WorldWideScience

Sample records for autophagy influences glomerular

  1. Heme oxygenase‑1 protects H2O2‑insulted glomerular mesangial cells from excessive autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia; Li, Jinshun; Wang, Jinhua; Chi, Yanchun; Zhang, Kun; Cui, Rui

    2016-06-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that the activation of heme oxygenase (HO)‑1 reduces autophagy stimulated by oxidative stress injury, in which the supraphysiological production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is detected. However, the potential mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the function of HO‑1 activation in the regulation of autophagy in glomerular mesangial cells subjected to H2O2‑induced oxidative stress injury. The results demonstrated that the HO‑1 agonist, hemin, reduces the LC3 protein level, which was enhanced by H2O2 treatment. Furthermore, hemin‑activated HO‑1 may function as a regulator of oxidative stress‑induced autophagy in a dose‑dependent manner. Pharmacological activation of c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (JNK) inhibited the effect of hemin, indicating that the JNK signaling pathway is associated with the mechanism of HO‑1 in impeding excessive autophagy. In addition to successfully alleviating H2O2‑induced oxidative stress and cellular apoptosis, hemin‑activated HO‑1 may provide cytoprotection against rapamycin, a specific autophagy agonist. The present result suggested the inhibitory action of HO‑1 in the avoidance of a potentially enhanced linkage between autophagy and apoptosis, particularly in the setting of excessive ROS. Therefore, enhancing the intracellular activity of HO‑1 may assist the crosstalk between oxidative stress, autophagy and apoptosis, and represent a novel therapeutic strategy for renal ischemic disease. PMID:27122182

  2. Influence of albuminuria and glomerular filtration rate on blood pressure response to antihypertensive drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Flack

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available John M Flack1, Karl Duncan2, Suzanne E Ohmit3, Ruth Quah1, Xuefeng Liu1, Preeti Ramappa1, Sandra Norris1, Lowell Hedquist1, Amanda Dudley1, Samar A Nasser11Division of Translational Research and Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA; 2Department of Interventional Cardiology, Harper University Hospital, Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA; 3School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USABackground: Albuminuria and glomerular filtration rate (GFR, two factors linked to kidney and vascular function, may influence longitudinal blood pressure (BP responses to complex antihypertensive drug regimens.Methods: We reviewed the clinic records of 459 patients with hypertension in an urban, academic practice.Results: Mean patient age was 57-years, 89% of patients were African American, and 69% were women. Mean patient systolic/diastolic BP (SBP/DBP at baseline was 171/98 mmHg while taking an average of 3.3 antihypertensive medications. At baseline, 27% of patients had estimated (eGFR <60 ml/min/1.732, 28% had micro-albuminuria (30–300 mg/g and 16% had macro-albuminuria (300 mg/g. The average longitudinal BP decline over the observation period (mean 7.2 visits was 25/12 mmHg. In adjusted regression models, macro-albuminuria predicted a 10.3 mmHg lesser longitudinal SBP reduction (p < 0.001 and a 7.9 mmHg lesser longitudinal DBP reduction (p < 0.001; similarly eGFR <60 ml/min/1.732 predicted an 8.4 mmHg lesser longitudinal SBP reduction (p < 0.001 and a 4.5 lesser longitudinal DBP reduction (p < 0.001. Presence of either micro- or macro-albuminuria, or lower eGFR, also significantly delayed the time to attainment of goal BP.Conclusions: These data suggest that an attenuated decline in BP in drug-treated hypertensives, resulting in higher average BP levels over the long-term, may mediate a portion of the increased risk of cardiovascular-renal disease linked to elevated

  3. Research on the influencing factors of measuring glomerular filtration rate through 99Tcm-DTPA renal dynamic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is an important criterion to estimate renal function. The most common way to measure GFR clinically is 99Tcm-DTPA Renal Dynamic Imaging. However, the result may be influenced by many factors such as plasma protein binding, delineation of kidney and background region of interest, kidney depth, age and renal function and preparation of patient, nurse's operative technique, etc. The article analyzed each factor above respectively for clinical reference. (authors)

  4. Glomerular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaden, Shelly L

    2011-08-01

    Glomerular diseases are a leading cause of chronic kidney disease in dogs but seem to be less common in cats. Glomerular diseases are diverse, and a renal biopsy is needed to determine the specific glomerular disease that is present in any animal. Familial glomerulopathies occur in many breeds of dogs. However, most dogs with glomerular disease have acquired glomerular injury that is either immune-complex mediated or due to systemic factors, both of which are believed to be the result of a disease process elsewhere in the body (i.e., neoplastic, infectious, and noninfectious inflammatory disorders). A thorough clinical evaluation is indicated in all dogs suspected of having glomerular disease and should include an extensive evaluation for potential predisposing disorders. Nonspecific management of dogs with glomerular disease can be divided into 3 major categories: (1) treatment of potential predisposing disorders, (2) management of proteinuria, and (3) management of uremia and other complications of glomerular disease and chronic kidney disease. Specific management of specific glomerular diseases has not been fully studied in dogs. However, it may be reasonable to consider immunosuppressive therapy in dogs that have developed a form of glomerulonephritis secondary to a steroid-responsive disease (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus) or have immune-mediated lesions that have been documented in renal biopsy specimens. Appropriate patient monitoring during therapy is important for maximizing patient care. The prognosis for dogs and cats with glomerular disease is variable and probably dependent on a combination of factors. The purpose of this article is to discuss the general diagnosis and management of dogs with glomerular disease. PMID:21782143

  5. Glomerular number and function are influenced by spontaneous and induced low birth weight in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreuder, Michiel F; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Fodor, M;

    2005-01-01

    A link exists between low birth weight and diseases in adulthood, such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and insulin resistance. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) has been used to explain this association and has been shown to lead to a nephron endowment in humans. A reduction in...... glomerular number has been described in animal models with induced low birth weight as well but not in animals with spontaneous low birth weight. It therefore is debatable whether the models are suitable. The effect on glomerular number and size was studied in rats with naturally occurring IUGR and...... experimental IUGR, induced by bilateral uterine artery ligation. Design-based stereologic methods were used. Urinary protein excretion was determined as a measure of renal damage. Results showed a decrease of approximately 20% in glomerular number in both groups of IUGR (control 35,400, naturally occurring...

  6. Influences of combination of chemotherapy and autophagy inhibitor on the calreticulin expression in colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-qing PENG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the influence of chemotherapy combined with autophagy inhibitor on apoptosis and calreticulin (CRT expression on colonic cancer cells. Methods  The colon cancer cells HCT116 were taken as the target in the present study. The inhibition rates (IC50 of chemotherapeutics oxaliplatin, 5-Fu and SN-38 were assessed by MTT assay. The changes in CRT expression on the membrane of HCT116 and apoptosis were determined with flow cytometry before and after treatment with chemotherapeutics. CRT location in HCT116 was detected by fluorescent immunoassay before and after treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. The influence on HCT116 autophagy was determined by Western blotting after treatment with these chemotherapeutic agents. The changes in CRT expression on HCT116 membrane and apoptosis were determined with flow cytometry before and after treatment with the chemotherapeutics combined with autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ. Results  The ratio of apoptosis and membrane expression of CRT were elevated 12 hours after treatment with Oxaliplatin, 5-Fu and SN38, but without statistical significance. Fluorescent immunoassay showed a transposition of CRT from cytoplasm to the membrane after oxaliplatin treatment. Western blotting revealed that oxaliplatin, 5Fu and SN38 induced autophagy of HCT116 cells, and the autophagy was inhibited by the addition of CQ. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the percentages of annexin V+ cells and membrane expression of CRT were higher after treatment with the chemotherapy agents combined with CQ. The upregulation of CRT expression on membrane was obviously higher after treatment with oxaliplatin combined with CQ than that before the treatment with these agents (P=0.027. Conclusion  Oxaliplatin combined with CQ may increase the apoptosis rate of HCT116 cells and upregulate CRT expression in the membrane. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.04.03

  7. Influences of combination of chemotherapy and autophagy inhibitor on the calreticulin expression in colon cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Rui-Qing; Dan-dan LI; Ding, Ya; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Xiao-Shi; Wu, Xiao-jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective  To investigate the influence of chemotherapy combined with autophagy inhibitor on apoptosis and calreticulin (CRT) expression on colonic cancer cells. Methods  The colon cancer cells HCT116 were taken as the target in the present study. The inhibition rates (IC50) of chemotherapeutics oxaliplatin, 5-Fu and SN-38 were assessed by MTT assay. The changes in CRT expression on the membrane of HCT116 and apoptosis were determined with flow cytometry before and after treatment with chemot...

  8. Glomerular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950356 Experimental studies of glomerular endothe- lial cell culture and its production of extracellular ma-trixes.CHEN Xiangmei(陈香美),et al.Dept Nephrol,Great Wall Hosp,Beijing,100853.Natl Med J China1995;75(1):25-27.We successfully cultured human fetal and bovineglomerular endothelial cells by cell cloning and main-

  9. Influence of Acute High Glucose on Protein Abundance Changes in Murine Glomerular Mesangial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati, Michelle T; Gould, James C; Salyer, Sarah A; Isaacs, Susan; Wilkey, Daniel W; Merchant, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The effects of acute exposure to high glucose levels as experienced by glomerular mesangial cells in postprandial conditions and states such as in prediabetes were investigated using proteomic methods. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry methods were used to identify protein expression patterns in immortalized rat mesangial cells altered by 2 h high glucose (HG) growth conditions as compared to isoosmotic/normal glucose control (NG(⁎)) conditions. Unique protein expression changes at 2 h HG treatment were measured for 51 protein spots. These proteins could be broadly grouped into two categories: (1) proteins involved in cell survival/cell signaling and (2) proteins involved in stress response. Immunoblot experiments for a protein belonging to both categories, prohibitin (PHB), supported a trend for increased total expression as well as significant increases in an acidic PHB isoform. Additional studies confirmed the regulation of proteasomal subunit alpha-type 2 and the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone and oxidoreductase PDI (protein disulfide isomerase), suggesting altered ER protein folding capacity and proteasomal function in response to acute HG. We conclude that short term high glucose induces subtle changes in protein abundances suggesting posttranslational modifications and regulation of pathways involved in proteostasis. PMID:26839892

  10. Influence of Acute High Glucose on Protein Abundance Changes in Murine Glomerular Mesangial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle T. Barati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of acute exposure to high glucose levels as experienced by glomerular mesangial cells in postprandial conditions and states such as in prediabetes were investigated using proteomic methods. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry methods were used to identify protein expression patterns in immortalized rat mesangial cells altered by 2 h high glucose (HG growth conditions as compared to isoosmotic/normal glucose control (NG⁎ conditions. Unique protein expression changes at 2 h HG treatment were measured for 51 protein spots. These proteins could be broadly grouped into two categories: (1 proteins involved in cell survival/cell signaling and (2 proteins involved in stress response. Immunoblot experiments for a protein belonging to both categories, prohibitin (PHB, supported a trend for increased total expression as well as significant increases in an acidic PHB isoform. Additional studies confirmed the regulation of proteasomal subunit alpha-type 2 and the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone and oxidoreductase PDI (protein disulfide isomerase, suggesting altered ER protein folding capacity and proteasomal function in response to acute HG. We conclude that short term high glucose induces subtle changes in protein abundances suggesting posttranslational modifications and regulation of pathways involved in proteostasis.

  11. Autophagy in Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. S. Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy provides a mechanism for the turnover of cellular organelles and proteins through a lysosome-dependent degradation pathway. During starvation, autophagy exerts a homeostatic function that promotes cell survival by recycling metabolic precursors. Additionally, autophagy can interact with other vital processes such as programmed cell death, inflammation, and adaptive immune mechanisms, and thereby potentially influence disease pathogenesis. Macrophages deficient in autophagic proteins display enhanced caspase-1-dependent proinflammatory cytokine production and the activation of the inflammasome. Autophagy provides a functional role in infectious diseases and sepsis by promoting intracellular bacterial clearance. Mutations in autophagy-related genes, leading to loss of autophagic function, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Furthermore, autophagy-dependent mechanisms have been proposed in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases that involve inflammation, including cystic fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Strategies aimed at modulating autophagy may lead to therapeutic interventions for diseases associated with inflammation.

  12. Safety in glomerular numbers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    A low nephron number is, according to Brenner's hyperfiltration hypothesis, associated with hypertension, glomerular damage and proteinuria, and starts a vicious cycle that ends in renal failure over the long term. Nephron endowment is set during foetal life, and there is no formation of nephrons af

  13. Inducing autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Lea M; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Andersen, Jens S.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal-mediated catabolic process, which through degradation of different cytoplasmic components aids in maintaining cellular homeostasis and survival during exposure to extra- or intracellular stresses. Ammonia is a potential toxic and stress-inducing byproduct of glutamine...... catabolism, which has recently been found to induce autophagy in an MTOR independent way and support cancer cell survival. In this study, quantitative phosphoproteomics was applied to investigate the initial signaling events linking ammonia to the induction of autophagy. The MTOR inhibitor rapamycin was used...... as a reference treatment to emphasize the differences between an MTOR-dependent and -independent autophagy-induction. By this means 5901 phosphosites were identified of which 626 were treatment-specific regulated and 175 were coregulated. Investigation of the ammonia-specific regulated sites...

  14. Analyse of influence elements in the process of dynamic renal imaging to measure glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To detect the changes and clinical influence elements of radionuclide renal dynamic imaging to measure glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: One hundred and eight patients with T2DM were divided into 4 groups according to the values of urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER): Group I: UAER-1, 31 cases. Group II: UAER 20∼200μg·min-1, 28 cases. Group III: UAER >200μg·min-1, serum creatinine(SCr)200μg·min-1, SCr≥ 105μmol/L, 23 cases. 99Tcm-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid and 99Tcm-ethylenedicysteine renal dynamic imaging were performed in all patients. GFR, ERPF and renogram were derived simultaneously. The levels of blood creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, urine albumin, blood press, fasting blood insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting blood glucousewere measured in the four groups. Results: With the evolvement of diabetes nephropathy (DN), UAERs were gradually ascended and the values of GFR and ERPF was gradually descended, the former offered remarkable inverse correlation with the two latters (r1= -0.497, P2=-0.215, P1=1.8, t2=2.1, t3=1.9, P4=3.2, P<0.01). Multielement stepwise regression analyses assumed that age, systolic pressure, glycosylated hemoglobin and insulin resistance index offered inverse correlation with GFR and ERPF (coefficient of regression factor: -0.507, -0.874, -0.528, -0.587, -0.336, -0.697, -0.348, -0.371, P<0.01). Conclusion: GFR and ERPF were sensitive index reflecting the changes of DN.Hypertension and insulin resistance were independence risk factors to make the value of GFR and ERPF decreased in patients with DN. (authors)

  15. Advances in Autophagy Regulatory Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Gallagher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy plays a critical role in cell metabolism by degrading and recycling internal components when challenged with limited nutrients. This fundamental and conserved mechanism is based on a membrane trafficking pathway in which nascent autophagosomes engulf cytoplasmic cargo to form vesicles that transport their content to the lysosome for degradation. Based on this simple scheme, autophagy modulates cellular metabolism and cytoplasmic quality control to influence an unexpectedly wide range of normal mammalian physiology and pathophysiology. In this review, we summarise recent advancements in three broad areas of autophagy regulation. We discuss current models on how autophagosomes are initiated from endogenous membranes. We detail how the uncoordinated 51-like kinase (ULK complex becomes activated downstream of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (MTORC1. Finally, we summarise the upstream signalling mechanisms that can sense amino acid availability leading to activation of MTORC1.

  16. Advances in Autophagy Regulatory Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Laura E; Williamson, Leon E; Chan, Edmond Y W

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy plays a critical role in cell metabolism by degrading and recycling internal components when challenged with limited nutrients. This fundamental and conserved mechanism is based on a membrane trafficking pathway in which nascent autophagosomes engulf cytoplasmic cargo to form vesicles that transport their content to the lysosome for degradation. Based on this simple scheme, autophagy modulates cellular metabolism and cytoplasmic quality control to influence an unexpectedly wide range of normal mammalian physiology and pathophysiology. In this review, we summarise recent advancements in three broad areas of autophagy regulation. We discuss current models on how autophagosomes are initiated from endogenous membranes. We detail how the uncoordinated 51-like kinase (ULK) complex becomes activated downstream of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (MTORC1). Finally, we summarise the upstream signalling mechanisms that can sense amino acid availability leading to activation of MTORC1. PMID:27187479

  17. Autophagy and neurodegenerative disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Evangelia Kesidou; Roza Lagoudaki; Olga Touloumi; Kyriaki-Nefeli Poulatsidou; Constantina Simeonidou

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of aberrant proteins and inclusion bodies are hallmarks in most neurodegenerative diseases. Consequently, these aggregates within neurons lead to toxic effects, overproduction of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress. Autophagy is a significant intracel ular mechanism that removes damaged organelles and misfolded proteins in order to maintain cel homeostasis. Excessive or insufficient autophagic activity in neurons leads to altered homeostasis and influences their survival rate, causing neurodegeneration. The review article provides an update of the role of autophagic process in representative chronic and acute neurodegenerative disorders.

  18. Influence of Radix Astragali, Hirudo, Hirudin and their Compound Medicated Serum on the Growth Cycle and Apoptosis of Glomerular Mesangial Cell in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianzhi Ren

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the effect of Radix Astragali (RA, hirudo, hirudin and their compound medicated serum on growth cycle and apoptosis of glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs in rats and their apoptotic morphology. Methods: The prepared cells were randomly divided into control group, hirudo group, hirudin group, RA group and compound group. Flow cytometer was used to detect the growth cycle and apoptosis of GMCs while Wright stain and microscope were applied for the observation of apoptotic cells. Results: RA, hirudo, hirudin and their compound medicated serum could maintain abundant GMCs in gap phase 0/1 (G0/G1 and improve apoptotic rate of GMCs, which had significant differences when compared with control group (P < 0.01. Additionally, they could improve GMCs apoptosis, and differences were significant in hirudo and formula groups when compared with control group (P < 0.01. Conclusion: Hirudo, hirudin, RA and their compound (containing hirudo and RA can effectively inhibit MC proliferation and promote GMCs apoptosis by stopping GMCs entering phase S of which the efficacy of compound is the best, followed by hirudo.

  19. Hypoxia, MTOR and autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2013-01-01

    Although hypoxia can cause cell cycle arrest, it may simultaneously suppress a conversion from this arrest to senescence. Furthermore, hypoxia can suppress senescence caused by diverse stimuli, maintaining reversible quiescence instead. Hypoxia activates autophagy and inhibits MTOR, thus also activating autophagy. What is the relationship between autophagy and cellular senescence? Also, can inhibition of MTOR and stimulation of autophagy explain the gerosuppressive effects of hypoxia?

  20. Autophagy and intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Khushbu K; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient absorption is the basic function that drives mammalian intestinal biology. To facilitate nutrient uptake, the host's epithelial barrier is composed of a single layer of cells. This constraint is problematic, as a design of this type can be easily disrupted. The solution during the course of evolution was to add numerous host defense mechanisms that can help prevent local and systemic infection. These mechanisms include specialized epithelial cells that produce a physiochemical barrier overlying the cellular barrier, robust and organized adaptive and innate immune cells, and the ability to mount an inflammatory response that is commensurate with a specific threat level. The autophagy pathway is a critical cellular process that strongly influences all these functions. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the components of this pathway and their influence on inflammation, immunity, and barrier function will facilitate our understanding of homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23216414

  1. Unraveling the immunopathogenesis of glomerular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Bonny L

    2016-08-01

    Immune-mediated damage to glomerular structures is largely responsible for the pathology associated with the majority of glomerular diseases. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the basic immune mechanisms responsible for glomerular damage is needed to inform the design of novel intervention strategies. Glomerular injury of immune origin is complex and involves both inflammatory and non-inflammatory processes driven by elements of the innate and adaptive immune system. This review summarizes the basic immune mechanisms that cause glomerular injury leading to the nephritic and nephrotic syndromes. A major focus of the review is to highlight the mechanisms by which antibodies cause glomerular injury through their interactions with glomerular cells, complement proteins, phagocytes bearing complement and Fcγ receptors, and dendritic cells expressing the neonatal receptor for IgG, FcRn. PMID:27373970

  2. Selective Autophagy in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis P. Nezis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process of cellular self-eating and is a major pathway for degradation of cytoplasmic material by the lysosomal machinery. Autophagy functions as a cellular response in nutrient starvation, but it is also associated with the removal of protein aggregates and damaged organelles and therefore plays an important role in the quality control of proteins and organelles. Although it was initially believed that autophagy occurs randomly in the cell, during the last years, there is growing evidence that sequestration and degradation of cytoplasmic material by autophagy can be selective. Given the important role of autophagy and selective autophagy in several disease-related processes such as neurodegeneration, infections, and tumorigenesis, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms of selective autophagy, especially at the organismal level. Drosophila is an excellent genetically modifiable model organism exhibiting high conservation in the autophagic machinery. However, the regulation and mechanisms of selective autophagy in Drosophila have been largely unexplored. In this paper, I will present an overview of the current knowledge about selective autophagy in Drosophila.

  3. Autophagy in infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deretic, Vojo

    2010-04-01

    Autophagy is a ubiquitous eukaryotic cytoplasmic quality and quantity control pathway. The role of autophagy in cytoplasmic homeostasis seamlessly extends to cell-autonomous defense against intracellular microbes. Recent studies also point to fully integrated, multitiered regulatory and effector connections between autophagy and nearly all facets of innate and adaptive immunity. Autophagy in the immune system as a whole confers measured immune responses; on the flip side, suppression of autophagy can lead to inflammation and tissue damage, as evidenced by Crohn's disease predisposition polymorphisms in autophagy basal apparatus (Atg16L) and regulatory (IRGM) genes. Polymorphisms in the IRGM gene in human populations have also been linked to predisposition to tuberculosis. There are several areas of most recent growth: first, links between autophagy regulators and infectious disease predisposition in human populations; second, demonstration of a role for autophagy in infection control in vivo in animal models; third, the definition of specific antiautophagic defenses in highly evolved pathogens; and fourth, recognition of connections between the ubiquitin system and autophagy of bacteria (and interestingly mitochondria, which are incidentally organelles of bacterial evolutionary origin) via a growing list of modifier and adapter proteins including p62/SQSTM1, NDP52, Atg32, Parkin, and Nix/BNIP3L. PMID:20116986

  4. Chemical Inhibition of Autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baek, Eric; Lin Kim, Che; Gyeom Kim, Mi;

    2016-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells activate and undergo apoptosis and autophagy for various environmental stresses. Unlike apoptosis, studies on increasing the production of therapeutic proteins in CHO cells by targeting the autophagy pathway are limited. In order to identify the effects of chemic...

  5. Autophagy and cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si-Zhao; Lu; Duygu; Dee; Harrison-Findik

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic and evolutionarily conserved mechanism of self-digestion by which the cells degrade and recycle long-lived proteins and excess or damaged organelles.Autophagy is activated in response to both physiological and pathological stimuli including growth factor depletion,energy deficiency or the upregulation of Bcl-2 protein expression.A novel role of autophagy in various cancers has been proposed.Interestingly,evidence that supports both a positive and negative role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of cancer has been reported.As a tumor suppression mechanism,autophagy maintains genome stability,induces senescence and possibly autophagic cell death.On the other hand,autophagy participates in tumor growth and maintenance by supplying metabolic substrate,limiting oxidative stress,and maintaining cancer stem cell population.It has been proposed that the differential roles of autophagy in cancer are disease type and stage specific.In addition,substrate selectivity might be involved in carrying out the specific effect of autophagy in cancer,and represents one of the potential directions for future studies.

  6. Schistosomal glomerular disease (a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilton A. Andrade

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review paper schistosomal glomerulopathy is defined as an immune-complex disease. The disease appears in 12-15 per cent of the individuals with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis. Portal hypertension with collateral circulation helps the by pass of the hepatic clearance process and the parasite antigens can bind to antibodies in the circulation and be trapped in the renal glomerulus. Chronic membranousproliferative glomerulonephritis is the most commom lesion present and the nephrotic syndrome is the usual form of clinical presentation. The disease can be experimentally produced, and schistosomal antigens and antibodies, as well as complement, can be demonstrated in the glomerular lesions. Specific treatment of schistosomiasis does not seem to alter the clinical course of schistosomal nephropathy.A glomerulopatia esquistossomotica e um exemplo de doenca causada por complexos imunes. Ela se manifesta em 12 a 15% dos portadores de forma hepato-eplenica da esquistossomose. A hipertensao porta, com circulacao colateral, facilita a ultrapassagem do filtro hepatico e os antigenos esquistossomoticos podem se acoplar aos anticorpos na circulacao e vir a se depositar nos glomerulos. O tipo histologico mais frequente e a glomerulonefrite cronica membrano-proliferativa, geralmente com sindrome nefrotica. A doenca e passivel de reproducao experimental e os antigenos esquistossomoticos, os anticorpos e fracoes do complemento podem ser demonstrados nas lesoes glomerulares. O tratamento especifico da esquistossomose nao mostrou ate o momento a capacidade de alterar o curso da nefropatia.

  7. Targeting Autophagy Addiction in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mancias, Joseph Douglas; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy inhibition is a novel cancer therapeutic strategy in the early stages of clinical trial testing. The initial rationale for using autophagy inhibition was generated by research revealing that autophagy is upregulated in response to external stresses, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Combining autophagy inhibition with agents that induce autophagy as a pro-survival response may therefore increase their therapeutic efficacy. Recent research has shown that some cancer cells, ...

  8. Oxidative stress in primary glomerular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markan, Suchita; Kohli, Harbir Singh; Sud, Kamal;

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the status of oxidative stress in patients with different primary glomerular diseases (PGD) which have differential predisposition to renal failure.......To evaluate the status of oxidative stress in patients with different primary glomerular diseases (PGD) which have differential predisposition to renal failure....

  9. Autophagy in protists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszenko, Michael; Ginger, Michael L; Brennand, Ana; Gualdrón-López, Melisa; Colombo, María Isabel; Coombs, Graham H; Coppens, Isabelle; Jayabalasingham, Bamini; Langsley, Gordon; de Castro, Solange Lisboa; Menna-Barreto, Rubem; Mottram, Jeremy C; Navarro, Miguel; Rigden, Daniel J; Romano, Patricia S; Stoka, Veronika; Turk, Boris; Michels, Paul A M

    2011-02-01

    Autophagy is the degradative process by which eukaryotic cells digest their own components using acid hydrolases within the lysosome. Originally thought to function almost exclusively in providing starving cells with nutrients taken from their own cellular constituents, autophagy is in fact involved in numerous cellular events including differentiation, turnover of macromolecules and organelles, and defense against parasitic invaders. During the last 10-20 years, molecular components of the autophagic machinery have been discovered, revealing a complex interactome of proteins and lipids, which, in a concerted way, induce membrane formation to engulf cellular material and target it for lysosomal degradation. Here, our emphasis is autophagy in protists. We discuss experimental and genomic data indicating that the canonical autophagy machinery characterized in animals and fungi appeared prior to the radiation of major eukaryotic lineages. Moreover, we describe how comparative bioinformatics revealed that this canonical machinery has been subject to moderation, outright loss or elaboration on multiple occasions in protist lineages, most probably as a consequence of diverse lifestyle adaptations. We also review experimental studies illustrating how several pathogenic protists either utilize autophagy mechanisms or manipulate host-cell autophagy in order to establish or maintain infection within a host. The essentiality of autophagy for the pathogenicity of many parasites, and the unique features of some of the autophagy-related proteins involved, suggest possible new targets for drug discovery. Further studies of the molecular details of autophagy in protists will undoubtedly enhance our understanding of the diversity and complexity of this cellular phenomenon and the opportunities it offers as a drug target. PMID:20962583

  10. Lithium and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoi, Yumiko; Shimada, Kohei; Ishiguro, Koichi; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2014-06-18

    Lithium, a drug used to treat bipolar disorders, has a variety of neuroprotective mechanisms, including autophagy regulation, in various neuropsychiatric conditions. In neurodegenerative diseases, lithium enhances degradation of aggregate-prone proteins, including mutated huntingtin, phosphorylated tau, and α-synuclein, and causes damaged mitochondria to degrade, while in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia and Alzheimer's disease autophagy downregulation by lithium is observed. The signaling pathway of lithium as an autophagy enhancer might be associated with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-independent pathway, which is involved in myo-inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, the mTOR-dependent pathway might be involved in inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) in other diseases. Lithium's autophagy-enhancing property may contribute to the therapeutic benefit of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:24738557

  11. Canonical autophagy does not contribute to cellular radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: (Pre)clinical studies indicate that autophagy inhibition increases response to anti-cancer therapies. Although promising, due to contradicting reports, it remains unclear if radiation therapy changes autophagy activity and if autophagy inhibition changes the cellular intrinsic radiosensitivity. Discrepancies may result from different assays and models through off-target effects and influencing other signaling routes. In this study, we directly compared the effects of genetic and pharmacological inhibition of autophagy after irradiation in human cancer cell lines. Materials and methods: Changes in autophagy activity after ionizing radiation (IR) were assessed by flux analysis in eight cell lines. Clonogenic survival, DNA damage (COMET-assay) and H2AX phosphorylation were assessed after chloroquine or 3-methyladenine pretreatment and after ATG7 or LC3b knockdown. Results: IR failed to induce autophagy and chloroquine failed to change intrinsic radiosensitivity of cells. Interestingly, 3-methyladenine and ATG7- or LC3b-deficiency sensitized cancer cells to irradiation. Surprisingly, the radiosensitizing effect of 3-methyladenine was also observed in ATG7 and LC3b deficient cells and was associated with attenuated γ-H2AX formation and DNA damage repair. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate that the anti-tumor effects of chloroquine are independent of changes in intrinsic radioresistance. Furthermore, ATG7 and LC3b support radioresistance independent of canonical autophagy that involves lysosomal degradation

  12. Receptor Proteins in Selective Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Behrends

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy has long been thought to be an essential but unselective bulk degradation pathway. However, increasing evidence suggests selective autophagosomal turnover of a broad range of substrates. Bifunctional autophagy receptors play a key role in selective autophagy by tethering cargo to the site of autophagosomal engulfment. While the identity of molecular components involved in selective autophagy has been revealed at least to some extent, we are only beginning to understand how selectivity is achieved in this process. Here, we summarize the mechanistic and structural basis of receptor-mediated selective autophagy.

  13. Influence of renal function on the measurement of glomerular filtration rate with Gates method%肾功能对Gates法肾小球滤过率实测值的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨仪; 唐军; 田金玲; 陆文栋; 刘增礼

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of renal function on the measurement of glomerular filtration rate(GFR) with Gates method. Methods In 155 cases with different kidney disease(95 male, 60 female; 19-83 years old) , having impairment of re-nal function to varying degrees,renal dynamic imaging was performed by 99Tcm-DTPA and GFR was measured twice using Gates method both by two different manipulators in 73 cases and by the same manipulator at more than 3 months interval in 82 cases. Two groups of cases were divided into A stages according to mean GFR. All GFR at different stages in two groups were analyzed with the matched t-test to reveal if there were significant differences between the before-and-after GFR measured by different manipulators or by same manipulator at different time. Coefficient of variation(CV) of GFR at different stages was obtained to explore the rela-tionship between CV and renal function(mean GFR). Results There were not statistically significant differences of GFR between the before-and-after GFR measured by different manipulators or by same manipulator at different time in all cases(P>0. 05). With decline of renal function from stage Ⅰ to stage Ⅳ of chronic kidney disease(CKD) ,CV became larger. They were in negative corre-lation and the regression equations were Y= -0. 09X+10. 22(r=0. 60)by two different manipulators and Y= - 0. 11X311. 23(r = 0. 66)by the same manipulator. Conclusion Deviation at different extent in measuring GFR with Gates method exists at different stages of renal function. The worse the renal function is,the greater the deviation rises.%目的 探讨肾功能对Gates法测定肾小球滤过率(GFR)实测值的影响.方法 对155例慢性肾脏病(CKD)患者进行99Tcm-DTPA肾动态显像,采用Gates法测定GFR,其中73例由两位不同操作者进行肾脏ROI的勾画,82例由同一操作者在不同的时间进行两次ROI勾画,将所得的GFR进行分析比较,观察在不同的肾功能状态下由于肾

  14. Autophagy Induction Protects Against 7-Oxysterol-induced Cell Death via Lysosomal Pathway and Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Xi-Ming Yuan; Nargis Sultana; Nabeel Siraj; Ward, Liam J.; Bijar Ghafouri; Wei Li

    2016-01-01

    7-Oxysterols are major toxic components in oxidized low-density lipoprotein and human atheroma lesions, which cause lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and cell death. Autophagy may function as a survival mechanism in this process. Here, we investigated whether 7-oxysterols mixed in an atheroma-relevant proportion induce autophagy, whether autophagy induction influences 7-oxysterol-mediated cell death, and the underlying mechanisms, by focusing on cellular lipid levels, oxidative stress...

  15. The interplays between autophagy and apoptosis induced by enterovirus 71.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyan Xi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is the causative agent of human diseases with distinct severity, from mild hand, foot and mouth disease to severe neurological syndromes, such as encephalitis and meningitis. The lack of understanding of viral pathogenesis as well as lack of efficient vaccine and drugs against this virus impedes the control of EV71 infection. EV71 virus induces autophagy and apoptosis; however, the relationship between EV71-induced autophagy and apoptosis as well as the influence of autophagy and apoptosis on virus virulence remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, it was observed that the Anhui strain of EV71 induced autophagy and apoptosis in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD-A cells. Additionally, by either applying chemical inhibitors or knocking down single essential autophagic or apoptotic genes, inhibition of EV71 induced autophagy inhibited the apoptosis both at the autophagosome formation stage and autophagy execution stage. However, inhibition of autophagy at the stage of autophagosome and lysosome fusion promoted apoptosis. In reverse, the inhibition of EV71-induced apoptosis contributed to the conversion of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-I (LC3-I to LC3-II and degradation of sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1/P62. Furthermore, the inhibition of autophagy in the autophagsome formation stage or apoptosis decreased the release of EV71 viral particles. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, the results of this study not only revealed novel aspect of the interplay between autophagy and apoptosis in EV71 infection, but also provided a new insight to control EV71 infection.

  16. Glomerular size and glomerulosclerosis in Australian aborigines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R J; Hoy, W E; Kincaid-Smith, P; Seymour, A E; Bertram, J F

    2000-09-01

    We have previously described the prevalence of glomerulomegaly in biopsy specimens from Australian Aborigines with renal disease, a phenomenon documented in a number of other indigenous populations. Many of the biopsy specimens showed variable degrees of focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Correlations between glomerular size and FSGS have been described in various animal models, as well as studies of humans. The aim of this study is to determine whether a relation exists between glomerular volume and severity of FSGS in biopsy specimens from Australian Aboriginals in the Northern Territory and Aboriginal inhabitants of the Tiwi Islands (Bathurst Island and Melville Island, Northern Territory, Australia). Consecutive clinical biopsy specimens were obtained from 78 non-Tiwi and 72 Tiwi Aboriginals. Glomerular volume was estimated using the stereological method of Weibel and Gomez. FSGS was graded from 0 to 4; 0 indicates no sclerosis and 4 indicates severe sclerosis. A biphasic relationship between glomerular size and severity of FSGS was identified. As the severity of FSGS increased from grade 0 to grade 3, glomerular size also increased. For both populations studied, glomeruli scored as grades 1, 2, and 3 were approximately 50% (PAustralian Aborigines. PMID:10977779

  17. Relationship among altered glomerular barrier permselectivity, angiotensin II, and mesangial uptake of macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keane, W.F.; Raij, L.

    1985-06-01

    Clinical and experimental studies suggest that accumulation of phlogogenic macromolecules in the glomerular mesangium may lead to mesangial expansion and eventual glomerulosclerosis. In focal glomerulosclerosis and nephrotic syndrome entrapment of macromolecules is observed in areas of glomerulosclerosis. To determine whether mesangial uptake of radiolabeled, heat-aggregated IgG (AG/sup 125/I), a biologically active macromolecular protein, is influenced by increased glomerular filtration barrier permeability, the authors evaluated the glomerular uptake of AG/sup 125/I in three models of proteinuria: aminonucleoside of puromycin nephropathy (PAN), adriamycin nephropathy, and Heyman's nephropathy. Rats were studied approximately 1 week after onset of proteinuria. AG/sup 125/I was measured in preparations of isolated glomeruli and compared to simultaneous blood, liver, and spleen levels. Only rats with PAN had a marked increase in glomerular AG/sup 125/I compared to control rats, 7.8 versus 2.6 micrograms/mg of glomeruli, respectively. The authors then evaluated whether a continuous infusion of a competitive inhibitor of angiotensin II, saralasin (300 micrograms/kg of body weight/minute), influenced mesangial uptake of AG/sup 125/I in PAN rats. Strikingly, glomerular AG/sup 125/I in rats with PAN was reduced to levels comparable to that observed in control rats infused with only saralasin, 2.8 versus 3.0 micrograms/mg of glomeruli, respectively. This effect on glomerular AG/sup 125/I content was independent of any significant effect of saralasin on blood, hepatic, or splenic levels of AG/sup 125/I. Moreover, these changes in glomerular AG/sup 125/I in saralasin-infused rats with PAN did not appear to directly correlate with changes in whole kidney function.

  18. Genetic analysis of intracapillary glomerular lipoprotein deposits in aging mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerda A Noordmans

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Renal aging is characterized by functional and structural changes like decreased glomerular filtration rate, and glomerular, tubular and interstitial damage. To gain insight in pathways involved in renal aging, we studied aged mouse strains and used genetic analysis to identify genes associated with aging phenotypes. METHODS: Upon morphological screening in kidneys from 20-month-old mice from 26 inbred strains we noted intracapillary PAS-positive deposits. The severity of these deposits was quantified by scoring of a total of 50 glomeruli per section (grade 0-4. Electron microscopy and immunohistochemical staining for apoE, apoB, apoA-IV and perilipin-2 was performed to further characterize the lesions. To identify loci associated with these PAS-positive intracapillary glomerular deposits, we performed haplotype association mapping. RESULTS: Six out of 26 mouse strains showed glomerular PAS-positive deposits. The severity of these deposits varied: NOD(0.97, NZW(0.41, NON(0.30, B10(0.21, C3 H(0.9 and C57BR(0.7. The intracapillary deposits were strongly positive for apoE and weakly positive for apoB and apoA-IV. Haplotype association mapping showed a strong association with a 30-Kb haplotype block on Chr 1 within the Esrrg gene. We investigated 1 Mb on each site of this region, which includes the genes Spata17, Gpatch2, Esrrg, Ush2a and Kctd3. CONCLUSIONS: By analyzing 26 aged mouse strains we found that some strains developed an intracapillary PAS and apoE-positive lesion and identified a small haplotype block on Chr 1 within the Esrrg gene to be associated with these lipoprotein deposits. The region spanning this haplotype block contains the genes Spata17, Gpatch2, Esrrg, Ush2a and Kctd3, which are all highly expressed in the kidney. Esrrg might be involved in the evolvement of these glomerular deposits by influencing lipid metabolism and possibly immune reponses.

  19. Calcium Homeostasis and ER Stress in Control of Autophagy in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Kania

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a basic catabolic process, serving as an internal engine during responses to various cellular stresses. As regards cancer, autophagy may play a tumor suppressive role by preserving cellular integrity during tumor development and by possible contribution to cell death. However, autophagy may also exert oncogenic effects by promoting tumor cell survival and preventing cell death, for example, upon anticancer treatment. The major factors influencing autophagy are Ca2+ homeostasis perturbation and starvation. Several Ca2+ channels like voltage-gated T- and L-type channels, IP3 receptors, or CRAC are involved in autophagy regulation. Glucose transporters, mainly from GLUT family, which are often upregulated in cancer, are also prominent targets for autophagy induction. Signals from both Ca2+ perturbations and glucose transport blockage might be integrated at UPR and ER stress activation. Molecular pathways such as IRE 1-JNK-Bcl-2, PERK-eIF2α-ATF4, or ATF6-XBP 1-ATG are related to autophagy induced through ER stress. Moreover ER molecular chaperones such as GRP78/BiP and transcription factors like CHOP participate in regulation of ER stress-mediated autophagy. Autophagy modulation might be promising in anticancer therapies; however, it is a context-dependent matter whether inhibition or activation of autophagy leads to tumor cell death.

  20. Vascular Growth Factors and Glomerular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Christina S; Jeansson, Marie; Quaggin, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    The glomerulus is a highly specialized microvascular bed that filters blood to form primary urinary filtrate. It contains four cell types: fenestrated endothelial cells, specialized vascular support cells termed podocytes, perivascular mesangial cells, and parietal epithelial cells. Glomerular cell-cell communication is critical for the development and maintenance of the glomerular filtration barrier. VEGF, ANGPT, EGF, SEMA3A, TGF-β, and CXCL12 signal in paracrine fashions between the podocytes, endothelium, and mesangium associated with the glomerular capillary bed to maintain filtration barrier function. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of these signaling pathways in the development and maintenance of the glomerulus and the progression of disease. PMID:26863327

  1. A human glomerular SAGE transcriptome database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulak Stephen C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To facilitate in the identification of gene products important in regulating renal glomerular structure and function, we have produced an annotated transcriptome database for normal human glomeruli using the SAGE approach. Description The database contains 22,907 unique SAGE tag sequences, with a total tag count of 48,905. For each SAGE tag, the ratio of its frequency in glomeruli relative to that in 115 non-glomerular tissues or cells, a measure of transcript enrichment in glomeruli, was calculated. A total of 133 SAGE tags representing well-characterized transcripts were enriched 10-fold or more in glomeruli compared to other tissues. Comparison of data from this study with a previous human glomerular Sau3A-anchored SAGE library reveals that 47 of the highly enriched transcripts are common to both libraries. Among these are the SAGE tags representing many podocyte-predominant transcripts like WT-1, podocin and synaptopodin. Enrichment of podocyte transcript tags SAGE library indicates that other SAGE tags observed at much higher frequencies in this glomerular compared to non-glomerular SAGE libraries are likely to be glomerulus-predominant. A higher level of mRNA expression for 19 transcripts represented by glomerulus-enriched SAGE tags was verified by RT-PCR comparing glomeruli to lung, liver and spleen. Conclusion The database can be retrieved from, or interrogated online at http://cgap.nci.nih.gov/SAGE. The annotated database is also provided as an additional file with gene identification for 9,022, and matches to the human genome or transcript homologs in other species for 1,433 tags. It should be a useful tool for in silico mining of glomerular gene expression.

  2. DNA damage and autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both exogenous and endogenous agents are a threat to DNA integrity. Exogenous environmental agents such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, genotoxic chemicals and endogenous byproducts of metabolism including reactive oxygen species can cause alterations in DNA structure (DNA damage). Unrepaired DNA damage has been linked to a variety of human disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Thus, efficient mechanisms to detect DNA lesions, signal their presence and promote their repair have been evolved in cells. If DNA is effectively repaired, DNA damage response is inactivated and normal cell functioning resumes. In contrast, when DNA lesions cannot be removed, chronic DNA damage triggers specific cell responses such as cell death and senescence. Recently, DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular catabolic process that maintains a balance between synthesis, degradation, and recycling of cellular components. But the exact mechanisms by which DNA damage triggers autophagy are unclear. More importantly, the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cellular fate is unknown. In this review we analyze evidence that supports a role for autophagy as an integral part of the DNA damage response.

  3. Dopamine Oxidation and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Muñoz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms involved in the neurodegenerative process of Parkinson's disease remain unclear. Currently, there is a general agreement that mitochondrial dysfunction, α-synuclein aggregation, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and impaired protein degradation are involved in the neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin in Parkinson's disease. Aminochrome has been proposed to play an essential role in the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, the formation of neurotoxic α-synuclein protofibrils, and impaired protein degradation. Here, we discuss the relationship between the oxidation of dopamine to aminochrome, the precursor of neuromelanin, autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin, and the role of dopamine oxidation to aminochrome in autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons. Aminochrome induces the following: (i the formation of α-synuclein protofibrils that inactivate chaperone-mediated autophagy; (ii the formation of adducts with α- and β-tubulin, which induce the aggregation of the microtubules required for the fusion of autophagy vacuoles and lysosomes.

  4. SIRT6 suppresses isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy through activation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Sun, Duanping; Liu, Zhiping; Li, Min; Hong, Huiqi; Liu, Cui; Gao, Si; Li, Hong; Cai, Yi; Chen, Shaorui; Li, Zhuoming; Ye, Jiantao; Liu, Peiqing

    2016-06-01

    Reduction in autophagy has been reported to contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the molecular pathways leading to impaired autophagy at the presence of hypertrophic stimuli remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the role of sirtuin 6 (SIRT6), a sirtuin family member, in regulating cardiomyocyte autophagy, and its implication in prevention of cardiac hypertrophy. Primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs) or Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were submitted to isoproterenol (ISO) treatment, and then the hypertrophic responses and changes in autophagy activity were measured. The influence of SIRT6 on autophagy was observed in cultured NRCMs with gain- and loss-of-function approaches to regulate SIRT6 expression, and further confirmed in vivo by intramyocardial delivery of an adenovirus vector encoding SIRT6 cDNA. In addition, the involvement of SIRT6-mediated autophagy in attenuation of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by ISO was determined basing on genetic or pharmaceutical disruption of autophagy, and the underlying mechanism was preliminarily explored. ISO-caused cardiac hypertrophy accompanying with a significant decrease in autophagy activity. SIRT6 overexpression enhanced autophagy in NRCMs and in rat hearts, whereas knockdown of SIRT6 by RNA interference led to suppression of cardiomyocyte autophagy. Furthermore, the protective effect of SIRT6 against ISO-stimulated hypertrophy was associated with induction of autophagy. SIRT6 promoted nuclear retention of forkhead box O3 transcription factor possibly via attenuating Akt signaling, which was responsible for autophagy activation. Our findings revealed that SIRT6 positively regulates autophagy in cardiomyocytes, which may help to ameliorate ISO-induced cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27016702

  5. Autophagy studies in Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Tian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, which is well conserved from yeast to mammals, plays essential roles in development and diseases. Using the domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori, as a model insect, several reports on autophagy have been made recently. Autophagic features are observed in the midgut and fat body during the larval-pupal transition as well as the silk gland and ovarian nurse cells during the pupal stage. There are 14 autophagy related (Atg genes, including at least two transcript variants of Atg1, predicated in Bombyx. Expression of most Atg genes is consistent with the autophagy process in the fat body during the larval-pupal transition, and reduction of Atg1 expression by RNAi blocks this process. The molting hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E, and starvation induce autophagy in the fat body by upregulating Atg gene expression and blocking the PI3K-TORC1 pathway. Meanwhile, autophagy precedes apoptosis in the midgut and other larval tissues during the larval-pupal transition, while the detailed mechanism is not illustrated yet. We assume that there are at least four future directions about autophagy studies in Bombyx during the next years: (1 physiological functions of autophagy; (2 identification of new components involved in the autophagy process; (3 detailed molecular mechanism of autophagosome formation; (4 functional relationship between autophagy and apoptosis.

  6. Autophagy During Cardiac Stress: Joys and Frustrations of Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Mentzer, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The study of autophagy has been transformed by the cloning of most genes in the pathway and the introduction of GFP-LC3 as a reporter to allow visual assessment of autophagy. The field of cardiac biology is not alone in attempting to understand the implications of autophagy. The purpose of this review is to address some of the controversies and conundrums associated with the evolving studies of autophagy in the heart. Autophagy is a cellular process involving a complex orchestration of regulatory gene products as well as machinery for assembly, selective targeting, and degradation of autophagosomes and their contents. Our understanding of the role of autophagy in human disease is rapidly evolving as investigators examine the process in different tissues and different pathophysiological contexts. In the field of heart disease, autophagy has been examined in the settings of ischemia and reperfusion, preconditioning, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure. This review addresses the role of autophagy in cardioprotection, the balance of catabolism and anabolism, the concept of mitochondrial quality control, and the implications of impaired autophagic flux or frustrated autophagy. PMID:20148666

  7. Glomerular Basement Membrane Type IV Collagen in Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fish, Alfred J.; Kashtan, Clifford E.; Matsukura, Hiro; Butkowski, Ralph J.

    1991-01-01

    Glomerular basement membrane is the major supporting structural element of the glomerular capillary wall. This is a highly complex locus which functionally serves as a filtration barrier, and has been the subject of detailed investigation. The composition of whole glomerular basement membrane suggests that collagen is a major component. Isolation and characterization of the collagenous domains has revealed that glomerular basement membrane is chiefly composed of type IV collagen. This molecul...

  8. The relationship between metabolism and the autophagy machinery during the innate immune response

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Jennifer; Verbist, Katherine; Wang, Ruoning; Green, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune response is shaped by multiple factors, including both traditional autophagy and LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP). As the autophagic machinery is engaged during times of nutrient stress, arising from scarcity or pathogens, we examine how autophagy, specifically LAP, and cellular metabolism together influence macrophage function and the innate immune response.

  9. Glomerular latency coding in artificial olfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaber eAl Yamani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensory perception results from the way sensory information is subsequently transformed in the brain. Olfaction is a typical example in which odor representations undergo considerable changes as they pass from olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs to second-order neurons. First, many ORNs expressing the same receptor protein yet presenting heterogeneous dose-response properties converge onto individually identifiable glomeruli. Second, onset latency of glomerular activation is believed to play a role in encoding odor quality and quantity in the context of fast information processing. Taking inspiration from the olfactory pathway, we designed a simple yet robust glomerular latency coding scheme for processing gas sensor data. The proposed bio-inspired approach was evaluated using an in-house Sn02 sensor array. Glomerular convergence was achieved by noting the possible analogy between receptor protein expressed in ORNs and metal catalyst used across the fabricated gas sensor array. Ion implantation was another technique used to account both for sensor heterogeneity and enhanced sensitivity. The response of the gas sensor array was mapped into glomerular latency patterns, whose rank order is concentration-invariant. Gas recognition was achieved by simply looking for a match within a library of spatio-temporal spike fingerprints. Because of its simplicity, this approach enables the integration of sensing and processing onto a single-chip.

  10. Autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stern Stephan T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study of the potential risks associated with the manufacture, use, and disposal of nanoscale materials, and their mechanisms of toxicity, is important for the continued advancement of nanotechnology. Currently, the most widely accepted paradigms of nanomaterial toxicity are oxidative stress and inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. This review will highlight the significance of autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity. Most endocytic routes of nanomaterial cell uptake converge upon the lysosome, making the lysosomal compartment the most common intracellular site of nanoparticle sequestration and degradation. In addition to the endo-lysosomal pathway, recent evidence suggests that some nanomaterials can also induce autophagy. Among the many physiological functions, the lysosome, by way of the autophagy (macroautophagy pathway, degrades intracellular pathogens, and damaged organelles and proteins. Thus, autophagy induction by nanoparticles may be an attempt to degrade what is perceived by the cell as foreign or aberrant. While the autophagy and endo-lysosomal pathways have the potential to influence the disposition of nanomaterials, there is also a growing body of literature suggesting that biopersistent nanomaterials can, in turn, negatively impact these pathways. Indeed, there is ample evidence that biopersistent nanomaterials can cause autophagy and lysosomal dysfunctions resulting in toxicological consequences.

  11. Autophagy in plants and phytopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Kohki; Takano, Yoshitaka; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2010-04-01

    Plants and plant-associated microorganisms including phytopathogens have to adapt to drastic changes in environmental conditions. Because of their immobility, plants must cope with various types of environmental stresses such as starvation, oxidative stress, drought stress, and invasion by phytopathogens during their differentiation, development, and aging processes. Here we briefly describe the early studies of plant autophagy, summarize recent studies on the molecular functions of ATG genes, and speculate on the role of autophagy in plants and phytopathogens. Autophagy regulates senescence and pathogen-induced cell death in plants, and autophagy and pexophagy play critical roles in differentiation and the invasion of host cells by phytopathogenic fungi. PMID:20079356

  12. Autophagy in cardiovascular biology

    OpenAIRE

    Lavandero, Sergio; Chiong, Mario; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. As such, there is great interest in identifying novel mechanisms that govern the cardiovascular response to disease-related stress. First described in failing hearts, autophagy within the cardiovascular system has been widely characterized in cardiomyocytes, cardiac fibroblasts, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and macrophages. In all cases, a window of optimal autophagic activity appears to be critical to the mai...

  13. AUTOPHAGY IN LUNG CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    Jaboin, Jerry J.; Hwang, Misun; Lu, Bo

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The relatively poor cure rate in lung cancer patients has been associated with a resistance to chemotherapy and radiation that is at least in part related to defects in cellular apoptotic machinery. Exploitation of another form of cell death, autophagy, has the capacity to improve the therapeutic gain of current therapies. In an effort to develop novel treatment strategies to enhance the therapeutic ratio for lung cancer, we...

  14. Autophagy Inhibition Delays Early but Not Late-Stage Metastatic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Rebecca A; Regan, Daniel P; Hansen, Ryan J; Maycotte, Paola; Thorburn, Andrew; Gustafson, Daniel L

    2016-08-01

    The autophagy pathway has been recognized as a mechanism of survival and therapy resistance in cancer, yet the extent of autophagy's function in metastatic progression is still unclear. Therefore, we used murine models of metastatic cancer to investigate the effect of autophagy modulation on metastasis development. Pharmacologic and genetic autophagy inhibition were able to impede cell proliferation in culture, but did not impact the development of experimentally induced 4T1 and B16-F10 metastases. Similarly, autophagy inhibition by adjuvant chloroquine (CQ) treatment did not delay metastasis in an orthotopic 4T1, tumor-resection model. However, neoadjuvant CQ treatment or genetic autophagy inhibition resulted in delayed metastasis development, whereas stimulation of autophagy by trehalose hastened development. Cisplatin was also administered either as a single agent or in combination with CQ. The combination of cisplatin and CQ was antagonistic. The effects of autophagy modulation on metastasis did not appear to be due to alterations in the intrinsic metastatic capability of the cells, as modulating autophagy had no impact on migration, invasion, or anchorage-independent growth in vitro. To explore the possibility of autophagy's influence on the metastatic microenvironment, bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs), which mediate the establishment of the premetastatic niche, were measured in the lung and in circulation. Trehalose-treated mice had significantly more BMDCs than either vehicle- or CQ-treated mice. Autophagy inhibition may be most useful as a treatment to impede early metastatic development. However, modulating autophagy may also alter the efficacy of platinum-based therapies, requiring caution when considering combination therapies. PMID:27231155

  15. Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 escapes to the cytosol and actively subverts autophagy in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khodor, Souhaila; Marshall-Batty, Kimberly; Nair, Vinod; Ding, Li; Greenberg, David E; Fraser, Iain D C

    2014-03-01

    Selective autophagy functions to specifically degrade cellular cargo tagged by ubiquitination, including bacteria. Strains of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are opportunistic pathogens that cause life-threatening infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). While there is evidence that defective macrophage autophagy in a mouse model of CF can influence B. cenocepacia susceptibility, there have been no comprehensive studies on how this bacterium is sensed and targeted by the host autophagy response in human macrophages. Here, we describe the intracellular life cycle of B. cenocepacia J2315 and its interaction with the autophagy pathway in human cells. Electron and confocal microscopy analyses demonstrate that the invading bacteria interact transiently with the endocytic pathway before escaping to the cytosol. This escape triggers theselective autophagy pathway, and the recruitment of ubiquitin, the ubiquitin-binding adaptors p62 and NDP52 and the autophagosome membrane-associated protein LC3B, to the bacterial vicinity. However, despite recruitment of these key autophagy pathway effectors, B. cenocepacia blocks autophagosome completion and replicates in the host cytosol. We find that a pre-infection increase in cellular autophagy flux can significantly inhibit B. cenocepacia replication and that lower autophagy flux in macrophages from immunocompromised CGD patients could contribute to increased B. cenocepacia susceptibility, identifying autophagy manipulation as a potential therapeutic approach to reduce bacterial burden in B. cenocepacia infections. PMID:24119232

  16. Effectors of mTOR-autophagy pathway: targeting cancer, affecting the skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagin, Andrei S

    2016-06-01

    Although some modulators of autophagy are emerging as drugs or supplements for anti-cancer therapy, the effects of these compounds on normal tissues must be examined carefully. Here, I review the role of autophagy in skeletal tissues in this context. First, I briefly review preclinical studies indicating the role of autophagy in cancer, as well as related on-going clinical trials. Thereafter, the role of autophagy in the physiology of skeletal tissues is discussed, with a focus on recent genetic preclinical studies. Specifically, I discuss the mTOR-autophagy pathway in relationship to epiphyseal chondrocytes, articular chondrocytes, osteoblasts, osteocytes and osteoclasts and potential side effects of targeting either mTOR pathway or autophagy in general in connection with anti-cancer therapy. Current preclinical findings indicate that inhibiting autophagy will not seriously reduce bone mass and enhance osteoporosis. However, inhibition of autophagy might damage articular cartilage and cause osteoarthritis, whereas treatment with rapalogs might result in relatively beneficial effects on articular cartilage. Modulation of the mTOR pathway or autophagy during childhood may have an undesirable influence on adult height, as well as acquisition of bone mass. PMID:26921601

  17. Autophagy in dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragh, Christine Lund; Ubhi, Kiren; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Wyss-Corey, Tony; Masliah, Eliezer

    2012-01-01

    Dementias are a varied group of disorders typically associated with memory loss, impaired judgment and/or language and by symptoms affecting other cognitive and social abilities to a degree that interferes with daily functioning. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of a progressive dementia, followed by dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), (VaD) and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The pathogenesis of this group of disorders has been linked to the abnormal accumulation of proteins in the brains of affected individuals, which in turn has been related to deficits in protein clearance. Autophagy is a key cellular protein clearance pathway with proteolytic cleavage and degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway representing another important clearance mechanism. Alterations in the levels of autophagy and the proteins associated with the autophagocytic pathway have been reported in various types of dementias. This review will examine recent literature across these disorders and highlight a common theme of altered autophagy across the spectrum of the dementias. PMID:22150925

  18. Quantitation of renal function with glomerular and tubular agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative methods to measure the glomerular and tubular function of the kidneys with radionuclides have been available for many years. They have not been widely used because the techniques and the calculations exceeded the scope of routine nuclear medicine practice. Validation of simplified methods and the introduction of computer technology have made measurement of the effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) simple enough so that they can be performed reproducibly in most nuclear medicine departments. The estimation of ERPF with radioiodinated OIH and GFR with /sup 99m/TcDTPA can be achieved in many ways, all of which yield clinically useful results. How to get the best results using the simplest methods is still unclear. The required accuracy depends on the intended clinical use. Our preference at the present time is to use a single or double plasma sample to calculate global ERPF or GFR, and to use the 1-2 min OIH or 1-3 min Tc-DTPA uptake to calculate relative function of the two kidneys (split function ERPF or GFR). The choice of method will be influenced by local factors, such as the nature of the patient population, the case volume, and the resources available. A desirable goal for future studies is to document carefully the capabilities and limitations of each alternative method, so that the choice can be rational

  19. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets

  20. Atypical anti-glomerular basement membrane disease

    OpenAIRE

    Troxell, Megan L.; Donald C Houghton

    2015-01-01

    Background Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease classically presents with aggressive necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis, often with pulmonary hemorrhage. The pathologic hallmark is linear staining of GBMs for deposited immunoglobulin G (IgG), usually accompanied by serum autoantibodies to the collagen IV alpha-3 constituents of GBMs. Methods Renal pathology files were searched for cases with linear anti-GBM to identify cases with atypical or indolent course. Histopa...

  1. Transcriptional Landscape of Glomerular Parietal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gharib, Sina A; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Takamoto Ohse; Pickering, Scott G.; Krofft, Ronald D.; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the function of glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs). In this study, we performed genome-wide expression analysis on PEC-enriched capsulated vs. PEC-deprived decapsulated rat glomeruli to determine the transcriptional state of PECs under normal conditions. We identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that mapped to distinct biologic modules including development, tight junction, ion transport, and metabolic processes. Since developmental programs ...

  2. Structure biology of selective autophagy receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Won; Kwon, Do Hoon; Song, Hyun Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a process tightly regulated by various autophagy-related proteins. It is generally classified into non-selective and selective autophagy. Whereas non-selective autophagy is triggered when the cell is under starvation, selective autophagy is involved in eliminating dysfunctional organelles, misfolded and/or ubiquitylated proteins, and intracellular pathogens. These components are recognized by autophagy receptors and delivered to phagophores. Several selective autophagy receptors have been identified and characterized. They usually have some common domains, such as motif, a specific cargo interacting (ubiquitin-dependent or ubiquitin-independent) domain. Recently, structural data of these autophagy receptors has been described, which provides an insight of their function in the selective autophagic process. In this review, we summarize the most up-to-date findings about the structure-function of autophagy receptors that regulates selective autophagy. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 73-80] PMID:26698872

  3. Activation of antibacterial autophagy by NADPH oxidases

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Ju; Canadien, Veronica; Lam, Grace Y.; Steinberg, Benjamin E.; Mary C. Dinauer; Magalhaes, Marco A. O.; Glogauer, Michael; Grinstein, Sergio; Brumell, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy plays an important role in immunity to microbial pathogens. The autophagy system can target bacteria in phagosomes, promoting phagosome maturation and preventing pathogen escape into the cytosol. Recently, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling from phagosomes was found to initiate their targeting by the autophagy system, but the mechanism by which TLR signaling activates autophagy is unclear. Here we show that autophagy targeting of phagosomes is not exclusive to those containing TLR l...

  4. Autophagy is required for ectoplasmic specialization assembly in sertoli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Wang, Hongna; Shang, Yongliang; Liu, Weixiao; Song, Zhenhua; Zhao, Haichao; Wang, Lina; Jia, Pengfei; Gao, Fengyi; Xu, Zhiliang; Yang, Lin; Gao, Fei; Li, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The ectoplasmic specialization (ES) is essential for Sertoli-germ cell communication to support all phases of germ cell development and maturity. Its formation and remodeling requires rapid reorganization of the cytoskeleton. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of ES assembly is still largely unknown. Here, we show that Sertoli cell-specific disruption of autophagy influenced male mouse fertility due to the resulting disorganized seminiferous tubules and spermatozoa with malformed heads. In autophagy-deficient mouse testes, cytoskeleton structures were disordered and ES assembly was disrupted. The disorganization of the cytoskeleton structures might be caused by the accumulation of a negative cytoskeleton organization regulator, PDLIM1, and these defects could be partially rescued by Pdlim1 knockdown in autophagy-deficient Sertoli cells. Altogether, our works reveal that the degradation of PDLIM1 by autophagy in Sertoli cells is important for the proper assembly of the ES, and these findings define a novel role for autophagy in Sertoli cell-germ cell communication. PMID:26986811

  5. Documentation of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M.; Sharma, R.; Greene, A. S.; McCarthy, E. T.; Savin, V. J.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II decreases glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and glomerular capillary hydraulic conductivity. Although angiotensin II receptors have been demonstrated in mesangial cells and proximal tubule cells, the presence of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells has not previously been shown. Previously, we have reported that angiotensin II caused an accumulation of cAMP and a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Current studies were conducted to verify the presence of angiotensin II receptors by immunological and non-peptide receptor ligand binding techniques and to ascertain the activation of intracellular signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells in response to angiotensin II. Confluent monolayer cultures of glomerular epithelial cells were incubated with angiotensin II, with or without losartan and/or PD-123,319 in the medium. Membrane vesicle preparations were obtained by homogenization of washed cells followed by centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membrane proteins followed by multiscreen immunoblotting was used to determine the presence of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) or type 2 (AT2). Angiotensin II-mediated signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells was studied by measuring the levels of cAMP, using radioimmunoassay. Results obtained in these experiments showed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptor types in glomerular epithelial cells. Angiotensin II was found to cause an accumulation of cAMP in glomerular epithelial cells, which could be prevented only by simultaneous use of losartan and PD-123,319, antagonists for AT1 and AT2, respectively. The presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors and an increase in cAMP indicate that glomerular epithelial cells respond to angiotensin II in a manner distinct from that of mesangial cells or proximal tubular epithelial cells. Our results suggest that glomerular epithelial

  6. Transcriptional Landscape of Glomerular Parietal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Sina A.; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Ohse, Takamoto; Pickering, Scott G.; Krofft, Ronald D.; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the function of glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs). In this study, we performed genome-wide expression analysis on PEC-enriched capsulated vs. PEC-deprived decapsulated rat glomeruli to determine the transcriptional state of PECs under normal conditions. We identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that mapped to distinct biologic modules including development, tight junction, ion transport, and metabolic processes. Since developmental programs were highly enriched in PECs, we characterized several of their candidate members at the protein level. Collectively, our findings confirm that PECs are multifaceted cells and help define their diverse functional repertoire. PMID:25127402

  7. Transcriptional landscape of glomerular parietal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina A Gharib

    Full Text Available Very little is known about the function of glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs. In this study, we performed genome-wide expression analysis on PEC-enriched capsulated vs. PEC-deprived decapsulated rat glomeruli to determine the transcriptional state of PECs under normal conditions. We identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that mapped to distinct biologic modules including development, tight junction, ion transport, and metabolic processes. Since developmental programs were highly enriched in PECs, we characterized several of their candidate members at the protein level. Collectively, our findings confirm that PECs are multifaceted cells and help define their diverse functional repertoire.

  8. Glomerular immunoglobulin deposits induce glomerular inflammation in pregnant but not in non-pregnant rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, MM; Van Der Schaaf, G; Schipper, M; Moes, H

    2003-01-01

    PROBLEM: Does an inflammatory stimulus evoke a more intense inflammatory response in pregnant rats as compared with nonpregnant rats? METHOD OF STUDY: Non-pregnant rats were injected with antibodies against the glomerular basement membrane (GBM), 14 days before pregnancy, to induce a subclinical glo

  9. Neuronal Autophagy and Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kyung-Min; Hwang, Su-Kyung; Lee, Jin-A

    2013-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders include a wide range of diseases such as autism spectrum disorders and mental retardation. Mutations in several genes that regulate neural development and synapse function have been identified in neurodevelopmental disorders. Interestingly, some affected genes and pathways in these diseases are associated with the autophagy pathway. Autophagy is a complex, bulky degradative process that involves the sequestration of cellular proteins, RNA, lipids, and cellular org...

  10. Autophagy in DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Czarny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage response (DDR involves DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, but autophagy is also suggested to play a role in DDR. Autophagy can be activated in response to DNA-damaging agents, but the exact mechanism underlying this activation is not fully understood, although it is suggested that it involves the inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1. mTORC1 represses autophagy via phosphorylation of the ULK1/2–Atg13–FIP200 complex thus preventing maturation of pre-autophagosomal structures. When DNA damage occurs, it is recognized by some proteins or their complexes, such as poly(ADPribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1, Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 (MRN complex or FOXO3, which activate repressors of mTORC1. SQSTM1/p62 is one of the proteins whose levels are regulated via autophagic degradation. Inhibition of autophagy by knockout of FIP200 results in upregulation of SQSTM1/p62, enhanced DNA damage and less efficient damage repair. Mitophagy, one form of autophagy involved in the selective degradation of mitochondria, may also play role in DDR. It degrades abnormal mitochondria and can either repress or activate apoptosis, but the exact mechanism remains unknown. There is a need to clarify the role of autophagy in DDR, as this process may possess several important biomedical applications, involving also cancer therapy.

  11. Autophagy and apoptosis: rivals or mates?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Cheng; Jin-Ming Yang

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy,a cellular process of "self-eating" by which intracellular components are degraded within the lysosome,is an evolutionarily conserved response to various stresses.Autophagy is associated with numerous patho-physiological conditions,and dysregulation of autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases including cancer.Depending on context,activation of autophagy may promote either cell survival or death,two major events that determine pathological process of many illnesses.Importantly,the activity of autophagy is often associated with apoptosis,another critical cellular process determining cellular fate.A better understanding of biology of autophagy and its implication in human health and disorder,as well as the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis,has the potential of facilitating the development of autophagy-based therapeutic interventions for human diseases such as cancer.

  12. Fluorescence microscopy: A tool to study autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Shashank; Manjithaya, Ravi

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy is a cellular recycling process through which a cell degrades old and damaged cellular components such as organelles and proteins and the degradation products are reused to provide energy and building blocks. Dysfunctional autophagy is reported in several pathological situations. Hence, autophagy plays an important role in both cellular homeostasis and diseased conditions. Autophagy can be studied through various techniques including fluorescence based microscopy. With the advancements of newer technologies in fluorescence microscopy, several novel processes of autophagy have been discovered which makes it an essential tool for autophagy research. Moreover, ability to tag fluorescent proteins with sub cellular targets has enabled us to evaluate autophagy processes in real time under fluorescent microscope. In this article, we demonstrate different aspects of autophagy in two different model organisms i.e. yeast and mammalian cells, with the help of fluorescence microscopy.

  13. Autophagy and apoptosis: rivals or mates?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Cheng

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, a cellular process of "self-eating" by which intracellular components are degraded within the lysosome, is an evolutionarily conserved response to various stresses. Autophagy is associated with numerous patho-physiological conditions, and dysregulation of autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases including cancer. Depending on context, activation of autophagy may promote either cell survival or death, two major events that determine pathological process of many illnesses. Importantly, the activity of autophagy is often associated with apoptosis, another critical cellular process determining cellular fate. A better understanding of biology of autophagy and its implication in human health and disorder, as well as the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis, has the potential of facilitating the development of autophagy-based therapeutic interventions for human diseases such as cancer.

  14. Autophagy and Tumor%自噬与肿瘤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宗鼎

    2011-01-01

    自噬(autophagy)作为细胞一种基本生物学特征,具有独特的形态学改变和特有的调控通路.近年来,自噬在关于对肿瘤的作用的研究已成为热点,在不同的种类肿瘤中,自噬扮演着不同的角色,分为促进和抑制肿瘤两种作用.自噬异常与人类恶性肿瘤的发生、发展联系紧密,其启动及调节与细胞能量代谢、微环境变化、抑癌基因及癌基因家族及复杂的信号调节等有关.清楚了解自噬的特点可为肿瘤治疗提供新的方向.%As a basic biological characteristic of cells, autophagy corresponds with specific morphological changes and a specific regulating pathways. In recent years autophagy has become a hot topic, in part due to its roles in both promoting and preventing neoplasms. Irregularities in autophagy in humans are closely linked to the occurrence of malignant neoplasms. Activation and regulation of autophagy influence not only cellular metabolism, but also microenvironments, antioncogene and oncogene function as well as complex signaling pathways. A clear understanding of autophagy would provide new approaches to the treatment of neoplasms.

  15. STAT3-Mediated Autophagy Dependence Identifies Subtypes of Breast Cancer where Autophagy Inhibition can be Efficacious

    OpenAIRE

    Maycotte, Paola; Gearheart, Christy M.; Barnard, Rebecca; Aryal, Suraj; Mulcahy Levy, Jean M.; Fosmire, Susan P.; Hansen, Ryan J.; Morgan, Michael J.; Christopher C Porter; Gustafson, Daniel L.; Thorburn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a protein and organelle degradation pathway that is involved in diverse diseases including cancer. Recent evidence suggests that autophagy is a cell survival mechanism in tumor cells and that its inhibition especially in combination with other therapy could be beneficial but it remains unclear if all cancer cells behave the same way when autophagy is inhibited. We inhibited autophagy in a panel of breast cancer cell lines and found that some of them are dependent on autophagy for...

  16. Autophagy: for better or for worse

    OpenAIRE

    Wirawan, Ellen; Berghe, Tom Vanden; Lippens, Saskia; Agostinis, Patrizia; Vandenabeele, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway that degrades damaged or superfluous cell components into basic biomolecules, which are then recycled back into the cytosol. In this respect, autophagy drives a flow of biomolecules in a continuous degradation-regeneration cycle. Autophagy is generally considered a pro-survival mechanism protecting cells under stress or poor nutrient conditions. Current research clearly shows that autophagy fulfills numerous functions in vital biological processes....

  17. Autophagy and mitophagy in cellular damage control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy and mitophagy are important cellular processes that are responsible for breaking down cellular contents, preserving energy and safeguarding against accumulation of damaged and aggregated biomolecules. This graphic review gives a broad summary of autophagy and discusses examples where autophagy is important in controlling protein degradation. In addition we highlight how autophagy and mitophagy are involved in the cellular responses to reactive species and mitochondrial dysfunction. The key signaling pathways for mitophagy are described in the context of bioenergetic dysfunction.

  18. Glomerular hemodynamic changes associated with arteriolar lesions and tubulointerstitial inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Tapia, Edilia; Johnson, Richard J; Rodríguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Herrera-Acosta, Jaime

    2003-10-01

    Glomerular hemodynamic adaptations to loss of renal mass are thought to be the initiating factor of progression to renal failure; however, tubulointerstitial (TI) injury correlates better with progression than with glomerular damage. Thus, it is conceivable that tubulointerstitial alterations participate in the pathophysiology of renal disease progression by modifying the adaptive responses of glomerular hemodynamics. In experimental models of progressive renal disease, suppressing tubulointerstitial inflammatory cell infiltration with anti-inflammatory drugs reduces renal damage despite persistence of systemic hypertension. In recent studies in rats with subtotal renal ablation, we found that treatment with polysulphate pentosan (PPS) and with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) prevented proteinuria, glomerular hypertension, and hyperfiltration, despite persisting arterial hypertension due to higher afferent resistance. In addition, arteriolopathy was significantly attenuated by MMF, suggesting preservation of vascular structure and function. Association of vascular injury of afferent arterioles, glomerular hemodynamic changes, and renal lesions has been described in other conditions such as hyperuricemia, protein overload, fawn-hooded rats, and aging spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Arteriolopathy results in a maladaptive function that permits the transmission of systemic hypertension to glomerular capillaries. Glomerular hypertension results in mechanical damage to the capillary wall and increased filtration of proteins to tubular lumen. Enhanced tubular reabsorption induces synthesis of proinflammatory and profibrotic factors, resulting in tubulointerstitial inflammation and fibrosis. In conditions in which there is overactivity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), such as mild hyperuricemia and protein overload, arteriolopathy is associated with increased glomerular pressure and reduced glomerular plasma flow that results in post-glomerular ischemia and

  19. Autophagy in the Pathogenesis of Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Beth; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway that is essential for survival, differentiation, development, and homeostasis. Autophagy principally serves an adaptive role to protect organisms against diverse pathologies, including infections, cancer, neurodegeneration, aging, and heart disease. However, in certain experimental disease settings, the self-cannibalistic or, paradoxically, even the prosurvival functions of autophagy may be deleterious. This Review summarizes recent advances in und...

  20. p53: The Janus of autophagy?

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Beth; Abrams, John

    2008-01-01

    The autophagy pathway functions in adaptation to nutrient stress and tumour suppression. The p53 tumour suppressor, previously thought to positively regulate autophagy, may also inhibit it. This dual interplay between p53 and autophagy regulation is enigmatic, but may underlie key aspects of metabolism and cancer biology.

  1. Gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakir, A.A.; Lopez-Majano, V.; Levy, P.S.; Rhee, H.L.; Dunea, G.

    1988-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease, 45 patients with various glomerulopathies, excluding lupus nephritis and renal vasculitis, were studied. Persistent renal visualization 48 hours after the gallium injection, a positive scintigram, was graded as + (less than), ++ (equal to), and +++ (greater than) the hepatic uptake. Positive scintigrams were seen in ten of 16 cases of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, six of 11 cases of proliferative glomerulonephritis, and one case of minimal change, and one of two cases of membranous nephropathy; also in three of six cases of sickle glomerulopathy, two cases of diabetic neuropathy, one of two cases of amyloidosis, and one case of mild chronic allograft rejection. The 25 patients with positive scans were younger than the 20 with negative scans (31 +/- 12 v 42 +/- 17 years; P less than 0.01), and exhibited greater proteinuria (8.19 +/- 7.96 v 2.9 +/- 2.3 S/d; P less than 0.01) and lower serum creatinine values (2 +/- 2 v 4.1 +/- 2.8 mg/dL; P less than 0.01). The amount of proteinuria correlated directly with the intensity grade of the gallium image (P less than 0.02), but there was no correlation between the biopsy diagnosis and the outcome of the gallium scan. It was concluded that gallium scintigraphy is not useful in the differential diagnosis of the glomerular diseases under discussion. Younger patients with good renal function and heavy proteinuria are likely to have a positive renal scintigram regardless of the underlying glomerulopathy.

  2. Gene expression profiles of autophagy-related genes in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igci, Mehri; Baysan, Mehmet; Yigiter, Remzi; Ulasli, Mustafa; Geyik, Sirma; Bayraktar, Recep; Bozgeyik, İbrahim; Bozgeyik, Esra; Bayram, Ali; Cakmak, Ecir Ali

    2016-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an imflammatory disease of central nervous system caused by genetic and environmental factors that remain largely unknown. Autophagy is the process of degradation and recycling of damaged cytoplasmic organelles, macromolecular aggregates, and long-lived proteins. Malfunction of autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of neurological diseases, and autophagy genes may modulate the T cell survival. We aimed to examine the expression levels of autophagy-related genes. The blood samples of 95 unrelated patients (aged 17-65years, 37 male, 58 female) diagnosed as MS and 95 healthy controls were used to extract the RNA samples. After conversion to single stranded cDNA using polyT priming: the targeted genes were pre-amplified, and 96×78 (samples×primers) qRT-PCR reactions were performed for each primer pair on each sample on a 96.96 array of Fluidigm BioMark™. Compared to age- and sex-matched controls, gene expression levels of ATG16L2, ATG9A, BCL2, FAS, GAA, HGS, PIK3R1, RAB24, RGS19, ULK1, FOXO1, HTT were significantly altered (false discovery rate<0.05). Thus, altered expression levels of several autophagy related genes may affect protein levels, which in turn would influence the activity of autophagy, or most probably, those genes might be acting independent of autophagy and contributing to MS pathogenesis as risk factors. The indeterminate genetic causes leading to alterations in gene expressions require further analysis. PMID:27125224

  3. Paris Saponin II induced apoptosis via activation of autophagy in human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Man, Shuli; Wang, Yongshuai; Liu, Jing; Liu, Zhen; Yu, Peng; Gao, Wenyuan

    2016-06-25

    Paris Saponin II (PSII) has been shown anticancer activity against several cancer lines through the pro-apoptotic pathway. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between apoptosis and autophagy taking part in the anti-cancer mechanisms of PSII. In this study, PSII induced autophagy and apoptosis in dose- and time-dependent manners. Meanwhile, it induced autophagy as early as 2 h after exposure to 1 μM of PSII accompanying with apoptosis. Blockade of autophagy with chloroquine (CQ) attenuated apoptosis, while regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), gallic acid (GA) and H2O2 could not influence autophagy. In addition, PSII induced apoptosis via activation of autophagy, which might be associated with the activation of JNK and inhibition of PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. All in all, our research increased the understanding of the role of PSII regulating autophagy and apoptosis, which would hopefully provide prospective strategies for cancer therapy. PMID:27180204

  4. Noncanonical autophagy inhibits the autoinflammatory, lupus-like response to dying cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jennifer; Cunha, Larissa D; Park, Sunmin; Yang, Mao; Lu, Qun; Orchard, Robert; Li, Quan-Zhen; Yan, Mei; Janke, Laura; Guy, Cliff; Linkermann, Andreas; Virgin, Herbert W; Green, Douglas R

    2016-05-01

    Defects in clearance of dying cells have been proposed to underlie the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Mice lacking molecules associated with dying cell clearance develop SLE-like disease, and phagocytes from patients with SLE often display defective clearance and increased inflammatory cytokine production when exposed to dying cells in vitro. Previously, we and others described a form of noncanonical autophagy known as LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP), in which phagosomes containing engulfed particles, including dying cells, recruit elements of the autophagy pathway to facilitate maturation of phagosomes and digestion of their contents. Genome-wide association studies have identified polymorphisms in the Atg5 (ref. 8) and possibly Atg7 (ref. 9) genes, involved in both canonical autophagy and LAP, as markers of a predisposition for SLE. Here we describe the consequences of defective LAP in vivo. Mice lacking any of several components of the LAP pathway show increased serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and autoantibodies, glomerular immune complex deposition, and evidence of kidney damage. When dying cells are injected into LAP-deficient mice, they are engulfed but not efficiently degraded and trigger acute elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines but not anti-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-10. Repeated injection of dying cells into LAP-deficient, but not LAP-sufficient, mice accelerated the development of SLE-like disease, including increased serum levels of autoantibodies. By contrast, mice deficient in genes required for canonical autophagy but not LAP do not display defective dying cell clearance, inflammatory cytokine production, or SLE-like disease, and, like wild-type mice, produce IL-10 in response to dying cells. Therefore, defects in LAP, rather than canonical autophagy, can cause SLE-like phenomena, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:27096368

  5. New Insight into Treatment of Diseases of Glomerular Endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazım DENİZLİ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The capillary wall of the glomerulus, which is composed of glomerular endothelial cells (GECs, the glomerular basement membrane (GBM, and podocytes, is responsible for the ultrafiltration of plasma in the kidney. The function of the fenestrated endothelium in filtration is poorly understood. On the other hand, the presence of a significant glomerular endothelial glycocalyx implies that the glomerular endothelium significantly contributes to the barrier to macromolecules. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is the most important and tightly regulated angiogenic cytokine in the kidney. Studies of fenestration formation have relied on overexpression of VEGF in in vivo models or on in vitro systems where VEGF or pharmacological agents are added exogenously. A greater understanding of the glomerular endothelial cells relevance of in glomerular physiology and pathology naturally raises the question of whether it will be possible to manipulate them therapeutically. For example, promotion of fenestration formation would be desirable in severe preeclampsia to avoid renal failure and may increase GFR in a number of other conditions, including diabetic nephropathy. In the near future, the use of experimental methods will further expand understanding of the pathology of the glomerular filtration barrier, and perhaps reveal novel target molecules for the therapy of proteinuric kidney diseases.

  6. Prevalence of Glomerular Diseases: King Khalid University Hospital, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitwalli A

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available To obtain a more recent and comprehensive insight into the prevalence of glomerular diseases in our patient population, medical records of 200 patients with biopsy proven glomerulonephritis (GN, between January 1994 and June 1999, at the King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia were analyzed. Primary glomerular disease was found to be the most prevalent, accounting for 63.5% of all glomerular diseases. Among primary glomerular diseases, focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS was the most common histological lesion (34.6% and was associated with a high prevalence of hypertension (86.4%, nephrotic syndrome (68.18%, hematuria (63.6% and renal functional impairment (27.3%. Mesangioproliferative GN was the second most common lesion (25.1% followed by mesangiocapillary GN (15.7%, IgA nephropathy (10.2%, and minimal change disease (8.5%. Amongst secondary glomerular diseases, lupus nephritis was the most prevalent (24.5%. In conclusion, primary glomerular diseases constituted the commonest group encountered and the prevalence of FSGS was quite high with male sex and young adults predominating. FSGS was also associated with a high prevalence of end-stage renal disease. Further collaborative studies are necessary to explore the predisposing factors and associations of glomerular disease, especially FSGS.

  7. The cellular decision between apoptosis and autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Jun Fan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis and autophagy are important molecular processes that maintain organismal and cellular homeostasis, respectively. While apoptosis fulfills its role through dismantling damaged or unwanted cells, autophagy maintains cellular homeostasis through recycling selective intracellular organelles and molecules. Yet in some conditions, autophagy can lead to cell death. Apoptosis and autophagy can be stimulated by the same stresses. Emerging evidence indicates an interplay between the core proteins in both pathways, which underlies the molecular mechanism of the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy. This review summarizes recent literature on molecules that regulate both the apoptotic and autophagic processes.

  8. Modulation of pathogen recognition by autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun eOh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an ancient biological process for maintaining cellular homeostasis by degradation of long-lived cytosolic proteins and organelles. Recent studies demonstrated that autophagy is availed by immune cells to regulate innate immunity. On the one hand, cells exert direct effector function by degrading intracellular pathogens; on the other hand, autophagy modulates pathogen recognition and downstream signaling for innate immune responses. Pathogen recognition via pattern recognition receptors induces autophagy. The function of phagocytic cells is enhanced by recruitment of autophagy-related proteins. Moreover, autophagy acts as a delivery system for viral replication complexes to migrate to the endosomal compartments where virus sensing occurs. In another case, key molecules of the autophagic pathway have been found to negatively regulate immune signaling, thus preventing aberrant activation of cytokine production and consequent immune responses. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in the role of autophagy in pathogen recognition and modulation of innate immune responses.

  9. Historical landmarks of autophagy research

    OpenAIRE

    Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    The year of 2013 marked the 50th anniversary of C de Duve's coining of the term “autophagy” for the degradation process of cytoplasmic constituents in the lysosome/vacuole. This year we regretfully lost this great scientist, who contributed much during the early years of research to the field of autophagy. Soon after the discovery of lysosomes by de Duve, electron microscopy revealed autophagy as a means of delivering intracellular components to the lysosome. For a long time after the discove...

  10. Estimating Glomerular Filtration Rate in Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Garasto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed at reviewing age-related changes in kidney structure and function, methods for estimating kidney function, and impact of reduced kidney function on geriatric outcomes, as well as the reliability and applicability of equations for estimating glomerular filtration rate (eGFR in older patients. CKD is associated with different comorbidities and adverse outcomes such as disability and premature death in older populations. Creatinine clearance and other methods for estimating kidney function are not easy to apply in older subjects. Thus, an accurate and reliable method for calculating eGFR would be highly desirable for early detection and management of CKD in this vulnerable population. Equations based on serum creatinine, age, race, and gender have been widely used. However, these equations have their own limitations, and no equation seems better than the other ones in older people. New equations specifically developed for use in older populations, especially those based on serum cystatin C, hold promises. However, further studies are needed to definitely accept them as the reference method to estimate kidney function in older patients in the clinical setting.

  11. Normalisation of glomerular filtration rate measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The result of a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) measurement on a particular patient is of limited use to the referring physician since normal GFR values vary widely with the patient's age and build, etc. To overcome this problem, it is usual to normalise the measured GFR by dividing it by the patient's surface area and multiplying the result by the surface area of a 'standard' man. This transforms the measurment onto a scale which applies to all patients, young and old, large and small, where normal values fall within a well-defined range and where the degree of renal impairment can be quantified. We have examined the generally accepted surface area (SA) and the less well-known extracellular volume (ECV) normalisation methods of GFR measurements in a series of 110 patients. The results show that both methods produce essentially the same result; however, ECV normalisation is theoretically more correct, can be found directly without the patient's ECV being measured and does not require the use of empirical formulae. Mathematical justification for ECV normalisation is presented, and a proposed distribution pattern for the normalised measurement is introduced. A simple mathematical model shows that accurate GFR measurements can be made in the presence of an enlarged ECV, but normalisation of these will produce misleading low values. (orig.)

  12. Ordered bulk degradation via autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Jörn; Kristensen, Anders Riis; Andersen, Jens S

    2008-01-01

    proteasomal and lysosomal degradation ample cross-talk between the two degradation pathways became evident. Degradation via autophagy appeared to be ordered and regulated at the protein complex/organelle level. This raises several important questions such as: can macroautophagy itself be specific and what is...

  13. Phlorizin Prevents Glomerular Hyperfiltration but not Hypertrophy in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slava Malatiali

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationships of renal and glomerular hypertrophies to development of hyperfiltration and proteinuria early in streptozotocin-induced diabetes were explored. Control, diabetic, phlorizin-treated controls, and diabetic male Fischer rats were used. Phlorizin (an Na+-glucose cotransport inhibitor was given at a dose sufficient to normalize blood glucose. Inulin clearance (Cinulin and protein excretion rate (PER were measured. For morphometry, kidney sections were stained with periodic acid Schiff. At one week, diabetes PER increased 2.8-folds (P<.001, Cinulin increased 80% (P<.01. Kidney wet and dry weights increased 10%–12% (P<.05, and glomerular tuft area increased 9.3% (P<.001. Phlorizin prevented proteinuria, hyperfiltration, and kidney hypertrophy, but not glomerular hypertrophy. Thus, hyperfiltration, proteinuria, and whole kidney hypertrophy were related to hyperglycemia but not to glomerular growth. Diabetic glomerular hypertrophy constitutes an early event in the progression of glomerular pathology which occurs in the absence of mesangial expansion and persists even after changes in protein excretion and GFR are reversed through glycemic control.

  14. Conditional Deletion of Smad1 Ameliorates Glomerular Injury in Progressive Glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Makoto; Matsubara, Takeshi; Abe, Hideharu; Torikoshi, Kazuo; Mima, Akira; Iehara, Noriyuki; Fukatsu, Atsushi; Kita, Toru; Arai, Hidenori; Doi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Matrix expansion and cell proliferation are concomitantly observed in various glomerular injuries. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these changes have not been fully elucidated. We have reported that Smad1 is a key signalling molecule that regulates the transcription of type IV collagen (Col4) in mesangial matrix expansion and is thereby involved in glomerular injury in an acute model of glomerulonephritis. In this study, we addressed the role of Smad1 signalling in accelerated nephrotoxic nephritis (NTN), a model of progressive glomerulonephritis, using conditional deletion of Smad1 in Rosa26CreERT2 mice (Smad1-CKO). Mesangial matrix expansion in the Smad1-CKO mice with NTN was significantly inhibited compared with that in wild type mice with NTN, which was consistent with the decrease in Col4 expression level. On the other hand, STAT3 activation and cell proliferation were not influenced by Smad1 deletion in the NTN model. Therefore, we investigated another factor that activates cell proliferation in the absence of Smad1. Id2 induced VEGF secretion and subsequent STAT3 activation, independently of Smad1 expression in mouse mesangial cells. Here we show that Smad1 plays an important role in the development of glomerular injury without affecting cell proliferation, in progressive glomerulonephritis. PMID:27492138

  15. Hemodinâmica glomerular renal no roedor Calomys callosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian A. Boim

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available A função renal do roedor Calomys callosus, envolvido no ciclo de transmissão de diversos agentes patogênicos para o homem foi avaliada no animal intacto, através da técnica de depuração e micropunção renal. Os resultados mostraram que este roedor apresenta níveis pressóricos, hematócrito e proteinas plasmáticas semelhantes aos dos ratos submetidos ao mesmo procedimento experimental. Os pesos corporal e renal, bem como a filtração glomerular global e por nefro assemelham-se aos do camundongo. Surpreendentemente estes roedores apresentaram significante número de glomérulos superficiais por rim, permitindo a avaliação da hemodinàmica glomerular. Apesar da pressão arterial semelhante à dos ratos Munich-Wistar (MW, a pressão hidráulica intraglomerular no Calomys callosus foi inferior. Esta redução foi conseqüente à menor resistência pós-glomerular quando comparada à dos ratos MW. O fluxo plasmático glomerular atingiu valor bastante elevado em relação à filtração glomerular por nefro, fato que não só compensaria a reduzida pressão intraglomerular, como também seria suficiente para elevar a filtração (por g/rim a níveis superiores neste roedor, pois o coeficiente de ultrafiltração glomerular (Kj foi semelhante ao do rato MW. O presente trabalho sugere que apesar das dificuldades técnicas que este animal impõe devido ao seu reduzido tamanho, o estudo da função renal global bem como da hemodinàmica glomerular é factível, podendo portanto ser utilizado como modelo para estudo da função renal em doenças tropicais.Renal function was characterized in Calomys callosus, a rodent which can participate in the transmission of several human diseases. The results showed that the pressures levels, hematocrit and plasmatic proteins were similar to rats submitted to the same experimental maneuvers. The corporal and renal weights, whole and single nephron glomerular filtration rates were similar to the mouse

  16. Molecular mechanism and regulation of autophagy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-ping YANG; Zhong-qin LIANG; Zhen-lun GU; Zheng-hong QIN

    2005-01-01

    Autophagy is a major cellular pathway for the degradation of long-lived proteins and cytoplasmic organelles in eukaryotic cells. A large number of intracellular/extracellular stimuli, including amino acid starvation and invasion of microorganisms, are able to induce the autophagic response in cells. The discovery of the ATG genes in yeast has greatly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms participating in autophagy and the genes involved in regulating the autophagic pathway. Many yeast genes have mammalian homologs,suggesting that the basic machinery for autophagy has been evolutionarily conserved along the eukaryotic phylum. The regulation of autophagy is a very complex process. Many signaling pathways, including target of rapamycin (TOR) or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-I (PI3K-I)/PKB, GTPases, calcium and protein synthesis all play important roles in regulating autophagy. The molecular mechanisms and regulation of autophagy are discussed in this review.

  17. FGF signalling regulates bone growth through autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinque, Laura; Forrester, Alison; Bartolomeo, Rosa; Svelto, Maria; Venditti, Rossella; Montefusco, Sandro; Polishchuk, Elena; Nusco, Edoardo; Rossi, Antonio; Medina, Diego L; Polishchuk, Roman; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Settembre, Carmine

    2015-12-10

    Skeletal growth relies on both biosynthetic and catabolic processes. While the role of the former is clearly established, how the latter contributes to growth-promoting pathways is less understood. Macroautophagy, hereafter referred to as autophagy, is a catabolic process that plays a fundamental part in tissue homeostasis. We investigated the role of autophagy during bone growth, which is mediated by chondrocyte rate of proliferation, hypertrophic differentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in growth plates. Here we show that autophagy is induced in growth-plate chondrocytes during post-natal development and regulates the secretion of type II collagen (Col2), the major component of cartilage ECM. Mice lacking the autophagy related gene 7 (Atg7) in chondrocytes experience endoplasmic reticulum storage of type II procollagen (PC2) and defective formation of the Col2 fibrillary network in the ECM. Surprisingly, post-natal induction of chondrocyte autophagy is mediated by the growth factor FGF18 through FGFR4 and JNK-dependent activation of the autophagy initiation complex VPS34-beclin-1. Autophagy is completely suppressed in growth plates from Fgf18(-/-) embryos, while Fgf18(+/-) heterozygous and Fgfr4(-/-) mice fail to induce autophagy during post-natal development and show decreased Col2 levels in the growth plate. Strikingly, the Fgf18(+/-) and Fgfr4(-/-) phenotypes can be rescued in vivo by pharmacological activation of autophagy, pointing to autophagy as a novel effector of FGF signalling in bone. These data demonstrate that autophagy is a developmentally regulated process necessary for bone growth, and identify FGF signalling as a crucial regulator of autophagy in chondrocytes. PMID:26595272

  18. The role of autophagy in Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Zhang; Yaru Dong; Xiaoheng Xu; Zhong Xu

    2012-01-01

    Although Parkinson's disease is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, the mechanisms of pathogenesis remain poorly understood. Recent findings have shown that deregulation of the autophagy-lysosome pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. This review summarizes the most recent findings and discusses the unique role of the autophagy-lysosome pathway in Parkinson's disease to highlight the possibility of Parkinson's disease treatment strategies that incorporate autophagy-lysosome pathway modulation.

  19. Oxidative Stress and Autophagy in Cardiovascular Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, Cyndi R.; Pedrozo, Zully; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient process of intracellular protein and organelle recycling required to maintain cellular homeostasis in the face of a wide variety of stresses. Dysregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) leads to oxidative damage. Both autophagy and ROS/RNS serve pathological or adaptive roles within cardiomyocytes, depending on the context. Recent Advances: ROS/RNS and autophagy communicate with each other via both tra...

  20. Autophagy and oxidative stress in cardiovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Mei, Yu; Thompson, Melissa D.; Cohen, Richard A.; Tong, XiaoYong

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved degradation process by which intracellular components, including soluble macromolecules (e.g. nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids) and dysfunctional organelles (e.g. mitochondria, ribosomes, peroxisomes, and endoplasmic reticulum) are degraded by the lysosome. Autophagy is orchestrated by the autophagy related protein (Atg) composed protein complexes to form autophagosomes, which fuse with lysosomes to generate autolysosomes where the contents ar...

  1. Enhanced autophagy signaling in diabetic rats with ischemia-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Luoxing; Lei, Zhigang; Shi, Zhongshan; Guo, Dave; Su, Henry; Ruan, Yiwen; Xu, Zao C

    2016-07-15

    Seizures are among the most common neurological sequelae of stroke, and ischemic insult in diabetes notably increases the incidence of seizures. Recent studies indicated that autophagy influences the outcome of stroke and involved in epileptogenesis. However, the association of autophagy and post-ischemic seizures in diabetes remains unclear. The present study aimed to reveal the involvement of autophagy in the seizures following cerebral ischemia in diabetes. Diabetes was induced in adult male Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). The diabetic rats were subjected to transient forebrain ischemia. The neuronal damage was assessed using hematoxylin-eosin staining. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to investigate the alteration of autophagy marker microtubule-associated protein light chain 1B (LC3B). The results showed that all diabetic animals developed seizures after ischemia. However, no apparent cell death was observed in the hippocampus of seizure rats 12h after the insult. The expression of LC3B was significantly enhanced in naïve animals after ischemia and was further increased in diabetic animals after ischemia. Immunofluorescence double-labeling study indicated that LC3B was mainly increased in neurons. Our study demonstrated, for the first time, that autophagy activity is significantly increased in diabetic animals with ischemia-induced seizures. Further studies are needed to explore the role of autophagy in seizure generation after ischemia in diabetic conditions. PMID:27125597

  2. Autophagy inhibition in endogenous and nutrient-deprived conditions reduces dorsal root ganglia neuron survival and neurite growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Joseph-Patrick; Mearow, Karen

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral neuropathies can result in cytoskeletal changes in axons, ultimately leading to Wallerian degeneration and cell death. Recently, autophagy has been studied as a potential target for improving axonal survival and growth during peripheral nerve damage. This study investigates the influence of autophagy on adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neuron survival and axonal growth under control and nutrient deprivation conditions. Constitutive autophagy was modulated with pharmacological activators (rapamycin; Rapa) and inhibitors (3-methyladenine, bafilomycin A1) in conjunction with either a nutrient-stable environment (standard culture medium) or a nutrient-deprived environment (Hank's balanced salt solution + Ca(2+) /Mg(2+) ). The results demonstrated that autophagy inhibition decreased cell viability and reduced neurite growth and branching complexity. Although autophagy was upregulated with nutrient deprivation compared with the control, it was not further activated by rapamycin, suggesting a threshold level of autophagy. Overall, both cellular and biochemical approaches combined to show the influence of autophagy on adult DRG neuron survival and growth. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27018986

  3. Modulating autophagy: a strategy for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Lin Li; Shao-Liang Han; Xia Fan

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a process in which long-lived proteins,damaged cell organelles,and other cellular particles are sequestered and degraded.This process is important for maintaining the cellular microenvironment when the cell is under stress.Many studies have shown that autophagy plays a complex role in human diseases,especially in cancer,where it is known to have paradoxical effects.Namely,autophagy provides the energy for metabolism and tumor growth and leads to cell death that promotes tumor suppression.The link between autophagy and cancer is also evident in that some of the genes that regulate carcinogenesis,oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes,participate in or impact the autophagy process.Therefore,modulating autophagy will be a valuable topic for cancer therapy.Many studies have shown that autophagy can inhibit the tumor growth when autophagy modulators are combined with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy.These findings suggest that autophagy may be a potent target for cancer therapy.

  4. Involvement of Autophagy in Coronavirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Britton

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses are single stranded, positive sense RNA viruses, which induce the rearrangement of cellular membranes upon infection of a host cell. This provides the virus with a platform for the assembly of viral replication complexes, improving efficiency of RNA synthesis. The membranes observed in coronavirus infected cells include double membrane vesicles. By nature of their double membrane, these vesicles resemble cellular autophagosomes, generated during the cellular autophagy pathway. In addition, coronavirus infection has been demonstrated to induce autophagy. Here we review current knowledge of coronavirus induced membrane rearrangements and the involvement of autophagy or autophagy protein microtubule associated protein 1B light chain 3 (LC3 in coronavirus replication.

  5. A Key Role of Autophagy in Osteoblast Differentiation on Titanium-Based Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluđerović, Milena R; Mojić, Marija; Schreckenbach, Joachim P; Maksimović-Ivanić, Danijela; Graf, Hans-Ludwig; Mijatović, Sanja

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy plays an important role in embryogenesis, for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and the elimination of damaged subcellular structures. Furthermore, autophagy could be a mode of physiological cell death and also be implicated in cell differentiation. Thus, we hypothesized that autophagy may have an impact on the differentiation of osteoblast cells influenced by various titanium-based surfaces. Interactions between smooth, commercially available pure titanium (Ti cp), rough Ticer, acid-etched Ti cp (SS) and M1-M3 (comprised of the monoclinic phase of sodium-titanium oxides and rutile; M2 contains amorphous calcium phosphates) and human osteoblast cells were investigated. Immunofluorescent staining was used for detecting autophagy, cell cluster formation and collagen type I (Col-1) expression. Flow cytometry was employed to identify autophagy, the production of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) and the size and granularity of the cells. Rough surfaces caused osteoblast differentiation via the autophagic-dependent PI3/Akt signalling pathway. These surfaces induced the formation of discrete populations of large, granular cells, i.e. mature osteoblasts. In addition, M1-M3 provoked the development of a third population of small, granular cells, responsible for cell cluster formation, which are important for the formation of bone noduli and mineralisation. The same surfaces induced faster osteoblast maturation and enhanced NO production, a hallmark of the already mentioned processes. Neither the mature osteoblasts nor the small cells appeared after the inhibition of autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy also prevented cell cluster formation. We demonstrate that autophagy plays an essential role in the osteoblast differentiation on titanium-based surfaces with rough topography. PMID:26316150

  6. Coffee induces autophagy in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrocola, Federico; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Mariño, Guillermo; Vacchelli, Erika; Senovilla, Laura; Chaba, Kariman; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies and clinical trials revealed that chronic consumption coffee is associated with the inhibition of several metabolic diseases as well as reduction in overall and cause-specific mortality. We show that both natural and decaffeinated brands of coffee similarly rapidly trigger autophagy in mice. One to 4 h after coffee consumption, we observed an increase in autophagic flux in all investigated organs (liver, muscle, heart) in vivo, as indicated by the increased lipidation ...

  7. Glomerular Aging and Focal Global Glomerulosclerosis: A Podometric Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Bitzer, Markus; Wickman, Larysa; Afshinnia, Farsad; Wang, Su Q; O'Connor, Christopher; Yang, Yan; Meadowbrooke, Chrysta; Chowdhury, Mahboob; Kikuchi, Masao; Wiggins, Jocelyn E; Wiggins, Roger C

    2015-12-01

    Kidney aging is associated with an increasing proportion of globally scarred glomeruli, decreasing renal function, and exponentially increasing ESRD prevalence. In model systems, podocyte depletion causes glomerulosclerosis, suggesting age-associated glomerulosclerosis could be caused by a similar mechanism. We measured podocyte number, size, density, and glomerular volume in 89 normal kidney samples from living and deceased kidney donors and normal poles of nephrectomies. Podocyte nuclear density decreased with age due to a combination of decreased podocyte number per glomerulus and increased glomerular volume. Compensatory podocyte cell hypertrophy prevented a change in the proportion of tuft volume occupied by podocytes. Young kidneys had high podocyte reserve (podocyte density >300 per 10(6) µm(3)), but by 70-80 years of age, average podocyte nuclear density decreased to, kidneys, proteinaceous material accumulated in the Bowman space of glomeruli with low podocyte density. In a subset of these glomeruli, mass podocyte detachment events occurred in association with podocytes becoming binucleate (mitotic podocyte catastrophe) and subsequent wrinkling of glomerular capillaries, tuft collapse, and periglomerular fibrosis. In kidneys of young patients with underlying glomerular diseases similar pathologic events were identified in association with focal global glomerulosclerosis. Podocyte density reduction with age may therefore directly lead to focal global glomerulosclerosis, and all progressive glomerular diseases can be considered superimposed accelerators of this underlying process. PMID:26038526

  8. Outcome of the acute glomerular injury in proliferative lupus nephritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and corticosteroids markedly reduced activity of systemic lupus erythematosis in 10 patients with diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (DPLN) complicated by a nephrotic syndrome. Physiologic and morphometric techniques were used serially before, and 12 and 36 mo post-TLI to characterize the course of glomerular injury. Judged by a progressive reduction in the density of glomerular cells and immune deposits, glomerular inflammation subsided. A sustained reduction in the fractional clearance of albumin, IgG and uncharged dextrans of radius greater than 50 A, pointed to a parallel improvement in glomerular barrier size-selectivity. Corresponding changes in GFR were modest, however. A trend towards higher GFR at 12 mo was associated with a marked increase in the fraction of glomerular tuft area occupied by patent capillary loops as inflammatory changes receded. A late trend toward declining GFR beyond 12 mo was associated with progressive glomerulosclerosis, which affected 57% of all glomeruli globally by 36 mo post-TLI. Judged by a parallel increase in volume by 59%, remaining, patent glomeruli had undergone a process of adaptive enlargement. We propose that an increasing fraction of glomeruli continues to undergo progressive sclerosis after DPLN has become quiescent, and that the prevailing GFR depends on the extent to which hypertrophied remnant glomeruli can compensate for the ensuing loss of filtration surface area

  9. Outcome of the acute glomerular injury in proliferative lupus nephritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chagnac, A.; Kiberd, B.A.; Farinas, M.C.; Strober, S.; Sibley, R.K.; Hoppe, R.; Myers, B.D. (Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Treatment with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and corticosteroids markedly reduced activity of systemic lupus erythematosis in 10 patients with diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (DPLN) complicated by a nephrotic syndrome. Physiologic and morphometric techniques were used serially before, and 12 and 36 mo post-TLI to characterize the course of glomerular injury. Judged by a progressive reduction in the density of glomerular cells and immune deposits, glomerular inflammation subsided. A sustained reduction in the fractional clearance of albumin, IgG and uncharged dextrans of radius greater than 50 A, pointed to a parallel improvement in glomerular barrier size-selectivity. Corresponding changes in GFR were modest, however. A trend towards higher GFR at 12 mo was associated with a marked increase in the fraction of glomerular tuft area occupied by patent capillary loops as inflammatory changes receded. A late trend toward declining GFR beyond 12 mo was associated with progressive glomerulosclerosis, which affected 57% of all glomeruli globally by 36 mo post-TLI. Judged by a parallel increase in volume by 59%, remaining, patent glomeruli had undergone a process of adaptive enlargement. We propose that an increasing fraction of glomeruli continues to undergo progressive sclerosis after DPLN has become quiescent, and that the prevailing GFR depends on the extent to which hypertrophied remnant glomeruli can compensate for the ensuing loss of filtration surface area.

  10. Autophagy selectivity through receptor clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutenberg, Andrew; Brown, Aidan

    Substrate selectivity in autophagy requires an all-or-none cellular response. We focus on peroxisomes, for which autophagy receptor proteins NBR1 and p62 are well characterized. Using computational models, we explore the hypothesis that physical clustering of autophagy receptor proteins on the peroxisome surface provides an appropriate all-or-none response. We find that larger peroxisomes nucleate NBR1 clusters first, and lose them due to competitive coarsening last, resulting in significant size-selectivity. We then consider a secondary hypothesis that p62 inhibits NBR1 cluster formation. We find that p62 inhibition enhances size-selectivity enough that, even if there is no change of the pexophagy rate, the volume of remaining peroxisomes can significantly decrease. We find that enhanced ubiquitin levels suppress size-selectivity, and that this effect is more pronounced for individual peroxisomes. Sufficient ubiquitin allows receptor clusters to form on even the smallest peroxisomes. We conclude that NBR1 cluster formation provides a viable physical mechanism for all-or-none substrate selectivity in pexophagy. We predict that cluster formation is associated with significant size-selectivity. Now at Simon Fraser University.

  11. Autophagy and the (prorenin receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KatrinaJeanBinger

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The (prorenin receptor (PRR is a newly reported member of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS; a hormonal cascade responsible for regulating blood pressure. Originally, the identification of PRR was heralded as the next drug target of the RAS, of which such therapies would have increased benefits against target-organ damage and hypertension. However, in the years since its discovery several conditional knockout mouse models of PRR have demonstrated an essential role for this receptor unrelated to the renin-angiotensin system and blood pressure. Deletion of PRR in podocytes or cardiomyocytes resulted in the rapid onset of organ failure, eventuating in animal mortality after only a matter of weeks. In both cases, deletion of PRR resulted in the intracellular accumulation of autophagosomes and misfolded proteins, indicating a disturbance in autophagy. In light of the fact that the majority of PRR is located intracellularly, this molecular function appears to be more relevant than its ability to bind to high, non-physiological concentrations of (prorenin. This review will focus on the role of PRR in autophagy and its importance in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Understanding the link between PRR, autophagy and how its loss results in cell death will be essential for deciphering its role in physiology and pathology.

  12. Characterization of the autophagy marker protein Atg8 reveals atypical features of autophagy in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Navale

    Full Text Available Conventional autophagy is a lysosome-dependent degradation process that has crucial homeostatic and regulatory functions in eukaryotic organisms. As malaria parasites must dispose a number of self and host cellular contents, we investigated if autophagy in malaria parasites is similar to the conventional autophagy. Genome wide analysis revealed a partial autophagy repertoire in Plasmodium, as homologs for only 15 of the 33 yeast autophagy proteins could be identified, including the autophagy marker Atg8. To gain insights into autophagy in malaria parasites, we investigated Plasmodium falciparum Atg8 (PfAtg8 employing techniques and conditions that are routinely used to study autophagy. Atg8 was similarly expressed and showed punctate localization throughout the parasite in both asexual and sexual stages; it was exclusively found in the pellet fraction as an integral membrane protein, which is in contrast to the yeast or mammalian Atg8 that is distributed among cytosolic and membrane fractions, and suggests for a constitutive autophagy. Starvation, the best known autophagy inducer, decreased PfAtg8 level by almost 3-fold compared to the normally growing parasites. Neither the Atg8-associated puncta nor the Atg8 expression level was significantly altered by treatment of parasites with routinely used autophagy inhibitors (cysteine (E64 and aspartic (pepstatin protease inhibitors, the kinase inhibitor 3-methyladenine, and the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine, indicating an atypical feature of autophagy. Furthermore, prolonged inhibition of the major food vacuole protease activity by E64 and pepstatin did not cause accumulation of the Atg8-associated puncta in the food vacuole, suggesting that autophagy is primarily not meant for degradative function in malaria parasites. Atg8 showed partial colocalization with the apicoplast; doxycycline treatment, which disrupts apicoplast, did not affect Atg8 localization, suggesting a role, but not exclusive, in

  13. Neonatal Fc receptor promotes immune complex-mediated glomerular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaru, Florina; Luo, Wentian; Suleiman, Hani; St John, Patricia L; Ge, Linna; Mezo, Adam R; Shaw, Andrey S; Abrahamson, Dale R; Miner, Jeffrey H; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2014-05-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is a major regulator of IgG and albumin homeostasis systemically and in the kidneys. We investigated the role of FcRn in the development of immune complex-mediated glomerular disease in mice. C57Bl/6 mice immunized with the noncollagenous domain of the α3 chain of type IV collagen (α3NC1) developed albuminuria associated with granular capillary loop deposition of exogenous antigen, mouse IgG, C3 and C5b-9, and podocyte injury. High-resolution imaging showed abundant IgG deposition in the expanded glomerular basement membrane, especially in regions corresponding to subepithelial electron dense deposits. FcRn-null and -humanized mice immunized with α3NC1 developed no albuminuria and had lower levels of serum IgG anti-α3NC1 antibodies and reduced glomerular deposition of IgG, antigen, and complement. Our results show that FcRn promotes the formation of subepithelial immune complexes and subsequent glomerular pathology leading to proteinuria, potentially by maintaining higher serum levels of pathogenic IgG antibodies. Therefore, reducing pathogenic IgG levels by pharmacologic inhibition of FcRn may provide a novel approach for the treatment of immune complex-mediated glomerular diseases. As proof of concept, we showed that a peptide inhibiting the interaction between human FcRn and human IgG accelerated the degradation of human IgG anti-α3NC1 autoantibodies injected into FCRN-humanized mice as effectively as genetic ablation of FcRn, thus preventing the glomerular deposition of immune complexes containing human IgG. PMID:24357670

  14. The Beneficial Role of Retinoids in Glomerular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep eMallipattu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The primary etiology of CKD is a direct consequence of initial dysfunction and injury of the glomerulus, the main filtration system. Podocytes are terminally differentiated epithelial cells in the glomerulus, whose major function is the maintenance of this renal filtration barrier. Podocyte injury is implicated in many glomerular diseases including Focal Segmental Glomerular Sclerosis (FSGS and HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN. In many of these diseased conditions, the podocyte can either undergo dedifferentiation and proliferation, apoptosis, or cell detachment. Regardless of the initial type of injury, the podocyte ultimately loses its functional capacity to maintain the glomerular filtration barrier. Significant injury resulting in a loss of the podocytes and failure to maintain the renal filtration barrier contributes to progressive kidney disease. Consequently, therapies that prevent podocyte injury and promote their regeneration will have a major clinical impact on glomerular disease. Retinoic acid (RA, which is a derivative of vitamin A, has many cellular functions including induction of cell differentiation, regulation of apoptosis, and inhibition of inflammation and proliferation. RA is required for kidney development and is essential for cellular differentiation in the setting of podocyte injury. The mechanism by which RA directs its beneficial effects is multifactorial, ranging from its anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects to a direct effect of upregulating podocyte differentiation markers in the podocyte. The focus of this review is to provide an overview of RA in kidney development and glomerular disease. We also highlight the key mechanism(s by which RA restores podocyte differentiation markers and ameliorates glomerular disease.

  15. Podocyte pathology and nephropathy - sphingolipids in glomerular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merscher, Sandra; Fornoni, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are components of the lipid rafts in plasma membranes, which are important for proper function of podocytes, a key element of the glomerular filtration barrier. Research revealed an essential role of sphingolipids and sphingolipid metabolites in glomerular disorders of genetic and non-genetic origin. The discovery that glucocerebrosides accumulate in Gaucher disease in glomerular cells and are associated with clinical proteinuria initiated intensive research into the function of other sphingolipids in glomerular disorders. The accumulation of sphingolipids in other genetic diseases including Tay-Sachs, Sandhoff, Fabry, hereditary inclusion body myopathy 2, Niemann-Pick, and nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type and its implications with respect to glomerular pathology will be discussed. Similarly, sphingolipid accumulation occurs in glomerular diseases of non-genetic origin including diabetic kidney disease (DKD), HIV-associated nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and lupus nephritis. Sphingomyelin metabolites, such as ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate have also gained tremendous interest. We recently described that sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase acid-like 3b (SMPDL3b) is expressed in podocytes where it modulates acid sphingomyelinase activity and acts as a master modulator of danger signaling. Decreased SMPDL3b expression in post-reperfusion kidney biopsies from transplant recipients with idiopathic FSGS correlates with the recurrence of proteinuria in patients and in experimental models of xenotransplantation. Increased SMPDL3b expression is associated with DKD. The consequences of differential SMPDL3b expression in podocytes in these diseases with respect to their pathogenesis will be discussed. Finally, the role of sphingolipids in the formation of lipid rafts in podocytes and their contribution to the maintenance of a functional slit diaphragm in the glomerulus will be discussed. PMID:25126087

  16. Autophagy- An emerging target for melanoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndoye, Abibatou; Weeraratna, Ashani T

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma accounts for only 5% of all cancers but is the leading cause of skin cancer death due to its high metastatic potential. Patients with metastatic melanoma have a 10-year survival rate of less than 10%. While the clinical landscape for melanoma is evolving rapidly, lack of response to therapies, as well as resistance to therapy remain critical obstacles for treatment of this disease. In recent years, a myriad of therapy resistance mechanisms have been unravelled, one of which is autophagy, the focus of this review. In advanced stages of malignancy, melanoma cells hijack the autophagy machinery in order to alleviate drug-induced and metabolic stress in the tumor microenvironment, thereby promoting resistance to multiple therapies, tumor cell survival, and progression.  Autophagy is an essential cellular process that maintains cellular homeostasis through the recycling of intracellular constituents. Early studies on the role of autophagy in cancer generated controversy as to whether autophagy was pro- or anti-tumorigenic. Currently, there is a consensus that autophagy is tumor-suppressive in the early stages of cancer and tumor-promoting in established tumors.  This review aims to highlight current understandings on the role of autophagy in melanoma malignancy, and specifically therapy resistance; as well as to evaluate recent strategies for therapeutic autophagy modulation. PMID:27583134

  17. Tumor Suppression and Promotion by Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenniffer Ávalos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process that involves lysosomal degradation of proteins and organelles, mostly mitochondria, for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and reduction of metabolic stress. Problems in the execution of this process are linked to different pathological conditions, such as neurodegeneration, aging, and cancer. Many of the proteins that regulate autophagy are either oncogenes or tumor suppressor proteins. Specifically, tumor suppressor genes that negatively regulate mTOR, such as PTEN, AMPK, LKB1, and TSC1/2 stimulate autophagy while, conversely, oncogenes that activate mTOR, such as class I PI3K, Ras, Rheb, and AKT, inhibit autophagy, suggesting that autophagy is a tumor suppressor mechanism. Consistent with this hypothesis, the inhibition of autophagy promotes oxidative stress, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, autophagy also functions as a cytoprotective mechanism under stress conditions, including hypoxia and nutrient starvation, that promotes tumor growth and resistance to chemotherapy in established tumors. Here, in this brief review, we will focus the discussion on this ambiguous role of autophagy in the development and progression of cancer.

  18. Autophagy in allografts rejection: A new direction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hukui; Cheng, Dayan; Ma, Yuanyuan; Wang, Huaiquan; Liang, Ting; Hou, Guihua

    2016-03-18

    Despite the introduction of new and effective immunosuppressive drugs, acute cellular graft rejection is still a major risk for graft survival. Modulating the dosage of immunosuppressive drugs is not a good choice for all patients, new rejection mechanisms discovery are crucial to limit the inflammatory process and preserve the function of the transplant. Autophagy, a fundamental cellular process, can be detected in all subsets of lymphocytes and freshly isolated naive T lymphocytes. It is required for the homeostasis and function of T lymphocytes, which lead to cell survival or cell death depending on the context. T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and costimulator signals induce strong autophagy, and autophagy deficient T cells leads to rampant apoptosis upon TCR stimulation. Autophagy has been proved to be activated during ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and associated with grafts dysfunction. Furthermore, Autophagy has also emerged as a key mechanism in orchestrating innate and adaptive immune response to self-antigens, which relates with negative selection and Foxp3(+) Treg induction. Although, the role of autophagy in allograft rejection is unknown, current data suggest that autophagy indeed sweeps across both in the graft organs and recipients lymphocytes after transplantation. This review presents the rationale for the hypothesis that targeting the autophagy pathway could be beneficial in promoting graft survival after transplantation. PMID:26876576

  19. Stress management by autophagy: Implications for chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhao; Zhou, Li; Chen, Zhibin; Nice, Edouard C; Huang, Canhua

    2016-07-01

    Development of chemoresistance, which limits the efficiency of anticancer agents, has long been a major problem in cancer therapy and urgently needs to be solved to improve clinical outcomes. Factors contributing to chemoresistance are various, but a key factor is the cell's capability for stress management. Autophagy, a favored survival strategy that organisms employ to get over many kinds of stress, is emerging as a crucial player in drug resistance. It has been shown that autophagy facilitates the resistance of tumor cells to anticancer agents, and abrogation of autophagy could be therapeutically beneficial in some cases, suggesting autophagy could be a promising target for cancer treatments. Thus, defining the roles of autophagy in chemoresistance, and the mechanisms involved, will be critical to enhance the efficiency of chemotherapy and develop novel anticancer strategy interventions. PMID:26757106

  20. Autophagy in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccia, Francesco; Haroon, Nigil

    2016-06-01

    The pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is not well understood, and treatment options have met with limited success. Autophagy is a highly conserved mechanism of controlled digestion of damaged organelles within a cell. It helps in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. The process of autophagy requires the formation of an isolation membrane. They form double-membraned vesicles called "autophagosomes" that engulf a portion of the cytoplasm. Beyond the role in maintenance of cellular homeostasis, autophagy has been demonstrated as one of the most remarkable tools employed by the host cellular defense against bacteria invasion. Autophagy also affects the immune system and thus is implicated in several rheumatic disease processes. In this article, we explore the potential role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of AS. PMID:27075464

  1. Autophagy and the immune function in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuervo, Ana Maria; Macian, Fernando

    2014-08-01

    Just when you thought that you had heard it all about autophagy-the conserved cellular process that mediates turnover of cellular constituents in the lysosomes - studies keep coming out highlighting new types of autophagy, new functions for autophagy or even new autophagy-independent roles for the proteins associated with this process. The field of immunology has been riding the autophagic wave since the beginning of its revival; first due to its role in the host defense against pathogens, and more recently through the better understanding of the unique characteristics and functions of different autophagic pathways in immune cells. Here, we describe some of these new functions that are tightening the connection between autophagy and acquired or innate immunity and their malfunctioning with age. PMID:24929664

  2. Relation of Low Glomerular Filtration Rate to Metabolic Disorders in Individuals without Diabetes and with Normoalbuminuria

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzo, Carlos; Nath, Subrata D.; Hanley, Anthony J. G.; Abboud, Hanna E.; Haffner, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Microalbuminuria increases cardiovascular risk and is considered a metabolic disorder. Low glomerular filtration rate is also associated with increased cardiovascular risk, but the relation of low glomerular filtration rate to metabolic disorders is not well understood.

  3. Autophagy and bacterial clearance: a not so clear picture

    OpenAIRE

    Mostowy, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy, an intracellular degradation process highly conserved from yeast to humans, is viewed as an important defence mechanism to clear intracellular bacteria. However, recent work has shown that autophagy may have different roles during different bacterial infections that restrict bacterial replication (antibacterial autophagy), act in cell autonomous signalling (non-bacterial autophagy) or support bacterial replication (pro-bacterial autophagy). This review will focus on newfound intera...

  4. Inhibition of integrin α2β1 ameliorates glomerular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borza, Corina M; Su, Yan; Chen, Xiwu; Yu, Ling; Mont, Stacey; Chetyrkin, Sergei; Voziyan, Paul; Hudson, Billy G; Billings, Paul C; Jo, Hyunil; Bennett, Joel S; Degrado, William F; Eckes, Beate; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2012-06-01

    Mesangial cells and podocytes express integrins α1β1 and α2β1, which are the two major collagen receptors that regulate multiple cellular functions, including extracellular matrix homeostasis. Integrin α1β1 protects from glomerular injury by negatively regulating collagen production, but the role of integrin α2β1 in renal injury is unclear. Here, we subjected wild-type and integrin α2-null mice to injury with adriamycin or partial renal ablation. In both of these models, integrin α2-null mice developed significantly less proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis. In addition, selective pharmacological inhibition of integrin α2β1 significantly reduced adriamycin-induced proteinuria, glomerular injury, and collagen deposition in wild-type mice. This inhibitor significantly reduced collagen synthesis in wild-type, but not integrin α2-null, mesangial cells in vitro, demonstrating that its effects are integrin α2β1-dependent. Taken together, these results indicate that integrin α2β1 contributes to glomerular injury by positively regulating collagen synthesis and suggest that its inhibition may be a promising strategy to reduce glomerular injury and proteinuria. PMID:22440900

  5. A genetic screen for modifiers of Drosophila caspase Dcp-1 reveals caspase involvement in autophagy and novel caspase-related genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahnn Joohong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caspases are cysteine proteases with essential functions in the apoptotic pathway; their proteolytic activity toward various substrates is associated with the morphological changes of cells. Recent reports have described non-apoptotic functions of caspases, including autophagy. In this report, we searched for novel modifiers of the phenotype of Dcp-1 gain-of-function (GF animals by screening promoter element- inserted Drosophila melanogaster lines (EP lines. Results We screened ~15,000 EP lines and identified 72 Dcp-1-interacting genes that were classified into 10 groups based on their functions and pathways: 4 apoptosis signaling genes, 10 autophagy genes, 5 insulin/IGF and TOR signaling pathway genes, 6 MAP kinase and JNK signaling pathway genes, 4 ecdysone signaling genes, 6 ubiquitination genes, 11 various developmental signaling genes, 12 transcription factors, 3 translation factors, and 11 other unclassified genes including 5 functionally undefined genes. Among them, insulin/IGF and TOR signaling pathway, MAP kinase and JNK signaling pathway, and ecdysone signaling are known to be involved in autophagy. Together with the identification of autophagy genes, the results of our screen suggest that autophagy counteracts Dcp-1-induced apoptosis. Consistent with this idea, we show that expression of eGFP-Atg5 rescued the eye phenotype caused by Dcp-1 GF. Paradoxically, we found that over-expression of full-length Dcp-1 induced autophagy, as Atg8b-GFP, an indicator of autophagy, was increased in the eye imaginal discs and in the S2 cell line. Taken together, these data suggest that autophagy suppresses Dcp-1-mediated apoptotic cell death, whereas Dcp-1 positively regulates autophagy, possibly through feedback regulation. Conclusions We identified a number of Dcp-1 modifiers that genetically interact with Dcp-1-induced cell death. Our results showing that Dcp-1 and autophagy-related genes influence each other will aid future

  6. Hemodinâmica glomerular renal no roedor Calomys callosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian A. Boim

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available A função renal do roedor Calomys callosus, envolvido no ciclo de transmissão de diversos agentes patogênicos para o homem foi avaliada no animal intacto, através da técnica de depuração e micropunção renal. Os resultados mostraram que este roedor apresenta níveis pressóricos, hematócrito e proteinas plasmáticas semelhantes aos dos ratos submetidos ao mesmo procedimento experimental. Os pesos corporal e renal, bem como a filtração glomerular global e por nefro assemelham-se aos do camundongo. Surpreendentemente estes roedores apresentaram significante número de glomérulos superficiais por rim, permitindo a avaliação da hemodinàmica glomerular. Apesar da pressão arterial semelhante à dos ratos Munich-Wistar (MW, a pressão hidráulica intraglomerular no Calomys callosus foi inferior. Esta redução foi conseqüente à menor resistência pós-glomerular quando comparada à dos ratos MW. O fluxo plasmático glomerular atingiu valor bastante elevado em relação à filtração glomerular por nefro, fato que não só compensaria a reduzida pressão intraglomerular, como também seria suficiente para elevar a filtração (por g/rim a níveis superiores neste roedor, pois o coeficiente de ultrafiltração glomerular (Kj foi semelhante ao do rato MW. O presente trabalho sugere que apesar das dificuldades técnicas que este animal impõe devido ao seu reduzido tamanho, o estudo da função renal global bem como da hemodinàmica glomerular é factível, podendo portanto ser utilizado como modelo para estudo da função renal em doenças tropicais.

  7. Autophagy in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien Tra

    Full Text Available Autophagy (macroautophagy is a degradative process that involves the sequestration of cytosolic material including organelles into double membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes for delivery to the lysosome. Autophagy is essential for preimplantation development of mouse embryos and cavitation of embryoid bodies. The precise roles of autophagy during early human embryonic development, remain however largely uncharacterized. Since human embryonic stem cells constitute a unique model system to study early human embryogenesis we investigated the occurrence of autophagy in human embryonic stem cells. We have, using lentiviral transduction, established multiple human embryonic stem cell lines that stably express GFP-LC3, a fluorescent marker for the autophagosome. Each cell line displays both a normal karyotype and pluripotency as indicated by the presence of cell types representative of the three germlayers in derived teratomas. GFP expression and labelling of autophagosomes is retained after differentiation. Baseline levels of autophagy detected in cultured undifferentiated hESC were increased or decreased in the presence of rapamycin and wortmannin, respectively. Interestingly, autophagy was upregulated in hESCs induced to undergo differentiation by treatment with type I TGF-beta receptor inhibitor SB431542 or removal of MEF secreted maintenance factors. In conclusion we have established hESCs capable of reporting macroautophagy and identify a novel link between autophagy and early differentiation events in hESC.

  8. The glomerular filtration rate during pregnancy : Saline infusion enhances the glomerular filtration rate in the pregnant rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, MM; Schuiling, GA; Klok, PA; Valkhof, N; Bakker, WW

    1996-01-01

    The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of pregnant rats is generally believed to exceed non-pregnant values. This notion is primarily based upon standard inulin clearances. However, the inulin clearance requires continuous infusion of inulin usually dissolved in saline. Since saline infusion per se in

  9. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic

  10. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaviya, Rama [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Debra L., E-mail: laskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.

  11. Glomerular extraction of antiglomerular basement membrane antibody in normal Wistar and in Brattleboro rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our results show that A-GBM antibody is, unfortunably, not a suitable indicator for glomerular plasma flow distribution studies. Its fixation is influenced by other factors, among which the size of the glomeruli and hence the glomerular basement membrane surface area are probably predominant. This is suggested: 1) by the parallel patterns of antibody fixation and glomerular size found in normal and in DI rats; 2) by the simultaneous restoration of size and A-GBM fixation heterogeneity in treated DI rats; 3) by the correlation between size and A-GBM fixation found in the various glomeruli of a given rat. Further experiments are required to determine whether other factors are also involved in the process of A-GBM fixation. Because the A-GBM antibody is not an adequate blood flow indicator, it was not possible to study the influence of ADH on GPF distribution as we had first intended. Nevertheless, the use of Brattleboro rats in these experiments disclosed the fact that their deep glomeruli are abnormally small and that this anomaly can be reversed, or prevented, by chronic vasopressin treatment. It is not possible to determine from the present experiments whether ADH has a direct effect on kidney morphology or acts indirectly through the correction of the DI and its consequences or other mechanisms. (orig.)

  12. The influence of blood glucose level on glomerular filtration rate and its estimation equations in type 2 diabetes%血糖水平对2型糖尿病患者肾小球滤过率及其评估方程的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张萌; 黄清梅; 简小金; 方红娟; 杨金奎

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨不同血糖水平对2型糖尿病患者肾小球滤过率(GFR)及其评估方程的影响方法 选择经同位素99mTc-DTPA测定GFR的2型糖尿病患者495例,HbA1c与99mTc-DTPA测定GFR及CG方程、MDRD方程和MCQ方程GFR估计值之间进行相关性分析;以HbA1c=8%为临界值,比较两组间各评估方程的精确性和准确性.结果:经同位素测定的GFR为(70.11±20.54)ml·min(-1)·(1.73 m2)(-1),HbA1c与同位素测定GFR及CG方程、MDRD方程和MCQ方程GFR估计值呈正相关(γ值分别为0.196、0.201、0.289和0.181,P<0.01).无论血糖水平如何,CG方程的准确性都明显高于其他两个方程.结论 近期高血糖增加同位素测定GFR和方程估算GFR的水平.虽然这些评估方程存在一些不足之处,但由于目前尚缺乏专门针对糖尿病人群的评估方程,在临床实际工作中采用CG方程来评估2型糖尿病患者的GFR不失为一个简便实用的方法.%Objective To discuss the influence of different blood glucose levels on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and on its estimation equations in type 2 diabetes. Methods 495 type 2 diabetic patients undergoing GFR measurement using 99m Tc-DTPA were enrolled in this study. The correlations were performed between glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and 99m Tc-DTPA measured GFR and its estimations by CG, MDRD and MCQ equations. The precision and accuracy were compared among these three estimating equations under the threshold of HbA1c 8 %. Results When GFR measured using 99m Tc-DTPA was (70. 11 ± 20. 54 ) ml· min-1 · ( 1.73 m2 )-1, HbA1c was positively correlated with isotopically measured GFR and its estimations by CG, MDRD and MCQ equations (r=0. 196, 0. 201,0. 289 and 0.181, P<0. 01). CG equation was more accurate than the other equations regardless of blood glucose level. Conclusions Acute hyperglycemia increases isotopically measured GFR and its estimations. These equations all have some disadvantages in estimating GFR, but in

  13. Autophagy in lung disease pathogenesis and therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Ryter, Stefan W.; Augustine M K Choi

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, a cellular pathway for the degradation of damaged organelles and proteins, has gained increasing importance in human pulmonary diseases, both as a modulator of pathogenesis and as a potential therapeutic target. In this pathway, cytosolic cargos are sequestered into autophagosomes, which are delivered to the lysosomes where they are enzymatically degraded and then recycled as metabolic precursors. Autophagy exerts an important effector function in the regulation of inflammation, an...

  14. Skeletal Muscle Autophagy: A New Metabolic Regulator

    OpenAIRE

    Neel, Brian A.; Lin, Yuxi; Pessin, Jeffrey E.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy classically functions as a physiological process to degrade cytoplasmic components, protein aggregates, and/or organelles, as a mechanism for nutrient breakdown, and as a regulator of cellular architecture. Proper autophagic flux is vital for both functional skeletal muscle, which controls support and movement of the skeleton, and muscle metabolism. The role of autophagy as a metabolic regulator in muscle has been previously studied; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms that...

  15. The role of autophagy in Parkinson's disease☆

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lei; Dong, Yaru; Xu, Xiaoheng; Xu, Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Although Parkinson's disease is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, the mechanisms of pathogenesis remain poorly understood. Recent findings have shown that deregulation of the autophagy-lysosome pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. This review summarizes the most recent findings and discusses the unique role of the autophagy-lysosome pathway in Parkinson's disease to highlight the possibility of Parkinson's disease treatment strategies that incorpo...

  16. Mechanisms of mitochondria and autophagy crosstalk

    OpenAIRE

    Rambold, Angelika S.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular survival pathway that recycles intracellular components to compensate for nutrient depletion and ensures the appropriate degradation of organelles. Mitochondrial number and health are regulated by mitophagy, a process by which excessive or damaged mitochondria are subjected to autophagic degradation. Autophagy is thus a key determinant for mitochondrial health and proper cell function. Mitophagic malfunction has been recently proposed to contribute to progressive neuro...

  17. RUFY4: Immunity piggybacking on autophagy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terawaki, Seigo; Camosseto, Voahirana; Pierre, Philippe; Gatti, Evelina

    2016-03-01

    Although autophagy is a highly conserved mechanism among species and cell types, few are the molecules involved with the autophagic process that display cell- or tissue- specific expression. We have unraveled the positive regulatory role on autophagy of RUFY4 (RUN and FYVE domain containing 4), which is expressed in subsets of immune cells, including dendritic cells (DCs). DCs orchestrate the eradication of pathogens by coordinating the action of the different cell types involved in microbe recognition and destruction during the immune response. To fulfill this function, DC display particular regulation of their endocytic and autophagy pathways in response to the immune environment. Autophagy flux is downmodulated in DCs upon microbe sensing, but is remarkably augmented, when cells are differentiated in the presence of the pleiotropic cytokine IL4 (interleukin 4). From gene expression studies aimed at comparing the impact of IL4 on DC differentiation, we identified RUFY4, as a novel regulator that augments autophagy flux and, when overexpressed, induces drastic membrane redistribution and strongly tethers lysosomes. RUFY4 is therefore one of the few known positive regulators of autophagy that is expressed in a cell-specific manner or under specific immunological conditions associated with IL4 expression such as allergic asthma. PMID:26760128

  18. Autophagy in the control of food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajat

    2012-04-01

    The cellular nutrient sensing apparatus detects nutritional depletion and transmits this information to downstream effectors that generate energy from alternate sources. Autophagy is a crucial catabolic pathway that turns over redundant cytoplasmic components in lysosomes to provide energy to the starved cell. Recent studies have described a role for hypothalamic autophagy in the control of food intake and energy balance. Activated autophagy in hypothalamic neurons during starvation mobilized neuron-intrinsic lipids to generate free fatty acids that increased AgRP levels. AgRP neuron-specific inhibition of autophagy decreased fasting-induced increases in AgRP levels and food intake. Deletion of autophagy in AgRP neurons led to constitutive increases in levels of proopiomelanocortin and its active processed product, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone that contributed to reduced adiposity in these rodents. The current manuscript discusses these new findings and raises additional questions that may help understand how hypothalamic autophagy controls food intake and energy balance. These studies may have implications for designing new therapies against obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:23700515

  19. The variables in normalizing glomerular filtration rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normalizing GFR with variables is important for non-cancer patients, especially for kidney donors. The most frequently evaluated variables are body surface area (BSA), extracellular fluid volume (ECV) and lean body mass (LBM). It is difficult to accurately quantify BSA and the power of BSA normalization decreases in children and obesity population. The ECV normalization is suitable for healthy children, but its clinical value decreases in patients with damaged renal function. The LBM can be accurately measured and has a larger serviceable range in the normalization. Although the influence factors of LBM should be extensively evaluated, the available data indicate that LBM is more suitable in the normalization of GFR than BSA and ECV. (authors)

  20. Estimating Glomerular Filtration Rate in Diabetes Using Serum Cystatin C

    OpenAIRE

    MacIsaac, Richard J.; Premaratne, Erosha; Jerums, George

    2011-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem, especially for people with diabetes. Not only is it a risk factor for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) but it is also a major cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor. Methods that accurately and simply estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) are therefore needed to optimise the detection and management of CKD in people with diabetes. One of the main failures of commonly used creatinine-based methods for estimating renal function ...

  1. Frequency of Glomerular Dysfunction in Children with Beta Thalassaemia Major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basma A. Ali

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study investigated the frequency of glomerular dysfunction in children with beta thalassaemia major (β-TM by using different markers and correlating them with serum ferritin and iron chelation therapy. Methods: The study, carried out between August 2011 and May 2012, included 100 patients with β-TM, in two groups. Group Ia (n = 62 received chelation therapy (deferoxamine. Group Ib (n = 38 received followup care at the Pediatric Hematology Outpatient Clinic, Minia University Children’s Hospital, Egypt. Group II included 50 apparently healthy controls, age- and sex-matched to Group I. All patients underwent a thorough history-taking, clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Results: Compared to Group II, Groups Ia and Ib had significantly higher levels of cystatin C, serum creatinine and serum ferritin, and a higher albumin/creatinine ratio in their urine, and a significantly lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and creatinine clearance (P <0.05. Moreover, Group Ιa had a significantly lower eGFR and creatinine clearance than Group Ib. Cystatin C had a highly significant strong negative correlation with eGFR and creatinine clearance and a significantly strong positive correlation with serum ferritin, and a higher sensitivity and specificity than serum creatinine and creatinine clearance for small changes in GFR. Conclusion: β-TM patients had a high frequency of glomerular dysfunction—possibly attributable to chronic anaemia, iron overload or chelation therapy. Periodic renal assessment is mandatory to detect renal complications. Cystatin C is a promising marker to monitor glomerular dysfunction, having a higher sensitivity and specificity than serum creatinine and creatinine clearance for small changes in GFR.

  2. The kinetics of glomerular deposition of nephritogenic IgA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Yamaji

    Full Text Available Whether IgA nephropathy is attributable to mesangial IgA is unclear as there is no correlation between intensity of deposits and extent of glomerular injury and no clear mechanism explaining how these mesangial deposits induce hematuria and subsequent proteinuria. This hinders the development of a specific therapy. Thus, precise events during deposition still remain clinical challenge to clarify. Since no study assessed induction of IgA nephropathy by nephritogenic IgA, we analyzed sequential events involving nephritogenic IgA from IgA nephropathy-prone mice by real-time imaging systems. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy showed that serum IgA from susceptible mice had strong affinity to mesangial, subepithelial, and subendothelial lesions, with effacement/actin aggregation in podocytes and arcade formation in endothelial cells. The deposits disappeared 24-h after single IgA injection. The data were supported by a fluorescence molecular tomography system and real-time and 3D in vivo imaging. In vivo imaging showed that IgA from the susceptible mice began depositing along the glomerular capillary from 1 min and accumulated until 2-h on the first stick in a focal and segmental manner. The findings indicate that glomerular IgA depositions in IgAN may be expressed under the balance between deposition and clearance. Since nephritogenic IgA showed mesangial as well as focal and segmental deposition along the capillary with acute cellular activation, all glomerular cellular elements are a plausible target for injury such as hematuria.

  3. Mechanisms of Glomerular Albumin Filtration and Tubular Reabsorption

    OpenAIRE

    Satoshi Kinugasa; Akihiro Tojo

    2012-01-01

    Albumin is filtered through the glomerulus with a sieving coefficient of 0.00062, which results in approximately 3.3 g of albumin filtered daily in human kidneys. The proximal convoluted tubule reabsorbs 71%, the loop of Henle and distal tubule 23%, and collecting duct 3% of the glomerular filtered albumin, thus indicating that the kidney plays an important role in protein metabolism. Dysfunction of albumin reabsorption in the proximal tubules, due to reduced megalin expression, may explain t...

  4. Intraglomerular microcirculation: measurements of single glomerular loop flow in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhausen, M; Zimmerhackl, B; Thederan, H; Dussel, R; Parekh, N; Esslinger, H U; von Hagens, G; Komitowski, D; Dallenbach, F D

    1981-08-01

    With the use of a new fluorescent microscopic technique, we were able to measure the mean intracapillary velocities and pressures of single capillary loops of renal glomeruli of living rats. The technique involved photographing and recording the flow of fluorescent latex particles through the glomerular loops with a television monitor. In 25 rats the single glomerular loop flow velocity was 781 +/- (SD) 271 micrometers . sec-1. The mean diameter of the capillary loops measured 8.4 +/- 1.4 micrometers; their lengths were 72.3 +/- 37.5 micrometers. From the decrease in velocity of flow along the capillary loop, we were able to evaluate the filtration equivalent for the capillary surface. It was possible to measure intracapillary pressures of single glomerular loops continuously under microscopic control. High intracapillary pressures correlated with high intracapillary velocities. From the data we obtained, we were unable to calculate a filtration equilibrium at the ends of the observed capillary loops. For further correlations, we injected the glomeruli we had studied in the living state and examined them with the scanning electron microscope. PMID:7289407

  5. Renal biopsy and pathologic evaluation of glomerular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, George E; Cianciolo, Rachel E; Clubb, Fred J

    2011-08-01

    Presence of suspected primary glomerular disease is the most common and compelling reason to consider renal biopsy. Pathologic findings in samples from animals with nephritic or nephrotic glomerulopathies, as well as from animals with persistent subclinical glomerular proteinuria that is not associated with advanced chronic kidney disease, frequently guide treatment decisions and inform prognosis when suitable specimens are obtained and examined appropriately. Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy techniques generally are satisfactory; however, other methods of locating or approaching the kidney, such as manual palpation (e.g., in cats), laparoscopy, or open surgery, also can be used. Visual assessment of the tissue content of needle biopsy samples to verify that they are renal cortex (i.e., contain glomeruli) as they are obtained is a key step that minimizes the submission of uninformative samples for examination. Adequate planning for a renal biopsy also requires prior procurement of the fixatives and preservatives needed to process and submit samples that will be suitable for electron microscopic examination and immunostaining, as well as for light microscopic evaluation. Finally, to be optimally informative, renal biopsy specimens must be processed by laboratories that routinely perform the required specialized examinations and then be evaluated by experienced veterinary nephropathologists. The pathologic findings must be carefully integrated with one another and with information derived from the clinical investigation of the patient's illness to formulate the correct diagnosis and most informative guidance for therapeutic management of the animal's glomerular disease. PMID:21782145

  6. Characterization of early autophagy signaling by quantitative phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer Tg; Zarei, Mostafa; Sprenger, Adrian;

    2014-01-01

    Under conditions of nutrient shortage autophagy is the primary cellular mechanism ensuring availability of substrates for continuous biosynthesis. Subjecting cells to starvation or rapamycin efficiently induces autophagy by inhibiting the MTOR signaling pathway triggering increased autophagic flu...

  7. Autophagy as a target for cancer therapy: new developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation pathway that eliminates cytosolic proteins, macromolecules, organelles, and protein aggregates. Activation of autophagy may function as a tumor suppressor by degrading defective organelles and other cellular components. However, this pathway may also be exploited by cancer cells to generate nutrients and energy during periods of starvation, hypoxia, and stress induced by chemotherapy. Therefore, induction of autophagy has emerged as a drug resistance mechanism that promotes cancer cell survival via self-digestion. Numerous preclinical studies have demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy enhances the activity of a broad array of anticancer agents. Thus, targeting autophagy may be a global anticancer strategy that may improve the efficacy of many standard of care agents. These results have led to multiple clinical trials to evaluate autophagy inhibition in combination with conventional chemotherapy. In this review, we summarize the anticancer agents that have been reported to modulate autophagy and discuss new developments in autophagy inhibition as an anticancer strategy

  8. Mechanisms of silver nanoparticle-induced toxicity and important role of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Bin-Hsu; Tsai, Jui-Chen; Chen, Chun-Wan; Yan, Shian-Jang; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2016-10-01

    Safety concerns have been raised over the extensive applications of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) because nano dimensions make them highly bioactive, being potentially harmful to the exposed humans. Surface physico-chemistry (shape, surface charge, chemical composition, etc.) that mainly dictates nano-bio interactions is relevant for influencing their biocompatibility and toxicity. Although the hazardousness of AgNPs has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, mechanistic understanding of the toxicity particularly at the molecular and organismal levels, in addition to oxidative stress and silver ion dissolution, has remained unclear. A growing body of research has elucidated that autophagy, being activated in response to exposure to various nanomaterials, may serve as a cellular defense mechanism against nanotoxicity. Recently, autophagy activation was shown to correlate with AgNPs exposure; however, the subsequent autophagosome-lysosome fusion was defective. As autophagy plays a crucial role in selective removal of stress-mediated protein aggregates and injured organelles, AgNPs-induced autophagic flux defect may consequently lead to aggravated cytotoxic responses. Furthermore, we suggest that p62 accumulation resulting from defective autophagy may also potentially account for AgNPs cytotoxicity. Intriguingly, AgNPs have been shown to interfere with ubiquitin modifications, either via upregulating levels of enzymes participating in ubiquitination, or through impairing the biological reactivity of ubiquitin (due to formation of AgNPs-ubiquitin corona). Ubiquitination both confers selectivity to autophagy as well as modulates stabilization, activation, and trafficking of proteins involved in autophagic clearance pathways. In this regard, we offer a new perspective that interference of AgNPs with ubiquitination may account for AgNPs-induced defective autophagy and cytotoxic effects. PMID:27240148

  9. Dual role of autophagy in HIV-1 replication and pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Killian M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Autophagy, the major mechanism for degrading long-lived intracellular proteins and organelles, is essential for eukaryotic cell homeostasis. Autophagy also defends the cell against invasion by microorganisms and has important roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Increasingly evident is that HIV-1 replication is dependent on select components of autophagy. Fittingly, HIV-1 proteins are able to modulate autophagy to maximize virus production. At the same time, HIV-1 proteins appear t...

  10. Bone Cell Autophagy Is Regulated by Environmental Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Zahm, Adam M.; Bohensky, Jolene; Adams, Christopher S.; Shapiro, Irving M.; Srinivas, Vickram

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to ascertain whether bone cells undergo autophagy and to determine if this process is regulated by environmental factors. We showed that osteocytes in both murine and human cortical bone display a punctuate distribution of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3, indicative of autophagy. In addition, we noted a basal level of autophagy in preosteocyte-like murine long bone-derived osteocytic (MLO)-A5 cells. Autophagy was upregulated following nutrient d...

  11. Interactions between Shigella flexneri and the Autophagy Machinery

    OpenAIRE

    Krokowski, Sina; Mostowy, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy, an intracellular degradation process, is increasingly recognized as having important roles in host defense. Interactions between Shigella flexneri and the autophagy machinery were first discovered in 2005. Since then, work has shown that multiple autophagy pathways are triggered by S. flexneri, and autophagic responses can have different roles during Shigella infection. Here, we review the interactions between S. flexneri and the autophagy machinery, highlighting that studies using...

  12. 活体肾移植供肾肾小球滤过率对术后移植肾功能恢复的影响%Influence of glomerular filtration rate of living donor on recovery of graft function after transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏子庭; 李珍; 曾仲; 刘涛; 段键; 黄汉飞; 林杰

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨活体肾移植供肾肾小球滤过率(GFR)对术后移植肾功能恢复的影响。方法回顾性分析2009年至2013年在昆明医科大学第一附属医院器官移植中心接受活体供肾移植的108对供受者的临床资料。按供肾 GFR 数值大小将研究对象分为 G1组(GFR <40 ml/min)、G2组(GFR 40~45 ml/min)、G3组(GFR 46~50 ml/min)及 G4组(GFR >50 ml/min)。比较各组受者术后1周、2周、3周、1个月、3个月、6个月及1年的血清肌酐(Scr)的变化情况,以及术后1年的人及肾存活情况。结果与 G1组比较,G2、G3、G4组术后2周、3周、1个月的 Scr 值较低,差异有统计学意义(均为 P <0.05)。术后1年内人、肾存活情况,G1组超急性排斥反应致移植肾失功1例、重症肺部感染死亡1例;G2组因急性排斥反应导致移植肾失功1例;G3组死于重症肺部感染者1例;G4组1例死于重症肺部感染;其余患者在随访期间人、肾均存活。结论活体肾移植供肾GFR 值低对术后移植肾早期(1个月内)肾功能恢复有一定影响。%Objective To investigate the influence of glomerular filtration rate (GFR)of living donor on recovery of graft function after transplantation.Methods Clinical data of 108 pairs of donors and recipients undergoing living donor renal transplantation at the Organ Transplantation Center of First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University from 2009 to 2013 were retrospectively studied.The objects were divided into G1 group (GFR 50 ml/min)according to GFR of the donor kidneys.Changes in serum creatinine (Scr)at 1 week,2 weeks,3 weeks,1 month,3 months,6 months and 1 year after transplantation as well as survival conditions of patient and kidney within 1 year after transplantation of each group were compared.Results Compared with G1 group,Scr at 2 weeks,3 weeks,1 month after transplantation was lower in G2 group,G3 group and G4 group,and the

  13. Autophagy and Retromer Components in Plant Innate Immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, David

    -hormone salicylic acid. Here, I present data that make it clear that NPR1 does not directly regulate autophagy, but instead control stress responses that indirectly activate autophagy. The observations presented will also clarify why autophagy has been described as being both a pro-death and pro-life pathway under...

  14. Effects of sulindac and naproxen in patients with chronic glomerular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Strandgaard, S; Christensen, P;

    1986-01-01

    . Naproxen caused a decrease (p less than 0.05) in 24-hour creatinine clearance of 14 ml/min, an increase (p less than 0.05) in plasma urea of 1.0 mmol/l, an increase (p less than 0.05) in plasma potassium of 0.4 mmol/l and a decrease (p less than 0.01) in 24-hour urinary excretion of albumin of 11 mumol....... Sulindac did not change any of these parameters significantly. In conclusion, sulindac affects renal prostaglandin synthesis to a significantly minor degree than naproxen and contrary to naproxen it does not influence the renal function in patients with chronic glomerular disease....

  15. Autophagy and Autoimmunity CrossTalks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhisek eBhattacharya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, initially viewed as a conserved bulk-degradation mechanism, has emerged as a central player in a multitude of immune functions. Autophagy is important in host defense against intracellular and extracellular pathogens, metabolic syndromes, immune cell homeostasis, antigen processing and presentation and maintenance of tolerance. The observation that the above processes are implicated in triggering or exacerbating autoimmunity raises the possibility that the autophagy pathway is involved in mediating autoimmune processes, either directly or as a consequence of innate or adaptive functions mediated by the pathway. Genome-wide association studies have shown association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in autophagy related gene 5 (Atg5, and Atg16l1 with susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematous (SLE and Crohn’s disease, respectively. Enhanced expression of Atg5 was also reported in blood of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS, and in T cells isolated from blood or brain tissues from patients with active relapse of MS. This review explores the roles of autophagy pathway in the innate and adaptive immune systems on regulating or mediating the onset, progression or exacerbation of autoimmune processes.

  16. Autophagy and Liver Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Cursio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver ischemia-reperfusion (I-R injury occurs during liver resection, liver transplantation, and hemorrhagic shock. The main mode of liver cell death after warm and/or cold liver I-R is necrosis, but other modes of cell death, as apoptosis and autophagy, are also involved. Autophagy is an intracellular self-digesting pathway responsible for removal of long-lived proteins, damaged organelles, and malformed proteins during biosynthesis by lysosomes. Autophagy is found in normal and diseased liver. Although depending on the type of ischemia, warm and/or cold, the dynamic process of liver I-R results mainly in adenosine triphosphate depletion and in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, leads to both, a local ischemic insult and an acute inflammatory-mediated reperfusion injury, and results finally in cell death. This process can induce liver dysfunction and can increase patient morbidity and mortality after liver surgery and hemorrhagic shock. Whether autophagy protects from or promotes liver injury following warm and/or cold I-R remains to be elucidated. The present review aims to summarize the current knowledge in liver I-R injury focusing on both the beneficial and the detrimental effects of liver autophagy following warm and/or cold liver I-R.

  17. Endothelin-1 increases glomerular permeability and inflammation independent of blood pressure in the rat

    OpenAIRE

    Saleh, Mohamed A; Boesen, Erika I.; Pollock, Jennifer S.; Savin, Virginia J.; Pollock, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent vasoactive peptide implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and renal disease. The aim of the current study was to test the hypotheses that ET-1 increases albumin permeability of glomeruli isolated from normal rats and that chronic ET-1 infusion will increase glomerular permeability and inflammation independent of blood pressure. Glomerular permeability to albumin (Palb) was determined from the change in glomerular volume induced by exposing isolated glom...

  18. Characterization of novel genes of importance for renal glomerular function and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Oddsson, Ásmundur

    2013-01-01

    Glomerular kidney diseases are a major health care burden. The glomerular filtration barrier consists of three layers: the slit diaphragm that bridges the interlocking foot pro- cesses of the podocytes, the glomerular basement membrane and fenestrated endothelial cells. The filtration barrier is permselective to plasma macromolecules based on size, shape, and charge. The molecular makeup of the filtration barrier determines its permselectivity. Knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of the ...

  19. High glucose stimulates the expression of erythropoietin in rat glomerular epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Seul Ki; Park, Soo Hyun

    2011-01-01

    It has been reported that the levels of erythropoietin are associated with diabetes mellitus. Glomerular epithelial cells, located in the renal cortex, play an important role in the regulation of kidney function and hyperglycemia-induced cell loss of glomerular epithelial cells is implicated in the onset of diabetic nephropathy. This study investigated the effect of high glucose on erythropoietin and erythropoietin receptor expression in rat glomerular epithelial cells. We found that 25 mM D-...

  20. Organogenesis of the kidney glomerulus: Focus on the glomerular basement membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Miner, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    The glomerular basement membrane (GBM) is a crucial component of the kidney's filtration barrier that separates the vasculature from the urinary space. During glomerulogenesis, the GBM is formed from fusion of two distinct basement membranes, one synthesized by the glomerular epithelial cell (podocyte) and the other by the glomerular endothelial cell. The main components of the GBM are laminin-521 (α5β2γ1), collagen α3α4α5(IV), nidogen and the heparan sulfate proteoglycan, agrin. By studying ...

  1. Tensin2-deficient mice on FVB/N background develop severe glomerular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    UCHIO-YAMADA, Kozue; MONOBE, Yoko; AKAGI, Ken-ichi; YAMAMOTO, Yoshie; OGURA, Atsuo; MANABE, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Tensin2 (Tns2) is an essential component for the maintenance of glomerular basement membrane (GBM) structures. Tns2-deficient mice were previously shown to develop mild glomerular injury on a DBA/2 background, but not on a C57BL/6J or a 129/SvJ background, suggesting that glomerular injury by the deletion of Tns2 was strongly dependent on the genetic background. To further understand the mechanisms for the onset and the progression of glomerular injury by the deletion of Tns2, we generated Tns2-deficient mice on an FVB/N (FVB) strain, which is highly sensitive to glomerular disease. Tns2-deficient mice on FVB (FVBGN) developed severe nephrotic syndrome, and female FVBGN mice died within 8 weeks. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that FVBGN mice exhibited severe glomerular defects with mesangial process invasion of glomerular capillary tufts, lamination and thickening of the GBM and subsequent podocyte foot process effacement soon after birth. Aberrant laminin components containing α1, α2 and β1 chains, which are normally expressed in the mesangium, accumulated in the GBM of FVBGN, suggesting that these components originated from mesangial cells that invaded glomerular capillary tufts. Compared to Tns2-deficient mice on the other backgrounds in previous reports, FVBGN mice developed earlier onset of glomerular defects and rapid progression of renal failure. Thus, this study further extended our understanding of the possible genetic background effect on the deterioration of nephrotic syndrome by Tns2 deficiency. PMID:26854109

  2. Exercise induces autophagy in peripheral tissues and in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    He, Congcong; Sumpter, Jr., Rhea; Levine, Beth

    2012-01-01

    We recently identified physical exercise as a newly defined inducer of autophagy in vivo. Exercise induced autophagy in multiple organs involved in metabolic regulation, such as muscle, liver, pancreas and adipose tissue. To study the physiological role of exercise-induced autophagy, we generated mice with a knock-in nonphosphorylatable mutation in BCL2 (Thr69Ala, Ser70Ala and Ser84Ala) (BCL2 AAA) that are defective in exercise- and starvation-induced autophagy but not in basal autophagy. We ...

  3. Hemodinâmica glomerular renal no roedor Calomys callosus

    OpenAIRE

    Mirian A. Boim; Nestor Schor

    1989-01-01

    A função renal do roedor Calomys callosus, envolvido no ciclo de transmissão de diversos agentes patogênicos para o homem foi avaliada no animal intacto, através da técnica de depuração e micropunção renal. Os resultados mostraram que este roedor apresenta níveis pressóricos, hematócrito e proteinas plasmáticas semelhantes aos dos ratos submetidos ao mesmo procedimento experimental. Os pesos corporal e renal, bem como a filtração glomerular global e por nefro assemelham-se aos do camundongo. ...

  4. Circadian glomerular function: from physiology to molecular and therapeutical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuerzner, Grégoire; Firsov, Dmitri; Bonny, Olivier

    2014-08-01

    Life on earth is rhythmic by essence due to day/night alternation, and many biological processes are also cyclic. The kidney has a special role in the organism, controlling electrolytes and water balance, blood pressure, elimination of metabolic waste and xenobiotics and the production of several hormones. The kidney is submitted to changes throughout 24 h with periods of intense activity followed by calmer periods. Filtration, reabsorption and secretion are the three components determining renal function. Here, we review circadian changes related to glomerular function and proteinuria and emphasize the role of the clock in these processes. PMID:24516223

  5. The Relationship between Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate and Diabetic Retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Jingyang Wu; Jin Geng; Limin Liu; Weiping Teng; Lei Liu; Lei Chen

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of visual impairment and blindness in working-aged people. Several studies have suggested that glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was correlated with DR. This is a hospital-based study and the aim of it was to examine the relationship between the GFR and DR in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We used CKD-EPI equation to estimate GFR and SPSS 19.0 and EmpowerStats software to assess their relationship. Among the 1613 participants (aged...

  6. Autophagy in the light of sphingolipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvald, Eva Bang; Olsen, Anne Sofie Braun; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of cellular homeostasis requires tight and coordinated control of numerous metabolic pathways, which are governed by interconnected networks of signaling pathways and energy-sensing regulators. Autophagy, a lysosomal degradation pathway by which the cell self-digests its own components......, has over the past decade been recognized as an essential part of metabolism. Autophagy not only rids the cell of excessive or damaged organelles, misfolded proteins, and invading microorganisms, it also provides nutrients to maintain crucial cellular functions. Besides serving as essential structural...... moieties of biomembranes, lipids including sphingolipids are increasingly being recognized as central regulators of a number of important cellular processes, including autophagy. In the present review we describe how sphingolipids, with special emphasis on ceramides and sphingosine-1-phosphate, can act as...

  7. What to Eat: Evidence for Selective Autophagy in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brice E.Floyd; Stephanie C.Morriss; Gustavo C.Maclntosh; Diane C.Bassham

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a macromolecular degradation pathway by which cells recycle their contents as a developmental process,house-keeping mechanism,and response to environmental stress.In plants,autophagy involves the sequestration of cargo to be degraded,transport to the cell vacuole in a double-membrane bound autophagosome,and subsequent degradation by lytic enzymes.Autophagy has generally been considered to be a non-selective mechanism of degradation.However,studies in yeast and animals have found numerous examples of selective autophagy,with cargo including proteins,protein aggregates,and organelles.Recent work has also provided evidence for several types of selective autophagy in plants.The degradation of protein aggregates was the first selective autophagy described in plants,and,more recently,a hybrid protein of the mammalian selective autophagy adaptors p62 and NBR1,which interacts with the autophagy machinery and may function in autophagy of protein aggregates,was described in plants.Other intracellular components have been suggested to be selectively targeted by autophagy in plants,but the current evidence is limited.Here,we discuss recent findings regarding the selective targeting of cell components by autophagy in plants.

  8. Induction of autophagy improves embryo viability in cloned mouse embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, XingHui; Zhang, Na; Wang, ZhenDong; Bai, GuangYu; Zheng, Zhong; Gu, YanLi; Wu, YanShuang; Liu, Hui; Zhou, DongJie; Lei, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential cellular mechanism that degrades cytoplasmic proteins and organelles to recycle their components. Moreover, autophagy is essential for preimplantation development in mammals. Here we show that autophagy is also important for reprogramming in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Our data indicate that unlike fertilized oocytes, autophagy is not triggered in SCNT embryos during 6 hours of activation. Mechanistically, the inhibited autophagic induction during SCNT activation is due to the cytochalasin B (CB) caused depolymerization of actin filaments. In this study, we induced autophagy during SCNT activation by rapamycin and pp242, which could restore the expected level of autophagy and significantly enhance the development of SCNT embryos to the blastocyst stage when compared with the control (68.5% and 68.7% vs. 41.5%, P autophagy is important for development of SCNT embryos and inhibited autophagic induction during SCNT activation might be one of the serious causes of low efficiency of SCNT. PMID:26643778

  9. Autophagy: A double-edged sword in intervertebral disk degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Jun; Yang, Wei; Wang, Cheng; He, Wen-Si; Deng, Hai-Yang; Yan, Yi-Guo; Zhang, Jian; Xiang, Yong-Xiao; Wang, Wen-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic mechanism through which intracellular damaged organelles and proteins are degraded and recycled in response to increased metabolic demands or stresses. Although primarily cytoprotective, dysfunction of autophagy is often associated with many degenerative diseases, including intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration (IDD). As a main contributing factor to low back pain, IDD is the pathological basis for various debilitating spinal diseases. Either higher or lower levels of autophagy are observed in degenerative IVD cells. Despite the precise role of autophagy in disc degeneration that is still controversial, with difference from protection to aggravation, targeting autophagy has shown promise for mitigating disc degeneration. In the current review, we summarize the changes of autophagy in degenerative IVD cells and mainly discuss the relationship between autophagy and IDD. With continued efforts, modulation of the autophagic process could be a potential and attractive therapeutic strategy for degenerative disc disease. PMID:27018178

  10. Degradation of AF1Q by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peng; Ji, Min; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Jingru [Department of Hematology, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Li, Huanjie; Cui, Taixing; Li Wang, Xing [Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Tang, Dongqi, E-mail: tangdq@sdu.edu.cn [Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250033 (China); Ji, Chunyan, E-mail: jichunyan@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Hematology, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2014-09-10

    AF1Q, a mixed lineage leukemia gene fusion partner, is identified as a poor prognostic biomarker for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), adult AML with normal cytogenetic and adult myelodysplastic syndrome. AF1Q is highly regulated during hematopoietic progenitor differentiation and development but its regulatory mechanism has not been defined clearly. In the present study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to influence chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and explored the degradation mechanism of AF1Q. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as chloroquine, increased AF1Q levels, whereas activators of CMA, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased AF1Q levels. AF1Q interacts with HSPA8 and LAMP-2A, which are core components of the CMA machinery. Knockdown of HSPA8 or LAMP-2A increased AF1Q protein levels, whereas overexpression showed the opposite effect. Using an amino acid deletion AF1Q mutation plasmid, we identified that AF1Q had a KFERQ-like motif which was recognized by HSPA8 for CMA-dependent proteolysis. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that AF1Q can be degraded in lysosomes by CMA. - Highlights: • Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is involved in the degradation of AF1Q. • Macroautophagy does not contribute to the AF1Q degradation. • AF1Q has a KFERQ-like motif that is recognized by CMA core components.

  11. LC3B is indispensable for selective autophagy of p62 but not basal autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Knockdown of LC3 or GABARAP families did not affect the basal autophagy. • LC3B has a higher affinity for the autophagy-specific substrate, p62, than GABARAPs. • siRNA-mediated knockdown of LC3B, but not that of GABARAPs, resulted in significant accumulation of p62. - Abstract: Autophagy is a unique intracellular protein degradation system accompanied by autophagosome formation. Besides its important role through bulk degradation in supplying nutrients, this system has an ability to degrade certain proteins, organelles, and invading bacteria selectively to maintain cellular homeostasis. In yeasts, Atg8p plays key roles in both autophagosome formation and selective autophagy based on its membrane fusion property and interaction with autophagy adaptors/specific substrates. In contrast to the single Atg8p in yeast, mammals have 6 homologs of Atg8p comprising LC3 and GABARAP families. However, it is not clear these two families have different or similar functions. The aim of this study was to determine the separate roles of LC3 and GABARAP families in basal/constitutive and/or selective autophagy. While the combined knockdown of LC3 and GABARAP families caused a defect in long-lived protein degradation through lysosomes, knockdown of each had no effect on the degradation. Meanwhile, knockdown of LC3B but not GABARAPs resulted in significant accumulation of p62/Sqstm1, one of the selective substrate for autophagy. Our results suggest that while mammalian Atg8 homologs are functionally redundant with regard to autophagosome formation, selective autophagy is regulated by specific Atg8 homologs

  12. LC3B is indispensable for selective autophagy of p62 but not basal autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Yoko [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Sou, Yu-Shin; Kageyama, Shun [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Takahashi, Takao [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Ueno, Takashi [Division of Proteomics and Biomolecular Science, Center for Biomedical Research Resources, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Tanaka, Keiji [Laboratory of Protein Metabolism, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Komatsu, Masaaki, E-mail: komatsu-ms@igakuken.or.jp [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8510 (Japan); Ichimura, Yoshinobu, E-mail: ichimura-ys@igakuken.or.jp [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Knockdown of LC3 or GABARAP families did not affect the basal autophagy. • LC3B has a higher affinity for the autophagy-specific substrate, p62, than GABARAPs. • siRNA-mediated knockdown of LC3B, but not that of GABARAPs, resulted in significant accumulation of p62. - Abstract: Autophagy is a unique intracellular protein degradation system accompanied by autophagosome formation. Besides its important role through bulk degradation in supplying nutrients, this system has an ability to degrade certain proteins, organelles, and invading bacteria selectively to maintain cellular homeostasis. In yeasts, Atg8p plays key roles in both autophagosome formation and selective autophagy based on its membrane fusion property and interaction with autophagy adaptors/specific substrates. In contrast to the single Atg8p in yeast, mammals have 6 homologs of Atg8p comprising LC3 and GABARAP families. However, it is not clear these two families have different or similar functions. The aim of this study was to determine the separate roles of LC3 and GABARAP families in basal/constitutive and/or selective autophagy. While the combined knockdown of LC3 and GABARAP families caused a defect in long-lived protein degradation through lysosomes, knockdown of each had no effect on the degradation. Meanwhile, knockdown of LC3B but not GABARAPs resulted in significant accumulation of p62/Sqstm1, one of the selective substrate for autophagy. Our results suggest that while mammalian Atg8 homologs are functionally redundant with regard to autophagosome formation, selective autophagy is regulated by specific Atg8 homologs.

  13. Glomerular endothelial surface layer acts as a barrier against albumin filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dane, M.J.; Berg, B.M. van den; Avramut, M.C.; Faas, F.G.; Vlag, J. van der; Rops, A.L.; Ravelli, R.B.; Koster, B.J.; Zonneveld, A.J. van; Vink, H.; Rabelink, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    Glomerular endothelium is highly fenestrated, and its contribution to glomerular barrier function is the subject of debate. In recent years, a polysaccharide-rich endothelial surface layer (ESL) has been postulated to act as a filtration barrier for large molecules, such as albumin. To test this hyp

  14. Glomerular Hyperfiltration in Adult Sickle Cell Anemia: A Frequent Hemolysis Associated Feature

    OpenAIRE

    Haymann, Jean-philippe; Stankovic, Katia; Levy, Pierre; Avellino, Virginie; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Letavernier, Emmanuel; Grateau, Gilles; Baud, Laurent; Girot, Robert; Lionnet, François

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Sickle cell anemia-associated nephropathy is a growing matter of concern because renal failure affects most aging sickle cell anemia patients. Glomerular damage is a common feature revealed by a microalbuminuria or a macroalbuminuria. Although glomerular hyperfiltration has been described for decades in this population, its prevalence in young adults is unknown.

  15. Avermectin induced autophagy in pigeon spleen tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ci; Zhao, Yanbing; Chen, Lijie; Zhang, Ziwei; Li, Ming; Li, Shu

    2015-12-01

    The level of autophagy is considered as an indicator for monitoring the toxic impact of pesticide exposure. Avermectin (AVM), a widely used insecticide, has immunotoxic effects on the pigeon spleen. The aim of this study was to investigate the status of autophagy and the expression levels of microtubule-associated protein1 light chain 3 (LC3), beclin-1, dynein, autophagy associated gene (Atg) 4B, Atg5, target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) and target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2) in AVM-treated pigeon spleens. Eighty two-month-old pigeons were randomly divided into four groups: a control group, a low-dose group, a medium-dose group and a high-dose group, which were fed a basal diet spiked with 0, 20, 40 and 60 mg AVM/kg diet, respectively. Microscopic cellular morphology revealed a significant increase in autophagic structures in the AVM-treated groups. The expression of LC3, beclin-1, dynein, Atg4B and Atg5 increased, while mRNA levels of TORC1 and TORC2 were decreased in the AVM-treated groups relative to the control groups at 30, 60 and 90 days in the pigeon spleen. These results indicated that AVM exposure could up-regulate the level of autophagy in a dose-time-dependent manner in the pigeon spleen. PMID:26541719

  16. MicroRNA regulation of Autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Lisa B; Lund, Anders H

    2012-01-01

    progress has recently contributed to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the autophagy machinery, yet several gaps remain in our knowledge of this process. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) established a new paradigm of post-transcriptional gene regulation and during the past decade these...

  17. Autophagy as a Potential Target for Sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jingjing; Kou, Xianjuan; Jia, Shaohui; Yang, Xiaoqi; Yang, Yi; Chen, Ning

    2016-07-01

    Sarcopenia is an aging-related disease with a significant reduction in mass and strength of skeletal muscle due to the imbalance between protein synthesis and protein degradation. The loss of skeletal muscle is an inevitable event during aging process, which can result in the significant impact on the quality of life, and also can increase the risk for other aging-associated diseases in the elderly. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of aging-related skeletal muscle loss is still poorly understood. Autophagy is a degradation pathway for the clearance of dysfunctional organelles and damaged macromolecules during aging process. Appropriate induction or accurate regulation of autophagic process and improved quality control of mitochondria through autophagy or other strategies are required for the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass. In this article, we have summarized the current understanding of autophagic pathways in sarcopenia, and discussed the functional status of autophagy and autophagy-associated quality control of mitochondria in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia. Moreover, this article will provide some theoretical references for the exploration of scientific and optimal intervention strategies such as exercise and caloric restriction for the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia through the regulation of autophagic pathways. PMID:26580995

  18. RUN and FYVE domain-containing protein 4 enhances autophagy and lysosome tethering in response to Interleukin-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terawaki, Seigo; Camosseto, Voahirana; Prete, Francesca; Wenger, Till; Papadopoulos, Alexia; Rondeau, Christiane; Combes, Alexis; Rodriguez Rodrigues, Christian; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Fallet, Mathieu; English, Luc; Santamaria, Rodrigo; Soares, Ana R; Weil, Tobias; Hammad, Hamida; Desjardins, Michel; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Santos, Manuel A S; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe

    2015-09-28

    Autophagy is a key degradative pathway coordinated by external cues, including starvation, oxidative stress, or pathogen detection. Rare are the molecules known to contribute mechanistically to the regulation of autophagy and expressed specifically in particular environmental contexts or in distinct cell types. Here, we unravel the role of RUN and FYVE domain-containing protein 4 (RUFY4) as a positive molecular regulator of macroautophagy in primary dendritic cells (DCs). We show that exposure to interleukin-4 (IL-4) during DC differentiation enhances autophagy flux through mTORC1 regulation and RUFY4 induction, which in turn actively promote LC3 degradation, Syntaxin 17-positive autophagosome formation, and lysosome tethering. Enhanced autophagy boosts endogenous antigen presentation by MHC II and allows host control of Brucella abortus replication in IL-4-treated DCs and in RUFY4-expressing cells. RUFY4 is therefore the first molecule characterized to date that promotes autophagy and influences endosome dynamics in a subset of immune cells. PMID:26416964

  19. The thiazole derivative CPTH6 impairs autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzoni, Y; Desideri, M; Gabellini, C; De Luca, T; Carradori, S; Secci, D; Nescatelli, R; Candiloro, A; Condello, M; Meschini, S; Del Bufalo, D; Trisciuoglio, D

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the thiazole derivative 3-methylcyclopentylidene-[4-(4'-chlorophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]hydrazone (CPTH6) induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human leukemia cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether CPTH6 is able to affect autophagy. By using several human tumor cell lines with different origins we demonstrated that CPTH6 treatment induced, in a dose-dependent manner, a significant increase in autophagic features, as imaged by electron microscopy, immunoblotting analysis of membrane-bound form of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3B-II) levels and by appearance of typical LC3B-II-associated autophagosomal puncta. To gain insights into the molecular mechanisms of elevated markers of autophagy induced by CPTH6 treatment, we silenced the expression of several proteins acting at different steps of autophagy. We found that the effect of CPTH6 on autophagy developed through a noncanonical mechanism that did not require beclin-1-dependent nucleation, but involved Atg-7-mediated elongation of autophagosomal membranes. Strikingly, a combined treatment of CPTH6 with late-stage autophagy inhibitors, such as chloroquine and bafilomycin A1, demonstrates that under basal condition CPTH6 reduces autophagosome turnover through an impairment of their degradation pathway, rather than enhancing autophagosome formation, as confirmed by immunofluorescence experiments. According to these results, CPTH6-induced enhancement of autophagy substrate p62 and NBR1 protein levels confirms a blockage of autophagic cargo degradation. In addition, CPTH6 inhibited autophagosome maturation and compounds having high structural similarities with CPTH6 produced similar effects on the autophagic pathway. Finally, the evidence that CPTH6 treatment decreased α-tubulin acetylation and failed to increase autophagic markers in cells in which acetyltransferase ATAT1 expression was silenced indicates a possible role of α-tubulin acetylation in

  20. Liver autophagy in anorexia nervosa and acute liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheloufi, Marouane; Boulanger, Chantal M; Durand, François; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy, a lysosomal catabolic pathway for long-lived proteins and damaged organelles, is crucial for cell homeostasis, and survival under stressful conditions. During starvation, autophagy is induced in numerous organisms ranging from yeast to mammals, and promotes survival by supplying nutrients and energy. In the early neonatal period, when transplacental nutrients supply is interrupted, starvation-induced autophagy is crucial for neonates' survival. In adult animals, autophagy provides amino acids and participates in glucose metabolism following starvation. In patients with anorexia nervosa, autophagy appears initially protective, allowing cells to copes with nutrient deprivation. However, when starvation is critically prolonged and when body mass index reaches 13 kg/m(2) or lower, acute liver insufficiency occurs with features of autophagic cell death, which can be observed by electron microscopy analysis of liver biopsy samples. In acetaminophen overdose, a classic cause of severe liver injury, autophagy is induced as a protective mechanism. Pharmacological enhancement of autophagy protects against acetaminophen-induced necrosis. Autophagy is also activated as a rescue mechanism in response to Efavirenz-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. However, Efavirenz overdose blocks autophagy leading to liver cell death. In conclusion, in acute liver injury, autophagy appears as a protective mechanism that can be however blocked or overwhelmed. PMID:25250330

  1. Impairment of autophagy: From hereditary disorder to drug intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At first, the molecular mechanism of autophagy was unveiled in a unicellular organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast), followed by the discovery that the basic mechanism of autophagy is conserved in multicellular organisms including mammals. Although autophagy was considered to be a non-selective bulk protein degradation system to recycle amino acids during periods of nutrient starvation, it is also believed to be an essential mechanism for the selective elimination of proteins/organelles that are damaged under pathological conditions. Research advances made using autophagy-deficient animals have revealed that impairments of autophagy often underlie the pathogenesis of hereditary disorders such as Danon, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. On the other hand, there are many reports that drugs and toxicants, including arsenic, cadmium, paraquat, methamphetamine, and ethanol, induce autophagy during the development of their toxicity on many organs including heart, brain, lung, kidney, and liver. Although the question as to whether autophagic machinery is involved in the execution of cell death or not remains controversial, the current view of the role of autophagy during cell/tissue injury is that it is an important, often essential, cytoprotective reaction; disturbances in cytoprotective autophagy aggravate cell/tissue injuries. The purpose of this review is to provide (1) a gross summarization of autophagy processes, which are becoming more important in the field of toxicology, and (2) examples of important studies reporting the involvement of perturbations in autophagy in cell/tissue injuries caused by acute as well as chronic intoxication

  2. Liver Autophagy in Anorexia Nervosa and Acute Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marouane Kheloufi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, a lysosomal catabolic pathway for long-lived proteins and damaged organelles, is crucial for cell homeostasis, and survival under stressful conditions. During starvation, autophagy is induced in numerous organisms ranging from yeast to mammals, and promotes survival by supplying nutrients and energy. In the early neonatal period, when transplacental nutrients supply is interrupted, starvation-induced autophagy is crucial for neonates’ survival. In adult animals, autophagy provides amino acids and participates in glucose metabolism following starvation. In patients with anorexia nervosa, autophagy appears initially protective, allowing cells to copes with nutrient deprivation. However, when starvation is critically prolonged and when body mass index reaches 13 kg/m2 or lower, acute liver insufficiency occurs with features of autophagic cell death, which can be observed by electron microscopy analysis of liver biopsy samples. In acetaminophen overdose, a classic cause of severe liver injury, autophagy is induced as a protective mechanism. Pharmacological enhancement of autophagy protects against acetaminophen-induced necrosis. Autophagy is also activated as a rescue mechanism in response to Efavirenz-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. However, Efavirenz overdose blocks autophagy leading to liver cell death. In conclusion, in acute liver injury, autophagy appears as a protective mechanism that can be however blocked or overwhelmed.

  3. Induction of cytoprotective autophagy in PC-12 cells by cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiwen [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Bijie Pilot Area Research Institute of Bijie University, Bijie 551700 (China); Zhu, Jiaqiao; Zhang, Kangbao; Jiang, Chenyang; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Yan; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong; Gu, Jianhong [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Liu, Zongping, E-mail: liuzongping@yzu.edu.cn [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou 225009 (China)

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •Cadmium can promote early upregulation of autophagy in PC-12 cells. •Autophagy precedes apoptosis in cadmium-treated PC-12 cells. •Cadmium-induced autophagy is cytoprotective in PC-12 cells. •Class III PI3K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathway plays a positive role in cadmium-triggered autophagy. -- Abstract: Laboratory data have demonstrated that cadmium (Cd) may induce neuronal apoptosis. However, little is known about the role of autophagy in neurons. In this study, cell viability decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment with Cd in PC-12 cells. As cells were exposed to Cd, the levels of LC3-II proteins became elevated, specific punctate distribution of endogenous LC3-II increased, and numerous autophagosomes appeared, which suggest that Cd induced a high level of autophagy. In the late stages of autophagy, an increase in the apoptosis ratio was observed. Likewise, pre-treatment with chloroquine (an autophagic inhibitor) and rapamycin (an autophagic inducer) resulted in an increased and decreased percentage of apoptosis in contrast to other Cd-treated groups, respectively. The results indicate that autophagy delayed apoptosis in Cd-treated PC-12 cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of cells with chloroquine reduced autophagy and cell activity. However, rapamycin had an opposite effect on autophagy and cell activity. Moreover, class III PI3 K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathways served a function in Cd-induced autophagy. The findings suggest that Cd can induce cytoprotective autophagy by activating class III PI3 K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathways. In sum, this study strongly suggests that autophagy may serve a positive function in the reduction of Cd-induced cytotoxicity.

  4. Induction of cytoprotective autophagy in PC-12 cells by cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Cadmium can promote early upregulation of autophagy in PC-12 cells. •Autophagy precedes apoptosis in cadmium-treated PC-12 cells. •Cadmium-induced autophagy is cytoprotective in PC-12 cells. •Class III PI3K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathway plays a positive role in cadmium-triggered autophagy. -- Abstract: Laboratory data have demonstrated that cadmium (Cd) may induce neuronal apoptosis. However, little is known about the role of autophagy in neurons. In this study, cell viability decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment with Cd in PC-12 cells. As cells were exposed to Cd, the levels of LC3-II proteins became elevated, specific punctate distribution of endogenous LC3-II increased, and numerous autophagosomes appeared, which suggest that Cd induced a high level of autophagy. In the late stages of autophagy, an increase in the apoptosis ratio was observed. Likewise, pre-treatment with chloroquine (an autophagic inhibitor) and rapamycin (an autophagic inducer) resulted in an increased and decreased percentage of apoptosis in contrast to other Cd-treated groups, respectively. The results indicate that autophagy delayed apoptosis in Cd-treated PC-12 cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of cells with chloroquine reduced autophagy and cell activity. However, rapamycin had an opposite effect on autophagy and cell activity. Moreover, class III PI3 K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathways served a function in Cd-induced autophagy. The findings suggest that Cd can induce cytoprotective autophagy by activating class III PI3 K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathways. In sum, this study strongly suggests that autophagy may serve a positive function in the reduction of Cd-induced cytotoxicity

  5. Effects of emodin on the proliferation of the glomerular mesangial cell and correlative cytokines in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of emodin(EMD) on cell proliferation and correlative cytokines secretion of glomerular mesangial in rats. Methods:The effects of EMD on cell proliferation and IL-6 , TGF-β1 secretion of glomerular mesangial in rats were observed. Cell proliferation was measured by MTT method. IL-6 and TGF-β1 secretion was detected with ELISA. Results:EMD was able to inhibit the cell proliferation and down-regulate the IL-6 and TGF-β1 secretion of glomerular mesangial, as compared to the model group in rats (P<0.05). Conclusion:EMD could significantly inhibit the cell proliferation, and reduce the creation of extracellular matrix(ECM), this indicated that it could play an important role in alleviation and prevention of glomerular sclerosis. The mechanism may be that EMD can reduce the IL-6 and TGF-β1 secretion of glomerular mesangial cell in rats.

  6. Osteolytic bone metastasis is hampered by impinging on the interplay among autophagy, anoikis and ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroni, P; Bendinelli, P; Matteucci, E; Locatelli, A; Nakamura, T; Scita, G; Desiderio, M A

    2014-01-01

    Here we show that the fate of osteolytic bone metastasis depends on the balance among autophagy, anoikis resistance and ossification, and that the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signaling pathway seems to have an important role in orchestrating bone colonization. These findings are consistent with the pathophysiology of bone metastasis that is influenced by the cross-talk of supportive and neoplastic cells through molecular signaling networks. We adopted the strategy to target metastasis and stroma with the use of adenovirally expressed NK4 (AdNK4) and Dasatinib to block HGF/Met axis and Src activity. In human bone metastatic 1833 cells, HGF conferred anoikis resistance via Akt and Src activities and HIF-1α induction, leading to Bim isoforms degradation. When Src and Met activities were inhibited with Dasatinib, the Bim isoforms accumulated conferring anoikis sensitivity. The proviability effect of HGF, under low-nutrient stress condition, was related to a faster autophagy deactivation with respect to HGF plus Dasatinib. In the 1833 xenograft model, AdNK4 switched metastasis vasculature to blood lacunae, increasing HIF-1α in metastasis. The combination of AdNK4 plus Dasatinib gave the most relevant results for mice survival, and the following molecular and cellular changes were found to be responsible. In bone metastasis, we observed a hypoxic condition - marked by HIF-1α - and an autophagy failure - marked by p62 without Beclin-1. Then, osteolytic bone metastases were largely prevented, because of autophagy failure in metastasis and ossification in bone marrow, with osteocalcin deposition. The abnormal repair process was triggered by the dysfunctional autophagy/anoikis interplay. In conclusion, the concomitant blockade of HGF/Met axis and Src activity seemed to induce HIF-1α in metastasis, whereas the bone marrow hypoxic response was reduced. As a consequence, anoikis resistance might be hampered favoring, instead, autophagy failure and neoformation of woven

  7. Sexual differences in glomerular ultrafiltration: effect of androgen administration in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blantz, R C; Peterson, O W; Blantz, E R; Wilson, C B

    1988-03-01

    The glomerular ultrafiltration rate varies as a function of age and sex. To further elucidate the basis for the sexual difference, an androgen [Deca-Durabolin (DECA)] was administered to female ovariectomized rats, and glomerular hemodynamics were evaluated by renal micropuncture after 6 and 16 weeks of therapy. Results were compared to those in control ovariectomized female rats injected with vehicle. Therapy did not produce significant differences in body weight, but kidney size was modestly increased in DECA-treated rats at 6 weeks (0.68 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.86 +/- 0.03 g wet weight; P less than 0.05); at 16 weeks major differences in renal size were documented (0.69 +/- 0.03 vs. 1.18 +/- 0.05 g wet weight; P less than 0.01). The increase in size was primarily due to tubular hypertrophy, with more modest increases in glomerular size. After 6 weeks of therapy, the single nephron glomerular filtration rate (SNGFR) was increased in DECA-treated ovariectomized rats (24.8 +/- 1.0 vs. 32.9 +/- 1.1 nl/min; P less than 0.01). Whole kidney glomerular filtration rate also rose in proportion to increases in kidney size. The greater SNGFR was attributed to higher rates of nephron plasma flow and a numerical increase in the glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient. However, after 16 weeks of androgen therapy, in spite of marked renal hypertrophy, SNGFR did not further rise in proportion to renal size, and the rate of nephron plasma flow and the glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient actually fell relative to those in control untreated rats. Light microscopic evaluation of renal tissue revealed no abnormalities in DECA-treated rats. Thus, 6-week androgen therapy to ovariectomized female rats increased both glomerular ultrafiltration rates and renal size. However, with prolonged administration a glomerular dysfunction may have ensued whereby glomerular ultrafiltration was dissociated from increases in renal size. PMID:3342752

  8. B Cell Depletion: Rituximab in Glomerular Disease and Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marinaki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available B cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Selective targeting can be achieved with the use of the monoclonal antibody rituximab. In addition to being a drug for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, rituximab is also an FDA-approved treatment for refractory rheumatoid arthritis and, since recently, ANCA vasculitis. It has shown efficacy in many autoimmune diseases. This review will discuss current evidence and the rationale of the use of rituximab in glomerular diseases, including randomized controlled trials. The focus will be on the use of rituximab in idiopathic membranous nephropathy, systemic lupus erythematosus and ANCA-associated vasculitis. The emerging role of rituximab in renal transplantation, where it seems to be important for the desensitization protocols for highly sensitized patients as well as for the preconditioning of ABO-incompatible recipients and the treatment of antibody-mediated rejection, will also be addressed.

  9. Research Progression of Cellular Autophagy in Liver System Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyun Liu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a basic biological phenomenon widely existed in eukaryotic cells and an important mechanism for cells to adjust to the surrounding environment, prevent invasion of pathogenic micro-organisms and maintain homeostasis, whose activity changes evidently in multiple liver system diseases, suggesting that there is close association between autophagy and the generation and development of liver system diseases. It is also reported that autophagy develops and exerts an important function in many liver-related diseases, such as hepatic carcinoma, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic liver disease, viral liver disease and acute liver injury. Therefore, this study aimed to summarize the relationship between autophagy and multiple liver diseases, hoping to explore the effect of autophagy in liver system diseases and further study the regulative effect of autophagy so as to provide new thoughts for their treatment.

  10. Phosphorylation of the autophagy receptor optineurin restricts Salmonella growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wild, Philipp; Farhan, Hesso; McEwan, David G; Wagner, Sebastian; Rogov, Vladimir V; Brady, Nathan R; Richter, Benjamin; Korac, Jelena; Waidmann, Oliver; Choudhary, Chunaram; Dötsch, Volker; Bumann, Dirk; Dikic, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Selective autophagy can be mediated via receptor molecules that link specific cargoes to the autophagosomal membranes decorated by ubiquitin-like microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) modifiers. Although several autophagy receptors have been identified, little is known about mechanisms...... controlling their functions in vivo. In this work, we found that phosphorylation of an autophagy receptor, optineurin, promoted selective autophagy of ubiquitin-coated cytosolic Salmonella enterica. The protein kinase TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1) phosphorylated optineurin on serine-177, enhancing LC3 binding...... affinity and autophagic clearance of cytosolic Salmonella. Conversely, ubiquitin- or LC3-binding optineurin mutants and silencing of optineurin or TBK1 impaired Salmonella autophagy, resulting in increased intracellular bacterial proliferation. We propose that phosphorylation of autophagy receptors might...

  11. Nanomaterial-modulated autophagy: underlying mechanisms and functional consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Wei, Min; Li, Song; Le, Weidong

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is an essential lysosome-dependent process that controls the quality of the cytoplasm and maintains cellular homeostasis, and dysfunction of this protein degradation system is correlated with various disorders. A growing body of evidence suggests that nanomaterials (NMs) have autophagy-modulating effects, thus predicting a valuable and promising application potential of NMs in the diagnosis and treatment of autophagy-related diseases. NMs exhibit unique physical, chemical and biofunctional properties, which may endow NMs with capabilities to modulate autophagy via various mechanisms. The present review highlights the impacts of various NMs on autophagy and their functional consequences. The possible underlying mechanisms for NM-modulated autophagy are also discussed. PMID:27193191

  12. Forms, Crosstalks, and the Role of Phospholipid Biosynthesis in Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne Pereira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a highly conserved cellular process occurring during periods of stress to ensure a cell's survival by recycling cytosolic constituents and making products that can be used in energy generation and other essential processes. Three major forms of autophagy exist according to the specific mechanism through which cytoplasmic material is transported to a lysosome. Chaperone-mediated autophagy is a highly selective form of autophagy that delivers specific proteins for lysosomal degradation. Microautophagy is a less selective form of autophagy that occurs through lysosomal membrane invaginations, forming tubes and directly engulfing cytoplasm. Finally, macroautophagy involves formation of new membrane bilayers (autophagosomes that engulf cytosolic material and deliver it to lysosomes. This review provides new insights on the crosstalks between different forms of autophagy and the significance of bilayer-forming phospholipid synthesis in autophagosomal membrane formation.

  13. WASH inhibits autophagy through suppression of Beclin 1 ubiquitination

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Pengyan; Wang, Shuo; Du, Ying; Zhao, Zhenao; Shi, Lei; Sun, Lei; Huang, Guanling; Ye, Buqing; Li, Chong; Dai, Zhonghua; Hou, Ning; Cheng, Xuan; Sun, Qingyuan; Li, Lei(Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing, 102617, People's Republic of China); Yang, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy degrades cytoplasmic proteins and organelles to recycle cellular components that are required for cell survival and tissue homeostasis. However, it is not clear how autophagy is regulated in mammalian cells. WASH (Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) and SCAR homologue) plays an essential role in endosomal sorting through facilitating tubule fission via Arp2/3 activation. Here, we demonstrate a novel function of WASH in modulation of autophagy. We show that WASH deficiency causes...

  14. Pyrvinium targets autophagy addiction to promote cancer cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Longfei; Lei, Yunlong; Liu, Rui; Li, Jingyi; Yuan, Kefei; Li, Yi; Chen, Yi; Liu, Yi; Lu, You; Edwards III, Carl K; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular catabolic process by which long-lived proteins and damaged organelles are degradated by lysosomes. Activation of autophagy is an important survival mechanism that protects cancer cells from various stresses, including anticancer agents. Recent studies indicate that pyrvinium pamoate, an FDA-approved antihelminthic drug, exhibits wide-ranging anticancer activity. Here we demonstrate that pyrvinium inhibits autophagy both in vitro and in vivo. We further demonstrate that...

  15. The interplay between autophagy and ROS in tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VassilikiKarantza

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS at physiological levels are important cell signaling molecules. However, aberrantly high ROS are intimately associated with disease and commonly observed in cancer. Mitochondria are primary sources of intracellular ROS, and their maintenance is essential to cellular health. Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved process whereby cytoplasmic components are delivered to lysosomes for degradation, is responsible for mitochondrial turnover and removal of damaged mitochondria. Impaired autophagy is implicated in many pathological conditions, including neurological disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, aging and cancer. The first reports connecting autophagy to cancer showed that allelic loss of the essential autophagy gene BECLIN1 (BECN1 is prevalent in human breast, ovarian and prostate cancers and that Becn1+/- mice develop mammary gland hyperplasias, lymphomas, and lung and liver tumors. Subsequent studies demonstrated that Atg5-/- and Atg7-/- livers give rise to adenomas, Atg4-/- mice are susceptible to chemical carcinogenesis, and Bif1-/- mice are prone to spontaneous tumors, indicating that autophagy defects promote tumorigenesis. Due to defective mitophagy, autophagy-deficient cells accumulate damaged mitochondria and deregulated ROS levels, which likely contribute to their tumor-initiating capacity. However, the role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is complex, as more recent work also revealed tumor dependence on autophagy: autophagy-competent mutant-Ras-expressing cells form tumors more efficiently than their autophagy-deficient counterparts; similarly, FIP200 deficiency suppresses PyMT-driven mammary tumorigenesis. These latter findings are attributed to the fact that tumors driven by powerful oncogenes have high metabolic demands catered to by autophagy. In this review, we discuss the relationship between ROS and autophagy and summarize our current knowledge on their functional interactions in

  16. Autophagy and mitophagy in the myocardium: therapeutic potential and concerns

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez, Rebecca E; Kubli, Dieter A.; Gustafsson, Åsa B.

    2014-01-01

    The autophagic-lysosomal degradation pathway is critical for cardiac homeostasis, and defects in this pathway are associated with development of cardiomyopathy. Autophagy is responsible for the normal turnover of organelles and long-lived proteins. Autophagy is also rapidly up-regulated in response to stress, where it rapidly clears dysfunctional organelles and cytotoxic protein aggregates in the cell. Autophagy is also important in clearing dysfunctional mitochondria before they can cause ha...

  17. Dexamethasone-induced autophagy mediates muscle atrophy through mitochondrial clearance

    OpenAIRE

    Troncoso, Rodrigo; Paredes, Felipe; Parra, Valentina; Gatica, Damián; Vásquez-Trincado, César; Quiroga, Clara; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; López-Crisosto, Camila; Rodriguez, Andrea E; Oyarzún, Alejandra P; Kroemer, Guido; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, such as dexamethasone, enhance protein breakdown via ubiquitin–proteasome system. However, the role of autophagy in organelle and protein turnover in the glucocorticoid-dependent atrophy program remains unknown. Here, we show that dexamethasone stimulates an early activation of autophagy in L6 myotubes depending on protein kinase, AMPK, and glucocorticoid receptor activity. Dexamethasone increases expression of several autophagy genes, including ATG5, LC3, BECN1, and SQSTM1 a...

  18. Autophagy in Lepidoptera: more than old wine in new bottle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Tettamanti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cellular pathway that leads to the degradation of proteins and organelles. This process is usually involved in the maintenance of cell homeostasis when the organism experiences nutrient starvation, but in holometabolous insects autophagy also intervenes in the demolition of larval tissues and organs during metamorphosis. This review summarizes the current knowledge about autophagy research in Lepidoptera and discusses the use of moths and butterflies as models for tudying the roles and regulation of autophagy. It also gives insights into the cooperation between utophagy and apoptosis in cell death events that occur in lepidopteran in vivo and in vitro systems.

  19. Tracking autophagy during proliferation and differentiation of Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Proto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent degradation mechanism that sequesters target cargo into autophagosomal vesicles. The Trypanosoma brucei genome contains apparent orthologues of several autophagy-related proteins including an ATG8 family. These ubiquitin-like proteins are required for autophagosome membrane formation, but our studies show that ATG8.3 is atypical. To investigate the function of other ATG proteins, RNAi compatible T. brucei were modified to function as autophagy reporter lines by expressing only either YFP-ATG8.1 or YFP-ATG8.2. In the insect procyclic lifecycle stage, independent RNAi down-regulation of ATG3 or ATG7 generated autophagy-defective mutants and confirmed a pro-survival role for autophagy in the procyclic form nutrient starvation response. Similarly, RNAi depletion of ATG5 or ATG7 in the bloodstream form disrupted autophagy, but did not impede proliferation. Further characterisation showed bloodstream form autophagy mutants retain the capacity to undergo the complex cellular remodelling that occurs during differentiation to the procyclic form and are equally susceptible to dihydroxyacetone-induced cell death as wild type parasites, not supporting a role for autophagy in this cell death mechanism. The RNAi reporter system developed, which also identified TOR1 as a negative regulator controlling YFP-ATG8.2 but not YFP-ATG8.1 autophagosome formation, will enable further targeted analysis of the mechanisms and function of autophagy in the medically relevant bloodstream form of T. brucei.

  20. Autophagy is required for IL-2-mediated fibroblast growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved pathway responsible for delivery of cytoplasmic material into the lysosomal degradation pathway to enable vesicular exocytosis. Interleukin (IL)-2 is produced by T-cells and its activity is important for immunoregulation. Fibroblasts are an immune competent cell type, playing a critical role in wound healing, chronic inflammation, and tumor development. Although autophagy plays an important role in each of these processes, whether it regulates IL-2 activity in fibroblasts is unknown. Here, we show that autophagy is required for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts. IL-2 significantly induced autophagy in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and primary lung fibroblasts. Autophagy inhibitors (e.g., 3-methylamphetamine and bafilomycin A1) or knockdown of ATG5 and beclin 1 blocked clinical grade IL-2-induced autophagy. Moreover, IL-2 induced HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation in MEFs and promoted interaction between HMGB1 and beclin1, which is required for autophagy induction. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy inhibited IL-2-induced cell proliferation and enhanced IL-2-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that autophagy is an important pro-survival regulator for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts

  1. Autophagy is required for IL-2-mediated fibroblast growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Rui [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States); Tang, Daolin, E-mail: tangd2@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States); Lotze, Michael T., E-mail: lotzemt@upcm.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States); Zeh III, Herbert J., E-mail: zehh@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved pathway responsible for delivery of cytoplasmic material into the lysosomal degradation pathway to enable vesicular exocytosis. Interleukin (IL)-2 is produced by T-cells and its activity is important for immunoregulation. Fibroblasts are an immune competent cell type, playing a critical role in wound healing, chronic inflammation, and tumor development. Although autophagy plays an important role in each of these processes, whether it regulates IL-2 activity in fibroblasts is unknown. Here, we show that autophagy is required for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts. IL-2 significantly induced autophagy in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and primary lung fibroblasts. Autophagy inhibitors (e.g., 3-methylamphetamine and bafilomycin A1) or knockdown of ATG5 and beclin 1 blocked clinical grade IL-2-induced autophagy. Moreover, IL-2 induced HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation in MEFs and promoted interaction between HMGB1 and beclin1, which is required for autophagy induction. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy inhibited IL-2-induced cell proliferation and enhanced IL-2-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that autophagy is an important pro-survival regulator for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts.

  2. Emerging role of selective autophagy in human diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji eMizumura

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAutophagy was originally described as a highly conserved system for the degradation of cytosol through a lysosome-dependent pathway. In response to starvation, autophagy degrades organelles and proteins to provide metabolites and energy for its pro-survival effects. Autophagy is recognized as playing a role in the pathogenesis of disease either directly or indirectly, through the regulation of vital processes such as programmed cell death, inflammation, and adaptive immune mechanisms. Recent studies have demonstrated that autophagy is not only a simple metabolite recycling system, but also has the ability to degrade specific cellular targets, such as mitochondria, cilia, and invading bacteria. In addition, selective autophagy has also been implicated in vesicle trafficking pathways, with potential roles in secretion and other intracellular transport processes. Selective autophagy has drawn the attention of researchers because of its potential importance in clinical diseases. Therapeutic strategies to target selective autophagy rather than general autophagy may maximize clinical benefit by enhancing selectivity. In this review, we outline the principle components of selective autophagy processes and their emerging importance in human disease, with an emphasis on pulmonary diseases.

  3. Regulation of autophagy by cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariño, Guillermo; Pietrocola, Federico; Eisenberg, Tobias;

    2014-01-01

    proteins, as well as the induction of autophagy, a homeostatic process of self-digestion. Multiple distinct manipulations designed to increase or reduce cytosolic AcCoA led to the suppression or induction of autophagy, respectively, both in cultured human cells and in mice. Moreover, maintenance of high Ac......CoA levels inhibited maladaptive autophagy in a model of cardiac pressure overload. Depletion of AcCoA reduced the activity of the acetyltransferase EP300, and EP300 was required for the suppression of autophagy by high AcCoA levels. Altogether, our results indicate that cytosolic AcCoA functions as a...

  4. Genetic Background is a Key Determinant of Glomerular Extracellular Matrix Composition and Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randles, Michael J; Woolf, Adrian S; Huang, Jennifer L; Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Price, Karen L; Kolatsi-Joannou, Maria; Collinson, Sophie; Denny, Thomas; Knight, David; Mironov, Aleksandr; Starborg, Toby; Korstanje, Ron; Humphries, Martin J; Long, David A; Lennon, Rachel

    2015-12-01

    Glomerular disease often features altered histologic patterns of extracellular matrix (ECM). Despite this, the potential complexities of the glomerular ECM in both health and disease are poorly understood. To explore whether genetic background and sex determine glomerular ECM composition, we investigated two mouse strains, FVB and B6, using RNA microarrays of isolated glomeruli combined with proteomic glomerular ECM analyses. These studies, undertaken in healthy young adult animals, revealed unique strain- and sex-dependent glomerular ECM signatures, which correlated with variations in levels of albuminuria and known predisposition to progressive nephropathy. Among the variation, we observed changes in netrin 4, fibroblast growth factor 2, tenascin C, collagen 1, meprin 1-α, and meprin 1-β. Differences in protein abundance were validated by quantitative immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, and the collective differences were not explained by mutations in known ECM or glomerular disease genes. Within the distinct signatures, we discovered a core set of structural ECM proteins that form multiple protein-protein interactions and are conserved from mouse to man. Furthermore, we found striking ultrastructural changes in glomerular basement membranes in FVB mice. Pathway analysis of merged transcriptomic and proteomic datasets identified potential ECM regulatory pathways involving inhibition of matrix metalloproteases, liver X receptor/retinoid X receptor, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, notch, and cyclin-dependent kinase 5. These pathways may therefore alter ECM and confer susceptibility to disease. PMID:25896609

  5. ESTIMATING TOTAL GLOMERULAR NUMBER IN HUMAN KIDNEYS WITH A PHYSICAL DISECTOR/FRACTIONATOR COMBINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelli J Johnson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available End-stage renal disease (ESRD has emerged as a major health issue for Australian Aborigines. This phenomenon is paralleled in other populations that have adopted a Westernised lifestyle, including African Americans. It has been suggested that abnormal glomerular hypertrophy (glomerulomegaly is an important predisposing factor for ESRD. The pathogenesis of glomerulomegaly remains unknown. It may represent a compensatory hypertrophic response to decreased nephron endowment during fetal development. Alternatively, glomerulomegaly may represent an abnormal haemodynamic/metabolic response to repeated infections, including renal infections during postnatal life. Since glomerular number and size are important issues associated with ESRD, an optimum quantitative method is required for estimating these parameters in human kidneys. The total number of glomeruli in the normal human kidney appears to vary by a factor of three or more, ranging from approximately 300,000 to more than 1 million. Recently, unbiased stereological methods for estimating total glomerular number in kidneys have been developed. The general aim of the present study was to evaluate (in terms of precision and efficiency a stereological method for estimating total glomerular number in human kidneys; the physical disector/fractionator combination. This method provided consistent estimates of total glomerular number. Estimates of total glomerular number obtained for four human kidneys ranged from 364,161 to 586,094 (coefficients of variation 9.2% to 20.0%. Mean glomerular volume for the four kidneys ranged from 6.04 to 10.32 μm3 x 106. These results indicate that this method is a precise and consistent method for estimating total glomerular number in human kidneys. The simple sampling technique developed in this study will be employed in future studies to determine if there is a difference in total glomerular, and hence nephron, number between Australian Aborigines and Caucasians, and

  6. Assessment of glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow in cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to examine renal function in 10 healthy control subjects and eight patients with cystic fibrosis in stable condition. Sequential bolus injections of /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA and 125I-OIH were administered to assess glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow, respectively. Blood was subsequently collected for 3 hours, and urine for 24 hours. Renal clearances of both radioisotope markers were virtually identical in patients and controls. Inasmuch as neither glomerular filtration rate nor effective renal plasma flow was enhanced in patients with cystic fibrosis, increased clearance of drugs in these patients is unlikely to be the result of enhanced glomerular filtration or tubular secretion

  7. Activation of RARα induces autophagy in SKBR3 breast cancer cells and depletion of key autophagy genes enhances ATRA toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigger, D; Schläfli, A M; Garattini, E; Tschan, M P

    2015-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), a pan-retinoic acid receptor (RAR) agonist, is, along with other retinoids, a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of a variety of solid tumors. On the one hand, preclinical studies have shown promising anticancer effects of ATRA in breast cancer; on the other hand, resistances occurred. Autophagy is a cellular recycling process that allows the degradation of bulk cellular contents. Tumor cells may take advantage of autophagy to cope with stress caused by anticancer drugs. We therefore wondered if autophagy is activated by ATRA in mammary tumor cells and if modulation of autophagy might be a potential novel treatment strategy. Indeed, ATRA induces autophagic flux in ATRA-sensitive but not in ATRA-resistant human breast cancer cells. Moreover, using different RAR agonists as well as RARα-knockdown breast cancer cells, we demonstrate that autophagy is dependent on RARα activation. Interestingly, inhibition of autophagy in breast cancer cells by either genetic or pharmacological approaches resulted in significantly increased apoptosis under ATRA treatment and attenuated epithelial differentiation. In summary, our findings demonstrate that ATRA-induced autophagy is mediated by RARα in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy results in enhanced apoptosis. This points to a potential novel treatment strategy for a selected group of breast cancer patients where ATRA and autophagy inhibitors are applied simultaneously. PMID:26313912

  8. Autophagy sensitivity of neuroendocrine lung tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    HONG, SEUNG-KEUN; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Starenki, Dmytro; Park, Jong-In

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) phenotypes characterize a spectrum of lung tumors, including low-grade typical and intermediate-grade atypical carcinoid, high-grade large-cell NE carcinoma and small cell lung carcinoma. Currently, no effective treatments are available to cure NE lung tumors, demanding identification of biological features specific to these tumors. Here, we report that autophagy has an important role for NE lung tumor cell proliferation and survival. We found that the expression levels of...

  9. Cardiomyocyte autophagy: metabolic profit and loss

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhao V.; Ferdous, Anwarul; Hill, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, even despite recent scientific and technological advances and comprehensive preventive strategies. The cardiac myocyte is a voracious consumer of energy, and alterations in metabolic substrate availability and consumption are hallmark features of these disorders. Autophagy, an evolutionarily ancient response to metabolic insufficiency, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide range of heart patholo...

  10. Autophagy in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV infections

    OpenAIRE

    Espert, Lucile; Beaumelle, Bruno; Vergne, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) are among the most lethal human pathogens worldwide, each being responsible for around 1.5 million deaths annually. Moreover, synergy between acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and tuberculosis (TB) has turned HIV/M.tb co-infection into a major public health threat in developing countries. In the past decade, autophagy, a lysosomal catabolic process, has emerged as a major host immune defense mechanism against in...

  11. The Role of Autophagy in Lupus Nephritis

    OpenAIRE

    Linlin Wang; Helen Ka Wai Law

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease characterized by the generation of immune responses to self-antigens. Lupus nephritis is one of the most common and severe complications in SLE patients. Though the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis has been studied extensively, unresolved questions are still left and new therapeutic methods are needed for disease control. Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process through which cytoplasmic constituents can be degraded in...

  12. Autophagy extends lifespan via vacuolar acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Ruckenstuhl

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Methionine restriction (MetR is one of the rare regimes that prolongs lifespan across species barriers. Using a yeast model, we recently demonstrated that this lifespan extension is promoted by autophagy, which in turn requires vacuolar acidification. Our study is the first to place autophagy as one of the major players required for MetR-mediated longevity. In addition, our work identifies vacuolar acidification as a key downstream element of autophagy induction under MetR, and possibly after rapamycin treatment. Unlike other amino acids, methionine plays pleiotropic roles in many metabolism-relevant pathways. For instance, methionine (i is the N-terminal amino acid of every newly translated protein; (ii acts as the central donor of methyl groups through S-adenosyl methionine (SAM during methylation reactions of proteins, DNA or RNA; and (iii provides the sulfhydryl groups for FeS-cluster formation and redox detoxification via transsulfuration to cysteine. Intriguingly, MetR causes lifespan extension, both in yeast and in rodents. We could show that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, chronological lifespan (CLS is increased in two specific methionine-auxotrophic strains (namely Δmet2 and Δmet15.

  13. Autophagy and ethanol-induced liver injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Terrence M Donohue Jr

    2009-01-01

    The majority of ethanol metabolism occurs in the liver. Consequently, this organ sustains the greatest damage from ethanol abuse. Ethanol consumption disturbs the delicate balance of protein homeostasis in the liver, causing intracellular protein accumulation due to a disruption of hepatic protein catabolism.Evidence indicates that ethanol or its metabolism impairs trafficking events in the liver, including the process of macroautophagy, which is the engulfment and degradation of cytoplasmic constituents by the lysosomal system. Autophagy is an essential, ongoing cellular process that is highly regulated by nutrients,endocrine factors and signaling pathways. A great number of the genes and gene products that govern the autophagic response have been characterized and the major metabolic and signaling pathways that activate or suppress autophagy have been identified. This review describes the process of autophagy, its regulation and the possible mechanisms by which ethanol disrupts the process of autophagic degradation. The implications of autophagic suppression are discussed in relation to the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver injury.

  14. The autophagy-related marker LC3 can predict prognosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Jin Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Defects of autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress are related to many diseases and tumors. However, only a few studies have examined hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC as related to these processes. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the expression and extent of autophagy and ER stress-related markers in HCC and their influence on clinical characteristics and prognosis for each protein. METHODOLOGY: The expression of autophagy-related markers (LC3 and Beclin-1 and ER stress-related markers (GRP78 and CHOP was analyzed by immunohistochemistry on tissues from completely resected specimens of 190 HCC patients. Their influence on clinicopathologic features and prognosis were evaluated using the chi-square test and Kaplan-Meier analysis. Correlations of each protein were determined by Spearman's correlation analysis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: LC3 expression was not correlated with TNM, BCLC stage, or Edmonson-Steiner grading, whereas it was correlated with longer overall survival (OS (p = 0.039 and tended to be related with longer time to recurrence (TTR (p=0.068 although it did not show statistical significance. Multivariate analysis indicated that LC3 expression was a significantly independent prognostic factor of OS (HR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.22-0.80; p-value=0.009 and TTR (HR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.33-0.90; p=0.017. Expression of LC3 in advanced stages of TNM (III (p=0.045 and Edmonson-Steiner Grades (III and IV (p=0.043 was correlated with longer survival, but not in the early stages. A positive correlation was not observed between the expression of autophagy-related markers and ER stress-related markers. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the expression and extent of LC3 might be a strong prognostic factor of HCC, especially in patients with surgical resection.

  15. Suitability of Labelled EDTA for Glomerular Renographic Examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation was made of 58 persons, 48 of which could be divided into the following main groups: control subjects; patients suffering from acute or chronic glomerulonephritis; and patients suffering from chronic pyelonephritis. The remainder were patients with various other diseases. Comparison of the 113mIn-EDTA and 115mIn-EDTA renograms with the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimated as endogenous creatinine clearances and with 131I-Hippuran renograms was made. Normal EDTA renograms did not correspond with normal values of the GFR in all cases and the abnormal results as well. In controls agreement in normal values of both examinations has been found in the majority of cases. In patients with glomerulonephritis the percentage of disagreement was highest. This supported our opinion that EDTA renograms do not indicate impairment in glomerular filtration only. In experiments the authors studied rats of the ''Whistar'' strain by means of dosimetric and histological investigations. Changes in the size of nuclei in epithelial cells of proximal convoluted tubules have been estimated. Rats weighing approximately 200 g received intravenously 0.25 ml of 51Cr edetic acid solution (specific activity 0.15 μCi/ml). The animals were killed at predetermined intervals and both kidneys removed for measurements. For histological purposes excisions from kidneys were fixed in cooled formol (1: 5 dilution), placed in paraffin, with haematoxylin and eosin used as a dye. The volumes of nuclei in epithelial cells in the proximal convoluted tubules were measured. This histophysiological test was chosen on the basis of many references. It has been proved that the size of a nucleus is dependent on the functional state of the given cell. Diagrams illustrate the similarity of dosimetric and caryometric measurements. In both cases the peak is reached in the second minute after 51Cr edetic acid' administration and a similar downward slope of the curves up to the 45th minute follows

  16. EFFECTS OF RAPAMYCIN ON INTRACELLULAR CHOLESTEROL HOMEOSTASIS OF GLOMERULAR MESANGIAL CELL IN THE PRESENCE OF INTERLEUKIN-1β

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-juan Zhang; Hang Li; Xue-wang Li

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of rapamycin on cholesterol homeostasis of glomerular mesangial cells and the underlying mechanisms.Methods Intracellular cholesterol accttmulation was measured by Oil Red O staining and high performance liquid chromatography.The effects of rapamycin on interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced mRNA and protein changes of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and ATP-binding cassette transporter Al (ABCAl) were assayed by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot.Transient expressions of 3 types of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR),including mTOR-WT (wild type),mTOR-RR (rapamycin resistant,with kinase activity),and mTOR-RR-KD (rapamycin resistant,without kinase activity),were obtained by plasmid transfection.Results Rapamycin had no significant influence on intracellular cholesterol concentration under normal condition,but it significantly decreased the intracelhilar cholesterol concentration in the presence of IL-1β.Rapamycin dose-dependently suppressed the increased expression of LDLR induced by IL-1β and up-regulated the suppressed expression of ABCAl caused by IL-Iβ.Transient expression of 3 types of roTOR all reduced ABCAl InRNA expression significantly,which all could be overroded by rapamycin.Conclusions Rapamycin may contribute to the maintaining of glomerular mesangial cell intracellular cholesterol homeostasis under inflammatory state by both reducing cholesterol uptake and increasing cholesterol efflux.And the effect may be not completely mediated by mTOR.

  17. Podocyte-specific knockout of myosin 1e disrupts glomerular filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Sharon E; Encina, Christina V; Stolzenburg, Lindsay R; Tatum, Arthur H; Holzman, Lawrence B; Krendel, Mira

    2012-10-01

    Myosin 1e (myo1e) is an actin-dependent molecular motor that plays an important role in kidney functions. Complete knockout of myo1e in mice and Myo1E mutations in humans are associated with nephrotic syndrome and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that myo1e is necessary for normal functions of glomerular visceral epithelial cells (podocytes) using podocyte-targeted knockout of myo1e. Myo1e was selectively knocked out in podocytes using Cre-mediated recombination controlled by the podocin promoter. Myo1e loss from podocytes resulted in proteinuria, podocyte foot process effacement, and glomerular basement membrane disorganization. Our findings indicate that myo1e expression in podocytes is necessary for normal glomerular filtration and that podocyte defects are likely to represent the primary pathway leading to glomerular disease associated with Myo1E mutations. PMID:22811491

  18. Persistent haematuria and proteinuria due to glomerular disease in related Abyssinian cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joanna D; Norris, Jacqueline M; Bosward, Katrina L; Fleay, R; Lauer, Chris; Malik, Richard

    2008-07-01

    Eight cases of glomerular disease in young, related Abyssinian cats are described. Haematuria was the most consistent feature. Six cats developed the nephrotic syndrome. The short-term prognosis was good for cats with haematuria and fair for cats with the nephrotic syndrome as oedema resolved in three of the six cats. Light microscopic examination of renal biopsies from three cats was considered normal or revealed only mild abnormalities. In the three cases subjected to necropsy, histological abnormalities included mild mesangial hypercellularity and adhesions between the glomerular tuft and Bowman's capsule consistent with a focal proliferative glomerulopathy. Further investigation into this glomerulopathy will require ultrastructural and immunohistochemical studies to characterise the glomerular abnormality and genetic analyses to investigate its potential to be an inherited disease. Glomerular disease, potentially a familial one, should be considered in the investigation of persistent haematuria or proteinuria in Abyssinian and related cats. PMID:18455462

  19. 125I iothalamate an ideal marker for glomerular filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The triiodinated angiographic contrast medium, iothalamate (usually labelled 125I), has been used extensively as a marker for glomerular filtration. The authors have studied the renal handling of 125I iothalamate (IOT) in vivo and in vitro in several species. In renal cortical slices from chicken, rabbit, rat, and monkey, the tissue-to-medium ratio of IOT was twice that of 51Cr-EDTA (EDTA) at 37 degrees C; a difference that was abolished at 0 degree C and markedly reduced by added o-iodohippurate or iodipamide. In five chickens the steady-state renal clearance of IOT (CIOT) was twice that of EDTA (CEDTA) or 3H inulin (C1); a difference that was abolished by administration of 100 mg/kg/hr of novobiocin, an organic anion transport inhibitor. CEDTA was similar to C1 before as well as after transport inhibition. Utilizing the Sperber technique the mean apparent tubular excretion fraction (ATEF) of IOT was 8%, while that of EDTA was 1%. After novobiocin coinfusion (new steady-state) ATEFIOT was significantly reduced and not different from that of EDTA (-1%). In the same animals the total urinary recovery of IOT was 84 and 57% before and after novobiocin, respectively, while corresponding values for EDTA was unchanged by the inhibitor. In seven rats the renal extraction of IOT was reduced from 29 to 17% by coinfusion of probenecid (5 mg/kg/hr). Corresponding extractions were 82 to 34% and 22% (unchanged) for PAH and EDTA, respectively

  20. The Relationship between Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate and Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyang Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is the leading cause of visual impairment and blindness in working-aged people. Several studies have suggested that glomerular filtration rate (GFR was correlated with DR. This is a hospital-based study and the aim of it was to examine the relationship between the GFR and DR in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. We used CKD-EPI equation to estimate GFR and SPSS 19.0 and EmpowerStats software to assess their relationship. Among the 1613 participants (aged 54.75 ± 12.19 years, 550 (34.1% patients suffered from DR. The multivariate analysis revealed that the risk factors for DR include age (P<0.001, OR = 0.940, duration of diabetes (P<0.001, OR = 1.163, hemoglobin A1c (P=0.007, OR = 1.224, systolic blood pressure (P<0.001, OR = 1.032, diastolic blood pressure (P=0.007, OR = 0.953, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (P=0.024, OR = 3.884, and eGFR (P=0.010, OR = 0.973. Through stratified analysis and saturation effect analysis, our data suggests that eGFR of 99.4 mL/min or lower might imply the early stage of DR in diabetic patients. Thus, the evaluation of eGFR has clinical significance for the early diagnosis of DR.

  1. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: Glomerular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomback, Andrew S; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the annual Kidney Week meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. Once again, the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories, along with single-best-answer questions, were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of United States nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions through an Internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by the experts. They compared their answers in real time using their cell phones with a special app with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology readers. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions. PMID:26847362

  2. Physiology Lab Demonstration: Glomerular Filtration Rate in a Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Jespersen, Brian; Shade, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and the fractional excretion of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) are critical in assessing renal function in health and disease. GFR is measured as the steady state renal clearance of inulin which is filtered at the glomerulus, but not secreted or reabsorbed along the nephron. The fractional excretion of Na and K can be determined from the concentration of Na and K in plasma and urine. The renal clearance of inulin can be demonstrated in an anesthetized animal which has catheters in the femoral artery, femoral vein and bladder. The equipment and supplies used for this procedure are those commonly available in a research core facility, and thus makes this procedure a practical means for measuring renal function. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate the procedures required to perform a lab demonstration in which renal function is assessed before and after a diuretic drug. The presented technique can be utilized to assess renal function in rat models of renal disease. PMID:26274567

  3. Autophagy contributes to resistance of tumor cells to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Autophagy signaling is a novel important target to improve anticancer therapy. To study the role of autophagy on resistance of tumor cells to ionizing radiation (IR), breast cancer cell lines differing in their intrinsic radiosensitivity were used. Materials and methods: Breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and HBL-100 were examined with respect to clonogenic cell survival and induction of autophagy after radiation exposure and pharmacological interference of the autophagic process. As marker for autophagy the appearance of LC3-I and LC3-II proteins was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Formation of autophagic vacuoles was monitored by immunofluorescence staining of LC3. Results: LC3-I and LC3-II formation differs markedly in radioresistant MDA-MB-231 versus radiosensitive HBL-100 cells. Western blot analyses of LC3-II/LC3-I ratio indicated marked induction of autophagy by IR in radioresistant MDA-MB-231 cells, but not in radiosensitive HBL-100 cells. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis of LC3-II positive vacuoles confirmed this differential effect. Pre-treatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) antagonized IR-induced autophagy. Likewise, pretreatment of radioresistant MDA-231 cells with autophagy inhibitors 3-MA or chloroquine (CQ) significantly reduced clonogenic survival of irradiated cells. Conclusion: Our data clearly indicate that radioresistant breast tumor cells show a strong post-irradiation induction of autophagy, which thus serves as a protective and pro-survival mechanism in radioresistance.

  4. Altered autophagy in human adipose tissues in obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Context: Autophagy is a housekeeping mechanism, involved in metabolic regulation and stress response, shown recently to regulate lipid droplets biogenesis/breakdown and adipose tissue phenotype. Objective: We hypothesized that in human obesity autophagy may be altered in adipose tissue in a fat d...

  5. Autophagy: A double-edged sword in Alzheimer's disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ying-Tsen Tung; Bo-Jeng Wang; Ming-Kuan Hu; Wen-Ming Hsu; Hsinyu Lee; Wei-Pang Huang; Yung-Feng Liao

    2012-03-01

    Autophagy is a major protein degradation pathway that is essential for stress-induced and constitutive protein turnover. Accumulated evidence has demonstrated that amyloid- (A) protein can be generated in autophagic vacuoles, promoting its extracellular deposition in neuritic plaques as the pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The molecular machinery for A generation, including APP, APP-C99 and -/-secretases, are all enriched in autophagic vacuoles. The induction of autophagy can be vividly observed in the brain at early stages of sporadic AD and in an AD transgenic mouse model. Accumulated evidence has also demonstrated a neuroprotective role of autophagy in mediating the degradation of aggregated proteins that are causative of various neurodegenerative diseases. Autophagy is thus widely regarded as an intracellular hub for the removal of the detrimental A peptides and Tau aggregates. Nonetheless, compelling data also reveal an unfavorable function of autophagy in facilitating the production of intracellular A. The two faces of autophagy on the homeostasis of A place it in a very unique and intriguing position in ADpathogenesis. This article briefly summarizes seminal discoveries that are shedding new light on the critical and unique roles of autophagy in AD and potential therapeutic approaches against autophagy-elicited AD.

  6. Autophagy in ageing and ageing-associated diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-qiang HE; Jia-hong LU; Zhen-yu YUE

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a cell self-digestion process via lysosomes that clears "cellular waste",including aberrantly modified proteins or protein aggregates and damaged organelles.Therefore,autophagy is considered a protein and organelle quality control mechanism that maintains normal cellular homeostasis.Dysfunctional autophagy has been observed in ageing tissues and several ageing-associated diseases.Lifespan of model organisms such as yeast,worms,flies,and mice can be extended through promoting autophagy,either by genetic manipulations such as over-expression of Sirtuin 1,or by administrations of rapamycin,resveratrol or spermidine.The evidence supports that autophagy may play an important role in delaying ageing or extending lifespan.In this review,we summarize the current knowledge about autophagy and its regulation,outline recent developments ie the genetic and pharmacological manipulations of autophagy that affects the lifespan,and discuss the role of autophagy in the ageing-related diseases.ow in Center for Neurodegenerative and Neuroimmunologic Diseases,Department of Neurology,University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School,Piscataway,NJ 08854,USA

  7. Cellular and Molecular Connections between Autophagy and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Lapaquette

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic pathway essential for the recycling of proteins and larger substrates such as aggregates, apoptotic corpses, or long-lived and superfluous organelles whose accumulation could be toxic for cells. Because of its unique feature to engulf part of cytoplasm in double-membrane cup-shaped structures, which further fuses with lysosomes, autophagy is also involved in the elimination of host cell invaders and takes an active part of the innate and adaptive immune response. Its pivotal role in maintenance of the inflammatory balance makes dysfunctions of the autophagy process having important pathological consequences. Indeed, defects in autophagy are associated with a wide range of human diseases including metabolic disorders (diabetes and obesity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, and cancer. In this review, we will focus on interrelations that exist between inflammation and autophagy. We will discuss in particular how mediators of inflammation can regulate autophagy activity and, conversely, how autophagy shapes the inflammatory response. Impact of genetic polymorphisms in autophagy-related gene on inflammatory bowel disease will be also discussed.

  8. Autophagy Inhibition Dysregulates TBK1 Signaling and Promotes Pancreatic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shenghong; Imamura, Yu; Jenkins, Russell W; Cañadas, Israel; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Aref, Amir; Brannon, Arthur; Oki, Eiji; Castoreno, Adam; Zhu, Zehua; Thai, Tran; Reibel, Jacob; Qian, Zhirong; Ogino, Shuji; Wong, Kwok K; Baba, Hideo; Kimmelman, Alec C; Pasca Di Magliano, Marina; Barbie, David A

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy promotes tumor progression downstream of oncogenic KRAS, yet also restrains inflammation and dysplasia through mechanisms that remain incompletely characterized. Understanding the basis of this paradox has important implications for the optimal targeting of autophagy in cancer. Using a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis, we found that loss of autophagy by deletion of Atg5 enhanced activation of the IκB kinase (IKK)-related kinase TBK1 in vivo, associated with increased neutrophil and T-cell infiltration and PD-L1 upregulation. Consistent with this observation, pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of autophagy in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells, including suppression of the autophagy receptors NDP52 or p62, prolonged TBK1 activation and increased expression of CCL5, IL6, and several other T-cell and neutrophil chemotactic cytokines in vitro Defective autophagy also promoted PD-L1 upregulation, which is particularly pronounced downstream of IFNγ signaling and involves JAK pathway activation. Treatment with the TBK1/IKKε/JAK inhibitor CYT387 (also known as momelotinib) not only inhibits autophagy, but also suppresses this feedback inflammation and reduces PD-L1 expression, limiting KRAS-driven pancreatic dysplasia. These findings could contribute to the dual role of autophagy in oncogenesis and have important consequences for its therapeutic targeting. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 520-30. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27068336

  9. Autophagy: A Potential Link between Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Codogno; A.J. Meijer

    2010-01-01

    Dysregulation of autophagy contributes to aging and to diseases such as neurodegeneration, cardiomyopathy, and cancer. The paper by Yang et al. (2010) in this issue of Cell Metabolism indicates that defective autophagy may also underlie impaired insulin sensitivity in obesity and that upregulating a

  10. Effect of beta-D-xyloside on the glomerular proteoglycans. I. Biochemical studies

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    The effect of p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-xylopyranoside on glomerular extracellular matrices (glomerular basement membrane and mesangial matrix) proteoglycans was studied. The proteoglycans of rat kidneys were labeled with [35S]sulfate in the presence or absence of beta- xyloside (2.5 mM) by using an isolated organ perfusion system. The proteoglycans from the glomeruli and perfusion medium were isolated and characterized by Sepharose CL-6B chromatography and by their behavior in CsCl density gradie...

  11. Exosomes from high glucose-treated glomerular endothelial cells activate mesangial cells to promote renal fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-ming Wu; Yan-bin Gao; Fang-qiang Cui; Na Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between glomerular endothelial cells (GECs) and glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs) is an essential aspect of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Therefore, understanding how GECs communicate with GMCs in the diabetic environment is crucial for the development of new targets for the prevention and treatment of DN. Exosomes, nanometer-sized extracellular membrane vesicles secreted by various cell types, play important roles in cell-to-cell communication via the transfer of mRNA, microRNA ...

  12. Biochemical Analysis of Autophagy in Algae and Plants by Monitoring the Electrophoretic Mobility of ATG8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Andrés-Garrido, Ascensión; Crespo, José L

    2016-01-01

    Identification of specific autophagy markers has been fundamental to investigate autophagy as catabolic process. Among them, the ATG8 protein turned out to be one of the most widely used and specific molecular markers of autophagy both in higher and lower eukaryotes. Here, we describe how ATG8 can be used to monitor autophagy in Chlamydomonas and Arabidopsis by western blot analysis. PMID:27424752

  13. Autophagy: Friend or Foe in Breast Cancer Development, Progression, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian E. Berardi

    2011-01-01

    Although autophagy inhibition, combined with anticancer agents, could be therapeutically beneficial in some cases, autophagy induction by itself could lead to cell death in some apoptosis-resistant cancers, indicating that autophagy induction may also be used as a therapy. This paper summarizes the most important findings described in the literature about autophagy and also discusses the importance of this process in clinical settings.

  14. Schistosomal glomerulopathy and changes in the distribution of histological patterns of glomerular diseases in Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washington Luis Conrado dos-Santos

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Distinct patterns of glomerular lesions, including membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, are associated with infection by Schistosoma mansoni or Schistosoma japonicum. Evidence suggests that immune complex deposition is the main mechanism underlying the different forms of schistosomal glomerulonephritis and that immune complex deposition may be intensified by portal hypertension. The relationship between focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and schistosomiasis remains poorly understood. A clinicopathologic classification of schistosomal glomerulopathies was proposed in 1992 by the African Association of Nephrology. In Brazil, mass treatment with oral medications has led to a decrease in the occurrence of schistosomal glomerulopathy. In a survey of renal biopsies performed in Salvador, Brazil, from 2003-2009, only 24 (4% patients were identified as positive for S. mansoni infection. Among these patients, only one had the hepatosplenic form of the disease. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was found in seven patients and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis was found in four patients. Although retrospective studies on the prevalence of renal diseases based on kidney biopsies may be influenced by many patient selection biases, a change in the distribution of glomerulopathies associated with nephrotic syndrome was observed along with a decline in the occurrence of severe forms of schistosomiasis.

  15. Opening new doors in autophagy research: Patrice Codogno.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codogno, Patrice; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Patrice Codogno ( Fig. 1 ), one of the associate editors of Autophagy since it was established, is well known in the autophagy field, and has played a particularly important role in France, serving as the first president of Club Francophone de l'AuTophaGie (CFATG). Patrice's research career spans from the predominantly biochemical analyses that were commonly used in the 1980s to the molecular studies that are the primary focus of many labs currently studying autophagy today. Anyone who has met Patrice knows that he is modest, which means his contributions to autophagy and to promoting the careers of scientists globally, are underappreciated. In addition, there is a fun-loving side to Patrice that is often hidden to the casual observer, and it is time to share some of his personality and thoughts with the rest of the autophagy community. PMID:27158743

  16. Role of autophagy in the regulation of epithelial cell junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nighot, Prashant; Ma, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cell survival mechanism by which bulk cytoplasmic material, including soluble macromolecules and organelles, is targeted for lysosomal degradation. The role of autophagy in diverse cellular processes such as metabolic stress, neurodegeneration, cancer, aging, immunity, and inflammatory diseases is being increasingly recognized. Epithelial cell junctions play an integral role in the cell homeostasis via physical binding, regulating paracellular pathways, integrating extracellular cues into intracellular signaling, and cell-cell communication. Recent data indicates that cell junction composition is very dynamic. The junctional protein complexes are actively regulated in response to various intra- and extra-cellular clues by intracellular trafficking and degradation pathways. This review discusses the recent and emerging information on how autophagy regulates various epithelial cell junctions. The knowledge of autophagy regulation of epithelial junctions will provide further rationale for targeting autophagy in a wide variety of human disease conditions. PMID:27583189

  17. Autophagy in Plants--What's New on the Menu?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaeli, Simon; Galili, Gad; Genschik, Pascal; Fernie, Alisdair R; Avin-Wittenberg, Tamar

    2016-02-01

    Autophagy is a major cellular degradation pathway in eukaryotes. Recent studies have revealed the importance of autophagy in many aspects of plant life, including seedling establishment, plant development, stress resistance, metabolism, and reproduction. This is manifested by the dual ability of autophagy to execute bulk degradation under severe environmental conditions, while simultaneously to be highly selective in targeting specific compartments and protein complexes to regulate key cellular processes, even during favorable growth conditions. Delivery of cellular components to the vacuole enables their recycling, affecting the plant metabolome, especially under stress. Recent research in Arabidopsis has further unveiled fundamental mechanistic aspects in autophagy which may have relevance in non-plant systems. We review the most recent discoveries concerning autophagy in plants, touching upon all these aspects. PMID:26598298

  18. Modulation of Autophagy-Like Processes by Tumor Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Munger

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an intracellular degradation pathway for long-lived proteins and organelles. This process is activated above basal levels upon cell intrinsic or environmental stress and dysregulation of autophagy has been linked to various human diseases, including those caused by viral infection. Many viruses have evolved strategies to directly interfere with autophagy, presumably to facilitate their replication or to escape immune detection. However, in some cases, modulation of autophagy appears to be a consequence of the virus disturbing the cell’s metabolic signaling networks. Here, we summarize recent advances in research at the interface of autophagy and viral infection, paying special attention to strategies that human tumor viruses have evolved.

  19. Beta1 integrin expression by podocytes is required to maintain glomerular structural integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Ambra; Jarad, George; Moeckel, Gilbert W; Coffa, Sergio; Zhang, Xi; Gewin, Leslie; Eremina, Vera; Hudson, Billy G; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Harris, Raymond C; Holzman, Lawrence B; Phillips, Carrie L; Fassler, Reinhard; Quaggin, Susan E; Miner, Jeffrey H; Zent, Roy

    2008-04-15

    Integrins are transmembrane heteromeric receptors that mediate interactions between cells and extracellular matrix (ECM). beta1, the most abundantly expressed integrin subunit, binds at least 12 alpha subunits. beta1 containing integrins are highly expressed in the glomerulus of the kidney; however their role in glomerular morphogenesis and maintenance of glomerular filtration barrier integrity is poorly understood. To study these questions we selectively deleted beta1 integrin in the podocyte by crossing beta1(flox/flox) mice with podocyte specific podocin-cre mice (pod-Cre), which express cre at the time of glomerular capillary formation. We demonstrate that podocyte abnormalities are visualized during glomerulogenesis of the pod-Cre;beta1(flox/flox) mice and proteinuria is present at birth, despite a grossly normal glomerular basement membrane. Following the advent of glomerular filtration there is progressive podocyte loss and the mice develop capillary loop and mesangium degeneration with little evidence of glomerulosclerosis. By 3 weeks of age the mice develop severe end stage renal failure characterized by both tubulointerstitial and glomerular pathology. Thus, expression of beta1 containing integrins by the podocyte is critical for maintaining the structural integrity of the glomerulus. PMID:18328474

  20. Olfactory aversive conditioning alters olfactory bulb mitral/tufted cell glomerular odor responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max L Fletcher

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical organization of receptor neuron input into the olfactory bulb (OB allows odor information to be transformed into an odorant-specific spatial map of mitral/tufted cell glomerular activity at the upper level of the olfactory bulb. In other sensory systems, neuronal representations of stimuli can be reorganized or enhanced following learning. While the mammalian OB has been shown to undergo experience-dependent plasticity at the glomerular level, it is still unclear if similar representational change occurs within mitral/tufted cell glomerular odor representations following learning. To address this, odorant-evoked glomerular activity patterns were imaged in mice expressing a GFP-based calcium indicator (GCaMP2 in OB mitral/tufted cells. Glomerular odor responses were imaged before and after olfactory associative conditioning to aversive foot shock. Following conditioning, we found no overall reorganization of the glomerular representation. Training, however, did significantly alter the amplitudes of individual glomeruli within the representation in mice in which the odor was presented together with foot shock. Further, the specific pairing of foot shock with odor presentations lead to increased responses primarily in initially weakly activated glomeruli. Overall, these results suggest that associative conditioning can enhance the initial representation of odors within the olfactory bulb by enhancing responses to the learned odor in some glomeruli.

  1. Activation of autophagy by unfolded proteins during endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Srivastava, Renu; Howell, Stephen H; Bassham, Diane C

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress is defined as the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, and is caused by conditions such as heat or agents that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress, including tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Autophagy, a major pathway for degradation of macromolecules in the vacuole, is activated by these stress agents in a manner dependent on inositol-requiring enzyme 1b (IRE1b), and delivers endoplasmic reticulum fragments to the vacuole for degradation. In this study, we examined the mechanism for activation of autophagy during endoplasmic reticulum stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. The chemical chaperones sodium 4-phenylbutyrate and tauroursodeoxycholic acid were found to reduce tunicamycin- or dithiothreitol-induced autophagy, but not autophagy caused by unrelated stresses. Similarly, over-expression of BINDING IMMUNOGLOBULIN PROTEIN (BIP), encoding a heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) molecular chaperone, reduced autophagy. Autophagy activated by heat stress was also found to be partially dependent on IRE1b and to be inhibited by sodium 4-phenylbutyrate, suggesting that heat-induced autophagy is due to accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression in Arabidopsis of the misfolded protein mimics zeolin or a mutated form of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY*) also induced autophagy in an IRE1b-dependent manner. Moreover, zeolin and CPY* partially co-localized with the autophagic body marker GFP-ATG8e, indicating delivery to the vacuole by autophagy. We conclude that accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum is a trigger for autophagy under conditions that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:26616142

  2. Influence of esculentoside A on proliferation and CDK2 of IL-1βinduced glomerular mesangial cell *%商陆皂苷甲对IL-1β诱导的肾小球系膜细胞增殖及CDK2、P27的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张祥贵; 汤杰印

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of esculemoside A (EsA)on the proliferation and expression of CDK2 and P27 of rats glomerular mesangial cell .Methods rGMC was cultured in vitro ,The cell growth and cell toxicity were detected by MTT assay ;rGMC proliferation was observed by Rnase/PI-Flous ;The expression of CDK2 and P27 were measured by Western blotting .Results EsA at observed dose has not apparent cytotoxicity effect on rGMC .EsA(2 .5-5 .0 mg/L) inhibited the proliferation of rGMC after 48h .EsA increased the number of the G1 phase and reduced the number of the S phase of IL-1βinduced rGMC .At the same time ,EsA inhibited the expression of CDK2 and promoted the expression of P27 of IL-1βinduced rGMC .Conclusion The GMC is one of the mainly target cell which EsA bing therapeu tical action .EsA inhibited proliferation of IL-1βinduced the GMC ,inhibited the expression of CDK2 and activated the expression of P27 may be its mechanism .%目的观察商陆皂苷甲(EsA )对白细胞介素(IL )-1β诱导的大鼠肾小球系膜细胞(rGM C )增殖和细胞周期依赖性蛋白激酶(CDK2)及其抑制蛋白(P27)表达的影响。方法噻唑蓝(MTT)法检测EsA对 rGMC增殖与毒性的影响;碘化丙啶(PI)染色法,流式细胞仪检测细胞周期;蛋白免疫印迹法(Western blotting )检测CDK2、P27的表达。结果观察剂量中EsA对rG-MC没有细胞毒作用,EsA(2.5~5.0 mg/L)作用rGMC 48 h后明显抑制其增殖;IL-1β减少了rGMC的G1期细胞数并增加了S期的细胞数,促进了rGMC的CDK2的表达,抑制了P27的表达;EsA增加了IL-1β诱导的rGMC的G1期的细胞数并减少了S期的细胞数,抑制了IL-1β诱导的rGMC的CDK2的表达,并促进了P27的表达。结论 rGMC可能是EsA的作用靶细胞,EsA通过抑制CDK2及激活P27的表达抑制了IL-1β诱导的rGMC的增殖,阻滞了细胞周期的进程。

  3. 7-Ketocholesterol Induces Autophagy in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells through Nox4 and Atg4B

    OpenAIRE

    He, Chaoyong; Zhu, Huaiping; Zhang, Wencheng; Okon, Imoh; Wang, Qilong; Li, Hongliang; Le, Yun-Zheng; Xie, Zhonglin

    2013-01-01

    Oxidized lipoproteins stimulate autophagy in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. However, the mechanisms underlying autophagy induction and the role of autophagy in atherogenesis remain to be determined. This study was designed to investigate the mechanisms by which 7-ketocholesterol (7-KC), a major component of oxidized lipoproteins, induces autophagy. This study was also designed to determine the effect of autophagy induction on apoptosis, a central event in the development of atherosclerosis...

  4. Production of monoclonal antibodies to human glomerular basement membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mino,Yasuaki

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available Using the technique of somatic cell fusion, we produced monoclonal antibodies to collagenase-digested human glomerular basement membrane (GBM. Fourteen monoclonal antibodies which reacted with normal human kidney in indirect immunofluorescence (IIF studies were produced. An analysis of the binding patterns indicated that the antigens recognized could be divided into six broad groups. Monoclonal antibody B3-H10 (Group 1 reacted with only GBM in a fine granular pattern. A5-B12 and B5-C2 (Group 2 reacted with GBM and peritubular capillary in a linear pattern. B2-A12 (Group 3 reacted with only epithelial cells. Al-C9 and A4-E2 (Group 4 showed a mesangial pattern in glomerulus and a lineal pattern in tubular basement membrane (TBM, Bowman's capsule and peritubular capillary. A1-E1, A1-E11, A2-E6, A3-B6, A4-F8 and B5-H2 (Group 5 recognized determinants common to GBM, TBM, Bowman's capsule and/or peritubular capillary. A3-F1 and B5-E10 (Group 6 reacted with TBM and Bowman's capsule. The staining pattern of B3-H10 (Group 1 was characteristic because it was not linear, but finely granular along the GBM. The staining pattern of B2-A12 (Group 3 was also characteristic because only epithelial cells were stained, and processes of epithelial cells were observed as fine fibrils. To the best of our knowledge, these two types of monoclonal antibodies have not been reported previously.

  5. Using mathematical algorithms to modify glomerular filtration rate estimation equations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Pei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The equations provide a rapid and low-cost method of evaluating glomerular filtration rate (GFR. Previous studies indicated that the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD, Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology (CKD-EPI and MacIsaac equations need further modification for application in Chinese population. Thus, this study was designed to modify the three equations, and compare the diagnostic accuracy of the equations modified before and after. METHODOLOGY: With the use of (99 mTc-DTPA renal dynamic imaging as the reference GFR (rGFR, the MDRD, CKD-EPI and MacIsaac equations were modified by two mathematical algorithms: the hill-climbing and the simulated-annealing algorithms. RESULTS: A total of 703 Chinese subjects were recruited, with the average rGFR 77.14±25.93 ml/min. The entire modification process was based on a random sample of 80% of subjects in each GFR level as a training sample set, the rest of 20% of subjects as a validation sample set. After modification, the three equations performed significant improvement in slop, intercept, correlated coefficient, root mean square error (RMSE, total deviation index (TDI, and the proportion of estimated GFR (eGFR within 10% and 30% deviation of rGFR (P10 and P30. Of the three modified equations, the modified CKD-EPI equation showed the best accuracy. CONCLUSIONS: Mathematical algorithms could be a considerable tool to modify the GFR equations. Accuracy of all the three modified equations was significantly improved in which the modified CKD-EPI equation could be the optimal one.

  6. Lysosomes and autophagy in aquatic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael N; Kohler, Angela; Lowe, David; Viarengo, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    The lysosomal-autophagic system appears to be a common target for many environmental pollutants, as lysosomes accumulate many toxic metals and organic xenobiotics, which perturb normal function and damage the lysosomal membrane. In fact, autophagic reactions frequently involving reduced lysosomal membrane integrity or stability appear to be effective generic indicators of cellular well-being in eukaryotes: in social amoebae (slime mold), mollusks and fish, autophagy/membrane destabilization is correlated with many stress and toxicological responses and pathological reactions. Prognostic use of adverse lysosomal and autophagic reactions to environmental pollutants can be used for predicting cellular dysfunction and health in aquatic animals, such as shellfish and fish, which are extensively used as sensitive bioindicators in monitoring ecosystem health; and also represent a significant food resource for at least 20% of the global human population. Explanatory frameworks for prediction of pollutant impact on health have been derived encompassing a conceptual mechanistic model linking lysosomal damage and autophagic dysfunction with injury to cells and tissues. Methods are described for tracking in vivo autophagy of fluorescently labeled cytoplasmic proteins, measuring degradation of radiolabeled intracellular proteins and morphometric measurement of lysosomal/cytoplasmic volume ratio. Additional methods for the determination of lysosomal membrane stability in lower animals are also described, which can be applied to frozen tissue sections, protozoans and isolated cells in vivo. Experimental and simulated results have also indicated that nutritional deprivation (analogous in marine mussels to caloric restriction)-induced autophagy has a protective function against toxic effects mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Finally, coupled measurement of lysosomal-autophagic reactions and simulation modelling is proposed as a practical toolbox for predicting toxic

  7. The Regulation of Autophagy by Influenza A Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus is a dreadful pathogen of animals and humans, causing widespread infection and severe morbidity and mortality. It is essential to characterize the influenza A virus-host interaction and develop efficient counter measures against the viral infection. Autophagy is known as a catabolic process for the recycling of the cytoplasmic macromolecules. Recently, it has been shown that autophagy is a critical mechanism underlying the interaction between influenza A virus and its host. Autophagy can be induced by the infection with influenza A virus, which is considered as a necessary process for the viral proliferation, including the accumulation of viral elements during the replication of influenza A virus. On the other hand, influenza A virus can inhibit the autophagic formation via interaction with the autophagy-related genes (Atg and signaling pathways. In addition, autophagy is involved in the influenza virus-regulated cell deaths, leading to significant changes in host apoptosis. Interestingly, the high pathogenic strains of influenza A virus, such as H5N1, stimulate autophagic cell death and appear to interplay with the autophagy in distinct ways as compared with low pathogenic strains. This review discusses the regulation of autophagy, an influenza A virus driven process.

  8. Piperlongumine induces autophagy by targeting p38 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Wang, J-W; Xiao, X; Shan, Y; Xue, B; Jiang, G; He, Q; Chen, J; Xu, H-G; Zhao, R-X; Werle, K D; Cui, R; Liang, J; Li, Y-L; Xu, Z-X

    2013-01-01

    Piperlongumine (PL), a natural product isolated from the plant species Piper longum L., can selectively induce apoptotic cell death in cancer cells by targeting the stress response to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we show that PL induces cell death in the presence of benzyloxycarbonylvalyl-alanyl-aspartic acid (O-methyl)-fluoro-methylketone (zVAD-fmk), a pan-apoptotic inhibitor, and in the presence of necrostatin-1, a necrotic inhibitor. Instead PL-induced cell death can be suppressed by 3-methyladenine, an autophagy inhibitor, and substantially attenuated in cells lacking the autophagy-related 5 (Atg5) gene. We further show that PL enhances autophagy activity without blocking autophagy flux. Application of N-acetyl-cysteine, an antioxidant, markedly reduces PL-induced autophagy and cell death, suggesting an essential role for intracellular ROS in PL-induced autophagy. Furthermore, PL stimulates the activation of p38 protein kinase through ROS-induced stress response and p38 signaling is necessary for the action of PL as SB203580, a p38 inhibitor, or dominant-negative p38 can effectively reduce PL-mediated autophagy. Thus, we have characterized a new mechanism for PL-induced cell death through the ROS-p38 pathway. Our findings support the therapeutic potential of PL by triggering autophagic cell death. PMID:24091667

  9. Targeting autophagy in cancer management – strategies and developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozpolat B

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bulent Ozpolat,1 Doris M Benbrook2 1Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas – Houston, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Oklahoma HSC, Oklahoma City, OK, USA Abstract: Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process involving lysosomal degradation of intracellular components, damaged organelles, misfolded proteins, and toxic aggregates, reducing oxidative stress and protecting cells from damage. The process is also induced in response to various conditions, including nutrient deprivation, metabolic stress, hypoxia, anticancer therapeutics, and radiation therapy to adapt cellular conditions for survival. Autophagy can function as a tumor suppressor mechanism in normal cells and dysregulation of this process (ie, monoallelic Beclin-1 deletion may lead to malignant transformation and carcinogenesis. In tumors, autophagy is thought to promote tumor growth and progression by helping cells to adapt and survive in metabolically-challenged and harsh tumor microenvironments (ie, hypoxia and acidity. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies in preclinical models suggested that modulation of autophagy can be used as a therapeutic modality to enhance the efficacy of conventional therapies, including chemo and radiation therapy. Currently, more than 30 clinical trials are investigating the effects of autophagy inhibition in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted agents in various cancers. In this review, we will discuss the role, molecular mechanism, and regulation of autophagy, while targeting this process as a novel therapeutic modality, in various cancers. Keywords: autophagy inhibition, chemotherapy, tumor microenvironment

  10. Laser stimulation can activate autophagy in HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue [Ultrafast Laser Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Information Technology (Ministry of Education), College of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Lan, Bei; Cao, Youjia [Key Laboratory of Microbial Functional Genomics of Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin (China); He, Hao, E-mail: haohe@tju.edu.cn [Ultrafast Laser Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Information Technology (Ministry of Education), College of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Med-X Research Institute, School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-10-27

    For decades, lasers have been a daily tool in most biological research for fluorescent excitation by confocal or multiphoton microscopy. More than 20 years ago, cell photodamage caused by intense laser stimulation was noticed by generating reactive oxygen species, which was then thought as the main damage effect by photons. In this study, we show that laser stimulation can induce autophagy, an important cell lysosomal pathway responding to immune stimulation and starvation, without any biochemical treatment. Two different types of laser stimulations are found to be capable of activating autophagy: continuous scanning by continuous-wave visible lasers and a short-time flash of femtosecond laser irradiation. The autophagy generation is independent from wavelength, power, and scanning duration of the visible lasers. In contrast, the power of femtosecond laser is very critical to autophagy because the multiphoton excited Ca{sup 2+} dominates autophagy signaling. In general, we show here the different mechanisms of autophagy generation by such laser stimulation, which correspond to confocal microscopy and cell surgery, respectively. Those results can help further understanding of photodamage and autophagy signaling.

  11. Laser stimulation can activate autophagy in HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yisen; Lan, Bei; He, Hao; Hu, Minglie; Cao, Youjia; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-10-01

    For decades, lasers have been a daily tool in most biological research for fluorescent excitation by confocal or multiphoton microscopy. More than 20 years ago, cell photodamage caused by intense laser stimulation was noticed by generating reactive oxygen species, which was then thought as the main damage effect by photons. In this study, we show that laser stimulation can induce autophagy, an important cell lysosomal pathway responding to immune stimulation and starvation, without any biochemical treatment. Two different types of laser stimulations are found to be capable of activating autophagy: continuous scanning by continuous-wave visible lasers and a short-time flash of femtosecond laser irradiation. The autophagy generation is independent from wavelength, power, and scanning duration of the visible lasers. In contrast, the power of femtosecond laser is very critical to autophagy because the multiphoton excited Ca2+ dominates autophagy signaling. In general, we show here the different mechanisms of autophagy generation by such laser stimulation, which correspond to confocal microscopy and cell surgery, respectively. Those results can help further understanding of photodamage and autophagy signaling.

  12. Nanomaterials and Autophagy: New Insights in Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy represents a cell’s response to stress. It is an evolutionarily conserved process with diversified roles. Indeed, it controls intracellular homeostasis by degradation and/or recycling intracellular metabolic material, supplies energy, provides nutrients, eliminates cytotoxic materials and damaged proteins and organelles. Moreover, autophagy is involved in several diseases. Recent evidences support a relationship between several classes of nanomaterials and autophagy perturbation, both induction and blockade, in many biological models. In fact, the autophagic mechanism represents a common cellular response to nanomaterials. On the other hand, the dynamic nature of autophagy in cancer biology is an intriguing approach for cancer therapeutics, since during tumour development and therapy, autophagy has been reported to trigger both an early cell survival and a late cell death. The use of nanomaterials in cancer treatment to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs and target tumours is well known. Recently, autophagy modulation mediated by nanomaterials has become an appealing notion in nanomedicine therapeutics, since it can be exploited as adjuvant in chemotherapy or in the development of cancer vaccines or as a potential anti-cancer agent. Herein, we summarize the effects of nanomaterials on autophagic processes in cancer, also considering the therapeutic outcome of synergism between nanomaterials and autophagy to improve existing cancer therapies

  13. Regulation of autophagy in oxygen-dependent cellular stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by supraphysiological production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), can cause cellular injury associated with protein and lipid oxidation, DNA damage, and mitochondrial dysfunction. The cellular responses triggered by oxidative stress include the altered regulation of signaling pathways that culminate in the regulation of cell survival or cell death pathways. Recent studies suggest that autophagy, a cellular homeostatic process that governs the turnover of damaged organelles and proteins, may represent a general cellular and tissue response to oxidative stress. The autophagic pathway involves the encapsulation of substrates in double-membraned vesicles, which are subsequently delivered to the lysosome for enzymatic degradation and recycling of metabolic precursors. Autophagy may play multifunctional roles in cellular adaptation to stress, by maintaining mitochondrial integrity, and removing damaged proteins. Additionally, autophagy may play important roles in the regulation of inflammation and immune function. Modulation of the autophagic pathway has been reported in cell culture models of oxidative stress, including altered states of oxygen tension (i.e., hypoxia, hyperoxia), and exposure to oxidants. Furthermore, proteins that regulate autophagy may be subject to redox regulation. The heme oxygenase- 1 (HO)-1 enzyme system may have a role in the regulation of autophagy. Recent studies suggest that carbon monoxide (CO), a reaction product of HO activity which can alter mitochondrial function, may induce autophagy in cultured epithelial cells. In conclusion, current research suggests a central role for autophagy as a mammalian oxidative stress response and its interrelationship to other stress defense systems. PMID:23092322

  14. The regulation of autophagy during exercise in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainshtein, Anna; Hood, David A

    2016-03-15

    The merits of exercise on muscle health and well-being are numerous and well documented. However, the mechanisms underlying the robust adaptations induced by exercise, particularly on mitochondria, are less clear and much sought after. Recently, an evolutionary conserved cellular recycling mechanism known as autophagy has been implicated in the adaptations to acute and chronic exercise. A basal level of autophagy is constantly ongoing in cells and tissues, ensuring cellular clearance and energy homeostasis. This pathway can be further induced, as a survival mechanism, by cellular perturbations, such as energetic imbalance and oxidative stress. During exercise, a biphasic autophagy response is mobilized, leading to both an acute induction and a long-term potentiation of the process. Posttranslational modifications arising from upstream signaling cascades induce an acute autophagic response during a single bout of exercise by mobilizing core autophagy machinery. A transcriptional program involving the regulators Forkhead box O, transcription factor EB, p53, and peroxisome proliferator coactivator-1α is also induced to fuel sustained increases in autophagic capacity. Autophagy has also been documented to mediate chronic exercise-induced metabolic benefits, and animal models in which autophagy is perturbed do not adapt to exercise to the same extent. In this review, we discuss recent developments in the field of autophagy and exercise. We specifically highlight the molecular mechanisms activated during acute exercise that lead to a prolonged adaptive response. PMID:26679612

  15. Nanomaterials and Autophagy: New Insights in Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panzarini, Elisa; Inguscio, Valentina; Tenuzzo, Bernardetta Anna; Carata, Elisabetta; Dini, Luciana, E-mail: luciana.dini@unisalento.it [Department of Biological and Environmental Science and Technology (Di.S.Te.B.A.), University of Salento, Lecce 73100 (Italy)

    2013-03-21

    Autophagy represents a cell’s response to stress. It is an evolutionarily conserved process with diversified roles. Indeed, it controls intracellular homeostasis by degradation and/or recycling intracellular metabolic material, supplies energy, provides nutrients, eliminates cytotoxic materials and damaged proteins and organelles. Moreover, autophagy is involved in several diseases. Recent evidences support a relationship between several classes of nanomaterials and autophagy perturbation, both induction and blockade, in many biological models. In fact, the autophagic mechanism represents a common cellular response to nanomaterials. On the other hand, the dynamic nature of autophagy in cancer biology is an intriguing approach for cancer therapeutics, since during tumour development and therapy, autophagy has been reported to trigger both an early cell survival and a late cell death. The use of nanomaterials in cancer treatment to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs and target tumours is well known. Recently, autophagy modulation mediated by nanomaterials has become an appealing notion in nanomedicine therapeutics, since it can be exploited as adjuvant in chemotherapy or in the development of cancer vaccines or as a potential anti-cancer agent. Herein, we summarize the effects of nanomaterials on autophagic processes in cancer, also considering the therapeutic outcome of synergism between nanomaterials and autophagy to improve existing cancer therapies.

  16. Transcriptional regulation of mammalian autophagy at a glance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füllgrabe, Jens; Ghislat, Ghita; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Rubinsztein, David C

    2016-08-15

    Macroautophagy, hereafter referred to as autophagy, is a catabolic process that results in the lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic contents ranging from abnormal proteins to damaged cell organelles. It is activated  under diverse conditions, including nutrient deprivation and hypoxia. During autophagy, members of the core autophagy-related (ATG) family of proteins mediate membrane rearrangements, which lead to the engulfment and degradation of cytoplasmic cargo. Recently, the nuclear regulation of autophagy, especially by transcription factors and histone modifiers, has gained increased attention. These factors are not only involved in rapid responses to autophagic stimuli, but also regulate the long-term outcome of autophagy. Now there are more than 20 transcription factors that have been shown to be linked to the autophagic process. However, their interplay and timing appear enigmatic as several have been individually shown to act as major regulators of autophagy. This Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster highlights the main cellular regulators of transcription involved in mammalian autophagy and their target genes. PMID:27528206

  17. Autophagy in the immune response to tuberculosis: clinical perspectives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ní Cheallaigh, C

    2011-06-01

    A growing body of evidence points to autophagy as an essential component in the immune response to tuberculosis. Autophagy is a direct mechanism of killing intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis and also acts as a modulator of proinflammatory cytokine secretion. In addition, autophagy plays a key role in antigen processing and presentation. Autophagy is modulated by cytokines; it is stimulated by T helper type 1 (Th1) cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ, and is inhibited by the Th2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Vitamin D, via cathelicidin, can also induce autophagy, as can Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated signals. Autophagy-promoting agents, administered either locally to the lungs or systemically, could have a clinical application as adjunctive treatment of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive tuberculosis. Moreover, vaccines which effectively induce autophagy could be more successful in preventing acquisition or reactivation of latent tuberculosis.

  18. Laser stimulation can activate autophagy in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For decades, lasers have been a daily tool in most biological research for fluorescent excitation by confocal or multiphoton microscopy. More than 20 years ago, cell photodamage caused by intense laser stimulation was noticed by generating reactive oxygen species, which was then thought as the main damage effect by photons. In this study, we show that laser stimulation can induce autophagy, an important cell lysosomal pathway responding to immune stimulation and starvation, without any biochemical treatment. Two different types of laser stimulations are found to be capable of activating autophagy: continuous scanning by continuous-wave visible lasers and a short-time flash of femtosecond laser irradiation. The autophagy generation is independent from wavelength, power, and scanning duration of the visible lasers. In contrast, the power of femtosecond laser is very critical to autophagy because the multiphoton excited Ca2+ dominates autophagy signaling. In general, we show here the different mechanisms of autophagy generation by such laser stimulation, which correspond to confocal microscopy and cell surgery, respectively. Those results can help further understanding of photodamage and autophagy signaling.

  19. Function of Autophagy in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaja, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative pathway that functions to promote cell survival by supplying energy in times of stress or by removing damaged organelles and proteins after injury. The involvement of autophagy in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was first suggested by the finding that this pathway mediates the breakdown of intracellular lipids in hepatocytes and therefore may regulate the development of hepatic steatosis. Subsequent studies have demonstrated additional critical functions for autophagy in hepatocytes and other hepatic cell types such as macrophages and stellate cells that regulate insulin sensitivity, hepatocellular injury, innate immunity, fibrosis, and carcinogenesis. These findings suggest a number of possible mechanistic roles for autophagy in the development of NAFLD and progression to NASH and its complications. The functions of autophagy in the liver, together with findings of decreased hepatic autophagy in association with conditions that predispose to NAFLD such as obesity and aging, suggest that autophagy may be a novel therapeutic target in this disease. PMID:26725058

  20. Glomerular filtration rate, cardiovascular risk factors and insulin resistance Filtrado glomerular, riesgo cardiovascular y resistencia a la insulina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín R. Salazar

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to study the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, its changes with age, and its association with systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic BP (DBP, indicators of obesity, dyslipemia, insulin resistance and inflammation on a random population sample. BP, weight, size and waist circumference (WC were recorded at home. Fasting morning blood samples were analysed. The eGFR was calculated with MDRD (eGFR-MDRD, Cockroft-Gault (eGFR-CG adjusted to 1.73 m² and reciprocal of serum creatinine (100/serum cretinine. A total of 1016 individuals, 722 females (41.97 ± 0.66 years old and 294 males (42.06 ± 0.99 years old, completed the laboratory tests. The mean of 100/Scr was 115.13 ± 0.60 (dl/mg, the mean eGFR-CG was 98.48 ± 0.82 ml/min/1.73 m²; the mean eGFR-MDRD was 85.15 ± 0.58 ml/min/1.73 m². The eGFR-MDRD decreased with age and with the number of risk factors in both sexes. The eGFR-MDRD El objetivo fue evaluar en una muestra poblacional aleatoria el filtrado glomerular estimado (FGe, sus cambios con la edad y su asociación con presión arterial sistólica (PAS y diastólica (PAD, indicadores de obesidad, dislipemia, resistencia a la insulina e inflamación. En cada domicilio fueron medidos presión arterial, peso y talla y perímetro de la cintura (PC. Se analizaron muestras de sangre en ayunas y fue calculado el FGe usando las fórmulas de MDRD (FGe-MDRD y Cockroft-Gault (FGe-CG ajustado a 1.73 m², y la inversa de la creatinina sérica (100/CrS. Completaron el protocolo de laboratorio 1016 sujetos, 722 mujeres (41.97 ± 0.66 años y 294 varones (42.06 ± 0.99 años. La media de 100/Crs fue 115.13 ± 0.60 (dl/mg, la del FGe-CG 98.48 ± 0.82 ml/min/1.73 m² y la del FGe-MDRD 85.15 ± 0.58 ml/min/1.73 m² (CI 95% 84.00-86.29. El FGe-MDRD disminuyó con la edad y con el número de factores de riesgo cardiovascular en ambos sexos. La prevalecencia ajustada de FGe-MDRD < 60 ml/min/1.73 m² fue 6.2 por 100

  1. Molecular sieve of the rat glomerular basement membrane: a transmission electron microscopic study of enzyme-treated specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiyasu,Akira

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available Isolated rat glomerular basement membrane was treated with elastase and observed by transmission electron microscopy. The treatment with elastase revealed the fundamental structure of the glomerular basement membrane quite clearly, and enabled the observation of a sieve structure within the glomerular basement membrane. This sieve structure may play a major role in the filtration of blood as well as in the production of urine. Treatment with antibody showed that the sieve was mainly constituted of type IV collagen.

  2. Study on the Relationship between Blood Stasis Syndrome and Clinical Pathology in 227 Patients with Primary Glomerular Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李深; 饶向荣; 王素霞; 张改华; 李晓玫; 戴希文; 陈可冀

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between the severity of Chinese medicine(CM) bloodstasis syndrome(BSS) with clinical features and renal lesion indexes of the primary glomerular disease. Methods:An epidemiological survey was conducted to collect the data of 227 patients diagnosed as chronic primary glomerular diseases,and their severity of BSS were scored three days before renal biopsies were performed.The following clinical indexes were analyzed:age,course of glomerular diseases,24-h urine protein ration...

  3. The expression of the structural proteins Dendrin and Neph1 in the glomerular filtration barrier in proteinuria

    OpenAIRE

    Hulkko, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Background In the normal kidney, the glomerular filtration barrier successfully clears about one litre blood per minute. Damage to the filtration barrier might lead to protein leakage in the urine – proteinuria. The major ultra-structural finding in glomerular diseases with proteinuria is foot process effacement (FPE). Despite these being the most common signs of glomerular dysfunction, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are still not fully understood. However, a number of prote...

  4. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Cheng-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 406, Taiwan (China); Kuan, Yu-Hsiang [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacy, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri [Division of Urology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-Cheng [Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China); Pan, Pin-Ho [Department of Pediatrics, Tungs’ Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital, Taichung 435, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Ying [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hsuan-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Jung, E-mail: cjchen@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Center for General Education, Tunghai University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, HungKuang University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  5. Autophagy: a new target for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao YQ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Yuqing Mao,1 Fujun Yu,1 Jianbo Wang,2 Chuanyong Guo,3 Xiaoming Fan1 1Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, 2Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Central Hospital of Lishui City, Wenzhou Medical University, Zhejiang, 3Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China Abstract: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has gained importance in recent decades due to drastic changes in diet, especially in Western countries. NAFLD occurs as a spectrum from simple hepatic steatosis, steatohepatitis to cirrhosis, and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of NAFLD have been intensively investigated, many issues remain to be resolved. Autophagy is a cell survival mechanism for disposing of excess or defective organelles, and has become a hot spot for research. Recent studies have revealed that autophagy is linked to the development of NAFLD and regulation of autophagy has therapeutic potential. Autophagy reduces intracellular lipid droplets by enclosing them and fusing with lysosomes for degradation. Furthermore, autophagy is involved in attenuating inflammation and liver injury. However, autophagy is regarded as a double-edged sword, as it may also affect adipogenesis and adipocyte differentiation. Moreover, it is unclear as to whether autophagy protects the body from injury or causes diseases and even death, and the association between autophagy and NAFLD remains controversial. This review is intended to discuss, comment, and outline the progress made in this field and establish the possible molecular mechanism involved. Keywords: nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, autophagy, steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, carcinogenesis

  6. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK

  7. Role of autophagy in acute myeloid leukemia therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Ping Zhang; Yu-Na Niu; Na Yuan; Ai-Hong Zhang; Dan Chao; Qiu-Ping Xu; Li-Jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Despite its dual role in determining cell fate in a wide array of solid cancer cell lines,autophagy has been robustly shown to suppress or kill acute myeloid leukemia cells via degradation of the oncogenic fusion protein that drives leukemogenesis.However,autophagy also induces the demise of acute leukemia cells that do not express the known fusion protein,though the molecular mechanism remains elusive.Nevertheless,since it can induce cooperation with apoptosis and differentiation in response to autophagic signals,autophagy can be manipulated for a better therapy on acute myeloid leukemia.

  8. Autophagy in HCV Infection: Keeping Fat and Inflammation at Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Vescovo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is one of the main causes of chronic liver disease. Viral persistence and pathogenesis rely mainly on the ability of HCV to deregulate specific host processes, including lipid metabolism and innate immunity. Recently, autophagy has emerged as a cellular pathway, playing a role in several aspects of HCV infection. This review summarizes current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms that link the HCV life cycle with autophagy machinery. In particular, we discuss the role of HCV/autophagy interaction in dysregulating inflammation and lipid homeostasis and its potential for translational applications in the treatment of HCV-infected patients.

  9. Zymophagy: Selective Autophagy of Secretory Granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria I. Vaccaro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Timing is everything. That's especially true when it comes to the activation of enzymes created by the pancreas to break down food. Pancreatic enzymes are packed in secretory granules as precursor molecules called zymogens. In physiological conditions, those zymogens are activated only when they reach the gut, where they get to work releasing and distributing nutrients that we need to survive. If this process fails and the enzymes are prematurely activated within the pancreatic cell, before they are released from the gland, they break down the pancreas itself causing acute pancreatitis. This is a painful disease that ranges from a mild and autolimited process to a severe and lethal condition. Recently, we demonstrated that the pancreatic acinar cell is able to switch on a refined mechanism that could explain the autolimited form of the disease. This is a novel selective form of autophagy named zymophagy, a cellular process to specifically detect and degrade secretory granules containing activated enzymes before they can digest the organ. In this work, we revise the molecules and mechanisms that mediate zymophagy, a selective autophagy of secretory granules.

  10. ER stress, autophagy, and RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Rong eJheng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is a general term for representing the pathway by which various stimuli affect ER functions. ER stress induces the evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways, called the unfolded protein response (UPR, which compromises the stimulus and then determines whether the cell survives or dies. In recent years, ongoing research has suggested that these pathways may be linked to the autophagic response, which plays a key role in the cell’s response to various stressors. Autophagy performs a self-digestion function, and its activation protects cells against certain pathogens. However, the link between the UPR and autophagy may be more complicated. These two systems may act dependently, or the induction of one system may interfere with the other. Experimental studies have found that different viruses modulate these mechanisms to allow them to escape the host immune response or, worse, to exploit the host’s defense to their advantage; thus, this topic is a critical area in antiviral research. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about how RNA viruses, including influenza virus, poliovirus, coxsackievirus, enterovirus 71, Japanese encephalitis virus, hepatitis C virus, and dengue virus, regulate these processes. We also discuss recent discoveries and how these will produce novel strategies for antiviral treatment.

  11. Atg5-dependent autophagy contributes to the development of acute myeloid leukemia in an MLL-AF9-driven mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Chen, Longgui; Atkinson, Jennifer M; Claxton, David F; Wang, Hong-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hierarchical hematopoietic malignancy originating from leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway that is hypothesized to be important for the maintenance of AML as well as contribute to chemotherapy response. Here we employ a mouse model of AML expressing the fusion oncogene MLL-AF9 and explore the effects of Atg5 deletion, a key autophagy protein, on the malignant transformation and progression of AML. Consistent with a transient decrease in colony-forming potential in vitro, the in vivo deletion of Atg5 in MLL-AF9-transduced bone marrow cells during primary transplantation prolonged the survival of recipient mice, suggesting that autophagy has a role in MLL-AF9-driven leukemia initiation. In contrast, deletion of Atg5 in malignant AML cells during secondary transplantation did not influence the survival or chemotherapeutic response of leukemic mice. Interestingly, autophagy was found to be involved in the survival of differentiated myeloid cells originating from MLL-AF9-driven LSCs. Taken together, our data suggest that Atg5-dependent autophagy may contribute to the development but not chemotherapy sensitivity of murine AML induced by MLL-AF9. PMID:27607576

  12. The role of cell-extracellular matrix interactions in glomerular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borza, Corina M; Pozzi, Ambra

    2012-05-15

    Glomerulosclerosis is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix within the glomeruli of the kidney, glomerular cell death, and subsequent loss of functional glomeruli. While in physiological situations the levels of extracellular matrix components are kept constant by a tight balance between formation and degradation, in the case of injury that results in fibrosis there is increased matrix deposition relative to its breakdown. Multiple factors control matrix synthesis and degradation, thus contributing to the development of glomerulosclerosis. This review focuses primarily on the role of cell-matrix interactions, which play a critical role in governing glomerular cell cues in both healthy and diseased kidneys. Cell-extracellular matrix interactions are made possible by various cellular receptors including integrins, discoidin domain receptors, and dystroglycan. Upon binding to a selective extracellular matrix protein, these receptors activate intracellular signaling pathways that can either downregulate or upregulate matrix synthesis and deposition. This, together with the observation that changes in the expression levels of matrix receptors have been documented in glomerular disease, clearly emphasizes the contribution of cell-matrix interactions in glomerular injury. Understanding the molecular mechanisms whereby extracellular matrix receptors regulate matrix homeostasis in the course of glomerular injury is therefore critical for devising more effective therapies to treat and ideally prevent glomerulosclerosis. PMID:22417893

  13. The Rho-GTPase binding protein IQGAP2 is required for the glomerular filtration barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Yuya; Lindenmeyer, Maja T; Auberger, Ines; Ziegler, Urs; Segerer, Stephan; Cohen, Clemens D; Neuhauss, Stephan C F; Loffing, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Podocyte dysfunction impairs the size selectivity of the glomerular filter, leading to proteinuria, hypoalbuminuria, and edema, clinically defined as nephrotic syndrome. Hereditary forms of nephrotic syndrome are linked to mutations in podocyte-specific genes. To identify genes contributing to podocyte dysfunction in acquired nephrotic syndrome, we studied human glomerular gene expression data sets for glomerular-enriched gene transcripts differentially regulated between pretransplant biopsy samples and biopsies from patients with nephrotic syndrome. Candidate genes were screened by in situ hybridization for expression in the zebrafish pronephros, an easy-to-use in vivo assay system to assess podocyte function. One glomerulus-enriched product was the Rho-GTPase binding protein, IQGAP2. Immunohistochemistry found a strong presence of IQGAP2 in normal human and zebrafish podocytes. In zebrafish larvae, morpholino-based knockdown of iqgap2 caused a mild foot process effacement of zebrafish podocytes and a cystic dilation of the urinary space of Bowman's capsule upon onset of urinary filtration. Moreover, the glomerulus of zebrafish morphants showed a glomerular permeability for injected high-molecular-weight dextrans, indicating an impaired size selectivity of the glomerular filter. Thus, IQGAP2 is a Rho-GTPase binding protein, highly abundant in human and zebrafish podocytes, which controls normal podocyte structure and function as evidenced in the zebrafish pronephros. PMID:26154927

  14. Pattern of glomerular diseases in oman: A study based on light microscopy and immunofluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasar Yousuf Alwahaibi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Light microscopy and immunofluorescence play an important part in the final diagnosis of renal biopsy. The aim of this study was to analyze the pattern of various glomerular diseases in Oman. A total of 424 renal biopsies were retrospectively analyzed at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital between 1999 and 2010. Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, minimal change disease (MCD, membranous glomerulopathy (MGN and IgA nephropathy were the most common primary glomerular diseases encountered, accounting for 21.2%, 17%, 12.3% and 8.3%, respectively, of all cases. Lupus nephritis was the most common secondary glomerular disease and was the most prevalent among all biopsies, accounting for 30.4% of all biopsies. Amyloidosis was seen in only two cases. The presence of fluorescein isothiocyanatefibrin in all renal cases was low when compared with IgG, IgA, IgM, C3 and C1q markers. In conclusion, based on the findings of this study, lupus nephritis was the most common of all glomerular diseases and FSGS was the most common primary glomerular disease. The importance of fluorescein isothiocyanate-fibrin in the diagnosis of renal biopsy needs to be further investigated.

  15. Pathogenesis of common glomerular diseases – role of the podocyte cytoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumagai T

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Takanori Kumagai, Flaviana Mouawad, Tomoko TakanoDepartment of Medicine, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, CanadaAbstract: Glomerulus is the filtration unit of the kidney where the first step of urine formation takes place. In the glomerulus, water and small molecules including waste products of the body are filtered into the urine, while large molecules essential for body function such as albumin are retained. When this barrier function of the kidney is impaired, protein leakage into the urine (proteinuria occurs. Proteinuria is not only a hallmark of many glomerular diseases but also a prognostic marker of kidney disease progression. Visceral glomerular epithelial cells (commonly called podocytes are known to have an important role in the maintenance of glomerular barrier function. In the last decade, remarkable progress has been made in podocyte biology, mainly led by the discoveries of important proteins that work together to maintain the intricate morphology and function of podocytes. Most of these so-called podocyte proteins modulate the actin cytoskeleton either directly or indirectly. The aim of the current review is to discuss the pathogenesis of common glomerular diseases with a particular focus on the role of the actin cytoskeleton in podocytes. The diseases covered include minimal change disease, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (idiopathic and hereditary, membranous nephropathy, hypertensive glomerulosclerosis, and diabetic nephropathy.Keywords: glomerular disease, podocyte, cytoskeleton, proteinuria

  16. mir-30d Regulates multiple genes in the autophagy pathway and impairs autophagy process in human cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaojun [Ovarian Cancer Research Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of General Surgery, Gansu Provincial Hospital, Lanzhou, Gansu 710000 (China); Zhong, Xiaomin [Ovarian Cancer Research Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Female Reproductive Endocrine Related Diseases, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200011 (China); Tanyi, Janos L.; Shen, Jianfeng [Ovarian Cancer Research Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Xu, Congjian [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Female Reproductive Endocrine Related Diseases, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200011 (China); Gao, Peng [Department of General Surgery, Gansu Provincial Hospital, Lanzhou, Gansu 710000 (China); Zheng, Tim M. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); DeMichele, Angela [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Zhang, Lin, E-mail: linzhang@mail.med.upenn.edu [Ovarian Cancer Research Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Gene set enrichment analysis indicated mir-30d might regulate the autophagy pathway. ► mir-30d represses the expression of BECN1, BNIP3L, ATG12, ATG5 and ATG2. ► BECN1, BNIP3L, ATG12, ATG5 and ATG2 are direct targets of mir-30d. ► mir-30d inhibits autophagosome formation and LC3B-I conversion to LC3B-II. ► mir-30d regulates the autophagy process. -- Abstract: In human epithelial cancers, the microRNA (miRNA) mir-30d is amplified with high frequency and serves as a critical oncomir by regulating metastasis, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. Autophagy, a degradation pathway for long-lived protein and organelles, regulates the survival and death of many cell types. Increasing evidence suggests that autophagy plays an important function in epithelial tumor initiation and progression. Using a combined bioinformatics approach, gene set enrichment analysis, and miRNA target prediction, we found that mir-30d might regulate multiple genes in the autophagy pathway including BECN1, BNIP3L, ATG12, ATG5, and ATG2. Our further functional experiments demonstrated that the expression of these core proteins in the autophagy pathway was directly suppressed by mir-30d in cancer cells. Finally, we showed that mir-30d regulated the autophagy process by inhibiting autophagosome formation and LC3B-I conversion to LC3B-II. Taken together, our results provide evidence that the oncomir mir-30d impairs the autophagy process by targeting multiple genes in the autophagy pathway. This result will contribute to understanding the molecular mechanism of mir-30d in tumorigenesis and developing novel cancer therapy strategy.

  17. mir-30d Regulates multiple genes in the autophagy pathway and impairs autophagy process in human cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Gene set enrichment analysis indicated mir-30d might regulate the autophagy pathway. ► mir-30d represses the expression of BECN1, BNIP3L, ATG12, ATG5 and ATG2. ► BECN1, BNIP3L, ATG12, ATG5 and ATG2 are direct targets of mir-30d. ► mir-30d inhibits autophagosome formation and LC3B-I conversion to LC3B-II. ► mir-30d regulates the autophagy process. -- Abstract: In human epithelial cancers, the microRNA (miRNA) mir-30d is amplified with high frequency and serves as a critical oncomir by regulating metastasis, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. Autophagy, a degradation pathway for long-lived protein and organelles, regulates the survival and death of many cell types. Increasing evidence suggests that autophagy plays an important function in epithelial tumor initiation and progression. Using a combined bioinformatics approach, gene set enrichment analysis, and miRNA target prediction, we found that mir-30d might regulate multiple genes in the autophagy pathway including BECN1, BNIP3L, ATG12, ATG5, and ATG2. Our further functional experiments demonstrated that the expression of these core proteins in the autophagy pathway was directly suppressed by mir-30d in cancer cells. Finally, we showed that mir-30d regulated the autophagy process by inhibiting autophagosome formation and LC3B-I conversion to LC3B-II. Taken together, our results provide evidence that the oncomir mir-30d impairs the autophagy process by targeting multiple genes in the autophagy pathway. This result will contribute to understanding the molecular mechanism of mir-30d in tumorigenesis and developing novel cancer therapy strategy

  18. Detection of Autophagy in Caenorhabditis elegans Using GFP::LGG-1 as an Autophagy Marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Nicholas J; Meléndez, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    In yeast and mammalian cells, the autophagy protein Atg8/LC3 (microtubule-associated proteins 1A/1B light chain 3B encoded by MAP1LC3B) has been the marker of choice to detect double-membraned autophagosomes that are produced during the process of autophagy. A lipid-conjugated form of Atg8/LC3B is localized to the inner and outer membrane of the early-forming structure known as the phagophore. During maturation of autophagosomes, Atg8/LC3 bound to the inner autophagosome membrane remains in situ as the autophagosomes fuse with lysosomes. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is thought to conduct a similar process, meaning that tagging the nematode ortholog of Atg8/LC3-known as LGG-1-with a fluorophore has become a widely accepted method to visualize autophagosomes. Under normal growth conditions, GFP-modified LGG-1 displays a diffuse expression pattern throughout a variety of tissues, whereas, when under conditions that induce autophagy, the GFP::LGG-1 tag labels positive punctate structures, and its overall level of expression increases. Here, we present a protocol for using fluorescent reporters of LGG-1 coupled to GFP to monitor autophagosomes in vivo. We also discuss the use of alternative fluorescent markers and the possible utility of the LGG-1 paralog LGG-2. PMID:26729905

  19. Autophagy as a Therapeutic Target in Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchenko, Andriy; Chiong, Mario; Turer, Aslan; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    The epidemic of heart failure continues apace, and development of novel therapies with clinical efficacy has lagged. Now, important insights into the molecular circuitry of cardiovascular autophagy have raised the prospect that this cellular pathway of protein quality control may be a target of clinical relevance. Whereas basal levels of autophagy are required for cell survival, excessive levels – or perhaps distinct forms of autophagic flux – contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our challenge will be to distinguish mechanisms that drive adaptive versus maladaptive autophagy and to manipulate those pathways for therapeutic gain. Recent evidence suggests this may be possible. Here, we review the fundamental biology of autophagy and its role in a variety of forms of cardiovascular disease. We discuss ways in which this evolutionarily conserved catabolic mechanism can be manipulated, discuss studies presently underway in heart disease, and provide our perspective on where this exciting field may lead in the future. PMID:21723289

  20. Autophagy in Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis and in Muscular Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bonaldo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscles are the agent of motion and one of the most important tissues responsible for the control of metabolism. The maintenance of muscle homeostasis is finely regulated by the balance between catabolic and anabolic process. Macroautophagy (or autophagy is a catabolic process that provides the degradation of protein aggregation and damaged organelles through the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes. Proper regulation of the autophagy flux is fundamental for the homeostasis of skeletal muscles during physiological situations and in response to stress. Defective as well as excessive autophagy is harmful for muscle health and has a pathogenic role in several forms of muscle diseases. This review will focus on the role of autophagy in muscle homeostasis and diseases.

  1. Loss of autophagy in hypothalamic POMC neurons impairs lipolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushik, Susmita; Arias, Esperanza; Kwon, Hyokjoon; Lopez, Nuria Martinez; Athonvarangkul, Diana; Sahu, Srabani; Schwartz, Gary J.; Pessin, Jeffrey E.; Singh, Rajat

    2012-01-01

    Both selective loss of autophagy in POMC neurons and ageing decrease ?-melanocyte stimulating hormone levels, promoting adiposity, impairing lipolysis and altering glucose homeostasis. These effects can be pharmacologically alleviated, suggesting prevention strategies for obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  2. Autophagy: A new therapeutic target for liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yu-Qing; Fan, Xiao-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound-healing response to liver injury and the result of imbalance of extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation and degradation. The relentless production and progressive accumulation of ECM can lead to end-stage liver disease. Although significant progress has been achieved in elucidating the mechanisms of fibrogenesis, effective anti-fibrotic strategies are still lacking. Autophagy is an intracellular process of self-digestion of defective organelles to provide material recycling or energy for cell survival. Autophagy has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many human disorders including hepatic fibrosis. However, the exact relationships between autophagy and hepatic fibrosis are not totally clear and need further investigations. A new therapeutic target for liver fibrosis could be developed with a better understanding of autophagy. PMID:26261688

  3. Role of autophagy in liver physiology and pathophysiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved intracellular degradation pathway by which bulk cytoplasm and superfluous or damaged organelles are enveloped by double membrane structures termed autophagosomes. The autophago-somes then fuse with lysosomes for degradation of their contents, and the resulting amino acids can then recycle back to the cytosol. Autophagy is normally activated in response to nutrient deprivation and other stressors and occurs in all eukaryotes. In addition to maintaining energy and nutrient balance in the liver, it is now clear that autophagy plays a role in liver protein aggregates related diseases, hepatocyte cell death, steatohepatitis, hepatitis virus infection and hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review, I discuss the recent findings of autophagy with a focus on its role in liver pathophysiology.

  4. Glucocorticoids induce autophagy in rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Fan, J.; Lin, Y. S.;

    2015-01-01

    and their responses to diverse stimuli, however, the role of autophagy in glucocorticoidinduced damage to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) remains unclear. The current study confirmed that glucocorticoid administration impaired the proliferation of BMSCs. Transmission electron microscopy...

  5. Methods for the Detection of Autophagy in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziyan; Singh, Rajat; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) is a degradation pathway that delivers cytoplasmic materials to lysosomes via double-membraned vesicles designated autophagosomes. Cytoplasmic constituents are sequestered into autophagosomes, which subsequently fuse with lysosomes, where the cargo is degraded. Autophagy is a crucial mechanism involved in many aspects of cell function, including cellular metabolism and energy balance; alterations in autophagy have been linked to various human pathological processes. Thus, methods that accurately measure autophagic activity are necessary. In this unit, we introduce several approaches to analyze autophagy in mammalian cells, including immunoblotting analysis of LC3 and p62, detection of autophagosome formation by fluorescence microscopy, and monitoring autophagosome maturation by tandem mRFP-GFP fluorescence microscopy. Overall, we recommend a combined use of multiple methods to accurately assess the autophagic activity in any given biological setting. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27479363

  6. Glomerular filtration rate by 51chomium and 113mindium labeled EDTA in horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The glomerular filtration rate was determined in nine healthy horses, six male and three female, aged two to 12-year-old, by means of 51Cr and 113mIn labeled EDTA single injection technique. The glomerular filtration rate was calculated from the plasma disappearance curve and the volume of distribution of the radiotracer, 51Cr-EDTA or 113mIn-EDTA. The result (mean +- standard deviation) was 148.80 +- 26.42 m L.min-1.100 kg. It is concluded that the measurement of glomerular filtration rate by 51Cr-EDTA or 113mIn-EDTA by single injection technique eliminates the bladder catheterization, and for its simplicity, convenience, accuracy, and low dose of radiation, can be used in horses as a method of choice in clinical routine. (author)

  7. Glomerular injury is exacerbated in diabetic integrin alpha1-null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zent, R; Yan, X; Su, Y; Hudson, B G; Borza, D-B; Moeckel, G W; Qi, Z; Sado, Y; Breyer, M D; Voziyan, P; Pozzi, A

    2006-08-01

    Excessive glomerular collagen IV and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production are key factors in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Integrin alpha1beta1, the major collagen IV receptor, dowregulates collagen IV and ROS production, suggesting this integrin might determine the severity of diabetic nephropathy. To test this possibility, wild-type and integrin alpha1-null mice were rendered diabetic with streptozotocin (STZ) (100 mg/kg single intraperitoneal injection), after which glomerular filtration rate (GFR), glomerular collagen deposition, and glomerular basement membrane (GBM) thickening were evaluated. In addition, ROS and collagen IV production by mesangial cells as well as their proliferation was measured in vitro. Diabetic alpha1-null mice developed worse renal disease than diabetic wild-type mice. A significant increase in GFR was evident in the alpha1-null mice at 6 weeks after the STZ injection; it started to decrease by week 24 and reached levels of non-diabetic mice by week 36. In contrast, GFR only increased in wild-type mice at week 12 and its elevation persisted throughout the study. Diabetic mutant mice also showed increased glomerular deposition of collagen IV and GBM thickening compared to diabetic wild-type mice. Primary alpha1-null mesangial cells exposed to high glucose produced more ROS than wild-type cells, which led to decreased proliferation and increased collagen IV synthesis, thus mimicking the in vivo finding. In conclusion, this study suggests that lack of integrin alpha1beta1 exacerbates the glomerular injury in a mouse model of diabetes by modulating GFR, ROS production, cell proliferation, and collagen deposition. PMID:16775606

  8. Are mitochondrial reactive oxygen species required for autophagy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jianfei, E-mail: jjf73@pitt.edu [Center for Free Radical and Antioxidant Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Maeda, Akihiro; Ji, Jing [Center for Free Radical and Antioxidant Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Baty, Catherine J.; Watkins, Simon C. [Center for Biologic Imaging, Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Greenberger, Joel S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Kagan, Valerian E., E-mail: kagan@pitt.edu [Center for Free Radical and Antioxidant Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh (United States)

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Autophageal and apoptotic pathways were dissected in cytochrome c deficient cells. {yields} Staurosporine (STS)-induced autophagy was not accompanied by ROS generation. {yields} Autophagy was detectable in mitochondrial DNA deficient {rho}{sup 0} cells. {yields} Mitochondrial ROS are not required for the STS-induced autophagy in HeLa cells. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are said to participate in the autophagy signaling. Supporting evidence is obscured by interference of autophagy and apoptosis, whereby the latter heavily relies on ROS signaling. To dissect autophagy from apoptosis we knocked down expression of cytochrome c, the key component of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, in HeLa cells using shRNA. In cytochrome c deficient HeLa1.2 cells, electron transport was compromised due to the lack of electron shuttle between mitochondrial respiratory complexes III and IV. A rapid and robust LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation were observed in HeLa1.2 cells treated with staurosporine (STS). Neither generation of superoxide nor accumulation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was detected in STS-treated HeLa1.2 cells. A membrane permeable antioxidant, PEG-SOD, plus catalase exerted no effect on STS-induced LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation. Further, STS caused autophagy in mitochondria DNA-deficient {rho}{sup o} HeLa1.2 cells in which both electron transport and ROS generation were completely disrupted. Counter to the widespread view, we conclude that mitochondrial ROS are not required for the induction of autophagy.

  9. Autophagy in Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis and in Muscular Dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Bonaldo; Paolo Grumati

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscles are the agent of motion and one of the most important tissues responsible for the control of metabolism. The maintenance of muscle homeostasis is finely regulated by the balance between catabolic and anabolic process. Macroautophagy (or autophagy) is a catabolic process that provides the degradation of protein aggregation and damaged organelles through the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes. Proper regulation of the autophagy flux is fundamental for the homeostasis o...

  10. Autophagy as a new therapeutic target in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Palma, C.; F. Morisi; Cheli, S; S. Pambianco; Cappello, V; Vezzoli, M; Rovere-Querini, P; Moggio, M; Ripolone, M.; Francolini, M; Sandri, M.; Clementi, E

    2012-01-01

    A resolutive therapy for Duchene muscular dystrophy, a severe degenerative disease of the skeletal muscle, is still lacking. Because autophagy has been shown to be crucial in clearing dysfunctional organelles and in preventing tissue damage, we investigated its pathogenic role and its suitability as a target for new therapeutic interventions in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Here we demonstrate that autophagy is severely impaired in muscles from patients affected by DMD and mdx mice, a mo...

  11. Hypoxic Preconditioning Alleviates Ethanol Neurotoxicity: the Involvement of Autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Haiping; Bower, Kimberly A.; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Xu, Mei; Luo, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is a neuroteratogen and neurodegeneration is the most devastating consequence of developmental exposure to ethanol. A sublethal preconditioning has been proposed as a neuroprotective strategy against several central nervous system (CNS) neurodegenerative diseases. We have recently demonstrated that autophagy is a protective response to alleviate ethanol toxicity. A modest hypoxic preconditioning (1% oxygen) did not cause neurotoxicity but induced autophagy (Tzeng et al., 2010). We the...

  12. Are mitochondrial reactive oxygen species required for autophagy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Autophageal and apoptotic pathways were dissected in cytochrome c deficient cells. → Staurosporine (STS)-induced autophagy was not accompanied by ROS generation. → Autophagy was detectable in mitochondrial DNA deficient ρ0 cells. → Mitochondrial ROS are not required for the STS-induced autophagy in HeLa cells. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are said to participate in the autophagy signaling. Supporting evidence is obscured by interference of autophagy and apoptosis, whereby the latter heavily relies on ROS signaling. To dissect autophagy from apoptosis we knocked down expression of cytochrome c, the key component of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, in HeLa cells using shRNA. In cytochrome c deficient HeLa1.2 cells, electron transport was compromised due to the lack of electron shuttle between mitochondrial respiratory complexes III and IV. A rapid and robust LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation were observed in HeLa1.2 cells treated with staurosporine (STS). Neither generation of superoxide nor accumulation of H2O2 was detected in STS-treated HeLa1.2 cells. A membrane permeable antioxidant, PEG-SOD, plus catalase exerted no effect on STS-induced LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation. Further, STS caused autophagy in mitochondria DNA-deficient ρo HeLa1.2 cells in which both electron transport and ROS generation were completely disrupted. Counter to the widespread view, we conclude that mitochondrial ROS are not required for the induction of autophagy.

  13. Epigenetic Regulation of Autophagy by the Methyltransferase G9a

    OpenAIRE

    Artal-Martinez de Narvajas, Amaia; Gomez, Timothy S.; Zhang, Jin-San; Mann, Alexander O.; Taoda, Yoshiyuki; Gorman, Jacquelyn A.; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Gress, Thomas M; Ellenrieder, Volker; Bujanda, Luis; Kim, Do-Hyung; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Koenig, Alexander; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2013-01-01

    Macroautophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular process involved in the clearance of proteins and organelles. Although the cytoplasmic machinery that orchestrates autophagy induction during starvation, hypoxia, or receptor stimulation has been widely studied, the key epigenetic events that initiate and maintain the autophagy process remain unknown. Here we show that the methyltransferase G9a coordinates the transcriptional activation of key regulators of autophagosome formation by remo...

  14. Autophagy is essential for mouse sense of balance

    OpenAIRE

    Mariño García, Guillermo; Fernández Fernández, Álvaro; Cabrera Benítez, María Sandra; Cabanillas Farpón, Rubén; Francisco RODRÍGUEZ; Salvador Montoliu, Natalia; Fueyo Silva, Antonio Manuel; Lundberg, Yunxia W.; Vega Álvarez, José Antonio; Germanà, Antonino; Pérez Freije, José María; López Otín, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process that is essential for cellular homeostasis and organismal viability in eukaryotes. However, the extent of its functions in higher-order processes of organismal physiology and behavior is still unknown. Here, we report that autophagy is essential for the maintenance of balance in mice and that its deficiency leads to severe balance disorders. We generated mice deficient in autophagin-1 protease (Atg4b) and showed that they had substantial system...

  15. Linking ER Stress to Autophagy: Potential Implications for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tom Verfaillie; Maria Salazar; Guillermo Velasco; Patrizia Agostinis

    2010-01-01

    Different physiological and pathological conditions can perturb protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, leading to a condition known as ER stress. ER stress activates a complex intracellular signal transduction pathway, called unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR is tailored essentially to reestablish ER homeostasis also through adaptive mechanisms involving the stimulation of autophagy. However, when persistent, ER stress can switch the cytoprotective functions of UPR and autophagy...

  16. Obesity, autophagy and the pathogenesis of liver and pancreatic cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Aghajan, Mariam; Ning LI; Karin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Liver and pancreatic cancers are both highly lethal diseases with limited to no therapeutic options for patients. Recent studies suggest that deregulated autophagy plays a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases by perturbing cellular homeostasis and laying the foundation for disease development. While accumulation of p62 upon impaired autophagy has been implicated in hepatocellular carcinoma, it’s role in pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains less clear. This review will focus on recent studi...

  17. Autophagy Inhibition to Increase Radiosensitization in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Diana Hwang; El-Zein, Randa; Dave, Bhuvanesh

    2015-01-01

    Currently, many breast cancer patients with localized breast cancer undergo breast-conserving therapy, consisting of local excision followed by radiation therapy. Following radiation therapy, breast cancer cells are noted to undergo induction of autophagy, development of radioresistance, and enrichment of breast cancer stem cell subpopulations. It is hypothesized that inhibition of the cytoprotective autophagy that arises following radiation therapy increases radiosensitivity and confers long...

  18. Autophagy in herpesvirus immune control and immune escape

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, G. S.; Mautner, J.; Münz, C

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy delivers cytoplasmic constituents for lysosomal degradation, and thereby facilitates pathogen degradation and pathogen fragment loading onto MHC molecules for antigen presentation to T cells. Herpesviruses have been used to demonstrate these novel functions of autophagy, which previously has been primarily appreciated for its pro-survival role during starvation. In this review, we summarize recent findings how macroautophagy restricts herpesvirus infections directly, how macroautoph...

  19. Perfil das doenças glomerulares em um hospital público do Distrito Federal Profile of glomerular diseases in a public hospital of Federal District, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Humberto Ribeiro Paes Ferraz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: As doenças glomerulares são uma causa frequente de doença renal crônica, sobretudo nos países em desenvolvimento. OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar o perfil destas glomerulopatias em um hospital público da cidade de Brasília, Distrito Federal. MÉTODOS: Foram realizadas 121 biopsias renais pela equipe de nefrologia do Hospital Regional da Asa Norte (HRAN entre agosto de 2005 e maio de 2009. Foram excluídas oito biopsias realizadas em pacientes transplantados renais e analisados os prontuários dos 113 pacientes restantes. Dados analisados: sexo, idade, exames laboratoriais, síndrome glomerular, diagnóstico clínico, grau de fibrose intersticial, uso de imunossupressores, necessidade de diálise e desfecho clínico. RESULTADOS: A média de idade foi 34,9 ± 16,2 anos, com predomínio masculino (51,3%. As principais síndromes glomerulares foram: síndrome nefrótica (41,6% e glomerulonefrite rapidamente progressiva (35,4%. Entre as glomerulopatias primárias, houve predomínio da glomeruloesclerose segmentar e focal (26,9% e da nefropatia por IgA (25% e entre as secundárias a nefrite lúpica (50% e a glomerulonefrite proliferativa exsudativa difusa (34,2%. A maioria dos pacientes fez uso de imunossupressores (68,1% e quase um terço deles (29,2% necessitou de diálise durante a internação. Evoluíram para terapia dialítica crônica 13,3% dos pacientes e 10,6% evoluíram a óbito. CONCLUSÃO: Este estudo poderá contribuir para melhor entendimento epidemiológico das doenças glomerulares no Distrito Federal, orientando na adoção de políticas públicas visando permitir rápido diagnóstico e manejo clínico das mesmas.INTRODUCTION: Glomerular diseases are a frequent etiology of chronic kidney disease, especially in the developing countries. OBJECTIVE: To determine the profile of such glomerulopathies in a public hospital located in the city of Brasilia, Federal District. METHODS: 121 renal biopsies in

  20. Clinical use of estimated glomerular filtration rate for evaluation of kidney function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Bo; Lindhardt, Morten; Rossing, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    Estimating glomerular filtration rate by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease or Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration formulas gives a reasonable estimate of kidney function for e.g. classification of chronic kidney disease. Additionally the estimated glomerular filtration rate...... is a significant predictor for cardiovascular disease and may along with classical cardiovascular risk factors add useful information to risk estimation. Several cautions need to be taken into account, e.g. rapid changes in kidney function, dialysis, high age, obesity, underweight and diverging and unanticipated...

  1. Relationship between islet α-cell function and glomerular filtration rate in type 2 diabetic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓宇

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the isletα-cell function in type 2 diabetic patients with different levels of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) .Methods Three hundred and eighty-eight cases of type 2 diabetic patients were classified into four groups according to eGFR:glomerular hyperfiltration group,normal renal function group,mild renal dysfunction group and moderate-severe renal dysfunction group.Oral glucose tolerance test,insulin releasing test and glucagon releasing test were conducted to compare

  2. Targeting autophagy in cancer management – strategies and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process involving lysosomal degradation of intracellular components, damaged organelles, misfolded proteins, and toxic aggregates, reducing oxidative stress and protecting cells from damage. The process is also induced in response to various conditions, including nutrient deprivation, metabolic stress, hypoxia, anticancer therapeutics, and radiation therapy to adapt cellular conditions for survival. Autophagy can function as a tumor suppressor mechanism in normal cells and dysregulation of this process (ie, monoallelic Beclin-1 deletion) may lead to malignant transformation and carcinogenesis. In tumors, autophagy is thought to promote tumor growth and progression by helping cells to adapt and survive in metabolically-challenged and harsh tumor microenvironments (ie, hypoxia and acidity). Recent in vitro and in vivo studies in preclinical models suggested that modulation of autophagy can be used as a therapeutic modality to enhance the efficacy of conventional therapies, including chemo and radiation therapy. Currently, more than 30 clinical trials are investigating the effects of autophagy inhibition in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted agents in various cancers. In this review, we will discuss the role, molecular mechanism, and regulation of autophagy, while targeting this process as a novel therapeutic modality, in various cancers

  3. The role of autophagy in microbial infection and immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desai M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mayura Desai,1 Rong Fang,2 Jiaren Sun11Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 2Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX, USAAbstract: The autophagy pathway represents an evolutionarily conserved cell recycling process that is activated in response to nutrient deprivation and other stress signals. Over the years, it has been linked to an array of cellular functions. Equally, a wide range of cell-intrinsic, as well as extracellular, factors have been implicated in the induction of the autophagy pathway. Microbial infections represent one such factor that can not only activate autophagy through specific mechanisms but also manipulate the response to the invading microbe's advantage. Moreover, in many cases, particularly among viruses, the pathway has been shown to be intricately involved in the replication cycle of the pathogen. Conversely, autophagy also plays a role in combating the infection process, both through direct destruction of the pathogen and as one of the key mediating factors in the host defense mechanisms of innate and adaptive immunity. Further, the pathway also plays a role in controlling the pathogenesis of infectious diseases by regulating inflammation. In this review, we discuss various interactions between pathogens and the cellular autophagic response and summarize the immunological functions of the autophagy pathway.Keywords: autophagy, xenophagy, antiviral, antibacterial

  4. Characterization of a novel autophagy-specific gene, ATG29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy is a process whereby cytoplasmic proteins and organelles are sequestered for bulk degradation in the vacuole/lysosome. At present, 16 ATG genes have been found that are essential for autophagosome formation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Most of these genes are also involved in the cytoplasm to vacuole transport pathway, which shares machinery with autophagy. Most Atg proteins are colocalized at the pre-autophagosomal structure (PAS), from which the autophagosome is thought to originate, but the precise mechanism of autophagy remains poorly understood. During a genetic screen aimed to obtain novel gene(s) required for autophagy, we identified a novel ORF, ATG29/YPL166w. atg29Δ cells were sensitive to starvation and induction of autophagy was severely retarded. However, the Cvt pathway operated normally. Therefore, ATG29 is an ATG gene specifically required for autophagy. Additionally, an Atg29-GFP fusion protein was observed to localize to the PAS. From these results, we propose that Atg29 functions in autophagosome formation at the PAS in collaboration with other Atg proteins

  5. Role of autophagy in prion protein-induced neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Yao; Deming Zhao; Sher Hayat Khan; Lifeng Yang

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases,characterized by spongiform degeneration and the accumulation of misfolded and aggregated PrPSc in the central nervous system,are one of fatal neurodegenerative and infectious disorders of humans and animals.In earlier studies,autophagy vacuoles in neurons were frequently observed in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's,Parkinson's,and Huntington's diseases as well as prion diseases.Autophagy is a highly conserved homeostatic process by which several cytoplasmic components (proteins or organelles) are sequestered in a doublemembrane-bound vesicle termed 'autophagosome' and degraded upon their fusion with lysosome.The pathway of intercellular self-digestion at basal physiological levels is indispensable for maintaining the healthy status of tissues and organs.In case of prion infection,increasing evidence indicates that autophagy has a crucial ability of eliminating pathological PrPSc accumulated within neurons.In contrast,autophagy dysfunction in affected neurons may contribute to the formation of spongiform changes.In this review,we summarized recent findings about the effect of mammalian autophagy in neurodegenerative disorders,particularly in prion diseases.We also summarized the therapeutic potential of some small molecules (such as lithium,rapamycin,Sirtuin 1 and resveratrol) targets to mitigate such diseases on brain function.Furthermore,we discussed the controversial role of autophagy,whether it mediates neuronal toxicity or serves a protective function in neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. Activation of Autophagy by Metals in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Andrés-Garrido, Ascensión; Blaby, Ian K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Crespo, José L

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular self-degradation pathway by which eukaryotic cells recycle their own material in response to specific stress conditions. Exposure to high concentrations of metals causes cell damage, although the effect of metal stress on autophagy has not been explored in photosynthetic organisms. In this study, we investigated the effect of metal excess on autophagy in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show in cells treated with nickel an upregulation of ATG8 that is independent of CRR1, a global regulator of copper signaling in Chlamydomonas. A similar effect on ATG8 was observed with copper and cobalt but not with cadmium or mercury ions. Transcriptome sequencing data revealed an increase in the abundance of the protein degradation machinery, including that responsible for autophagy, and a substantial overlap of that increased abundance with the hydrogen peroxide response in cells treated with nickel ions. Thus, our results indicate that metal stress triggers autophagy in Chlamydomonas and suggest that excess nickel may cause oxidative damage, which in turn activates degradative pathways, including autophagy, to clear impaired components and recover cellular homeostasis. PMID:26163317

  7. Autophagy as a Possible Underlying Mechanism of Nanomaterial Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cohignac

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of nanotechnologies is raising safety concerns because of the potential effects of engineered nanomaterials on human health, particularly at the respiratory level. Since the last decades, many in vivo studies have been interested in the pulmonary effects of different classes of nanomaterials. It has been shown that some of them can induce toxic effects, essentially depending on their physico-chemical characteristics, but other studies did not identify such effects. Inflammation and oxidative stress are currently the two main mechanisms described to explain the observed toxicity. However, the exact underlying mechanism(s still remain(s unknown and autophagy could represent an interesting candidate. Autophagy is a physiological process in which cytoplasmic components are digested via a lysosomal pathway. It has been shown that autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis and the progression of human diseases, and is able to modulate the oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory responses. A growing amount of literature suggests that a link between nanomaterial toxicity and autophagy impairment could exist. In this review, we will first summarize what is known about the respiratory effects of nanomaterials and we will then discuss the possible involvement of autophagy in this toxicity. This review should help understand why autophagy impairment could be taken as a promising candidate to fully understand nanomaterials toxicity.

  8. Retinoid receptor signaling and autophagy in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orfali, Nina [Cork Cancer Research Center, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States); McKenna, Sharon L. [Cork Cancer Research Center, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Cahill, Mary R. [Department of Hematology, Cork University Hospital, Cork (Ireland); Gudas, Lorraine J., E-mail: ljgudas@med.cornell.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States); Mongan, Nigel P., E-mail: nigel.mongan@nottingham.ac.uk [Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, LE12 5RD (United Kingdom); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Retinoids are a family of signaling molecules derived from vitamin A with well established roles in cellular differentiation. Physiologically active retinoids mediate transcriptional effects on cells through interactions with retinoic acid (RARs) and retinoid-X (RXR) receptors. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARα gene, which lead to impaired retinoid signaling, are implicated in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), alone and in combination with arsenic trioxide (ATO), restores differentiation in APL cells and promotes degradation of the abnormal oncogenic fusion protein through several proteolytic mechanisms. RARα fusion-protein elimination is emerging as critical to obtaining sustained remission and long-term cure in APL. Autophagy is a degradative cellular pathway involved in protein turnover. Both ATRA and ATO also induce autophagy in APL cells. Enhancing autophagy may therefore be of therapeutic benefit in resistant APL and could broaden the application of differentiation therapy to other cancers. Here we discuss retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis, leukemogenesis, and APL treatment. We highlight autophagy as a potential important regulator in anti-leukemic strategies. - Highlights: • Normal and aberrant retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis and leukemia is reviewed. • We suggest a novel role for RARα in the development of X-RARα gene fusions in APL. • ATRA therapy in APL activates transcription and promotes onco-protein degradation. • Autophagy may be involved in both onco-protein degradation and differentiation. • Pharmacologic autophagy induction may potentiate ATRA's therapeutic effects.

  9. Targeting Protective Autophagy Exacerbates UV-Triggered Apoptotic Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hwa Chiou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is activated by various stresses, including DNA damage, and previous studies of DNA damage-induced autophagy have focused on the response to chemotherapeutic drugs, ionizing radiation, and reactive oxygen species. In this study, we investigated the biological significance of autophagic response to ultraviolet (UV irradiation in A549 and H1299 cells. Our results indicated that UV induces on-rate autophagic flux in these cells. Autophagy inhibition resulting from the knockdown of beclin-1 and Atg5 reduced cell viability and enhanced apoptosis. Moreover, we found that ATR phosphorylation was accompanied by microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B II (LC3B-II expression during the early phases following UV irradiation, which is a well-established inducer of ATR. Knocking down ATR further attenuated the reduction in LC3B-II at early stages in response to UV treatment. Despite the potential role of ATR in autophagic response, reduced ATR expression does not affect autophagy induction during late phases (24 and 48 h after UV treatment. The result is consistent with the reduced ATR phosphorylation at the same time points and suggests that autophagic response at this stage is activated via a distinct pathway. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that autophagy acts as a cytoprotective mechanism against UV-induced apoptosis and that autophagy induction accompanied with apoptosis at late stages is independent of ATR activation.

  10. Protective Effects of Gastrodin Against Autophagy-Mediated Astrocyte Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Shang; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Nan; Han, Jing; Guo, Hong-Liang; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Liu, Shui-Bing

    2016-03-01

    Gastrodin is an active ingredient derived from the rhizome of Gastrodia elata. This compound is usually used to treat convulsive illness, dizziness, vertigo, and headache. This study aimed to investigate the effect of gastrodin on the autophagy of glial cells exposed to lipopolysaccharides (LPS, 1 µg/mL). Autophagy is a form of programmed cell death, although it also promotes cell survival. In cultured astrocytes, LPS exposure induced excessive autophagy and apoptosis, which were significantly prevented by the pretreatment cells with gastrodin (10 μM). The protective effects of gastrodin via autophagy inhibition were verified by the decreased levels of LC3-II, P62, and Beclin-1, which are classical markers for autophagy. Furthermore, gastrodin protected astrocytes from apoptosis through Bcl-2 and Bax signaling pathway. The treatment of astrocytes with rapamycin (500 nM), wortmannin (100 nM), and LY294002 (10 μM), which are inhibitors of mTOR and PI3K, respectively, eliminated the known effects of gastrodin on the inhibited Beclin-1 expression. Furthermore, gastrodin blocked the down-regulation of glutamine synthetase induced by LPS exposure in astrocytes. Our results suggest that gastrodin can be used as a preventive agent for the excessive autophagy induced by LPS. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26643508

  11. Retinoid receptor signaling and autophagy in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retinoids are a family of signaling molecules derived from vitamin A with well established roles in cellular differentiation. Physiologically active retinoids mediate transcriptional effects on cells through interactions with retinoic acid (RARs) and retinoid-X (RXR) receptors. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARα gene, which lead to impaired retinoid signaling, are implicated in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), alone and in combination with arsenic trioxide (ATO), restores differentiation in APL cells and promotes degradation of the abnormal oncogenic fusion protein through several proteolytic mechanisms. RARα fusion-protein elimination is emerging as critical to obtaining sustained remission and long-term cure in APL. Autophagy is a degradative cellular pathway involved in protein turnover. Both ATRA and ATO also induce autophagy in APL cells. Enhancing autophagy may therefore be of therapeutic benefit in resistant APL and could broaden the application of differentiation therapy to other cancers. Here we discuss retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis, leukemogenesis, and APL treatment. We highlight autophagy as a potential important regulator in anti-leukemic strategies. - Highlights: • Normal and aberrant retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis and leukemia is reviewed. • We suggest a novel role for RARα in the development of X-RARα gene fusions in APL. • ATRA therapy in APL activates transcription and promotes onco-protein degradation. • Autophagy may be involved in both onco-protein degradation and differentiation. • Pharmacologic autophagy induction may potentiate ATRA's therapeutic effects

  12. Experimental autoimmune glomerulonephritis induced by anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody. II. Effects of injecting heterologous, homologous, or autologous glomerular basement membranes and complete Freund's adjuvant into sheep.

    OpenAIRE

    Steblay, R. W.; Rudofsky, U H

    1983-01-01

    The effects of injecting human, rabbit, rat, or single-kidney homologous glomerular basement membrane (GBM) or autologous GBM, each in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), into 15- to 18-month-old sheep are compared. All sheep receiving heterologous GBM and 3 of 6 sheep receiving homologous GBM had anti-GBM nephritis, but such sheep did not bind autoantibodies or have Goodpasturelike lesions in their lungs. Sheep given injections of human GBM had autoantibodies to antigenic determinants shared b...

  13. Glomerular changes in trisomy 18-related horseshoe kidney: report of a case and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Parodo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A case of horseshoe kidney is reported in a 11 week-old fetus affected by trisomy 18. Macroscopic examination did not show any other pathological change. The histological picture of the fused-kidney was characterized by architectural and glomerular changes. At x 100 magnification, large areas of metanephric mesenchyme, characterized by spindle cells surrounded by a loose oedematous stroma, were detected in the deep cortex and in the medulla. At higher power, multiple glomerular changes were observed. Maldeveloped glomeruli showed enlarged capsular spaces, adhesions between vascular tuft and capsular cells, podocytes in multiple layers, and large glomerular bodies formed by two vascular tufts. Our data confirm previous reports on glomerular changes in horseshoe kidney, and reinforce the hypothesis that horseshoe kidney should not be considered a simple fusion problem, but a complex developmental abnormality, possibly involving glomerular development.

  14. Survival by self-destruction: A role for autophagy in the placenta?

    OpenAIRE

    Bildirici, I; Longtine, MS; B. Chen; Nelson, DM

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a burgeoning area of research from yeast to humans. Although previously described as a death pathway, autophagy is now considered an important survival phenomenon in response to environmental stressors to which most organs are exposed.

  15. Transient overexpression of Werner protein rescues starvation induced autophagy in Werner syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Jyotirindra; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Laskar, Aparna; Karmakar, Parimal

    2014-12-01

    Reduced autophagy may be associated with normal and pathological aging. Here we report a link between autophagy and Werner protein (WRNp), mutated in Werner syndrome, the human premature aging Werner syndrome (WS). WRN mutant fibroblast AG11395 and AG05229 respond weakly to starvation induced autophagy compared to normal cells. While the fusion of phagosomes with lysosome is normal, WS cells contain fewer autophagy vacuoles. Cellular starvation autophagy in WS cells is restored after transfection with full length WRN. Further, siRNA mediated silencing of WRN in the normal fibroblast cell line WI-38 results in decreased autophagy and altered expression of autophagy related proteins. Thus, our observations suggest that WRN may have a role in controlling autophagy and hereby cellular maintenance. PMID:25257404

  16. Structural Alterations of the Glomerular Wall And Vessels in Early Stages of Diabetes Mellitus: Light and Transmission Electron Microscopic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dkhil MA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The capillary changes at the initial stage of diabetes may show an angioarchitecture clearly different from those of later stages and,/or very severe glomerular change. However, the onset of alterations in the early phases is unclear. This study attempts to determine the functional and structural alterations of the glomerular wall and vesicles in the early stage of diabetes.Material and Methods: Twenty-five adult rats were used in this study. They were divided into two groups: the first group of five was used as a control .The second group of 20 (the experimental group was injected intraperitoneally by a single dose of streptozotocin to induce hyperglycemia. Rats were sacrificed after ten days, two months, and four months.Five rats at two months of age with hyperglycemia were treated with insulin for eight weeks. Renal tissues were prepared by routine technique for light and transmission electron microscopic evaluation. Results: By light microscopy after ten days of induced hyperglycemia, there were no structural modifications detected either in renal glomerular fine vessels or in the glomerular basement membrane of the glomerular capillaries. After two months, there was a moderate glomerular enlargement and dilatation of glomerular capillaries, afferent, and efferent arterioles. After four months, glomerular basement membrane thickening was the only structural alteration observed. Recovery of the glomerular alterations was observed after two months of treatment with insulin. Conclusion: In early stages of diabetes mellitus in rats, there was an increase in the diameter of glomerular vessels. In later stages of the disease, the reverse was seen, but insulin treatment had a positive role in reversing these changes in the study subjects.

  17. Reduced glomerular size- and charge-selectivity in clinically healthy individuals with microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J S; Borch-Johnsen, K; Deckert, T; Deckert, M; Jensen, G; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1995-01-01

    -microglobulin clearance was similar in the two groups. Since total IgG and the IgG4 subclass are of similar size and configuration but electrically neutral and negative, respectively; these findings indicate that microalbuminuria is associated with decreased size- and charge-selectivity of the glomerular vessel...

  18. Hydrochloride pioglitazone protects diabetic rats against podocyte injury through preserving glomerular podocalyxin expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xing

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We sought to test the effect of different dosages of pioglitazone (PIO on the glomerular expression of podocalyxin and urinary sediment podocalyxin excretion and to explore the potential renoprotective mechanism. Materials and methods: Type 1 diabetes induced with streptozotocin (65 mg/kg in 36 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to be treated with vehicle or 10, 20, 30 mg/kg/d PIO respectively for 8 weeks. Eight rats were enrolled in the normal control group. Results: At 8th week, rats were sacrificed for the observation of kidney injury through electron microscope. Glomerular podocalyxin production including mRNA and protein were determined by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry respectively. Levels of urinary albumin excretion and urinary sediment podocalyxin, kidney injury index were all significantly increased, whereas expression of glomerular podocalyxin protein and mRNA were decreased significantly in diabetic rats compared to normal control. Dosages-dependent analysis revealed that protective effect of PIO ameliorated the physiopathological changes and reached a peak at dosage of 20 mg/kg/d. Conclusion: PIO could alleviate diabetic kidney injury in a dose-dependent pattern and the role may be associated with restraining urinary sediment podocalyxin excretion and preserving the glomerular podocalyxin expression.

  19. T cells and dendritic cells in glomerular disease: the new glomerulotubular feedback loop

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Sun-Sang; Bolton, Warren K.

    2009-01-01

    A newly described glomerulotubular feedback loop may explain the relationship between glomerular damage, epitope spreading, tubulointerstitial nephritis, proteinuria as a progression factor, and the importance of the local milieu in kidney damage. It also opens the horizons for exciting innovative approaches to therapy of both acute and chronic kidney diseases.

  20. Consensus Recommendations for the Diagnostic Investigation of Dogs with Suspected Glomerular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Littman, M.P.; Daminet, S.; Grauer, G.F.; Lees, G.E.; van Dongen, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The International Renal Interest Society (IRIS) offers guidelines for chronic kidney disease and acute kidney injury. As dogs with glomerular disease may present differently and require different treatment than those with whole nephron or tubular disease, the IRIS Canine Glomerulonephriti

  1. Tubular and Glomerular Injury in Diabetes and the Impact of ACE Inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Stine E.; Sugaya, Takeshi; Tarnow, Lise; Lajer, Maria; Schjoedt, Katrine J.; Astrup, Anne Sofie; Baba, Tsuneharu; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Rossing, Peter

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We studied tubular and glomerular damage in type 1 diabetic patients by measuring urinary–liver fatty acid binding protein (U-LFABP) and albuminuria. Subsequently, we evaluated the effect of ACE inhibition on U-LFABP in patients with diabetic nephropathy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied Caucasians with type 1 diabetes: 58 with normoalbuminuria (urinary albumin

  2. The role of autophagy induced by tumor microenvironment in different cells and stages of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xue; Yu, Dan-Dan; Yan, Fei; Jing, Ying-Ying; Han, Zhi-Peng; Sun, Kai; Liang, Lei; Hou, Jing; Li-xin WEI

    2015-01-01

    Development of a tumor is a very complex process, and invasion and metastasis of malignant tumors are hallmarks and are difficult problems to overcome. The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in controlling tumor fate and autophagy induced by the tumor microenvironment is attracting more and more attention. Autophagy can be induced by several stressors in the tumor microenvironment and autophagy modifies the tumor microenvironment, too. Autophagy has dual roles in tumor growth. In ...

  3. PGC‐1α promotes exercise‐induced autophagy in mouse skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Halling, Jens F.; Ringholm, Stine; Nielsen, Maja M; Overby, Peter; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent evidence suggests that exercise stimulates the degradation of cellular components in skeletal muscle through activation of autophagy, but the time course of the autophagy response during recovery from exercise has not been determined. Furthermore, the regulatory mechanisms behind exercise‐induced autophagy remain unclear, although the muscle oxidative phenotype has been linked with basal autophagy levels. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of the key ...

  4. You are what you eat: multifaceted functions of autophagy during C. elegans development

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Peiguo; Zhang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy involves the sequestration of a portion of the cytosolic contents in an enclosed double-membrane autophagosomal structure and its subsequent delivery to lysosomes for degradation. Autophagy activity functions in multiple biological processes during Caenorhabditis elegans development. The basal level of autophagy in embryos removes aggregate-prone proteins, paternal mitochondria and spermatid-specific membranous organelles (MOs). Autophagy also contributes to the efficient removal of...

  5. Role of autophagy in diabetes and endoplasmic reticulum stress of pancreatic β-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Quan, Wenying; Lim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Myung-Shik

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by insulin resistance and failure of pancreatic β-cells producing insulin. Autophagy plays a crucial role in cellular homeostasis through degradation and recycling of organelles such as mitochondria or endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here we discussed the role of β-cell autophagy in development of diabetes, based on our own studies using mice with β-cell-specific deletion of Atg7 (autophagy-related 7), an important autophagy gene, and studies by others. β...

  6. Sinomenine Hydrochloride Protects against Polymicrobial Sepsis via Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis, a systemic inflammatory response to infection, is the major cause of death in intensive care units (ICUs. The mortality rate of sepsis remains high even though the treatment and understanding of sepsis both continue to improve. Sinomenine (SIN is a natural alkaloid extracted from Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum, and its hydrochloride salt (Sinomenine hydrochloride, SIN-HCl is widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, its role in sepsis remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of SIN-HCl in sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP in BALB/c mice and the corresponding mechanism. SIN-HCl treatment improved the survival of BALB/c mice that were subjected to CLP and reduced multiple organ dysfunction and the release of systemic inflammatory mediators. Autophagy activities were examined using Western blotting. The results showed that CLP-induced autophagy was elevated, and SIN-HCl treatment further strengthened the autophagy activity. Autophagy blocker 3-methyladenine (3-MA was used to investigate the mechanism of SIN-HCl in vitro. Autophagy activities were determined by examining the autophagosome formation, which was shown as microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3 puncta with green immunofluorescence. SIN-HCl reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced inflammatory cytokine release and increased autophagy in peritoneal macrophages (PM. 3-MA significantly decreased autophagosome formation induced by LPS and SIN-HCl. The decrease of inflammatory cytokines caused by SIN-HCl was partially aggravated by 3-MA treatment. Taken together, our results indicated that SIN-HCl could improve survival, reduce organ damage, and attenuate the release of inflammatory cytokines induced by CLP, at least in part through regulating autophagy activities.

  7. Live and Let Die: Roles of Autophagy in Cadmium Nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Thévenod

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The transition metal ion cadmium (Cd2+ is a significant environmental contaminant. With a biological half-life of ~20 years, Cd2+ accumulates in the kidney cortex, where it particularly damages proximal tubule (PT cells and can result in renal fibrosis, failure, or cancer. Because death represents a powerful means by which cells avoid malignant transformation, it is crucial to clearly identify and understand the pathways that determine cell fate in chronic Cd2+ nephrotoxicity. When cells are subjected to stress, they make a decision to adapt and survive, or—depending on the magnitude and duration of stress—to die by several modes of death (programmed cell death, including autophagic cell death (ACD. Autophagy is part of a larger system of intracellular protein degradation and represents the channel by which organelles and long-lived proteins are delivered to the lysosome for degradation. Basal autophagy levels in all eukaryotic cells serve as a dynamic physiological recycling system, but they can also be induced by intra- or extracellular stress and pathological processes, such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. In a context-dependent manner, autophagy can either be protective and hence contribute to survival, or promote death by non-apoptotic or apoptotic pathways. So far, the role of autophagy in Cd2+-induced nephrotoxicity has remained unsettled due to contradictory results. In this review, we critically survey the current literature on autophagy in Cd2+-induced nephrotoxicity in light of our own ongoing studies. Data obtained in kidney cells illustrate a dual and complex function of autophagy in a stimulus- and time-dependent manner that possibly reflects distinct outcomes in vitro and in vivo. A better understanding of the context-specific regulation of cell fate by autophagy may ultimately contribute to the development of preventive and novel therapeutic strategies for acute and chronic Cd2+ nephrotoxicity.

  8. Changes of the glomerular size during the human fetal kidney development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daković-Bjelaković Marija

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Newborns adaptation on postnatal conditions includes significant morphological and functional renal changes. Every kidney contains a constant number of nephrons, at the end of the nephrogenesis period, which extends from week 8 to 34 of gestation. Mature juxtamedullary nephrons possess higher filtration capacity than primitive superficial nephrons, which have insufficient vascularization. Objective. The objective of the study was to calculate an average glomerular diameter in cortical zones of the kidney during development, to define periods of their most intensive growth, and to record differences of glomerular size between different cortical zones. METHOD A total of 30 human fetal kidneys aged from IV to X lunar months were analyzed. Stereological methods were used for calculating the average glomerular diameter in superficial, intermediate and juxtamedullary zone of the kidney cortex. Results. Glomeruli in the superficial cortical zone had the lowest average diameter. The average glomerular diameter continually increased from IV lunar month (0.057±0.004 mm to X lunar month (0.082±0.004 mm, with highly significant correlation with gestational age (r=0.755; p<0.01. The average glomerular diameter in the intermediate zone increased from 0.081±0.004 mm (IV lunar month to 0.096±0.004 mm (X lunar month with low linear correlation with gestational age (r=0.161. Juxtamedullary glomeruli were the biggest ones. Their average diameter, during the IV LM ranged from 0.093±0.006 mm to 0.101±0.004 mm. In the newborns (X lunar month, juxtamedullary glomeruli had spherical structures with an average diameter of 0.103±0.004 mm, and low negative correlation (r=-0.032 with gestational age. In the IV and V lunar months of gestation, there was significant difference (p<0.01; p<0.05 between the average glomerular diameter in the different zones of the kidney cortex. Conclusion. Superficial glomeruli had the smallest diameter, while

  9. CYSTATIN C AS A SURROGATE MARKER FOR EVALUATING GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE IN ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davendra

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The gold standard for measuring GFR has practical limitations in clinical practice; instead it is estimated by use of the serum concentration of endogenous filtration markers. The objective of this research was to compare serum cystatin C with serum creatinine for Estimating Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR in acute kidney injury and to determine whether elevated serum cystatin C has an impact on mortality in the presence of kidney injury. METHODS This prospective observation study was carried out for 18 months in our institution. It included all indoor Acute Kidney Injury (AKI patients more than 18 years, admitted in the Department of Medicine of our tertiary care centre. The renal function of the patients was evaluated by testing for serum creatinine and serum cystatin C. Serum creatinine based Cockcroft and Gault (CG equation and Estimated GFR (e-GFR with Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD equation were compared with serum cystatin C based e-GFR Hoek and Larsson equations. All-cause mortality was ascertained by examination of death certificates, inpatient hospital records. RESULTS A total of 90 patients were enrolled during the study. The mean serum creatinine (mg/dL 3.455±1.77, serum cystatin (mg/L 2.932±1.13, and creatinine clearance (CG 27.16±16.96, eGFR-MDRD (mL/min. 24.94±17.95, eGFR-Larsson 31.60±17.36 and eGFRHoek 29.00±17.39. The correlation of the Larsson and Hoek cystatin C based GFR estimates (r= 0.94; p=<0.001 and MDRD and CG serum creatinine based GFR estimates (r=-0.93; p<0.001 were highly significant. In multiple logistic regression analysis which included age, serum creatinine and serum cystatin C as variables, only serum cystatin C (p=0. 046 was found to be a significant factor influencing mortality in acute kidney injury. CONCLUSIONS The present study suggests that the cystatin C-based prediction equation achieved a diagnostic performance that was at least as good as the creatinine based formulas

  10. Inflammation, Autophagy, and Obesity: Common Features in the Pathogenesis of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gukovsky, Ilya; Ning LI; Todoric, Jelena; Gukovskaya, Anna; Karin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation and autophagy are cellular defense mechanisms. When these processes are deregulated (deficient or overactivated) they produce pathologic effects, such as oxidative stress, metabolic impairments, and cell death. Unresolved inflammation and disrupted regulation of autophagy are common features of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, obesity, a risk factor for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, promotes inflammation and inhibits or deregulates autophagy, creating an env...

  11. Golgi-associated LC3 lipidation requires V-ATPase in noncanonical autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Liu, Yajun; Hong, Liang; Yang, Zuolong; Cai, Xinran; Chen, Xiaoyun; Fu, Yuanyuan; Lin, Yujie; Wen, Weijie; Li, Sitong; Liu, Xingguo; Huang, Heqing; Vogt, Andreas; Liu, Peiqing; Yin, Xiao-Ming; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process by which cells degrade intracellular proteins and organelles in the lysosomes. Canonical autophagy requires all autophagy proteins (ATGs), whereas noncanonical autophagy is activated by diverse agents in which some of the essential autophagy proteins are dispensable. How noncanonical autophagy is induced and/or inhibited is still largely unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that AMDE-1, a recently identified chemical that can induce canonical autophagy, was able to elicit noncanonical autophagy that is independent of the ULK1 (unc-51-like kinase 1) complex and the Beclin1 complex. AMDE-1-induced noncanonical autophagy could be specifically suppressed by various V-ATPase (vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase) inhibitors, but not by disturbance of the lysosome function or the intracellular ion redistribution. Similar findings were applicable to a diverse group of stimuli that can induce noncanonical autophagy in a FIP200-independent manner. AMDE-1-induced LC3 lipidation was colocalized with the Golgi complex, and was inhibited by the disturbance of Golgi complex. The integrity of the Golgi complex was also required for multiple other agents to stimulate noncanonical LC3 lipidation. These results suggest that the Golgi complex may serve as a membrane platform for noncanonical autophagy where V-ATPase is a key player. V-ATPase inhibitors could be useful tools for studying noncanonical autophagy. PMID:27512951

  12. Radiation-induced changes in the kinetics of glomerular and tubular cells in the pig kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both kidneys of 13 mature female Large White pigs were irradiated with a single dose of 9.8 Gy 60Co γ rays. The pigs were killed serially between 2 to 24 weeks after irradiation. One hour prior to sacrifice bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) (500 mg/pig) was injected intravenously. At postmortem the kidneys were removed and tissue was taken to prepare cell suspensions. The labeling index (LI) of these suspensions was determined using flow cytometry. In vivo BrdU incorporation in tubular and glomerular cells was determined immunohistochemically. The kinetics of glomerular and tubular cells was evaluated by counting the number of labeled cells/glomerules and the number of labeled tubular cells/fields of view. An average of 1200 glomeruli and 1500 fields of view/time were counted. Similar analyses were performed on renal tissue from unirradiated control animals. Flow cytometry revealed rapid and significant increases in the LI of kidney cells; 2 weeks after irradiation the LI increased from a control value of 0.18 ± 0.01 to 1.23 ± 0.22% (P < 0.001). By 4 weeks the maximal value of 2.45 ± 0.36% was seen; the LI then declined progressively but at 24 weeks after irradiation still remained significantly above control values (P < 0.001). A similar pattern of response was determined by counting the laveled glomerular and tubular cells identified immunohistochemically. However, the increase in labeled glomerular cells occurred 2 weeks after irradiation, whereas that for the tubules occurred 4 weeks after irradiation. These findings indicate that irradiation of the kidney, classically regarded as a open-quotes late-respondingclose quotes organ, is associated with rapid and significant changes in the kinetics of both tubular and glomerular cells. 28 refs., 4 figs

  13. Laminin α2-mediated focal adhesion kinase activation triggers Alport glomerular pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duane Delimont

    Full Text Available It has been known for some time that laminins containing α1 and α2 chains, which are normally restricted to the mesangial matrix, accumulate in the glomerular basement membranes (GBM of Alport mice, dogs, and humans. We show that laminins containing the α2 chain, but not those containing the α1 chain activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK on glomerular podocytes in vitro and in vivo. CD151-null mice, which have weakened podocyte adhesion to the GBM rendering these mice more susceptible to biomechanical strain in the glomerulus, also show progressive accumulation of α2 laminins in the GBM, and podocyte FAK activation. Analysis of glomerular mRNA from both models demonstrates significant induction of MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-12, MMPs linked to GBM destruction in Alport disease models, as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. SiRNA knockdown of FAK in cultured podocytes significantly reduced expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and IL-6, but not MMP-12. Treatment of Alport mice with TAE226, a small molecule inhibitor of FAK activation, ameliorated fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis, significantly reduced proteinuria and blood urea nitrogen levels, and partially restored GBM ultrastructure. Glomerular expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-12 mRNAs was significantly reduced in TAE226 treated animals. Collectively, this work identifies laminin α2-mediated FAK activation in podocytes as an important early event in Alport glomerular pathogenesis and suggests that FAK inhibitors, if safe formulations can be developed, might be employed as a novel therapeutic approach for treating Alport renal disease in its early stages.

  14. Consensus recommendations for immunosuppressive treatment of dogs with glomerular disease based on established pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, G; Cowgill, L D; Heiene, R; Labato, M A; Polzin, D J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to provide consensus recommendations for the use of immunosuppressive therapy in dogs with active glomerular diseases. Recommendations were developed based on comprehensive review of relevant literature on immunosuppressive therapy of glomerular disease in dogs and humans, contemporary expert opinion, and anecdotal experience in dogs with glomerular disease treated with immunosuppression. Recommendations were subsequently validated by a formal consensus methodology. The Study Group recommends empirical application of immunosuppressive therapy for dogs with severe, persistent, or progressive glomerular disease in which there is evidence of an active immune-mediated pathogenesis on kidney biopsy and no identified contraindication to immunosuppressive therapy. The most compelling evidence supporting active immune-mediated mechanisms includes electron-dense deposits identified with transmission electron microscopic examination and unequivocal immunofluorescent staining in the glomeruli. For diseases associated with profound proteinuria, attendant hypoalbuminemia, nephrotic syndrome, or rapidly progressive azotemia, single drug or combination therapy consisting of rapidly acting immunosuppressive drugs is recommended. The Study Group recommends mycophenolate alone or in combination with prednisolone. To minimize the adverse effects, glucocorticoids should not be used as a sole treatment, and when used concurrently with mycophenolate, glucocorticoids should be tapered as quickly as possible. For stable or slowly progressive glomerular diseases, the Study Group recommends mycophenolate or chlorambucil alone or in combination with azathioprine on alternating days. Therapeutic effectiveness should be assessed serially by changes in proteinuria, renal function, and serum albumin concentration. In the absence of overt adverse effects, at least 8 weeks of the rapidly acting nonsteroidal drug therapy and 8-12 weeks of slowly acting drug therapy

  15. Pattern of glomerular diseases in Sudanese children:A clinico-pathological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelraheem Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glomerular diseases are a common cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD in many countries. The pattern of glomerular diseases has been reported in adult Sudanese patients but there has been no previous study on Sudanese children. The aim of this study is to describe the pattern of glomerular diseases in Sudanese children from a clinico-pathological perspective. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 321 children seen with nephritis/nephrosis at the Pediatric Nephrology Unit, Soba University Hospital and Dr. Salma Dialysis and Kidney Transplantation Centre, Khartoum, Sudan during the period from 2002 to 2007. Biopsies were studied with light microscopy and immuno-histochemistry with electron microscopy performed abroad in selected patients (predominantly Alport′s. The mean age of the 321 study children was 8.71 years (range 2 months-16 yrs of whom, 188 were males (60.2%. The most common presentation was with the nephrotic syndrome, seen in 202 patients (62.9%. The most common glomerular disease encountered was minimal change disease, seen in 96 children (29.9%, followed by post-infectious GN in 78 (24.3% and focal and segmental glome-rulosclerosis, seen in 44 patients (13.7%. Membranoproliferative GN (MPGN was seen in 43 patients (13.4% while mesangioproliferative GN was seen in 24 (7.5%. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE was the most common secondary glomerular disease accounting for 16 patients (4.9%. HBsAg was positive in 10 patients and the most common associated lesion was MPGN (60%. Histopathology enabled us to change the therapy in 55.3% of the patients. Our study suggests that the pattern of GN in our cohort of patients is comparable with reports from other parts of the world with a high prevalence of post-infectious GN. Renal biopsies have an important part in planning therapy and management. Also, the importance of establishing a Sudanese renal registry including pediatric patients is stressed.

  16. Resveratrol couples apoptosis with autophagy in UVB-irradiated HaCaT cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Vitale

    Full Text Available UVB radiation causes about 90% of non-melanoma skin cancers by damaging DNA either directly or indirectly by increasing levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Skin, chronically exposed to both endogenous and environmental pro-oxidant agents, contains a well-organised system of chemical and enzymatic antioxidants. However, increased or prolonged free radical action can overwhelm ROS defence mechanisms, contributing to the development of cutaneous diseases. Thus, new strategies for skin protection comprise the use of food antioxidants to counteract oxidative stress. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin from grape, has gained a great interest for its ability to influence several biological mechanisms like redox balance, cell proliferation, signal transduction pathways, immune and inflammatory response. Therefore, the potential of resveratrol to modify skin cell response to UVB exposure could turn out to be a useful option to protect skin from sunlight-induced degenerative diseases. To investigate into this matter, HaCaT cells, a largely used model for human skin keratinocytes, were treated with 25 or 100 µM resveratrol for 2 and 24 hours prior to UVB irradiation (10 to 100 mJ/cm(2. Cell viability and molecular markers of proliferation, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and autophagy were analyzed. In HaCaT cells resveratrol pretreatment: reduces UVB-induced ROS formation, enhances the detrimental effect of UVB on HaCaT cell vitality, increases UVB-induced caspase 8, PARP cleavage, and induces autophagy. These findings suggest that resveratrol could exert photochemopreventive effects by enhancing UVB-induced apoptosis and by inducing autophagy, thus reducing the odds that damaged cells could escape programmed cell death and initiate malignant transformation.

  17. Structured illumination microscopy and correlative microscopy to study autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligeon, Laure-Anne; Barois, Nicolas; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Bongiovanni, Antonino; Lafont, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Autophagy is a predominant eukaryotic mechanism for the engulfment of "portions" of cytoplasm allowing their degradation to recycle metabolites. The autophagy is ubiquitous among the life kingdom revealing the importance of this pathway that appears more complex than previously thought. Several reviews have already addressed how to monitor this pathway and have highlighted the existence of new routes such as the LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP) and the non-canonical autophagy. The principal difference between autophagosomes and LAP vacuoles is that the former has two limiting membranes positives for LC3 whereas the latter has one. Herein, we propose to emphasize the use of correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) to answer some autophagy's related questions. The structured illumination microscopy (SIM) relatively easy to implement allows to better observe the Atg proteins recruitment and localization during the autophagy process. While LC3 recruitment is performed using light microscopy the ultrastructural morphological analysis of LC3-vacuoles is ascertained by electron microscopy. Hence, these combined and correlated approaches allow to tackle the LAP vs. autophagosome issue. PMID:25667106

  18. Polymorphisms in autophagy genes and susceptibility to tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Songane

    Full Text Available Recent data suggest that autophagy is important for intracellular killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and polymorphisms in the autophagy gene IRGM have been linked with susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB among African-Americans, and with TB caused by particular M. tuberculosis genotypes in Ghana. We compared 22 polymorphisms of 14 autophagy genes between 1022 Indonesian TB patients and 952 matched controls, and between patients infected with different M. tuberculosis genotypes, as determined by spoligotyping. The same autophagy polymorphisms were studied in correlation with ex-vivo production of TNF, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ and IL-17 in healthy volunteers. No association was found between TB and polymorphisms in the genes ATG10, ATG16L2, ATG2B, ATG5, ATG9B, IRGM, LAMP1, LAMP3, P2RX7, WIPI1, MTOR and ATG4C. Associations were found between polymorphisms in LAMP1 (p = 0.02 and MTOR (p = 0.02 and infection with the successful M. tuberculosis Beijing genotype. The polymorphisms examined were not associated with M. tuberculosis induced cytokines, except for a polymorphism in ATG10, which was linked with IL-8 production (p = 0.04. All associations found lost statistical significance after correction for multiple testing. This first examination of a broad set of polymorphisms in autophagy genes fails to show a clear association with TB, with M. tuberculosis Beijing genotype infection or with ex-vivo pro-inflammatory cytokine production.

  19. Autophagy precedes apoptosis during the remodeling of silkworm larval midgut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzetti, Eleonora; Huang, Zhi-Jun; Shi, Yan-Xia; Xie, Kun; Deng, Xiao-Juan; Li, Jian-Ping; Li, Qing-Rong; Yang, Wan-Ying; Zeng, Wen-Nian; Casartelli, Morena; Deng, Hui-Min; Cappellozza, Silvia; Grimaldi, Annalisa; Xia, Qingyou; Feng, Qili; Cao, Yang; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2012-03-01

    Although several features of apoptosis and autophagy have been reported in the larval organs of Lepidoptera during metamorphosis, solid experimental evidence for autophagy is still lacking. Moreover, the role of the two processes and the nature of their relationship are still cryptic. In this study, we perform a cellular, biochemical and molecular analysis of the degeneration process that occurs in the larval midgut of Bombyx mori during larval-adult transformation, with the aim to analyze autophagy and apoptosis in cells that die under physiological conditions. We demonstrate that larval midgut degradation is due to the concerted action of the two mechanisms, which occur at different times and have different functions. Autophagy is activated from the wandering stage and reaches a high level of activity during the spinning and prepupal stages, as demonstrated by specific autophagic markers. Our data show that the process of autophagy can recycle molecules from the degenerating cells and supply nutrients to the animal during the non-feeding period. Apoptosis intervenes later. In fact, although genes encoding caspases are transcribed at the end of the larval period, the activity of these proteases is not appreciable until the second day of spinning and apoptotic features are observable from prepupal phase. The abundance of apoptotic features during the pupal phase, when the majority of the cells die, indicates that apoptosis is actually responsible for cell death and for the disappearance of larval midgut cells. PMID:22127643

  20. Dexamethasone-induced autophagy mediates muscle atrophy through mitochondrial clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troncoso, Rodrigo; Paredes, Felipe; Parra, Valentina; Gatica, Damián; Vásquez-Trincado, César; Quiroga, Clara; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; López-Crisosto, Camila; Rodriguez, Andrea E; Oyarzún, Alejandra P; Kroemer, Guido; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, such as dexamethasone, enhance protein breakdown via ubiquitin–proteasome system. However, the role of autophagy in organelle and protein turnover in the glucocorticoid-dependent atrophy program remains unknown. Here, we show that dexamethasone stimulates an early activation of autophagy in L6 myotubes depending on protein kinase, AMPK, and glucocorticoid receptor activity. Dexamethasone increases expression of several autophagy genes, including ATG5, LC3, BECN1, and SQSTM1 and triggers AMPK-dependent mitochondrial fragmentation associated with increased DNM1L protein levels. This process is required for mitophagy induced by dexamethasone. Inhibition of mitochondrial fragmentation by Mdivi-1 results in disrupted dexamethasone-induced autophagy/mitophagy. Furthermore, Mdivi-1 increases the expression of genes associated with the atrophy program, suggesting that mitophagy may serve as part of the quality control process in dexamethasone-treated L6 myotubes. Collectively, these data suggest a novel role for dexamethasone-induced autophagy/mitophagy in the regulation of the muscle atrophy program. PMID:24897381

  1. Mycelial development preceding basidioma formation in Moniliophthora perniciosa is associated to chitin, sugar and nutrient metabolism alterations involving autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Dayane Santos; Lopes, Maíza Alves; Menezes, Sara Pereira; Ribeiro, Lidiane Figueredo; Dias, Cristiano Villela; Andrade, Bruno Silva; de Jesus, Raildo Mota; Pires, Acassia Benjamin Leal; Goes-Neto, Aristóteles; Micheli, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    We identified and characterized two chitinases, named MpCHIT1 and MpCHIT2, from the fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa - the etiologic agent of witches' broom disease in cacao tree (Theobroma cacao L.) - during its development, mainly in the mycelia phases preceding the basidioma formation. The expression of MpCHIT1 and MpCHIT2, together with MpCHS and MpATG8 (chitin synthase and autophagy genes, respectively), was analyzed during the M. perniciosa growth and development on bran-based solid medium as well as in liquid medium containing H2O2 or rapamycin (oxidative and nutritional related-autophagy stress agents, respectively). In order to link the expression of chitin metabolism-related genes to nutritional composition influencing fungus development, we also quantified total and reduced sugars, as well as macro- and micronutrients in the bran-based solid medium. The expression analysis showed that the MpCHS expression increased through mycelial development and then decreased in the primordium and basidioma phases, while the expression of MpCHIT1 and MpCHIT2 was higher in basidioma and primordium phases, respectively. Moreover, the expression pattern of MpCHIT1 and MpCHIT2 is distinct, the second correlated with the MpATG8 expression pattern and possibly with autophagy process, while the first may be related to the basidioma formation. The quantification of total and reduced sugars, as well as macro- and micronutrients supported the idea that the cell wall restructuration due to MpCHS, MpCHIT1 and MpCHIT2 is related to stress and fungal nutrient reallocation, allowing the formation and development of the basidioma. Experiments involving M. perniciosa growth on liquid medium containing H2O2 or rapamycin showed that MpCHIT1 and MpCHIT2 were over-expressed in response to oxidative but also to nutritional related-autophagy stresses. Interestingly, the expression level of MpCHS, MpCHIT1 and MpCHIT2 in presence of rapamycin is similar to the one observed in the primordium

  2. MAVS maintains mitochondrial homeostasis via autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Sun, Liwei; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Li, Ying; Lin, Wei; Chen, Dahua; Sun, Qinmiao

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein (MAVS) acts as a critical adaptor protein to transduce antiviral signalling by physically interacting with activated RIG-I and MDA5 receptors. MAVS executes its functions at the outer membrane of mitochondria to regulate downstream antiviral signalling, indicating that the mitochondria provides a functional platform for innate antiviral signalling transduction. However, little is known about whether and how MAVS-mediated antiviral signalling contributes to mitochondrial homeostasis. Here we show that the activation of MAVS is sufficient to induce autophagic signalling, which may mediate the turnover of the damaged mitochondria. Importantly, we find MAVS directly interacts with LC3 through its LC3-binding motif 'YxxI', suggesting that MAVS might act as an autophagy receptor to mediate mitochondrial turnover upon excessive activation of RLR signalling. Furthermore, we provide evidence that both MAVS self-aggregation and its interaction with TRAF2/6 proteins are important for MAVS-mediated mitochondrial turnover. Collectively, our findings suggest that MAVS acts as a potential receptor for mitochondria-associated autophagic signalling to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:27551434

  3. PML at Mitochondria-Associated Membranes Is Critical for the Repression of Autophagy and Cancer Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Missiroli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The precise molecular mechanisms that coordinate apoptosis and autophagy in cancer remain to be determined. Here, we provide evidence that the tumor suppressor promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML controls autophagosome formation at mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs and, thus, autophagy induction. Our in vitro and in vivo results demonstrate how PML functions as a repressor of autophagy. PML loss promotes tumor development, providing a growth advantage to tumor cells that use autophagy as a cell survival strategy during stress conditions. These findings demonstrate that autophagy inhibition could be paired with a chemotherapeutic agent to develop anticancer strategies for tumors that present PML downregulation.

  4. Postfertilization autophagy of sperm organelles prevents paternal mitochondrial DNA transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rawi, Sara; Louvet-Vallée, Sophie; Djeddi, Abderazak; Sachse, Martin; Culetto, Emmanuel; Hajjar, Connie; Boyd, Lynn; Legouis, Renaud; Galy, Vincent

    2011-11-25

    In sexual reproduction of most animals, the spermatozoon provides DNA and centrioles, together with some cytoplasm and organelles, to the oocyte that is being fertilized. Paternal mitochondria and their genomes are generally eliminated in the embryo by an unknown degradation mechanism. We show that, upon fertilization, a Caenorhabditis elegans spermatozoon triggers the recruitment of autophagosomes within minutes and subsequent paternal mitochondria degradation. Whereas the nematode-specific sperm membranous organelles are ubiquitinated before autophagosome formation, the mitochondria are not. The degradation of both paternal structures and mitochondrial DNA requires an LC3-dependent autophagy. Analysis of fertilized mouse embryos shows the localization of autophagy markers, which suggests that this autophagy event is evolutionarily conserved to prevent both the transmission of paternal mitochondrial DNA to the offspring and the establishment of heteroplasmy. PMID:22033522

  5. Cannabinoid-induced autophagy: Protective or death role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Lia; Amaral, Cristina; Teixeira, Natércia; Correia-da-Silva, Georgina; Fonseca, Bruno M

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy, the "self-digestion" mechanism of the cells, is an evolutionary conserved catabolic process that targets portions of cytoplasm, damaged organelles and proteins for lysosomal degradation, which plays a crucial role in development and disease. Cannabinoids are active compounds of Cannabis sativa and the most prevalent psychoactive substance is Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Cannabinoid compounds can be divided in three types: the plant-derived natural products (phytocannabinoids), the cannabinoids produced endogenously (endocannabinoids) and the synthesized compounds (synthetic cannabinoids). Various studies reported a cannabinoid-induced autophagy mechanism in cancer and non-cancer cells. In this review we focus on the recent advances in the cannabinoid-induced autophagy and highlight the molecular mechanisms involved in these processes. PMID:26732541

  6. Tuning flux: autophagy as a target of heart disease therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Min; Morales, Cyndi R.; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite maximum medical and mechanical support therapy, heart failure remains a relentlessly progressive disorder with substantial morbidity and mortality. Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved process of cellular cannibalization, has been implicated in virtually all forms of cardiovascular disease. Indeed, its role is context dependent, antagonizing or promoting disease depending on the circumstance. Here, we review current understanding of the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of heart failure and explore this pathway as a target of therapeutic intervention. Recent findings In preclinical models of heart disease, cardiomyocyte autophagic flux is activated; indeed, its role in disease pathogenesis is the subject of intense investigation to define mechanism. Similarly, in failing human heart of a variety of etiologies, cardiomyocyte autophagic activity is upregulated, and therapy, such as with mechanical support systems, elicits declines in autophagy activity. However, when suppression of autophagy is complete, rapid and catastrophic cell death occurs, consistent with a model in which basal autophagic flux is required for proteostasis. Thus, a narrow zone of ‘optimal’ autophagy seems to exist. The challenge moving forward is to tune the stress-triggered autophagic response within that ‘sweet spot’ range for therapeutic benefit. Summary Whereas we have known for some years of the participation of lysosomal mechanisms in heart disease, it is only recently that upstream mechanisms (autophagy) are being explored. The challenge for the future is to dissect the underlying circuitry and titrate the response into an optimal, proteostasis-promoting range in hopes of mitigating the ever-expanding epidemic of heart failure. PMID:21415729

  7. Spermidine induces autophagy by inhibiting the acetyltransferase EP300.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrocola, F; Lachkar, S; Enot, D P; Niso-Santano, M; Bravo-San Pedro, J M; Sica, V; Izzo, V; Maiuri, M C; Madeo, F; Mariño, G; Kroemer, G

    2015-03-01

    Several natural compounds found in health-related food items can inhibit acetyltransferases as they induce autophagy. Here we show that this applies to anacardic acid, curcumin, garcinol and spermidine, all of which reduce the acetylation level of cultured human cells as they induce signs of increased autophagic flux (such as the formation of green fluorescent protein-microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (GFP-LC3) puncta and the depletion of sequestosome-1, p62/SQSTM1) coupled to the inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). We performed a screen to identify the acetyltransferases whose depletion would activate autophagy and simultaneously inhibit mTORC1. The knockdown of only two acetyltransferases (among 43 candidates) had such effects: EP300 (E1A-binding protein p300), which is a lysine acetyltranferase, and NAA20 (N(α)-acetyltransferase 20, also known as NAT5), which catalyzes the N-terminal acetylation of methionine residues. Subsequent studies validated the capacity of a pharmacological EP300 inhibitor, C646, to induce autophagy in both normal and enucleated cells (cytoplasts), underscoring the capacity of EP300 to repress autophagy by cytoplasmic (non-nuclear) effects. Notably, anacardic acid, curcumin, garcinol and spermidine all inhibited the acetyltransferase activity of recombinant EP300 protein in vitro. Altogether, these results support the idea that EP300 acts as an endogenous repressor of autophagy and that potent autophagy inducers including spermidine de facto act as EP300 inhibitors. PMID:25526088

  8. The Importance of Autophagy Regulation in Breast Cancer Development and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Magdalena Zarzynska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC is a potentially life-threatening malignant tumor that still causes high mortality among women. One of the mechanisms through which cancer development could be controlled is autophagy. This process exerts different effects during the stages of cancer initiation and progression due to the occurring superimposition of signaling pathways of autophagy and carcinogenesis. Chronic inhibition of autophagy or autophagy deficiency promotes cancer, due to instability of the genome and defective cell growth and as a result of cell stress. However, increased induction of autophagy can become a mechanism which allows tumor cells to survive the conditions of hypoxia, acidosis, or chemotherapy. Therefore, in the development of cancer, autophagy is regarded as a double-edged sword. Determination of the molecular mechanisms underlying autophagy regulation and its role in tumorigenesis is an essential component of modern anticancer strategies. Results of scientific studies show that inhibition of autophagy may enhance the effectiveness of currently used anticancer drugs and other therapies (like radiotherapy. However, in some cases, the promotion of autophagy can induce death and, hence, elimination of the cancer cells and reduction of tumor size. This review summarizes the current knowledge on autophagy regulation in BC and up-to-date anticancer strategies correlated with autophagy.

  9. Autophagy: Friend or Foe in Breast Cancer Development, Progression, and Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy is a catabolic process responsible for the degradation and recycling of long-lived proteins and organelles by lysosomes. This degradative pathway sustains cell survival during nutrient deprivation, but in some circumstances, autophagy leads to cell death. Thereby, autophagy can serve as tumor suppressor, as the reduction in autophagic capacity causes malignant transformation and spontaneous tumors. On the other hand, this process also functions as a protective cell-survival mechanism against environmental stress causing resistance to antineoplastic therapies. Although autophagy inhibition, combined with anticancer agents, could be therapeutically beneficial in some cases, autophagy induction by itself could lead to cell death in some apoptosis-resistant cancers, indicating that autophagy induction may also be used as a therapy. This paper summarizes the most important findings described in the literature about autophagy and also discusses the importance of this process in clinical settings

  10. PUMA and Bax-induced Autophagy Contributes to Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yee, Karen S.; Wilkinson, Simon; James, John; Ryan, Kevin M.; Vousden, Karen H.

    2009-01-01

    The p53-inducible BH3-only protein PUMA is a key mediator of p53-dependent apoptosis, and PUMA has been shown to function by activating Bax and mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. In this study we describe an ability of PUMA to induce autophagy that leads to the selective removal of mitochondria. This function of PUMA depends on Bax/Bak and can be reproduced by overexpression of Bax. The induction of autophagy coincides with cytochrome c release, and taken together the results sugg...

  11. PUMA- and Bax-induced autophagy contributes to apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yee, K S; Wilkinson, S; James, J; Ryan, K M; Vousden, K H

    2009-01-01

    The p53-inducible BH3-only protein PUMA is a key mediator of p53-dependent apoptosis, and PUMA has been shown to function by activating Bax and mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. In this study, we describe an ability of PUMA to induce autophagy that leads to the selective removal of mitochondria. This function of PUMA depends on Bax/Bak and can be reproduced by overexpression of Bax. The induction of autophagy coincides with cytochrome c release, and taken together the results sug...

  12. Autophagy: a pathway that contributes to connexin degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Lichtenstein, Alexandra; Minogue, Peter J.; Beyer, Eric C.; Berthoud, Viviana M.

    2011-01-01

    The function of connexins, which form gap junctions, can be rapidly modulated by degradation, because they have half-lives of only a few hours. Autophagy is a degradation pathway that has been implicated in several diseases and can be induced by cellular stresses such as starvation. We investigated the involvement of autophagy in proteolysis of the wild-type connexins CX50 and CX43, and a cataract-associated connexin mutant, CX50P88S, which forms cytoplasmic accumulations. We observed that cy...

  13. Bim Inhibits Autophagy by Recruiting Beclin 1 to Microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Shouqing; Garcia-Arencibia, Moises; Zhao, Rui; Puri, Claudia; Toh, Pearl P.C.; Sadiq, Oana; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bim is a proapoptotic BH3-only Bcl-2 family member. In response to death stimuli, Bim dissociates from the dynein light chain 1 (DYNLL1/LC8), where it is inactive, and can then initiate Bax/Bak-mediated mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. We found that Bim depletion increases autophagosome synthesis in cells and in vivo, and this effect is inhibited by overexpression of cell death-deficient Bim. Bim inhibits autophagy by interacting with Beclin 1, an autophagy regulator, and this intera...

  14. Additive effect of polymorphisms in the β2 -adrenoceptor and NADPH oxidase p22 phox genes contributes to the loss of estimated glomerular filtration rate in Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Yan; Ma, JingTao; Feng, Zhen; Niu, Kai; Liu, Bing

    2014-09-01

    Because increased oxidative stress may mediate the detrimental actions of enhanced sympathetic nervous activity on renal function and vice versa, we investigated the effect of the polymorphic Arg16Gly in the β2 -adrenoceptor (ADRB2) gene, Trp64Arg in the β3 -adrenoceptor (ADRB3) gene and C242T in the NADPH oxidase p22phox (CYBA) gene on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in a Chinese population. Initially recruited from different outpatient services of HeBei General Hospital in northern China, 668 individuals were finally included in the study, with complete demographic information. Laboratory tests were performed and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was derived from the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation for the Chinese population. Plasma noradrenaline levels and genotype were determined by HPLC and the TaqMan method, respectively. Only across the Arg16Gly polymorphism did eGFR show significant difference: it was lower in individuals with the Gly16Gly variation, who also had the highest plasma noradrenaline levels. This polymorphism remained a significant determinant of eGFR after multivariate analysis. Of importance, the multifactor dimensionality reduction method further detected a significant synergism between the Arg16Gly and C242T polymorphisms in reducing eGFR. These observations clarify the effects of the studied polymorphisms on eGFR and exemplify gene-gene interactions influencing renal function. PMID:24890187

  15. The lack of autophagy triggers precocious activation of Notch signaling during Drosophila oogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth Julia MI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proper balance of autophagy, a lysosome-mediated degradation process, is indispensable for oogenesis in Drosophila. We recently demonstrated that egg development depends on autophagy in the somatic follicle cells (FC, but not in the germline cells (GCs. However, the lack of autophagy only affects oogenesis when FCs are autophagy-deficient but GCs are wild type, indicating that a dysfunctional signaling between soma and germline may be responsible for the oogenesis defects. Thus, autophagy could play an essential role in modulating signal transduction pathways during egg development. Results Here, we provide further evidence for the necessity of autophagy during oogenesis and demonstrate that autophagy is especially required in subsets of FCs. Generation of autophagy-deficient FCs leads to a wide range of phenotypes that are similar to mutants with defects in the classical cell-cell signaling pathways in the ovary. Interestingly, we observe that loss of autophagy leads to a precocious activation of the Notch pathway in the FCs as monitored by the expression of Cut and Hindsight, two downstream effectors of Notch signaling. Conclusion Our findings point to an unexpected function for autophagy in the modulation of the Notch signaling pathway during Drosophila oogenesis and suggest a function for autophagy in proper receptor activation. Egg development is affected by an imbalance of autophagy between signal sending (germline and signal receiving cell (FC, thus the lack of autophagy in the germline is likely to decrease the amount of active ligand and accordingly compensates for increased signaling in autophagy-defective follicle cells.

  16. Basement membrane proteoglycans in glomerular morphogenesis: chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan is temporally and spatially restricted during development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarthy, K J; Bynum, K; St John, P L; Abrahamson, D R; Couchman, J R

    1993-01-01

    basement membrane (GBM) but present in other basement membranes of the nephron, including collecting ducts, tubules, Bowman's capsule, and the glomerular mesangium. In light of this unique pattern of distribution and of the complex histoarchitectural reorganization occurring during nephrogenesis, the...... vasculature and ureteric buds, its first appearance in nephron basement membrane occurs during the late comma stage. In capillary loop-stage glomeruli of prenatal animals, BM-CSPG is present in the presumptive mesangial matrix but undetectable in the GBM. However, as postnatal glomerular maturation progresses...... BM-CSPG is also found in both the lamina rara interna and lamina densa of the GBM in progressively increasing amounts, being most evident in the GBM of 21-day-old animals. Micrographs of glomeruli from 42-day-old animals show that BM-CSPG gradually disappears from the GBM and, by 56 days after birth...

  17. Measurement of renal glomerular filtration rate using labelled substances with compartmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a model for the two-compartmental open system and experiments on animals (rabbits and dogs) as well as on human healthy volunteers, an attempt was made to study the advantages and limitations of different radionuclide methods for glomerular filtration rate determination. Labelled compounds used in different combinations were: 3H-inulin, sup(113m)In-EDTA, 131I-iothalamate, sup(99m)Tc-DTPA and 14C-creatinine. The results of the study lead to some working hypotheses concerning the value of creatinine and other labelled substances in the measurement of glomerular filtration rate in clinical practice. The advantages and disadvantages of individual methods summarized in the final report are generally in agreement with the present views of many research workers. Also the hypothesis can be justified that the different labelled compounds which have been studied might be handled independently by the membranes involved but at the long run produce similar homeostatic balance

  18. EFFECTS OF PDGF-BB ON INTRACELLULAR CALCIUM CONCENTRATION AND PROLIFERATION IN CULTURED GLOMERULAR MESANGIAL CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Li-ping; ZHANG Chong; BIAN Fan; ZOU Jun; JIANG Geng-ru; ZHU Han-wei

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the alteration of intracellular calcium concentration and proliferation in cultured glomerular mesangial cells. Methods Rat mesangial cells were cultured.Intracellular calcium concentrations were measured by confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and Fura-3 fluorescence dyeing techniques. Cell growth was measured by MTT assay. Results PDGF-BB increased intracellular calcium concentrations in a dose-dependent manner, and at the same time promote the proliferation of mesangial cells. After preincubation with calcium channel blocker nifedipine or angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor captopril, both the increase of intracellular calcium concentrations and cell proliferations induced by PDGF-BB were inhibited. Tripterigium Wilfordii Glycosides (TMG) significantly inhibited the mesangial cell proliferations, but it had no significant effect on intracellular calcium concentrations. Conclusion There was a positive relationship between the elevation of intracellular calcium concentration and cell proliferation in glomerular mesangial cells, but the increase of in- tracellular calcium concentrations wasn't the only way for proliferation.

  19. IgA-mediated anti-glomerular basement membrane disease: an uncommon mechanism of Goodpasture's syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Moulis, Guillaume; Huart, Antoine; Guitard, Joëlle; Fortenfant, Françoise; Chauveau, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Goodpasture's (GP) disease is usually mediated by IgG autoantibodies. We describe a case of IgA-mediated GP, in a patient presenting with isolated rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. The diagnosis was established on kidney biopsy, since routine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) targeted at IgG circulating autoantibodies failed to detect the nephritogenic antibodies. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed intense linear deposition of IgA along the glomerular capillary walls. An eleva...

  20. Glomerular hemodynamic alterations during acute hyperinsulinemia in normal and diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, B. J.; Anderson, C. M.; Thies, R. S.; Collins, R. C.; Blantz, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of insulin dependent diabetes invariably requires exogenous insulin to control blood glucose. Insulin treatment, independent of other factors associated with insulin dependent diabetes, may induce changes that affect glomerular function. Due to exogenous delivery of insulin in insulin dependent diabetes entering systemic circulation prior to the portal vein, plasma levels of insulin are often in excess of that observed in non-diabetics. The specific effects of hyperinsulinemia on glomerular hemodynamics have not been previously examined. Micropuncture studies were performed in control (non-diabetic), untreated diabetic and insulin-treated diabetic rats 7 to 10 days after administration of 65 mg/kg body weight streptozotocin. After the first period micropuncture measurements were obtained, 5 U of regular insulin (Humulin-R) was infused i.v., and glucose clamped at euglycemic values (80 to 120 mg/dl). Blood glucose concentration in non-diabetic controls was 99 +/- 6 mg/dl. In control rats, insulin infusion and glucose clamp increased nephron filtration rate due to decreases in both afferent and efferent arteriolar resistance (afferent greater than efferent) resulting in increased plasma flow and increased glomerular hydrostatic pressure gradient. However, insulin infusion and glucose clamp produced the opposite effect in both untreated and insulin-treated diabetic rats with afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction resulting in decreases in plasma flow, glomerular hydrostatic pressure gradient and nephron filtration rate. Thromboxane A2 (TX) synthetase inhibition partially decreased the vasoconstrictive response due to acute insulin infusion in diabetic rats preventing the decrease in nephron filtration rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  1. Glomerular Autoimmune Multicomponents of Human Lupus Nephritis In Vivo (2): Planted Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Galetti, Maricla; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Bonanni, Alice; Radice, Antonella; Tincani, Angela; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Murtas, Corrado; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Brunini, Francesca; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Barbano, Giancarlo; Piaggio, Giorgio; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Scolari, Francesco; Candiano, Giovanni; Martini, Alberto; Allegri, Landino; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2015-08-01

    Glomerular planted antigens (histones, DNA, and C1q) are potential targets of autoimmunity in lupus nephritis (LN). However, the characterization of these antigens in human glomeruli in vivo remains inconsistent. We eluted glomerular autoantibodies recognizing planted antigens from laser-microdissected renal biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN. Prevalent antibody isotypes were defined, levels were determined, and glomerular colocalization was investigated. Renal and circulating antibodies were matched, and serum levels were compared in 104 patients with LN, 84 patients with SLE without LN, and 50 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Autoantibodies against podocyte antigens (anti-α-enolase/antiannexin AI) were also investigated. IgG2 autoantibodies against DNA, histones (H2A, H3, and H4), and C1q were detected in 50%, 55%, and 70% of biopsy samples, respectively. Anti-DNA IgG3 was the unique non-IgG2 anti-DNA deposit, and anti-C1q IgG4 was mainly detected in subepithelial membranous deposits. Anti-H3, anti-DNA, and anti-C1q IgG2 autoantibodies were also prevalent in LN serum, which also contained IgG3 against the antigen panel and anti-C1q IgG4. Serum and glomerular levels of autoantibodies were not strictly associated. High serum levels of all autoantibodies detected, including anti-α-enolase and antiannexin AI, identified LN versus SLE and RA. Anti-H3 and anti-α-enolase IgG2 levels had the most remarkable increase in LN serum and represented a discriminating feature of LN in principal component analysis. The highest levels of these two autoantibodies were also associated with proteinuria>3.5 g/24 hours and creatinine>1.2 mg/dl. Our findings suggest that timely autoantibody characterization might allow outcome prediction and targeted therapies for patients with nephritis. PMID:25398787

  2. Indomethacin administered early in the postnatal period results in reduced glomerular number in the adult rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, A L; Koina, M E; Gubhaju, L; Cullen-McEwen, L A; Bertram, J F; Lynnhtun, J; Shadbolt, B; Falk, M C; Dahlstrom, J E

    2014-11-15

    Indomethacin and ibuprofen are administered to close a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) during active glomerulogenesis. Light and electron microscopic glomerular changes with no change in glomerular number were seen following indomethacin and ibuprofen treatment during glomerulogenesis at 14 days after birth in a neonatal rat model. This present study aimed to determine whether longstanding renal structural changes are present at 30 days and 6 mo (equivalent to human adulthood). Rat pups were administered indomethacin or ibuprofen antenatally on days 18-20 (0.5 mg·kg(-1)·dose(-1) indomethacin; 10 mg·kg(-1)·dose(-1) ibuprofen) or postnatally intraperitoneally from day 1 to 3 or day 1 to 5 (0.2 mg·kg(-1)·dose(-1) indomethacin; 10 mg·kg(-1)·dose(-1) ibuprofen). Control groups received no treatment or normal saline intraperitoneally. Pups were killed at 30 days of age and 6 mo of age. Tissue blocks from right kidneys were prepared for light and electron microscopic examination, while total glomerular number was determined in left kidneys using unbiased stereology. Eight pups were included in each group from 14 maternal rats. At 30 days and 6 mo, there were persistent electron microscopy abnormalities of the glomerular basement membrane in those receiving postnatal indomethacin and ibuprofen. There were no significant light microscopy findings at 30 days or 6 mo. At 6 mo, there were significantly fewer glomeruli in those receiving postnatal indomethacin but not ibuprofen (P = 0.003). In conclusion, indomethacin administered during glomerulogenesis appears to reduce the number of glomeruli in adulthood. Alternative options for closing a PDA should be considered including ibuprofen as well as emerging therapies such as paracetamol. PMID:25186294

  3. Sex steroids do not affect shigatoxin cytotoxicity on human renal tubular or glomerular cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kohan Donald E; Schmid Douglas I; Hughes Alisa K

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background The greater susceptibility of children to renal injury in post-diarrheal hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) may be related, at least in part, to heightened renal cell sensitivity to the cytotoxic effect of Shiga toxin (Stx), the putative mediator of kidney damage in HUS. We hypothesized that sexual maturation, which coincides with a falling incidence of HUS, may induce a relatively Stx-resistant state in the renal cells. Methods Cultured human glomerular endothelial (HGEN), h...

  4. Water-Soluble Vitamins in People with Low Glomerular Filtration Rate or On Dialysis: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Clase, Catherine M.; Ki, Vincent; Holden, Rachel M.

    2013-01-01

    People with low glomerular filtration rate and people on dialysis are spontaneously at risk for vitamin deficiency because of the potential for problems with decreased appetite and decreased sense of smell and taste, leading to decreased intake, and because decreased energy or decreased cognitive ability results in difficulties in shopping and cooking. Imposed dietary restrictions because of their renal dysfunction and because of comorbidities such as hypertension and diabetes exacerbate this...

  5. Relationship between Serum Symmetric Dimethylarginine Concentration and Glomerular Filtration Rate in Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Braff, J.; Obare, E.; Elliott, J.; Yerramilli, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Direct measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is the preferred method to assess renal function in cats, but it is not widely used in the diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In cats with CKD, symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) has been shown to increase and to correlate with plasma creatinine concentrations. Hypothesis In cats, reduced GFR corresponds with increased serum SDMA concentration. Animals The study group consisted of ten client‐owned cats whose GFR had been...

  6. An overview of glomerular filtration rate testing in dogs and cats

    OpenAIRE

    Von Hendy-Willson, Vanessa E.; Pressler, Barrak M.

    2010-01-01

    Determination of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a valuable, yet underused, diagnostic tool for evaluating renal function in dogs and cats. This article first reviews the hormonal and hemodynamic factors which contribute to GFR, followed by a description of considerations when selecting a pharmacokinetic model and methods of animal-to-animal standardization. The best-characterized existing GFR markers, including creatinine, radiolabeled markers, and iohexol, are reviewed in depth, as well...

  7. Radiation induced changes in the expression of fibronectin, Pai-1, MMP in rat glomerular epithelial cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal irradiation can lead to the development of radiation nephropathy, and this is characterized by the accumulation of extracellular matrix and final fibrosis. To determine the possible role of the glomerular epithelial cell, the radiation-induced changes in the expression of its genes associated with the extracellular matrix were analyzed. Rat glomerular epithelial cells (GEpC) were irradiated with a single dose of 0, 2, 5, 10 and 20 Gy with using 6 MV LINAC (Siemens, USA), and the samples were collected 6, 24, 48 and 72 hours post-irradiation, respectively. Northern blotting, western blotting and zymography were used to measure the expression level of fibronectin (Fn), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (Pai-1), matrix metalloproteinases-2, 9 (MMP-2, 9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2), tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA). Irradiation with a single dose of 10 Gy resulted in a significant increase in Fn mRNA since 24 hours post-irradiation, and a single dose of 5 and 10 Gy significantly increased the Fn immunoreactive protein measured 48 hours post-irradiation. An increase in Pai-mRNA and protein was also observed and especially, a single dose of 10 Gy significantly increased the mRNA measured 24 and 48 hours post-irradiation. The active MMP-2 measured 24 hours post-irradiation slightly increased in a dose dependent manner, but this increase did not reach statistical significance. The levels of MMP-9, TIMP-2, t-PA and u-PA appeared unaltered after irradiation. Irradiation of the glomerular epithelial cells altered the expression of genes associated with the extracellular matrix, implying that the glomerular epithelial cell may be involved in the development of radiation nephropathy

  8. Abdominal Adipose Tissue was Associated with Glomerular Hyperfiltration among Non- Diabetic and Normotensive Adults with a Normal Body Mass Index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeonghwan Lee

    Full Text Available Glomerular hyperfiltration is recognized as an early marker of progressive kidney dysfunction in the obese population. This study aimed to identify the relationship between glomerular hyperfiltration and body fat distribution measured by computed tomography (CT in healthy Korean adults. The study population included individuals aged 20-64 years who went a routine health check-up including an abdominal CT scan. We selected 4,378 individuals without diabetes and hypertension. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated using the CKD-EPI equation, and glomerular hyperfiltration was defined as the highest quintile of glomerular filtration rate. Abdominal adipose tissue areas were measured at the level of the umbilicus using a 16-detector CT scanner, and the cross-sectional area was calculated using Rapidia 2.8 CT software. The prevalence of glomerular hyperfiltration increased significantly according to the subcutaneous adipose tissue area in men (OR = 1.74 (1.16-2.61, P for trend 0.016, for the comparisons of lowest vs. highest quartile and visceral adipose tissue area in women (OR = 2.34 (1.46-3.75, P for trend < 0.001 in multivariate analysis. After stratification by body mass index (normal < 23 kg/m2, overweight ≥ 23 kg/m2, male subjects with greater subcutaneous adipose tissue, even those in the normal BMI group, had a higher prevalence of glomerular hyperfiltration (OR = 2.11 (1.17-3.80, P for trend = 0.009. Among women, the significance of visceral adipose tissue area on glomerular hyperfiltration resulted from the normal BMI group (OR = 2.14 (1.31-3.49, P for trend = 0.002. After menopause, the odds ratio of the association of glomerular hyperfiltration with subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue increased (OR = 2.96 (1.21-7.25, P for trend = 0.013. Subcutaneous adipose tissue areas and visceral adipose tissue areas are positively associated with glomerular hyperfiltration in healthy Korean adult men and women, respectively. In post

  9. Glomerular filtration rate estimated from the uptake phase of 99mTc-DTPA renography in chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, L J; Petersen, J R; Talleruphuus, U;

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from 99mTc-DTPA renography with that estimated from the renal clearance of 51Cr-EDTA, creatinine and urea.......The purpose of the study was to compare the estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from 99mTc-DTPA renography with that estimated from the renal clearance of 51Cr-EDTA, creatinine and urea....

  10. Pattern secretion of matrix Metalloproteinases and their biological tissue inhibitors by human glomerular mesangial cells in culture

    OpenAIRE

    "Hosseini R; Hampel G; Jung K

    2001-01-01

    The glomerular mesangial cells (GMC) play a central role in the synthesis and turnover of the glomerular mesangial matrix. The breakdown of the matrix likely depends on the balance between of a variety of proteinases including matrix metalloproteinases and their biological inhibitors secreted by the GMC, and any disturbance in the balance may result in appearance of various pathological states such as glomerulosclerosis. We therefore studied pattern secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP...

  11. Involvement of MAPKs in ICAM-1 Expression in Glomerular Endothelial Cells in Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe,Naomi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory processes are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. The aim of this study was to clarify the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways for induction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 expression in glomerular endothelial cells under diabetic conditions. We examined the expression of ICAM-1 in the kidneys of experimental diabetic rats. Human glomerular endothelial cells (GE cells were exposed to normal glucose concentration, high glucose concentration (HG, or high mannitol concentration (HM, and then the expression of the ICAM-1 protein and the phosphorylation of the 3 subfamilies of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK were determined using Western blot analysis. Next, to evaluate the involvement of MAPKs in HG- or HM-induced ICAM-1 expression, we preincubated GE cells with the inhibitors for ERK, p38 or JNK 1h prior to the application of glucose or mannitol. Expression of ICAM-1 was increased in the glomeruli of diabetic rats. Both HG and HM induced ICAM-1 expression and phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK in GE cells. Expression of ICAM-1 was significantly attenuated by inhibitors of ERK, p38 and JNK. We conclude that activation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK cascades may be involved in ICAM-1 expression in glomerular endothelial cells under diabetic conditions.

  12. Anti-glomerular basement membrane disease superimposed on membranous nephropathy: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivera Noel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Anti-glomerular basement membrane disease is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by pulmonary hemorrhage, crescentic glomerulonephritis and the presence of circulating anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies. The simultaneous occurrence of both anti-glomerular basement membrane disease and membranous nephropathy is rare. Case presentation A 59-year-old Hispanic man presented with acute onset of nausea and vomiting and was found to have renal insufficiency. Work-up included a kidney biopsy, which revealed anti-glomerular basement membrane disease with underlying membranous nephropathy. He was treated with emergent hemodialysis, intravenous corticosteroids, plasmapheresis, and cyclophosphamide without improvement in his renal function. Conclusion Simultaneous anti-glomerular basement membrane disease and membranous nephropathy is very rare. There have been 16 previous case reports in the English language literature that have been associated with a high mortality and morbidity, and a very high rate of renal failure resulting in hemodialysis. Co-existence of membranous nephropathy and anti-glomerular basement membrane disease may be immune-mediated, although the exact mechanism is not clear.

  13. Pseudomonas toxin pyocyanin triggers autophagy: Implications for pathoadaptive mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong-Shan; Ma, Lan-Qing; Zhu, Kun; Yan, Jin-Yuan; Bian, Li; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Zou, Cheng-Gang

    2016-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can establish life-long chronic infection in patients with cystic fibrosis by generating genetic loss-of-function mutations, which enhance fitness of the bacterium in the airways. However, the precise role of the pathoadaptive mutations in persistence in chronic airways infection remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that pyocyanin, a well-described P. aeruginosa virulence factor that plays an important role in the initial infection, promotes autophagy in bronchial epithelial cells. Disruption of phzM, which is required for pyocyanin biosynthesis, leads to a significant reduction in autophagy in Beas-2B cells and lung tissues. Pyocyanin-induced autophagy is mediated by the EIF2AK4/GCN2-EIF2S1/eIF2α-ATF4 pathway. Interestingly, rats infected with the phzMΔ mutant strain have high mortality rate and numbers of colony-forming units, compared to those infected with wild-type (WT) P. aeruginosa PA14 strain, during chronic P. aeruginosa infection. In addition, the phzMΔ mutant strain induces more extensive alveolar wall thickening than the WT strain in the pulmonary airways of rats. As autophagy plays an essential role in suppressing bacterial burden, our findings provide a detailed understanding of why reduction of pyocyanin production in P. aeruginosa in chronic airways infections has been associated with better host adaptation and worse outcomes in cystic fibrosis. PMID:27159636

  14. microRNA-101 is a potent inhibitor of autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Lisa B; Wen, Jiayu; Lees, Michael; Høyer-Hansen, Maria; Farkas, Thomas; Krogh, Anders; Jäättelä, Marja; Lund, Anders H

    2011-01-01

    performed a functional screen in search of microRNAs (miRNAs), which regulate the autophagic flux in breast cancer cells. In this study, we identified the tumour suppressive miRNA, miR-101, as a potent inhibitor of basal, etoposide- and rapamycin-induced autophagy. Through transcriptome profiling, we...

  15. Telemetric control of peripheral lipophagy by hypothalamic autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Singh, Rajat

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy maintains cellular quality control by degrading organelles, and cytosolic proteins and their aggregates in lysosomes. Autophagy also degrades lipid droplets (LD) through a process termed lipophagy. During lipophagy, LD are sequestered within autophagosomes and degraded by lysosomal acid lipases to generate free fatty acids that are β-oxidized for energy. Lipophagy was discovered in hepatocytes, and since then has been shown to function in diverse cell types. Whether lipophagy degrades LD in the major fat storing cell-the adipocyte-remained unclear. We have found that blocking autophagy in brown adipose tissues (BAT) by deleting the autophagy gene Atg7 in BAT MYF5 (myogenic factor 5)-positive progenitors increases basal lipid content in BAT and decreases lipid utilization during cold exposure-indicating that lipophagy contributes to lipohomeostasis in the adipose tissue. Surprisingly, knocking out Atg7 in hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons also blocks lipophagy in BAT and liver suggesting that specific neurons within the central nervous system (CNS) exert telemetric control over lipophagy in BAT and liver. PMID:27341145

  16. Retinoid receptor signaling and autophagy in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Orfali, Nina

    2014-05-15

    Retinoids are a family of signaling molecules derived from vitamin A with well established roles in cellular differentiation. Physiologically active retinoids mediate transcriptional effects on cells through interactions with retinoic acid (RARs) and retinoid-X (RXR) receptors. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARα gene, which lead to impaired retinoid signaling, are implicated in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), alone and in combination with arsenic trioxide (ATO), restores differentiation in APL cells and promotes degradation of the abnormal oncogenic fusion protein through several proteolytic mechanisms. RARα fusion-protein elimination is emerging as critical to obtaining sustained remission and long-term cure in APL. Autophagy is a degradative cellular pathway involved in protein turnover. Both ATRA and ATO also induce autophagy in APL cells. Enhancing autophagy may therefore be of therapeutic benefit in resistant APL and could broaden the application of differentiation therapy to other cancers. Here we discuss retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis, leukemogenesis, and APL treatment. We highlight autophagy as a potential important regulator in anti-leukemic strategies.

  17. Role of autophagy in differential sensitivity of hepatocarcinoma cells to sorafenib

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Trevan; D; Fischer; Jin-Hee; Wang; Adrian; Vlada; Jae-Sung; Kim; Kevin; E; Behrns

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of sorafenib(SFN) in autophagy of hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC). We evaluated how SFN affects autophagy signaling pathway in human HCC cell lines. METHODS: Two different human HCC cell lines, Hep3 B and Huh7, were subjected to different concentrations of SFN. Cell viability and onset of apoptosis were determined with colorimetric assay and immunoblotting analysis, respectively. The changes in autophagy-related proteins, including LC3, ULK1, AMPK, and LKB, were determined with immunoblotting analysis in the presence or absence of SFN. To assess autophagic dynamics, autophagic flux was measured with chloroquine, a lysosomal inhibitor. The autophagic responsiveness between different HCC cell lines was compared under the autophagy enhancing conditions.RESULTS: Hep3 B cells were significantly more resistant to SFN than Huh7 cells. Immunoblotting analysis revealed a marked increase in SFN-mediated autophagy flux in Huh7 cells, which was, however, absent in Hep3 B cells. While both starvation and rapamycin enhanced autophagy in Huh7 cells, only rapamycin increased autophagy in Hep3 B cells. Immunoblotting analysis of autophagy initiation proteins showed that SFN substantially increased phosphorylation of AMPK and consequently autophagy in Huh7, but not in Hep3 B cells.CONCLUSION: The autophagic responsiveness to SFN is distinct between Hep3 B and Huh7 cells. Resistance of Hep3 B cells to SFN may be associated with altered autophagy signaling pathways.

  18. FoxO1 antagonist suppresses autophagy and lipid droplet growth in adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longhua; Zheng, Louise D; Zou, Peng; Brooke, Joseph; Smith, Cayleen; Long, Yun Chau; Almeida, Fabio A; Liu, Dongmin; Cheng, Zhiyong

    2016-08-01

    Obesity and related metabolic disorders constitute one of the most pressing heath concerns worldwide. Increased adiposity is linked to autophagy upregulation in adipose tissues. However, it is unknown how autophagy is upregulated and contributes to aberrant adiposity. Here we show a FoxO1-autophagy-FSP27 axis that regulates adipogenesis and lipid droplet (LD) growth in adipocytes. Adipocyte differentiation was associated with upregulation of autophagy and fat specific protein 27 (FSP27), a key regulator of adipocyte maturation and expansion by promoting LD formation and growth. However, FoxO1 specific inhibitor AS1842856 potently suppressed autophagy, FSP27 expression, and adipocyte differentiation. In terminally differentiated adipocytes, AS1842856 significantly reduced FSP27 level and LD size, which was recapitulated by autophagy inhibitors (bafilomycin-A1 and leupeptin, BL). Similarly, AS1842856 and BL dampened autophagy activity and FSP27 expression in explant cultures of white adipose tissue. To our knowledge, this is the first study addressing FoxO1 in the regulation of adipose autophagy, shedding light on the mechanism of increased autophagy and adiposity in obese individuals. Given that adipogenesis and adipocyte expansion contribute to aberrant adiposity, targeting the FoxO1-autophagy-FSP27 axis may lead to new anti-obesity options. PMID:27260854

  19. Intestinal Autophagy Improves Healthspan and Longevity in C. elegans during Dietary Restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gelino

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dietary restriction (DR is a dietary regimen that extends lifespan in many organisms. One mechanism contributing to the conserved effect of DR on longevity is the cellular recycling process autophagy, which is induced in response to nutrient scarcity and increases sequestration of cytosolic material into double-membrane autophagosomes for degradation in the lysosome. Although autophagy plays a direct role in DR-mediated lifespan extension in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the contribution of autophagy in individual tissues remains unclear. In this study, we show a critical role for autophagy in the intestine, a major metabolic tissue, to ensure lifespan extension of dietary-restricted eat-2 mutants. The intestine of eat-2 mutants has an enlarged lysosomal compartment and flux assays indicate increased turnover of autophagosomes, consistent with an induction of autophagy in this tissue. This increase in intestinal autophagy may underlie the improved intestinal integrity we observe in eat-2 mutants, since whole-body and intestinal-specific inhibition of autophagy in eat-2 mutants greatly impairs the intestinal barrier function. Interestingly, intestinal-specific inhibition of autophagy in eat-2 mutants leads to a decrease in motility with age, alluding to a potential cell non-autonomous role for autophagy in the intestine. Collectively, these results highlight important functions for autophagy in the intestine of dietary-restricted C. elegans.

  20. VMP1 related autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells: VMP1 regulates cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Qinyi [Department of Ultrasonograph, Changshu No. 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu (China); Zhou, Hao; Chen, Yan [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Shen, Chenglong [Department of General Surgery, Changshu No. 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu (China); He, Songbing; Zhao, Hua; Wang, Liang [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Wan, Daiwei, E-mail: 372710369@qq.com [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Gu, Wen, E-mail: 505339704@qq.com [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •This research confirmed VMP1 as a regulator of autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We proved the pro-survival role of VMP1-mediated autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We found the interaction between VMP1 and BECLIN1 also existing in colorectal cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1) is an autophagy-related protein and identified as a key regulator of autophagy in recent years. In pancreatic cell lines, VMP1-dependent autophagy has been linked to positive regulation of apoptosis. However, there are no published reports on the role of VMP1 in autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancers. Therefore, to address this gap of knowledge, we decided to interrogate regulation of autophagy and apoptosis by VMP1. We have studied the induction of autophagy by starvation and rapamycin treatment in colorectal cell lines using electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting. We found that starvation-induced autophagy correlated with an increase in VMP1 expression, that VMP1 interacted with BECLIN1, and that siRNA mediated down-regulation of VMP1-reduced autophagy. Next, we examined the relationship between VMP1-dependent autophagy and apoptosis and found that VMP1 down-regulation sensitizes cells to apoptosis and that agents that induce apoptosis down-regulate VMP1. In conclusion, similar to its reported role in other cell types, VMP1 is an important regulator of autophagy in colorectal cell lines. However, in contrast to its role in pancreatic cell lines, in colorectal cancer cells, VMP1-dependent autophagy appears to be pro-survival rather than pro-cell death.

  1. VMP1 related autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells: VMP1 regulates cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •This research confirmed VMP1 as a regulator of autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We proved the pro-survival role of VMP1-mediated autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We found the interaction between VMP1 and BECLIN1 also existing in colorectal cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1) is an autophagy-related protein and identified as a key regulator of autophagy in recent years. In pancreatic cell lines, VMP1-dependent autophagy has been linked to positive regulation of apoptosis. However, there are no published reports on the role of VMP1 in autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancers. Therefore, to address this gap of knowledge, we decided to interrogate regulation of autophagy and apoptosis by VMP1. We have studied the induction of autophagy by starvation and rapamycin treatment in colorectal cell lines using electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting. We found that starvation-induced autophagy correlated with an increase in VMP1 expression, that VMP1 interacted with BECLIN1, and that siRNA mediated down-regulation of VMP1-reduced autophagy. Next, we examined the relationship between VMP1-dependent autophagy and apoptosis and found that VMP1 down-regulation sensitizes cells to apoptosis and that agents that induce apoptosis down-regulate VMP1. In conclusion, similar to its reported role in other cell types, VMP1 is an important regulator of autophagy in colorectal cell lines. However, in contrast to its role in pancreatic cell lines, in colorectal cancer cells, VMP1-dependent autophagy appears to be pro-survival rather than pro-cell death

  2. Neem oil limonoids induces p53-independent apoptosis and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Pragya; Yadav, Neelu; Lella, Ravi; Schneider, Andrea; Jones, Anthony; Marlowe, Timothy; Lovett, Gabrielle; O'Loughlin, Kieran; Minderman, Hans; Gogada, Raghu; Chandra, Dhyan

    2012-11-01

    Azadirachta indica, commonly known as neem, has a wide range of medicinal properties. Neem extracts and its purified products have been examined for induction of apoptosis in multiple cancer cell types; however, its underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We show that neem oil (i.e., neem), which contains majority of neem limonoids including azadirachtin, induced apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Gene silencing demonstrated that caspase cascade was initiated by the activation of caspase-9, whereas caspase-8 was also activated late during neem-induced apoptosis. Pretreatment of cancer cells with pan caspase inhibitor, z-VAD inhibited activities of both initiator caspases (e.g., caspase-8 and -9) and executioner caspase-3. Neem induced the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria, suggesting the involvement of both caspase-dependent and AIF-mediated apoptosis. p21 deficiency caused an increase in caspase activities at lower doses of neem, whereas p53 deficiency did not modulate neem-induced caspase activation. Additionally, neem treatment resulted in the accumulation of LC3-II in cancer cells, suggesting the involvement of autophagy in neem-induced cancer cell death. Low doses of autophagy inhibitors (i.e., 3-methyladenine and LY294002) did not prevent accumulation of neem-induced LC3-II in cancer cells. Silencing of ATG5 or Beclin-1 further enhanced neem-induced cell death. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) or autophagy inhibitors increased neem-induced caspase-3 activation and inhibition of caspases enhanced neem-induced autophagy. Together, for the first time, we demonstrate that neem induces caspase-dependent and AIF-mediated apoptosis, and autophagy in cancer cells. PMID:22915764

  3. Salvianolic acid B inhibits autophagy and protects starving cardiac myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao HAN; Jian-xun LIU; Xin-zhi LI

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the protective or lethal role of autophagy and the effects of Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) on autophagy in starving myocytes.Methods: Cardiac myocytes were incubated under starvation conditions (GD) for O, 1, 2, 3, and 6 h. Autophagic flux in starving cells was measured via chloroquine (3 μmol/L). After myocytes were treated with Sat B (50 μmol/L) in the presence or absence of chloro-quine (3 μmol/L) under GD 3 h, the amount of LC3-11, the abundance of LC3-positive fluorescent dots in cells, cell viability and cellular ATP levels were determined using immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, MTT assay and luminometer, respectively. More-over, electron microscopy (EM) and immunofluorescent duel labeling of LC3 and Caspase-8 were used to examine the characteristics of autophagy and apoptosis.Results: Immunoblot analysis showed that the amount of LC3-11 in starving cells increased in a time-dependent manner accompanied by increased LC3-positive fluorescence and decreased cell viability and ATP content. Sal B (50 μmol/L) inhibited the increase in LC3-11, reduced the abundance of LC3 immunofluorescence and intensity of Caspase-8 fluorescence, and enhanced cellular viability and ATP levels in myocytes under GD 3 h, regardless of whether chloroquine was present.Conclusion: Autophagy induced by starvation for 3 h led to cell injury. Sal B protected starving cells by blocking the early stage of autophagic flux and inhibiting apoptosis that occurred during autophagy.

  4. Autophagy involved in resveratrol increased radiosensitivity in glioma stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Resveratrol combined with X-ray on radiosensitivity in glioma stem cells. Methods: The proliferation inhibition of glioma stem cells induced by X-rays and Resveratrol was assessed with MTT assay. The activation of proapoptotic effect was characterized by Hoechst 33258 stain. MDC stain and Western blot analysis were used to analyze the autophagy mechanism in X-rays-induced death of glioma stem cells. Results: MTT assay indicated that X-rays and Resveratrol decreased the viability of glioma stem cells (P<0.05); we found the proliferative inhibition of glioma stem cells was declined when we used 3-MA to inhibit autophagy(P<0.05). When the cells were treated by the Resveratrol and x-rays, their spherical shape were changed. Apoptosis was induced in glioma stem cells by combined X-rays and Resveratrol as detected by Hoechst 33258 staining. In addition, autophagy was induced in glioma stem cells in the combined treatment group as detected by MDC staining. Western blotting showed that Bcl-2 expression was decreased. in the combined treatment group (P<0.01), and the LC3-Ⅱ expression was increased in the combined treatment group (P<0.01). Conclusion: Resveratrol can increased the radiation sensitivity of glioma stem cells, the apoptosis and autophagy was induced in the glioma stem cells in the combined treatment X-rays and Resveratrol. Our results suggest that autophagy plays an essential role in the regulation of radiosensitization of glioma stem cells. (authors)

  5. Epidemiological-molecular evidence of metabolic reprogramming on proliferation, autophagy and cell signaling in pancreas cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søreide, Kjetil; Sund, Malin

    2015-01-28

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the deadliest human cancers with little progress made in survival over the past decades, and 5-year survival usually below 5%. Despite this dismal scenario, progresses have been made in understanding of the underlying tumor biology through among other definition of precursor lesions, delineation of molecular pathways, and advances in genome-wide technology. Further, exploring the relationship between epidemiological risk factors involving metabolic features to that of an altered cancer metabolism may provide the foundation for new therapies. Here we explore how nutrients and caloric intake may influence the KRAS-driven ductal carcinogenesis through mediators of metabolic stress, including autophagy in presence of TP53, advanced glycation end products (AGE) and the receptors (RAGE) and ligands (HMGB1), as well as glutamine pathways, among others. Effective understanding the cancer metabolism mechanisms in pancreatic cancer may propose new ways of prevention and treatment. PMID:24704294

  6. Autophagy in cerebral ischemia and the effects of traditional Chinese medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-ping Huang; Huang Ding; Jin-dong Lu; Ying-hong Tang; Bing-xiang Deng; Chang-qing Deng

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated degradation process for non-essential or damaged celular constituents, playing an important homeostatic role in cel survival, differentiation and development to maintain homeostasis. Autophagy is involved in tumors as wel as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Recently, active compounds from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) have been found to modulate the levels of autophagy in tumor cels, nerve cels, myocardial cels and endothelial cels. Ischemic stroke is a major cause of neurological disability and places a heavy burden on family and society. Regaining function can signiifcantly reduce dependence and improve the quality of life of stroke survivors. In healthy cels, autophagy plays a key role in adapting to nutritional deprivation and eliminating aggregated proteins, however inappropriate activation of autophagy may lead to cel death in cerebral ischemia. This paper reviews the process and the molecular basis of autophagy, as wel as its roles in cerebral ischemia and the roles of TCM in modulating its activity.

  7. Knockdown of retinoblastoma protein may sensitize glioma cells to cisplatin through inhibition of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangyu; Sun, Kangjian; Wang, Handong; Dai, Yuyuan

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the deadliest forms of cancer due to its limited sensitivity to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Cisplatin (CCDP) is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for tumors, but the agent often results in the development of chemo-resistance. In several cancers, cisplatin resistance is associated with autophagy induction. Here, we found that in glioma cells cisplatin treatment induced autophagy. Our data indicates that the autophagy induction plays a critical role in cisplatin resistance of glioma cells, knockdown of RB inhibited autophagy induced by cisplatin, and inhibition of autophagy improved cisplatin-induced apoptosis. It suggests that a combination of autophagy inhibitors with cisplatin may improve the therapeutic efficiency of cisplatin towards GBM with acquired resistance. PMID:27048711

  8. Mechanisms of autophagy and apoptosis:Recent developments in breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan; M; Esteve; Erwin; Knecht

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy,the pathway whereby cell components are degraded by lysosomes,is involved in the cell response to environmental stresses,such as nutrient deprivation,hypoxia or exposition to chemotherapeutic agents.Under these conditions,which are reminiscent of certain phases of tumor development,autophagy either promotes cell survival or induces cell death. This strengthens the possibility that autophagy could be an important target in cancer therapy,as has been proposed.Here,we describe the regulation of survival and death by autophagy and apoptosis,especially in cultured breast cancer cells.In particular,we discuss whether autophagy represents an apoptosis-independent process and/or if they share common pathways. We believe that understanding in detail the molecular mechanisms that underlie the relationships between autophagy and apoptosis in breast cancer cells could improve the available treatments for this disease.

  9. Enhanced autophagy as a potential mechanism for the improved physiological function by simvastatin in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Nicholas P

    2016-04-01

    Autophagy has recently emerged as an important cellular process for the maintenance of skeletal muscle health and function. Excessive autophagy can trigger muscle catabolism, leading to atrophy. In contrast, reduced autophagic flux is a characteristic of several muscle diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the most common and severe inherited muscle disorder. Recent evidence demonstrates that enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by CYBB/NOX2 impairs autophagy in muscles from the dmd/mdx mouse, a genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Statins decrease CYBB/NOX2 expression and activity and stimulate autophagy in skeletal muscle. Therefore, we treated dmd/mdx mice with simvastatin and showed decreased CYBB/NOX2-mediated oxidative stress and enhanced autophagy induction. This was accompanied by reduced muscle damage, inflammation and fibrosis, and increased muscle force production. Our data suggest that increased autophagy may be a potential mechanism by which simvastatin improves skeletal muscle health and function in muscular dystrophy. PMID:26890413

  10. Spermidine and resveratrol induce autophagy by distinct pathways converging on the acetylproteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morselli, Eugenia; Mariño, Guillermo; Bennetzen, Martin V; Eisenberg, Tobias; Megalou, Evgenia; Schroeder, Sabrina; Cabrera, Sandra; Bénit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre; Criollo, Alfredo; Kepp, Oliver; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Shen, Shensi; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Horio, Yoshiyuki; López-Otín, Carlos; Andersen, Jens S.; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy protects organelles, cells, and organisms against several stress conditions. Induction of autophagy by resveratrol requires the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). In this paper, we show that the acetylase inhibitor spermidine stimulates autophagy...... independent of SIRT1 in human and yeast cells as well as in nematodes. Although resveratrol and spermidine ignite autophagy through distinct mechanisms, these compounds stimulate convergent pathways that culminate in concordant modifications of the acetylproteome. Both agents favor convergent deacetylation...... and acetylation reactions in the cytosol and in the nucleus, respectively. Both resveratrol and spermidine were able to induce autophagy in cytoplasts (enucleated cells). Moreover, a cytoplasm-restricted mutant of SIRT1 could stimulate autophagy, suggesting that cytoplasmic deacetylation reactions...

  11. Study on γ-ray induced mitochondrial autophagy and regeneration of liver cells in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the role of mitochondrial autophagy in wound healing. Methods Damages of liver cells in rats after γ-ray irradiation with a total dose of 8 Gy were investigated. The relationship between mitochondrial autophagy and repair of liver cells was observed ultrastructurally. Apoptosis-related DNA fragment and mitochondrial RNA levels were analyzed. Results: Most of the damaged mitochondria were removed through mitochondrial autophagy. Apoptosis-related DNA fragment analysis implied that, accompanied with reduction of mitochondrial autophagy, the amount of cellular apoptosis was decreased during wound healing. Wound healing was related to mitochondrial regeneration after mitochondrial autophagy. Conclusion: Mitochondrial autophagy may release some molecular signals for wound healing so as to accelerate sufficiently the regeneration of newly formed mitochondria. (authors)

  12. Autophagy sustains the replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory virus in host cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we confirmed the autophagy induced by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in permissive cells and investigated the role of autophagy in the replication of PRRSV. We first demonstrated that PRRSV infection significantly results in the increased double-membrane vesicles, the accumulation of LC3 fluorescence puncta, and the raised ratio of LC3-II/β-actin, in MARC-145 cells. Then we discovered that induction of autophagy by rapamycin significantly enhances the viral titers of PRRSV, while inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA and silencing of LC3 gene by siRNA reduces the yield of PRRSV. The results showed functional autolysosomes can be formed after PRRSV infection and the autophagosome–lysosome-fusion inhibitor decreases the virus titers. We also examined the induction of autophagy by PRRSV infection in pulmonary alveolar macrophages. These findings indicate that autophagy induced by PRRSV infection plays a role in sustaining the replication of PRRSV in host cells.

  13. Targeting autophagy as a potential therapeutic approach for immune thrombocytopenia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Ning-Ning; Dong, Li-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Xin; Li, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Autophagy involves the sequestration and lysosomal degradation of various cytoplasmic structures, including damaged organelles and invading microorganisms. Autophagy is not only an essential cell-intrinsic mechanism for protecting against internal and external stress conditions but is also key in the cellular response against microbes, in antigen processing for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presentation, and in lymphocyte development, survival, and proliferation. In recent years, perturbations in autophagy have been implicated in a number of diseases, including autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and multiple sclerosis (MS). Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a multifactorial disease characterized by autoimmune responses to self-platelet membrane proteins. Recently, our unpublished original data demonstrated aberrant expression of molecules in the autophagy pathway in ITP patients compared with controls, and we found a close correlation between the pathogenesis of ITP and the autophagy pathway. The potential of targeting the autophagy pathway in ITP as a novel therapeutic approach has been discussed. PMID:26830007

  14. Autophagy sustains the replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory virus in host cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qinghao; Qin, Yixian; Zhou, Lei; Kou, Qiuwen; Guo, Xin; Ge, Xinna [Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology and Zoonosis of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine and State Key Laboratory of Agribiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China); Yang, Hanchun, E-mail: yanghanchun1@cau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology and Zoonosis of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine and State Key Laboratory of Agribiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China); Hu, Hongbo, E-mail: hongbo@cau.edu.cn [College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China)

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we confirmed the autophagy induced by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in permissive cells and investigated the role of autophagy in the replication of PRRSV. We first demonstrated that PRRSV infection significantly results in the increased double-membrane vesicles, the accumulation of LC3 fluorescence puncta, and the raised ratio of LC3-II/{beta}-actin, in MARC-145 cells. Then we discovered that induction of autophagy by rapamycin significantly enhances the viral titers of PRRSV, while inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA and silencing of LC3 gene by siRNA reduces the yield of PRRSV. The results showed functional autolysosomes can be formed after PRRSV infection and the autophagosome-lysosome-fusion inhibitor decreases the virus titers. We also examined the induction of autophagy by PRRSV infection in pulmonary alveolar macrophages. These findings indicate that autophagy induced by PRRSV infection plays a role in sustaining the replication of PRRSV in host cells.

  15. The role of autophagy in cell survival from heavy ion irradiation in the plateau region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study cytotoxic effect of heavy ion irradiation in the plateau region, and investigate whether autophagy induced by heavy ion irradiation is cytoprotective, HeLa cells were irradiated with 350 MeV/u carbon ions beams, and the clonogenic survival was analyzed. The results showed that cell survival decreased with increasing doses. It was also found that G2/M-phase cells increased, and the autophagy-related activity was significantly higher than the control. When autophagy was blocked by 3-methyladenine in carbon-ion irradiated cells, G2/M phase arrest and the percentage of apoptosis cells were further elevated, and cell survival decreased significantly, indicating the induction of cytoprotective autophagy by carbon-ion irradiation. Our results demonstrated that autophagy induced by carbon ion irradiation provided a self-protective mechanism in HeLa cells, short-time inhibition of autophagy before carbon-ion irradiation could enhance radiation cytotoxicity in HeLa cells. (authors)

  16. Cell death and autophagy: Cytokines, drugs, and nutritional factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells may use multiple pathways to commit suicide. In certain contexts, dying cells generate large amounts of autophagic vacuoles and clear large proportions of their cytoplasm, before they finally die, as exemplified by the treatment of human mammary carcinoma cells with the anti-estrogen tamoxifen (TAM, ≤1 μM). Protein analysis during autophagic cell death revealed distinct proteins of the nuclear fraction including GST-π and some proteasomal subunit constituents to be affected during autophagic cell death. Depending on the functional status of caspase-3, MCF-7 cells may switch between autophagic and apoptotic features of cell death [Fazi, B., Bursch, W., Fimia, G.M., Nardacci R., Piacentini, M., Di Sano, F., Piredda, L., 2008. Fenretinide induces autophagic cell death in caspase-defective breast cancer cells. Autophagy 4(4), 435-441]. Furthermore, the self-destruction of MCF-7 cells was found to be completed by phagocytosis of cell residues [Petrovski, G., Zahuczky, G., Katona, K., Vereb, G., Martinet, W., Nemes, Z., Bursch, W., Fesues, L., 2007. Clearance of dying autophagic cells of different origin by professional and non-professional phagocytes. Cell Death Diff. 14 (6), 1117-1128]. Autophagy also constitutes a cell's strategy of defense upon cell damage by eliminating damaged bulk proteins/organelles. This biological condition may be exemplified by the treatment of MCF-7 cells with a necrogenic TAM-dose (10 μM), resulting in the lysis of almost all cells within 24 h. However, a transient (1 h) challenge of MCF-7 cells with the same dose allowed the recovery of cells involving autophagy. Enrichment of chaperones in the insoluble cytoplasmic protein fraction indicated the formation of aggresomes, a potential trigger for autophagy. In a further experimental model HL60 cells were treated with TAM, causing dose-dependent distinct responses: 1-5 μM TAM, autophagy predominant; 7-9 μM, apoptosis predominant; 15 μM, necrosis. These phenomena might be

  17. Enhanced autophagy as a potential mechanism for the improved physiological function by simvastatin in muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Whitehead, Nicholas P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy has recently emerged as an important cellular process for the maintenance of skeletal muscle health and function. Excessive autophagy can trigger muscle catabolism, leading to atrophy. In contrast, reduced autophagic flux is a characteristic of several muscle diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the most common and severe inherited muscle disorder. Recent evidence demonstrates that enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by CYBB/NOX2 impairs autophagy ...

  18. Impaired Autophagy in the Lipid-Storage Disorder Niemann-Pick Type C1 Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy dysfunction has been implicated in misfolded protein accumulation and cellular toxicity in several diseases. Whether alterations in autophagy also contribute to the pathology of lipid-storage disorders is not clear. Here, we show defective autophagy in Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease associated with cholesterol accumulation, where the maturation of autophagosomes is impaired because of defective amphisome formation caused by failure in SNARE machinery, whereas the lysosomal prot...

  19. Autophagy in 5-Fluorouracil Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancer: Trends and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Jia-Cheng Tang; Yi-Li Feng; Xiao Liang; Xiu-Jun Cai

    2016-01-01

    Objective: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-based combination therapies are standard treatments for gastrointestinal cancer, where the modulation of autophagy is becoming increasingly important in offering effective treatment for patients in clinical practice. This review focuses on the role of autophagy in 5-FU-induced tumor suppression and cancer therapy in the digestive system. Data Sources: All articles published in English from 1996 to date those assess the synergistic effect of autophagy and 5-...

  20. Naringin-sensitive protein phosphorylation pathways in the regulation of hepatocytic autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Autophagy is a process used by eukaryotic cells to degrade their own cytoplasm under conditions of nitrogen starvation or stress, in order to obtain amino acids and other small molecules needed for the maintenance of essential cell functions. A variety of biological agents have been described to take part in the regulation of mammalian autophagy. Naringin, a flavanone isolated from grapefruit peel as the bitter principle, is known to exhibit autophagy-preserving effects in isolated hepatoc...

  1. Ras-Related Tumorigenesis Is Suppressed by BNIP3-Mediated Autophagy through Inhibition of Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Ying Wu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy plays diverse roles in Ras-related tumorigenesis. H-rasval12 induces autophagy through multiple signaling pathways including Raf-1/ERK pathway, and various ERK downstream molecules of autophagy have been reported. In this study, Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa–interacting protein 3 (BNIP3 is identified as a downstream transducer of the Ras/Raf/ERK signaling pathway to induce autophagy. BNIP3 was upregulated by H-rasval12 at the transcriptional level to compete with Beclin 1 for binding with Bcl-2. H-rasval12–induced autophagy suppresses cell proliferation demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo by expression of ectopic BNIP3, Atg5, or interference RNA of BNIP3 (siBNIP3 and Atg5 (shAtg5 using mouse NIH3T3 and embryo fibroblast cells. H-rasval12 induces different autophagic responses depending on the duration of Ras overexpression. After a short time (48 hours of Ras overexpression, autophagy inhibits cell proliferation. In contrast, a longer time (2 weeks of Ras overexpression, cell proliferation was enhanced by autophagy. Furthermore, overexpression of mutant Ras, BNIP3, and LC3-II was detected in bladder cancer T24 cells and the tumor parts of 75% of bladder cancer specimens indicating a positive correlation between autophagy and tumorigenesis. Taken together, our mouse model demonstrates a balance between BNIP3-mediated autophagy and H-rasval12–induced tumor formation and reveals that H-rasval12 induces autophagy in a BNIP3-dependent manner, and the threshold of autophagy plays a decisive role in H-rasval12–induced tumorigenesis. Our findings combined with others’ reports suggest a new therapeutic strategy against Ras-related tumorigenesis by negative or positive regulation of autophagic activity, which is determined by the level of autophagy and tumor progression stages.

  2. Autophagy activation aggravates neuronal injury in the hippocampus of vascular dementia rats

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Bin; Tang, Jing; Zhang, Jinxia; Li, Shiying; Yuan, Min; Wang, Ruimin

    2014-01-01

    It remains unclear whether autophagy affects hippocampal neuronal injury in vascular dementia. In the present study, we investigated the effects of autophagy blockade on hippocampal neuronal injury in a rat model of vascular dementia. In model rats, hippocampal CA1 neurons were severely damaged, and expression of the autophagy-related proteins beclin-1, cathepsin B and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 was elevated compared with that in sham-operated animals. These responses were...

  3. Acid sphingomyelinase gene knockout ameliorates hyperhomocysteinemic glomerular injury in mice lacking cystathionine-β-synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna M Boini

    Full Text Available Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM has been implicated in the development of hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcys-induced glomerular oxidative stress and injury. However, it remains unknown whether genetically engineering of ASM gene produces beneficial or detrimental action on hHcys-induced glomerular injury. The present study generated and characterized the mice lacking cystathionine β-synthase (Cbs and Asm mouse gene by cross breeding Cbs(+/- and Asm(+/- mice. Given that the homozygotes of Cbs(-/-/Asm(-/- mice could not survive for 3 weeks. Cbs(+/-/Asm(+/+, Cbs(+/-/Asm(+/- and Cbs(+/-/Asm(-/- as well as their Cbs wild type littermates were used to study the role of Asm(-/- under a background of Cbs(+/- with hHcys. HPLC analysis revealed that plasma Hcys level was significantly elevated in Cbs heterozygous (Cbs(+/- mice with different copies of Asm gene compared to Cbs(+/+ mice with different Asm gene copies. Cbs(+/-/Asm(+/+ mice had significantly increased renal Asm activity, ceramide production and O(2.(- level compared to Cbs(+/+/Asm(+/+, while Cbs(+/-/Asm(-/- mice showed significantly reduced renal Asm activity, ceramide production and O(2.(- level due to increased plasma Hcys levels. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that colocalization of podocin with ceramide was much lower in Cbs(+/-/Asm(-/- mice compared to Cbs(+/-/Asm(+/+ mice, which was accompanied by a reduced glomerular damage index, albuminuria and proteinuria in Cbs(+/-/Asm(-/- mice. Immunofluorescent analyses of the podocin, nephrin and desmin expression also illustrated less podocyte damages in the glomeruli from Cbs(+/-/Asm(-/- mice compared to Cbs(+/-/Asm(+/+ mice. In in vitro studies of podocytes, hHcys-enhanced O(2.(- production, desmin expression, and ceramide production as well as decreases in VEGF level and podocin expression in podocytes were substantially attenuated by prior treatment with amitriptyline, an Asm inhibitor. In conclusion, Asm gene knockout or corresponding enzyme

  4. Partial characterization of proteoglycans synthesized by human glomerular epithelial cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, D.J.; Oegema, T.R. Jr.; Fredeen, T.S.; van der Woude, F.; Kim, Y.; Brown, D.M. (Univ. of Minnesota Department of Pediatrics, MN (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Confluent adult and fetal human glomerular epithelial cells were incubated for 24 h in the presence of (3H)-amino acids and (35S)sulfate. Two heparan-35SO4 proteoglycans were released into the culture medium. These 35S-labeled proteoglycans eluted as a single peak from anion exchange chromatographic columns, but were separable by gel filtration on Sepharose CL-6B columns. The larger heparan-35SO4 proteoglycan eluted with the column void volume and at a Kav of 0.26 from Sepharose CL-4B columns. The most abundant medium heparan-35SO4 proteoglycan was a high buoyant density proteoglycan similar in hydrodynamic size (Sepharose CL-6B Kav 0.23) to those previously described in glomerular basement membranes and isolated glomeruli. Heparan-35SO4 chains from both proteoglycans were 36 kDa. A smaller proportion of Sepharose CL-6B excluded dermatan-35SO4 proteoglycan was also synthesized by these cells. The predominant protein cores of both medium heparan-35SO4 proteoglycans were approximately 230 and 180 kDa. A hybrid chondroitin/dermatan-heparan-35SO4 proteoglycan with an 80-kDa protein core copurified with the smaller medium heparan-35SO4 proteoglycan. This 35S-labeled proteoglycan appeared as a diffuse, chondroitinase ABC sensitive 155-kDa fluorographic band in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels after the Sepharose CL-6B Kav 0.23 35S-labeled proteoglycan fraction was digested with heparitinase. The heparitinase generated heparan sulfate proteoglycan protein cores and the 155-kDa hybrid proteoglycan fragment had molecular weights similar to those previously identified in rat glomerular basement membrane and glomeruli using antibodies against a basement membrane tumor proteoglycan precursor.

  5. Partial characterization of proteoglycans synthesized by human glomerular epithelial cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Confluent adult and fetal human glomerular epithelial cells were incubated for 24 h in the presence of [3H]-amino acids and [35S]sulfate. Two heparan-35SO4 proteoglycans were released into the culture medium. These 35S-labeled proteoglycans eluted as a single peak from anion exchange chromatographic columns, but were separable by gel filtration on Sepharose CL-6B columns. The larger heparan-35SO4 proteoglycan eluted with the column void volume and at a Kav of 0.26 from Sepharose CL-4B columns. The most abundant medium heparan-35SO4 proteoglycan was a high buoyant density proteoglycan similar in hydrodynamic size (Sepharose CL-6B Kav 0.23) to those previously described in glomerular basement membranes and isolated glomeruli. Heparan-35SO4 chains from both proteoglycans were 36 kDa. A smaller proportion of Sepharose CL-6B excluded dermatan-35SO4 proteoglycan was also synthesized by these cells. The predominant protein cores of both medium heparan-35SO4 proteoglycans were approximately 230 and 180 kDa. A hybrid chondroitin/dermatan-heparan-35SO4 proteoglycan with an 80-kDa protein core copurified with the smaller medium heparan-35SO4 proteoglycan. This 35S-labeled proteoglycan appeared as a diffuse, chondroitinase ABC sensitive 155-kDa fluorographic band in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels after the Sepharose CL-6B Kav 0.23 35S-labeled proteoglycan fraction was digested with heparitinase. The heparitinase generated heparan sulfate proteoglycan protein cores and the 155-kDa hybrid proteoglycan fragment had molecular weights similar to those previously identified in rat glomerular basement membrane and glomeruli using antibodies against a basement membrane tumor proteoglycan precursor

  6. Role of autophagy in disease resistance and hypersensitive response-associated cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Munch, David; Bressendorff, Simon;

    2011-01-01

    documented, but how autophagy contributes to plant innate immunity and cell death is not that clear. A few research reports have appeared recently to shed light on the roles of autophagy in plant-pathogen interactions and in disease-associated host cell death. We present a first attempt to reconcile the......Ancient autophagy pathways are emerging as key defense modules in host eukaryotic cells against microbial pathogens. Apart from actively eliminating intracellular intruders, autophagy is also responsible for cell survival, for example by reducing the deleterious effects of endoplasmic reticulum...

  7. Survival and death of endoplasmic-reticulum-stressed cells:Role of autophagy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in ER stress, which subsequently activates the unfolded protein response that induces a transcriptional program to alleviate the stress. Another cellular process that is activated during ER stress is autophagy, a mechanism of enclosing intracellular compo- nents in a double-membrane autophagosome, and then delivering it to the lysosome for degradation. Here, we discuss the role of autophagy in cellular response to ER stress, the signaling pathways linking ER stress to autophagy, and the possible implication of modulating autophagy in treatment of diseases such as cancer.

  8. Impaired Autophagy in the Lipid-Storage Disorder Niemann-Pick Type C1 Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sovan Sarkar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy dysfunction has been implicated in misfolded protein accumulation and cellular toxicity in several diseases. Whether alterations in autophagy also contribute to the pathology of lipid-storage disorders is not clear. Here, we show defective autophagy in Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1 disease associated with cholesterol accumulation, where the maturation of autophagosomes is impaired because of defective amphisome formation caused by failure in SNARE machinery, whereas the lysosomal proteolytic function remains unaffected. Expression of functional NPC1 protein rescues this defect. Inhibition of autophagy also causes cholesterol accumulation. Compromised autophagy was seen in disease-affected organs of Npc1 mutant mice. Of potential therapeutic relevance is that HP-β-cyclodextrin, which is used for cholesterol-depletion treatment, impedes autophagy, whereas stimulating autophagy restores its function independent of amphisome formation. Our data suggest that a low dose of HP-β-cyclodextrin that does not perturb autophagy, coupled with an autophagy inducer, may provide a rational treatment strategy for NPC1 disease.

  9. Autophagy Protects against CYP2E1/Chronic Ethanol-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Yongke Lu; Cederbaum, Arthur I.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular pathway by which lysosomes degrade and recycle long-lived proteins and cellular organelles. The effects of ethanol on autophagy are complex but recent studies have shown that autophagy serves a protective function against ethanol-induced liver injury. Autophagy was found to also be protective against CYP2E1-dependent toxicity in vitro in HepG2 cells which express CYP2E1 and in vivo in an acute alcohol/CYPE1-dependent liver injury model. The goal of the current re...

  10. Deconvoluting the relationships between autophagy and metastasis for potential cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Dahong; Wang, Peiqi; Zhang, Jin; Fu, Leilei; Ouyang, Liang; Wang, Jinhui

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved lysosome-dependent degradation process that may digest some long-lived proteins and damaged organelles. As an essential homeostasis maintaining system in normal cells, autophagy plays a key role in several pathological settings, especially cancer. Metastasis, known as a crucial hallmark of cancer progression, is the primary cause of cancer lethality. The role of autophagy in metastasis is quite complex as supportive evidence has indicated both pro-metastatic and anti-metastatic functions of autophagy. Autophagy can inhibit metastasis by restricting necrosis and mediating autophagic cell death, whereas it may also promote metastasis by enhancing cancer cell fitness in response to stress. Moreover, the function of autophagy is context- and stage-dependent. Specifically, during the early steps of metastasis, autophagy mainly serves as a suppressor, while it plays a pro-metastatic role in the later steps. Here, we focus on highlighting the dual roles of autophagy in metastasis and address the molecular mechanisms involved in this process, which may provide a new insight into cancer biology. While, we also summarize several anti-metastatic agents manipulating autophagy, in the hope of shedding light on exploration of potential novel drugs for future cancer therapy. PMID:27003389

  11. There is more to autophagy than induction: regulating the roller coaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klionsky, Daniel J; Nemchenko, Andriy

    2011-08-01

    Considerable attention has been paid to the topic of autophagy induction. In part, this is because of the potential for modulating this process for therapeutic purposes. Of course we know that induced autophagy can also be problematic--for example, when trying to eliminate an established tumor that might be relying on autophagy for its own cytoprotective uses. Accordingly, inhibitory mechanisms have been considered; however, the corresponding studies have tended to focus on the pathways that block autophagy under non-inducing conditions, such as when nutrients are available. In contrast, relatively little is known about the mechanisms for inhibiting autophagy under inducing conditions. Yet, this type of regulation must be occurring on a routine basis. We know that dysregulation of autophagy, e.g., due to improper activation of Beclin 1 leading to excessive autophagy activity, can cause cell death. Accordingly, we assume that during starvation or other inducing conditions there must be a mechanism to modulate autophagy. That is, once you turn it on, you do not want to let it continue unchecked. But how is autophagy downregulated when the inducing conditions still exist? PMID:21636971

  12. Radiation-induced autophagy promotes esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell survival via the LKB1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chi; Xie, Conghua

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy is an important treatment modality for esophageal cancer; however, the clinical efficacy of radiotherapy is limited by tumor radioresistance. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that radiation induces tumor cell autophagy as a cytoprotective adaptive response, which depends on liver kinase B1 (LKB1) also known as serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11). Radiation-induced Eca-109 cell autophagy was found to be dependent on signaling through the LKB1 pathway, and autophagy inhibitors that disrupted radiation-induced Eca-109 cell autophagy increased cell cycle arrest and cell death in vitro. Inhibition of autophagy also reduced the clonogenic survival of the Eca-109 cells. When treated with radiation alone, human esophageal carcinoma xenografts showed increased LC3B and p-LKB1 expression, which was decreased by the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine. In vivo inhibition of autophagy disrupted tumor growth and increased tumor apoptosis when combined with 6 Gy of ionizing radiation. In summary, our findings elucidate a novel mechanism of resistance to radiotherapy in which radiation-induced autophagy, via the LKB1 pathway, promotes tumor cell survival. This indicates that inhibition of autophagy can serve as an adjuvant treatment to improve the curative effect of radiotherapy. PMID:27109915

  13. Alpha-lipoic acid protects cardiomyocytes against hypoxia/reoxygenation injury by inhibiting autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •We observed the cell viability and death subjected to H/R in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. •We observed the degree of autophagy subjected to H/R in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. •LA inhibited the degree of autophagy in parallel to the enhanced cell survival. •LA inhibited the autophagy in parallel to the decreased total cell death. •We concluded that LA protected cardiomyocytes against H/R by inhibiting autophagy. -- Abstract: Hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) is an important in vitro model for exploring the molecular mechanisms and functions of autophagy during myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Alpha-lipoic acid (LA) plays an important role in the etiology of cardiovascular disease. Autophagy is widely implicated in myocardial I/R injury. We assessed the degree of autophagy by pretreatment with LA exposed to H/R in H9c2 cell based on the expression levels of Beclin-1, LC3II/LC3I, and green fluorescent protein-labeled LC3 fusion proteins. Autophagic vacuoles were confirmed in H9c2 cells exposed to H/R using transmission electron microscopy. Our findings indicated that pretreatment with LA inhibited the degree of autophagy in parallel to the enhanced cell survival and decreased total cell death in H9c2 cells exposed to H/R. We conclude that LA protects cardiomyocytes against H/R injury by inhibiting autophagy

  14. Alpha-lipoic acid protects cardiomyocytes against hypoxia/reoxygenation injury by inhibiting autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xueming; Chen, Aihua, E-mail: aihuachen2012@sina.com; Yang, Pingzhen; Song, Xudong; Liu, Yingfeng; Li, Zhiliang; Wang, Xianbao; Wang, Lizi; Li, Yunpeng

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •We observed the cell viability and death subjected to H/R in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. •We observed the degree of autophagy subjected to H/R in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. •LA inhibited the degree of autophagy in parallel to the enhanced cell survival. •LA inhibited the autophagy in parallel to the decreased total cell death. •We concluded that LA protected cardiomyocytes against H/R by inhibiting autophagy. -- Abstract: Hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) is an important in vitro model for exploring the molecular mechanisms and functions of autophagy during myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Alpha-lipoic acid (LA) plays an important role in the etiology of cardiovascular disease. Autophagy is widely implicated in myocardial I/R injury. We assessed the degree of autophagy by pretreatment with LA exposed to H/R in H9c2 cell based on the expression levels of Beclin-1, LC3II/LC3I, and green fluorescent protein-labeled LC3 fusion proteins. Autophagic vacuoles were confirmed in H9c2 cells exposed to H/R using transmission electron microscopy. Our findings indicated that pretreatment with LA inhibited the degree of autophagy in parallel to the enhanced cell survival and decreased total cell death in H9c2 cells exposed to H/R. We conclude that LA protects cardiomyocytes against H/R injury by inhibiting autophagy.

  15. Insulin directly stimulates VEGF-A production in the glomerular podocyte

    OpenAIRE

    Hale, L. J.; Hurcombe, J.; Lay, A.; Santamaría, B.; Valverde, A M; Saleem, M A; Mathieson, P. W.; Welsh, G. I.; Coward, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    Podocytes are critically important for maintaining the integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier and preventing albuminuria. Recently, it has become clear that to achieve this, they need to be insulin sensitive and produce an optimal amount of VEGF-A. In other tissues, insulin has been shown to regulate VEGF-A release, but this has not been previously examined in the podocyte. Using in vitro and in vivo approaches, in the present study, we now show that insulin regulates VEGF-A in the po...

  16. Comparative evaluation of iohexol and inulin clearance for glomerular filtration rate determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have evaluated iohexol as a filtration marker in 150 children. The clearance of iohexol was compared with that of inulin or with a formula clearance. The single-sample clearance of iohexol showed a good correlation with the clearance of inulin. The clearance of iohexol correlated well with the formula clearance. The optimal blood sampling time for iohexol clearance determinations appears to be between 120 and 180 min after injection, at least in patient with relatively normal filtration rates. It is concluded that iohexol clearance is an accurate method of determining the glomerular filtration rate in clinical practice. 25 refs., 5 figs

  17. Human liver ferritin as a new tracer for studying glomerular permeability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ota,Zensuke

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Sprague-Dawley rats, 6 with aminonucleoside nephrosis and 6 controls, were intravenously injected with human liver ferritin isolated from post mortem liver, and their 24-h urine samples were examined for human ferritin by immunoradiometric assay. In rats with aminonucleoside nephrosis, the amount of excreted ferritin in urine was forty times greater than in control rats. Much more monomeric ferritin was excreted than that of polymeric ferritin. We are the first to have utilized human liver ferritin as a tracer to measure a minor amount of ferritin by a commercially available kit. Our present study seems to indicate a critical role for glomerular basement membrane as a size barrier.

  18. Rapid decline in glomerular filtration rate during the first weeks following heart transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, M; Andersen, M; Gustafsson, F;

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesized that a decrease in renal function is seen immediately after heart transplantation (HTX) with little recovery over time. Twelve consecutive patients had their glomerular filtration rate (GFR) measured using (51)Cr-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) measured GFR (mGFR) before...... transplantation and at 1, 2, 3, and 26 weeks after transplantation. The mGFR decreased by 28% and 24% during the first 3 and 26 weeks, respectively, with mean blood cyclosporine concentration as an independent risk factor for the decrease in mGFR. The identification of cyclosporine A (CsA) as the most important...

  19. Glomerular C3c localization indicates ongoing immune deposit formation and complement activation in experimental glomerulonephritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Schulze, M.; Pruchno, C. J.; Burns, M.; Baker, P. J.; R. J. Johnson; Couser, W G

    1993-01-01

    In antibody-mediated glomerular disease, deposits of C3 (C3b) are common and are degraded by factor I to C3c and C3d. However, the kinetics of C3b degradation in glomerulonephritis have not been defined. To do this, we studied three models of complement-dependent glomerulonephritis with established C3 deposits (passive Heymann nephritis, cationized immunoglobulin G membranous nephropathy, and concanavalin A-anticoncanavalin A glomerulonephritis). C3b deposition was halted by administration of...

  20. Impaired autoregulation of glomerular filtration rate in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Kastrup, Helge; Smidt, U M; Andersen, A R; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Christiansen, J S

    1984-01-01

    The effect of acute lowering of arterial blood pressure upon kidney function in nephropathy was studied in 13 patients with long-term Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes. Ten normal subjects (six normotensive and four hypertensive) and five short-term Type 1 diabetic patients without nephropathy...... served as controls. Renal function was assessed by glomerular filtration rate (single bolus 51Cr-EDTA technique) and urinary albumin excretion rate (radial immunodiffusion). The study was performed twice within 2 weeks, with the subjects receiving an intravenous injection of either clonidine (225...

  1. Gata3 Hypomorphic Mutant Mice Rescued with a Yeast Artificial Chromosome Transgene Suffer a Glomerular Mesangial Cell Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriguchi, Takashi; Yu, Lei; Otsuki, Akihito; Ainoya, Keiko; Lim, Kim-Chew; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Engel, James Douglas

    2016-09-01

    GATA3 is a zinc finger transcription factor that plays a crucial role in embryonic kidney development, while its precise functions in the adult kidney remain largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GATA3 is specifically expressed in glomerular mesangial cells and plays a critical role in the maintenance of renal glomerular function. Newly generated Gata3 hypomorphic mutant mice exhibited neonatal lethality associated with severe renal hypoplasia. Normal kidney size was restored by breeding the hypomorphic mutant with a rescuing transgenic mouse line bearing a 662-kb Gata3 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC), and these animals (termed G3YR mice) survived to adulthood. However, most of the G3YR mice showed degenerative changes in glomerular mesangial cells, which deteriorated progressively during postnatal development. Consequently, the G3YR adult mice suffered severe renal failure. We found that the 662-kb Gata3 YAC transgene recapitulated Gata3 expression in the renal tubules but failed to direct sufficient GATA3 activity to mesangial cells. Renal glomeruli of the G3YR mice had significantly reduced amounts of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), which is known to participate in the development and maintenance of glomerular mesangial cells. These results demonstrate a critical role for GATA3 in the maintenance of mesangial cells and its absolute requirement for prevention of glomerular disease. PMID:27296697

  2. Phenotyping by magnetic resonance imaging nondestructively measures glomerular number and volume distribution in mice with and without nephron reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldelomar, Edwin J; Charlton, Jennifer R; Beeman, Scott C; Hann, Bradley D; Cullen-McEwen, Luise; Pearl, Valeria M; Bertram, John F; Wu, Teresa; Zhang, Min; Bennett, Kevin M

    2016-02-01

    Reduced nephron mass is strongly linked to susceptibility to chronic renal and cardiovascular diseases. There are currently no tools to identify nephropenia in clinical or preclinical diagnostics. Such new methods could uncover novel mechanisms and therapies for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and reveal how variation among traits can affect renal function and morphology. Here we used cationized ferritin (CF)–enhanced MRI (CFE-MRI) to investigate the relationship between glomerular number (Nglom) and volume (Vglom) in kidneys of healthy wild-type mice and mice with oligosyndactylism (Os/+), a model of congenital nephron reduction. Mice were injected with CF and perfused, and the resected kidneys were imaged with 7T MRI to detect CF-labeled glomeruli. CFE-MRI was used to measure the intrarenal distribution of individual glomerular volumes and revealed two major populations of glomeruli distinguished by size. Spatial mapping revealed that the largest glomeruli were located in the juxtamedullary region in both wild-type and Os/+ mice and the smallest population located in the cortex. Os/+ mice had about a 50% reduction and 35% increase of Nglom and Vglom, respectively, in both glomerular populations compared with wild type, consistent with glomerular hypertrophy in the Os/+ mice. Thus, we provide a foundation for whole-kidney, MRI-based phenotyping of mouse renal glomerular morphology and provide new potential for quantitative human renal diagnostics. PMID:26535998

  3. Glomerular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... x ray to see whether the shape or size of the kidneys is abnormal. These tests are called renal imaging. ... product in the blood that results from the normal breakdown of muscle. Healthy kidneys filter creatinine from the blood. glomerulus (gloh-MEHR- ...

  4. Glomerular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... diabetes, digestive and liver diseases, kidney diseases, weight control and nutrition, urologic diseases, endocrine and metabolic diseases, ...

  5. Glomerular filtration rate by {sup 51}chomium and {sup 113m}indium labeled EDTA in horses; Taxa de filtracao glomerular pelo EDTA marcado com {sup 51}cromo e com {sup 113m}indio em equinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maliska, C.; D' Almeida, J.; Pellegrini, P.M.; Schimit, T.S. [Hospital Central do Exercito (HCE), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear; Pinho, W.R. [Centro de Ensino Superior, Valenca, RJ (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina Veterinaria; Lima, J.E.T. [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear

    2009-07-01

    The glomerular filtration rate was determined in nine healthy horses, six male and three female, aged two to 12-year-old, by means of {sup 51}Cr and {sup 113m}In labeled EDTA single injection technique. The glomerular filtration rate was calculated from the plasma disappearance curve and the volume of distribution of the radiotracer, {sup 51}Cr-EDTA or {sup 113m}In-EDTA. The result (mean +- standard deviation) was 148.80 +- 26.42 m L.min{sup -1}.100 kg. It is concluded that the measurement of glomerular filtration rate by {sup 51}Cr-EDTA or {sup 113m}In-EDTA by single injection technique eliminates the bladder catheterization, and for its simplicity, convenience, accuracy, and low dose of radiation, can be used in horses as a method of choice in clinical routine. (author)

  6. Diabetes and the Brain: Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Muriach

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder associated with chronic complications including a state of mild to moderate cognitive impairment, in particular psychomotor slowing and reduced mental flexibility, not attributable to other causes, and shares many symptoms that are best described as accelerated brain ageing. A common theory for aging and for the pathogenesis of this cerebral dysfunctioning in diabetes relates cell death to oxidative stress in strong association to inflammation, and in fact nuclear factor κB (NFκB, a master regulator of inflammation and also a sensor of oxidative stress, has a strategic position at the crossroad between oxidative stress and inflammation. Moreover, metabolic inflammation is, in turn, related to the induction of various intracellular stresses such as mitochondrial oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, and autophagy defect. In parallel, blockade of autophagy can relate to proinflammatory signaling via oxidative stress pathway and NFκB-mediated inflammation.

  7. Membrane proteomics of phagosomes suggests a connection to autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, Wenqing; Sheu, Leslie; Liu, Jun; Smart, Brian; Petzold, Christopher J.; Hsieh, Tsung-yen; Pitcher, Austin; Keasling*, Jay D.; Bertozzi*, Carolyn R.

    2008-11-25

    Phagocytosis is the central process by which macrophage cellsinternalize and eliminate infectious microbes as well as apoptoticcells. During maturation, phagosomes containing engulfed particlesfuse with various endosomal compartments through theaction of regulatory molecules on the phagosomal membrane. Inthis study, we performed a proteomic analysis of the membranefraction from latex bead-containing (LBC) phagosomes isolatedfrom macrophages. The profile, which comprised 546 proteins,suggests diverse functions of the phagosome and potential connectionsto secretory processes, toll-like receptor signaling, andautophagy. Many identified proteins were not previously knownto reside in the phagosome. We characterized several proteins inLBC phagosomes that change in abundance on induction of autophagy,a process that has been previously implicated in the hostdefense against microbial pathogens. These observations suggestcrosstalk between autophagy and phagocytosis that may be relevantto the innate immune response of macrophages.

  8. Autophagy-A free meal in sickness-associated anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Niekerk, Gustav; Loos, Ben; Nell, Theo; Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart

    2016-04-01

    Activation of the immune system is metabolically costly, yet a hallmark of an infection is a reduction in appetite with a subsequent reduction in metabolite provision. What is the functional value of decreasing nutrient intake when an infection imposes large demands on metabolic parameters? Here, we propose that sickness-associated anorexia (SAA) upregulates the ancient process of autophagy systemically, thereby profoundly controlling not only immune- but also nonimmune-competent cells. This allows an advanced impact on the resolution of an infection through direct pathogen killing, enhancement of epitope presentation and the contribution toward the clearance of noxious factors. By rendering a 'free meal,' autophagy is thus most fundamentally harnessed during an anorexic response in order to promote both host tolerance and resistance. These findings strongly suggest a reassessment of numerous SAA-related clinical applications and a re-evaluation of current efforts in patient care. PMID:27050464

  9. IFNB1/interferon-ß-induced autophagy in MCF-7 breast cancer cells counteracts its proapoptotic function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjørn, Malene; Ejlerskov, Patrick; Liu, Yawei; Lees, Michael; Jäättelä, Marja; Navikas, Shohreh

    2013-01-01

    survival pathways leading to treatment resistance. Defects in autophagy, a conserved cellular degradation pathway, are implicated in numerous cancer diseases. Autophagy is induced in response to cancer therapies and can contribute to treatment resistance. While the type II IFN, IFNG, which in many aspects...... differs significantly from type I IFNs, can induce autophagy, no such function for any type I IFN has been reported. We show here that IFNB1 induces autophagy in MCF-7, MDAMB231 and SKBR3 breast cancer cells by measuring the turnover of two autophagic markers, MAP1LC3B/LC3 and SQSTM1/p62. The induction of...... autophagy in MCF-7 cells occurred upstream of the negative regulator of autophagy MTORC1, and autophagosome formation was dependent on the known core autophagy molecule ATG7 and the IFNB1 signaling molecule STAT1. Using siRNA-mediated silencing of several core autophagy molecules and STAT1, we provide...

  10. Deficient autophagy unravels the ROS paradox in chronic granulomatous disease

    OpenAIRE

    Van De Veerdonk, Frank L.; Dinarello, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy defects resulting in inflammation appear to be a key feature in the pathogenesis of Crohn colitis. An inflammatory colitis indistinguishable from Crohn disease is described in patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). Patients with CGD have a mutated NADPH complex and are therefore deficient in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production; however, the underlying mechanism for the inflammatory colitis in CGD remained unknown. In a recent study, our group reported that NADPH-dep...

  11. A Lysosome-Targeting AIEgen for Autophagy Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Chris Wai Tung; Wang, Zhiming; Zhao, Engui; Hong, Yuning; Chen, Sijie; Kwok, Ryan Tsz Kin; Leung, Anakin Chun Sing; Wen, Rongsen; Li, Bingshi; Lam, Jacky Wing Yip; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-02-18

    In this work, a morpholine-functionalized aggregation-induced emission luminogen (AIEgen), AIE-LysoY, is reported for lysosomal imaging and autophagy visualization. To attain outstanding imaging contrast, AIE-LysoY is equipped with excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) characteristic. AIE-LysoY provides a new platform for lysosome visualization with good biocompatibility, large Stokes shift, superior signal-to-noise ratio, and high photostability. PMID:26688031

  12. Autophagy is a protective response to ethanol neurotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Gang; Ke, Zunji; Xu, Mei; Liao, Mingjun; Wang, Xin; Qi, Yuanlin; Zhang,Tao; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Bower, Kimberly A.; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol is a neuroteratogen and neurodegeneration is the most devastating consequence of developmental exposure to ethanol. The mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced neurodegeneration are complex. Ethanol exposure produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) which cause oxidative stress in the brain. We hypothesized that ethanol would activate autophagy to alleviate oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Our results indicated that ethanol increased the level of the autophagic marker Map1lc3-II (LC3-II...

  13. Emerging nexus between RAB GTPases, autophagy and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Navodita; Ganesh, Subramaniam

    2016-05-01

    The RAB class of small GTPases includes the major regulators of intracellular communication, which are involved in vesicle generation through fusion and fission, and vesicular trafficking. RAB proteins also play an imperative role in neuronal maintenance and survival. Recent studies in the field of neurodegeneration have also highlighted the process of autophagy as being essential for neuronal maintenance. Here we review the emerging roles of RAB proteins in regulating macroautophagy and its impact in the context of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26985808

  14. Caloric restriction mimetics: natural/physiological pharmacological autophagy inducers

    OpenAIRE

    Mariño, Guillermo; Pietrocola, Federico; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient depletion, which is one of the physiological triggers of autophagy, results in the depletion of intracellular acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) coupled to the deacetylation of cellular proteins. We surmise that there are 3 possibilities to mimic these effects, namely (i) the depletion of cytosolic AcCoA by interfering with its biosynthesis, (ii) the inhibition of acetyltransferases, which are enzymes that transfer acetyl groups from AcCoA to other molecules, mostly leucine residues in cellul...

  15. Autophagy regulates Wolbachia populations across diverse symbiotic associations

    OpenAIRE

    Voronin, Denis; Cook, Darren A. N.; Steven, Andrew; Taylor, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    Wolbachia are widespread and abundant intracellular symbionts of arthropods and filarial nematodes. Their symbiotic relationships encompass obligate mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, and pathogenicity. A consequence of these diverse associations is that Wolbachia encounter a wide range of host cells and intracellular immune defense mechanisms of invertebrates, which they must evade to maintain their populations and spread to new hosts. Here we show that autophagy, a conserved intracellular...

  16. Autophagy, inflammation and innate immunity in inflammatory myopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Cappelletti

    Full Text Available Autophagy has a large range of physiological functions and its dysregulation contributes to several human disorders, including autoinflammatory/autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory myopathies (IIMs. In order to better understand the pathogenetic mechanisms of these muscular disorders, we sought to define the role of autophagic processes and their relation with the innate immune system in the three main subtypes of IIM, specifically sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM, polymyositis (PM, dermatomyositis (DM and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM. We found that although the mRNA transcript levels of the autophagy-related genes BECN1, ATG5 and FBXO32 were similar in IIM and controls, autophagy activation in all IIM subgroups was suggested by immunoblotting results and confirmed by immunofluorescence. TLR4 and TLR3, two potent inducers of autophagy, were highly increased in IIM, with TLR4 transcripts significantly more expressed in PM and DM than in JDM, sIBM and controls, and TLR3 transcripts highly up-regulated in all IIM subgroups compared to controls. Co-localization between autophagic marker, LC3, and TLR4 and TLR3 was observed not only in sIBM but also in PM, DM and JDM muscle tissues. Furthermore, a highly association with the autophagic processes was observed in all IIM subgroups also for some TLR4 ligands, endogenous and bacterial HSP60, other than the high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1. These findings indicate that autophagic processes are active not only in sIBM but also in PM, DM and JDM, probably in response to an exogenous or endogenous 'danger signal'. However, autophagic activation and regulation, and also interaction with the innate immune system, differ in each type of IIM. Better understanding of these differences may lead to new therapies for the different IIM types.

  17. Intestinal Epithelium and Autophagy: Partners in Gut Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Randall-Demllo, Sarron; Chieppa, Marcello; Eri, Rajaraman

    2013-01-01

    One of the most significant challenges of cell biology is to understand how each type of cell copes with its specific workload without suffering damage. Among the most intriguing questions concerns intestinal epithelial cells in mammals; these cells act as a barrier between the internally protected region and the external environment that is exposed constantly to food and microbes. A major process involved in the processing of microbes is autophagy. In the intestine, through multiple, complex...

  18. The late stage of autophagy: cellular events and molecular regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Jingjing; Yan, Xianghua; Yu, Li

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system that delivers cytoplasmic contents to the lysosome for degradation. It is a “self-eating” process and plays a “house-cleaner” role in cells. The complex process consists of several sequential steps—induction, autophagosome formation, fusion of lysosome and autophagosome, degradation, efflux transportation of degradation products, and autophagic lysosome reformation. In this review, the cellular and molecular regulations of late stage of autopha...

  19. Apoptosis, autophagy and unfolded proteinresponse pathways in Arbovirus replicationand pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Iranpour, Mahmoud; Moghadam, Adel R; Yazdi, Mina; Ande, Sudharsana R; Alizadeh, Javad; Wiechec, Emilia; Lindsay, Robbin; Drebot, Michael; Coombs, Kevin M; Ghavami, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Arboviruses are pathogens that widely affect the health of people in different communities around the world. Recently, a few successful approaches toward production of effective vaccines against some of these pathogens have been developed, but treatment and prevention of the resulting diseases remain a major health and research concern. The arbovirus infection and replication processes are complex, and many factors are involved in their regulation. Apoptosis, autophagy and the unfolded protei...

  20. Viruses, Autophagy Genes, and Crohn’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hubbard, Vanessa M.; Ken Cadwell

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of the intestinal disease Crohn’s disease involves genetic factors as well as ill-defined environmental agents. Several genetic variants linked to this disease are associated with autophagy, a process that is critical for proper responses to viral infections. While a role for viruses in this disease remains speculative, accumulating evidence indicate that this possibility requires serious consideration. In this review, we will examine the three-way relationship between viruses, a...

  1. Lacritin and other autophagy associated proteins in ocular surface health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnati, Roy; Talla, Venu; Peterson, Katherine; Laurie, Gordon W

    2016-03-01

    Advantage may be taken of macroautophagy ('autophagy') to promote ocular health. Autophagy continually captures aged or damaged cellular material for lysosomal degradation and recyling. When autophagic flux is chronically elevated, or alternatively deficient, health suffers. Chronic elevation of flux and stress are the consequence of inflammatory cytokines or of dry eye tears but not normal tears invitro. Exogenous tear protein lacritin transiently accelerates flux to restore homeostasis invitro and corneal health invivo, and yet the monomeric active form of lacritin appears to be selectively deficient in dry eye. Tissue transglutaminase-dependent cross-linking of monomer decreases monomer quantity and monomer affinity for coreceptor syndecan-1 thereby abrogating activity. Tissue transglutaminase is elevated in dry eye. Mutation of arylsulfatase A, arylsulfatase B, ceroid-lipofuscinosis neuronal 3, mucolipin, or Niemann-Pick disease type C1 respectively underlie several diseases of apparently insufficient autophagic flux that affect the eye, including: metachromatic leukodystrophy, mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, juvenile-onset Batten disease, mucolipidosis IV, and Niemann-Pick type C associated with myelin sheath destruction of corneal sensory and ciliary nerves and of the optic nerve; corneal clouding, ocular hypertension, glaucoma and optic nerve atrophy; accumulation of 'ceroid-lipofuscin' in surface conjunctival cells, and in ganglion and neuronal cells; decreased visual acuity and retinal dystrophy; and neurodegeneration. For some, enzyme or gene replacement, or substrate reduction, therapy is proving to be successful. Here we discuss examples of restoring ocular surface homeostasis through alteration of autophagy, with particular attention to lacritin. PMID:26318608

  2. Wogonoside induces autophagy-related apoptosis in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Handong; Cong, Zixiang; Xu, Jianguo; Zhu, Jianhong; Ji, Xiangjun; Ding, Ke

    2014-09-01

    Wogonoside, a bioactive flavonoid extracted from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has shown preclinical anticancer efficacy in various cancer models. However, the effects of wogonoside on glioblastoma cells remain unclear. In the present study, we found that wogonoside exhibited a cytotoxic effect on human glioblastoma cells. The suppression of cell viability was due to the induction of mitochondrial apoptosis. Furthermore, the presence of autophagic hallmarks, including an increase in punctate microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) dots, changes in cellular morphology and increased levels of autophagy-related proteins were observed in the wogonoside-treated cells. Wogonoside treatment also enhanced autophagic flux as reflected by the increased acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) formation, p62 degradation and LC3 turnover. Notably, blockade of autophagy by a chemical inhibitor or RNA interference decreased the anticancer effect of wogonoside. In addition, the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway, the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin/p70S6 kinase (PI3K/AKT/mTOR/p70S6K) signaling pathway and reactive oxygen species (ROS) participated in wogonoside-induced autophagy and apoptosis. These findings support the initiation of further studies of wogonoside as a candidate for the treatment of human malignant glioma. PMID:24970553

  3. Environmental enrichment enhances autophagy signaling in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tomohisa; Shimizu, Kunio; Shimazaki, Kuniko; Toda, Hiroyuki; Nibuya, Masashi

    2014-12-10

    The findings that antidepressive treatments increase hippocampal neurotrophins have led researchers to emphasize the importance of neurogenesis, formation of new dendrites, and survival of neurons in the brain. However, it is difficult to maintain neural plasticity just by enriching the environment to facilitate formation of new networks. Neural plasticity also requires a degradation process that clears off unnecessary and undesirable components. We have recently reported an increase in autophagy signaling (wherein the cell digests components of itself) that has the potential of enhancing neuronal and synaptic plasticity after multiple sessions of electroconvulsive seizure treatment. The present study revealed an increase in autophagy signaling in the rat hippocampus following 2 weeks of environmental enrichment (EE), a procedure known to elicit antidepressive and anxiolytic behavioral changes in various animal paradigms. Western blot analysis showed an increase in hippocampal expression of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II), which is lipidated from LC3-I, in rats in the EE group. The effectiveness of the 2-week EE housing condition was validated by anxiolytic effects observed in the elevated plus maze test, enhanced habituation in the open field test, and elevation of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression. In addition, we showed that the EE housing condition ameliorated numbing/avoidance behaviors, but not hypervigilant behaviors, in an animal model of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This is the first report to show that EE can increase autophagy signaling and improve numbing/avoidance behaviors in an animal model of PTSD. PMID:25451096

  4. Autophagy, Innate Immunity and Tissue Repair in Acute Kidney Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duann, Pu; Lianos, Elias A.; Ma, Jianjie; Lin, Pei-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Kidney is a vital organ with high energy demands to actively maintain plasma hemodynamics, electrolytes and water homeostasis. Among the nephron segments, the renal tubular epithelium is endowed with high mitochondria density for their function in active transport. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important clinical syndrome and a global public health issue with high mortality rate and socioeconomic burden due to lack of effective therapy. AKI results in acute cell death and necrosis of renal tubule epithelial cells accompanied with leakage of tubular fluid and inflammation. The inflammatory immune response triggered by the tubular cell death, mitochondrial damage, associative oxidative stress, and the release of many tissue damage factors have been identified as key elements driving the pathophysiology of AKI. Autophagy, the cellular mechanism that removes damaged organelles via lysosome-mediated degradation, had been proposed to be renoprotective. An in-depth understanding of the intricate interplay between autophagy and innate immune response, and their roles in AKI pathology could lead to novel therapies in AKI. This review addresses the current pathophysiology of AKI in aspects of mitochondrial dysfunction, innate immunity, and molecular mechanisms of autophagy. Recent advances in renal tissue regeneration and potential therapeutic interventions are also discussed. PMID:27153058

  5. Role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Keun; Shin, Jin Hee; Lee, Ji Eun; Choi, Eui-Ju

    2015-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons associated with the abnormal aggregation of ubiquitinated proteins. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of ALS remain unclear, however. Autophagy is a major pathway for the elimination of protein aggregates and damaged organelles and therefore contributes to cellular homeostasis. This catabolic process begins with the formation of the double membrane-bound autophagosome that engulfs portions of the cytoplasm and subsequently fuses with a lysosome to form an autolysosome, in which lysosomal enzymes digest autophagic substrates. Defects at various stages of autophagy have been associated with pathological mutations of several ALS-linked genes including SOD1, p62, TDP-43, and optineurin, suggesting that such defects may play a causative role in the pathogenesis of this condition. In this review, we summarize the dysregulation of autophagy associated with ALS as well as potential therapeutic strategies based on modulation of the autophagic process. PMID:26264610

  6. Caloric restriction mimetics: natural/physiological pharmacological autophagy inducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Guillermo; Pietrocola, Federico; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient depletion, which is one of the physiological triggers of autophagy, results in the depletion of intracellular acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) coupled to the deacetylation of cellular proteins. We surmise that there are 3 possibilities to mimic these effects, namely (i) the depletion of cytosolic AcCoA by interfering with its biosynthesis, (ii) the inhibition of acetyltransferases, which are enzymes that transfer acetyl groups from AcCoA to other molecules, mostly leucine residues in cellular proteins, or (iii) the stimulation of deacetylases, which catalyze the removal of acetyl groups from leucine residues. There are several examples of rather nontoxic natural compounds that act as AcCoA depleting agents (e.g., hydroxycitrate), acetyltransferase inhibitors (e.g., anacardic acid, curcumin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, garcinol, spermidine) or deacetylase activators (e.g., nicotinamide, resveratrol), and that are highly efficient inducers of autophagy in vitro and in vivo, in rodents. Another common characteristic of these agents is their capacity to reduce aging-associated diseases and to confer protective responses against ischemia-induced organ damage. Hence, we classify them as "caloric restriction mimetics" (CRM). Here, we speculate that CRM may mediate their broad health-improving effects by triggering the same molecular pathways that usually are elicited by long-term caloric restriction or short-term starvation and that imply the induction of autophagy as an obligatory event conferring organismal, organ- or cytoprotection. PMID:25484097

  7. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor induces vascular leakage via autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ru Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular leakage is an important feature of acute inflammatory shock, which currently has no effective treatment. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that can induce vascular leakage and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of shock. However, the mechanism of MIF-induced vascular leakage is still unclear. In this study, using recombinant MIF (rMIF, we demonstrated that MIF induced disorganization and degradation of junction proteins and increased the permeability of human endothelial cells in vitro. Western blotting analysis showed that rMIF treatment induced LC3 conversion and p62 degradation. Inhibition of autophagy with a PI3K inhibitor (3-MA, a ROS scavenger (NAC or autophagosomal-lysosomal fusion inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine rescued rMIF-induced vascular leakage, suggesting that autophagy mediates MIF-induced vascular leakage. The potential involvement of other signaling pathways was also studied using different inhibitors, and the results suggested that MIF-induced vascular leakage may occur through the ERK pathway. In conclusion, we showed that MIF triggered autophagic degradation of endothelial cells, resulting in vascular leakage. Inhibition of MIF-induced autophagy may provide therapeutic targets against vascular leakage in inflammatory shock.

  8. Mevalonate Pathway Blockade, Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Autophagy: A Possible Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Maura Tricarico

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The mevalonate pathway, crucial for cholesterol synthesis, plays a key role in multiple cellular processes. Deregulation of this pathway is also correlated with diminished protein prenylation, an important post-translational modification necessary to localize certain proteins, such as small GTPases, to membranes. Mevalonate pathway blockade has been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction: especially involving lower mitochondrial membrane potential and increased release of pro-apoptotic factors in cytosol. Furthermore a severe reduction of protein prenylation has also been associated with defective autophagy, possibly causing inflammasome activation and subsequent cell death. So, it is tempting to hypothesize a mechanism in which defective autophagy fails to remove damaged mitochondria, resulting in increased cell death. This mechanism could play a significant role in Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency, an autoinflammatory disease characterized by a defect in Mevalonate Kinase, a key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway. Patients carrying mutations in the MVK gene, encoding this enzyme, show increased inflammation and lower protein prenylation levels. This review aims at analysing the correlation between mevalonate pathway defects, mitochondrial dysfunction and defective autophagy, as well as inflammation, using Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency as a model to clarify the current pathogenetic hypothesis as the basis of the disease.

  9. Autophagy, Innate Immunity and Tissue Repair in Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Duann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Kidney is a vital organ with high energy demands to actively maintain plasma hemodynamics, electrolytes and water homeostasis. Among the nephron segments, the renal tubular epithelium is endowed with high mitochondria density for their function in active transport. Acute kidney injury (AKI is an important clinical syndrome and a global public health issue with high mortality rate and socioeconomic burden due to lack of effective therapy. AKI results in acute cell death and necrosis of renal tubule epithelial cells accompanied with leakage of tubular fluid and inflammation. The inflammatory immune response triggered by the tubular cell death, mitochondrial damage, associative oxidative stress, and the release of many tissue damage factors have been identified as key elements driving the pathophysiology of AKI. Autophagy, the cellular mechanism that removes damaged organelles via lysosome-mediated degradation, had been proposed to be renoprotective. An in-depth understanding of the intricate interplay between autophagy and innate immune response, and their roles in AKI pathology could lead to novel therapies in AKI. This review addresses the current pathophysiology of AKI in aspects of mitochondrial dysfunction, innate immunity, and molecular mechanisms of autophagy. Recent advances in renal tissue regeneration and potential therapeutic interventions are also discussed.

  10. Legionella pneumophila restrains autophagy by modulating the host's sphingolipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolando, Monica; Escoll, Pedro; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-06-01

    Sphingolipids are bioactive molecules playing a key role as membrane components, but they are also central regulators of many intracellular processes including macroautophagy/autophagy. In particular, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a critical mediator that controls the balance between sphingolipid-induced autophagy and cell death. S1P levels are adjusted via S1P synthesis, dephosphorylation or degradation, catalyzed by SGPL1 (sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase 1). Intracellular pathogens are able to modulate many different host cell pathways to allow their replication. We have found that infection of eukaryotic cells with the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila triggers a change in the host cell sphingolipid metabolism and specifically affects the levels of sphingosine. Indeed, L. pneumophila secretes a protein highly homologous to eukaryotic SGPL1 (named LpSPL). We solved the crystal structure of LpSPL and showed that it encodes lyase activity, targets the host's sphingolipid metabolism, and plays a role in starvation-induced autophagy during L. pneumophila infection to promote intracellular survival. PMID:27191778

  11. Global genomic profiling reveals an extensive p53-regulated autophagy program contributing to key p53 responses

    OpenAIRE

    Kenzelmann Broz, Daniela; Spano Mello, Stephano; Bieging, Kathryn T.; Jiang, Dadi; Rachel L Dusek; Brady, Colleen A.; Sidow, Arend; Attardi, Laura D.

    2013-01-01

    To gain new insights into p53 biology, Kenzelmann Broz et al. used high-throughput sequencing to analyze global p53 transcriptional networks in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts in response to DNA damage. This approach identified autophagy genes as direct p53 target genes. p53-induced autophagy was important for both p53-dependent apoptosis and transformation suppression by p53. These data highlight an intimate connection between p53 and autophagy and suggest that autophagy contributes to p53-...

  12. Glomerulonefritis fibrilar: Una rara forma de enfermedad glomerular por depósitos organizados Fibrillary glomerulo-nephritis: A rare form of glomerular disease with organized deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta B. Cabrera

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Se describe el caso de una mujer de 67 años de edad que consultó por debilidad y astenia, constatándose proteinuria de rango nefrótico y dislipemia. Se realizó punción para biopsia renal, la que se analizó por microscopia óptica, inmunofluorescencia y microscopia electrónica de transmisión. El análisis ultra-estructural reveló la existencia de depósitos fibrilares organizados, rectos, no ramificados, cuyo espesor osciló entre 15 y 20 nm. Dichas fibrillas ópticamente se veían como una expansión mesangial discretamente nodular, ligeramente PAS positiva, rojo Congo negativa y débilmente positiva para IgG. El diagnóstico fue glomerulonefritis fibrilar. Las enfermedades glomerulares por depósitos organizados pueden exhibir superposición sindrómica e histopatológica. Por tal motivo, resulta de importancia una primera separación entre aquellas rojo Congo positivas o negativas, siendo en este último caso la microscopia electrónica de transmisión la que diferencia dos entidades: la glomerulonefritis fibrilar y la glomerulonefritis inmunotactoide. Esta diferencia se apoya no sólo en las características ultraestructurales, sino en sus características clínicas. La glomerulonefritis inmunotactoide muestra una fuerte asociación con procesos linfoproliferativos, a diferencia de lo que ocurre con la glomerulonefritis fibrilar.We describe the case of a 67 year-old female who presented weakness and fatigue. Laboratory data showed nephrotic level of proteinuria and dyslipidemia. A renal biopsy was performed, and studied by light microscopy, immuno-fluorescence and electron microscopy. Ultra-structural analysis revealed the existence of organized fibrillary deposits, straight and without ramifications, the thickness of which ranged from 15 to 20 nm. These fibres were identified, by light microscopy, as slightly nodular mesangial expansions PAS positive, Congo red negative and weakly positive for IgG. Given the above findings, the

  13. Autophagy regulates odontoblast differentiation by suppressing NF-κB activation in an inflammatory environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, F; Wang, H S; Chen, Z; Zhang, L

    2016-01-01

    Odontoblasts are derived from dental papilla mesenchymal cells and have an important role in defense against bacterial infection, whereas autophagy can recycle long-lived proteins and damaged organelles to sustain cellular homeostasis. Thus, this study explores the role of autophagy in odontoblast differentiation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation in vitro and the colocalization of p-NF-κB and LC3 in caries teeth. The odontoblasts differentiation was enhanced through LPS stimulation, and this outcome was reflected in the increased number of mineralized nodules and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. The expression levels of the autophagy markers LC3, Atg5, Beclin1 and TFE3 increased time dependently, as well along with the amount of autophagosomes and autophagy fluxes. This result suggests that autophagy was enhanced in odontoblasts cultured with mineralized-induced media containing LPS. To confirm the role of autophagy in differentiated odontoblasts with LPS stimulation, chloroquine (CQ) or rapamycin were used to either block or enhance autophagy. The number of mineralized nodules decreased when autophagy was inhibited, but this number increased with rapamycin treatment. Phosphorylated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) expression was negatively related to autophagy and could inhibit odontoblast differentiation. Furthermore, p-NF-κB and LC3 colocalization could be detected in cells stimulated with LPS. The nucleus translocation of p-NF-κB in odontoblasts was enhanced when autophagy was inhibited by Atg5 small interfering RNA. In addition, the colocalization of p-NF-κB and LC3 in odontoblasts and sub-odontoblastic layers was observed in caries teeth with reactionary dentin. Therefore, our findings provide a novel insight into the role of autophagy in regulating odontoblast differentiation by suppressing NF-κB activation in inflammatory environments. PMID:26938294

  14. Targeted deletion of Atg5 reveals differential roles of autophagy in keratin K5-expressing epithelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We generated mice lacking Atg5 and autophagy in keratin K5-positive epithelia. ► Suppression of autophagy in thymic epithelium was not associated with signs of autoimmunity. ► Autophagy was required for normal terminal differentiation of preputial gland cells. ► Autophagy-deficient cells of the preputial glands degraded nuclear DNA prematurely. -- Abstract: Autophagy contributes to the homeostasis of many tissues, yet its role in epithelia is incompletely understood. A recent report proposed that Atg5-dependent autophagy in thymic epithelial cells is essential for their function in the negative selection of self-reactive T-cells and, thus, for the suppression of tissue inflammation. Here we crossed mice carrying floxed alleles of the Atg5 gene with mice expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of the keratin K5 promoter to suppress autophagy in all K5-positive epithelia. The efficiency of autophagy abrogation was confirmed by immunoanalyses of LC3, which was converted to the autophagy-associated LC3-II form in normal but not Atg5-deficient cells, and of p62, which accumulated in Atg5-deficient cells. Mice carrying the epithelium-specific deletion of Atg5 showed normal weight gain, absence of tissue inflammation, and a normal morphology of the thymic epithelium. By contrast, autophagy-deficient epithelial cells of the preputial gland showed aberrant eosinophilic staining in histology and premature degradation of nuclear DNA during terminal differentiation. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that autophagy is dispensable for the suppression of autoimmunity by thymic epithelial cells but essential for normal differentiation of the preputial gland in mice.

  15. Targeted deletion of Atg5 reveals differential roles of autophagy in keratin K5-expressing epithelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukseree, Supawadee [Research Division of Biology and Pathobiology of the Skin, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok (Thailand); Rossiter, Heidemarie; Mildner, Michael [Research Division of Biology and Pathobiology of the Skin, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Pammer, Johannes [Institute of Clinical Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Buchberger, Maria; Gruber, Florian [Research Division of Biology and Pathobiology of the Skin, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Watanapokasin, Ramida [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok (Thailand); Tschachler, Erwin [Research Division of Biology and Pathobiology of the Skin, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Eckhart, Leopold, E-mail: leopold.eckhart@meduniwien.ac.at [Research Division of Biology and Pathobiology of the Skin, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated mice lacking Atg5 and autophagy in keratin K5-positive epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suppression of autophagy in thymic epithelium was not associated with signs of autoimmunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy was required for normal terminal differentiation of preputial gland cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy-deficient cells of the preputial glands degraded nuclear DNA prematurely. -- Abstract: Autophagy contributes to the homeostasis of many tissues, yet its role in epithelia is incompletely understood. A recent report proposed that Atg5-dependent autophagy in thymic epithelial cells is essential for their function in the negative selection of self-reactive T-cells and, thus, for the suppression of tissue inflammation. Here we crossed mice carrying floxed alleles of the Atg5 gene with mice expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of the keratin K5 promoter to suppress autophagy in all K5-positive epithelia. The efficiency of autophagy abrogation was confirmed by immunoanalyses of LC3, which was converted to the autophagy-associated LC3-II form in normal but not Atg5-deficient cells, and of p62, which accumulated in Atg5-deficient cells. Mice carrying the epithelium-specific deletion of Atg5 showed normal weight gain, absence of tissue inflammation, and a normal morphology of the thymic epithelium. By contrast, autophagy-deficient epithelial cells of the preputial gland showed aberrant eosinophilic staining in histology and premature degradation of nuclear DNA during terminal differentiation. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that autophagy is dispensable for the suppression of autoimmunity by thymic epithelial cells but essential for normal differentiation of the preputial gland in mice.

  16. Idarubicin induces mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in leukemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated if the antileukemic drug idarubicin induces autophagy, a process of programmed cellular self-digestion, in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. Transmission electron microscopy and acridine orange staining demonstrated the presence of autophagic vesicles and intracellular acidification, respectively, in idarubicin-treated REH leukemic cell line. Idarubicin increased punctuation/aggregation of microtubule-associated light chain 3B (LC3B), enhanced the conversion of LC3B-I to autophagosome-associated LC3B-II in the presence of proteolysis inhibitors, and promoted the degradation of the selective autophagic target p62, thus indicating the increase in autophagic flux. Idarubicin inhibited the phosphorylation of the main autophagy repressor mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its downstream target p70S6 kinase. The treatment with the mTOR activator leucine prevented idarubicin-mediated autophagy induction. Idarubicin-induced mTOR repression was associated with the activation of the mTOR inhibitor AMP-activated protein kinase and down-regulation of the mTOR activator Akt. The suppression of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors or LC3B and beclin-1 genetic knockdown rescued REH cells from idarubicin-mediated oxidative stress, mitochondrial depolarization, caspase activation and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Idarubicin also caused mTOR inhibition and cytotoxic autophagy in K562 leukemic cell line and leukocytes from chronic myeloid leukemia patients, but not healthy controls. By demonstrating mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in idarubicin-treated leukemic cells, our results warrant caution when considering combining idarubicin with autophagy inhibitors in leukemia therapy. - Highlights: • Idarubicin induces autophagy in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. • Idarubicin induces autophagy by inhibiting mTOR in leukemic cells. • mTOR suppression by idarubicin is associated with AMPK activation and Akt blockade.

  17. Idarubicin induces mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in leukemic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristic, Biljana [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Bosnjak, Mihajlo [Institute of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Arsikin, Katarina [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Mircic, Aleksandar; Suzin-Zivkovic, Violeta [Institute of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Bogdanovic, Andrija [Clinic for Hematology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Perovic, Vladimir [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Martinovic, Tamara; Kravic-Stevovic, Tamara; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir [Institute of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Trajkovic, Vladimir, E-mail: vtrajkovic@med.bg.ac.rs [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Harhaji-Trajkovic, Ljubica, E-mail: buajk@yahoo.com [Institute for Biological Research, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Despot Stefan Blvd. 142, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-08-01

    We investigated if the antileukemic drug idarubicin induces autophagy, a process of programmed cellular self-digestion, in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. Transmission electron microscopy and acridine orange staining demonstrated the presence of autophagic vesicles and intracellular acidification, respectively, in idarubicin-treated REH leukemic cell line. Idarubicin increased punctuation/aggregation of microtubule-associated light chain 3B (LC3B), enhanced the conversion of LC3B-I to autophagosome-associated LC3B-II in the presence of proteolysis inhibitors, and promoted the degradation of the selective autophagic target p62, thus indicating the increase in autophagic flux. Idarubicin inhibited the phosphorylation of the main autophagy repressor mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its downstream target p70S6 kinase. The treatment with the mTOR activator leucine prevented idarubicin-mediated autophagy induction. Idarubicin-induced mTOR repression was associated with the activation of the mTOR inhibitor AMP-activated protein kinase and down-regulation of the mTOR activator Akt. The suppression of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors or LC3B and beclin-1 genetic knockdown rescued REH cells from idarubicin-mediated oxidative stress, mitochondrial depolarization, caspase activation and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Idarubicin also caused mTOR inhibition and cytotoxic autophagy in K562 leukemic cell line and leukocytes from chronic myeloid leukemia patients, but not healthy controls. By demonstrating mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in idarubicin-treated leukemic cells, our results warrant caution when considering combining idarubicin with autophagy inhibitors in leukemia therapy. - Highlights: • Idarubicin induces autophagy in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. • Idarubicin induces autophagy by inhibiting mTOR in leukemic cells. • mTOR suppression by idarubicin is associated with AMPK activation and Akt blockade.

  18. Effect of cAMP analogues on glomerular inulin space of isolated rats renal glomeruli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bemmelen, M X P; Szczepańska-Konkel, M; Jastorff, B; Jankowski, M; Angielski, S

    2005-03-01

    Cyclic AMP has been generally recognised as activator of cAMP-dependent protein kinases. However, there is little evidence about role of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), in particular izoenzymes PKA-I and PKA-II, in glomeruli contractility. We measured changes of glomerular inulin space (GIS) as a marker of its contractility in the presence of phosphodiesterase resistance cAMP analogues; activators and inhibitors of PKA. Activator of PKA i.e. (Sp) 8-Cl-cAMPS (0.1-100 microM) decreased GIS. (Rp) 8-Cl-cAMPS (0.1-100 microM), inhibitor of PKA, was ineffective but shifted concentration-response curve of (Sp) 8-Cl-cAMPS to right at 50 microM. Specific A site activation by N6-benzoyl-cAMP decreased GIS with maximum at 0.1 microM. Activation of B site by 8-aminobutyloamino-cAMP (0.1-100 microM) had no effect. However, specific activation of both sites on PKA-I or PKA-II by site-selective analogue pairs e.g. 8-aminobutyloamino-cAMP plus 8-piperidino-cAMP or N6-benzoyl-cAMP plus 8-piperidino-cAMP respectively, significantly increased sensitivity of glomeruli to analogues. Our data suggest that activation of PKA-I or PKA-II might have an important role in the regulation of glomerular contractility. PMID:15795479

  19. Sex steroids do not affect shigatoxin cytotoxicity on human renal tubular or glomerular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohan Donald E

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The greater susceptibility of children to renal injury in post-diarrheal hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS may be related, at least in part, to heightened renal cell sensitivity to the cytotoxic effect of Shiga toxin (Stx, the putative mediator of kidney damage in HUS. We hypothesized that sexual maturation, which coincides with a falling incidence of HUS, may induce a relatively Stx-resistant state in the renal cells. Methods Cultured human glomerular endothelial (HGEN, human glomerular visceral epithelial (HGEC and human proximal tubule (HPT cells were exposed to Stx-1 after pre-incubation with progesterone, β-estradiol or testosterone followed by determination of cytotoxicity. Results Under basal conditions, Stx-1 potently and dose-dependently killed HPT and HGEC, but had relatively little effect on HGEN. Pre-incubation for 1, 2 or 7 days with physiologic or pharmacologic concentrations of progesterone, β-estradiol or testosterone had no effect on Stx-1 cytotoxicity dose-response on any cell type. In addition, no steroid altered Gb3 expression (Stx receptor by any cell type at any time point. Conclusion These data do not support the notion that hormonal changes associated with puberty induce an Stx-resistant state within kidney cells.

  20. MC1R is dispensable for the proteinuria reducing and glomerular protective effect of melanocortin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yingjin; Berg, Anna-Lena; Wang, Pei; Ge, Yan; Quan, Songxia; Zhou, Sijie; Wang, Hai; Liu, Zhangsuo; Gong, Rujun

    2016-01-01

    Melanocortin therapy by using adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or non-steroidogenic melanocortin peptides attenuates proteinuria and glomerular injury in experimental glomerular diseases and induces remission of nephrotic syndrome in patients with diverse glomerulopathies, even those resistant to steroids. The underlying mechanism remains elusive, but the role of melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) has been implicated and was examined here. Four patients with congenital red hair color and nephrotic syndrome caused by idiopathic membranous nephropathy or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis were confirmed by gene sequencing to bear dominant-negative MC1R mutations. Despite prior corticosteroid resistance, all patients responded to ACTH monotherapy and ultimately achieved clinical remission, inferring a steroidogenic-independent and MC1R-dispensable anti-proteinuric effect of melanocortin signaling. In confirmatory animal studies, the protective effect of [Nle(4), D-Phe(7)]-α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (NDP-MSH), a potent non-steroidogenic pan-melanocortin receptor agonist, on the lipopolysaccharide elicited podocytopathy was completely preserved in MC1R-null mice, marked by reduced albuminuria and diminished histologic signs of podocyte injury. Moreover, in complementary in vitro studies, NDP-MSH attenuated the lipopolysaccharide elicited apoptosis, hypermotility and impairment of filtration barrier function equally in primary podocytes derived from MC1R-null and wild-type mice. Collectively, our findings suggest that melanocortin therapy confers a proteinuria reducing and podoprotective effect in proteinuric glomerulopathies via MC1R-independent mechanisms. PMID:27270328

  1. Clinico-pathological study of glomerular diseases in patients with significant proteinuria in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irneet Mundi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteinuria is a common manifestation of renal disease. The present study was carried out to analyze the clinic-pathological correlation, assess the value of histopathology and immunofluorescence (IF as well as note the spectrum of renal diseases in patients with significant proteinuria. Fifty consecutive patients having proteinuria >1 g/24 h underwent ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy. Clinical information was correlated with the pathological findings and the results were analyzed. The patients were in the age range of 12-79 years. Males (60% outnumbered females (40% in all the disease categories except lupus nephritis and IgA nephropathy. The most common clinical presentation was the nephrotic syndrome, seen in 31 cases (62%. Primary glomerular diseases (72% were more common than secondary glomerular diseases (24% and tubulointerstitial diseases (4%. Overall, the most common pathological diag-nosis was focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS (20%, followed by membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN (18%. In young patients (age 60 years it was FSGS (60%. IF modified the diagnosis in 12% of the cases. The concordance between clinical diagnosis and pathological diagnosis was 66%. The difference between clinical diagnosis and final diagnosis was statistically significant. Our study further reinforces the knowledge that renal biopsy helps in accurate diagnosis and, thus, helps in appropriate management of the patients. IF provides additional information that can make the morphologic diagnosis considerably more precise.

  2. Automatic Reporting of Creatinine-Based Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in Children: Is this Feasible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Lunn

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Creatinine, although widely used as a biomarker to measure renal function, has long been known as an insensitive marker of renal impairment. Patients with reduced renal function can have a creatinine level within the normal range, with a rapid rise when renal function is significantly reduced. As of 1976, the correlation between height, the reciprocal of creatinine, and measured glomerular filtration rate (GFR in children has been described. It has been used to derive a simple formula for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR that could be used at the bedside as a more sensitive method of identifying children with renal impairment. Formulae based on this association, with modifications over time as creatinine assay methods have changed, are still widely used clinically at the bedside and in research studies to assess the degree of renal impairment in children. Adult practice has moved in many countries to computer-generated results that report eGFR alongside creatinine results using more complex, but potentially more accurate estimates of GFR, which are independent of height. This permits early identification of patients with chronic kidney disease. This review assesses the feasibility of automated reporting of eGFR and the advantages and disadvantages of this in children.

  3. Effect of arctiin on glomerular filtration barrier damage in STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Song-Tao; Liu, Dong-lian; Deng, Jing-jing; Niu, Rui; Liu, Rui-bin

    2013-10-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the major life-threatening complication of diabetes. Abnormal permeability of glomerular basement membrane plays an important role in DN pathogenesis. This study was performed to assess the effect of arctiin, the lignan constituent from Arctium lappa L., on metabolic profile and aggravation of renal lesions in a rat model of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced DN. STZ-induced diabetic rats were treated with arctiin at the dosage of 60 or 40 mg/kg/day via intraperitoneal injection for 8 weeks. Blood glucose and 24-h urinary albumin content were measured, and kidney histopathological changes were monitored. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the mRNA and protein levels of nephrin, podocin and heparanase (HPSE) in the kidney cortex of rats, respectively. Treatment with arctiin significantly decreased the levels of 24-h urinary albumin, prevented the sclerosis of glomeruli and effectively restored the glomerular filtration barrier damage by up-regulating the expression of nephrin and podocin and down-regulating HPSE level. Our studies suggest that arctiin might be beneficial for DN. The effects of arctiin on attenuating albuminuria and glomerulosclerosis are possibly mediated by regulating the expression of nephrin and podocin and HPSE in STZ-induced diabetic rats. PMID:23147865

  4. Estimation of the glomerular filtration rate in infants and children using iohexol and X-ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to establish methods for the estimation of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in children. The conclusions and clinical implications of the study are as follows: Urography with iohexol in children had no significant influence on the GFR. Valid GFR estimates were calculated from the plasma disappearance rate obtained from two plasma samples taken three and four hour after the injection of iohexol. Both iohexol and metrizoate caused a transitory, increased renal excretion of alkaline phosphatase. GFR as well as the excretion of albumin and β2-microglobulin were unchanged. Using the weight-related empirical distribution volume for determination of GFR from the plasma sample taken three hour after the injection of iohexol, a high degree of agreement was found between the preliminary single sample GFR estimate and the reference, two plasma sample GFR. However, the relationship was curvilinear, and in order to obtain a value for the final three hour single sample GFR equal to the reference GFR, the preliminary value had to be corrected by a second degree correction factor. The day-to-day variations of GFRs estimated with the iohexol methods were similar to those obtained with other standard methods. In another group of infants and children, independent, but otherwise comparable to the patients who formed the basis for the single sample iohexol method, it was confirmed that valid GFR estimates were obtained from the three hour single plasma sample. GFR determinations from one hour, two hour, and four hour single samples further supported that the optimal sampling time in patients with GFR down to 20 ml per minute-1 1.73 m-2 was three hours. 53 refs., 5 figs

  5. Restoration of glomerular haemodynamics and renal injury independent of arterial hypertension in rats with subtotal renal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Acosta, Jaime; Tapia, Edilia; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Franco, Martha; Striker, Liliane J; Striker, Gary E; Rodríguez, Iturbe Bernardo

    2002-06-01

    To study whether prevention of renal injury using the anti-inflammatory drugs pentosan polysulphate (PPS) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is associated with improvement of glomerular haemodynamics, PPS and MMF were compared with losartan. The awake systolic blood pressure (SBP), proteinuria (Uprot) and micropuncture studies were performed 30 days after five-sixths nephrectomy in untreated rats and in rats treated with PPS (100 mg/kg per day), MMF (30 mg/kg per day) or losartan (30 mg/kg per day). In the rats receiving no treatment, there was a rise in SBP (to 180-200 mmHg) and in Uprot, which were prevented by losartan. In the PPS and MMF groups, the SBP was elevated but the Uprot did not increase. In the untreated rats the total glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decreased (-80%) and the single-nephron GFR (37-42%), plasma flow (67-127%) and glomerular pressure (10-15 mmHg) increased. These changes were prevented by PPS and MMF to the same extent as by losartan: the rise in single-nephron GFR and plasma flow were reduced by 50% and the glomerular pressure was normal. In rats receiving losartan, this was due to the fall in arterial pressure, whereas in PPS- and MMF-treated rats it was due to a rise in afferent resistance, indicating autoregulatory capacity. Total GFR was similar, despite the lower single-nephron GFR in treated groups, suggesting a larger proportion of functioning nephrons. Losartan, PPS and MMF significantly reduced glomerular sclerosis and tubular dilation and atrophy in association with a reduction in the lymphocyte and macrophage infiltrate. These results suggest an interaction between the haemodynamic and inflammatory changes that perpetuate each other during progression of renal injury. Renal protection provided by anti-inflammatory drugs is partially mediated by the prevention of glomerular haemodynamic alterations. PMID:12184053

  6. Pattern of glomerular disease in the Saudi population: A single-center, five-year retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Nawaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glomerular diseases continue to be the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD globally. Hence, it is important to recognize the pattern of glomerular diseases in different geographical areas in order to understand the patho-biology, incidence and progression of the disorder. Published studies from different centers in Saudi Arabia have reported contradicting results. In this retrospective study, we report our experience at the Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A total of 348 native renal biopsies performed at our center on patients with proteinuria >1 g, hematuria and/or renal impairment during a period of 5 years (between January 2005 and December 2009 were studied by a histopathologist using light microscopy, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, and were categorized. Results showed that primary glomerular disease accounted for 55.1% of all renal biopsies. The most common histological lesion was focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS (27.6%, followed by minimal change disease (MCD (17.7% and membrano-proliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN (13.0%. Secondary glomerular disease accounted for 37.9% of the glomerular diseases, with lupus nephritis (LN being the most common lesion (54.5%, followed by hypertensive nephrosclerosis (22%, post-infectious glomerulonephritis (7.5%, diabetic nephropathy (DN (6.8% and vasculitides (4.5%. Four percent of all biopsies turned out to be ESRD while biopsy was inadequate in 2.8% of the cases. In conclusion, our study showed that FSGS was the most common primary GN encountered, while LN was the most common secondary GN. We encountered 14 cases of crescentic glomerulonephritis. Also, the prevalence of MPGN, MCD, IgA nephropathy and membranous GN was many folds higher in males when compared with the Western data. We believe that it is mandatory to maintain a Saudi Arabian Renal Biopsy Registry to understand better the pattern of glomerular disease in the Saudi population and to follow

  7. 自噬在肥胖中的研究进展%Research advance in autophagy in obesity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王李洁; 杨怡; 孙永红; 郑筱祥

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a harmful nutritional metabolic disorder to human health. Autophagy is a catabolic mechanism whereby cells degrade intracellular substances. Recent studies show that autophagy was closely correlated with insulin resistance, fat composing, and lipid droplet and triglyceride accumulation. Here, we review the association between autophagy and obesity, which may provide theoretical and experimental evidence for prevention of obesity and related diseases.

  8. The giraffe kidney tolerates high arterial blood pressure by high renal interstitial pressure and low glomerular filtration rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjaer, M; Wang, T; Brøndum, E;

    2015-01-01

    adaption in the giraffe kidney allows normal for size renal haemodynamics and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) despite a MAP double that of other mammals. METHODS: Fourteen anaesthetized giraffes were instrumented with vascular and bladder catheters to measure glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective......BACKGROUND: The tallest animal on earth, the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is endowed with a mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) twice that of other mammals. The kidneys reside at heart level and show no sign of hypertension-related damage. We hypothesized that a species-specific evolutionary...

  9. Autophagy Induced by Intracellular Infection of Propionibacterium acnes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Teruko; Furukawa, Asuka; Uchida, Keisuke; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Tamura, Tomoki; Sakonishi, Daisuke; Wada, Yuriko; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Ishige, Yuki; Minami, Junko; Akashi, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Background Sarcoidosis is caused by Th1-type immune responses to unknown agents, and is linked to the infectious agent Propionibacterium acnes. Many strains of P. acnes isolated from sarcoid lesions cause intracellular infection and autophagy may contribute to the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis. We examined whether P. acnes induces autophagy. Methods Three cell lines from macrophages (Raw264.7), mesenchymal cells (MEF), and epithelial cells (HeLa) were infected by viable or heat-killed P. acnes (clinical isolate from sarcoid lymph node) at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 100 or 1000 for 1 h. Extracellular bacteria were killed by washing and culturing infected cells with antibiotics. Samples were examined by colony assay, electron-microscopy, and fluorescence-microscopy with anti-LC3 and anti-LAMP1 antibodies. Autophagy-deficient (Atg5-/-) MEF cells were also used. Results Small and large (≥5 μm in diameter) LC3-positive vacuoles containing few or many P. acnes cells (LC3-positive P. acnes) were frequently found in the three cell lines when infected by viable P. acnes at MOI 1000. LC3-positive large vacuoles were mostly LAMP1-positive. A few small LC3-positive/LAMP1-negative vacuoles were consistently observed in some infected cells for 24 h postinfection. The number of LC3-positive P. acnes was decreased at MOI 100 and completely abolished when heat-killed P. acnes was used. LC3-positive P. acnes was not found in autophagy-deficient Atg5-/- cells where the rate of infection was 25.3 and 17.6 times greater than that in wild-type Atg5+/+ cells at 48 h postinfection at MOI 100 and 1000, respectively. Electron-microscopic examination revealed bacterial cells surrounded mostly by a single-membrane including the large vacuoles and sometimes a double or multi-layered membrane, with occasional undigested bacterial cells in ruptured late endosomes or in the cytoplasm. Conclusion Autophagy was induced by intracellular P. acnes infection and contributed to intracellular

  10. Intensified autophagy compromises the efficacy of radiotherapy against prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Radiotherapy is an equivalent alternative or complement to radical prostatectomy, with high therapeutic efficacy. High risk patients, however, experience high relapse rates, so that research on radio-sensitization is the most evident route to improve curability of this common disease. Materials and methods: In the current study we investigated the autophagic activity in a series of patients with localized prostate tumors treated with radical radiotherapy, using the LC3A and the LAMP2a proteins as markers of autophagosome and lysosome cellular content, respectively. The role of autophagy on prostate cancer cell line resistance to radiation was also examined. Results: Using confocal microscopy on tissue biopsies, we showed that prostate cancer cells have, overall, high levels of LC3A and low levels of LAMP2a compared to normal prostate glands. Tumors with a ‘highLC3A/lowLAMP2a’ phenotype, suggestive of intensified lysosomal consumption, had a significantly poorer biochemical relapse free survival. The PC3 radioresistant cell line sustained remarkably its autophagic flux ability after radiation, while the DU145 radiosensitive one experiences a prolonged blockage of the autophagic process. This was assessed with aggresome accumulation detection and LC3A/LAMP2a double immunofluorescence, as well as with sequestrosome/p62 protein detection. By silencing the LC3A or LAMP2a expression, both cell lines became more sensitive to escalated doses of radiation. Conclusions: High base line autophagy activity and cell ability to sustain functional autophagy define resistance of prostate cancer cells to radiotherapy. This can be reversed by blocking up-regulated components of the autophagy pathway, which may prove of importance in the field of clinical radiotherapy. - Highlights: • High LC3A and low LAMP2a levels is a frequent expression pattern of prostate carcinoma. • This pattern of intensified autophagic flux relates with high relapse rates after

  11. Intensified autophagy compromises the efficacy of radiotherapy against prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koukourakis, Michael I., E-mail: targ@her.forthnet.gr [Department of Radiotherapy/Oncology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, 68100 (Greece); Kalamida, Dimitra; Mitrakas, Achilleas; Pouliliou, Stamatia; Kalamida, Sofia [Department of Radiotherapy/Oncology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, 68100 (Greece); Sivridis, Efthimios; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra [Department of Pathology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, 68100 (Greece)

    2015-05-29

    Introduction: Radiotherapy is an equivalent alternative or complement to radical prostatectomy, with high therapeutic efficacy. High risk patients, however, experience high relapse rates, so that research on radio-sensitization is the most evident route to improve curability of this common disease. Materials and methods: In the current study we investigated the autophagic activity in a series of patients with localized prostate tumors treated with radical radiotherapy, using the LC3A and the LAMP2a proteins as markers of autophagosome and lysosome cellular content, respectively. The role of autophagy on prostate cancer cell line resistance to radiation was also examined. Results: Using confocal microscopy on tissue biopsies, we showed that prostate cancer cells have, overall, high levels of LC3A and low levels of LAMP2a compared to normal prostate glands. Tumors with a ‘highLC3A/lowLAMP2a’ phenotype, suggestive of intensified lysosomal consumption, had a significantly poorer biochemical relapse free survival. The PC3 radioresistant cell line sustained remarkably its autophagic flux ability after radiation, while the DU145 radiosensitive one experiences a prolonged blockage of the autophagic process. This was assessed with aggresome accumulation detection and LC3A/LAMP2a double immunofluorescence, as well as with sequestrosome/p62 protein detection. By silencing the LC3A or LAMP2a expression, both cell lines became more sensitive to escalated doses of radiation. Conclusions: High base line autophagy activity and cell ability to sustain functional autophagy define resistance of prostate cancer cells to radiotherapy. This can be reversed by blocking up-regulated components of the autophagy pathway, which may prove of importance in the field of clinical radiotherapy. - Highlights: • High LC3A and low LAMP2a levels is a frequent expression pattern of prostate carcinoma. • This pattern of intensified autophagic flux relates with high relapse rates after

  12. Autophagy in Natural History and After ERT in Glycogenosis Type II

    OpenAIRE

    Angelini, Corrado; Nascimbeni, Anna C.; Fanin, Marina

    2015-01-01

    We studied the role of autophagy in a series of 10 infantile-, juvenile-, and adult-onset GSDII patients and investigated autophagy blockade in successive biopsies of adult cases during disease natural history. We also correlated the autophagosome accumulation and efficiency of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in four treated cases (two infantile and two juvenile-adult onsets).

  13. Autophagy- An emerging target for melanoma therapy [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abibatou Ndoye

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma accounts for only 5% of all cancers but is the leading cause of skin cancer death due to its high metastatic potential. Patients with metastatic melanoma have a 10-year survival rate of less than 10%. While the clinical landscape for melanoma is evolving rapidly, lack of response to therapies, as well as resistance to therapy remain critical obstacles for treatment of this disease. In recent years, a myriad of therapy resistance mechanisms have been unravelled, one of which is autophagy, the focus of this review. In advanced stages of malignancy, melanoma cells hijack the autophagy machinery in order to alleviate drug-induced and metabolic stress in the tumor microenvironment, thereby promoting resistance to multiple therapies, tumor cell survival, and progression.  Autophagy is an essential cellular process that maintains cellular homeostasis through the recycling of intracellular constituents. Early studies on the role of autophagy in cancer generated controversy as to whether autophagy was pro- or anti-tumorigenic. Currently, there is a consensus that autophagy is tumor-suppressive in the early stages of cancer and tumor-promoting in established tumors.  This review aims to highlight current understandings on the role of autophagy in melanoma malignancy, and specifically therapy resistance; as well as to evaluate recent strategies for therapeutic autophagy modulation.

  14. Protective autophagy antagonizes oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Xu; Xiu-Juan Qu; Yun-Peng Liu; Ying-Ying Xu; Jing Liu; Ke-Zuo Hou; Ye Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy is used for treating gastric cancer. Autophagy has been extensively implicated in cancer cells; however, its function is not fully understood. Our study aimed to determine if oxaliplatin induce autophagy in gastric cancer MGC803 cells and to assess the effect of autophagy on apoptosis induced by oxaliplatin. MGC803 cells were cultured with oxaliplatin. Cell proliferation was measured using MTT assay, and apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry. Protein expression was detected by Western blot. Autophagy was observed using fluorescent microscopy. Our results showed that the rate of apoptosis was 9.73% and 16.36% when MGC803 cells were treated with 5 and 20 μg/mL oxaliplatin for 24 h, respectively. In addition, caspase activation and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP)cleavage were detected. Furthermore, when MGC803 cells were treated with oxaliplatin for 24 h, an accumulation of punctate LC3 and an increase of LC3-Ⅱ protein were also detected, indicating the activation of autophagy. Phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR were inhibited by oxaliplatin. Compared to oxaliplatin alone, the combination of autophagy inhibitor chlorochine and oxaliplatin significantly enhanced the inhibition of cell proliferation and the induction of cell apoptosis. In conclusion, oxaliplatin-induced protective autophagy partially prevents apoptosis in gastric cancer MGC803 cells. The combination of autophagy inhibitor and oxaliplatin may be a new therapeutic option for gastric cancer.

  15. The role of autophagy in epileptogenesis and in epilepsy-induced neuronal alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Filippo Sean; Biagioni, Francesca; Lenzi, Paola; Frati, Alessandro; Fornai, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that autophagy alterations are present in a variety of neurological disorders. These range from neurodegenerative diseases to acute neurological insults. Thus, despite a role of autophagy was investigated in a variety of neurological diseases, only recently these studies included epilepsy. This was fostered by the evidence that rapamycin, a powerful autophagy inducer, strongly modulates a variety of seizure models and epilepsies. These findings were originally interpreted as the results of the inhibition exerted by rapamycin on the molecular complex named "mammalian Target of Rapamycin" (mTOR). Recently, an increasing number of papers demonstrated that mTOR inhibition produces a strong activation of the autophagy machinery. In this way, it is now increasingly recognized that what was once defined as mTORpathy in epileptogenesis may be partially explained by abnormalities in the autophagy machinery. The present review features a brief introductory statement about the autophagy machinery and discusses the involvement of autophagy in seizures and epilepsies. An emphasis is posed on evidence addressing both pros and cons making it sometime puzzling and sometime evident, the role of autophagy in the epileptic brain. PMID:25217966

  16. Baicalein pretreatment reduces liver ischemia/reperfusion injury via induction of autophagy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Anding; Huang, Liang; Guo, Enshuang; Li, Renlong; Yang, Jiankun; Li, Anyi; Yang, Yan; Liu, Shenpei; Hu, Jifa; Jiang, Xiaojing; Dirsch, Olaf; Dahmen, Uta; Sun, Jian

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that baicalein could protect against liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in mice. The exact mechanism of baicalein remains poorly understood. Autophagy plays an important role in protecting against I/R injury. This study was designed to determine whether baicalein could protect against liver I/R injury via induction of autophagy in rats. Baicalein was intraperitoneally injected 1 h before warm ischemia. Pretreatment with baicalein prior to I/R insult significantly blunted I/R-induced elevations of serum aminotransferase levels and significantly improved the histological status of livers. Electron microscopy and expression of the autophagic marker LC3B-II suggested induction of autophagy after baicalein treatment. Moreover, inhibition of the baicalein-induced autophagy using 3-methyladenine (3-MA) worsened liver injury. Furthermore, baicalein treatment increased heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression, and pharmacological inhibition of HO-1 with tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP) abolished the baicalein-mediated autophagy and the hepatocellular protection. In primary rat hepatocytes, baicalein-induced autophagy also protected hepatocytes from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in vitro and the beneficial effect was abrogated by 3-MA or Atg7 siRNA, respectively. Suppression of HO-1 activity by SnPP or HO-1 siRNA prevented the baicalein-mediated autophagy and resulted in increased hepatocellular injury. Collectively, these results suggest that baicalein prevents hepatocellular injury via induction of HO-1-mediated autophagy. PMID:27150843

  17. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef Inhibits Autophagy through Transcription Factor EB Sequestration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant R Campbell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available HIV Nef acts as an anti-autophagic maturation factor through interaction with beclin-1 (BECN1. We report that exposure of macrophages to infectious or non-infectious purified HIV induces toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8 and BECN1 dependent dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of TFEB and that this correlates with an increase in autophagy markers. RNA interference for ATG13, TFEB, TLR8, or BECN1 inhibits this HIV-induced autophagy. However, once HIV establishes a productive infection, TFEB phosphorylation and cytoplasmic sequestration are increased resulting in decreased autophagy markers. Moreover, by 7 d post-infection, autophagy levels are similar to mock infected controls. Conversely, although Nef deleted HIV similarly induces TFEB dephosphorylation and nuclear localization, and increases autophagy, these levels remain elevated during continued productive infection. Thus, the interaction between HIV and TLR8 serves as a signal for autophagy induction that is dependent upon the dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of TFEB. During permissive infection, Nef binds BECN1 resulting in mammalian target of rapamycin (MTOR activation, TFEB phosphorylation and cytosolic sequestration, and the inhibition of autophagy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a virus modulating TFEB localization and helps to explain how HIV modulates autophagy to promote its own replication and cell survival.

  18. A comprehensive glossary of autophagy-related molecules and processes (2nd edition)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klionsky, Daniel J; Baehrecke, Eric H; Brumell, John H; Chu, Charleen T; Codogno, Patrice; Cuervo, Ana Marie; Debnath, Jayanta; Deretic, Vojo; Elazar, Zvulun; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Finkbeiner, Steven; Fueyo-Margareto, Juan; Gewirtz, David; Jaattela, Marja; Kroemer, Guido; Levine, Beth; Melia, Thomas J; Mizushima, Noboru; Rubinsztein, David C; Simonsen, Anne; Thorburn, Andrew; Thumm, Michael; Tooze, Sharon A

    2011-01-01

    readers--even those who work in the field--to keep up with the ever-expanding terminology associated with the various autophagy-related processes. Accordingly, we have developed a comprehensive glossary of autophagy-related terms that is meant to provide a quick reference for researchers who need a brief...

  19. You are what you eat: multifaceted functions of autophagy during C. elegans development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peiguo; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy involves the sequestration of a portion of the cytosolic contents in an enclosed double-membrane autophagosomal structure and its subsequent delivery to lysosomes for degradation. Autophagy activity functions in multiple biological processes during Caenorhabditis elegans development. The basal level of autophagy in embryos removes aggregate-prone proteins, paternal mitochondria and spermatid-specific membranous organelles (MOs). Autophagy also contributes to the efficient removal of embryonic apoptotic cell corpses by promoting phagosome maturation. During larval development, autophagy modulates miRNA-mediated gene silencing by selectively degrading AIN-1, a component of miRNA-induced silencing complex, and thus participates in the specification of multiple cell fates controlled by miRNAs. During development of the hermaphrodite germline, autophagy acts coordinately with the core apoptotic machinery to execute genotoxic stress-induced germline cell death and also cell death when caspase activity is partially compromised. Autophagy is also involved in the utilization of lipid droplets in the aging process in adult animals. Studies in C. elegans provide valuable insights into the physiological functions of autophagy in the development of multicellular organisms. PMID:24296782

  20. Regulatory coordination between two major intracellular homeostatic systems: heat shock response and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokladny, Karol; Zuhl, Micah Nathaniel; Mandell, Michael; Bhattacharya, Dhruva; Schneider, Suzanne; Deretic, Vojo; Moseley, Pope Lloyd

    2013-05-24

    The eukaryotic cell depends on multitiered homeostatic systems ensuring maintenance of proteostasis, organellar integrity, function and turnover, and overall cellular viability. At the two opposite ends of the homeostatic system spectrum are heat shock response and autophagy. Here, we tested whether there are interactions between these homeostatic systems, one universally operational in all prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, and the other one (autophagy) is limited to eukaryotes. We found that heat shock response regulates autophagy. The interaction between the two systems was demonstrated by testing the role of HSF-1, the central regulator of heat shock gene expression. Knockdown of HSF-1 increased the LC3 lipidation associated with formation of autophagosomal organelles, whereas depletion of HSF-1 potentiated both starvation- and rapamycin-induced autophagy. HSP70 expression but not expression of its ATPase mutant inhibited starvation or rapamycin-induced autophagy. We also show that exercise induces autophagy in humans. As predicted by our in vitro studies, glutamine supplementation as a conditioning stimulus prior to exercise significantly increased HSP70 protein expression and prevented the expected exercise induction of autophagy. Our data demonstrate for the first time that heat shock response, from the top of its regulatory cascade (HSF-1) down to the execution stages delivered by HSP70, controls autophagy thus connecting and coordinating the two extreme ends of the homeostatic systems in the eukaryotic cell. PMID:23576438

  1. LAMP3 is involved in tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer cells through the modulation of autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelkerke, A.P.; Sieuwerts, A.M.; Bussink, J.; Sweep, F.C.; Look, M.P.; Foekens, J.A.; Martens, J.W.; Span, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    Lysosome-associated membrane protein 3 (LAMP3) is a member of the LAMP-family of proteins, which are involved in the process of autophagy. Autophagy is induced by tamoxifen in breast cancer cells and may contribute to tamoxifen resistance. In this study, the significance of LAMP3 for tamoxifen resis

  2. LAMP3 is involved in tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer cells through the modulation of autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Nagelkerke (Anika); A.M. Sieuwerts (Anieta); J. Bussink (Johan); F.C. Sweep (Fred); M.P. Look (Maxime); J.A. Foekens (John); J.W.M. Martens (John); P.N. Span (Paul)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractLysosome-associated membrane protein 3 (LAMP3) is a member of the LAMP-family of proteins, which are involved in the process of autophagy. Autophagy is induced by tamoxifen in breast cancer cells and may contribute to tamoxifen resistance. In this study, the significance of LAMP3 for tam

  3. A dual function for Deep orange in programmed autophagy in the Drosophila melanogaster fat body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysosomal degradation of cytoplasm by way of autophagy is essential for cellular amino acid homeostasis and for tissue remodeling. In insects such as Drosophila, autophagy is developmentally upregulated in the larval fat body prior to metamorphosis. Here, autophagy is induced by the hormone ecdysone through down-regulation of the autophagy-suppressive phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. In yeast, Vps18 and other members of the HOPS complex have been found essential for autophagic degradation. In Drosophila, the Vps18 homologue Deep orange (Dor) has previously been shown to mediate fusion of multivesicular endosomes with lysosomes. A requirement of Dor for ecdysone-mediated chromosome puffing has also been reported. In the present report, we have tested the hypothesis that Dor may control programmed autophagy at the level of ecdysone signaling as well as by mediating autophagosome-to-lysosome fusion. We show that dor mutants are defective in programmed autophagy and provide evidence that autophagy is blocked at two levels. First, PI3K activity was not down-regulated correctly in dor larvae, which correlated with a decrease in ecdysone reporter activity. The down-regulation of PI3K activity was restored by feeding ecdysone to the mutant larvae. Second, neither exogenous ecdysone nor overexpression of PTEN, a silencer of PI3K signaling, restored fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes in the fat body of dor mutants. These results indicate that Dor controls autophagy indirectly, via ecdysone signaling, as well as directly, via autolysosomal fusion

  4. Erythropoietin protects epithelial cells from excessive autophagy and apoptosis in experimental neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueyue Yu

    Full Text Available Neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC is a devastating gastrointestinal disease of preterm infants. Increased intestinal epithelium permeability is an early event in NEC pathogenesis. Autophagy and apoptosis are induced by multiple stress pathways which may impact the intestinal barrier, and they have been associated with pathogenesis of diverse gastrointestinal diseases including inflammatory bowel disease. Using both in vitro and in vivo models, this study investigates autophagy and apoptosis under experimental NEC stresses. Furthermore this study evaluates the effect of erythropoietin (Epo, a component of breast milk previously shown to decrease the incidence of NEC and to preserve intestinal barrier function, on intestinal autophagy and apoptosis. It was found that autophagy and apoptosis are both rapidly up regulated in NEC in vivo as indicated by increased expression of the autophagy markers Beclin 1 and LC3II, and by evidence of apoptosis by TUNEL and cleaved caspase-3 staining. In the rat NEC experimental model, autophagy preceded the onset of apoptosis in intestine. In vitro studies suggested that Epo supplementation significantly decreased both autophagy and apoptosis via the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and the MAPK/ERK pathway respectively. These results suggest that Epo protects intestinal epithelium from excessive autophagy and apoptosis in experimental NEC.

  5. Determination of autophagy gene ATG16L1 polymorphism in human colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoli, Elena Raluca; Dumitrescu, Theodor; Uscatu, Constantin Daniel;

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy has emerged not only as an essential repair mechanism to degrade damaged organelles and proteins but also as a major player in protection of tumor cells from multiple stresses. It was shown that autophagy gene polymorphisms are correlated with development of chronic inflammatory lesions...

  6. Autophagy is required for stem cell mobilization by G-CSF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Vu, Therese; Lineburg, Katie E.;

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used clinically to prevent neutropenia after cytotoxic chemotherapy and to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for transplantation. Autophagy, a process of cytoplasmic component recycling, maintains cellular homeostasis and protects...... the cell during periods of metabolic stress or nutrient deprivation. We have observed that G-CSF activates autophagy in neutrophils and HSCs from both mouse and human donors. Furthermore, G-CSF-induced neutrophil and HSC mobilization is impaired in the absence of autophagy. In contrast, autophagy...... is dispensable for direct HSC mobilization in response to the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100. Altogether, these data demonstrate an important role for G-CSF in invoking autophagy within hematopoietic and myeloid cells and suggest that this pathway is critical for ensuring cell survival in response to clinically...

  7. The impact of autophagy on peripheral synapses in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Rudiger; Khan, Muzamil Majid; Wild, Franziska; Hashemolhosseini, Said

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of autophagy have been linked to several peripheral nervous system diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Modulation of autophagy by metabolic or pharmacological interventions has been increasingly recognized as a strategy to fight many of these disorders. Cellular processes that are aberrant in case of impaired autophagy and that might lead to these diseases belong to three different categories: (1) clearing of protein aggregates, (2) regulation of vesicle and cargo turnover, and (3) disposal of damaged mitochondria. This review summarizes the present literature that addresses both, the impact and mechanisms of autophagy on the health of the peripheral nervous system and treatment proposals for human disorders associated with impaired autophagy. PMID:27100517

  8. Heavy ion irradiation induces autophagy in irradiated C2C12 myoblasts and their bystander cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy is one of the major processes involved in the degradation of intracellular materials. Here, we examined the potential impact of heavy ion irradiation on the induction of autophagy in irradiated C2C12 mouse myoblasts and their non-targeted bystander cells. In irradiated cells, ultrastructural analysis revealed the accumulation of autophagic structures at various stages of autophagy (id est (i.e.) phagophores, autophagosomes and autolysosomes) within 20 min after irradiation. Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and autolysosomes containing MVBs (amphisomes) were also observed. Heavy ion irradiation increased the staining of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 and LysoTracker Red (LTR). Such enhanced staining was suppressed by an autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. In addition to irradiated cells, bystander cells were also positive with LTR staining. Altogether, these results suggest that heavy ion irradiation induces autophagy not only in irradiated myoblasts but also in their bystander cells. (author)

  9. Longevity-relevant regulation of autophagy at the level of the acetylproteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariño, Guillermo; Morselli, Eugenia; Bennetzen, Martin V; Eisenberg, Tobias; Megalou, Evgenia; Schroeder, Sabrina; Cabrera, Sandra; Bénit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre; Criollo, Alfredo; Kepp, Oliver; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Shen, Shensi; Malik, Shoaib A; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Horio, Yoshiyuki; López-Otín, Carlos; Andersen, Jens S.; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-01-01

    The acetylase inhibitor, spermidine and the deacetylase activator, resveratrol, both induce autophagy and prolong life span of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans in an autophagydependent fashion. Based on these premises, we investigated the differences and similarities in spermidine and...... resveratrol-induced autophagy. The deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and its orthologs are required for the autophagy induction by resveratrol but dispensable for autophagy stimulation by spermidine in human cells, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. elegans. SIRT1 is also dispensable for life-span extension by...... spermidine. Mass spectrometry analysis of the human acetylproteome revealed that resveratrol and/or spermidine induce changes in the acetylation of 560 peptides corresponding to 375 different proteins. Among these, 170 proteins are part of the recently elucidated human autophagy protein network. Importantly...

  10. Inhibition of Autophagy by Chloroquine Enhances the Antitumor Efficacy of Sorafenib in Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangyu; Sun, Kangjian; Wang, Handong; Dai, Yuyuan

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive and common brain tumor in adults. Sorafenib, a multi-kinase inhibitor, has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis through inhibition of STAT3 signaling in glioblastoma cells and in intracranial gliomas. However, sorafenib also induces cell autophagy. Due to the dual roles of autophagy in tumor cell survival and death, the therapeutic effect of sorafenib on glioblastoma is uncertain. Here, we combined sorafenib treatment in GBM cells (U373 and LN229) and tumors with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine. We found that blockage of autophagy further inhibited cell proliferation and migration and induced cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest the possibility of combination treatment with sorafenib and autophagy inhibitors for GBM. PMID:26971793

  11. Listeriolysin O is necessary and sufficient to induce autophagy during Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Meyer-Morse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies have suggested that autophagy is utilized by cells as a protective mechanism against Listeria monocytogenes infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: However we find autophagy has no measurable role in vacuolar escape and intracellular growth in primary cultured bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs deficient for autophagy (atg5-/-. Nevertheless, we provide evidence that the pore forming activity of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin listeriolysin O (LLO can induce autophagy subsequent to infection by L. monocytogenes. Infection of BMDMs with L. monocytogenes induced microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3 lipidation, consistent with autophagy activation, whereas a mutant lacking LLO did not. Infection of BMDMs that express LC3-GFP demonstrated that wild-type L. monocytogenes was encapsulated by LC3-GFP, consistent with autophagy activation, whereas a mutant lacking LLO was not. Bacillus subtilis expressing either LLO or a related cytolysin, perfringolysin O (PFO, induced LC3 colocalization and LC3 lipidation. Further, LLO-containing liposomes also recruited LC3-GFP, indicating that LLO was sufficient to induce targeted autophagy in the absence of infection. The role of autophagy had variable effects depending on the cell type assayed. In atg5-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts, L. monocytogenes had a primary vacuole escape defect. However, the bacteria escaped and grew normally in atg5-/- BMDMs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that membrane damage, such as that caused by LLO, triggers bacterial-targeted autophagy, although autophagy does not affect the fate of wild-type intracellular L. monocytogenes in primary BMDMs.

  12. Rejuvenation of MPTP-induced human neural precursor cell senescence by activating autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Liang [East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Dong, Chuanming [East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, The Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Neuroregeneration, Nantong University, Nantong (China); Sun, Chenxi; Ma, Rongjie; Yang, Danjing [East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Hongwen, E-mail: hongwen_zhu@hotmail.com [Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin Academy of Integrative Medicine, Tianjin (China); Xu, Jun, E-mail: xunymc2000@yahoo.com [East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2015-08-21

    Aging of neural stem cell, which can affect brain homeostasis, may be caused by many cellular mechanisms. Autophagy dysfunction was found in aged and neurodegenerative brains. However, little is known about the relationship between autophagy and human neural stem cell (hNSC) aging. The present study used 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) to treat neural precursor cells (NPCs) derived from human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line H9 and investigate related molecular mechanisms involved in this process. MPTP-treated NPCs were found to undergo premature senescence [determined by increased senescence-associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity, elevated intracellular reactive oxygen species level, and decreased proliferation] and were associated with impaired autophagy. Additionally, the cellular senescence phenotypes were manifested at the molecular level by a significant increase in p21 and p53 expression, a decrease in SOD2 expression, and a decrease in expression of some key autophagy-related genes such as Atg5, Atg7, Atg12, and Beclin 1. Furthermore, we found that the senescence-like phenotype of MPTP-treated hNPCs was rejuvenated through treatment with a well-known autophagy enhancer rapamycin, which was blocked by suppression of essential autophagy gene Beclin 1. Taken together, these findings reveal the critical role of autophagy in the process of hNSC aging, and this process can be reversed by activating autophagy. - Highlights: • We successfully establish hESC-derived neural precursor cells. • MPTP treatment induced senescence-like state in hESC-derived NPCs. • MPTP treatment induced impaired autophagy of hESC-derived NPCs. • MPTP-induced hESC-derived NPC senescence was rejuvenated by activating autophagy.

  13. Suppression of autophagy augments the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition on human glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is an essential component of the standard therapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma. To increase the radiosensitivity of glioma cells is a feasible solution to improve the therapeutic effects. It has been suggested that inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) can radiosensitize glioma cells, probably via the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In this study, human malignant glioma cells, U251 and A172, were treated with an STAT3 inhibitor, WP1066, or a short hairpin RNA plasmid targeting STAT3 to suppress the activation of STAT3 signaling. The radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition were confirmed in glioma cells. Intriguingly, combination of ionizing radiation exposure and STAT3 inhibition triggered a pronounced increase of autophagy flux. To explore the role of autophagy, glioma cells were treated with 3-methyladenine or siRNA for autophagy-related gene 5, and it was demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy further strengthened the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition. Accordingly, more apoptotic cells were induced by the dual inhibition of autophagy and STAT3 signaling. In conclusion, our data revealed a protective role of autophagy in the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition, and inhibition of both autophagy and STAT3 might be a potential therapeutic strategy to increase the radiosensitivity of glioma cells. - Highlights: • Inactivation of STAT3 signaling radiosensitizes malignant glioma cells. • STAT3 inhibition triggers a significant increase of autophagy flux induced by ionizing radiation in glioma cells. • Suppression of autophagy further strengthens the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition in glioma cells. • Dual inhibition of autophagy and STAT3 induce massive apoptotic cells upon exposure to ionizing radiation

  14. Autophagy blockade sensitizes the anticancer activity of CA-4 via JNK-Bcl-2 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yangling; Luo, Peihua; Wang, Jincheng; Dai, Jiabin; Yang, Xiaochun; Wu, Honghai; Yang, Bo, E-mail: yang924@zju.edu.cn; He, Qiaojun, E-mail: qiaojunhe@zju.edu.cn

    2014-01-15

    Combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) has already entered clinical trials of solid tumors over ten years. However, the limited anticancer activity and dose-dependent toxicity restrict its clinical application. Here, we offered convincing evidence that CA-4 induced autophagy in various cancer cells, which was demonstrated by acridine orange staining of intracellular acidic vesicles, the degradation of p62, the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and GFP-LC3 punctate fluorescence. Interestingly, CA-4-mediated apoptotic cell death was further potentiated by pretreatment with autophagy inhibitors (3-methyladenine and bafilomycin A1) or small interfering RNAs against the autophagic genes (Atg5 and Beclin 1). The enhanced anticancer activity of CA-4 and 3-MA was further confirmed in the SGC-7901 xenograft tumor model. These findings suggested that CA-4-elicited autophagic response played a protective role that impeded the eventual cell death while autophagy inhibition was expected to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy of CA-4. Meanwhile, CA-4 treatment led to phosphorylation/activation of JNK and JNK-dependent phosphorylation of Bcl-2. Importantly, JNK inhibitor or JNK siRNA inhibited autophagy but promoted CA-4-induced apoptosis, indicating a key requirement of JNK-Bcl-2 pathway in the activation of autophagy by CA-4. We also identified that pretreatment of Bcl-2 inhibitor (ABT-737) could significantly enhance anticancer activity of CA-4 due to inhibition of autophagy. Taken together, our data suggested that the JNK-Bcl-2 pathway was considered as the critical regulator of CA-4-induced protective autophagy and a potential drug target for chemotherapeutic combination. - Highlights: • Autophagy inhibition could be a potential for combretastatin A-4 antitumor efficacy. • The JNK-Bcl-2 pathway plays a critical role in CA-4-induced autophagy. • ABT-737 enhances CA-4 anticancer activity due to inhibition of autophagy.

  15. Autophagy blockade sensitizes the anticancer activity of CA-4 via JNK-Bcl-2 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) has already entered clinical trials of solid tumors over ten years. However, the limited anticancer activity and dose-dependent toxicity restrict its clinical application. Here, we offered convincing evidence that CA-4 induced autophagy in various cancer cells, which was demonstrated by acridine orange staining of intracellular acidic vesicles, the degradation of p62, the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and GFP-LC3 punctate fluorescence. Interestingly, CA-4-mediated apoptotic cell death was further potentiated by pretreatment with autophagy inhibitors (3-methyladenine and bafilomycin A1) or small interfering RNAs against the autophagic genes (Atg5 and Beclin 1). The enhanced anticancer activity of CA-4 and 3-MA was further confirmed in the SGC-7901 xenograft tumor model. These findings suggested that CA-4-elicited autophagic response played a protective role that impeded the eventual cell death while autophagy inhibition was expected to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy of CA-4. Meanwhile, CA-4 treatment led to phosphorylation/activation of JNK and JNK-dependent phosphorylation of Bcl-2. Importantly, JNK inhibitor or JNK siRNA inhibited autophagy but promoted CA-4-induced apoptosis, indicating a key requirement of JNK-Bcl-2 pathway in the activation of autophagy by CA-4. We also identified that pretreatment of Bcl-2 inhibitor (ABT-737) could significantly enhance anticancer activity of CA-4 due to inhibition of autophagy. Taken together, our data suggested that the JNK-Bcl-2 pathway was considered as the critical regulator of CA-4-induced protective autophagy and a potential drug target for chemotherapeutic combination. - Highlights: • Autophagy inhibition could be a potential for combretastatin A-4 antitumor efficacy. • The JNK-Bcl-2 pathway plays a critical role in CA-4-induced autophagy. • ABT-737 enhances CA-4 anticancer activity due to inhibition of autophagy

  16. Rejuvenation of MPTP-induced human neural precursor cell senescence by activating autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aging of neural stem cell, which can affect brain homeostasis, may be caused by many cellular mechanisms. Autophagy dysfunction was found in aged and neurodegenerative brains. However, little is known about the relationship between autophagy and human neural stem cell (hNSC) aging. The present study used 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) to treat neural precursor cells (NPCs) derived from human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line H9 and investigate related molecular mechanisms involved in this process. MPTP-treated NPCs were found to undergo premature senescence [determined by increased senescence-associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity, elevated intracellular reactive oxygen species level, and decreased proliferation] and were associated with impaired autophagy. Additionally, the cellular senescence phenotypes were manifested at the molecular level by a significant increase in p21 and p53 expression, a decrease in SOD2 expression, and a decrease in expression of some key autophagy-related genes such as Atg5, Atg7, Atg12, and Beclin 1. Furthermore, we found that the senescence-like phenotype of MPTP-treated hNPCs was rejuvenated through treatment with a well-known autophagy enhancer rapamycin, which was blocked by suppression of essential autophagy gene Beclin 1. Taken together, these findings reveal the critical role of autophagy in the process of hNSC aging, and this process can be reversed by activating autophagy. - Highlights: • We successfully establish hESC-derived neural precursor cells. • MPTP treatment induced senescence-like state in hESC-derived NPCs. • MPTP treatment induced impaired autophagy of hESC-derived NPCs. • MPTP-induced hESC-derived NPC senescence was rejuvenated by activating autophagy

  17. Suppression of autophagy augments the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition on human glioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Xiaopeng; Du, Jie; Hua, Song; Zhang, Haowen; Gu, Cheng; Wang, Jie; Yang, Lei; Huang, Jianfeng; Yu, Jiahua, E-mail: yujiahua@suda.edu.cn; Liu, Fenju, E-mail: fangsh@suda.edu.cn

    2015-01-15

    Radiotherapy is an essential component of the standard therapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma. To increase the radiosensitivity of glioma cells is a feasible solution to improve the therapeutic effects. It has been suggested that inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) can radiosensitize glioma cells, probably via the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In this study, human malignant glioma cells, U251 and A172, were treated with an STAT3 inhibitor, WP1066, or a short hairpin RNA plasmid targeting STAT3 to suppress the activation of STAT3 signaling. The radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition were confirmed in glioma cells. Intriguingly, combination of ionizing radiation exposure and STAT3 inhibition triggered a pronounced increase of autophagy flux. To explore the role of autophagy, glioma cells were treated with 3-methyladenine or siRNA for autophagy-related gene 5, and it was demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy further strengthened the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition. Accordingly, more apoptotic cells were induced by the dual inhibition of autophagy and STAT3 signaling. In conclusion, our data revealed a protective role of autophagy in the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition, and inhibition of both autophagy and STAT3 might be a potential therapeutic strategy to increase the radiosensitivity of glioma cells. - Highlights: • Inactivation of STAT3 signaling radiosensitizes malignant glioma cells. • STAT3 inhibition triggers a significant increase of autophagy flux induced by ionizing radiation in glioma cells. • Suppression of autophagy further strengthens the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition in glioma cells. • Dual inhibition of autophagy and STAT3 induce massive apoptotic cells upon exposure to ionizing radiation.

  18. Astragalus Polysaccharide Inhibits Autophagy and Apoptosis from Peroxide-Induced Injury in C2C12 Myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yi; Lu, Lu; Wang, Dongtao; Shi, Ying; Wang, Ming; Huang, Yanfeng; Chen, Dexiu; Deng, Cong; Chen, Jiebin; Lv, Peijia; Wang, Yanjing; Li, Chengjie; Wei, Lian-Bo

    2015-11-01

    The aim is to study the effects and underlying mechanisms of astragalus polysaccharide (APS) on the peroxide-induced injury in C2C12 myoblasts in vitro. Cell viability in the presence or absence of APS was detected by the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium colorimetric assay. The autophagosomes were observed by electron microscopy to examine the influence of APS on autophagy caused by H2O2 in C2C12 cells, and the percentage of apoptosis cells was measured by flow cytometry. To further confirm the effect of H2O2 on C2C12 cells, the protein expression of LC3 and RARP, which are the markers of autophagy and apoptosis, respectively, was analyzed by Western blot, as well as the expression levels of p-p70S6K, p70S6K, Bcl-2, Bax, cyto-C, and Caspase-3, to reveal the underlying mechanisms. We observed multiple effects of APS on C2C12 functionality. APS treatment of C2C12 cells at 1 mg/mL reduced cell viability to less than 70 %, and analysis by electron microscopy revealed that APS also reduced the number of H2O2-induced autophagosome formation. Similarly, APS abated the H2O2-mediated increase in cell apoptosis, which was accompanied by the inhibition of LC3 II and RARP that are normally upregulated by H2O2. The expression of p-p70S6K and p70S6K, however, remained unchanged in C2C12 cells in the Control, H2O2 and H2O2 + APS groups. In addition, APS promoted the expression of protein Bcl-2 in H2O2-treated C2C12 cells, but did not change Bax, thus reducing the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio that in turn prevented the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-3. APS inhibits the autophagy and apoptosis induced by peroxide injury in C2C12 myoblasts through two independent signaling pathways: the mTOR-independent pathway for the inhibition of autophagy, and the caspase-3-dependent pathway for the suppression of apoptosis. PMID:27352334

  19. EGFR-independent autophagy induction with gefitinib and enhancement of its cytotoxic effect by targeting autophagy with clarithromycin in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Shohei; Ito, Kentaro; Yamashiro, Yutaro; Moriya, Shota; Che, Xiao-Fang; Yokoyama, Tomohisa; Hiramoto, Masaki; Miyazawa, Keisuke

    2015-05-22

    Gefitinib (GEF), an inhibitor for EGFR tyrosine kinase, potently induces autophagy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines such as PC-9 cells expressing constitutively activated EGFR kinase by EGFR gene mutation as well as A549 and H226 cells with wild-type EGFR. Unexpectedly, GEF-induced autophagy was also observed in non-NSCLC cells such as murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and leukemia cell lines K562 and HL-60 without EGFR expression. Knockout of EGFR gene in A549 cells by CRISPR/Cas9 system still exhibited autophagy induction after treatment with GEF, indicating that the autophagy induction by GEF is not mediated through inhibiting EGFR kinase activity. Combined treatment with GEF and clarithromycin (CAM), a macrolide antibiotic having the effect of inhibiting autophagy flux, enhances the cytotoxic effect in NSCLC cell lines, although treatment with CAM alone exhibits no cytotoxicity. GEF treatment induced up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress related genes such as CHOP/GADD153 and GRP78. Knockdown of CHOP in PC-9 cells and Chop-knockout MEF both exhibited less sensitivity to GEF than controls. Addition of CAM in culture medium resulted in further pronounced GEF-induced ER stress loading, while CAM alone exhibited no effect. These data suggest that GEF-induced autophagy functions as cytoprotective and indicates the potential therapeutic possibility of using CAM for GEF therapy. Furthermore, it is suggested that the intracellular signaling for autophagy initiation in response to GEF can be completely dissociated from EGFR, but unknown target molecule(s) of GEF for autophagy induction might exist. PMID:25858318

  20. Estimated glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria for prediction of cardiovascular outcomes : a collaborative meta-analysis of individual participant data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsushita, Kunihiro; Coresh, Josef; Sang, Yingying; Chalmers, John; Fox, Caroline; Guallar, Eliseo; Jafar, Tazeen; Jassal, Simerjot K.; Landman, Gijs W. D.; Muntner, Paul; Roderick, Paul; Sairenchi, Toshimi; Schoettker, Ben; Shankar, Anoop; Shlipak, Michael; Tonelli, Marcello; Townend, Jonathan; van Zuilen, Arjan; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Yamashita, Kentaro; Gansevoort, Ron; Sarnak, Mark; Warnock, David G.; Woodward, Mark; Arnlov, Johan; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Background The usefulness of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria for prediction of cardiovascular outcomes is controversial. We aimed to assess the addition of creatinine-based eGFR and albuminuria to traditional risk factors for prediction of cardiovascular risk with a meta-