplementation might have therapeutic potential in preventing diet-induced obesity and improving insulin sensitivity. However, the underlying mechanisms are at present unclear. Additionally, it is unclear whether leucine supplementation might be equally efficacious once obesity has developed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed chow or a high-fat diet (HFD, supplemented or not with leucine for 17 weeks. Another group of HFD-fed mice (HFD-pairfat group was food restricted in order to reach an adiposity level comparable to that of HFD-Leu mice. Finally, a third group of mice was exposed to HFD for 12 weeks before being chronically supplemented with leucine. Leucine supplementation in HFD-fed mice decreased body weight and fat mass by increasing energy expenditure, fatty acid oxidation and locomotor activity in vivo. The decreased adiposity in HFD-Leu mice was associated with increased expression of uncoupling protein 3 (UCP-3 in the brown adipose tissue, better insulin sensitivity, increased intestinal gluconeogenesis and preservation of islets of Langerhans histomorphology and function. HFD-pairfat mice had a comparable improvement in insulin sensitivity, without changes in islets physiology or intestinal gluconeogenesis. Remarkably, both HFD-Leu and HFD-pairfat mice had decreased hepatic lipid content, which likely helped improve insulin sensitivity. In contrast, when leucine was supplemented to already obese animals, no changes in body weight, body composition or glucose metabolism were observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that leucine improves insulin sensitivity in HFD-fed mice by primarily decreasing adiposity, rather than directly acting on peripheral target organs. However, beneficial effects of leucine on intestinal gluconeogenesis and islets of Langerhans's physiology might help prevent type 2 diabetes development. Differently, metabolic benefit of leucine supplementation

  14. Regulation of autophagy by some natural products as a potential therapeutic strategy for cardiovascular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemzaei, Mahmoud; Entezari Heravi, Reza; Rezaee, Ramin; Roohbakhsh, Ali; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2017-02-24

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation process through which long-lived and misfolded proteins and organelles are sequestered, degraded by lysosomes, and recycled. Autophagy is an essential part of cardiomyocyte homeostasis and increases the survival of cells following cellular stress and starvation. Recent studies made clear that dysregulation of autophagy in the cardiovascular system leads to heart hypertrophy and failure. In this manner, autophagy seems to be an attractive target in the new treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Although limited activation of autophagy is generally considered to be cardioprotective, excessive autophagy leads to cell death and cardiac atrophy. Natural products such as resveratrol, berberine, and curcumin that are present in our diet, can trigger autophagy via canonical (Beclin-1-dependent) and non-canonical (Beclin-1-independent) pathways. The autophagy-modifying capacity of these compounds should be taken into consideration for designing novel therapeutic agents. This review focuses on the role of autophagy in the cardioprotective effects of these compounds.

  15. The 'selfish brain' is regulated by aquaporins and autophagy under nutrient deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qiao; Wu, Yonghong; Gao, Yan; Li, Zhihui; Li, Weiguang; Zhang, Chenggang

    2016-05-01

    The brain maintains its mass and physiological functional capacity compared with other organs under harsh conditions such as starvation, a mechanism termed the 'selfish brain' theory. To further investigate this phenomenon, mice were examined following water and/or food deprivation. Although the body weights of the mice, the weight of the organs except the brain and blood glucose levels were significantly reduced in the absence of water and/or food, the brain weight maintained its original state. Furthermore, no significant differences in the water content of the brain or its energy balance were observed when the mice were subjected to water and/or food deprivation. To further investigate the mechanism underlying the brain maintenance of water and substance homeostasis, the expression levels of aquaporins (AQPs) and autophagy‑specific protein long‑chain protein 3 (LC3) were examined. During the process of water and food deprivation, no significant differences in the transcriptional levels of AQPs were observed. However, autophagy activity levels were initially stimulated, then suppressed in a time‑dependent manner. LC3 and AQPs have important roles for the survival of the brain under conditions of food and water deprivation, which provided further understanding of the mechanism underlying the 'selfish brain' phenomenon. Although not involved in the energy regulation of the 'selfish brain', AQPs were observed to have important roles in water and food deprivation, specifically with regards to the control of water content. Additionally, the brain exhibits an 'unselfish strategy' using autophagy during water and/or food deprivation. The present study furthered current understanding of the 'selfish brain' theory, and identified additional regulating target genes of AQPs and autophagy, with the aim of providing a basis for the prevention of nutrient shortage in humans and animals.

  16. b-Series gangliosides crucially regulate leptin secretion in adipose tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shuting; Ohkawa, Yuki; Tokizane, Kyohei; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Banno, Ryoichi; Furukawa, Keiko; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Koichi

    2015-04-01

    Gangliosides are widely involved in the regulation of cells and organs. However, little is known about their roles in leptin secretion from adipose tissues. Genetic deletion of b-series gangliosides resulted in the marked reduction of serum leptin. Expression analysis of leptin revealed that leptin accumulated in the adipose tissues of GD3 synthase-knockout (GD3S KO) mice. Analysis of primary cultured stromal vascular fractions (SVF) derived from GD3S KO mice revealed that leptin secretion was reduced, although leptin amounts in cells were increased compared with those of wild type. Interestingly, addition of b-series gangliosides to the culture medium of differentiated SVF resulted in the restoration of leptin secretion. Results of methyl-β-cyclodextrin treatment of differentiated 3T3-L1 cells as well as immunocytostaining of leptin and caveolin-1 suggested that b-series gangliosides regulate the leptin secretion from adipose tissues in lipid rafts.

  17. The adaptive immune system as a fundamental regulator of adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, Shawn; Winer, Daniel A

    2012-09-01

    Over the past decade, chronic inflammation in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) has gained acceptance as a lead promoter of insulin resistance in obesity. A great deal of evidence has pointed to the role of adipokines and innate immune cells, in particular, adipose tissue macrophages, in the regulation of fat inflammation and glucose homeostasis. However, more recently, cells of the adaptive immune system, specifically B and T lymphocytes, have emerged as unexpected promoters and controllers of insulin resistance. These adaptive immune cells infiltrate obesity expanded VAT and through cytokine secretion and macrophage modulation dictate the extent of the local inflammatory response, thereby directly impacting insulin resistance. The remarkable ability of our adaptive immune system to regulate insulin sensitivity and metabolism has unmasked a novel physiological function of this system, and promises new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to manage the disease. This review highlights critical roles of adipose tissue lymphocytes in governing glucose homeostasis.

  18. Dissecting adipose tissue lipolysis: molecular regulation and implications for metabolic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Svava; Jessen, Niels; Jørgensen, Jens Otto L;

    2014-01-01

    is tightly regulated by hormonal and nutritional factors. Under conditions of negative energy balance such as fasting and exercise, stimulation of lipolysis results in a profound increase in FFA release from adipose tissue. This response is crucial in order to provide the organism with a sufficient supply......Lipolysis is the process by which triglycerides are hydrolyzed to free fatty acids (FFA) and glycerol. In adipocytes, this is achieved by the sequential action of Adipose Triglyceride Lipase (ATGL), Hormone Sensitive Lipase (HSL) and Monoglyceride Lipase (MGL). The activity in the lipolytic pathway...... localization, protein-protein interactions, and protein stability/degradation. Here, we provide an overview of the recent advances in the field of adipose tissue lipolysis with particular focus on the molecular regulation of the two main lipases, ATGL and HSL and the intracellular and extracellular signals...

  19. Adipose Genes Down-Regulated During Experimental Endotoxemia Are Also Suppressed in Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Christine C.; Haris, Lalarukh; Shah, Rhia; Mehta, Nehal N.; Putt, Mary E.; Reilly, Muredach P.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Adipose inflammation is a crucial link between obesity and its metabolic complications. Human experimental endotoxemia is a controlled model for the study of inflammatory cardiometabolic responses in vivo. Objective: We hypothesized that adipose genes down-regulated during endotoxemia would approximate changes observed with obesity-related inflammation and reveal novel candidates in cardiometabolic disease. Design, Subjects, and Intervention: Healthy volunteers (n = 14) underwent a 3 ng/kg endotoxin challenge; adipose biopsies were taken at 0, 4, 12, and 24 h for mRNA microarray. A priority list of highly down-regulated and biologically relevant genes was validated by RT-PCR in an independent sample of adipose from healthy subjects (n = 7) undergoing a subclinical 0.6 ng/kg endotoxemia protocol. Expression of validated genes was screened in adipose of lean and severely obese individuals (n = 11 per group), and cellular source was probed in cultured adipocytes and macrophages. Results: Endotoxemia (3 ng/kg) suppressed expression of 353 genes (to <67% of baseline; P < 1 × 10−5) of which 68 candidates were prioritized for validation. In low-dose (0.6 ng/kg) endotoxin validation, 22 (32%) of these 68 genes were confirmed. Functional classification revealed that many of these genes are involved in cell development and differentiation. Of validated genes, 59% (13 of 22) were down-regulated more than 1.5-fold in primary human adipocytes after treatment with endotoxin. In human macrophages, 59% (13 of 22) were up-regulated during differentiation to inflammatory M1 macrophages whereas 64% (14 of 22) were down-regulated during transition to homeostatic M2 macrophages. Finally, in obese vs. lean adipose, 91% (20 of 22) tended to have reduced expression (χ2 = 10.72, P < 0.01) with 50% (11 of 22) reaching P < 0.05 (χ2 = 9.28, P < 0.01). Conclusions: Exploration of down-regulated mRNA in adipose during human endotoxemia revealed suppression of genes involved in

  20. Doxorubicin Regulates Autophagy Signals via Accumulation of Cytosolic Ca2+ in Human Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hye Park

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin (DOXO is widely used to treat solid tumors. However, its clinical use is limited by side effects including serious cardiotoxicity due to cardiomyocyte damage. Resident cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs act as key regulators of homeostasis in myocardial cells. However, little is known about the function of hCPCs in DOXO-induced cardiotoxicity. In this study, we found that DOXO-mediated hCPC toxicity is closely related to calcium-related autophagy signaling and was significantly attenuated by blocking mTOR signaling in human hCPCs. DOXO induced hCPC apoptosis with reduction of SMP30 (regucalcin and autophagosome marker LC3, as well as remarkable induction of the autophagy-related markers, Beclin-1, APG7, and P62/SQSTM1 and induction of calcium-related molecules, CaM (Calmodulin and CaMKII (Calmodulin kinase II. The results of an LC3 puncta assay further indicated that DOXO reduced autophagosome formation via accumulation of cytosolic Ca2+. Additionally, DOXO significantly induced mTOR expression in hCPCs, and inhibition of mTOR signaling by rapamycin, a specific inhibitor, rescued DOXO-mediated autophagosome depletion in hCPCs with significant reduction of DOXO-mediated cytosolic Ca2+ accumulation in hCPCs, and restored SMP30 and mTOR expression. Thus, DOXO-mediated hCPC toxicity is linked to Ca2+-related autophagy signaling, and inhibition of mTOR signaling may provide a cardio-protective effect against DOXO-mediated hCPC toxicity.

  1. Doxorubicin Regulates Autophagy Signals via Accumulation of Cytosolic Ca2+ in Human Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Hye; Choi, Sung Hyun; Kim, Hyungtae; Ji, Seung Taek; Jang, Woong Bi; Kim, Jae Ho; Baek, Sang Hong; Kwon, Sang Mo

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOXO) is widely used to treat solid tumors. However, its clinical use is limited by side effects including serious cardiotoxicity due to cardiomyocyte damage. Resident cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) act as key regulators of homeostasis in myocardial cells. However, little is known about the function of hCPCs in DOXO-induced cardiotoxicity. In this study, we found that DOXO-mediated hCPC toxicity is closely related to calcium-related autophagy signaling and was significantly attenuated by blocking mTOR signaling in human hCPCs. DOXO induced hCPC apoptosis with reduction of SMP30 (regucalcin) and autophagosome marker LC3, as well as remarkable induction of the autophagy-related markers, Beclin-1, APG7, and P62/SQSTM1 and induction of calcium-related molecules, CaM (Calmodulin) and CaMKII (Calmodulin kinase II). The results of an LC3 puncta assay further indicated that DOXO reduced autophagosome formation via accumulation of cytosolic Ca2+. Additionally, DOXO significantly induced mTOR expression in hCPCs, and inhibition of mTOR signaling by rapamycin, a specific inhibitor, rescued DOXO-mediated autophagosome depletion in hCPCs with significant reduction of DOXO-mediated cytosolic Ca2+ accumulation in hCPCs, and restored SMP30 and mTOR expression. Thus, DOXO-mediated hCPC toxicity is linked to Ca2+-related autophagy signaling, and inhibition of mTOR signaling may provide a cardio-protective effect against DOXO-mediated hCPC toxicity. PMID:27735842

  2. TOR complex 2-Ypk1 signaling is an essential positive regulator of the general amino acid control response and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Graef, Martin; Nunnari, Jodi; Powers, Ted

    2014-07-22

    The highly conserved Target of Rapamycin (TOR) kinase is a central regulator of cell growth and metabolism in response to nutrient availability. TOR functions in two structurally and functionally distinct complexes, TOR Complex 1 (TORC1) and TOR Complex 2 (TORC2). Through TORC1, TOR negatively regulates autophagy, a conserved process that functions in quality control and cellular homeostasis and, in this capacity, is part of an adaptive nutrient deprivation response. Here we demonstrate that during amino acid starvation TOR also operates independently as a positive regulator of autophagy through the conserved TORC2 and its downstream target protein kinase, Ypk1. Under these conditions, TORC2-Ypk1 signaling negatively regulates the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, to enable the activation of the amino acid-sensing eIF2α kinase, Gcn2, and to promote autophagy. Our work reveals that the TORC2 pathway regulates autophagy in an opposing manner to TORC1 to provide a tunable response to cellular metabolic status.

  3. Oxygen-glucose deprivation regulates BACE1 expression through induction of autophagy in Neuro-2a/APP695 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-fu Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous findings have demonstrated that autophagy regulation can alleviate the decline of learning and memory by eliminating deposition of extracellular beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ in the brain after stroke, but the exact mechanism is unclear. It is presumed that the regulation of beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1, the rate-limiting enzyme in metabolism of Aβ, would be a key site. Neuro-2a/amyloid precursor protein 695 (APP695 cell models of cerebral ischemia were established by oxygen-glucose deprivation to investigate the effects of Rapamycin (an autophagy inducer or 3-methyladenine (an autophagy inhibitor on the expression of BACE1. Either oxygen-glucose deprivation or Rapamycin down-regulated the expression of BACE1 while 3-methyladenine up-regulated BACE1 expression. These results confirm that oxygen-glucose deprivation down-regulates BACE1 expression in Neuro-2a/APP695 cells through the introduction of autophagy.

  4. Oxygen-glucose deprivation regulates BACE1 expression through induction of autophagy in Neuro-2a/APP695 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-fu Chen; Xiao-jiang Sun; Ting Zhang; Yin-yi Sun; Ya-meng Sun; Wen-qi Chen; Nan Shi; Fang Shen; Yan Zhang; Kang-yong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Our previous ifndings have demonstrated that autophagy regulation can alleviate the decline of learning and memory by eliminating deposition of extracellular beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in the brain after stroke, but the exact mechanism is unclear. It is presumed that the regulation of beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), the rate-limiting enzyme in metabolism of Aβ, would be a key site. Neuro-2a/amyloid precursor protein 695 (APP695) cell models of cerebral isch-emia were established by oxygen-glucose deprivation to investigate the effects of Rapamycin (an autophagy inducer) or 3-methyladenine (an autophagy inhibitor) on the expression of BACE1. Either oxygen-glucose deprivation or Rapamycin down-regulated the expression of BACE1 while 3-methyladenine up-regulated BACE1 expression. These results confirm that oxygen-glucose deprivation down-regulates BACE1 expression in Neuro-2a/APP695 cells through the introduc-tion of autophagy.

  5. Physical activity and exercise in the regulation of human adipose tissue physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Dylan; Karpe, Fredrik; Lafontan, Max; Frayn, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Physical activity and exercise are key components of energy expenditure and therefore of energy balance. Changes in energy balance alter fat mass. It is therefore reasonable to ask: What are the links between physical activity and adipose tissue function? There are many complexities. Physical activity is a multifaceted behavior of which exercise is just one component. Physical activity influences adipose tissue both acutely and in the longer term. A single bout of exercise stimulates adipose tissue blood flow and fat mobilization, resulting in delivery of fatty acids to skeletal muscles at a rate well-matched to metabolic requirements, except perhaps in vigorous intensity exercise. The stimuli include adrenergic and other circulating factors. There is a period following an exercise bout when fatty acids are directed away from adipose tissue to other tissues such as skeletal muscle, reducing dietary fat storage in adipose. With chronic exercise (training), there are changes in adipose tissue physiology, particularly an enhanced fat mobilization during acute exercise. It is difficult, however, to distinguish chronic "structural" changes from those associated with the last exercise bout. In addition, it is difficult to distinguish between the effects of training per se and negative energy balance. Epidemiological observations support the idea that physically active people have relatively low fat mass, and intervention studies tend to show that exercise training reduces fat mass. A much-discussed effect of exercise versus calorie restriction in preferentially reducing visceral fat is not borne out by meta-analyses. We conclude that, in addition to the regulation of fat mass, physical activity may contribute to metabolic health through beneficial dynamic changes within adipose tissue in response to each activity bout.

  6. Intrinsic regulation of blood flow in adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; Nielsen, Steen Levin; Paaske, W

    1976-01-01

    Previous studies on intact human subcutaneous tissue have shown, that blood flow remains constant during minor changes in perfusion pressure. This so-called autoregulatory response has not been demonstrable in isolated preparations of adipose tissue. In the present study on isolated, denervated...... subcutaneous tissue in female rabbits only 2 of 12 expts. revealed an autoregulatory response during reduction in arterial perfusion pressure. Effluent blood flow from the tissue in the control state was 15.5 ml/100 g-min (S.D. 6.4, n = 12) corresponding to slight vasodilatation of the exposed tissue....... Following total ischemia all experiments showed a period with reactive hyperemia, and both duration of hyperemia and excess flow was related to the duration of the ischemia. This response therefore seems more resistant to the experimental procedure, while autoregulation of blood flow to lowered pressure...

  7. Regulation of protein synthesis and autophagy in activated dendritic cells: implications for antigen processing and presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello, Rafael J; Reverendo, Marisa; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Antigenic peptides presented in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules originate from the degradation of both self and non-self proteins. T cells can therefore recognize at the surface of surveyed cells, the self-peptidome produced by the cell itself (mostly inducing tolerance) or immunogenic peptides derived from exogenous origins. The initiation of adaptive immune responses by dendritic cells (DCs), through the antigenic priming of naïve T cells, is associated to microbial pattern recognition receptors engagement. Activation of DCs by microbial product or inflammatory cytokines initiates multiple processes that maximize DC capacity to present exogenous antigens and stimulate T cells by affecting major metabolic and membrane traffic pathways. These include the modulation of protein synthesis, the regulation of MHC and co-stimulatory molecules transport, as well as the regulation of autophagy, that, all together promote exogenous antigen presentation while limiting the display of self-antigens by MHC molecules.

  8. MicroRNA regulation of adipose derived stem cells in aging rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Fei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Perturbations in abdominal fat secreted adipokines play a key role in metabolic syndrome. This process is further altered during the aging process, probably due to alterations in the preadipocytes (aka. stromal vascular fraction cells-SVF cells or adipose derived stem cells-ASCs composition and/or function. Since microRNAs regulate genes involved both in development and aging processes, we hypothesized that the impaired adipose function with aging is due to altered microRNA regulation of adipogenic pathways in SVF cells. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Alterations in mRNA and proteins associated with adipogenic differentiation (ERK5 and PPARg but not osteogenic (RUNX2 pathways were observed in SVF cells isolated from visceral adipose tissue with aging (6 to 30 mo in female Fischer 344 x Brown Norway Hybrid (FBN rats. The impaired differentiation capacity with aging correlated with altered levels of miRNAs involved in adipocyte differentiation (miRNA-143 and osteogenic pathways (miRNA-204. Gain and loss of function studies using premir or antagomir-143 validated the age associated adipocyte dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Our studies for the first time indicate a role for miRNA mediated regulation of SVF cells with aging. This discovery is important in the light of the findings that dysfunctional adipose derived stem cells contribute to age related chronic diseases.

  9. TORC1 Inhibits GSK3-Mediated Elo2 Phosphorylation to Regulate Very Long Chain Fatty Acid Synthesis and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Zimmermann

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs are essential fatty acids with multiple functions, including ceramide synthesis. Although the components of the VLCFA biosynthetic machinery have been elucidated, how their activity is regulated to meet the cell’s metabolic demand remains unknown. The goal of this study was to identify mechanisms that regulate the rate of VLCFA synthesis, and we discovered that the fatty acid elongase Elo2 is regulated by phosphorylation. Elo2 phosphorylation is induced upon inhibition of TORC1 and requires GSK3. Expression of nonphosphorylatable Elo2 profoundly alters the ceramide spectrum, reflecting aberrant VLCFA synthesis. Furthermore, VLCFA depletion results in constitutive activation of autophagy, which requires sphingoid base phosphorylation. This constitutive activation of autophagy diminishes cell survival, indicating that VLCFAs serve to dampen the amplitude of autophagy. Together, our data reveal a function for TORC1 and GSK3 in the regulation of VLCFA synthesis that has important implications for autophagy and cell homeostasis.

  10. Roles and regulation of autophagy and apoptosis in the remodelling of the lepidopteran midgut epithelium during metamorphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, Davide; Casartelli, Morena; Cappellozza, Silvia; de Eguileor, Magda; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2016-09-01

    We previously showed that autophagy and apoptosis occur in the removal of the lepidopteran larval midgut during metamorphosis. However, their roles in this context and the molecular pathways underlying their activation and regulation were only hypothesized. The results of the present study better clarify the timing of the activation of these two processes: autophagic and apoptotic genes are transcribed at the beginning of metamorphosis, but apoptosis intervenes after autophagy. To investigate the mechanisms that promote the activation of autophagy and apoptosis, we designed a set of experiments based on injections of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). Our data demonstrate that autophagy is induced at the end of the last larval stage by the 20E commitment peak, while the onset of apoptosis occurs concomitantly with the 20E metamorphic peak. By impairing autophagic flux, the midgut epithelium degenerated faster, and higher caspase activity was observed compared to controls, whereas inhibiting caspase activation caused a severe delay in epithelial degeneration. Our data demonstrate that autophagy plays a pro-survival function in the silkworm midgut during metamorphosis, while apoptosis is the major process that drives the demise of the epithelium. The evidence collected in this study seems to exclude the occurrence of autophagic cell death in this setting.

  11. Roles and regulation of autophagy and apoptosis in the remodelling of the lepidopteran midgut epithelium during metamorphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, Davide; Casartelli, Morena; Cappellozza, Silvia; de Eguileor, Magda; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed that autophagy and apoptosis occur in the removal of the lepidopteran larval midgut during metamorphosis. However, their roles in this context and the molecular pathways underlying their activation and regulation were only hypothesized. The results of the present study better clarify the timing of the activation of these two processes: autophagic and apoptotic genes are transcribed at the beginning of metamorphosis, but apoptosis intervenes after autophagy. To investigate the mechanisms that promote the activation of autophagy and apoptosis, we designed a set of experiments based on injections of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). Our data demonstrate that autophagy is induced at the end of the last larval stage by the 20E commitment peak, while the onset of apoptosis occurs concomitantly with the 20E metamorphic peak. By impairing autophagic flux, the midgut epithelium degenerated faster, and higher caspase activity was observed compared to controls, whereas inhibiting caspase activation caused a severe delay in epithelial degeneration. Our data demonstrate that autophagy plays a pro-survival function in the silkworm midgut during metamorphosis, while apoptosis is the major process that drives the demise of the epithelium. The evidence collected in this study seems to exclude the occurrence of autophagic cell death in this setting. PMID:27609527

  12. Autophagy counteracts apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells exposed to oridonin in vitro via regulating intracellular ROS and SIRT1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong ZENG; Yan CHEN; Shuai ZHAO; Guo-hui CUI

    2012-01-01

    To explore the mechanisms underlying the oridonin-induced apoptosis and autophagy in human multiple myeloma cells in vitro.Methods:Human multiple myeloma RPMI8266 cells were used.The cell viability was assessed using MTT assay.Morphological changes of apoptosis and autophagy were observed under transmission electron microscope.TUNEL and annexin V-FITC/PI dual staining assays were used to measure apoptosis.Autophagy was analyzed using Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining with a QDs605 nm-Anti-LC3 fluorescent probe.Intracellular ROS was estimated with flow cytometry using DCFH-DA fluorescent probe.Protein levels of active caspase 3,Beclin 1 and SIRT1 were determined with Western blot analysis.Results:Exposure to oridonin (1-64 μmol/L) inhibited the proliferation of RPMI8266 cells in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 6.74 μmol/L.Exposure to oridonin (7 μmol/L) simultaneously induced caspase 3-mediated apoptosis and Beclin 1-dependent autophagy of RPMI8266 cells.Both the apoptosis and autophagy were time-dependent,and apoptosis was the main effector pathway of cell death.Exposure to oridonin (7 μmol/L) increased intracellular ROS and reduced SIRT1 nuclear protein in a time-dependent manner.The blockade of intracellular generation of ROS by NAC (5 mmol/L) abrogated apoptosis,autophagy and the decrease of SIRT1 in the cells exposed to oridonin (7 μmol/L).The inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA (5 mmol/L) sensitized the cells to oridonin-induced apoptosis,which was accompanied by increased intracellular ROS and decreased SlRT1.Conclusion:Oridonin simultaneously induces apoptosis and autophagy of human multiple myeloma RPMI8266 cells via regulation of intracellular ROS generation and SIRT1 nuclear protein.The cytotoxicity of oridonin is mainly mediated through the apoptotic pathway,whereas the autophagy protects the cells from apoptosis.

  13. GAIP interacting protein C-terminus regulates autophagy and exosome biogenesis of pancreatic cancer through metabolic pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu Bhattacharya

    Full Text Available GAIP interacting protein C terminus (GIPC is known to play an important role in a variety of physiological and disease states. In the present study, we have identified a novel role for GIPC as a master regulator of autophagy and the exocytotic pathways in cancer. We show that depletion of GIPC-induced autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells, as evident from the upregulation of the autophagy marker LC3II. We further report that GIPC regulates cellular trafficking pathways by modulating the secretion, biogenesis, and molecular composition of exosomes. We also identified the involvement of GIPC on metabolic stress pathways regulating autophagy and microvesicular shedding, and observed that GIPC status determines the loading of cellular cargo in the exosome. Furthermore, we have shown the overexpression of the drug resistance gene ABCG2 in exosomes from GIPC-depleted pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrated that depletion of GIPC from cancer cells sensitized them to gemcitabine treatment, an avenue that can be explored as a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer.

  14. Autophagy Regulates the Post-Translational Cleavage of BCL-2 and Promotes Neuronal Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Lossi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available B-cell lymphoma 2 protein (BCL-2 is one of the more widely investigated anti-apoptotic protein in mammals, and its levels are critical for protecting from programmed cell death. We report here that the cellular content of BCL-2 is regulated at post-translational level along the autophagy/lysosome pathways in organotypic cultures of post-natal mouse cerebellar cortex. Specifically this mechanism appears to be effective in the cerebellar granule cells (CGCs that are known to undergo massive programmed cell death (apoptosis during post-natal maturation. By the use of specific agonists/antagonist of calcium channels at the endoplasmic reticulum it was possible to understand the pivotal role of calcium release from intracellular stores in CGC neuroprotection. The more general significance of these findings is supported by a very recent study Niemann-Pick transgenic mice.

  15. TORC1 Inhibits GSK3-Mediated Elo2 Phosphorylation to Regulate Very Long Chain Fatty Acid Synthesis and Autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Christine; Santos, Aline; Gable, Kenneth;

    2013-01-01

    Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) are essential fatty acids with multiple functions, including ceramide synthesis. Although the components of the VLCFA biosynthetic machinery have been elucidated, how their activity is regulated to meet the cell's metabolic demand remains unknown. The goal...... of this study was to identify mechanisms that regulate the rate of VLCFA synthesis, and we discovered that the fatty acid elongase Elo2 is regulated by phosphorylation. Elo2 phosphorylation is induced upon inhibition of TORC1 and requires GSK3. Expression of nonphosphorylatable Elo2 profoundly alters...... of autophagy. Together, our data reveal a function for TORC1 and GSK3 in the regulation of VLCFA synthesis that has important implications for autophagy and cell homeostasis....

  16. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Protein BAG3 Negatively Regulates Ebola and Marburg VP40-Mediated Egress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jingjing; Sagum, Cari A.; Bedford, Mark T.; Sudol, Marius; Han, Ziying

    2017-01-01

    Ebola (EBOV) and Marburg (MARV) viruses are members of the Filoviridae family which cause outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever. The filovirus VP40 matrix protein is essential for virus assembly and budding, and its PPxY L-domain motif interacts with WW-domains of specific host proteins, such as Nedd4 and ITCH, to facilitate the late stage of virus-cell separation. To identify additional WW-domain-bearing host proteins that interact with VP40, we used an EBOV PPxY-containing peptide to screen an array of 115 mammalian WW-domain-bearing proteins. Using this unbiased approach, we identified BCL2 Associated Athanogene 3 (BAG3), a member of the BAG family of molecular chaperone proteins, as a specific VP40 PPxY interactor. Here, we demonstrate that the WW-domain of BAG3 interacts with the PPxY motif of both EBOV and MARV VP40 and, unexpectedly, inhibits budding of both eVP40 and mVP40 virus-like particles (VLPs), as well as infectious VSV-EBOV recombinants. BAG3 is a stress induced protein that regulates cellular protein homeostasis and cell survival through chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Interestingly, our results show that BAG3 alters the intracellular localization of VP40 by sequestering VP40 away from the plasma membrane. As BAG3 is the first WW-domain interactor identified that negatively regulates budding of VP40 VLPs and infectious virus, we propose that the chaperone-mediated autophagy function of BAG3 represents a specific host defense strategy to counteract the function of VP40 in promoting efficient egress and spread of virus particles. PMID:28076420

  17. Polydatin regulates proliferation, apoptosis and autophagy in multiple myeloma cells through mTOR/p70s6k pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baojun; Zhao, Shunxin

    2017-01-01

    Background Polydatin (PD) plays an important role in suppressing platelet aggregation, reducing blood lipid, restoring microcirculation and protecting from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury and shock. In addition, PD possesses anticancer activity. However, the effect and the mechanism of PD in regulating multiple myeloma (MM) cell survival and death are still unknown. Methods Cell proliferation and apoptosis of RPMI 8226 cells, respectively, were analyzed by cell counting kit8 (CCK-8) assay and flow cytometry. The levels of caspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, caspase-9, cleaved caspase-9, Bcl-2 and Bax were analyzed by Western blot. Autophagy induced by PD was investigated by detecting the levels of Beclin 1, Atg5, LC3I, LC3II, HSP70 and HSP27. The autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA), mTOR/p70s6k inhibitor rapamycin, and mTOR activator MHY1485 were used to analyze the mechanism of cell proliferation, apoptosis and autophagy influenced by PD. The phosphorylations of mTOR and p70s6k were detected by Western blot. Results A gradual decrease in cell proliferation of RPMI 8226 cells was observed with an increase in PD concentrations (Pcell apoptosis and autophagy in a concentration-dependent manner. Both 3-MA and MHY1485 reversed the inhibitory effect of PD on cell proliferation and attenuated the positive effect of PD on cell apoptosis and autophagy. The phosphorylation of mTOR and p70s6k was significantly suppressed by PD (Pcell viability (Pcell proliferation and induced apoptosis and autophagy of MM cells via the mTOR/p70s6k signaling pathway in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro, indicating that PD could be a potential anticancer drug for MM therapy.

  18. Autophagy down regulates pro-inflammatory mediators in BV2 microglial cells and rescues both LPS and alpha-synuclein induced neuronal cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussi, Claudio; Ramos, Javier Maria Peralta; Arroyo, Daniela S.; Gaviglio, Emilia A.; Gallea, Jose Ignacio; Wang, Ji Ming; Celej, Maria Soledad; Iribarren, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a fundamental cellular homeostatic mechanism, whereby cells autodigest parts of their cytoplasm for removal or turnover. Neurodegenerative disorders are associated with autophagy dysregulation, and drugs modulating autophagy have been successful in several animal models. Microglial cells are phagocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) that become activated in pathological conditions and determine the fate of other neural cells. Here, we studied the effects of autophagy on the production of pro-inflammatory molecules in microglial cells and their effects on neuronal cells. We observed that both trehalose and rapamycin activate autophagy in BV2 microglial cells and down-regulate the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO), in response to LPS and alpha-synuclein. Autophagy also modulated the phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPKs in BV2 cells, which was required for NO production. These actions of autophagy modified the impact of microglial activation on neuronal cells, leading to suppression of neurotoxicity. Our results demonstrate a novel role for autophagy in the regulation of microglial cell activation and pro-inflammatory molecule secretion, which may be important for the control of inflammatory responses in the CNS and neurotoxicity. PMID:28256519

  19. Regulation of HSL serine phosphorylation in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Matthew J; Holmes, Anna G; Pinnamaneni, Srijan K; Garnham, Andrew P; Steinberg, Gregory R; Kemp, Bruce E; Febbraio, Mark A

    2006-03-01

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) is important for the degradation of triacylglycerol in adipose and muscle tissue, but the tissue-specific regulation of this enzyme is not fully understood. We investigated the effects of adrenergic stimulation and AMPK activation in vitro and in circumstances where AMPK activity and catecholamines are physiologically elevated in humans in vivo (during physical exercise) on HSL activity and phosphorylation at Ser(563) and Ser(660), the PKA regulatory sites, and Ser(565), the AMPK regulatory site. In human experiments, skeletal muscle, subcutaneous adipose and venous blood samples were obtained before, at 15 and 90 min during, and 120 min after exercise. Skeletal muscle HSL activity was increased by approximately 80% at 15 min compared with rest and returned to resting rates at the cessation of and 120 min after exercise. Consistent with changes in plasma epinephrine, skeletal muscle HSL Ser(563) and Ser(660) phosphorylation were increased by 27% at 15 min (P HSL Ser(565) phosphorylation and AMPK signaling were increased at 90 min during, and after, exercise. Phosphorylation of adipose tissue HSL paralleled changes in skeletal muscle in vivo, except HSL Ser(660) was elevated 80% in adipose compared with 35% in skeletal muscle during exercise. Studies in L6 myotubes and 3T3-L1 adipocytes revealed important tissue differences in the regulation of HSL. AMPK inhibited epinephrine-induced HSL activity in L6 myotubes and was associated with reduced HSL Ser(660) but not Ser(563) phosphorylation. HSL activity was reduced in L6 myotubes expressing constitutively active AMPK, confirming the inhibitory effects of AMPK on HSL activity. Conversely, in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, AMPK activation after epinephrine stimulation did not prevent HSL activity or glycerol release, which coincided with maintenance of HSL Ser(660) phosphorylation. Taken together, these data indicate that HSL activity is maintained in the face of AMPK activation as a result of

  20. 4E-BP1 regulates the differentiation of white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Katsume, Asao; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Saito, Masayuki; Kohara, Michinori

    2013-07-01

    4E Binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) suppresses translation initiation. The absence of 4E-BP1 drastically reduces the amount of adipose tissue in mice. To address the role of 4E-BP1 in adipocyte differentiation, we characterized 4E-BP1(-/-) mice in this study. The lack of 4E-BP1 decreased the amount of white adipose tissue and increased the amount of brown adipose tissue. In 4E-BP1(-/-) MEF cells, PPARγ coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) expression increased and exogenous 4E-BP1 expression suppressed PGC-1α expression. The level of 4E-BP1 expression was higher in white adipocytes than in brown adipocytes and showed significantly greater up-regulation in white adipocytes than in brown adipocytes during preadipocyte differentiation into mature adipocytes. The amount of PGC-1α was consistently higher in HB cells (a brown preadipocyte cell line) than in HW cells (a white preadipocyte cell line) during differentiation. Moreover, the ectopic over-expression of 4E-BP1 suppressed PGC-1α expression in white adipocytes, but not in brown adipocytes. Thus, the results of our study indicate that 4E-BP1 may suppress brown adipocyte differentiation and PGC-1α expression in white adipose tissues.

  1. The regulation of HSL and LPL expression by DHT and flutamide in human subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L A; McTernan, P G; Harte, A L; Barnett, A H; Kumar, S

    2002-05-01

    Clinical observations suggest a role for testosterone in the accumulation of central adiposity and with an associated increased risk of disease. To date, no human study has analysed the role of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on adipose tissue mass regulation in vitro. This study investigated the role of DHT and androgen receptors (AR) in the regulation of lipolysis and lipogenesis by examining the key enzymes hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) respectively. Isolated abdominal subcutaneous adipocytes (Scad) (n = 15) were treated with either DHT (10(-7)-10(-9) m), an antiandrogen, flutamide (FLT: 10(-7)-10(-9) m) or a combination of DHT (10(-7)-10(-9) m) with FLT (10(-8) m). Relative protein expression of HSL, LPL and AR was determined. In Scad, DHT inhibited HSL expression maximally at 10(-9) m (0.7 +/- 0.4**; p HSL expression data. LPL expression was reduced at all doses with combinations of DHT + FLT compared with DHT alone. Androgen receptor expression studies showed an inverse correlation with DHT, whereas DHT + FLT reduced AR expression. These studies indicate that DHT may alter HSL and LPL expression, whereas only LPL expression appears mediated by AR. These findings suggest a physiological role for DHT in the control of adipose tissue mass in women, and indicate that androgens may also play an important role in regulating lipid metabolism.

  2. Epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG) regulates autophagy in human retinal pigment epithelial cells: A potential role for reducing UVB light-induced retinal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chao-Peng; Yao, Jin; Tao, Zhi-Fu; Li, Xiu-Miao; Jiang, Qin, E-mail: jqin710@vip.sina.com; Yan, Biao, E-mail: yanbiao1982@hotmail.com

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •UVB irradiation induces RPE autophagy. •EGCG treatment represses UVB-mediated autophagy. •EGCG regulates UVB-mediated autophagy through mTOR signaling pathway. •EGCG sensitizes RPE cells to UVB-induced damage in an autophagy-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process involved in protein and organelle degradation via the lysosomal pathway that has been linked in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). UVB irradiation-mediated degeneration of the macular retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is an important hallmark of AMD, which is along with the change in RPE autophagy. Thus, pharmacological manipulation of RPE autophagy may offer an alternative therapeutic target in AMD. Here, we found that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenolic compound from green tea, plays a regulatory role in UVB irradiation-induced autophagy in RPE cells. UVB irradiation results in a marked increase in the amount of LC3-II protein in a dose-dependent manner. EGCG administration leads to a significant reduction in the formation of LC3-II and autophagosomes. mTOR signaling activation is required for EGCG-induced LC3-II formation, as evidenced by the fact that EGCG-induced LC3-II formation is significantly impaired by rapamycin administration. Moreover, EGCG significantly alleviates the toxic effects of UVB irradiation on RPE cells in an autophagy-dependent manner. Collectively, our study reveals a novel role of EGCG in RPE autophagy. EGCG may be exploited as a potential therapeutic reagent for the treatment of pathological conditions associated with abnormal autophagy.

  3. The Transcription Factor p8 Regulates Autophagy in Response to Palmitic Acid Stress via a Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR)-independent Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Sheng-Nan; Lin, Cheng; Chen, Dian-Fu; Li, An-Qi; Dai, Li; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Ling-Ling; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Fan; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2016-02-26

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved degradative process that allows cells to maintain homoeostasis in numerous physiological situations. This process also functions as an essential protective response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which promotes the removal and degradation of unfolded proteins. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which autophagy is initiated and regulated in response to ER stress. In this study, different types of autophagy were identified in human gastric cancer MKN45 cells in response to the stress induced by nutrient starvation or lipotoxicity in which the regulation of these pathways is mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent or -independent, respectively. Interestingly, we found that p8, a stress-inducible transcription factor, was enhanced in MKN45 cells treated with palmitic acid to induce lipotoxicity. Furthermore, an increase in autophagy was observed in MKN45 cells stably overexpressing p8 using a lentivirus system, and autophagy induced by palmitic acid was blocked by p8 RNAi compared with the control. Western blotting analyses showed that autophagy was regulated by p8 or mTOR in response to the protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/activating transcription factor 6-mediated ER stress of lipotoxicity or the parkin-mediated mitochondrial stress of nutrient starvation, respectively. Furthermore, our results indicated that autophagy induced by palmitic acid is mTOR-independent, but this autophagy pathway was regulated by p8 via p53- and PKCα-mediated signaling in MKN45 cells. Our findings provide insights into the role of p8 in regulating autophagy induced by the lipotoxic effects of excess fat accumulation in cells.

  4. Thioredoxin Binding Protein-2 Regulates Autophagy of Human Lens Epithelial Cells under Oxidative Stress via Inhibition of Akt Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ke; Zhang, Yidong; Chen, Guangdi; Lai, Kairan; Yin, Houfa

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an essential role in the development of age-related cataract. Thioredoxin binding protein-2 (TBP-2) is a negative regulator of thioredoxin (Trx), which deteriorates cellular antioxidant system. Our study focused on the autophagy-regulating effect of TBP-2 under oxidative stress in human lens epithelial cells (LECs). Human lens epithelial cells were used for cell culture and treatment. Lentiviral-based transfection system was used for overexpression of TBP-2. Cytotoxicity assay, western blot analysis, GFP/mCherry-fused LC3 plasmid, immunofluorescence, and transmission electronic microscopy were performed. The results showed that autophagic response of LECs with increased LC3-II, p62, and GFP/mCherry-LC3 puncta (P < 0.01) was induced by oxidative stress. Overexpression of TBP-2 further strengthens this response and worsens the cell viability (P < 0.01). Knockdown of TBP-2 attenuates the autophagic response and cell viability loss induced by oxidative stress. TBP-2 mainly regulates autophagy in the initiation stage, which is mTOR-independent and probably caused by the dephosphorylation of Akt under oxidative stress. These findings suggest a novel role of TBP-2 in human LECs under oxidative stress. Oxidative stress can cause cell injury and autophagy in LECs, and TBP-2 regulates this response. Hence, this study provides evidence regarding the role of TBP-2 in lens and the possible mechanism of cataract development. PMID:27656263

  5. Effect of regional muscle location but not adiposity on mitochondrial biogenesis-regulating proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponce-González, Jesús Gustavo; Ara, Ignacio; Larsen, Steen;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine if the expression of the mitochondrial biogenesis-regulating proteins SIRT1, SIRT3 and PGC-1alpha in human skeletal muscle is influenced by adiposity. METHOD: Twenty-nine male subjects were recruited into three groups: control (n = 10), obese (n = 10......) and post-obese (n = 9). Intentionally, groups were matched by age, aerobic capacity and in addition the control and post-obese groups also by BMI. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the m. deltoid and vastus lateralis. PGC-1alpha, SIRT1 and SIRT3 protein expression was analyzed by Western blot. RESULT: PGC......-1alpha, SIRT1 and SIRT3 protein expression was similar regardless of the level of adiposity. Only a main effect of group on SIRT1 protein showed a trend toward higher expression in post-obese than control and obese (P = 0.09). Despite similar muscle fiber-type composition (previously reported), PGC...

  6. Folliculin contributes to VHL tumor suppressing activity in renal cancer through regulation of autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat Bastola

    Full Text Available Von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor (VHL is lost in the majority of clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC. Folliculin (FLCN is a tumor suppressor whose function is lost in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD, a disorder characterized by renal cancer of multiple histological types including clear cell carcinoma, cutaneous fibrofolliculoma, and pneumothorax. Here we explored whether there is connection between VHL and FLCN in clear cell renal carcinoma cell lines and tumors. We demonstrate that VHL regulates expression of FLCN at the mRNA and protein levels in RCC cell lines, and that FLCN protein expression is decreased in human ccRCC tumors with VHL loss, as compared with matched normal kidney tissue. Knockdown of FLCN results in increased formation of tumors by RCC cells with wild-type VHL in orthotopic xenografts in nude mice, an indication that FLCN plays a role in the tumor-suppressing activity of VHL. Interestingly, FLCN, similarly to VHL, is necessary for the activity of LC3C-mediated autophagic program that we have previously characterized as contributing to the tumor suppressing activity of VHL. The results show the existence of functional crosstalk between two major tumor suppressors in renal cancer, VHL and FLCN, converging on regulation of autophagy.

  7. Down-regulation of Zac1 gene expression in rat white adipose tissue by androgens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirowska, Agnieszka; Sledzinski, Tomasz; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Swierczynski, Julian

    2014-03-01

    ZAC1 is a zinc-finger protein transcription factor, a transcriptional cofactor for nuclear receptors, and a co-activator of nuclear receptors, which interacts with multiple signaling pathways affecting apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and metabolism. Some data suggest that ZAC1 regulates the expression of genes associated with function of adipose tissue. Since there is no information about the levels of Zac1 gene expression in white adipose tissue (WAT), and the expression of several genes associated with metabolic function of WAT is significantly lower in male than female animals, we have examined: (a) the relative ZAC1 mRNA levels in some organs/tissues, including three main depots of WAT, in 3-month-old male rats; (b) the relative ZAC1 mRNA levels in WAT of male and female rats; (c) the effect of orchidectomy and orchidectomy with concomitant testosterone treatment on ZAC1 mRNA and protein levels; (d) the effect of ovariectomy and ovariectomy with concomitant 17β-estradiol treatment on ZAC1 mRNA levels; (e) the effect of dihydrotestosterone on ZAC1 mRNA levels in isolated adipocytes. Our results indicate that: (a) ZAC1 mRNA levels are relatively high in WAT in comparison with other organs/tissues; (b) ZAC1 mRNA levels in subcutaneous WAT are approximately 2-fold lower than in epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue; (c) ZAC1 mRNA levels in WAT of adult female rats are approximately 2-fold higher than in male rats; (d) testosterone is inversely related to ZAC1 mRNA and protein levels in WAT of male rats; and (e) dihydrotestosterone decreases the ZAC1 mRNA levels in adipocytes in dose dependent manner. In conclusion, Zac1 gene is highly expressed in white adipose tissue of adult rats. Androgens could play an important role in down-regulation of the ZAC1 mRNA and protein levels in rats.

  8. Up-Regulated Expression of LAMP2 and Autophagy Activity during Neuroendocrine Differentiation of Prostate Cancer LNCaP Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vara-Ciruelos, Diana; Ramos-Torres, Ágata; Altamirano-Dimas, Manuel; Díaz-Laviada, Inés; Rodríguez-Henche, Nieves

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) prostate cancer (PCa) is a highly aggressive subtype of prostate cancer associated with resistance to androgen ablation therapy. In this study, we used LNCaP prostate cancer cells cultured in a serum-free medium for 6 days as a NE model of prostate cancer. Serum deprivation increased the expression of NE markers such as neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and βIII tubulin (βIII tub) and decreased the expression of the androgen receptor protein in LNCaP cells. Using cDNA microarrays, we compared gene expression profiles of NE cells and non-differentiated LNCaP cells. We identified up-regulation of 155 genes, among them LAMP2, a lysosomal membrane protein involved in lysosomal stability and autophagy. We then confirmed up-regulation of LAMP2 in NE cells by qRT-PCR, Western blot and confocal microscopy assays, showing that mRNA up-regulation correlated with increased levels of LAMP2 protein. Subsequently, we determined autophagy activity in NE cells by assessing the protein levels of SQSTM/p62 and LC3 by Western blot and LC3 and Atg5 mRNAs content by qRT-PCR. The decreased levels of SQSTM/p62 was accompanied by an enhanced expression of LC3 and ATG5, suggesting activation of autophagy in NE cells. Blockage of autophagy with 1μM AKT inhibitor IV, or by silencing Beclin 1 and Atg5, prevented NE cell differentiation, as revealed by decreased levels of the NE markers. In addition, AKT inhibitor IV as well as Beclin1 and Atg5 kwockdown attenuated LAMP2 expression in NE cells. On the other hand, LAMP2 knockdown by siRNA led to a marked blockage of autophagy, prevention of NE differentiation and decrease of cell survival. Taken together, these results suggest that LAMP2 overexpression assists NE differentiation of LNCaP cells induced by serum deprivation and facilitates autophagy activity in order to attain the NE phenotype and cell survival. LAMP2 could thus be a potential biomarker and potential target for NE prostate cancer. PMID:27627761

  9. Autophagy regulates the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Shipeng; Xu, Huanbai; Xu, Congfeng; Cai, Wei; Li, Qian; Cheng, Yiji; Jin, Min; Wang, Ru-Xing; Peng, Yongde; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Changping; He, Xiaozhou; Wan, Bing; Zhang, Yanyun

    2014-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising approach to treat various inflammatory disorders including multiple sclerosis. However, the fate of MSCs in the inflammatory microenvironment is largely unknown. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a well-studied animal model of multiple sclerosis. We demonstrated that autophagy occurred in MSCs during their application for EAE treatment. Inflammatory cytokines, e.g., interferon gamma and tumor necrosis factor, induced autophagy in MSCs synergistically by inducing expression of BECN1/Beclin 1. Inhibition of autophagy by knockdown of Becn1 significantly improved the therapeutic effects of MSCs on EAE, which was mainly attributable to enhanced suppression upon activation and expansion of CD4(+) T cells. Mechanistically, inhibition of autophagy increased reactive oxygen species generation and mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/3 activation in MSCs, which were essential for PTGS2 (prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 [prostaglandin G/H synthase and cyclooxygenase]) and downstream prostaglandin E2 expression to exert immunoregulatory function. Furthermore, pharmacological treatment of MSCs to inhibit autophagy increased their immunosuppressive effects on T cell-mediated EAE. Our findings indicate that inflammatory microenvironment-induced autophagy downregulates the immunosuppressive function of MSCs. Therefore, modulation of autophagy in MSCs would provide a novel strategy to improve MSC-based immunotherapy.

  10. Brown Adipose Tissue Thermogenic Capacity Is Regulated by Elovl6

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    Chong Yew Tan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although many transcriptional pathways regulating BAT have been identified, the role of lipid biosynthetic enzymes in thermogenesis has been less investigated. Whereas cold exposure causes changes in the fatty acid composition of BAT, the functional consequences of this remains relatively unexplored. In this study, we demonstrate that the enzyme Elongation of Very Long Chain fatty acids 6 (Elovl6 is necessary for the thermogenic action of BAT. Elovl6 is responsible for converting C16 non-essential fatty acids into C18 species. Loss of Elovl6 does not modulate traditional BAT markers; instead, it causes reduced expression of mitochondrial electron transport chain components and lower BAT thermogenic capacity. The reduction in BAT activity appears to be counteracted by increased beiging of scWAT. When beige fat is disabled by thermoneutrality or aging, Elovl6 KO mice gain weight and have increased scWAT mass and impaired carbohydrate metabolism. Overall, our study suggests fatty acid chain length is important for BAT function.

  11. Regional differences and up-regulation of progesterone receptors in adipose tissues from oestrogen-treated sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, J S; McCann, J P; Ownbey, T C; Watson, G H

    1996-01-01

    Differing risk factors between men and women for a number of vascular and metabolic diseases have been linked to regional obesity. The differences in the distribution of adipose tissues between men (abdominal or upper-body obesity) and women (gluteal/femoral or lower body obesity) suggest a role for sex steroids in the regional distribution of fat. Previous work from this laboratory has shown the presence of oestrogen receptor (ER) in gluteal, perirenal and omental adipose tissues of ewes with similar physical characteristics to the ER in uterine tissue. The concentration profile for adipose ER was gluteal > perirenal > omental. In this report, we determined the physiological significance of adipose ERs by showing an up-regulation of the progesterone receptor (PR) in adipose tissues after oestrogen treatment in a fashion similar to that seen in a major responsive tissue such as uterus. Using PR antibodies (PR-6 and C-262), Western blot analysis of PR from oestrogen-treated sheep indicated that PR was induced in uterus > gluteal adipose > perirenal adipose consistent with the concentration of ER contained in these tissues. PR could not be detected by Western blotting in omental adipose tissue from oestrogen-treated animals or in gluteal, perirenal and omental adipose tissues from untreated animals. Sucrose gradient profiles of progestin (R-5020) binding from uterus and gluteal adipose tissues of oestrogen-treated ewes showed specific binding in both the 5S and 9S regions of the gradient, while perirenal and omental adipose tissue had only the 5S peak. The amount of specific binding was increased with oestrogen treatment in all the tissues. When gluteal adipose tissue cytosol was preincubated with PR antibody (C-262) to prevent binding of ligand and subjected to sucrose gradient analysis, both the 5S and 9S regions were diminished, suggesting that both peaks contained PR. Dilution of uterine cytosol resulted in an increase in the ratio of the 5S to the 9S peak

  12. Micro RNA-124a Regulates Lipolysis via Adipose Triglyceride Lipase and Comparative Gene Identification 58

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    Suman K. Das

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipolysis is the biochemical pathway responsible for the catabolism of cellular triacylglycerol (TG. Lipolytic TG breakdown is a central metabolic process leading to the generation of free fatty acids (FA and glycerol, thereby regulating lipid, as well as energy homeostasis. The precise tuning of lipolysis is imperative to prevent lipotoxicity, obesity, diabetes and other related metabolic disorders. Here, we present our finding that miR-124a attenuates RNA and protein expression of the major TG hydrolase, adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL/PNPLA2 and its co-activator comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58/ABHD5. Ectopic expression of miR-124a in adipocytes leads to reduced lipolysis and increased cellular TG accumulation. This phenotype, however, can be rescued by overexpression of truncated Atgl lacking its 3'UTR, which harbors the identified miR-124a target site. In addition, we observe a strong negative correlation between miR-124a and Atgl expression in various murine tissues. Moreover, miR-124a regulates the expression of Atgl and Cgi-58 in murine white adipose tissue during fasting as well as the expression of Atgl in murine liver, during fasting and re-feeding. Together, these results point to an instrumental role of miR-124a in the regulation of TG catabolism. Therefore, we suggest that miR-124a may be involved in the regulation of several cellular and organismal metabolic parameters, including lipid storage and plasma FA concentration.

  13. HnRNP K contributes to drug resistance in acute myeloid leukemia through the regulation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, JinFang; Liu, XiaoLi; Lin, YuDeng; Li, YuLing; Pan, JianWei; Zong, Sa; Li, YongKang; Zhou, Yang

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the role of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) in drug resistance through the regulation of autophagy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). First, we used fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to verify the connection between the expression level of hnRNP K and the level of drug resistance in AML. We then used Western blotting to determine the expression level of the autophagy-related proteins microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 I and II (LC3 I/II) after the modulation of hnRNP K by ribonucleic acid (RNA) interference. Finally, an analysis of adriamycin drug sensitivity was conducted before and after the modulation of hnRNP K expression. hnRNP K and LC3 I/II were significantly overexpressed in the bone marrow of nonremission patients and in drug-resistant cell lines; however, the expression of LC3 I/II was decreased when the expression of hnRNP K was reduced and drug sensitivity to adriamycin could be restored. hnRNP K may be involved in the development of adriamycin resistance in AML through the regulation of autophagy.

  14. HIF-1α Inhibition Sensitized Pituitary Adenoma Cells to Temozolomide by Regulating Presenilin 1 Expression and Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Zhang; Yuling, Yang; Dongchun, Wang; Bingbing, Xie; Xiaoli, Li; Bin, Xu

    2016-12-01

    Pituitary adenomas usually develop temozolomide resistance, which could compromise the anticancer effects of temozolomide. Suppression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α has been shown to sensitize glioblastoma cells to temozolomide treatment according to previous reports. However, whether and how the suppression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α could sensitize pituitary adenomas to temozolomide treatment are still poorly understood. In the present study, using hypoxia-inducible factor 1α knockdown strategy, we demonstrated for the first time that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α knockdown could inhibit temozolomide-induced autophagy in rat pituitary adenoma GH3 cells and thus increase antitumor efficacy of temozolomide. Furthermore, we found hypoxia-inducible factor 1α knockdown could block autophagy process through neutralizing lysosomal pH value but not inhibiting autophagy induction. Finally, we found hypoxia-inducible factor 1α could regulate lysosomal pH value through regulating full length presenilin 1 expression, and exogenous reexpression of presenilin 1could restore lysosome acidic levels. Our data indicated hypoxia-inducible factor 1α knockdown could be a potential approach to improve the efficacy of temozolomide therapy for pituitary adenomas.

  15. Spermine ameliorates ischemia/reperfusion injury in cardiomyocytes via regulation of autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Qunjun; Yang, Weijun; Jiang, Daming; Tao, Kaiyu; Dong, Aiqiang; Cheng, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction could result in high morbidity and mortality and heart diseases of children have becoming prevalent. Functions of spermine administration on cardiomyocytes remain unknown. The present study was designed to investigate the role of spermine pretreatment on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). A cell model of simulated ischemia/reperfusion injury was established by incubating neonatal Sprague-Dawley rat cardiomyocytes in ischemia medium and re-cultured in normal medium. Of note, spermine pretreatment significantly reduced apoptosis and increased viability of immature cardiomyocytes. Spermine pretreatment enhanced autophagic flux as determined by confocal microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, proteins of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway were significantly reduced in response to spermine pretreatment during IRI, while proteins related to autophagy were up-regulated. The cell viability was enhanced and apoptosis decreased by rapamycin after spermine pretreatment, while these were reversed by 3-methyladenine. However, when immature cardiomyocytes were pretreated with rapamycin or 3-methyladenine, followed by IRI and spermine administration, no significant changes of viability and apoptosis were observed. In conclusion, this study suggests that spermine is a potential novel approach for preventing IRI, especially in children. PMID:27725878

  16. Role of AMPK in regulation of LC3 lipidation as a marker of autophagy in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel; Frøsig, Christian; Jeppesen, Jacob Fuglsbjerg;

    2016-01-01

    During induction of the autophagosomal degradation process, LC3-I is lipidated to LC3-II and associates to the cargo isolation membrane allowing for autophagosome formation. Lipidation of LC3 results in an increased LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, and this ratio is an often used marker for autophagy in various...... tissues, including skeletal muscle. From cell studies AMPK has been proposed to be necessary and sufficient for LC3 lipidation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of AMPK in regulation of LC3 lipidation as a marker of autophagy in skeletal muscle. We observed an increase in the LC3.......01) in plasma insulin concentration, a subsequent decrease in muscle mTORC1 signaling and increased (pautophagy-promoting proteins, FoxO3a and ULK1. Furthermore, a higher (p

  17. RIPK1 regulates survival of human melanoma cells upon endoplasmic reticulum stress through autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Qi; Jin, Lei; Jiang, Chen Chen; Tay, Kwang Hong; Lai, Fritz; Liu, Xiao Ying; Liu, Yi Lun; Guo, Su Tang; Li, Chun Ying; Yan, Xu Guang; Tseng, Hsin-Yi; Zhang, Xu Dong

    2015-01-01

    Although RIPK1 (receptor [TNFRSF]-interacting protein kinase 1) is emerging as a critical determinant of cell fate in response to cellular stress resulting from activation of death receptors and DNA damage, its potential role in cell response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress remains undefined. Here we report that RIPK1 functions as an important prosurvival mechanism in melanoma cells undergoing pharmacological ER stress induced by tunicamycin (TM) or thapsigargin (TG) through activation of autophagy. While treatment with TM or TG upregulated RIPK1 and triggered autophagy in melanoma cells, knockdown of RIPK1 inhibited autophagy and rendered the cells sensitive to killing by TM or TG, recapitulating the effect of inhibition of autophagy. Consistently, overexpression of RIPK1 enhanced induction of autophagy and conferred resistance of melanoma cells to TM- or TG-induced cell death. Activation of MAPK8/JNK1 or MAPK9/JNK2, which phosphorylated BCL2L11/BIM leading to its dissociation from BECN1/Beclin 1, was involved in TM- or TG-induced, RIPK1-mediated activation of autophagy; whereas, activation of the transcription factor HSF1 (heat shock factor protein 1) downstream of the ERN1/IRE1-XBP1 axis of the unfolded protein response was responsible for the increase in RIPK1 in melanoma cells undergoing pharmacological ER stress. Collectively, these results identify upregulation of RIPK1 as an important resistance mechanism of melanoma cells to TM- or TG-induced ER stress by protecting against cell death through activation of autophagy, and suggest that targeting the autophagy-activating mechanism of RIPK1 may be a useful strategy to enhance sensitivity of melanoma cells to therapeutic agents that induce ER stress.

  18. Egr-1 regulates autophagy in cigarette smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

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    Zhi-Hua Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a progressive lung disease characterized by abnormal cellular responses to cigarette smoke, resulting in tissue destruction and airflow limitation. Autophagy is a degradative process involving lysosomal turnover of cellular components, though its role in human diseases remains unclear. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Increased autophagy was observed in lung tissue from COPD patients, as indicated by electron microscopic analysis, as well as by increased activation of autophagic proteins (microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3B, LC3B, Atg4, Atg5/12, Atg7. Cigarette smoke extract (CSE is an established model for studying the effects of cigarette smoke exposure in vitro. In human pulmonary epithelial cells, exposure to CSE or histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor rapidly induced autophagy. CSE decreased HDAC activity, resulting in increased binding of early growth response-1 (Egr-1 and E2F factors to the autophagy gene LC3B promoter, and increased LC3B expression. Knockdown of E2F-4 or Egr-1 inhibited CSE-induced LC3B expression. Knockdown of Egr-1 also inhibited the expression of Atg4B, a critical factor for LC3B conversion. Inhibition of autophagy by LC3B-knockdown protected epithelial cells from CSE-induced apoptosis. Egr-1(-/- mice, which displayed basal airspace enlargement, resisted cigarette-smoke induced autophagy, apoptosis, and emphysema. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate a critical role for Egr-1 in promoting autophagy and apoptosis in response to cigarette smoke exposure in vitro and in vivo. The induction of autophagy at early stages of COPD progression suggests novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of cigarette smoke induced lung injury.

  19. Coronavirus membrane-associated papain-like proteases induce autophagy through interacting with Beclin1 to negatively regulate antiviral innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojuan; Wang, Kai; Xing, Yaling; Tu, Jian; Yang, Xingxing; Zhao, Qian; Li, Kui; Chen, Zhongbin

    2014-12-01

    Autophagy plays important roles in modulating viral replication and antiviral immune response. Coronavirus infection is associated with the autophagic process, however, little is known about the mechanisms of autophagy induction and its contribution to coronavirus regulation of host innate responses. Here, we show that the membrane-associated papain-like protease PLP2 (PLP2-TM) of coronaviruses acts as a novel autophagy-inducing protein. Intriguingly, PLP2-TM induces incomplete autophagy process by increasing the accumulation of autophagosomes but blocking the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes. Furthermore, PLP2-TM interacts with the key autophagy regulators, LC3 and Beclin1, and promotes Beclin1 interaction with STING, the key regulator for antiviral IFN signaling. Finally, knockdown of Beclin1 partially reverses PLP2-TM's inhibitory effect on innate immunity which resulting in decreased coronavirus replication. These results suggested that coronavirus papain-like protease induces incomplete autophagy by interacting with Beclin1, which in turn modulates coronavirus replication and antiviral innate immunity.

  20. Cyclophilin D Is Involved in the Regulation of Autophagy and Affects the Lifespan of P. anserina in Response to Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Piet; Jung, Alexander T.; Hamann, Andrea; Osiewacz, Heinz D.

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial permeability transition pore plays a key role in programmed cell death and the induction of autophagy. Opening of the pore is regulated by the mitochondrial peptidyl prolyl-cis, trans-isomerase cyclophilin D (CYPD). Previously it was shown in the aging model organism Podospora anserina that PaCYPD abundance increases during aging and that PaCypD overexpressors are characterized by accelerated aging. Here, we describe a role of PaCYPD in the regulation of autophagy. We found that the accelerated aging phenotype observed in a strain overexpressing PaCypD is not metacaspase-dependent but is accompanied by an increase of general autophagy and mitophagy, the selective autophagic degradation of mitochondria. It thus is linked to what has been defined as “autophagic cell death” or “type II” programmed cell death. Moreover, we found that the previously demonstrated age-related induction of autophagy in wild-type aging depends on the presence of PaCYPD. Deletion of PaCypD leads to a decrease in autophagy in later stages of age and under paraquat-mediated oxidative stress. Finally, we report that PaCYPD is also required for mitohormesis, the beneficial effect of mild mitochondrial stress. Thus, PaCYPD plays a key role in the context-dependent regulation of pathways leading to pro-survival and pro-death effects of autophagy. PMID:27683587

  1. Regulation of visceral adipose tissue-derived serine protease inhibitor by nutritional status, metformin, gender and pituitary factors in rat white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, C R; Caminos, J E; Vázquez, M J; Garcés, M F; Cepeda, L A; Angel, A; González, A C; García-Rendueles, M E; Sangiao-Alvarellos, S; López, M; Bravo, S B; Nogueiras, R; Diéguez, C

    2009-07-15

    Visceral adipose tissue-derived serine protease inhibitor (vaspin) is a recently discovered adipocytokine mainly secreted from visceral adipose tissue, which plays a main role in insulin sensitivity. In this study, we have investigated the regulation of vaspin gene expression in rat white adipose tissue (WAT) in different physiological (nutritional status, pregnancy, age and gender) and pathophysiological (gonadectomy, thyroid status and growth hormone deficiency) settings known to be associated with energy homeostasis and alterations in insulin sensitivity. We have determined vaspin gene expression by real-time PCR. Vaspin was decreased after fasting and its levels were partially recovered after leptin treatment. Chronic treatment with metformin increased vaspin gene expression. Vaspin mRNA expression reached the highest peak at 45 days in both sexes after birth and its expression was higher in females than males, but its levels did not change throughout pregnancy. Finally, decreased levels of growth hormone and thyroid hormones suppressed vaspin expression. These findings suggest that WAT vaspin mRNA expression is regulated by nutritional status, and leptin seems to be the nutrient signal responsible for those changes. Vaspin is influenced by age and gender, and its expression is increased after treatment with insulin sensitizers. Finally, alterations in pituitary functions modify vaspin levels. Understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating vaspin will provide new insights into the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome.

  2. Tachykinin-1 in the central nervous system regulates adiposity in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Chitrang; Shan, Xiaoye; Tung, Yi-Chun Loraine; Kabra, Dhiraj; Holland, Jenna; Amburgy, Sarah; Heppner, Kristy; Kirchner, Henriette; Yeo, Giles S H; Perez-Tilve, Diego

    2015-05-01

    Ghrelin is a circulating hormone that targets the central nervous system to regulate feeding and adiposity. The best-characterized neural system that mediates the effects of ghrelin on energy balance involves the activation of neuropeptide Y/agouti-related peptide neurons, expressed exclusively in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. However, ghrelin receptors are expressed in other neuronal populations involved in the control of energy balance. We combined laser capture microdissection of several nuclei of the central nervous system expressing the ghrelin receptor (GH secretagoge receptor) with microarray gene expression analysis to identify additional neuronal systems involved in the control of central nervous system-ghrelin action. We identified tachykinin-1 (Tac1) as a gene negatively regulated by ghrelin in the hypothalamus. Furthermore, we identified neuropeptide k as the TAC1-derived peptide with more prominent activity, inducing negative energy balance when delivered directly into the brain. Conversely, loss of Tac1 expression enhances the effectiveness of ghrelin promoting fat mass gain both in male and in female mice and increases the susceptibility to diet-induced obesity in ovariectomized mice. Taken together, our data demonstrate a role TAC1 in the control energy balance by regulating the levels of adiposity in response to ghrelin administration and to changes in the status of the gonadal function.

  3. Regulation of adipose branched chain amino acid catabolism enzyme expression and cross-adipose amino acid flux in human obesity

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    Elevated blood branched chain amino acids (BCAA) are often associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. One possibility is that under these conditions there is a reduced cellular utilization and/or lower complete oxidation of BCAAs. White adipose tissue (WAT) has become appreciated as a...

  4. Up-regulation of mitochondrial activity and acquirement of brown adipose tissue-like property in the white adipose tissue of fsp27 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Yon Toh

    Full Text Available Fsp27, a member of the Cide family proteins, was shown to localize to lipid droplet and promote lipid storage in adipocytes. We aimed to understand the biological role of Fsp27 in regulating adipose tissue differentiation, insulin sensitivity and energy balance. Fsp27(-/- mice and Fsp27/lep double deficient mice were generated and we examined the adiposity, whole body metabolism, BAT and WAT morphology, insulin sensitivity, mitochondrial activity, and gene expression changes in these mouse strains. Furthermore, we isolated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs from wildtype and Fsp27(-/- mice, followed by their differentiation into adipocytes in vitro. We found that Fsp27 is expressed in both brown adipose tissue (BAT and white adipose tissue (WAT and its levels were significantly elevated in the WAT and liver of leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Fsp27(-/- mice had increased energy expenditure, lower levels of plasma triglycerides and free fatty acids. Furthermore, Fsp27(-/-and Fsp27/lep double-deficient mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity and display increased insulin sensitivity. Moreover, white adipocytes in Fsp27(-/- mice have reduced triglycerides accumulation and smaller lipid droplets, while levels of mitochondrial proteins, mitochondrial size and activity are dramatically increased. We further demonstrated that BAT-specific genes and key metabolic controlling factors such as FoxC2, PPAR and PGC1alpha were all markedly upregulated. In contrast, factors inhibiting BAT differentiation such as Rb, p107 and RIP140 were down-regulated in the WAT of Fsp27(-/- mice. Remarkably, Fsp27(-/- MEFs differentiated in vitro show many brown adipocyte characteristics in the presence of the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3. Our data thus suggest that Fsp27 acts as a novel regulator in vivo to control WAT identity, mitochondrial activity and insulin sensitivity.

  5. Autophagy positively regulates the CD44(+) CD24(-/low) breast cancer stem-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cufí, Sílvia; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Vellon, Luciano; Menendez, Javier A

    2011-11-15

    The molecular mechanisms used by breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) to survive and/or maintain their undifferentiated CD44(+) CD24(-/low ) mesenchymal-like antigenic state remains largely unexplored. Autophagy, a key homeostatic process of cytoplasmic degradation and recycling evolved to respond to stress conditions, might be causally fundamental in the biology of BCSCs. Stable & specific knockdown of autophagy-regulatory genes by lentiviral-delivered small hairpin (sh) RNA drastically decreased the number of JIMT-1 epithelial BC cells bearing CD44(+) CD24(-/low) cell-surface antigens from ~75% in parental and control (-) shRNA-transduced cells to 26% and 7% in ATG8/LC3 shRNA- and ATG12 shRNA-transduced cells, respectively. Autophagy inhibition notably enhanced transcriptional activation of CD24 gene, potentiating the epithelial-like phenotype of CD44(+) CD24(+) cells versus the mesenchymal CD44(+) CD24(-/low ) progeny. EMT-focused Real Time RT-PCR profiling revealed that genetic ablation of autophagy transcriptionally repressed the gene coding for the mesenchymal filament vimentin (VIM). shRNA-driven silencing of the ATG12 gene and disabling the final step in the autophagy pathway by the antimalarial drug chloroquine both prevented TGFb1-induced accumulation of vimentin in JIMT-1 cells. Knockdown of autophagy-specific genes was sufficient also to increase by up to 11-times the number of CD24(+) cells in MDA-MB-231 cells, a BC model of mesenchymal origin that is virtually composed of CD44(+) CD24(-/low ) cells. Chloroquine treatment augmented the number of CD24(+) cells and concomitantly reduced constitutive overexpression of vimentin in MDA-MB-231 cells. This is the first report demonstrating that autophagy is mechanistically linked to the maintenance of tumor cells expressing high levels of CD44 and low levels of CD24, which are typical of BCSCs.

  6. The Parkinson's disease-associated genes ATP13A2 and SYT11 regulate autophagy via a common pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Carla F; Ashkenazi, Avraham; Jimenez-Sanchez, Maria; Rubinsztein, David C

    2016-06-09

    Forms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are associated with lysosomal and autophagic dysfunction. ATP13A2, which is mutated in some types of early-onset Parkinsonism, has been suggested as a regulator of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. However, little is known about the ATP13A2 effectors and how they regulate this pathway. Here we show that ATP13A2 depletion negatively regulates another PD-associated gene (SYT11) at both transcriptional and post-translational levels. Decreased SYT11 transcription is controlled by a mechanism dependent on MYCBP2-induced ubiquitination of TSC2, which leads to mTORC1 activation and decreased TFEB-mediated transcription of SYT11, while increased protein turnover is regulated by SYT11 ubiquitination and degradation. Both mechanisms account for a decrease in the levels of SYT11, which, in turn, induces lysosomal dysfunction and impaired degradation of autophagosomes. Thus, we propose that ATP13A2 and SYT11 form a new functional network in the regulation of the autophagy-lysosome pathway, which is likely to contribute to forms of PD-associated neurodegeneration.

  7. Autophagy regulates T lymphocyte proliferation through selective degradation of the cell-cycle inhibitor CDKN1B/p27Kip1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wei; He, Ming-Xiao; McLeod, Ian X; Guo, Jian; Ji, Dong; He, You-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved cellular degradation pathway, macroautophagy, regulates the homeostasis of organelles and promotes the survival of T lymphocytes. Previous results indicate that Atg3-, Atg5-, or Pik3c3/Vps34-deficient T cells cannot proliferate efficiently. Here we demonstrate that the proliferation of Atg7-deficient T cells is defective. By using an adoptive transfer and Listeria monocytogenes (LM) mouse infection model, we found that the primary immune response against LM is intrinsically impaired in autophagy-deficient CD8(+) T cells because the cell population cannot expand after infection. Autophagy-deficient T cells fail to enter into S-phase after TCR stimulation. The major negative regulator of the cell cycle in T lymphocytes, CDKN1B, is accumulated in autophagy-deficient naïve T cells and CDKN1B cannot be degraded after TCR stimulation. Furthermore, our results indicate that genetic deletion of one allele of CDKN1B in autophagy-deficient T cells restores proliferative capability and the cells can enter into S-phase after TCR stimulation. Finally, we found that natural CDKN1B forms polymers and is physiologically associated with the autophagy receptor protein SQSTM1/p62 (sequestosome 1). Collectively, autophagy is required for maintaining the expression level of CDKN1B in naïve T cells and selectively degrades CDKN1B after TCR stimulation.

  8. Identification of a novel MTOR activator and discovery of a competing endogenous RNA regulating autophagy in vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Di; Han, Lei; Huang, ShuYa; Peng, Nan; Wang, PengChong; Jiang, Zheng; Zhao, Jing; Su, Le; Zhang, ShangLi; Zhang, Yun; Kung, HsiangFu; Zhao, BaoXiang; Miao, JunYing

    2014-06-01

    MTOR, a central regulator of autophagy, is involved in cancer and cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Modulating the MTOR signaling balance could be of great significance for numerous diseases. No chemical activators of MTOR have been found, and the urgent challenge is to find novel MTOR downstream components. In previous studies, we found a chemical small molecule, 3-benzyl-5-((2-nitrophenoxy) methyl)-dihydrofuran-2(3H)-one (3BDO), that inhibited autophagy in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and neuronal cells. Here, we found that 3BDO activated MTOR by targeting FKBP1A (FK506-binding protein 1A, 12 kDa). We next used 3BDO to detect novel factors downstream of the MTOR signaling pathway. Activation of MTOR by 3BDO increased the phosphorylation of TIA1 (TIA1 cytotoxic granule-associated RNA binding protein/T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1). Finally, we used gene microarray, RNA interference, RNA-ChIP assay, bioinformatics, luciferase reporter assay, and other assays and found that 3BDO greatly decreased the level of a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) derived from the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of TGFB2, known as FLJ11812. TIA1 was responsible for processing FLJ11812. Further experiments results showed that FLJ11812 could bind with MIR4459 targeting ATG13 (autophagy-related 13), and ATG13 protein level was decreased along with 3BDO-decreased FLJ11812 level. Here, we provide a new activator of MTOR, and our findings highlight the role of the lncRNA in autophagy.

  9. Dissecting adipose tissue lipolysis: molecular regulation and implications for metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Thomas Svava; Jessen, Niels; Jørgensen, Jens Otto L; Møller, Niels; Lund, Sten

    2014-06-01

    Lipolysis is the process by which triglycerides (TGs) are hydrolyzed to free fatty acids (FFAs) and glycerol. In adipocytes, this is achieved by sequential action of adipose TG lipase (ATGL), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), and monoglyceride lipase. The activity in the lipolytic pathway is tightly regulated by hormonal and nutritional factors. Under conditions of negative energy balance such as fasting and exercise, stimulation of lipolysis results in a profound increase in FFA release from adipose tissue (AT). This response is crucial in order to provide the organism with a sufficient supply of substrate for oxidative metabolism. However, failure to efficiently suppress lipolysis when FFA demands are low can have serious metabolic consequences and is believed to be a key mechanism in the development of type 2 diabetes in obesity. As the discovery of ATGL in 2004, substantial progress has been made in the delineation of the remarkable complexity of the regulatory network controlling adipocyte lipolysis. Notably, regulatory mechanisms have been identified on multiple levels of the lipolytic pathway, including gene transcription and translation, post-translational modifications, intracellular localization, protein-protein interactions, and protein stability/degradation. Here, we provide an overview of the recent advances in the field of AT lipolysis with particular focus on the molecular regulation of the two main lipases, ATGL and HSL, and the intracellular and extracellular signals affecting their activity.

  10. SIRT1 regulates accumulation of oxidized LDL in HUVEC via the autophagy-lysosomal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanlin; Sun, Juanjuan; Yu, Xiaoyan; Shi, Luyao; Du, Wenxiu; Hu, Lifang; Liu, Chunfeng; Cao, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in the degradation of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Sirtuin1 (SIRT1), a new anti-atherosclerotic factor, can induce autophagy in cardiac myocytes. In the present study, we observed the effect of SIRT1 on the accumulation of ox-LDL in HUVECs, and elucidated whether its effect is relative with the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. The results showed that treatment with either SIRT1 siRNA or SIRT1 inhibitor nicotinamide (NAM) increased Dil-labelled-ox-LDL (Dil-ox-LDL) accumulation in HUVECs, and the SIRT1 inducer resveratrol (RSV) decreased it. Knockdown of autophagy-related protein 5 or inhibit the lysosomal degradation by chloroquine (CQ) decreased the effect of RSV. In HUVECs with ox-LDL, expression of LC3II and LC3 puncta was decreased by treatment with SIRT1 siRNA or NAM, but increased by RSV treatment; sequestosome 1 p62 expression showed the opposite effects. Moreover, Dil-ox-LDL combined with SIRT1 siRNA or NAM showed a much smaller degree of overlap of Lamp1 or Cathepsin D with Dil-ox-LDL than in cells with Dil-ox-LDL alone, and RSV treatment resulted in a greater degree of overlap. These results suggest that SIRT1 can decrease the accumulation of ox-LDL in HUVECs, and this effect is related to the autophagy-lysosomal pathway.

  11. Heteromultimeric TRPML channel assemblies play a crucial role in the regulation of cell viability models and starvation-induced autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeevi, David A; Lev, Shaya; Frumkin, Ayala; Minke, Baruch; Bach, Gideon

    2010-09-15

    The mucolipin (TRPML) subfamily of transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels consists of three members that play various roles in the regulation of membrane and protein sorting along endo-lysosomal pathways. Loss-of-function mutations in TRPML1 cause the neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder, mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV), whereas a gain-of-function mutation in TRPML3 is principally implicated in the hearing-impaired and abnormally pigmented varitint-waddler mouse. Currently, TRPML2 is not implicated in any pathological disorder, but we have recently shown that it is a functional cation channel that physically interacts with TRPML1 and TRPML3 to potentially regulate lysosomal integrity. Here, we show that mutant TRPMLs heteromultimerize with other mutant and wild-type TRPMLs to regulate cell viability and starvation-induced autophagy, a process that mediates macromolecular and organellar turnover under cell starvation conditions. Heteromultimerization of dominant-negative TRPMLs with constitutively active TRPMLs rescues cells from the cytotoxic effects of TRPML constitutive activity. Moreover, dominant-negative TRPML1 channels, including a mutant channel directly implicated in MLIV pathology, also inhibit starvation-induced autophagy by interacting with and affecting native TRPML channel function. Collectively, our results indicate that heteromultimerization of TRPML channels plays a role in various TRPML-regulated mechanisms.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis eis regulates autophagy, inflammation, and cell death through redox-dependent signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Min Shin

    Full Text Available The "enhanced intracellular survival" (eis gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is involved in the intracellular survival of M. smegmatis. However, its exact effects on host cell function remain elusive. We herein report that Mtb Eis plays essential roles in modulating macrophage autophagy, inflammatory responses, and cell death via a reactive oxygen species (ROS-dependent pathway. Macrophages infected with an Mtb eis-deletion mutant H37Rv (Mtb-Δeis displayed markedly increased accumulation of massive autophagic vacuoles and formation of autophagosomes in vitro and in vivo. Infection of macrophages with Mtb-Δeis increased the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 over the levels produced by infection with wild-type or complemented strains. Elevated ROS generation in macrophages infected with Mtb-Δeis (for which NADPH oxidase and mitochondria were largely responsible rendered the cells highly sensitive to autophagy activation and cytokine production. Despite considerable activation of autophagy and proinflammatory responses, macrophages infected with Mtb-Δeis underwent caspase-independent cell death. This cell death was significantly inhibited by blockade of autophagy and c-Jun N-terminal kinase-ROS signaling, suggesting that excessive autophagy and oxidative stress are detrimental to cell survival. Finally, artificial over-expression of Eis or pretreatment with recombinant Eis abrogated production of both ROS and proinflammatory cytokines, which depends on the N-acetyltransferase domain of the Eis protein. Collectively, these data indicate that Mtb Eis suppresses host innate immune defenses by modulating autophagy, inflammation, and cell death in a redox-dependent manner.

  13. Molecular pathways regulating the formation of brown-like adipocytes in white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jianfei; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Huiqin; Mao, Yushan; Wang, Anshi; Wang, Xin; Zou, Zuquan; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-07-01

    Adipose tissue is functionally composed of brown adipose tissue and white adipose tissue. The unique thermogenic capacity of brown adipose tissue results from expression of uncoupling protein 1 in the mitochondrial inner membrane. On the basis of recent findings that adult humans have functionally active brown adipose tissue, it is now recognized as playing a much more important role in human metabolism than was previously thought. More importantly, brown-like adipocytes can be recruited in white adipose tissue upon environmental stimulation and pharmacologic treatment, and this change is associated with increased energy expenditure, contributing to a lean and healthy phenotype. Thus, the promotion of brown-like adipocyte development in white adipose tissue offers novel possibilities for the development of therapeutic strategies to combat obesity and related metabolic diseases. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the recruitment of brown-like adipocyte in white adipose tissue.

  14. Brucella Melitensis 16M Regulates the Effect of AIR Domain on Inflammatory Factors, Autophagy, and Apoptosis in Mouse Macrophage through the ROS Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiansen; Xu, Yafang; Liu, Laizhen; Huang, Meiling; Wang, Zhen; Tong, Zhixia; Zhang, Hui; Guo, Fei; Chen, Chuangfu

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a highly contagious zoonosis caused by Brucella. Brucella can invade and persist inside host cells, which results in chronic infection. We constructed AIR interference and overexpression lentiviruses to acquire AIR interference, overexpression, and rescue stable expression cell lines. We also established a Brucella melitensis 16M-infected macrophage model, which was treated with either the vehicle control or NAC (ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) for 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h. Confocal laser microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence quantitative PCR, flow cytometry, ELISA, and Western blot were used to detect inflammation, cell autophagy and apoptosis-related protein expression levels, ROS levels, and the distribution of mitochondria. It was found that after interference and overexpression of AIR, ROS release was significantly changed, and mitochondria became abnormally aggregated. B. melitensis 16M activated the NLRP3/AIM2 inflammatory complex, and induced RAW264.7 cells to secrete IL-1β and IL-18 through the ROS pathway. B. melitensis 16M also altered autophagy-related gene expression, increased autophagy activity, and induced cell apoptosis through the ROS pathway. The results showed that after B. melitensis 16M infection, ROS induced apoptosis, inflammation, and autophagy while AIR inhibited autophagosome maturation and autophagy initiation. Autophagy negatively regulated the activation of inflammasomes and prevented inflammation from occurring. In addition, mitophagy could promote cell apoptosis. PMID:27907115

  15. Adiponectin self-regulates its expression and multimerization in adipose tissue: an autocrine/paracrine mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huan; Li, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Adiponectin, a 30-kDa peptide hormone discovered in the mid 1990s, is secreted abundantly and exclusively by adipose tissue. Adiponectin exists in three major forms: a low molecular weight (LMW) trimer, a medium molecular weight (MMW) hexamer, and a high molecular weight (HMW) 18-36 oligomer. The HMW oligomer has the most potent insulin-sensitizing activity therefore impaired adiponectin multimerization may lead to impaired glycemic control. Decreased ratio of HMW/total adiponectin has been observed in patients with obesity, type-2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases and insulin resistance-related metabolic syndrome. Previous studies have indicated that berberine or aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR)-induced activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) suppresses the expression of adiponectin but promotes adiponectin multimerization in adipocytes. Since adiponectin activates AMPK through adiponectin receptors (AdipoRs) in the membranes of adipocytes, we speculate that adiponectin self-regulates its expression and multimerization in adipose tissue. The hypothesis suggests a potential drug target for treating insulin resistance and provides new interpretation of several clinical observations. In addition, we propose a rapid method for one-step detection of the distribution of adiponectin oligomers in approximately 30 min, based on the open sandwich immunoassay and fluorescence resonance energy transfer technology. With the development of this new method, the ratio of HMW/total adiponectin may be applied in clinical diagnosis as a novel biomarker for insulin resistance and metabolic disorders.

  16. miR-140-5p attenuates chemotherapeutic drug-induced cell death by regulating autophagy through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate kinase 2 (IP3k2) in human osteosarcoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Renxiong; Cao, Gang; Deng, Zhouming; Su, Jiajia; Cai, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Acquisition of drug-resistant phenotypes is often associated with chemotherapy in osteosarcoma. A number of studies have demonstrated a critical role for autophagy in osteosarcoma development, therapy and drug resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the autophagy-mediated chemotherapy resistance of osteosarcoma cells remain largely unknown. In the present study, we determined the autophagy and microRNA-140 (miR-140-5p, miRBase ID: MIMAT0000431) expression induced by chemotherapeutic drugs in osteosarcoma cells. Then we determined the promotory role of miR-140-5p to the chemotherapy-induced autophagy. Our results demonstrated that miR-140-5p expression was highly induced during chemotherapy of osteosarcoma cells, and this was accompanied by up-regulated autophagy. The increased miR-140-5p expression levels up-regulated anticancer drug-induced autophagy in osteosarcoma cells and ameliorated the anticancer drug-induced cell proliferation and viability decrease. Importantly, miR-140-5p regulates this context-specific autophagy through its target, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate kinase 2 (IP3k2). Therefore, the results of the present study demonstrated that miR-140-5p mediated drug-resistance in osteosarcoma cells by inducing autophagy. The present study provides evidence of miRNA regulation of autophagy through modulation of IP3 signalling. The present study recognized a novel mechanism of chemoresistance in osteosarcoma cancers. PMID:27582507

  17. Reactive oxygen species are involved in insulin-dependent regulation of autophagy in primary rat podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audzeyenka, Irena; Rogacka, Dorota; Piwkowska, Agnieszka; Rychlowski, Michal; Bierla, Joanna Beata; Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Angielski, Stefan; Jankowski, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular defense mechanism responsible for the turnover of damaged or non-functional cellular constituents. This process provides cells with energy and essential compounds under unfavorable environmental conditions-such as oxidative stress and hyperglycemia, which are both observed in diabetes. The most common diabetes complication is diabetic nephropathy (DN), which can lead to renal failure. This condition often includes impaired podocyte function. Here we investigated autophagic activity in rat podocytes cultured with a high insulin concentration (300nM). Autophagy was activated after 60min of insulin stimulation. Moreover, this effect was abolished following pharmacological (apocynin) or genetic (siRNA) inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase activity, indicating that insulin-dependent autophagy stimulation involved reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also observed a continuous and time-dependent increase of podocyte albumin permeability in response to insulin, and this process was slightly improved by autophagy inhibition following short-term insulin exposure. Our results suggest that insulin may be a factor affecting the development of diabetic nephropathy.

  18. Differential regulation of oxytocin receptor in various adipose tissue depots and skeletal muscle types in obese Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdosechova, L; Krskova, K; Olszanecki, R; Zorad, S

    2015-07-01

    Multifunctional peptide oxytocin currently undergoes intensive research due to its proposed anti-obesity properties. Until now, little is known about regulation of oxytocin receptor in metabolically active tissues in obesity. The aim of the present study was to measure expression of oxytocin receptor upon obese phenotype with respect to the variety among adipose tissue and skeletal muscles with distinct anatomical localisation. Total homogenates were prepared from epididymal, retroperitoneal and inguinal adipose tissues as well as quadriceps and soleus muscle from lean and obese Zucker rats. Oxytocin receptor protein was determined by immunoblot. Interestingly, elevated oxytocin receptor was observed in epididymal adipose tissue of obese rats in contrast to its downregulation in subcutaneous and no change in retroperitoneal fat. In lean animals, oxytocin receptor protein was expressed at similar levels in all adipose depots. This uniformity was not observed in the case of skeletal muscle in which fibre type composition seems to be determinant of oxytocin receptor expression. Quadriceps muscle with the predominance of glycolytic fibres exhibits higher oxytocin receptor expression than almost exclusively oxidative soleus muscle. Oxytocin receptor protein levels were decreased in both skeletal muscles analysed upon obese phenotype. The present work demonstrates that even under identical endocrine circumstances, oxytocin receptor is differentially regulated in adipose tissue of obese rats depending on fat depot localisation. These results also imply which tissues may be preferentially targeted by oxytocin treatment in metabolic disease.

  19. Autophagy and ethanol neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Excessive ethanol exposure is detrimental to the brain. The developing brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol such that prenatal ethanol exposure causes fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Neuronal loss in the brain is the most devastating consequence and is associated with mental retardation and other behavioral deficits observed in FASD. Since alcohol consumption during pregnancy has not declined, it is imperative to elucidate the underlying mechanisms and develop effective therapeutic strategies. One cellular mechanism that acts as a protective response for the central nervous system (CNS) is autophagy. Autophagy regulates lysosomal turnover of organelles and proteins within cells, and is involved in cell differentiation, survival, metabolism, and immunity. We have recently shown that ethanol activates autophagy in the developing brain. The autophagic preconditioning alleviates ethanol-induced neuron apoptosis, whereas inhibition of autophagy potentiates ethanol-stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and exacerbates ethanol-induced neuroapoptosis. The expression of genes encoding proteins required for autophagy in the CNS is developmentally regulated; their levels are much lower during an ethanol-sensitive period than during an ethanol-resistant period. Ethanol may stimulate autophagy through multiple mechanisms; these include induction of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress, modulation of MTOR and AMPK signaling, alterations in BCL2 family proteins, and disruption of intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. This review discusses the most recent evidence regarding the involvement of autophagy in ethanol-mediated neurotoxicity as well as the potential therapeutic approach of targeting autophagic pathways.

  20. Autophagy contributes to regulation of nuclear dynamics during vegetative growth and hyphal fusion in Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Ramos, Cristina; Roca, M Gabriela; Di Pietro, Antonio; Roncero, M Isabel G; Ruiz-Roldán, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    In the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, vegetative hyphal fusion triggers nuclear mitotic division in the invading hypha followed by migration of a nucleus into the receptor hypha and degradation of the resident nucleus. Here we examined the role of autophagy in fusion-induced nuclear degradation. A search of the F. oxysporum genome database for autophagy pathway components identified putative orthologs of 16 core autophagy-related (ATG) genes in yeast, including the ubiquitin-like protein Atg8, which is required for the formation of autophagosomal membranes. F. oxysporum Foatg8Δ mutants were generated in a strain harboring H1-cherry fluorescent protein (ChFP)-labeled nuclei to facilitate analysis of nuclear dynamics. The Foatg8Δ mutants did not show MDC-positive staining in contrast to the wild type and the FoATG8-complemented (cFoATG8) strain, suggesting that FoAtg8 is required for autophagy in F. oxysporum. The Foatg8Δ strains displayed reduced rates of hyphal growth, conidiation, and fusion, and were significantly attenuated in virulence on tomato plants and in the nonvertebrate animal host Galleria mellonella. In contrast to wild-type hyphae, which are almost exclusively composed of uninucleated hyphal compartments, the hyphae of the Foatg8Δ mutants contained a significant fraction of hyphal compartments with 2 or more nuclei. The increase in the number of nuclei per hyphal compartment was particularly evident after hyphal fusion events. Time-lapse microscopy analyses revealed abnormal mitotic patterns during vegetative growth in the Foatg8Δ mutants. Our results suggest that autophagy mediates nuclear degradation after hyphal fusion and has a general function in the control of nuclear distribution in F. oxysporum.

  1. Ambra1 is an essential regulator of autophagy and apoptosis in SW620 cells: pro-survival role of Ambra1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Gu

    Full Text Available Recent research has revealed a role for Ambra1, an autophagy-related gene-related (ATG protein, in the autophagic pro-survival response, and Ambra1 has been shown to regulate Beclin1 and Beclin1-dependent autophagy in embryonic stem cells. However, whether Ambra1 plays an important role in the autophagy pathway in colorectal cancer cells is unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that Ambra1 is an important regulator of autophagy and apoptosis in CRC cell lines. To test this hypothesis, we confirmed autophagic activity in serum-starved SW620 CRC cells by assessing endogenous microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3 localization, the presence of autophagosomes (transmission electron microscopy and LC3 protein levels (Western blotting. Ambra1 expression was detected by Western blot in SW620 cells treated with staurosporine or etoposide. Calpain and caspase inhibitors were employed to verify whether calpains and caspases were responsible for Ambra1 cleavage. To examine the role of Ambra1 in apoptosis, Ambra1 knockdown cells were treated with staurosporine and etoposide. Cell apoptosis and viability were measured by annexin-V and PI staining and MTT assays. We determined that serum deprivation-induced autophagy was associated with Ambra1 upregulation in colorectal cancer cell lines. Ambra1 expression decreased during staurosporine- or etoposide-induced apoptosis. Calpains and caspases may be responsible for Ambra1 degradation. When Ambra1 expression was reduced by siRNA, SW620 cells were more sensitive to staurosporine- or etoposide-induced apoptosis. In addition, starvation-induced autophagy decreased. Finally, Co-immunoprecipitation of Ambra1 and Beclin1 demonstrated that Ambra1 and Beclin1 interact in serum-starved or rapamycin-treated SW620 cells, suggesting that Ambra1 regulates autophagy in CRC cells by interacting with Beclin1. In conclusion, Ambra1 is a crucial regulator of autophagy and apoptosis in CRC cells that maintains the

  2. G0/G1 switch gene-2 regulates human adipocyte lipolysis by affecting activity and localization of adipose triglyceride lipase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweiger, M.; Paar, M.; Eder, C.; Brandis, J.; Moser, E.; Gorkiewisz, G.; Grond, S.; Radner, F.P.W.; Cerk, I.; Cornaciu, I.; Oberer, M.; Kersten, A.H.; Zechner, R.; Zimmermann, M.B.; Lass, A.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrolysis of triglycerides in adipocytes, termed lipolysis, provides free fatty acids as energy fuel. Murine lipolysis largely depends on the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL)5, which is regulated by two proteins annotated as comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) and G0/G1 sw

  3. BMP4 Cross-talks With Estrogen/ERα Signaling to Regulate Adiposity and Glucose Metabolism in Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-wen Qian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Similar to estrogens, bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4 promotes the accumulation of more metabolically active subcutaneous fat and reduction of visceral fat. However, whether there is a cross-talk between BMP4 and estrogen signaling remained unknown. Herein, we found that BMP4 deficiency in white adipose tissue (WAT increased the estrogen receptor α (ERα level and its signaling, which prevented adult female mice from developing high fat diet (HFD-induced obesity and insulin resistance; estrogens depletion up regulated BMP4 expression to overcome overt adiposity and impaired insulin sensitivity with aging, and failure of BMP4 regulation due to genetic knockout led to more fat gain in aged female mice. This mutual regulation between BMP4 and estrogen/ERα signaling may also happen in adipose tissue of women, since the BMP4 level significantly increased after menopause, and was inversely correlated with body mass index (BMI. These findings suggest a counterbalance between BMP4 and estrogen/ERα signaling in the regulation of adiposity and relative metabolism in females.

  4. Autophagy and cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, James

    2011-11-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved homoeostatic mechanism for the lysosomal degradation of cytosolic constituents, including long-lived macromolecules, organelles and intracellular pathogens. Autophagosomes are formed in response to a number of environmental stimuli, including amino acid deprivation, but also by both host- and pathogen-derived molecules, including toll-like receptor ligands and cytokines. In particular, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-2, IL-6 and TGF-β have been shown to induce autophagy, while IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13 are inhibitory. Moreover, autophagy can itself regulate the production and secretion of cytokines, including IL-1, IL-18, TNF-α, and Type I IFN. This review discusses the potentially pivotal roles of autophagy in the regulation of inflammation and the coordination of innate and adaptive immune responses.

  5. Global genomic profiling reveals an extensive p53-regulated autophagy program contributing to key p53 responses

    OpenAIRE

    Kenzelmann Broz, Daniela; Spano Mello, Stephano; Bieging, Kathryn T.; Jiang, Dadi; Dusek, Rachel L.; Brady, Colleen A.; Sidow, Arend; Attardi, Laura D

    2013-01-01

    To gain new insights into p53 biology, Kenzelmann Broz et al. used high-throughput sequencing to analyze global p53 transcriptional networks in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts in response to DNA damage. This approach identified autophagy genes as direct p53 target genes. p53-induced autophagy was important for both p53-dependent apoptosis and transformation suppression by p53. These data highlight an intimate connection between p53 and autophagy and suggest that autophagy contributes to p53-...

  6. Oxidative stress, autophagy, epigenetic changes and regulation by miRNAs as potential therapeutic targets in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal-Núñez, Sergio; Esbrit, Pedro; Alcaraz, María José; Largo, Raquel

    2016-05-15

    Aging is a natural process characterized by the declining ability of the different organs and tissues to respond to stress, increasing homeostatic imbalance and risk of disease. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease in which cartilage degradation is a central feature. Aging is the main risk factor for OA. In OA cartilage, a decrease in the number of chondrocytes and in their ability to regenerate the extracellular matrix and adequately respond to stress has been described. OA chondrocytes show a senescence secretory phenotype (SSP) consisting on the overproduction of cytokines (interleukins 1 and 6), growth factors (e.g., epidermal growth factor) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) (e.g., MMP-3, MMP-13). Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) play a major role in the induction of the SSP. In chondrocytes, an increase in ROS production leads to hyper-peroxidation, protein carbonylation and DNA damage which alter chondrocyte function. ROS overproduction also induces changes in metabolic pathways such as PI3K-Akt and ERK. Autophagy is a key mechanism for maintaining cell homeostasis by adjusting cell metabolism to nutrient supply and removing damaged organelles. In cartilage, aging-related loss of autophagy leads to cell death and OA, while stimulation of autophagy exerts protective effects on cartilage deterioration. Aging also interferes with epigenetic mechanisms such as activity of histone acetylases that control the pattern of DNA methylation, and induces up- or down-regulation of microRNAs expression. A deeper knowledge of the mechanisms involved in chondrocyte aging could identify potential targets for the treatment of OA, a prevalent and therapeutic-orphan disease.

  7. ALFY-Controlled DVL3 Autophagy Regulates Wnt Signaling, Determining Human Brain Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Rotem; Harel, Tamar; Markus, Barak; Perez, Yonatan; Bakhrat, Anna; Cohen, Idan; Volodarsky, Michael; Feintsein-Linial, Miora; Chervinski, Elana; Zlotogora, Joel; Sivan, Sara; Birnbaum, Ramon Y; Abdu, Uri; Shalev, Stavit; Birk, Ohad S

    2016-03-01

    Primary microcephaly is a congenital neurodevelopmental disorder of reduced head circumference and brain volume, with fewer neurons in the cortex of the developing brain due to premature transition between symmetrical and asymmetrical cellular division of the neuronal stem cell layer during neurogenesis. We now show through linkage analysis and whole exome sequencing, that a dominant mutation in ALFY, encoding an autophagy scaffold protein, causes human primary microcephaly. We demonstrate the dominant effect of the mutation in drosophila: transgenic flies harboring the human mutant allele display small brain volume, recapitulating the disease phenotype. Moreover, eye-specific expression of human mutant ALFY causes rough eye phenotype. In molecular terms, we demonstrate that normally ALFY attenuates the canonical Wnt signaling pathway via autophagy-dependent removal specifically of aggregates of DVL3 and not of Dvl1 or Dvl2. Thus, autophagic attenuation of Wnt signaling through removal of Dvl3 aggregates by ALFY acts in determining human brain size.

  8. ALFY-Controlled DVL3 Autophagy Regulates Wnt Signaling, Determining Human Brain Size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotem Kadir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary microcephaly is a congenital neurodevelopmental disorder of reduced head circumference and brain volume, with fewer neurons in the cortex of the developing brain due to premature transition between symmetrical and asymmetrical cellular division of the neuronal stem cell layer during neurogenesis. We now show through linkage analysis and whole exome sequencing, that a dominant mutation in ALFY, encoding an autophagy scaffold protein, causes human primary microcephaly. We demonstrate the dominant effect of the mutation in drosophila: transgenic flies harboring the human mutant allele display small brain volume, recapitulating the disease phenotype. Moreover, eye-specific expression of human mutant ALFY causes rough eye phenotype. In molecular terms, we demonstrate that normally ALFY attenuates the canonical Wnt signaling pathway via autophagy-dependent removal specifically of aggregates of DVL3 and not of Dvl1 or Dvl2. Thus, autophagic attenuation of Wnt signaling through removal of Dvl3 aggregates by ALFY acts in determining human brain size.

  9. The autophagy gene Wdr45/Wipi4 regulates learning and memory function and axonal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan G; Sun, Le; Miao, Guangyan; Ji, Cuicui; Zhao, Hongyu; Sun, Huayu; Miao, Lin; Yoshii, Saori R; Mizushima, Noboru; Wang, Xiaoqun; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    WDR45/WIPI4, encoding a WD40 repeat-containing PtdIns(3)P binding protein, is essential for the basal autophagy pathway. Mutations in WDR45 cause the neurodegenerative disease β-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration (BPAN), a subtype of NBIA. We generated CNS-specific Wdr45 knockout mice, which exhibit poor motor coordination, greatly impaired learning and memory, and extensive axon swelling with numerous axon spheroids. Autophagic flux is defective and SQSTM1 (sequestosome-1)/p62 and ubiquitin-positive protein aggregates accumulate in neurons and swollen axons. Nes-Wdr45(fl/Y) mice recapitulate some hallmarks of BPAN, including cognitive impairment and defective axonal homeostasis, providing a model for revealing the disease pathogenesis of BPAN and also for investigating the possible role of autophagy in axon maintenance.

  10. The Regulation of Autophagy and Its Effect on Cancer%自噬的调控及其对肿瘤的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阳丽君

    2012-01-01

    自噬是广泛存在于真核细胞内的一种溶酶体依赖性降解途径,是细胞维持稳态的一种机制,在促进细胞生存方面发挥重要作用,其广泛参与细胞的生理和病理过程.根据信号调控自噬主要分为依赖mTOR的自噬和不依赖mTOR的自噬.自噬活性的改变存在于多种人类肿瘤中,自噬在肿瘤的发生、发展过程中起到了促进和抑制的双重作用.随着对自噬研究的深入,有望通过调节自噬达到预防和治疗肿瘤的目的.%Autophagy is lysosomal-dependent degradation widely existing in eukaryotic cells, which is a mechanism to maintain homeostasis and plays an important role in promoting cell survival. Autophagy is widely involved in cell physiological and pathological processes. Signal-dependent regulated autophagy is divided into the mTOR-dependent autophagy and mTOR-independent autophagy. The change of autophagic activity is in a variety of human tumors and plays a dual role for the promotion and inhibition in tumor occurrence and development. Along with the deeper study of autophagy, prevention and treatment of tumor by adjusting autophagy is expected.

  11. Research Progress of the Relationship between Autophagy and Lipid Deposition%自噬与脂质沉积关系的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a kind of degradation pathway for the breakdown of cytosolic macromolecules and organelles in eukaryotic cells. In non-adipose tissues, activation of autophagy can protect tissue from damage of lipid deposition,while inhibition of autophagy can prevent the development of obesity in adipose tissue. Autophagy is involved in the regulation of lipid deposition. There is a close relationship between autophagy disorders and lipid deposition-related diseases, such as fatty liver,type 2 diabetes mellitus( T2DM )and metabolic syndrome( MS ). Here is to make a review on the role of autophagy and lipid deposition.%自噬是真核细胞内一种大分子物质和细胞器降解途径,在非脂肪组织,激活自噬可保护组织免于脂质沉积的损伤,在脂肪组织,抑制自噬可阻止肥胖的发展.自噬参与细胞脂质沉积的调节,与脂肪肝、2型糖尿病(T2DM)、代谢综合征(MS)等脂质沉积相关疾病的发生、发展关系密切.现就自噬与脂质沉积的关系予以综述.

  12. Differential Expression of Cell Cycle Regulators During Hyperplastic and Hypertrophic Growth of Broiler Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Suh, Y; Choi, Y M; Chen, P R; Davis, M E; Lee, K

    2015-10-01

    Hyperplastic growth and hypertrophic growth within adipose tissue is tightly associated with cell cycle activity. In this study, CCNG2 and CDKN2C were found to be correlated with cell cycle inhibition during fat cell differentiation, whereas CCND3, CCNA1, and ANAPC5 were positively associated with cell cycle activity during fat cell proliferation after selection based on GEO datasets available on the NCBI website. The findings were validated through comparison of expressions of these genes among different tissues/fractions in broiler chickens and time points during primary cell culture using quantitative real-time PCR. Development of broiler subcutaneous adipose tissue was investigated on embryonic days 15 and 17 and on post-hatch days 0, 5, 11, and 33 using H&E staining and PCNA immunostaining with DAPI counter stain. In addition, mRNA expressions of five cell cycle regulators as well as precursor cell and adipocyte markers were measured at those time points. The results suggest that cellular proliferation activity decreased as the fat pad grows, but a population of precursor cells seemed to be maintained until post-hatch day 5 despite increasing differentiation activity. Hypertrophic growth gradually intensified despite a slight cessation on post-hatch day 0 due to increased energy expenditure during hatching and delayed food access. From post-hatch day 5 to day 11, most of the precursor cells may become differentiated. After post-hatch day 11, hyperplastic growth seemed to slow, while hypertrophic growth may become dominant. This study provides further understanding about broiler fat tissue development which is imperative for effective control of fat deposition.

  13. Adrenergic regulation of cellular plasticity in brown, beige/brite and white adipose tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseyer, Vanesa D; Granneman, James G

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of brown adipose tissue in adult humans along with the recognition of adipocyte heterogeneity and plasticity of white fat depots has renewed the interest in targeting adipose tissue for therapeutic benefit. Adrenergic activation is a well-established means of recruiting catabolic adipocyte phenotypes in brown and white adipose tissues. In this article, we review mechanisms of brown adipocyte recruitment by the sympathetic nervous system and by direct β-adrenergic receptor activation. We highlight the distinct modes of brown adipocyte recruitment in brown, beige/brite, and white adipose tissues, UCP1-independent thermogenesis, and potential non-thermogenic, metabolically beneficial effects of brown adipocytes.

  14. Autophagy and obesity%自噬和肥胖

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张林; 胡茂清

    2015-01-01

    [Summary] Autophagy is an intracellular degradation process by which the damaged organelles and macromolecules are lysosomal dependently degraded by auto‐phagocyte under the control of autophagy‐related genes. The autophagy level in hypothalamus and adipose tissue changes in obese individuals.Autophagy participates in the regulation of food intake and energy balance ,and associates with adipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis. More and more attention has been paid to the relationship between autophagy and obesity w hich may guide the new research direction of pathogenesis study and therapy of obesity.%自噬是在相关基因的调控下,自噬细胞溶酶体依赖性的降解细胞内受损的细胞器及大分子物质的过程。肥胖个体下丘脑、脂肪组织自噬水平改变,自噬参与了下丘脑控制进食及能量平衡调节,并且与脂肪细胞的分化、脂肪形成有关。自噬与肥胖发生的关系日益受到重视,为肥胖的发病机制研究及治疗提供了新的方向。

  15. AUTOPHAGY AND IL-1 FAMILY CYTOKINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Harris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an important intracellular homeostatic mechanism for the targeting of cytosolic constituents, including organelles, for lysosomal degradation. Autophagy plays roles in numerous physiological processes, include immune cell responses to endogenous and exogenous pathogenic stimuli. Moreover, autophagy has a potentially pivotal role in the regulation of inflammatory responses. In particular, autophagy regulates endogenous inflammasome activators, as well as inflammasome components and pro-IL-1β. This review focuses specifically on the role autophagy plays in regulating the production, processing and secretion of IL-1 family cytokines.

  16. Intra-articular delivery of sinomenium encapsulated by chitosan microspheres and photo-crosslinked GelMA hydrogel ameliorates osteoarthritis by effectively regulating autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengfei; Xia, Chen; Mei, Sheng; Wang, Jiying; Shan, Zhi; Lin, Xianfeng; Fan, Shunwu

    2016-03-01

    Reduced expression of autophagy regulators has been observed in pathological cartilage in humans and mice. The present study aimed to investigate the synergistic therapeutic effect of promotion of chondrocyte autophagy via exposure to sinomenium (SIN) encapsulated by chitosan microspheres (CM-SIN) and photo-crosslinked gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogel, with the goal of evaluating CM-SIN as a treatment for patients with osteoarthritis. First, we fabricated and characterized GelMA hydrogels and chitosan microspheres. Next, we measured the effect of SIN on cartilage matrix degradation induced by IL1-β in chondrocytes and an ex vivo model. SIN ameliorated the pathological changes induced by IL1-β at least partially through activation of autophagy. Moreover, we surgically induced osteoarthritis in mice, which were injected intra-articularly with CM-SIN and GelMA. Cartilage matrix degradation and chondrocyte autophagy were evaluated 4 and 8 weeks after surgery. Treatment with the combination of CM-SIN and GelMA retarded the progression of surgically induced OA. SIN ameliorated cartilage matrix degradation at least partially by inducing autophagy in vivo. Our results demonstrate that injection of the combination of GelMA hydrogel and CM-SIN could be a promising strategy for treating patients with osteoarthritis.

  17. Regulation of metabolic health and adipose tissue function by group 2 innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cautivo, Kelly M; Molofsky, Ari B

    2016-06-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) is home to an abundance of immune cells. With chronic obesity, inflammatory immune cells accumulate and promote insulin resistance and the progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus. In contrast, recent studies have highlighted the regulation and function of immune cells in lean, healthy AT, including those associated with type 2 or "allergic" immunity. Although traditionally activated by infection with multicellular helminthes, AT type 2 immunity is active independently of infection, and promotes tissue homeostasis, AT "browning," and systemic insulin sensitivity, protecting against obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In particular, group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) are integral regulators of AT type 2 immunity, producing the cytokines interleukin-5 and IL-13, promoting eosinophils and alternatively activated macrophages, and cooperating with and promoting AT regulatory T (Treg) cells. In this review, we focus on the recent developments in our understanding of group 2 innate lymphoid cell cells and type 2 immunity in AT metabolism and homeostasis.

  18. Nutritional Status and Cardiac Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihyun Ahn

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is necessary for the degradation of long-lasting proteins and nonfunctional organelles, and is activated to promote cellular survival. However, overactivation of autophagy may deplete essential molecules and organelles responsible for cellular survival. Lifelong calorie restriction by 40% has been shown to increase the cardiac expression of autophagic markers, which suggests that it may have a cardioprotective effect by decreasing oxidative damage brought on by aging and cardiovascular diseases. Although cardiac autophagy is critical to regulating protein quality and maintaining cellular function and survival, increased or excessive autophagy may have deleterious effects on the heart under some circumstances, including pressure overload-induced heart failure. The importance of autophagy has been shown in nutrient supply and preservation of energy in times of limitation, such as ischemia. Some studies have suggested that a transition from obesity to metabolic syndrome may involve progressive changes in myocardial inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, fibrosis, apoptosis, and myocardial autophagy.

  19. Leptin differentially regulates STAT3 activation in the ob/ob mice adipose mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptin-deficient genetically obese ob/ob mice exhibit adipocyte hypertrophy and hyperplasia as well as elevated adipose tissue and systemic inflammation. Studies have shown that multipotent stem cells isolated from adult adipose tissue can differentiate into adipocytes ex vivo and thereby contribute...

  20. TUSC5 regulates insulin-mediated adipose tissue glucose uptake by modulation of GLUT4 recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Beaton

    2015-11-01

    Conclusions: Collectively, these findings establish TUSC5 as an adipose tissue-specific protein that enables proper protein recycling, linking the ubiquitous vesicle traffic machinery with tissue-specific insulin-mediated glucose uptake into adipose tissue and the maintenance of a healthy metabolic phenotype in mice and humans.

  1. Regulation and function of FTO mRNA expression in human skeletal muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Louise G; Nilsson, Emma; Ling, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Common variants in FTO (the fat-mass and obesity-associated gene) associate with obesity and type 2 diabetes. The regulation and biological function of FTO mRNA expression in target tissue is unknown. We investigated the genetic and non-genetic regulation of FTO mRNA in skeletal muscle...... and adipose tissue, and their influence on in vivo glucose and fat metabolism. Research Design and Methods. The FTO rs9939609 polymorphism was genotyped in two twin cohorts: 1) 298 elderly twins aged 62-83 years with glucose tolerance ranging from normal to type 2 diabetes and 2) 196 young (25-32 years......, FTO mRNA expression was negatively associated to fat and positively to glucose oxidation rates as well as positively correlated with expression of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation including PGC1alpha. Conclusions. The heritability of FTO expression in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle...

  2. Autophagy in cancer: good, bad, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippert, Melanie M; O'Toole, Patrick S; Thorburn, Andrew

    2006-10-01

    Autophagy has been recognized as an important cellular process for at least 50 years; however, it is only with the recent identification of key regulators of autophagy (Atg genes) that we have begun a mechanistic exploration of its importance in cancer. Recent studies suggest that autophagy may be important in the regulation of cancer development and progression and in determining the response of tumor cells to anticancer therapy. However, the role of autophagy in these processes is complicated and may, depending on the circumstances, have diametrically opposite consequences for the tumor. In this article, we discuss recent discoveries regarding autophagy in cancer.

  3. Regulation of gene expression by FSP27 in white and brown adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Bofu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brown and white adipose tissues (BAT and WAT play critical roles in controlling energy homeostasis and in the development of obesity and diabetes. The mouse Fat-Specific protein 27 (FSP27, a member of the cell death-inducing DFF45-like effector (CIDE family, is expressed in both BAT and WAT and is associated with lipid droplets. Over-expression of FSP27 promotes lipid storage, whereas FSP27 deficient mice have improved insulin sensitivity and are resistant to diet-induced obesity. In addition, FSP27-deficient white adipocytes have reduced lipid storage, smaller lipid droplets, increased mitochondrial activity and a higher expression of several BAT-selective genes. To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which FSP27 controls lipid storage and gene expression in WAT and BAT, we systematically analyzed the gene expression profile of FSP27-deficient WAT by microarray analysis and compared the expression levels of a specific set of genes in WAT and BAT by semi-quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Results BAT-selective genes were significantly up-regulated, whereas WAT-selective genes were down-regulated in the WAT of FSP27-deficient mice. The expression of the BAT-selective genes was also dramatically up-regulated in the WAT of leptin/FSP27 double deficient mice. In addition, the expression levels of genes involved in multiple metabolic pathways, including oxidative phosphorylation, the TCA cycle, fatty acid synthesis and fatty acid oxidation, were increased in the FSP27-deficient WAT. In contrast, the expression levels for genes involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, the classic complement pathway and TGF-β signaling were down-regulated in the FSP27-deficient WAT. Most importantly, the expression levels of regulatory factors that determine BAT identity, such as CEBPα/β, PRDM16 and major components of the cAMP pathway, were markedly up-regulated in the WAT of FSP27-deficient mice. The expression levels of these regulatory

  4. Adipose triglyceride lipase is a TG hydrolase of the small intestine and regulates intestinal PPARα signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrowsky, Sascha; Chandak, Prakash G; Patankar, Jay V; Povoden, Silvia; Schlager, Stefanie; Kershaw, Erin E; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G; Hoefler, Gerald; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Kratky, Dagmar

    2013-02-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the rate-limiting enzyme mediating triglyceride (TG) hydrolysis. The lack of ATGL results in TG accumulation in multiple tissues, underscoring the critical role of ATGL in maintaining lipid homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that ATGL affects TG metabolism via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). To investigate specific effects of intestinal ATGL on lipid metabolism we generated mice lacking ATGL exclusively in the intestine (ATGLiKO). We found decreased TG hydrolase activity and increased intracellular TG content in ATGLiKO small intestines. Intragastric administration of [(3)H]trioleate resulted in the accumulation of radioactive TG in the intestine, whereas absorption into the systemic circulation was unchanged. Intraperitoneally injected [(3)H]oleate also accumulated within TG in ATGLiKO intestines, indicating that ATGL mobilizes fatty acids from the systemic circulation absorbed by the basolateral side from the blood. Down-regulation of PPARα target genes suggested modulation of cholesterol absorption by intestinal ATGL. Accordingly, ATGL deficiency in the intestine resulted in delayed cholesterol absorption. Importantly, this study provides evidence that ATGL has no impact on intestinal TG absorption but hydrolyzes TGs taken up from the intestinal lumen and systemic circulation. Our data support the role of ATGL in modulating PPARα-dependent processes also in the small intestine.

  5. A Secreted Slit2 Fragment Regulates Adipose Tissue Thermogenesis and Metabolic Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Katrin J; Long, Jonathan Z; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Cohen, Paul; Lo, James C; Serag, Sara; Kir, Serkan; Shinoda, Kosaku; Tartaglia, Julia A; Rao, Rajesh R; Chédotal, Alain; Kajimura, Shingo; Gygi, Steven P; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2016-03-01

    Activation of brown and beige fat can reduce obesity and improve glucose homeostasis through nonshivering thermogenesis. Whether brown or beige fat also secretes paracrine or endocrine factors to promote and amplify adaptive thermogenesis is not fully explored. Here we identify Slit2, a 180 kDa member of the Slit extracellular protein family, as a PRDM16-regulated secreted factor from beige fat cells. In isolated cells and in mice, full-length Slit2 is cleaved to generate several smaller fragments, and we identify an active thermogenic moiety as the C-terminal fragment. This Slit2-C fragment of 50 kDa promotes adipose thermogenesis, augments energy expenditure, and improves glucose homeostasis in vivo. Mechanistically, Slit2 induces a robust activation of PKA signaling, which is required for its prothermogenic activity. Our findings establish a previously unknown peripheral role for Slit2 as a beige fat secreted factor that has therapeutic potential for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  6. Regulation of Diet-Induced Adipose Tissue and Systemic Inflammation by Salicylates and Pioglitazone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Nozomu; Shimada, Takeshi; Liu, Libin; Moore, Kristin; Woo, Ju Rang; Shoelson, Steven E.; Lee, Jongsoon

    2013-01-01

    It is increasingly accepted that chronic inflammation participates in obesity-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Salicylates and thiazolidinediones (TZDs) both have anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperglycemic properties. The present study compared the effects of these drugs on obesity-induced inflammation in adipose tissue (AT) and AT macrophages (ATMs), as well as the metabolic and immunological phenotypes of the animal models. Both drugs improved high fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance. However, salicylates did not affect AT and ATM inflammation, whereas Pioglitazone improved these parameters. Interestingly, HFD and the drug treatments all modulated systemic inflammation as assessed by changes in circulating immune cell numbers and activation states. HFD increased the numbers of circulating white blood cells, neutrophils, and a pro-inflammatory monocyte subpopulation (Ly6Chi), whereas salicylates and Pioglitazone normalized these cell numbers. The drug treatments also decreased circulating lymphocyte numbers. These data suggest that obesity induces systemic inflammation by regulating circulating immune cell phenotypes and that anti-diabetic interventions suppress systemic inflammation by normalizing circulating immune phenotypes. PMID:24376593

  7. Invariant natural killer T cells in adipose tissue: novel regulators of immune-mediated metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhshandehroo, M; Kalkhoven, E; Boes, M

    2013-12-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) represents a microenvironment where intersection takes place between immune processes and metabolic pathways. A variety of immune cells have been characterized in AT over the past decades, with the most recent addition of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. As members of the T cell family, iNKT cells represent a subset that exhibits both innate and adaptive characteristics and directs ensuing immune responses. In disease conditions, iNKT cells have established roles that include disorders in the autoimmune spectrum in malignancies and infectious diseases. Recent work supports a role for iNKT cells in the maintenance of AT homeostasis through both immune and metabolic pathways. The deficiency of iNKT cells can result in AT metabolic disruptions and insulin resistance. In this review, we summarize recent work on iNKT cells in immune regulation, with an emphasis on AT-resident iNKT cells, and identify the potential mechanisms by which adipocytes can mediate iNKT cell activity.

  8. Adipose triglyceride lipase regulates eicosanoid production in activated human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichlberger, Andrea; Schlager, Stefanie; Maaninka, Katariina; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Kovanen, Petri T

    2014-12-01

    Human mast cells (MCs) contain TG-rich cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) with high arachidonic acid (AA) content. Here, we investigated the functional role of adipose TG lipase (ATGL) in TG hydrolysis and the ensuing release of AA as substrate for eicosanoid generation by activated human primary MCs in culture. Silencing of ATGL in MCs by siRNAs induced the accumulation of neutral lipids in LDs. IgE-dependent activation of MCs triggered the secretion of the two major eicosanoids, prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and leukotriene C4 (LTC4). The immediate release of PGD2 from the activated MCs was solely dependent on cyclooxygenase (COX) 1, while during the delayed phase of lipid mediator production, the inducible COX-2 also contributed to its release. Importantly, when ATGL-silenced MCs were activated, the secretion of both PGD2 and LTC4 was significantly reduced. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect on the release of LTC4 was even more pronounced in ATGL-silenced MCs than in cytosolic phospholipase A2-silenced MCs. These data show that ATGL hydrolyzes AA-containing TGs present in human MC LDs and define ATGL as a novel regulator of the substrate availability of AA for eicosanoid generation upon MC activation.

  9. Insulin regulates Glut4 confinement in plasma membrane clusters in adipose cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizunov, Vladimir A; Stenkula, Karin; Troy, Aaron; Cushman, Samuel W; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-stimulated delivery of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane (PM) is the hallmark of glucose metabolism. In this study we examined insulin's effects on GLUT4 organization in PM of adipose cells by direct microscopic observation of single monomers tagged with photoswitchable fluorescent protein. In the basal state, after exocytotic delivery only a fraction of GLUT4 is dispersed into the PM as monomers, while most of the GLUT4 stays at the site of fusion and forms elongated clusters (60-240 nm). GLUT4 monomers outside clusters diffuse freely and do not aggregate with other monomers. In contrast, GLUT4 molecule collision with an existing cluster can lead to immediate confinement and association with that cluster. Insulin has three effects: it shifts the fraction of dispersed GLUT4 upon delivery, it augments the dissociation of GLUT4 monomers from clusters ∼3-fold and it decreases the rate of endocytic uptake. All together these three effects of insulin shift most of the PM GLUT4 from clustered to dispersed states. GLUT4 confinement in clusters represents a novel kinetic mechanism for insulin regulation of glucose homeostasis.

  10. Depletion of white adipose tissue in cancer cachexia syndrome is associated with inflammatory signaling and disrupted circadian regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tsoli

    Full Text Available Involuntary weight loss in patients with cancer is the hallmark of cancer cachexia. The etiology of cachexia is multifactorial involving loss of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue associated with high systemic levels of acute phase proteins and inflammatory cytokines. While muscle wasting overtly impacts on cancer patient quality of life, loss of lipid depots represents a sustained energy imbalance. In this study fat depletion was examined in Colon-26 model of cancer cachexia, which is a widely used rodent model of this syndrome. We investigated diurnal expression of circadian rhythm regulators as well as key mediators of energy metabolism and cytokine signaling. Mice bearing the C26 tumour exhibited reduced adipose mass, elevated adipose tissue lipolysis and a 5-fold increase in plasma levels of free fatty acids. These changes were associated with activated IL-6 signaling in WAT through a 3-fold increase in phosphorylated STAT3 and high SOCS3 gene expression levels. In addition perturbations in circadian regulation of lipid metabolism were also observed. Lipid catabolism did not appear to be influenced by the classical PKA pathway activating the lipase HSL. ATGL protein levels were elevated 2-fold in cachectic mice while 4-fold increase phosphorylated ACC and a 2-fold decrease in phosphorylated 4EBP1 was observed indicating that lipid metabolism is modulated by the ATGL & AMPK/mTOR pathways. This study provides evidence for activation of cytokine signaling and concomitant alterations in circadian rhythm and regulators of lipid metabolism in WAT of cachectic animals.

  11. Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO is regulated in white and brown adipose tissue by obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misty M Thompson

    Full Text Available Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO is an outer-mitochondrial membrane transporter which has many functions including participation in the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, production of cellular energy, and is the rate-limiting step in the uptake of cholesterol. TSPO expression is dysregulated during disease pathologies involving changes in tissue energy demands such as cancer, and is up-regulated in activated macrophages during the inflammatory response. Obesity is associated with decreased energy expenditure, mitochondrial dysfunction, and chronic low-grade inflammation which collectively contribute to the development of the Metabolic Syndrome. Therefore, we hypothesized that dysregulation of TSPO in adipose tissue may be a feature of disease pathology in obesity. Radioligand binding studies revealed a significant reduction in TSPO ligand binding sites in mitochondrial extracts from both white (WAT and brown adipose tissue (BAT in mouse models of obesity (diet-induced and genetic compared to control animals. We also confirmed a reduction in TSPO gene expression in whole tissue extracts from WAT and BAT. Immunohistochemistry in WAT confirmed TSPO expression in adipocytes but also revealed high-levels of TSPO expression in WAT macrophages in obese animals. No changes in TSPO expression were observed in WAT or BAT after a 17 hour fast or 4 hour cold exposure. Treatment of mice with the TSPO ligand PK11195 resulted in regulation of metabolic genes in WAT. Together, these results suggest a potential role for TSPO in mediating adipose tissue homeostasis.

  12. Sexual dimorphic regulation of body weight dynamics and adipose tissue lipolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Benz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Successful reduction of body weight (BW is often followed by recidivism to obesity. BW-changes including BW-loss and -regain is associated with marked alterations in energy expenditure (EE and adipose tissue (AT metabolism. Since these processes are sex-specifically controlled, we investigated sexual dimorphisms in metabolic processes during BW-dynamics (gain-loss-regain. RESEARCH DESIGN: Obesity was induced in C57BL/6J male (m and female (f mice by 15 weeks high-fat diet (HFD feeding. Subsequently BW was reduced (-20% by caloric restriction (CR followed by adaptive feeding, and a regain-phase. Measurement of EE, body composition, blood/organ sampling were performed after each feeding period. Lipolysis was analyzed ex-vivo in gonadal AT. RESULTS: Male mice exhibited accelerated BW-gain compared to females (relative BW-gain m:140.5±3.2%; f:103.7±6.5%; p<0.001. In consonance, lean mass-specific EE was significantly higher in females compared to males during BW-gain. Under CR female mice reached their target-BW significantly faster than male mice (m:12.2 days; f:7.6 days; p<0.001 accompanied by a sustained sex-difference in EE. In addition, female mice predominantly downsized gonadal AT whereas the relation between gonadal and total body fat was not altered in males. Accordingly, only females exhibited an increased rate of forskolin-stimulated lipolysis in AT associated with significantly higher glycerol concentrations, lower RER-values, and increased AT expression of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL and hormone sensitive lipase (HSL. Analysis of AT lipolysis in estrogen receptor alpha (ERα-deficient mice revealed a reduced lipolytic rate in the absence of ERα exclusively in females. Finally, re-feeding caused BW-regain faster in males than in females. CONCLUSION: The present study shows sex-specific dynamics during BW-gain-loss-regain. Female mice responded to CR with an increase in lipolytic activity, and augmented lipid

  13. Autophagy in mammalian cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kadija; Abounit; Tiziano; M; Scarabelli; Roy; B; McCauley

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a regulated process for the degradation of cellular components that has been well conserved in eukaryotic cells. The discovery of autophagy-regulating proteins in yeast has been important in understanding this process. Although many parallels exist between fungi and mammals in the regulation and execution of autophagy, there are some important differences. The preautophagosomal structure found in yeast has not been identified in mammals, and it seems that there may be multiple origins for autophagosomes, including endoplasmic reticulum, plasma membrane and mitochondrial outer membrane. The maturation of the phagophore is largely dependent on 5’-AMP activated protein kinase and other factors that lead to the dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. Once the process is initiated, the mammalian phagophore elongates and matures into an autophagosome by processes that are similar to those in yeast. Cargo selection is dependent on the ubiquitin conjugation of protein aggregates and organelles and recognition of these conjugates by autophagosomal receptors. Lysosomal degradation of cargo produces metabolites that can be recycled during stress. Autophagy is an impor-tant cellular safeguard during starvation in all eukaryotes; however, it may have more complicated, tissue specific roles in mammals. With certain exceptions, autophagy seems to be cytoprotective, and defects in the process have been associated with human disease.

  14. 细胞自噬的调控机制及其在老年性痴呆发生发展中的作用%The Mechanism of Autophagy Regulation and The Role of Autophagy in Alzheimer's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘知学; 陈洁; 张德翼

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a main pathway that clears the dysfunction organelles, misfolding proteins and oxidative lipids. It's important for maintaining life activity and conserved from yeast to mammalian. In the AD neurons the misfolding proteins were not efficiently cleared then accumulated. These caused neurons loss of function even neuron death. This review focuses on the recent progresses on regulation of autophagy and the role of autophagy in Alzheimer's diseases. Autophagy is protective in early stage of AD, although it induces autophagic cell death in late stage of AD. Autophagosome may be the main site for Aβ production and clearance. Presenilin 1 which is the key proteinase in γ-secrectase also plays a role in lysosomal acidification which is a key step for autophagic degradation. Tau may be involved in autophagosome trafficking and autophagosome-lysosome fusion. mTOR and AMPK sensing nutrients and energy in cells also regulate autophagy.%细胞自噬是生物体内一种用于清除功能异常的细胞器、错误折叠的蛋白质、被氧化的脂类等有害大分子物质的重要途径.它的机制从低等生物酵母到高等的哺乳动物都高度保守,对维持正常的生命活动至关重要.错误折叠的蛋白质若不能被有效清除,就会造成积聚,致使神经细胞功能丧失乃至死亡,这是神经退行性疾病包括老年性痴呆(Alzheimer's disease,AD)的主要原因.本文回顾了近年来关于细胞自噬及其与老年性痴呆关系的研究进展,主要内容包括以下几点:自噬参与Aβ的产生和清除;γ分泌酶中的Presenilin 1在自噬底物降解中的作用:Tau蛋白调控自噬体转运、融合;老年性痴呆 早期自噬对细胞的保护;细胞中感应营养和能量的两个关键蛋白mTOR和AMPK调控自噬及其对老年性痴呆的潜在影响机制.

  15. A novel protective mechanism for mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) in type i diabetes-induced cardiac dysfunction: role of AMPK-regulated autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuli; Yu, Wenjun; Sun, Dongdong; Wang, Jiaxing; Li, Congye; Zhang, Rongqing; Babcock, Sara A; Li, Yan; Liu, Min; Ma, Meijuan; Shen, Mingzhi; Zeng, Chao; Li, Na; He, Wei; Zou, Qian; Zhang, Yingmei; Wang, Haichang

    2015-02-01

    AMPK -dependent regulation of autophagy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Autophagy and protein quality control in cardiometabolic diseases.

  16. Autophagy induction by leptin contributes to suppression of apoptosis in cancer cells and xenograft model: involvement of p53/FoxO3A axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepal, Saroj; Kim, Mi Jin; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Sang Hyun; Sohn, Dong-Hwan; Lee, Sung Hee; Song, Kyung; Choi, Dong Young; Lee, Eung Seok; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2015-03-30

    Leptin, a hormone mainly produced from adipose tissue, has been shown to induce proliferation of cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying leptin-induced tumor progression have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the role of autophagy in leptin-induced cancer cell proliferation using human hepatoma (HepG2) and breast cancer cells (MCF-7), and tumor growth in a xenograft model. Herein, we showed that leptin treatment caused autophagy induction as assessed by increase in expression of autophagy-related genes, including beclin-1, Atg5 and LC3 II, further induction of autophagosome formation and autophagic flux. Interestingly, inhibition of autophagic process by treatment with inhibitors and LC3B gene silencing blocked leptin-induced increase in cell number and suppression of apoptosis, indicating a crucial role of autophagy in leptin-induced tumor progression. Moreover, gene silencing of p53 or FoxO3A prevented leptin-induced LC3 II protein expression, suggesting an involvement of p53/FoxO3A axis in leptin-induced autophagy activation. Leptin administration also accelerated tumor growth in BALB/c nude mice, which was found to be autophagy dependent. Taken together, our results demonstrate that leptin-induced tumor growth is mediated by autophagy induction and autophagic process would be a promising target to regulate development of cancer caused by leptin production.

  17. Developmental regulation of adipose tissue growth through hyperplasia and hypertrophy in the embryonic Leghorn and broiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Paula; Suh, Yeunsu; Choi, Young Min; Shin, Sangsu; Lee, Kichoon

    2014-07-01

    The United States is a world leader in poultry production, which is the reason why achieving better performance and muscle growth each year is a necessity. Reducing accretion of adipose tissue is another important factor for poultry producers because this allows more nutrients to be directed toward muscle growth, but the effect of embryonic adipose growth on posthatch development has not been fully understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the total DNA mass, morphological characteristics, differentiation markers, and triglyceride breakdown factors of embryonic adipose tissue, and their relation to hyperplastic and hypertrophic growth within layers (Leghorn) and meat-type chickens (broilers). After embryonic day (E) 12, broiler weight was significantly higher than Leghorn, and this trend continued throughout the rest of incubation and posthatch (P hypertrophy. At embryonic stages and early posthatch, layer- and meat-type chicken adipose growth does not differ, which suggests breed differences occur posthatch.

  18. The role of brown adipose tissue in temperature regulation. [of hibernating and hypothermic mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The thermogenetic capacities of brown adipose tissue were studied on marmots, rats and monkeys in response to cold exposure. All experiments indicated that the brown fat produced heat and slowed the cooling of tissues.

  19. Visfatin mRNA expression in human subcutaneous adipose tissue is regulated by exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydelund-Larsen, Lone; Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Nielsen, Søren;

    2006-01-01

    Visfatin [pre-beta-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF)] is a novel adipokine that is produced by adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and liver and has insulin-mimetic actions. Regular exercise enhances insulin sensitivity. In the present study, we therefore examined visfatin mRNA expression...... in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and skeletal muscle biopsies obtained from healthy young men at time points 0, 3, 4.5, 6, 9, and 24 h in relation to either 3 h of ergometer cycle exercise at 60% of Vo(2 max) or rest. Adipose tissue visfatin mRNA expression increased threefold at the time points 3, 4.......5, and 6 h in response to exercise (n = 8) compared with preexercise samples and compared with the resting control group (n = 7, P = 0.001). Visfatin mRNA expression in skeletal muscle was not influenced by exercise. The exercise-induced increase in adipose tissue visfatin was, however, not accompanied...

  20. Autophagy regulating kinases as potential therapeutic targets for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Kauppinen, Anu; Blasiak, Janusz; Salminen, Antero

    2012-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central vision loss in the elderly in the developed countries. The number of AMD patients will double during the next decades due to increasing number of aged people. Chronic oxidative stress, inflammation and accumulation of protein-rich deposits both in the retinal pigment epithelium lysosomes and under the retinal pigment epithelium herald the onset of AMD. The disease can be divided into dry and wet AMD forms. The dry form of the disease is more prevalent accounting for up to 90% of all cases. Continued intraocular injections are the current treatment strategy to prevent progression of wet AMD. It is a major challenge to develop new drugs that could prevent or at least ease the symptoms of the increasing population of AMD patients. Since AMD pathology is clearly associated with accumulated protein deposits, the autophagy clearance system might represent a potential future therapeutic target for AMD as is thoroughly discussed here.

  1. Vitamin D differentially regulates Salmonella-induced intestine epithelial autophagy and interleukin-1β expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fu-Chen

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of active vitamin D3 on autophagy and interleukin (IL)-1β expression in Salmonella-infected intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). METHODS Caco-2 cells, NOD2 siRNA-, Atg16L1 siRNA- or vitamin D receptor (VDR) siRNA-transfected Caco-2 cells were pretreated with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3), and then infected by wild-type S. typhimurium strain SL1344. The conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II was detected by Western blot analysis and LC3+ autophagosome was analyzed by immunofluorescence. Caco-2 cells or VDR siRNA-transfected cells were pretreated with 1,25D3, and then infected by SL1344. Membrane protein and total RNA were analyzed by Western blot and RT-PCR for VDR and Atg16L1 protein and mRNA expression, respectively. Atg16L1 siRNA-transfected Caco-2 cells were pretreated by 1,25D3 and then infected with SL1344. Total RNA was analyzed by RT-PCR for IL-1β mRNA expression. RESULTS The active form of vitamin D, 1,25D3, showed enhanced VDR-mediated Atg16L1 mRNA expression, membranous Atg16L1 protein expression leading to enhanced autophagic LC3II protein expression and LC3 punctae in Salmonella-infected Caco-2 cells which was counteracted by Atg16L1 and VDR siRNA, but Atg16L1 mediated suppression of IL-1β expression. Thus, active vitamin D may enhance autophagy but suppress inflammatory IL-1β expression in Salmonella-infected IECs. CONCLUSION Active vitamin D might enhance autophagic clearance of Salmonella infection, while modulation of inflammatory responses prevents the host from detrimental effects of overwhelming inflammation. PMID:28058015

  2. Precision autophagy: Will the next wave of selective autophagy markers and specific autophagy inhibitors feed clinical pipelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebovitz, Chandra B; DeVorkin, Lindsay; Bosc, Damien; Rothe, Katharina; Singh, Jagbir; Bally, Marcel; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Young, Robert N; Lum, Julian J; Gorski, Sharon M

    2015-01-01

    Research presented at the Vancouver Autophagy Symposium (VAS) 2014 suggests that autophagy's influence on health and disease depends on tight regulation and precision targeting of substrates. Discussions recognized a pressing need for robust biomarkers that accurately assess the clinical utility of modulating autophagy in disease contexts. Biomarker discovery could flow from investigations of context-dependent triggers, sensors, and adaptors that tailor the autophagy machinery to achieve target specificity. In his keynote address, Dr. Vojo Deretic (University of New Mexico) described the discovery of a cargo receptor family that utilizes peptide motif-based cargo recognition, a mechanism that may be more precise than generic substrate tagging. The keynote by Dr. Alec Kimmelman (Harvard Medical School) emphasized that unbiased screens for novel selective autophagy factors may accelerate the development of autophagy-based therapies. Using a quantitative proteomics screen for de novo identification of autophagosome substrates in pancreatic cancer, Kimmelman's group discovered a new type of selective autophagy that regulates bioavailable iron. Additional presentations revealed novel autophagy regulators and receptors in metabolic diseases, proteinopathies, and cancer, and outlined the development of specific autophagy inhibitors and treatment regimens that combine autophagy modulation with anticancer therapies. VAS 2014 stimulated interdisciplinary discussions focused on the development of biomarkers, drugs, and preclinical models to facilitate clinical translation of key autophagy discoveries.

  3. AKT3 controls mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy via regulation of the major nuclear export protein CRM-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corum, Daniel G; Tsichlis, Philip N; Muise-Helmericks, Robin C

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that Akt3 is required for mitochondrial biogenesis in primary human endothelial cells (ECs) and in Akt3-null mice; Akt3 affects subcellular localization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1 (PGC-1α), the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. The purpose of this study is to determine the mechanism by which Akt3 controls the subcellular distribution of PGC-1α and to explore the effect on mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover during angiogenesis. Here we use standard biochemical analyses and Akt3-knockdown strategies to show that Akt3 controls the stabilization of chromosome maintenance region-1 (CRM-1), the major nuclear export receptor. Site-directed mutagenesis and association analyses show that PGC-1α nuclear export is CRM-1 dependent. Akt3 knockdown and CRM-1 overexpression cause 3-fold reductions in PGC-1α target gene expression, compared to control levels. Akt3 inhibition causes autophagy, as measured by autophagosome formation, in a CRM-1-dependent, Akt1/mTOR-independent pathway. In vivo, Akt3-null and heterozygous mice show dose-dependent decreases in angiogenesis compared to wild-type littermates (~5- and 2.5-fold decreases, respectively), as assessed by Matrigel plug assays. This correlates with an ~1.5-fold decrease in mitochondrial Cox IV expression. Our studies suggest that Akt3 is a regulator of mitochondrial dynamics in the vasculature via regulation of CRM-1-dependent nuclear export.

  4. Novel regulator of acylated ghrelin, CF801, reduces weight gain, rebound feeding after a fast, and adiposity in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K Wellman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ghrelin is a 28 amino-acid hormonal peptide that is intimately related to the regulation of food intake and body weight. Once secreted, ghrelin binds to the growth hormone secretagogue receptor-1a (GHSR-1a, the only known receptor for ghrelin and is capable of activating a number of signaling cascades ultimately resulting in an increase in food intake and adiposity. Because ghrelin has been linked to overeating and the development of obesity, a number of pharmacological interventions have been generated in order to interfere with either the activation of ghrelin or interrupting ghrelin signaling as a means to reducing appetite and decrease weight gain. Here we present a novel peptide, CF801, capable of reducing circulating acylated ghrelin levels and subsequent body weight gain and adiposity. To this end, we show that IP administration of CF801 is sufficient to reduce circulating plasma acylated ghrelin levels. Acutely, intraperitoneal injections of CF801 resulted in decreased rebound feeding after an overnight fast. When delivered chronically decreased weight gain and adiposity without affecting caloric intake. CF801, however, did cause a change in diet preference, decreasing preference for a high fat diet and increasing preference for regular chow diet. Given the complexity of ghrelin receptor function, we propose that CF801 along with other compounds that regulate ghrelin secretion may prove to be a beneficial tool in the study of the ghrelin system, and potential targets for ghrelin based obesity treatments without altering the function of ghrelin receptors.

  5. The pancreatitis-associated protein VMP1, a key regulator of inducible autophagy, promotes KrasG12D-mediated pancreatic cancer initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loncle, C; Molejon, M I; Lac, S; Tellechea, J I; Lomberk, G; Gramatica, L; Fernandez Zapico, M F; Dusetti, N; Urrutia, R; Iovanna, J L

    2016-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental evidence have firmly established that chronic pancreatitis, in particular in the context of Kras oncogenic mutations, predisposes to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the repertoire of molecular mediators of pancreatitis involved in Kras-mediated initiation of pancreatic carcinogenesis remains to be fully defined. In this study we demonstrate a novel role for vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1), a pancreatitis-associated protein critical for inducible autophagy, in the regulation of Kras-induced PDAC initiation. Using a newly developed genetically engineered model, we demonstrate that VMP1 increases the ability of Kras to give rise to preneoplastic lesions, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs). This promoting effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation is due, at least in part, by an increase in cell proliferation combined with a decrease in apoptosis. Using chloroquine, an inhibitor of autophagy, we show that this drug antagonizes the effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation. Thus, we conclude that VMP1-mediated autophagy cooperate with Kras to promote PDAC initiation. These findings are of significant medical relevance, molecules targeting autophagy are currently being tested along chemotherapeutic agents to treat PDAC and other tumors in human trials. PMID:27415425

  6. Metabolic reprogramming through fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1 regulates macrophage inflammatory potential and adipose inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy R. Johnson

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: Our findings provide evidence that FATP1 is a novel regulator of MΦ activation through control of substrate metabolism. Absence of FATP1 exacerbated pro-inflammatory activation in vitro and increased local and systemic components of the metabolic syndrome in HFD-fed Fatp1B−/− mice. In contrast, gain of FATP1 activity in MΦs suggested that Fatp1-mediated activation of fatty acids, substrate switch to glucose, oxidative stress, and lipid mediator synthesis are potential mechanisms. We demonstrate for the first time that FATP1 provides a unique mechanism by which the inflammatory tone of adipose and systemic metabolism may be regulated.

  7. The symphony of autophagy and calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhiyuan; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Posttranslational regulation of macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy), including phosphorylating and dephosphorylating components of the autophagy-related (Atg) core machinery and the corresponding upstream transcriptional factors, is important for the precise modulation of autophagy levels. Several kinases that are involved in phosphorylating autophagy-related proteins have been identified in both yeast and mammalian cells. However, there has been much less research published with regard to the identification of the complementary phosphatases that function in autophagy. A recent study identified PPP3/calcineurin, a calcium-dependent phosphatase, as a regulator of autophagy, and demonstrated that one of the key targets of PPP3/calcineurin is TFEB, a master transcriptional factor that controls autophagy and lysosomal function in mammalian cells.

  8. Modulation of pathogen recognition by autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun eOh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an ancient biological process for maintaining cellular homeostasis by degradation of long-lived cytosolic proteins and organelles. Recent studies demonstrated that autophagy is availed by immune cells to regulate innate immunity. On the one hand, cells exert direct effector function by degrading intracellular pathogens; on the other hand, autophagy modulates pathogen recognition and downstream signaling for innate immune responses. Pathogen recognition via pattern recognition receptors induces autophagy. The function of phagocytic cells is enhanced by recruitment of autophagy-related proteins. Moreover, autophagy acts as a delivery system for viral replication complexes to migrate to the endosomal compartments where virus sensing occurs. In another case, key molecules of the autophagic pathway have been found to negatively regulate immune signaling, thus preventing aberrant activation of cytokine production and consequent immune responses. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in the role of autophagy in pathogen recognition and modulation of innate immune responses.

  9. Inducing autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Lea M; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Andersen, Jens S.

    2014-01-01

    catabolism, which has recently been found to induce autophagy in an MTOR independent way and support cancer cell survival. In this study, quantitative phosphoproteomics was applied to investigate the initial signaling events linking ammonia to the induction of autophagy. The MTOR inhibitor rapamycin was used...

  10. The cellular decision between apoptosis and autophagy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Jun Fan; Wei-Xing Zong

    2013-01-01

    Apoptosis and autophagy are important molecular processes that maintain organismal and cellular homeostasis,respectively.While apoptosis fulfills its role through dismantling damaged or unwanted cells,autophagy maintains cellular homeostasis through recycling selective intracellular organelles and molecules.Yet in some conditions,autophagy can lead to cell death.Apoptosis and autophagy can be stimulated by the same stresses.Emerging evidence indicates an interplay between the core proteins in both pathways,which underlies the molecular mechanism of the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy.This review summarizes recent literature on molecules that regulate both the apoptotic and autophagic processes.

  11. Redox regulation of antioxidants, autophagy, and the response to stress: implications for electrophile therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levonen, Anna-Liisa; Hill, Bradford G; Kansanen, Emilia; Zhang, Jianhua; Darley-Usmar, Victor M

    2014-06-01

    Redox networks in the cell integrate signaling pathways that control metabolism, energetics, cell survival, and death. The physiological second messengers that modulate these pathways include nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide, and electrophiles. Electrophiles are produced in the cell via both enzymatic and nonenzymatic lipid peroxidation and are also relatively abundant constituents of the diet. These compounds bind covalently to families of cysteine-containing, redox-sensing proteins that constitute the electrophile-responsive proteome, the subproteomes of which are found in localized intracellular domains. These include those proteins controlling responses to oxidative stress in the cytosol-notably the Keap1-Nrf2 pathway, the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, and proteins in other compartments including mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. The signaling pathways through which electrophiles function have unique characteristics that could be exploited for novel therapeutic interventions; however, development of such therapeutic strategies has been challenging due to a lack of basic understanding of the mechanisms controlling this form of redox signaling. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the basic mechanisms of thiol-electrophile signaling and its potential impact on the translation of this important field of redox biology to the clinic. Emerging understanding of thiol-electrophile interactions and redox signaling suggests replacement of the oxidative stress hypothesis with a new redox biology paradigm, which provides an exciting and influential framework for guiding translational research.

  12. Central and peripheral mechanisms of the NPY system in the regulation of bone and adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan-Chuan; Baldock, Paul A

    2012-02-01

    Skeletal research is currently undergoing a period of marked expansion. The boundaries of "bone" research are being re-evaluated and with this, a growing recognition of a more complex and interconnected biology than previously considered. One aspect that has become the focus of particular attention is the relationship between bone and fat homeostasis. Evidence from a number of avenues indicates that bone and adipose regulation are both related and interdependent. This review examines the neuropeptide Y (NPY) system, known to exert powerful control over both bone and fat tissue. The actions of this system are characterized by signaling both within specific nuclei of the hypothalamus and also the target tissues, mediated predominantly through two G-protein coupled receptors (Y1 and Y2). In bone tissue, elevated NPY levels act consistently to repress osteoblast activity. Moreover, both central Y2 receptor and osteoblastic Y1 receptor signaling act similarly to repress bone formation. Conversely, loss of NPY expression or receptor signaling induces increased osteoblast activity and bone mass in both cortical and cancellous envelopes. In fat tissue, NPY action is more complex. Energy homeostasis is powerfully altered by elevations in hypothalamic NPY, resulting in increases in fat accretion and body-wide energy conservation, through the action of locally expressed Y1 receptors, while local Y2 receptors act to inhibit NPY-ergic tone. Loss of central NPY expression has a markedly reduced effect, consistent with a physiological drive to promote fat accretion. In fat tissue, NPY and Y1 receptors act to promote lipogenesis, consistent with their roles in the brain. Y2 receptors expressed in adipocytes also act in this manner, showing an opposing action to their role in the hypothalamus. While direct investigation of these processes has yet to be completed, these responses appear to be interrelated to some degree. The starvation-based signal of elevated central NPY inducing

  13. The role of STAT3 in autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Liangkun; Wang, Zhanggui; Li, Hongsen; Shou, Jiawei; Jing, Zhao; Xie, Jiansheng; Sui, Xinbing; Pan, Hongming; Han, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process in eukaryotes that eliminates harmful components and maintains cellular homeostasis in response to a series of extracellular insults. However, these insults may trigger the downstream signaling of another prominent stress responsive pathway, the STAT3 signaling pathway, which has been implicated in multiple aspects of the autophagic process. Recent reports further indicate that different subcellular localization patterns of STAT3 affect autophagy in various ways. For example, nuclear STAT3 fine-tunes autophagy via the transcriptional regulation of several autophagy-related genes such as BCL2 family members, BECN1, PIK3C3, CTSB, CTSL, PIK3R1, HIF1A, BNIP3, and microRNAs with targets of autophagy modulators. Cytoplasmic STAT3 constitutively inhibits autophagy by sequestering EIF2AK2 as well as by interacting with other autophagy-related signaling molecules such as FOXO1 and FOXO3. Additionally, the mitochondrial translocation of STAT3 suppresses autophagy induced by oxidative stress and may effectively preserve mitochondria from being degraded by mitophagy. Understanding the role of STAT3 signaling in the regulation of autophagy may provide insight into the classic autophagy model and also into cancer therapy, especially for the emerging targeted therapy, because a series of targeted agents execute antitumor activities via blocking STAT3 signaling, which inevitably affects the autophagy pathway. Here, we review several of the representative studies and the current understanding in this particular field.

  14. Regulation of Lipolysis and Adipose Tissue Signaling during Acute Endotoxin-Induced Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittig, Nikolaj; Bach, Ermina; Thomsen, Henrik Holm;

    2016-01-01

    = 0.001) compared with Placebo. These effects were associated with increased phosphorylation of hormone sensitive lipase (pHSL) at ser650 in adipose tissue (p = 0.03), a trend towards elevated pHSL at ser552 (p = 0.09) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation of perilipin 1 (PLIN1) (p...... lipolysis in adipose tissue and is associated with increased pHSL and signs of increased PLIN1 phosphorylation combined with a trend toward decreased insulin signaling. The combination of these mechanisms appear to be the driving forces behind the increased lipolysis observed in the early stages of acute...

  15. Novel anti-inflammatory role of SLPI in adipose tissue and its regulation by high fat diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buhman Kimberly K

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI is an anti-inflammatory protein that is constitutively expressed in multiple cell types where it functions to counteract localized tissue inflammation by its anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and anti-protease properties. Little is known about the expression and implication of SLPI in the regulation of adipose tissue inflammation. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that obesity induces expression of SLPI in adipose tissue where it functions to counteract adipocyte inflammation. Methods Male C57BL6 mice were fed a high fat (60% fat calories or a control diet (10% fat calories diet for 12 weeks. Adipose tissue expression of SLPI was determined by western blotting and PCR. Fully differentiated adipocytes (3T3-L1 were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 ng/ml or peptidoglycan (10 μg/ml for 24 hours in the presence or absence of SLPI. Media was collected for interleukin 6 (IL-6 analysis by enzyme-linked immune absorbent assay (ELISA. RNA was isolated for gene expression analysis by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results Visceral fat (mesenteric and epididymal express a higher level of SLPI than subcutaneous fat. The expression of SLPI is mostly in the stromal vascular fraction compared to adipocytes. We also confirmed in vitro that activation of TLR2 and 4 with peptidoglycan and LPS respectively leads to induction of SLPI. Finally, we confirmed that SLPI exerted an anti-inflammatory effect in adipocytes treated with LPS by causing a reduction in expression of IL-6 via a mechanism that included stabilization of cellular IKBα expression. Conclusion Our results show that SLPI is also expressed in adipocytes and adipose tissue where it could play an important feedback role in the resolution of inflammation.

  16. Regulation of body mass and adiposity in the field vole, Microtus agrestis: a model of leptin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Król, Elzbieta; Speakman, John R

    2007-02-01

    Adult mammals are typically highly resistant to perturbations in their energy balance. In obese humans, however, this control appears to be lost. Apart from a few exceptional cases, this loss of control occurs despite appropriate levels of circulating leptin -- suggesting that elevated adiposity may be a consequence of failure to respond to the leptin signal: leptin resistance. When cold-acclimated male field voles (Microtus agrestis) are transferred from short (SD, 8 h light) to long (LD, 16 h light) photoperiods, they increase dramatically in body mass and fatness for about 4 weeks. After this period, their mass stabilizes at a new plateau about 25% higher than animals maintained in SD. The increase in adiposity is not caused by significant increases in food intake, but reflects an increase in digestive efficiency. Measures of circulating leptin reveal that the increased adiposity is matched by increased circulating leptin. By infusing voles with exogenous leptin, we have demonstrated that SD voles are leptin sensitive (reducing both body mass and food intake), whereas LD animals are leptin resistant. Voles may therefore be a useful model for understanding the process of leptin resistance. The change in leptin sensitivity in voles was not associated with changes in the levels of gene expression of the orexogenic or anorexogenic neuropeptides, such as neuropeptide Y, agouti-related peptide, POMC and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, measured in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). During the phase that body mass was increasing, however, there was a transient increase in the ARC expression of suppressor of cytokine signalling-3 (SOCS3). These data suggest that the changes in the expression of SOCS3 in the ARC may be involved in leptin resistance. However, the mechanism by which these changes may be linked to alterations in digestive efficiency that underpin the changes in adiposity, or how the differences are signalled by changes in photoperiod

  17. Autophagy and IL-1 family cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James eHarris

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an important intracellular homeostatic mechanism for the targeting of cytosolic constituents, including organelles, for lysosomal degradation. Autophagy plays roles in numerous physiological processes, including immune cell responses to endogenous and exogenous pathogenic stimuli. Moreover, autophagy has a potentially pivotal role to play in the regulation of inflammatory responses. In particular, autophagy regulates endogenous inflammasome activators, as well as inflammasome components and pro-IL-1β. As a result, autophagy acts a key modulator of IL-1β and IL-18, as well as IL-1α, release. This review focuses specifically on the role autophagy plays in regulating the production, processing and secretion of IL-1 and IL-18 and the consequences of this important function.

  18. Autophagy and IL-1 Family Cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, James

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is an important intracellular homeostatic mechanism for the targeting of cytosolic constituents, including organelles, for lysosomal degradation. Autophagy plays roles in numerous physiological processes, including immune cell responses to endogenous and exogenous pathogenic stimuli. Moreover, autophagy has a potentially pivotal role to play in the regulation of inflammatory responses. In particular, autophagy regulates endogenous inflammasome activators, as well as inflammasome components and pro-IL-1β. As a result, autophagy acts a key modulator of IL-1β and IL-18, as well as IL-1α, release. This review focuses specifically on the role autophagy plays in regulating the production, processing, and secretion of IL-1 and IL-18 and the consequences of this important function.

  19. Dietary soy isoflavones differentially regulate expression of the lipid-metabolic genes in different white adipose tissues of the female Bama mini-pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoli; Li, Lili; Fan, Juexin; Zhang, Bin; Oso, A O; Xiao, Chaowu; Yin, Yulong

    2015-05-22

    Soy isoflavones have been shown to affect lipid metabolism, however the underlying molecular mechanism(s) have not yet been fully understood. The present study, using female Bama mini-pig as a model, examined the effects of soy isoflavones on lipid metabolism and involved gene expression in different white adipose tissues. Female Bama Xiang mini-pigs of 35 days old were fed a basal diet (control, Con), or basal diet supplemented with increasing amounts of soy isoflavones (250, 500, or 1250 mg/kg diet) for 120 days. The results showed that soy isoflavones did not affect the body weight, but decreased the dorsal subcutaneous adipose tissue (DSA) mass and increased the mass of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (ASA) and perirenal adipose tissue (PRA). Besides, soy isoflavones decreased the expression of lipogenic genes and increased the expression of lipolytic genes in DSA, while the opposite effects were observed in ASA and PRA. In addition, the expression of lipoprotein lipase was down regulated in DSA while up regulated in ASA and PRA by soy isoflavones. Moreover, the expression of estrogen receptors (ERs) was up regulated in DSA, and down regulated in ASA and PRA by soy isoflavones. Our results suggest that soy isoflavones affected the lipid metabolism in white adipose tissues of Bama mini-pigs in a site-specific manner, which might be mediated through PPARs and ERs regulated gene expression.

  20. Hsp90 regulates processing of NF-κB2 p100 involving protection of NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) from autophagy-mediated degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoliang Qing; Pengrong Yan; Zhaoxia Qu; Hudan Liu; Gutian Xiao

    2007-01-01

    NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) is required for NF-κB activation based on the processing of NF-κB2 p100. Here we report a novel mechanism of NIK regulation involving the chaperone 90 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp90) and autophagy.Functional inhibition of lisp90 by the anti-tumor agent geldanamycin (GA) efficiently disrupts its interaction with NIK,resulting in NIK degradation and subsequent blockage of p100 processing. Surprisingly, GA-induced NIK degradation is mediated by autophagy, but largely independent of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Hsp90 seems to be specifically involved in the folding/stabilization of NIK protein, because GA inhibition does not affect NIK mRNA transcription and translation. Furthermore, Hsp90 is not required for NIK-mediated recruitment of the α subunit of IκB kinase to p100, a key step in induction of p100 processing. These findings define an alternative mechanism for Hsp90 client degradation and identify a novel function of autophagy in NF-κB regulation. These findings also suggest a new therapeutic strategy for diseases associated with p100 processing.

  1. Regulation of autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome system by the FoxO transcriptional network during muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, Giulia; Romanello, Vanina; Pescatore, Francesca; Armani, Andrea; Paik, Ji-Hye; Frasson, Laura; Seydel, Anke; Zhao, Jinghui; Abraham, Reimar; Goldberg, Alfred L; Blaauw, Bert; DePinho, Ronald A; Sandri, Marco

    2015-04-10

    Stresses like low nutrients, systemic inflammation, cancer or infections provoke a catabolic state characterized by enhanced muscle proteolysis and amino acid release to sustain liver gluconeogenesis and tissue protein synthesis. These conditions activate the family of Forkhead Box (Fox) O transcription factors. Here we report that muscle-specific deletion of FoxO members protects from muscle loss as a result of the role of FoxOs in the induction of autophagy-lysosome and ubiquitin-proteasome systems. Notably, in the setting of low nutrient signalling, we demonstrate that FoxOs are required for Akt activity but not for mTOR signalling. FoxOs control several stress-response pathways such as the unfolded protein response, ROS detoxification, DNA repair and translation. Finally, we identify FoxO-dependent ubiquitin ligases including MUSA1 and a previously uncharacterised ligase termed SMART (Specific of Muscle Atrophy and Regulated by Transcription). Our findings underscore the central function of FoxOs in coordinating a variety of stress-response genes during catabolic conditions.

  2. Regulation of mTORC1 by the Rag GTPases is necessary for neonatal autophagy and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efeyan, Alejo; Zoncu, Roberto; Chang, Steven; Gumper, Iwona; Snitkin, Harriet; Wolfson, Rachel L; Kirak, Oktay; Sabatini, David D; Sabatini, David M

    2013-01-31

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway regulates organismal growth in response to many environmental cues, including nutrients and growth factors. Cell-based studies showed that mTORC1 senses amino acids through the RagA-D family of GTPases (also known as RRAGA, B, C and D), but their importance in mammalian physiology is unknown. Here we generate knock-in mice that express a constitutively active form of RagA (RagA(GTP)) from its endogenous promoter. RagA(GTP/GTP) mice develop normally, but fail to survive postnatal day 1. When delivered by Caesarean section, fasted RagA(GTP/GTP) neonates die almost twice as rapidly as wild-type littermates. Within an hour of birth, wild-type neonates strongly inhibit mTORC1, which coincides with profound hypoglycaemia and a decrease in plasma amino-acid concentrations. In contrast, mTORC1 inhibition does not occur in RagA(GTP/GTP) neonates, despite identical reductions in blood nutrient amounts. With prolonged fasting, wild-type neonates recover their plasma glucose concentrations, but RagA(GTP/GTP) mice remain hypoglycaemic until death, despite using glycogen at a faster rate. The glucose homeostasis defect correlates with the inability of fasted RagA(GTP/GTP) neonates to trigger autophagy and produce amino acids for de novo glucose production. Because profound hypoglycaemia does not inhibit mTORC1 in RagA(GTP/GTP) neonates, we considered the possibility that the Rag pathway signals glucose as well as amino-acid sufficiency to mTORC1. Indeed, mTORC1 is resistant to glucose deprivation in RagA(GTP/GTP) fibroblasts, and glucose, like amino acids, controls its recruitment to the lysosomal surface, the site of mTORC1 activation. Thus, the Rag GTPases signal glucose and amino-acid concentrations to mTORC1, and have an unexpectedly key role in neonates in autophagy induction and thus nutrient homeostasis and viability.

  3. Autophagy as a Stress Response Pathway in the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Abhisek; Eissa, N Tony

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy, hereafter, referred to as autophagy, has long been regarded as a housekeeping pathway involved in intracellular degradation and energy recycling. These housekeeping and homeostatic functions are especially important during cellular stress, such as periods of nutrient deprivation. However, importance of autophagy extends far beyond its degradative functions. Recent evidence shows that autophagy plays an essential role in development, organization and functions of the immune system, and defects in autophagy lead to several diseases, including cancer and autoimmunity. In the immune system, autophagy is important in regulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. This review focuses on the roles of autophagy in the adaptive immune system. We first introduce the autophagy pathway and provide a brief description of the major molecular players involved in autophagy. We then discuss the importance of autophagy as a stress integrator mechanism and provide relevant examples of this role of autophagy in adaptive immune cells. Then we proceed to describe how autophagy regulates development, activation and functions of different adaptive immune cells. In these contexts, we mention both degradative and non-degradative roles of autophagy, and illustrate their importance. We also discuss role of autophagy in antigen presenting cells, which play critical roles in the activation of adaptive immune cells. Further, we describe how autophagy regulates functions of different adaptive immune cells during infection, inflammation and autoimmunity.

  4. Antioxidant catalase rescues against high fat diet-induced cardiac dysfunction via an IKKβ-AMPK-dependent regulation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lei; Shou, Xi-Ling; Zhao, Hai-Kang; Ren, Gu-Qun; Wang, Jian-Bang; Wang, Xi-Hui; Ai, Wen-Ting; Maris, Jackie R; Hueckstaedt, Lindsay K; Ma, Ai-Qun; Zhang, Yingmei

    2015-02-01

    Autophagy, a conservative degradation process for long-lived and damaged proteins, participates in a variety of biological processes including obesity. However, the precise mechanism of action behind obesity-induced changes in autophagy still remains elusive. This study was designed to examine the role of the antioxidant catalase in high fat diet-induced changes in cardiac geometry and function as well as the underlying mechanism of action involved with a focus on autophagy. Wild-type (WT) and transgenic mice with cardiac overexpression of catalase were fed low or high fat diet for 20 weeks prior to assessment of myocardial geometry and function. High fat diet intake triggered obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and hypertriglyceridemia, the effects of which were unaffected by catalase transgene. Myocardial geometry and function were compromised with fat diet intake as manifested by cardiac hypertrophy, enlarged left ventricular end systolic and diastolic diameters, fractional shortening, cardiomyocyte contractile capacity and intracellular Ca²⁺ mishandling, the effects of which were ameliorated by catalase. High fat diet intake promoted reactive oxygen species production and suppressed autophagy in the heart, the effects of which were attenuated by catalase. High fat diet intake dampened phosphorylation of inhibitor kappa B kinase β(IKKβ), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) while promoting phosphorylation of mTOR, the effects of which were ablated by catalase. In vitro study revealed that palmitic acid compromised cardiomyocyte autophagy and contractile function in a manner reminiscent of fat diet intake, the effect of which was significantly alleviated by inhibition of IKKβ, activation of AMPK and induction of autophagy. Taken together, our data revealed that the antioxidant catalase counteracts against high fat diet-induced cardiac geometric and functional anomalies possibly via an IKKβ-AMPK-dependent restoration of myocardial

  5. Modulation of inflammation by autophagy: consequences for Crohn's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, T.S.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Netea, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy, the cellular machinery for targeting intracellular components for lysosomal degradation, is critically involved in the host defence to pathogenic microorganisms. Recent studies have unveiled several aspects of the immune response that are regulated by autophagy, including antigen presenta

  6. Activation of the MAPK11/12/13/14 (p38 MAPK) pathway regulates the transcription of autophagy genes in response to oxidative stress induced by a novel copper complex in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wu; Zhu, Haichuan; Sheng, Fugeng; Tian, Yonglu; Zhou, Jun; Chen, Yingyu; Li, Song; Lin, Jian

    2014-07-01

    Transition metal copper (Cu) can exist in oxidized or reduced states in cells, leading to cytotoxicity in cancer cells through oxidative stress. Recently, copper complexes are emerging as a new class of anticancer compounds. Here, we report that a novel anticancer copper complex (HYF127c/Cu) induces oxidative stress-dependent cell death in cancer cells. Further, transcriptional analysis revealed that oxidative stress elicits broad transcriptional changes of genes, in which autophagy-related genes are significantly changed in HYF127c/Cu-treated cells. Consistently, autophagy was induced in HYF127c/Cu-treated cells and inhibitors of autophagy promoted cell death induced by HYF127c/Cu. Further analysis identified that the MAPK11/12/13/14 (formerly known as p38 MAPK) pathway was also activated in HYF127c/Cu-treated cells. Meanwhile, the MAPK11/12/13/14 inhibitor SB203580 downregulated autophagy by inhibiting the transcription of the autophagy genes MAP1LC3B, BAG3, and HSPA1A, and promoted HYF127c/Cu-induced cell death. These data suggest that copper-induced oxidative stress will induce protective autophagy through transcriptional regulation of autophagy genes by activation of the MAPK11/12/13/14 pathway in HeLa cells.

  7. Taxol-induced unfolded protein response activation in breast cancer cells exposed to hypoxia: ATF4 activation regulates autophagy and inhibits apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notte, Annick; Rebucci, Magali; Fransolet, Maude; Roegiers, Edith; Genin, Marie; Tellier, Celine; Watillon, Kassandra; Fattaccioli, Antoine; Arnould, Thierry; Michiels, Carine

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for the resistance against chemotherapy-induced cell death is still of great interest since the number of patients with cancer increases and relapse is commonly observed. Indeed, the development of hypoxic regions as well as UPR (unfolded protein response) activation is known to promote cancer cell adaptive responses to the stressful tumor microenvironment and resistance against anticancer therapies. Therefore, the impact of UPR combined to hypoxia on autophagy and apoptosis activation during taxol exposure was investigated in MDA-MB-231 and T47D breast cancer cells. The results showed that taxol rapidly induced UPR activation and that hypoxia modulated taxol-induced UPR activation differently according to the different UPR pathways (PERK, ATF6, and IRE1α). The putative involvement of these signaling pathways in autophagy or in apoptosis regulation in response to taxol exposure was investigated. However, while no link between the activation of these three ER stress sensors and autophagy or apoptosis regulation could be evidenced, results showed that ATF4 activation, which occurs independently of UPR activation, was involved in taxol-induced autophagy completion. In addition, an ATF4-dependent mechanism leading to cancer cell adaptation and resistance against taxol-induced cell death was evidenced. Finally, our results demonstrate that expression of ATF4, in association with hypoxia-induced genes, can be used as a biomarker of a poor prognosis for human breast cancer patients supporting the conclusion that ATF4 might play an important role in adaptation and resistance of breast cancer cells to chemotherapy in hypoxic tumors.

  8. Ghrelin Attenuates Liver Fibrosis through Regulation of TGF-β1 Expression and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing Mao

    2015-09-01

    and maintaining the balance between MMP2 and TIMP1. Our results demonstrated that ghrelin attenuates liver fibrosis via inhibition of the TGF-β1/Smad3 and NF-κB signaling pathways, as well as autophagy suppression.

  9. Autophagy is involved in regulating the immune response of dendritic cells to influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Farong; Chen, Yinghu; Lin, Zhendong; Cai, Zhijian; Yu, Lei; Xu, Feng; Wang, Jiaoli; Zhu, Weiguo; Lu, Huoquan

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy can mediate antiviral immunity. However, it remains unknown whether autophagy regulates the immune response of dendritic cells (DCs) to influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 infection. In this study, we found that infection with the H1N1 virus induced DC autophagy in an endocytosis-dependent manner. Compared with autophagy-deficient Beclin-1(+/-) mice, we found that bone-marrow-derived DCs from wild-type mice (WT BMDCs) presented a more mature phenotype on H1N1 infection. Wild-type BMDCs secreted higher levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor- α (TNF-α), interferon-β (IFN-β), IL-12p70 and IFN-γ than did Beclin-1(+/-) BMDCs. In contrast to Beclin-1(+/-) BMDCs, H1N1-infected WT BMDCs exhibited increased activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, Jun N-terminal kinase, p38, and nuclear factor-κB as well as IFN regulatory factor 7 nuclear translocation. Blockade of autophagosomal and lysosomal fusion by bafilomycin A1 decreased the co-localization of H1N1 viruses, autophagosomes and lysosomes as well as the secretion of IL-6, TNF-α and IFN-β in H1N1-infected BMDCs. In contrast to Beclin-1(+/-) BMDCs, H1N1-infected WT BMDCs were more efficient in inducing allogeneic CD4(+) T-cell proliferation and driving T helper type 1, 2 and 17 cell differentiation while inhibiting CD4(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T-cell differentiation. Moreover, WT BMDCs were more efficient at cross-presenting the ovalbumin antigen to CD8(+) T cells. We consistently found that Beclin-1(+/-) BMDCs were inferior in their inhibition of H1N1 virus replication and their induction of H1N1-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses, which produced lower levels of IL-6, TNF-α and IFN-β in vivo. Our data indicate that autophagy is important in the regulation of the DC immune response to H1N1 infection, thereby extending our understanding of host immune responses to the virus.

  10. Regulation of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate concentration in white adipose tissue.

    OpenAIRE

    Rider, Mark; Hue, Louis

    1985-01-01

    Injection of insulin to fed rats diminished the concentration of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate in white adipose tissue. Incubation of epididymal fat-pads or adipocytes with insulin stimulated lactate release and sugar detritiation and also decreased fructose 2,6-bisphosphate concentration. Such a decrease was, however, not observed in fat-pads from starved or alloxan-diabetic rats. Incubation of adipocytes from fed rats with various concentrations of glucose or fructose led to a dose-dependent ri...

  11. Netrin-1 Improves Functional Recovery through Autophagy Regulation by Activating the AMPK/mTOR Signaling Pathway in Rats with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Liangjie; Mei, Xifan; Shen, Zhaoliang; Bi, Yunlong; Yuan, Yajiang; Guo, Zhanpeng; Wang, Hongyu; Zhao, Haosen; Zhou, Zipeng; Wang, Chen; Zhu, Kunming; Li, Gang; Lv, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is an process for the degradation of cytoplasmic aggregated proteins and damaged organelles and plays an important role in the development of SCI. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of Netrin-1 and its potential mechanism for autophagy regulation after SCI. A rat model of SCI was established and used for analysis. Results showed that administration of Netrin-1 not only significantly enhanced the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) but also reduced the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and P70S6K. In addition, the expression of Beclin-1 and the ratio of the light-chain 3B-II (LC3B-II)/LC3B-I in the injured spinal cord significantly increased in Netrin-1 group than those in SCI group. Moreover, the ratio of apoptotic neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord and the cavity area of spinal cord significantly decreased in Netrin-1 group compared with those in SCI group. In addition, Netrin-1 not only preserved motor neurons but also significantly improved motor fuction of injured rats. These results suggest that Netrin-1 improved functional recovery through autophagy stimulation by activating the AMPK/mTOR signaling pathway in rats with SCI. Thus, Netrin-1 treatment could be a novel therapeutic strategy for SCI. PMID:28186165

  12. Regulation of adipose branched-chain amino acid catabolism enzyme expression and cross-adipose amino acid flux in human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Denise E; Lynch, Christopher J; Olson, Kristine C; Mostaedi, Rouzbeh; Ali, Mohamed; Smith, William H; Karpe, Fredrik; Humphreys, Sandy; Bedinger, Daniel H; Dunn, Tamara N; Thomas, Anthony P; Oort, Pieter J; Kieffer, Dorothy A; Amin, Rajesh; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Haj, Fawaz G; Permana, Paska; Anthony, Tracy G; Adams, Sean H

    2013-06-01

    Elevated blood branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are often associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, which might result from a reduced cellular utilization and/or incomplete BCAA oxidation. White adipose tissue (WAT) has become appreciated as a potential player in whole body BCAA metabolism. We tested if expression of the mitochondrial BCAA oxidation checkpoint, branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex, is reduced in obese WAT and regulated by metabolic signals. WAT BCKD protein (E1α subunit) was significantly reduced by 35-50% in various obesity models (fa/fa rats, db/db mice, diet-induced obese mice), and BCKD component transcripts significantly lower in subcutaneous (SC) adipocytes from obese vs. lean Pima Indians. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes or mice with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists increased WAT BCAA catabolism enzyme mRNAs, whereas the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxy-d-glucose had the opposite effect. The results support the hypothesis that suboptimal insulin action and/or perturbed metabolic signals in WAT, as would be seen with insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, could impair WAT BCAA utilization. However, cross-tissue flux studies comparing lean vs. insulin-sensitive or insulin-resistant obese subjects revealed an unexpected negligible uptake of BCAA from human abdominal SC WAT. This suggests that SC WAT may not be an important contributor to blood BCAA phenotypes associated with insulin resistance in the overnight-fasted state. mRNA abundances for BCAA catabolic enzymes were markedly reduced in omental (but not SC) WAT of obese persons with metabolic syndrome compared with weight-matched healthy obese subjects, raising the possibility that visceral WAT contributes to the BCAA metabolic phenotype of metabolically compromised individuals.

  13. The Ca{sup 2+} channel TRPML3 specifically interacts with the mammalian ATG8 homologue GATE16 to regulate autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Suzy; Kim, Hyun Jin, E-mail: kimhyunjin@skku.edu

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Split-ubiquitin MY2H screen identified GATE16 as an interacting protein of TRPML3. •TRPML3 specifically binds to a mammalian ATG8 homologue GATE16, not to LC3B. •The interaction of TRPML3 with GATE16 facilitates autophagosome formation. •GATE16 is expressed in both autophagosome and extra-autophagosomal compartments. -- Abstract: TRPML3 is a Ca{sup 2+} permeable cation channel expressed in multiple intracellular compartments. Although TRPML3 is implicated in autophagy, how TRPML3 can regulate autophagy is not understood. To search interacting proteins with TRPML3 in autophagy, we performed split-ubiquitin membrane yeast two-hybrid (MY2H) screening with TRPML3-loop as a bait and identified GATE16, a mammalian ATG8 homologue. GST pull-down assay revealed that TRPML3 and TRPML3-loop specifically bind to GATE16, not to LC3B. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) experiments showed that TRPML3 and TRPML3-loop pull down only the lipidated form of GATE16, indicating that the interaction occurs exclusively at the organellar membrane. The interaction of TRPML3 with GATE16 and GATE16-positive vesicle formation were increased in starvation induced autophagy, suggesting that the interaction facilitates the function of GATE16 in autophagosome formation. However, GATE16 was not required for TRPML3 trafficking to autophagosomes. Experiments using dominant-negative (DN) TRPML3(D458K) showed that GATE16 is localized not only in autophagosomes but also in extra-autophagosomal compartments, by contrast with LC3B. Since GATE16 acts at a later stage of the autophagosome biogenesis, our results suggest that TRPML3 plays a role in autophagosome maturation through the interaction with GATE16, by providing Ca{sup 2+} in the fusion process.

  14. Autophagy mitigates metabolic stress and genome damage in mammary tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karantza-Wadsworth, Vassiliki; Patel, Shyam; Kravchuk, Olga; Chen, Guanghua; Mathew, Robin; Jin, Shengkan; White, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involving self-digestion of cellular organelles during starvation as a means of cell survival; however, if it proceeds to completion, autophagy can lead to cell death. Autophagy is also a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor mechanism for mammary tumorigenesis, as the essential autophagy regulator beclin1 is monoallelically deleted in breast carcinomas. However, the mechanism by which autophagy suppresses breast cancer remains elusive. Here we show that allelic loss of beclin1 and defective autophagy sensitized mammary epithelial cells to metabolic stress and accelerated lumen formation in mammary acini. Autophagy defects also activated the DNA damage response in vitro and in mammary tumors in vivo, promoted gene amplification, and synergized with defective apoptosis to promote mammary tumorigenesis. Therefore, we propose that autophagy limits metabolic stress to protect the genome, and that defective autophagy increases DNA damage and genomic instability that ultimately facilitate breast cancer progression. PMID:17606641

  15. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaviya, Rama [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Debra L., E-mail: laskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.

  16. Autophagy gets in on the regulatory act

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Steven K. Backues; Daniel J. Klionsky

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy down-regulates the Wnt signal transduction pathway via targeted degradation of a key signaling protein. This may provide an explanation for autophagy's role in tumor suppression.%@@ The eukaryotic cell has at its disposal two primary methods for getting rid of unwanted proteins: the proteasome and autophagy.The proteasome is a large protein complex comprising regulatory and proteolytic subunits whose core function is the degradation of damaged or misfolded proteins.

  17. Autophagy regulation revealed by SapM-induced block of autophagosome-lysosome fusion via binding RAB7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Dong, E-mail: austhudong@126.com [Institute of Infection and Immunology, Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Wu, Jing, E-mail: wujing8008@126.com [Institute of Infection and Immunology, Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Wang, Wan; Mu, Min; Zhao, Runpeng; Xu, Xuewei; Chen, Zhaoquan [Institute of Infection and Immunology, Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Xiao, Jian [School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Hu, Fengyu; Yang, Yabo [Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Rongbo, E-mail: lory456@126.com [Institute of Infection and Immunology, Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China)

    2015-05-29

    The mechanism underlying autophagy alteration by mycobacterium tuberculosis remains unclear. Our previous study shows LpqH, a lipoprotein of mycobacterium tuberculosis, can cause autophagosomes accumulation in murine macrophages. It is well known that SapM, another virulence factor, plays an important role in blocking phagosome-endosome fusion. However, the mechanism that SapM interferes with autophagy remains poorly defined. In this study, we report that SapM suppresses the autophagy flux by blocking autophagosome fusion with lysosome. Exposure to SapM results in accumulations of autophagosomes and decreased co-localization of autophagosome with lysosome. Molecularly, Rab7, a small GTPase, is blocked by SapM through its CT domain and is prevented from involvement of autophagosome-lysosome fusion. In conclusion, our study reveals that SapM takes Rab7 as a previously unknown target to govern a distinct molecular mechanism underlying autophagosome-lysosome fusion, which may bring light to a new thought about developing potential drugs or vaccines against tuberculosis. - Highlights: • A mechanism for disrupting autophagosome-lysosome fusion induced by SapM. • Rab7 is involved in SapM-inhibited autophagy. • SapM interacts with Rab7 by CT-domain. • CT-domain is indispensable to SapM-inhibited autophagy.

  18. Regulation of UCP1 in the Browning of Epididymal Adipose Tissue by β3-Adrenergic Agonist: A Role for MicroRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongji Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. White adipose tissue browning may be a promising strategy to combat obesity. UCP1 is strongly induced in White adipose tissue with β3-adrenergic agonist treatment, but the causes of this increase have not been fully elucidated. This study aims to explore more miRNAs involved in the process of browning of visceral adipose tissue. Methods. Total of fourteen mice were randomly divided into control and study group. Study group mice were injected intraperitoneally with CL316243 once daily for seven days; meanwhile the control group were treated with 0.9% NaCl. After a 7-day period, the expression of genes involved in WAT browning and potential UCP1-targeting miRNAs in adipose tissues was analyzed by qPCR. Results. qPCR analysis revealed that UCP1, DIO2, CIDEA, and CPT1B in epididymal adipose tissue were overexpressed in CL316243 group. Furthermore, potential UCP1-targeting miR-9 and miR-338-3p in epididymal adipose tissue were significantly decreased in CL316243 group. Conclusion. This suggests that potential UCP1-targeting miR-9 and miR-338-3p may be involved in the browning of epididymal adipose tissue by regulating UCP1 gene expression. In this study, we demonstrated that this increase of UCP1 is due, at least in part, to the decreased expression of certain UCP1-targeting miRNAs in epididymal adipose tissue compared to control.

  19. Autophagy and apoptosis: where do they meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhadip; Panda, Prashanta Kumar; Sinha, Niharika; Das, Durgesh Nandini; Bhutia, Sujit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis are two important cellular processes with complex and intersecting protein networks; as such, they have been the subjects of intense investigation. Recent advances have elucidated the key players and their molecular circuitry. For instance, the discovery of Beclin-1's interacting partners has resulted in the identification of Bcl-2 as a central regulator of autophagy and apoptosis, which functions by interacting with both Beclin-1 and Bax/Bak respectively. When localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, Bcl-2 inhibits autophagy. Cellular stress causes the displacement of Bcl-2 from Beclin-1 and Bax, thereby triggering autophagy and apoptosis, respectively. The induction of autophagy or apoptosis results in disruption of complexes by BH3-only proteins and through post-translational modification. The mechanisms linking autophagy and apoptosis are not fully defined; however, recent discoveries have revealed that several apoptotic proteins (e.g., PUMA, Noxa, Nix, Bax, XIAP, and Bim) modulate autophagy. Moreover, autophagic proteins that control nucleation and elongation regulate intrinsic apoptosis through calpain- and caspase-mediated cleavage of autophagy-related proteins, which switches the cellular program from autophagy to apoptosis. Similarly, several autophagic proteins are implicated in extrinsic apoptosis. This highlights a dual cellular role for autophagy. On one hand, autophagy degrades damaged mitochondria and caspases, and on the other hand, it provides a membrane-based intracellular platform for caspase processing in the regulation of apoptosis. In this review, we highlight the crucial factors governing the crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis and describe the mechanisms controlling cell survival and cell death.

  20. The dynamic nature of autophagy in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmelman, Alec C

    2011-10-01

    Macroautophagy (referred to hereafter as autophagy) is a highly regulated cellular process that serves to remove damaged proteins and organelles from the cell. Autophagy contributes to an array of normal and pathological processes, and has recently emerged as a key regulator of multiple aspects of cancer biology. The role of autophagy in cancer is complex and is likely dependent on tumor type, stage, and genetic context. This complexity is illustrated by the identification of settings where autophagy acts potently to either promote or inhibit tumorigenesis. In this review, I discuss the underlying basis for these opposing functions and propose a model suggesting a dynamic role for autophagy in malignancy. Collectively, the data point to autophagy as serving as a barrier to limit tumor initiation. Once neoplastic lesions are established, it appears that adaptive changes occur that now result in positive roles for autophagy in malignant progression and in subsequent tumor maintenance. Remarkably, constitutive activation of autophagy is critical for continued growth of some tumors, serving to both reduce oxidative stress and provide key intermediates to sustain cell metabolism. Autophagy is also induced in response to cancer therapies where it can function as a survival mechanism that limits drug efficacy. These findings have inspired significant interest in applying anti-autophagy therapies as an entirely new approach to cancer treatment. It is now apparent that aberrant control of autophagy is among the key hallmarks of cancer. While much needs to be learned about the regulation and context-dependent biological functions of autophagy, it seems clear that modulation of this process will be an attractive avenue for future cancer therapeutic approaches.

  1. Beta(3)-adrenergic signaling acutely down regulates adipose triglyceride lipase in brown adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiuliis, Jeffrey A; Liu, Li-Fen; Belury, Martha A; Rim, Jong S; Shin, Sangsu; Lee, Kichoon

    2010-06-01

    Mice exposed to cold rely upon brown adipose tissue (BAT)-mediated nonshivering thermogenesis to generate body heat using dietary glucose and lipids from the liver and white adipose tissue. In this report, we investigate how cold exposure affects the PI3 K/Akt signaling cascade and the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and trafficking in BAT. Cold exposure at an early time point led to the activation of the PI3 K/Akt, insulin-like signaling cascade followed by a transient decrease in adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) gene and protein expression in BAT. To further investigate how cold exposure-induced signaling altered ATGL expression, cultured primary brown adipocytes were treated with the beta(3)-adrenergic receptor (beta(3)AR) agonist CL 316,243 (CL) resulting in activation of PI3 K/Akt, ERK 1/2, and p38 signaling pathways and significantly decreased ATGL protein levels. ATGL protein levels decreased significantly 30 min post CL treatment suggesting protein degradation. Inhibition of PKA signaling by H89 rescued ATGL levels. The effects of PKA signaling on ATGL were shown to be independent of relevant pathways downstream of PKA such as PI3 K/Akt, ERK 1/2, and p38. However, CL treatment in 3T3-L1 adipocytes did not decrease ATGL protein and mRNA expression, suggesting a distinct response in WAT to beta3-adrenergic agonism. Transitory effects, possibly attributed to acute Akt activation during the early recruitment phase, were noted as well as stable changes in gene expression which may be attributed to beta3-adrenergic signaling in BAT.

  2. Ursolic acid attenuates diabetic mesangial cell injury through the up-regulation of autophagy via miRNA-21/PTEN/Akt/mTOR suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxing Lu

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of ursolic acid on autophagy mediated through the miRNA-21-targeted phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway in rat mesangial cells cultured under high glucose (HG conditions.Rat glomerular mesangial cells were cultured under normal glucose, HG, HG with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 or HG with ursolic acid conditions. Cell proliferation and hypertrophy were assayed using an MTT assay and the ratio of total protein to cell number, respectively. The miRNA-21 expression was detected using RT-qPCR. The expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN/AKT/mTOR signaling signatures, autophagy-associated protein and collagen I was detected by western blotting and RT-qPCR. Autophagosomes were observed using electron microscopy.Compared with mesangial cells cultured under normal glucose conditions, the cells exposed to HG showed up-regulated miRNA-21 expression, down-regulated PTEN protein and mRNA expression, up-regulated p85PI3K, pAkt, pmTOR, p62/SQSTMI, and collagen I expression and down-regulated LC3II expression. Ursolic acid and LY294002 inhibited HG-induced mesangial cell hypertrophy and proliferation, down-regulated p85PI3K, pAkt, pmTOR, p62/SQSTMI, and collagen I expression and up-regulated LC3II expression. However, LY294002 did not affect the expression of miRNA-21 and PTEN. Ursolic acid down-regulated miRNA-21 expression and up-regulated PTEN protein and mRNA expression.Ursolic acid inhibits the glucose-induced up-regulation of mesangial cell miRNA-21 expression, up-regulates PTEN expression, inhibits the activation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, and enhances autophagy to reduce the accumulation of the extracellular matrix and ameliorate cell hypertrophy and proliferation.

  3. Autophagy in DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Czarny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage response (DDR involves DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, but autophagy is also suggested to play a role in DDR. Autophagy can be activated in response to DNA-damaging agents, but the exact mechanism underlying this activation is not fully understood, although it is suggested that it involves the inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1. mTORC1 represses autophagy via phosphorylation of the ULK1/2–Atg13–FIP200 complex thus preventing maturation of pre-autophagosomal structures. When DNA damage occurs, it is recognized by some proteins or their complexes, such as poly(ADPribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1, Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 (MRN complex or FOXO3, which activate repressors of mTORC1. SQSTM1/p62 is one of the proteins whose levels are regulated via autophagic degradation. Inhibition of autophagy by knockout of FIP200 results in upregulation of SQSTM1/p62, enhanced DNA damage and less efficient damage repair. Mitophagy, one form of autophagy involved in the selective degradation of mitochondria, may also play role in DDR. It degrades abnormal mitochondria and can either repress or activate apoptosis, but the exact mechanism remains unknown. There is a need to clarify the role of autophagy in DDR, as this process may possess several important biomedical applications, involving also cancer therapy.

  4. Phosphorylation of the autophagy receptor optineurin restricts Salmonella growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wild, Philipp; Farhan, Hesso; McEwan, David G;

    2011-01-01

    Selective autophagy can be mediated via receptor molecules that link specific cargoes to the autophagosomal membranes decorated by ubiquitin-like microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) modifiers. Although several autophagy receptors have been identified, little is known about mechanisms...... be a general mechanism for regulation of cargo-selective autophagy....

  5. Autophagy and Retromer Components in Plant Innate Immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, David

    -hormone salicylic acid. Here, I present data that make it clear that NPR1 does not directly regulate autophagy, but instead control stress responses that indirectly activate autophagy. The observations presented will also clarify why autophagy has been described as being both a pro-death and pro-life pathway under...

  6. Regulation of adipose branched-chain amin acid catabolism enzyme expression and cross-adipose amino acid flux in human obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated blood branched-chain amin acids (BCAA)are often assoicated with insulin resistance and type2 diabetes, which might result from a reduced cellular utilization and/or incomplete BCAA oxidation. White adipose tissue (WAT) has become appreciated as a potential player in whole body BCAA metaboli...

  7. Berberine attenuates autophagy in adipocytes by targeting BECN1

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Yujie; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jian; Zhang, Di; Huang, Jian; Lv, Pengfei; Shen, Weili; Yang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    The lysosomal degradation pathway, autophagy, is essential for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Recently, autophagy has been demonstrated to be required in the process of adipocyte conversion. However, its role in mature adipocytes under physiological and pathological conditions remains unclear. Here, we report a major function of BECN1 in the regulation of basal autophagy in mature adipocytes. We also show that berberine, a natural plant alkaloid, inhibits basal autophagy in adipocyt...

  8. Autophagy and the nutritional signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long HE,Shabnam ESLAMFAM,Xi MA,Defa LI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During their growth and development, animals adapt to tremendous changes in order to survive. These include responses to both environmental and physiological changes and autophagy is one of most important adaptive and regulatory mechanisms. Autophagy is defined as an autolytic process to clear damaged cellular organelles and recycle the nutrients via lysosomic degradation. The process of autophagy responds to special conditions such as nutrient withdrawal. Once autophagy is induced, phagophores form and then elongate and curve to form autophagosomes. Autophagosomes then engulf cargo, fuse with endosomes, and finally fuse with lysosomes for maturation. During the initiation process, the ATG1/ULK1 (unc-51-like kinase 1 and VPS34 (which encodes a class III phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns 3-kinase complexes are critical in recruitment and assembly of other complexes required for autophagy. The process of autophagy is regulated by autophagy related genes (ATGs. Amino acid and energy starvation mediate autophagy by activating mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK. AMPK is the energy status sensor, the core nutrient signaling component and the metabolic kinase of cells. This review mainly focuses on the mechanism of autophagy regulated by nutrient signaling especially for the two important complexes, ULK1 and VPS34.

  9. Altered gut microbiota and endocannabinoid system tone in obese and diabetic leptin-resistant mice: impact on apelin regulation in adipose tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, L.; Vos, de W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the role of gut microbiota in the development of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and low-grade inflammation. The endocrine activity of adipose tissue has been found to contribute to the regulation of glucose homeostasis and low-grade inflammation. Among the key hormones produced

  10. Regulation of autophagy via PERK-eIF2α effectively relieve the radiation myelitis induced by iodine-125.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuozhang Yang

    Full Text Available Radiation myelitis is the most serious complication in clinical radiotherapy for spinal metastases. We previously showed that (125I brachytherapy induced apoptosis of spinal cord neurons accompanied by autophagy. In this study, we further investigated the mechanism by which (125I radiation triggered autophagy in neural cells. We found that autophagy induced by (125I radiation was involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and mainly dependent on PERK-eIF2α pathway. The expressions of LC3II, ATG12 and PI3K were significantly suppressed in PERK knockout neural cells. Meanwhile, the expressions of phosphorylated-Akt s473 and caspase3/8 all significantly increased in neural cells transfected with a PERK siRNA and which enhanced apoptosis of neurons after (125I radiation. The results were consistent with that by MTT and Annexin-FITC/PT staining. In animal model of banna pigs with radiation myelitis caused by (125I brachytherapy, we have successfully decreased PERK expression by intrathecal administration of the lentivirus vector. The apoptosis rate was significantly higher than that in control group and which deteriorated radiation myelitis of banna pigs. Thus, autophagy caused by (125I radiation was mainly as an attempt of cell survival at an early stage, but it would be a self-destructive process and promoted the process of apoptosis and necrosis radiated by (125I for more than 72 hours. The study would be useful and helpful to maximize efficiency of radiation therapy in clinical therapy.

  11. Metformin Protects Against Cisplatin-Induced Tubular Cell Apoptosis and Acute Kidney Injury via AMPKα-regulated Autophagy Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianzhong; Gui, Yuan; Ren, Jiafa; Liu, Xin; Feng, Ye; Zeng, Zhifeng; He, Weichun; Yang, Junwei; Dai, Chunsun

    2016-04-07

    Metformin, one of the most common prescriptions for patients with type 2 diabetes, is reported to protect the kidney from gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. However, the role and mechanisms for metformin in preventing cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity remains largely unknown. In this study, a single intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin was employed to induce acute kidney injury (AKI) in CD1 mice. The mice exhibited severe kidney dysfunction and histological damage at day 2 after cisplatin injection. Pretreatment of metformin could markedly attenuate cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury, tubular cell apoptosis and inflammatory cell accumulation in the kidneys. Additionally, pretreatment of metformin could enhance both AMPKα phosphorylation and autophagy induction in the kidneys after cisplatin injection. In cultured NRK-52E cells, a rat kidney tubular cell line, metformin could stimulate AMPKα phosphorylation, induce autophagy and inhibit cisplatin-induced cell apoptosis. Blockade of either AMPKα activation or autophagy induction could largely abolish the protective effect of metformin in cisplatin-induced cell death. Together, this study demonstrated that metformin may protect against cisplatin-induced tubular cell apoptosis and AKI through stimulating AMPKα activation and autophagy induction in the tubular cells.

  12. Keeping autophagy in cheCK1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Jit Kong; Virshup, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mutant RAS-driven cancer cells cope with proliferative stress by increasing basal autophagy to maintain protein/organelle and energy homeostasis. We recently demonstrated that casein kinase 1 alpha (CK1α), a therapeutically tractable enzyme, is critical for fine-tuning the transcriptional regulation of mutant RAS-induced autophagy and the development of mutant RAS-driven cancers. PMID:27314070

  13. Nutritional, hormonal, and depot-dependent regulation of the expression of the small GTPase Rab18 in rodent adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Marina R; Rabanal-Ruiz, Yoana; Almabouada, Farid; Díaz-Ruiz, Alberto; Burrell, María A; Vázquez, María J; Castaño, Justo P; Kineman, Rhonda D; Luque, Raúl M; Diéguez, Carlos; Vázquez-Martínez, Rafael; Malagón, María M

    2013-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that proteins associated with lipid droplets (LDs) play a key role in the coordination of lipid storage and mobilization in adipocytes. The small GTPase, RAB18, has been recently identified as a novel component of the protein coat of LDs and proposed to play a role in both β-adrenergic stimulation of lipolysis and insulin-induced lipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In order to better understand the role of Rab18 in the regulation of lipid metabolism in adipocytes, we evaluated the effects of age, fat location, metabolic status, and hormonal milieu on Rab18 expression in rodent white adipose tissue (WAT). Rab18 mRNA was undetectable at postnatal day 15 (P15), but reached adult levels by P45, in both male and female rats. In adult rats, Rab18 immunolocalized around LDs, as well as within the cytoplasm of mature adipocytes. A weak Rab18 signal was also detected in the stromal-vascular fraction of WAT. In mice, fasting significantly increased, though with a distinct time-course pattern, Rab18 mRNA and protein levels in visceral and subcutaneous WAT. The expression of Rab18 was also increased in visceral and subcutaneous WAT of obese mice (diet-induced, ob/ob, and New Zealand obese mice) compared with lean controls. Rab18 expression in rats was unaltered by castration, adrenalectomy, or GH deficiency but was increased by hypophysectomy, as well as hypothyroidism. When viewed together, our results suggest the participation of Rab18 in the regulation of lipid processing in adipose tissue under both normal and pathological conditions.

  14. Autophagy is induced by 3β-O-succinyl-lupeol (LD9-4) in A549 cells via up-regulation of Beclin 1 and down-regulation mTOR pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jing; Pei, Ying; Ji, Guiyuan; Li, Weijie; Feng, Shixiu; Qiu, Shengxiang

    2011-11-16

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the antitumor activity of a new derivative of lupeol-3β-O-succinyl-lupeol (LD9-4) and the molecular mechanism underlying cell death in human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells. The results revealed that LD9-4 inhibited A549 cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with an IC(50) value of 5.78 ± 0.48 μM after cells exposed to LD9-4 for 72 h. Markers indicative of apoptosis (cell cycle arrest, phosphatidylserine externalization and Hoechst33258 staining) were uniformly negative in LD9-4 exposed cells. Interestingly, transmission electron microscope, MDC staining and LC3 level determination all confirmed that autophagy was induced in LD9-4 treated A549 cells. Furthermore, we found that LD9-4-induced autophagy in A549 cells was associated with the increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species and the decrease of phosphorylated mTOR and p70S6K levels. In the meanwhile, both mRNA and protein levels of Beclin 1 were up-regulated in a time-dependent manner. Our data suggest that autophagy is induced by LD9-4 in A549 cells, and the accumulating reactive oxygen species, up-regulation of Beclin 1 and inhibition of the mTOR signaling pathway are involved in this process.

  15. The Drosophila deoxyhypusine hydroxylase homologue nero and its target eIF5A are required for cell growth and the regulation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Prajal H; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro; Schulze, Karen L; Bellen, Hugo J

    2009-06-29

    Hypusination is a unique posttranslational modification by which lysine is transformed into the atypical amino acid hypusine. eIF5A (eukaryotic initiation factor 5A) is the only known protein to contain hypusine. In this study, we describe the identification and characterization of nero, the Drosophila melanogaster deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH) homologue. nero mutations affect cell and organ size, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, and autophagy. Knockdown of the hypusination target eIF5A via RNA interference causes phenotypes similar to nero mutations. However, loss of nero appears to cause milder phenotypes than loss of eIF5A. This is partially explained through a potential compensatory mechanism by which nero mutant cells up-regulate eIF5A levels. The failure of eIF5A up-regulation to rescue nero mutant phenotypes suggests that hypusination is required for eIF5A function. Furthermore, expression of enzymatically impaired forms of DOHH fails to rescue nero clones, indicating that hypusination activity is important for nero function. Our data also indicate that nero and eIF5A are required for cell growth and affect autophagy and protein synthesis.

  16. Control of autophagy by oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, M C; Tasdemir, E; Criollo, A; Morselli, E; Vicencio, J M; Carnuccio, R; Kroemer, G

    2009-01-01

    Multiple oncogenes (in particular phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, PI3K; activated Akt1; antiapoptotic proteins from the Bcl-2 family) inhibit autophagy. Similarly, several tumor suppressor proteins (such as BH3-only proteins; death-associated protein kinase-1, DAPK1; the phosphatase that antagonizes PI3K, PTEN; tuberous sclerosic complex 1 and 2, TSC1 and TSC2; as well as LKB1/STK11) induce autophagy, meaning that their loss reduces autophagy. Beclin-1, which is required for autophagy induction acts as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor protein, and other essential autophagy mediators (such as Atg4c, UVRAG and Bif-1) are bona fide oncosuppressors. One of the central tumor suppressor proteins, p53 exerts an ambiguous function in the regulation of autophagy. Within the nucleus, p53 can act as an autophagy-inducing transcription factor. Within the cytoplasm, p53 exerts a tonic autophagy-inhibitory function, and its degradation is actually required for the induction of autophagy. The role of autophagy in oncogenesis and anticancer therapy is contradictory. Chronic suppression of autophagy may stimulate oncogenesis. However, once a tumor is formed, autophagy inhibition may be a therapeutic goal for radiosensitization and chemosensitization. Altogether, the current state-of-the art suggests a complex relationship between cancer and deregulated autophagy that must be disentangled by further in-depth investigation.

  17. Autophagy-associated immune responses and cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongming; Chen, Liuxi; Xu, Yinghua; Han, Weidong; Lou, Fang; Fei, Weiqiang; Liu, Shuiping; Jing, Zhao; Sui, Xinbing

    2016-04-19

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process by which cellular components are sequestered into a double-membrane vesicle and delivered to the lysosome for terminal degradation and recycling. Accumulating evidence suggests that autophagy plays a critical role in cell survival, senescence and homeostasis, and its dysregulation is associated with a variety of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurodegeneration. Recent studies show that autophagy is also an important regulator of cell immune response. However, the mechanism by which autophagy regulates tumor immune responses remains elusive. In this review, we will describe the role of autophagy in immune regulation and summarize the possible molecular mechanisms that are currently well documented in the ability of autophagy to control cell immune response. In addition, the scientific and clinical hurdles regarding the potential role of autophagy in cancer immunotherapy will be discussed.

  18. Oridonin Up-regulates Expression of P21 and Induces Autophagy and Apoptosis in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li, Xiang Li, Jiaxiong Wang, Zaiyuan Ye, Ji-Cheng Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oridonin (ORI could inhibit the proliferation and induce apoptosis in various cancer cell lines. However, the mechanism is not fully understood.Methods: Human prostate cancer (HPC cells were cultured in vitro and cell viability was detected by the CCK-8 assay. The ultrastructure changes were observed under transmission electron microscope (TEM. Chemical staining with acridine orange (AO, MDC or DAPI was used to detect acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs and alternation of DNA. Expression of LC3 and P21 was detected by Western Blot. Apoptotic rates and cell cycle arrest were detected by FACS.Results: Our study demonstrated that after ORI treatment, the proliferations of human prostate cancer (HPC cell lines PC-3 and LNCaP were inhibited in a concentration and time-dependent manner. ORI induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. A large number of autophagosomes with double-membrane structure and acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs were detected in the cytoplasm of HPC cells treated with ORI for 24 hours. ORI resulted in the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and recruitment of LC3-II to the autophagosomal membranes. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA reduced AVOs formation and inhibited LC3-I to LC3-II conversion. At 48 h, DNA fragmentation, chromatin condensation and disappearance of surface microvilli were detected in ORI-treated cells. ORI induced a significant increase in the number of apoptotic cells (PC-3: 5.4% to 27.0%, LNCaP: 5.3% to 31.0%. Promoting autophagy by nutrient starvation increased cell viability, while inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA promoted cell death. The expression of P21 was increased by ORI, which could be completely reversed by the inhibition of autophagy.Conclusions: Our findings indicated that autophagy occurred before the onset of apoptosis and protected cancer cells in ORI-treated HPC cells. P21 was involved in ORI-induced autophagy and apoptosis. Our results provide an experimental basis for understand

  19. Tumor Suppression and Promotion by Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenniffer Ávalos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process that involves lysosomal degradation of proteins and organelles, mostly mitochondria, for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and reduction of metabolic stress. Problems in the execution of this process are linked to different pathological conditions, such as neurodegeneration, aging, and cancer. Many of the proteins that regulate autophagy are either oncogenes or tumor suppressor proteins. Specifically, tumor suppressor genes that negatively regulate mTOR, such as PTEN, AMPK, LKB1, and TSC1/2 stimulate autophagy while, conversely, oncogenes that activate mTOR, such as class I PI3K, Ras, Rheb, and AKT, inhibit autophagy, suggesting that autophagy is a tumor suppressor mechanism. Consistent with this hypothesis, the inhibition of autophagy promotes oxidative stress, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, autophagy also functions as a cytoprotective mechanism under stress conditions, including hypoxia and nutrient starvation, that promotes tumor growth and resistance to chemotherapy in established tumors. Here, in this brief review, we will focus the discussion on this ambiguous role of autophagy in the development and progression of cancer.

  20. Tumor suppression and promotion by autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávalos, Yenniffer; Canales, Jimena; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Criollo, Alfredo; Lavandero, Sergio; Quest, Andrew F G

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process that involves lysosomal degradation of proteins and organelles, mostly mitochondria, for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and reduction of metabolic stress. Problems in the execution of this process are linked to different pathological conditions, such as neurodegeneration, aging, and cancer. Many of the proteins that regulate autophagy are either oncogenes or tumor suppressor proteins. Specifically, tumor suppressor genes that negatively regulate mTOR, such as PTEN, AMPK, LKB1, and TSC1/2 stimulate autophagy while, conversely, oncogenes that activate mTOR, such as class I PI3K, Ras, Rheb, and AKT, inhibit autophagy, suggesting that autophagy is a tumor suppressor mechanism. Consistent with this hypothesis, the inhibition of autophagy promotes oxidative stress, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, autophagy also functions as a cytoprotective mechanism under stress conditions, including hypoxia and nutrient starvation, that promotes tumor growth and resistance to chemotherapy in established tumors. Here, in this brief review, we will focus the discussion on this ambiguous role of autophagy in the development and progression of cancer.

  1. RSPO3-LGR4 Regulates Osteogenic Differentiation Of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Via ERK/FGF Signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Yunsong; Lv, Longwei; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Hao; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2017-01-01

    The four R-spondins (RSPOs) and their three related receptors, LGR4, 5 and 6, have emerged as a major ligand-receptor system with critical roles in development and stem cell survival. However, the exact roles of the RSPO-LGR system in osteogenesis remain largely unknown. In the present study, we showed that RSPO3-shRNA increased the osteogenic potential of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) significantly. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that RSPO3 is a negative regulator of ERK/FGF signalling. We confirmed that inhibition of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway blocked osteogenic differentiation in hASCs, and the increased osteogenic capacity observed after RSPO3 knockdown in hASCs was reversed by inhibition of ERK signalling. Further, silencing of LGR4 inhibited the activity of ERK signalling and osteogenic differentiation of hASCs. Most importantly, we found that loss of LGR4 abrogated RSPO3-regulated osteogenesis and RSPO3-induced ERK1/2 signalling inhibition. Collectively, our data show that ERK signalling works downstream of LGR4 and RSPO3 regulates osteoblastic differentiation of hASCs possibly via the LGR4-ERK signalling. PMID:28220828

  2. Modulating autophagy: a strategy for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Lin Li; Shao-Liang Han; Xia Fan

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a process in which long-lived proteins,damaged cell organelles,and other cellular particles are sequestered and degraded.This process is important for maintaining the cellular microenvironment when the cell is under stress.Many studies have shown that autophagy plays a complex role in human diseases,especially in cancer,where it is known to have paradoxical effects.Namely,autophagy provides the energy for metabolism and tumor growth and leads to cell death that promotes tumor suppression.The link between autophagy and cancer is also evident in that some of the genes that regulate carcinogenesis,oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes,participate in or impact the autophagy process.Therefore,modulating autophagy will be a valuable topic for cancer therapy.Many studies have shown that autophagy can inhibit the tumor growth when autophagy modulators are combined with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy.These findings suggest that autophagy may be a potent target for cancer therapy.

  3. Emerging connections between RNA and autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Lisa B; Lubas, Michal; Lund, Anders H

    2016-01-01

    Macroautophagy/autophagy is a key catabolic process, essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and survival through the removal and recycling of unwanted cellular material. Emerging evidence has revealed intricate connections between the RNA and autophagy research fields. While a majority...... of studies have focused on protein, lipid and carbohydrate catabolism via autophagy, accumulating data supports the view that several types of RNA and associated ribonucleoprotein complexes are specifically recruited to phagophores (precursors to autophagosomes) and subsequently degraded in the lysosome....../vacuole. Moreover, recent studies have revealed a substantial number of novel autophagy regulators with RNA-related functions, indicating roles for RNA and associated proteins not only as cargo, but also as regulators of this process. In this review, we discuss widespread evidence of RNA catabolism via autophagy...

  4. 细胞自噬在病毒感染与免疫调节中的作用机制%Regulation of Viral Infection and Immune Response by Autophagy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凯; 郑洋; 邢雅玲; 陈晓娟; 陈忠斌

    2011-01-01

    As a protective mechanism to sustain cellular homeostatic, cellular autophagy is the degradation pathway mediated by lysosotne. Autophagy provides recycle resource for cell by degradating long-live protein and senile cell organelle to small peptide or amino acid. In the mean time, atuophagy can repress the pathogenic infection and parasitization. It was demonstrated that the deficiency of the autophagy was related to many diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, implying the improtance of the autophagy in the physiological and pathological process. In this review, we summarized the relationship between the autophagy and the immunity including the innate and the adaptive immune response, and described the interaction between the autophagy and human virus infection. Further studying the molecular mechanism of autophagy will contribute to understanding the cellular autophagy development and the autophagy pathway involving in regulation of the immunity to initiate the antiviral infection. Also, it can offer the new idea to find the targets of antiviral therapy.%细胞自噬(autophagy)是一种主要由溶酶体介导的降解通路,作为细胞维持内环境稳态的一种保护性机制,不仅通过将长寿命蛋白和衰老细胞器降解为小肽或氨基酸为细胞提供再生资源,而且也可作为防御机制抵抗病原微生物感染和寄生.自噬缺失与许多疾病如癌症、心血管疾病等的发生关系密切,在机体生理、病理过程中发挥重要作用.本文拟就细胞自噬与病毒感染、机体免疫的关系加以综述,以期为研究细胞自噬的发生、参与机体免疫、发挥抗病毒感染作用及其分子机制提供参考,也为进一步研究抗病毒治疗的靶标提供新思路.

  5. Genetic versus Non-Genetic Regulation of miR-103, miR-143 and miR-483-3p Expression in Adipose Tissue and Their Metabolic Implications-A Twin Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork-Jensen, Jette; Thuesen, Anne Cathrine Baun; Bang-Bertelsen, Claus Heiner;

    2014-01-01

    Murine models suggest that the microRNAs miR-103 and miR-143 may play central roles in the regulation of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). The microRNA miR-483-3p may reduce adipose tissue expandability and cause ectopic lipid accumulation, insulin resist...

  6. SPBP is a sulforaphane induced transcriptional coactivator of NRF2 regulating expression of the autophagy receptor p62/SQSTM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvekar, Sagar Ramesh; Elvenes, Julianne; Brenne, Hanne Britt; Johansen, Terje; Sjøttem, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Organisms exposed to oxidative stress respond by orchestrating a stress response to prevent further damage. Intracellular levels of antioxidant agents increase, and damaged components are removed by autophagy induction. The KEAP1-NRF2 signaling pathway is the main pathway responsible for cell defense against oxidative stress and for maintaining the cellular redox balance at physiological levels. Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, is a potent inducer of KEAP1-NRF2 signaling and antioxidant response element driven gene expression. In this study, we show that sulforaphane enhances the expression of the transcriptional coregulator SPBP. The expression curve peaks 6-8 hours post stimulation, and parallels the sulforaphane-induced expression of NRF2 and the autophagy receptor protein p62/SQSTM1. Reporter gene assays show that SPBP stimulates the expression of p62/SQSTM1 via ARE elements in the promoter region, and siRNA mediated knock down of SPBP significantly decreases the expression of p62/SQSTM1 and the formation of p62/SQSTM1 bodies in HeLa cells. Furthermore, SPBP siRNA reduces the sulforaphane induced expression of NRF2, and the expression of the autophagy marker protein LC3B. Both these proteins contain ARE-like elements in their promoter regions. Over-expressed SPBP and NRF2 acts synergistically on the p62/SQSTM1 promoter and colocalize in nuclear speckles in HeLa cells. Collectively, these results suggest that SPBP is a coactivator of NRF2, and hence may be important for securing enhanced and sustained expression of NRF2 induced genes such as proteins involved in selective autophagy.

  7. SPBP is a sulforaphane induced transcriptional coactivator of NRF2 regulating expression of the autophagy receptor p62/SQSTM1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Ramesh Darvekar

    Full Text Available Organisms exposed to oxidative stress respond by orchestrating a stress response to prevent further damage. Intracellular levels of antioxidant agents increase, and damaged components are removed by autophagy induction. The KEAP1-NRF2 signaling pathway is the main pathway responsible for cell defense against oxidative stress and for maintaining the cellular redox balance at physiological levels. Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, is a potent inducer of KEAP1-NRF2 signaling and antioxidant response element driven gene expression. In this study, we show that sulforaphane enhances the expression of the transcriptional coregulator SPBP. The expression curve peaks 6-8 hours post stimulation, and parallels the sulforaphane-induced expression of NRF2 and the autophagy receptor protein p62/SQSTM1. Reporter gene assays show that SPBP stimulates the expression of p62/SQSTM1 via ARE elements in the promoter region, and siRNA mediated knock down of SPBP significantly decreases the expression of p62/SQSTM1 and the formation of p62/SQSTM1 bodies in HeLa cells. Furthermore, SPBP siRNA reduces the sulforaphane induced expression of NRF2, and the expression of the autophagy marker protein LC3B. Both these proteins contain ARE-like elements in their promoter regions. Over-expressed SPBP and NRF2 acts synergistically on the p62/SQSTM1 promoter and colocalize in nuclear speckles in HeLa cells. Collectively, these results suggest that SPBP is a coactivator of NRF2, and hence may be important for securing enhanced and sustained expression of NRF2 induced genes such as proteins involved in selective autophagy.

  8. Regulation of autophagy in cardiomyocytes by Ins(1,4,5)P(3) and IP(3)-receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Albert; Grubb, David R; Cooley, Nicola; Luo, Jieting; Woodcock, Elizabeth A

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a process that removes damaged proteins and organelles and is of particular importance in terminally differentiated cells such as cardiomyocytes, where it has primarily a protective role. We investigated the involvement of inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P(3)) and its receptors in autophagic responses in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM). Treatment with the IP(3)-receptor (IP(3)-R) antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) at 5 or 20 μmol/L resulted in an increase in autophagosome content, defined as puncta labeled by antibody to microtubule associated light chain 3 (LC3). 2-APB also increased autophagic flux, indicated by heightened LC3II accumulation, which was further enhanced by bafilomycin (10nmol/L). Expression of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) 5-phosphatase (IP(3)-5-Pase) to deplete Ins(1,4,5)P(3) also increased LC3-labeled puncta and LC3II content, suggesting that Ins(1,4,5)P(3) inhibits autophagy. The IP(3)-R can act as an inhibitory scaffold sequestering the autophagic effector, beclin-1 to its ligand binding domain (LBD). Expression of GFP-IP(3)-R-LBD inhibited autophagic signaling and furthermore, beclin-1 co-immunoprecipitated with the IP(3)-R-LBD. A mutant GFP-IP(3)-R-LBD with reduced ability to bind Ins(1,4,5)P(3) bound beclin-1 and inhibited autophagy similarly to the wild type sequence. These data provide evidence that Ins(1,4,5)P(3) and IP(3)-R act as inhibitors of autophagic responses in cardiomyocytes. By suppressing autophagy, IP(3)-R may contribute to cardiac pathology.

  9. Interleukin-1β regulates fat-liver crosstalk in obesity by auto-paracrine modulation of adipose tissue inflammation and expandability.

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    Ori Nov

    Full Text Available The inflammasome has been recently implicated in obesity-associated dys-metabolism. However, of its products, the specific role of IL-1β was clinically demonstrated to mediate only the pancreatic beta-cell demise, and in mice mainly the intra-hepatic manifestations of obesity. Yet, it remains largely unknown if IL-1β, a cytokine believed to mainly function locally, could regulate dysfunctional inter-organ crosstalk in obesity. Here we show that High-fat-fed (HFF mice exhibited a preferential increase of IL-1β in portal compared to systemic blood. Moreover, portally-drained mesenteric fat transplantation from IL-1βKO donors resulted in lower pyruvate-glucose flux compared to mice receiving wild-type (WT transplant. These results raised a putative endocrine function for visceral fat-derived IL-1β in regulating hepatic gluconeogenic flux. IL-1βKO mice on HFF exhibited only a minor or no increase in adipose expression of pro-inflammatory genes (including macrophage M1 markers, Mac2-positive crown-like structures and CD11b-F4/80-double-positive macrophages, all of which were markedly increased in WT-HFF mice. Further consistent with autocrine/paracrine functions of IL-1β within adipose tissue, adipose tissue macrophage lipid content was increased in WT-HFF mice, but significantly less in IL-1βKO mice. Ex-vivo, adipose explants co-cultured with primary hepatocytes from WT or IL-1-receptor (IL-1RI-KO mice suggested only a minor direct effect of adipose-derived IL-1β on hepatocyte insulin resistance. Importantly, although IL-1βKOs gained weight similarly to WT-HFF, they had larger fat depots with similar degree of adipocyte hypertrophy. Furthermore, adipogenesis genes and markers (pparg, cepba, fabp4, glut4 that were decreased by HFF in WT, were paradoxically elevated in IL-1βKO-HFF mice. These local alterations in adipose tissue inflammation and expansion correlated with a lower liver size, less hepatic steatosis, and preserved insulin

  10. GPR30 regulates diet-induced adiposity in female mice and adipogenesis in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aihua; Luo, Jing; Moore, William; Alkhalidy, Hana; Wu, Ling; Zhang, Jinhua; Zhen, Wei; Wang, Yao; Clegg, Deborah J.; Bin Xu; Cheng, Zhiyong; McMillan, Ryan P.; Hulver, Matthew W.; Liu, Dongmin

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies showed that GPR30, a seven-transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptor, is a novel estrogen receptor (ER) that mediates some biological events elicited by estrogen in several types of cancer cells. However, its physiological or pathological role in vivo is unclear. Here, we show that GPR30 knockout (GPRKO) female mice were protected from high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, blood glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. The decreased body weight gain in GPRKO female mice is due to the reduction in body fat mass. These effects occurred in the absence of significant changes in food intake, intestinal fat absorption, triglyceride metabolism, or energy expenditure. However, GPR30 had no significant metabolic effects in male mice fed the HFD and both sexes of mice fed a chow diet. Further, GPR30 expression levels in fat tissues of WT obese female mice were greatly increased, whereas ERα and β expression was not altered. Deletion of GPR30 reduced adipogenic differentiation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells. Conversely, activation of GPR30 enhanced adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. These findings provide evidence for the first time that GPR30 promotes adipogenesis and therefore the development of obesity in female mice exposed to excess fat energy. PMID:27698362

  11. 白色脂肪棕色化及其调控因素%Browning of white adipose tissue and its regulating factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕丹; 陈树春; 李晓思

    2014-01-01

    Recently,great progress has been achieved in the understanding of the origin,differentiation,function,and regulation of adipose tissue.While white adipose tissue in the body is responsible for storing energy and secreting adipocytokines which involved in various metabolic diseases,brown adipose tissue is mainly responsible for producing heat and energy consumption.So ‘browning of white adipose tissue’ has great potential to be used in the treatment of obesity and many related diseases,which can provide new options for the treatment of these diseases in the future.The process of ‘browning of white adipose tissue’ is regulated by many factors,such as a variety of transcriptional regulators,proteins and hormones,so new intervention method may be achieved by targeting these regulatory factors.%近年,对脂肪组织的起源、分化、作用及调节的认识有了新的进展.体内的白色脂肪组织负责储存能量并分泌一些脂肪因子参与各种代谢性疾病的发生,而棕色脂肪组织主要负责产热和消耗能量.因此,“白色脂肪棕色化”对肥胖及许多相关疾病有着巨大的治疗潜力,可为这些疾病的治疗提供新的选择.“白色脂肪棕色化”这一过程受多种因素调控,如多种转录调节剂、蛋白质和激素等,因此未来可通过干预这些调控因素来研究相关疾病的新治疗方法.

  12. De Novo Reconstruction of Adipose Tissue Transcriptomes Reveals Long Non-coding RNA Regulators of Brown Adipocyte Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Bai, Zhiqiang; Xu, Dan; Yuan, Bingbing; Lo, Kinyui Alice; Yoon, Myeong Jin; Lim, Yen Ching; Knoll, Marko; Slavov, Nikolai; Chen, Shuai; Chen, Peng; Lodish, Harvey F; Sun, Lei

    2015-05-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) protects against obesity by promoting energy expenditure via uncoupled respiration. To uncover BAT-specific long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), we used RNA-seq to reconstruct de novo transcriptomes of mouse brown, inguinal white, and epididymal white fat and identified ∼1,500 lncRNAs, including 127 BAT-restricted loci induced during differentiation and often targeted by key regulators PPARγ, C/EBPα, and C/EBPβ. One of them, lnc-BATE1, is required for establishment and maintenance of BAT identity and thermogenic capacity. lnc-BATE1 inhibition impairs concurrent activation of brown fat and repression of white fat genes and is partially rescued by exogenous lnc-BATE1 with mutated siRNA-targeting sites, demonstrating a function in trans. We show that lnc-BATE1 binds heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U and that both are required for brown adipogenesis. Our work provides an annotated catalog for the study of fat depot-selective lncRNAs and establishes lnc-BATE1 as a regulator of BAT development and physiology.

  13. Regulation of lipin1 by nutritional status, adiponectin, sex and pituitary function in rat white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, C Ruth; Novelle, Marta G; Caminos, Jorge E; Vázquez, María J; Luque, Raul M; López, Miguel; Nogueiras, Ruben; Diéguez, Carlos

    2012-02-01

    Lipin1 is a member of the lipin protein family that plays an important role in the regulation of lipid metabolism. The endogenous role of lipin1 was demonstrated by the fact that mutations in lipin1 caused lipodystrophy and metabolic disorders. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of nutritional status, pregnancy, insulin-sensitizers and pituitary hormones on lipin1 mRNA levels in adipose tissue of rats. Lipin1 gene expression was induced in conditions of hypoleptinemia (fasting) and leptin resistance (high fat diet), whereas it was decreased by high circulating leptin levels (leptin administration, pregnancy) and in leptin-deficient mice. Lipin1 mRNA levels were also decreased in adiponectin-deficient mice. Lipin1 mRNA levels are influenced by age in female rats, with peak expression at 25th day of life and decreasing thereafter. Consistently, ovariectomy increased lipin1 expression indicating that estrogens modulate lipin1. Finally, lipin1 was also regulated by pituitary hormones, since its expression was modified by thyroid status and growth hormone deficiency. Our observations indicate that: a) gWAT lipin1 mRNA levels are regulated by nutritional status, and leptin plays an important role in this regard, b) lipin1 is modulated by adiponectin, c) lipin1 is influenced by age and sex, and d) alterations in pituitary function modify lipin1 mRNA levels. To dissect the complicated interactions between key regulators of lipid metabolism like lipin1, may be important for the development of new therapies for the treatment and prevention of obesity and its associated disorders.

  14. The obese brain athlete: self-regulation of the anterior insula in adiposity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Frank

    Full Text Available The anterior insular cortex (AIC is involved in emotional processes and gustatory functions which can be examined by imaging techniques. Such imaging studies showed increased activation in the insula in response to food stimuli as well as a differential activation in lean and obese people. Additionally, studies investigating lean subjects established the voluntary regulation of the insula by a real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging-brain computer interface (rtfMRI-BCI approach. In this exploratory study, 11 lean and 10 obese healthy, male participants were investigated in a rtfMRI-BCI protocol. During the training sessions, all obese participants were able to regulate the activity of the AIC voluntarily, while four lean participants were not able to regulate at all. In successful regulators, functional connectivity during regulation vs. relaxation between the AIC and all other regions of the brain was determined by a seed voxel approach. Lean in comparison to obese regulators showed stronger connectivity in cingular and temporal cortices during regulation. We conclude, that obese people possess an improved capacity to self-regulate the anterior insula, a brain system tightly related to bodily awareness and gustatory functions.

  15. Mechanisms of mitochondria and autophagy crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambold, Angelika S; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2011-12-01

    Autophagy is a cellular survival pathway that recycles intracellular components to compensate for nutrient depletion and ensures the appropriate degradation of organelles. Mitochondrial number and health are regulated by mitophagy, a process by which excessive or damaged mitochondria are subjected to autophagic degradation. Autophagy is thus a key determinant for mitochondrial health and proper cell function. Mitophagic malfunction has been recently proposed to contribute to progressive neuronal loss in Parkinson's disease. In addition to autophagy's significance in mitochondrial integrity, several lines of evidence suggest that mitochondria can also substantially influence the autophagic process. The mitochondria's ability to influence and be influenced by autophagy places both elements (mitochondria and autophagy) in a unique position where defects in one or the other system could increase the risk to various metabolic and autophagic related diseases.

  16. Primary cilia: the chemical antenna regulating human adipose-derived stem cell osteogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine C Bodle

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem cells (ASC are multipotent stem cells that show great potential as a cell source for osteogenic tissue replacements and it is critical to understand the underlying mechanisms of lineage specification. Here we explore the role of primary cilia in human ASC (hASC differentiation. This study focuses on the chemosensitivity of the primary cilium and the action of its associated proteins: polycystin-1 (PC1, polycystin-2 (PC2 and intraflagellar transport protein-88 (IFT88, in hASC osteogenesis. To elucidate cilia-mediated mechanisms of hASC differentiation, siRNA knockdown of PC1, PC2 and IFT88 was performed to disrupt cilia-associated protein function. Immunostaining of the primary cilium structure indicated phenotypic-dependent changes in cilia morphology. hASC cultured in osteogenic differentiation media yielded cilia of a more elongated conformation than those cultured in expansion media, indicating cilia-sensitivity to the chemical environment and a relationship between the cilium structure and phenotypic determination. Abrogation of PC1, PC2 and IFT88 effected changes in both hASC proliferation and differentiation activity, as measured through proliferative activity, expression of osteogenic gene markers, calcium accretion and endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity. Results indicated that IFT88 may be an early mediator of the hASC differentiation process with its knockdown increasing hASC proliferation and decreasing Runx2, alkaline phosphatase and BMP-2 mRNA expression. PC1 and PC2 knockdown affected later osteogenic gene and end-product expression. PC1 knockdown resulted in downregulation of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin gene expression, diminished calcium accretion and reduced alkaline phosphatase enzymatic activity. Taken together our results indicate that the structure of the primary cilium is intimately associated with the process of hASC osteogenic differentiation and that its associated proteins are critical

  17. Wnt5a Regulates the Assembly of Human Adipose Derived Stromal Vascular Fraction-Derived Microvasculatures.

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    Venkat M Ramakrishnan

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (hSVF cells are an easily accessible, heterogeneous cell system that can spontaneously self-assemble into functional microvasculatures in vivo. However, the mechanisms underlying vascular self-assembly and maturation are poorly understood, therefore we utilized an in vitro model to identify potential in vivo regulatory mechanisms. We utilized passage one (P1 hSVF because of the rapid UEA1+ endothelium (EC loss at even P2 culture. We exposed hSVF cells to a battery of angiogenesis inhibitors and found that the pan-Wnt inhibitor IWP2 produced the most significant hSVF-EC networking decrease (~25%. To determine which Wnt isoform(s and receptor(s may be involved, hSVF was screened by PCR for isoforms associated with angiogenesis, with only WNT5A and its receptor, FZD4, being expressed for all time points observed. Immunocytochemistry confirmed Wnt5a protein expression by hSVF. To see if Wnt5a alone could restore IWP2-induced EC network inhibition, recombinant human Wnt5a (0-150 ng/ml was added to IWP2-treated cultures. The addition of rhWnt5a significantly increased EC network area and significantly decreased the ratio of total EC network length to EC network area compared to untreated controls. To determine if Wnt5a mediates in vivo microvascular self-assembly, 3D hSVF constructs containing an IgG isotype control, anti-Wnt5a neutralizing antibody or rhWnt5a were implanted subcutaneously for 2w in immune compromised mice. Compared to IgG controls, anti-Wnt5a treatment significantly reduced vessel length density by ~41%, while rhWnt5a significantly increased vessel length density by ~62%. However, anti-Wnt5a or rhWnt5a did not significantly affect the density of segments and nodes, both of which measure vascular complexity. Taken together, this data demonstrates that endogenous Wnt5a produced by hSVF plays a regulatory role in microvascular self-assembly in vivo. These findings also suggest that

  18. Overexpression of KAI1 induces autophagy and increases MiaPaCa-2 cell survival through the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chun-Yan [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Disease, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Department of Gastroenterology, Shenyang General Hospital of PLA, 83 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Yan, Jun; Yang, Yue-Feng; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Li, Qing-Fang; Zhang, Qun-Wei; Wang, Li-Sheng [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Guo, Xiao-Zhong, E-mail: guoxiaozhong1962@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Shenyang General Hospital of PLA, 83 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Hua, E-mail: wanghua@bmi.ac.cn [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China)

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} We first investigate the effects of KAI1 on autophagy in MiaPaCa-2 cells. {yields} Our findings demonstrate that KAI1 induces autophagy, which in turn inhibits KAI1-induced apoptosis. {yields} This study also supplies a possible novel therapeutic method for the treatment of pancreatic cancer using autophagy inhibitors. -- Abstract: KAI1, a metastasis-suppressor gene belonging to the tetraspanin family, is known to inhibit cancer metastasis without affecting the primary tumorigenicity by inhibiting the epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling pathway. Recent studies have shown that hypoxic conditions of solid tumors induce high-level autophagy and KAI1 expression. However, the relationship between autophagy and KAI1 remains unclear. By using transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and Western blotting, we found that KAI1 can induce autophagy in a dose- and time-dependent manner in the human pancreatic cell line MiaPaCa-2. KAI1-induced autophagy was confirmed by the expression of autophagy-related proteins LC3 and Beclin 1. KAI1 induces autophagy through phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinases rather than that of AKT. KAI1-induced autophagy protects MiaPaCa-2 cells from apoptosis and proliferation inhibition partially through the downregulation of poly [adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose] polymerase (PARP) cleavage and caspase-3 activation.

  19. Autophagy is an inflammation-related defensive mechanism against disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joven, Jorge; Guirro, Maria; Mariné-Casadó, Roger; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Menéndez, Javier A

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory response is an energy-intensive process. Consequently, metabolism is closely associated with immune function. The autophagy machinery plays a role in metabolism by providing energy but may also be used to attack invading pathogens (xenophagy). The autophagy machinery may function to protect against not only the threats of infection but also the threats of the host's own response acting on the central immunological tolerance and the negative regulation of innate and inflammatory signaling. The balance between too little and too much autophagy is critical for the survival of immune cells because autophagy is linked to type 2-cell death programmed necrosis and apoptosis. Changes in inflammatory cells are driven by extracellular signals; however, the mechanisms by which cytokines mediate autophagy regulation and govern immune cell function remain unknown. Certain cytokines increase autophagy, whereas others inhibit autophagy. The relationship between autophagy and inflammation is also important in the pathogenesis of metabolic, non-communicable diseases. Inflammation per se is not the cause of obesity-associated diseases, but it is secondary to both the positive energy balance and the specific cellular responses. In metabolic tissues, the suppression of autophagy increases inflammation with the overexpression of cytokines, resulting in an activation of autophagy. The physiological role of these apparently contradictory findings remains uncertain but exemplifies future challenges in the therapeutic modulation of autophagy in the management of disease.

  20. Ordered bulk degradation via autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Jörn; Kristensen, Anders Riis; Andersen, Jens S

    2008-01-01

    at proteasomal and lysosomal degradation ample cross-talk between the two degradation pathways became evident. Degradation via autophagy appeared to be ordered and regulated at the protein complex/organelle level. This raises several important questions such as: can macroautophagy itself be specific and what...

  1. The Impact of Autophagy on Cell Death Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W. Ryter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy represents a homeostatic cellular mechanism for the turnover of organelles and proteins, through a lysosome-dependent degradation pathway. During starvation, autophagy facilitates cell survival through the recycling of metabolic precursors. Additionally, autophagy can modulate other vital processes such as programmed cell death (e.g., apoptosis, inflammation, and adaptive immune mechanisms and thereby influence disease pathogenesis. Selective pathways can target distinct cargoes (e.g., mitochondria and proteins for autophagic degradation. At present, the causal relationship between autophagy and various forms of regulated or nonregulated cell death remains unclear. Autophagy can occur in association with necrosis-like cell death triggered by caspase inhibition. Autophagy and apoptosis have been shown to be coincident or antagonistic, depending on experimental context, and share cross-talk between signal transduction elements. Autophagy may modulate the outcome of other regulated forms of cell death such as necroptosis. Recent advances suggest that autophagy can dampen inflammatory responses, including inflammasome-dependent caspase-1 activation and maturation of proinflammatory cytokines. Autophagy may also act as regulator of caspase-1 dependent cell death (pyroptosis. Strategies aimed at modulating autophagy may lead to therapeutic interventions for diseases in which apoptosis or other forms of regulated cell death may play a cardinal role.

  2. Identification of a novel phosphorylation site in adipose triglyceride lipase as a regulator of lipid droplet localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xitao; Langlais, Paul; Zhang, Xiaodong; Heckmann, Bradlee L; Saarinen, Alicia M; Mandarino, Lawrence J; Liu, Jun

    2014-06-15

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the rate-limiting enzyme for triacylglycerol (TG) hydrolysis, has long been known to be a phosphoprotein. However, the potential phosphorylation events that are involved in the regulation of ATGL function remain incompletely defined. Here, using a combinatorial proteomics approach, we obtained evidence that at least eight different sites of ATGL can be phosphorylated in adipocytes. Among them, Thr³⁷² resides within the hydrophobic region known to mediate lipid droplet (LD) targeting. Although it had no impact on the TG hydrolase activity, substitution of phosphorylation-mimic Asp for Thr³⁷² eliminated LD localization and LD-degrading capacity of ATGL expressed in HeLa cells. In contrast, mutation of Thr³⁷² to Ala gave a protein that bound LDs and functioned the same as the wild-type protein. In nonstimulated adipocytes, the Asp mutation led to decreased LD association and basal lipolytic activity of ATGL, whereas the Ala mutation produced opposite effects. Moreover, the LD translocation of ATGL upon β-adrenergic stimulation was also compromised by the Asp mutation. In accord with these findings, the Ala mutation promoted and the Asp mutation attenuated the capacity of ATGL to mediate lipolysis in adipocytes under both basal and stimulated conditions. Collectively, these studies identified Thr³⁷² as a novel phosphorylation site that may play a critical role in determining subcellular distribution as well as lipolytic action of ATGL.

  3. Pinus Densiflora Bark Extract (Pinexol) Decreased Adiposity in Mice by Down-Regulation of Hepatic de novo Lipogenesis and Adipogenesis in White Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyemyoung; Go, Gwang-Woong

    2017-01-12

    PineXol, extracted from Korean red pine bark, has beneficial effects, such as antioxidant, anti3 inflammatory, and anti-lipogenic activities in vitro. We tested the hypothesis that PineXol supplementation could have anti-obesity effects on mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Four-week old male C57BL/6 mice were fed normal chow (18% kcal from fat) or HFD (60% kcal from fat). HFD-fed animals were also subjected to PineXol treatment at a dose of 10 or 50 mg/kg body weight (BW) (PX10 or PX50, respectively) body weight. Body weight and body fat mass in the PX50 group were statistically lower than those in the HFD group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively). The concentration of hepatic triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were reduced in the PX50 group compared to HFD group (P < 0.01). Acetyl CoA carboxylase (P < 0.01), elongase of very long chain fatty acids 6 (P < 0.01), stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 (P < 0.05), microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (P < 0.01), and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (P < 0.05) were significantly decreased in the PX50 group compared with that in the HFD group. In the white adipose tissue, CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein alpha (P < 0.05), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (P < 0.001), and perilipin (P < 0.01) were decreased in the PX50 group compared with those in the HFD group. Therefore, the current study implies the potential of PineXol for the prevention and/or amelioration of obesity, in part, by inhibition of both hepatic lipid synthesis and adipogenesis in the white adipose tissue.

  4. OSM mitigates post-infarction cardiac remodeling and dysfunction by up-regulating autophagy through Mst1 suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianqiang; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Zhijing; Zhang, Mingming; Lin, Jie; Wang, Jiaxing; Yu, Wenjun; Man, Wanrong; Li, Congye; Zhang, Rongqing; Gao, Erhe; Wang, Haichang; Sun, Dongdong

    2016-11-04

    The incidence and prevalence of heart failure (HF) in the world are rapidly rising possibly attributed to the worsened HF following myocardial infarction (MI) in recent years. Here we examined the effects of oncostatin M (OSM) on postinfarction cardiac remodeling and the underlying mechanisms involved. MI model was induced using left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) ligation. In addition, cultured neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes were subjected to simulated MI. Our results revealed that OSM alleviated left ventricular remodeling, promoted cardiac function, restored mitochondrial cristae density and architecture disorders after 4weeks of MI. Enhanced autophagic flux was indicated in cardiomyocytes transduced with Ad-GFP -LC3 in the OSM treated group as compared with the MI group. OSM receptor Oβ knockout blocked the beneficial effects of OSM in postinfarction cardiac remodeling and cardiomyocytes autophagy. OSM pretreatment significantly alleviated left ventricular remodeling and dysfunction in Mst1 transgenic mice, while it failed to reverse further the postinfarction left ventricular dilatation and cardiac function in the Mst1 knockout mice. Our data revealed that OSM alleviated postinfarction cardiac remodeling and dysfunction by enhancing cardiomyocyte autophagy. OSM holds promise as a therapeutic target in treating HF after MI through Oβ receptor by inhibiting Mst1 phosphorylation.

  5. Steroid biosynthesis in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiehan; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Vihma, Veera

    2015-11-01

    Tissue-specific expression of steroidogenic enzymes allows the modulation of active steroid levels in a local manner. Thus, the measurement of local steroid concentrations, rather than the circulating levels, has been recognized as a more accurate indicator of the steroid action within a specific tissue. Adipose tissue, one of the largest endocrine tissues in the human body, has been established as an important site for steroid storage and metabolism. Locally produced steroids, through the enzymatic conversion from steroid precursors delivered to adipose tissue, have been proven to either functionally regulate adipose tissue metabolism, or quantitatively contribute to the whole body's steroid levels. Most recently, it has been suggested that adipose tissue may contain the steroidogenic machinery necessary for the initiation of steroid biosynthesis de novo from cholesterol. This review summarizes the evidence indicating the presence of the entire steroidogenic apparatus in adipose tissue and discusses the potential roles of local steroid products in modulating adipose tissue activity and other metabolic parameters.

  6. HIV-1 differentially modulates autophagy in neurons and astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehla, Rajeev; Chauhan, Ashok

    2015-08-15

    Autophagy, a lysosomal degradative pathway that maintains cellular homeostasis, has emerged as an innate immune defense against pathogens. The role of autophagy in the deregulated HIV-infected central nervous system (CNS) is unclear. We have found that HIV-1-induced neuro-glial (neurons and astrocytes) damage involves modulation of the autophagy pathway. Neuro-glial stress induced by HIV-1 led to biochemical and morphological dysfunctions. X4 HIV-1 produced neuro-glial toxicity coupled with suppression of autophagy, while R5 HIV-1-induced toxicity was restricted to neurons. Rapamycin, a specific mTOR inhibitor (autophagy inducer) relieved the blockage of the autophagy pathway caused by HIV-1 and resulted in neuro-glial protection. Further understanding of the regulation of autophagy by cytokines and chemokines or other signaling events may lead to recognition of therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Induces Autophagy to Benefit Its Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhen Guo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The new porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED has caused devastating economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Despite extensive research on the relationship between autophagy and virus infection, the concrete role of autophagy in porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV infection has not been reported. In this study, autophagy was demonstrated to be triggered by the effective replication of PEDV through transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and Western blot analysis. Moreover, autophagy was confirmed to benefit PEDV replication by using autophagy regulators and RNA interference. Furthermore, autophagy might be associated with the expression of inflammatory cytokines and have a positive feedback loop with the NF-κB signaling pathway during PEDV infection. This work is the first attempt to explore the complex interplay between autophagy and PEDV infection. Our findings might accelerate our understanding of the pathogenesis of PEDV infection and provide new insights into the development of effective therapeutic strategies.

  8. Midazolam regulated caspase pathway, endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy, and cell cycle to induce apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells

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    So EC

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Edmund Cheung So,1,2 Yung-Chia Chen,3 Shu-Chun Wang,4 Chia-Ching Wu,4 Man-Chi Huang,4 Meng-Shao Lai,4 Bo-Syong Pan,4,5 Fu-Chi Kang,6 Bu-Miin Huang4 1Department of Anesthesia, An Nan Hospital, China Medical University, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2Department of Anesthesia, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; Republic of China; 3Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China; 4Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China; 5Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC, USA; 6Department of Anesthesia, Chi Mei Medical Center, Chiali, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China Purpose: Midazolam is widely used as a sedative and anesthetic induction agent by modulating the different GABA receptors in the central nervous system. Studies have also shown that midazolam has an anticancer effect on various tumors. In a previous study, we found that midazolam could induce MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cell apoptosis by activating caspase cascade. However, the detailed mechanism related to the upstream and downstream pathways of the caspase cascade, such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, autophagy, and p53 pathways plus cell cycle regulation in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells, remains elusive.Methods: Flow cytometry assay and Western blot analyses were exploited.Results: Midazolam significantly decreased cell viability but increased sub-G1 phase cell numbers in MA-10 cells (P<0.05. Annexin V/propidium iodide double staining further confirmed that midazolam induced apoptosis. In addition, expressions of Fas and Fas ligand could be detected in MA-10 cells with midazolam treatments, and Bax translocation and cytochrome c release were also involved in midazolam-induced MA-10 cell apoptosis. Moreover, the staining and expression of LC3-II proteins could

  9. Determinants of human adipose tissue gene expression: impact of diet, sex, metabolic status, and cis genetic regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Viguerie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Weight control diets favorably affect parameters of the metabolic syndrome and delay the onset of diabetic complications. The adaptations occurring in adipose tissue (AT are likely to have a profound impact on the whole body response as AT is a key target of dietary intervention. Identification of environmental and individual factors controlling AT adaptation is therefore essential. Here, expression of 271 transcripts, selected for regulation according to obesity and weight changes, was determined in 515 individuals before, after 8-week low-calorie diet-induced weight loss, and after 26-week ad libitum weight maintenance diets. For 175 genes, opposite regulation was observed during calorie restriction and weight maintenance phases, independently of variations in body weight. Metabolism and immunity genes showed inverse profiles. During the dietary intervention, network-based analyses revealed strong interconnection between expression of genes involved in de novo lipogenesis and components of the metabolic syndrome. Sex had a marked influence on AT expression of 88 transcripts, which persisted during the entire dietary intervention and after control for fat mass. In women, the influence of body mass index on expression of a subset of genes persisted during the dietary intervention. Twenty-two genes revealed a metabolic syndrome signature common to men and women. Genetic control of AT gene expression by cis signals was observed for 46 genes. Dietary intervention, sex, and cis genetic variants independently controlled AT gene expression. These analyses help understanding the relative importance of environmental and individual factors that control the expression of human AT genes and therefore may foster strategies aimed at improving AT function in metabolic diseases.

  10. 自噬与甲状腺癌的研究进展%Autophagy and its research progress in thyroid cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张思林; 罗庆; 余杰情

    2016-01-01

    To summarize the autophagy and its research progress in thyroid cancer.In combination with available literatures published in recent years involving the relationship between autophagy and thyroid cancer,the characteristics of autophagy,the role in thyroid cancer were reviewed.The changes of autophagy level will directly or indirectly participate in the pathogenesis and progression of thyroid cancer.Reagents regulating autophagy will have broad prospect of application in thyroid cancer therapy.The autophagy in the thyroid cancer is still poorly understood,and to clarify the molecular mechanism of autophagy and kill thyroid cancer cells by reasonable regulation of autophagy still needs more further studies.

  11. Epigenetic modifications as regulatory elements of autophagy in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Xinbing; Zhu, Jing; Zhou, Jichun; Wang, Xian; Li, Da; Han, Weidong; Fang, Yong; Pan, Hongming

    2015-05-01

    Epigenetic modifications have been considered as hallmarks of cancer and play an important role in tumor initiation and development. Epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNAs, may regulate cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy). Autophagy, as a crucial cellular homeostatic mechanism, performs a dual role, having pro-survival or pro-death properties. A variety of signaling pathways including epigenetic control have been implicated in the upregulation or downregulation of autophagy. However, the role of epigenetic regulation in autophagy is still less well acknowledged. Recent studies have linked epigenetic control to the autophagic process. Some epigenetic modifiers are also involved in the regulation of autophagy and potentiate the efficacy of traditional therapeutics. Thus, understanding the novel functions of epigenetic control in autophagy may allow us to develop potential therapeutic approaches for cancer treatment.

  12. Adipose tissue mTORC2 regulates ChREBP-driven de novo lipogenesis and hepatic glucose metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuefeng; Wallace, Martina; Sanchez-Gurmaches, Joan; Hsiao, Wen-Yu; Li, Huawei; Lee, Peter L.; Vernia, Santiago; Metallo, Christian M.; Guertin, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue de novo lipogenesis (DNL) positively influences insulin sensitivity, is reduced in obesity, and predicts insulin resistance. Therefore, elucidating mechanisms controlling adipose tissue DNL could lead to therapies for type 2 diabetes. Here, we report that mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) functions in white adipose tissue (WAT) to control expression of the lipogenic transcription factor ChREBPβ. Conditionally deleting the essential mTORC2 subunit Rictor in mature adipocytes decreases ChREBPβ expression, which reduces DNL in WAT, and impairs hepatic insulin sensitivity. Mechanistically, Rictor/mTORC2 promotes ChREBPβ expression in part by controlling glucose uptake, but without impairing pan-AKT signalling. High-fat diet also rapidly decreases adipose tissue ChREBPβ expression and insulin sensitivity in wild-type mice, and does not further exacerbate insulin resistance in adipose tissue Rictor knockout mice, implicating adipose tissue DNL as an early target in diet-induced insulin resistance. These data suggest mTORC2 functions in WAT as part of an extra-hepatic nutrient-sensing mechanism to control glucose homeostasis. PMID:27098609

  13. PPARγ and MyoD are differentially regulated by myostatin in adipose-derived stem cells and muscle satellite cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Feng [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding of the Agricultural Ministry and Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of the Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Deng, Bing [Wuhan Institute of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Wuhan Academy of Agricultural Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, 430208 (China); Wen, Jianghui [Wu Han University of Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chen, Kun [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding of the Agricultural Ministry and Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of the Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Liu, Wu; Ye, Shengqiang; Huang, Haijun [Wuhan Institute of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Wuhan Academy of Agricultural Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, 430208 (China); Jiang, Siwen, E-mail: jiangsiwen@mail.hzau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding of the Agricultural Ministry and Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of the Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Xiong, Yuanzhu, E-mail: xiongyzhu@163.com [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding of the Agricultural Ministry and Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of the Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China)

    2015-03-06

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted protein belonging to the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family that is primarily expressed in skeletal muscle and also functions in adipocyte maturation. Studies have shown that MSTN can inhibit adipogenesis in muscle satellite cells (MSCs) but not in adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). However, the mechanism by which MSTN differently regulates adipogenesis in these two cell types remains unknown. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and myogenic differentiation factor (MyoD) are two key transcription factors in fat and muscle cell development that influence adipogenesis. To investigate whether MSTN differentially regulates PPARγ and MyoD, we analyzed PPARγ and MyoD expression by assessing mRNA, protein and methylation levels in ADSCs and MSCs after treatment with 100 ng/mL MSTN for 0, 24, and 48 h. PPARγ mRNA levels were downregulated after 24 h and upregulated after 48 h of treatment in ADSCs, whereas in MSCs, PPARγ levels were downregulated at both time points. MyoD expression was significantly increased in ADSCs and decreased in MSCs. PPARγ and MyoD protein levels were upregulated in ADSCs and downregulated in MSCs. The CpG methylation levels of the PPARγ and MyoD promoters were decreased in ADSCs and increased in MSCs. Therefore, this study demonstrated that the different regulatory adipogenic roles of MSTN in ADSCs and MSCs act by differentially regulating PPARγ and MyoD expression. - Highlights: • PPARγ and MyoD mRNA and protein levels are upregulated by myostatin in ADSCs. • PPARγ and MyoD mRNA and protein levels are downregulated by myostatin in MSCs. • PPARγ exhibited different methylation levels in myostatin-treated ADSCs and MSCs. • MyoD exhibited different methylation levels in myostatin-treated ADSCs and MSCs. • PPARγ and MyoD are differentially regulated by myostatin in ADSCs and MSCs.

  14. MicroRNA 21 regulates the proliferation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells and high-fat diet-induced obesity alters microRNA 21 expression in white adipose tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Jeong; Hwang, Soo Hyun; Cho, Hyun Hwa; Shin, Keun Koo; Bae, Yong Chan; Jung, Jin Sup

    2012-01-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs) differentiation could provide new insights into a number of diseases including obesity. Our previous study demonstrated that microRNA-21 (miR-21) controls the adipogenic differentiation of hASCs. In this study, we determined the expression of miR-21 in white adipose tissues in a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity mouse model to examine the relationship between miR-21 and obesity and the effect of miR-21 on hASCs proliferation. Our study showed biphasic changes of miR-21 expression and a correlation between miR-21 level and adipocyte number in the epididymal fat of HFD mice. Over-expression of miR-21 decreased cell proliferation, whereas inhibiting miR-21 with 2'-O-methyl-antisense RNA increased it. Over-expression of miR-21 decreased both protein and mRNA levels of STAT3, whereas inhibiting miR-21 with 2'-O-methyl-antisense RNA increased these levels. The activity of a luciferase construct containing the miR-21 target site from the STAT3 3'UTR was lower in LV-miR21-infected hASCs than in LV-miLacZ infected cells. RNA interference-mediated down-regulation of STAT3 decreased cell proliferation without affecting adipogenic differentiation. These findings provide the evidence of the correlation between miR-21 level and adipocyte number in the white adipose tissue of HFD-induced obese mice, which provides new insights into the mechanisms of obesity.

  15. Fluoxetine Decreases the Proliferation and Adipogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Kyung Sun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fluoxetine was originally developed as an antidepressant, but it has also been used to treat obesity. Although the anti-appetite effect of fluoxetine is well-documented, its potential effects on human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs or mature adipocytes have not been investigated. Therefore, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of fluoxetine on the proliferation of ASCs. We also investigated its inhibitory effect on adipogenic differentiation. Fluoxetine significantly decreased ASC proliferation, and signal transduction PCR array analysis showed that it increased expression of autophagy-related genes. In addition, fluoxetine up-regulated SQSTM1 and LC3B protein expression as detected by western blotting and immunofluorescence. The autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3-MA, significantly attenuated fluoxetine-mediated effects on ASC proliferation and SQSTM1/LC3B expression. In addition, 3-MA decreased the mRNA expression of two autophagy-related genes, beclin-1 and Atg7, in ASCs. Fluoxetine also significantly inhibited lipid accumulation and down-regulated the levels of PPAR-γ and C/EBP-α in ASCs. Collectively, these results indicate that fluoxetine decreases ASC proliferation and adipogenic differentiation. This is the first in vitro evidence that fluoxetine can reduce fat accumulation by inhibiting ASC proliferation and differentiation.

  16. Fluoxetine Decreases the Proliferation and Adipogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo Kyung; Kim, Ji Hye; Choi, Joon-Seok; Hwang, Sung-Joo; Sung, Jong-Hyuk

    2015-07-22

    Fluoxetine was originally developed as an antidepressant, but it has also been used to treat obesity. Although the anti-appetite effect of fluoxetine is well-documented, its potential effects on human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) or mature adipocytes have not been investigated. Therefore, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of fluoxetine on the proliferation of ASCs. We also investigated its inhibitory effect on adipogenic differentiation. Fluoxetine significantly decreased ASC proliferation, and signal transduction PCR array analysis showed that it increased expression of autophagy-related genes. In addition, fluoxetine up-regulated SQSTM1 and LC3B protein expression as detected by western blotting and immunofluorescence. The autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), significantly attenuated fluoxetine-mediated effects on ASC proliferation and SQSTM1/LC3B expression. In addition, 3-MA decreased the mRNA expression of two autophagy-related genes, beclin-1 and Atg7, in ASCs. Fluoxetine also significantly inhibited lipid accumulation and down-regulated the levels of PPAR-γ and C/EBP-α in ASCs. Collectively, these results indicate that fluoxetine decreases ASC proliferation and adipogenic differentiation. This is the first in vitro evidence that fluoxetine can reduce fat accumulation by inhibiting ASC proliferation and differentiation.

  17. Soy isoflavones modulate adipokines and myokines to regulate lipid metabolism in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and liver of male Huanjiang mini-pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huansheng; Li, Fengna; Xiong, Xia; Kong, Xiangfeng; Zhang, Bin; Yuan, Xiaoxue; Fan, Juexin; Duan, Yefei; Geng, Meimei; Li, Lili; Yin, Yulong

    2013-01-05

    Although a growing body of evidence suggests that soy isoflavones help regulate lipid metabolism, the underlying mechanism has not yet been thoroughly clarified. The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of soy isoflavones on the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism in different adipose tissue depots, skeletal muscle and liver of male Huanjiang mini-pigs, as well as the expression of adipokines and myokines. A total of 36 male Huanjiang mini-pigs were fed basal diet (control, Con), low-dose soy isoflavones (LSI) and high-dose soy isoflavones (HSI). The results showed that LSI and HSI regulated the expression of genes involved in the anabolism and catabolism of fatty acids in dorsal subcutaneous (DSA), abdominal subcutaneous (ASA) and perirenal (PRA) adipose tissue depots, as well as longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM) and liver. LSI and HSI also regulated the expression of adipokines in DSA, ASA and PRA, and the expression of myokines in LDM in male Huanjiang mini-pigs. In addition, soy isoflavones regulated plasma glucose, leptin and adiponectin contents after treatment for two months. Our results indicate that soy isoflavones, by regulating the expression of adipokines and myokines, may regulate the metabolism of lipids and could have potential therapeutic applications in lipid abnormalities.

  18. Emerging role of mammalian autophagy in ketogenesis to overcome starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Ayano; Kume, Shinji; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is essential for the survival of lower organisms under conditions of nutrient depletion. However, whether autophagy plays a physiological role in mammals experiencing starvation is unknown. Ketogenesis is critical for overcoming starvation in mammals. We recently revealed that hepatic and renal autophagy are involved in starvation-induced ketogenesis, by utilizing tissue-specific autophagy-deficient mouse models. The liver is the principal organ to regulate ketogenesis, and a deficiency of liver-specific autophagy partially but significantly attenuates starvation-induced ketogenesis. While deficiency of renal-specific autophagy does not affect starvation-induced ketogenesis, mice with deficiency of both liver and kidney autophagy have even lower blood ketone levels and physical activity under starvation conditions than those lacking autophagy in the liver alone. These results suggest that the kidney can compensate for impaired hepatic ketogenesis. Since ketone bodies are catabolized from fatty acids, the uptake of fatty acids, the formation of intracellular lipid droplets, and fatty acid oxidation are critical for ketogenesis. We found that starvation-induced lipid droplet formation is impaired in autophagy-deficient organs. Thus, hepatic and renal autophagy are required for starvation-induced ketogenesis. This process is essential for maintaining systemic energy homeostasis and physical activity during starvation. Our findings provide a novel insight into mammalian autophagy and the physiology of starvation.

  19. Role of the Crosstalk between Autophagy and Apoptosis in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minfei Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy and apoptosis are catabolic pathways essential for organismal homeostasis. Autophagy is normally a cell-survival pathway involving the degradation and recycling of obsolete, damaged, or harmful macromolecular assemblies; however, excess autophagy has been implicated in type II cell death. Apoptosis is the canonical programmed cell death pathway. Autophagy and apoptosis have now been shown to be interconnected by several molecular nodes of crosstalk, enabling the coordinate regulation of degradation by these pathways. Normally, autophagy and apoptosis are both tumor suppressor pathways. Autophagy fulfils this role as it facilitates the degradation of oncogenic molecules, preventing development of cancers, while apoptosis prevents the survival of cancer cells. Consequently, defective or inadequate levels of either autophagy or apoptosis can lead to cancer. However, autophagy appears to have a dual role in cancer, as it has now been shown that autophagy also facilitates the survival of tumor cells in stress conditions such as hypoxic or low-nutrition environments. Here we review the multiple molecular mechanisms of coordination of autophagy and apoptosis and the role of the proteins involved in this crosstalk in cancer. A comprehensive understanding of the interconnectivity of autophagy and apoptosis is essential for the development of effective cancer therapeutics.

  20. BMP4 is involved in the chemoresistance of myeloid leukemia cells through regulating autophagy-apoptosis balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xielan; Liu, Juan; Peng, Minyuan; Liu, Jing; Chen, Fangping

    2013-10-01

    This study showed that silencing BMP4 expression significantly activated caspase-2, 3, and 9, while decreasing Matrigel colony formation in Cytarabine (Ara-C)-treated leukemia HL-60 cells. In contrast, Ara-C significantly upregulated Atg5 and Beclin-1 expression, the ratio of LC3-II/LC3-I, and CDK1 and cyclin B1 expression in leukemia cells expressing BMP4. BafA significantly sensitized the apoptotic effect of Ara-C in leukemia cells. Injection of Ara-C significantly inhibited tumor growth in mice inoculated with leukemia cells with BMP4 silenced. In conclusion, BMP4 plays a crucial role in the chemoresistance of leukemia cells through the activation of autophagy and subsequent inhibition of apoptosis.

  1. Autophagy, Metabolism, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Eileen; Mehnert, Janice M; Chan, Chang S

    2015-11-15

    Macroautophagy (autophagy hereafter) captures intracellular proteins and organelles and degrades them in lysosomes. The degradation breakdown products are released from lysosomes and recycled into metabolic and biosynthetic pathways. Basal autophagy provides protein and organelle quality control by eliminating damaged cellular components. Starvation-induced autophagy recycles intracellular components into metabolic pathways to sustain mitochondrial metabolic function and energy homeostasis. Recycling by autophagy is essential for yeast and mammals to survive starvation through intracellular nutrient scavenging. Autophagy suppresses degenerative diseases and has a context-dependent role in cancer. In some models, cancer initiation is suppressed by autophagy. By preventing the toxic accumulation of damaged protein and organelles, particularly mitochondria, autophagy limits oxidative stress, chronic tissue damage, and oncogenic signaling, which suppresses cancer initiation. This suggests a role for autophagy stimulation in cancer prevention, although the role of autophagy in the suppression of human cancer is unclear. In contrast, some cancers induce autophagy and are dependent on autophagy for survival. Much in the way that autophagy promotes survival in starvation, cancers can use autophagy-mediated recycling to maintain mitochondrial function and energy homeostasis to meet the elevated metabolic demand of growth and proliferation. Thus, autophagy inhibition may be beneficial for cancer therapy. Moreover, tumors are more autophagy-dependent than normal tissues, suggesting that there is a therapeutic window. Despite these insights, many important unanswered questions remain about the exact mechanisms of autophagy-mediated cancer suppression and promotion, how relevant these observations are to humans, and whether the autophagy pathway can be modulated therapeutically in cancer. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Cell Death and Cancer Therapy."

  2. Altered gut microbiota and endocannabinoid system tone in obese and diabetic leptin-resistant mice: impact on apelin regulation in adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie eGeurts

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence supports the role of gut microbiota in the development of obesity, type 2 diabetes and low-grade inflammation. The endocrine activity of adipose tissue has been found to contribute to the regulation of glucose homeostasis and low-grade inflammation. Among the key hormones produced by this tissue, apelin has been shown to regulate glucose homeostasis. Recently, it has been proposed that gut microbiota participate in adipose tissue metabolism via the endocannabinoid system and gut microbiota-derived compounds, namely lipopolysaccharide (LPS. We have investigated gut microbiota composition in obese and diabetic leptin-resistant mice (db/db by combining pyrosequencing and phylogenetic microarray analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences. We observed a significant higher abundance of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Fibrobacteres phyla in db/db mice compared to lean mice. The abundance of 10 genera was significantly affected by the genotype. We identified the roles of the endocannabinoid system and LPS in the regulation of apelinergic system tone (apelin and APJ mRNA expression in genetic obese and diabetic mice. By using in vivo and in vitro models, we have demonstrated that both the endocannabinoid system and low-grade inflammation differentially regulate apelin and APJ mRNA expression in adipose tissue. Finally, deep-gut microbiota profiling revealed that the gut microbial community of type 2 diabetic mice is significantly different from that of their lean counterparts. This indicates specific relationships between the gut microbiota and the regulation of the apelinergic system. However, the exact roles of specific bacteria in shaping the phenotype of db/db mice remain to be determined.

  3. Differential regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide- and adrenergic receptor-dependent lipolytic pathways in human adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Cédric; Polak, Jan; Richterova, Blanka; Sengenès, Coralie; Pelikanova, Terezie; Galitzky, Jean; Stich, Vladimir; Lafontan, Max; Berlan, Michel

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the regulation affecting the recently described atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)-dependent lipolytic pathway in comparison with the adrenergic lipolytic cascade. We studied in vivo the effect of a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp on the changes occurring in the extracellular glycerol concentration (EGC) of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) during ANP or epinephrine perfusion in a microdialysis probe. Homologous desensitization and the incidence of hyperinsulinemia on the ANP- and catecholaminergic-dependent control of lipolysis were also investigated in vitro on fat cells from SCAT. When perfused in SCAT, epinephrine and ANP promoted an increase in EGC; the EGC increase was significantly lower during the clamp. The reduction of epinephrine-induced lipolysis was limited (18%) when phentolamine (an alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor [AR] antagonist) was perfused together with epinephrine. Unlike the effect of epinephrine, the response to ANP observed during the second perfusion was reduced by 32%. The increase in extracellular guanosine 3',5' -cyclic monophosphate concentration, which reflects ANP activity, was also reduced during the second perfusion. Desensitization of the lipolytic effects of ANP was observed in vitro after a 2-hour period of recovery, while the effects of alpha(2)-AR agonist or of epinephrine were unchanged. Insulin was without any effect on ANP-induced lipolysis and alpha(2)-AR-mediated antilipolysis, while it reduced beta-AR-induced lipolysis. The ANP-dependent lipolytic pathway undergoes desensitization in vitro and in situ. Insulin had no inhibitory effect on either ANP- or alpha(2)-AR-dependent pathways, while it counteracted the beta-AR pathway.

  4. Crosstalk of clock gene expression and autophagy in aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfalah, Faiza; Janke, Linda; Schiavi, Alfonso; Tigges, Julia; Ix, Alexander; Ventura, Natascia; Boege, Fritz; Reinke, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy and the circadian clock counteract tissue degeneration and support longevity in many organisms. Accumulating evidence indicates that aging compromises both the circadian clock and autophagy but the mechanisms involved are unknown. Here we show that the expression levels of transcriptional repressor components of the circadian oscillator, most prominently the human Period homologue PER2, are strongly reduced in primary dermal fibroblasts from aged humans, while raising the expression of PER2 in the same cells partially restores diminished autophagy levels. The link between clock gene expression and autophagy is corroborated by the finding that the circadian clock drives cell-autonomous, rhythmic autophagy levels in immortalized murine fibroblasts, and that siRNA-mediated downregulation of PER2 decreases autophagy levels while leaving core clock oscillations intact. Moreover, the Period homologue lin-42 regulates autophagy and life span in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting an evolutionarily conserved role for Period proteins in autophagy control and aging. Taken together, this study identifies circadian clock proteins as set-point regulators of autophagy and puts forward a model, in which age-related changes of clock gene expression promote declining autophagy levels. PMID:27574892

  5. Autophagy modulation as a target for anticancer drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin LI; Huai-long XU; Yong-xi LIU; Na AN; Si ZHAO; Jin-ku BAO

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy,an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process involving the engulfment and degradation of non-essential or abnormal cellular organelles and proteins,is crucial for homeostatic maintenance in living cells.This highly regulated,multi-step process has been implicated in diverse diseases including cancer.Autophagy can function as either a promoter or a suppressor of cancer,which makes it a promising and challenging therapeutic target.Herein,we overview the regulatory mechanisms and dual roles of autophagy in cancer.We also describe some of the representative agents that exert their anticancer effects by regulating autophagy.Additionally,some emerging strategies aimed at modulating autophagy are discussed as having the potential for future anticancer drug discovery.In summary,these findings will provide valuable information to better utilize autophagy in the future development of anticancer therapeutics that meet clinical requirements.

  6. Sestrin2, a regulator of thermogenesis and mitohormesis in brown adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hyun eRo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sestrin2 is a stress-inducible protein that functions as an antioxidant and inhibitor of mTOR complex 1. In a recent study, we found that Sestrin2 overexpression in brown adipocytes interfered with normal metabolism by reducing mitochondrial respiration through the suppression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1 expression. The metabolic effects of Sestrin2 in brown adipocytes were dependent on its antioxidant activity, and chemical antioxidants produced similar effects in inhibiting UCP1-dependent thermogenesis. These observations suggest that low levels of ROS in brown adipocytes can actually be beneficial and necessary for proper metabolic homeostasis. In addition, considering that Sestrins are ROS-inducible and perform ROS-detoxifying as well as other metabolism-controlling functions, they are potential regulators of mitohormesis. This is a concept in which overall beneficial effects result from low-level oxidative stress stimuli, such as the ones induced by caloric restriction or physical exercise. In this perspective, we incorporate our recent insight obtained from the Sestrin2 study towards a better understanding of the relationship between ROS, Sestrin2 and mitochondrial metabolism in the context of brown adipocyte physiology.

  7. NAMPT-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis in adipocytes regulates adipose tissue function and multi-organ insulin sensitivity in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromsdorfer, Kelly L.; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Yoon, Myeong Jin; Moseley, Anna C.; Franczyk, Michael P.; Kelly, Shannon C.; Qi, Nathan; Imai, Shin-ichiro; Yoshino, Jun

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Obesity is associated with adipose tissue dysfunction and multi-organ insulin resistance. However, the mechanisms of such obesity-associated systemic metabolic complications are not clear. Here, we characterized mice with adipocyte-specific deletion of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), a rate-limiting NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme known to decrease in adipose tissue of obese and aged rodents and people. We found that adipocyte-specific Nampt knockout mice had severe insulin resistance in adipose tissue, liver, and skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue dysfunction, manifested by increased plasma free fatty acids concentrations and decreased plasma concentrations of a major insulin-sensitizing adipokine, adiponectin. Loss of Nampt increased phosphorylation of CDK5 and PPARγ (serine-273) and decreased gene expression of obesity-linked phosphorylated PPARγ targets in adipose tissue. Remarkably, these deleterious alterations were normalized by administering rosiglitazone or a key NAD+ intermediate, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN). Collectively, our results provide important mechanistic and therapeutic insights into obesity-associated systemic metabolic derangements, particularly multi-organ insulin resistance. PMID:27498863

  8. Regulation of glucose utilization and lipogenesis in adipose tissue of diabetic and fat fed animals: Effects of insulin and manganese

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Najma Z Baquer; M Sinclair; S Kunjara; Umesh C S Yadav; P McLean

    2003-03-01

    In order to evaluate the modulatory effects of manganese, high fat diet fed and alloxan diabetic rats were taken and the changes in the glucose oxidation, glycerol release and effects of manganese on these parameters were measured from adipose tissue. An insulin-mimetic effect of manganese was observed in the adipose tissue in the controls and an additive effect of insulin and manganese on glucose oxidation was seen when Mn2+ was added in vitro. The flux of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis was significantly decreased in high fat fed animals. Although the in vitro addition of Mn2+ was additive with insulin when 14CO2 was measured from control animals, it was found neither in young diabetic animals (6–8 weeks old) nor in the old (16 weeks old). Both insulin and manganese caused an increased oxidation of carbon-1 of glucose and an increase of its incorporation into 14C-lipids in the young control animals; the additive effect of insulin and manganese suggests separate site of action. This effect was decreased in fat fed animals, diabetic animals and old animals. Manganese alone was found to decrease glycerol in both the control and diabetic adipose tissue in in vitro incubations. The results of the effects of glucose oxidation, lipogenesis, and glycerol release in adipose tissue of control and diabetic animals of different ages are presented together with the effect of manganese on adipose tissue from high fat milk diet fed animals.

  9. Inverse regulation of inflammation and mitochondrial function in adipose tissue defines extreme insulin sensitivity in morbidly obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qatanani, Mohammed; Tan, Yejun; Dobrin, Radu; Greenawalt, Danielle M; Hu, Guanghui; Zhao, Wenqing; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Sears, Dorothy D; Kaplan, Lee M; Kemp, Daniel M

    2013-03-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance, a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, not all obese individuals are insulin resistant, which confounds our understanding of the mechanistic link between these conditions. We conducted transcriptome analyses on 835 obese subjects with mean BMI of 48.8, on which we have previously reported genetic associations of gene expression. Here, we selected ~320 nondiabetic (HbA(1c) immune response and inflammation-related genes were significantly downregulated in the omental adipose tissue of obese individuals with extreme insulin sensitivity and, to a much lesser extent, in subcutaneous adipose tissue. In contrast, genes related to β-oxidation and the citric acid cycle were relatively overexpressed in adipose of insulin-sensitive patients. These observations were verified by querying an independent cohort of our published dataset of 37 subjects whose subcutaneous adipose tissue was sampled before and after treatment with thiazolidinediones. Whereas the immune response and inflammation pathway genes were downregulated by thiazolidinedione treatment, β-oxidation and citric acid cycle genes were upregulated. This work highlights the critical role that omental adipose inflammatory pathways might play in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance, independent of body weight.

  10. Mechanisms of mitochondria and autophagy crosstalk

    OpenAIRE

    Rambold, Angelika S; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular survival pathway that recycles intracellular components to compensate for nutrient depletion and ensures the appropriate degradation of organelles. Mitochondrial number and health are regulated by mitophagy, a process by which excessive or damaged mitochondria are subjected to autophagic degradation. Autophagy is thus a key determinant for mitochondrial health and proper cell function. Mitophagic malfunction has been recently proposed to contribute to progressive neuro...

  11. Rph1 mediates the nutrient-limitation signaling pathway leading to transcriptional activation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Amélie; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2015-04-01

    To maintain proper cellular homeostasis, the magnitude of autophagy activity has to be finely tuned in response to environmental changes. Many aspects of autophagy regulation have been extensively studied: pathways integrating signals through the master regulators TORC1 and PKA lead to multiple post-translational modifications affecting the functions, protein-protein interactions, and localization of Atg proteins. The expression of several ATG genes increases sharply upon autophagy induction conditions, and defects in ATG gene expression are associated with various diseases, pointing to the importance of transcriptional regulation of autophagy. Yet, how changes in ATG gene expression affect the rate of autophagy is not well characterized, and transcriptional regulators of the autophagy pathway remain largely unknown. To identify such regulators, we analyzed the expression of several ATG genes in a library of DNA-binding protein mutants. This led to the identification of Rph1 as a master transcriptional regulator of autophagy.

  12. Autophagy in lung disease pathogenesis and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W. Ryter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, a cellular pathway for the degradation of damaged organelles and proteins, has gained increasing importance in human pulmonary diseases, both as a modulator of pathogenesis and as a potential therapeutic target. In this pathway, cytosolic cargos are sequestered into autophagosomes, which are delivered to the lysosomes where they are enzymatically degraded and then recycled as metabolic precursors. Autophagy exerts an important effector function in the regulation of inflammation, and immune system functions. Selective pathways for autophagic degradation of cargoes may have variable significance in disease pathogenesis. Among these, the autophagic clearance of bacteria (xenophagy may represent a crucial host defense mechanism in the pathogenesis of sepsis and inflammatory diseases. Our recent studies indicate that the autophagic clearance of mitochondria, a potentially protective program, may aggravate the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by activating cell death programs. We report similar findings with respect to the autophagic clearance of cilia components, which can contribute to airways dysfunction in chronic lung disease. In certain diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, autophagy may confer protection by modulating proliferation and cell death. In other disorders, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and cystic fibrosis, impaired autophagy may contribute to pathogenesis. In lung cancer, autophagy has multiple consequences by limiting carcinogenesis, modulating therapeutic effectiveness, and promoting tumor cell survival. In this review we highlight the multiple functions of autophagy and its selective autophagy subtypes that may be of significance to the pathogenesis of human disease, with an emphasis on lung disease and therapeutics.

  13. Autophagy in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucile eEspert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb are among the most lethal human pathogens worldwide, each being responsible for around 1.5 million deaths annually. Moreover, synergy between acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS and tuberculosis (TB has turned HIV/M.tb co-infection into a major public health threat in developing countries. In the past decade, autophagy, a lysosomal catabolic process, has emerged as a major host immune defense mechanism against infectious agents like M.tb and HIV. Nevertheless, in some instances, autophagy machinery appears to be instrumental for HIV infection. Finally, there is mounting evidence that both pathogens deploy various countermeasures to thwart autophagy. This mini-review proposes an overview of the roles and regulations of autophagy in HIV and M.tb infections with an emphasis on microbial factors. We also discuss the role of autophagy manipulation in the context of HIV/M.tb co-infection. In future, a comprehensive understanding of autophagy interaction with these pathogens will be critical for development of autophagy-based prophylactic and therapeutic interventions for AIDS and TB.

  14. Autophagy: for better or for worse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ellen Wirawan; Tom Vanden Berghe; Saskia Lippens; Patrizia Agostinis; Peter Vandenabeele

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway that degrades damaged or superfluous cell components into basic biomolecules,which are then recycled back into the cytosol.In this respect,autophagy drives a flow of biomolecules in a continuous degradation-regeneration cycle.Autophagy is generally considered a pro-survival mechanism protecting cells under stress or poor nutrient conditions.Current research clearly shows that autophagy fulfills numerous functions in vital biological processes.It is implicated in development,differentiation,innate and adaptive immunity,ageing and cell death.In addition,accumulating evidence demonstrates interesting links between autophagy and several human diseases and tumor development.Therefore,autophagy seems to be an important player in the life and death of cells and organisms.Despite the mounting knowledge about autophagy,the mechanisms through which the autophagic machinery regulates these diverse processes are not entirely understood.In this review,we give a comprehensive overview of the autophagic signaling pathway,its role in general cellular processes and its connection to cell death.In addition,we present a brief overview of the possible contribution of defective autophagic signaling to disease.

  15. Visceral adiposity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Heno F; Corrêa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda M; Egan, Brent M

    2016-01-01

    adipose tissue blocks lipolysis to a variety of lipolytic stimuli and adipose tissue send inputs to the brain. An imbalance of sympathetic/parasympathetic and alpha2 adrenergic/beta3 receptor is related to visceral adipose tissue storage and insulin sensitivity. Thus, in addition to the well-known factors classically associated with VAS, abnormal autonomic activity also emerges as an important factor regulating white adipose tissue, which highlights complex role of adipose tissue in the VAS.

  16. Characterization of early autophagy signaling by quantitative phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer Tg; Zarei, Mostafa; Sprenger, Adrian;

    2014-01-01

    Under conditions of nutrient shortage autophagy is the primary cellular mechanism ensuring availability of substrates for continuous biosynthesis. Subjecting cells to starvation or rapamycin efficiently induces autophagy by inhibiting the MTOR signaling pathway triggering increased autophagic flux....... To elucidate the regulation of early signaling events upon autophagy induction, we applied quantitative phosphoproteomics characterizing the temporal phosphorylation dynamics after starvation and rapamycin treatment. We obtained a comprehensive atlas of phosphorylation kinetics within the first 30 min upon...

  17. Beclin 1 complex in autophagy and Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Philipp A; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2010-10-01

    Beclin 1 is a protein involved in the regulation of autophagy and has been shown to be reduced in patients with Alzheimer disease. This review summarizes the current research data that link disturbances in autophagy, a cellular degradation and maintenance pathway, to the development of Alzheimer disease and related neurodegenerative diseases. It also provides a brief overview of the existing pharmacological interventions available to modulate autophagy activity in mammalian cells.

  18. RUFY4: Immunity piggybacking on autophagy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terawaki, Seigo; Camosseto, Voahirana; Pierre, Philippe; Gatti, Evelina

    2016-01-01

    Although autophagy is a highly conserved mechanism among species and cell types, few are the molecules involved with the autophagic process that display cell- or tissue- specific expression. We have unraveled the positive regulatory role on autophagy of RUFY4 (RUN and FYVE domain containing 4), which is expressed in subsets of immune cells, including dendritic cells (DCs). DCs orchestrate the eradication of pathogens by coordinating the action of the different cell types involved in microbe recognition and destruction during the immune response. To fulfill this function, DC display particular regulation of their endocytic and autophagy pathways in response to the immune environment. Autophagy flux is downmodulated in DCs upon microbe sensing, but is remarkably augmented, when cells are differentiated in the presence of the pleiotropic cytokine IL4 (interleukin 4). From gene expression studies aimed at comparing the impact of IL4 on DC differentiation, we identified RUFY4, as a novel regulator that augments autophagy flux and, when overexpressed, induces drastic membrane redistribution and strongly tethers lysosomes. RUFY4 is therefore one of the few known positive regulators of autophagy that is expressed in a cell-specific manner or under specific immunological conditions associated with IL4 expression such as allergic asthma.

  19. Autophagy in stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodolfo, Carlo; Di Bartolomeo, Sabrina; Cecconi, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved cellular process, responsible for the degradation and recycling of damaged and/or outlived proteins and organelles. This is the major cellular pathway, acting throughout the formation of cytosolic vesicles, called autophagosomes, for the delivering to lysosome. Recycling of cellular components through autophagy is a crucial step for cell homeostasis as well as for tissue remodelling during development. Impairment of this process has been related to the pathogenesis of various diseases, such as cancer and neurodegeneration, to the response to bacterial and viral infections, and to ageing. The ability of stem cells to self-renew and differentiate into the mature cells of the body renders this unique type of cell highly crucial to development and tissue renewal, not least in various diseases. During the last two decades, extensive knowledge about autophagy roles and regulation in somatic cells has been acquired; however, the picture about the role and the regulation of autophagy in the different types of stem cells is still largely unknown. Autophagy is a major player in the quality control and maintenance of cellular homeostasis, both crucial factors for stem cells during an organism's life. In this review, we have highlighted the most significant advances in the comprehension of autophagy regulation in embryonic and tissue stem cells, as well as in cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent cells.

  20. miR-487b-5p Regulates Temozolomide Resistance of Lung Cancer Cells Through LAMP2-Medicated Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Liang; Lv, Lei; Feng, Jinping; Chen, Yuyu; Wang, Xinhua; Han, Shuguang; Zhao, Hongqing

    2016-08-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is a standard agent used in the treatment of various types of cancers, including lung carcinoma, but TMZ resistance is common and accounts for many treatment failures. We investigated miRNA-487b-5p (miR-487b-5p) was highly expressed in A549 and H1299 cells which acquired TMZ resistance. Suppression of miR-487b-5p had overt effects on cellular proliferation and migration in the presence of TMZ. On the other hand, knockdown of miR-487b-5p resulted in increased survival and moderate tumor growth in vivo. In addition, the decreased cellular proliferation following miR-487b-5p suppression was linked to enhanced autophagy, evident by drastically increased levels of LC3-II, BECLIN1, and LAMP2 when miR-487b-5p was knocked down. Further analysis revealed that LAMP2 might be the target gene of miR-487b-5p. In conclusion, our study suggested that miR-487b-5p may be a potential biomarker of acquired TMZ resistance in lung cancer cells, and miR-487b-5p inhibition can be further explored as a chemotherapy target in the treatment of TMZ-resistant lung carcinoma.

  1. The DUB-ious lack of ALIS in Salmonella infection: a Salmonella deubiquitinase regulates the autophagy of protein aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mair; Mesquita, Francisco S; Holden, David W

    2012-12-01

    Ubiquitinated aggregates are formed in eukaryotic cells in response to several external stimuli, including exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Although Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) LPS has been shown to induce aggresome-like induced structures (ALIS) in macrophages, these have not been described in S. Typhimurium-infected macrophages. Given that LPS is present in infection, this suggests that S. Typhimurium might suppress the formation of ALIS. We found that S. Typhimurium induces the formation of ubiquitinated aggregates in epithelial cells and macrophages, but that their presence is masked by the deubiquitinase (DUB) activity of the S. Typhimurium virulence protein, SseL. SseL deubiquitinates SQSTM1/p62-bound proteins found in S. Typhimurium-induced aggregates and ALIS, and reduces the recruitment of autophagic components. While the functions of ALIS and other ubiquitinated aggregates remain unclear, they serve to sequester cytosolic proteins under a variety of stress conditions and are suggested to be involved in host immune defense. During infection, the deubiquitinase activity of SseL reduces autophagic flux in infected cells and favors bacterial replication. This is a new example of how a bacterial pathogen counteracts the autophagy pathway through the action of a translocated virulence protein.

  2. Intrinsically disordered regions in autophagy proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yang; Su, Minfei; Soni, Gaurav; Salem, Saeed; Colbert, Christopher L; Sinha, Sangita C

    2014-04-01

    Autophagy is an essential eukaryotic pathway required for cellular homeostasis. Numerous key autophagy effectors and regulators have been identified, but the mechanism by which they carry out their function in autophagy is not fully understood. Our rigorous bioinformatic analysis shows that the majority of key human autophagy proteins include intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), which are sequences lacking stable secondary and tertiary structure; suggesting that IDRs play an important, yet hitherto uninvestigated, role in autophagy. Available crystal structures corroborate the absence of structure in some of these predicted IDRs. Regions of orthologs equivalent to the IDRs predicted in the human autophagy proteins are poorly conserved, indicating that these regions may have diverse functions in different homologs. We also show that IDRs predicted in human proteins contain several regions predicted to facilitate protein-protein interactions, and delineate the network of proteins that interact with each predicted IDR-containing autophagy protein, suggesting that many of these interactions may involve IDRs. Lastly, we experimentally show that a BCL2 homology 3 domain (BH3D), within the key autophagy effector BECN1 is an IDR. This BH3D undergoes a dramatic conformational change from coil to α-helix upon binding to BCL2s, with the C-terminal half of this BH3D constituting a binding motif, which serves to anchor the interaction of the BH3D to BCL2s. The information presented here will help inform future in-depth investigations of the biological role and mechanism of IDRs in autophagy proteins.

  3. Autophagy in Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deretic, Vojo

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy as an immune mechanism controls inflammation and acts as a cell-autonomous defense against intracellular microbes including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. An equally significant role of autophagy is its anti-inflammatory and tissue-sparing function. This combination of antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory actions prevents active disease in animal models. In human populations, genetic links between autophagy, inflammatory bowel disease, and susceptibility to tuberculosis provide further support to these combined roles of autophagy. The autophagic control of M. tuberculosis and prevention of progressive disease provide novel insights into physiological and immune control of tuberculosis. It also offers host-based therapeutic opportunities because autophagy can be pharmacologically modulated. PMID:25167980

  4. Globular Adiponectin Causes Tolerance to LPS-Induced TNF-α Expression via Autophagy Induction in RAW 264.7 Macrophages: Involvement of SIRT1/FoxO3A Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Nirmala Tilija; Subedi, Amit; Kim, Mi Jin; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin, an adipokine predominantly produced from adipose tissue, exhibited potent anti-inflammatory properties. In particular, it inhibits production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), in macrophages. Autophagy, an intracellular self-digestion process, has been recently shown to regulate inflammatory responses. In the present study, we investigated the role of autophagy induction in the suppression of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced TNF-α expression by globular adiponectin (gAcrp) and its potential mechanisms. Herein, we found that gAcrp treatment increased expression of genes related with autophagy, including Atg5 and microtubule-associated protein light chain (LC3B), induced autophagosome formation and autophagy flux in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Similar results were observed in primary macrophages isolated peritoneum of mice. Interestingly, inhibition of autophagy by pretreatment with Bafilomycin A1 or knocking down of LC3B gene restored suppression of TNF-α expression, tumor necrosis factor receptor- associated factor 6 (TRAF6) expression and p38MAPK phosphorylation by gAcrp, implying a critical role of autophagy induction in the development of tolerance to LPS-induced TNF-α expression by gAcrp. We also found that knocking-down of FoxO3A, a forkhead box O member of transcription factor, blocked gAcrp-induced expression of LC3II and Atg5. Moreover, gene silencing of Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) blocked both gAcrp-induced nuclear translocation of FoxO3A and LC3II expression. Finally, pretreatment with ROS inhibitors, prevented gAcrp-induced SIRT1 expression and further generated inhibitory effects on gAcrp-induced autophagy, indicating a role of ROS production in gAcrp-induced SIRT1 expression and subsequent autophagy induction. Taken together, these findings indicate that globular adiponectin suppresses LPS-induced TNF-α expression, at least in part, via autophagy activation. Furthermore, SIRT1-FoxO3A

  5. Mutant p53 protein localized in the cytoplasm inhibits autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Eugenia; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Soussi, Thierry; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-10-01

    The knockout, knockdown or chemical inhibition of p53 stimulates autophagy. Moreover, autophagy-inducing stimuli such as nutrient depletion, rapamycin or lithium cause the depletion of cytoplasmic p53, which in turn is required for the induction of autophagy. Here, we show that retransfection of p53(-/-) HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells with wild type p53 decreases autophagy down to baseline levels. Surprisingly, one third among a panel of 22 cancer-associated p53 single amino acid mutants also inhibited autophagy when transfected into p53(-/-) cells. Those variants of p53 that preferentially localize to the cytoplasm effectively repressed autophagy, whereas p53 mutants that display a prominently nuclear distribution failed to inhibit autophagy. The investigation of a series of deletion mutants revealed that removal of the DNA-binding domain from p53 fails to interfere with its role in the regulation of autophagy. Altogether, these results identify the cytoplasmic localization of p53 as the most important feature for p53-mediated autophagy inhibition. Moreover, the structural requirements for the two biological activities of extranuclear p53, namely induction of apoptosis and inhibition of autophagy, are manifestly different.

  6. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair.

  7. Adipose tissue gene expression is differentially regulated with different rates of weight loss in overweight and obese humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, R G; Roumans, N J; Fazelzadeh, P; Tareen, S H K; Boekschoten, M V; van Baak, M A; Mariman, E C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Moderate weight loss (WL) can ameliorate adverse health effects associated with obesity, reflected by an improved adipose tissue (AT) gene expression profile. However, the effect of rate of WL on the AT transcriptome is unknown. We investigated the global AT gene expression pr

  8. Autophagy in Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. S. Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy provides a mechanism for the turnover of cellular organelles and proteins through a lysosome-dependent degradation pathway. During starvation, autophagy exerts a homeostatic function that promotes cell survival by recycling metabolic precursors. Additionally, autophagy can interact with other vital processes such as programmed cell death, inflammation, and adaptive immune mechanisms, and thereby potentially influence disease pathogenesis. Macrophages deficient in autophagic proteins display enhanced caspase-1-dependent proinflammatory cytokine production and the activation of the inflammasome. Autophagy provides a functional role in infectious diseases and sepsis by promoting intracellular bacterial clearance. Mutations in autophagy-related genes, leading to loss of autophagic function, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Furthermore, autophagy-dependent mechanisms have been proposed in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases that involve inflammation, including cystic fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Strategies aimed at modulating autophagy may lead to therapeutic interventions for diseases associated with inflammation.

  9. Proteasome inhibition-induced p38 MAPK/ERK signaling regulates autophagy and apoptosis through the dual phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Cheol-Hee [Research Center for Resistant Cells, Chosun University, Seosuk-dong, Dong-gu, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Chosun University, Seosuk-dong, Dong-gu, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung-Hoon [College of Pharmacy and Multiscreening Center for Drug Development, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sang-Gun [Department of Pathology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seon-Hee, E-mail: oshccw@hanmail.net [Research Center for Resistant Cells, Chosun University, Seosuk-dong, Dong-gu, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MG132 induces the phosphorylation of GSK3{beta}{sup Ser9} and, to a lesser extent, of GSK3{beta}{sup Thr390}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MG132 induces dephosphorylation of p70S6K{sup Thr389} and phosphorylation of p70S6K{sup Thr421/Ser424}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivation of p38 dephosphorylates GSK3{beta}{sup Ser9} and phosphorylates GSK3{beta}{sup Thr390}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivation of p38 phosphorylates p70S6K{sup Thr389} and increases the phosphorylation of p70S6K{sup Thr421/Ser424}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivation of p38 decreases autophagy and increases apoptosis induced by MG132. -- Abstract: Proteasome inhibition is a promising approach for cancer treatment; however, the underlying mechanisms involved have not been fully elucidated. Here, we show that proteasome inhibition-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase regulates autophagy and apoptosis by modulating the phosphorylation status of glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} (GSK3{beta}) and 70 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K). The treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with MG132 induced endoplasmic reticulum stress through the induction of ATF6a, PERK phosphorylation, and CHOP, and apoptosis through the cleavage of Bax and procaspase-3. MG132 caused the phosphorylation of GSK3{beta} at Ser{sup 9} and, to a lesser extent, Thr{sup 390}, the dephosphorylation of p70S6K at Thr{sup 389}, and the phosphorylation of p70S6K at Thr{sup 421} and Ser{sup 424}. The specific p38 inhibitor SB203080 reduced the p-GSK3{beta}{sup Ser9} and autophagy through the phosphorylation of p70S6K{sup Thr389}; however, it augmented the levels of p-ERK, p-GSK3{beta}{sup Thr390}, and p-70S6K{sup Thr421/Ser424} induced by MG132, and increased apoptotic cell death. The GSK inhibitor SB216763, but not lithium, inhibited the MG132-induced phosphorylation of p38, and the downstream signaling pathway was consistent with that in SB203580-treated cells. Taken together, our

  10. Mammalian Autophagy: How Does It Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Carla F; Renna, Maurizio; Ghislat, Ghita; Puri, Claudia; Ashkenazi, Avraham; Vicinanza, Mariella; Menzies, Fiona M; Rubinsztein, David C

    2016-06-02

    Autophagy is a conserved intracellular pathway that delivers cytoplasmic contents to lysosomes for degradation via double-membrane autophagosomes. Autophagy substrates include organelles such as mitochondria, aggregate-prone proteins that cause neurodegeneration and various pathogens. Thus, this pathway appears to be relevant to the pathogenesis of diverse diseases, and its modulation may have therapeutic value. Here, we focus on the cell and molecular biology of mammalian autophagy and review the key proteins that regulate the process by discussing their roles and how these may be modulated by posttranslational modifications. We consider the membrane-trafficking events that impact autophagy and the questions relating to the sources of autophagosome membrane(s). Finally, we discuss data from structural studies and some of the insights these have provided.

  11. Influence of Autophagy Regulation Agent on the Proliferation of Toxoplasma Gondii in Mice%自噬调控剂对小鼠体内弓形虫增殖的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琼; 张婧; 高劲松; 李万峰; 汪学龙

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the influence of autophagy regulation agent on the proliferation of toxo-plasma gondii in mice.Methods:Using autophagy inhibitors bafilomycin A1 and autophagy iinducing agent lithium chloride respectively to intervene toxoplasma gondii infected mice.Fluorescence quantitative PCR was used to detect proliferation of Toxoplasma gondii under different experimental conditions.Results:Quantita-tive PCR results showed that bafilomycin A1 dose and the number of toxoplasma gondii in mice was negative correlated,while inducing agent lithium chloride and the number of toxoplasma gondii in mice was positive correlated.Conclusion:The regulation on autophagy of host cells in mice could regulate the proliferation and replication of toxoplasma gondii.%目的::研究自噬调控剂对小鼠体内弓形虫增殖的影响。方法:建立弓形虫感染的小鼠模型,分别使用自噬抑制剂巴弗洛霉 A1(bafilomycin A1)和自噬诱导剂氯化锂对弓形虫感染小鼠模型进行干预,应用荧光定量 PCR 检测不同实验条件下弓形虫数量。结果:实验结果表明巴弗洛霉素 A1剂量与小鼠体内弓形虫数量呈负相关,而诱导剂氯化锂与小鼠体内弓形虫数量呈正相关。结论:调控宿主细胞自噬可调控体内弓形虫增殖。

  12. NPY neuron-specific Y2 receptors regulate adipose tissue and trabecular bone but not cortical bone homeostasis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Chuan Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Y2 receptor signalling is known to be important in neuropeptide Y (NPY-mediated effects on energy homeostasis and bone physiology. Y2 receptors are located post-synaptically as well as acting as auto receptors on NPY-expressing neurons, and the different roles of these two populations of Y2 receptors in the regulation of energy homeostasis and body composition are unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We thus generated two conditional knockout mouse models, Y2(lox/lox and NPYCre/+;Y2(lox/lox, in which Y2 receptors can be selectively ablated either in the hypothalamus or specifically in hypothalamic NPY-producing neurons of adult mice. Specific deletion of hypothalamic Y2 receptors increases food intake and body weight compared to controls. Importantly, specific ablation of hypothalamic Y2 receptors on NPY-containing neurons results in a significantly greater adiposity in female but not male mice, accompanied by increased hepatic triglyceride levels, decreased expression of liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT1 and increased expression of muscle phosphorylated acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC. While food intake, body weight, femur length, bone mineral content, density and cortical bone volume and thickness are not significantly altered, trabecular bone volume and number were significantly increased by hypothalamic Y2 deletion on NPY-expressing neurons. Interestingly, in situ hybridisation reveals increased NPY and decreased proopiomelanocortin (POMC mRNA expression in the arcuate nucleus of mice with hypothalamus-specific deletion of Y2 receptors in NPY neurons, consistent with a negative feedback mechanism between NPY expression and Y2 receptors on NPY-ergic neurons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together these data demonstrate the anti-obesogenic role of Y2 receptors in the brain, notably on NPY-ergic neurons, possibly via inhibition of NPY neurons and concomitant stimulation of POMC-expressing neurons in the arcuate nucleus of

  13. Genome-wide mRNA-seq profiling reveals predominant down-regulation of lipid metabolic processes in adipose tissues of Small Tail Han than Dorset sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiangyang; Luo, Qingmiao; Qin, Xiaoyu; Guo, Yuntao; Zhao, Huijing

    2015-11-13

    Small Tail Han and Dorset sheep are two different sheep with distinguished morphologies in fat depositions. In order to characterize their gene expression profiles, our present study took the advantages of RNA sequencing technology with the aims to identify important genes regulating the metabolisms in adipose tissues of two different sheep. In obtained high quality sequencing reads, 85.9 (Han) and 86.1% (Dorset) were uniquely aligned to Oar v3.1 sheep reference genome, and over 76% of bases in mapped reads corresponded to mRNA. Using R package EBSeq, we identified 602 differentially expressed genes. Using the 602 genes, GO analysis showed that 30 out of 56 significantly enriched biological processes were metabolism related, of which the most significant one was triglyceride biosynthetic process. The KEGG pathway analysis indicated the down-regulation of several fat metabolic pathways. The predominant down-regulation of massive metabolic processes, particularly the lipid metabolism, in adipose tissues of Han sheep could explain, at least in part, the distinguished fat deposition between two different sheep, and our data constitute a basic picture of transcriptomes in these sheep for better understanding of underline biological mechanism in their lipid metabolisms.

  14. Mammalian autophagy is essential for hepatic and renal ketogenesis during starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Ayano; Kume, Shinji; Kondo, Motoyuki; Nakazawa, Jun; Chin-Kanasaki, Masami; Araki, Hisazumi; Araki, Shin-ichi; Koya, Daisuke; Haneda, Masakazu; Chano, Tokuhiro; Matsusaka, Taiji; Nagao, Kenji; Adachi, Yusuke; Chan, Lawrence; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2016-01-06

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system activated, across species, by starvation. Although accumulating evidence has shown that mammalian autophagy is involved in pathogenesis of several modern diseases, its physiological role to combat starvation has not been fully clarified. In this study, we analysed starvation-induced gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis in mouse strains lacking autophagy in liver, skeletal muscle or kidney. Autophagy-deficiency in any tissue had no effect on gluconeogenesis during starvation. Though skeletal muscle- and kidney-specific autophagy-deficiency did not alter starvation-induced increases in blood ketone levels, liver-specific autophagy-deficiency significantly attenuated this effect. Interestingly, renal as well as hepatic expression of HMG-CoA synthase 2 increased with prolonged starvation. Furthermore, during starvation, mice lacking autophagy both in liver and kidney showed even lower blood ketone levels and physical activity than mice lacking autophagy only in liver. Starvation induced massive lipid droplet formation in extra-adipose tissues including liver and kidney, which was essential for ketogenesis. Moreover, this process was impaired in the autophagy-deficient liver and kidney. These findings demonstrate that hepatic and renal autophagy are essential for starvation-induced lipid droplet formation and subsequent ketogenesis and, ultimately, for maintaining systemic energy homeostasis. Our findings provide novel biological insights into adaptive mechanisms to combat starvation in mammals.

  15. Suppression of autophagy exacerbates Mefloquine-mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ji Hyun; Park, So Jung; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Eun Sung; Kang, Hee; Park, Ji-Ho; Lee, Eunjoo H; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2012-05-02

    Mefloquine is an effective treatment drug for malaria. However, it can cause several adverse side effects, and the precise mechanism associated with the adverse neurological effects of Mefloquine is not clearly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Mefloquine on autophagy in neuroblastoma cells. Mefloquine treatment highly induced the formation of autophagosomes and the conversion of LC3I into LC3II. Moreover, Mefloquine-induced autophagy was efficiently suppressed by an autophagy inhibitor and by down regulation of ATG6. The autophagy was also completely blocked in ATG5 deficient mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Moreover, suppression of autophagy significantly intensified Mefloquine-mediated cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Our findings suggest that suppression of autophagy may exacerbate Mefloquine toxicity in neuroblastoma cells.

  16. Research Progression of Cellular Autophagy in Liver System Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyun Liu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a basic biological phenomenon widely existed in eukaryotic cells and an important mechanism for cells to adjust to the surrounding environment, prevent invasion of pathogenic micro-organisms and maintain homeostasis, whose activity changes evidently in multiple liver system diseases, suggesting that there is close association between autophagy and the generation and development of liver system diseases. It is also reported that autophagy develops and exerts an important function in many liver-related diseases, such as hepatic carcinoma, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic liver disease, viral liver disease and acute liver injury. Therefore, this study aimed to summarize the relationship between autophagy and multiple liver diseases, hoping to explore the effect of autophagy in liver system diseases and further study the regulative effect of autophagy so as to provide new thoughts for their treatment.

  17. Research Progression of Cellular Autophagy in Liver System Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chunyun; Gong Xiangwen; Xiao Xinfa; Yuan Xiangying

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a basic biological phenomenon widely existed in eukaryotic cells and an important mechanism for cells to adjust to the surrounding environment, prevent invasion of pathogenic micro-organisms and maintain homeostasis, whose activity changes evidently in multiple liver system diseases, suggesting that there is close association between autophagy and the generation and development of liver system diseases. It is also reported that autophagy develops and exerts an important function in many liver-related diseases, such as hepatic carcinoma, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic liver disease, viral liver disease and acute liver injury. Therefore, this study aimed to summarize the relationship between autophagy and multiple liver diseases, hoping to explore the effect of autophagy in liver system diseases and further study the regulative effect of autophagy so as to provide new thoughts for their treatment.

  18. AGEs Induced Autophagy Impairs Cutaneous Wound Healing via Stimulating Macrophage Polarization to M1 in Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Yuanyuan Guo; Cai Lin; Peng Xu; Shan Wu; Xiujun Fu; Weidong Xia; Min Yao

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is essential in physiological and pathological processes, however, the role of autophagy in cutaneous wound healing and the underlying molecular mechanism remain elusive. We hypothesized that autophagy plays an important role in regulating wound healing. Here, we show that enhanced autophagy negatively impacts on normal cutaneous healing process and is related to chronic wounds as demonstrated by the increased LC3 in diabetic mice skin or patients’ chronic wounds. In addition, inhib...

  19. Autophagy is required for IL-2-mediated fibroblast growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Rui [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States); Tang, Daolin, E-mail: tangd2@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States); Lotze, Michael T., E-mail: lotzemt@upcm.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States); Zeh III, Herbert J., E-mail: zehh@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved pathway responsible for delivery of cytoplasmic material into the lysosomal degradation pathway to enable vesicular exocytosis. Interleukin (IL)-2 is produced by T-cells and its activity is important for immunoregulation. Fibroblasts are an immune competent cell type, playing a critical role in wound healing, chronic inflammation, and tumor development. Although autophagy plays an important role in each of these processes, whether it regulates IL-2 activity in fibroblasts is unknown. Here, we show that autophagy is required for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts. IL-2 significantly induced autophagy in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and primary lung fibroblasts. Autophagy inhibitors (e.g., 3-methylamphetamine and bafilomycin A1) or knockdown of ATG5 and beclin 1 blocked clinical grade IL-2-induced autophagy. Moreover, IL-2 induced HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation in MEFs and promoted interaction between HMGB1 and beclin1, which is required for autophagy induction. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy inhibited IL-2-induced cell proliferation and enhanced IL-2-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that autophagy is an important pro-survival regulator for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts.

  20. Autophagy and the Cell Cycle: A Complex Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiassen, Søs Grønbæk; De Zio, Daniela; Cecconi, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a self-degradation pathway, in which cytoplasmic material is sequestered in double-membrane vesicles and delivered to the lysosome for degradation. Under basal conditions, autophagy plays a homeostatic function. However, in response to various stresses, the pathway can be further induced to mediate cytoprotection. Defective autophagy has been linked to a number of human pathologies, including neoplastic transformation, even though autophagy can also sustain the growth of tumor cells in certain contexts. In recent years, a considerable correlation has emerged between autophagy induction and stress-related cell-cycle responses, as well as unexpected roles for autophagy factors and selective autophagic degradation in the process of cell division. These advances have obvious implications for our understanding of the intricate relationship between autophagy and cancer. In this review, we will discuss our current knowledge of the reciprocal regulation connecting the autophagy pathway and cell-cycle progression. Furthermore, key findings involving nonautophagic functions for autophagy-related factors in cell-cycle regulation will be addressed.

  1. Application and interpretation of current autophagy inhibitors and activators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-ping YANG; Li-fang HU; Hui-fen ZHENG; Cheng-jie MAO; Wei-dong HU; Kang-ping XIONG; Fen WANG

    2013-01-01

    Aut ophagy is the major intracellular degradation system,by which cytoplasmic materials are delivered to and degraded in the lysosome.As a quality control mechanism for cytoplasmic proteins and organelles,autophagy plays important roles in a variety of human diseases,including neurodegenerative diseases,cancer,cardiovascular disease,diabetes and infectious and inflammatory diseases.The discovery of ATG genes and the dissection of the signaling pathways involved in regulating autophagy have greatly enriched our knowledge on the occurrence and development of this lysosomal degradation pathway.In addition to its role in degradation,autophagy may also promote a type of programmed cell death that is different from apoptosis,termed type II programmed cell death.Owing to the dual roles of autophagy in cell death and the specificity of diseases,the exact mechanisms of autophagy in various diseases require more investigation.The application of autophagy inhibitors and activators will help us understand the regulation of autophagy in human diseases,and provide insight into the use of autophagy-targeted drugs.In this review,we summarize the latest research on autophagy inhibitors and activators and discuss the possibility of their application in human disease therapy.

  2. 雷帕霉素通过诱导细胞自噬调控调节性T细胞的分化及功能%R apamycin Regulateing Treg Cells Differen it ation and Function Via Autophagy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈全刚; 陈仁金; 袁红花

    2016-01-01

    Obej ctive To explore whether the effect of Rapamycin on the Treg cells is related to autophagy .Methods the mice spleen was gently minced and the cells were sorted by the cell sorting kit .Inhibitors or siRNA were used to inhibit or induce the cellular au-tophagy.The proportion of Treg cells was detected by flow cytometry .Results Inhibited autophagy down -regulates the proportion of Treg cells.Conclusion Autophagy participates in the regulation of Treg cells function .%目的:探究雷帕霉素Treg细胞的调控作用是否与细胞自噬有关。方法取小鼠脾脏,经研磨后用细胞分选试剂盒分选细胞。细胞经抑制剂或干扰分子处理改变细胞自噬水平。通过流式细胞术检测Treg细胞的生成比例。结果抑制自噬Treg细胞生成比例显著下降。结论细胞自噬参与调控Treg细胞功能。

  3. Annexin A2 Regulates Autophagy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection through the Akt1-mTOR-ULK1/2 Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongpeng; Tan, Shirui; Yu, Min; Jundt, Michael C; Zhang, Shuang; Wu, Min

    2015-10-15

    Earlier studies reported that a cell membrane protein, Annexin A2 (AnxA2), plays multiple roles in the development, invasion, and metastasis of cancer. Recent studies demonstrated that AnxA2 also functions in immunity against infection, but the underlying mechanism remains largely elusive. Using a mouse infection model, we reveal a crucial role for AnxA2 in host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as anxa2(-/-) mice manifested severe lung injury, systemic dissemination, and increased mortality compared with wild-type littermates. In addition, anxa2(-/-) mice exhibited elevated inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and IFN-γ), decreased bacterial clearance by macrophages, and increased superoxide release in the lung. We further identified an unexpected molecular interaction between AnxA2 and Fam13A, which activated Rho GTPase. P. aeruginosa infection induced autophagosome formation by inhibiting Akt1 and mTOR. Our results indicate that AnxA2 regulates autophagy, thereby contributing to host immunity against bacteria through the Akt1-mTOR-ULK1/2 signaling pathway.

  4. A nonapoptotic role for CASP2/caspase 2: modulation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Meenakshi; Sharma, Lokendra K; Vanegas, Difernando; Callaway, Danielle A; Bai, Yidong; Lechleiter, James D; Herman, Brian

    2014-06-01

    CASP2/caspase 2 plays a role in aging, neurodegeneration, and cancer. The contributions of CASP2 have been attributed to its regulatory role in apoptotic and nonapoptotic processes including the cell cycle, DNA repair, lipid biosynthesis, and regulation of oxidant levels in the cells. Previously, our lab demonstrated CASP2-mediated modulation of autophagy during oxidative stress. Here we report the novel finding that CASP2 is an endogenous repressor of autophagy. Knockout or knockdown of CASP2 resulted in upregulation of autophagy in a variety of cell types and tissues. Reinsertion of Caspase-2 gene (Casp2) in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEFs) lacking Casp2 (casp2(-/-)) suppresses autophagy, suggesting its role as a negative regulator of autophagy. Loss of CASP2-mediated autophagy involved AMP-activated protein kinase, mechanistic target of rapamycin, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and autophagy-related proteins, indicating the involvement of the canonical pathway of autophagy. The present study also demonstrates an important role for loss of CASP2-induced enhanced reactive oxygen species production as an upstream event in autophagy induction. Additionally, in response to a variety of stressors that induce CASP2-mediated apoptosis, casp2(-/-) cells demonstrate a further upregulation of autophagy compared with wild-type MEFs, and upregulated autophagy provides a survival advantage. In conclusion, we document a novel role for CASP2 as a negative regulator of autophagy, which may provide important insight into the role of CASP2 in various processes including aging, neurodegeneration, and cancer.

  5. Exercise reduces adipose tissue via cannabinoid receptor type 1 which is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Zhen Cheng; Liu, Dao Yan; Zhang, Li Li

    2007-01-01

    Obesity is one major cardiovascular risk factor. We tested effects of endurance exercise on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPAR-delta)-dependent pathways in adipose tissue. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to standard laboratory chow...... or a high-fat diet without and with regular endurance exercise. Exercise in rats on high-fat diet significantly reduced visceral fat mass, blood pressure, and adipocyte size (each p...

  6. Estrogen Receptor (ER)α-regulated Lipocalin 2 Expression in Adipose Tissue Links Obesity with Breast Cancer Progression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Brian G.; Hamidi, Habib; Zhou, Zhenqi; Villanueva, Claudio J.; Krum, Susan A.; Calkin, Anna C.; Parks, Brian W.; Ribas, Vicent; Kalajian, Nareg Y.; Phun, Jennifer; Daraei, Pedram; Christofk, Heather R.; Hewitt, Sylvia C.; Korach, Kenneth S.; Tontonoz, Peter; Lusis, Aldons J.; Slamon, Dennis J.; Hurvitz, Sara A.; Hevener, Andrea L.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with increased breast cancer (BrCA) incidence. Considering that inactivation of estrogen receptor (ER)α promotes obesity and metabolic dysfunction in women and female mice, understanding the mechanisms and tissue-specific sites of ERα action to combat metabolic-related disease, including BrCA, is of clinical importance. To study the role of ERα in adipose tissue we generated fat-specific ERα knock-out (FERKO) mice. Herein we show that ERα deletion increased adipocyte size, fat pad weight, and tissue expression and circulating levels of the secreted glycoprotein, lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), an adipokine previously associated with BrCA development. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter studies showed that ERα binds the Lcn2 promoter to repress its expression. Because adipocytes constitute an important cell type of the breast microenvironment, we examined the impact of adipocyte ERα deletion on cancer cell behavior. Conditioned medium from ERα-null adipocytes and medium containing pure Lcn2 increased proliferation and migration of a subset of BrCA cells in culture. The proliferative and promigratory effects of ERα-deficient adipocyte-conditioned medium on BrCA cells was reversed by Lcn2 deletion. BrCA cell responsiveness to exogenous Lcn2 was heightened in cell types where endogenous Lcn2 expression was minimal, but components of the Lcn2 signaling pathway were enriched, i.e. SLC22A17 and 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BDH2). In breast tumor biopsies from women diagnosed with BrCA we found that BDH2 expression was positively associated with adiposity and circulating Lcn2 levels. Collectively these data suggest that reduction of ERα expression in adipose tissue promotes adiposity and is linked with the progression and severity of BrCA via increased adipocyte-specific Lcn2 production and enhanced tumor cell Lcn2 sensitivity. PMID:25468909

  7. Extracellular Vesicles and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyang Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a type of chronic joint disease that is characterized by the degeneration and loss of articular cartilage and hyperplasia of the synovium and subchondral bone. There is reasonable knowledge about articular cartilage physiology, biochemistry, and chondrocyte metabolism. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of OA remain unclear and need urgent clarification to guide the early diagnosis and treatment of OA. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are small membrane-linking particles that are released from cells. In recent decades, several special biological properties have been found in EV, especially in terms of cartilage. Autophagy plays a critical role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Likewise, more and more research has gradually focused on the effect of autophagy on chondrocyte proliferation and function in OA. The synthesis and release of EV are closely associated with autophagy. At the same time, both EV and autophagy play a role in OA development. Based on the mechanism of EV and autophagy in OA development, EV may be beneficial in the early diagnosis of OA; on the other hand, the combination of EV and autophagy-related regulatory drugs may provide insight into possible OA therapeutic strategies.

  8. Autophagy and its neuroprotection in neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Gu; Avaneesh Jakkoju; Mingwei Wang; Weidong Le

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that protein misfolding and aggregation contribute significantly to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Misfolded and aggregated proteins are cleared by ubiquitin proteasomal system (UPS) and by both Micro and Macro autophagy lysosomal pathway (ALP). Autophagosomal dysfunction has been implicated in an increasing number of diseases including neurodegenerative diseases. Autophagy is a cellular self-eating process that plays an important role in neuroprotection as well as neuronal injury and death. While a decrease in autophagic activity interferes with protein degradation and possibly organelle turnover, increased autophagy has been shown to facilitate the clearance of aggregation-prone proteins and promote neuronal survival in a number of disease models. On the other hand, too much autophagic activity can be detrimental, suggesting the regulation of autophagy is critical in dictating cell fate. In this review paper, we will discuss various aspects of ALP biology and its dual functions in neuronal cell death and survival. We will also evaluate the role of autophagy in neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Finally, we will explore the therapeutic potential of autophagy modifiers in several neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Serratia marcescens ShlA pore-forming toxin is responsible for early induction of autophagy in host cells and is transcriptionally regulated by RcsB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Venanzio, Gisela; Stepanenko, Tatiana M; García Véscovi, Eleonora

    2014-09-01

    Serratia marcescens is a Gram-negative bacterium that thrives in a wide variety of ambient niches and interacts with an ample range of hosts. As an opportunistic human pathogen, it has increased its clinical incidence in recent years, being responsible for life-threatening nosocomial infections. S. marcescens produces numerous exoproteins with toxic effects, including the ShlA pore-forming toxin, which has been catalogued as its most potent cytotoxin. However, the regulatory mechanisms that govern ShlA expression, as well as its action toward the host, have remained unclear. We have shown that S. marcescens elicits an autophagic response in host nonphagocytic cells. In this work, we determine that the expression of ShlA is responsible for the autophagic response that is promoted prior to bacterial internalization in epithelial cells. We show that a strain unable to express ShlA is no longer able to induce this autophagic mechanism, while heterologous expression of ShlA/ShlB suffices to confer on noninvasive Escherichia coli the capacity to trigger autophagy. We also demonstrate that shlBA harbors a binding motif for the RcsB regulator in its promoter region. RcsB-dependent control of shlBA constitutes a feed-forward regulatory mechanism that allows interplay with flagellar-biogenesis regulation. At the top of the circuit, activated RcsB downregulates expression of flagella by binding to the flhDC promoter region, preventing FliA-activated transcription of shlBA. Simultaneously, RcsB interaction within the shlBA promoter represses ShlA expression. This circuit offers multiple access points to fine-tune ShlA production. These findings also strengthen the case for an RcsB role in orchestrating the expression of Serratia virulence factors.

  10. Adipose tissue plasticity from WAT to BAT and in between.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Mottillo, Emilio P; Granneman, James G

    2014-03-01

    Adipose tissue plays an essential role in regulating energy balance through its metabolic, cellular and endocrine functions. Adipose tissue has been historically classified into anabolic white adipose tissue and catabolic brown adipose tissue. An explosion of new data, however, points to the remarkable heterogeneity among the cells types that can become adipocytes, as well as the inherent metabolic plasticity of mature cells. These data indicate that targeting cellular and metabolic plasticity of adipose tissue might provide new avenues for treatment of obesity-related diseases. This review will discuss the developmental origins of adipose tissue, the cellular complexity of adipose tissues, and the identification of progenitors that contribute to adipogenesis throughout development. We will touch upon the pathological remodeling of adipose tissue and discuss how our understanding of adipose tissue remodeling can uncover new therapeutic targets. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Modulation of Adipose Tissue in Health and Disease.

  11. A switch from canonical to noncanonical autophagy shapes B cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Martin, Nuria; Maldonado, Paula; Gasparrini, Francesca; Frederico, Bruno; Aggarwal, Shweta; Gaya, Mauro; Tsui, Carlson; Burbage, Marianne; Keppler, Selina Jessica; Montaner, Beatriz; Jefferies, Harold B J; Nair, Usha; Zhao, Yan G; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Collinson, Lucy; Bruckbauer, Andreas; Tooze, Sharon A; Batista, Facundo D

    2017-02-10

    Autophagy is important in a variety of cellular and pathophysiological situations; however, its role in immune responses remains elusive. Here, we show that among B cells, germinal center (GC) cells exhibited the highest rate of autophagy during viral infection. In contrast to mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1-dependent canonical autophagy, GC B cell autophagy occurred predominantly through a noncanonical pathway. B cell stimulation was sufficient to down-regulate canonical autophagy transiently while triggering noncanonical autophagy. Genetic ablation of WD repeat domain, phosphoinositide-interacting protein 2 in B cells alone enhanced this noncanonical autophagy, resulting in changes of mitochondrial homeostasis and alterations in GC and antibody-secreting cells. Thus, B cell activation prompts a temporal switch from canonical to noncanonical autophagy that is important in controlling B cell differentiation and fate.

  12. Growth hormone regulation of p85alpha expression and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity in adipose tissue: mechanism for growth hormone-mediated insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rincon, Juan-Pablo; Iida, Keiji; Gaylinn, Bruce D; McCurdy, Carrie E; Leitner, J Wayne; Barbour, Linda A; Kopchick, John J; Friedman, Jacob E; Draznin, Boris; Thorner, Michael O

    2007-06-01

    Phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinase is involved in insulin-mediated effects on glucose uptake, lipid deposition, and adiponectin secretion from adipocytes. Genetic disruption of the p85alpha regulatory subunit of PI 3-kinase increases insulin sensitivity, whereas elevated p85alpha levels are associated with insulin resistance through PI 3-kinase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Adipose tissue plays a critical role in the antagonistic effects of growth hormone (GH) on insulin actions on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism through changes in gene transcription. The objective of this study was to assess the role of the p85alpha subunit of PI 3-kinase and PI 3-kinase signaling in GH-mediated insulin resistance in adipose tissue. To do this, p85alpha mRNA and protein expression and insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1-associated PI 3-kinase activity were measured in white adipose tissue (WAT) of mice with GH excess, deficiency, and sufficiency. Additional studies using 3T3-F442A cells were conducted to confirm direct effects of GH on free p85alpha protein abundance. We found that p85alpha expression 1) is decreased in WAT from mice with isolated GH deficiency, 2) is increased in WAT from mice with chronic GH excess, 3) is acutely upregulated in WAT from GH-deficient and -sufficient mice after GH administration, and 4) is directly upregulated by GH in 3T3-F442A adipocytes. The insulin-induced increase in PI 3-kinase activity was robust in mice with GH deficiency, but not in mice with GH excess. In conclusion, GH regulates p85alpha expression and PI 3-kinase activity in WAT and provides a potential explanation for 1) the insulin hypersensitivity and associated obesity and hyperadiponectinemia of GH-deficient mice and 2) the insulin resistance and associated reduced fat mass and hypoadiponectinemia of mice with GH excess.

  13. Calcium-permeable ion channels in control of autophagy and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratskyi, Artem; Yassine, Maya; Kondratska, Kateryna; Skryma, Roman; Slomianny, Christian; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy, or cellular self-eating, is a tightly regulated cellular pathway the main purpose of which is lysosomal degradation and subsequent recycling of cytoplasmic material to maintain normal cellular homeostasis. Defects in autophagy are linked to a variety of pathological states, including cancer. Cancer is the disease associated with abnormal tissue growth following an alteration in such fundamental cellular processes as apoptosis, proliferation, differentiation, migration and autophagy. The role of autophagy in cancer is complex, as it can promote both tumor prevention and survival/treatment resistance. It's now clear that modulation of autophagy has a great potential in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Recent findings identified intracellular calcium as an important regulator of both basal and induced autophagy. Calcium is a ubiquitous secondary messenger which regulates plethora of physiological and pathological processes such as aging, neurodegeneration and cancer. The role of calcium and calcium-permeable channels in cancer is well-established, whereas the information about molecular nature of channels regulating autophagy and the mechanisms of this regulation is still limited. Here we review existing mechanisms of autophagy regulation by calcium and calcium-permeable ion channels. Furthermore, we will also discuss some calcium-permeable channels as the potential new candidates for autophagy regulation. Finally we will propose the possible link between calcium permeable channels, autophagy and cancer progression and therapeutic response.

  14. IFN-γ Regulation of Vacuolar pH, Cathepsin D Processing and Autophagy in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    In this study we examined the ability of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) to regulate mammary epithelial cell growth and gene expression, with particular emphasis on two genes: Maspin (a member of serine protease inhibitor superfamily), and the lysosomal aspartyl endopeptidase cathepsin D (CatD). The protein products of these genes are critically involved in regulation of multitude of biological functions in different stages of mammary tissue development and remodeling. In addition, the expression of Mas...

  15. Targeting adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haas Bodo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Two different types of adipose tissues can be found in humans enabling them to respond to starvation and cold: white adipose tissue (WAT is generally known and stores excess energy in the form of triacylglycerol (TG, insulates against cold, and serves as a mechanical cushion. Brown adipose tissue (BAT helps newborns to cope with cold. BAT has the capacity to uncouple the mitochondrial respiratory chain, thereby generating heat rather than adenosine triphosphate (ATP. The previously widely held view was that BAT disappears rapidly after birth and is no longer present in adult humans. Using positron emission tomography (PET, however, it was recently shown that metabolically active BAT occurs in defined regions and scattered in WAT of the adult and possibly has an influence on whole-body energy homeostasis. In obese individuals adipose tissue is at the center of metabolic syndrome. Targeting of WAT by thiazolidinediones (TZDs, activators of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ a ‘master’ regulator of fat cell biology, is a current therapy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Since its unique capacity to increase energy consumption of the body and to dissipate surplus energy as heat, BAT offers new perspectives as a therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity and associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Recent discoveries of new signaling pathways of BAT development give rise to new therapeutic possibilities in order to influence BAT content and activity.

  16. Stimulation of autophagy by the p53 target gene Sestrin2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Morselli, Eugenia; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Mouchel, Pierre-Luc; Carnuccio, Rosa; Kroemer, Guido

    2009-05-15

    The oncosuppressor protein p53 regulates autophagy in a dual fashion. The pool of cytoplasmic p53 protein represses autophagy in a transcription-independent fashion, while the pool of nuclear p53 stimulates autophagy through the transactivation of specific genes. Here we report the discovery that Sestrin2, a novel p53 target gene, is involved in the induction of autophagy. Depletion of Sestrin2 by RNA interference reduced the level of autophagy in a panel of p53-sufficient human cancer cell lines responding to distinct autophagy inducers. In quantitative terms, Sestrin2 depletion was as efficient in preventing autophagy induction as was the depletion of Dram, another p53 target gene. Knockout of either Sestrin2 or Dram reduced autophagy elicited by nutrient depletion, rapamycin, lithium or thapsigargin. Moreover, autophagy induction by nutrient depletion or pharmacological stimuli led to an increase in Sestrin2 expression levels in p53-proficient cells. In strict contrast, the depletion of Sestrin2 or Dram failed to affect autophagy in p53-deficient cells and did not modulate the inhibition of baseline autophagy by a cytoplasmic p53 mutant that was reintroduced into p53-deficient cells. We conclude that Sestrin2 acts as a positive regulator of autophagy in p53-proficient cells.

  17. 脂肪细胞的功能调节与脂肪组织重构%Functional regulation of adipocytes and adipose tissue remodeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马度芳; 李晓

    2016-01-01

    Adipocytes are classified into three types, including white, brown, and “beige/brite” adipocytes. There exist differences in origin of adipocytes, gene expressions, morphology, and functions among three kinds of adipocytes. Multiple factors such as physical and chemical factors, neurohormonal and immunological factors, transcriptional factors have been shown to regulate and control the browning process and lipolysis of white adipose tissue. Thus, they may become new targets for anti-obesity intervention. In the process of obesity, chronic inflammation reaction, adipose tissue remodeling and abnormal angiogenesis occurring in the adipose tissue cause pathological fat expansion and reduce lipid storage in adipocytes. Understanding adipocytes biology is important to decipher how the aberrant adipose tissue contributes to obesity and metabolic disorders, and provides guidance for treating obesity.%脂肪细胞分为白色脂肪细胞、棕色脂肪细胞和米色脂肪细胞,三者在细胞来源、基因表达、形态学及功能方面存在差异。机体理化因素、神经内分泌和免疫因素、转录因子等多种因素可调控白色脂肪“棕色化”和脂肪分解。这些因素可能是药物干预的新靶点。肥胖时脂肪组织慢性炎症、纤维化和血管异常可导致脂肪扩充障碍,降低脂肪细胞的储脂能力。了解脂肪组织的这些生物学特性可揭示异常的脂肪组织如何导致肥胖以及肥胖相关的代谢紊乱,而且对于肥胖的治疗具有指导性意义。

  18. Hormonal regulation of intracellular lipolysis in C57BL/6J mice: effect of diet-induced adiposity and data normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bederman, Ilya R; Previs, Stephen F

    2008-10-01

    The breakdown of intracellular triglycerides in adipose tissue provides fatty acids and glycerol as substrates for oxidation. However, the exposure of target organs to excess free fatty acids is associated with the development of insulin resistance and impaired regulation of carbohydrate metabolism, suggesting that the control of triglyceride breakdown is an important factor in balancing health and disease. We have studied the temporal influence of diet-induced changes in adiposity on the response of intracellular lipolysis to epinephrine +/- insulin using freshly isolated adipocytes from C57BL/6J mice fed a low-fat (10% kcal) or high-fat (HF, 45% kcal) diet for 1, 4, or 12 weeks. In this model, we also tested how data normalization affects the interpretation. The contribution of the epididymal fat to total body mass increased by approximately 15%, 45%, and 100% after 1, 4, and 12 weeks of HF diet consumption, respectively. In addition, HF feeding led to an increase in fasting insulin, that is, approximately 2-fold greater in HF- vs low-fat-fed mice at 4 and 12 weeks. We found that diet-induced changes in adiposity did not alter the lipolytic response to epinephrine when data were normalized per DNA (ie, per cell); however, the lipolytic potential of the organ (ie, the lipolytic rate per cell multiplied by the total number of cells) was increased in isolated adipocytes after 4 and 12 weeks of HF feeding. We also observed a marked impairment in insulin-mediated inhibition of epinephrine-stimulated lipolysis after 4 and 12 weeks of HF feeding, demonstrating that diet-induced adiposity leads to insulin resistance in adipocytes. In conclusion, HF feeding in mice leads to greater rates of lipolysis via (1) an increase in the number of fat cells and (2) a defect in insulin signaling in adipocytes. The combination of these 2 alterations on the control of intracellular lipolysis suggests a mechanism(s) that (partly) explains how target organs could be exposed to excess

  19. Anti- and pro-tumor functions of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Eugenia; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Vicencio, José-Miguel; Criollo, Alfredo; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Kroemer, Guido

    2009-09-01

    Autophagy constitutes one of the major responses to stress in eukaryotic cells, and is regulated by a complex network of signaling cascades. Not surprisingly, autophagy is implicated in multiple pathological processes, including infection by pathogens, inflammatory bowel disease, neurodegeneration and cancer. Both oncogenesis and tumor survival are influenced by perturbations of the molecular machinery that controls autophagy. Numerous oncoproteins, including phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt1 and anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family suppress autophagy. Conversely, several tumor suppressor proteins (e.g., Atg4c; beclin 1; Bif-1; BH3-only proteins; death-associated protein kinase 1; LKB1/STK11; PTEN; UVRAG) promote the autophagic pathway. This does not entirely apply to p53, one of the most important tumor suppressor proteins, which regulates autophagy in an ambiguous fashion, depending on its subcellular localization. Irrespective of the controversial role of p53, basal levels of autophagy appear to inhibit tumor development. On the contrary, chemotherapy- and metabolic stress-induced activation of the autophagic pathway reportedly contribute to the survival of formed tumors, thereby favoring resistance. In this context, autophagy inhibition would represent a major therapeutic target for chemosensitization. Here, we will review the current knowledge on the dual role of autophagy as an anti- and pro-tumor mechanism.

  20. Potential roles of autophagy and silent information regulator protein family in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury%自噬与沉默信息调节因子蛋白家族对心肌缺血/再灌注的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞莹; 刘新伟

    2012-01-01

    背景自噬是一种细胞本体的降解过程.它以溶酶体的方式参与或老化非正常的细胞蛋白及细胞本身的降解.许多研究证实自噬水平在心肌缺血/再灌注(ischemia/reperfusion,I/R)中增高,但对于自噬在再灌注中的作用,现在争议较大.同时有研究证实新发现的与长寿相关的沉默信息调节因子蛋白(silent information regulator protein,Sirt)家族可能参与了自噬对I/R的调节.目的了解Sirt家族、自噬及I/R这三者间的联系.内容对自噬的基本过程,自噬的分子机制,自噬在心肌I/R中的作用,自噬与Sirt家族的关系作一综述.趋向促进对自噬的深入了解,期望对Sirt家族在心肌保护方面的作用提供新的认识.%Background Autophagy is the endogenous,tightly regulated cellular process responsible for the degradation of damaged and dysfunctional cellular organelles and protein aggregates.There is a growing consensus that autophagy is upregulated in the setting of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R),but it has also been unclear whether autophagy is protective or detrimental in response to I/R.Silent information regulator protein (Sirt) family,which was considered as a longevity factor,may be involved in the regulation of autophagy in I/R.Objective To understand the relationship of Sirt family,autophagy and I/R.Content Thereview will discussthe basic process of autophagy,molecular machinery and signaling pathways of autophagy,the role of autophagy during I/R,and the relationship between Sirt family and autophagy.Trend In addition to understand the concept of autophagy deeply,the role of Sirt family in myocardial protection needs further exploration.

  1. Lkb1 controls brown adipose tissue growth and thermogenesis by regulating the intracellular localization of CRTC3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Tizhong; Xiong, Yan; Zhang, Pengpeng; Li, Zhiguo; Jiang, Qingyang; Bi, Pengpeng; Yue, Feng; Yang, Gongshe; Wang, Yizhen; Liu, Xiaoqi; Kuang, Shihuan

    2016-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) dissipates energy through Ucp1-mediated uncoupled respiration and its activation may represent a therapeutic strategy to combat obesity. Here we show that Lkb1 controls BAT expansion and UCP1 expression in mice. We generate adipocyte-specific Lkb1 knockout mice and show that, compared with wild-type littermates, these mice exhibit elevated UCP1 expression in BAT and subcutaneous white adipose tissue, have increased BAT mass and higher energy expenditure. Consequently, KO mice have improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, and are more resistant to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Deletion of Lkb1 results in a cytoplasm to nuclear translocation of CRTC3 in brown adipocytes, where it recruits C/EBPβ to enhance Ucp1 transcription. In parallel, the absence of Lkb1 also suppresses AMPK activity, leading to activation of the mTOR signalling pathway and subsequent BAT expansion. These data suggest that inhibition of Lkb1 or its downstream signalling in adipocytes could be a novel strategy to increase energy expenditure in the context of obesity, diabetes and other metabolic diseases. PMID:27461402

  2. Selective inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway regulates autophagy of macrophage and vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaque.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chungang Zhai

    Full Text Available Macrophage infiltration contributes to the instability of atherosclerotic plaques. In the present study, we investigated whether selective inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway can enhance the stability of atherosclerotic plaques by activation of macrophage autophagy. In vitro study, selective inhibitors or siRNA of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways were used to treat the rabbit's peritoneal primary macrophage cells. Inflammation related cytokines secreted by macrophages were measured. Ultrastructure changes of macrophages were examined by transmission electron microscope. mRNA or protein expression levels of autophagy related gene Beclin 1, protein 1 light chain 3 II dots (LC3-II or Atg5-Atg12 conjugation were assayed by quantitative RT-PCR or Western blot. In vivo study, vulnerable plaque models were established in 40 New Zealand White rabbits and then drugs or siRNA were given for 8 weeks to inhibit the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS was performed to observe the plaque imaging. The ultrastructure of the abdominal aortic atherosclerosis lesions were analyzed with histopathology. RT-PCR or Western blot methods were used to measure the expression levels of corresponding autophagy related molecules. We found that macrophage autophagy was induced in the presence of Akt inhibitor, mTOR inhibitor and mTOR-siRNA in vitro study, while PI3K inhibitor had the opposite role. In vivo study, we found that macrophage autophagy increased significantly and the rabbits had lower plaque rupture incidence, lower plaque burden and decreased vulnerability index in the inhibitors or siRNA treated groups. We made a conclusion that selective inhibition of the Akt/mTOR signal pathway can reduce macrophages and stabilize the vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques by promoting macrophage autophagy.

  3. Autophagy and cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si-Zhao; Lu; Duygu; Dee; Harrison-Findik

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic and evolutionarily conserved mechanism of self-digestion by which the cells degrade and recycle long-lived proteins and excess or damaged organelles.Autophagy is activated in response to both physiological and pathological stimuli including growth factor depletion,energy deficiency or the upregulation of Bcl-2 protein expression.A novel role of autophagy in various cancers has been proposed.Interestingly,evidence that supports both a positive and negative role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of cancer has been reported.As a tumor suppression mechanism,autophagy maintains genome stability,induces senescence and possibly autophagic cell death.On the other hand,autophagy participates in tumor growth and maintenance by supplying metabolic substrate,limiting oxidative stress,and maintaining cancer stem cell population.It has been proposed that the differential roles of autophagy in cancer are disease type and stage specific.In addition,substrate selectivity might be involved in carrying out the specific effect of autophagy in cancer,and represents one of the potential directions for future studies.

  4. Crosstalk between Autophagy and Apoptosis: Potential and Emerging Therapeutic Targets for Cardiac Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cell survival process which is related to breaking down and reusing cytoplasm components. Moreover, autophagy regulates cell death under certain conditions. Apoptosis has the characteristics of chromatin agglutination and the shrinking of nuclear and apoptosis body form. Even if the mechanisms of autophagy and apoptosis have differences, some proteins modulate both autophagy and apoptosis. Crosstalk between them exists. This review highlights recent advances in the interaction of autophagy and apoptosis and its importance in the development of cardiovascular diseases.

  5. Autophagy in Hepatic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic fibrosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic fibrosis is usually associated with chronic liver diseases caused by infection, drugs, metabolic disorders, or autoimmune imbalances. Effective clinical therapies are still lacking. Autophagy is a cellular process that degrades damaged organelles or protein aggregation, which participates in many pathological processes including liver diseases. Autophagy participates in hepatic fibrosis by activating hepatic stellate cells and may participate as well through influencing other fibrogenic cells. Besides that, autophagy can induce some liver diseases to develop while it may play a protective role in hepatocellular abnormal aggregates related liver diseases and reduces fibrosis. With a better understanding of the potential effects of autophagy on hepatic fibrosis, targeting autophagy might be a novel therapeutic strategy for hepatic fibrosis in the near future.

  6. Rab32 is important for autophagy and lipid storage in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    Full Text Available Lipids are essential components of all organisms. Within cells, lipids are mainly stored in a specific type of organelle, called the lipid droplet. The molecular mechanisms governing the dynamics of lipid droplets have been little explored. The protein composition of lipid droplets has been analyzed in numerous proteomic studies, and a large number of lipid droplet-associated proteins have been identified, including Rab small GTPases. Rab proteins are known to participate in many intracellular membranous events; however, their exact role in lipid droplets is largely unexplored. Here we systematically investigate the roles of Drosophila Rab family proteins in lipid storage in the larval adipose tissue, fat body. Rab32 and several other Rabs were found to affect the size of lipid droplets as well as lipid levels. Further studies showed that Rab32 and Rab32 GEF/Claret may be involved in autophagy, consequently affecting lipid storage. Loss-of-function mutants of several components in the autophagy pathway result in similar effects on lipid storage. These results highlight the potential functions of Rabs in regulating lipid metabolism.

  7. The protective roles of autophagy in ischemic preconditioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-jun YAN; Hai-long DONG; Li-ze XIONG

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy,a process for the degradation of protein aggregates and dysfunctional organelles,is required for cellular homeostasis and cell survival in response to stress and is implicated in endogenous protection.Ischemic preconditioning is a brief and nonlethal episode of ischemia,confers protection against subsequent ischemia-repenfusion through the up-regulation of endogenous protective mechanisms.Emerging evidence shows that autophagy is associated with the protective effect of ischemic preconditioning.This review summarizes recent progress in research on the functions and regulations of the autophagy pathway in preconditioning-induced protection and cellular survival.

  8. Fibroblast growth factor 21 regulates lipolysis in white adipose tissue but is not required for ketogenesis and triglyceride clearance in liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Yuhei; Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Konishi, Morichika; Murata, Yusuke; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Inoue, Kazuo; Fushiki, Tohru; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2009-10-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) are polypeptide growth factors with diverse functions. Fgf21, a unique member of the Fgf family, is expected to function as a metabolic regulator in an endocrine manner. Hepatic Fgf21 expression was increased by fasting. The phenotypes of hepatic Fgf21 transgenic or knockdown mice and high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet-fed mice suggests that Fgf21 stimulates lipolysis in the white adipose tissue during normal feeding and is required for ketogenesis and triglyceride clearance in the liver during fasting. However, the physiological roles of Fgf21 remain unclear. To elucidate the physiological roles of Fgf21, we generated Fgf21 knockout (KO) mice by targeted disruption. Fgf21 KO mice were viable, fertile, and seemingly normal. Food intake, oxygen consumption, and energy expenditure were also essentially unchanged in Fgf21 KO mice. However, hypertrophy of adipocytes, decreased lipolysis in adipocytes, and decreased blood nonesterified fatty acid levels were observed when Fgf21 KO mice were fed normally. In contrast, increased lipolysis in adipocytes and increased blood nonesterified fatty acid levels were observed in Fgf21 KO mice by fasting for 24 h, indicating that Fgf21 stimulates lipolysis in the white adipose tissue during feeding but inhibits it during fasting. In contrast, unexpectedly, hepatic triglyceride levels were essentially unchanged in Fgf21 KO mice. In addition, ketogenesis in Fgf21 KO mice was not impaired by fasting for 24 h. The present results indicate that Fgf21 regulates lipolysis in adipocytes in response to the metabolic state but is not required for ketogenesis and triglyceride clearance in the liver.

  9. Host Cell Autophagy in Immune Response to Zoonotic Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Skendros

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a fundamental homeostatic process in which cytoplasmic targets are sequestered within double-membraned autophagosomes and subsequently delivered to lysosomes for degradation. Accumulating evidence supports the pivotal role of autophagy in host defense against intracellular pathogens implicating both innate and adaptive immunity. Many of these pathogens cause common zoonotic infections worldwide. The induction of the autophagic machinery by innate immune receptors signaling, such as TLRs, NOD1/2, and p62/SQSTM1 in antigen-presenting cells results in inhibition of survival and elimination of invading pathogens. Furthermore, Th1 cytokines induce the autophagic process, whereas autophagy also contributes to antigen processing and MHC class II presentation, linking innate to adaptive immunity. However, several pathogens have developed strategies to avoid autophagy or exploit autophagic machinery to their advantage. This paper focuses on the role of host cell autophagy in the regulation of immune response against intracellular pathogens, emphasizing on selected bacterial and protozoan zoonoses.

  10. Autophagy process is associated with anti-neoplastic function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong Wang; Yachen Wang; Michael A. McNutt; Wei-Guo Zhu

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved process of cellular degradation, which is present in yeast, plants, and mammals.Under normal physiological conditions, autophagy acts to maintain cellular homeostasis and regulate the turnover of organelles.In response to cellular stresses, autophagy prevents the accumulation of impaired proteins and organelles, which serves to inhibit carcinogenesis.On this basis,it is widely accepted that most tumor suppressors, such as beclin 1 associated proteins, forkhead box class O (FoxO)family proteins, multiple mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) inactivators, and nuclear p53 play a role in indu cing autophagy.Here, we focus on how the process of autophagy is associated with anti-neoplastic function.

  11. Autophagy in Plants--What's New on the Menu?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaeli, Simon; Galili, Gad; Genschik, Pascal; Fernie, Alisdair R; Avin-Wittenberg, Tamar

    2016-02-01

    Autophagy is a major cellular degradation pathway in eukaryotes. Recent studies have revealed the importance of autophagy in many aspects of plant life, including seedling establishment, plant development, stress resistance, metabolism, and reproduction. This is manifested by the dual ability of autophagy to execute bulk degradation under severe environmental conditions, while simultaneously to be highly selective in targeting specific compartments and protein complexes to regulate key cellular processes, even during favorable growth conditions. Delivery of cellular components to the vacuole enables their recycling, affecting the plant metabolome, especially under stress. Recent research in Arabidopsis has further unveiled fundamental mechanistic aspects in autophagy which may have relevance in non-plant systems. We review the most recent discoveries concerning autophagy in plants, touching upon all these aspects.

  12. Targeting autophagy to sensitive glioma to temozolomide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuanliang; Xu, Zhijie; Dai, Shuang; Qian, Long; Sun, Lunquan; Gong, Zhicheng

    2016-02-02

    Temozolomide (TMZ), an alkylating agent, is widely used for treating primary and recurrent high-grade gliomas. However, the efficacy of TMZ is often limited by the development of resistance. Recently, studies have found that TMZ treatment could induce autophagy, which contributes to therapy resistance in glioma. To enhance the benefit of TMZ in the treatment of glioblastomas, effective combination strategies are needed to sensitize glioblastoma cells to TMZ. In this regard, as autophagy could promote cell survival or autophagic cell death, modulating autophagy using a pharmacological inhibitor, such as chloroquine, or an inducer, such as rapamycin, has received considerably more attention. To understand the effectiveness of regulating autophagy in glioblastoma treatment, this review summarizes reports on glioblastoma treatments with TMZ and autophagic modulators from in vitro and in vivo studies, as well as clinical trials. Additionally, we discuss the possibility of using autophagy regulatory compounds that can sensitive TMZ treatment as a chemotherapy for glioma treatment.

  13. mTOR Hyperactivation by Ablation of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 in the Mouse Heart Induces Cardiac Dysfunction with the Increased Number of Small Mitochondria Mediated through the Down-Regulation of Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneike, Manabu; Nishida, Kazuhiko; Omiya, Shigemiki; Zarrinpashneh, Elham; Misaka, Tomofumi; Kitazume-Taneike, Rika; Austin, Ruth; Takaoka, Minoru; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Gambello, Michael J; Shah, Ajay M; Otsu, Kinya

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a key regulator of cell growth, proliferation and metabolism. mTORC1 regulates protein synthesis positively and autophagy negatively. Autophagy is a major system to manage bulk degradation and recycling of cytoplasmic components and organelles. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 1 and 2 form a heterodimeric complex and inactivate Ras homolog enriched in brain, resulting in inhibition of mTORC1. Here, we investigated the effects of hyperactivation of mTORC1 on cardiac function and structure using cardiac-specific TSC2-deficient (TSC2-/-) mice. TSC2-/- mice were born normally at the expected Mendelian ratio. However, the median life span of TSC2-/- mice was approximately 10 months and significantly shorter than that of control mice. TSC2-/- mice showed cardiac dysfunction and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy without considerable fibrosis, cell infiltration or apoptotic cardiomyocyte death. Ultrastructural analysis of TSC2-/- hearts revealed misalignment, aggregation and a decrease in the size and an increase in the number of mitochondria, but the mitochondrial function was maintained. Autophagic flux was inhibited, while the phosphorylation level of S6 or eukaryotic initiation factor 4E -binding protein 1, downstream of mTORC1, was increased. The upregulation of autophagic flux by trehalose treatment attenuated the cardiac phenotypes such as cardiac dysfunction and structural abnormalities of mitochondria in TSC2-/- hearts. The results suggest that autophagy via the TSC2-mTORC1 signaling pathway plays an important role in maintenance of cardiac function and mitochondrial quantity and size in the heart and could be a therapeutic target to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis in failing hearts.

  14. YY1-MIR372-SQSTM1 regulatory axis in autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lifeng; Ma, Yanning; Sun, Jie; Shen, Qi; Liu, Leiming; Lu, Haiqi; Wang, Faliang; Yue, Yongfang; Li, Jiaqiu; Zhang, Shenjie; Lin, Xiaoying; Chu, Jue; Han, Weidong; Wang, Xian; Jin, Hongchuan

    2014-08-01

    Autophagy is a self-proteolytic process that degrades intracellular material to enable cellular survival under unfavorable conditions. However, how autophagy is activated in human carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. Herein we report an epigenetic regulation of autophagy in human cancer cells. YY1 (YY1 transcription factor) is a well-known epigenetic regulator and is upregulated in many cancers. We found that YY1 knockdown inhibited cell viability and autophagy flux through downregulating SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1). YY1 regulated SQSTM1 expression through the epigenetic modulation of the transcription of MIR372 (microRNA 372) which was found to target SQSTM1 directly. During nutrient starvation, YY1 was stimulated to promote SQSTM1 expression and subsequent autophagy activation by suppressing MIR372 expression. Similar to YY1 depletion, MIR372 overexpression blocked autophagy activation and inhibited in vivo tumor growth. SQSTM1 upregulation and competent autophagy flux thus contributed to the oncogenic function of YY1. YY1-promoted SQSTM1 upregulation might be a useful histological marker for cancer detection and a potential target for drug development.

  15. Autophagy in the light of sphingolipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvald, Eva Bang; Olsen, Anne Sofie Braun; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2015-01-01

    , has over the past decade been recognized as an essential part of metabolism. Autophagy not only rids the cell of excessive or damaged organelles, misfolded proteins, and invading microorganisms, it also provides nutrients to maintain crucial cellular functions. Besides serving as essential structural......Maintenance of cellular homeostasis requires tight and coordinated control of numerous metabolic pathways, which are governed by interconnected networks of signaling pathways and energy-sensing regulators. Autophagy, a lysosomal degradation pathway by which the cell self-digests its own components...

  16. Role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Peizhou; Le, Weidong

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy plays an important role in maintaining the cellular homeostasis. One of its functions is to degrade unnecessary organelles and proteins for energy recycling or amino-acids for cell survival. Ablation of autophagy leads to neurodegeneration. Multiple sclerosis (MS), a permanent neurological impairment typical of chronic inflammatory demyelinating disorder, is an auto-immune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Autophagy is tightly linked to the innate and adaptive immune systems during the autoimmune process, and several studies have shown that autophagy directly participates in the progress of MS or experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mouse model of MS). Dysfunction of mitochondria that intensively influences the autophagy pathway is one of the important factors in the pathogenesis of MS. Autophagy-related gene (ATG) 5 and immune-related GTPase M (IRGM) 1 are increased, while ATG16L2 is decreased, in T-cells in EAE and active relapsing-remitting MS brains. Administration of rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin ( mTOR), ameliorates relapsing-remitting EAE. Inflammation and oxidative stress are increased in MS lesions and EAE, but Lamp2 and the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio are decreased. Furthermore, autophagy in various glial cells plays important roles in regulating neuro-inflammation in the CNS, implying potential roles in MS. In this review, we discuss the role of autophagy in the peripheral immune system and the CNS in neuroinflammation associated with the pathogenesis of MS.

  17. Autophagy in ageing and ageing-associated diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-qiang HE; Jia-hong LU; Zhen-yu YUE

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a cell self-digestion process via lysosomes that clears "cellular waste",including aberrantly modified proteins or protein aggregates and damaged organelles.Therefore,autophagy is considered a protein and organelle quality control mechanism that maintains normal cellular homeostasis.Dysfunctional autophagy has been observed in ageing tissues and several ageing-associated diseases.Lifespan of model organisms such as yeast,worms,flies,and mice can be extended through promoting autophagy,either by genetic manipulations such as over-expression of Sirtuin 1,or by administrations of rapamycin,resveratrol or spermidine.The evidence supports that autophagy may play an important role in delaying ageing or extending lifespan.In this review,we summarize the current knowledge about autophagy and its regulation,outline recent developments ie the genetic and pharmacological manipulations of autophagy that affects the lifespan,and discuss the role of autophagy in the ageing-related diseases.ow in Center for Neurodegenerative and Neuroimmunologic Diseases,Department of Neurology,University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School,Piscataway,NJ 08854,USA

  18. Autophagy mediates pharmacological lifespan extension by spermidine and resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Eugenia; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2009-12-23

    Although autophagy has widely been conceived as a self-destructive mechanism that causes cell death, accumulating evidence suggests that autophagy usually mediates cytoprotection, thereby avoiding the apoptotic or necrotic demise of stressed cells. Recent evidence produced by our groups demonstrates that autophagy is also involved in pharmacological manipulations that increase longevity. Exogenous supply of the polyamine spermidine can prolong the lifespan of (while inducing autophagy in) yeast, nematodes and flies. Similarly, resveratrol can trigger autophagy in cells from different organisms, extend lifespan in nematodes, and ameliorate the fitness of human cells undergoing metabolic stress. These beneficial effects are lost when essential autophagy modulators are genetically or pharmacologically inactivated, indicating that autophagy is required for the cytoprotective and/or anti-aging effects of spermidine and resveratrol. Genetic and functional studies indicate that spermidine inhibits histone acetylases, while resveratrol activates the histone deacetylase Sirtuin 1 to confer cytoprotection/longevity. Although it remains elusive whether the same histones (or perhaps other nuclear or cytoplasmic proteins) act as the downstream targets of spermidine and resveratrol, these results point to an essential role of protein hypoacetylation in autophagy control and in the regulation of longevity.

  19. LC3B is indispensable for selective autophagy of p62 but not basal autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Yoko [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Sou, Yu-Shin; Kageyama, Shun [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Takahashi, Takao [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Ueno, Takashi [Division of Proteomics and Biomolecular Science, Center for Biomedical Research Resources, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Tanaka, Keiji [Laboratory of Protein Metabolism, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Komatsu, Masaaki, E-mail: komatsu-ms@igakuken.or.jp [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8510 (Japan); Ichimura, Yoshinobu, E-mail: ichimura-ys@igakuken.or.jp [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Knockdown of LC3 or GABARAP families did not affect the basal autophagy. • LC3B has a higher affinity for the autophagy-specific substrate, p62, than GABARAPs. • siRNA-mediated knockdown of LC3B, but not that of GABARAPs, resulted in significant accumulation of p62. - Abstract: Autophagy is a unique intracellular protein degradation system accompanied by autophagosome formation. Besides its important role through bulk degradation in supplying nutrients, this system has an ability to degrade certain proteins, organelles, and invading bacteria selectively to maintain cellular homeostasis. In yeasts, Atg8p plays key roles in both autophagosome formation and selective autophagy based on its membrane fusion property and interaction with autophagy adaptors/specific substrates. In contrast to the single Atg8p in yeast, mammals have 6 homologs of Atg8p comprising LC3 and GABARAP families. However, it is not clear these two families have different or similar functions. The aim of this study was to determine the separate roles of LC3 and GABARAP families in basal/constitutive and/or selective autophagy. While the combined knockdown of LC3 and GABARAP families caused a defect in long-lived protein degradation through lysosomes, knockdown of each had no effect on the degradation. Meanwhile, knockdown of LC3B but not GABARAPs resulted in significant accumulation of p62/Sqstm1, one of the selective substrate for autophagy. Our results suggest that while mammalian Atg8 homologs are functionally redundant with regard to autophagosome formation, selective autophagy is regulated by specific Atg8 homologs.

  20. IKK connects autophagy to major stress pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criollo, Alfredo; Senovilla, Laura; Authier, Hélène; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Morselli, Eugenia; Vitale, Ilio; Kepp, Oliver; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Shen, Shensi; Tailler, Maximilien; Delahaye, Nicolas; Tesniere, Antoine; De Stefano, Daniela; Younes, Aména Ben; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard; Lavandero, Sergio; Zitvogel, Laurence; Israel, Alain; Baud, Véronique; Kroemer, Guido

    2010-01-01

    Cells respond to stress by activating cytoplasmic mechanisms as well as transcriptional programs that can lead to adaptation or death. Autophagy represents an important cytoprotective response that is regulated by both transcriptional and transcription-independent pathways. NFkappaB is perhaps the transcription factor most frequently activated by stress and has been ascribed with either pro- or anti-autophagic functions, depending on the cellular context. Our results demonstrate that activation of the IKK (IkappaB kinase) complex, which is critical for the stress-elicited activation of NFkappaB, is sufficient to promote autophagy independent of NFkappaB, and that IKK is required for the optimal induction of autophagy by both physiological and pharmacological autophagic triggers.

  1. A role for TOR complex 2 signaling in promoting autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Powers, Ted

    2014-01-01

    The conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase is a central regulator of cell growth in response to nutrient availability. TOR forms 2 structurally and functionally distinct complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, and negatively regulates autophagy via TORC1. Here we demonstrate TOR also operates independently through the TORC2 signaling pathway to promote autophagy upon amino acid limitation. Under these conditions, TORC2, through its downstream target kinase Ypk1, inhibits the Ca(2+)- and Cmd1/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, to enable the activation of the amino acid-sensing EIF2S1/eIF2α kinase, Gcn2, and promote autophagy. Thus TORC2 signaling regulates autophagy in a pathway distinct from TORC1 to provide a tunable response to the cellular metabolic state.

  2. Phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein (PRIP regulates lipolysis in adipose tissue by modulating the phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiya Okumura

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL and perilipin by protein kinase A (PKA promotes the hydrolysis of lipids in adipocytes. Although activation of lipolysis by PKA has been well studied, inactivation via protein phosphatases is poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein (PRIP, a binding partner for protein phosphatase 1 and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, is involved in lipolysis by regulating phosphatase activity. PRIP knockout (PRIP-KO mice displayed reduced body-fat mass as compared with wild-type mice fed with standard chow ad libitum. Most other organs appeared normal, suggesting that mutant mice had aberrant fat metabolism in adipocytes. HSL in PRIP-KO adipose tissue was highly phosphorylated compared to that in wild-type mice. Starvation of wild-type mice or stimulation of adipose tissue explants with the catabolic hormone, adrenaline, translocated both PRIP and PP2A from the cytosol to lipid droplets, but the translocation of PP2A was significantly reduced in PRIP-KO adipocytes. Consistently, the phosphatase activity associated with lipid droplet fraction in PRIP-KO adipocytes was significantly reduced and was independent of adrenaline stimulation. Lipolysis activity, as assessed by measurement of non-esterified fatty acids and glycerol, was higher in PRIP-KO adipocytes. When wild-type adipocytes were treated with a phosphatase inhibitor, they showed a high lipolysis activity at the similar level to PRIP-KO adipocytes. Collectively, these results suggest that PRIP promotes the translocation of phosphatases to lipid droplets to trigger the dephosphorylation of HSL and perilipin A, thus reducing PKA-mediated lipolysis.

  3. 自噬相关蛋白对固有免疫调控的研究进展%The researches on innate immunity regulated by autophagy-related proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅占江

    2011-01-01

    模式识别受体(PPRs)识别病原微生物成分,诱导机体产生固有免疫应答.固有免疫应答异常,可导致超强的炎症反应,并可引起自身免疫性疾病.因此,必须对固有免疫应答进行严格的调控,才能维持机体生理平衡稳定.近年来,研究发现细胞自噬(autophagy)对固有免疫应答有着重要的调控作用.%Pattern recognition receptors detect the components of microorganism and induce innate immunity. Aberrant activation of immune responses can cause super-reactive inflammation and lead to autoimmune diseases. Therefore, innate immunity must be strictly regulated to maintain physiological homeostasis. Recent studies have shown that cellular autophagy is vital for the regulation of innate immunity. We reviewed the progress in this area.

  4. A critical role of autophagy in plant resistance to necrotrophic fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhibing; Wang, Fei; Zheng, Zuyu; Fan, Baofang; Chen, Zhixiang

    2011-06-01

    Autophagy is a pathway for degradation of cytoplasmic components. In plants, autophagy plays an important role in nutrient recycling during nitrogen or carbon starvation, and in responses to abiotic stress. Autophagy also regulates age- and immunity-related programmed cell death, which is important in plant defense against biotrophic pathogens. Here we show that autophagy plays a critical role in plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens. ATG18a, a critical autophagy protein in Arabidopsis, interacts with WRKY33, a transcription factor that is required for resistance to necrotrophic pathogens. Expression of autophagy genes and formation of autophagosomes are induced in Arabidopsis by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Induction of ATG18a and autophagy by B. cinerea was compromised in the wrky33 mutant, which is highly susceptible to necrotrophic pathogens. Arabidopsis mutants defective in autophagy exhibit enhanced susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungal pathogens B. cinerea and Alternaria brassicicola based on increased pathogen growth in the mutants. The hypersusceptibility of the autophagy mutants was associated with reduced expression of the jasmonate-regulated PFD1.2 gene, accelerated development of senescence-like chlorotic symptoms, and increased protein degradation in infected plant tissues. These results strongly suggest that autophagy cooperates with jasmonate- and WRKY33-mediated signaling pathways in the regulation of plant defense responses to necrotrophic pathogens.

  5. Lifespan extension by suppression of autophagy genes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yasufumi; Ookuma, Sadatsugu; Nishida, Eisuke

    2009-06-01

    Lifespan is regulated by a complex combination of environmental and genetic factors. Autophagy, which is a bulk degradation system of macromolecules and organelles, has an important role in various biological events. In Caenorhabditis elegans, several autophagy genes have been shown to have a role in promoting longevity, but many other autophagy genes have not been examined for their role in the lifespan regulation. Here we have systematically examined the effect of RNAi suppression of 14 autophagy genes on lifespan. While maternal RNAi of autophagy genes in wild-type worms tended to reduce lifespan, maternal RNAi of each of seven autophagy genes in the insulin/IGF-1 receptor daf-2 mutants extended lifespan. Remarkably, RNAi of unc-51/atg-1, bec-1/atg-6 or atg-9, from young adult, i.e. after development, extended lifespan in both wild-type animals and daf-2 mutants, although RNAi of one or two genes shortened it. Moreover, our analysis suggests that the lifespan extension, which is induced by RNAi of unc-51, bec-1 or atg-9 after development, does not require the transcription factor daf-16, the NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase sir-2.1 or the genes related to mitochondrial functions. Collectively, our results suggest that autophagy may not always be beneficial to longevity, but may also function to restrict lifespan in C. elegans.

  6. Lactobacillus plantarum HAC01 regulates gut microbiota and adipose tissue accumulation in a diet-induced obesity murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soyoung; Ji, Yosep; Jung, Hoe-Yune; Park, Hyunjoon; Kang, Jihee; Choi, Sang-Haeng; Shin, Heuynkil; Hyun, Chang-Kee; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H

    2017-02-01

    The functional features of Lactobacillus plantarum HAC01 (HAC01), isolated from fermented Korean kimchi, were studied with regard to the fat mass, immunometabolic biomarkers and dysbiosis in a diet-induced obesity (DIO) murine model. L. rhamnosus GG (LGG) served as reference strain and a PBS-treated group as control. The administration of L. plantarum HAC01 resulted in reduction of the mesenteric adipose depot, the conjunctive tissue closely associated with the gastrointestinal tract, where lipid oxidative gene expression was upregulated compared to the control group. Metagenome analysis of intestinal microbiota showed that both strains HAC01 and LGG influenced specific bacterial families such as the Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae rather than the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes as a whole. The relative abundance of the Lachnospiraceae (phylum Firmicutes) was significantly higher in both LAB-treated groups than in the control. Comparing the impact of the two Lactobacillus strains on microbial composition in the gut also suggests strain-specific effects. The study emphasises the need for deeper studies into functional specificity of a probiotic organism at the strain level. Alleviation of obesity-associated dysbiosis by modulation of the gut microbiota appears to be associated with "indicator" bacterial taxa such as the family Lachnospiraceae. This may provide further insight into mechanisms basic to the mode of probiotic action against obesity and associated dysbiosis.

  7. Metabolic Regulation of Adipose Tissue on Reproduction%脂肪组织对繁殖的代谢调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯冬冬; 姚海莉; 贺小卫; 杜亚轩; 左晓梅

    2012-01-01

    脂肪组织可以分泌一系列激素和细胞因子,广泛参与机体的能量代谢、免疫和炎症反应、发育和生殖等生理、病理活动。瘦素、脂联素和抵抗素被认为是重要的脂肪分泌因子,可能在介导能量代谢状态、神经内分泌轴及繁殖的过程中发挥重要作用。%The adipose tissue can secrete hormones and gy metabolism, immune and inflammatory responses, develop logical activities. Leptin, adiponectin and resistin was consid tissue, and may play an important role in the process of inte crine axis and reproduction. cytokines, which participate widely in the body's enerment, reproduction and other physiological and pathoered to be important factors which secreted by dipose raction between energy metabolic and the neuroendocrine axis and reproduction.

  8. Oxidative stress in mouse sperm impairs embryo development, fetal growth and alters adiposity and glucose regulation in female offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Lane

    Full Text Available Paternal health cues are able to program the health of the next generation however the mechanism for this transmission is unknown. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are increased in many paternal pathologies, some of which program offspring health, and are known to induce DNA damage and alter the methylation pattern of chromatin. We therefore investigated whether a chemically induced increase of ROS in sperm impairs embryo, pregnancy and offspring health. Mouse sperm was exposed to 1500 µM of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, which induced oxidative damage, however did not affect sperm motility or the ability to bind and fertilize an oocyte. Sperm treated with H2O2 delayed on-time development of subsequent embryos, decreased the ratio of inner cell mass cells (ICM in the resulting blastocyst and reduced implantation rates. Crown-rump length at day 18 of gestation was also reduced in offspring produced by H2O2 treated sperm. Female offspring from H2O2 treated sperm were smaller, became glucose intolerant and accumulated increased levels of adipose tissue compared to control female offspring. Interestingly male offspring phenotype was less severe with increases in fat depots only seen at 4 weeks of age, which was restored to that of control offspring later in life, demonstrating sex-specific impacts on offspring. This study implicates elevated sperm ROS concentrations, which are common to many paternal health pathologies, as a mediator of programming offspring for metabolic syndrome and obesity.

  9. Chemical Inhibition of Autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baek, Eric; Lin Kim, Che; Gyeom Kim, Mi;

    2016-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells activate and undergo apoptosis and autophagy for various environmental stresses. Unlike apoptosis, studies on increasing the production of therapeutic proteins in CHO cells by targeting the autophagy pathway are limited. In order to identify the effects of chemical...... autophagy inhibitors on the specific productivity (qp), nine chemical inhibitors that had been reported to target three different phases of autophagy (metformin, dorsomorphin, resveratrol, and SP600125 against initiation and nucleation; 3-MA, wortmannin, and LY294002 against elongation, and chloroquine...... and bafilomycin A1 against autophagosome fusion) were used to treat three recombinant CHO (rCHO) cell lines: the Fc-fusion protein-producing DG44 (DG44-Fc) and DUKX-B11 (DUKX-Fc) and antibody-producing DG44 (DG44-Ab) cell lines. Among the nine chemical inhibitors tested, 3-MA, dorsomorphin, and SP600125...

  10. Targeting Adipose Tissue Lipid Metabolism to Improve Glucose Metabolism in Cardiometabolic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan W.E. Jocken

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With Type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease prevalence on the rise, there is a growing need for improved strategies to prevent or treat obesity and insulin resistance, both of which are major risk factors for these chronic diseases. Impairments in adipose tissue lipid metabolism seem to play a critical role in these disorders. In the classical picture of intracellular lipid breakdown, cytosolic lipolysis was proposed as the sole mechanism for triacylglycerol hydrolysis in adipocytes. Recent evidence suggests involvement of several hormones, membrane receptors, and intracellular signalling cascades, which has added complexity to the regulation of cytosolic lipolysis. Interestingly, a specific form of autophagy, called lipophagy, has been implicated as alternative lipolytic pathway. Defective regulation of cytosolic lipolysis and lipophagy might have substantial effects on lipid metabolism, thereby contributing to adipose tissue dysfunction, insulin resistance, and related cardiometabolic (cMet diseases. This review will discuss recent advances in our understanding of classical lipolysis and lipophagy in adipocyte lipid metabolism under normal and pathological conditions. Furthermore, the question of whether modulation of adipocyte lipolysis and lipophagy might be a potential therapeutic target to combat cMet disorders will be addressed.

  11. Autophagy in Trypanosomatids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. M. Michels

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a ubiquitous eukaryotic process that also occurs in trypanosomatid parasites, protist organisms belonging to the supergroup Excavata, distinct from the supergroup Opistokontha that includes mammals and fungi. Half of the known yeast and mammalian AuTophaGy (ATG proteins were detected in trypanosomatids, although with low sequence conservation. Trypanosomatids such as Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania spp. are responsible for serious tropical diseases in humans. The parasites are transmitted by insects and, consequently, have a complicated life cycle during which they undergo dramatic morphological and metabolic transformations to adapt to the different environments. Autophagy plays a major role during these transformations. Since inhibition of autophagy affects the transformation, survival and/or virulence of the parasites, the ATGs offer promise for development of drugs against tropical diseases. Furthermore, various trypanocidal drugs have been shown to trigger autophagy-like processes in the parasites. It is inferred that autophagy is used by the parasites in an—not always successful—attempt to cope with the stress caused by the toxic compounds.

  12. N-acetylcysteine attenuates ischemia-reperfusion-induced apoptosis and autophagy in mouse liver via regulation of the ROS/JNK/Bcl-2 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengfen Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury (HIRI remains a pivotal clinical problem after hemorrhagic shock, transplantation, and some types of toxic hepatic injury. Apoptosis and autophagy play important roles in cell death during HIRI. It is also known that N-acetylcysteine (NAC has significant pharmacologic effects on HIRI including elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROS and attenuation of hepatic apoptosis. However, the effects of NAC on HIRI-induced autophagy have not been reported. In this study, we evaluated the effects of NAC on autophagy and apoptosis in HIRI, and explored the possible mechanism involved. METHODS: A mouse model of segmental (70% hepatic warm ischemia was adopted to determine hepatic injury. NAC (150 mg/kg, a hepatoprotection agent, was administered before surgery. We hypothesized that the mechanism of NAC may involve the ROS/JNK/Bcl-2 pathway. We evaluated the expression of JNK, P-JNK, Bcl-2, Beclin 1 and LC3 by western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. Autophagosomes were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. RESULTS: We found that ALT, AST and pathological changes were significantly improved in the NAC group. Western blotting analysis showed that the expression levels of Beclin 1 and LC3 were significantly decreased in NAC-treated mice. In addition, JNK, p-JNK, Bax, TNF-α, NF-κB, IL2, IL6 and levels were also decreased in NAC-treated mice. CONCLUSION: NAC can prevent HIRI-induced autophagy and apoptosis by influencing the JNK signal pathway. The mechanism is likely to involve attenuation of JNK and p-JNK via scavenged ROS, an indirect increase in Bcl-2 level, and finally an alteration in the balance of Beclin 1 and Bcl-2.

  13. Adipose-Vascular Coupling and Potential Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollasch, Maik

    2017-01-06

    Excess visceral adipose tissue is associated with increased risk of high blood pressure, lipid disorders, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ with multiple humoral and metabolic roles in regulating whole-body physiology. However, perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) also plays a functional role in regulating the contractile state of the underlying smooth muscle cell layer. Work during the past decade has shown that this adipose-vascular coupling is achieved by production of numerous substances released from PVAT. Animal disease models have been instrumental in identifying biological and pathophysiological functions of this regulation. These studies have produced strong evidence that alterations in the paracrine control of PVAT in the regulation of arterial tone contribute to vascular dysfunction in obesity, hypertension, and cardiometabolic disease. Perivascular relaxing factors, or perhaps their putative targets, might represent exciting new targets for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

  14. The emerging role of acid sphingomyelinase in autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Cristiana; Cervia, Davide; De Palma, Clara; Assi, Emma; Pellegrino, Paolo; Bassi, Maria Teresa; Clementi, Emilio

    2015-05-01

    Autophagy, the main intracellular process of cytoplasmic material degradation, is involved in cell survival and death. Autophagy is regulated at various levels and novel modulators of its function are being continuously identified. An intriguing recent observation is that among these modulators is the sphingolipid metabolising enzyme, Acid Sphingomyelinase (A-SMase), already known to play a fundamental role in apoptotic cell death participating in several pathophysiological conditions. In this review we analyse and discuss the relationship between autophagy and A-SMase describing how A-SMase may regulate it and defining, for the first time, the existence of an A-SMase-autophagy axis. The imbalance of this axis plays a role in cancer, nervous system, cardiovascular, and hepatic disorders.

  15. Adipose Tissue Biology: An Update Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is a major health problem in most countries in the world today. It increases the risk of diabetes, heart disease, fatty liver and some form of cancer. Adipose tissue biology is currently one of the “hot” areas of biomedical science, as fundamental for the development of novel therapeutics for obesity and its related disorders.CONTENT: Adipose tissue consist predominantly of adipocytes, adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs, vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, fibroblast, macrophages, and extracellular matrix. Adipose tissue metabolism is extremely dynamic, and the supply of and removal of substrates in the blood is acutely regulated according to the nutritional state. Adipose tissue possesses the ability to a very large extent to modulate its own metabolic activities including differentiation of new adipocytes and production of blood vessels as necessary to accommodate increasing fat stores. At the same time, adipocytes signal to other tissue to regulate their energy metabolism in accordance with the body's nutritional state. Ultimately adipocyte fat stores have to match the body's overall surplus or deficit of energy. Obesity causes adipose tissue dysfunction and results in obesity-related disorders. SUMMARY: It is now clear that adipose tissue is a complex and highly active metabolic and endocrine organ. Undestanding the molecular mechanisms underlying obesity and its associated disease cluster is also of great significance as the need for new and more effective therapeutic strategies is more urgent than ever.  KEYWORDS: obesity, adipocyte, adipose, tissue, adipogenesis, angiogenesis, lipid droplet, lipolysis, plasticity, dysfunction.

  16. Cinnamon extract regulates plasma levels of adipose-derived factors and expression of multiple genes related to carbohydrate metabolism and lipogenesis in adipose tissue of fructose-fed rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    We reported previously that a dietary cinnamon extract (CE) improves systemic insulin sensitivity and dyslipidemia by enhancing insulin signaling. In the present study, we examined the effects of CE on several biomarkers including plasma levels of adipose-derived adipokines, and the potential molec...

  17. Calcium Homeostasis and ER Stress in Control of Autophagy in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Kania

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a basic catabolic process, serving as an internal engine during responses to various cellular stresses. As regards cancer, autophagy may play a tumor suppressive role by preserving cellular integrity during tumor development and by possible contribution to cell death. However, autophagy may also exert oncogenic effects by promoting tumor cell survival and preventing cell death, for example, upon anticancer treatment. The major factors influencing autophagy are Ca2+ homeostasis perturbation and starvation. Several Ca2+ channels like voltage-gated T- and L-type channels, IP3 receptors, or CRAC are involved in autophagy regulation. Glucose transporters, mainly from GLUT family, which are often upregulated in cancer, are also prominent targets for autophagy induction. Signals from both Ca2+ perturbations and glucose transport blockage might be integrated at UPR and ER stress activation. Molecular pathways such as IRE 1-JNK-Bcl-2, PERK-eIF2α-ATF4, or ATF6-XBP 1-ATG are related to autophagy induced through ER stress. Moreover ER molecular chaperones such as GRP78/BiP and transcription factors like CHOP participate in regulation of ER stress-mediated autophagy. Autophagy modulation might be promising in anticancer therapies; however, it is a context-dependent matter whether inhibition or activation of autophagy leads to tumor cell death.

  18. Autophagy research: Lessons from metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Meijer

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy research continues to expand exponentially. Clearly autophagy and metabolism are intimately connected; however, the rapid expansion of research into this topic inevitably brings the risk that important basic knowledge of metabolism will be overlooked when considering experimental data. Unf

  19. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Quaade, Marlene Louise; Sheikh, Søren Paludan

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that adipose tissue is the richest and most accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells. Many different therapies for chronic wounds exist with varying success rates. The capacity of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) to promote angiogenesis, secrete growth factors......, regulate the inflammatory process, and differentiate into multiple cell types makes them a potential ideal therapy for chronic wounds. The aim of this article was to review all preclinical trials using ASCs in problem wound models. A systematic search was performed and 12 studies were found where different...

  20. Glucocorticoids induce autophagy in rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Fan, J.; Lin, Y. S.;

    2015-01-01

    and their responses to diverse stimuli, however, the role of autophagy in glucocorticoidinduced damage to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) remains unclear. The current study confirmed that glucocorticoid administration impaired the proliferation of BMSCs. Transmission electron microscopy......Glucocorticoidinduced osteoporosis (GIOP) is a widespread clinical complication following glucocorticoid therapy. This irreversible damage to boneforming and resorbing cells is essential in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Autophagy is a physiological process involved in the regulation of cells...

  1. A dual role of p53 in the control of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Chiara Maiuri, M; Morselli, Eugenia; Criollo, Alfredo; D'Amelio, Marcello; Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan; Cecconi, Francesco; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-08-01

    Genotoxic stress can induce autophagy in a p53-dependent fashion and p53 can transactivate autophagy-inducing genes. We have observed recently that inactivation of p53 by deletion, depletion or inhibition can trigger autophagy. Thus, human and mouse cells subjected to knockout, knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of p53 manifest signs of autophagy such as depletion of p62/SQSTM1, LC3 lipidation, redistribution of GFP-LC3 in cytoplasmic puncta, and accumulation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes, both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of p53 causes autophagy in enucleated cells, indicating that the cytoplasmic, non-nuclear pool of p53 can regulate autophagy. Accordingly, retransfection of p53(-/-) cells with wild-type p53 as well as a p53 mutant that is excluded from the nucleus (due to the deletion of the nuclear localization sequence) can inhibit autophagy, whereas retransfection with a nucleus-restricted p53 mutant (in which the nuclear localization sequence has been deleted) does not inhibit autophagy. Several distinct autophagy inducers (e.g., starvation, rapamycin, lithium, tunicamycin and thapsigargin) stimulate the rapid degradation of p53. In these conditions, inhibition of the p53-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2 can avoid p53 depletion and simultaneously prevent the activation of autophagy. Moreover, a p53 mutant that lacks the HDM2 ubiquitinylation site and hence is more stable than wild-type p53 is particularly efficient in suppressing autophagy. In conclusion, p53 plays a dual role in the control of autophagy. On the one hand, nuclear p53 can induce autophagy through transcriptional effects. On the other hand, cytoplasmic p53 may act as a master repressor of autophagy.

  2. miR-34a inhibits differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells by regulating cell cycle and senescence induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ho; Park, Hyeon; Pak, Ha-Jin; Yang, Dong-Yun; Kim, Yun-Hong; Choi, Won-Jun; Park, Se-Jin; Cho, Jung-Ah; Lee, Kyo-Won

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical in the maintenance, differentiation, and lineage commitment of stem cells. Stem cells have the unique property to differentiate into tissue-specific cell types (lineage commitment) during cell division (self-renewal). In this study, we investigated whether miR-34a, a cell cycle-regulating microRNA, could control the stem cell properties of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs). First, we found that the expression level of miR-34a was increased as the cell passage number was increased. This finding, however, was inversely correlated with our finding that the overexpression of miR-34a induced the decrease of cell proliferation. In addition, miR-34a overexpression decreased the expression of various cell cycle regulators such as CDKs (-2, -4, -6) and cyclins (-E, -D), but not p21 and p53. The cell cycle analysis showed accumulation of dividing cells at S phase by miR-34a, which was reversible by co-treatment with anti-miR-34a. The potential of adipogenesis and osteogenesis of ADSCs was also decreased by miR-34a overexpression, which was recovered by co-treatment with anti-miR-34a. The surface expression of stem cell markers including CD44 was also down-regulated by miR-34a overexpression as similar to that elicited by cell cycle inhibitors. miR-34a also caused a significant decrease in mRNA expression of stem cell transcription factors as well as STAT-3 expression and phosphorylation. Cytokine profiling revealed that miR-34a significantly modulated IL-6 and -8 production, which was strongly related to cellular senescence. These data suggest the importance of miR-34a for the fate of ADSCs toward senescence rather than differentiation.

  3. Adipose tissue fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity causes a majorinterest in white adipose tissue biology. Adipose tissuecells are surrounded by extracellular matrix proteinswhose composition and remodeling is of crucial importancefor cell function. The expansion of adipose tissue inobesity is linked to an inappropriate supply with oxygenand hypoxia development. Subsequent activation ofhypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) inhibits preadipocytedifferentiation and initiates adipose tissue fibrosis. Therebyadipose tissue growth is limited and excess triglyceridesare stored in ectopic tissues. Stressed adipocytes andhypoxia contribute to immune cell immigration andactivation which further aggravates adipose tissuefibrosis. There is substantial evidence that adipose tissuefibrosis is linked to metabolic dysfunction,both in rodentmodels and in the clinical setting. Peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor gamma agonists and adiponectin bothreduce adipose tissue fibrosis, inflammation and insulinresistance. Current knowledge suggests that antifibroticdrugs, increasing adipose tissue oxygen supply or HIF-1antagonists will improve adipose tissue function andthereby ameliorate metabolic diseases.

  4. Imaging white adipose tissue with confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Santibañez, Gabriel; Cho, Kae Won; Lumeng, Carey N

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is composed of a variety of cell types that include mature adipocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, adipocyte progenitors, and a range of inflammatory leukocytes. These cells work in concert to promote nutrient storage in adipose tissue depots and vary widely based on location. In addition, overnutrition and obesity impart significant changes in the architecture of adipose tissue that are strongly associated with metabolic dysfunction. Recent studies have called attention to the importance of adipose tissue microenvironments in regulating adipocyte function and therefore require techniques that preserve cellular interactions and permit detailed analysis of three-dimensional structures in fat. This chapter summarizes our experience with the use of laser scanning confocal microscopy for imaging adipose tissue in rodents.

  5. Cathepsin-D, a key protease in breast cancer, is up-regulated in obese mouse and human adipose tissue, and controls adipogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Masson

    Full Text Available The aspartic protease cathepsin-D (cath-D is overexpressed by human epithelial breast cancer cells and is closely correlated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. The adipocyte is one of the most prominent cell types in the tumor-microenvironment of breast cancer, and clinical studies have shown that obesity increases the incidence of breast cancer. Here, we provide the first evidence that cath-D expression is up-regulated in adipose tissue from obese human beings, as well as in adipocytes from the obese C57BI6/J mouse. Cath-D expression is also increased during human and mouse adipocyte differentiation. We show that cath-D silencing in 3T3-F442A murine preadipocytes leads to lipid-depleted cells after adipogenesis induction, and inhibits of the expression of PPARγ, HSL and aP2 adipocyte differentiation markers. Altogether, our findings demonstrate the key role of cath-D in the control of adipogenesis, and suggest that cath-D may be a novel target in obesity.

  6. Adipose tissue: cell heterogeneity and functional diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve Ràfols, Montserrat

    2014-02-01

    There are two types of adipose tissue in the body whose function appears to be clearly differentiated. White adipose tissue stores energy reserves as fat, whereas the metabolic function of brown adipose tissue is lipid oxidation to produce heat. A good balance between them is important to maintain energy homeostasis. The concept of white adipose tissue has radically changed in the past decades, and is now considered as an endocrine organ that secretes many factors with autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine functions. In addition, we can no longer consider white adipose tissue as a single tissue, because it shows different metabolic profiles in its different locations, with also different implications. Although the characteristic cell of adipose tissue is the adipocyte, this is not the only cell type present in adipose tissue, neither the most abundant. Other cell types in adipose tissue described include stem cells, preadipocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and endothelial cells. The balance between these different cell types and their expression profile is closely related to maintenance of energy homeostasis. Increases in adipocyte size, number and type of lymphocytes, and infiltrated macrophages are closely related to the metabolic syndrome diseases. The study of regulation of proliferation and differentiation of preadipocytes and stem cells, and understanding of the interrelationship between the different cell types will provide new targets for action against these diseases.

  7. Trehalose Accumulation Triggers Autophagy during Plant Desiccation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Williams

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Global climate change, increasingly erratic weather and a burgeoning global population are significant threats to the sustainability of future crop production. There is an urgent need for the development of robust measures that enable crops to withstand the uncertainty of climate change whilst still producing maximum yields. Resurrection plants possess the unique ability to withstand desiccation for prolonged periods, can be restored upon watering and represent great potential for the development of stress tolerant crops. Here, we describe the remarkable stress characteristics of Tripogon loliiformis, an uncharacterised resurrection grass and close relative of the economically important cereals, rice, sorghum, and maize. We show that T. loliiformis survives extreme environmental stress by implementing autophagy to prevent Programmed Cell Death. Notably, we identified a novel role for trehalose in the regulation of autophagy in T.loliiformis. Transcriptome, Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry, immunoblotting and confocal microscopy analyses directly linked the accumulation of trehalose with the onset of autophagy in dehydrating and desiccated T. loliiformis shoots. These results were supported in vitro with the observation of autophagosomes in trehalose treated T. loliiformis leaves; autophagosomes were not detected in untreated samples. Presumably, once induced, autophagy promotes desiccation tolerance in T.loliiformis, by removal of cellular toxins to suppress programmed cell death and the recycling of nutrients to delay the onset of senescence. These findings illustrate how resurrection plants manipulate sugar metabolism to promote desiccation tolerance and may provide candidate genes that are potentially useful for the development of stress tolerant crops.

  8. Avermectin induced autophagy in pigeon spleen tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ci; Zhao, Yanbing; Chen, Lijie; Zhang, Ziwei; Li, Ming; Li, Shu

    2015-12-05

    The level of autophagy is considered as an indicator for monitoring the toxic impact of pesticide exposure. Avermectin (AVM), a widely used insecticide, has immunotoxic effects on the pigeon spleen. The aim of this study was to investigate the status of autophagy and the expression levels of microtubule-associated protein1 light chain 3 (LC3), beclin-1, dynein, autophagy associated gene (Atg) 4B, Atg5, target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) and target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2) in AVM-treated pigeon spleens. Eighty two-month-old pigeons were randomly divided into four groups: a control group, a low-dose group, a medium-dose group and a high-dose group, which were fed a basal diet spiked with 0, 20, 40 and 60 mg AVM/kg diet, respectively. Microscopic cellular morphology revealed a significant increase in autophagic structures in the AVM-treated groups. The expression of LC3, beclin-1, dynein, Atg4B and Atg5 increased, while mRNA levels of TORC1 and TORC2 were decreased in the AVM-treated groups relative to the control groups at 30, 60 and 90 days in the pigeon spleen. These results indicated that AVM exposure could up-regulate the level of autophagy in a dose-time-dependent manner in the pigeon spleen.

  9. Trehalose-mediated autophagy impairs the anti-viral function of human primary airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Wu

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (HRV is the most common cause of acute exacerbations of chronic lung diseases including asthma. Impaired anti-viral IFN-λ1 production and increased HRV replication in human asthmatic airway epithelial cells may be one of the underlying mechanisms leading to asthma exacerbations. Increased autophagy has been shown in asthmatic airway epithelium, but the role of autophagy in anti-HRV response remains uncertain. Trehalose, a natural glucose disaccharide, has been recognized as an effective autophagy inducer in mammalian cells. In the current study, we used trehalose to induce autophagy in normal human primary airway epithelial cells in order to determine if autophagy directly regulates the anti-viral response against HRV. We found that trehalose-induced autophagy significantly impaired IFN-λ1 expression and increased HRV-16 load. Inhibition of autophagy via knockdown of autophagy-related gene 5 (ATG5 effectively rescued the impaired IFN-λ1 expression by trehalose and subsequently reduced HRV-16 load. Mechanistically, ATG5 protein interacted with retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I and IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1, two critical molecules involved in the expression of anti-viral interferons. Our results suggest that induction of autophagy in human primary airway epithelial cells inhibits the anti-viral IFN-λ1 expression and facilitates HRV infection. Intervention of excessive autophagy in chronic lung diseases may provide a novel approach to attenuate viral infections and associated disease exacerbations.

  10. Hepatitis B virus x protein induces autophagy via activating death-associated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H-T; Chen, G G; Hu, B-G; Zhang, Z-Y; Yun, J-P; He, M-L; Lai, P B S

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus x protein (HBX), a product of hepatitis B virus (HBV), is a multifunctional protein that regulates viral replication and various cellular functions. Recently, HBX has been shown to induce autophagy; however, the responsible mechanism is not fully known. In this study, we established stable HBX-expressing epithelial Chang cells as the platform to study how HBX induced autophagy. The results showed that the overexpression of HBX resulted in starvation-induced autophagy. HBX-induced autophagy was related to its ability to dephosphorylate/activate death-associated protein kinase (DAPK). The block of DAPK by its siRNA significantly counteracted HBX-mediated autophagy, confirming the positive role of DAPK in this process. HBX also induced Beclin 1, which functions at the downstream of the DAPK-mediated autophagy pathway. Although HBX could activate JNK, a kinase known to participate in autophagy in certain conditions, the change in JNK failed to influence HBX-induced autophagy. In conclusion, HBX induces autophagy via activating DAPK in a pathway related to Beclin 1, but not JNK. This new finding should help us to understand the role of autophagy in HBX-mediated pathogenesis and thus may provide targets for intervening HBX-related disorders.

  11. The role of autophagy in lung ischemia/reperfusion injury after lung transplantation in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Bentong; Huang, Lei; Dai, Bin; Liu, Jichun; Tang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to explore the role of autophagy in the cold I/R injury following lung transplantation. Methods: The rat orthotopic lung transplantation model was established to perform the level of autophagy in the cold I/R injury in this study. The pretreatment of inhibitor (3-Methyladenine [3-MA]) and activator (rapamycin [RAPA]) of autophagy were performed to assess the role of autophagy in the cold I/R injury following lung transplantation in rats. Results: After lung transplantation, the autophagy, lung cell apoptosis and lung injury were aggravated and peaked at 6 h following the transplantation. The inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA induced downregulated of autophagy, decreased cell apoptosis. Meanwhile, the lung injury, which was indicated by calculating the peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), pulmonary vein blood gas analysis (PO2) and ratio of wet to dry in lung (W/D), was ameliorated after treatment with 3-MA. The activation of autophagy by RAPA causing the upregulated of autophagy and apoptosis of lung cells, and enhanced the lung injury. Conclusion: All the results suggested that the autophagy was involved in the cold I/R injury in lung transplantation model, and played a potential role on the regulation of I/R injury after lung transplantation. PMID:27648150

  12. A pathway of targeted autophagy is induced by DNA damage in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Vinay V.; Waterman, David P.; Bernard, Amélie; Schiffmann, Nathan; Sayas, Enrich; Kamber, Roarke; Lemos, Brenda; Memisoglu, Gonen; Ang, Jessie; Mazella, Allison; Chuartzman, Silvia G.; Loewith, Robbie J.; Schuldiner, Maya; Denic, Vladimir; Klionsky, Daniel J.; Haber, James E.

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy plays a central role in the DNA damage response (DDR) by controlling the levels of various DNA repair and checkpoint proteins; however, how the DDR communicates with the autophagy pathway remains unknown. Using budding yeast, we demonstrate that global genotoxic damage or even a single unrepaired double-strand break (DSB) initiates a previously undescribed and selective pathway of autophagy that we term genotoxin-induced targeted autophagy (GTA). GTA requires the action primarily of Mec1/ATR and Rad53/CHEK2 checkpoint kinases, in part via transcriptional up-regulation of central autophagy proteins. GTA is distinct from starvation-induced autophagy. GTA requires Atg11, a central component of the selective autophagy machinery, but is different from previously described autophagy pathways. By screening a collection of ∼6,000 yeast mutants, we identified genes that control GTA but do not significantly affect rapamycin-induced autophagy. Overall, our findings establish a pathway of autophagy specific to the DNA damage response. PMID:28154131

  13. The neuro-glial properties of adipose-derived adult stromal (ADAS cells are not regulated by Notch 1 and are not derived from neural crest lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip C Wrage

    Full Text Available We investigated whether adipose-derived adult stromal (ADAS are of neural crest origin and the extent to which Notch 1 regulates their growth and differentiation. Mouse ADAS cells cultured in media formulated for neural stem cells (NSC displayed limited capacity for self-renewal, clonogenicity, and neurosphere formation compared to NSC from the subventricular zone in the hippocampus. Although ADAS cells expressed Nestin, GFAP, NSE and Tuj1 in vitro, exposure to NSC differentiation supplements did not induce mature neuronal marker expression. In contrast, in mesenchymal stem cell (MSC media, ADAS cells retained their ability to proliferate and differentiate beyond 20 passages and expressed high levels of Nestin. In neuritizing cocktails, ADAS cells extended processes, downregulated Nestin expression, and displayed depolarization-induced Ca(2+ transients but no spontaneous or evoked neural network activity on Multi-Electrode Arrays. Deletion of Notch 1 in ADAS cell cultures grown in NSC proliferation medium did not significantly alter their proliferative potential in vitro or the differentiation-induced downregulation of Nestin. Co-culture of ADAS cells with fibroblasts that stably expressed the Notch ligand Jagged 1 or overexpression of the Notch intracellular domain (NICD did not alter ADAS cell growth, morphology, or cellular marker expression. ADAS cells did not display robust expression of neural crest transcription factors or genes (Sox, CRABP2, and TH; and lineage tracing analyses using Wnt1-Cre;Rosa26R-lacZ or -EYFP reporter mice confirmed that fewer than 2% of the ADAS cell population derived from a Wnt1-positive population during development. In summary, although media formulations optimized for MSCs or NSCs enable expansion of mouse ADAS cells in vitro, we find no evidence that these cells are of neural crest origin, that they can undergo robust terminal differentiation into functionally mature neurons, and that Notch 1 is likely to be

  14. Genetic versus Non-Genetic Regulation of miR-103, miR-143 and miR-483-3p Expression in Adipose Tissue and Their Metabolic Implications—A Twin Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jette Bork-Jensen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Murine models suggest that the microRNAs miR-103 and miR-143 may play central roles in the regulation of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT and development of type 2 diabetes (T2D. The microRNA miR-483-3p may reduce adipose tissue expandability and cause ectopic lipid accumulation, insulin resistance and T2D. We aimed to explore the genetic and non-genetic factors that regulate these microRNAs in human SAT, and to investigate their impact on metabolism in humans. Levels of miR-103, miR-143 and miR-483-3p were measured in SAT biopsies from 244 elderly monozygotic and dizygotic twins using real-time PCR. Heritability estimates were calculated and multiple regression analyses were performed to study associations between these microRNAs and measures of metabolism, as well as between these microRNAs and possible regulating factors. We found that increased BMI was associated with increased miR-103 expression levels. In addition, the miR-103 levels were positively associated with 2 h plasma glucose levels and hemoglobin A1c independently of BMI. Heritability estimates for all three microRNAs were low. In conclusion, the expression levels of miR-103, miR-143 and miR-483-3p in adipose tissue are primarily influenced by non-genetic factors, and miR-103 may be involved in the development of adiposity and control of glucose metabolism in humans.

  15. Interactions between Autophagy and Bacterial Toxins: Targets for Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a physiological process involved in defense mechanisms for clearing intracellular bacteria. The autophagic pathway is finely regulated and bacterial toxins interact with this process in a complex manner. Bacterial toxins also interact significantly with many biochemical processes. Evaluations of the effects of bacterial toxins, such as endotoxins, pore-forming toxins and adenylate cyclases, on autophagy could support the development of new strategies for counteracting bacterial pathogenicity. Treatment strategies could focus on drugs that enhance autophagic processes to improve the clearance of intracellular bacteria. However, further in vivo studies are required to decipher the upregulation of autophagy and potential side effects limiting such approaches. The capacity of autophagy activation strategies to improve the outcome of antibiotic treatment should be investigated in the future.

  16. Interactions between Autophagy and Bacterial Toxins: Targets for Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Jacques

    2015-08-04

    Autophagy is a physiological process involved in defense mechanisms for clearing intracellular bacteria. The autophagic pathway is finely regulated and bacterial toxins interact with this process in a complex manner. Bacterial toxins also interact significantly with many biochemical processes. Evaluations of the effects of bacterial toxins, such as endotoxins, pore-forming toxins and adenylate cyclases, on autophagy could support the development of new strategies for counteracting bacterial pathogenicity. Treatment strategies could focus on drugs that enhance autophagic processes to improve the clearance of intracellular bacteria. However, further in vivo studies are required to decipher the upregulation of autophagy and potential side effects limiting such approaches. The capacity of autophagy activation strategies to improve the outcome of antibiotic treatment should be investigated in the future.

  17. Interactive regulation of Beclin 1 and mTOR in autophagy in myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury%Beclin1与mTOR对心肌缺血/再灌注损伤中自噬的交互调控机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马芹芹; 刘立亚; 黄秀兰

    2012-01-01

    自噬是一个进化上高度保守的受损或功能障碍的蛋白质聚集体或细胞器降解的过程.在心肌缺血/再灌注(L/R)过程中,可以通过多种因素诱导细胞的自噬活动,而且越来越多的证据表明,自噬在心肌缺血/再灌注损伤(MIRI)中可能起“双刃剑”的作用,适度自噬可促进细胞存活;而不适当的激活自噬可能会加速细胞死亡.Beclin 1介导的自噬/凋亡互反馈信号通路和哺乳动物雷帕霉素靶蛋白(mTOR)介导的自噬与mTOR的互反馈信号通路,是两条经典的白噬激活信号途径,也可能是调控自噬“双刃剑”转向促进细胞存活的重要调控机制.本文将重点综述上述两条信号通路对自噬的交互式调控作用.%Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process responsible for the degradation of damaged and dysfunctional cellular organelles and protein aggregates. Recent evidence indicates that autophagy could be induced in ischemia/reperfusion injury. There is increasing evidence that autophagy plays a "double-edge sword" role in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Moderate autophagy could promote cell survival, but improperly activated autophagy may accelerate cell death. Beclin 1 and mTOR mediated signaling pathways are two classical signaling pathways that activate autophagy and may also be involved in the important regulation mechanism of autophagy in promoting cell survival. This paper mainly reviewed the interactive regulation of Beclin 1 and mTOR signaling pathways in autophagy.

  18. The Role of Secretory Autophagy in Zika Virus Transfer through the Placental Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Li, Zi-Lin; Yuan, Shu

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies indicated that the Zika virus genome could be detected in the amniotic fluid and the fetal brain, which confirms that the virus can cross the placental barrier. Secretory autophagy or exosome pathways may participate in this virus transfer. Autophagy modulators regulate autophagosome formation or membrane fusion with lysosomal vesicles and therefore inhibit viral nucleocapsid releasing or virus transfer to the fetus hypothetically. However, some autophagy modulators may enhance virus replication. Autophagy inhibitors may arrest placental development; while exaggeration of autophagy in human placenta may be associated with the fetal growth restriction. Therefore, autophagy modulators should be used carefully due to their complex clinical effects. Alternatively, exosome-specific inhibitors might be also considered, although their safety of both maternal and fetal conditions must be carefully assessed before any advancement to human clinical trials. PMID:28119857

  19. Mechanisms of autophagy and apoptosis:Recent developments in breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan; M; Esteve; Erwin; Knecht

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy,the pathway whereby cell components are degraded by lysosomes,is involved in the cell response to environmental stresses,such as nutrient deprivation,hypoxia or exposition to chemotherapeutic agents.Under these conditions,which are reminiscent of certain phases of tumor development,autophagy either promotes cell survival or induces cell death. This strengthens the possibility that autophagy could be an important target in cancer therapy,as has been proposed.Here,we describe the regulation of survival and death by autophagy and apoptosis,especially in cultured breast cancer cells.In particular,we discuss whether autophagy represents an apoptosis-independent process and/or if they share common pathways. We believe that understanding in detail the molecular mechanisms that underlie the relationships between autophagy and apoptosis in breast cancer cells could improve the available treatments for this disease.

  20. Interplay between the cellular autophagy machinery and positive-stranded RNA viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junyan Shi; Honglin Luo

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular process that acts as a key regulator in maintaining cellular homeostasis.Recent studies implicate an important role for autophagy in infection and immunity by removing invading pathogens and through modulating innate and adaptive immune responses.However,several pathogens,notably some positive-stranded RNA viruses,have subverted autophagy to their own ends.In this review,we summarize the current understanding of how viruses with a positive-stranded RNA genome interact with the host autophagy machinery to control their replication and spread.We review the mechanisms underlying the induction of autophagy and discuss the pro- and anti-viral functions of autophagy and the potential mechanisms involved.

  1. Adipose, bone and muscle tissues as new endocrine organs: role of reciprocal regulation for osteoporosis and obesity development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Silvia; Greco, Emanuela A; Wannenes, Francesca; Donini, Lorenzo M; Lenzi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The belief that obesity is protective against osteoporosis has recently been revised. In fact, the latest epidemiologic and clinical studies show that a high level of fat mass, but also reduced muscle mass, might be a risk factor for osteoporosis and fragility fractures. Furthermore, increasing evidence seems to indicate that different components such as myokines, adipokines and growth factors, released by both fat and muscle tissues, could play a key role in the regulation of skeletal health and in low bone mineral density and, thus, in osteoporosis development. This review considers old and recent data in the literature to further evaluate the relationship between fat, bone and muscle tissue.

  2. A role for autophagy in the extension of lifespan by dietary restriction in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malene Hansen

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In many organisms, dietary restriction appears to extend lifespan, at least in part, by down-regulating the nutrient-sensor TOR (Target Of Rapamycin. TOR inhibition elicits autophagy, the large-scale recycling of cytoplasmic macromolecules and organelles. In this study, we asked whether autophagy might contribute to the lifespan extension induced by dietary restriction in C. elegans. We find that dietary restriction and TOR inhibition produce an autophagic phenotype and that inhibiting genes required for autophagy prevents dietary restriction and TOR inhibition from extending lifespan. The longevity response to dietary restriction in C. elegans requires the PHA-4 transcription factor. We find that the autophagic response to dietary restriction also requires PHA-4 activity, indicating that autophagy is a transcriptionally regulated response to food limitation. In spite of the rejuvenating effect that autophagy is predicted to have on cells, our findings suggest that autophagy is not sufficient to extend lifespan. Long-lived daf-2 insulin/IGF-1 receptor mutants require both autophagy and the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO for their longevity, but we find that autophagy takes place in the absence of DAF-16. Perhaps autophagy is not sufficient for lifespan extension because although it provides raw material for new macromolecular synthesis, DAF-16/FOXO must program the cells to recycle this raw material into cell-protective longevity proteins.

  3. Sex dimorphism and depot differences in adipose tissue function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ursula A; Tchoukalova, Yourka D

    2014-03-01

    Obesity, characterized by excessive adiposity, is a risk factor for many metabolic pathologies, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Numerous studies have shown that adipose tissue distribution may be a greater predictor of metabolic health. Upper-body fat (visceral and subcutaneous abdominal) is commonly associated with the unfavorable complications of obesity, while lower-body fat (gluteal-femoral) may be protective. Current research investigations are focused on analyzing the metabolic properties of adipose tissue, in order to better understand the mechanisms that regulate fat distribution in both men and women. This review will highlight the adipose tissue depot- and sex-dependent differences in white adipose tissue function, including adipogenesis, adipose tissue developmental patterning, the storage and release of fatty acids, and secretory function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Modulation of Adipose Tissue in Health and Disease.

  4. TAK1-mediated autophagy and fatty acid oxidation prevent hepatosteatosis and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokuchi-Shimizu, Sayaka; Park, Eek Joong; Roh, Yoon Seok; Yang, Ling; Zhang, Bi; Song, Jingyi; Liang, Shuang; Pimienta, Michael; Taniguchi, Koji; Wu, Xuefeng; Asahina, Kinji; Lagakos, William; Mackey, Mason R; Akira, Shizuo; Ellisman, Mark H; Sears, Dorothy D; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Karin, Michael; Brenner, David A; Seki, Ekihiro

    2014-08-01

    The MAP kinase kinase kinase TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is activated by TLRs, IL-1, TNF, and TGFβ and in turn activates IKK-NF-κB and JNK, which regulate cell survival, growth, tumorigenesis, and metabolism. TAK1 signaling also upregulates AMPK activity and autophagy. Here, we investigated TAK1-dependent regulation of autophagy, lipid metabolism, and tumorigenesis in the liver. Fasted mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of Tak1 exhibited severe hepatosteatosis with increased mTORC1 activity and suppression of autophagy compared with their WT counterparts. TAK1-deficient hepatocytes exhibited suppressed AMPK activity and autophagy in response to starvation or metformin treatment; however, ectopic activation of AMPK restored autophagy in these cells. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) target genes and β-oxidation, which regulate hepatic lipid degradation, were also suppressed in hepatocytes lacking TAK1. Due to suppression of autophagy and β-oxidation, a high-fat diet challenge aggravated steatohepatitis in mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of Tak1. Notably, inhibition of mTORC1 restored autophagy and PPARα target gene expression in TAK1-deficient livers, indicating that TAK1 acts upstream of mTORC1. mTORC1 inhibition also suppressed spontaneous liver fibrosis and hepatocarcinogenesis in animals with hepatocyte-specific deletion of Tak1. These data indicate that TAK1 regulates hepatic lipid metabolism and tumorigenesis via the AMPK/mTORC1 axis, affecting both autophagy and PPARα activity.

  5. Dopamine Oxidation and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Muñoz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms involved in the neurodegenerative process of Parkinson's disease remain unclear. Currently, there is a general agreement that mitochondrial dysfunction, α-synuclein aggregation, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and impaired protein degradation are involved in the neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin in Parkinson's disease. Aminochrome has been proposed to play an essential role in the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, the formation of neurotoxic α-synuclein protofibrils, and impaired protein degradation. Here, we discuss the relationship between the oxidation of dopamine to aminochrome, the precursor of neuromelanin, autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin, and the role of dopamine oxidation to aminochrome in autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons. Aminochrome induces the following: (i the formation of α-synuclein protofibrils that inactivate chaperone-mediated autophagy; (ii the formation of adducts with α- and β-tubulin, which induce the aggregation of the microtubules required for the fusion of autophagy vacuoles and lysosomes.

  6. DNA damage and autophagy

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    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely [Redox Biology Center and School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States); Panayiotidis, Mihalis I. [School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Franco, Rodrigo, E-mail: rfrancocruz2@unl.edu [Redox Biology Center and School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Both exogenous and endogenous agents are a threat to DNA integrity. Exogenous environmental agents such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, genotoxic chemicals and endogenous byproducts of metabolism including reactive oxygen species can cause alterations in DNA structure (DNA damage). Unrepaired DNA damage has been linked to a variety of human disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Thus, efficient mechanisms to detect DNA lesions, signal their presence and promote their repair have been evolved in cells. If DNA is effectively repaired, DNA damage response is inactivated and normal cell functioning resumes. In contrast, when DNA lesions cannot be removed, chronic DNA damage triggers specific cell responses such as cell death and senescence. Recently, DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular catabolic process that maintains a balance between synthesis, degradation, and recycling of cellular components. But the exact mechanisms by which DNA damage triggers autophagy are unclear. More importantly, the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cellular fate is unknown. In this review we analyze evidence that supports a role for autophagy as an integral part of the DNA damage response.

  7. Genetic mutations in adipose triglyceride lipase and myocardial up-regulation of peroxisome proliferated activated receptor-γ in patients with triglyceride deposit cardiomyovasculopathy

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    Hirano, Ken-ichi, E-mail: khirano@cnt-osaka.com [Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Novel, Non-Invasive, and Nutritional Therapeutics (CNT), Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 6-2-3, Furuedai, Suita, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tanaka, Tatsuya [Center for Medical Research and Education, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ikeda, Yoshihiko [Department of Pathology, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, 5-7-1 Fujishirodai, Suita 565-8565 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Satoshi [Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Novel, Non-Invasive, and Nutritional Therapeutics (CNT), Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 6-2-3, Furuedai, Suita, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Zaima, Nobuhiro [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Kinki University, 3327-204, Nakamachi, Nara 631-8505 (Japan); Kobayashi, Kazuhiro [Division of Neurology/Molecular Brain Science, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1, Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Suzuki, Akira [Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Novel, Non-Invasive, and Nutritional Therapeutics (CNT), Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 6-2-3, Furuedai, Suita, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sakata, Yasuhiko [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1, Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8574 (Japan); and others

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Triglyceride deposit cardiomyovasculopathy (TGCV) is a rare severe heart disease. •PPARγ is up-regulated in myocardium in patients with TGCV. •Possible vicious cycle for fatty acid may be involved in pathophysiology of TGCV. -- Abstract: Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL, also known as PNPLA2) is an essential molecule for hydrolysis of intracellular triglyceride (TG). Genetic ATGL deficiency is a rare multi-systemic neutral lipid storage disease. Information regarding its clinical profile and pathophysiology, particularly for cardiac involvement, is still very limited. A previous middle-aged ATGL-deficient patient in our institute (Case 1) with severe heart failure required cardiac transplantation (CTx) and exhibited a novel phenotype, “Triglyceride deposit cardiomyovasculopathy (TGCV)”. Here, we tried to elucidate molecular mechanism underlying TGCV. The subjects were two cases with TGCV, including our second case who was a 33-year-old male patient (Case 2) with congestive heart failure requiring CTx. Case 2 was homozygous for a point mutation in the 5′ splice donor site of intron 5 in the ATGL, which results in at least two types of mRNAs due to splicing defects. The myocardium of both patients (Cases 1 and 2) showed up-regulation of peroxisome proliferated activated receptors (PPARs), key transcription factors for metabolism of long chain fatty acids (LCFAs), which was in contrast to these molecules’ lower expression in ATGL-targeted mice. We investigated the intracellular metabolism of LCFAs under human ATGL-deficient conditions using patients’ passaged skin fibroblasts as a model. ATGL-deficient cells showed higher uptake and abnormal intracellular transport of LCFA, resulting in massive TG accumulation. We used these findings from cardiac specimens and cell-biological experiments to construct a hypothetical model to clarify the pathophysiology of the human disorder. In patients with TGCV, even when hydrolysis of intracellular TG

  8. PGC-1α is required for exercise- and exercise training-induced UCP1 up-regulation in mouse white adipose tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stine Ringholm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to test the hypotheses that 1 a single exercise bout increases UCP1 mRNA in both inguinal (iWAT and epididymal (eWAT, 2 UCP1 expression and responsiveness to exercise are different in iWAT and eWAT, 3 PGC-1α determines the basal levels of UCP1 and PRDM16 in WAT and 4 exercise and exercise training regulate UCP1 and PRDM16 expression in WAT in a PGC-1α-dependent manner. METHODS: Whole body PGC-1α knockout (KO and wildtype (WT littermate mice performed a single treadmill exercise bout at 14 m/min and 10% slope for 1 hour. Mice were sacrificed and iWAT, eWAT and quadriceps muscle were removed immediately after, 2, 6 and 10 hours after running, and from sedentary mice that served as controls. In addition, PGC-1α KO mice and WT littermates were exercise trained for 5 weeks with sedentary mice as untrained controls. Thirty-six-37 hours after the last exercise bout iWAT was removed. RESULTS: UCP1 mRNA content increased 19-fold in iWAT and 7.5-fold in eWAT peaking at 6 h and 0' of recovery, respectively, in WT but with no changes in PGC-1α KO mice. UCP1 protein was undetectable in eWAT and very low in iWAT of untrained mice but increased with exercise training to 4.4 (AU in iWAT from WT mice without significant effects in PGC-1α KO mice. CONCLUSION: The present observations provide evidence that exercise training increases UCP1 protein in iWAT through PGC-1α, likely as a cumulative effect of transient increases in UCP1 expression after each exercise bout. Moreover, the results suggest that iWAT is more responsive than eWAT in exercise-induced regulation of UCP1. In addition, as PRDM16 mRNA content decreased in recovery from acute exercise, the present findings suggest that acute exercise elicits regulation of several brown adipose tissue genes in mouse WAT.

  9. Regulation of apelin and its receptor expression in adipose tissues of obesity rats with hypertension and cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongxian; Cheng, Xian Wu; Hao, Changning; Zhang, Zhi; Yao, Huali; Murohara, Toyoaki; Dai, Qiuyan

    2014-01-01

    The apelin/APJ system has been implicated in obesity-related hypertension. We investigated the mechanism responsible for the pathogenesis of obesity-related hypertension with a special focus on the crosstalk between AngII/its type 1 receptor (AT1R) signaling and apelin/APJ expression. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a high-fat (obesity-related hypertension, OH) or normal-fat diet (NF) for 15 weeks were randomly assigned to one of two groups and administered vehicle or perindopril for 4 weeks. Compared to the NF rats, the OH rats showed lower levels of plasma apelin and apelin/APJ mRNAs of perirenal adipose tissues, and these changes were restored by perindopril. Administration of the AT1R antagonist olmesartan resulted in the restoration of the reduction of apelin and APJ expressions induced by AngII for 48 h in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Among several inhibitors for extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) PD98059, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) SB203580 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) LY294002, the latter showed an additive effect on AngII-mediated inhibitory effects. In addition, the levels of p-Akt, p-ERK and p38MAPK proteins were decreased by long-term treatment with AngII (120 min), and these changes were restored by Olmesartan. Apelin/APJ appears to be impaired in obesity-related hypertension. The AngII inhibition-mediated beneficial effects are likely attributable, at least in part, to restoration of p38/ERK-dependent apelin/APJ expression in diet-induced obesity-related hypertension.

  10. Retinoid receptor signaling and autophagy in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orfali, Nina [Cork Cancer Research Center, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States); McKenna, Sharon L. [Cork Cancer Research Center, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Cahill, Mary R. [Department of Hematology, Cork University Hospital, Cork (Ireland); Gudas, Lorraine J., E-mail: ljgudas@med.cornell.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States); Mongan, Nigel P., E-mail: nigel.mongan@nottingham.ac.uk [Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, LE12 5RD (United Kingdom); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Retinoids are a family of signaling molecules derived from vitamin A with well established roles in cellular differentiation. Physiologically active retinoids mediate transcriptional effects on cells through interactions with retinoic acid (RARs) and retinoid-X (RXR) receptors. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARα gene, which lead to impaired retinoid signaling, are implicated in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), alone and in combination with arsenic trioxide (ATO), restores differentiation in APL cells and promotes degradation of the abnormal oncogenic fusion protein through several proteolytic mechanisms. RARα fusion-protein elimination is emerging as critical to obtaining sustained remission and long-term cure in APL. Autophagy is a degradative cellular pathway involved in protein turnover. Both ATRA and ATO also induce autophagy in APL cells. Enhancing autophagy may therefore be of therapeutic benefit in resistant APL and could broaden the application of differentiation therapy to other cancers. Here we discuss retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis, leukemogenesis, and APL treatment. We highlight autophagy as a potential important regulator in anti-leukemic strategies. - Highlights: • Normal and aberrant retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis and leukemia is reviewed. • We suggest a novel role for RARα in the development of X-RARα gene fusions in APL. • ATRA therapy in APL activates transcription and promotes onco-protein degradation. • Autophagy may be involved in both onco-protein degradation and differentiation. • Pharmacologic autophagy induction may potentiate ATRA's therapeutic effects.

  11. The role of autophagy in microbial infection and immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desai M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mayura Desai,1 Rong Fang,2 Jiaren Sun11Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 2Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX, USAAbstract: The autophagy pathway represents an evolutionarily conserved cell recycling process that is activated in response to nutrient deprivation and other stress signals. Over the years, it has been linked to an array of cellular functions. Equally, a wide range of cell-intrinsic, as well as extracellular, factors have been implicated in the induction of the autophagy pathway. Microbial infections represent one such factor that can not only activate autophagy through specific mechanisms but also manipulate the response to the invading microbe's advantage. Moreover, in many cases, particularly among viruses, the pathway has been shown to be intricately involved in the replication cycle of the pathogen. Conversely, autophagy also plays a role in combating the infection process, both through direct destruction of the pathogen and as one of the key mediating factors in the host defense mechanisms of innate and adaptive immunity. Further, the pathway also plays a role in controlling the pathogenesis of infectious diseases by regulating inflammation. In this review, we discuss various interactions between pathogens and the cellular autophagic response and summarize the immunological functions of the autophagy pathway.Keywords: autophagy, xenophagy, antiviral, antibacterial

  12. A matter of balance between life and death: targeting reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced autophagy for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Spencer B

    2010-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in many biological functions and diseases. Often their role is counterintuitive, where ROS can either promote cell survival or cell death depending on the cellular context. Similarly, autophagy is involved in many biological functions and diseases where it can either promote cell survival or cell death. There is now a growing consensus that ROS controls autophagy in multiple contexts and cell types. Furthermore, alterations in ROS and autophagy regulation contribute to cancer initiation and progression. However, how ROS and autophagy contribute to cancer and how to target either for cancer treatment is controversial. Blocking ROS generation could prevent cancer initiation, whereas blockage of autophagy seems to be required for initiation of cancer. In cancer progression, high levels of ROS correspond with increased metabolism and under metabolic stress autophagy is required to maintain cellular integrity. In cancer treatment, therapeutic drugs that increase ROS and autophagy have been implicated in their mechanism for cell death, such as 2-methoxyestrodial (2-ME) and arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)), whereas other therapeutic drugs that induce ROS and autophagy seem to have a protective effect. This has led to different approaches to treat cancer patients where autophagy is either activated or inhibited. Both views of ROS and autophagy are valid and reflect the balance within a cell to either survive or die. Understanding this balancing act within a cell is essential to determine whether to block or activate ROS-controlled autophagy for cancer therapy.

  13. The role of DPO-1 and XE991-sensitive potassium channels in perivascular adipose tissue-mediated regulation of vascular tone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Tsvetkov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The anti-contractile effect of perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT is an important mechanism in the modulation of vascular tone in peripheral arteries. Recent evidence has implicated the XE991-sensitive voltage-gated Kv (KCNQ channels in the regulation of arterial tone by PVAT. However, until now the in vivo pharmacology of the involved vascular Kv channels with regard to XE991 remains undetermined, since XE991 effects may involve Ca2+ activated BKCa channels and/or voltage-dependent Kv1.5 channels sensitive to diphenyl phosphine oxide-1 (DPO-1. In this study, we tested whether Kv1.5 channels are involved in the control of mesenteric arterial tone and its regulation by PVAT. Our study was also aimed at extending our current knowledge on the in situ vascular pharmacology of DPO-1 and XE991 regarding Kv1.5 and BKCa channels, in helping to identify the nature of K+ channels that could contribute to PVAT-mediated relaxation. XE991 at 30 µM reduced the anti-contractile response of PVAT, but had no effects on vasocontraction induced by phenylephrine (PE in the absence of PVAT. Similar effects were observed for XE991 at 0.3 µM, which is known to almost completely inhibit mesenteric artery VSMC Kv currents. 30 µM XE991 did not affect BKCa currents in VSMCs. Kcna5-/- arteries and wild-type arteries incubated with 1 µM DPO-1 showed normal vasocontractions in response to PE in the presence and absence of PVAT. Kv current density and inhibition by 30 µM XE991 were normal in mesenteric artery VSMCs isolated from Kcna5-/- mice. We conclude that Kv channels are involved in the control of arterial vascular tone by PVAT. These channels are present in VSMCs and very potently inhibited by the KCNQ channel blocker XE991. BKCa channels and/or DPO-1 sensitive Kv1.5 channels in VSMCs are not the downstream mediators of the XE991 effects on PVAT-dependent arterial vasorelaxation. Further studies will need to be undertaken to examine the role of other Kv channels in

  14. Differential regulatory functions of three classes of phosphatidylinositol and phosphoinositide 3-kinases in autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinlei; Long, Yun Chau; Shen, Han-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved and exquisitely regulated self-eating cellular process with important biological functions. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PtdIns3Ks) and phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are involved in the autophagic process. Here we aim to recapitulate how 3 classes of these lipid kinases differentially regulate autophagy. Generally, activation of the class I PI3K suppresses autophagy, via the well-established PI3K-AKT-MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) complex 1 (MTORC1) pathway. In contrast, the class III PtdIns3K catalytic subunit PIK3C3/Vps34 forms a protein complex with BECN1 and PIK3R4 and produces phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P), which is required for the initiation and progression of autophagy. The class II enzyme emerged only recently as an alternative source of PtdIns3P and autophagic initiator. However, the orthodox paradigm is challenged by findings that the PIK3CB catalytic subunit of class I PI3K acts as a positive regulator of autophagy, and PIK3C3 was thought to be an amino acid sensor for MTOR, which curbs autophagy. At present, a number of PtdIns3K and PI3K inhibitors, including specific PIK3C3 inhibitors, have been developed for suppression of autophagy and for clinical applications in autophagy-related human diseases.

  15. Autophagy and ethanol-induced liver injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Terrence M Donohue Jr

    2009-01-01

    The majority of ethanol metabolism occurs in the liver. Consequently, this organ sustains the greatest damage from ethanol abuse. Ethanol consumption disturbs the delicate balance of protein homeostasis in the liver, causing intracellular protein accumulation due to a disruption of hepatic protein catabolism.Evidence indicates that ethanol or its metabolism impairs trafficking events in the liver, including the process of macroautophagy, which is the engulfment and degradation of cytoplasmic constituents by the lysosomal system. Autophagy is an essential, ongoing cellular process that is highly regulated by nutrients,endocrine factors and signaling pathways. A great number of the genes and gene products that govern the autophagic response have been characterized and the major metabolic and signaling pathways that activate or suppress autophagy have been identified. This review describes the process of autophagy, its regulation and the possible mechanisms by which ethanol disrupts the process of autophagic degradation. The implications of autophagic suppression are discussed in relation to the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver injury.

  16. Diet-induced obesity impairs spermatogenesis: a potential role for autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yang; Yan, Wen-jie; Yin, Tai-lang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jie; Yang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process that plays a crucial role in maintaining a series of cellular functions. It has been found that autophagy is closely involved in the physiological process of spermatogenesis and the regulation of sperm survival and motility. However, the role of autophagy in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced impaired spermatogenesis remains unknown. This study was designed to investigate the role of autophagy in HFD-induced spermatogenesis deficiency and employed chloroquine (CQ) to inhibit autophagy and rapamycin (RAP) to induce autophagy. 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and CQ were administered via intratesticular injection in vivo. The effects of CQ and 3-MA on the parameters of spermatozoa co-cultured with palmitic acid (PA) in vitro were also investigated. Human semen samples from obese, subfertile male pa