WorldWideScience

Sample records for autonomic nervous function

  1. The Relationship between Vascular Function and the Autonomic Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiya, Eisuke; Watanabe, Masafumi; Komuro, Issei

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and autonomic nervous system dysfunction are both risk factors for atherosclerosis. There is evidence demonstrating that there is a close interrelationship between these two systems. In hypertension, endothelial dysfunction affects the pathologic process through autonomic nervous pathways, and the pathophysiological process of autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus is closely related with vascular function. However, detailed mechanisms of this interrelationship have not been clearly explained. In this review, we summarize findings concerning the interrelationship between vascular function and the autonomic nervous system from both experimental and clinical studies. The clarification of this interrelationship may provide more comprehensive risk stratification and a new effective therapeutic strategy against atherosclerosis.

  2. Overview of the Autonomic Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be reversible or progressive. Anatomy of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous system is the part of ... organs they connect with. Function of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous system controls internal body processes ...

  3. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart ... breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result ...

  4. Perturbed autonomic nervous system function in metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tentolouris, Nicholas; Argyrakopoulou, Georgia; Katsilambros, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is characterized by the clustering of various common metabolic abnormalities in an individual and it is associated with increased risk for the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Its prevalence in the general population is approximately 25%. Central fat accumulation and insulin resistance are considered as the common denominators of the abnormalities of the metabolic syndrome. Subjects with metabolic syndrome have autonomic nervous system dysfunction characterized by predominance of the sympathetic nervous system in many organs, i.e. heart, kidneys, vasculature, adipose tissue, and muscles. Sympathetic nervous system activation in metabolic syndrome is detected as increased heart rate and blood pressure, diminished heart rate variability, baroreceptor dysfunction, enhanced lipolysis in visceral fat, increased muscle sympathetic nerve activity, and high urine or plasma catecholamine concentrations as well as turnover rates. The augmented sympathetic activity in individuals with metabolic syndrome worsens prognosis of this high-risk population. The mechanisms linking metabolic syndrome with sympathetic activation are complex and not clearly understood. Whether sympathetic overactivity is involved in the development of the metabolic syndrome or is a consequence of it remains to be elucidated since data from prospective studies are missing. Intervention studies have demonstrated that the autonomic disturbances of the metabolic syndrome may be reversible.

  5. Relationship between autonomic nervous system function and acute mountain sickness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Min; Huang Lan; Tian Kaixin; Yu Shiyong; Yu Yang; Qin Jun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the role of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in acute mountain sickness (AMS) during the initial phase at acute high-altitude exposure. Methods: Ninety-nine healthy sea-level residents rapidly ascended to Tibet plateau (3 675 m altitude) by airplane from Chengdu plain (560 m altitude). ANS function was tested in plain and day 2-4 in Tibet by heart rate variability (HRV), cold pressor test (CPT). AMS was evaluated by clinic symptomatic scores. All subjects were divided into non-AMS group (57, scores(4). Results: Compared with non-AMS group, AMS group had higher standard deviation of normal to normal intervals (SDNN), root mean square of delta RR (rMSSD), low-frequency (LF) power, and normalized low-frequency (Lfnu) power in plain (P50 ms(PNN50), rMSSD (P<0.01) and SDNN, LF, total power (TP) (P<0.05). Although no significant differences in the increase of SP and DP during CPT were found between 2 groups in plain, the SP increase during CPT of AMS group was less than non-AMS group (P<0.05) at 3 675 m altitude. AMS symptomatic scores was not only positively correlated with SDNN,rMSSD, LF/HF in plain (P<0.05), but also negatively correlated with Hfnu in plain (P<0.05). Conclusion: During the initial high altitude exposure, ANS modulation is generally blunted, but the relatively predominant sympathetic control is enhanced, and this characteristic change of ANS function is positively correlated with the development of AMS.

  6. Autonomic nervous system function in young children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have been reported to have alterations in autonomic nervous system function as measured by vagal activity via heart rate variability. Whether the same is true for children is unknown. We compared young children 7 to 10 years of age with functional abdominal...

  7. Analysis of Autonomic Nervous System Functional Age and Heart Rate Variability in Mine Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasicko T

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Heavy working conditions and many unpropitious factors influencing workers health participate in development of various health disorders, among other autonomic cardiovascular regulation malfunction. The aim of this study is to draw a comparison of autonomic nervous system functional age and heart rate variability changes between workers with and without mining occupational exposure.

  8. Adrenergic receptor polymorphisms and autonomic nervous system function in human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Koichiro; Matsunaga, Tetsuro; Adachi, Tetsuya; Aoki, Norihiko; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Tsuda, Kinsuke

    2006-09-01

    Adrenergic receptors (ARs) are cell-surface G-protein-coupled receptors for catecholamines. They are essential components of the sympathetic nervous system, organized within the autonomic nervous system (ANS), which controls various physiological functions, including energy homeostasis and metabolism of glucose and lipids. An impairment of ANS function in metabolism is considered to be one of the pathological states associated with human obesity and related metabolic diseases; thus, alterations in AR function might be implicated in the pathophysiology of these diseases. Several studies have suggested an association between obesity phenotypes and some AR polymorphisms. In vitro and human clinical studies indicate that some of these polymorphisms have functional and pathophysiological significance, including the linkage to ANS function. This review summarizes present knowledge of AR polymorphisms related to human obesity, and their association with ANS function.

  9. Cardiovascular autonomic nervous system function and aerobic capacity in type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet eHägglund

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Impaired cardiovascular autonomic nervous system (ANS function has been reported in type 1 diabetes patients. ANS function, evaluated by heart rate variability (HRV, systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS, has been linked to aerobic capacity (VO2peak in healthy subjects, but relationship is unknown in type 1 diabetes. We examined cardiovascular ANS function at rest and during function tests, and its relations to VO2peak in type 1 diabetes individuals. Ten type 1 diabetes patients (T1D (34 ± 7 years and 11 healthy control (CON (31 ± 6 years age and leisure-time physical activity-matched men were studied. Autonomic nervous system function was recorded at rest and during active standing and handgrip. Determination of VO2peak was obtained with graded cycle ergometer test. During ANS recordings SBPV, BRS, and resting HRV did not differ between groups, but alpha1 responses to manoeuvres in detrended fluctuation analyses were smaller in T1D (active standing; 32%, handgrip; 20%, medians than in CON (active standing; 71%, handgrip; 54%, p < 0.05. VO2peak was lower in T1D (36 ± 4 ml ∙ kg-1 ∙ min-1 than in CON (45 ± 9 ml ∙ kg-1 ∙ min-1, p < 0.05. Resting HRV measures, RMSSD, HF and SD1 correlated with VO2peak in CON (p < 0.05 and when analysing groups together. These results suggest that T1D had lower VO2peak, weaker HRV response to manoeuvres, but not impaired cardiovascular ANS function at rest compared with CON. Resting parasympathetic cardiac activity correlated with VO2peak in CON but not in T1D. Detrended fluctuation analysis could be a sensitive detector of changes in cardiac ANS function in type 1 diabetes.

  10. Autonomic nervous system function in type 2 diabetes using conventional clinical autonomic tests, heart rate and blood pressure variability measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sucharita

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are currently approximately 40.9 million patients with diabetes mellitus in India and this number is expected to rise to about 69.9 million by the year 2025. This high burden of diabetes is likely to be associated with an increase in associated complications. Materials and Methods: A total of 23 (15 male and 8 female patients with type 2 diabetes of 10-15 years duration and their age and gender matched controls (n=23 were recruited. All subjects underwent detailed clinical proforma, questionnaire related to autonomic symptoms, anthropometry, peripheral neural examination and tests of autonomic nervous system including both conventional and newer methods (heart rate and blood pressure variability. Results: Conventional tests of cardiac parasympathetic and sympathetic activity were significantly lower in patients with diabetes compared to the controls (P<0.05. The diabetic patients group had significantly lower high frequency and low-frequency HRV when expressed in absolute units (P<0.05 and total power (P<0.01 compared to the controls. Conclusion: Data from the current study demonstrated that diabetics had both cardiac sympathetic and cardiac parasympathetic nervous system involvement. The presence of symptoms and involvement of both components of the autonomic nervous system suggest that dysfunction has been present for a while in these diabetics. There is a strong need for earlier and regular evaluation of autonomic nervous system in type 2 diabetics to prevent further complications.

  11. Functional programming of the autonomic nervous system by early life immune exposure: implications for anxiety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luba Sominsky

    Full Text Available Neonatal exposure of rodents to an immune challenge alters a variety of behavioural and physiological parameters in adulthood. In particular, neonatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.05 mg/kg, i.p. exposure produces robust increases in anxiety-like behaviour, accompanied by persistent changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis functioning. Altered autonomic nervous system (ANS activity is an important physiological contributor to the generation of anxiety. Here we examined the long term effects of neonatal LPS exposure on ANS function and the associated changes in neuroendocrine and behavioural indices. ANS function in Wistar rats, neonatally treated with LPS, was assessed via analysis of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH in the adrenal glands on postnatal days (PNDs 50 and 85, and via plethysmographic assessment of adult respiratory rate in response to mild stress (acoustic and light stimuli. Expression of genes implicated in regulation of autonomic and endocrine activity in the relevant brain areas was also examined. Neonatal LPS exposure produced an increase in TH phosphorylation and activity at both PNDs 50 and 85. In adulthood, LPS-treated rats responded with increased respiratory rates to the lower intensities of stimuli, indicative of increased autonomic arousal. These changes were associated with increases in anxiety-like behaviours and HPA axis activity, alongside altered expression of the GABA-A receptor α2 subunit, CRH receptor type 1, CRH binding protein, and glucocorticoid receptor mRNA levels in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus. The current findings suggest that in addition to the commonly reported alterations in HPA axis functioning, neonatal LPS challenge is associated with a persistent change in ANS activity, associated with, and potentially contributing to, the anxiety-like phenotype. The findings of this study reflect the importance of changes in the perinatal microbial environment on the ontogeny of

  12. Functional programming of the autonomic nervous system by early life immune exposure: implications for anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sominsky, Luba; Fuller, Erin A; Bondarenko, Evgeny; Ong, Lin Kooi; Averell, Lee; Nalivaiko, Eugene; Dunkley, Peter R; Dickson, Phillip W; Hodgson, Deborah M

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal exposure of rodents to an immune challenge alters a variety of behavioural and physiological parameters in adulthood. In particular, neonatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) exposure produces robust increases in anxiety-like behaviour, accompanied by persistent changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning. Altered autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity is an important physiological contributor to the generation of anxiety. Here we examined the long term effects of neonatal LPS exposure on ANS function and the associated changes in neuroendocrine and behavioural indices. ANS function in Wistar rats, neonatally treated with LPS, was assessed via analysis of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the adrenal glands on postnatal days (PNDs) 50 and 85, and via plethysmographic assessment of adult respiratory rate in response to mild stress (acoustic and light stimuli). Expression of genes implicated in regulation of autonomic and endocrine activity in the relevant brain areas was also examined. Neonatal LPS exposure produced an increase in TH phosphorylation and activity at both PNDs 50 and 85. In adulthood, LPS-treated rats responded with increased respiratory rates to the lower intensities of stimuli, indicative of increased autonomic arousal. These changes were associated with increases in anxiety-like behaviours and HPA axis activity, alongside altered expression of the GABA-A receptor α2 subunit, CRH receptor type 1, CRH binding protein, and glucocorticoid receptor mRNA levels in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus. The current findings suggest that in addition to the commonly reported alterations in HPA axis functioning, neonatal LPS challenge is associated with a persistent change in ANS activity, associated with, and potentially contributing to, the anxiety-like phenotype. The findings of this study reflect the importance of changes in the perinatal microbial environment on the ontogeny of physiological processes.

  13. Potential benefits of mindfulness during pregnancy on maternal autonomic nervous system function and infant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeken, Marijke A K A; Jones, Alexander; Otte, Renée A; Nyklíček, Ivan; Van den Bergh, Bea R H

    2017-02-01

    Mindfulness is known to decrease psychological distress. Possible benefits in pregnancy have rarely been explored. Our aim was to examine the prospective association of mindfulness with autonomic nervous system function during pregnancy and with later infant social-emotional development. Pregnant women (N = 156) completed self-report mindfulness and emotional distress questionnaires, and had their autonomic function assessed in their first and third trimesters, including heart rate (HR), indices of heart rate variability (HRV), preejection period (PEP), and systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). The social-emotional development of 109 infants was assessed at 4 months of age. More mindful pregnant women had less prenatal and postnatal emotional distress (p mindful mothers, parasympathetic activity decreased less (RMSSD: p = .01; HF HRV: p = .03) and sympathetic activity (inversely related to PEP) increased less (PEP: p = .02) between trimesters. Their offspring displayed less negative social-emotional behavior (p = .03) compared to offspring of less mindful mothers. Mindfulness in pregnancy was associated with ANS changes likely to be adaptive and with better social-emotional offspring development. Interventions to increase mindfulness during pregnancy might improve maternal and offspring health, but randomized trials are needed to demonstrate this.

  14. Autonomic nervous system function in patients with functional abdominal pain. An experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L S; Christiansen, P; Raundahl, U

    1993-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain--that is, pain without demonstrable organic abnormalities--has often been associated with psychologic stress. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether sympathetic nervous system response to laboratory stress and basal parasympathetic neural activity were...

  15. Autonomic nervous functions in fetal type Minamata disease patients: assessment of heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Tomoko; Matsukura, Makoto; Okamoto, Miwako; Harada, Noriaki; Kitano, Takao; Miike, Teruhisa; Futatsuka, Makoto

    2002-12-01

    In order to assess the cardiovascular autonomic nervous functions in patients with fetal type Minamata disease (FMD), we investigated blood pressure (BP), and conducted time and frequency domain analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). Subjects were 9 patients in Meisuien recognized as FMD, and 13 healthy age matched control subjects. HRV and BP were assessed after subjects rested in a supine position for 10 minutes. Electrocardiographic (ECG) data were collected for 3 minutes during natural breathing. Time domain analysis (the average of R-R intervals [Mean RR], standard deviation of R-R intervals [SD RR], coefficient of variation [CV]), and frequency domain analysis by fast Fourier transformation (FFT) (power of low frequency [LF] and high frequency [HF] component, expressed in normalized units[nu]) were then conducted. In the time domain analysis, the mean RR of the FMD group was significantly lower than that of the control group. Neither SD RR nor CV showed significant differences between the two groups, but both tended to be lower in the FMD group. In the frequency domain analysis, the HF component of the FMD group was significantly lower than that of the control group. Pulse pressure (PP) was significantly lower in the FMD subjects. These findings suggest that parasympathetic nervous dysfunction might exist in FMD patients, who were exposed to high doses of methylmercury (MeHg) during the prenatal period. Decrease of PP might be due to degenerative changes of blood vessels driven by exposure to high doses of MeHg.

  16. Measuring quality of sleep and autonomic nervous function in healthy Japanese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Miki Sato,1 Yuko Yasuhara,2 Tetsuya Tanioka,2 Yukie Iwasa,2 Masafumi Miyake,3 Toshiyuki Yasui,2 Masahito Tomotake,2 Haruo Kobayashi,4 Rozzano C Locsin51Department of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Shikoku University, 2Department of Nursing, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3Tokushima Prefectural Minami Health Care Center, Tokushima, 4Faculty of Medical Welfare, Kawasaki University of Medical Welfare, Kurashiki, Japan; 5Christine E Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USAAbstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between quality of sleep and autonomic nervous functioning in healthy adult Japanese women using three measures, namely, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI for subjective assessment of sleep quality, actigraphy for objective assessment of sleep, and heart rate variability using high frequency and low frequency domains. Participants were 31 healthy women in their 20s to 40s who met the selection criteria, including having normal monthly menstrual periods. Participants were categorized as good or poor sleepers according to their PSQI score. Median correlation coefficients of activity count and high frequency were −0.62 (range −0.43 to −0.84 for good sleepers and −0.45 (range 0.003 to −0.64 for poor sleepers. Good sleepers showed a significantly higher correlation of activity count and high frequency (Z=−2.11, P<0.05. Median correlation coefficients of activity count and low frequency/high frequency were 0.54 (range 0.29–0.73 for good sleepers and 0.41 (range 0.11–0.63 for poor sleepers. The PSQI, actigraphy data, and heart rate variability results showed positive correlations between sleep time as measured by PSQI and duration of inactivity as measured by actigraphy (r=0.446, P<0.05 and sleep time as measured by actigraphy (r=0.377, P<0.05, and a negative correlation between sleep time as measured by PSQI and the

  17. Autonomic nervous system and immune system interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, M J; Ganta, C K

    2014-07-01

    The present review assesses the current state of literature defining integrative autonomic-immune physiological processing, focusing on studies that have employed electrophysiological, pharmacological, molecular biological, and central nervous system experimental approaches. Central autonomic neural networks are informed of peripheral immune status via numerous communicating pathways, including neural and non-neural. Cytokines and other immune factors affect the level of activity and responsivity of discharges in sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves innervating diverse targets. Multiple levels of the neuraxis contribute to cytokine-induced changes in efferent parasympathetic and sympathetic nerve outflows, leading to modulation of peripheral immune responses. The functionality of local sympathoimmune interactions depends on the microenvironment created by diverse signaling mechanisms involving integration between sympathetic nervous system neurotransmitters and neuromodulators; specific adrenergic receptors; and the presence or absence of immune cells, cytokines, and bacteria. Functional mechanisms contributing to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway likely involve novel cholinergic-adrenergic interactions at peripheral sites, including autonomic ganglion and lymphoid targets. Immune cells express adrenergic and nicotinic receptors. Neurotransmitters released by sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve endings bind to their respective receptors located on the surface of immune cells and initiate immune-modulatory responses. Both sympathetic and parasympathetic arms of the autonomic nervous system are instrumental in orchestrating neuroimmune processes, although additional studies are required to understand dynamic and complex adrenergic-cholinergic interactions. Further understanding of regulatory mechanisms linking the sympathetic nervous, parasympathetic nervous, and immune systems is critical for understanding relationships between chronic disease

  18. Anxiety and depression are related to autonomic nervous system function in women with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Monica E; Burr, Robert L; Cain, Kevin C; Hertig, Vicky; Weisman, Pam; Heitkemper, Margaret M

    2003-02-01

    This study compared women with irritable bowel syndrome who had a history of an anxiety or depressive disorder to those without symptoms of either disorder on indicators of cardiac parasympathetic activity, autonomic nervous system balance, and general autonomic activity. The Diagnostic Interview Schedule was used to determine anxiety or depressive disorders, and a Holter monitor was used to record R-R intervals over 24 hr. A similar comparison was done with healthy controls. Among women with irritable bowel syndrome, those with a positive history had lower parasympathetic and general activity throughout the 24-hr period than did women without a diagnosis. Indicators of autonomic balance were slightly higher in women with a positive history compared to those without a history. Similar differences were seen in controls. Thus, a history of anxiety and depressive disorders is associated with lower parasympathetic activity, both in women with IBS and healthy controls. Further exploration is needed to understand if lower parasympathetic activity influences the pain and stool pattern changes seen in persons with irritable bowel syndrome.

  19. Effects of work stress and home stress on autonomic nervous function in Japanese male workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Eri; Iwata, Toyoto; Murata, Katsuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic imbalance is one of the important pathways through which psychological stress contributes to cardiovascular diseases/sudden death. Although previous studies have focused mainly on stress at work (work stress), the association between autonomic function and stress at home (home stress) is still poorly understood. The purpose was to clarify the effect of work/home stress on autonomic function in 1,809 Japanese male workers. We measured corrected QT (QTc) interval and QT index on the electrocardiogram along with blood pressure and heart rate. Participants provided self-reported information about the presence/absence of work/home stress and the possible confounders affecting QT indicators. Home stress was related positively to QT index (p=0.040) after adjusting for the possible confounders, though work stress did not show a significant relation to QTc interval or QT index. The odds ratio of home stress to elevated QT index (≥105) was 2.677 (95% CI, 1.050 to 6.822). Work/home stress showed no significant relation to blood pressure or heart rate. These findings suggest that autonomic imbalance, readily assessed by QT indicators, can be induced by home stress in Japanese workers. Additional research is needed to identify different types of home stress that are strongly associated with autonomic imbalance.

  20. Autonomic nervous system function in patients with functional abdominal pain. An experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L S; Christiansen, P; Raundahl, U

    1993-01-01

    disturbed in 22 patients with functional abdominal pain (functional group) as compared with 14 healthy controls (healthy group) and 26 patients with organic abdominal pain (organic group) due to duodenal ulcer (DU), gallstones, or urinary tract calculi. Plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and serum...... cortisol measurements were included, to assess the pituitary-adrenocortical axis. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and plasma adrenaline increased significantly in all groups in response to a stress test (mental arithmetic). Plasma noradrenaline increased in the DU patients only, and plasma ACTH...

  1. [Autonomic nervous system in diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emdin, M

    2001-08-01

    Hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia have a primary role in determining the early functional and later anatomic changes at the level of the autonomic pathways controlling the circulation, and besides in directly influencing cardiac and vascular cellular targets and feed-back baroreceptor system sensitivity to neurohumoral modulation in patients with diabetes mellitus. The basic mechanisms of dysfunction and damage, and the clinical and prognostic value of diabetic cardiovascular dysautonomia are discussed together with the diagnostic apparatus and the possible therapeutic approaches.

  2. Effects of sildenafil on autonomic nervous function during sleep in obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Neves

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of sildenafil on the autonomic nervous system in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea. METHODS: Thirteen male patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (mean age 43±10 years with a mean body mass index of 26.7±1.9 kg/m² received a single 50-mg dose of sildenafil or a placebo at bedtime. All-night polysomnography and heart rate variability were recorded. Frequency domain analysis of heart rate variability was performed for the central five-minute sample of the longest uninterrupted interval of slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep, as well as for one-minute samples during apnea and during slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep after resumption of respiration. RESULTS: Compared to the placebo, sildenafil was associated with an increase in the normalized high-frequency (HFnu components and a decrease in the low/high-frequency components of the heart rate variability ratio (LF/HF in slow wave sleep (p<0.01 for both. Differences in heart rate variability parameters between one-minute post-apnea and apnea samples (Δ= difference between resumption of respiration and apnea were assessed. A trend toward a decreasing magnitude of ΔLF activity was observed during rapid eye movement sleep with sildenafil in comparison to placebo (p=0.046. Additionally, Δ LF/HF in SWS and rapid eye movement sleep was correlated with mean desaturation (sR= -0.72 and -0.51, respectively, p= 0.01 for both, and Δ HFnu in rapid eye movement sleep was correlated with mean desaturation (sR= 0.66, p= 0.02 and the desaturation index (sR= 0.58, p = 0.047. CONCLUSIONS: The decrease in arousal response to apnea/hypopnea events along with the increase in HFnu components and decrease in LH/HF components of the heart rate variability ratio during slow wave sleep suggest that, in addition to worsening sleep apnea, sildenafil has potentially immediate cardiac effects in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea.

  3. Social functioning and autonomic nervous system sensitivity across vocal and musical emotion in Williams syndrome and autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, Anna; Ng, Rowena; Crivelli, Davide; Neumann, Dirk; Arnold, Andrew J; Woo-VonHoogenstyn, Nicholas; Lai, Philip; Trauner, Doris; Bellugi, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Both Williams syndrome (WS) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are associated with unusual auditory phenotypes with respect to processing vocal and musical stimuli, which may be shaped by the atypical social profiles that characterize the syndromes. Autonomic nervous system (ANS) reactivity to vocal and musical emotional stimuli was examined in 12 children with WS, 17 children with ASD, and 20 typically developing (TD) children, and related to their level of social functioning. The results of this small-scale study showed that after controlling for between-group differences in cognitive ability, all groups showed similar emotion identification performance across conditions. Additionally, in ASD, lower autonomic reactivity to human voice, and in TD, to musical emotion, was related to more normal social functioning. Compared to TD, both clinical groups showed increased arousal to vocalizations. A further result highlighted uniquely increased arousal to music in WS, contrasted with a decrease in arousal in ASD and TD. The ASD and WS groups exhibited arousal patterns suggestive of diminished habituation to the auditory stimuli. The results are discussed in the context of the clinical presentation of WS and ASD.

  4. Nutritional stimulation of the autonomic nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Misha DP Luyer; Quirine Habes; Richard van Hak; Wim Buurman

    2011-01-01

    Disturbance of the inflammatory response in the gut is important in several clinical diseases ranging from inflammatory bowel disease to postoperative ileus. Several feedback mechanisms exist that control the inflammatory cascade and avoid collateral damage. In the gastrointestinal tract, it is of particular importance to control the immune response to maintain the balance that allows dietary uptake and utilization of nutrients on one hand, while preventing invasion of bacteria and toxins on the other hand. The process of digestion and absorption of nutrients requires a relative hyporesponsiveness of the immune cells in the gut to luminal contents which is not yet fully understood. Recently, the autonomic nervous system has been identified as an important pathway to control local and systemic inflammation and gut barrier integrity. Activation of the pathway is possible via electrical or via pharmacological interventions, but is also achieved in a physiological manner by ingestion of dietary lipids. Administration of dietary lipids has been shown to be very effective in reducing the inflammatory cascade and maintaining intestinal barrier integrity in several experimental studies. This beneficial effect of nutrition on the inflammatory inflammatory response and intestinal barrier integrity opens new therapeutic opportunities for treatment of certain gastrointestinal disorders. Furthermore, this neural feedback mechanism provides more insight in the relative hyporesponsiveness of the immune cells in the gut. Here, we will discuss the regulatory function of the autonomic nervous system on the inflammatory response and gut barrier function and the potential benefit in a clinical setting.

  5. Comparative anatomy of the autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Stefan

    2011-11-16

    This short review aims to point out the general anatomical features of the autonomic nervous systems of non-mammalian vertebrates. In addition it attempts to outline the similarities and also the increased complexity of the autonomic nervous patterns from fish to tetrapods. With the possible exception of the cyclostomes, perhaps the most striking feature of the vertebrate autonomic nervous system is the similarity between the vertebrate classes. An evolution of the complexity of the system can be seen, with the segmental ganglia of elasmobranchs incompletely connected longitudinally, while well developed paired sympathetic chains are present in teleosts and the tetrapods. In some groups the sympathetic chains may be reduced (dipnoans and caecilians), and have yet to be properly described in snakes. Cranial autonomic pathways are present in the oculomotor (III) and vagus (X) nerves of gnathostome fish and the tetrapods, and with the evolution of salivary and lachrymal glands in the tetrapods, also in the facial (VII) and glossopharyngeal (IX) nerves.

  6. Autonomic Nervous System Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zesiewicz, Theresa A.; Baker, Matthew J.; Wahba, Mervat; Hauser, Robert A.

    2003-03-01

    Autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), affects 70% to 80% of patients, and causes significant morbidity and discomfort. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction symptoms in PD include sexual dysfunction, swallowing and gastrointestinal disorders, bowel and bladder abnormalities, sleep disturbances, and derangements of cardiovascular regulation, particularly, orthostatic hypotension. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction in PD may be caused by an underlying degenerative process that affects the autonomic ganglia, brainstem nuclei, and hypothalamic nuclei. Anti-parkinsonian medications can cause or worsen symptoms of ANS dysfunction. The care of a PD patient with ANS dysfunction relies on its recognition and directed treatment, including coordinated care between the neurologist and appropriate subspecialist. Pharmacotherapy may be useful to treat orthostasis, gastrointestinal, urinary, and sexual dysfunction.

  7. Postnatal Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Control in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke Nederend

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital defect. During childhood, survival is generally good but, in adulthood, late complications are not uncommon. Abnormal autonomic control in children with congenital heart disease may contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of these long term sequelae. This narrative review of 34 studies aims to summarize current knowledge on function of the autonomic nervous system in children with a congenital heart defect. Large scale studies that measure both branches of the nervous system for prolonged periods of time in well-defined patient cohorts in various phases of childhood and adolescence are currently lacking. Pending such studies, there is not yet a good grasp on the extent and direction of sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic function in pediatric congenital heart disease. Longitudinal studies in homogenous patient groups linking autonomic nervous system function and clinical outcome are warranted.

  8. N-Acetylmannosamine improves sleep-wake quality in middle-aged mice: relevance to autonomic nervous function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Masayoshi; Ito, Koichi; Hayakawa, Koji; Yagi, Shintaro; Shiota, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with a variety of physiological changes originating peripherally and centrally, including within the autonomic nervous system. Sleep-wake disturbances constitute reliable hallmarks of aging in several animal species and humans. Recent studies have been interested in N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) a potential therapeutic agent for improving quality of life, as well as preventing age-related cognitive decline. In this study, ManNAc (5.0 mg/ml) was administered in the drinking water of middle-aged male C57BL/6J mice (55 weeks old) for 7 days. Mice were housed under a 12:12 h light:dark cycle at 23-24 °C. We evaluated bio-behavioral activity using electrocardiogram, body temperature and locomotor activity recorded by an implanted telemetry transmitter. To estimate sleep-wake profile, surface electroencephalogram and electromyogram leads connected to a telemetry transmitter were also implanted in mice. Autonomic nervous activity was evaluated using power spectral analysis of heart rate variability. ManNAc-treated mice spent more time in a wakeful state and less time in slow wave sleep during the dark phase. Parasympathetic nervous activity was increased following ManNAc treatment, then the sympatho-vagal balance was shifted predominance of parasympathetic nervous system. Furthermore, improvement in sleep-wake pattern was associated with increased parasympathetic nervous activity. These results suggest that ManNAc treatment can improve bio-behavioral activity and sleep-wake quality in middle-aged mice. This may have implications for improving sleep patterns in elderly humans.

  9. Impact of simulated microgravity and caloric restriction on autonomic nervous system function in adipose tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschmann, Michael; Adams, Frauke; Tank, Jens; Schaller, Karin; Boese, Andrea; Heer, Martina; Klause, Susanne; Luft, Friedrich C.; Jordan, Jens

    2005-08-01

    Long term immobilization and reduced food intake is often associated with development of orthostatic intolerance. Blocking the norepinephrine transporter (NET) can also mimic symptoms of orthostatic intolerance. Therefore, we hypothesized that simulated microgravity (14 days bed rest at head down tilt, BR) can cause changes in postganglionic NET function and adrenoreceptor (AR) sensitivity and these changes can be aggravated by hypocaloric food intake. For testing, two microdialysis probes were inserted into subcutaneous adipose tissue of eight young healthy men at day 1 and 14 of BR and perfused with Ringer's solution and increasing doses of tyramine and isoproterenol in order to simulate NET blockade and stimulate AR, respectively. At day 14 of eucaloric diet and BR, isoproterenol induced lipolysis was greater, whereas at day 14 of hypocaloric diet and BR, tyramine induced lipolysis was greater when compared to day 1. Therefore, the nutritional state affects NET function and AR sensitivity differently during BR.

  10. Changes of autonomic nervous system function in healthy young men during initial phase at acute high-altitude exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Jun; Huang Lan; Tian Kaixin; Yu Shiyong; Yu Yang; Long Min

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of autonomic nervous system (ANS) function during the initial phase at acute high-altitude exposure. Methods: Ninety-nine healthy sea-level male residents were studied in Chengdu plain and then Tibet plateau. Heart rate variability (HRV), cold pressor test (CPT), resting heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured at baseline (560 m altitude) and in 2 to 4 d after arriving at Tibet plateau (3 675 m altitude) to assess the ANS function. Results: Compared with baseline, on day 2 in Tibet the standard deviation of normal to normal intervals (SDNN), high-frequency (HF) power, total power (TP), root mean square of delta RR (rMSSD), percentage of delta RR>50 ms (PNN50), normalized high-frequency (Hfnu) and fractal dimension (FD) decreased significantly (SDNN, HF,TP P<0.01, rMSSD, PNNs0, Hfnu, FD P<0.05), while the normalized low-frequency (Lfnu) and LF/HF increased significantly (P<0.01). During day 3-4 in Tibet, SDNN, rMSSD, HF, TP and Hfnu tended to rebound while Lfnu and LF/HF decreased towards baseline day by day. In addition, in Tibet the increase in systolic pressure (SP) and diastolic pressure (DP) during CPT decreased significantly (P<0.01, 0.05), but resting HR increased compared with baseline (P<0.01). Conclusion: ANS modulation is generally blunted, and the relatively predominant sympathetic control is enhanced originally, then it reverts to the sea level states gradually during the initial days of acute high-altitude exposure.

  11. Are Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System Activity and Perceived Stress Related to Functional Somatic Symptoms in Adolescents? The TRAILS Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin A M Janssens

    Full Text Available Stressors have been related to medically insufficiently explained or functional somatic symptoms (FSS. However, the underlying mechanism of this association is largely unclear. In the current study, we examined whether FSS are associated with different perceived stress and cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS levels during a standardized stressful situation, and whether these associations are symptom-specific.We examined 715 adolescents (16.1 years, 51.3% girls from the Dutch cohort study Tracking Adolescents' Individual Lives Sample during the Groningen Social Stress Test (GSST. FSS were assessed by the Youth Self-Report, and clustered into a cluster of overtiredness, dizziness and musculoskeletal pain and a cluster of headache and gastrointestinal symptoms. Perceived stress levels (i.e. unpleasantness and arousal were assessed by the Self-Assessment Manikin, and cardiac ANS activity by assessing heart rate variability (HRV-HF and pre-ejection period (PEP. Perceived stress and cardiac ANS levels before, during, and after the GSST were studied as well as cardiac ANS reactivity. Linear regression analyses were used to examine the associations.Perceived arousal levels during (beta = 0.09, p = 0.04 and after (beta = 0.07, p = 0.047 the GSST, and perceived unpleasantness levels before (beta = 0.07, p = 0.048 and during (beta = 0.12, p = 0.001 the GSST were related to FSS during the past couple of months. The association between perceived stress and FSS was stronger for the FSS cluster of overtiredness, dizziness and musculoskeletal pain than for the cluster of headache and gastrointestinal symptoms. Neither ANS activity levels before, during, and after the GSST, nor maximal HF-HRV and PEP reactivity were related to FSS.This study suggests that perceived stress levels during social stress are related to FSS, whereas cardiac ANS activity and reactivity are not related to FSS.

  12. Altered balance in the autonomic nervous system in schizophrenic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, B M; Mehlsen, J; Behnke, K

    1988-01-01

    .05). Heart-rate response to inspiration was greater in non-medicated schizophrenics compared to normal subjects (P less than 0.05), whereas no difference was found between medicated and non-medicated schizophrenics. The results show that the balance in the autonomic nervous system is altered in schizophrenic...... patients with a hyperexcitability in both the sympathetic and the parasympathetic division. Our study has thus indicated a dysfunction in the autonomic nervous system per se and the previous interpretations of attentional orienting responses in schizophrenia is questioned. Medication with neuroleptics......The aim of the present study was to evaluate the autonomic nervous function in schizophrenic patients. Twenty-eight patients (29 +/- 6 years) diagnosed as schizophrenics and in stable medication were included, together with ten schizophrenic patients (25 +/- 5 years) who were unmedicated. Eleven...

  13. [Emotion, amygdala, and autonomic nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueyama, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    Emotion refers to the dynamic changes of feeling accompanied by the alteration of physical and visceral activities. Autonomic nervous system (sympathetic and parasympathetic) regulates the visceral activities. Therefore, monitoring and analyzing autonomic nervous activity help understand the emotional changes. To this end, the survey of the expression of immediate early genes (IEGs), such as c-Fos in the brain and target organs, and the viral transneuronal labeling method using the pseudorabies virus (PRV) have enabled the visualization of the neurocircuitry of emotion. By comparing c-Fos expression and data from PRV or other neuroanatomical labeling techniques, the central sites that regulate emotional stress-induced autonomic activation can be deduced. Such regions have been identified in the limbic system (e. g., the extended amygdaloid complex; lateral septum; and infralimbic, insular, and ventromedial temporal cortical regions), as well as in several hypothalamic and brainstem nuclei. The amygdala is structurally diverse and comprises several subnuclei, which play a role in emotional process via projections from the cortex and a variety of subcortical structures. All amygdaloid subnuclei receive psychological information from other limbic systems, while the lateral and central subnuclei receive peripheral and sensory information. Output to the hypothalamus and peripheral sympathetic system mainly originates from the medial amygdala. As estrogen receptor α, estrogen receptor β, and androgen receptor are expressed in the medial amygdala, sex steroids may modulate the autonomic nervous activities.

  14. Are Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System Activity and Perceived Stress Related to Functional Somatic Symptoms in Adolescents? The TRAILS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Karin A. M.; Riese, Harriette; Van Roon, Arie M.; Hunfeld, Joke A. M.; Groot, Paul F. C.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Stressors have been related to medically insufficiently explained or functional somatic symptoms (FSS). However, the underlying mechanism of this association is largely unclear. In the current study, we examined whether FSS are associated with different perceived stress and cardiac autonom

  15. Autonomic nervous system dysregulation in pediatric hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feber, Janusz; Ruzicka, Marcel; Geier, Pavel; Litwin, Mieczyslaw

    2014-05-01

    Historically, primary hypertension (HTN) has been prevalent typically in adults. Recent data however, suggests an increasing number of children diagnosed with primary HTN, mainly in the setting of obesity. One of the factors considered in the etiology of HTN is the autonomous nervous system, namely its dysregulation. In the past, the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) was regarded as a system engaged mostly in buffering major acute changes in blood pressure (BP), in response to physical and emotional stressors. Recent evidence suggests that the SNS plays a much broader role in the regulation of BP, including the development and maintenance of sustained HTN by a chronically elevated central sympathetic tone in adults and children with central/visceral obesity. Consequently, attempts have been made to reduce the SNS hyperactivity, in order to intervene early in the course of the disease and prevent HTN-related complications later in life.

  16. Of Scaredy Cats and Cold Fish: The autonomic nervous system and behaviour in young children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Dierckx (Bram)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The autonomic nervous system regulates the body’s internal functions. The goal of this regulation is to maintain bodily homeostasis in a changing external environment. The autonomic nervous system acts largely independent of volition and controls heart rate, respiratory

  17. Cardiac autonomic nervous system activity in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liatis, Stavros; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Katsilambros, Nikolaos

    2004-08-01

    The development of obesity is caused by a disturbance of energy balance, with energy intake exceeding energy expenditure. As the autonomic nervous system (ANS) has a role in the regulation of both these variables, it has become a major focus of investigation in the fields of obesity pathogenesis. The enhanced cardiac sympathetic drive shown in most of the studies in obese persons might be due to an increase in their levels of circulating insulin. The role of leptin needs further investigation with studies in humans. There is a blunted response of the cardiac sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity in obese subjects after consumption of a carbohydrate-rich meal as well as after insulin administration. This might be due to insulin resistance. It is speculated that increased SNS activity in obesity may contribute to the development of hypertension in genetically susceptible individuals. It is also speculated that the increase in cardiac SNS activity under fasting conditions in obesity may be associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  18. Moderate Exercise Restores Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function and Autonomic Nervous System Activity in Obese Rats Induced by High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Mello Gomes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Metabolic syndrome has been identified as one of the most significant threats to human health in the 21st century. Exercise training has been shown to counteract obesity and metabolic syndrome. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of moderate exercise training on pancreatic beta-cell function and autonomic nervous system (ANS activity in rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD. Methods: Weaning rats were divided into four groups: rats fed a standard chow or HFD (sedentary, Control-SED and HFD-SED; or exercised, Control-EXE and HFD-EXE, respectively. Exercised rats ran (from 21- to 91-days-old for 60 minutes (3 times/week over a 10-week period. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. Pancreatic islets were isolated to study glucose-induced insulin secretion (GIIS. Parasympathetic and sympathetic nerve electrical signals were measured, and liver samples were processed and histologically analyzed. Results: Exercise prevented obesity, insulin resistance, and liver steatosis as well as improved total cholesterol, ALT, and AST levels. Islets from HFD rats showed insulin hypersecretion which was ameliorated by exercise. Exercise decreased vagal nerve activity in the HFD-EXE group and increased the activity of the sympathetic nervous system in both exercised groups. Conclusion: Exercise prevents obesity and liver steatosis and restores pancreatic beta-cell function and ANS activity in HFD-obese rats.

  19. Autonomic nervous system correlates in movement observation and motor imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eCollet

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the current article is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature offering a better understanding on the autonomic nervous system (ANS correlates in motor imagery (MI and movement observation. These are two high brain functions involving sensori-motor coupling, mediated by memory systems. How observing or mentally rehearsing a movement affect ANS activity has not been extensively investigated. The links between cognitive functions and ANS responses are not so obvious. We first describe the organization of the ANS whose main purposes are controlling vital functions by maintaining the homeostasis of the organism and providing adaptive responses when changes occur either in the external or internal milieu. We will then review how scientific knowledge evolved, thus integrating recent findings related to ANS functioning, and show how these are linked to mental functions. In turn, we will describe how movement observation or MI may elicit physiological responses at the peripheral level of the autonomic effectors, thus eliciting autonomic correlates to cognitive activity. Key features of this paper are to draw a step-by step progression from the understanding of ANS physiology to its relationships with high mental processes such as movement observation or MI. We will further provide evidence that mental processes are co-programmed both at the somatic and autonomic levels of the central nervous system. We will thus detail how peripheral physiological responses may be analyzed to provide objective evidence that MI is actually performed. The main perspective is thus to consider that, during movement observation and MI, ANS activity is an objective witness of mental processes.

  20. Responses of Six-Weeks Aquatic Exercise on the Autonomic Nervous System, Peak Nasal Inspiratory Flow and Lung Functions in Young Adults with Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taweesak Janyacharoen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis is a chronic respiratory disease. Sympathetic hypofunction is identified in all of the allergic rhinitis patients. Moreover, allergic rhinitis is associated with decreased peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF and impaired lung functions. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of six-week of aquatic exercise on the autonomic nervous system function, PNIF and lung functions in allergic rhinitis patients.Twenty-six allergic rhinitis patients, 12 males and 14 females were recruited in this study. Subjects were diagnosed by a physician based on history, physical examination, and positive reaction to a skin prick test. Subjects were randomly assigned to two groups. The control allergic rhinitis group received education and maintained normal life. The aquatic group performed aquatic exercise for 30 minutes a day, three days a week for six weeks. Heart rate variability, PNIF and lung functions were measured at the beginning, after three weeks and six weeks.There were statistically significant increased low frequency normal units (LF n.u., PNIF and showed decreased high frequency normal units (HF n.u. at six weeks after aquatic exercise compared with the control group.Six weeks of aquatic exercise could increase sympathetic activity and PNIF in allergicrhinitis patients.

  1. Responses of Six-Weeks Aquatic Exercise on the Autonomic Nervous System, Peak Nasal Inspiratory Flow and Lung Functions in Young Adults with Allergic Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janyacharoen, Taweesak; Kunbootsri, Narupon; Arayawichanon, Preeda; Chainansamit, Seksun; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2015-06-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a chronic respiratory disease. Sympathetic hypofunction is identified in all of the allergic rhinitis patients. Moreover, allergic rhinitis is associated with decreased peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) and impaired lung functions. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of six-week of aquatic exercise on the autonomic nervous system function, PNIF and lung functions in allergic rhinitis patients. Twenty-six allergic rhinitis patients, 12 males and 14 females were recruited in this study. Subjects were diagnosed by a physician based on history, physical examination, and positive reaction to a skin prick test. Subjects were randomly assigned to two groups. The control allergic rhinitis group received education and maintained normal life. The aquatic group performed aquatic exercise for 30 minutes a day, three days a week for six weeks. Heart rate variability, PNIF and lung functions were measured at the beginning, after three weeks and six weeks. There were statistically significant increased low frequency normal units (LF n.u.), PNIF and showed decreased high frequency normal units (HF n.u.) at six weeks after aquatic exercise compared with the control group. Six weeks of aquatic exercise could increase sympathetic activity and PNIF in allergic rhinitis patients.

  2. Is There Anything "Autonomous" in the Nervous System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasia-Filho, Alberto A.

    2006-01-01

    The terms "autonomous" or "vegetative" are currently used to identify one part of the nervous system composed of sympathetic, parasympathetic, and gastrointestinal divisions. However, the concepts that are under the literal meaning of these words can lead to misconceptions about the actual nervous organization. Some clear-cut examples indicate…

  3. Are Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System Activity and Perceived Stress Related to Functional Somatic Symptoms in Adolescents? The TRAILS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.A.M. Janssens (Karin); H. Riese (Harriëtte); A.M.M. van Roon (Arie); J.A.M. Hunfeld (Joke); Groot, P.F.C. (Paul F. C.); A.J. Oldehinkel (Albertine); J.G.M. Rosmalen (Judith)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective Stressors have been related to medically insufficiently explained or functional somatic symptoms (FSS). However, the underlying mechanism of this association is largely unclear. In the current study, we examined whether FSS are associated with different perceived stress and car

  4. Are Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System Activity and Perceived Stress Related to Functional Somatic Symptoms in Adolescents? : The TRAILS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Karin A M; Riese, Harriëtte; Van Roon, Arie M; Hunfeld, Joke A M; Groot, Paul F C; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Rosmalen, Judith G M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Stressors have been related to medically insufficiently explained or functional somatic symptoms (FSS). However, the underlying mechanism of this association is largely unclear. In the current study, we examined whether FSS are associated with different perceived stress and cardiac autono

  5. Association between depression, pressure pain sensitivity, stress and autonomous nervous system function in stable ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Søren; Bergmann, Natasha; Karpatschof, Benny

    2016-01-01

    table test (TTT). Beta-blocker treatment reduces the efferent beta-adrenergic ANS function, and thus, the physiological stress response. Objective: To test the effect of beta-blockers on changes in depression score in patients with IHD, as well as the influence on persistent stress and ANS dysfunction....... Methods: Three months of non-pharmacological intervention aiming at reducing PPS and depression score in patients with stable IHD. Beta-blocker users (N = 102) were compared with non-users (N = 75), with respect to signs of depression measured by the Major Depressive Inventory questionnaire (MDI), resting...... in depression, reduction in persistent stress, and restoration of ANS dysfunction was only seen in non-users, suggesting a central role of beta-adrenergic receptors in the association between these factors....

  6. Gyrosonics a Novel Stimulant for Autonomic Nervous System

    CERN Document Server

    Ghatak, S K; Choudhuri, R; Banerjee, S

    2009-01-01

    Gyrosonics refers to novel audio binaural stimulus that produces rotational perceptions of sound movement in head at a particular predetermined frequency. Therapeutic effect observed with this is considered to be associated with modification of arousal of autonomic nervous system. The heart rate variability (HRV), non-invasive measure of autonomic nervous system, has been measured for group of 30 subjects for pre- and post- gyrosonic installation. The time- and frequency- domain analysis of HRV results show overall decrease in sympathetic response and increase in para- sympathetic response due to listening of gyro sonics.

  7. Patterns of Sensitivity to Emotion in Children with Williams Syndrome and Autism: Relations between Autonomic Nervous System Reactivity and Social Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, Anna; Ng, Rowena; Crivelli, Davide; Neumann, Dirk; Grichanik, Mark; Arnold, Andrew J.; Lai, Philip; Trauner, Doris; Bellugi, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are associated with atypical social-emotional functioning. Affective visual stimuli were used to assess autonomic reactivity and emotion identification, and the social responsiveness scale was used to determine the level social functioning in children with WS and ASD contrasted with typical…

  8. An Electerophisioligic Study Of Autonomic Nervous System In Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorolahi Moghaddam H

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system dysfunction in diabetics can occur apart from peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy and sometimes leads to complaints which may be diagnosed by electrodiagnostic methods. Moreover glycemic control of these patients may prevent such a complications."nMaterials and Methods: 30 diabetic patients were compared to the same number of age and sex-matched controls regarding to electrophysiologic findings of autonomic nervous system. Symptoms referable to autonomic disorder including nightly diarrhea, dizziness, urinary incontinence, constipation, nausea, and mouth dryness were recorded in all diabetic patients. Palmar and plantar SSR and expiration to inspiration ratio (E: I and Valsalva ratio were recorded in all diabetics and control individuals by electromyography device. In addition NCS was performed on two sensory and two motor nerves in diabetic patients."nResults: There was no relation between age of diabetics and abnormal D: I ratio, Valsalva ratio and degree of electrophysiologic autonomic impairment. Also no relation between peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy and electrophysiologic autonomic impairment was found. Plantar SSR was absent in 80% of diabetics with orthostatic hypotension (p~ 0.019. Palmar and plantar SSR were absent in many diabetics in comparison to control group (for palmar SSR p~ 0.00 and for plantar SSR p< 0.015. There was no relation between diabetes duration since diagnosis and electrophysiologic autonomic impairment."nConclusion: According to the above mentioned findings diabetic autonomic neuropathy develops apart from peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy and probably with different mechanisms. Remarkable absence of palmar SSR in diabetics with orthostatic hypotension can be due to its sympathetic origin. Absence of any relation between diabetes duration and electrophysiologic autonomic impairment can be due to late diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or no pathophysiologic relation between chronic

  9. Role of the autonomic nervous system in modulating cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mark J; Zipes, Douglas P

    2014-03-14

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the modulation of cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmogenesis. Decades of research has contributed to a better understanding of the anatomy and physiology of cardiac autonomic nervous system and provided evidence supporting the relationship of autonomic tone to clinically significant arrhythmias. The mechanisms by which autonomic activation is arrhythmogenic or antiarrhythmic are complex and different for specific arrhythmias. In atrial fibrillation, simultaneous sympathetic and parasympathetic activations are the most common trigger. In contrast, in ventricular fibrillation in the setting of cardiac ischemia, sympathetic activation is proarrhythmic, whereas parasympathetic activation is antiarrhythmic. In inherited arrhythmia syndromes, sympathetic stimulation precipitates ventricular tachyarrhythmias and sudden cardiac death except in Brugada and J-wave syndromes where it can prevent them. The identification of specific autonomic triggers in different arrhythmias has brought the idea of modulating autonomic activities for both preventing and treating these arrhythmias. This has been achieved by either neural ablation or stimulation. Neural modulation as a treatment for arrhythmias has been well established in certain diseases, such as long QT syndrome. However, in most other arrhythmia diseases, it is still an emerging modality and under investigation. Recent preliminary trials have yielded encouraging results. Further larger-scale clinical studies are necessary before widespread application can be recommended.

  10. The role of the autonomic nervous system in diabetes and cardiovascular disease : an epidemiological approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillebrand, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to study the role of autonomic nervous system (ANS) function in the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease using an epidemiological approach. Based on earlier studies it has remained unclear whether impaired ANS function is a risk factor for the deve

  11. Neuronal types and their specification dynamics in the autonomic nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system is formed by a sympathetic and a parasympathetic division that have complementary roles in the maintenance of body homeostasis. Autonomic neurons, also known as visceral motor neurons, are tonically active and innervate virtually every organ in our body. For instance, cardiac outflow, thermoregulation and even the focusing of our eyes are just some of the plethora of physiological functions under the control of this system. Consequently, perturbatio...

  12. Immunomodulation by the autonomic nervous system: therapeutic approach for cancer, collagen diseases, and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo, Toru; Kawamura, Toshihiko

    2002-10-01

    The distribution of leukocytes is regulated by the autonomic nervous system in humans and animals. The number and function of granulocytes are stimulated by sympathetic nerves whereas those of lymphocytes are stimulated by parasympathetic nerves. This is because granulocytes bear adrenergic receptors, but lymphocytes bear cholinergic receptors on the surface. These regulations may be beneficial to protect the body of living beings. However, when the autonomic nervous system deviates too much to one direction, we fall victim to certain diseases. For example, severe physical or mental stress --> sympathetic nerve activation --> granulocytosis --> tissue damage, including collagen diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, and cancer. If we introduce the concept of immunomodulation by the autonomic nervous system, a new approach for collagen diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, and even cancer is raised. With this approach, we believe that these diseases are no longer incurable.

  13. 炎症性肠病患者的自主神经功能改变%Changes of autonomic nervous function in patients with IBD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沙立娜; 李楠; 王艳梅

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨炎症性肠病(IBD)患者的自主神经功能改变状况。方法分析2012年1月至2014年2月在消化内科接受住院或是门诊治疗的 IBD 患者[溃疡性结肠炎(UC)和克罗恩病(CD)]的临床资料,并选取正常体检者作为对照组。两组受试者均行迷走副交感神经和交感肾上腺能神经功能的检查。结果共纳入研究对象105例,其中 IBD 患者70例(UC 患者38例,CD 32例),对照组35例。IBD 患者的卧立位心率变化值均显著低于对照组,差异具有统计学意义( t =4.025,P <0.001);两组受试者的瓦氏指数相比差异无统计学差异( t =0.400,P =0.690)。IBD 组患者的卧立位血压差值显著高于对照组( t =2.845,P <0.001);IBD 组患者的握力实验血压差值均显著低于对照组,差异具有统计学意义( t =8.273,P <0.001)。结论 IBD 患者相对于正常对照组,其交感肾上腺素能神经系统功能明显增强,而迷走副交感神经功能相对有所减弱。%Objective To investigate the changes of autonomic nervous function in patients with inflammation bowel diseases(IBD). Methods From 2012 January to 2014 February,clinical data was analyzed for inpatient or outpatient treatment of IBD patients(UC and CD)in our hospital department of internal medicine digestion. Health examinations people were selected as the normal controls. Two groups of subjects un-derwent vagal parasympathetic and sympathetic adrenergic nerve function tests. Results 70 cases of IBD patients were selected into this study. The control group included 35 cases. IBD group with orthostatic heart rate values were significantly lower than those in the control group( t = 4. 025,P < 0. 01). Warburg index of two groups showed no significant difference( t = 0. 400,P = 0. 690). IBD patients with orthostatic blood pressure values were higher than in the control group( t = 2. 845,P < 0. 001). While difference grip experimental

  14. Investigation of Autonomic Nervous System Function and Influencing Factors of Employees in Changchun%长春市企业员工自主神经系统功能状况及影响因素调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵璐; 张秀敏; 刘红箭; 李晶华; 吴方园; 刘妍妤; 刘莹圆; 王云

    2016-01-01

    目的:通过测量长春市企业员工的心率变异性,了解其自主神经系统功能状况,分析相关影响因素,为改善企业员工自主神经系统功能提供参考依据。方法:采用整群抽样的方法,以自填式调查问卷的形式收集企业员工的基本信息,采用SUN-8800健康检测系统对长春市两家企业427名员工进行心率变异性测定。结果:调查人群自主神经系统活性偏低的检出率为75.2%,调节功能异常的检出率为63.0%。多元线性回归分析显示,性别、年龄、企业性质、BMI指数、吸烟、饮酒对该人群的心率变异性频域指标的影响具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:长春市企业员工中普遍存在自主神经系统活性减低和调节功能失衡的现象,男性、大龄、超重与肥胖、吸烟、饮酒是企业员工自主神经系统功能的危险因素,其中,超重与肥胖、吸烟、饮酒是应进行干预的重要危险因素。%Objective: To know the status of autonomic nervous system function, analyze influencing factors, provide scientific basis for making policy of autonomic nervous system function improvement of employees in Changchun by measuring their heart rate variability. Methods:Questionnaire and SUN - 8800 health detecting system were conducted among 427 employees of 2 enterprises to gather essential information and determine heart rate variability through cluster sampling method. Results:There were 75. 2% of the survey population with lower functional ac⁃tiveness of the autonomic nervous system and 63. 0% with unbalanced regulation of autonomic nervous system. The results of multiple linear re⁃gression analysis indicated that there were statistical differences(P<0. 05) in frequency-domain indicators of heart rate variability because of different sex, age, type of enterprise, BMI index, smoking and drinking. Conclusion: The autonomic nervous system function of employees in

  15. Lost among the trees? The autonomic nervous system and paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Corinne A

    2014-06-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) has been strikingly neglected in Western medicine. Despite its profound importance for regulation, adjustment and coordination of body systems, it lacks priority in training and practice and receives scant attention in numerous major textbooks. The ANS is integral to manifestations of illness, underlying familiar physical and psychological symptoms. When ANS activity is itself dysfunctional, usual indicators of acute illness may prove deceptive. Recognising the relevance of the ANS can involve seeing the familiar through fresh eyes, challenging assumptions in clinical assessment and in approaches to practice. Its importance extends from physical and psychological well-being to parenting and safeguarding, public services and the functioning of society. Exploration of its role in conditions ranging from neurological, gastrointestinal and connective tissue disorders, diabetes and chronic fatigue syndrome, to autism, behavioural and mental health difficulties may open therapeutic avenues. The ANS offers a mechanism for so-called functional illnesses and illustrates the importance of recognising that 'stress' takes many forms, physical, psychological and environmental, desirable and otherwise. Evidence of intrauterine and post-natal programming of ANS reactivity suggests that neonatal care and safeguarding practice may offer preventive opportunity, as may greater understanding of epigenetic change of ANS activity through, for example, accidental or psychological trauma or infection. The aim of this article is to accelerate recognition of the importance of the ANS throughout paediatrics, and of the potential physical and psychological cost of neglecting it.

  16. Central- and autonomic nervous system coupling in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Steffen; Bolz, Mathias; Bär, Karl-Jürgen; Voss, Andreas

    2016-05-13

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction has been well described in schizophrenia (SZ), a severe mental disorder. Nevertheless, the coupling between the ANS and central brain activity has been not addressed until now in SZ. The interactions between the central nervous system (CNS) and ANS need to be considered as a feedback-feed-forward system that supports flexible and adaptive responses to specific demands. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, this study investigates central-autonomic couplings (CAC) studying heart rate, blood pressure and electroencephalogram in paranoid schizophrenic patients, comparing them with age-gender-matched healthy subjects (CO). The emphasis is to determine how these couplings are composed by the different regulatory aspects of the CNS-ANS. We found that CAC were bidirectional, and that the causal influence of central activity towards systolic blood pressure was more strongly pronounced than such causal influence towards heart rate in paranoid schizophrenic patients when compared with CO. In paranoid schizophrenic patients, the central activity was a much stronger variable, being more random and having fewer rhythmic oscillatory components. This study provides a more in-depth understanding of the interplay of neuronal and autonomic regulatory processes in SZ and most likely greater insights into the complex relationship between psychotic stages and autonomic activity.

  17. The role of the autonomic nervous system in Tourette Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack eHawksley

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tourette Syndrome (TS is a neurodevelopmental disorder, consisting of multiple involuntary movements (motor tics and one or more vocal (phonic tics. It affects up to one percent of children worldwide, of whom about one third continue to experience symptoms into adulthood. The central neural mechanisms of tic generation are not clearly understood, however recent neuroimaging investigations suggest impaired cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical activity during motor control. In the current manuscript, we will tackle the relatively under-investigated role of the peripheral autonomic nervous system, and its central influences, on tic activity. There is emerging evidence that both sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous activity influences tic expression. Pharmacological treatments which act on sympathetic tone are often helpful: for example, Clonidine (an alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonist is often used as first choice medication for treating TS in children due to its good tolerability profile and potential usefulness for co-morbid attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder. Clonidine suppresses sympathetic activity, reducing the triggering of motor tics. A general elevation of sympathetic tone is reported in patients with TS compared to healthy people, however this observation may reflect transient responses coupled to tic activity. Thus the presence of autonomic impairments in patients with TS remains unclear. Effect of autonomic afferent input to cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit will be discussed schematically. We additionally review how TS is affected by modulation of central autonomic control through biofeedback and Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS. Biofeedback training can enable a patient to gain voluntary control over covert physiological responses by making these responses explicit. Electrodermal biofeedback training to elicit a reduction in sympathetic tone has a demonstrated association with reduced tic frequency. VNS, achieved through an

  18. Autonomic Nervous System in Viral Myocarditis: Pathophysiology and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zheng; Li-Sha, Ge; Yue-Chun, Li

    2016-01-01

    Myocarditis, which is caused by viral infection, can lead to heart failure, malignant arrhythmias, and even sudden cardiac death in young patients. It is also one of the most important causes of dilated cardiomyopathy worldwide. Although remarkable advances in diagnosis and understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of viral myocarditis have been gained during recent years, no standard treatment strategies have been defined as yet. Fortunately, recent studies present some evidence that immunomodulating therapy is effective for myocarditis. The immunomodulatory effect of the autonomic nervous system has raised considerable interest over recent decades. Studying the influence on the inflammation and immune system of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems will not only increase our understanding of the mechanism of disease but could also lead to the identification of potential new therapies for viral myocarditis. Studies have shown that the immunomodulating effect of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system is realized by the release of neurotransmitters to their corresponding receptors (catecholamine for α or β adrenergic receptor, acetylcholine for α7 nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptor). This review will discuss the current knowledge of the roles of both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system in inflammation, with a special focus on their roles in viral myocarditis.

  19. Effect of a 1-Year Obesity Intervention (KLAKS Program) on Preexisting Autonomic Nervous Dysfunction in Childhood Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blüher, Susann; Petroff, David; Keller, Alexandra; Wagner, Antje; Classen, Joseph; Baum, Petra

    2015-08-01

    Childhood obesity may involve autonomic nervous system dysfunction. Whether it improves following weight loss remains unclear. Thirty-one obese children (body mass index standard deviation scores 2.33 ± 0.47; age 11.2 ± 2.0) completed a 1-year lifestyle intervention (KLAKS: Concept Leipzig: Adiposity Therapy for School-Aged Children). Anthropometric/biochemical parameters and autonomic nervous system function (heart rate variability, quantitative pupillography) were assessed at baseline and follow-up. A multivariate model for changes in body mass index standard deviation scores considered age, gender, and changes in autonomic nervous system function. Weight status (Δ body mass index standard deviation scores: 0.16 [0.05, 0.29], P = .008), glycemic control, and free fatty acids (all P nervous system dysfunction in childhood obesity.

  20. Involvement of the autonomic nervous system in Chagas heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edison Reis Lopes

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available The autonomic nervous system and especially the intracardiac autonomic nervous system is involved in Chagas' disease. Ganglionitis and periganglionitis were noted in three groups ofpatients dying with Chagas'disease: 1 Those in heart failure; 2 Those dying a sudden, non violent death and; 3 Those dying as a consequence ofaccidents or homicide. Hearts in the threegroups also revealed myocarditis and scattered involvement of intramyocardial ganglion cells as well as lesions of myelinic and unmyelinic fibers ascribable to Chagas'disease. In mice with experimentally induced Chagas' disease weobserved more intensive neuronal lesions of the cardiac ganglia in the acute phase of infection. Perhaps neuronal loss has a role in the pathogenesis of Chagas cardiomyopathy. However based on our own experience and on other data from the literature we conclude that the loss of neurones is not the main factor responsible for the manifestations exhibited by chronic chagasic patients. On the other hand the neuronal lesions may have played a role in the sudden death ofone group of patients with Chagas'disease but is difficult to explain the group of patients who did not die sudderly but instead progressed to cardiac failure.

  1. Regulation of autonomic nervous system in space and magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baevsky, R. M.; Petrov, V. M.; Chernikova, A. G.

    Variations in the earth's magnetic field and magnetic storms are known to be a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disorders. The main ``targets'' for geomagnetic perturbations are the central nervous system and the neural regulation of vascular tone and heart rate variability. This paper presents the data about effect of geomagnetic fluctuations on human body in space. As a method for research the analysis of heart rate variability was used, which allows evaluating the state of the sympathetic and parasympathetic parts of the autonomic nervous system, vasomotor center and subcortical neural centers activity. Heart rate variability data were analyzed for 30 cosmonauts at the 2-nd day of space flight on transport spaceship Soyuz (32nd orbit). There were formed three groups of cosmonauts: without magnetic storm (n=9), on a day with magnetic storm (n=12) and 1-2 days after magnetic storm (n=9). The present study was the first to demonstrate a specific impact of geomagnetic perturbations on the system of autonomic circulatory control in cosmonauts during space flight. The increasing of highest nervous centers activity was shown for group with magnetic storms, which was more significant on 1-2 days after magnetic storm. The use of discriminate analysis allowed to classify indicated three groups with 88 % precision. Canonical variables are suggested to be used as criterions for evaluation of specific and non-specific components of cardiovascular reactions to geomagnetic perturbations. The applied aspect of the findings from the present study should be emphasized. They show, in particular, the need to supplement the medical monitoring of cosmonauts with predictions of probable geomagnetic perturbations in view of the prevention of unfavorable states appearances if the adverse reactions to geomagnetic perturbations are added to the tension experienced by regulatory systems during various stresses situations (such as work in the open space).

  2. Music Improves Subjective Feelings Leading to Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Modulation: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Satoshi; Nishimura, Yukako; Mizuno, Kei; Sakimoto, Nae; Hori, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yasuhisa; Yamato, Masanori; Mitsuhashi, Rika; Akiba, Keigo; Koizumi, Jun-ichi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that listening to music improves subjective feelings and reduces fatigue sensations, and different kinds of music lead to different activations of these feelings. Recently, cardiac autonomic nervous modulation has been proposed as a useful objective indicator of fatigue. However, scientific considerations of the relation between feelings of fatigue and cardiac autonomic nervous modulation while listening to music are still lacking. In this study, we examined which subjective feelings of fatigue are related to participants' cardiac autonomic nervous function while they listen to music. We used an album of comfortable and relaxing environmental music, with blended sounds from a piano and violin as well as natural sound sources. We performed a crossover trial of environmental music and silent sessions for 20 healthy subjects, 12 females, and 8 males, after their daily work shift. We measured changes in eight types of subjective feelings, including healing, fatigue, sleepiness, relaxation, and refreshment, using the KOKORO scale, a subjective mood measurement system for self-reported feelings. Further, we obtained measures of cardiac autonomic nervous function on the basis of heart rate variability before and after the sessions. During the music session, subjective feelings significantly shifted toward healing and a secure/relaxed feeling and these changes were greater than those in the silent session. Heart rates (ΔHR) in the music session significantly decreased compared with those in the silent session. Other cardiac autonomic parameters such as high-frequency (HF) component and the ratio of low-frequency (LF) and HF components (LF/HF) were similar in the two sessions. In the linear regression analysis of the feelings with ΔHR and changes in LF/HF (ΔLF/HF), increases and decreases in ΔHR were correlated to the feeling axes of Fatigue-Healing and Anxiety/Tension–Security/Relaxation, whereas those in ΔLF/HF were related to the feeling axes

  3. Music Improves Subjective Feelings Leading to Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Modulation: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Satoshi; Nishimura, Yukako; Mizuno, Kei; Sakimoto, Nae; Hori, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yasuhisa; Yamato, Masanori; Mitsuhashi, Rika; Akiba, Keigo; Koizumi, Jun-Ichi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that listening to music improves subjective feelings and reduces fatigue sensations, and different kinds of music lead to different activations of these feelings. Recently, cardiac autonomic nervous modulation has been proposed as a useful objective indicator of fatigue. However, scientific considerations of the relation between feelings of fatigue and cardiac autonomic nervous modulation while listening to music are still lacking. In this study, we examined which subjective feelings of fatigue are related to participants' cardiac autonomic nervous function while they listen to music. We used an album of comfortable and relaxing environmental music, with blended sounds from a piano and violin as well as natural sound sources. We performed a crossover trial of environmental music and silent sessions for 20 healthy subjects, 12 females, and 8 males, after their daily work shift. We measured changes in eight types of subjective feelings, including healing, fatigue, sleepiness, relaxation, and refreshment, using the KOKORO scale, a subjective mood measurement system for self-reported feelings. Further, we obtained measures of cardiac autonomic nervous function on the basis of heart rate variability before and after the sessions. During the music session, subjective feelings significantly shifted toward healing and a secure/relaxed feeling and these changes were greater than those in the silent session. Heart rates (ΔHR) in the music session significantly decreased compared with those in the silent session. Other cardiac autonomic parameters such as high-frequency (HF) component and the ratio of low-frequency (LF) and HF components (LF/HF) were similar in the two sessions. In the linear regression analysis of the feelings with ΔHR and changes in LF/HF (ΔLF/HF), increases and decreases in ΔHR were correlated to the feeling axes of Fatigue-Healing and Anxiety/Tension-Security/Relaxation, whereas those in ΔLF/HF were related to the feeling axes

  4. Involvement of the autonomic nervous system in diurnal variation of corrected QT intervals in common marmosets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Masaki; Komatsu, Ryuichi; Isobe, Takehito; Tabo, Mitsuyasu; Ishikawa, Tomohisa

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study has shown that the corrected QT (QTc) interval of the electrocardiogram is longer during the dark period than during the light period in telemetered common marmosets. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous activities in the changes of QTc interval associated with the light-dark cycle.Telemetry transmitters were implanted in six common marmosets to continuously record the electrocardiogram. The QT intervals obtained were corrected for the RR interval by applying individual probabilistic QT-rate correction formulae. Power spectral analysis of heart rate variability was performed to quantify each autonomic nervous function. Changes in QTc intervals and autonomic nervous tones were associated with the light-dark cycle. Parasympathetic nervous activity and QTc intervals significantly increased by approximately 10 ms during the dark period.Atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, suppressed the increased parasympathetic tone and QTc prolongation during the dark period. In contrast, propranolol, a β-adrenoceptor antagonist, decreased the sympathetic activity and increased QTc intervals during the light period. These results suggest that the parasympathetic nerve functions prolong QTc intervals during the dark period, while the sympathetic nerve functions shorten them during the light period in common marmosets.

  5. Autonomic Nervous System Responses to Concussion: Arterial Pulse Contour Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F La Fountaine

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The arterial pulse wave (APW has a distinct morphology whose contours reflect dynamics in cardiac function and peripheral vascular tone as a result of sympathetic nervous system (SNS control. With a transition from rest to increased metabolic demand, the expected augmentation of SNS outflow will not only affect arterial blood pressure and heart rate, it will also induce changes to the contours of the APW. Following a sports concussion, a transient state cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is present. How this state affects the APW, has yet to be described. A prospective, parallel-group study on cardiovascular autonomic control (i.e., digital electrocardiogram and continuous beat-to-beat blood pressure was performed in the seated upright position in ten athletes with concussion and 7 non-injured control athletes. Changes in APW were compared at rest and during the first 60 seconds (F60 of an isometric handgrip test (IHGT in concussed athletes and non-injured controls within 48 hours (48hr and 1 week (1wk of injury. The concussion group was further separated by the length of time until they were permitted to return to play (RTP>1wk; RTP≤1wk. SysSlope, an indirect measurement of stroke volume, was significantly lower in the concussion group at rest and during F60 at 48hr and 1wk; a paradoxical decline in SysSlope occurred at each visit during the transition from rest to IHGT F60. The RTP>1wk group had lower SysSlope (405±200; 420±88; 454±236 mmHg/s, respectively at rest 48hr compared to the RTP≤1wk and controls. Similarly at 48hr rest, several measurements of arterial stiffness were abnormal in RTP>1wk compared to RTP≤1wk and controls: Peak-to-Notch Latency (0.12±0.04; 0.16±0.02; 0.17±0.05, respectively, Notch Relative Amplitude (0.70±0.03; 0.71±0.04; 0.66±0.14, respectively and Stiffness Index (6.4±0.2; 5.7±0.4; 5.8±0.5, respectively. Use of APW revealed that concussed athletes have a transient increase in peripheral artery

  6. Autonomic nervous system and risk factors for vascular disease. Effects of autonomic unbalance in schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scigliano, Giulio; Ronchetti, Gabriele; Girotti, Floriano

    2008-02-01

    Alterations of the cardiovascular system and of the glucose and lipid metabolism can represent important factors of vascular risk. The autonomic nervous system, through its two efferent branches, the parasympatheticcholinergic and the sympathetic-adrenergic, plays an important role in the control of the cardiovascular activity and of the glucose and lipid metabolism, and its impaired working can interfere with these functions. An increased sympathetic activity and an increased frequency of diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension and obesity have been reported in untreated schizophrenic patients, and a further worsening of these vascular risk factors has been signalled as a side effect of treatment with neuroleptic drugs. The opposite is observed in Parkinson's disease, where the reduced autonomic activity induced by the illness is associated with a decreased frequency of vascular risk factors, and their occurrence is further reduced by the treatment with dopaminergic drugs.

  7. (Non-invasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system by PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The proposed research addresses the development, validation and application of cardiac PET imaging techniques to characterize the autonomic nervous system of the heart. PET technology has significantly matured over the last two decades. Instrument design, image processing and production of radiochemical compounds have formed an integrative approach to provide a powerful and novel imaging modality for the quantitative in vivo evaluation of the autonomic nervous system of the heart. Animal studies using novel tracers for the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve terminals will be employed to characterize the functional integrity of nerve terminals. This work will be complemented by the development of agents which bind to postsynaptic receptor sites. The combined evaluation of presynaptic and postsynaptic neuronal function will allow a unique characterization of neuronal function. Initial development in animal studies will be followed by feasibility studies in humans. These studies are designed to test sophisticated imaging protocols in the human heart and validate the scintigraphic findings with independent markers of autonomic innervation. Subsequent clinical application in various cardiac diseases is expected to provide new insights into the neuropathophysiology of the heart.

  8. Conditioned nausea after cancer chemotherapy and autonomic nervous system conditionability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrikson, M; Hursti, T; Salmi, P; Börjeson, S; Fürst, C J; Peterson, C; Steineck, G

    1993-12-01

    There are marked individual differences in conditioned nausea after cancer chemotherapy. To examine if part of this variation is associated with individual differences in autonomic nervous system conditionability, the present study addressed whether patients with conditioned nausea acquired conditioned heart rate and electrodermal responses at a different rate than patients without conditioned nausea. Of 28 relapse-free patients who had completed cisplatinum treatment for testicular cancer between 1981 and 1986, 10 reported persistent conditioned nausea, 8 extinguished conditioned nausea and 10 no conditioned nausea. These three groups were subjected to a differential conditioning paradigm with 8 sec pictorial stimuli (circles and triangles) serving as conditioned stimuli for an unconditioned electric shock while heart rate and electrodermal activity was monitored. There were 4 habituation, 8 acquisition and 8 extinction trials with each of the two cues. Analyses of variance using nausea status as the independent variable and physiological responses as the dependent lended some support to the notion that conditioned heart rate deceleration developed in response to the reinforced compared to the nonreinforced cue during acquisition in the two groups with persistent or extinguished conditioned nausea but not in the group with no conditioned nausea. In addition, patients that displayed good, as compared to poor heart rate conditionability during acquisition, were more likely to have persistent conditioned nausea, whereas those who showed poor heart rate conditioning mostly were those without conditioned nausea. Electrodermal variables revealed no systematic differences between groups. This tentatively supports that individual differences in parasympathetic but not sympathetic nervous system conditionability may be associated with individual differences in conditioned nausea resulting from cancer chemotherapy.

  9. Autonomic Function in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    , which includes the cardiac centre and controls autonomic functions, and therefore autonomic dysfunction may be experienced early in the disease course. Sleep disturbances are also common non-motor complications of PD, and therefore PD patients undergo polysomnography at the Danish Center for Sleep......Neurodegenerative diseases are highly debilitating and often lead to severe morbidity and even death. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer’s disease. According to the Braak staging study, the progressionof PD starts in the medulla oblongata...... Medicine to assess the sleep disturbances. The aim of this PhD dissertation was to: 1) Develop a method to investigate autonomic changes during sleep in neurodegenerative diseases, and apply this method on PD, iRBD and narcolepsy patients to evaluate the autonomic function in these diseases. 2) Validate...

  10. Causal interactions between the cerebral cortex and the autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, XiaoLin; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, JianBao

    2014-05-01

    Mental states such as stress and anxiety can cause heart disease. On the other hand, meditation can improve cardiac performance. In this study, the heart rate variability, directed transfer function and corrected conditional entropy were used to investigate the effects of mental tasks on cardiac performance, and the functional coupling between the cerebral cortex and the heart. When subjects tried to decrease their heart rate by volition, the sympathetic nervous system was inhibited and the heart rate decreased. When subjects tried to increase their heart rate by volition, the parasympathetic nervous system was inhibited and the sympathetic nervous system was stimulated, and the heart rate increased. When autonomic nervous system activity was regulated by mental tasks, the information flow from the post-central areas to the pre-central areas of the cerebral cortex increased, and there was greater coupling between the brain and the heart. Use of directed transfer function and corrected conditional entropy techniques enabled analysis of electroencephalographic recordings, and of the information flow causing functional coupling between the brain and the heart.

  11. Non-linear HRV indices under autonomic nervous system blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolea, Juan; Pueyo, Esther; Laguna, Pablo; Bailón, Raquel

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been studied as a non-invasive technique to characterize the autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation of the heart. Non-linear methods based on chaos theory have been used during the last decades as markers for risk stratification. However, interpretation of these nonlinear methods in terms of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity is not fully established. In this work we study linear and non-linear HRV indices during ANS blockades in order to assess their relation with sympathetic and parasympathetic activities. Power spectral content in low frequency (0.04-0.15 Hz) and high frequency (0.15-0.4 Hz) bands of HRV, as well as correlation dimension, sample and approximate entropies were computed in a database of subjects during single and dual ANS blockade with atropine and/or propranolol. Parasympathetic blockade caused a significant decrease in the low and high frequency power of HRV, as well as in correlation dimension and sample and approximate entropies. Sympathetic blockade caused a significant increase in approximate entropy. Sympathetic activation due to postural change from supine to standing caused a significant decrease in all the investigated non-linear indices and a significant increase in the normalized power in the low frequency band. The other investigated linear indices did not show significant changes. Results suggest that parasympathetic activity has a direct relation with sample and approximate entropies.

  12. Modulation of Autonomous Nervous System activity by gyrosonic stimulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ghatak, S K; Choudhuri, R; Bandopadhaya, S

    2010-01-01

    A novel audio binaural stimulus that generates rotational perceptions of sound movement in brain at a particular predetermined frequency is referred as gyrosonics. The influence of gyrosonics on autonomic nervous system of healthy subjects has been examined by analyzing heart rate variability (HRV) in time- and frequency- domain. The M-lagged Poincare plot shows that the parameters SD1, SD2 and ratio SD12 (SD1/SD2) increases with lagged number M, and M-dependence is well described by Pade' approximant $\\chi \\frac{1+\\beta M}{1+\\gamma M}$ where values of $\\chi$, $\\beta$ and $ \\gamma$ depend on parameters SD1,SD2 and SD12. The values of these parameters for different M are augmented after gyrosonic stimulation. The slope and magnitude of curvature of SD1 and SD12 vs M plot increase considerably due to stimulation. The DFA analysis exhibits decrease in value of exponent $\\alpha$ due to stimulation. This stimulation results slower Heart rate, higher values of the standard deviation SD and the root-mean squared suc...

  13. Autonomic Modulation by Electrical Stimulation of the Parasympathetic Nervous System: An Emerging Intervention for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bo; Lu, Zhibing; He, Wenbo; Huang, Bing; Jiang, Hong

    2016-06-01

    The cardiac autonomic nervous system has been known to play an important role in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Autonomic modulation by electrical stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system, which increases the parasympathetic activity and suppresses the sympathetic activity, is emerging as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Here, we review the recent literature on autonomic modulation by electrical stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system, including vagus nerve stimulation, transcutaneous auricular vagal stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, and ganglionated plexi stimulation, in the treatment of heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and ventricular arrhythmias.

  14. The Nervous System and Gastrointestinal Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaf, Muhammad A.; Sood, Manu R.

    2008-01-01

    The enteric nervous system is an integrative brain with collection of neurons in the gastrointestinal tract which is capable of functioning independently of the central nervous system (CNS). The enteric nervous system modulates motility, secretions, microcirculation, immune and inflammatory responses of the gastrointestinal tract. Dysphagia,…

  15. Imaging of the autonomic nervous system: focus on cardiac sympathetic innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, David S

    2003-12-01

    Symptoms or signs of abnormal autonomic nervous system function occur commonly in several neurological disorders. Clinical evaluations have depended on physiological, pharmacological, and neurochemical approaches. Recently, imaging of sympathetic noradrenergic innervation has been introduced and applied especially in the heart. Most studies have used the radiolabeled sympathomimetic amine, (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine. Decreased uptake or increased "washout" of (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine-derived radioactivity is associated with worse prognosis or more severe disease in hypertension, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and diabetes mellitus. This pattern may reflect a high rate of postganglionic sympathetic nerve traffic to the heart. Many recent studies have agreed on the remarkable finding that all patients with Parkinson's disease and orthostatic hypotension have a loss of cardiac sympathetic innervation, whereas all patients with multiple system atrophy, often difficult to distinguish clinically from Parkinson's disease, have intact cardiac sympathetic innervation. Because Parkinson's disease entails a postganglionic sympathetic noradrenergic lesion, the disease appears to be not only a movement disorder, with dopamine loss in the nigrostriatal system of the brain, but also a dysautonomia, with noradrenaline loss in the sympathetic nervous system of the heart. As new ligands are developed, one may predict further discoveries of involvement of components of the autonomic nervous system in neurological diseases.

  16. Relationship between Vitamin D Status and Autonomic Nervous System Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Morton G.; Mangelsdorf, Brenda L.; Stranks, Stephen N.; Mangoni, Arduino A.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased arterial stiffness. However, the mechanisms underlying this association have not been clarified. The aim was to investigate whether changes in autonomic nervous system activity could underlie an association between 25 hydroxy vitamin D and arterial stiffness. A total of 49 subjects (age = 60 ± 8 years, body mass index = 26.7 ± 4.6 kg/m2, 25 hydroxy vitamin D = 69 ± 22 nmol/L) underwent measurements of pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx), spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity, plasma metanephrines and 25 hydroxy vitamin D. Subjects with 25 hydroxy vitamin D ≤ 50 nmol/L were restudied after 200,000 International Units 25 hydroxy vitamin D. Plasma metanephrine was positively associated with AIx (p = 0.02) independent of age, sex, smoking and cholesterol and negatively associated with 25 hydroxy vitamin D (p = 0.002) independent of age, sex and season. In contrast, there was no association between baroreflex sensitivity and 25 hydroxy vitamin D (p = 0.54). Treatment with vitamin D increased 25 hydroxy vitamin D from 43 ± 5 to 96 ± 24 nmol/L (p < 0.0001) but there was no significant change in plasma metanephrine (115 ± 25 vs. 99 ± 39 pmol/L, p = 0.12). We conclude that as plasma metanephrine was negatively associated with 25 hydroxy vitamin D and positively with AIx, it could mediate an association between these two variables. This hypothesis should be tested in larger interventional studies. PMID:27649235

  17. Relationship between Vitamin D Status and Autonomic Nervous System Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morton G. Burt

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased arterial stiffness. However, the mechanisms underlying this association have not been clarified. The aim was to investigate whether changes in autonomic nervous system activity could underlie an association between 25 hydroxy vitamin D and arterial stiffness. A total of 49 subjects (age = 60 ± 8 years, body mass index = 26.7 ± 4.6 kg/m2, 25 hydroxy vitamin D = 69 ± 22 nmol/L underwent measurements of pulse wave velocity (PWV and augmentation index (AIx, spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity, plasma metanephrines and 25 hydroxy vitamin D. Subjects with 25 hydroxy vitamin D ≤ 50 nmol/L were restudied after 200,000 International Units 25 hydroxy vitamin D. Plasma metanephrine was positively associated with AIx (p = 0.02 independent of age, sex, smoking and cholesterol and negatively associated with 25 hydroxy vitamin D (p = 0.002 independent of age, sex and season. In contrast, there was no association between baroreflex sensitivity and 25 hydroxy vitamin D (p = 0.54. Treatment with vitamin D increased 25 hydroxy vitamin D from 43 ± 5 to 96 ± 24 nmol/L (p < 0.0001 but there was no significant change in plasma metanephrine (115 ± 25 vs. 99 ± 39 pmol/L, p = 0.12. We conclude that as plasma metanephrine was negatively associated with 25 hydroxy vitamin D and positively with AIx, it could mediate an association between these two variables. This hypothesis should be tested in larger interventional studies.

  18. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation and levodopa on the autonomic nervous system in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Janne; Remien, Piet; Guballa, Christoph; Binder, Andreas; Binder, Sabine; Schattschneider, Jörn; Herzog, Jan; Volkmann, Jens; Deuschl, Günther; Wasner, Gunnar; Baron, Ralf

    2007-07-01

    Dysfunctions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) are common in Parkinson's disease (PD). Regarding motor disability, deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective treatment option in long lasting PD. The aims of this study were to examine whether STN stimulation has an influence on functions of the ANS and to compare these effects to those induced by levodopa. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) during rest and orthostatic conditions, HR variability (HRV) and breathing-induced cutaneous sympathetic vasoconstriction (CVC) were tested in 14 PD patients treated with STN stimulation during "ON" and "OFF" condition of the stimulator. The effects of a single dose of levodopa on ANS were tested in 15 PD patients without DBS. STN stimulation had no influence on cardiovascular ANS functions, whereas CVC was significantly increased. In contrast, levodopa significantly lowered BP and HR at rest and enhanced orthostatic hypotension. Further, HRV, skin perfusion and temperature increased after administration of levodopa. Our results suggest that in contrast to levodopa, STN stimulation has only minor effects on autonomic functions. Since less pharmacotherapy is needed after STN stimulation, reduced levodopa intake results in relative improvement of autonomic function in deep brain stimulated PD patients.

  19. [Functional anatomy of the central nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainik, A; Feydy, A; Colombani, J M; Hélias, A; Menu, Y

    2003-03-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has a particular regional functional anatomy. The morphological support of cognitive functions can now be depicted using functional imaging. Lesions of the central nervous system may be responsible of specific symptoms based on their location. Current neuroimaging techniques are able to show and locate precisely macroscopic lesions. Therefore, the knowledge of functional anatomy of the central nervous system is useful to link clinical disorders to symptomatic lesions. Using radio-clinical cases, we present the functional neuro-anatomy related to common cognitive impairments.

  20. GERD and obesity: is the autonomic nervous system the missing link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendran, Neranjani; Chauhan, Nita; Armstrong, David; Upton, Adrian R M; Kamath, Markad V

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common chronic condition that not only impairs the quality of life of those who are affected by it but also poses a significant economic burden. It encompasses a wide spectrum of symptoms as a result of gastric content moving into the esophagus. The most common cause of GERD, other than a hiatus hernia, is considered to be transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) normally has a higher resting tone than the stomach, thus preventing the reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus. The greater prevalence of GERD and GERD symptoms in obese individuals has generated significant interest in understanding the association between these 2 conditions and the underlying physiological mechanisms. The potential relationship between GERD and obesity and the exact mechanism by which obesity may cause reflux, however, remains uncertain. It has been proposed that patients with GERD have altered autonomic nervous function and, more specifically, have reduced parasympathetic activity. Obese individuals also have shown diminished parasympathetic activity, which may be reversed after weight reduction through exercise, diet control, and bariatric surgery. Given that contraction and relaxation of the LES are vagally mediated, the question that arises is whether the autonomic nervous system is, in fact, the missing link between obesity and GERD. In this article we examine the current evidence and hypothesize that the potential imbalance in sympathovagal stimulation to the LES is a key contributing factor to the increased prevalence of GERD symptoms in obese individuals.

  1. Measuring Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) Activity in Toddlers - Resting and Developmental Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Nicole R; Caron, Zoe K; Blackburn, Katherine S; Alkon, Abbey

    2016-02-25

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) consists of two branches, the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, and controls the function of internal organs (e.g., heart rate, respiration, digestion) and responds to everyday and adverse experiences (1). ANS measures in children have been found to be related to behavior problems, emotion regulation, and health (2-7). Therefore, understanding the factors that affect ANS development during early childhood is important. Both branches of the ANS affect young children's cardiovascular responses to stimuli and have been measured noninvasively, via external monitoring equipment, using valid and reliable measures of physiological change (8-11). However, there are few studies of very young children with simultaneous measures of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, which limits understanding of the integrated functioning of the two systems. In addition, the majority of existing studies of young children report on infants' resting ANS measures or their reactivity to commonly used mother-child interaction paradigms, and less is known about ANS reactivity to other challenging conditions. We present a study design and standardized protocol for a non-invasive and rapid assessment of cardiac autonomic control in 18 month old children. We describe methods for continuous monitoring of the parasympathetic and sympathetic branches of the ANS under resting and challenge conditions during a home or laboratory visit and provide descriptive findings from our sample of 140 ethnically diverse toddlers using validated equipment and scoring software. Results revealed that this protocol can produce a range of physiological responses to both resting and developmentally challenging conditions, as indicated by changes in heart rate and indices of parasympathetic and sympathetic activity. Individuals demonstrated variability in resting levels, responses to challenges, and challenge reactivity, which provides additional evidence

  2. Autonomous requirements of the Menkes disease protein in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, Victoria L; Zhu, Sha; Wang, Yanfang; Ladomersky, Erik; Nickelson, Karen; Weisman, Gary A; Lee, Jaekwon; Gitlin, Jonathan D; Petris, Michael J

    2015-11-15

    Menkes disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder arising from a systemic copper deficiency caused by loss-of-function mutations in a ubiquitously expressed copper transporter, ATP7A. Although this disorder reveals an essential role for copper in the developing human nervous system, the role of ATP7A in the pathogenesis of signs and symptoms in affected patients, including severe mental retardation, ataxia, and excitotoxic seizures, remains unknown. To directly examine the role of ATP7A within the central nervous system, we generated Atp7a(Nes) mice, in which the Atp7a gene was specifically deleted within neural and glial cell precursors without impairing systemic copper homeostasis, and compared these mice with the mottled brindle (mo-br) mutant, a murine model of Menkes disease in which Atp7a is defective in all cells. Whereas mo-br mice displayed neurodegeneration, demyelination, and 100% mortality prior to weaning, the Atp7a(Nes) mice showed none of these phenotypes, exhibiting only mild sensorimotor deficits, increased anxiety, and susceptibility to NMDA-induced seizure. Our results indicate that the pathophysiology of severe neurological signs and symptoms in Menkes disease is the result of copper deficiency within the central nervous system secondary to impaired systemic copper homeostasis and does not arise from an intrinsic lack of ATP7A within the developing brain. Furthermore, the sensorimotor deficits, hypophagia, anxiety, and sensitivity to NMDA-induced seizure in the Atp7a(Nes) mice reveal unique autonomous requirements for ATP7A in the nervous system. Taken together, these data reveal essential roles for copper acquisition in the central nervous system in early development and suggest novel therapeutic approaches in affected patients.

  3. Autonomous requirements of the Menkes disease protein in the nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, Victoria L.; Zhu, Sha; Wang, Yanfang; Ladomersky, Erik; Nickelson, Karen; Weisman, Gary A.; Lee, Jaekwon; Gitlin, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Menkes disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder arising from a systemic copper deficiency caused by loss-of-function mutations in a ubiquitously expressed copper transporter, ATP7A. Although this disorder reveals an essential role for copper in the developing human nervous system, the role of ATP7A in the pathogenesis of signs and symptoms in affected patients, including severe mental retardation, ataxia, and excitotoxic seizures, remains unknown. To directly examine the role of ATP7A within the central nervous system, we generated Atp7aNes mice, in which the Atp7a gene was specifically deleted within neural and glial cell precursors without impairing systemic copper homeostasis, and compared these mice with the mottled brindle (mo-br) mutant, a murine model of Menkes disease in which Atp7a is defective in all cells. Whereas mo-br mice displayed neurodegeneration, demyelination, and 100% mortality prior to weaning, the Atp7aNes mice showed none of these phenotypes, exhibiting only mild sensorimotor deficits, increased anxiety, and susceptibility to NMDA-induced seizure. Our results indicate that the pathophysiology of severe neurological signs and symptoms in Menkes disease is the result of copper deficiency within the central nervous system secondary to impaired systemic copper homeostasis and does not arise from an intrinsic lack of ATP7A within the developing brain. Furthermore, the sensorimotor deficits, hypophagia, anxiety, and sensitivity to NMDA-induced seizure in the Atp7aNes mice reveal unique autonomous requirements for ATP7A in the nervous system. Taken together, these data reveal essential roles for copper acquisition in the central nervous system in early development and suggest novel therapeutic approaches in affected patients. PMID:26269458

  4. 星状神经节阻滞治疗围绝经期自主神经系统功能不稳定症状的疗效%Curative Effect of Stellate Ganglion Block on Function Disorders of Autonomic Nervous System in Perimenopause Women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玲玲; 马杰; 张海泉; 张宝琴; 赵树华; 房丽

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨星状神经节阻滞治疗围绝经期自主神经系统功能不稳定症状的疗效.方法 对30例主要表现自主神经系统功能不稳定症状如失眠、眩晕、心悸,皮肤感觉异常等的围绝经期患者.采用前入路星状神经节阻滞(Stellate Canglion Block,SGB)每日1次,左右交替进行,每10次为1个疗程,均治疗2个疗程.观察血中E2,FSH的水平及自主神经系统功能不稳定症状改善情况.结果 运用星状神经阻滞法治疗后,围绝经期患者自主神经系统功能不稳定症状明显改善,血中E2水平显著升高,FSH下降(P<0.05).结论 星状神经节阻滞可以治疗围绝经期自主神经系统功能不稳定,其症状明显缓解或消失.%[ Objective] To observe the curative effect of stellate ganglion block on function disorders of autonomic nervous system in perimenopause women. [ Methods ] 30 perimenopause women with function disorders of autonomic nervous system were collected, which the symptoms included insomnia, vertigo, palpitation and paresthesia. The patients were given anterior approach stellate ganglion block (SGB) once a day, alternating left and right, 10 times was one course, and all patients were treated for two courses. The levels of E2 and FSH in blood, and improvement of disorders symptoms of autonomic nervous system were observed. [ Results] After SGB treatment, symptoms of function disorders of autonomic nervous system in perimenopause women improved significantly, level of blood E2 increased significantly, whereas FSH level decreased (P < 0.05). [ Conclusion ] SGB has good effect on the function disorders of autonomic nervous system in perimenopause women, the symptoms are significantly alleviated or disappeared.

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi strains and autonomic nervous system pathology in experimental chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Maria de Souza

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Lesions involving the sympathetic (para-vertebral ganglia and para-sympathetic ganglia of intestines (Auerbach plexus and heart (right atrial ganglia were comparatively analyzed in mice infected with either of three different strain types of Trypanosoma cruzi, during acute and chronic infection, in an attempt to understand the influence of parasite strain in causing autonomic nervous system pathology. Ganglionar involvement with neuronal destruction appeared related to inflammation, which most of the times extended from neighboring adipose and cardiac, smooth and striated muscular tissues. Intraganglionic parasitism was exceptional. Inflammation involving peripheral nervous tissue exhibited a focal character and its variability in the several groups examined appeared unpredictable. Although lesions were generally more severe with the Y strain, comparative qualitative study did not allow the conclusion, under the present experimental conditions, that one strain was more pathogenic to the autonomic nervous system than others. No special tropism of the parasites from any strain toward autonomic ganglia was disclosed.

  6. Power spectral analysis of heart rate variability for assessment of diurnal variation of autonomic nervous activity in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Megumi; Ishii, Keiji; Kuwahara, Masayoshi; Tsubone, Hirokazu

    2002-01-01

    We established characteristics of power spectral analysis of heart rate variability, and assessed the diurnal variations of autonomic nervous function in guinea pigs. For this purpose, an electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded for 24 hr from conscious and unrestrained guinea pigs using a telemetry system. There were two major spectral components, at low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) bands, in the power spectrum of HR variability. On the basis of these data, we defined two frequency bands of interest: LF (0.07-0.7 Hz) and HF (0.7-3.0 Hz). The power of LF was higher than that of HF in the normal guinea pigs. Atropine significantly reduced power at HF. Propranolol also significantly reduced power at LF. Furthermore, the decrease in the parasympathetic mechanism produced by atropine was reflected in a slight increase in the LF/HF ratio. The LF/HF ratio appeared to follow the reductions of sympathetic activity produced by propranolol. Autonomic blockade studies indicated that the HF component reflected parasympathetic activity and the LF/HF ratio seemed to be a convenient index of autonomic balance. Nocturnal patterns, in which the values of heart rate in the dark phase (20:00-06:00) were higher than those in the light phase (06:00-20:00), were observed. However, the HF, LF and the LF/HF ratio showed no daily pattern. These results suggest that the autonomic nervous function in guinea pigs has no clear circadian rhythmicity. Therefore, this information may be useful for future studies concerning the autonomic nervous function in this species.

  7. Effect Of Haemodialysis On Intra Dialytic Calcium, Phosphorus,Magnesium, Levels In Relation To AutonomicNervous System Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Hosny, Sahar Shawky, Ahmed Ramadan , Hany Refaat

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system dysfunction is common in uremia and in patients under hemodialysis. Changes in serum calcium, serum phosphorus and serum magnesuim always occur during hemodialysis. The relation between these changes and autonomic nervous system activity during hemodialysis has not been fully studied. This study was carried out on 30 patients with chronic renal failure on regular hemo-dialysis with nearly similar age group. We measured serum calcium, serum phosphorus and serum magnesium throughout the session (at predialysis state, middialysis state: after 2 hours of the session and postdialysis: at the end of the hemodialysis Session. We have also assessed autonomic function (sympathetic by cold pressor test and parasympathetic by Valsalva maneuver test. Autonomic function tests were assessed at predialysis state, middialysis state and postdialysis state. Calcuim level uncreased throughout the session (P<0.05, phosphorus leuel and Magnesium levels decreased , (P<0.001 and (P<0.05, throghout session . As reguards parasympathetie dysfunetion, there was a significamt relation (P<0.05 with calcuim changes at predialytic and post dialytic states, a highly significant relation (P<0.001 with phosphorus and (P<0.05 with magnesiun, both at predialysis states. Concerging sympathetie dysfunction, there was a significant relation (P<0.05 with calcium levels at end of session. There was a signifcant relation (P<0.05 with predialytic and postdialytic phosphorus levels .There was also significant relation (P<0.05 with predialytic magnesium level.

  8. Autonomic and endocrine control of cardiovascular function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard; Gordan; Judith; K; Gwathmey; Lai-Hua; Xie

    2015-01-01

    The function of the heart is to contract and pump oxygenated blood to the body and deoxygenated blood to the lungs.To achieve this goal,a normal human heart must beat regularly and continuously for one’s entire life.Heartbeats originate from the rhythmic pacing discharge from the sinoatrial(SA) node within the heart itself.In the absence of extrinsic neural or hormonal influences,the SA node pacing rate would be about 100 beats per minute.Heart rate and cardiac output,however,must vary in response to the needs of the body’s cells for oxygen and nutrients under varying conditions.In order to respond rapidly to the changing requirements of the body’s tissues,the heart rate and contractility are regulated by the nervous system,hormones,and other factors.Here we review how the cardiovascular system is controlled and influenced by not only a unique intrinsic system,but is also heavily influenced by the autonomic nervous system as well as the endocrine system.

  9. Does the autonomic nervous system contribute to the initiation and progression of prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Sabatino; Evans, Bronwyn A

    2013-11-01

    In the July 12 issue of Science magazine, researchers from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, the Durham VA Medical Centre and Duke University published an elegant study demonstrating that the sympathetic nervous system, acting through β2 and β3-adrenoceptors in the prostate, plays an important role in the initiation of prostate cancer, while the parasympathetic nervous system plays a role in the dissemination of tumour metastases via M1 muscarinic receptors. These findings are significant because they indicate that receptors associated with the autonomic nervous system may be viable targets for prostate cancer therapy.

  10. Autonomic nervous system responses to viewing green and built settings: differentiating between sympathetic and parasympathetic activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Magdalena; Maas, Jolanda; Mulder, Rianne; Braun, Anoek; Kaandorp, Wendy; van Lien, René; van Poppel, Mireille; van Mechelen, Willem; van den Berg, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    his laboratory study explored buffering and recovery effects of viewing urban green and built spaces on autonomic nervous system activity. Forty-six students viewed photos of green and built spaces immediately following, and preceding acute stress induction. Simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram

  11. Child Abuse and Autonomic Nervous System Hyporesponsivity among Psychiatrically Impaired Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Julian D.; Fraleigh, Lisa A.; Albert, David B.; Connor, Daniel F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Sexually or physically abused children are at risk for neurobiological dysregulation as well as for internalizing and disruptive behavior disorders. Stress-related autonomic nervous system (ANS) down-regulation has been proposed as a sequela of abuse and was investigated in the present study. Methods: Child Protective Services…

  12. Case Studies in a Physiology Course on the Autonomic Nervous System: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Martina

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of case studies on the autonomic nervous system in a fourth-semester physiology course unit for Pharmacy students is described in this article. This article considers how these case studies were developed and presents their content. Moreover, it reflects on their implementation and, finally, the reception of such a transformation…

  13. Autonomic nervous system mediated effects of food intake. Interaction between gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Orshoven, N.P.

    2008-01-01

    The studies presented in this thesis focused on the autonomic nervous system mediated interactions between the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems in response to food intake and on potential consequences of failure of these interactions. The effects of food intake on cardiovascular parameter

  14. Dysregulation of the Autonomic Nervous System Predicts the Development of the Metabolic Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Licht, Carmilla M. M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Stress is suggested to lead to metabolic dysregulations as clustered in the metabolic syndrome. Although dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system is found to associate with the metabolic syndrome and its dysregulations, no longitudinal study has been performed to date to examine the pr

  15. Dysfunction of pre- and post-operative cardiac autonomic nervous system in elderly patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junlong; Tu, Weifeng; Dai, Jianqiang; Lv, Qing; Yang, Xiaoqi

    2011-01-01

    The pre- and post-operative cardiac autonomic nervous functions were compared in elderly, non-cardiac surgery patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and without diabetes mellitus (NDM). A group of 30 unpremedicated elderly patients scheduled to undergo elective non-cardiac surgery were studied, including 15 DM patients and 15 NDM patients. Each component of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis in the frequency domain was monitored with Holter during the nights of the day before and on 1st and 2nd day after operation. After surgery, total power (TP), high frequency (HF), low frequency (LF) and very low frequency (VLF) significantly decreased as compared to the baseline values before operation in both groups (p<0.05). The LF/HF ratio was significantly changed in DM group but did not change in NDM group. On the 2nd postoperative day, TP, HF, LF and VLF in DM group were further decreased as compared to those on the 1st postoperative day and were significantly lower than those in NDM group (p<0.01 or 0.05), but these indices in NDM group did not show significant decreases. Surgery induced the cardiac autonomic nervous dysfunction in elderly patients not only with DM but also without diabetes. On the 2nd postoperative day, the disturbances of cardiac autonomic nervous activity were more sever in DM patients, compared to the 1st postoperative day, but was not significantly more sever than in the NDM patients.

  16. Circadian rhythm of rest activity and autonomic nervous system activity at different stages in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Fumitoshi; Kuriyama, Nagato; Nakagawa, Masanori; Imanishi, Jiro

    2011-12-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) often suffer from non-motor symptoms, including sleep and autonomic dysfunctions, controlled by circadian regulation. To evaluate the alteration of circadian rhythm in PD patients, we investigated both rest activities and autonomic functions. Twenty-seven patients with idiopathic PD and 30 age-matched control subjects were recruited. Group comparisons of controls (mean age: 68.93 years), early-PD patients classified as Hoehn-Yahr (HY) stage 1&2 (mean age: 70.78 years), and advanced-PD as HY 3&4 (mean age: 68.61 years) were conducted. Measurement of rest activities was performed using Actigraph for 7 continuous days, and included measuring rhythm patterns (activity patterns recorded in or out of bed) and circadian rhythm amplitudes (power of the cycle being closest to 24h). A power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) using 24-hour ambulatory ECG was also performed. The actigraphic measurements indicated that statistically PD patients have lower activity levels when out of bed and higher activity levels when in bed, and that, the circadian rest-activity rhythm in PD decreases with disease severity. The HRV analysis showed that the total frequency component and low frequency/high frequency ratio were low in PD patients, suggesting that autonomic activities and the circadian rhythm of the sympathetic nervous system are attenuated in PD. This study elucidated the disorganization in the rest activities and HRV of PD patients as well as the gradual alterations in the circadian rhythm. The circadian rhythm disturbances are important to consider the mechanism of non-motor symptoms that occur from early stage of PD.

  17. Autonomic Nervous System Responses Can Reveal Visual Fatigue Induced by 3D Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eui Chul Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has indicated that viewing 3D displays may induce greater visual fatigue than viewing 2D displays. Whether viewing 3D displays can evoke measureable emotional responses, however, is uncertain. In the present study, we examined autonomic nervous system responses in subjects viewing 2D or 3D displays. Autonomic responses were quantified in each subject by heart rate, galvanic skin response, and skin temperature. Viewers of both 2D and 3D displays showed strong positive correlations with heart rate, which indicated little differences between groups. In contrast, galvanic skin response and skin temperature showed weak positive correlations with average difference between viewing 2D and 3D. We suggest that galvanic skin response and skin temperature can be used to measure and compare autonomic nervous responses in subjects viewing 2D and 3D displays.

  18. Cognitive function in peripheral autonomic disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Guaraldi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: aims of the current study were 1 to evaluate global cognitive function in patients with autonomic failure (AF of peripheral origin and 2 to investigate the effect of a documented fall in blood pressure (BP fulfilling the criteria for orthostatic hypotension (OH on cognitive performances. METHODS: we assessed 12 consecutive patients (10 males, 68±7 years old with pure AF (PAF or autoimmune autonomic neuropathy (AAN and 12 age- and gender-matched controls. All patients had no clinical signs of central nervous system involvement and normal brain CT/MRI scan. Cognitive function was assessed on two consecutive days in 3 conditions: on day 1, while sitting, by means of a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests; on day 2, while tilted (HUT and during supine rest (supine in a randomized manner. BP and heart rate (HR were continuously recorded non-invasively for the whole duration of the examination. RESULTS: patients with PAF or AAN displayed a preserved global cognitive function while sitting. However, compared to supine assessment, during HUT patients scored significantly worse during the Trail Making Test A and B, Barrage test, Analogies test, Immediate Visual Memory, Span Forward and Span Backward test. Pathological scores, with regard to Italian normative range values, were observed only during HUT in the Barrage test and in the Analogies test in 3 and 6 patients respectively. On the contrary, in healthy controls, results to neuropsychological tests were not significantly different, during HUT compared to supine rest. CONCLUSIONS: these data demonstrate that patients with PAF and AAN present a normal sitting global cognitive evaluation. However, their executive functions worsen significantly during the orthostatic challenge, possibly because of transient frontal lobes hypoperfusion.

  19. Sleep, sleep deprivation, autonomic nervous system and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobaldini, Eleonora; Costantino, Giorgio; Solbiati, Monica; Cogliati, Chiara; Kara, Tomas; Nobili, Lino; Montano, Nicola

    2017-03-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) has become a relevant health problem in modern societies. We can be sleep deprived due to lifestyle habits or due to sleep disorders, such as insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and neurological disorders. One of the common element of sleep disorders is the condition of chronic SD, which has complex biological consequences. SD is capable of inducing different biological effects, such as neural autonomic control changes, increased oxidative stress, altered inflammatory and coagulatory responses and accelerated atherosclerosis. All these mechanisms links SD and cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Epidemiological studies have shown that short sleep duration is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases, such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, arrhythmias, diabetes and obesity, after adjustment for socioeconomic and demographic risk factors and comorbidities. Thus, an early assessment of a condition of SD and its treatment is clinically relevant to prevent the harmful consequences of a very common condition in adult population.

  20. [Non-invasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system by PET]. Progress report, September 1991--September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    The proposed research addresses the development, validation and application of cardiac PET imaging techniques to characterize the autonomic nervous system of the heart. PET technology has significantly matured over the last two decades. Instrument design, image processing and production of radiochemical compounds have formed an integrative approach to provide a powerful and novel imaging modality for the quantitative in vivo evaluation of the autonomic nervous system of the heart. Animal studies using novel tracers for the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve terminals will be employed to characterize the functional integrity of nerve terminals. This work will be complemented by the development of agents which bind to postsynaptic receptor sites. The combined evaluation of presynaptic and postsynaptic neuronal function will allow a unique characterization of neuronal function. Initial development in animal studies will be followed by feasibility studies in humans. These studies are designed to test sophisticated imaging protocols in the human heart and validate the scintigraphic findings with independent markers of autonomic innervation. Subsequent clinical application in various cardiac diseases is expected to provide new insights into the neuropathophysiology of the heart.

  1. When do the symptoms of autonomic nervous system malfunction appear in patients with Parkinson’s disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Luka Silvio R.

    2014-01-01

    disease, involved side of the body, pain and freezing, but mini mental status (MMS score and Hamilton depression and anxiety rating scale were significantly lower (p < 0.05. Conclusion. Our results confirm a high prevalence of autonomic nervous system disturbances among PD patients from the near onset of disease, with a predominant sympathetic nervous system involvement. The patients who developed complete autonomic neuropathy (both sympathetic and parasympathetic were individuals with considerable level of functional failure, more severe clinical presentation and the existing anxiety and depression. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175090

  2. The unexplored relationship between urinary tract infections and the autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbing, Michael E; Conover, Matt S; Hultgren, Scott J

    2016-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs), the majority of which are caused by uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), are extremely common infections that preferentially effect women. Additional complicating factors, such as catheterization, diabetes, and spinal cord injuries can increase the frequency and severity of UTIs. The rise of antimicrobial resistant uropathogens and the ability of this disease to chronically recur make the development of alternative preventative and therapeutic modalities a priority. The major symptoms of UTIs, urgency, frequency, and dysuria, are readouts of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and the majority of the factors that lead to complicated UTIs have been shown to impact ANS function. This review summarizes the decades' long efforts to understand the molecular mechanisms of the interactions between UPEC and the host, with a particular focus on the recent findings revealing the molecular, bacteriological, immunological and epidemiological complexity of pathogenesis. Additionally, we describe the progress that has been made in: i) generating vaccines and anti-virulence compounds that prevent and/or treat UTI by blocking bacterial adherence to urinary tract tissue and; and ii) elucidating the mechanism by which anti-inflammatories are able to alleviate symptoms and improve disease prognosis. Finally, the potential relationships between the ANS and UTI are considered throughout. While these relationships have not been experimentally explored, the known interactions between numerous UTI characteristics (symptoms, complicating factors, and inflammation) and ANS function suggest that UTIs are directly impacting ANS stimulation and that ANS (dys)function may alter UTI prognosis.

  3. 恶劣心境患者述情障碍与自主神经功能的相关研究%A correlative study of alexithymia and autonomic nervous function in patients with dysthymic disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘小溪; 吴爱勤

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨恶劣心境患者的人格特质、述情障碍与自主神经功能心理生理反应的相关机制.方法:采用多伦多述情障碍量表中文版(TAS-20-C)及心理健康测查表(PHI)对42例恶劣心境患者组(DD组)、33例重性抑郁症患者组(MD组)及30例健康对照组(NC组)进行述情障碍和心理健康水平和人格特质测定,并分析短时(5 min)心率变异性(HRV),评定自主神经功能. 结果:DD组TAS-20-C各因子得分及总分显著高于NC组(P<0.01),因子Ⅰ、因子Ⅱ及总分均明显高于MD组(P<0.01或P<0.05);DD组PHI量表躯体化、焦虑、病态人格及疑心因子分明显高于MD组(P<0.01或P<0.05);DD组HRV频谱指标中SDNN、PNN50及HF较MD及NC组均显著下降(P<0.01或P<0.05),LF/HF较MD及NC组均明显升高(P<0.05);TAS-20-C总分及因子Ⅰ与躯体化、焦虑、病态人格、疑心均相关(|r| =0.25 ~0.38,0.40~0.44,0.47 ~0.59,0.43 ~0.42,P<0.01或P<0.05),因子Ⅱ与焦虑及变态人格相关(|r| =0.31,0.31,P<0.05);躯体化及焦虑与SDNN、VLF及LF均相关(|r| =0.26~0.27,0.39~0.27; |r| =0.36~0.28,P<0.05或P<0.01). 结论:恶劣心境患者存在明显的述情障碍,其人格特质可能导致患者焦虑程度更高,伴自主神经功能紊乱.%Objective: To explore the correlations between personality character,alexithymia and nervous function in patients with dysthymic disorder. Method: TAS-20-C , PHI and short-term heart rate variability were measured in 42 patients with dysthymic disorder(DD group) ,33 patients with major depressive disorder (MD group) and 30 heathty controls ( NC group). Results: The total and subscale scores of TAS-20-C of DD group are higher than the NC group { P <0.01} , DD group showed higher total and factor I as well as H score of TAS-20-C than the MD group( P <0.01 or P <0.05). DD group gained higher score in the somatization,anxiety ,psychopathic deviate and hypomania than the MD group(P < 0.05 orP<0

  4. Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation on Autonomic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Basiago

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the course of the development of deep brain stimulation (DBS into a well-established therapy for Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia, its utility as a potential treatment for autonomic dysfunction has emerged. Dysfunction of autonomic processes is common in neurological diseases. Depending on the specific target in the brain, DBS has been shown to raise or lower blood pressure, normalize the baroreflex, to alter the caliber of bronchioles, and eliminate hyperhidrosis, all through modulation of the sympathetic nervous system. It has also been shown to improve cortical control of the bladder, directly induce or inhibit the micturition reflex, and to improve deglutition and gastric emptying. In this review, we will attempt to summarize the relevant available studies describing these effects of DBS on autonomic function, which vary greatly in character and magnitude with respect to stimulation target.

  5. Autonomic nervous system response to L-dopa in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruonala, Verneri; Tarvainen, Mika P; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Pekkonen, Eero; Rissanen, Saara M

    2015-01-01

    Levodopa is the main treatment method for reducing the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Whereas it reduces the motor symptoms efficiently, its effect on autonomous nervous system is not clear. The information about effect of levodopa on heart rate variability is not coherent between the studies. In this study, ECG of 11 patients with Parkinson's disease was measured during levodopa challenge with pronounced dose of fast release levodopa to ensure the positive drug effect for deep brain stimulation treatment. Heart rate variability analysis was done at three time points, before administration of levodopa, 30 and 60 minutes after administration. After 30 minutes of administration, the HRV parameters show that parasympathetic nervous system activity is decreased and the sympatho-vagal balance is shifted towards sympathetic control. At 60 minutes after administration the parasympathetic nervous system activates slightly and causes a decrease in heart rate.

  6. Autologous Adipose Stem Cell Therapy for Autonomic Nervous System Dysfunction in Two Young Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamdar, Ankur; Young, Jane; Butler, Ian. J.

    2017-01-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and neurocardiogenic syncope are clinical manifestations of autonomic nervous system dysfunction (dysautonomia) that can lead to impaired daily functions. We report two young patients presenting with dysautonomia and autoimmune disease who both received autologous adipose stem cells (ASCs) infusions. This report is the first description of ASCs therapy for patients with combined dysautonomia and autoimmune disease. Case 1: A 21-year-old female presented at 12 years of age with escalating severe dysautonomia with weight loss and gastrointestinal symptoms. She had elevated autoantibodies and cytokines and received multiple immune modulation therapies. Her dysautonomia was treated by volume expanders, vasoconstrictors, and beta blockers with mild improvement. She received ASCs about 2 years before this report with dramatic improvement in her dysautonomia and autoimmune symptoms with a 10 kg weight gain. Case 2: A 7-year-old boy presented at 2 years of age with polyarthritis. At 5 years of age, he manifested orthostatic intolerance. He received immune modulatory therapies with mild improvement. He received ASCs and showed marked improvement of his dysautonomia and immune symptoms. Dysautonomia symptoms of these two patients improved significantly after modulation of autoimmune components by ASC therapy. Favorable clinical responses of these two cases warrant further case–control studies. PMID:27959743

  7. Effects of diving and oxygen on autonomic nervous system and cerebral blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winklewski, Pawel J; Kot, Jacek; Frydrychowski, Andrzej F; Nuckowska, Magdalena K; Tkachenko, Yurii

    2013-09-01

    Recreational scuba diving is a popular leisure activity with the number of divers reaching several millions worldwide. Scuba diving represents a huge challenge for integrative physiology. In mammalian evolution, physiological reflexes developed to deal with lack of oxygen, rather than with an excess, which makes adaptations to scuba diving more difficult to describe and understand than those associated with breath-hold diving. The underwater environment significantly limits the use of equipment to register the organism's functions, so, in most instances, scientific theories are built on experiments that model real diving to some extent, like hyperbaric exposures, dive reflexes or water immersion. The aim of this review is to summarise the current knowledge related to the influence exerted by physiological conditions specific to diving on the autonomic nervous system and cerebral blood flow. The main factors regulating cerebral blood flow during scuba diving are discussed as follows: 1) increased oxygen partial pressure; 2) immersion-related trigemino-cardiac reflexes and 3) exposure to cold, exercise and stress. Also discussed are the potential mechanisms associated with immersion pulmonary oedema.

  8. Assessment of autonomic function in untreated adult coeliac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gian Marco Giorgetti; Antonio Tursi; Cesare Iani; Flavio Arciprete; Giovanni Brandimarte; Ambrogio Capria; Luigi Fontana

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Some recent studies showed that alteration of upper-gut motility in coeliac disease may be related to dysfunction of autonomic nervous system. The aim of our study was to investigate whether autonomic nervous system was altered in untreated and unselected coeliac disease patients.METHODS: We studied 8 untreated and consecutive coeliac disease patients (2 males and 6 females, age range 37±14.5 years). Histological evaluation of duodenal mucosa, anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA), antiendomysial antibodies (EMA) and anti-tTG antibodies and sorbitol H2 breath test were performed in all patients. Extrinsic autonomic neuropathy was assessed by the standardized measurement of cardiovascular reflexes (lying-to-standing, Valsalva manoeuvre, deep breathing, sustained handgrip). The results obtained were compared with a healthy, asymptomatic control group (6 males and 7females, age range 42.3±13.5 years). RESULTS: Coeliac patients exhibited a lower increase of PAS as a response to isometric effort, a reduction of spectral power LF as a response to clinostatic position, but without statistical significance. Also they showed a lower tolerance to orthostatic position, associated with a latent disequilibrium of sympathetic-vagal balance, a relative prevalence of parasympathetic component of the autonomic function. However, these results were not statistically significant when compared with control group (P = n.s.). And they were unchanged after 6 and 12 mo of gluten-free diet.CONCLUSION: This study failed to confirm a significant correlation between autonomic dysfunction and coeliac disease, yet we could not exclude a role of autonomic dysfunction in the genesis of systemic symptoms in some coeliacs.

  9. Effect Of Haemodialysis On Intra Dialytic Calcium, Phosphorus,Magnesium, Levels In Relation To AutonomicNervous System Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Mona Hosny, Sahar Shawky, Ahmed Ramadan , Hany Refaat

    2004-01-01

    Autonomic nervous system dysfunction is common in uremia and in patients under hemodialysis. Changes in serum calcium, serum phosphorus and serum magnesuim always occur during hemodialysis. The relation between these changes and autonomic nervous system activity during hemodialysis has not been fully studied. This study was carried out on 30 patients with chronic renal failure on regular hemo-dialysis with nearly similar age group. We measured serum calcium, serum phosphorus and serum magnesi...

  10. Differentiation of Internet addiction risk level based on autonomic nervous responses: the Internet-addiction hypothesis of autonomic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dong Wei; Wang, Jenn Wu; Huang, Andrew Chih Wei

    2010-08-01

    How high-risk Internet addiction (IA) abusers respond to different autonomic nervous activities compared with low-risk subjects may be a critical research goal with prevention and treatment implications. The aim of the present study was to address this issue by observing differences between high- and low-risk IA abusers in four physiological assessments when surfing the Internet: blood volume pulse (BVP), skin conductance (SC), peripheral temperature (PTEMP), and respiratory response (RESPR). Forty-two male and ten female participants aged 18-24 years were screened with the Chen Internet Addiction Scale (CIAS, 2003), and then separated into high- and low-risk IA groups. Using psychophysiology equipment, participants encountered a 3-minute adaptation period followed by a 6-minute testing period for surfing the Internet on baseline and testing phases. The present results indicate that: (a) the CIAS scores were positively and negatively correlated with the RESPR and the PTEMP; (b) the PTEMP and RESPR of high-risk IA abusers were respectively weaker and stronger than those of low-risk IA abusers; the BVP and SC of high-risk IA abusers were respectively augmented and decreased relative to low-risk IA abusers. Thus we suggest that four autonomic responses may be differentially sensitive to abusers' potency in terms of the IA hypothesis of autonomic activity. The stronger BVP and RESPR responses and the weaker PTEMP reactions of the high-risk IA abusers indicate the sympathetic nervous system was heavily activated in these individuals. However, SC activates parasympathetic responses at the same time in the high-risk IA abusers. The paradoxical responses between the sympathetic and parasympathetic actions are addressed in the discussion.

  11. Effect of Autonomic Nervous System on the Transmurai Dispersion of Ventricular Repolarization in Intact Canine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张存泰; 徐大文; 李泱; 刘念; 王琳; 陆再英

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The effect of the autonomic nerves on the transmural dispersion of ventricular repolarization in intact canine was investigated. By using the monophasic action potential (MAP) recording technique, monophasic action potentials (MAPs) of the epicardium (Epi), midmyocardium (Mid)and endocardium (Endo) were recorded simultaneously by specially designed plunge-needle electrodes at the left ventricular free wall in 12 open-chest dogs. MAPD90 and transmural dispersion of repolarization among three myocardial layers as well as the incidence of the EAD before autonomic nervous stimulation and during autonomic nervous stimulation were compared. The results showed that the MAPD90 of Epi, Mid and Endo before autonomic nervous stimulation were 278±11 ms,316± 16 ms and 270± 12 ms respectively, the MAPD90of Mid was significantly longer than that of Epi or Endo (P<0.01). MAPD90 of Epi, Mid and Endo were shortened by 19±4 ms, 45±6 ms,18± 3 ms respectively during sympathetic stimulation. Compared with that of the control, the transmural dispersion of repolarization during sympathetic stimulation was shortened from 44 ± 4 ms to 15±3 ms (P<0. 01), but early afterdepolarizations were elicited in the Mid of 5 dogs (41 0%)during sympathetic stimulation. Parasympathetic stimulation did not significantly affect the MAPD90 in the three layers. It is concluded that there is the transmural dispersion of ventricular repolarization in intact canine. Sympathetic stimulation can reduce transmural dispersion of repolarization, but it can produce early afterdepolarizations in the Mid. Parasympathetic stimulation does not significantly affect the transmural dispersion of ventricular repolarization.

  12. Investigating the autonomic nervous system response to anxiety in children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushki, Azadeh; Drumm, Ellen; Pla Mobarak, Michele; Tanel, Nadia; Dupuis, Annie; Chau, Tom; Anagnostou, Evdokia

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of anxiety symptoms in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is a challenging task due to the symptom overlap between the two conditions as well as the difficulties in communication and awareness of emotions in ASD. This motivates the development of a physiological marker of anxiety in ASD that is independent of language and does not require observation of overt behaviour. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using indicators of autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity for this purpose. Specially, the objectives of the study were to 1) examine whether or not anxiety causes significant measurable changes in indicators of ANS in an ASD population, and 2) characterize the pattern of these changes in ASD. We measured three physiological indicators of the autonomic nervous system response (heart rate, electrodermal activity, and skin temperature) during a baseline (movie watching) and anxiety condition (Stroop task) in a sample of typically developing children (n = 17) and children with ASD (n = 12). The anxiety condition caused significant changes in heart rate and electrodermal activity in both groups, however, a differential pattern of response was found between the two groups. In particular, the ASD group showed elevated heart rate during both baseline and anxiety conditions. Elevated and blunted phasic electrodermal activity were found in the ASD group during baseline and anxiety conditions, respectively. Finally, the ASD group did not show the typical decrease in skin temperature in response to anxiety. These results suggest that 1) signals of the autonomic nervous system may be used as indicators of anxiety in children with ASD, and 2) ASD may be associated with an atypical autonomic response to anxiety that is most consistent with sympathetic over-arousal and parasympathetic under-arousal.

  13. Investigating the Autonomic Nervous System Response to Anxiety in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushki, Azadeh; Drumm, Ellen; Pla Mobarak, Michele; Tanel, Nadia; Dupuis, Annie; Chau, Tom; Anagnostou, Evdokia

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of anxiety symptoms in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is a challenging task due to the symptom overlap between the two conditions as well as the difficulties in communication and awareness of emotions in ASD. This motivates the development of a physiological marker of anxiety in ASD that is independent of language and does not require observation of overt behaviour. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using indicators of autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity for this purpose. Specially, the objectives of the study were to 1) examine whether or not anxiety causes significant measurable changes in indicators of ANS in an ASD population, and 2) characterize the pattern of these changes in ASD. We measured three physiological indicators of the autonomic nervous system response (heart rate, electrodermal activity, and skin temperature) during a baseline (movie watching) and anxiety condition (Stroop task) in a sample of typically developing children (n = 17) and children with ASD (n = 12). The anxiety condition caused significant changes in heart rate and electrodermal activity in both groups, however, a differential pattern of response was found between the two groups. In particular, the ASD group showed elevated heart rate during both baseline and anxiety conditions. Elevated and blunted phasic electrodermal activity were found in the ASD group during baseline and anxiety conditions, respectively. Finally, the ASD group did not show the typical decrease in skin temperature in response to anxiety. These results suggest that 1) signals of the autonomic nervous system may be used as indicators of anxiety in children with ASD, and 2) ASD may be associated with an atypical autonomic response to anxiety that is most consistent with sympathetic over-arousal and parasympathetic under-arousal. PMID:23577072

  14. Investigating the autonomic nervous system response to anxiety in children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Kushki

    Full Text Available Assessment of anxiety symptoms in autism spectrum disorders (ASD is a challenging task due to the symptom overlap between the two conditions as well as the difficulties in communication and awareness of emotions in ASD. This motivates the development of a physiological marker of anxiety in ASD that is independent of language and does not require observation of overt behaviour. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using indicators of autonomic nervous system (ANS activity for this purpose. Specially, the objectives of the study were to 1 examine whether or not anxiety causes significant measurable changes in indicators of ANS in an ASD population, and 2 characterize the pattern of these changes in ASD. We measured three physiological indicators of the autonomic nervous system response (heart rate, electrodermal activity, and skin temperature during a baseline (movie watching and anxiety condition (Stroop task in a sample of typically developing children (n = 17 and children with ASD (n = 12. The anxiety condition caused significant changes in heart rate and electrodermal activity in both groups, however, a differential pattern of response was found between the two groups. In particular, the ASD group showed elevated heart rate during both baseline and anxiety conditions. Elevated and blunted phasic electrodermal activity were found in the ASD group during baseline and anxiety conditions, respectively. Finally, the ASD group did not show the typical decrease in skin temperature in response to anxiety. These results suggest that 1 signals of the autonomic nervous system may be used as indicators of anxiety in children with ASD, and 2 ASD may be associated with an atypical autonomic response to anxiety that is most consistent with sympathetic over-arousal and parasympathetic under-arousal.

  15. Restoring the Balance of the Autonomic Nervous System as an Innovative Approach to the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, F.A.; Stoof, S.P.; Straub, R.H.; van Maanen, M.A.; Vervoordeldonk, M.J.; Tak, P.P.

    2011-01-01

    The immunomodulatory effect of the autonomic nervous system has raised considerable interest over the last decades. Studying the influence on the immune system and the role in inflammation of the sympathetic as well as the parasympathetic nervous system not only will increase our understanding of th

  16. Type 2 diabetes affects the autonomic nervous system function of the eye%2型糖尿病对眼部自主神经功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章伟利; 胡慧丽; 李金瑛; 吴承高; 张纯

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate autonomic nervous function lesions in eyes with type 2 diabetes mellitus by investigating pupil diameters under the natural state and drug-induced dilated conditions and maximum binocular amplitude adjustment.Methods In this prospective cohert study, 80 type 2 diabetic patients from Peking University Shenzhen Hospital were divided into two groups based on the results of fundus fluorescene angiography (FFA), a preclinical group and a non-proliferative group with 40 patients in each group.Thirty age-matched healthy people were selected as controls.Maximum binocular amplitude adjustment was tested with a comprehensive refractometer, pupil diameters under the natural state and drug-induced dilated conditions were measured with corneal topography.A one-way ANOVA was used for data analysis.Results The mean pupil diameters of the two eyes under the natural state in the control group, preclinical group and non-proliferative group were the same, 2.92±0.47 mm, 3.14±0.65 mm, and 3.24±0.58 mm, respectively.The differences between the groups were not statistically significant (F=2.637, P>0.05).For the right eyes, the mean pupil diameters under the drug-induced dilated conditions were 7.28±0.64 mm, 6.66±0.95 mm, and 6.42±1.32 mm, respectively.The differences between the groups were not statistically significant (F=6.008, P<0.05).The mean diameters for the left eyes were 7.37±0.63 mm, 6.50±1.21 mm, and 6.51±1.04 mm, respectively.The differences between the groups were statistically significant (F=7.737, P<0.05).For the right eyes, the mean dilation ratios were 1.56%±0.47%, 1.16%±0.32%, and 0.98%±0.32%, respectively.The differences between the groups were statistically significant (F=21.620, P<0.05).The ratios for the left eyes were 1.59%±0.47%, 1.11%±0.36%, and 1.04%±0.32%, respectively.The differences between the groups were significant (F=20.289, P<0.05).The mean maximum binocular amplitude adjustments were

  17. [Autonomic nervous system as a source of biomarkers in Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouclet, Hélène; Lebouvier, Thibaud; Flamant, Mathurin; Coron, Emmanuel; Neunlist, Michel; Derkinderen, Pascal; Rouaud, Tiphaine

    2012-07-01

    No validated biomarker is yet available for Parkinson's disease (PD). Clinical PD symptoms include dopa-responsive motor symptoms and dopa-resistant non motor symptoms. Some of the non motor symptoms begin during the premotor stage, like constipation, hyposmia or REM-sleep disorders. Dementia, gait disorders and dysarthria occur in later stages of the disease. PD pathology extends well beyond the substantia nigra. It affects autonomic and non autonomic nuclei in the brainstem and in the medulla, the olfactory bulb and the peripheral autonomic nervous system. Alpha-synuclein aggregates, called Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, are detectable in these structures at early stages. The study of the enteric nervous system (ENS) displays the Lewy pathology in living patients through the digestive biopsies. Minor salivary glands analysis could be a good marker as well, but this needs confirmation. An anatomopathologic PD biomarker would be interesting at different stages of PD: for the positive diagnosis, to follow the progression and to develop neuroprotective treatments.

  18. Monitoring fetal maturation - objectives, techniques and indices of autonomic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Dirk; Zebrowski, Jan; Cysarz, Dirk; Goncalves, Hernani; Pytlik, Adelina; Amorim-Costa, Celia; Bernardes, Joao; Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo; Witte, Otto; Schleussner, Ekkehard; Stroux, Lisa; Redman, Christopher; Georgieva, Antoniya; Payne, Stephen; Clifford, Gari; Signorini, Maria; Magenes, Giovanni; Andreotti, Fernando; Malberg, Hagen; Zaunseder, Sebastian; Lakhno, Igor; Schneider, Uwe

    2017-02-10

    Monitoring the fetal behavior does not only have implications for acute care but also for identifying developmental disturbances that burden the entire later life. The concept, of "fetal programming", also known as "developmental origins of adult disease hypothesis", e.g. applies for cardiovascular, metabolic, hyperkinetic, cognitive disorders. Since the autonomic nervous system is involved in all of those systems, cardiac autonomic control may provide relevant functional diagnostic and prognostic information. The fetal heart rate patterns (HRP) are one of the few functional signals in the prenatal period that relate to autonomic control and, therefore, is predestinated for its evaluation. The development of sensitive markers of fetal maturation and its disturbances requires the consideration of physiological fundamentals, recording technology and HRP parameters of autonomic control. Based on the ESGCO2016 special session on monitoring the fetal maturation we herein report the most recent results on: (i) functional fetal autonomic brain age score (fABAS), Recurrence Quantitative Analysis and Binary Symbolic Dynamics of complex HRP resolve specific maturation periods, (ii) magnetocardiography (MCG) based fABAS was validated for cardiotocography (CTG), (iii) 30 min recordings are sufficient for obtaining episodes of high variability, important for intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) detection in handheld Doppler, (iv) novel parameters from PRSA to identify Intra IUGR fetuses, (v) Electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings allowed a stable heart beat detection in the maturation periods between 20 to 28 weeks of gestation only, (vi) correlation between maternal and fetal HRV is disturbed in pre-eclampsia. The reported novel developments significantly extend the possibilities for the established CTG methodology. Novel HRP indices improve the accuracy of assessment due to their more appropriate consideration of complex autonomic processes across the recording technologies

  19. Autonomic function testing aboard the ISS using “PNEUMOCARD”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baevsky, R. M.; Funtova, I. I.; Diedrich, A.; Chernikova, A. G.; Drescher, J.; Baranov, V. M.; Tank, J.

    2009-10-01

    Investigations of blood pressure, heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV) during long term space flights on board the "ISS" have shown characteristic changes of autonomic cardiovascular control. Therefore, alterations of the autonomic nervous system occurring during spaceflight may be responsible for in- and post-flight disturbances. The device "Pneumocard" was developed to further investigate autonomic cardiovascular and respiratory function aboard the ISS. The hard-software diagnostic complex "Pneumocard" was used during in-flight experiment aboard ISS for autonomic function testing. ECG, photoplethysmography, respiration, transthoracic bioimpedance and seismocardiography were assessed in one male cosmonaut (flight lengths six month). Recordings were made prior to the flight, late during flight, and post-flight during spontaneous respiration and controlled respiration at different rates. HR remained stable during flight. The values were comparable to supine measurements on earth. Respiratory frequency and blood pressure decreased during flight. Post flight HR and BP values increased compared to in-flight data exceeding pre-flight values. Cardiac time intervals did not change dramatically during flight. Pulse wave transit time decreased during flight. The maximum of the first time derivative of the impedance cardiogram, which is highly correlated with stroke volume was not reduced in-flight. Our results demonstrate that autonomic function testing aboard the ISS using "Pneumocard" is feasible and generates data of good quality. Despite the decrease in BP, pulse wave transit time was found reduced in space as shown earlier. However, cardiac output did not decrease profoundly in the investigated cosmonaut. Autonomic testing during space flight detects individual changes in cardiovascular control and may add important information to standard medical control. The recent plans to support a flight to Mars, makes these kinds of observations all the more relevant

  20. An overview of the effect of weight loss on cardiovascular autonomic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maser, Raelene E; Lenhard, M James

    2007-08-01

    The prevalence of obesity is rising to epidemic proportions in many countries worldwide. Obesity seriously increases an individual's risk of developing many health problems including diabetes. Diabetes, like obesity, is also in epidemic proportions with 300 million adults predicted to have the disease by 2025. Investigating strategies for the prevention and treatment of obesity and diabetes is vitally important. Autonomic dysfunction is evident in both obesity and diabetes. In persons with diabetes, impaired cardiovascular autonomic activity is characterized by a reduction in parasympathetic tone with a relative increase in sympathetic activity and is specifically associated with a number of clinically significant manifestations including exercise intolerance, intraoperative cardiovascular lability, orthostatic hypotension, silent myocardial ischemia, and increased risk of mortality. In obesity, parasympathetic function is decreased while regional heterogeneity of increased sympathetic activity may occur. Autonomic dysfunction increases cardiovascular workload, hemodynamic stress, serious dysrhythmias, and significant cardiac pathology. Thus, cardiac autonomic imbalance may also be an important link between obesity and increased morbidity and mortality. Beyond the obese and diabetic state, multiple variables associated with these conditions such as insulin, glucose, leptin, adiponectin and free fatty acids have an affect on the autonomic nervous system. Autonomic disturbances, however, appear to be reversible with weight reduction. Since autonomic imbalance is a marker of adverse risk, improvement obtained from weight loss should be beneficial for the health of individuals with obesity and diabetes. This overview will examine the relationship of the autonomic nervous system in obesity and diabetes and explore the effect of weight loss on autonomic function.

  1. Autonomic nervous system modulation affects the inflammatory immune response in mice with acute Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Marcus Paulo Ribeiro; Rocha, Aletheia Moraes; de Oliveira, Lucas Felipe; de Cuba, Marília Beatriz; de Oliveira Loss, Igor; Castellano, Lucio Roberto; Silva, Marcus Vinicius; Machado, Juliana Reis; Nascentes, Gabriel Antonio Nogueira; Paiva, Luciano Henrique; Savino, Wilson; Junior, Virmondes Rodrigues; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Prado, Vania Ferreira; Prado, Marco Antonio Maximo; Silva, Eliane Lages; Montano, Nicola; Ramirez, Luis Eduardo; Dias da Silva, Valdo Jose

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of changes to the autonomic nervous system in mice during the acute phase of Chagas disease, which is an infection caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The following types of mice were inoculated with T. cruzi (CHG): wild-type (WT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter knockdown (KDVAChT) C57BL/6j mice; wild-type non-treated (NT) FVB mice; FVB mice treated with pyridostigmine bromide (PYR) or salbutamol (SALB); and β(2)-adrenergic receptor knockout (KOβ2) FVB mice. During infection and at 18-21 days after infection (acute phase), the survival curves, parasitaemia, electrocardiograms, heart rate variability, autonomic tonus and histopathology of the animals were evaluated. Negative control groups were matched for age, genetic background and treatment. The KDVAChT-CHG mice exhibited a significant shift in the electrocardiographic, autonomic and histopathological profiles towards a greater inflammatory immune response that was associated with a reduction in blood and tissue parasitism. In contrast, the CHG-PYR mice manifested reduced myocardial inflammation and lower blood and tissue parasitism. Similar results were observed in CHG-SALB animals. Unexpectedly, the KOβ2-CHG mice exhibited less myocardial inflammation and higher blood and tissue parasitism, which were associated with reduced mortality. These findings could have been due to the increase in vagal tone observed in the KOβ2 mice, which rendered them more similar to the CHG-PYR animals. In conclusion, our results indicate a marked immunomodulatory role for the parasympathetic and sympathetic autonomic nervous systems, which inhibit both the inflammatory immune response and parasite clearance during the acute phase of experimental Chagas heart disease in mice.

  2. Autonomic Nervous System Responses to Viewing Green and Built Settings: Differentiating Between Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Magdalena M H E; Maas, Jolanda; Muller, Rianne; Braun, Anoek; Kaandorp, Wendy; van Lien, René; van Poppel, Mireille N M; van Mechelen, Willem; van den Berg, Agnes E

    2015-12-14

    This laboratory study explored buffering and recovery effects of viewing urban green and built spaces on autonomic nervous system activity. Forty-six students viewed photos of green and built spaces immediately following, and preceding acute stress induction. Simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram signal was used to derive respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and pre-ejection period (PEP), indicators of respectively parasympathetic and sympathetic activity. The findings provide support for greater recovery after viewing green scenes, as marked by a stronger increase in RSA as a marker of parasympathetic activity. There were no indications for greater recovery after viewing green scenes in PEP as a marker of sympathetic activity, and there were also no indications of greater buffering effects of green space in neither RSA nor PEP. Overall, our findings are consistent with a predominant role of the parasympathetic nervous system in restorative effects of viewing green space.

  3. Autonomic Nervous System Responses to Viewing Green and Built Settings: Differentiating Between Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Magdalena M.H.E.; Maas, Jolanda; Muller, Rianne; Braun, Anoek; Kaandorp, Wendy; van Lien, René; van Poppel, Mireille N.M.; van Mechelen, Willem; van den Berg, Agnes E.

    2015-01-01

    This laboratory study explored buffering and recovery effects of viewing urban green and built spaces on autonomic nervous system activity. Forty-six students viewed photos of green and built spaces immediately following, and preceding acute stress induction. Simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram signal was used to derive respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and pre-ejection period (PEP), indicators of respectively parasympathetic and sympathetic activity. The findings provide support for greater recovery after viewing green scenes, as marked by a stronger increase in RSA as a marker of parasympathetic activity. There were no indications for greater recovery after viewing green scenes in PEP as a marker of sympathetic activity, and there were also no indications of greater buffering effects of green space in neither RSA nor PEP. Overall, our findings are consistent with a predominant role of the parasympathetic nervous system in restorative effects of viewing green space. PMID:26694426

  4. Autonomic Nervous System Responses to Viewing Green and Built Settings: Differentiating Between Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena M.H.E. van den Berg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This laboratory study explored buffering and recovery effects of viewing urban green and built spaces on autonomic nervous system activity. Forty-six students viewed photos of green and built spaces immediately following, and preceding acute stress induction. Simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram signal was used to derive respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA and pre-ejection period (PEP, indicators of respectively parasympathetic and sympathetic activity. The findings provide support for greater recovery after viewing green scenes, as marked by a stronger increase in RSA as a marker of parasympathetic activity. There were no indications for greater recovery after viewing green scenes in PEP as a marker of sympathetic activity, and there were also no indications of greater buffering effects of green space in neither RSA nor PEP. Overall, our findings are consistent with a predominant role of the parasympathetic nervous system in restorative effects of viewing green space.

  5. Chinese-chi and Kundalini yoga Meditations Effects on the Autonomic Nervous System: Comparative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Anilesh Dey; D. K. Bhattacha; Tibarewala, D. N.; Nilanjan Dey; Amira Ashour; Dac-Nhuong Le; Evgeniya Gospodinova; Mitko Gospodinov

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac disease is one of the major causes for death all over the world. Heart rate variability (HRV) is a significant parameter that used in assessing Autonomous Nervous System (ANS) activity. Generally, the 2D Poincare′ plot and 3D Poincaré plot of the HRV signals reflect the effect of different external stimuli on the ANS. Meditation is one of such external stimulus, which has different techniques with different types of effects on the ANS. Chinese Chi-meditation and Kundalini yoga are two...

  6. Assessment of the autonomic nervous injury by adriamycin using the analysis of heart rate variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsukawa, Seishirou [Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Omori Hospital

    1998-06-01

    Analysis of the heart rate variability were carried out for the cases with malignant tumors of the erythropoietic organ who received adriamycin (ADR), and the effects of ADR on the autonomic nervous of these patients were studied. Seven of 35 cases were examined for the consecutive heart rate variability and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial SPECT, after the administration of ADR. TP value, LF value, LF/HF and SDANN value were 1,448 msec{sup 2}, 354 msec{sup 2}, 2.0 and 97 msec, respectively, indicating that these values were significantly lower than the healthy controls (the C group) (P<0.01). Consecutive observation for 7 cases of ADR group revealed that TP value decreased from 1,489 msec{sup 2} to 1,058 msec{sup 2}, and HF value decreased from 191 msec{sup 2} to 123 msec{sup 2}, significantly (P<0.05). On the other hand, the washout rate of left ventricle which was estimated from MIBG myocardial SPECT increased from 22{+-}14% to 32{+-}14%, significantly (P<0.05). Though cumulative mean dosage of ADR was 286{+-}148 mg/m{sup 2}, sympathetic nervous injury and parasympathetic nervous was caused by such dose ADR, when examinated by the analysis of the heart rate variability and MIBG myocardial SPECT. It is possible to estimate the myocardial injury of heart autonomic nervous that precedes the injury of heart muscle by ADR, by analyzing the heart rate variability, when the cases with malignant tumors are subject to the chemotherapy. Thus it was suggested that the death by arrhythmia and the irreversible myocardial injury might be predictable. (author)

  7. Dysregulation of the autonomous nervous system in patients with temporomandibular disorder: a pupillometric study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Monaco

    Full Text Available The role of the autonomic nervous system (ANS was recently investigated in Temporomandibular disorders (TMD. Several authors argue that in subjects with TMD there is a dysregulation of ANS. Recent literature support that Pupillometry is a simple non-invasive tool to study ANS. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between TMD and ANS activity using pupillometry recording in Infrared light at rest Mandible Position (RP; Infrared light at Forced Habitual Occlusion (FHO; Yellow-green light at RP; Yellow-green light at FHO. Forty female subjects were enrolled: 20 case patients showed TMD based on the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD, and 20 control patients, aged matched, had no signs or symptoms of TMD. Statistical analysis was performed on average pupil size. Ratio between pupil size in FHO and RP (FHO/RP ratio and yellow-green and infrared (light/darkness ratio lighting were carried out. Within group differences of pupil size and of "ratio" were analyzed using a paired t test, while differences of pupil size between groups were tested using an unpaired t test. Statistical comparisons between groups showed no significant differences of absolute values of pupil dimension in RP and FHO, both in yellow-green and in infrared lighting. In addition, there were no significant differences within groups comparing RP and FHO in yellow-green light. In within group comparison of pupil size, differences between RP and FHO were significant in infrared conditions. Control subjects increased, whereas TMD patients decreased pupil size at FHO in infrared lightening. FHO/RP ratio in darkness and light/darkness ratio in RP were significantly different between groups. Taken together, these data suggest that TMD subjects have an impairment of the sympathetic-adrenergic component of the ANS to be activated under stress. The present study provides preliminary pupillometric data confirming that adrenergic function is dysregulated in patients with

  8. Autonomic nervous system regulation of the sinoatrial cell depolarization rate: Unifying computational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, P; Godinez, R

    2015-01-01

    In the last years different computational models have been proposed to simulate the sinoatrial node cell (SANC) action potential. Also, there has been a great effort to model the heart regulation mechanism by the autonomic nervous system (ANS) through the sympathetic and parasympathetic pathways. Both computational models have tried to fit the rabbit and/or the guinea-pig experimental heart rate data with an increasing success. Thus, the aim of this work was to unify the available models that have been reported to study the heart rate behavior when the SANC is stimulated by using different frequency patterns. Our results contribute to the unification of part of the Scepanovic's model [1] (involved with second messengers dynamics and its influence over specific SANC ionic channels), and the SANC ionic channels computational model proposed by Severi et al. [2] in 2012. In this model unification we did refit some parameters, particularly, those related to the Hill functions in the dynamic modeling of phosphokinase and its effect on the ionic channels currents If and ICaL, and over the Pup, parameter that is related to the Ca(++) uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Also, we eliminated the neurotransmitter effect over the ionic current IKr that is not presented in the Severi's model. These modifications were enough to successfully reproduce the heart rate experimental recordings under acetylcholine (Ach) or norepinephrine (NE) for independent stimulation: Ach 10 nM stimulation showed a 21.54% action potential shift compared with the 20% reported for experimental recordings; Isoprenaline 1 μM, also displayed a depolarization increased rate of 29.3%, compared with the experimental data of 28.2%. Furthermore, we were able to reproduce the guinea-pig experimental heart rate recordings, when the SANC model was vagal stimulated by using a 2 Hz, 10 Hz and 20 Hz frequency for 10 seconds and the experimental heart rate data for a sympathetic stimulation of 10 Hz frequency for

  9. STUDY OF CARDIOVASCULAR AUTONOMIC FUNCTIONS IN CONGENITALLY DEAF CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Majority of congenitally deaf children are at risk of cardiac abnormalities in the form of long QT syndrome which could be due to an intracardiac abnormality or autonomic dysfunction. Altered sympathetic/parasympathetic balance as a result of the absence of auditory stimuli on the autonomic nervous system results in lower mean heart rate in congenitally deaf children. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether the cardiovascular autonomic functions are altered in congenitally deaf children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 30 congenitally deaf children aged between 14 - 18 yrs and 30 age matched controls were included for the study. Parasympathetic activity was assessed by observing the heart rate changes to immediate standing from lying down position, heart rate changes during deep breathing and heart rate changes during valsalva maneuver. Sympathetic activity was assessed by observing blood pressure changes on immediate standing from lying down position and blood pressure changes during sustained hand grip. RESULTS: The results of the present study showed statistically significant decrease in the systolic blood pressure in response to immediate standing among congenitally deaf children suggestive of sympathetic imbalance and an early stage of autonomic dysfunction.

  10. Clinical assessment of the autonomic nervous system in diabetes mellitus and its correlation with glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday B Nayak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Clinical assessment of the autonomic nervous system in Diabetes mellitus (DM and its correlation with glycemic control. STUDY DESIGN: Cross sectional study of 50 adult diabetes patients. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with DM who were on regular treatment with either insulin and/or oral hypoglycemic agents were studied. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN score was calculated using the clinical test variables. Results: Of the 50 patients 30 had no CAN, 10 had early CAN and 10 had severe CAN. The mean of CAN score increased with duration of diabetes. The mean HbA 1C was 7.73. The mean CAN score was higher in patients who had complication of diabetes as compared to patients without complications. The heart rate variability with respiration was found to be 15.84 ± 7.02/min. The mean valsalva ratio was 1.31 ± 0.23. The mean drop in BP on standing was 7.30 ± 7.24 mmHg. The mean 30:15 ratio was 1.06 ± 0.04. The mean rise in diastolic BP on sustained hand grip was 16.04 ± 4.11 mmHg. Conclusions: The prevalence of autonomic neuropathy in DM as assessed by CAN score was 40%. The CAN score did not correlate with the duration of DM. The HbA 1C had a significant correlation with the severity of autonomic neuropathy. Occurrence of CAN correlated with the presence of peripheral neuropathy but not with the presence of retinopathy or nephropathy. All individual tests in the battery of CAN score were significantly associated with the presence of autonomic neuropathy, except 30:15 ratio.

  11. AMPK Functions to Modulate Tissue and Organismal Aging in a Cell Non-Autonomous Manner

    OpenAIRE

    Ulgherait, Matthew John

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the biological mechanisms of aging represents an urgent biomedical challenge. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) exhibits pro-longevity effects in diverse species. However, the tissue-specific mechanisms involved in AMPK regulation of aging are poorly understood. Here, we show that activation of AMPK in the adult Drosophila nervous system induces autophagy both in the brain and the intestinal epithelium. These cell autonomous and non-autonomous functions of AMPK are linked ...

  12. Dynamics of autonomic nervous system responses and facial expressions to odors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eHe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Why we like or dislike certain products may be better captured by physiological and behavioral measures of the autonomic nervous system than by conscious or classical sensory tests. Responses to pleasant and unpleasant food odors presented in varying concentrations were assessed continuously using facial expressions and responses of the autonomic nervous system (ANS. Results of 26 young and healthy female participants showed that the unpleasant fish odor triggered higher heart rates and skin conductance responses, lower skin temperature, fewer neutral facial expressions and more disgusted and angry expressions (p < .05. Neutral facial expressions differentiated between odors within 100 ms, after the start of the odor presentation followed by expressions of disgust (180 ms, anger (500 ms, surprised (580 ms, sadness (820 ms, scared (1020 ms, and happy (1780 ms (all p values < .05. Heart rate differentiated between odors after 400 ms, whereas skin conductance responses differentiated between odors after 3920 ms. At shorter intervals (between 520 and 1000 ms and between 2690 and 3880 ms skin temperature for fish was higher than that for orange, but became considerable lower after 5440 ms. This temporal unfolding of emotions in reactions to odors, as seen in facial expressions and physiological measurements supports sequential appraisal theories.

  13. Hormones and the autonomic nervous system are involved in suprachiasmatic nucleus modulation of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiter, Marieke; Buijs, Ruud M; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2006-05-01

    Glucose is one of the most important energy sources for the body in general, and the brain in particular. It is essential for survival to keep glucose levels within strict boundaries. Acute disturbances of glucose homeostasis are rapidly corrected by hormonal and neuronal mechanisms. Furthermore, changes in energy expenditure associated with the light-dark cycle induce variations in the plasma glucose concentration that are more gradual. Organisms take advantage of adapting their internal physiology to the predictable daily changes in energy expenditure, because it enables them to anticipate these changes and to prevent unnecessary disturbance of homeostasis. The hypothalamic biological clock, located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), receives light information from the eyes and transmits this information to the rest of the body to synchronize physiology to the environment. Here we review several studies providing evidence for biological clock control of the daily variation in several aspects of glucose metabolism. Although both hormones and the autonomic nervous system can stimulate glucose uptake or production by organs in the periphery, we have shown that the biological clock control of glucose metabolism mostly occurs through the autonomic nervous system. The critical involvement of the biological clock is also indicated by several studies, indicating that disturbance of the biological clock is often associated with metabolic diseases, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus and hypertension.

  14. Restoring the balance of the autonomic nervous system as an innovative approach to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Frieda A; Stoof, Susanne P; Straub, Rainer H; Van Maanen, Marjolein A; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J; Tak, Paul P

    2011-01-01

    The immunomodulatory effect of the autonomic nervous system has raised considerable interest over the last decades. Studying the influence on the immune system and the role in inflammation of the sympathetic as well as the parasympathetic nervous system not only will increase our understanding of the mechanism of disease, but also could lead to the identification of potential new therapeutic targets for chronic immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). An imbalanced autonomic nervous system, with a reduced parasympathetic and increased sympathetic tone, has been a consistent finding in RA patients. Studies in animal models of arthritis have shown that influencing the sympathetic (via α- and β-adrenergic receptors) and the parasympathetic (via the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7nAChR or by electrically stimulating the vagus nerve) nervous system can have a beneficial effect on inflammation markers and arthritis. The immunosuppressive effect of the parasympathetic nervous system appears less ambiguous than the immunomodulatory effect of the sympathetic nervous system, where activation can lead to increased or decreased inflammation depending on timing, doses and kind of adrenergic agent used. In this review we will discuss the current knowledge of the role of both the sympathetic (SNS) and parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) in inflammation with a special focus on the role in RA. In addition, potential antirheumatic strategies that could be developed by targeting these autonomic pathways are discussed.

  15. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction in obesity and Prader-Willi syndrome: current evidence and implications for future obesity therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqq, A M; DeLorey, D S; Sharma, A M; Freemark, M; Kreier, F; Mackenzie, M L; Richer, L P

    2011-08-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) controls essential functions like breathing, heart rate, digestion, body temperature and hormone levels. Evidence suggests that ANS dysfunction is associated with adult and childhood obesity and plays a role in the distribution of total body fat and the development of obesity-related complications in humans. This review summarizes our current understanding of ANS involvement in the pathogenesis of obesity and Prader-Willi syndrome. Available evidence of ANS dysfunction in the control of energy balance is limited and, in some cases, contradictory. Further investigation in this area is warranted in order to better understand the important contributions of the ANS to regulation of body fat, development of obesity and its comorbidities. Results from these studies will guide the development of novel obesity therapeutics targeting specific ANS dysfunction.

  16. Regular Football Practice Improves Autonomic Cardiac Function in Male Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Luis; Oliveira, Jose; Soares-Miranda, Luisa; Rebelo, Antonio; Brito, Joao

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in the cardiovascular regulation is of primal importance. Since it has been associated with adverse conditions such as cardiac arrhythmias, sudden death, sleep disorders, hypertension and obesity. Objectives: The present study aimed to investigate the impact of recreational football practice on the autonomic cardiac function of male children, as measured by heart rate variability. Patients and Methods: Forty-seven male children aged 9 - 12 years were selected according to their engagement with football oriented practice outside school context. The children were divided into a football group (FG; n = 22) and a control group (CG; n = 25). The FG had regular football practices, with 2 weekly training sessions and occasional weekend matches. The CG was not engaged with any physical activity other than complementary school-based physical education classes. Data from physical activity, physical fitness, and heart rate variability measured in time and frequency domains were obtained. Results: The anthropometric and body composition characteristics were similar in both groups (P > 0.05). The groups were also similar in time spent daily on moderate-to-vigorous physical activities (FG vs. CG: 114 ± 64 vs. 87 ± 55 minutes; P > 0.05). However, the FG performed better (P football practice presented enhanced physical fitness and autonomic function, by increasing vagal tone at rest. PMID:26448848

  17. Effect of 100 Hz electroacupuncture on salivary immunoglobulin A and the autonomic nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hideaki, Waki; Tatsuya, Hisajima; Shogo, Miyazaki; Naruto, Yoshida; Hideaki, Tamai; Yoichi, Minakawa; Yoshihiro, Okuma; Kazuo, Uebaba; Hidenori, Takahashi

    2015-01-01

    Background A previous study has reported that low-frequency (LF) electroacupuncture (EA) influences salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) and the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The ANS is known to control the secretion volume of sIgA; however, the effect of high-frequency (HF) EA on salivary sIgA has not been determined. We investigated whether HF EA affects salivary sIgA levels and the ANS. Method Sixteen healthy subjects were randomly classified into two groups: a control group and an EA group. After a 5 min rest, subjects in the EA group received EA at 100 Hz bilaterally at LI4 and LI11 for 15 min before resting for a further 40 min post-stimulation. Subjects in the control group rested for a total of 60 min. Measurements of the ANS and sIgA levels in both groups were made before, immediately after, 20 min after, and 40 min after rest or 15 min EA treatment. HF and LF components of heart rate variability were analysed as markers of ANS function. LF/HF ratio and HF were taken as indices of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activity, respectively. Salivary protein concentrations and sIgA levels were determined by Bradford protein assay and ELISA, respectively. Results LF/HF ratio was significantly increased immediately after EA. HF was significantly increased at 20 min after EA and sIgA level was significantly increased at 40 min after EA. In addition, HF and salivary sIgA level were positively correlated with each another. Conclusions HF EA exerted sequential positive effects on sympathetic nerve activity, parasympathetic nerve activity, and salivary sIgA level (immediately and after 20 and 40 min, respectively). HF EA may increase salivary sIgA levels by influencing parasympathetic nerve activity. PMID:26449884

  18. An Educational Board Game to Assist PharmD Students in Learning Autonomic Nervous System Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J Shawn; Tincher, Lindsay; Odeng-Otu, Emmanuel; Herdman, Michelle

    2015-10-25

    Objective. To examine whether playing a board game can assist PharmD students in learning autonomic nervous system (ANS) pharmacology. Design. Of 72 students enrolled in a required second-year pharmacology course, 22 students volunteered to play the board game, which was followed by an in-class examination consisting of 42 ANS questions (ANSQs) and 8 control questions (CTLQs). Participants were given a pretest and a posttest to assess immediate educational improvement. Participants' scores for pretest, posttest, in-class examination, and ANSQs were compared. Also, scores for examination, ANSQs, and CTLQs were compared between board game participants (PART) and nonparticipating classmates (NPART). Assessment. Board game participants scored progressively higher between the pretest, posttest, examination, and ANSQs. Additionally, PART scores were higher than NPART scores for examination and ANSQs. Difference between PART and NPART CTLQ scores was not significant. Conclusion. A board game can assist PharmD students in learning ANS pharmacology.

  19. Objective evaluation of stress with the blind by the monitoring of autonomic nervous system activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massot, Bertrand; Baltenneck, Nicolas; Gehin, Claudine; Dittmar, Andre; McAdams, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Accessibility for the blind in an urban space must be studied under real conditions in their daily environment. A new approach for evaluating the impact of environmental conditions on blind pedestrians is the objective measure of stress by the monitoring of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity. Original techniques of data analysis and spatial representation are proposed for the detection of the ANS activity through the assessment of the electrodermal activity. Skin resistance was recorded with an EmoSense system on 10 blind subjects who followed a charted course independently. The course was 1065 meters long and consisted of various environmental conditions in an urban space. The spatial frequency of the non-specific skin resistance responses was used to provide a more relevant representation of geographic hotspots. Results of statistical analysis based on this new parameter are discussed to conclude on phenomena causing mental stress with the blind moving in an urban space.

  20. Lack of circadian variation in the activity of the autonomic nervous system after major abdominal operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg-Adamsen, Susan; Lie, Claus;

    2002-01-01

    patients who had had major abdominal operations. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were monitored with 24-hour Holter ECG on the second postoperative day-evening-night. We calculated heart rate variability from the standard deviation of all normal R-R intervals (excluding ectopics-NN intervals) around the mean NN......OBJECTIVE: Most sudden postoperative deaths occur during the night and we conjectured that this was associated with circadian variations in the autonomic nervous tone, reflected in heart rate variability. DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTINGS: University hospital, Denmark. SUBJECTS: 44...... OUTCOME MEASURES: Heart rate and heart rate variability. RESULTS: Circadian variation calculated from the SDNN (p = 0.43) the pNN50 (p = 0.11), the RMSSD (p = 0.47), and mean NN:SDNN ratio (p = 0.13) was absent postoperatively. Circadian variation in the heart rate was present but was set on a higher...

  1. The Association between Baseline Subjective Anxiety Rating and Changes in Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Activity in Response to Tryptophan Depletion in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chih Yin; Tsai, Hsin Chun; Chi, Mei Hung; Chen, Kao Chin; Chen, Po See; Lee, I Hui; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Yang, Yen Kuang

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of serotonin on anxiety and autonomic nervous system (ANS) function; the correlation between subjective anxiety rating and changes of ANS function following tryptophan depletion (TD) in healthy volunteers was examined. Twenty-eight healthy participants, consisting of 15 females and 13 males, with an average age of 33.3 years, were recruited.Baseline Chinese Symptom Checklist-90-Revised and ANS function measurements were taken. TD was carried out on the testing day, and participants provided blood samples right before and 5 hours after TD. ANS function, somatic symptoms, and Visual Analogue Scales (VASs) were determined after TD. Wilcoxon signed rank test and Spearman ρ correlation were adapted for analyses of the results.The TD procedure reduced total and free plasma tryptophan effectively. After TD, the sympathetic nervous activity increased and parasympathetic nervous activity decreased. Baseline anxiety ratings positively correlated with post-TD changes in sympathetic nervous activity, VAS ratings, and physical symptoms. However, a negative correlation with post-TD changes in parasympathetic nervous activity was found.The change in ANS function after TD was associated with the severity of anxiety in healthy volunteers. This supports the fact that the effect of anxiety on heart rate variability is related to serotonin vulnerability. Furthermore, it also shows that the subjective anxiety rating has a biological basis related to serotonin.

  2. Induced Effects of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on the Autonomic Nervous System and the Cardiac Rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Cabrerizo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several standard protocols based on repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS have been employed for treatment of a variety of neurological disorders. Despite their advantages in patients that are retractable to medication, there is a lack of knowledge about the effects of rTMS on the autonomic nervous system that controls the cardiovascular system. Current understanding suggests that the shape of the so-called QRS complex together with the size of the different segments and intervals between the PQRST deflections of the heart could predict the nature of the different arrhythmias and ailments affecting the heart. This preliminary study involving 10 normal subjects from 20 to 30 years of age demonstrated that rTMS can induce changes in the heart rhythm. The autonomic activity that controls the cardiac rhythm was indeed altered by an rTMS session targeting the motor cortex using intensity below the subject’s motor threshold and lasting no more than 5 minutes. The rTMS activation resulted in a reduction of the RR intervals (cardioacceleration in most cases. Most of these cases also showed significant changes in the Poincare plot descriptor SD2 (long-term variability, the area under the low frequency (LF power spectrum density curve, and the low frequency to high frequency (LF/HF ratio. The RR intervals changed significantly in specific instants of time during rTMS activation showing either heart rate acceleration or heart rate deceleration.

  3. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction and their relationship with disease severity in children with atopic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emin, Ozkaya; Esra, Gursoy; Aysegül, Demir; Ufuk, Erenberk; Ayhan, Sogut; Rusen, Dundaroz M

    2012-09-30

    The involvement of autonomic imbalance has been reported in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the clinical severity of childhood asthma with autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction and to define whether the severity of asthma correlates with ANS activity. In this case-control study, we evaluated the ANS activity by testing heart rate variability (HRV) and sympathetic skin response (SRR) in 77 asthmatic children, age 7-12 yrs, who had no co-morbidity and compared them with 40 gender- and age-matched control subjects. According to the severity of their asthma, study subjects were further divided into three groups: I (mild asthmatics), II (moderate asthmatics), and III (severe asthmatics). Inter-group ANS scale scores differed significantly (p<0.01) between Groups I and III and between Groups II and III. Combined use of HRV and SSR provides a higher degree of sensitivity for assessing disease severity in cases of pediatric asthma.

  4. Association of autonomic nervous system and EEG scalp potential during playing 2D Grand Turismo 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhani, Ahmad Rauf; Likun, Xia; Saeed Malik, Aamir

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral activation and autonomic nervous system have importance in studies such as mental stress. The aim of this study is to analyze variations in EEG scalp potential which may influence autonomic activation of heart while playing video games. Ten healthy participants were recruited in this study. Electroencephalogram (EEG) and electrocardiogram (ECG) signals were measured simultaneously during playing video game and rest conditions. Sympathetic and parasympathetic innervations of heart were evaluated from heart rate variability (HRV), derived from the ECG. Scalp potential was measured by the EEG. The results showed a significant upsurge in the value theta Fz/alpha Pz (p<0.001) while playing game. The results also showed tachycardia while playing video game as compared to rest condition (p<0.005). Normalized low frequency power and ratio of low frequency/high frequency power were significantly increased while playing video game and normalized high frequency power sank during video games. Results showed synchronized activity of cerebellum and sympathetic and parasympathetic innervation of heart.

  5. Autonomic nervous system and lipid metabolism: findings in anxious-depressive spectrum and eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messina Vincenzo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To correlate lipid metabolism and autonomic dysfunction with anxious-depressive spectrum and eating disorders. To propose the lipid index (LI as a new possible biomarker. Methods 95 patients and 60 controls were enrolled from the University Psychiatry Unit of Catania and from general practitioners (GPs. The patients were divided into four pathological groups: Anxiety, Depression, Anxious-Depressive Disorder and Eating Disorders [Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR official/appendix criteria]. The levels of the cholesterol, triglycerides and apolipoproteins A and B were determined. The LI, for each subject, was obtained through a mathematical operation on the values of the cholesterol and triglycerides levels compared with the maximum cut-off of the general population. The autonomic functioning was tested with Ewing battery tests. Particularly, the correlation between heart rate variability (HRV and lipid metabolism has been investigated. Results Pathological and control groups, compared among each other, presented some peculiarities in the lipid metabolism and the autonomic dysfunction scores. In addition, a statistically significant correlation has been found between HRV and lipid metabolism. Conclusions Lipid metabolism and autonomic functioning seem to be related to the discussed psychiatric disorders. LI, in addition, could represent a new possible biomarker to be considered.

  6. Autonomic nervous activities assessed by heart rate variability in pre- and post-adolescent Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuba, Yoshiyuki; Sato, Hironori; Sakiyama, Tomomi; Yamaoka Endo, Masako; Yamada, Masako; Ueoka, Hatsumi; Miura, Akira; Koga, Shunsaku

    2009-11-01

    There are many studies with respect to the age-related change of the characteristics of beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV), reflected by cardiac autonomic control, especially focusing on adulthood (i.e., aging related to the incidence of metabolic syndrome) in Japanese individuals. However, it is not still clear how basic control matures during childhood. This study was, therefore, designed to explore the HRV characteristics of pre- and post-adolescent Japanese, in a cross-sectional manner. Resting HRV data was recorded in a relaxing supine position from 136 healthy individuals between 8 and 20 years (48 boys between 8 and 14 years; 88 girls between 8 and 20 years) who were instructed to breathe periodically (0.25 Hz). Frequency-domain analysis (i.e., the spectral analysis based on an autoregressive model) of short-term, stationary R-R intervals was performed to evaluate the low- (LF; below 0.15 Hz) and high- (HF; 0.15-0.40 Hz) frequency powers. The HF to total power represents the vagal control of heart rate (PNS indicator), and the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF) is considered to relate to the sympathetic modulations (SNS indicator). Both PNS and SNS indices had substantially no effect from age and/or gender in the range between 8 and 20 years. In conclusion, the control of the cardiac autonomic nervous system in Japanese seems already to be compatible with that in adulthood before approximately 10 years. In other word, the cardiac autonomic modulation would presumably be maturated before the age of approximately 7-8 years, though further research is awaited.

  7. The impact of emotion-related autonomic nervous system responsiveness on pain sensitivity in female patients with fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middendorp, H. van; Lumley, M.A.; Houtveen, J.H.; Jacobs, J.W.G.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Geenen, R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with fibromyalgia have shown hyporeactive autonomic nervous system (ANS) responses to physical stressors, augmented pain to ANS changes, and heightened negative emotions, which can increase pain. This study examined ANS reactivity to negative emotions and its association with pai

  8. Stimulation of the autonomic nervous system in colorectal surgery: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berghmans Tim MP

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postoperative ileus (POI is a well-known complication of abdominal surgery and is considered to be caused by a local inflammation in the gut. Previously it has been shown that both local and systemic inflammation can be reduced by stimulation of the autonomic nervous system via lipid rich nutrition. Stimulation of the autonomic nervous system releases acetylcholine from efferent vagal nerve endings that binds to nicotinic receptors located on the inflammatory cells leading to a decrease of pro-inflammatory mediators. Besides administration of nutrition there are other ways of stimulating the autonomic nervous system such as gum chewing. Methods/design This prospective, placebo-controlled randomized trial will include 120 patients undergoing colorectal surgery which are randomized for gum chewing preoperatively and in the direct postoperative phase or a placebo. Postoperative ileus will be assessed both clinically by time to first flatus and time to first defecation and by determination of gastric motility using ultrasound to measure dimensions of the antrum. Furthermore the inflammatory response is quantified by analyzing pro-inflammatory mediators. Finally, markers of gut barrier integrity will be measured as well as occurrence of postoperative complications. Discussion We hypothesize that chewing gum preoperatively and in the direct postoperative phase in patients undergoing colorectal surgery dampens local and systematic inflammation, via activation of the autonomic nervous system. Down-regulation of the inflammatory cascade via stimulation of the vagus nerve will ameleriote POI and enhance postoperative recovery. Trial registration NTR2867

  9. Autonomic nervous system modulation during an archery competition in novice and experienced adolescent archers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Andres E; Christodoulou, Vasilios X; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Flouris, Andreas D

    2011-06-01

    We assessed autonomic nervous system modulation through changes in heart rate variability during an archery competition as well as archery performance by comparing novice and experienced adolescent archers. Seven novice (age 14.0 ± 8.5 years, body mass index 22.9 ± 4.3 kg · m(-2), training experience 0.4 ± 0.3 years) and ten experienced archers (age 16.5 ± 10.3 years, body mass index 22.4 ± 3.1 kg · m(-2), training experience 4.1 ± 0.9 years) volunteered. Using beat-by-beat heart rate monitoring, heart rate variability was measured for 20 s before each arrow shot during two rounds of competition. We found that, compared with novices, experienced adolescent archers: (i) take more time per shot; (ii) have a higher low frequency band, square root of the mean of squared differences between successive R-R intervals (i.e. the time elapsing between two consecutive R waves in the electrocardiogram), and percentage of successive normal-to-normal intervals greater than 50 ms; and (iii) demonstrate an increase in parasympathetic nervous system activity compared with pre-competition values. We propose that these characteristics of experienced archers are appropriate for optimal performance during competition.

  10. Aromatherapy Benefits Autonomic Nervous System Regulation for Elementary School Faculty in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Ming Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Workplace stress-related illness is a serious issue, and consequently many stress reduction methods have been investigated. Aromatherapy is especially for populations that work under high stress. Elementary school teachers are a high-stress working population in Taiwan. In this study, fifty-four elementary school teachers were recruited to evaluate aromatherapy performance on stress reduction. Bergamot essential oil was used for aromatherapy spray for 10 minutes. Blood pressure and autonomic nervous system parameters were recorded 5 minutes before and after the application of the aroma spray. Results showed that there were significant decreases in blood pressure, heart rate, LF power percentage, and LF/HF while there were increases in heart rate variability and HF power percentage (P<.001∗∗∗ after application of the aromatherapy spray. Further analysis was investigated by dividing subjects into three background variables (position variables, age variables, gender variables and anxiety degree groups. All parameters were significantly different for most subgroups, except for the substitute teachers and the light-anxiety group. Parasympathetic nervous system activation was measured after aromatherapy in this study. It encouraged further study for other stress working population by aromatherapy.

  11. Assessment of autonomic nervous system activity by heart rate recovery response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Zhaohui; BAI Jing

    2004-01-01

    The assessment of autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity is a tool for diagnosing or predicting cardiovascular diseases,while heart rate recovery response (HRRR) after exercise has been promoted as a process under the regulation of ANS (sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems).Therefore,assessment of ANS activity was performed by HRRR in this study.Firstly,HRRR signal was extracted based on wavelet decomposition and difference curve of coarse component from heart rate signal.Then,HRRR was divided into quickly descending interval (QDI) and slowly descending interval (SDI).Finally,3 groups of indexes (Difference,Exponential and Quadratic Groups) from QDI and SDI were compared between 50 normotensive and 61 hypertensive subjects.The results showed that the indexes of Difference Group were better choices than others in analyzing the features of HRRR.Furthermore,parasympathetic activity is dominant in QDI,while sympathetic and parasympathetic activities affect SDI together.In conclusion,the proposed method was effective to assess ANS activity.

  12. Neurotechnology for monitoring and restoring sensory, motor, and autonomic functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pae C.; Knaack, Gretchen; Weber, Douglas J.

    2016-05-01

    The rapid and exponential advances in micro- and nanotechnologies over the last decade have enabled devices that communicate directly with the nervous system to measure and influence neural activity. Many of the earliest implementations focused on restoration of sensory and motor function, but as knowledge of physiology advances and technology continues to improve in accuracy, precision, and safety, new modes of engaging with the autonomic system herald an era of health restoration that may augment or replace many conventional pharmacotherapies. DARPA's Biological Technologies Office is continuing to advance neurotechnology by investing in neural interface technologies that are effective, reliable, and safe for long-term use in humans. DARPA's Hand Proprioception and Touch Interfaces (HAPTIX) program is creating a fully implantable system that interfaces with peripheral nerves in amputees to enable natural control and sensation for prosthetic limbs. Beyond standard electrode implementations, the Electrical Prescriptions (ElectRx) program is investing in innovative approaches to minimally or non-invasively interface with the peripheral nervous system using novel magnetic, optogenetic, and ultrasound-based technologies. These new mechanisms of interrogating and stimulating the peripheral nervous system are driving towards unparalleled spatiotemporal resolution, specificity and targeting, and noninvasiveness to enable chronic, human-use applications in closed-loop neuromodulation for the treatment of disease.

  13. Prions spread via the autonomic nervous system from the gut to the central nervous system in cattle incubating bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Christine; Ziegler, Ute; Buschmann, Anne; Weber, Artur; Kupfer, Leila; Oelschlegel, Anja; Hammerschmidt, Baerbel; Groschup, Martin H

    2007-03-01

    To elucidate the still-unknown pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), an oral BSE challenge and sequential kill study was carried out on 56 calves. Relevant tissues belonging to the peripheral and central nervous system, as well as to the lymphoreticular tract, from necropsied animals were analysed by highly sensitive immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting techniques to reveal the presence of BSE-associated pathological prion protein (PrPSc) depositions. Our results demonstrate two routes involving the autonomic nervous system through which BSE prions spread by anterograde pathways from the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) to the central nervous system (CNS): (i) via the coeliac and mesenteric ganglion complex, splanchnic nerves and the lumbal/caudal thoracic spinal cord (representing the sympathetic GIT innervation); and (ii) via the Nervus vagus (parasympathetic GIT innervation). The dorsal root ganglia seem to be subsequently affected, so it is likely that BSE prion invasion of the non-autonomic peripheral nervous system (e.g. sciatic nerve) is a secondary retrograde event following prion replication in the CNS. Moreover, BSE-associated PrPSc was already detected in the brainstem of an animal 24 months post-infection, which is 8 months earlier than reported previously. These findings are important for the understanding of BSE pathogenesis and for the development of new diagnostic strategies for this infectious disease.

  14. Autonomic nervous system activity assessement by heart rate variability in experimental bladder outlet obstruction 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Dobrek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A syndrome with urgency, with or without associated urine incontinence and usually accompanied by higher urinary frequency and nocturia has been named “overactive bladder; OAB”. OAB is an entity with complex pathophysiology, involving both myogenic and neurogenic (afferent / efferent bladder innervation disturbances. OAB symptoms accompany benign prostatic hypertrophy - BPH (“obstructive OAB”. The aim of the study was to estimate the autonomic nervous system activity (ANS in the experimental bladder outlet obstruction (BOO which was an animal model of the human BPH. The study was conducted using 30 female rats, divided into two groups: BOO animals (n=15, with surgically induced BOO (by partial ligation of the proximal urethra and control ones (n=15, which underwent sham procedure (without urethral ligation. Two weeks after the surgery, in both groups, ANS activity was estimated using time- and spectral analysis of the heart rate variability recordings. The bladder overactivity in BOO animals was confirmed using urodynamic recordings and bladder histological assessment, juxtaposed against the results of the control group. The key finding of our study was the development of autonomic disturbances in bladder outlet obstruction (BOO rats. Our study revealed that BOO animals were characterised by diminished rMSSD and spectral HRV parameters: TP, LF and HF, in comparison with the control group. The normalised nLF and nHF parameters did not differ significantly in both groups, although slight changes in the nLF (increased and nHF (decreased were noted in BOO group. The absolute VLF value was almost the same in both studied populations, however, the percentage part of this component in the appropriate HRV spectrum differed considerably in both studied groups. In BOO animals, VLF percentage amounted to about 90�20whereas in control animals this parameter reached only about 53�0of the total power spectrum.Thus, to sum up, our findings suggest

  15. DISORDERS OF THE AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM IN THE CARDIOLOGY PRACTICE: FOCUS ON THE ANALYSIS OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Akhmedova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV in patients with ischemic heart disease, a life-threatening heart rhythm disorders, as well as diabetes mellitus (DM is considered. A significant association between the autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system and death from cardiovascular causes is identified. The reactions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS can serve as a precipitating factor of arrhythmias in patients with heart disorders. Analysis of HRV at rest is the main and informative method for determination of the ANS disorders. HRV decreases greatly in patients with acute myocardial infarction, cardiac arrhythmia, and DM, predicting a high risk of death. The leading cause of death in diabetic patients is cardiac autonomic neuropathy, with the development of "silent" ischemia and painless myocardial infarction. Autonomic regulation of the heart rate should be assessed for early diagnosis and prevention of complications in the form of sudden death.

  16. DISORDERS OF THE AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM IN THE CARDIOLOGY PRACTICE: FOCUS ON THE ANALYSIS OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Akhmedova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV in patients with ischemic heart disease, a life-threatening heart rhythm disorders, as well as diabetes mellitus (DM is considered. A significant association between the autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system and death from cardiovascular causes is identified. The reactions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS can serve as a precipitating factor of arrhythmias in patients with heart disorders. Analysis of HRV at rest is the main and informative method for determination of the ANS disorders. HRV decreases greatly in patients with acute myocardial infarction, cardiac arrhythmia, and DM, predicting a high risk of death. The leading cause of death in diabetic patients is cardiac autonomic neuropathy, with the development of "silent" ischemia and painless myocardial infarction. Autonomic regulation of the heart rate should be assessed for early diagnosis and prevention of complications in the form of sudden death.

  17. Functional State of Puberty Aged Hockey Players’ Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Shichavin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article estimates age-specific indexes of nervous system, responsible for juveniles’ speed qualities, training in Children and Youth Ice Hockey School. The received data justifies the necessity for individual approach to each hockey player, considering his age peculiarities and, respectively the functioning of the nervous system in the course of training organization.

  18. Autonomous requirements of the Menkes disease protein in the nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgkinson, Victoria L.; Zhu, Sha; Wang, Yanfang; Ladomersky, Erik; Nickelson, Karen; Weisman, Gary A.; Lee, Jaekwon; Gitlin, Jonathan D.; Petris, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Menkes disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder arising from a systemic copper deficiency caused by loss-of-function mutations in a ubiquitously expressed copper transporter, ATP7A. Although this disorder reveals an essential role for copper in the developing human nervous system, the role of ATP7A in the pathogenesis of signs and symptoms in affected patients, including severe mental retardation, ataxia, and excitotoxic seizures, remains unknown. To directly examine the role of ATP7A wi...

  19. Error awareness revisited: accumulation of multimodal evidence from central and autonomic nervous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Jan R; Danielmeier, Claudia; Ullsperger, Markus

    2011-10-01

    The differences between erroneous actions that are consciously perceived as errors and those that go unnoticed have recently become an issue in the field of performance monitoring. In EEG studies, error awareness has been suggested to influence the error positivity (Pe) of the response-locked event-related brain potential, a positive voltage deflection prominent approximately 300 msec after error commission, whereas the preceding error-related negativity (ERN) seemed to be unaffected by error awareness. Erroneous actions, in general, have been shown to promote several changes in ongoing autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity, yet such investigations have only rarely taken into account the question of subjective error awareness. In the first part of this study, heart rate, pupillometry, and EEG were recorded during an antisaccade task to measure autonomic arousal and activity of the CNS separately for perceived and unperceived errors. Contrary to our expectations, we observed differences in both Pe and ERN with respect to subjective error awareness. This was replicated in a second experiment, using a modified version of the same task. In line with our predictions, only perceived errors provoke the previously established post-error heart rate deceleration. Also, pupil size yields a more prominent dilatory effect after an erroneous saccade, which is also significantly larger for perceived than unperceived errors. On the basis of the ERP and ANS results as well as brain-behavior correlations, we suggest a novel interpretation of the implementation and emergence of error awareness in the brain. In our framework, several systems generate input signals (e.g., ERN, sensory input, proprioception) that influence the emergence of error awareness, which is then accumulated and presumably reflected in later potentials, such as the Pe.

  20. Autonomic nervous control of the heart rate during isometric exercise in normal man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, B C; Gallo Júnior, L; Marin Neto, J A; Martins, L E

    1987-02-01

    The relative contribution of the efferent components of the autonomic nervous system to the regulation of tachycardia induced by isometric exercise was assessed in 23 normal males. The isometric exercise (handgrip) was performed at the maximum intensity tolerated by the individual over a period of 10 s (maximal voluntary contraction-MVC) and at levels equivalent to 75, 50 and 25% of MVC for 20, 40 and 10 s, respectively. The study was performed both under control conditions and after pharmacological blockade with atropine (12 individuals) or propranolol (11 individuals). Under control conditions, the heart rate (HR) responses to isometric effort were dependent on the intensity and duration of the exercise, showing a tendency towards progressive elevation with the maintenance of muscular contraction at the levels studied. The tachycardia evoked by this effort was of considerable magnitude and of rapid onset, especially at the more intense levels of activity. Parasympathetic blockade markedly decreased tachycardia, which manifested itself during the first 10 s of exercise at all levels of intensity, whereas sympathetic blockade markedly modified the HR response after 10 s of effort at the 75 and 50% MVC levels. A slight depression of the tachycardiac response could be observed already after 10 s of maximum effort after propranolol. The present results suggest that the autonomic regulation of these responses is based on a biphasic mechanism, with the initial phase depending on the rapid withdrawal of the parasympathetic influence, followed by a marked sympathetic contribution to the induction of tachycardia after 10 s of isometric contraction or even a little before at maximum exertion.

  1. Effects of a Passive Online Software Application on Heart Rate Variability and Autonomic Nervous System Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study investigated whether short-term exposure to a passive online software application of purported subtle energy technology would affect heart rate variability (HRV) and associated autonomic nervous system measures. Methods: This was a randomized, double-blinded, sham-controlled clinical trial (RCT). The study took place in a nonprofit laboratory in Emeryville, California. Twenty healthy, nonsmoking subjects (16 females), aged 40–75 years, participated. Quantum Code Technology™ (QCT), a purported subtle energy technology, was delivered through a passive software application (Heart+ App) on a smartphone placed <1 m from subjects who were seated and reading a catalog. HRV was measured for 5 min in triplicate for each condition via finger plethysmography using a Food and Drug Administration medically approved HRV measurement device. Measurements were made at baseline and 35 min following exposure to the software applications. The following parameters were calculated and analyzed: heart rate, total power, standard deviation node-to-node, root mean square sequential difference, low frequency to high frequency ratio (LF/HF), low frequency (LF), and high frequency (HF). Results: Paired samples t-tests showed that for the Heart+ App, mean LF/HF decreased (p = 9.5 × 10–4), while mean LF decreased in a trend (p = 0.06), indicating reduced sympathetic dominance. Root mean square sequential difference increased for the Heart+ App, showing a possible trend (p = 0.09). Post–pre differences in LF/HF for sham compared with the Heart+ App were also significant (p < 0.008) by independent t-test, indicating clinical relevance. Conclusions: Significant beneficial changes in mean LF/HF, along with possible trends in mean LF and root mean square sequential difference, were observed in subjects following 35 min exposure to the Heart+ App that was working in the background on an active smartphone untouched by the subjects

  2. Autonomic function in manganese alloy workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, W W; Angle, C R; Willcockson, N K; Padula, M A; Korn, T

    1998-07-01

    The observation of orthostatic hypotension in an index case of manganese toxicity lead to this prospective attempt to evaluate cardiovascular autonomic function and cognitive and emotional neurotoxicity in eight manganese alloy welders and machinists. The subjects consisted of a convenience sample consisting of an index case of manganese dementia, his four co-workers in a "frog shop" for gouging, welding, and grinding repair of high manganese railway track and a convenience sample of three mild steel welders with lesser manganese exposure also referred because of cognitive or autonomic symptoms. Frog shop air manganese samples 9.6-10 years before and 1.2-3.4 years after the diagnosis of the index case exceeded 1.0 mg/m3 in 29% and 0.2 mg/m3 in 62%. Twenty-four-hour electrocardiographic (Holter) monitoring was used to determine the temporal variability of the heartrate (RR' interval) and the rates of change at low frequency (0.04-0.15 Hz) and high frequency (0.15-0.40 Hz). MMPI and MCMI personality assessment and short-term memory, figure copy, controlled oral word association, and symbol digit tests were used. The five frog shop workers had abnormal sympathovagal balance with decreased high frequency variability (increased ln LF/ln HF). Seven of the eight workers had symptoms of autonomic dysfunction and significantly decreased heart rate variability (rMSSD) but these did not distinguish the relative exposure. Mood or affect was disturbed in all with associated changes in short-term memory and attention in four of the subjects. There were no significant correlations with serum or urine manganese. Power spectrum analysis of 24-h ambulatory ECG indicating a decrease in parasympathetic high frequency activation of heart rate variability may provide a sensitive index of central autonomic dysfunction reflecting increased exposure to manganese, although the contribution of exposures to solvents and other metals cannot be excluded. Neurotoxicity due to the gouging

  3. 心率变异性评估运输应激对Beagle犬自主神经功能的影响%Assessment of the effect of transportation stress on autonomic nervous function in beagle dogs based on heart rate variability (HRV) analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘永明; 何欢; 陈亮; 徐孝平; 杨玉伟; 朱科燕; 陈民利

    2011-01-01

    目的 基于心率变异性(heart rate variability,HRV)分析评估运输应激对Beagle犬自主神经功能的影响,并界定其恢复期.方法 16只Beagle犬随机分成两组(每组8只),即对照组和运输应激组,利用大动物无创生理信号遥测技术,分别监测清醒自由活动状态下对照组和运输应激组应激4 h后、恢复1、2、3周时,Beagle犬的心电图(ECG)的改变情况,并用HRV分析评估其自主神经功能情况.结果 ①Beagle犬HRV参数具有明显的昼夜节律变化(P<0.01),与对照组比,运输应激后Beagle犬的HRV时域分析参数中RR间期、SDNN、RMSSD、TI、pNN50、STV和LTV参数均出现明显的降低 (P<0.05,P<0.01),且恢复3周后时域分析参数恢复至正常水平; ②与对照组比,运输应激后Beagle犬频域分析参数中HR、LFnorm、LF/HF比值均显著升高(P<0.01),而LnTP、LnVLF、HFnorm均出现明显的降低(P<0.01),且恢复3周后频域分析参数恢复正常水平;③运输应激后,Beagle犬HR与HRV参数具有显著的相关性(P<0.01).结论 运输应激可引起Beagle犬交感神经活动增强,使得交感神经/副交感神经活动平衡发生紊乱,导致HRV降低,其可能是引起Beagle犬自主神经功能紊乱的主要原因之一.Beagle犬运输应激后,最好进行2周以上或3周的恢复期.%Objective To assess the effect of transportation stress on autonomic nervous function in beagle dogs based on heart rate variability (HRV) analysis, and define its recovery.Methods Sixteen beagle dogs were randomly divided into two groups (n= 8 in each): the control group and transportation stress group.Using a non-invasive telemetry system in conscious and unrestrained beagle dogs, electrocardiograms (ECG) were recorded in both groups after a 4 h transportation stress and after a recovery of 1, 2 and 3 weeks.HRV analysis was used to assess the autonomic nervous function.Results (1) There was an obvious circadian rhythm in beagle dogs (P <0.01 ).Compared with

  4. Characterizing Psychological Dimensions in Non-Pathological Subjects through Autonomic Nervous System Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimma eNardelli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective assessment of psychological traits of healthy subjects and psychiatric patients has been growing interest in clinical and bioengineering research fields during the last decade. Several experimental evidences strongly suggest that a link between Autonomic Nervous System (ANS dynamics and specific dimensions such as anxiety, social phobia, stress and emotional regulation might exist. Nevertheless, an extensive investigation on a wide range of psycho-cognitive scales and ANS non-invasive markers gathered from standard and nonlinear analysis still needs to be addressed. In this study, we analyzed the discerning and correlation capabilities of a comprehensive set of ANS features and psycho-cognitive scales in 29 non-pathological subjects monitored during resting conditions. In particular, the state of the art of standard and nonlinear analysis was performed on Heart Rate Variability, InterBreath Interval series, and Inter-Beat Respiration series, which were considered as monovariate and multivariate measurements. Experimental results show that each ANS feature is linked to specific psychological traits. Moreover, nonlinear analysis outperforms the psychological assessment with respect to standard analysis. Considering that the current clinical practice relies only on subjective scores from interviews and questionnaires, this study provides objective tools for the assessment of psychological dimensions.

  5. Exercise training improves cardiac autonomic nervous system activity in type 1 diabetic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ki Ok; Moritani, Toshio; Woo, Jinhee; Jang, Ki Soeng; Bae, Ju Yong; Yoo, Jaeho; Kang, Sunghwun

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the effect exercise training has on cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS) and cardiovascular risk profiles in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). [Subjects] Fifteen type 1 DM children (all boys; 13.0±1.0 years of age) were enrolled in the study. [Methods] The subjects received exercise training three times a week in a 12-week program. Each child was asked to walk on a treadmill to achieve an exercise intensity of VO2max 60%. ANS activity was measured by power spectral analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG). Blood samples were obtained for serum lipid profiles. To evaluate Doppler-shifted Fourier pulsatility index (PI) analysis, a 5-MHz continuous wave Doppler (VASCULAB D10) set was used to measure forward blood flow velocity (FLOW) in the radial artery. [Results] Total and low-frequency (LF) power of heart rate variability increased significantly after exercise intervention. Total cholesterol (TC) levels were significant lower after exercise intervention. Total and high-frequency (HF) power were significantly correlated with higher TC levels, but diastolic blood pressure and HF was significantly correlated with lower TC levels. [Conclusion] Regular exercise intervention should be prescribed for children with type 1 DM.

  6. Early postnatal low-protein nutrition, metabolic programming and the autonomic nervous system in adult life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Oliveira Júlio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Protein restriction during lactation has been used as a rat model of metabolic programming to study the impact of perinatal malnutrition on adult metabolism. In contrast to protein restriction during fetal life, protein restriction during lactation did not appear to cause either obesity or the hallmarks of metabolic syndrome, such as hyperinsulinemia, when individuals reached adulthood. However, protein restriction provokes body underweight and hypoinsulinemia. This review is focused on the regulation of insulin secretion and the influence of the autonomic nervous system (ANS in adult rats that were protein-malnourished during lactation. The data available on the topic suggest that the perinatal phase of lactation, when insulted by protein deficit, imprints the adult metabolism and thereby alters the glycemic control. Although hypoinsulinemia programs adult rats to maintain normoglycemia, pancreatic β-cells are less sensitive to secretion stimuli, such as glucose and cholinergic agents. These pancreatic dysfunctions may be attributed to an imbalance of ANS activity recorded in adult rats that experienced maternal protein restriction.

  7. Early postnatal low-protein nutrition, metabolic programming and the autonomic nervous system in adult life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Júlio Cezar; Grassiolli, Sabrina; Gravena, Clarice; de Mathias, Paulo Cezar Freitas

    2012-09-11

    Protein restriction during lactation has been used as a rat model of metabolic programming to study the impact of perinatal malnutrition on adult metabolism. In contrast to protein restriction during fetal life, protein restriction during lactation did not appear to cause either obesity or the hallmarks of metabolic syndrome, such as hyperinsulinemia, when individuals reached adulthood. However, protein restriction provokes body underweight and hypoinsulinemia. This review is focused on the regulation of insulin secretion and the influence of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in adult rats that were protein-malnourished during lactation. The data available on the topic suggest that the perinatal phase of lactation, when insulted by protein deficit, imprints the adult metabolism and thereby alters the glycemic control. Although hypoinsulinemia programs adult rats to maintain normoglycemia, pancreatic β-cells are less sensitive to secretion stimuli, such as glucose and cholinergic agents. These pancreatic dysfunctions may be attributed to an imbalance of ANS activity recorded in adult rats that experienced maternal protein restriction.

  8. Central nervous system control of gastrointestinal motility and secretion and modulation of gastrointestinal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Kirsteen N; Travagli, R Alberto

    2014-10-01

    Although the gastrointestinal (GI) tract possesses intrinsic neural plexuses that allow a significant degree of autonomy over GI functions, the central nervous system (CNS) provides extrinsic neural inputs that regulate, modulate, and control these functions. While the intestines are capable of functioning in the absence of extrinsic inputs, the stomach and esophagus are much more dependent upon extrinsic neural inputs, particularly from parasympathetic and sympathetic pathways. The sympathetic nervous system exerts a predominantly inhibitory effect upon GI muscle and provides a tonic inhibitory influence over mucosal secretion while, at the same time, regulates GI blood flow via neurally mediated vasoconstriction. The parasympathetic nervous system, in contrast, exerts both excitatory and inhibitory control over gastric and intestinal tone and motility. Although GI functions are controlled by the autonomic nervous system and occur, by and large, independently of conscious perception, it is clear that the higher CNS centers influence homeostatic control as well as cognitive and behavioral functions. This review will describe the basic neural circuitry of extrinsic inputs to the GI tract as well as the major CNS nuclei that innervate and modulate the activity of these pathways. The role of CNS-centered reflexes in the regulation of GI functions will be discussed as will modulation of these reflexes under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Finally, future directions within the field will be discussed in terms of important questions that remain to be resolved and advances in technology that may help provide these answers.

  9. Assessment of the autonomic nervous system is an appropriate biological marker for the well-being in erectile dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tolga Dogru; Orhan Murat Kocak; Nurper Erberk-Ozen; Murat Basar

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether the autonomic nervous system (ANS) components are suitable biological markers for representing well-being in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED). Methods: The present study included 74 male patients who had applied for check-ups in the cardiology outpatient clinic at Kirikkale University (Kirikkale, Turkey) and who had been diagnosed as having hyperlipidemia. Of these patients, 26 had an additional diagnosis of ED and made up the patient group. The remaining 48 patients formed the control group. Well-being was assessed with short- form 36 (SF-36). The International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) was used as a measure of libido and erectile function. Quantitative assessment of the ANS was made based on the analysis of heart rate variability by means of 24-h holter monitorization. Results: Comparisons between the ED and control groups showed significant differences only in energy scale of SF-36. The ED group also had significantly higher values of sympathetic activity. Except for the general health score of SF-36, which was found to be correlated with parasympathetic activity only in ED group, there were similar correlation patterns within the groups. Although well-being and sympathetic activity were corre- lated negatively, parasympathetic activity and well-being were correlated positively. Conclusion: Quantitative as- sessment of the ANS by heart rate variability analysis might be a suitable marker for well-being of patients with ED. (Asian J Androl 2008 Jul; 10: 643-650)

  10. Autonomic nervous system dynamics for mood and emotional-state recognition significant advances in data acquisition, signal processing and classification

    CERN Document Server

    Valenza, Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    This monograph reports on advances in the measurement and study of autonomic nervous system (ANS) dynamics as a source of reliable and effective markers for mood state recognition and assessment of emotional responses. Its primary impact will be in affective computing and the application of emotion-recognition systems. Applicative studies of biosignals such as: electrocardiograms; electrodermal responses; respiration activity; gaze points; and pupil-size variation are covered in detail, and experimental results explain how to characterize the elicited affective levels and mood states pragmatically and accurately using the information thus extracted from the ANS. Nonlinear signal processing techniques play a crucial role in understanding the ANS physiology underlying superficially noticeable changes and provide important quantifiers of cardiovascular control dynamics. These have prognostic value in both healthy subjects and patients with mood disorders. Moreover, Autonomic Nervous System Dynamics for Mood and ...

  11. Enhanced insulin sensitivity mediated by adipose tissue browning perturbs islet morphology and hormone secretion in response to autonomic nervous activation in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Bilal A; Kvist-Reimer, Martina; Enerbäck, Sven; Ahrén, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance results in a compensatory increase in insulin secretion to maintain normoglycemia. Conversely, high insulin sensitivity results in reduced insulin secretion to prevent hypoglycemia. The mechanisms for this inverse adaptation are not well understood. We utilized highly insulin-sensitive mice, due to adipocyte-specific overexpression of the FOXC2 transcription factor, to study mechanisms of the reversed islet adaptation to increased insulin sensitivity. We found that Foxc2TG mice responded to mild hyperglycemia with insulin secretion significantly lower than that of wild-type mice; however, when severe hyperglycemia was induced, Foxc2TG mice demonstrated insulin secretion equal to or greater than that of wild-type mice. In response to autonomic nervous activation by 2-deoxyglucose, the acute suppression of insulin seen in wild-type mice was absent in Foxc2TG mice, suggesting impaired sympathetic signaling to the islet. Basal glucagon was increased in Foxc2TG mice, but they displayed severely impaired glucagon responses to cholinergic and autonomic nervous stimuli. These data suggest that the autonomic nerves contribute to the islet adaptation to high insulin sensitivity, which is compatible with a neuro-adipo regulation of islet function being instrumental for maintaining glucose regulation.

  12. The impact of paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy on the autonomous nervous system of patients with ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Paclitaxel-based regimens are frequently associated with the development of peripheral neuropathy. The autonomous nervous system (ANS) effects, however, of this chemotherapeutic agent remain unexplored. Methods We investigated a group of 31 female patients with ovarian cancer receiving treatment with paclitaxel and carboplatin, as well as a group of 16 healthy age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers. All study participants completed a questionnaire and were assessed neurophysiol...

  13. Assessment of Fetal Autonomic Nervous System Activity by Fetal Magnetocardiography: Comparison of Normal Pregnancy and Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To clarify the developmental activity of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) of the normal fetus and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) cases using fetal magnetocardiography (FMCG). Subjects and Methods. Normal pregnancy (n = 35) and IUGR (n = 12) cases at 28–39 and 32–37 weeks of gestation, respectively, were included in this study. The R-R interval variability was used to calculate the coefficient of variance (CVRR) and low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio. Results. The ...

  14. Treatment effect of uvulopalatopharyngoplasty on autonomic nervous activity during sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋光峰; 孙炜; 李娜; 孙彦; 张念凯

    2004-01-01

    @@ Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by repetitive episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep. The prevalence of OSAS in middle-aged population is about 2%-4%.1 Many OSAS patients can be accompanied by serious cardiovascular complications, such as hypertension.2 The aim of this study was to find the changes of autonomic nervous system (ANS) during sleep, and the impact of surgical treatment on heart rate variability (HRV) in OSAS patients.

  15. Human skin hypoxia modulates cerebrovascular and autonomic functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Pucci

    Full Text Available Because the skin is an oxygen sensor in amphibians and mice, we thought to confirm this function also in humans. The human upright posture, however, introduces additional functional demands for the maintenance of oxygen homeostasis in which cerebral blood flow and autonomic nervous system (ANS function may also be involved. We examined nine males and three females. While subjects were breathing ambient air, at sea level, we changed gases in a plastic body-bag during two conditions of the experiment such as to induce skin hypoxia (with pure nitrogen or skin normoxia (with air. The subjects performed a test of hypoxic ventilatory drive during each condition of the experiment. We found no differences in the hypoxic ventilatory drive tests. However, ANS function and cerebral blood flow velocities were modulated by skin hypoxia and the effect was significantly greater on the left than right middle cerebral arteries. We conclude that skin hypoxia modulates ANS function and cerebral blood flow velocities and this might impact life styles and tolerance to ambient hypoxia at altitude. Thus the skin in normal humans, in addition to its numerous other functions, is also an oxygen sensor.

  16. Impaired autonomic function predicts dizziness at onset of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, MP; Hassink, RJ; Tuinenburg, AE; Lefrandt, JD; de Kam, PJ; Crijns, HJGM

    2001-01-01

    Background: Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is associated with various symptoms, including dizziness, which presumably reflects hemodynamic deterioration. Given the importance of the autonomic nervous system in mitigating the hemodynamic effect of atrial fibrillation, we hypothesized that autonomic f

  17. Bright light therapy for depression: a review of its effects on chronobiology and the autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Mark A; Ciraulo, Domenic A

    2014-04-01

    Bright light therapy (BLT) is considered among the first-line treatments for seasonal affective disorder (SAD), yet a growing body of literature supports its use in other neuropsychiatric conditions including non-seasonal depression. Despite evidence of its antidepressant efficacy, clinical use of BLT remains highly variable internationally. In this article, we explore the autonomic effects of BLT and suggest that such effects may play a role in its antidepressant and chronotherapeutic properties. After providing a brief introduction on the clinical application of BLT, we review the chronobiological effects of BLT on depression and on the autonomic nervous system in depressed and non-depressed individuals with an emphasis on non-seasonal depression. Such a theory of autonomic modulation via BLT could serve to integrate aspects of recent work centered on alleviating allostatic load, the polyvagal theory, the neurovisceral integration model and emerging evidence on the roles of glutamate and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GABA).

  18. Regular Football Practice Improves Autonomic Cardiac Function in Male Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The role of the autonomic nervous system (ANS in the cardiovascular regulation is of primal importance. Since it has been associated with adverse conditions such as cardiac arrhythmias, sudden death, sleep disorders, hypertension and obesity. Objectives The present study aimed to investigate the impact of recreational football practice on the autonomic cardiac function of male children, as measured by heart rate variability. Patients and Methods Forty-seven male children aged 9 - 12 years were selected according to their engagement with football oriented practice outside school context. The children were divided into a football group (FG; n = 22 and a control group (CG; n = 25. The FG had regular football practices, with 2 weekly training sessions and occasional weekend matches. The CG was not engaged with any physical activity other than complementary school-based physical education classes. Data from physical activity, physical fitness, and heart rate variability measured in time and frequency domains were obtained. Results The anthropometric and body composition characteristics were similar in both groups (P > 0.05. The groups were also similar in time spent daily on moderate-to-vigorous physical activities (FG vs. CG: 114 ± 64 vs. 87 ± 55 minutes; P > 0.05. However, the FG performed better (P < 0.05 in Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test (1394 ± 558 vs. 778 ± 408 m and 15-m sprint test (3.06 ± 0.17 vs. 3.20 ± 0.23 s. Also, the FG presented enhanced autonomic function. Significant differences were detected (P < 0.05 between groups for low frequency normalized units (38.0 ± 15.2 vs. 47.3 ± 14.2 n.u (normalized units, high frequency normalized units (62.1 ± 15.2 vs. 52.8 ± 14.2 n.u., and LF:HF ratio (0.7 ± 0.4 vs. 1.1 ± 0.6 ms2. Conclusions Children engaged with regular football practice presented enhanced physical fitness and autonomic function, by increasing vagal tone at rest.

  19. Effects of extreme endurance running on cardiac autonomic nervous modulation in healthy trained subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztajzel, Juan; Atchou, Guillaume; Adamec, Richard; Bayes de Luna, Antonio

    2006-01-15

    This study examined spectral components of heart rate variability (HRV) during endurance mountain running in 8 healthy trained subjects. The data showed that during this type of mountain running, all spectral components of HRV may severely decrease, particularly very-low-frequency and low-frequency (LF) power, suggesting extreme activation of the sympathetic nervous system. The physiologic response of the heart in this situation was the downregulation of the beta-adrenergic receptors to protect myocardial function, with a subsequent increase in parasympathetic tone, reflected by an increase in high-frequency (HF) power and a decrease in the LF/HF ratio.

  20. [Sleep and autonomic function: sleep related breathing disorders in Parkinson's disease and related disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    In patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), sleep related breathing disorders (SRBD), including obstructive and central sleep apnea, vocal cord abductor paralysis and dysrhythmic breathing pattern, are frequently observed. SRBD may have a considerable impact on variation of autonomic nervous activity during sleep. The previous studies correlated upper airway muscle dysfunction related parkinsonism with increased prevalence of SRBD in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, recently, the clinical significance of SRBD and its impact on sleepiness and disease severity have been debated. In this review, we discuss sleep and autonomic function, especially, SRBD in PD and related disorders, including the previous studies from our department.

  1. Hypoxemia and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction: autonomic nervous system versus mixed venous PO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellett, A A; Cairo, J M; Levitzky, M G

    1997-09-01

    Hypoxemia interferes with hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). We investigated the respective roles of the autonomic nervous system and the mixed venous PO2 (PVO2) in the attenuation of HPV by hypoxemia. Pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs had their lungs separately ventilated with a dual-lumen endotracheal tube. Left (Ql) and total (Qt) pulmonary blood flows were determined using electromagnetic flow probes. HPV was initiated by ventilating the left lung with nitrogen for 5-10 min while the right lung received 100% oxygen. The animals were subsequently made hypoxemic by switching the right lung to room air ventilation (5-10 min). Two different protocol groups received either intravenous atropine during hypoxemia (group I) or intravenous propranolol prior to protocol initiation (group II). A third group of dogs (group III) had their mixed venous PO2S maintained above 30 torr during hypoxemia. In response to left lung hypoxia, Ql/Qt decreased from 44 +/- 5, 48 +/- 3 and 46 +/- 2% to 25 +/- 4, 28 +/- 2 and 26 +/- 3% in the three groups, respectively. During hypoxemia Ql/Qt increased to 50 +/- 7 and 47 +/- 3% in groups I and II. In group III dogs, Ql/Qt remained significantly decreased at 31 +/- 3%. Subsequent administration of atropine in group I had no effect on Ql/Qt. We conclude that the loss of flow diversion from a hypoxic lung during hypoxemia may be mediated primarily by a decreased in mixed venous PO2 when PVO2 is allowed to decrease to 15-20 torr.

  2. Chinese-chi and Kundalini yoga Meditations Effects on the Autonomic Nervous System: Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anilesh Dey

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac disease is one of the major causes for death all over the world. Heart rate variability (HRV is a significant parameter that used in assessing Autonomous Nervous System (ANS activity. Generally, the 2D Poincare′ plot and 3D Poincaré plot of the HRV signals reflect the effect of different external stimuli on the ANS. Meditation is one of such external stimulus, which has different techniques with different types of effects on the ANS. Chinese Chi-meditation and Kundalini yoga are two different effective meditation techniques. The current work is interested with the analysis of the HRV signals under the effect of these two based on meditation techniques. The 2D and 3D Poincare′ plots are generally plotted by fitting respectively an ellipse/ellipsoid to the dense region of the constructed Poincare′ plot of HRV signals. However, the 2D and 3D Poincaré plots sometimes fail to describe the proper behaviour of the system. Thus in this study, a three-dimensional frequency-delay plot is proposed to properly distinguish these two famous meditation techniques by analyzing their effects on ANS. This proposed 3D frequency-delay plot is applied on HRV signals of eight persons practicing same Chi-meditation and four other persons practising same Kundalini yoga. To substantiate the result for larger sample of data, statistical Student t-test is applied, which shows a satisfactory result in this context. The experimental results established that the Chi-meditation has large impact on the HRVcompared to the Kundalini yoga.

  3. Deciphering Human Cell-Autonomous Anti-HSV-1 Immunity in the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafaille, Fabien G; Ciancanelli, Michael J; Studer, Lorenz; Smith, Gregory; Notarangelo, Luigi; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Zhang, Shen-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a common virus that can rarely invade the human central nervous system (CNS), causing devastating encephalitis. The permissiveness to HSV-1 of the various relevant cell types of the CNS, neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia cells, as well as their response to viral infection, has been extensively studied in humans and other animals. Nevertheless, human CNS cell-based models of anti-HSV-1 immunity are of particular importance, as responses to any given neurotropic virus may differ between humans and other animals. Human CNS neuron cell lines as well as primary human CNS neurons, astrocytes, and microglia cells cultured/isolated from embryos or cadavers, have enabled the study of cell-autonomous anti-HSV-1 immunity in vitro. However, the paucity of biological samples and their lack of purity have hindered progress in the field, which furthermore suffers from the absence of testable primary human oligodendrocytes. Recently, the authors have established a human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs)-based model of anti-HSV-1 immunity in neurons, oligodendrocyte precursor cells, astrocytes, and neural stem cells, which has widened the scope of possible in vitro studies while permitting in-depth explorations. This mini-review summarizes the available data on human primary and iPSC-derived CNS cells for anti-HSV-1 immunity. The hiPSC-mediated study of anti-viral immunity in both healthy individuals and patients with viral encephalitis will be a powerful tool in dissecting the disease pathogenesis of CNS infections with HSV-1 and other neurotropic viruses.

  4. 眩晕与自主神经功能障碍的关系%The relationship between vertigo and autonomic nervous dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱淑娟

    2016-01-01

    Objective Analysis of the relationship between peripheral vertigo and autonomic nervous dysfunction.Methods From April 2014 to April 2015,48 patients with peripheral vertigo were selected,and their autonomic nervous function was examined when the vertigo was re-lieved or disappeared.Results The abnormal rate of parasympathetic nerve was 14.58% to 27.08% and the critical 2.708% to 45.83%,the ab-normal rate of parasympathetic nerve was higher than that of the sympathetic nerve,the dif erence is statistical y significant (P <0.05)of autonomic nerve function tests.Conclusion Autonomic nerve disorder have close relations with vertigo,the autonomic nervous system can ef ectively reduce the incidence of dizziness.%目的:分析周围性眩晕与自主神经功能障碍间的关系。方法选取2014年4月至2015年4月收治的48例周围性眩晕患者,在其眩晕明显缓解或消失时,对其的自主神经功能进行检查。结果进行自主神经功能检测其异常率为14.58%~27.08%,其临界为27.08%~45.83%,副交感神经异常率为副交感神经的异常率高于交感神经,差异有统计学意义(P <0.05)。结论自主神经障碍是与眩晕有着密切的关系,对自主神经进行调节可以有效减轻眩晕发病率。

  5. 基于心率变异性分析针刺对自主神经功能调节作用研究近况%Recent Research Situation of Heart Rate Variability-based Analysis of the Regulating Effect of Acupuncture on Autonomic Nervous Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈芷枫; 赵芸芸; 汪杏; 向云霞; 赵凌

    2016-01-01

    中医学认为针灸治病的最终目的是调和阴阳,针刺向穴位传递信息,通过经络系统或神经系统传递到相应脏腑组织器官和大脑,从而调节机体的阴阳平衡状态。近年来国内学者对针刺调节疾病的心率变异性(heart rate variability,HRV)分析进行了深入研究,发现针刺调节各内脏器官的作用与自主神经系统密切相关,针刺可以调节交感神经和副交感神经的平衡;许多学者通过 HRV 频域性或时域性分析探讨针刺效应对自主神经功能失调相关疾病的影响,取得了一定的成果。该文就近年来国内对针刺结合 HRV 分析对自主神经功能失调疾病的研究加以总结,综述了自主神经与疾病的紧密联系和针刺作用的相关机制。%Traditional Chinese medicine considers that the final purpose of acupuncture treatment for disease is to harmonize yin and yang. Acupuncture redresses a balance between yin and yang by transmitting information to acupoints and then to corresponding visceral tissues and organs and the brain through the meridian system or the nervous system. In recent years, scholars at home thoroughly studied heart rate variability (HRV) analysis for acupuncture treatment of diseases and found that the regulating effect of acupuncture on visceral organs was closely related to autonomic nerves and acupuncture could restore a balance between sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves. Many scholars explored the effect of acupuncture on diseases related to autonomic nervous dysfunction by HRV frequency domain or time domain analysis and gained a certain achievements. This article summarizes recent years’ domestic studies on HRV-based analysis of acupuncture for diseases with autonomic nervous dysfunction and reviews the close relationship between autonomic nerves and diseases and the related mechanism of acupuncture action.

  6. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction predicts poor prognosis in patients with mild to moderate tetanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsi Rohmah

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autonomic nervous system (ANS dysfunction is present in up to one third of patients with tetanus. The prognostic value of ANS dysfunction is known in severe tetanus but its value is not well established in mild to moderate tetanus. Methods Medical records of all patients admitted with tetanus at two academic tertiary care centers in Karachi, Pakistan were reviewed. The demographic, clinical and laboratory data was recorded and analyzed. ANS dysfunction was defined as presence of labile or persistent hypertension or hypotension and sinus tachycardia, tachyarrythmia or bradycardia on EKG. Patients were divided into two groups based on presence of ANS dysfunction (ANS group and non ANS group. Tetanus severity was classified on the basis of Ablett criteria. Results Ninety six (64 males; 32 females patients were admitted with the diagnosis over a period of 10 years. ANS group had 31 (32% patients while non ANS group comprised of 65 (68% patients. Both groups matched for age, gender, symptom severity, use of tetanus immunoglobulin and antibiotics. Twelve patients in ANS group had mild to moderate tetanus (Ablett I and II and 19 patients had severe/very severe tetanus (Ablett III and IV. Fifteen (50% patients in ANS group required ventilation as compared to 28 (45% in non-ANS group (p = 0.09. Fourteen (47% patients died in ANS group as compared to 10 (15% in non ANS group (p= 0.002. Out of those 14 patients died in ANS group, six patients had mild to moderate tetanus and eight patients had severe/ very severe tetanus. Major cause of death was cardiac arrhythmias (13/14; 93% in ANS group and respiratory arrest (7/10; 70% in non ANS group. Ten (33% patients had complete recovery in ANS group while in non ANS group 35(48% patients had complete recovery (p= 0.05. Conclusions ANS dysfunction was present in one third of our tetanus population. 40% patients with ANS dysfunction had only mild to moderate tetanus. ANS dysfunction

  7. The circadian system and the balance of the autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijs, Ruud M; Escobar, Carolina; Swaab, Dick F

    2013-01-01

    Our biological clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), sets the pace of our life: it provides a rhythmic function to our sleep-wake cycle. In order to do so properly the SCN synchronizes our physiology to behavioral patterns by directing the autonomic and hormonal output of the hypothalamus to the different organs of the body that require a different setting - activity or inactivity - during particular phases of the day or night. In this chapter we show that this delicate balance requires that the SCN should not only provide an output to these organs but also be informed about the physiological state of the organs in order to adapt its output. This occurs via a hypothalamic neuronal network that provides the necessary input to the SCN. We argue that the feedback that the SCN receives from its hypothalamic target structures is essential to maintain a balance in our physiological functions, which fluctuate during the sleep-wake cycle. We propose that this crucial role of the hypothalamus in the homeostatic response is the reason why, e.g., in aging or depression, changes in the functioning of the biological clock, the SCN, lead to the development of pathology. In addition, if this balance is not adequately organized, for example, if the signals of the biological clock are violated by being active and eating during the night, as in shift work, one will be more susceptible to diseases such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.

  8. The impact of rotigotine on cardiovascular autonomic function in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchi, Camilla; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Pisani, Valerio; Marfia, Girolama Alessandra; Di Giorgio, Alessandra; Stanzione, Paolo; Bernardi, Giorgio; Stefani, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Dysautonomia can occur in early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) influencing tolerance to dopaminergic therapies. Rotigotine, a non-ergot dopamine agonist, has recently been developed as an effective alternative antiparkinsonian drug, but its influence on the autonomic nervous system was not investigated. Twenty subjects out of 34 consecutive de novo PD patients were submitted to full assessment of cardiovascular autonomic function before and after reaching a stable rotigotine regimen [6 mg/24 h (n = 3) or 8 mg/24 h (n = 17)]. Patients reached significant clinical improvement (-27% on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III) and did not show significant differences in cardiovascular tests compared to baseline data. However, an unexpected trend towards increasing systolic blood pressure after head-up tilt test was detected. Our study demonstrates that rotigotine does not influence cardiovascular autonomic responses in early de novo PD patients. Consequently, it may represent a well-tolerated and efficacious therapeutic option in newly diagnosed PD subjects.

  9. POSTMENOPAUSAL METABOLIC SYNDROME: CORRECTION OF AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM DISBALANCE WITH COMBINATION OF ACE-INHIBITOR AND STATIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Logacheva

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study dynamics of the indices of heart rate variability (HRV and heart remodeling in response on combined therapy with fosinopril and simvastatin in postmenopausal metabolic syndrome (MS. Material and methods. 95 women were dynamically examined (before and after 12 months of therapy with fosinopril and simvastatin to assess heart rhythm variability (time and spectral domains and remodeling with Holter ECG monitoring and echocardiography. Results. Fosinopril has resulted in blood pressure decrease, reduction in heart remodeling andmyocardial heterogeneity , which accompanied HRV rise with increase in parasympathetic activity. Simvastatin potentiated fosinopril positive effects on left ventricular hypertrophy , myocardial electric heterogeneity and autonomic modulation due to its prominent hypolipidemic and pleiotropic effect. Conclusion. In patients with postmenopausal MS medicines, which modified different elements of MS (ACE inhibitor and statin, not only have antihypertensive and hypolipidemic action, but also reduce the heart remodeling and improve the autonomic nervous system balance.

  10. [Application of linear and nonlinear characteristics of heart rate variability in assessment of autonomic nervous system activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ping; Yu, Hongliu

    2014-04-01

    Calculation of linear parameters, such as time-domain and frequency-domain analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), is a conventional method for assessment of autonomic nervous system activity. Nonlinear phenomena are certainly involved in the genesis of HRV. In a seemingly random signal the Poincaré plot can easily demonstrate whether there is an underlying determinism in the signal. Linear and nonlinear analysis methods were applied in the computer words inputting experiments in this study for physiological measurement. This study therefore demonstrated that Poincaré plot was a simple but powerful graphical tool to describe the dynamics of a system.

  11. Systematic morphology and evolutionary anatomy of the autonomic cardiac nervous system in the lesser apes, gibbons (hylobatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Tomokazu; Thorington, Richard W; Kunimatsu, Yutaka; Whatton, James F

    2008-08-01

    We examined the morphology of the autonomic cardiac nervous system (ACNS) on 20 sides of 10 gibbons (Hylobatidae) of three genera, and we have inferred the evolution of the anatomy of the primate ACNS. We report the following. (1) Several trivial intraspecific and interspecific variations are present in gibbons, but the general arrangement of the ACNS in gibbons is consistent. (2) Although the parasympathetic vagal cardiac nervous system is extremely consistent, the sympathetic cardiac nervous system, such as the composition of the sympathetic ganglia and the range of origin of the sympathetic cardiac nerves, exhibit topographical differences among primates. (3) The vertebral ganglion, seldom observed in the Old World monkeys (Cercopithecidae), was consistently present in gibbons as well as in humans. (4) There are fewer thoracic ganglia contributing to the cervicothoracic ganglion in humans than in gibbons and in gibbons than in Old World monkeys. (5) The superior cardiac nerve originating from the superior cervical ganglion, rarely observed in Old World monkeys but commonly observed in humans, was present in 13 of 20 sides (65%), mostly on the left. Accordingly, the ACNS morphology exhibits evolutionary changes within the primate lineage. These evolutionary differences between Old World monkeys, gibbons, and humans are most parsimoniously interpreted as resulting from regular changes in the lineages leading from their common ancestor to the extant species that we dissected. They include the reduction in the number of thoracic ganglia contributing to the cervicothoracic ganglion and the expansion of the range of the cardiac nervous origin.

  12. Marital Conflict and Growth in Children's Internalizing Symptoms: The Role of Autonomic Nervous System Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Keiley, Margaret; Erath, Stephen; Dyer, W. Justin

    2013-01-01

    We assessed trajectories of children's internalizing symptoms, indexed through anxiety and depression, with a focus on the role of interactions between interparental marital conflict, children's sympathetic nervous system activity indexed by skin conductance level (SCL), and parasympathetic nervous system activity indexed by respiratory sinus…

  13. Structural and functional features of central nervous system lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louveau, Antoine; Smirnov, Igor; Keyes, Timothy J; Eccles, Jacob D; Rouhani, Sherin J; Peske, J David; Derecki, Noel C; Castle, David; Mandell, James W; Lee, Kevin S; Harris, Tajie H; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-07-16

    One of the characteristics of the central nervous system is the lack of a classical lymphatic drainage system. Although it is now accepted that the central nervous system undergoes constant immune surveillance that takes place within the meningeal compartment, the mechanisms governing the entrance and exit of immune cells from the central nervous system remain poorly understood. In searching for T-cell gateways into and out of the meninges, we discovered functional lymphatic vessels lining the dural sinuses. These structures express all of the molecular hallmarks of lymphatic endothelial cells, are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid, and are connected to the deep cervical lymph nodes. The unique location of these vessels may have impeded their discovery to date, thereby contributing to the long-held concept of the absence of lymphatic vasculature in the central nervous system. The discovery of the central nervous system lymphatic system may call for a reassessment of basic assumptions in neuroimmunology and sheds new light on the aetiology of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases associated with immune system dysfunction.

  14. Evaluations of autonomic nervous system function in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome by heart rate variability analysis%阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停综合征患儿心率变异性与自主神经功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许志飞; 吴云肖; 张励兵; 申昆玲

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the autonomic nervous system function in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) by heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Methods A total of 93 snoring children (≥5 years old) were enrolled. All subjects underwent polysonmography and spectrum analysis of heart rate variability using 24-hour Holter electrocardiograms. Time domain indices, SDNN, RMSSD, SDANN, and PNN50, and frequency domain indices, low fire-qnency (LF) and high frequency (HF), as well as LF/HF were included in HRY analysis. Results Forty-ssven of 93 children met the criteria for OSAS and 46 did not. HRV analysis showed that OSAS children had significantly decreased SDNN and SDANN than those of non-GSAS children (all P<0.01). Nocturnal PNN50 in OSAS children was significanlty decreased while LF/HF was significantly elevated compared to those of non-OSAS children (P=0.025 and 0,026 respectively). Multiple regression analysis showed that SDNN was significantly related to apnea-hypopnea index and age (P=0.03 and 0.006, re-spectively). Conclusions Autooomic nervous system dysfunctions are found in OSAS children with sympathetic overflow* weaker parasympathetic modulation and dysfunction of equilibrium between sympathetic and parasympathetie nerves as main manifestations.%目的 分析心率变异性 (HRV) 评估阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停综合征 (OSAS) 儿童的自主神经功能.方法 对93名≥5岁的打鼾儿童,在睡眠监测同时进行24 h动态心电图监测.HRV分析包括时域指标和频域指标,即SDNN、RMSSD、SDANN、PNN50、低频功率谱 (LF)、高频功率谱 (HF) 以及LF/HF.结果 93名儿童中,47名儿童符合OSAS诊断,46名为非OSAS.OSAS组的SDNN、SDANN较非OSAS组降低,差异有统计学意义 (P 均<0.01);不同严重程度OSAS患儿间,其SDNN的差异也有统计学意义 (P <0.01).OSAS组较非OSAS组夜间PNN50降低,LF/HF增高,差异均有统计学意义 (P =0.025,0.026).多元逐步回归分析显示,SDNN

  15. [Non-invasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system by PET]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    C-11 hydroxy ephedrine, introduced as the first clinically usable norepinephrine analogue, studies employing normal volunteers and patients with various cardiac disorders was found to valuable as a nonadreneric tracer. Simultaneously, animal studies been used to assess its use following ischemic injury in order to define neuronal damage. Current research focuses on the comparison of C-11 hydroxyephedrine with other neurotransmitters such as C-11 epinephrine and C-11 threohydroxyephedrine. Epinephrine is primarily stored in vesicles of the nerve terminal, while threo-hydroxyephedrine is only substrate to uptake I mechanism. Such a combination of radiotracers may allow the dissection of uptake I mechanism as well as vesicular storage. In parallel to the refinement of presynaptic tracers for the sympathetic nervous system, we are developing radiopharmaceuticals to delineate the adrenergic receptors in the heart. The combined evaluation of pre- and postsynaptic nerve function will improve our ability to identify abnormalides. We are currently developing a new radiosynthesis of the hydrophilic adrenergic receptor antagonist C-11 CGP-12177 which has been used by others for the visualization of adrenergic receptors in the heart. We are developing radiopharmaceuticals, for the delineation of presynaptic cholinergic nerve terminals. Derivatives of benzovesamicol have been labeled in our institution and are currently under investigation. The most promising agent is F-18 benzovesamicol (FEBOBV) which allows the visualization of parasympathetic nerve terminals in the canine heart as demonstrated by, preliminary PET data.

  16. [Non-invasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    C-11 hydroxy ephedrine, introduced as the first clinically usable norepinephrine analogue, studies employing normal volunteers and patients with various cardiac disorders was found to valuable as a nonadreneric tracer. Simultaneously, animal studies been used to assess its use following ischemic injury in order to define neuronal damage. Current research focuses on the comparison of C-11 hydroxyephedrine with other neurotransmitters such as C-11 epinephrine and C-11 threohydroxyephedrine. Epinephrine is primarily stored in vesicles of the nerve terminal, while threo-hydroxyephedrine is only substrate to uptake I mechanism. Such a combination of radiotracers may allow the dissection of uptake I mechanism as well as vesicular storage. In parallel to the refinement of presynaptic tracers for the sympathetic nervous system, we are developing radiopharmaceuticals to delineate the adrenergic receptors in the heart. The combined evaluation of pre- and postsynaptic nerve function will improve our ability to identify abnormalides. We are currently developing a new radiosynthesis of the hydrophilic adrenergic receptor antagonist C-11 CGP-12177 which has been used by others for the visualization of adrenergic receptors in the heart. We are developing radiopharmaceuticals, for the delineation of presynaptic cholinergic nerve terminals. Derivatives of benzovesamicol have been labeled in our institution and are currently under investigation. The most promising agent is F-18 benzovesamicol (FEBOBV) which allows the visualization of parasympathetic nerve terminals in the canine heart as demonstrated by, preliminary PET data.

  17. Stress, acute hyperglycemia, and hyperlipidemia role of the autonomic nervous system and cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonogaki, K; Iguchi, A

    1997-07-01

    Stress is accompanied by metabolic alterations that could contribute to the etiology of diabetes mellitus, arteriosclerosis, and cardiovascular diseases; however, the mechanisms by which stress affects glucose and lipid metabolism remain to be resolved. Stress-induced effects on neurotransmission and interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling rapidly produce hyperglycemia by increasing sympathetic outflow. Activation of the sympathetic nervous system can also rapidly stimulate lipolysis and hepatic triglyceride secretion. Furthermore, stress increases serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and nerve growth factor (NGF) levels by activating neuroendocrine systems. IL-6 and NGF can rapidly increase lipolysis and hepatic triglyceride secretion without inducing hyperglycemia. The sympathetic nervous system does not mediate cytokine-induced hypertriglyceridemia. Thus, the central nervous system plays an important role in regulation of hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism via the sympathetic nervous system and cytokines. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:192-197). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  18. Links between adolescent sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system functioning and interpersonal behavior over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Lisa M; Cribbet, Matthew R

    2013-06-01

    Extensive research has investigated links between individual differences in youths' autonomic nervous system (ANS) functioning and psychological outcomes related to emotion regulation, yet little of this research has examined developmental change. The study tested whether individual differences in youths' tonic and stress-induced ANS functioning, assessed at age 14, and changes in ANS functioning from age 14 to 16 predicted corresponding changes in youths' behavioral warmth, as displayed during videotaped mother-child conflict interactions conducted at age 14 and 16. Increased behavioral warmth was predicted by increased baseline respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), increased SCL stress reactivity, decreased RSA stress reactivity (i.e., greater vagal suppression), and decreased baseline SCL. There was also an interaction between RSA stress reactivity at age 14 and changes in maternal warmth from age 14 to 16, such that increased maternal warmth was only associated with increased adolescent warmth for adolescents with lower RSA stress reactivity at age 14.

  19. Integrated Control Strategies Supporting Autonomous Functionalities in Mobile Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Integrated Control Strategies Supporting Autonomous Functionalities in Mobile Robots B. Sightsa, H.R. Everetta, E. Biagtan Pacisa, G. Koguta M...TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Integrated Control Strategies Supporting Autonomous Functionalities in Mobile Robots 5a...calculation methods using encoder counts, wheel radius, and the robot’s wheelbase, as described in Sensors For Mobile Robots [5]. On top of this

  20. Transfer function analysis of the autonomic response to respiratory activity during random interval breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M. H.; Berger, R. D.; Saul, J. P.; Stevenson, K.; Cohen, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    We report a new method for the noninvasive characterization of the frequency response of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in mediating fluctuations in heart rate (HR). The approach entails computation of the transfer function magnitude and phase between instantaneous lung volume and HR. Broad band fluctuations in lung volume were initiated when subjects breathed on cue to a sequence of beeps spaced randomly in time. We studied 10 subjects in both supine and standing positions. The transfer function, averaged among all the subjects, showed systematic differences between the two postures, reflecting the differing frequency responses of the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the ANS.

  1. Expression and function of aquaporins in peripheral nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong-hui MA; Hong-wen GAO; Xue-dong FANG; Hong YANG

    2011-01-01

    The expression and role of the aquaporin (AQP) family water channels in the peripheral nervous system was less investigated. Since 2004, however, significant progress has been made in the immunolocalization, regulation and function of AQPs in the peripheral nervous system. These studies showed selective localization of three AQPs (AQP1, AQP2, and AQP4) in dorsal root ganglion neurons,enteric neurons and glial cells, periodontal Ruffini endings, trigeminal ganglion neurons and vomeronasal sensory neurons. Functional characterization in transgenic knockout mouse model revealed important role of AQP1 in pain perception. This review will summarize the progress in this field and discuss possible involvement of AQPs in peripheral neuropathies and their potential as novel drug targets.

  2. Neuron-glia crosstalk in the autonomic nervous system and its possible role in the progression of metabolic syndrome: A new hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODRIGO eDEL RIO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MS is characterized by the following physiological alterations: increase in abdominal fat, insulin resistance, high concentration of triglycerides, low levels of HDL, high blood pressure and a generalized inflammatory state. One of the pathophysiological hallmarks of this syndrome is the presence of neurohumoral activation, which involve autonomic imbalance associated to hyperactivation of the sympathetic nervous system. Indeed, enhanced sympathetic drive has been linked to the development of endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, stroke, myocardial infarct and obstructive sleep apnea. Glial cells, the most abundant cells in the central nervous system, control synaptic transmission and regulate neuronal function by releasing bioactive molecules called gliotransmitters. Recently, a new family of plasma membrane channels called hemichannels has been described to allow the release of gliotransmitters and modulate neuronal firing rate. Moreover, a growing amount of evidence indicates that uncontrolled hemichannel opening could impair glial cell functions, affecting synaptic transmission and neuronal survival. Given that glial cell functions are disturbed in various metabolic diseases, we hypothesize that progression of MS may relies on hemichannel-dependent impairment of glial-to-neuron communication by a mechanism related to dysfunction of inflammatory response and mitochondrial metabolism of glial cells. In this manuscript, we discuss how glial cells may contribute to the enhanced sympathetic drive observed in MS, and shed light about the possible role of hemichannels in this process.

  3. Neuron-Glia Crosstalk in the Autonomic Nervous System and Its Possible Role in the Progression of Metabolic Syndrome: A New Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio, Rodrigo; Quintanilla, Rodrigo A; Orellana, Juan A; Retamal, Mauricio A

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is characterized by the following physiological alterations: increase in abdominal fat, insulin resistance, high concentration of triglycerides, low levels of HDL, high blood pressure, and a generalized inflammatory state. One of the pathophysiological hallmarks of this syndrome is the presence of neurohumoral activation, which involve autonomic imbalance associated to hyperactivation of the sympathetic nervous system. Indeed, enhanced sympathetic drive has been linked to the development of endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, stroke, myocardial infarct, and obstructive sleep apnea. Glial cells, the most abundant cells in the central nervous system, control synaptic transmission, and regulate neuronal function by releasing bioactive molecules called gliotransmitters. Recently, a new family of plasma membrane channels called hemichannels has been described to allow the release of gliotransmitters and modulate neuronal firing rate. Moreover, a growing amount of evidence indicates that uncontrolled hemichannel opening could impair glial cell functions, affecting synaptic transmission and neuronal survival. Given that glial cell functions are disturbed in various metabolic diseases, we hypothesize that progression of MS may relies on hemichannel-dependent impairment of glial-to-neuron communication by a mechanism related to dysfunction of inflammatory response and mitochondrial metabolism of glial cells. In this manuscript, we discuss how glial cells may contribute to the enhanced sympathetic drive observed in MS, and shed light about the possible role of hemichannels in this process.

  4. Prenatal adversities and Latino children's autonomic nervous system reactivity trajectories from 6 months to 5 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkon, Abbey; Boyce, W Thomas; Tran, Linh; Harley, Kim G; Neuhaus, John; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether mothers' adversities experienced during early pregnancy are associated with offspring's autonomic nervous system (ANS) reactivity trajectories from 6 months to 5 years of age. This cohort study of primarily Latino families included maternal interviews at 13-14 weeks gestation about their experience of a range of adversities: father's absence, general social support, poverty level, and household density. ANS measures of heart rate, respiratory sinus arrhythmia (parasympathetic nervous system) and preejection period (sympathetic nervous system) were collected during resting and challenging conditions on children at 6 months and 1, 3.5 and 5 years of age. Reactivity measures were calculated as the mean of the responses to challenging conditions minus a resting condition. Fixed effects models were conducted for the 212 children with two or more timepoints of ANS measures. Interactions between maternal prenatal adversity levels and child age at time of ANS protocol were included in the models, allowing the calculation of separate trajectories or slopes for each level of adversity. Results showed no significant relations between mothers' prenatal socioeconomic or social support adversity and offspring's parasympathetic nervous system trajectories, but there was a statistically significant relationship between social support adversity and offspring's heart rate trajectories (pnervous system trajectories (p = .05). Children whose mothers experienced one, not two, social support adversity had the smallest increases in heart rate reactivity compared to children whose mothers experienced no adversity. The children whose mothers experienced no social support and no socioeconomic adversity had the largest increases in heart rate and preejection period respectively from 6 months to 5 years showing the most plasticity. Mothers' prenatal adverse experiences may program their children's physiologic trajectory to dampen their

  5. The autonomic laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, P. A.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system can now be studied quantitatively, noninvasively, and reproducibly in a clinical autonomic laboratory. The approach at the Mayo Clinic is to study the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers of peripheral nerve (using the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test [QSART]), the parasympathetic nerves to the heart (cardiovagal tests), and the regulation of blood pressure by the baroreflexes (adrenergic tests). Patient preparation is extremely important, since the state of the patient influences the results of autonomic function tests. The autonomic technologist in this evolving field needs to have a solid core of knowledge of autonomic physiology and autonomic function tests, followed by training in the performance of these tests in a standardized fashion. The range and utilization of tests of autonomic function will likely continue to evolve.

  6. Quality of life in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and its predictors : importance of the autonomic nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, MP; Hassink, RJ; Tuinenburg, AE; van Sonderen, EFLP; Lefrandt, JD; de Kam, PJ; van Gelder, IC; Smit, AJ; Sanderman, R; Crijns, HJGM

    2001-01-01

    Aims To determine the impact of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation on quality of life and to determine the predictors of quality of life, particularly the role of symptomatology and autonomic function. Methods and Results The study group comprised 73 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (mean ag

  7. Emotion Regulation via the Autonomic Nervous System in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Erica D.; Backs, Richard W.; Schmitt, Colleen F.; Ablow, Jennifer C.; Measelle, Jeffery R.; Nigg, Joel T.

    2011-01-01

    Despite growing interest in conceptualizing ADHD as involving disrupted emotion regulation, few studies have examined the physiological mechanisms related to emotion regulation in children with this disorder. This study examined parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system reactivity via measures of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and cardiac…

  8. [Heart rate variability as a method of assessing the autonomic nervous system in polycystic ovary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá, Joceline Cássia Ferezini; Costa, Eduardo Caldas; da Silva, Ester; Azevedo, George Dantas

    2013-09-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disorder associated with several cardiometabolic risk factors, such as central obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and hypertension. These factors are associated with adrenergic overactivity, which is an important prognostic factor for the development of cardiovascular disorders. Given the common cardiometabolic disturbances occurring in PCOS women, over the last years studies have investigated the cardiac autonomic control of these patients, mainly based on heart rate variability (HRV). Thus, in this review, we will discuss the recent findings of the studies that investigated the HRV of women with PCOS, as well as noninvasive methods of analysis of autonomic control starting from basic indexes related to this methodology.

  9. Organisation of autonomic nervous structures in the small intestine of chinchilla (Chinchilla laniger, Molina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, E

    2014-08-01

    Using histochemical, histological and immunocytochemical methods, organisation of the autonomic nerve structures in small intestine of chinchilla was investigated. Myenteric plexus was localised between circular and longitudinal layers of the smooth muscles. Forming network nodes, the small autonomic, cholinergic ganglia were linked with the bundles of nerve fibres. Adrenergic structures were visible as specific varicose, rosary-like fibres forming bundles of parallel fibres connecting network nodes. Structures of the submucosal plexus formed a finer network than those of the myenteric plexus. Moreover, in 'whole-mount' specimens, fibres forming thick perivascular plexuses were also observed. Immunocytochemical studies confirmed the cholinergic and adrenergic character of the investigated structures. VAChT-positive neurones were found only in myenteric plexus, and numerous VAChT-positive and DBH-positive fibres were found in both plexuses.

  10. On the Persistance of Dualism in our so-called Unified Neurosciences: The case of the autonomic nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Pattyn

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the historical overview of descriptions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS is applied as a case study to serve the demonstration of the persistence of dualisms in our current framework of neurosciences. First, the four main views on the ANS are briefly summarised, with an emphasis on the latest one, being the neurovisceral integration perspectives, striving for an integrative view on cognition, emotion regulation and physiological adaptation. Second, an explanation is offered on why we are so reluctant to give up the explanatory framework of dualisms, based on both developmental psychology accounts and postmodernism philosophy. To conclude, an attitude based on positivism and epistemological anarchism is suggested for scientists.

  11. How Can Music Influence the Autonomic Nervous System Response in Patients with Severe Disorder of Consciousness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riganello, Francesco; Cortese, Maria D; Arcuri, Francesco; Quintieri, Maria; Dolce, Giuliano

    2015-01-01

    Activations to pleasant and unpleasant musical stimuli were observed within an extensive neuronal network and different brain structures, as well as in the processing of the syntactic and semantic aspects of the music. Previous studies evidenced a correlation between autonomic activity and emotion evoked by music listening in patients with Disorders of Consciousness (DoC). In this study, we analyzed retrospectively the autonomic response to musical stimuli by mean of normalized units of Low Frequency (nuLF) and Sample Entropy (SampEn) of Heart Rate Variability (HRV) parameters, and their possible correlation to the different complexity of four musical samples (i.e., Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky, Grieg, and Boccherini) in Healthy subjects and Vegetative State/Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome (VS/UWS) patients. The complexity of musical sample was based on Formal Complexity and General Dynamics parameters defined by Imberty's semiology studies. The results showed a significant difference between the two groups for SampEn during the listening of Mussorgsky's music and for nuLF during the listening of Boccherini and Mussorgsky's music. Moreover, the VS/UWS group showed a reduction of nuLF as well as SampEn comparing music of increasing Formal Complexity and General Dynamics. These results put in evidence how the internal structure of the music can change the autonomic response in patients with DoC. Further investigations are required to better comprehend how musical stimulation can modify the autonomic response in DoC patients, in order to administer the stimuli in a more effective way.

  12. How can music influence the Autonomic Nervous System response in patients with severe Disorder of Consciousness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eRiganello

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Activations to pleasant and unpleasant musical stimuli were observed within an extensive neuronal network and different brain structures, as well as in the processing of the syntactic and semantic aspects of the music. Previous studies evidenced a correlation between autonomic activity and emotion evoked by music listening in patients with Disorders of Consciousness (DoC. In this study, we analyzed retrospectively the autonomic response to musical stimuli by mean of normalized units of Low Frequency (nuLF and Sample Entropy (SampEn of Heart Rate Variability (HRV parameters, and their possible correlation to the different complexity of four musical samples (i.e. Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky, Grieg and Boccherini in Healthy subjects and Vegetative State/Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome (VS/UWS patients.The complexity of musical sample was based on Formal Complexity and General Dynamics parameters defined by Imberty’s semiology studies.The results showed a significant difference between the two groups for SampEn during the listening of Mussorgsky’s music and for nuLF during the listening of Boccherini and Mussorgsky’s music.Moreover, the VS/UWS group showed a reduction of nuLF as well as SampEn comparing music of increasing Formal Complexity and General Dynamics.These results put in evidence how the internal structure of the music can change the autonomic response in patients with DoC. Further investigations are required to better comprehend how musical stimulation can modify the autonomic response in DoC patients, in order to administer the stimuli in a more effective way.

  13. 符合罗马Ⅲ标准FD患者心理测试及自主神经功能观察44例%Psychological states and autonomic nervous system function in 44 patients with functional dyspepsia diagnosed based on the Room III criteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴改玲; 蓝宇

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the psychological states and autonomic nerve function in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD).METHODS: Forty-four FD patients who were diagnosed according to the Room Ⅲ criteria and 16 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. FD patients were divided into postprandial distress syndrome (PDS) group (n = 31) and epigastric pain syndrome (EPS) group (n = 13). Sixteen healthy subjects (HS) were used as controls. Epigastric discomfort and Zung Scale scoring was performed for testing psychological states and autonomic nerve function in all participants.RESULTS: The incidence of depression and/or anxiety was significantly higher in FD patients than in HS (24/44 vs 1/16, P = 0.001). Both the depression score and anxiety score were significantly higher in the FD group than in the HS group (49.36 ± 1.71 vs 34.42 ± 1.98, 39.83 ± 1.57 vs 27.77 ± 0,75, both P = 0.000), in the PDS group(51.40 ± 1.80, 40.39 ± 2.01) than in the HS group (both P = 0.000), and in the EPS group (45.50 ± 3.68,38.52 ± 2.44) than in the HS group (P = 0.026 and 0.001). The heart rate variability (HRV) with deep breathing was significantly lower in FD patients than in HS (17.61 ± 1.18 vs 22.71 ± 2.12, P = 0.031), in EPS patients than in HS (16.17 ± 1.98 vs 22.71 ± 2.12, P = 0.038), and in FD patients with depression and/or anxiety than in HS (17.23 ± 1.49 vs 22.71 ± 2.12, P = 0.036). However, no significant difference was observed between FD patients without depression or anxiety and HS, and between FD patients with and without depression or anxiety.CONCLUSION: Depression and anxiety are notable in FD patients. PDS patients generally suffer more severe depression than EPS patients. Impaired autonomic nerve function is mainly due to the injury of the parasympathetic nerve. Patients with depression and/or anxiety are more likely to have impaired autonomic nerve function.%目的:观察功能性消化不良(functional dyspepsial,FD)及其不同类型患者的心

  14. Measurement of the effect of Isha Yoga on cardiac autonomic nervous system using short-term heart rate variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Muralikrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Beneficial effects of Yoga have been postulated to be due to modulation of the autonomic nervous system. Objective: To assess the effect of Isha Yoga practices on cardiovascular autonomic nervous system through short-term heart rate variability (HRV. Design of the Study: Short-term HRV of long-term regular healthy 14 (12 males and 2 females Isha Yoga practitioners was compared with that of age- and gender-matched 14 (12 males and 2 females non-Yoga practitioners. Methods and Materials: ECG Lead II and respiratory movements were recorded in both groups using Polyrite during supine rest for 5 min and controlled deep breathing for 1 minute. Frequency domain analysis [RR interval is the mean of distance between subsequent R wave peaks in ECG], low frequency (LF power, high frequency (HF power, LF normalized units (nu, HF nu, LF/HF ratio] and time domain analysis [Standard Deviation of normal to normal interval (SDNN, square of mean squared difference of successive normal to normal intervals (RMSSD, normal to normal intervals which are differing by 50 ms (NN50, and percentage of NN50 (pNN50] of HRV variables were analyzed for supine rest. Time domain analysis was recorded for deep breathing. Results: Results showed statistically significant differences between Isha Yoga practitioners and controls in both frequency and time domain analyses of HRV indices, with no difference in resting heart rate between the groups. Conclusions: Practitioners of Isha Yoga showed well-balanced beneficial activity of vagal efferents, an overall increased HRV, and sympathovagal balance, compared to non-Yoga practitioners during supine rest and deep breathing.

  15. SoxE function in vertebrate nervous system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolt, C Claus; Wegner, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Sox8, Sox9, and Sox10 as transcription factors of subgroup E of the Sox protein family are essential for many aspects of nervous system development. These SoxE proteins are already required for the initial neural crest induction, but also guarantee survival and maintenance of pluripotency in migrating neural crest stem cells. SoxE proteins are furthermore key regulators of glial specification in both the peripheral and the central nervous systems. At later stages of development, Sox10 plays crucial roles in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes for terminal differentiation and myelin formation. In both glial cell types, Sox10 controls directly the expression of genes encoding the major myelin proteins. SoxE proteins are well-integrated components of regulatory networks and as such modulated in their activity by cooperating or antagonistic transcription factors such as SoxD or various bHLH proteins. The multiple functions in peripheral and central nervous system development also link SoxE proteins to various human diseases and identify these proteins as promising targets of future therapeutic approaches.

  16. Functional roles of neuropeptides in the insect central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nässel, D. R.

    With the completion of the Drosophila genome sequencing project we can begin to appreciate the extent of the complexity in the components involved in signal transfer and modulation in the nervous system of an animal with reasonably complex behavior. Of all the different classes of signaling substances utilized by the nervous system, the neuropeptides are the most diverse structurally and functionally. Thus peptidergic mechanisms of action in the central nervous system need to be analyzed in the context of the neuronal circuits in which they act and generalized traits cannot be established. By taking advantage of Drosophila molecular genetics and the presence of identifiable neurons, it has been possible to interfere with peptidergic signaling in small populations of central neurons and monitor the consequences on behavior. These studies and experiments on other insects with large identifiable neurons, permitting cellular analysis of signaling mechanisms, have outlined important principles for temporal and spatial action of neuropeptides in outputs of the circadian clock and in orchestrating molting behavior. Considering the large number of neuropeptides available in each insect species and their diverse distribution patterns, it is to be expected that different neuropeptides play roles in most aspects of insect physiology and behavior.

  17. Impaired Neural Structure and Function Contributing to Autonomic Symptoms in Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald M Harper

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS patients show major autonomic alterations in addition to their better-known breathing deficiencies. The processes underlying CCHS, mutations in the PHOX2B gene, target autonomic neuronal development, with frame shift extent contributing to symptom severity. Many autonomic characteristics, such as impaired pupillary constriction and poor temperature regulation, reflect parasympathetic alterations, and can include disturbed alimentary processes, with malabsorption and intestinal motility dyscontrol. The sympathetic nervous system changes can exert life-threatening outcomes, with dysregulation of sympathetic outflow leading to high blood pressure, time-altered and dampened heart rate and breathing responses to challenges, cardiac arrhythmia, profuse sweating, and poor fluid regulation. The central mechanisms contributing to failed autonomic processes are readily apparent from structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, which reveal substantial cortical thinning, tissue injury, and disrupted functional responses in hypothalamic, hippocampal, posterior thalamic, and basal ganglia sites and their descending projections, as well as insular, cingulate, and medial frontal cortices, which influence subcortical autonomic structures. Midbrain structures are also compromised, including the raphe system and its projections to cerebellar and medullary sites, the locus coeruleus, and medullary reflex integrating sites, including the dorsal and ventrolateral medullary nuclei. The damage to rostral autonomic sites overlaps metabolic, affective and cognitive regulatory regions, leading to hormonal disruption, anxiety, depression, behavioral control, and sudden death concerns. The injuries suggest that interventions for mitigating hypoxic exposure and nutrient loss may provide cellular protection, in the same fashion as interventions in other conditions with similar malabsorption, fluid turnover

  18. Randomized controlled evaluation during anesthesia induction of sevoflurane and propofol on autonomic nervous function%麻醉诱导期七氟醚与丙泊酚对自主神经功能影响随机对照评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林武万; 陈科展; 黄秋立

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨麻醉诱导期七氟醚与丙泊酚对自主神经功能的影响。方法将110例择期行手术治疗的患者随机分为两组,每组55例。 A组麻醉诱导给予七氟醚,B组给予丙泊酚,观察两组各时间段血压、心率等变化情况。结果 A组麻醉诱导后即刻和插管即刻的呼吸频率及血压低于麻醉前(P<0.05);B组麻醉诱导后即刻、插管即刻、插管后5 min呼吸频率、血压低于麻醉前,且水平低于同时段A组(P<0.05)。A组麻醉后即刻、插管即刻、插管后5 min心率均低于麻醉前,麻醉诱导后即刻、插管即刻高频、低频均低于麻醉前(P<0.05);麻醉前与麻醉后各时间段高低频比值比较(P>0.05)。 B组麻醉诱导后即刻至插管后即刻高频、低频均低于麻醉前,麻醉诱导后各时间段高低频比值均高于麻醉前(P<0.05)。结论与丙泊酚相比,采用七氟醚进行麻醉诱导对患者血流动力学的影响较小,诱导相对平稳,利于手术顺利进行。%Objective To explore the sevoflurane and propofol anesthesia induction period effects on autonomic nervous function .Methods 110 patients undergoing elective surgery patients were randomly divided into 2 groups, each group of 55 cases.Induced given sevoflurane anesthesia group A , group B to give propofol , observed two groups of each time period , the change of the blood pressure , heart rate , etc.Results Immediately after anesthesia induction and intubation group A immediate breathing rate , blood pressure was lower than before anesthesia (P 0.05).Group B immediately after anesthesia induction and intubation immediately after high frequency and low frequency was lower than before anesthesia , after anesthesia induction times high frequency ratio were higher than anesthesia ( P <0.05).Conclusions Compared with propofol , sevoflurane induction of anesthesia has less influence on hemodynamics of the patients

  19. A study of relationship between function of cardiac autonomic nervous system and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in diabetes mellitus%糖尿病患者心自主神经系统功能与24 小时动态血压变化关系的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李荣; 严钟德; 刘东方

    2000-01-01

    目的 探讨偶测血压正常的糖尿病(DM)患者心自主神经系统功能(ANSF)状况与24小时动态血压(24小时AMBP)的变化关系。方法对71例偶测血压正常的DM患者进行心率功率谱分析及24小时AMBP检测。结果无心自主神经病变(AN)的DM患者与健康人有类似的24小时AMBP;伴轻度AN的DM患者,其24小时动态收缩压及压力负荷发生率明显高于正常对照组,而昼夜改变百分率明显低于正常对照组;伴重度AN的DM患者,其24小时动态收缩压及24小时AMBP负荷发生率高于伴轻度AN的DM患者,昼夜改变百分率低于伴轻度AN的DM患者,但两者间无显著性差异。结论偶测血压正常的DM患者一旦发生心AN,则会对血压造成明显不利的影响;DM患者异常的ANSF和血压参与了急性心血管病变的发生、发展;随访DM患者心ANSF状况及对偶测血压正常、伴AN的DM患者进行早期干预治疗尤为重要。%Objective To study the relationship between function of cardiac autonomic nervous system and 24-hourambulatory blood pressure in diabetes mellitus with normal blood pressure in the casual assay.Methods71 DMpatients with normal blood pressure in casual assay were measured with cardiac power spectral analysis and 24hAMBPassessment.Results There was no difference in 24hAMBP between DM patients without AND and normal subjects.24-hour ambulatory systolic pressure values and the prevalence of blood pressure burden in DM patients with mild AND were significantly higher than that in the control group and the percentage of day-night change in AMBP weresignificantly lower than that in the control group.In DM patients with severe AND, 24-hour ambulatory systolicpressure values and the prevalence of 24hAMBP burden were higher and the percentage of day-night change was lowerthan that in DM patients with mild AND, however, there was no significant difference between them.Conclusion Blood pressure was in severe disorder as

  20. Prenatal stress and balance of the child's cardiac autonomic nervous system at age 5-6 years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimée E van Dijk

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Autonomic nervous system (ANS misbalance is a potential causal factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. The ANS may be programmed during pregnancy due to various maternal factors. Our aim is to study maternal prenatal psychosocial stress as a potential disruptor of cardiac ANS balance in the child. METHODS: Mothers from a prospective birth cohort (ABCD study filled out a questionnaire at gestational week 16 [IQR 12-20], that included validated instruments for state anxiety, depressive symptoms, pregnancy-related anxiety, parenting daily hassles and job strain. A cumulative stress score was also calculated (based on 80(th percentiles. Indicators of cardiac ANS in the offspring at age 5-6 years are: pre-ejection period (PEP, heart rate (HR, respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA and cardiac autonomic balance (CAB, measured with electrocardiography and impedance cardiography in resting supine and sitting positions. RESULTS: 2,624 mother-child pairs, only single births, were available for analysis. The stress scales were not significantly associated with HR, PEP, RSA and CAB (p≥0.17. Accumulation of maternal stress was also not associated with HR, PEP, RSA and CAB (p≥0.07. CONCLUSION: Results did not support the hypothesis that prenatal maternal psychosocial stress deregulates cardiac ANS balance in the offspring, at least in rest, and at the age of five-six years.

  1. Autonomic disorders in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensch, E; Jost, W H

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease leading to disseminated lesions of the central nervous system resulting in both somatomotor and autonomic disturbances. These involve the central centers of the autonomic nervous system, as well as the automatic control and pathway systems. All autonomic functions may be disordered individually or in combined form. There is no other disease with a clinical picture so multifaceted. Besides cardiovascular dysfunctions disorders of bladder and rectum have become apparent. Somatomotor and autonomic disturbances occur with similar frequency; however the focused exam often heavily favors somatomotor symptoms. Autonomic disturbances should primarily be taken into account on history taking and clinical examination. Individual diagnosis and treatment is a secondary feature. Impairments of the autonomic nervous systems in multiple sclerosis are frequently overlooked.

  2. Autonomic Disorders in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lensch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease leading to disseminated lesions of the central nervous system resulting in both somatomotor and autonomic disturbances. These involve the central centers of the autonomic nervous system, as well as the automatic control and pathway systems. All autonomic functions may be disordered individually or in combined form. There is no other disease with a clinical picture so multifaceted. Besides cardiovascular dysfunctions disorders of bladder and rectum have become apparent. Somatomotor and autonomic disturbances occur with similar frequency; however the focused exam often heavily favors somatomotor symptoms. Autonomic disturbances should primarily be taken into account on history taking and clinical examination. Individual diagnosis and treatment is a secondary feature. Impairments of the autonomic nervous systems in multiple sclerosis are frequently overlooked.

  3. Safety analysis of autonomous excavator functionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seward, D.; Pace, C.; Morrey, R.; Sommerville, I

    2000-10-01

    This paper presents an account of carrying out a hazard analysis to define the safety requirements for an autonomous robotic excavator. The work is also relevant to the growing generic class of heavy automated mobile machinery. An overview of the excavator design is provided and the concept of a safety manager is introduced. The safety manager is an autonomous module responsible for all aspects of system operational safety, and is central to the control system's architecture. Each stage of the hazard analysis is described, i.e. system model creation, hazard definition and hazard analysis. Analysis at an early stage of the design process, and on a system that interfaces directly to an unstructured environment, exposes certain issues relevant to the application of current hazard analysis methods. The approach taken in the analysis is described. Finally, it is explained how the results of the hazard analysis have influenced system design, in particular, safety manager specifications. Conclusions are then drawn about the applicability of hazard analysis of requirements in general, and suggestions are made as to how the approach can be taken further.

  4. Effects of different "relaxing" music styles on the autonomic nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Pérez-Lloret

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the effects on heart rate variability (HRV of exposure to different styles of "relaxing" music. Autonomic responses to musical stimuli were correlated with subjective preferences regarding the relaxing properties of each music style. Linear and nonlinear HRV analysis was conducted in 25 healthy subjects exposed to silence or to classical, new age or romantic melodies in a random fashion. At the end of the study, subjects were asked to choose the melody that they would use to relax. The low-to-high-frequency ratio was significantly higher when subjects were exposed to "new age" music when compared with silence (3.4 ± 0.3 vs. 2.6 ± 0.3, respectively, P < 0.02, while no differences were found with "classical" or "romantic" melodies (2.1 ± 0.4 and 2.2 ± 0.3. These results were related to a reduction in the high frequency component with "new age" compared to silence (17.4 ± 1.9 vs. 23.1 ± 1.1, respectively P < 0.004. Significant differences across melodies were also found for nonlinear HRV indexes. Subjects′ preferences did not correlate with autonomic responses to melodies. The results suggest that "new age" music induced a shift in HRV from higher to lower frequencies, independently on the music preference of the listener.

  5. [Autonomic dysfunction syndrome and diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy in children with diabetes mellitus type I. The correction method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukian, V Iu; Bolotova, N V; Aver'ianov, A P; Filina, N Iu; Raĭgorodskiĭ, Iu M

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the state of the autonomic nervous system in 90 children with diabetes mellitus type I. The autonomic dysfunction syndrome was found in 58,9% and diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy in 28,9% of patients. We revealed the high risk of the development of diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy in children with diabetes mellitus type I in the presence of the autonomic dysfunction syndrome. It has been shown that the early treatment of functional disturbances of the autonomic nervous system using transcranial magnetic stimulation is necessary to prevent the manifestation of diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

  6. Radiation from wireless technology affects the blood, the heart, and the autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havas, Magda

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to electrosmog generated by electric, electronic, and wireless technology is accelerating to the point that a portion of the population is experiencing adverse reactions when they are exposed. The symptoms of electrohypersensitivity (EHS), best described as rapid aging syndrome, experienced by adults and children resemble symptoms experienced by radar operators in the 1940s to the 1960s and are well described in the literature. An increasingly common response includes clumping (rouleau formation) of the red blood cells, heart palpitations, pain or pressure in the chest accompanied by anxiety, and an upregulation of the sympathetic nervous system coincident with a downregulation of the parasympathetic nervous system typical of the "fight-or-flight" response. Provocation studies presented in this article demonstrate that the response to electrosmog is physiologic and not psychosomatic. Those who experience prolonged and severe EHS may develop psychologic problems as a consequence of their inability to work, their limited ability to travel in our highly technologic environment, and the social stigma that their symptoms are imagined rather than real.

  7. Discrimination between Healthy and Sick Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System by Detrended Heart Rate Variability Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ashkenazy, Yu; Levitan, J; Havlin, S; Saermark, K; Moelgaard, H; Bloch-Thomsen, P E

    1998-01-01

    Multiresolution Wavelet Transform and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis have been recently proven as excellent methods in the analysis of Heart Rate Variability, and in distinguishing between healthy subjects and patients with various dysfunctions of the cardiac nervous system. We argue that it is possible to obtain a distinction between healthy subjects/patients of at least similar quality by, first, detrending the time-series of RR-intervals by subtracting a running average based on a local window with a length of around 32 data points, and then, calculating the standard deviation of the detrended time-series. The results presented here indicate that the analysis can be based on very short time-series of RR-data (7-8 minutes), which is a considerable improvement relative to 24-hours Holter recordings.

  8. Histone methylation in the nervous system: functions and dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattaroni, Céline; Jacob, Claire

    2013-04-01

    Chromatin remodeling is a key epigenetic process controlling the regulation of gene transcription. Local changes of chromatin architecture can be achieved by post-translational modifications of histones such as methylation, acetylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation, and ADP-ribosylation. These changes are dynamic and allow for rapid repression or de-repression of specific target genes. Chromatin remodeling enzymes are largely involved in the control of cellular differentiation, and loss or gain of function is often correlated with pathological events. For these reasons, research on chromatin remodeling enzymes is currently very active and rapidly expanding, these enzymes representing very promising targets for the design of novel therapeutics in different areas of medicine including oncology and neurology. In this review, we focus on histone methylation in the nervous system. We provide an overview on mammalian histone methyltransferases and demethylases and their mechanisms of action, and we discuss their roles in the development of the nervous system and their involvement in neurodevelopmental, neurodegenerative, and behavioral disorders.

  9. The daily pattern of heart rate, body temperature, locomotor activity, and autonomic nervous activity in congenitally bronchial-hypersensitive (BHS) and bronchial-hyposensitive (BHR) guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Megumi; Kuwahara, Masayoshi; Nishibata, Ryoji; Mikami, Hiroki; Tsubone, Hirokazu

    2004-04-01

    We studied the characteristics of the rhythmicity of heart rate (HR), body temperature (BT), locomotor activity (LA) and autonomic nervous activity in bronchial-hypersensitive (BHS) and bronchial-hyposensitive (BHR) guinea pigs. For this purpose, HR, BT, LA, and electrocardiogram (ECG) were recorded from conscious and unrestrained guinea pigs using a telemetry system. Autonomic nervous activity was analyzed by power spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Nocturnal patterns, in which the values in the dark phase (20:00-06:00) were higher than those in the light phase (06:00-20:00), were observed in HR, BT and LA in both strains of guinea pigs. The autonomic nervous activity in BHS guinea pigs showed a daily pattern, although BHR guinea pigs did not show such a rhythmicity. The high frequency (HF) power in BHS guinea pigs was higher than that in BHR guinea pigs throughout the day. Moreover, the low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio in BHS guinea pigs was lower than that in BHR guinea pigs throughout the day. These results suggest that parasympathetic nervous activity may be predominant in BHS guinea pigs.

  10. Responses of the autonomic nervous system in altitude adapted and high altitude pulmonary oedema subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Lazar; Purkayastha, S. S.; Jayashankar, A.; Radhakrishnan, U.; Sen Gupta, J.; Nayar, H. S.

    1985-06-01

    Studies were carried out to ascertain the role of sympatho-parasympathetic responses in the process of adaptation to altitude. The assessment of status of autonomic balance was carried out in a group of 20 young male subjects by recording their resting heart rate, blood pressure, oral temperature, mean skin temperature, extremity temperatures, pupillary diameter, cold pressor response, oxygen consumption, cardioacceleration during orthostasis and urinary excretion of catecholamines; in a thermoneutral laboratory. The same parameters were repeated on day 3 and at weekly intervals for a period of 3 weeks, after exposing them to 3,500 m; and also after return to sea level. At altitude, similar studies were carried out in a group of 10 acclimatized lowlanders, 10 high altitude natives and 6 patients who had recently recovered from high altitude pulmonary oedema. In another phase, similar studies were done in two groups of subjects, one representing 15 subjects who had stayed at altitude (3,500 4,000 m) without any ill effects and the other comprising of 10 subjects who had either suffered from high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPO) or acute mountain sickness (AMS). The results revealed sympathetic overactivity on acute induction to altitude which showed gradual recovery on prolonged stay, the high altitude natives had preponderance to parasympathetic system. Sympathetic preponderance may not be an essential etiological factor for the causation of maladaptation syndromes.

  11. Autonomic function assessment in Parkinson's disease patients using the kernel method and entrainment techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Ahmed K

    2007-01-01

    The experimental procedure of lowering and raising a leg while the subject is in the supine position is considered to stimulate and entrain the autonomic nervous system of fifteen untreated patients with Parkinson's disease and fifteen age and sex matched control subjects. The assessment of autonomic function for each group is achieved using an algorithm based on Volterra kernel estimation. By applying this algorithm and considering the process of lowering and raising a leg as stimulus input and the Heart Rate Variability signal (HRV) as output for system identification, a mathematical model is expressed as integral equations. The integral equations are considered and fixed for control subjects and Parkinson's disease patients so that the identification method reduced to the determination of the values within the integral called kernels, resulting in an integral equations whose input-output behavior is nearly identical to that of the system in both healthy subjects and Parkinson's disease patients. The model for each group contains the linear part (first order kernel) and quadratic part (second order kernel). A difference equation model was employed to represent the system for both control subjects and patients with Parkinson's disease. The results show significant difference in first order kernel(impulse response) and second order kernel (mesh diagram) for each group. Using first order kernel and second order kernel, it is possible to assess autonomic function qualitatively and quantitatively in both groups.

  12. Determination of the autonomously functioning volume of the thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emrich, D.; Erlenmaier, U.; Pohl, M.; Luig, H. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin)

    1993-05-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the autonomously functioning volume in euthyroid and hyperthyroid goitres for prognostic and therapeutic pruposes. To this end, various groups of patients were selected: Individuals without evidence of thyroid disease, euthyroid patients with diffuse goitre of normal structure and function, euthyroid patients with evidence of autonomy and patients with hyperthyroidism due to autonomy. In all of them the thyroid uptake of Technetium-99m was determined under exogeneous suppression (TcU[sub s]) in the euthyroid state and under endogenous suppression (TcU) in the hyperthyroid state. It was demonstrated that: 1. In patients with unifocal autonomy the TcU[sub s] and TcU correlated linearly with the autonomous volume delineated and measured by sonography. 2. A nearly identical result was obtained if the mean autonomous volume in individuals without thyroid disease of 2.2[+-]1.1 ml calculated by TcU[sub s]/TcU x total thyroid volume was used as a basis. 3. The critical autonomous volume, i.e. the volume at which hyperthryroidism will occur, was found to be 16 ml at a cumulated sensitivity and specificity of >0.9. The method can be used to select patients for definitive treatment before hyperthryroidism occurs and to measure the autonomously functioning volume independent of its distribution within the thyroid for treatment with radioiodine. The method is easy to perform and is also an example of how a relative parameter of a function can be converted into an absolute parameter of a functioning volume. (orig.).

  13. Pulmonary function, cholinergic bronchomotor tone, and cardiac autonomic abnormalities in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melo E.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This prospective study analyzed the involvement of the autonomic nervous system in pulmonary and cardiac function by evaluating cardiovascular reflex and its correlation with pulmonary function abnormalities of type 2 diabetic patients. Diabetic patients (N = 17 and healthy subjects (N = 17 were evaluated by 1 pulmonary function tests including spirometry, He-dilution method, N2 washout test, and specific airway conductance (SGaw determined by plethysmography before and after aerosol administration of atropine sulfate, and 2 autonomic cardiovascular activity by the passive tilting test and the magnitude of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA. Basal heart rate was higher in the diabetic group (87.8 ± 11.2 bpm; mean ± SD than in the control group (72.9 ± 7.8 bpm, P<0.05. The increase of heart rate at 5 s of tilting was 11.8 ± 6.5 bpm in diabetic patients and 17.6 ± 6.2 bpm in the control group (P<0.05. Systemic arterial pressure and RSA analysis did not reveal significant differences between groups. Diabetes intragroup analysis revealed two behaviors: 10 patients with close to normal findings and 7 with significant abnormalities in terms of RSA, with the latter subgroup presenting one or more abnormalities in other tests and clear evidence of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. End-expiratory flows were significantly lower in diabetic patients than in the control group (P<0.05. Pulmonary function tests before and after atropine administration demonstrated comparable responses by both groups. Type 2 diabetic patients have cardiac autonomic dysfunction that is not associated with bronchomotor tone alterations, probably reflecting a less severe impairment than that of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Yet, a reduction of end-expiratory flow was detected.

  14. Integrity of central nervous function in diabetes mellitus assessed by resting state EEG frequency analysis and source localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøkjær, Jens B; Graversen, Carina; Brock, Christina;

    2016-01-01

    localization analysis identified sources with reduced activity in the left postcentral gyrus for the gamma band and in right superior parietal lobule for the alpha1 (8-10Hz) band. DM patients with clinical signs of autonomic dysfunction and gastrointestinal symptoms had evidence of altered resting state......Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with structural and functional changes of the central nervous system. We used electroencephalography (EEG) to assess resting state cortical activity and explored associations to relevant clinical features. Multichannel resting state EEG was recorded in 27...... healthy controls and 24 patients with longstanding DM and signs of autonomic dysfunction. The power distribution based on wavelet analysis was summarized into frequency bands with corresponding topographic mapping. Source localization analysis was applied to explore the electrical cortical sources...

  15. The significance of amlodipine on autonomic nervous system adjustment (ANSA method: A new approach in the treatment of hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cardiovascular autonomic modulation is altered in patients with essential hypertension. Objective To evaluate acute and long-term effects of amlodipine on cardiovascular autonomic function and haemodynamic status in patients with mild essential hypertension. Methods. Ninety patients (43 male, mean age 52.12 ±10.7 years with mild hypertension were tested before, 30 minutes after the first 5 mg oral dose of amlodipine and three weeks after monotherapy with amlodipine. A comprehensive study protocol was done including finger blood pressure variability (BPV and heart rate variability (HRV beat-to-beat analysis with impedance cardiography, ECG with software short-term HRV and nonlinear analysis, 24-hour Holter ECG monitoring with QT and HRV analysis, 24-hour blood pressure (BP monitoring with systolic and diastolic BPV analysis, cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests, cold pressure test, mental stress test. The patients were also divided into sympathetic and parasympathetic groups, depending on predominance in short time spectral analysis of sympathovagal balance according to low frequency and high frequency values. Results. We confirmed a significant systolic and diastolic BP reduction, and a reduction of pulse pressure during day, night and early morning hours. The reduction of supraventricular and ventricular ectopic beats during the night was also achieved with therapy, but without statistical significance. The increment of sympathetic activity in early phase of amlodipine therapy was without statistical significance and persistence of sympathetic predominance after a few weeks of therapy detected based on the results of short-term spectral HRV analysis. All time domain parameters of long-term HRV analysis were decreased and low frequency amongst spectral parameters. Amlodipne reduced baroreflex sensitivity after three weeks of therapy, but increased it immediately after the administration of the first dose. Conclusion. The results

  16. Sex-specific effects of intranasal oxytocin on autonomic nervous system and emotional responses to couple conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nater, Urs M.; Schaer, Marcel; La Marca, Roberto; Bodenmann, Guy; Ehlert, Ulrike; Heinrichs, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Unhappy couple relationships are associated with impaired individual health, an effect thought to be mediated through ongoing couple conflicts. Little is known, however, about the underlying mechanisms regulating psychobiological stress, and particularly autonomic nervous system (ANS) reactivity, during negative couple interaction. In this study, we tested the effects of the neuropeptide oxytocin on ANS reactivity during couple conflict in a standardized laboratory paradigm. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 47 heterosexual couples (total n = 94) received oxytocin or placebo intranasally prior to instructed couple conflict. Participants’ behavior was videotaped and salivary alpha-amylase (sAA), a measure of sympathetic activity, and emotional arousal were repeatedly measured during the experiment. Oxytocin significantly reduced sAA during couple conflict in women, whereas men showed increases in sAA levels (sex × group interaction: B = −49.36, t = −2.68, P = 0.009). In men, these increases were related to augmented emotional arousal (r = 0.286, P = 0.028) and more positive behavior (r = 0.291, P = 0.026), whereas there was no such association in women. Our results imply sex-specific effects of oxytocin on sympathetic activity, to negative couple interaction, with the neuropeptide reducing sAA responses and emotional arousal in women while increasing them in men. PMID:22842905

  17. Effect of Forest Walking on Autonomic Nervous System Activity in Middle-Aged Hypertensive Individuals: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chorong Song

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been increasing attention on the therapeutic effects of the forest environment. However, evidence-based research that clarifies the physiological effects of the forest environment on hypertensive individuals is lacking. This study provides scientific evidence suggesting that a brief forest walk affects autonomic nervous system activity in middle-aged hypertensive individuals. Twenty participants (58.0 ± 10.6 years were instructed to walk predetermined courses in forest and urban environments (as control. Course length (17-min walk, walking speed, and energy expenditure were equal between the forest and urban environments to clarify the effects of each environment. Heart rate variability (HRV and heart rate were used to quantify physiological responses. The modified semantic differential method and Profile of Mood States were used to determine psychological responses. The natural logarithm of the high-frequency component of HRV was significantly higher and heart rate was significantly lower when participants walked in the forest than when they walked in the urban environment. The questionnaire results indicated that, compared with the urban environment, walking in the forest increased “comfortable”, “relaxed”, “natural” and “vigorous” feelings and decreased “tension-anxiety,” “depression,” “anxiety-hostility,” “fatigue” and “confusion”. A brief walk in the forest elicited physiological and psychological relaxation effects on middle-aged hypertensive individuals.

  18. Diminished autonomic neurocardiac function in patients with generalized anxiety disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungwook; Lee, Seul; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a chronic and highly prevalent disorder that is characterized by a number of autonomic nervous system symptoms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the linear and nonlinear complexity measures of heart rate variability (HRV), measuring autonomic regulation, and to evaluate the relationship between HRV parameters and the severity of anxiety, in medication-free patients with GAD. Methods Assessments of linear and nonlinear complexity measures of HRV were performed in 42 medication-free patients with GAD and 50 healthy control subjects. In addition, the severity of anxiety symptoms was assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory. The values of the HRV measures of the groups were compared, and the correlations between the HRV measures and the severity of anxiety symptoms were assessed. Results The GAD group showed significantly lower standard deviation of RR intervals and the square root of the mean squared differences of successive normal sinus intervals values compared to the control group (P<0.01). The approximate entropy value, which is a nonlinear complexity indicator, was also significantly lower in the patient group than in the control group (P<0.01). In correlation analysis, there were no significant correlations between HRV parameters and the severity of anxiety symptoms. Conclusion The present study indicates that GAD is significantly associated with reduced HRV, suggesting that autonomic neurocardiac integrity is substantially impaired in patients with GAD. Future prospective studies are required to investigate the effects of pharmacological or non-pharmacological treatment on neuroautonomic modulation in patients with GAD. PMID:27994467

  19. Diminished autonomic neurocardiac function in patients with generalized anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim K

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Kyungwook Kim,1 Seul Lee,2 Jong-Hoon Kim1–3 1Gachon University School of Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry, Gil Medical Center, Gachon University School of Medicine, Gachon University, 3Neuroscience Research Institute, Gachon University, Incheon, Republic of Korea Background: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD is a chronic and highly prevalent disorder that is characterized by a number of autonomic nervous system symptoms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the linear and nonlinear complexity measures of heart rate variability (HRV, measuring autonomic regulation, and to evaluate the relationship between HRV parameters and the severity of anxiety, in medication-free patients with GAD. Methods: Assessments of linear and nonlinear complexity measures of HRV were performed in 42 medication-free patients with GAD and 50 healthy control subjects. In addition, the severity of anxiety symptoms was assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory. The values of the HRV measures of the groups were compared, and the correlations between the HRV measures and the severity of anxiety symptoms were assessed. Results: The GAD group showed significantly lower standard deviation of RR intervals and the square root of the mean squared differences of successive normal sinus intervals values compared to the control group (P<0.01. The approximate entropy value, which is a nonlinear complexity indicator, was also significantly lower in the patient group than in the control group (P<0.01. In correlation analysis, there were no significant correlations between HRV parameters and the severity of anxiety symptoms. Conclusion: The present study indicates that GAD is significantly associated with reduced HRV, suggesting that autonomic neurocardiac integrity is substantially impaired in patients with GAD. Future prospective studies are required to investigate the effects of pharmacological or non-pharmacological treatment on

  20. Directed Autonomic Flow : Functional Motility Fluidics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuehn, Philipp T.; de Miranda, Barbara Santos; van Rijn, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Unidirectional coherent motion of a self-moving droplet is achieved and combined in a functional motility fluidic chip for chemical reactions via a novel and straightforward approach. The droplet shows both increased movement speeds and displacement distances without any input of energy. Nanoparticl

  1. Fasting-induced changes in hepatic thyroid hormone metabolism in male rats are independent of autonomic nervous input to the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, E M; Eggels, L; van Beeren, H C; Ackermans, M T; Kalsbeek, A; Fliers, E; Boelen, A

    2014-12-01

    During fasting, profound changes in the regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis occur in order to save energy and limit catabolism. In this setting, serum T3 and T4 are decreased without an appropriate TSH and TRH response reflecting central down-regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. Hepatic thyroid hormone (TH) metabolism is also affected by fasting, because type 3 deiodinase (D3) is increased, which is mediated by serum leptin concentrations. A recent study showed that fasting-induced changes in liver TH sulfotransferases (Sults) and uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (Ugts) depend on a functional melanocortin system in the hypothalamus. However, the pathways connecting the hypothalamus and the liver that induce these changes are currently unknown. In the present study, we investigated in rats whether the fasting-induced changes in hepatic TH metabolism are regulated by the autonomic nervous system. We selectively cut either the sympathetic or the parasympathetic input to the liver. Serum and liver TH concentrations, deiodinase expression, and activity and Sult and Ugt expression were measured in rats that had been fasted for 36 hours or were fed ad libitum. Fasting decreased serum T3 and T4 concentrations, whereas intrahepatic TH concentrations remained unchanged. D3 expression and activity increased, as was the expression of constitutive androstane receptor, Sult1b1, and Ugt1a1, whereas liver D1 was unaffected. Neither sympathetic nor parasympathetic denervation affected the fasting-induced alterations. We conclude that fasting-induced changes in liver TH metabolism are not regulated via the hepatic autonomic input in a major way and more likely reflect a direct effect of humoral factors on the hepatocyte.

  2. Identifying functional thermodynamics in autonomous Maxwellian ratchets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Alexander B.; Mandal, Dibyendu; Crutchfield, James P.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a family of Maxwellian Demons for which correlations among information bearing degrees of freedom can be calculated exactly and in compact analytical form. This allows one to precisely determine Demon functional thermodynamic operating regimes, when previous methods either misclassify or simply fail due to approximations they invoke. This reveals that these Demons are more functional than previous candidates. They too behave either as engines, lifting a mass against gravity by extracting energy from a single heat reservoir, or as Landauer erasers, consuming external work to remove information from a sequence of binary symbols by decreasing their individual uncertainty. Going beyond these, our Demon exhibits a new functionality that erases bits not by simply decreasing individual-symbol uncertainty, but by increasing inter-bit correlations (that is, by adding temporal order) while increasing single-symbol uncertainty. In all cases, but especially in the new erasure regime, exactly accounting for informational correlations leads to tight bounds on Demon performance, expressed as a refined Second Law of thermodynamics that relies on the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy for dynamical processes and not on changes purely in system configurational entropy, as previously employed. We rigorously derive the refined Second Law under minimal assumptions and so it applies quite broadly—for Demons with and without memory and input sequences that are correlated or not. We note that general Maxwellian Demons readily violate previously proposed, alternative such bounds, while the current bound still holds. As such, it broadly describes the minimal energetic cost of any computation by a thermodynamic system.

  3. The impact of maternal depression and overcrowded housing on associations between autonomic nervous system reactivity and externalizing behavior problems in vulnerable Latino children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Sara F; Boyce, W Thomas; Eskenazi, Brenda; Alkon, Abbey

    2016-01-01

    The study of autonomic nervous system responses and contextual factors has shed light on the development of children's negative outcomes, but the majority of these studies have not focused on minority populations living under adversity. To address these gaps, the current longitudinal study included a sample of poor, immigrant Latino families to examine whether associations between children's autonomic nervous system reactivity at 6 months and their externalizing behavior problems at 7 years of age were moderated by two risk factors associated with poverty: the interpersonal factor of chronic maternal depression and the environmental factor of chronic overcrowded housing. Multiple linear regression (N = 99) revealed that children who exhibited less parasympathetic nervous system withdrawal in response to challenge during infancy had more externalizing problems during childhood only if they had mothers who experienced chronic depression. Children who exhibited greater sympathetic nervous system reactivity during infancy had the lowest levels of externalizing problems during childhood only if they had mothers who chronic depression. Chronic overcrowded housing did not moderate associations between physiological reactivity and level of externalizing problems. These findings extend our understanding of the interaction of physiology and context on child outcomes to the understudied population of impoverished Latino families.

  4. Sensitivity of the autonomic nervous system to visual and auditory affect across social and non-social domains in Williams syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maaria Järvinen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Although individuals with Williams syndrome (WS typically demonstrate an increased appetitive social drive, their social profile is characterized by dissociations, including socially fearless behavior coupled with anxiousness, and distinct patterns of peaks and valleys of ability. The aim of this study was to compare the processing of social and non-social visually and aurally presented affective stimuli, at the levels of behavior and autonomic nervous system (ANS responsivity, in individuals with WS contrasted with a typically developing (TD group, with the view of elucidating the highly sociable and emotionally sensitive predisposition noted in WS. Behavioral findings supported previous studies of enhanced competence in processing social over non-social stimuli by individuals with WS; however, the patterns of ANS functioning underlying the behavioral performance revealed a surprising profile previously undocumented in WS. Specifically, increased heart rate (HR reactivity, and a failure for electrodermal activity (EDA to habituate were found in individuals with WS contrasted with the TD group, predominantly in response to visual social-affective stimuli. Within the auditory domain, greater arousal linked to variation in heart beat period was observed in relation to music stimuli in individuals with WS. Taken together, the findings suggest that the pattern of ANS response in WS is more complex than previously noted, with increased arousal to face and music stimuli potentially underpinning the heightened behavioral emotionality to such stimuli. The lack of habituation may underlie the increased affiliation and attraction to faces characterizing individuals with WS. Future research directions are suggested.

  5. Cardiac Autonomic Function in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Cheng-Yu; Kung, Woon-Man; Chou, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Yao-Chin; Tai, Hsu-Chih; Wei, James Cheng-Chung

    2016-05-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease involing spine and enthesis. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the autonomic nervous system (ANS) function and the association between ANS and the functional status or disease activity in AS.The study included 42 AS patients, all fulfilling the modified New York criteria. All the patients are totally symptom free for ANS involvement and had normal neurological findings. These AS patients and 230 healthy volunteers receive analysis of 5 minutes heart rate variability (HRV) in lying posture. In addition, disease activity and functional status of these AS patients are assessed by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Score (BAS-G).Both groups were age and sex-matched. Although the HRV analysis indicates that the peaks of total power (TP, 0-0.5 Hz) and high-frequency power (HF, 0.15-0.40 Hz) are similar in both groups, the activities of low-frequency power (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz), LF in normalized units (LF%), and the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF) in AS patients are obviously lower than healthy controls. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein revealed negative relationship with HF. The AS patients without peripheral joint disease have higher LF, TP, variance, LF%, and HF than the patients with peripheral joint disease. The AS patients without uvetis have higher HF than the patients with uvetis. The total scores of BASDI, BASFI, and BAS-G do not show any association to HRV parameters.AS patients have significantly abnormal cardiac autonomic regulation. This is closely related with some inflammatory activities. Reduced autonomic function may be one of the factors of high cardiovascular risk in AS patients.

  6. Investigation of the Effects of Continuous Low-Dose Epidural Analgesia on the Autonomic Nervous System Using Hilbert Huang Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ren Chuang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of continuous low-dose epidural bupivacaine (0.05-0.1% infusion on the Doppler velocimetry for labor analgesia have been well documented. The aim of this study was to monitor the activity of the autonomic nervous system (ANS for women in labor based on Hilbert Huang transform (HHT, which performs signal processing for nonlinear systems, such as human cardiac systems. Thirteen pregnant women were included in the experimental group for labor analgesia. They received continuous epidural bupivacaine 0.075% infusion. The normal-to-normal intervals (NN-interval were downloaded from an ECG holter. Another 20 pregnant women in non-anesthesia labor (average gestation age was 38.6 weeks were included in the comparison group. In this study, HHT was used to decompose components of ECG signals, which reflect three different frequency bands of a person's heart rate spectrum (viz. high frequency (HF, low frequency (LF and very low frequency (VLF. It was found that the change of energy in subjects without anesthesia was more active than that with continuous epidural bupivacaine 0.075% infusion. The energy values of the experimental group (i.e., labor analgesia of HF and LF of ANS activities were significantly lower (P < 0.05 than the values of the comparison group (viz. labor without analgesia, but the trend of energy ratio of LF/HF was opposite. In conclusion, the sympathetic and parasympathetic components of ANS are all suppressed by continuous low-dose epidural bupivacaine 0.075% infusion, but parasympathetic power is suppressed more than sympathetic power.

  7. Response of Autonomic Nervous System to Body Positions: Fourier and Wavelet Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, A; Federici, A; Stramaglia, S; Simone, F; Zenzola, A; Santostasi, R; Xu, Aiguo

    2003-01-01

    Two mathematical methods, the Fourier and wavelet transforms, were used to study the short term cardiovascular control system. Time series, picked from electrocardiogram and arterial blood pressure lasting 6 minutes, were analyzed in supine position (SUP), during the first (HD1), and the second half (HD2) of $90^{\\circ}$ head down tilt and during recovery (REC). The wavelet transform was performed using the Haar function of period $T=2^j$ ($% j=1$,2,$... $,6) to obtain wavelet coefficients. Power spectra components were analyzed within three bands, VLF (0.003-0.04), LF (0.04-0.15) and HF (0.15-0.4) with the frquency unit cycle/interval. Wavelet transform demonstrated a higher discrimination among all analyzed periods than the Fourier transform. For the Fourier analysis, the LF of R-R intervals and VLF of systolic blood pressure show more evident difference for different body positions. For the wavelet analysis, the systolic blood pressures show much more evident difference than the R-R intervals. This study s...

  8. Autonomic Regulation of Splanchnic Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A Fraser

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the autonomic nervous system in circulatory regulation of the splanchnic organs (stomach, small intestine, colon, liver, pancreas and spleen is reviewed. In general, the sympathetic nervous system is primarily involved in vasoconstriction, while the parasympathetic contributes to vasodilation. Vasoconstriction in the splanchnic circulation appears to be mediated by alpha-2 receptors and vasodilation by activation of primary afferent nerves with subsequent release of vasodilatory peptides, or by stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors. As well, an important function of the autonomic nervous system is to provide a mechanism by which splanchnic vascular reserve can be mobilized during stress to maintain overall cardiovascular homeostasis.

  9. A study of cardiovascular autonomic function in normal pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumana Panja

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was designed to evaluate the physiological responses to noninvasive cardiovascular autonomic function tests in normal pregnancy and compare them with non- pregnant controls. Materials and Methods: The study population comprised of 90 apparently healthy, pregnant women divided equally into three groups based on their period of gestation and 30 otherwise healthy, non-pregnant women as controls. The standard autonomic function tests based on cardiovascular reflexes, including heart rate response tests and blood pressure response tests were performed. Result: It was observed that variability of mean between and within all the population groups and controls was significantly different. Multiple comparison analysis revealed a significantly lower Deep Breathing Difference in pregnant subjects, significant difference in Valsalva Ratio in third trimester group, a significantly lower Postural Tachycardia Index only during last trimester and a significantly higher fall in systolic blood pressure on standing only during 1st trimester. A significantly lower alteration in diastolic blood pressure during isometric handgrip in later trimesters and a significant increase in overall cardiovascular autonomic score between and within all groups were also observed. Conclusion: The observations serve to corroborate that the cardiovascular indices in pregnant women are significantly altered in comparison to non-pregnant women, thus highlighting the importance of cardiovascular monitoring during pregnancy. The study also helped to reaffirm the efficacy of simple cardiovascular reflex tests in research on pregnancy physiology.

  10. Comparison of Cardiac Autonomic Functions in Glucometabolic Disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Elçim Yıldırım

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Autonomic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus. The aim of the present study was to compare heart rate recovery time and heart rate variation among the indicators of cardiac autonomic function between patients with glucometabolic abnormalities in various levels and normal glucose homeostasis. METHODS: A total of 90 patients were enrolled in the study. The patients were divided into four groups: impaired fasting glucose (IFG (n=18, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT (n=25, type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM (n=21, and the control group (n=26. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN was evaluated by the maximum exercise stress test and Holter electrocardiography. RESULTS: The baseline heart rate in the DM group was higher than the IFG, IGT, and control groups, but the difference was not statistically significant (93.5±15.5, 87.8±9.4, 84.3±10.8, and 84.3±14.2, respectively; p=0.06. In multiple regression analysis FPG level was an independent variable, increased baseline heart rate was correlated with an elevated FPG level (constant: 71.35, p: 0.004. The metabolic equivalent of task (MET value was lower in the DM group compared to the IFG, IGT, and control groups (9.9±1.2, 9.0±1.6, 9.78±1.46, 8.77±1.74 p=0.06. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: When compared to patients with normal glucose homeostasis heart rate at rest was higher in the IGT, IFG, and DM groups. Elevated fasting glucose levels were correlated with an increased baseline heart rate. A negative correlation was found between HbA1c levels and HRRT, and HR index. These finding indicate autonomic functions are impaired in patients with DM, IGT and IFG groups.

  11. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CHANGE IN FUNCTION OF AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ACUTE MOUNTAIN SICKNESS AFTER URGENT ENTERING INTO HIGH ALTITUDE%急进高原自主神经功能变化与急性高原反应的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田开新; 覃军; 黄岚; 隆敏; 喻杨; 于世勇

    2008-01-01

    目的 研究急进高原前、后心血管自主神经(autonomic nervous system,ANS)功能变化及其与急性高原反应(acute mountain sickness,AMS)之间关系, 揭示ANS在AMS发病中的作用,探求预防AMS的可能途径.方法 对99名健康男性青年在海拔450 m平原和空运急进3 700 m高原后2~4 d内进行心率变异性(heart rate variability,HRV)和冷加压试验(cold pressor test,CPT)检测; 在急进高原后1~ 5 d接受AMS发病情况调查.结果 急进高原后第1天AMS发病率92%,其中, 中重度AMS占10%、轻度占36%、基本无反应占54%.LF/HFn随AMS程度减轻而减少,HFn随AMS 程度加重而增加.中重度、轻度、基本无AMS反应组平原时收缩压(SBP)分别为(123.42± 7.14) mmHg、 (120.6±11.22) mmHg、 (122.58±10.92) mmHg, 均显著高于无反应组( 111.31±9.48) mmHg, (P<0.05); 中重度AMS组在平原CPT后心率(H R)变化幅度[(7.57±8.22)b/min]显著低于基本无反应组[(25.47±19.26)b/min,(P<0.05)].急进高原后,中重度、轻度、基本无AMS反应组CPT后SBP变化幅度分别为(8.14±4.95)mmHg、(9.56±7.77)mmHg、(9.97±6.80)mmHg,均显著低于无反应组[(17.00±12.75)mmHg,(P<0.05)];HR变化幅度分别为 (11.13±6.08)b/min、 (10±7.5)b/min、 (12.25±8.14)b/min, 均显著低于无反应组([19.71±9.35)b/min,P<0.05].AMS症状积分与平原时LF/HF正相关(r=0.437,P<0.01),与平原时CPT后HR变化幅度呈负相关(r=-0.35,P=0.01).结论 平原交感神经活动较高者其A NS的应激调节能力相对较小,对AMS易感性较高.改善ANS功能可能有助于预防AMS.

  12. Leader-follower function for autonomous military convoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasseur, Laurent; Lecointe, Olivier; Dento, Jerome; Cherfaoui, Nourrdine; Marion, Vincent; Morillon, Joel G.

    2004-09-01

    The French Military Robotic Study Program (introduced in Aerosense 2003), sponsored by the French Defense Procurement Agency and managed by Thales Airborne Systems as the prime contractor, focuses on about 15 robotic themes which can provide an immediate "operational added value." The paper details the "robotic convoy" theme (named TEL1), which main purpose is to develop a robotic leader-follower function so that several unmanned vehicles can autonomously follow teleoperated, autonomous or on-board driven leader. Two modes have been implemented: Perceptive follower: each autonomous follower anticipates the trajectory of the vehicle in front of it, thanks to a dedicated perception equipment. This mode is mainly based on the use of perceptive data, without any communication link between leader and follower (to lower the cost of future mass development and extend the operational capabilities). Delayed follower: the leader records its path and transmits it to the follower; the follower is able to follow the recorded trajectory again at any delayed time. This mode uses localization data got from inertial measurements. The paper presents both modes with detailed algorithms and the results got from the military acceptance tests performed on wheeled 4x4 vehicles (DARDS French ATD).

  13. Experimental Study of the Effect of Autonomic Nervous System on the Transmural Dispersion of Ventricular Repolarization under Acute Myocardial Ischemia in Vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张存泰; 徐大文; 李泱; 刘念; 钟江华; 王琳; 陆再英

    2002-01-01

    Summary: The effect of the autonomic nerves on the transmural dispersion of ventricular repolariza tion (TDR) under acute myocardial ischemia in intact canine was investigated. Using the monophasic action potential (MAP) recording technique, MAPs of the epicardium (Epi), midmyocardium (Mid) and endocardium (Endo) were recorded simultaneously by specially designed plunge-needle electrodes at the left ventricular free wall under acute myocardial ischemia in 12 open-chest dogs.MAPD90 and TDR among three myocardial layers as well as the incidence of the early afterdepolar ization (EAD) before autonomic nervous stimulation and during autonomic nervous stimulation were compared. It was found that 10 min after acute myocardial I~hemia, TDR was increased from 55±8.ms to 86± 15 ms during sympathetic stimulation (P<0. 01). The TDR (53± 9 ms) during parasympathetic stimulation was not significantly different from that of the control (55±8 ms) (P>0.05). The EAD was elicited in the Mid of 2 dogs (16 %) 10 min after acute myocardial ischemia,but the EAD were elicited in the Mid of 7 dogs (58 %) during sympathetic stimulation (P<0. 01).It was concluded that: (1) Sympathetic stimulation can increase the transmural dispersion of repolari zation and induce early afterdepolarizations in the Mid under acute myocardial ischemia, which pro-vide the opportunity for the ventricular arrhythmia developing; (2) Parasympathetic stimulation has no significant effect on the transmural dispersion of repolarization under myocardial ischemia.

  14. Hjertefrekvensvariationer til vurdering af det autonome nervesystem. En oversigt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T L; Kambskar, G; Mehlsen, J

    1997-01-01

    activity in the different branches of the autonomic nervous system. In the diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy, short-term forced variations in heart rate are employed in order to describe the dynamic capacity of the parasympathetic nervous system. In the subsequent data-analysis several different principles......Analysis of heart rate variability is increasingly used for testing the function of the autonomic nervous system in cardiovascular disease and for the diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy. In cardiovascular disease, long-term data collection (several hours) is primarily used to describe the static...

  15. Accessing autonomic function can early screen metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome is time-consuming and invasive. Convenient instruments that do not require laboratory or physical investigation would be useful in early screening individuals at high risk of metabolic syndrome. Examination of the autonomic function can be taken as a directly reference and screening indicator for predicting metabolic syndrome. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The EZSCAN test, as an efficient and noninvasive technology, can access autonomic function through measuring electrochemical skin conductance. In this study, we used EZSCAN value to evaluate autonomic function and to detect metabolic syndrome in 5,887 participants aged 40 years or older. The EZSCAN test diagnostic accuracy was analyzed by receiver operating characteristic curves. Among the 5,815 participants in the final analysis, 2,541 were diagnosed as metabolic syndrome and the overall prevalence was 43.7%. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome increased with the elevated EZSCAN risk level (p for trend <0.0001. Moreover, EZSCAN value was associated with an increase in the number of metabolic syndrome components (p for trend <0.0001. Compared with the no risk group (EZSCAN value 0-24, participants at the high risk group (EZSCAN value: 50-100 had a 2.35 fold increased risk of prevalent metabolic syndrome after the multiple adjustments. The area under the curve of the EZSCAN test was 0.62 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.61-0.64 for predicting metabolic syndrome. The optimal operating point for the EZSCAN value to detect a high risk of prevalent metabolic syndrome was 30 in this study, while the sensitivity and specificity were 71.2% and 46.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, although less sensitive and accurate when compared with the clinical definition of metabolic syndrome, we found that the EZSCAN test is a good and simple screening technique for early predicting metabolic syndrome.

  16. Heart rate variability and the influence of craniosacral therapy on autonomous nervous system regulation in persons with subjective discomforts:a pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wanda Girsberger; Ulricke Bnziger; Gerhard Lingg; Harald Lothaller; Peter-Christian Endler

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Subjective discomforts in a preclinical range are often due to imbalanced autonomic nervous system activity, which is a focus of craniosacral therapy. OBJECTIVE:The aim of this work was to determine any changes in heart rate variability (HRV) in a study on craniosacral therapy. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: This is a quasi-experimental (controlled) study with cross-over design. In a private practice, measurements were performed on 31 patients with subjective discomforts before and after a control and an intervention period. HRV was determined using a device that requires a measuring time of 140 s and electrode contact only with the ifngertips. Main PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: HRV change under the inlfuence of a deifned one-time intervention (test intervention) with craniosacral therapy versus control (deifned rest period). RESULTS:Standard deviation of all RR-intervals (ms) and total power of RR-interval variability in the frequency range (ms2) were together interpreted as an indicator of test subjects’ autonomic nervous activity and as a measure of their ability to cope with demands on their health. Neither of these parameters increased during the control period (P>0.05), whereas during the test intervention period there was an increase in both (P0.05). No changes were observed in the low frequency/high frequency ratio (sympathetic-vagal balance) in the course of the control or the test intervention period (P>0.05). CONCLUSION: Craniosacral treatment had a favourable effect on autonomic nervous activity. This in itself is an interesting result, but further research will be needed to distinguish speciifc effects of craniosacral therapy technique from less speciifc therapist-client interaction effects.

  17. 自主神经诱发心房颤动的离子通道基础%Ion Channel Basis of Atrial Fibrillation Induced by Autonomic Nervous System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张淑娟(综述); 赵庆彦(审校)

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic nervous system includes the double control of vagus nerve and sympathetic nerve. Recent experimental and clinical studies suggest that autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the development and maintenance of atrial fibrillation( AF) . Electrical and structural remodeling after AF prompts its maintaining and recurrence. The mechanisms may be related to the neurotransmitters released by nerve endings acting on myocardial cell membrane receptors, thereby affecting the activity of potassium, sodium and calcium and other ion channels on the cardiac cell membrane, resulting in ECG physiological function disorder.%心脏受自主神经包括迷走神经和交感神经的双重支配,近年来的实验及临床研究提示,其在心房颤动(房颤)的发生、发展及维持中起重要作用,房颤发生后的电重构和结构重构促使其自身的维持和复发。其作用机制与其末梢释放神经递质作用于心肌细胞膜上的受体,进而影响心房肌细胞膜上钾、钠及钙等多种离子通道的活动,致使心电生理功能紊乱有关。

  18. Effect of carotid and aortic baroreceptors on cardiopulmonary reflex: the role of autonomic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.L. Fernandes

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We determined the sympathetic and parasympathetic control of heart rate (HR and the sensitivity of the cardiopulmonary receptors after selective carotid and aortic denervation. We also investigated the participation of the autonomic nervous system in the Bezold-Jarish reflex after selective removal of aortic and carotid baroreceptors. Male Wistar rats (220-270 g were divided into three groups: control (CG, N = 8, aortic denervation (AG, N = 5 and carotid denervation (CAG, N = 9. AG animals presented increased arterial pressure (12% and HR (11% compared with CG, while CAG animals presented a reduction in arterial pressure (16% and unchanged HR compared with CG. The sequential blockade of autonomic effects by atropine and propranolol indicated a reduction in vagal function in CAG (a 50 and 62% reduction in vagal effect and tonus, respectively while AG showed an increase of more than 100% in sympathetic control of HR. The Bezold-Jarish reflex was evaluated using serotonin, which induced increased bradycardia and hypotension in AG and CAG, suggesting that the sensitivity of the cardiopulmonary reflex is augmented after selective denervation. Atropine administration abolished the bradycardic responses induced by serotonin in all groups; however, the hypotensive response was still increased in AG. Although the responses after atropine were lower than the responses before the drug, indicating a reduction in vagal outflow after selective denervation, our data suggest that both denervation procedures are associated with an increase in sympathetic modulation of the vessels, indicating that the sensitivity of the cardiopulmonary receptors was modulated by baroreceptor fibers.

  19. Cholinergic stimulation with pyridostigmine improves autonomic function in infarcted rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Fuente, Raquel N; Rodrigues, Bruno; Moraes-Silva, Ivana C; Souza, Leandro E; Sirvente, Raquel; Mostarda, Cristiano; De Angelis, Kátia; Soares, Pedro P; Lacchini, Silvia; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia

    2013-09-01

    In the present study we evaluated the effects of short-term pyridostigmine bromide (0.14 mg/mL) treatment started early after myocardial infarction (MI) on left ventricular (LV) and autonomic functions in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control, pyridostigmine, infarcted and infarcted + pyridostigmine-treated groups. Pyridostigmine was administered in the drinking water, starting immediately after MI or sham operation, for 11 days. Left ventricular function was evaluated indirectly by echocardiography and directly by LV catheterization. Cardiovascular autonomic control was evaluated by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), heart rate variability (HRV) and pharmacological blockade. All evaluations started after 7 days pyridostigmine treatment and were finalized after 11 days treatment. Pyridostigmine prevented the impairment of +dP/dT and reduced the MI area in infarcted + pyridostigmine compared with infarcted rats (7 ± 3% vs 17 ± 4%, respectively). Mean blood pressure was restored in infarcted + pyridostigmine compared with infarcted rats (103 ± 3 vs 94 ± 3 mmHg, respectively). In addition, compared with the infarcted group, pyridostigmine improved BRS, as evaluated by tachycardic (1.6 ± 0.2 vs 2.5 ± 0.2 b.p.m./mmHg, respectively) and bradycardic (-0.42 ± 0.01 vs -1.9 ± 0.1 b.p.m./mmHg) responses, and reduced the low frequency/high frequency ratio of HRV (0.81 ± 0.11 vs 0.24 ± 0.14, respectively). These improvements are probably associated with increased vagal tone and reduced sympathetic tone in infarcted + pyridostigmine compared with infarcted rats. In conclusion, the data suggest that short-term pyridostigmine treatment started early after MI can improve BRS, HRV and parasympathetic and sympathetic tone in experimental rats. These data may have potential clinical implications because autonomic markers have prognostic significance after MI.

  20. Huperzine A protects sepsis associated encephalopathy by promoting the deficient cholinergic nervous function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Sen-Zhi; Huang, Wei-Ping; Huang, Lin-Qiang; Han, Yong-Li; Han, Qian-Peng; Zhu, Gao-Feng; Wen, Miao-Yun; Deng, Yi-Yu; Zeng, Hong-Ke

    2016-09-19

    Neuroinflammatory deregulation in the brain plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE). Given the mounting evidence of anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of the cholinergic nervous system, it is surprising that there is little information about its changes in the brain during sepsis. To elucidate the role of the cholinergic nervous system in SAE, hippocampal choline acetyltransferase, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-1, acetylcholinesterase and acetylcholine were evaluated in LPS-induced sepsis rats. Expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, neuronal apoptosis, and animal cognitive performance were also assessed. Furthermore, therapeutic effects of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor Huperzine A (HupA) on the hippocampal cholinergic nervous function and neuroinflammation were evaluated. A deficiency of the cholinergic nervous function was revealed in SAE, accompanied with over-expressed pro-inflammatory cytokines, increase in neuronal apoptosis and brain cognitive impairment. HupA remarkably promoted the deficient cholinergic nervous function and attenuated the abnormal neuroinflammation in SAE, paralleled with the recovery of brain function. We suggest that the deficiency of the cholinergic nervous function and the abnormal neuroinflammation are synergistically implicated in the pathogenesis of SAE. Thus, HupA is a potential therapeutic candidate for SAE, as it improves the deficient cholinergic nervous function and exerts anti-inflammatory action.

  1. Influence of hydrotherapy on clinical and cardiac autonomic function in migraine patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M U Sujan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migraine is associated with autonomic symptoms. The growing body of literature suggests that the dysfunctional autonomic nervous system might play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of migraine. Thermal therapies have been hypothesized to modulate these changes and alleviate pain. However, data regarding the efficacy of hydrotherapy in migraine remain scant. We evaluated the effect of add on hydrotherapy procedure (a hot arm and foot bath with ice massage to head in migraine patients. Methods: Forty chronic migraine patients fulfilling the International Classification of Headache Disorders II criteria were recruited from the neurology outpatient clinic. Patients were randomized to receive either hydrotherapy plus conventional pharmacological care (n = 20 or conventional medication only (n = 20. Hydrotherapy group received treatment with hot arm and foot bath (103°F to 110°F and ice massage to head daily for 20 min for 45 days. Patients were assessed using headache impact test (HIT, visual analog scale for pain and cardiac autonomic function by heart rate variability (HRV before and after intervention period. Results: There was a significant decrease in HIT score, frequency, and intensity of headaches following treatment in both the groups. However, it was more evident in add on hydrotherapy group compared to pharmacological treatment alone group. There was also significant improvement in the HRV parameters. In particular, there was a significant decrease in heart rate (P = 0.017, increase in high frequency (HF (P = 0.014 and decrease in low frequency/HF ratio (P = 0.004 in add on hydrotherapy group. Conclusion: Our study shows that add on hydrotherapy enhanced the vagal tone in addition to reducing the frequency and intensity of headaches in migraine patients.

  2. Circadian rhythm of the autonomic nervous system in insulin resistant subjects with normoglycemia, impaired fasting glycemia, impaired glucose tolerance, type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serra Pietro

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In type 2 diabetes mellitus both insulin resistance and hyperglycemia are considered responsible for autonomic dysfunction. The relation between the autonomic activity, impaired fasting glycemia and impaired glucose tolerance is, however, unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the circadian autonomic activity expressed as heart rate variability (HRV measured by 24-hours ECG recording in insulin resistant subjects (IR with characteristics as follow: IR subjects with normal oral glucose tolerance test results, IR subjects with impaired fasting glucose, IR subjects with impaired glucose tolerance and subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods Eighty Caucasian insulin resistant subjects (IR and twenty five control subjects were recruited for the study. IR subjects were divided into four groups according to the outcoming results of oral glucose tests (OGTTs: IR subjects with normal glucose regulation (NGR, IR subjects with impaired fasting glycemia (IFG, IR subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT and subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM. Autonomic nervous activity was studied by 24-hours ECG recording. Heart rate variability analysis was performed in time and frequency domains: SDNN, RMS-SD, low frequency (LF and high frequency (HF were calculated. Results The total SDNN showed statistically significant reduction in all four groups with insulin resistant subjects (IR when compared to the control group (p Conclusion The results of our study suggest that insulin resistance might cause global autonomic dysfunction which increases along with worsening glucose metabolic impairment. The analysis of sympathetic and parasympathetic components and the sympathovagal balance demonstrated an association between insulin resistance and sympathetic over-activity, especially during night. The results indicated that the sympathetic over-activity is directly correlated to the grade of insulin resistance

  3. Functional Observational Battery Testing for Nervous System Effects of Drugs and Other Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screening for behavioral toxicity, or neurotoxicity, has become standard practice in preclinical safety pharmacology and toxicology. Behavior represents the integrated sum of activities mediated by the nervous system. Current screening batteries, such as the functional observat...

  4. Comparing the accuracy of ES-BC, EIS-GS, and ES Oxi on body composition, autonomic nervous system activity, and cardiac output to standardized assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis JE

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available John E Lewis1, Stacey L Tannenbaum1, Jinrun Gao3, Angelica B Melillo1, Evan G Long1, Yaima Alonso2, Janet Konefal1, Judi M Woolger2, Susanna Leonard1, Prabjot K Singh1, Lawrence Chen1, Eduard Tiozzo1 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 2Department of Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, 3State Farm Insurance, Bloomington, IL, USA Background and purpose: The Electro Sensor Complex (ESC is software that combines three devices using bioelectrical impedance, galvanic skin response, and spectrophotometry: (1 ES-BC (Electro Sensor-Body Composition; LD Technology, Miami, FL to assess body composition, (2 EIS-GS (Electro Interstitial Scan-Galvanic Skin; LD Technology to predict autonomic nervous system activity, and (3 ES Oxi (Electro Sensor Oxi; LD Technology to assess cardiac output. The objective of this study was to compare each to a standardized assessment: ES-BC to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, EIS-GS to heart rate variability, and ES Oxi to BioZ Dx Diagnostic System (BioZ Dx; SonoSite Inc, Bothell, WA. Patients and methods: The study was conducted in two waves. Fifty subjects were assessed for body composition and autonomic nervous system activity. Fifty-one subjects were assessed for cardiac output. Results: We found adequate relative and absolute agreement between ES-BC and DXA for fat mass (r = 0.97, P < 0.001 with ES-BC overestimating fat mass by 0.1 kg and for body fat percentage (r = 0.92, P < 0.001 with overestimation of fat percentage by 0.4%. For autonomic nervous system activity, we found marginal relative agreement between EIS-GS and heart rate variability by using EIS-GS as the predictor in a linear regression equation (adjusted R2 = 0.56, P = 0.03. For cardiac output, adequate relative and absolute agreement was found between ES Oxi and BioZ Dx at baseline (r = 0.60, P < 0.001, after the first exercise stage (r = 0.79, P < 0.001, and after the second exercise stage (r = 0.86, P

  5. The influence of piroxicam, a non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor, on autonomic nervous system activity in experimental cyclophosphamide-induced hemorrhagic cystitis and bladder outlet obstruction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrek, Łukasz; Baranowska, Agnieszka; Skowron, Beata; Thor, Piotr J

    2014-01-01

    Signs and symptoms of secondary overactive bladder (OAB) are observed both in course of infravesical obstruction of urine outflow in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia, and as a result of development of hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) following administration of cyclophosphamide (CP). Non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) alleviate symptoms of bladder overactivity reducing local synthesis of prostaglandins (PGs), but precise effects of those agents on functions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in course of OAB remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of piroxicam-induced prostaglandins (PGs) synthesis block on activity of the ANS in two experimental models of secondary OAB: bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) and cyclophosphamide-induced HC (CP-HC), by heart rate variability analysis (HRV). The experiment was performed on a group of rats with surgically induced 2-week BOO, and on a group of rats that were administered CP five times, with corresponding control groups. Study animals were given piroxicam (PRX) i.p. in two doses: 2 and 10 mg/kg b.w. In the BOO model, PRX in both doses revealed a trend for reduction of value of all non-normalized components of HRV. The lower PRX dose caused an increased nHF value, and PRX administered in the dose of 10 mg/kg b.w. caused an increase of the nLF value. In the CP-HC model, the lower PRX dose caused a trend for an increase of values of all non-normalized components, and the higher dose--for their decrease. Both doses of PRX in that model caused increase of the nLF value. Inhibition of PGs synthesis caused changes of ANS function in both models of OAB. Both in BOO and in CP-HC, PGs seem to be ANS-activating factors, responsible for maintenance of a high parasympathetic activity. In both models, inhibition of PGs synthesis with PRX administered at the dose of 10 mg/kg b.w. lead to functional reconstruction of ANS, with marked sympathetic predominance. That may contribute to reduction of

  6. Cerebral Hemispheric Lateralization Associated with Hippocampal Sclerosis May Affect Interictal Cardiovascular Autonomic Functions in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokia Ghchime

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that the temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is linked to the autonomic nervous system dysfunctions. Seizures alter the function of different systems such as the respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and urogenital systems. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possible factors which may be involved in interictal cardiovascular autonomic function in temporal lobe epilepsy with complex partial seizures, and with particular attention to hippocampal sclerosis. The study was conducted in 30 patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (19 with left hippocampal sclerosis, 11 with right hippocampal sclerosis. All subjects underwent four tests of cardiac autonomic function: heart rate changes in response to deep breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure variations throughout resting activity and during hand grip, mental stress, and orthostatic tests. Our results show that the right cerebral hemisphere predominantly modulates sympathetic activity, while the left cerebral hemisphere mainly modulates parasympathetic activity, which mediated tachycardia and excessive bradycardia counterregulation, both of which might be involved as a mechanism of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy patients (SUDEP.

  7. Influence of yearlong training on the state of cardiovascular, autonomic nervous system and physical performance in female 400 meters runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. L. Mikhalyuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the research – identification and comparison of heart rate variability, central hemodynamics and physical performance in 400 meters runners from the III category to masters of sports of international class (MSIC in the annual cycle of the training process. Materials and methods. The study included 22 female athletes, 400 meters runners between the ages of 14 and 27 years (mean age – 16.8 ± 0.67 years, running experience – from 2 to 13 years (average – 4.4 ± 0.68 years in the preparatory and competitive periods. Body length and weight of athletes were 167.9 ± 0.91 cm and 52.5 ± 0.98 kg, respectively. For the analysis of the autonomic regulation of cardiac activity mathematical methods of HRV analysis were used. Analysis and evaluation of periodic components of heart rate were carried out by means of the research of spectral parameters of autocorrelation functions. Determination of physical performance was carried out under the practical standard on the cycle ergometer. It was established that in high class sportswomen (n=12 and ones with qualifications of the II–III category (n=10 in the competitive period there were strengthening of parasympathetic effects of ANS, transformation of eukinetic circulation type (CT into hypokinetic CT and absence of sportswomen with hyperkinetic CT. In high class sportswomen there were significant increase of the relative value of physical working capacity (PWC170/kg by 12.33% and tendency to increase of index of functional state (IFS by 9.46%, in sportswomen with qualifications of II–III category PWC170/kg significantly increased by 19.26%, and IFS by 17.87%. Correlation analysis conducted in both periods in the group and separately in high class sportswomen and ones with qualifications of II–III category found the relationship indicating that the increase of PWC170/kg and IFS is associated with the prevalence of hypokinetic CT and parasympathetic ANS influences. In the competitive period

  8. Noninvasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system. Final progress report, December 24, 1993--February 28, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-31

    During the first year of funding, C-11 hydroxyephedrine has been introduced as the first clinically usable norepinephrine analogue. Studies in normal volunteers and patients with various cardiac disorders indicated the feasibility of this tracer for further evaluation. Simultaneously, animal studies have been used to assess the use of these radiopharmaceuticals in ischemic injury in order to define neuronal damage. Current research focuses on the comparison of C-11 hydroxyephedrine with other neurotransmitters such as C-11 epinephrine and C-11 threo-hydroxyephedrine. Epinephrine is primarily stored in vesicles of the nerve terminal, while threo-hydroxyephedrine is only substrate to uptake I mechanism. Such a combination of radiotracers may allow the dissection of uptake I mechanism as well as vesicular storage. In parallel to the refinement of presynaptic tracers for the sympathetic nervous system, the authors are developing radiopharmaceuticals to delineate the adrenergic receptors in the heart. The combined evaluation of pre- and postsynaptic nerve function will improve their ability to identify abnormalities. They are currently developing a new radiosynthesis of the hydrophilic adrenergic receptor antagonist C-11 CGP-12177 which has been used by others for the visualization of adrenergic receptors in the heart. In addition, they are participating in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for the delineation of presynaptic cholinergic nerve terminals. Derivatives of benzovesamicol have been labeled in their institution and are currently under investigation. The most promising agent is F-18 benzovesamicol (FEBOBV) which allows the visualization of parasympathetic nerve terminals in the canine heart as demonstrated by preliminary PET data. A compilation of all publications funded by this grant is presented in this report.

  9. Sensorized Garments and Textrode-Enabled Measurement Instrumentation for Ambulatory Assessment of the Autonomic Nervous System Response in the ATREC Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosme Llerena

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in textile materials, technology and miniaturization of electronics for measurement instrumentation has boosted the development of wearable measurement systems. In several projects sensorized garments and non-invasive instrumentation have been integrated to assess on emotional, cognitive responses as well as physical arousal and status of mental stress through the study of the autonomous nervous system. Assessing the mental state of workers under stressful conditions is critical to identify which workers are in the proper state of mind and which are not ready to undertake a mission, which might consequently risk their own life and the lives of others. The project Assessment in Real Time of the Stress in Combatants (ATREC aims to enable real time assessment of mental stress of the Spanish Armed Forces during military activities using a wearable measurement system containing sensorized garments and textile-enabled non-invasive instrumentation. This work describes the multiparametric sensorized garments and measurement instrumentation implemented in the first phase of the project required to evaluate physiological indicators and recording candidates that can be useful for detection of mental stress. For such purpose different sensorized garments have been constructed: a textrode chest-strap system with six repositionable textrodes, a sensorized glove and an upper-arm strap. The implemented textile-enabled instrumentation contains one skin galvanometer, two temperature sensors for skin and environmental temperature and an impedance pneumographer containing a 1-channel ECG amplifier to record cardiogenic biopotentials. With such combinations of garments and non-invasive measurement devices, a multiparametric wearable measurement system has been implemented able to record the following physiological parameters: heart and respiration rate, skin galvanic response, environmental and peripheral temperature. To ensure the proper functioning of the

  10. Effects and biological limitations of +Gz acceleration on the autonomic functions-related circulation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Satoshi; Shouji, Ichiro; Kemuriyama, Takehito; Tashiro, Akimasa; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Hagisawa, Kohsue; Hiruma, Megumi; Yokoe, Hidetake

    2016-11-01

    The effects of gravitational loading (G load) on humans have been studied ever since the early 20th century. After the dangers of G load in the vertical head-to-leg direction (+Gz load) became evident, many animal experiments were performed between 1920 and 1945 in an effort to identify the origins of high G-force-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC), which led to development of the anti-G suit. The establishment of norms and training for G-LOC prevention resulted in a gradual decline in reports of animal experiments on G load, a decline that steepened with the establishment of anti-G techniques in humans, such as special breathing methods and skeletal muscle contraction, called an anti-G straining maneuver, which are voluntary physiological functions. Because the issue involves humans during flight, the effects on humans themselves are clearly of great importance, but ethical considerations largely preclude any research on the human body that probes to any depth the endogenous physiological states and functions. The decline in reports on animal experiments may therefore signify a general decline in research into the changes seen in the various involuntary, autonomic functions. The declining number of related reports on investigations of physiological autonomic systems other than the circulatory system seems to bear this out. In this review, we therefore describe our findings on the effects of G load on the autonomic nervous system, cardiac function, cerebral blood flow, tissue oxygen level, and other physiological autonomic functions as measured in animal experiments, including denervation or pharmacological blocking, in an effort to present the limits and the mechanisms of G-load response extending physiologically. We demonstrate previously unrecognized risks due to G load, and also describe fundamental research aimed at countering these effects and development of a scientific training measure devised for actively enhancing +Gz tolerance in involuntary

  11. Validation of a questionnaire measuring the regulation of autonomic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthes H

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To broaden the range of outcomes that we can measure for patients undergoing treatment for oncological and other chronic conditions, we aimed to validate a questionnaire measuring self-reported autonomic regulation (aR, i.e. to characterise a subject's autonomic functioning by questions on sleeping and waking, vertigo, morningness-eveningness, thermoregulation, perspiration, bowel movements and digestion. Methods We administered the questionnaire to 440 participants (♀: N = 316, ♂: N = 124: 95 patients with breast cancer, 49 with colorectal cancer, 60 with diabetes mellitus, 39 with coronary heart disease, 28 with rheumatological conditions, 32 with Hashimoto's disease, 22 with multiple morbidities and 115 healthy people. We administered the questionnaire a second time to 50.2% of the participants. External convergence criteria included the German version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D, a short questionnaire on morningness-eveningness, the Herdecke Quality of Life Questionnaire (HLQ and a short version questionnaire on self-regulation. Results A principal component analysis yielded a three dimensional 18-item inventory of aR. The subscales orthostatic-circulatory, rest/activity and digestive regulation had internal consistency (Cronbach-α: rα = 0.65 – 0.75 and test-retest reliability (rrt = 0.70 – 85. AR was negatively associated with anxiety, depression, and dysmenorrhoea but positively correlated to HLQ, self-regulation and in part to morningness (except digestive aR (0.49 – 0.13, all p Conclusion An internal validation of the long-version scale of aR yielded consistent relationships with health versus illness, quality of life and personality. Further studies are required to clarify the issues of external validity, clinical and physiological relevance.

  12. Assessment of autonomic function after acute spinal cord injury using heart rate variability analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmqvist, L; Biering-Sørensen, T; Bartholdy, K;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in severe dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system. C1-C8 SCI affects the supraspinal control to the heart, T1-T5 SCI affects the spinal sympathetic outflow to the heart, and T6-T12 SCI leaves sympathetic control to the heart intact. Heart rate...... variability (HRV) analysis can serve as a surrogate measure of autonomic regulation. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in HRV patterns and alterations in patients with acute traumatic SCI. METHODS: As soon as possible after SCI patients who met the inclusion criteria had 24 h Holter monitoring...

  13. Pathogenesis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in girls - a double neuro-osseous theory involving disharmony between two nervous systems, somatic and autonomic expressed in the spine and trunk: possible dependency on sympathetic nervous system and hormones with implications for medical therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulton Alan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Anthropometric data from three groups of adolescent girls - preoperative adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS, screened for scoliosis and normals were analysed by comparing skeletal data between higher and lower body mass index subsets. Unexpected findings for each of skeletal maturation, asymmetries and overgrowth are not explained by prevailing theories of AIS pathogenesis. A speculative pathogenetic theory for girls is formulated after surveying evidence including: (1 the thoracospinal concept for right thoracic AIS in girls; (2 the new neuroskeletal biology relating the sympathetic nervous system to bone formation/resorption and bone growth; (3 white adipose tissue storing triglycerides and the adiposity hormone leptin which functions as satiety hormone and sentinel of energy balance to the hypothalamus for long-term adiposity; and (4 central leptin resistance in obesity and possibly in healthy females. The new theory states that AIS in girls results from developmental disharmony expressed in spine and trunk between autonomic and somatic nervous systems. The autonomic component of this double neuro-osseous theory for AIS pathogenesis in girls involves selectively increased sensitivity of the hypothalamus to circulating leptin (genetically-determined up-regulation possibly involving inhibitory or sensitizing intracellular molecules, such as SOC3, PTP-1B and SH2B1 respectively, with asymmetry as an adverse response (hormesis; this asymmetry is routed bilaterally via the sympathetic nervous system to the growing axial skeleton where it may initiate the scoliosis deformity (leptin-hypothalamic-sympathetic nervous system concept = LHS concept. In some younger preoperative AIS girls, the hypothalamic up-regulation to circulating leptin also involves the somatotropic (growth hormone/IGF axis which exaggerates the sympathetically-induced asymmetric skeletal effects and contributes to curve progression, a concept with therapeutic

  14. Restoring nervous system structure and function using tissue engineered living scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Struzyna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural tissue engineering is premised on the integration of engineered living tissue with the host nervous system to directly restore lost function or to augment regenerative capacity following nervous system injury or neurodegenerative disease. Disconnection of axon pathways - the long-distance fibers connecting specialized regions of the central nervous system or relaying peripheral signals - is a common feature of many neurological disorders and injury. However, functional axonal regeneration rarely occurs due to extreme distances to targets, absence of directed guidance, and the presence of inhibitory factors in the central nervous system, resulting in devastating effects on cognitive and sensorimotor function. To address this need, we are pursuing multiple strategies using tissue engineered "living scaffolds", which are preformed three-dimensional constructs consisting of living neural cells in a defined, often anisotropic architecture. Living scaffolds are designed to restore function by serving as a living labeled pathway for targeted axonal regeneration - mimicking key developmental mechanisms- or by restoring lost neural circuitry via direct replacement of neurons and axonal tracts. We are currently utilizing preformed living scaffolds consisting of neuronal clusters spanned by long axonal tracts as regenerative bridges to facilitate long-distance axonal regeneration and for targeted neurosurgical reconstruction of local circuits in the brain. Although there are formidable challenges in preclinical and clinical advancement, these living tissue engineered constructs represent a promising strategy to facilitate nervous system repair and functional recovery.

  15. Restoring nervous system structure and function using tissue engineered living scaffolds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laura A Struzyna; James P Harris; Kritika S Katiyar; H Isaac Chen; D KacyCullen

    2015-01-01

    Neural tissue engineering is premised on the integration of engineered living tissue with the host nervous system to directly restore lost function or to augment regenerative capacity following ner-vous system injury or neurodegenerative disease. Disconnection of axon pathways – the long-distance ifbers connecting specialized regions of the central nervous system or relaying peripheral signals – is a common feature of many neurological disorders and injury. However, functional axonal regenera-tion rarely occurs due to extreme distances to targets, absence of directed guidance, and the presence of inhibitory factors in the central nervous system, resulting in devastating effects on cognitive and sensorimotor function. To address this need, we are pursuing multiple strategies using tissue engi-neered “living scaffolds”, which are preformed three-dimensional constructs consisting of living neural cells in a deifned, often anisotropic architecture. Living scaffolds are designed to restore function by serving as a living labeled pathway for targeted axonal regeneration – mimicking key developmental mechanisms– or by restoring lost neural circuitry via direct replacement of neurons and axonal tracts. We are currently utilizing preformed living scaffolds consisting of neuronal clusters spanned by long axonal tracts as regenerative bridges to facilitate long-distance axonal regeneration and for targeted neurosurgical reconstruction of local circuits in the brain. Although there are formidable challenges in preclinical and clinical advancement, these living tissue engineered constructs represent a promising strategy to facilitate nervous system repair and functional recovery.

  16. Muscle fibers in the central nervous system of nemerteans: spatial organization and functional role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A A; Zaitseva, O V

    2012-08-01

    The system of muscle fibers associated with the brain and lateral nerve cords is present in all major groups of enoplan nemerteans. Unfortunately, very little is known about the functional role and spatial arrangement of these muscles of the central nervous system. This article examines the architecture of the musculature of the central nervous system in two species of monostiliferous nemerteans (Emplectonema gracile and Tetrastemma cf. candidum) using phalloidin staining and confocal microscopy. The article also briefly discusses the body-wall musculature and the muscles of the cephalic region. In both species, the lateral nerve cords possess two pairs of cardinal muscles that run the length of the nerve cords and pass through the ventral cerebral ganglia. A system of peripheral muscles forms a meshwork around the lateral nerve cords in E. gracile. The actin-rich processes that ramify within the nerve cords in E. gracile (transverse fibers) might represent a separate population of glia-like cells or sarcoplasmic projections of the peripheral muscles of the central nervous system. The lateral nerve cords in T. cf. candidum lack peripheral muscles but have muscles similar in their position and orientation to the transverse fibers. The musculature of the central nervous system is hypothesized to function as a support system for the lateral nerve cords and brain, preventing rupturing and herniation of the nervous tissue during locomotion. The occurrence of muscles of the central nervous system in nemerteans and other groups and their possible relevance in taxonomy are discussed.

  17. [Characteristics of the acute phase reaction in humans with various types of autonomic nervous system regulation during simulated hyperthermia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannikov, A V; Dorofeĭkov, V V; Freĭdlin, T S; Freĭdlin, I S; Shustov, E B; Shcherbak, I G; Iastrebov, D Iu

    2000-01-01

    Depending on the type of autonomous regulation, differences in basic levels of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) were revealed under conditions of hyperthermia in healthy subjects aged 19-21. A parasympathetic type of autonomous regulation corresponded to higher initial levels of proinflammatory cytokinesis, whereas a dominating sympathetic type corresponded to lower levels of the IL-1 beta and TNF alpha. The subjects with the latter type of regulation revealed an increase in the IL-1 beta TNF alpha combined with a higher heat tolerance. The subjects with the former type of regulation revealed a lower heat tolerance. The increase in the alpha2-macroglobulin appeared to be a most typical acute phase response of the human body to hyperthermia.

  18. 心电图对功能性心血管疾病自主神经功能评价的意义%Significance of electrocardiogram in the evaluation of the autonomic nerve function in functional cardiovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽萍; 王成

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic nervous system(ANS) activity plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease,including organic cardiovascular disease(such as hypertension,coronary artery disease,etc) and functional cardiovascular disease (such as vasovagal syncope,postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome,etc).Many methods was used to evaluate ANS function.Heart rate variability is a widely accepted method to assess cardiac autonomic nerve function.Autonomic nervous affected cardiac action potential and let electrocardiogram changes.Through the sympathetic and parasympathetic neurotransmitters which acting on the corresponding receptors.Electrocardiogram changes reflects autonomic nervous function.Present researches suggest that electrocardiogram has an important significance in the evaluation of autonomic nerve function in functional cardiovascular disease.%自主神经系统对心血管疾病的发生发展起重要调节作用,包括器质性心血管疾病(如高血压、冠状动脉粥样硬化性心脏病等)及功能性心血管疾病(如血管迷走性晕厥、体位性心动过速综合征等).评估自主神经功能的方法有很多,心率变异性分析是公认的评估心脏自主神经功能的方法.自主神经系统通过交感神经和副交感神经作用于相应受体,影响心肌动作电位导致心电图变化.因此,心电图能反映心脏自主神经功能变化,对功能性心血管疾病的自主神经功能评估具有重要意义.

  19. TSH RECEPTOR GENETIC ALTERATIONS IN THE AUTONOMOUSLY FUNCTIONING THYROID ADENOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施秉银; 李雪萍; 李社莉; 薛明战; 王毅; 徐莉

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between TSH receptor gene mutations and autonomously functioning thyroid adenomas (AFTAs). Methods The thyroid samples from 14 cases of diagnosed AFTAs were analyzed, with normal thyroid specimens adjacent to the tumors as controls. The 155 base pairs DNA fragments which encompassed the third cytoplasmic loop and the sixth transmembrane segments in the TSH receptor gene exon 10 were amplified by Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and analyzed by the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Direct sequencing of the PCR products was performed with Prism Dye Terminator Cycle Sequencing Core Kit. Results 6 of 14 AFTA specimens displayed abnormal migration in SSCP analysis. In sequence analysis of 3 abnormally migrated samples, one base substitution at nucleotide 1957 (A to C) and two same insertion mutations of one adenosine nucleotide between nucleotide 1972 and 1973 were identified. No mutations were found in controls. Conclusion This study confirmed the presence of TSH receptor gene mutations in AFTAs; both one-point substitution mutation and one-base insertion mutation were found to be responsible for the pathogenesis of AFTAs.

  20. 24-Hour motor activity and autonomic cardiac functioning in major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Volkers (Anita)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe studies of this thesis concern the spontaneous pattern of motor activity and autonomic cardiac functioning in major depressive disorder. The main purpose of the studies was to obtain insight in the psychomotor and autonomic cardiac dysfunction in depression by investigating the 24-ho

  1. 自主神经系统在心房颤动中的作用和联系%Interrelationships between the Autonomic Nervous System and Atrial Fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张培德

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is common in clinic.Mechanisms responsible for atrial fibrillation are not completely understood ,among various mechanisms, the autonomic nervous system is a potentially potent modulator of the initiation, maintenance, termination and ventricular rate deter- I mination of atrial fibrillation. Complex interactions exist between the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems on the central, ganglionic, peripheral, tissue, cellular and subcellular levels that could be responsible for alterations in conduction and refractoriness properties of the heart ,the more important is that autonomic nervous which distribute in heart may change arythmia and influnte the presence and type of triggeredactivity, all of which could arouse and maintain atrial fibrillation, this artical reviews the roles and interrelationship of automomic nerve system in atrial fibrillation.%心房颤动(房颤)在临床上极为常见,目前心房颤动的机制尚未阐明,其中自主神经系统在房颤的发生、维持、终止和决定室性心律上是一个潜在的强大的调节因素.存在于中枢、神经节、外周组织、细胞和亚细胞水平的交感和副交感系统的复杂相互作用都能够改变心脏的传导性和不应期,较为重要的是分布于心脏的自主神经的调节作用能引起心房节律的改变以及影响触发活动的产生和类型,所有这些变化都能引发和维持房颤.本文就心脏自主神经系统在房颤发生发展过程中的可能的作用机制及相互联系作一综述,为基础研究和临床实践中对房颤的机制研究和治疗提供参考依据和理论基础.

  2. 体位改变对Beagle犬心脏自主神经控制的影响%Effect of Postural Changes on Autonomic Nervous Control of Heart in Beagle Dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘永明; 陈亮; 何欢; 徐孝平; 陈民利

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to observe the effect of postural changes on autonomic nervous control of heart in Beagle dogs. Methods Electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded in static posture (lying, standing, sitting and hanging) and moving posture (walking) from conscious and unrestrained female Beagle dogs using a non-invasive telemetry system, and the autonomic nervous function was investigated by power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). Results In static postures, the RR interval, SDNN, RMSSD, pNNabs (50) , total power (TP) , very low frequency ( VLF) power and normalized high frequency ( HF) power were significantly higher than those in moving posture (P < 0. 05 , P < 0. 01) , while the heart rate, normalized LF and the LF to HF ratio were significantly lowered (P < 0.05, P < 0. 01). Conclusions The parasympathetic nervous activity is dominant in static state of different postures, while sympathetic nervous activity is dominant in moving state. Postural changes can influence the heart rate and inevitably affect the cardiac autonomic nervous control. It depends on the intensity of the vagus nerve activity, and leads to the disturbance of LF/HF balance.%目的 观察体位改变对Beagle犬心脏自主神经控制的影响.方法 利用大动物无创生理遥测技术,监测清醒活动状态下雌性Beagle犬在静态姿势(lying、standing、sitting、hanging)和运动(walking)姿势下的心电图(ECG),并用HRV功率谱分析其自主神经功能.结果 在静态姿势下,Beagle犬RR间期(RRI)、RR间期的标准差SDNN(SDNN)、相邻RR间期差值平方和的均方根RMSSD(RMSSD)、相邻R-R间期差值>50 ms的窦性个数占心搏总数的百分比pNNabs (50)( pNNabs (50))、TP总功率(TP)、VLF极低频功率(VLF)、标准化高频功率(HFnorm)均明显高于运动状态(P <0.05,P<0.01),而心率(HR)、标准化低频功率(LFnorm)和低频功率/高频功率(LF/HF)平衡指数则明显低于运动状态(P<0.05,P<0.01).

  3. Features of the autonomic nervous system in elderly patients with paratraumatic eczema with concomitant varicosis and arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mohammadamin Ahmad Baninaser

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Relevance. In elderly and senile age there are changes in the neuroendocrine regulation in the body. Aim. In order to determine the status of cardiac activity autonomic regulation in elderly and old age patients with paratraumatic eczema 25 patients with paratraumatic eczema on the background of varicose symptom complex and hypertension aged 60-74 years, 25 patients with paratraumatic eczema on the background of varicose symptom. complex and hypertension aged 75-89 years, 15 patients with paratraumatic eczema on the background of varicose veins, but no concomitant hypertension and 15 patients aged 20-35 years were studied. Methods and results. Significant decrease in HRV fluctuations has been established, especially in the high frequency HF, describing parasympathetic influence on the heart. Statistically significant difference (p<0.05 among patients with varicose eczema on the background of hypertension was established as compared with older patients (60-74 years and patients without hypertension: 311.61±95 ms² (р<0.001, 544.7±131 ms² (р<0.01 and 662.9±127 ms² (р<0.01, respectively. Conclusion. These data indicate that the state of cardiac autonomic regulation of patients with paratraumatic eczema directly correlates with the age and the presence of comorbidity (chronic venous failure and hypertension.

  4. Discrimination of the Healthy and Sick Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System by a New Wavelet Analysis of Heartbeat Intervals

    CERN Document Server

    Ashkenazy, Yu; Levitan, J; Moelgaard, H; Bloch-Thomsen, P E; Saermark, K

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to distinguish with a complete certainty between healthy subjects and patients with various dysfunctions of the cardiac nervous system by way of multiresolutional wavelet transform of RR intervals. We repeated the study of Thurner et al on different ensemble of subjects. We show that reconstructed series using a filter which discards wavelet coefficients related with higher scales enables one to classify individuals for which the method otherwise is inconclusive. We suggest a delimiting diagnostic value of the standard deviation of the filtered, reconstructed RR interval time series in the range of $\\sim 0.035$ (for the above mentioned filter), below which individuals are at risk.

  5. Does Virtual Reality-based Kinect Dance Training Paradigm Improve Autonomic Nervous System Modulation in Individuals with Chronic Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Subramaniam, Savitha; Arena, Ross; Bhatt, Tanvi

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity and low resting heart rate variability (HRV) are associated with an increased cardiovascular deconditioning, risk of secondary stroke and mortality. Aerobic dance is a multidimensional physical activity and recent research supports its application as a valid alternative cardiovascular training. Furthermore, technological advances have facilitated the emergence of new approaches for exercise training holding promise, especially those methods that integrate rehabilitation with virtual gaming. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate cardiac autonomic modulation in individuals with chronic stroke post-training using a virtual reality – based aerobic dance training paradigm. Methods Eleven community-dwelling individuals with hemiparetic stroke [61.7( ± 4.3) years] received a virtual reality-based dance paradigm for 6 weeks using the commercially available Kinect dance video game “Just Dance 3.” The training was delivered in a high-intensity tapering method with the first two weeks consisting of 5 sessions/week, next two weeks of 3 sessions/week and last two weeks of 2 sessions/week, with a total of 20 sessions. Data obtained for HRV analysis pre- and post-intervention consists of HRV for ten minutes in (1) supine resting position; (2) quiet standing. High-frequency (HF) power measures as indicators of cardiac parasympathetic activity, low-frequency (LF) power of parasympathetic-sympathetic balance and LF/HF of sympatho-vagal balance were calculated. YMCA submaximal cycle Ergometer test was used to acquire VO2 max pre- and post-intervention. Changes in physical activity during dance training were assessed using Omran HJ-321 Tri-Axis Pedometer. Results After training, participants demonstrated a significant improvement in autonomic modulation in the supine position, indicating an improvement in LF=48.4 ( ± 20.1) to 40.3 ( ± 8.0), p=0.03; HF=51.5 ( ± 19) to 59.7 ( ± 8), p= 0.02 and LF/HF=1.6 ( ± 1.9) to 0.8 ( ± 0

  6. [Effect of barnidipine hydrochloride on the autonomic nervous system: difference between short- and long-acting components of calcium antagonist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejima, K; Akaishi, M; Oyamada, K; Mitamura, H; Ogawa, S

    1997-07-01

    Short-acting calcium antagonists have a deleterious effect on the prognosis for patients with myocardial ischemia, possibly caused by overactivation of sympathetic nerves due to vasodilatation, negative inotropism, or coronary steal. However, there is considerable debate about whether long-acting calcium antagonists as well as the short-acting calcium antagonists have the same effect. Barnidipine-HCl is a newly-developed calcium antagonist with 1:2 short- and long-acting particles. This study evaluated the changes of autonomic tone due to barnidipine. Both the short- and long-acting effect of the calcium antagonist was evaluated. Eleven patients with primary hypertension underwent 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiogram and blood pressure monitoring before and after the treatment with barnidipine. Heart rate and blood pressure were compared before and after the medication. Heart rate variability was analyzed with a Marquette 8000/T. High frequency power (HF), as a parameter of vagal tone, and the ratio to low frequency power (LF), as a parameter of sympathetic tone, were obtained. Twenty-four-hour average blood pressure decreased significantly during the day, but nocturnal hypotension was not observed. Heart rate did not increase. HF decreased at the peak of the short- and long-acting components. LF/HF increased at the peak of the short-acting component. Short-acting particles of barnidipine had a deleterious effect on the autonomic tone, that is overactivation of sympathetic tone and suppression of vagal tone. Long-acting particles of barnidipine suppressed the vagal tone. These findings suggest that short-acting calcium antagonists may cause arrhythmia or deterioration of coronary ischemia.

  7. Microglia - insights into immune system structure, function, and reactivity in the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirenfeldt, Martin; Babcock, Alicia A; Vinters, Harry V

    2011-01-01

    Microglia are essential cellular components of a well-functioning central nervous system (CNS). The development and establishment of the microglial population differs from the other major cell populations in the CNS i.e. neurons and macroglia (astrocytes and oligodendrocytes). This different...

  8. Autonomic dysfunction in diabetes : a consequence of cardiovascular damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefrandt, J D; Smit, A J; Zeebregts, C J; Gans, R O B; Hoogenberg, K H

    2010-01-01

    In 1976, D.J. Ewing showed a clear survival disadvantage for diabetic patients that had 'diabetic autonomic neuropathy', as assessed by heart rate and blood pressure variations during a battery of bedside tests. However, these variations do not solely depend on autonomic nervous system function, but

  9. The parasympathetic nervous system as a regulator of mast cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Often considered as the archetype of neuroimmune communication, much of our understanding of the bidirectional relationship between the nervous and immune systems has come from the study of mast cell-nerve interaction. Mast cells play a role in resistance to infection and are extensively involved in inflammation and subsequent tissue repair. Thus, the relationship between mast cells and neurons enables the involvement of peripheral and central nervous systems in the regulation of host defense mechanisms and inflammation. Recently, with the identification of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, there has been increased interest in the role of the parasympathetic nervous system in regulating immune responses. Classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides released from cholinergic and inhibitory NANC neurons can modulate mast cell activity, and there is good evidence for the existence of parasympathetic nerve-mast cell functional units in the skin, lung, and intestine that have the potential to regulate a range of physiological processes.

  10. Central and peripheral nervous system functions are independently disturbed in HIV-1 infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Giesen, Hans-Jürgen; Köller, Hubertus; Hefter, Harald; Arendt, Gabriele

    2002-06-01

    We examined the peripheral nervous system (PNS) (nerve conduction velocity (NCV)) and the central nervous system (CNS) (basal ganglia-mediated psychomotor speed) in 93 males seropositive for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with no prior history of opportunistic brain disease, antiretroviral treatment or intravenous drug use. Patients with different degrees of slowing of peroneal and sural NCV showed no significant differences in psychomotor speed as assessed by tremor peak frequency, most rapid alternating movements, reaction times and contraction times. There was no significant correlation between psychomotor measures and NCV. Psychomotor slowing test findings were independent from peripheral nervous system damage indicating uncorrelated disturbances of CNS and PNS function in HIV-1 infection. Differences in HIV-1 viral quasispecies or host responses may determine the predominance of CNS or PNS injury.

  11. International standards to document remaining autonomic function after spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krassioukov, Andrei; Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Donovan, William

    2012-01-01

    the ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS), which documents the neurological examination of individuals with SCI. The Autonomic Standards Assessment Form is recommended to be completed during the evaluation of individuals with SCI, but is not a part of the ISNCSCI. A web-based training course (Autonomic Standards......This is the first guideline describing the International Standards to document remaining Autonomic Function after Spinal Cord Injury (ISAFSCI). This guideline should be used as an adjunct to the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) including...... Training E Program (ASTeP)) is available to assist clinicians with understanding autonomic dysfunctions following SCI and with completion of the Autonomic Standards Assessment Form (www.ASIAlearningcenter.com)....

  12. Regulating Rac in the nervous system: molecular function and disease implication of Rac GEFs and GAPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yanyang; Xiang, Xiaoliang; Liang, Chunmei; Shi, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Rho family GTPases, including RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 as the most studied members, are master regulators of actin cytoskeletal organization. Rho GTPases control various aspects of the nervous system and are associated with a number of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. The activity of Rho GTPases is controlled by two families of regulators, guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) as the activators and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) as the inhibitors. Through coordinated regulation by GEFs and GAPs, Rho GTPases act as converging signaling molecules that convey different upstream signals in the nervous system. So far, more than 70 members of either GEFs or GAPs of Rho GTPases have been identified in mammals, but only a small subset of them have well-known functions. Thus, characterization of important GEFs and GAPs in the nervous system is crucial for the understanding of spatiotemporal dynamics of Rho GTPase activity in different neuronal functions. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of GEFs and GAPs for Rac1, with emphasis on the molecular function and disease implication of these regulators in the nervous system.

  13. ASSESSMENT OF CARDIOVASCULAR AUTONOMIC FUNCTION IN ASYMPTOMATIC OBESE YOUNG ADULTS - PREVENTION IS BETTER THAN CURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Vijetha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Back ground: Obesity is emerging global epidemic in young adults who form the productive group of the society. This has been called as new world syndrome and is a massive reflection of social, economic and cultural problems currently faced by the developing and developed countries. As cardiac autonomic dysfunction often coexists with obesity, early detection of autonomic impairment by simple investigations of autonomic function, can be potentially important to prevent future complications. Objective: To identify cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in asymptomatic obese young adults. Study design: This study was conducted in the department of Physiology at Kakatiya Medical College, Warangal, A.P, 30 apparently healthy obese subjects of both sex with BMI > 25 kg/sqm were taken as study group. Age and sex matched 30 normal weight subjects (BMI 18.5-22.9 kg/ sqm taken as control group. Methods: Ewing’s battery of 5 noninvasive cardiovascular reflex tests were done for assessing autonomic function. These autonomic function parameters were correlated with BMI, Unpaired Student‘t’ test and Pearson correlation coefficient test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Mean values of all cardiovascular reflex tests were significantly lower in the study group. Conclusion: The results indicate that cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is present in otherwise healthy obese young adults.

  14. Effects of music therapy on autonomic nervous system activity, incidence of heart failure events, and plasma cytokine and catecholamine levels in elderly patients with cerebrovascular disease and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kaoru; Kurita, Akira; Takase, Bonpei; Otsuka, Toshiaki; Kodani, Eitaro; Kusama, Yoshiki; Atarashi, Hirotsugu; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2009-01-01

    Music therapy (MT) has been used in geriatric nursing hospitals, but there has been no extensive research into whether it actually has beneficial effects on elderly patients with cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and dementia. We investigated the effects of MT on the autonomic nervous system and plasma cytokine and catecholamine levels in elderly patients with CVD and dementia, since these are related to aging and chronic geriatric disease. We also investigated the effects of MT on congestive heart failure (CHF) events.Eighty-seven patients with pre-existing CVD were enrolled in the study. We assigned patients into an MT group (n = 55) and non-MT group (n = 32). The MT group received MT at least once per week for 45 minutes over 10 times. Cardiac autonomic activity was assessed by heart rate variability (HRV). We measured plasma cytokine and catecholamine levels in both the MT group and non-MT group. We compared the incidence of CHF events between these two groups. In the MT group, rMSSD, pNN50, and HF were significantly increased by MT, whereas LF/HF was slightly decreased. In the non-MT group, there were no significant changes in any HRV parameters. Among cytokines, plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the MT group was significantly lower than those in the non-MT group. Plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline levels were significantly lower in the MT group than in the non-MT group. CHF events were less frequent in the MT group than in the non-MT group (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that MT enhanced parasympathetic activities and decreased CHF by reducing plasma cytokine and catecholamine levels.

  15. Renal denervation in an animal model of diabetes and hypertension: Impact on the autonomic nervous system and nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Ubiratan F

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of renal denervation on cardiovascular reflexes and markers of nephropathy in diabetic-hypertensive rats have not yet been explored. Methods Aim: To evaluate the effects of renal denervation on nephropathy development mechanisms (blood pressure, cardiovascular autonomic changes, renal GLUT2 in diabetic-hypertensive rats. Forty-one male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR ~250 g were injected with STZ or not; 30 days later, surgical renal denervation (RD or sham procedure was performed; 15 days later, glycemia and albuminuria (ELISA were evaluated. Catheters were implanted into the femoral artery to evaluate arterial pressure (AP and heart rate variability (spectral analysis one day later in conscious animals. Animals were killed, kidneys removed, and cortical renal GLUT2 quantified (Western blotting. Results Higher glycemia (p vs. nondiabetics (p vs. SHR. Conclusions Renal denervation in diabetic-hypertensive rats improved previously reduced heart rate variability. The GLUT2 equally overexpressed by diabetes and renal denervation may represent a maximal derangement effect of each condition.

  16. Role of the autonomic nervous system and neuropeptides in the development of obesity in humans: targets for therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Jerry R; Campbell, Lesley V

    2008-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes have reached epidemic proportions worldwide. These metabolic disorders, particularly obesity, are characterised by increased basal sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity but an impaired sympathetic response to certain stimuli, such as insulin. Although targeting the SNS may seem an attractive avenue for the pharmacological prevention and treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders, it remains unknown whether changes in SNS tone are primary and contribute to the development of these metabolic conditions or whether they develop secondary to the obese state. This question can be answered by the study of insulin-resistant individuals prior to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using this model, it has been shown that early insulin resistance is associated with increased SNS activity in genetically-predisposed humans. It has been suggested that in insulin-resistant states, hyperinsulinaemia is the initiating factor that increases sympathetic neural activity. Over time, adrenoreceptor down-regulation and/or reduced sensitivity are likely to develop, resulting in reduced sympathetic responsiveness. In the postprandial state, this will lead to impaired diet-induced thermogenesis and post-prandial fat oxidation, promoting the accumulation of body fat. More recent evidence demonstrates that stress-induced SNS overactivity up-regulates Neuropeptide Y, an orexigenic hormone, and its Y2 receptor, in visceral adipose tissue, the fat depot most strongly linked to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. There is evidence that SNS overactivity specifically contributes to the development of abdominal obesity via this pathway, which could represent a novel target for the prevention and treatment of abdominal obesity and related metabolic consequences.

  17. The role of autonomic function on sport performance in athletes with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krassioukov, Andrei; West, Christopher

    2014-08-01

    Devastating paralysis, autonomic dysfunction, and abnormal cardiovascular control present significant hemodynamic challenges to individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI), especially during exercise. In general, resting arterial pressure after SCI is lower than with able-bodied individuals and is commonly associated with persistent orthostatic intolerance along with transient episodes of life-threatening hypertension, known as "autonomic dysreflexia." During exercise, the loss of central and reflexive cardiovascular control attenuates maximal heart rate and impairs blood pressure regulation and blood redistribution, which ultimately reduces venous return, stroke volume, and cardiac output. Thermoregulation also is severely compromised in high-lesion SCI, a problem that is compounded when competing in hot and humid conditions. There is some evidence that enhancing venous return via lower body positive pressure or abdominal binding improves exercise performance, as do cooling strategies. Athletes with SCI also have been documented to self-induce autonomic dysreflexia before competition with a view of increasing blood pressure and improving their performance, a technique known as "boosting." For health safety reasons, boosting is officially banned by the International Paralympics Committee. This article addresses the complex issue of how the autonomic nervous system affects sports performance in athletes with SCI, with a specific focus on the potential debilitating effects of deranged cardiovascular control.

  18. Cardiac biopotentials influence on central nervous system functioning: first steps in hypothesis verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondal'skaya Yu.O.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to verify the hypothesis on influence of cardiac biopotentials on central nervous system. Materials: 20 healthy individuals aged 18-26 years old have been participated in the investigations. Two groups composed of 10 patients each have been formed. Double increase in heart biopotentials by means of artificial impulse insertion between natural cardiac contractions has been modeled. Artificial impulses have been similar to unaffected ones, produced in a normal heart work. Additional impulses have been generated using external pacemaker and have been linked up with electrodes on the chest. They have been synchronized with the heart rhythm and located in-between R waves. The duration of those impulses has been fully matched to ventricular complex. Their amplitude has been adjusted individually depending on the height of R wave. Nervous system mobility has been used as the indicator reflecting the central nervous system functioning. Degree of mobility has been defined on the basis of tapping test results. The test has been repeated at specific intervals. Groups have been exposed to two adverse testing modes. Additional impulses have been conducted to the patients of group I within an hour over a period of the first and the third 15-minute intervals and to the patients of group II over a period of the second and the fourth 15-minute intervals. In the middle and in the end of each time interval tapping test has been carried out. After preliminary analysis two other modes of stimulation have been tested. The stimulation has been performed within the 40-minute course: over a period of the first 20-minute interval and vice versa. Results: Detailed evaluation has revealed that short-time increase of nervous processes has been checked in combination with decrease in their stability. Conclusion: The data obtained have shown that there is possible influence on central nervous system functioning. The article ends with prospects of further

  19. Does Acupuncture Alter Pain-related Functional Connectivity of the Central Nervous System? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal Santiago, María; Tumilty, Steve; Mącznik, Aleksandra; Mani, Ramakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Acupuncture has been studied for several decades to establish evidence-based clinical practice. This systematic review aims to evaluate evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in influencing the functional connectivity of the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain. A systematic search of the literature was conducted to identify studies in which the central response of acupuncture in patients with musculoskeletal pain was evaluated by neuroimaging techniques. Databases searched were AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PEDro, Pubmed, SCOPUS, SPORTDiscuss, and Web of Science. Included studies were assessed by two independent reviewers for their methodological quality by using the Downs and Black questionnaire and for their levels of completeness and transparency in reporting acupuncture interventions by using Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) criteria. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Three studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and four studies were nonrandomized controlled trials (NRCTs). The neuroimaging techniques used were functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Positive effects on the functional connectivity of the central nervous system more consistently occurred during long-term acupuncture treatment. The results were heterogeneous from a descriptive perspective; however, the key findings support acupuncture's ability to alter pain-related functional connectivity in the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain.

  20. Baroreflex Sensitivity And Autonomic Nervous System Function In Carotid Sinus Hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise Schouborg; Pors, Kirsten; Theibel, Ann Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Syncope in the elderly may be caused by an apparent hypersensitivity in the high pressure baroreflex control of heart rate and blood pressure - carotid sinus hypersensitivity. Previous studies have found ambiguous results regarding the baroreceptor sensitivity in patients with carotid sinus hyper...... sensitivity may not follow the same neuronal pathways as those responding to the crude external pressures applied during carotid sinus massage...

  1. Autonomic dysfunction in early breast cancer: Incidence, clinical importance, and underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakoski, Susan G; Jones, Lee W; Krone, Ronald J; Stein, Phyllis K; Scott, Jessica M

    2015-08-01

    Autonomic dysfunction represents a loss of normal autonomic control of the cardiovascular system associated with both sympathetic nervous system overdrive and reduced efficacy of the parasympathetic nervous system. Autonomic dysfunction is a strong predictor of future coronary heart disease, vascular disease, and sudden cardiac death. In the current review, we will discuss the clinical importance of autonomic dysfunction as a cardiovascular risk marker among breast cancer patients. We will review the effects of antineoplastic therapy on autonomic function, as well as discuss secondary exposures, such as psychological stress, sleep disturbances, weight gain/metabolic derangements, and loss of cardiorespiratory fitness, which may negatively impact autonomic function in breast cancer patients. Lastly, we review potential strategies to improve autonomic function in this population. The perspective can help guide new therapeutic interventions to promote longevity and cardiovascular health among breast cancer survivors.

  2. A review of nanoparticle functionality and toxicity on the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Z.; Z. W. Liu; Allaker, R P; Reip, P.; Oxford, J; Ahmad, Z.; Ren, G.

    2010-01-01

    Although nanoparticles have tremendous potential for a host of applications, their adverse effects on living cells have raised serious concerns recently for their use in the healthcare and consumer sectors. As regards the central nervous system (CNS), research data on nanoparticle interaction with neurons has provided evidence of both negative and positive effects. Maximal application dosage of nanoparticles in materials to provide applications such as antibacterial and antiviral functions is...

  3. Functional Analysis of Actin-Binding Proteins in the Central Nervous System of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qi; Roblodowski, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Using Drosophila actin-binding protein Dunc-115 as model system, this chapter describes a MARCM (mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker)-based method for analyzing cytoskeletal components for their functions in the nervous system. Following a concise description about the principle, a step-by-step protocol is provided for generating the needed stocks and for histological analysis. Additional details and explanations have been given in the accompanying notes. Together, this should form a practical and sufficient recipe for performing at the single-cell-level loss-of-function and gain-of-function analyses of proteins associated with the cytoskeleton.

  4. Zebrafish model of tuberous sclerosis complex reveals cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous functions of mutant tuberin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Hyung Kim

    2011-03-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in either the TSC1 (encodes hamartin or TSC2 (encodes tuberin genes. Patients with TSC have hamartomas in various organs throughout the whole body, most notably in the brain, skin, eye, heart, kidney and lung. To study the development of hamartomas, we generated a zebrafish model of TSC featuring a nonsense mutation (vu242 in the tsc2 gene. This tsc2vu242 allele encodes a truncated Tuberin protein lacking the GAP domain, which is required for inhibition of Rheb and of the TOR kinase within TORC1. We show that tsc2vu242 is a recessive larval-lethal mutation that causes increased cell size in the brain and liver. Greatly elevated TORC1 signaling is observed in tsc2vu242/vu242 homozygous zebrafish, and is moderately increased in tsc2vu242/+ heterozygotes. Forebrain neurons are poorly organized in tsc2vu242/vu242 homozygous mutants, which have extensive gray and white matter disorganization and ectopically positioned cells. Genetic mosaic analyses demonstrate that tsc2 limits TORC1 signaling in a cell-autonomous manner. However, in chimeric animals, tsc2vu242/vu242 mutant cells also mislocalize wild-type host cells in the forebrain in a non-cell-autonomous manner. These results demonstrate a highly conserved role of tsc2 in zebrafish and establish a new animal model for studies of TSC. The finding of a non-cell-autonomous function of mutant cells might help explain the formation of brain hamartomas and cortical malformations in human TSC.

  5. Autonomic disturbances in narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plazzi, Giuseppe; Moghadam, Keivan Kaveh; Maggi, Leonardo Serra; Donadio, Vincenzo; Vetrugno, Roberto; Liguori, Rocco; Zoccoli, Giovanna; Poli, Francesca; Pizza, Fabio; Pagotto, Uberto; Ferri, Raffaele

    2011-06-01

    Narcolepsy is a clinical condition characterized mainly by excessive sleepiness and cataplexy. Hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis complete the narcoleptic tetrad; disrupted night sleep, automatic behaviors and weight gain are also usual complaints. Different studies focus on autonomic changes or dysfunctions among narcoleptic patients, such as pupillary abnormalities, fainting spells, erectile dysfunction, night sweats, gastric problems, low body temperature, systemic hypotension, dry mouth, heart palpitations, headache and extremities dysthermia. Even if many studies lack sufficient standardization or their results have not been replicated, a non-secondary involvement of the autonomic nervous system in narcolepsy is strongly suggested, mainly by metabolic and cardiovascular findings. Furthermore, the recent discovery of a high risk for overweight and for metabolic syndrome in narcoleptic patients represents an important warning for clinicians in order to monitor and follow them up for their autonomic functions. We review here studies on autonomic functions and clinical disturbances in narcoleptic patients, trying to shed light on the possible contribute of alterations of the hypocretin system in autonomic pathophysiology.

  6. The effect of marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on cardiac autonomic and hemodynamic function in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Salome; Schmidt, Erik Berg; Schlemmer, Annette;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on cardiac autonomic function and vascular function in patients with psoriatic arthritis.......The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on cardiac autonomic function and vascular function in patients with psoriatic arthritis....

  7. Uncertainty in anticipation of uncomfortable rectal distension is modulated by the autonomic nervous system--a fMRI study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Amandine; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Pellissier, Sonia; Ly, Huynh Giao; Dupont, Patrick; de Micheaux, Hugo Lafaye; Tack, Jan; Dantzer, Cécile; Delon-Martin, Chantal; Bonaz, Bruno

    2015-02-15

    The human brain responds both before and during the application of aversive stimuli. Anticipation allows the organism to prepare its nociceptive system to respond adequately to the subsequent stimulus. The context in which an uncomfortable stimulus is experienced may also influence neural processing. Uncertainty of occurrence, timing and intensity of an aversive event may lead to increased anticipatory anxiety, fear, physiological arousal and sensory perception. We aimed to identify, in healthy volunteers, the effects of uncertainty in the anticipation of uncomfortable rectal distension, and the impact of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity and anxiety-related psychological variables on neural mechanisms of anticipation of rectal distension using fMRI. Barostat-controlled uncomfortable rectal distensions were preceded by cued uncertain or certain anticipation in 15 healthy volunteers in a fMRI protocol at 3T. Electrocardiographic data were concurrently registered by MR scanner. The low frequency (LF)-component of the heart rate variability (HRV) time-series was extracted and inserted as a regressor in the fMRI model ('LF-HRV model'). The impact of ANS activity was analyzed by comparing the fMRI signal in the 'standard model' and in the 'LF-HRV model' across the different anticipation and distension conditions. The scores of the psychological questionnaires and the rating of perceived anticipatory anxiety were included as covariates in the fMRI data analysis. Our experiments led to the following key findings: 1) the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) is the only activation site that relates to uncertainty in healthy volunteers and is directly correlated to individual questionnaire score for pain-related anxiety; 2) uncertain anticipation of rectal distension involved several relevant brain regions, namely activation of sgACC and medial prefrontal cortex and deactivation of amygdala, insula, thalamus, secondary somatosensory cortex, supplementary

  8. Physiological functions of the small GTPase Arf6 in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Masahiro; Kanaho, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) plays important roles in membrane dynamics-based neuronal cell events such as neurite outgrowth and spine formation. However, physiological functions of Arf6 in the nervous system at whole animal level have not yet been explored. We have recently generated conditional knockout mice lacking Arf6 in neurons or oligodendrocytes of central nervous system (CNS) or both cell lineages, and analyzed them. We found that ablation of Arf6 gene from neurons, but not from oligodendrocytes, caused the defect in axon myelination at the fimbria of hippocampus (Fim) and corpus callosum (CC). We also found that migration of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) from the subventricular zone to the Fim and CC in mice lacking Arf6 in neurons was impaired. Finally, it was found that secretion of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a guidance factor for OPC migration, from hippocampi lacking Arf6 was impaired. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that Arf6 in neurons of the CNS plays an important role in OPC migration by regulating secretion of FGF-2 from neurons, thereby contributing to the axon myelination. Here, we discuss our current understanding of physiological functions of Arf6 in the nervous system.

  9. CD44: molecular interactions, signalling and functions in the nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Marek Wilczynski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available CD44 is the major surface hyaluronan receptor implicated in intercellular and cell-matrix adhesion, cell migration and signalling. It is a transmembrane, highly glycosylated protein with several isoforms resulting from alternative gene splicing. The CD44 molecule consists of several domains serving different functions: the N-terminal extracellular domain, the stem region, the transmembrane domain and the C-terminal tail. In the nervous system, CD44 expression occurs in both glial and neuronal cells. The role of CD44 in the physiology and pathology of the nervous system is not entirely understood, however, there exists evidence suggesting it might be involved in the axon guidance, cytoplasmic Ca2+ clearance, dendritic arborization, synaptic transmission, epileptogenesis, oligodendrocyte and astrocyte differentiation, post-traumatic brain repair and brain tumour development.

  10. Eag1 K+ Channel: Endogenous Regulation and Functions in Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokay, Tursonjan; Zhang, Guangming; Sun, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Ether-à-go-go1 (Eag1, Kv10.1, KCNH1) K+ channel is a member of the voltage-gated K+ channel family mainly distributed in the central nervous system and cancer cells. Like other types of voltage-gated K+ channels, the EAG1 channels are regulated by a variety of endogenous signals including reactive oxygen species, rendering the EAG1 to be in the redox-regulated ion channel family. The role of EAG1 channels in tumor development and its therapeutic significance have been well established. Meanwhile, the importance of hEAG1 channels in the nervous system is now increasingly appreciated. The present review will focus on the recent progress on the channel regulation by endogenous signals and the potential functions of EAG1 channels in normal neuronal signaling as well as neurological diseases.

  11. Eag1 K+ Channel: Endogenous Regulation and Functions in Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ether-à-go-go1 (Eag1, Kv10.1, KCNH1 K+ channel is a member of the voltage-gated K+ channel family mainly distributed in the central nervous system and cancer cells. Like other types of voltage-gated K+ channels, the EAG1 channels are regulated by a variety of endogenous signals including reactive oxygen species, rendering the EAG1 to be in the redox-regulated ion channel family. The role of EAG1 channels in tumor development and its therapeutic significance have been well established. Meanwhile, the importance of hEAG1 channels in the nervous system is now increasingly appreciated. The present review will focus on the recent progress on the channel regulation by endogenous signals and the potential functions of EAG1 channels in normal neuronal signaling as well as neurological diseases.

  12. Situational reactivity of autonomic functions in schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albus, M; Ackenheil, M; Engel, R R; Müller, F

    1982-06-01

    In a study designed to evaluate the state of arousal and the autonomic reactivity to experimental conditions in schizophrenic patients, 12 acute, unmedicated schizophrenic patients with paranoid hallucinatory symptomatology and 63 healthy normal control subjects were administered four standardized tasks: cold pressor test, noise, mental arithmetic, and active relaxation. Biochemical (norepinephrine and cortisol) and physiological (electromyogram, electroencephalogram, skin and conductance response, skin conductance level, finger pulse amplitude, finger temperature, heart rate, respiratory volume, pulse wave velocity, and electrogastrogram) parameters were measured simultaneously. Schizophrenic patients showed elevated levels of cortisol and norepinephrine, as well as heightened responsivity on measures of electromyographic activity, skin conductance level, and heart rate, throughout the trial, and reduced responsivity to conditions of stress. It is concluded that schizophrenic patients show higher nonspecific activation and reduced ability to react to external stimulation, perhaps induced by lack of inhibition of the reticular formation by the limbic system.

  13. International standards to document remaining autonomic function after spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, M S; Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Bodner, D;

    2008-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Experts opinions consensus. OBJECTIVE: To develop a common strategy to document remaining autonomic neurologic function following spinal cord injury (SCI). BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE: The impact of a specific SCI on a person's neurologic function is generally described through use of ...

  14. Sinus node function after autonomic blockade in normals and in sick sinus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, K K; Jaishankar, S; Balachander, J; Bahl, V K; Gupta, M P

    1984-06-01

    Electrophysiologic studies were performed in 10 normals and 33 patients with sick sinus syndrome before and after total autonomic blockade with propranolol and atropine. In normals both corrected sinus node recovery time (SNRT) and sinoatrial conduction time (SACT) decreased significantly after autonomic blockade. In patients with sick sinus syndrome the corrected SNRT was abnormal (greater than 450 msec) in 16 (48.5%) cases before and 25 (76%) cases (greater than 285 msec) after autonomic ablation (P less than 0.02). Thirteen of 21 patients (62%) with normal intrinsic heart rate and all 12 cases with abnormally low intrinsic rate after autonomic blockade had abnormal corrected SNRT (greater than 285 msec). Mean SACT measured in 19 patients also shortened significantly following pharmacologic denervation. During control it was prolonged (greater than 226 msec) in 8 patients (44%). After autonomic blockade 2 of 13 patients with normal intrinsic heart rate and 3 of 6 with low intrinsic rate showed abnormal SACT (greater than 151 msec). The data suggest that the majority (76%) of patients with sick sinus syndrome have intrinsic abnormality of sinus node automaticity while in a minority (24%) disturbed autonomic regulation is the pathogenetic mechanism. Patients with normal intrinsic heart rate usually have normal intrinsic SACT, while a significant proportion of those with low intrinsic rate have abnormal perinodal conduction. Subjects with abnormal intrinsic heart rate have more severe disturbances of sinus node function than those with normal intrinsic rate.

  15. Chronic stress induces a hyporeactivity of the autonomic nervous system in response to acute mental stressor and impairs cognitive performance in business executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Renata Roland; Díaz, Miguel Mauricio; Santos, Tatiane Vanessa da Silva; Bernardes, Jean Tofoles Martins; Peixoto, Leonardo Gomes; Bocanegra, Olga Lucia; Neto, Morun Bernardino; Espindola, Foued Salmen

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the incidence of chronic stress in business executives (109 subjects: 75 male and 34 female) and its relationship with cortisol levels, cognitive performance, and autonomic nervous system (ANS) reactivity after an acute mental stressor. Blood samples were collected from the subjects to measure cortisol concentration. After the sample collection, the subjects completed the Lipp Inventory of Stress Symptoms for Adults and the Stroop Color-Word Test to evaluate stress and cognitive performance levels, respectively. Saliva samples were collected prior to, immediately after, and five minutes after the test. The results revealed that 90.1% of the stressed subjects experienced stress phases that are considered chronic stress. At rest, the subjects with chronic stress showed higher cortisol levels, and no gender differences were observed. No differences were found between the stressed and non-stressed subjects regarding salivary amylase activity prior to test. Chronic stress also impaired performance on the Stroop test, which revealed higher rates of error and longer reaction times in the incongruent stimulus task independently of gender. For the congruent stimulus task of the Stroop test, the stressed males presented a higher rate of errors than the non-stressed males and a longer reaction time than the stressed females. After the acute mental stressor, the non-stressed male group showed an increase in salivary alpha-amylase activity, which returned to the initial values five minutes after the test; this ANS reactivity was not observed in the chronically stressed male subjects. The ANS responses of the non-stressed vs stressed female groups were not different prior to or after the Stroop test. This study is the first to demonstrate a blunted reactivity of the ANS when male subjects with chronic psychological stress were subjected to an acute mental stressor, and this change could contribute to impairments in cognitive performance.

  16. Fetal heart rate variability reveals differential dynamics in the intrauterine development of the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, U; Schleussner, E; Fiedler, A; Jaekel, S; Liehr, M; Haueisen, J; Hoyer, D

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that fetal beat-to-beat heart rate variability (fHRV) displays the different time scales of sympatho-vagal development prior to and after 32 weeks of gestation (wks GA). Ninety-two magnetocardiograms of singletons with normal courses of pregnancy between 24 + 1 and 41 + 6 wks GA were studied. Heart rate patterns were either quiet/non-accelerative (fHRP I) or active/accelerative (fHRP II) and recording quality sufficient for fHRV. The sample was divided into the GA groups 32 wks GA. Linear parameters of fHRV were calculated: mean heart rate (mHR), SDNN and RMSSD of normal-to-normal interbeat intervals, power in the low (0.04-0.15 Hz) and high frequency range (0.15-0.4 Hz) and the ratios SDNN/RMSSD and LF/HF as markers for sympatho-vagal balance. fHRP I is characterized by decreasing SDNN/RMSSD, LF/HF and mHR. The decrease is more pronounced 32 wks GA. LF/HF increases in fHRP II during the first half of the third trimester. Non-accelerative fHRP are indicative of parasympathetic dominance >32 wks GA. In contrast, the sympathetic accentuation during accelerative fHRP is displayed in the interrelations between mHR, SDNN and SDNN/RMSSD. Prior to 32 wks GA, fHRV reveals the increasing activity of the respective branches of the autonomic nervous system differentiating the types of fHRP.

  17. Chronic stress induces a hyporeactivity of the autonomic nervous system in response to acute mental stressor and impairs cognitive performance in business executives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Roland Teixeira

    Full Text Available The present study examined the incidence of chronic stress in business executives (109 subjects: 75 male and 34 female and its relationship with cortisol levels, cognitive performance, and autonomic nervous system (ANS reactivity after an acute mental stressor. Blood samples were collected from the subjects to measure cortisol concentration. After the sample collection, the subjects completed the Lipp Inventory of Stress Symptoms for Adults and the Stroop Color-Word Test to evaluate stress and cognitive performance levels, respectively. Saliva samples were collected prior to, immediately after, and five minutes after the test. The results revealed that 90.1% of the stressed subjects experienced stress phases that are considered chronic stress. At rest, the subjects with chronic stress showed higher cortisol levels, and no gender differences were observed. No differences were found between the stressed and non-stressed subjects regarding salivary amylase activity prior to test. Chronic stress also impaired performance on the Stroop test, which revealed higher rates of error and longer reaction times in the incongruent stimulus task independently of gender. For the congruent stimulus task of the Stroop test, the stressed males presented a higher rate of errors than the non-stressed males and a longer reaction time than the stressed females. After the acute mental stressor, the non-stressed male group showed an increase in salivary alpha-amylase activity, which returned to the initial values five minutes after the test; this ANS reactivity was not observed in the chronically stressed male subjects. The ANS responses of the non-stressed vs stressed female groups were not different prior to or after the Stroop test. This study is the first to demonstrate a blunted reactivity of the ANS when male subjects with chronic psychological stress were subjected to an acute mental stressor, and this change could contribute to impairments in cognitive

  18. Research progress on sepsis-induced cardiac autonomic nervous system dysfunction%脓毒症心脏自主神经功能障碍研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余海洋; 俞凤

    2011-01-01

    脓毒症是诱发脓毒性休克,多器官功能障碍综合征的重要原因,病死率高,目前仍是危重病领域关注的问题之一.脓毒症合并心功能不全非常常见,其机制尚未完全阐明.目前认为脓毒症患者自主神经系统功能障碍是脓毒症并发心血管功能障碍的机制之一.该文以心血管自主神经调控为切入点,对脓毒症心脏自主神经系统功能障碍的表现、引起心脏自主神经系统功能障碍的机制及相关干预措施进行综述,以期为脓毒症的研究和防治提供理论依据.%Sepsis with its high mortality,was an important etiology of septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. It remainsone of the research focuses in critical care areas. Cardiac dysfunction is common in patients with sepsis, and its pathogenesis remains incompletely clear. Nowadays, autonomic nervous system dysfunction is considered one of the mechanisms of sepsis-induced cardiovascular dysfunction. In this review.we will expatiate on the cardiovascular autonomic control mechanism. the manifestation and pathogenesis of sepsis-induced cardiac autonomic nervous system dysfunction. Furthermore. some intervention measures in sepsis-induced cardiac autonomic nervous system dysfunction was introduced. We hope to provide theory basis in the prevention and treatment of sepsis.

  19. Electrospun micro- and nanofiber tubes for functional nervous regeneration in sciatic nerve transections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amadio Stefano

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although many nerve prostheses have been proposed in recent years, in the case of consistent loss of nervous tissue peripheral nerve injury is still a traumatic pathology that may impair patient's movements by interrupting his motor-sensory pathways. In the last few decades tissue engineering has opened the door to new approaches;: however most of them make use of rigid channel guides that may cause cell loss due to the lack of physiological local stresses exerted over the nervous tissue during patient's movement. Electrospinning technique makes it possible to spin microfiber and nanofiber flexible tubular scaffolds composed of a number of natural and synthetic components, showing high porosity and remarkable surface/volume ratio. Results In this study we used electrospun tubes made of biodegradable polymers (a blend of PLGA/PCL to regenerate a 10-mm nerve gap in a rat sciatic nerve in vivo. Experimental groups comprise lesioned animals (control group and lesioned animals subjected to guide conduits implantated at the severed nerve stumps, where the tubular scaffolds are filled with saline solution. Four months after surgery, sciatic nerves failed to reconnect the two stumps of transected nerves in the control animal group. In most of the treated animals the electrospun tubes induced nervous regeneration and functional reconnection of the two severed sciatic nerve tracts. Myelination and collagen IV deposition have been detected in concurrence with regenerated fibers. No significant inflammatory response has been found. Neural tracers revealed the re-establishment of functional neuronal connections and evoked potential results showed the reinnervation of the target muscles in the majority of the treated animals. Conclusion Corroborating previous works, this study indicates that electrospun tubes, with no additional biological coating or drug loading treatment, are promising scaffolds for functional nervous regeneration. They

  20. The brain on itself: Nobel laureates and the history of fundamental nervous system function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmoen, Iver A; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2007-11-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been given in recognition of work in the neurosciences a number of times. Laureates have been awarded for work on both fundamental and more complex nervous system functions. This review is restricted to contributions by 20th century laureates to the understanding of fundamental nervous system function on the cellular level. In 1906, Camillo Golgi and Ramón y Cajal were awarded for their work on the microscopic structure of the nervous system. Their achievement and those of others within this field, coupled with technological progress, gradually allowed more complex physiological studies. In 1932, the prize was awarded to Charles Sherrington and Edgar Adrian for their discoveries of how neurons function. They were followed in 1944 by Herbert Gasser and Joseph Erlanger who uncovered the highly differentiated functions of single nerve fibers. Alan Hodgkin and Andrew Huxley were awarded for the detection of the ionic mechanism of the action potential and its mathematical explanation in 1963. In 1991, Erwin Neher and Bernd Sakmann were awarded for their work on single ion channels. Although the scientists who proved the hypothesis (Fridjof Nansen, Wilhelm His, and August Forel) were never awarded by the Nobel Committee, their studies gave rise to one of the most fundamental questions in 20th century neuroscience: How is information carried from one neuron to another or to an effector cell? This was first solved in the vegetative nervous system, and, in 1936, Henry Dale and Otto Loewi received the prize for their discoveries relating to chemical transmission of nerve impulses. In 1963, John Eccles was awarded the prize for his work on the physiology of synapses. In 1970, Bernhard Katz received the Nobel Prize for the discovery of quantal release. Katz shared the prize with Julius Axelrod and Ulf von Euler, who were central in finding that transmitters are stored in presynaptic vesicles and that the effect in many synapses is

  1. Measures of Autonomic Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Resiliency Model (TRM)* X* X* Trauma and Tension Releasing Exercises (TRE) Yoga (Asana) Postures X X Breathing Practices...MBSR) Yoga Nidra (iRest) X X *Study currently in progress utilizing these measures 7...measuring oxygen saturation of blood. The Doppler radar cardiopulmonary remote sensing unit and the wearable reflectance pulse oximeter have the benefit

  2. New roles for ‘old’ microRNAs in nervous system function and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion eHartl

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery, microRNAs became prominent candidates providing missing links on how to explain the developmental and phenotypical variation within one species or among different species. In addition, microRNAs were implicated in diseases such as neurodegeneration and cancer. More recently, the regulation of animal behavior was shown to be influenced by microRNAs. In spite of their numerous functions, only a few microRNAs were discovered by using classic genetic approaches. Due to the very mild or redundant phenotypes of most microRNAs or their genomic location within introns of other genes many regulatory microRNAs were missed. In this review, we focus on three microRNAs first identified in a forward genetic screen in invertebrates for their essential function in animal development, namely bantam, let-7 and miR-279. All three are essential for survival, are not located in introns of other genes, and are highly conserved among species. We highlight their important functions in the nervous system and discuss their emerging roles, especially during nervous system disease and behavior.

  3. Monitoring and Correcting Autonomic Function Aboard Mir: NASA Technology Used in Space and on Earth to Facilitate Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, P.; Toscano, W.; Taylor, B.; DeRoshia, C.; Kornilova, L.; Koslovskaya, I.; Miller, N.

    1999-01-01

    The broad objective of the research was to study individual characteristics of human adaptation to long duration spaceflight and possibilities of their correction using autonomic conditioning. The changes in autonomic state during adaptation to microgravity can have profound effects on the operational efficiency of crewmembers and may result in debilitating biomedical symptoms. Ground-based and inflight experiment results showed that certain responses of autonomic nervous system were correlated with, or consistently preceded, reports of performance decrements or the symptoms. Autogenic-Feedback-Training Exercise (AFTE) is a physiological conditioning method that has been used to train people to voluntary control several of their own physiological responses. The specific objectives were: 1) To study human autonomic nervous system (ANS) responses to sustained exposure to microgravity; 2) To study human behavior/performance changes related to physiology; 3) To evaluate the effectiveness of preflight autonomic conditioning (AFTE) for facilitating adaptation to space and readaptation to Earth; and 4) To archive these data for the NASA Life Sciences Data Archive and thereby make this information available to the international scientific community.

  4. A Double-Blind Atropine Trial for Active Learning of Autonomic Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Jeffrey R.; Burr, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we describe a human physiology laboratory class measuring changes in autonomic function over time in response to atropine. Students use themselves as subjects, generating ownership and self-interest in the learning as well as directly experiencing the active link between physiology and pharmacology in people. The class is designed to…

  5. Temperamental activation and inhibition associated with autonomic function in preadolescents. The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietrich, Andrea; Riese, Harriette; van Roon, Arie M.; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Neeleman, Jan; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the temperamental traits high-intensity pleasure (temperamental activation) and shyness (temperamental inhibition) in relation to autonomic function as measured by heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in 938 10-13-year-old preadolescen

  6. Changes of Pain Perception, Autonomic Function, and Endocrine Parameters during Treatment of Anorectic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Karl-Jurgen; Boettger, Silke; Wagner, Gerd; Wilsdorf, Christine; Gerhard, Uwe Jens; Boettger, Michael K.; Blanz, Bernhard; Sauer, Heinrich

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The underlying mechanisms of reduced pain perception in anorexia nervosa (AN) are unknown. To gain more insight into the pathology, the authors investigated pain perception, autonomic function, and endocrine parameters before and during successful treatment of adolescent AN patients. Method: Heat pain perception was assessed in 15…

  7. Teaching Cardiac Autonomic Function Dynamics Employing the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) Maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Luiz Fernando, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    In this report, a brief history of the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) maneuver is outlined, followed by an explanation on the use of this approach for the evaluation of cardiac autonomic function based on underlying heart rate changes. The most important methodological and interpretative aspects of the Valsalva-Weber maneuver are critically updated,…

  8. Autonomic function in hypertensive and normotensive subjects - The importance of gender

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevre, K; Lefrandt, JD; Nordby, G; Os, [No Value; Mulder, M; Gans, ROB; Rostrup, M; Smit, AJ

    2001-01-01

    Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS) has been found lower and heart rate variability (HRV) parasympathetic markers have been found higher in healthy women than in healthy men. Thus, in the present study we hypothesized gender differences in the autonomic function among hypertensive subjects. Forty-

  9. Synchronization in lattices of coupled non-autonomous Chen system via Lyapunov function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN tao; ZHOU Sheng-fan

    2009-01-01

    This paper consider the synchronization of solutions for lattices of the coupled non-autonomous Chen system. By using the Lyapunov function, we show that when the second coupled operator is negative definite self-adjoint and its coefficient is suitable large, the Chen coupled lattice system is bounded dissipative (In particular, the solutions for lattices of the coupled autonomous Chen system converge to zero as t→∞). The synchronization between any two solutions of the coupled Chen system can be slaved only by coefficients in the x- or y-component for the suitably large second coupled coefficient. Finally,some numerical simulations are given.

  10. Exploring the Relationship of Autonomic and Endocrine Activity with Social Functioning in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeekens, I.; Didden, R.; Verhoeven, E. W. M.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies indicate that autonomic and endocrine activity may be related to social functioning in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), although the number of studies in adults is limited. The present study explored the relationship of autonomic and endocrine activity with social functioning in young adult males with ASD compared…

  11. Live imaging of nervous system development and function using light-sheet microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, William C; Keller, Philipp J

    2015-01-01

    In vivo imaging applications typically require carefully balancing conflicting parameters. Often it is necessary to achieve high imaging speed, low photo-bleaching, and photo-toxicity, good three-dimensional resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio, and excellent physical coverage at the same time. Light-sheet microscopy provides good performance in all of these categories, and is thus emerging as a particularly powerful live imaging method for the life sciences. We see an outstanding potential for applying light-sheet microscopy to the study of development and function of the early nervous system in vertebrates and higher invertebrates. Here, we review state-of-the-art approaches to live imaging of early development, and show how the unique capabilities of light-sheet microscopy can further advance our understanding of the development and function of the nervous system. We discuss key considerations in the design of light-sheet microscopy experiments, including sample preparation and fluorescent marker strategies, and provide an outlook for future directions in the field.

  12. Effect of Probiotics on Central Nervous System Functions in Animals and Humans: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiying; Lee, In-Seon; Braun, Christoph; Enck, Paul

    2016-01-01

    To systematically review the effects of probiotics on central nervous system function in animals and humans, to summarize effective interventions (species of probiotic, dose, duration), and to analyze the possibility of translating preclinical studies. Literature searches were conducted in Pubmed, Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. Only randomized controlled trials were included. In total, 38 studies were included: 25 in animals and 15 in humans (2 studies were conducted in both). Most studies used Bifidobacterium (eg, B. longum, B. breve, and B. infantis) and Lactobacillus (eg, L. helveticus, and L. rhamnosus), with doses between 109 and 1010 colony-forming units for 2 weeks in animals and 4 weeks in humans. These probiotics showed efficacy in improving psychiatric disorder-related behaviors including anxiety, depression, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), obsessive-compulsive disorder, and memory abilities, including spatial and non-spatial memory. Because many of the basic science studies showed some efficacy of probiotics on central nervous system function, this background may guide and promote further preclinical and clinical studies. Translating animal studies to human studies has obvious limitations but also suggests possibilities. Here, we provide several suggestions for the translation of animal studies. More experimental designs with both behavioral and neuroimaging measures in healthy volunteers and patients are needed in the future. PMID:27413138

  13. Viewing nature scenes positively affects recovery of autonomic function following acute-mental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Daniel K; Barton, Jo L; Gladwell, Valerie F

    2013-06-04

    A randomized crossover study explored whether viewing different scenes prior to a stressor altered autonomic function during the recovery from the stressor. The two scenes were (a) nature (composed of trees, grass, fields) or (b) built (composed of man-made, urban scenes lacking natural characteristics) environments. Autonomic function was assessed using noninvasive techniques of heart rate variability; in particular, time domain analyses evaluated parasympathetic activity, using root-mean-square of successive differences (RMSSD). During stress, secondary cardiovascular markers (heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure) showed significant increases from baseline which did not differ between the two viewing conditions. Parasympathetic activity, however, was significantly higher in recovery following the stressor in the viewing scenes of nature condition compared to viewing scenes depicting built environments (RMSSD; 50.0 ± 31.3 vs 34.8 ± 14.8 ms). Thus, viewing nature scenes prior to a stressor alters autonomic activity in the recovery period. The secondary aim was to examine autonomic function during viewing of the two scenes. Standard deviation of R-R intervals (SDRR), as change from baseline, during the first 5 min of viewing nature scenes was greater than during built scenes. Overall, this suggests that nature can elicit improvements in the recovery process following a stressor.

  14. Technological Support of Estimating Functional Opportunities of Higher Parts of Central Nervous System in the Individuals with Auditory Deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarenko M.V.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A new computerized technology of investigating and estimating the individual features of higher parts of the central nervous system in people with auditory deprivation is offered. The essence of the offered technology for investigating and estimating individual functional opportunities of higher parts of the nervous system of an individual with auditory deprivation consists in using the specific sequence of representing the load tests with corresponding criteria of estimating the processed information of different level of complexity, which are applied on hardware devices developed by us. We represented the scales for estimating the parameters of simple and complex sensorimotor reactions, speed qualitative and quantitative indicators of processing information based on the typological properties of the nervous system, such as the functional mobility, strength and balance of basic nervous processes. We suppose that the research using the same tests and criteria of estimating neuro-dynamic properties will increase the opportunity for the analysis of different experimental material and enhance its value

  15. Local behavior of autonomous neutral functional differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    Basic problems for a special class of neutral functional differential equations (NFDE) are formulated, and some contributions to a general qualitative theory in the neighborhood of an equilibrium point are indicated. The properties of a NFDE (G,f) are examined to determine in what sense these properties are insensitive to small changes in (G,f) in the topology G x F. The special class of equations that is introduced includes retarded functional differential equations and difference equations.

  16. Cardiac autonomic nervous test value to the diagnosis of plant diabetic neuropathy%心脏自主神经试验对糖尿病合并植物神经病变的诊断价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何煜暐

    2015-01-01

    目的:对46例糖尿病患者心脏自主神经试验进行分析,探讨心脏自主神经试验对糖尿病合并植物神经病变的诊断价值。方法:根据临床表现把糖尿病患者分为糖尿病合并植物神经病变组和糖尿病不合并植物神经病变组。行心脏自主神经试验,并对两组数据进行比较。结果:糖尿病合并植物神经病变组呼吸差,乏氏指数、30/15比值均低于不合并植物神经病变组。结论:心脏自主神经试验方法简单方便,容易掌握,重复性好,可作为评估糖尿病合并植物神经病变的敏感指标。%Objective46 cases of diabetic cardiac autonomic nervous test were analyzed, and discuss the heart autonomic nervous test value to the diagnosis of plant diabetic neuropathy.MethodsThe diabetes patients according to clinical manifestations of divided into diabetic neuropathy group and diabetes do not merge plants group of neuropathy. Heart the heart nerve test, and carries on the comparison to 2 sets of data.ResultsPlant diabetic neuropathy group of poor breathing, lack of index, the ratio of 30/15 were less merger plant neuropathy group.Conclusions Cardiac autonomic nervous test method is simple and convenient, easy to learn, good repeatability, can be used as evaluation of sensitive indicator of plant diabetic neuropathy.

  17. EXACT NULL CONTROLLABILITY OF NON-AUTONOMOUS FUNCTIONAL EVOLUTION SYSTEMS WITH NONLOCAL CONDITIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianlong FU; Yu ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    In this article,by using theory of linear evolution system and Schauder fixed point theorem,we establish a sufficient result of exact null controllability for a non-autonomous functional evolution system with nonlocal conditions.In particular,the compactness condition or Lipschitz condition for the function g in the nonlocal conditions appearing in various literatures is not required here.An example is also provided to show an application of the obtained result.

  18. Association of altered cardiac autonomic function with psychopathology and metabolic profiles in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ming-Shun; Yang, Albert C; Lin, Yu-Chung; Lin, Chieh-Nan; Chang, Fang-Rong; Shen, Shu-hua; Ouyang, Wen-Chen; Loh, El-Wui; Chiu, Hsien-Jane

    2013-12-30

    Schizophrenia has been associated with autonomic dysregulation and increased cardiovascular co-morbidity. We hypothesised that autonomic dysregulation in patients with schizophrenia is associated with psychopathology and metabolic profiles. In this study, we aimed to evaluate psychopathology, comprehensive metabolic profiles and cardiac autonomic function using heart-rate variability (HRV) analysis in patients with schizophrenia. A total of 94 patients with schizophrenia and 51 healthy controls were recruited. Each patient underwent a physical examination, laboratory tests and rating scale evaluation, and all subjects underwent a 1-h electrocardiogram monitoring. Analysis of variance was used to compare demographic and HRV variables between control and patient groups. We applied multiple regression analysis with backward selection to examine the association between HRV indices and demographic, metabolic and psychopathology profiles. A decreased HRV was found in patient groups, compared to controls. Reduced vagal-related and complexity domain of HRV indices in patient groups were correlated with increased body mass indices, diastolic pressure, triglycerides, high- and low-density lipoprotein and severity of psychosis mainly in the negative symptom domain. This study provides evidence that altered autonomic function is associated with both psychopathology and metabolic profiles in patients with schizophrenia. These findings may warrant future research in using HRV as objective markers to monitor cardiovascular health and the severity of psychosis in patients with schizophrenia.

  19. Autonomous functioning of the goitre; Funktionelle Autonomie der Schilddruese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emrich, D. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. Nuklearmedizin

    1994-12-01

    The article summarizes the status of knowledge on functional autonomy of the thyroid gland from the standpoint of definition, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, epidemiology, diagnostics and treatment. (orig.) [Deutsch] In einer Uebersicht werden die bisherigen Befunde und Kenntnisse ueber die funktionelle Autonomie der Schilddruese unter den Gesichtspunkten Definition, Pathogenese und Pathophysiologie, Epidemiologie, Diagnostik und Therapie zusammengefasst. (orig.)

  20. Effects of physical exercise on central nervous system functions: a review of brain region specific adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Julie A; Corrigan, Frances; Baune, Bernhard T

    2015-01-01

    Pathologies of central nervous system (CNS) functions are involved in prevalent conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, depression, and Parkinson's disease. Notable pathologies include dysfunctions of circadian rhythm, central metabolism, cardiovascular function, central stress responses, and movement mediated by the basal ganglia. Although evidence suggests exercise may benefit these conditions, the neurobiological mechanisms of exercise in specific brain regions involved in these important CNS functions have yet to be clarified. Here we review murine evidence about the effects of exercise on discrete brain regions involved in important CNS functions. Exercise effects on circadian rhythm, central metabolism, cardiovascular function, stress responses in the brain stem and hypothalamic pituitary axis, and movement are examined. The databases Pubmed, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for articles investigating regional brain adaptations to exercise. Brain regions examined included the brain stem, hypothalamus, and basal ganglia. We found evidence of multiple regional adaptations to both forced and voluntary exercise. Exercise can induce molecular adaptations in neuronal function in many instances. Taken together, these findings suggest that the regional physiological adaptations that occur with exercise could constitute a promising field for elucidating molecular and cellular mechanisms of recovery in psychiatric and neurological health conditions.

  1. Barrier function in the peripheral and central nervous system-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, A K; Rittner, H L

    2017-01-01

    The peripheral (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS) are delicate structures, highly sensitive to homeostatic changes-and crucial for basic vital functions. Thus, a selection of barriers ensures the protection of the nervous system from noxious blood-borne or surrounding stimuli. In this chapter, anatomy and functioning of the blood-nerve (BNB), the blood-brain (BBB), and the blood-spinal cord barriers (BSCB) are presented and the key tight junction (TJ) proteins described: claudin-1, claudin-3, claudin-5, claudin-11, claudin-12, claudin-19, occludin, Zona occludens-1 (ZO-1), and tricellulin are by now identified as relevant for nerval barriers. Different diseases can lead to or be accompanied by neural barrier disruption, and impairment of these barriers worsens pathology. Peripheral nerve injury and inflammatory polyneuropathy cause an increased permeability of BNB as well as BSCB, while, e.g., diseases of the CNS such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, or Alzheimer's disease can progress and worsen through barrier dysfunction. Moreover, the complex role and regulation of the BBB after ischemic stroke is described. On the other side, PNS and CNS barriers hamper the delivery of drugs in diseases when the barrier is intact, e.g., in certain neurodegenerative diseases or inflammatory pain. Understanding of the barrier - regulating processes has already lead to the discovery of new molecules as drug enhancers. In summary, the knowledge of all of these mechanisms might ultimately lead to the invention of drugs to control barrier function to help ameliorating or curing neurological diseases.

  2. Exploring the relationship of autonomic and endocrine activity with social functioning in adults with autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeekens, I.; Didden, H.C.M.; Verhoeven, E.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies indicate that autonomic and endocrine activity may be related to social functioning in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), although the number of studies in adults is limited. The present study explored the relationship of autonomic and endocrine activity with social fun

  3. Autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1983-01-01

    The diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy is often difficult to establish, since clinical symptoms generally appear late in the course of the disease, and may be non-specific. A number of recently developed quantifiable and reproducible autonomic nerve function tests are reviewed, with emphasis on th...

  4. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSN/HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders of the peripheral nervous system that predominantly affect the sensory and autonomic neurons. Hallmark features comprise not only prominent sensory signs and symptoms and ulcerative mutilations but also variable autonomic and motor disturbances. Autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance has been reported. Molecular genetics studies have identified disease-causing mutations in 11 genes. Some of the affected proteins have nerve-specific roles but underlying mechanisms have also been shown to involve sphingolipid metabolism, vesicular transport, structural integrity, and transcription regulation. Genetic and functional studies have substantially improved the understanding of the pathogenesis of the HSN/HSAN and will help to find preventive and causative therapies in the future.

  5. Motion planning for autonomous vehicle based on radial basis function neural network in unstructured environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiajia; Zhao, Pan; Liang, Huawei; Mei, Tao

    2014-09-18

    The autonomous vehicle is an automated system equipped with features like environment perception, decision-making, motion planning, and control and execution technology. Navigating in an unstructured and complex environment is a huge challenge for autonomous vehicles, due to the irregular shape of road, the requirement of real-time planning, and the nonholonomic constraints of vehicle. This paper presents a motion planning method, based on the Radial Basis Function (RBF) neural network, to guide the autonomous vehicle in unstructured environments. The proposed algorithm extracts the drivable region from the perception grid map based on the global path, which is available in the road network. The sample points are randomly selected in the drivable region, and a gradient descent method is used to train the RBF network. The parameters of the motion-planning algorithm are verified through the simulation and experiment. It is observed that the proposed approach produces a flexible, smooth, and safe path that can fit any road shape. The method is implemented on autonomous vehicle and verified against many outdoor scenes; furthermore, a comparison of proposed method with the existing well-known Rapidly-exploring Random Tree (RRT) method is presented. The experimental results show that the proposed method is highly effective in planning the vehicle path and offers better motion quality.

  6. Cardiovascular autonomic function tests in type 2 diabetes mellitus with micro albuminuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhavana S.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in type2 diabetes (DM. Microalbuminuria (MAis strongly associated with cardiovascular complications in type2 diabetes. Impaired cardiovascular autonomicfunction and increased albumin excretion are related in patients with diabetes. So this study is designed toinvestigate the relationship between cardiovascular autonomic function and microalbuminuria in type2 diabetes.Methods: The study comprised of 180 subjects of age group>50 years, classified into 3 groups of 60 subjects each.DM without MA, DM with MA and controls. The tests performed were 1 Heart rate response to deep breathing,valsalva maneuver and standing; 2 Blood pressure response to standing and to sustained handgrip. Individual testswere given score of 0, 1, or 2 and an overall autonomic test score of 0-10 was obtained.Results: Mean autonomic score in control, DM without MA and DM with MA are 1.97 ± 0.81, 5.73 ± 1.26 and 7.00± 1.80 respectively. The Coefficient of variation (% of control, DM without MA, DM with MA is 41.1, 21.9 and25.7 respectively. A significant difference in autonomic score was observed in the DM without MA (P<0.01 andDM with MA (P<0.01 when compared to controls.Conclusion: In conclusion type2 diabetic individuals should be diagnosed early to prevent disease progression tomicroalbuminuria and thus minimize complications.

  7. Integrated Control Strategies Supporting Autonomous Functionalities in Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Sights

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available High-level intelligence allows a mobile robot to create and interpret complex world models, but without a precise control system, the accuracy of the world model and the robot's ability to interact with its surroundings are greatly diminished. This problem is amplified when the environment is hostile, such as in a battlefield situation where an error in movement or a slow response may lead to destruction of the robot. As the presence of robots on the battlefield continues to escalate and the trend toward relieving the human of the low-level control burden advances, the ability to combine the functionalities of several critical control systems on a single platform becomes imperative.

  8. Functional profiles of SCN9A variants in dorsal root ganglion neurons and superior cervical ganglion neurons correlate with autonomic symptoms in small fibre neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chongyang; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Liu, Shujun; Gerrits, Monique M; te Morsche, Rene H M; Lauria, Giuseppe; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Drenth, Joost P H; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Waxman, Stephen G

    2012-09-01

    Patients with small fibre neuropathy typically manifest pain in distal extremities and severe autonomic dysfunction. However, occasionally patients present with minimal autonomic symptoms. The basis for this phenotypic difference is not understood. Sodium channel Na(v)1.7, encoded by the SCN9A gene, is preferentially expressed in the peripheral nervous system within sensory dorsal root ganglion and sympathetic ganglion neurons and their small diameter peripheral axons. We recently reported missense substitutions in SCN9A that encode functional Na(v)1.7 variants in 28% of patients with biopsy-confirmed small fibre neuropathy. Two patients with biopsy-confirmed small fibre neuropathy manifested minimal autonomic dysfunction unlike the other six patients in this series, and both of these patients carry the Na(v)1.7/R185H variant, presenting the opportunity to compare variants associated with extreme ends of a spectrum from minimal to severe autonomic dysfunction. Herein, we show by voltage-clamp that R185H variant channels enhance resurgent currents within dorsal root ganglion neurons and show by current-clamp that R185H renders dorsal root ganglion neurons hyperexcitable. We also show that in contrast, R185H variant channels do not produce detectable changes when studied by voltage-clamp within sympathetic neurons of the superior cervical ganglion, and have no effect on the excitability of these cells. As a comparator, we studied the Na(v)1.7 variant I739V, identified in three patients with small fibre neuropathy characterized by severe autonomic dysfunction as well as neuropathic pain, and show that this variant impairs channel slow inactivation within both dorsal root ganglion and superior cervical ganglion neurons, and renders dorsal root ganglion neurons hyperexcitable and superior cervical ganglion neurons hypoexcitable. Thus, we show that R185H, from patients with minimal autonomic dysfunction, does not produce detectable changes in the properties of

  9. EFFECT OF SUKHA PRANAYAMA AND BHASTRIKA PRANAYAMA ON CARDIOVASCULAR AUTONOMIC FUNCTIONS AMONG YOUNG HEALTHY INDIVIDUALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghouse

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Practice of Yoga causes several changes in normal physiology. Meditation has positive short and longterm rewards which include a balance of the parasympathetic and sympathetic functions. Cardiovascular autonomic functions are quantified by changes in the heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP in response to some of the physiological stimuli and different types of Pranayamas is known to alter the autonomic function. OBJECTIVES To assess the effects of Sukha Pranayama and Bhastrika Pranayama on cardiovascular autonomic functions in normal healthy medical students. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 male and female young healthy volunteers studying at PES Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Kuppam belonging to age group of 17-22 years were included for the study. Parasympathetic activity was assessed by observing the heart rate changes to immediate standing from lying down position, heart rate changes during deep breathing and heart rate changes during Valsalva manoeuvre using Biopac Student Lab MP30 device. Sympathetic activity was assessed by observing blood pressure changes on immediate standing from lying down position and blood pressure changes during sustained hand grip using sphygmomanometer before and after yoga. RESULTS & CONCLUSION The baseline heart rate and blood pressure response to immediate standing showed a tendency to decrease possibly due to increased vagal tone and decreased sympathetic discharge thereby indicating practice of yogasanas and pranayamas would benefit the young population as it would prepare them in overcoming stress by modulating and optimising sympathetic activities in stressful situations.

  10. Executive Cognitive Functioning and Cardiovascular Autonomic Regulation in a Population-Based Sample of Working Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenfors, Cecilia U. D.; Hanson, Linda M.; Theorell, Töres; Osika, Walter S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Executive cognitive functioning is essential in private and working life and is sensitive to stress and aging. Cardiovascular (CV) health factors are related to cognitive decline and dementia, but there is relatively few studies of the role of CV autonomic regulation, a key component in stress responses and risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and executive processes. An emerging pattern of results from previous studies suggest that different executive processes may be differentially associated with CV autonomic regulation. The aim was thus to study the associations between multiple measures of CV autonomic regulation and measures of different executive cognitive processes. Method: Participants were 119 healthy working adults (79% women), from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health. Electrocardiogram was sampled for analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) measures, including the Standard Deviation of NN, here heart beats (SDNN), root of the mean squares of successive differences (RMSSD), high frequency (HF) power band from spectral analyses, and QT variability index (QTVI), a measure of myocardial repolarization patterns. Executive cognitive functioning was measured by seven neuropsychological tests. The relationships between CV autonomic regulation measures and executive cognitive measures were tested with bivariate and partial correlational analyses, controlling for demographic variables, and mental health symptoms. Results: Higher SDNN and RMSSD and lower QTVI were significantly associated with better performance on cognitive tests tapping inhibition, updating, shifting, and psychomotor speed. After adjustments for demographic factors however (age being the greatest confounder), only QTVI was clearly associated with these executive tests. No such associations were seen for working memory capacity. Conclusion: Poorer CV autonomic regulation in terms of lower SDNN and RMSSD and higher QTVI was associated with poorer executive

  11. Role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in nervous system function and disease: using C. elegans as a dissecting tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Márcio S; Duarte, Carlos B; Maciel, Patrícia

    2012-08-01

    In addition to its central roles in protein quality control, regulation of cell cycle, intracellular signaling, DNA damage response and transcription regulation, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays specific roles in the nervous system, where it contributes to precise connectivity through development, and later assures functionality by regulating a wide spectrum of neuron-specific cellular processes. Aberrations in this system have been implicated in the etiology of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we provide an updated view on the UPS and highlight recent findings concerning its role in normal and diseased nervous systems. We discuss the advantages of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans as a tool to unravel the major unsolved questions concerning this biochemical pathway and its involvement in nervous system function and dysfunction, and expose the new possibilities, using state-of-the-art techniques, to assess UPS function using this model system.

  12. [Effects of electromagnetic field from cellular phones on selected central nervous system functions: a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Marek; Zmyślony, Marek

    2010-01-01

    In the opinion of some experts, a growing emission of man-made electromagnetic fields (EMF), also known as electromagnetic is a source of continuously increasing health hazards to the general population. Due to their large number and very close proximity to the user's head, mobile phones deserve special attention. This work is intended to give a systematic review of objective studies, assessing the effects of mobile phone EMF on the functions of the central nervous system (CNS) structures. Our review shows that short exposures to mobile phone EMF, experienced by telephone users during receiving calls, do not affect the cochlear function. Effects of GSM mobile phone EMF on the conduction of neural impulses from the inner car neurons to the brainstem auditory centres have not been detected either. If Picton's principle, saying that P300 amplitude varies with the improbability of the targets and its latency varies with difficulty of discriminating the target stimulus from standard stimuli, is true, EMF changes the improbability of the targets without hindering their discrimination. Experiments with use of indirect methods do not enable unequivocal verification of EMF effects on the cognitive functions due to the CNS anatomical and functional complexity. Thus, it seems advisable to develop a model of EMF effects on the excitable brain structures at the cellular level.

  13. Diverse functional roles of lipocalin-2 in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Lee, Shinrye; Park, Dong Ho; Kook, Hyun; Park, Keun-Gyu; Lee, In-Kyu; Suk, Kyoungho

    2015-02-01

    Lipocalin-2 (LCN2) is an acute phase protein with multiple functions that has garnered a great deal of interest over the last decade. However, its precise role in the pathophysiology of the central nervous system (CNS) remains to be outlined. Emerging evidence indicates that LCN2 is synthesized and secreted as an inducible factor from activated microglia, reactive astrocytes, neurons, and endothelial cells in response to inflammatory, infectious, or injurious insults. More recently, it has been recognized as a modulatory factor for diverse cellular phenotypes in the CNS, such as cell death, survival, morphology, migration, invasion, differentiation, and functional polarization. LCN2 induces chemokine production in the CNS in response to inflammatory challenges, and actively participates in the innate immune response, cellular influx of iron, and regulation of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. LCN2 also modulates several biobehavioral responses including pain hypersensitivity, cognitive functions, emotional behaviors, depression, neuronal excitability, and anxiety. This review covers recent advances in our knowledge regarding functional roles of LCN2 in the CNS, and discusses how LCN2 acts as an autocrine mediator of astrocytosis, a chemokine inducer, and a modulator of various cellular phenotypes in the CNS. We finally explore the possibilities and challenges of employing LCN2 as a signature of several CNS anomalies.

  14. Autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1980-01-01

    In order to elucidate the physiological significance of autonomic neuropathy in juvenile diabetics, cardiovascular, hormonal and metabolic functions have been investigated in three groups of juvenile diabetics: One group had no signs of neuropathy, one group had presumably slight autonomic...... neuropathy (reduced beat-to-beat variation in heart rate during hyperventilation) and one group had clinically severe autonomic neuropathy, defined by presence of orthostatic hypotension. In all three experimental situations we found sympathetic dysfunction causing cardiovascular and/or hormonal...... maladjustments in patients with autonomic neuropathy. Regarding metabolic functions we found normal responses to graded exercise and insulin-induced hypoglycemia in patients with autonomic neuropathy in spite of blunted catecholamine responses, suggesting increased sensitivity of glycogen stores and adipose...

  15. Resistance Training After Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Its Role on Cardiac and Autonomic Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grans, Camilla Figueiredo; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Abssamra, Marcos Elias Vergilino; Rocha, Leandro Yanase; Carrozzi, Nicolle Martins [Laboratório do Movimento Humano, Universidade São Judas Tadeu (USJT), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mostarda, Cristiano [Departamento de Educação Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão (UFMA), São Luís, MA (Brazil); Figueroa, Diego Mendrot [Laboratório de Hipertensão Experimental, Instituto do Coração (InCor), Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Angelis, Kátia De [Laboratório de Fisiologia Translacional, Universidade Nove de Julho (Uninove), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia [Laboratório de Hipertensão Experimental, Instituto do Coração (InCor), Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rodrigues, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.rodrigues@incor.usp.br [Laboratório do Movimento Humano, Universidade São Judas Tadeu (USJT), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction. To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week). At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made. The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%), myocardial performance index (-39%) and systolic blood pressure (+6%) improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%), as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46%) in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted. Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats.

  16. Autonomic Functioning in Young Adults Born at Extremely Low Birth Weight

    OpenAIRE

    Karen J. Mathewson PhD; Ryan J. Van Lieshout MD, PhD; Saroj Saigal MD; Katherine M. Morrison MD; Michael H. Boyle PhD; Louis A. Schmidt PhD

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic functioning is altered in infants born at extremely low birth weight (ELBW; 2500 g). HF in the smallest-born ELBW participants was significantly lower than in NBW controls. In both groups, greater birth weight was associated with higher HF. Among ELBW survivors, lower birth weight predicted faster heart rate and higher DBP, but neither heart rate nor DBP appeared to be well-coordinated with baroreflex activity (LF), the principal mechanism for short-term blood pressure regulation. A...

  17. Autonomic nervous activation triggered during induction of reactive hyperemia exerts a greater influence on the measured reactive hyperemia index by peripheral arterial tonometry than on flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery in patients with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Yoshida, Masanobu; Higashi, Yukihito; Takase, Bonpei; Furumoto, Tomoo; Kario, Kazuomi; Ohya, Yusuke; Yamashina, Akira

    2014-10-01

    Flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery (FMD) and reactive hyperemia index (RHI) measured by peripheral arterial tonometry are known to be weakly associated with one another, but the mechanisms underlying this weak association remain to be clarified. We examined whether the autonomic nervous activation induced by the 5 min forearm clamping used to induce reactive hyperemia might exert any influence on the FMD and RHI in subjects with hypertension. In 115 subjects with hypertension (age 61±1 years), the FMD and RHI were measured simultaneously, and the heart rate variability (HRV) parameters (low-frequency component (LF), high-frequency component (HF), and the ratio (LF/HF) between the two) were calculated from the electrocardiographic recordings obtained before and after the start of forearm clamping. A multivariate linear regression analysis with adjustments for confounding variables demonstrated that the RHI, but not the FMD, was significantly associated with the percent change of the LF/HF associated with forearm clamping (beta=-0.204, P=0.043). In conclusion, autonomic nervous system activation, especially sympathetic activation, induced by 5-min forearm clamping utilized to provoke reactive hyperemia may significantly affect the RHI rather than FMD in subjects with hypertension.

  18. The nature of the autonomic dysfunction in multiple system atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Samir M.; Diedrich, Andre; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David

    2002-01-01

    The concept that multiple system atrophy (MSA, Shy-Drager syndrome) is a disorder of the autonomic nervous system is several decades old. While there has been renewed interest in the movement disorder associated with MSA, two recent consensus statements confirm the centrality of the autonomic disorder to the diagnosis. Here, we reexamine the autonomic pathophysiology in MSA. Whereas MSA is often thought of as "autonomic failure", new evidence indicates substantial persistence of functioning sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves even in clinically advanced disease. These findings help explain some of the previously poorly understood features of MSA. Recognition that MSA entails persistent, constitutive autonomic tone requires a significant revision of our concepts of its diagnosis and therapy. We will review recent evidence bearing on autonomic tone in MSA and discuss their therapeutic implications, particularly in terms of the possible development of a bionic baroreflex for better control of blood pressure.

  19. Inhalation of Hydrocarbon Jet Fuel Suppress Central Auditory Nervous System Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, O'neil W; Wong, Brian A; McInturf, Shawn M; Reboulet, James E; Ortiz, Pedro A; Mattie, David R

    2015-01-01

    More than 800 million L/d of hydrocarbon fuels is used to power cars, boats, and jet airplanes. The weekly consumption of these fuels necessarily puts the public at risk for repeated inhalation exposure. Recent studies showed that exposure to hydrocarbon jet fuel produces lethality in presynaptic sensory cells, leading to hearing loss, especially in the presence of noise. However, the effects of hydrocarbon jet fuel on the central auditory nervous system (CANS) have not received much attention. It is important to investigate the effects of hydrocarbons on the CANS in order to complete current knowledge regarding the ototoxic profile of such exposures. The objective of the current study was to determine whether inhalation exposure to hydrocarbon jet fuel might affect the functions of the CANS. Male Fischer 344 rats were randomly divided into four groups (control, noise, fuel, and fuel + noise). The structural and functional integrity of presynaptic sensory cells was determined in each group. Neurotransmission in both peripheral and central auditory pathways was simultaneously evaluated in order to identify and differentiate between peripheral and central dysfunctions. There were no detectable effects on pre- and postsynaptic peripheral functions. However, the responsiveness of the brain was significantly depressed and neural transmission time was markedly delayed. The development of CANS dysfunctions in the general public and the military due to cumulative exposure to hydrocarbon fuels may represent a significant but currently unrecognized public health issue.

  20. Docetaxel does not impair cardiac autonomic function in breast cancer patients previously treated with anthracyclines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekholm, Eeva; Rantanen, Virpi; Syvänen, Kari; Jalonen, Jarmo; Antila, Kari; Salminen, Eeva

    2002-04-01

    The effects of docetaxel treatment on autonomic cardiac function was studied with 24-h ECG recordings in breast cancer patients pretreated with anthracyclines. Twenty-four women were evaluated before docetaxel treatment and after 3-4 courses of docetaxel 100 mg/m(2). The heart rate, cardiac extrasystoles and heart rate variability (HRV) in both the time and frequency domain were assessed from 24-h ECG recordings. The acute effects of docetaxel were calculated from 1-h recordings immediately prior to, during and after infusion. Long-term effects were evaluated from 24-h recordings performed before treatment and after 3-4 courses of docetaxel. There was no increase in the number of cardiac extrasystoles during docetaxel infusion. The number of ventricular extrasystoles decreased from 14 (23) to 7 (14) during and 5 (10) after the first infusion (p=0.02). The heart rate, HRV and extrasystoles were similar before and after 3-4 courses of docetaxel. The treatment did not abolish circadian variability of the heart rate. Docetaxel did not deteriorate autonomic cardiac function. In conclusion, our findings suggest that docetaxel does not have harmful cumulative effects on autonomic control of the heart and is therefore unlikely to be cardiotoxic.

  1. Identification of low and high frequency ranges for heart rate variability and blood pressure variability analyses using pharmacological autonomic blockade with atropine and propranolol in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding autonomic nervous system functioning, which mediates behavioral and physiological responses to stress, offers great potential for evaluation of farm animal stress and welfare. Evaluation of heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV), using time and frequency doma...

  2. SMN deficiency disrupts gastrointestinal and enteric nervous system function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombash, Sara E; Cowley, Christopher J; Fitzgerald, Julie A; Iyer, Chitra C; Fried, David; McGovern, Vicki L; Williams, Kent C; Burghes, Arthur H M; Christofi, Fedias L; Gulbransen, Brian D; Foust, Kevin D

    2015-07-01

    The 2007 Consensus Statement for Standard of Care in Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) notes that patients suffer from gastroesophageal reflux, constipation and delayed gastric emptying. We used two mouse models of SMA to determine whether functional GI complications are a direct consequence of or are secondary to survival motor neuron (Smn) deficiency. Our results show that despite normal activity levels and food and water intake, Smn deficiency caused constipation, delayed gastric emptying, slow intestinal transit and reduced colonic motility without gross anatomical or histopathological abnormalities. These changes indicate alterations to the intrinsic neural control of gut functions mediated by the enteric nervous system (ENS). Indeed, Smn deficiency led to disrupted ENS signaling to the smooth muscle of the colon but did not cause enteric neuron loss. High-frequency electrical field stimulation (EFS) of distal colon segments produced up to a 10-fold greater contractile response in Smn deficient tissues. EFS responses were not corrected by the addition of a neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor indicating that the increased contractility was due to hyperexcitability and not disinhibition of the circuitry. The GI symptoms observed in mice are similar to those reported in SMA patients. Together these data suggest that ENS cells are susceptible to Smn deficiency and may underlie the patient GI symptoms.

  3. Central Nervous System Functional Condition In Interns With Different Progress Levels At Military Medical Institution Of Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Bochkarjova

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of CNS functional condition and cognitive functions of interns with different progress levels at Military Medical School have been analyzed. According to the research results, the rate of excitement, noiseroof feature, functional mobility of nervous processes, development of verbal and logical thinking, verbal and operative memory as well as distribution and shifting of attention are the most important suppositions for successful military-professional training.

  4. ASYMPTOTICAL STABILITY OFNON-AUTONOMOUS DISCRETE-TIME NEURAL NETWORKS WITH GENERALIZED INPUT-OUTPUT FUNCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮炯; 王军平; 郭德典

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we first introduce the model of discrete-time neural networks with generalized input-output function and present a proof of the existence of a fixed point by Schauder fixed-point principle. Secondly, we study the uniformly asymptotical stability of equilibrium in non-autonomous discrete-time neural networks and give some sufficient conditions that guarantee the stability of it by using the converse theorem of Lyapunov function. Finally, several examples and numerical simulations are given to illustrate and reinforce our theories.

  5. Acupuncture Effect and Central Autonomic Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Qian Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is a therapeutic technique and part of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. Acupuncture has clinical efficacy on various autonomic nerve-related disorders, such as cardiovascular diseases, epilepsy, anxiety and nervousness, circadian rhythm disorders, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS and subfertility. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that acupuncture can control autonomic nerve system (ANS functions including blood pressure, pupil size, skin conductance, skin temperature, muscle sympathetic nerve activities, heart rate and/or pulse rate, and heart rate variability. Emerging evidence indicates that acupuncture treatment not only activates distinct brain regions in different kinds of diseases caused by imbalance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic activities, but also modulates adaptive neurotransmitter in related brain regions to alleviate autonomic response. This review focused on the central mechanism of acupuncture in modulating various autonomic responses, which might provide neurobiological foundations for acupuncture effects.

  6. Assessment of Autonomic Function by Phase Rectification of RRInterval Histogram Analysis in Chagas Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivassé Nasari Junior

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In chronic Chagas disease (ChD, impairment of cardiac autonomic function bears prognostic implications. Phase‑rectification of RR-interval series isolates the sympathetic, acceleration phase (AC and parasympathetic, deceleration phase (DC influences on cardiac autonomic modulation. Objective: This study investigated heart rate variability (HRV as a function of RR-interval to assess autonomic function in healthy and ChD subjects. Methods: Control (n = 20 and ChD (n = 20 groups were studied. All underwent 60-min head-up tilt table test under ECG recording. Histogram of RR-interval series was calculated, with 100 ms class, ranging from 600–1100 ms. In each class, mean RR-intervals (MNN and root-mean-squared difference (RMSNN of consecutive normal RR-intervals that suited a particular class were calculated. Average of all RMSNN values in each class was analyzed as function of MNN, in the whole series (RMSNNT, and in AC (RMSNNAC and DC (RMSNNDC phases. Slopes of linear regression lines were compared between groups using Student t-test. Correlation coefficients were tested before comparisons. RMSNN was log-transformed. (α < 0.05. Results: Correlation coefficient was significant in all regressions (p < 0.05. In the control group, RMSNNT, RMSNNAC, and RMSNNDC significantly increased linearly with MNN (p < 0.05. In ChD, only RMSNNAC showed significant increase as a function of MNN, whereas RMSNNT and RMSNNDC did not. Conclusion: HRV increases in proportion with the RR-interval in healthy subjects. This behavior is lost in ChD, particularly in the DC phase, indicating cardiac vagal incompetence.

  7. Complex cooperative functions of heparan sulfate proteoglycans shape nervous system development in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Balzac, Carlos A; Lázaro-Peña, María I; Tecle, Eillen; Gomez, Nathali; Bülow, Hannes E

    2014-08-05

    The development of the nervous system is a complex process requiring the integration of numerous molecular cues to form functional circuits. Many cues are regulated by heparan sulfates, a class of linear glycosaminoglycan polysaccharides. These sugars contain distinct modification patterns that regulate protein-protein interactions. Misexpressing the homolog of KAL-1/anosmin-1, a neural cell adhesion molecule mutant in Kallmann syndrome, in Caenorhabditis elegans causes a highly penetrant, heparan sulfate-dependent axonal branching phenotype in AIY interneurons. In an extended forward genetic screen for modifiers of this phenotype, we identified alleles in new as well as previously identified genes involved in HS biosynthesis and modification, namely the xylosyltransferase sqv-6, the HS-6-O-sulfotransferase hst-6, and the HS-3-O-sulfotransferase hst-3.2. Cell-specific rescue experiments showed that different HS biosynthetic and modification enzymes can be provided cell-nonautonomously by different tissues to allow kal-1-dependent branching of AIY. In addition, we show that heparan sulfate proteoglycan core proteins that carry the heparan sulfate chains act genetically in a highly redundant fashion to mediate kal-1-dependent branching in AIY neurons. Specifically, lon-2/glypican and unc-52/perlecan act in parallel genetic pathways and display synergistic interactions with sdn-1/syndecan to mediate kal-1 function. Because all of these heparan sulfate core proteins have been shown to act in different tissues, these studies indicate that KAL-1/anosmin-1 requires heparan sulfate with distinct modification patterns of different cellular origin for function. Our results support a model in which a three-dimensional scaffold of heparan sulfate mediates KAL-1/anosmin-1 and intercellular communication through complex and cooperative interactions. In addition, the genes we have identified could contribute to the etiology of Kallmann syndrome in humans.

  8. Locus coeruleus lesions and PCOS: role of the central and peripheral sympathetic nervous system in the ovarian function of rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Zafari Zangeneh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a complex endocrine and metabolic disorder associated with ovulatory dysfunction”. “Autonomic and central nervous systems play important roles in the regulation of ovarian physiology”. The noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus (LC plays a central role in the regulation of the sympathetic nervous system and synaptically connected to the preganglionic cell bodies of the ovarian sympathetic pathway and its activation is essential to trigger spontaneous or induced LH surges. This study evaluates sympathetic outflow in central and peripheral pathways in PCO rats. Objective: Our objectives in this study were (1 to estimate LC activity in rats with estradiol valerate (EV-induced PCO; (2 to antagonized alpha2a adrenoceptor in systemic conditions with yohimbine. Materials and Methods: Forty two rats were divided into two groups: 1 LC and yohimbine and 2 control. Every group subdivided in two groups: eighteen rats were treated with estradiol valerate for induction of follicular cysts and the remainders were sesame oil groups. Results: Estradiol concentration was significantly augmented by the LC lesion in PCO rats (p<0.001, while LC lesion could not alter serum concentrations of LH and FSH, like yohimbine. The morphological observations of ovaries of LC lesion rats showed follicles with hyperthecosis, but yohimbine reduced the number of cysts, increased corpus lutea and developed follicles. Conclusion: Rats with EV-induced PCO increased sympathetic activity. LC lesion and yohimbine decreased the number of cysts and yohimbine increased corpus lutea and developed follicles in PCO rats.

  9. The muscle relaxant thiocolchicoside is an antagonist of GABAA receptor function in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, Mario; Murru, Luca; Botta, Paolo; Talani, Giuseppe; Sechi, GianPietro; De Riu, PierLuigi; Sanna, Enrico; Biggio, Giovanni

    2006-09-01

    Thiocolchicoside (TCC) is used clinically for its muscle relaxant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic properties, and it has been shown to interact with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors (GABAARs) and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in the rat central nervous system. In contrast to a proposed agonistic action at these two types of inhibitory receptors, pharmacological evidence has shown that, under certain conditions, TCC manifests convulsant activity in animals and humans. We now show that the phasic and tonic GABAAR-mediated currents recorded from Purkinje cells and granule neurons, respectively, in parasagittal cerebellar slices from adult male rats were inhibited by TCC in a concentration-dependent manner. The median inhibitory concentrations of TCC for these effects were approximately 0.15 and approximately 0.9 microM, respectively. TCC did not potentiate GABABR-mediated currents in hippocampal slices, suggesting that its muscle relaxant action is not mediated by GABABRs. Intraperitoneal injection of TCC in rats either alone or in combination with negative modulators of GABAergic transmission revealed convulsant and proconvulsant actions of this drug. Our data, consistent with clinical observations of the epileptogenic effect of this compound, suggest that TCC is a potent competitive antagonist of GABAAR function.

  10. [Effects of radio- and microwaves emitted by wireless communication devices on the functions of the nervous system selected elements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politański, Piotr; Bortkiewicz, Alicja; Zmyślony, Marek

    Nervous system is the most "electric" system in the human body. The research of the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) of different frequencies on its functioning have been carried out for years. This paper presents the results of the scientific literature review on the EMF influence on the functioning of the human nervous system with a particular emphasis on the recent studies of the modern wireless communication and data transmission systems. In the majority of the analyzed areas the published research results do not show EMF effects on the nervous system, except for the influence of GSM telephony signal on resting EEG and EEG during patients' sleep and the influence of radiofrequency EMF on the cardiovascular regulation. In other analyzed areas (EMF impact on sleep, the evoked potentials and cognitive processes), there are no consistent results supporting any influence of electromagnetic fields. Neurophysiological studies of the effect of radio- and microwaves on the brain functions in humans are still considered inconclusive. This is among others due to, different exposure conditions, a large number of variables tested, deficiencies in repeatability of research and statistical uncertainties. However, methodological guidelines are already available giving a chance of unifying research that definitely needs to be continued in order to identify biophysical mechanisms of interaction between EMFs and the nervous system. One of the EMF research aspects, on which more and more attention is paid, are inter-individual differences. Med Pr 2016;67(3):411-421.

  11. Autonomic dysfunction in cirrhosis and portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dümcke, Christine Winkler; Møller, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension are frequently associated with signs of circulatory dysfunction and peripheral polyneuropathy, which includes defects of the autonomic nervous system. Autonomic dysfunction, which is seen in both alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis and increases...

  12. 低氘白酒对人体心率变异性和自主神经的调控作用%Effects of deuterium-depleted Chinese liquor on heart rate variability and autonomic nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏红蕾; 石路; 沈才洪; 刘洪涛; 周军; 曾娜; 刘世龙; 李云辉; 丛峰松

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of deuterium-depleted Chinese liquor on heart rate variability(HRV),and evaluate the regulation of autonomic nervous system activity for cardiac function.Methods A total of 11 healthy adult male were enrolled,aged 21-25 years old with mean age of 23.7,and body weight (64.7 ± 4.5) kg.The study was divided into 7 groups:①control group(CK),without any alcoholic beverages; ②low-dose alcohol group(A-L),every day drinking 50 mL 52 degrees self-made alcohol + 200 mL water,③high-dose alcohol group (A-H),every day drinking 100 mL 52 degrees self-made alcohol + 200 mL water; ④low-dose ordinary Chinese liquor group (L-L),every day drinking 50 mL 52 degrees Luzhoulaojiao + 200mL water; ⑤high dose ordinary Chinese liquor group(L-H),every day drinking 100 mL 52 degrees Luzhoulaojiao + 200 mL water; ⑤low-dose deuterium-depleted Chinese liquor group(DDL-L),every day drinking 50 mL 52 degrees Luzhoulaojiao + 200 mL deuterium-depleted water;,⑦high-dose deuterium depleted Chinese liquor group (DDL-H),every day drinking 100 mL 52 degrees Luzhoulaojiao + 200 mL deuteriumdepleted water.The test was performed serial 8-day,the Biopac MP30 system was adopted to collect data of HRV 30-45 minutes after drinking and sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems were evaluated.Results The self-made alcoholic and traditional liquor made sympathetic atomic nerve activity and changed parasympathetic,the most was sympathetic nerve,but there was no significant changed in deuterium-depleted Chinese liquor.Conclusion It is demonstrated that the deuterium-depleted Chinese liquor is useful to maintain the balance of cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic nervous to the certain degree.%目的 研究连续8d急性摄入不同剂量自制酒精饮料、传统白酒和低氘白酒对人体心率变异性(HRV)和自主神经调控作用.方法 11例健康成年男性志愿者,体质量(64.7±4.5) kg,年龄21~25岁,平均年龄23.7岁.分为7个

  13. The serotonergic central nervous system of the Drosophila larva: anatomy and behavioral function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annina Huser

    Full Text Available The Drosophila larva has turned into a particularly simple model system for studying the neuronal basis of innate behaviors and higher brain functions. Neuronal networks involved in olfaction, gustation, vision and learning and memory have been described during the last decade, often up to the single-cell level. Thus, most of these sensory networks are substantially defined, from the sensory level up to third-order neurons. This is especially true for the olfactory system of the larva. Given the wealth of genetic tools in Drosophila it is now possible to address the question how modulatory systems interfere with sensory systems and affect learning and memory. Here we focus on the serotonergic system that was shown to be involved in mammalian and insect sensory perception as well as learning and memory. Larval studies suggested that the serotonergic system is involved in the modulation of olfaction, feeding, vision and heart rate regulation. In a dual anatomical and behavioral approach we describe the basic anatomy of the larval serotonergic system, down to the single-cell level. In parallel, by expressing apoptosis-inducing genes during embryonic and larval development, we ablate most of the serotonergic neurons within the larval central nervous system. When testing these animals for naïve odor, sugar, salt and light perception, no profound phenotype was detectable; even appetitive and aversive learning was normal. Our results provide the first comprehensive description of the neuronal network of the larval serotonergic system. Moreover, they suggest that serotonin per se is not necessary for any of the behaviors tested. However, our data do not exclude that this system may modulate or fine-tune a wide set of behaviors, similar to its reported function in other insect species or in mammals. Based on our observations and the availability of a wide variety of genetic tools, this issue can now be addressed.

  14. The serotonergic central nervous system of the Drosophila larva: anatomy and behavioral function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Annina; Rohwedder, Astrid; Apostolopoulou, Anthi A; Widmann, Annekathrin; Pfitzenmaier, Johanna E; Maiolo, Elena M; Selcho, Mareike; Pauls, Dennis; von Essen, Alina; Gupta, Tripti; Sprecher, Simon G; Birman, Serge; Riemensperger, Thomas; Stocker, Reinhard F; Thum, Andreas S

    2012-01-01

    The Drosophila larva has turned into a particularly simple model system for studying the neuronal basis of innate behaviors and higher brain functions. Neuronal networks involved in olfaction, gustation, vision and learning and memory have been described during the last decade, often up to the single-cell level. Thus, most of these sensory networks are substantially defined, from the sensory level up to third-order neurons. This is especially true for the olfactory system of the larva. Given the wealth of genetic tools in Drosophila it is now possible to address the question how modulatory systems interfere with sensory systems and affect learning and memory. Here we focus on the serotonergic system that was shown to be involved in mammalian and insect sensory perception as well as learning and memory. Larval studies suggested that the serotonergic system is involved in the modulation of olfaction, feeding, vision and heart rate regulation. In a dual anatomical and behavioral approach we describe the basic anatomy of the larval serotonergic system, down to the single-cell level. In parallel, by expressing apoptosis-inducing genes during embryonic and larval development, we ablate most of the serotonergic neurons within the larval central nervous system. When testing these animals for naïve odor, sugar, salt and light perception, no profound phenotype was detectable; even appetitive and aversive learning was normal. Our results provide the first comprehensive description of the neuronal network of the larval serotonergic system. Moreover, they suggest that serotonin per se is not necessary for any of the behaviors tested. However, our data do not exclude that this system may modulate or fine-tune a wide set of behaviors, similar to its reported function in other insect species or in mammals. Based on our observations and the availability of a wide variety of genetic tools, this issue can now be addressed.

  15. A review of nanoparticle functionality and toxicity on the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z; Liu, Z W; Allaker, R P; Reip, P; Oxford, J; Ahmad, Z; Ren, G

    2010-08-06

    Although nanoparticles have tremendous potential for a host of applications, their adverse effects on living cells have raised serious concerns recently for their use in the healthcare and consumer sectors. As regards the central nervous system (CNS), research data on nanoparticle interaction with neurons has provided evidence of both negative and positive effects. Maximal application dosage of nanoparticles in materials to provide applications such as antibacterial and antiviral functions is approximately 0.1-1.0 wt%. This concentration can be converted into a liquid phase release rate (leaching rate) depending upon the host or base materials used. For example, nanoparticulate silver (Ag) or copper oxide (CuO)-filled epoxy resin demonstrates much reduced release of the metal ions (Ag(+) or Cu(2+)) into their surrounding environment unless they are mechanically removed or aggravated. Subsequent to leaching effects and entry into living systems, nanoparticles can also cross through many other barriers, such as skin and the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and may also reach bodily organs. In such cases, their concentration or dosage in body fluids is considered to be well below the maximum drug toxicity test limit (10(-5) g ml(-1)) as determined in artificial cerebrospinal solution. As this is a rapidly evolving area and the use of such materials will continue to mature, so will their exposure to members of society. Hence, neurologists have equal interests in nanoparticle effects (positive functionality and negative toxicity) on human neuronal cells within the CNS, where the current research in this field will be highlighted and reviewed.

  16. The Effect of Nervous Peptide on the Senile Mice's Immunological Function at Sub-low Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Bin; MEI Dan; SUN Xinqi; GAO Mei; JIN Lianhai; ZHAO Xingyu

    2002-01-01

    Objective To research the effect of nervous peptide on senile mice' s immunological function at sub - low temperature environment. Methods Senile mice models were prepared with D galactose. Assayed the content of B - EP and L- EK、 proliferation response of splenic cell induced by ConA and LPS and the activities of IL - 1 and IL - 2 in senile mice as well. Results The content of β EP in plasma was obviously higher in control group and senile group of 10℃ or 5℃ than that in chamber temperature group (P < 0.01), the content of L- EK was higher in control group 5℃ than that in control group 10 ℃ and control chamber temperature group ( P < 0.01 or P < 0.05); at chamber temperature, the content of β - EP was also higher in senile mice than that in control group and lower than that in control group at 5℃ (P < 0.01). The proliferation response induced by ConA and LPS- two kinds of splenic cells, was obviously lower in group 10℃ and 5 ℃ than that in chamber temperature group ( P < 0.01 ), the proliferation response induced by ConA or LPS in senile group 10℃ were higher than in control group (P< 0.01). Compared with chamber temperature group,the IL- 1 activity of senile mice of 5℃ group and control mice of 10℃ and 5 ℃ group increased distinctively ( P < 0.01 ). Conclusion At 10℃ or 5 ℃temperature, the increasing of β - EP content and IL - 1 activity in senile mice had inhibited for the function of non - specific cell immunity and B cell.

  17. Adverse Impact of Sleep Restriction and Circadian Misalignment on Autonomic Function in Healthy Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Daniela; Carter, Jason R; Van Cauter, Eve; Leproult, Rachel

    2016-07-01

    Insufficient sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances have been each associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes in epidemiological studies, but experimental evidence for a causal link is scarce. The present study compares the impact of circadian misalignment (CM) to circadian alignment (CA) on human autonomic function using a nonrandomized parallel group design to achieve the same total sleep time in both conditions. After baseline assessments (3 days with 10-hour bedtimes), 26 healthy young adults were assigned to sleep restriction (SR; eight 5-hour bedtimes) with either fixed nocturnal bedtimes (CA; n=13) or bedtimes delayed by 8.5 hours on 4 of the 8 days (CM; n=13). Daytime ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate (HR; CA, n=11; CM, n=10) and 24-hour urinary norepinephrine levels (CA, n=13; CM, n=13) were assessed at baseline and the end of SR. Nocturnal HR and HR variability were analyzed during sleep at baseline and during the fourth and seventh nights of SR (CA, n=8; CM, n=12). SR resulted in a significant increase in daytime HR in both groups, without changes in blood pressure. SR increased 24-hour urinary norepinephrine in the CM group (30±4 versus 21±2 μg), but not in the circadian alignment group (group×condition, P=0.005). In contrast to the lack of detectable impact of CM on daytime autonomic function, SR with CM elicited greater increases in nocturnal HR, as well as greater reductions in vagal indices of HR variability, than SR without CM (group×condition, P<0.05). In conclusion, SR and CM both result in impaired autonomic function that could lead, under chronic conditions, to enhanced cardiovascular risk.

  18. Functional Based Adaptive and Fuzzy Sliding Controller for Non-Autonomous Active Suspension System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shiuh-Jer; Chen, Hung-Yi

    In this paper, an adaptive sliding controller is developed for controlling a vehicle active suspension system. The functional approximation technique is employed to substitute the unknown non-autonomous functions of the suspension system and release the model-based requirement of sliding mode control algorithm. In order to improve the control performance and reduce the implementation problem, a fuzzy strategy with online learning ability is added to compensate the functional approximation error. The update laws of the functional approximation coefficients and the fuzzy tuning parameters are derived from the Lyapunov theorem to guarantee the system stability. The proposed controller is implemented on a quarter-car hydraulic actuating active suspension system test-rig. The experimental results show that the proposed controller suppresses the oscillation amplitude of the suspension system effectively.

  19. Pulmonary function tests in type 1 diabetes adolescents with diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ďurdík, Peter; Vojtková, Jarmila; Michnová, Zuzana; Turčan, Tomáš; Šujanská, Anna; Kuchta, Milan; Čiljaková, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diabetic complications may afflict all organ tissues including cardiovascular and respiratory system. The aim of the study was to establish if the presence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) was associated with impaired pulmonary function tests in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D). 46 adolescents with T1D and 25 healthy subjects at the age 15-19years were enrolled to the study. Basic anthropometric data, diabetes onset and duration, plasma glucose and A1c were established. Pulmonary function tests were measured by spirometry and the presence of CAN was examined by heart rate variability. Adolescents with T1D had significantly lower pulmonary function test parameters - FVC (ppulmonary functions in adolescents with T1D.

  20. Autonomic Nervous System Mediates the Hypotensive Effects of Aqueous and Residual Methanolic Extracts of Syzygium polyanthum (Wight) Walp. var. polyanthum Leaves in Anaesthetized Rats

    OpenAIRE

    A.Ismail; Mohamed, M.; Sulaiman, S. A.; Wan Ahmad, W. A. N.

    2013-01-01

    Syzygium polyanthum (Wight) Walp. var. polyanthum leaves are consumed as a traditional Malay treatment of hypertension. This study investigates hypotensive potential of aqueous (AESP) and residual methanolic (met-AESP) extracts of S. polyanthum leaves and possible involvement of autonomic receptors. AESP and met-AESP (20 to 100 mg/kg) were intravenously administered into anaesthetized Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. Blood pressure and heart were monitored for 20 ...

  1. Sexual features of the old rats’ autonomic nervous system response to the development of necrotic process in heart on the background of melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Khara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. An effect of melatonin on the autonomic regulation of the heart in terms of damage was studied in adult and old male and female rats. Methods and results. Necrotic process in the myocardium was caused by the injection of epinephrine (1 mg / kg, single dose, intramuscular 1 h after injection of melatonin (5 mg / kg intravenous. In 1 and 24 hours after administration of epinephrine heart rate was determined and features of autonomic regulation of the heart on indicators Mo (mode, AMo (mode amplitude, ΔH (variation range of cardio intervals, and SI (stress index of regulatory mechanisms were evaluated. It was found that the effects of melatonin aimed at increasing the role of cholinergic ANS link in the formation of heart rate and reducing the adrenergic participation in the body of older individuals significantly decreased. To a greater extent this applies to older males. In the dynamics of adrenalin necrosis the character of vegetative regulation of heart rate of old rats reflects greater, than in adults, role of adrenergic link in animals of both sexes and reduce of the impact of cholinergic one – only in older males, which resulted in a significant tension of regulatory mechanisms. Conclusion. The obtained results show that with increasing age in rats effectiveness of melatonin as a drug which can affect the autonomic regulation of the heart by activating cardio-protective effects decreases, especially in male rats.

  2. Autonomic Nervous System Mediates the Hypotensive Effects of Aqueous and Residual Methanolic Extracts of Syzygium polyanthum (Wight Walp. var. polyanthum Leaves in Anaesthetized Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Syzygium polyanthum (Wight Walp. var. polyanthum leaves are consumed as a traditional Malay treatment of hypertension. This study investigates hypotensive potential of aqueous (AESP and residual methanolic (met-AESP extracts of S. polyanthum leaves and possible involvement of autonomic receptors. AESP and met-AESP (20 to 100 mg/kg were intravenously administered into anaesthetized Wistar-Kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR rats. Blood pressure and heart were monitored for 20 min. AESP and met-AESP induced significant dose-dependent hypotension, but only 100 mg/kg AESP caused mild bradycardia (n=5. AESP-induced hypotension was more potent than that of met-AESP in WKY. AESP has a faster onset time than that of met-AESP in both WKY and SHR. However, met-AESP-induced hypotension was more sustained than that of AESP in SHR. Blockages of autonomic ganglion and α-adrenergic receptors using hexamethonium and phentolamine (n=5 for each group partially attenuated AESP-induced hypotension, suggesting involvement of α-adrenergic receptors. Blockages of autonomic ganglion, β-adrenergic, cholinergic receptors, and nitric oxide production using hexamethonium, propranolol, atropine, and N-ω-nitro-l arginine methyl ester (L-NAME (n=5 for each group partially attenuated met-AESP-induced hypotension, suggesting involvement of β-adrenergic and cholinergic receptors via nitric oxide production.

  3. Autonomic Nervous System Mediates the Hypotensive Effects of Aqueous and Residual Methanolic Extracts of Syzygium polyanthum (Wight) Walp. var. polyanthum Leaves in Anaesthetized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, A; Mohamed, M; Sulaiman, S A; Wan Ahmad, W A N

    2013-01-01

    Syzygium polyanthum (Wight) Walp. var. polyanthum leaves are consumed as a traditional Malay treatment of hypertension. This study investigates hypotensive potential of aqueous (AESP) and residual methanolic (met-AESP) extracts of S. polyanthum leaves and possible involvement of autonomic receptors. AESP and met-AESP (20 to 100 mg/kg) were intravenously administered into anaesthetized Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. Blood pressure and heart were monitored for 20 min. AESP and met-AESP induced significant dose-dependent hypotension, but only 100 mg/kg AESP caused mild bradycardia (n = 5). AESP-induced hypotension was more potent than that of met-AESP in WKY. AESP has a faster onset time than that of met-AESP in both WKY and SHR. However, met-AESP-induced hypotension was more sustained than that of AESP in SHR. Blockages of autonomic ganglion and α -adrenergic receptors using hexamethonium and phentolamine (n = 5 for each group) partially attenuated AESP-induced hypotension, suggesting involvement of α -adrenergic receptors. Blockages of autonomic ganglion, β -adrenergic, cholinergic receptors, and nitric oxide production using hexamethonium, propranolol, atropine, and N- ω -nitro-l arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (n = 5 for each group) partially attenuated met-AESP-induced hypotension, suggesting involvement of β -adrenergic and cholinergic receptors via nitric oxide production.

  4. CaMKII is essential for the function of the enteric nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ca(2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs are major downstream mediators of neuronal calcium signaling that regulate multiple neuronal functions. CaMKII, one of the key CaMKs, plays a significant role in mediating cellular responses to external signaling molecules. Although calcium signaling plays an essential role in the enteric nervous system (ENS, the role of CaMKII in neurogenic intestinal function has not been determined. In this study, we investigated the function and expression pattern of CaMKII in the ENS across several mammalian species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CaMKII expression was characterized by immunofluorescence analyses and Western Blot. CaMKII function was examined by intracellular recordings and by assays of colonic contractile activity. Immunoreactivity for CaMKII was detected in the ENS of guinea pig, mouse, rat and human preparations. In guinea pig ENS, CaMKII immunoreactivity was enriched in both nitric oxide synthase (NOS- and calretinin-containing myenteric plexus neurons and non-cholinergic secretomotor/vasodilator neurons in the submucosal plexus. CaMKII immunoreactivity was also expressed in both cholinergic and non-cholinergic neurons in the ENS of mouse, rat and human. The selective CaMKII inhibitor, KN-62, suppressed stimulus-evoked purinergic slow EPSPs and ATP-induced slow EPSP-like response in guinea pig submucosal plexus, suggesting that CaMKII activity is required for some metabotropic synaptic transmissions in the ENS. More importantly, KN-62 significantly suppressed tetrodotoxin-induced contractile response in mouse colon, which suggests that CaMKII activity is a major determinant of the tonic neurogenic inhibition of this tissue. CONCLUSION: ENS neurons across multiple mammalian species express CaMKII. CaMKII signaling constitutes an important molecular mechanism for controlling intestinal motility and secretion by regulating the excitability of musculomotor and secretomotor

  5. [Autonomic neuropathy: a high risk complication for type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss-Freitas, Maria Cristina; Marques Junior, Wilson; Foss, Milton Cesar

    2008-03-01

    The pathological alteration of the nervous system in diabetic patients is extensive and frequently severe. The prevalence of the diabetic neuropathy reach high levels with the evolution of the diabetes, often showing frequencies higher than 50% in several groups of patients. The neurological lesion in this pathological situation is extensive in the diabetic patient, including widely the peripheral nervous system with its components sensory, motor and autonomic: with typical symptoms and in accordance with the pathogenesis of metabolic origin and/or microvascular disease. The autonomic nervous system is a main regulator of many systems in the human body. Then its lesion can promote significant alterations in the function of the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, urogenital system, that can be related to increased motality. This review anlyses the abnormalities related to lesion of the autonomic nervous system, particularly in type 1 diabetic patients, trying to characterize the risk of morbidity and mortality.

  6. Effect of exercise on cardiac autonomic function in females with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janse van Rensburg, Dina C; Ker, James A; Grant, Catharina C; Fletcher, Lizelle

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of exercise on cardiac autonomic function as measured by short-term heart rate variability (HRV) in females suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Females with confirmed RA were randomly assigned to an exercise group (RAE) and a sedentary group (RAC). RAE was required to train under supervision two to three times per week, for 3 months. Three techniques (time domain, frequency domain and Poincaré plot analyses) were used to measure HRV at baseline and study completion. At baseline, RAC (n = 18) had a significantly higher variability compared to RAE (n = 19) for most HRV indicators. At study completion, the variables showing significant changes (p = 0.01 to 0.05) favoured RAE in all instances. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were performed to assess changes within groups from start to end. RAE showed significant improvement for most of the standing variables, including measurements of combined autonomic influence, e.g. SDRR (p = 0.002) and variables indicating only vagal influence, e.g. pNN50 (p = 0.014). RAC mostly deteriorated with emphasis on variables measuring vagal influence (RMSSD, pNN50, SD1 and HF (ms(2)). Study results indicated that 12 weeks of exercise intervention had a positive effect on cardiac autonomic function as measured by short-term HRV, in females with RA. Several of the standing variables indicated improved vagal influence on the heart rate. Exercise can thus potentially be used as an instrument to improve cardiac health in a patient group known for increased cardiac morbidity.

  7. 自主神经介导性晕厥儿童消化道症状临床分析%Clinical significance of abdominal pain and other gastrointestinal manifestations in children with autonomic nervous-mediated syncope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫辉; 张春雨; 杜军保; 金红芳

    2013-01-01

    目的 认识自主神经介导性晕厥患儿中腹痛等消化道表现的临床意义.方法 2009年1月至2012年3月在北京大学第一医院儿科住院诊断为自主神经介导性晕厥及心因性发作的患儿共108例,对患儿发作前及直立倾斜试验(HUT)中诱发的腹痛、恶心、呕吐等消化道症状进行临床研究.结果 108例患儿中,男49例(45.4%),女59例(54.6%).年龄5~ 17岁(中位年龄11岁).共33例(35.5%)自主神经介导性晕厥患儿在发作前出现胃肠道不适,15例(16.1%)表现为腹痛,20例(21.5%)恶心,12例(12.9%)呕吐.27例(40.9%)在HUT时诱发出胃肠道表现,6例(9.1%)HUT时诱发出腹痛,24例(36.4%)恶心.共39例(59.1%)在发作前或HUT时出现消化道表现.HUT时出现的消化道表现在体位性心动过速综合征(POTS)患儿和血管迷走性晕厥(vvs)患几分别达到40%及41.5%,心因性发作组为0;发作前及HUT时患儿消化道表现在POTS及VVS组分别达到60%及58.5%,明显高于心因性发作(10%)组(P<0.05).自主神经介导性晕厥患儿发作前及HUT时出现消化道症状的危险度是心因性发作患儿的13倍(95%CI均>1).结论 消化道表现是自主神经介导性晕厥的常见症状之一,对于发作前及HUT时发生腹痛、恶心患儿,需注意自主神经介导性晕厥的可能.剧烈腹痛可作为自主神经介导性晕厥的伴随症状.%Objective To investigate the clinical significance of abdominal pain and other gastrointestinal manifestations in autonomic nervous-mediated syncope in children. Methods A total of 108 cases treated in our hospital because of autonomic nervous-mediated syncope or psychogenic pseudosyncope from Jan. 2009 to Mar. 2012 were recruited. The incidences of gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting before the onset of syncope attack and during upright tilt test processes were analyzed in children with autonomic nervous system-mediated syncope

  8. Topography and function of androgen-metabolizing enzymes in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruo, Yoshihiro

    2005-03-01

    The present review describes concisely the topography and function of the three androgen-metabolizing enzymes, namely aromatase, 5alpha-reductase and 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, in the central nervous system (CNS). Aromatase, estrogen synthetase, is the key enzyme for converting androgens to estrogens. Aromatase is indispensable for the sexual differentiation of the brain and the enzyme activity and expression of aromatase are high during the critical period of neural development, which extends from the late embryonal to the early neonatal period in rodents. Aromatase is expressed in neurons within specific hypothalamic and limbic regions. The locations of aromatase-immunoreactive neurons are divided into three groups according to the period of enzyme expression. Steroid 5alpha-reductase converts a number of steroids with a C3 ketone group and a C4-C5 double bond (delta4; androgens, progestins and glucocorticoids) to their 5alpha-reduced metabolites. Two isoforms of 5alpha-reductase are found and type 1 is predominant in neural tissues. The enzyme activity of 5alpha-reductase is found widely in the CNS and is high in white matter regions. The enzyme expression of 5alpha-reductase peaks during the late embryonic period. 3alpha-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase is the oxidoreductase that interconverts 3-ketosteroids to 3alpha-hydroxysteroids. Four isozymes have been found in humans and only one type has been found in rats. The enzyme converts 5alpha-reduced steroids (e.g. 5alpha-dihydroprogesterone) to tetrahydrosteroids (e.g. 3alpha,5alpha-tetrahydroprogesterone). The latter steroid is a potent stimulator of the GABA(A) receptor. The activity of 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase is high during the first 1-2 postnatal weeks, decreases with development and this enzyme is highly expressed in astrocytes.

  9. Physiology of school burnout in medical students: Hemodynamic and autonomic functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross W. May

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relationship between burnout and hemodynamic and autonomic functioning in both medical students (N = 55 and premedical undergraduate students (N = 77. Questionnaires screened for health related issues and assessed school burnout and negative affect symptomatology (anxiety and depression. Continuous beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP through finger plethysmography and electrocardiogram (ECG monitoring was conducted during conditions of baseline and cardiac stress induced via the cold pressor task to produce hemodynamic, heart rate variability, and blood pressure variability indices. Independent sample t-tests demonstrated that medical students had significantly higher school burnout scores compared to their undergraduate counterparts. Controlling for age, BMI, anxiety and depressive symptoms, multiple regression analyses indicated that school burnout was a stronger predictor of elevated hemodynamics (blood pressure, decreased heart rate variability, decreased markers of vagal activity and increased markers of sympathetic tone at baseline for medical students than for undergraduates. Analyses of physiological values collected during the cold pressor task indicated greater cardiac hyperactivity for medical students than for undergraduates. The present study supports previous research linking medical school burnout to hemodynamic and autonomic functioning, suggests biomarkers for medical school burnout, and provides evidence that burnout may be implicated as a physiological risk factor in medical students. Study limitations and potential intervention avenues are discussed.

  10. Effect of 48 h Fasting on Autonomic Function, Brain Activity, Cognition, and Mood in Amateur Weight Lifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solianik, Rima; Sujeta, Artūras; Terentjevienė, Asta; Skurvydas, Albertas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The acute fasting-induced cardiovascular autonomic response and its effect on cognition and mood remain debatable. Thus, the main purpose of this study was to estimate the effect of a 48 h, zero-calorie diet on autonomic function, brain activity, cognition, and mood in amateur weight lifters. Methods. Nine participants completed a 48 h, zero-calorie diet program. Cardiovascular autonomic function, resting frontal brain activity, cognitive performance, and mood were evaluated before and after fasting. Results. Fasting decreased (p Fasting decreased (p Fasting also increased (p fasting resulted in higher parasympathetic activity and decreased resting frontal brain activity, increased anger, and improved prefrontal-cortex-related cognitive functions, such as mental flexibility and set shifting, in amateur weight lifters. In contrast, hippocampus-related cognitive functions were not affected by it.

  11. Origin of heart rate variability and turbulence: an appraisal of autonomic modulation of cardiovascular function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico eLombardi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of autonomic modulation of sinus node by non-invasive techniques has provided relevant clinical information in patients with several cardiac and non-cardiac diseases and has facilitated the appraisal of neural regulatory mechanisms in normal and diseased subjects. The finding that even during resting conditions the heart period changes on a beat to beat basis and that after a premature ventricular beat there are small variations in RR interval whose measurements may be utilised to evaluate the autonomic modulation of sinus node, has provided unprecedented clinical and pathophysiological information. Heart rate variability (HRV and Heart Rate Turbulence (HRT have been extensively utilised in the clinical setting. To explain the negative predictive value of a reduced HRV it was determined that overall HRV was largely dependent on vagal mechanisms and that a reduction in HRV could reflect an increased sympathetic and a reduced vagal modulation of sinus node; i.e. an autonomic alteration favouring cardiac electrical instability. This initial interpretation was challenged by several findings indicating a greater complexity of the relationship between neural input and sinus node responsiveness as well as the possible interference with non-neural mechanisms.Under controlled conditions, however, the computation of low and high frequency components and of their ratio seems capable of providing adequate information on sympatho-vagal balance in normal subjects as well as in most patients with a preserved left ventricular function, thus providing a unique tool to investigate neural control mechanisms. Analysis on non-linear dynamics of HRV has also been utilised to describe the fractal like characteristic of the variability signal and proven effective to identify patients at risk for sudden cardiac death. A reduction on HRT parameters reflecting reduced baroreflex sensitivity as a likely result of a reduced vagal and of an increased sympathetic

  12. Gene expression, autonomic function and chronic hypoxia:lessons from the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appenzeller, Otto; Minko, Tamara; Qualls, Clifford; Pozharov, Vitaly; Gamboa, Jorge; Gamboa, Alfredo; Wang, Yang

    2006-06-01

    Autonomic function is altered by altitude in sojourners and natives. We hypothesized that these physiologic responses are modulated by changes in gene expression. We compared gene product levels in 20 natives of Cerro de Pasco (CP), (4338 m), 10 of which had chronic mountain sickness (CMS) established by a CMS-scoring system, with gene products in the same men after 1 h at sea level. We further compared the results with those obtained from 10 US men residing at 1500 m. We measured gene products in white cells by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We focused on genes important in vascular autonomic physiology, and/or activated by hypoxia; hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF 1-alpha), 2 splicing variants of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF); VEGF-121, VEGF-165, and phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK 1). Normal CP natives showed high expression of all genes in CP, compared to US controls. Within 1 h of arrival at sea level, they had comparable levels to US residents. In CMS, the gene products were higher in CP. Although gene products decreased in Lima in this group, they never reached US values. VEGF 121 and 165 were correlated (P<0.001). VEGF 165 was higher in CMS in CP (P=0.006), and was positively correlated with CMS-score (R=0.86, P<0.001), and negatively correlated with arterial saturation (R=-0.79, P<0.001). Our findings underscore the changes in gene expression levels in intact humans in response to environmental stress. These changes may support the physiologic alterations induced by the ambient hypoxia at altitude and impact organism survival. They also suggest therapeutic strategies for autonomic and neurodegenerative diseases at sea level.

  13. REVIEW ARTICLE: In vivo magnetic resonance imaging: insights into structure and function of the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natt, Oliver; Frahm, Jens

    2005-04-01

    Spatially resolved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques provide structural, metabolic and functional insights into the central nervous system and allow for repetitive in vivo studies of both humans and animals. Complementing its prominent role in diagnostic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into an indispensable research tool in system-oriented neurobiology where contributions to functional genomics and translational medicine bridge the gap from molecular biology to animal models and clinical applications. This review presents an overview on some of the most relevant advances in MRI. An introduction covering the basic principles is followed by a discussion of technological improvements in instrumentation and imaging sequences including recent developments in parallel acquisition techniques. Because MRI is noninvasive in contrast to most other imaging modalities, examples focus on in vivo studies of the central nervous system in a variety of species ranging from humans to mice and insects.

  14. microRNA involvement in developmental and functional aspects of the nervous system and in neurological diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette; Schratt, Gerhard M

    2009-01-01

    and early differentiation as well as in later stages of neuronal development, such as dendritogenesis and synaptic plasticity. A link between microRNAs and neurological diseases, such as neurodegeneration or synaptic dysfunction, is becoming increasingly clear. This review summarizes the current knowledge...... of the function of microRNAs in the developing and adult nervous system and their potential contribution to the etiology of neurological diseases....

  15. A comparative study of lipid profile and autonomic functions in vegetarian and non-vegetarian postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunima Chaudhuri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of dyslipedaemia, autonomic dysfunction leading to cardiovascular diseases, increases with menopause and an ageing population. Autonomic dysfunction as measured by lower heart rate variability is an established risk factor for cardiac death. Diet and nutrition have been extensively investigated as risk factors for major cardiovascular diseases and are also linked to other cardiovascular risk factors. Objectives: To compare lipid profile and autonomic functions of postmenopausal women on vegetarian and non- vegetarian diet. Materials and Methods: 120 Postmenopausal women (menopausal duration and age-matched without any gross systemic disease from an Industrial population were selected. Sixty women were on vegetarian diet and 60 on non-vegetarian diet. BMI and waist/hip ratios were calculated, lipid profile was analyzed, and autonomic function tests were carried out. A comparison was done between the two groups using Students t test. Pearson′s correlation coefficient was calculated between the independent variable (lipid profile parameters and the dependent variables (deep breath test, valsalva ratio, 30:15 ratio, OTT, IHG, CPT to understand the effect of lipid profile on autonomic control of heart. Results : Significant increases in total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, cholesterol/HDL ratio were noticed in women on non-vegetarian diet. Results of autonomic function tests, i.e. valsalva ratio, deep breath test, 30: 15R-R intervals ratio, isometric hand grip test, cold pressor test, and orthostatic tolerance test were significantly worsened in postmenopausal women on non-vegetarian diet. Conclusion: Dietary factors may be an important cause of alteration of lipid metabolism. Increased cholesterol decreases heart rate variability and increased LDL cholesterol decreases baroreceptor sensitivity thereby worsening autonomic functions in postmenopausal women.

  16. Working activity hygiene, central nervous system and attention function parameters of the working females at knitting enterprises of Uzbekistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Iskandarov

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Last years in Uzbekistan the knitted manufactures have developed intensively, supplied with the new equipment and modern technologies which result in change of working conditions at the knitted-goods enterprises, in increase of intensity, strained nervous-emotional state and intellectuality of working processes. The purpose was to reveal influence of working conditions of the working women of knitted manufactures on dynamics of working activity, on the central nervous system and functions of attention. The healthy working women of the Tashkent knitted manufactures making a knitted cloth and wears (knitters, seamstresses, ironers at the age from 20 till 40 years with the operational experience from 2 till 20 years were enrolled in this study. It was established that of all unfavourable factors that effect on the reduction of the working activity the air dust contamination accounts for 13.6%, noise 13.6% and light exposure of workplace 32.4%. For decrease of a functional strain of the central nervous system and function of attention of the working women it is necessary to introduce the rational mode of work and rest as well as measures for improvement of working conditions.

  17. On the existence and function of galanin receptor heteromers in the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell eFuxe

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Galanin receptor (GalR subtypes1-3 linked to central galanin neurons may form heteromers with each other and other types of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs in the Central Nervous System (CNS. These heteromers may be one molecular mechanism for galanin peptides and their N-terminal fragments (gal 1-15 to modulate the function of different types of glia-neuronal networks in the CNS, especially the emotional and the cardiovascular networks. GalR-5-HT1A heteromers likely exist with antagonistic GalR-5-HT1A receptor-receptor interactions in the ascending midbrain raphe 5-HT neuron systems and their target regions. They represent a novel target for antidepressant drugs. Evidence is given for the existence of GalR1-5-HT1A heteromers in cellular models with transinhibition of the protomer signaling. A GalR1-GalR2 heteromer is proposed to be a galanin N-terminal fragment preferring receptor (1-15 in the CNS. Furthermore, a GalR1-GalR2-5-HT1A heterotrimer is postulated to explain why only galanin (1-15 but not galanin (1-29 can antagonistically modulate the 5-HT1A receptors in the dorsal hippocampus rich in gal fragment binding sites. The results underline a putative role of different types of GalR-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complexes in depression. GalR antagonists may also have therapeutic actions in depression by blocking the antagonistic GalR-NPYY1 receptor interactions in putative GalR-NPYY1 receptor heteromers in the CNS resulting in increases in NPYY1 transmission and antidepressant effects. In contrast the galanin fragment receptor (a postulated GalR1-GalR2 heteromer appears to be linked to the NPYY2 receptor enhancing the affinity of the NPYY2 binding sites in a putative GalR1-GalR2-NPYY2 heterotrimer. Finally, putative GalR-α2-adrenoreceptor heteromers with antagonistic receptor-receptor interactions may be a widespread mechanism in the CNS for integration of galanin and noradrenaline signals also of likely relevance for depression.

  18. 特发性室早气阴两虚证患者自主神经功能的变化%Changes of Autonomic Nerve Function in Premature Ventricular Contraction Beats Patients with Deficiency of both Qi and Yin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮小芬; 王肖龙; 张一乐; 徐燕; 龚菊芬; 吴昉怡

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨气阴两虚证室早患者自主神经功能变化的特点.方法 与30例健康对照组相比较,分析41例室早患者自主神经功能各项指标变化,及室早、中医证候与自主神经功能的相关性.结果 室早组患者的SDANN、rMSSD、PNN50显著降低,室早患者中医证候积分与rMSSD、PNN50显著负相关.结论 气阴两虚证室早患者存在迷走神经功能显著降低及交感神经功能亢进,室早临床症状产生与迷走神经功能低下相关.%Objective: To observe the characteristics of autonomic nerve function in premature ventricular contraction beats(PVC) patients. Methods: Compared with 30 healthy controls,the autonomic nervous function of 41 cases PVC patients and the relationship between ventricular premature, the clinical symptoms and autonomic nervous function were analysed. Results: SDANN, rMSSD, and PNN50 were significantly lower in patients with PVC. TCM syndrome and rMSSD, PNN50 was significantly negative correlation. Conclusions: The vagus nerve function are decreased and the sympathetic nerve functionin is hyperthyroidism in PVC patients of both deficiency qi and Yin. clinical symptoms have associated with the vagus nerve function.

  19. Vagus nerve stimulation: state of the art of stimulation and recording strategies to address autonomic function neuromodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraud, David; Andreu, David; Bonnet, Stéphane; Carrault, Guy; Couderc, Pascal; Hagège, Albert; Henry, Christine; Hernandez, Alfredo; Karam, Nicole; Le Rolle, Virginie; Mabo, Philippe; Maciejasz, Paweł; Malbert, Charles-Henri; Marijon, Eloi; Maubert, Sandrine; Picq, Chloé; Rossel, Olivier; Bonnet, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Neural signals along the vagus nerve (VN) drive many somatic and autonomic functions. The clinical interest of VN stimulation (VNS) is thus potentially huge and has already been demonstrated in epilepsy. However, side effects are often elicited, in addition to the targeted neuromodulation. Approach. This review examines the state of the art of VNS applied to two emerging modulations of autonomic function: heart failure and obesity, especially morbid obesity. Main results. We report that VNS may benefit from improved stimulation delivery using very advanced technologies. However, most of the results from fundamental animal studies still need to be demonstrated in humans.

  20. Auditory driving of the autonomic nervous system: Listening to theta-frequency binaural beats post-exercise increases parasympathetic activation and sympathetic withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Patrick A; Froeliger, Brett; Garland, Eric L; Ives, Jeffrey C; Sforzo, Gary A

    2014-01-01

    Binaural beats are an auditory illusion perceived when two or more pure tones of similar frequencies are presented dichotically through stereo headphones. Although this phenomenon is thought to facilitate state changes (e.g., relaxation), few empirical studies have reported on whether binaural beats produce changes in autonomic arousal. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of binaural beating on autonomic dynamics [heart rate variability (HRV)] during post-exercise relaxation. Subjects (n = 21; 18-29 years old) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study during which binaural beats and placebo were administered over two randomized and counterbalanced sessions (within-subjects repeated-measures design). At the onset of each visit, subjects exercised for 20-min; post-exercise, subjects listened to either binaural beats ('wide-band' theta-frequency binaural beats) or placebo (carrier tones) for 20-min while relaxing alone in a quiet, low-light environment. Dependent variables consisted of high-frequency (HF, reflecting parasympathetic activity), low-frequency (LF, reflecting sympathetic and parasympathetic activity), and LF/HF normalized powers, as well as self-reported relaxation. As compared to the placebo visit, the binaural-beat visit resulted in greater self-reported relaxation, increased parasympathetic activation and increased sympathetic withdrawal. By the end of the 20-min relaxation period there were no observable differences in HRV between binaural-beat and placebo visits, although binaural-beat associated HRV significantly predicted subsequent reported relaxation. Findings suggest that listening to binaural beats may exert an acute influence on both LF and HF components of HRV and may increase subjective feelings of relaxation.

  1. Structural and functional effects of heavy metals on the nervous system, including sense organs, of fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, E

    1991-01-01

    metals are well known pollutants in the aquatic environment. Their interaction with relevant chemical stimuli may interfere with the communication between fish and environment. 5. The affinity for a number of ligands and macromolecules makes heavy metals most potent neurotoxins. 6. The present Mini......1. Today, fish in the environment are inevitably exposed to chemical pollution. Although most hazardous substances are present at concentrations far below the lethal level, they may still cause serious damage to the life processes of these animals. 2. Fish depend on an intact nervous system......, including their sense organs, for mediating relevant behaviour such as food search, predator recognition, communication and orientation. 3. Unfortunately, the nervous system is most vulnerable and injuries to its elements may dramatically change the behaviour and consequently the survival of fish. 4. Heavy...

  2. Paring down on Descartes: a review of brain noradrenaline and sympathetic nervous function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, G W

    2001-12-01

    1. The conceptual framework of mind-body interaction can be traced back to the seminal observations of the French philosopher and mathematician René Descartes (1596-1650). Descartes succeeded in eliminating the soul's apparent physiological role and established the brain as the body's control centre. 2. While the pivotal role played by the central nervous system (CNS) in the maintenance of physiological and psychological health has long been recognized, the development of methods designed for the direct examination of human CNS processes has only recently come to fruition. 3. There exists a substantial body of evidence derived from clinical and experimental studies indicating that CNS monoaminergic cell groups, in particular those using noradrenaline as their neurotransmitter, participate in the excitatory regulation of the sympathetic nervous system and the development and maintenance of the hypertensive state. 4. In essential hypertension, particularly in younger patients, there occurs an activation of sympathetic nervous outflows to the kidneys, heart and skeletal muscle. The existence of a correlation between subcortical brain noradrenaline turnover and total body noradrenaline spillover to plasma, resting blood pressure and heart rate provides further support for the observation that elevated subcortical noradrenergic activity subserves a sympathoexcitatory role in the regulation of sympathetic preganglionic neurons of the thorocolumbar cord.

  3. ADAMTS expression and function in central nervous system injury and disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschall, Paul E.; Howell, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    The components of the adult extracellular matrix in the central nervous system form a lattice-like structure that is deposited as perineuronal nets, around axon initial segments and as synapse-associated matrix. An abundant component of this matrix is the lecticans, chondroitin sulfate-bearing proteoglycans that are the major substrate for several members of the ADAMTSs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs) family. Since lecticans are key regulators of neural plasticity, ADAMTS cleavage of lecticans would likely also contribute to neuroplasticity. Indeed, many studies have examined the neuroplastic contribution of the ADAMTSs to damage and recovery after injury and in central nervous system disease. Much of this data supports a role for the ADAMTSs in recovery and repair following spinal cord injury by stimulating axonal outgrowth after degradation of a glial scar and improving synaptic plasticity following seizure-induced neural damage in the brain. The action of the ADAMTSs in chronic diseases of the central nervous system appears to be more complex and less well-defined. Increasing evidence indicates that lecticans participate in synaptic plasticity in neurodegenerative disease states. It will be interesting to examine how ADAMTS expression and action would affect the progression of these diseases. PMID:25622912

  4. Examining the Roles of Work Autonomous and Controlled Motivations on Satisfaction and Anxiety as a Function of Role Ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Nicolas; Fouquereau, Evelyne; Lafrenière, Marc-André K; Huyghebaert, Tiphaine

    2016-07-03

    Past research in the self-determination theory has shown that autonomous motivation is associated with positive outcomes (e.g., work satisfaction), whereas controlled motivation is related to negative outcomes (e.g., anxiety). The purpose of the present research was to examine the moderating function of role ambiguity on the relationships between work autonomous and controlled motivations on the one hand, and work satisfaction and anxiety on the other. Six hundred and ninety-eight workers (449 men and 249 women) participated in this study. Results revealed that autonomous motivation was most strongly related to satisfaction when ambiguity was low. In addition, controlled motivation was most strongly related to anxiety when ambiguity was high. In other words, the present findings suggest that the outcomes associated with each form of motivation may vary as a function of role ambiguity. The present study thus offers meaningful insights for organizations, managers, and employees.

  5. Perception system and functions for autonomous navigation in a natural environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatila, Raja; Devy, Michel; Lacroix, Simon; Herrb, Matthieu

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the approach, algorithms, and processes we developed for the perception system of a cross-country autonomous robot. After a presentation of the tele-programming context we favor for intervention robots, we introduce an adaptive navigation approach, well suited for the characteristics of complex natural environments. This approach lead us to develop a heterogeneous perception system that manages several different terrain representatives. The perception functionalities required during navigation are listed, along with the corresponding representations we consider. The main perception processes we developed are presented. They are integrated within an on-board control architecture we developed. First results of an ambitious experiment currently underway at LAAS are then presented.

  6. Relationship between inflammatory and coagulation biomarkers and cardiac autonomic function in HIV-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, Lari C; Roediger, Mollie P; Grandits, Greg;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To examine the relationship between inflammatory and coagulation biomarkers and cardiac autonomic function (CAF) as measured by heart rate variability in persons with HIV. MATERIALS & METHODS: This analysis included 4073 HIV-infected persons from the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral...... Therapy study. We examined the association between IL-6, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and D-dimer with heart rate variability measures (SDNN and rMSSD), both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. RESULTS: Cross-sectional analysis revealed significant inverse associations between IL-6, hs......CRP and d-dimer with SDNN and rMSSD (p longitudinal analysis failed to show a significant association between baseline IL-6, hsCRP and d-dimer with change in CAF over time. CONCLUSION: Cross-sectionally, higher levels of inflammatory and coagulation biomarkers were...

  7. Multilevel interactions between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems: a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondicova, K; Mravec, B

    2010-04-01

    In order to allow precise regulation of bodily functions, the activity of the autonomic nervous system must be precisely regulated. The traditional model concerning the regulation of norepinephrine and acetylcholine release in target tissues suggests that the activities of the efferent arms of the autonomic nervous system are more or less independent of each other. However, plenty of experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated the presence of multiple interactions between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system that are mediated through several pathways and mechanisms at both central and peripheral levels of the neuraxis. Interactions within the central nervous system are mediated predominantly by neurons within the nucleus of the solitary tract and paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus. Peripheral interactions are based on the morphological-functional organization of the sympathetic and parasympathetic pathways at the levels of the sympathetic prevertebral ganglia or neuroeffector connections. Furthermore, evidence suggests that neuroeffector connections may be realized at the axo-axonal, presynaptic, postsynaptic, and post-receptor levels. Alterations in interactions between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system can lead to unbalanced autonomic activities, which may influence the development of various disorders, including cardiovascular, inflammatory, metabolic, neurological, and psychiatric diseases. The aim of this article is to illustrate the complexity of interaction between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems and to describe the role of these interactions in the heart, adrenal medulla, and vagal trunk.

  8. Cell Autonomous and Nonautonomous Function of CUL4B in Mouse Spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yan; Liu, Liren; Yang, Chenyi; Lin, Congxing; Veith, George Michael; Wang, Caihong; Sutovsky, Peter; Zhou, Pengbo; Ma, Liang

    2016-03-25

    CUL4B ubiquitin ligase belongs to the cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase family. Although sharing many sequence and structural similarities, CUL4B plays distinct roles in spermatogenesis from its homologous protein CUL4A. We previously reported that genetic ablation ofCul4ain mice led to male infertility because of aberrant meiotic progression. In the present study, we generated Cul4bgerm cell-specific conditional knock-out (Cul4b(Vasa)),as well asCul4bglobal knock-out (Cul4b(Sox2)) mouse, to investigate its roles in spermatogenesis. Germ cell-specific deletion of Cul4bled to male infertility, despite normal testicular morphology and comparable numbers of spermatozoa. Notably, significantly impaired sperm mobility caused by reduced mitochondrial activity and glycolysis level were observed in the majority of the mutant spermatozoa, manifested by low, if any, sperm ATP production. Furthermore,Cul4b(Vasa)spermatozoa exhibited defective arrangement of axonemal microtubules and flagella outer dense fibers. Our mass spectrometry analysis identified INSL6 as a novel CUL4B substrate in male germ cells, evidenced by its direct polyubiquination and degradation by CUL4B E3 ligase. Nevertheless,Cul4bglobal knock-out males lost their germ cells in an age-dependent manner, implying failure of maintaining the spermatogonial stem cell niche in somatic cells. Taken together, our results show that CUL4B is indispensable to spermatogenesis, and it functions cell autonomously in male germ cells to ensure spermatozoa motility, whereas it functions non-cell-autonomously in somatic cells to maintain spermatogonial stemness. Thus, CUL4B links two distinct spermatogenetic processes to a single E3 ligase, highlighting the significance of ubiquitin modification during spermatogenesis.

  9. Autonomic nervous system response patterns in freshmen with different resilience in a military university%某军校不同心理弹性水平的大一新生自主神经反应特点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张佳佳; 彭李; 李敏

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究不同心理弹性水平军校大学生自主神经反应特点.方法 采用成人心理弹性量表(resilience scale for adults,RSA)对重庆某军校大一新生进行心理测评,筛选出心理弹性高分组和低分组被试共144名,再从中选取愿意参加本实验的心理弹性高分组和低分组被试各27名,其进行自主神经反应(心率、皮电、皮温、指端血容振幅)特点的实验研究.结果 ①静息状态下,心理弹性高分组和低分组被试的自主神经反应没有统计学差异(P>0.05).②悲伤情绪诱导下,心理弹性高分组在皮电上低于心理弹性低分组(t=-2.077,P=0.043).③悲伤情绪诱导后,心理弹性高分组和心理弹性低分组的各个指标的恢复时间上均无统计学差异(P>0.05).结论 心理弹性水平不同的大学生的自主神经活动模式可能存在一定程度的差异.%Objective To investigate the autonomic nervous system response pattern in military college students with different levels of resilience. Methods Resilience Scale for Adults (R.SA) was applied to test 144 college students, and based on the RSA score 54 freshmen who accepted to join the test were selected and were divided into a high resilience group and a low resilience group. Each 27 freshmen of the two groups were tested for autonomic nervous system response pattern. Results ① At resting state, students of the high resilience group and low resilience group did not show significant differences in heart rate ( HR) , skin conductance (SC), skin temperature (ST) and blood volume pulse (BVP) (P>0. 05). ② Compared with those indices obtained at resting state, students of the high resilience group scored lower in HR, SC and ST under sad mood induction, but higher in BVP; students of the low resilience group scored higher in HR and SC under sad mood induction, but lower in ST and BVP. Sad mood induction showed that SC of the high resilience group was significantly lower than that of the

  10. [Isoforms of the human histamine H3 receptor: Generation, expression in the central nervous system and functional implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gálvez, Ana Maricela; Arias-Montaño, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Histamine plays a significant role as a neuromodulator in the human central nervous system. Histamine-releasing neurons are exclusively located in the tuberomammillary nucleus of the hypothalamus, project to all major areas of the brain, and participate in functions such as the regulation of sleep/wakefulness, locomotor activity, feeding and drinking, analgesia, learning, and memory. The functional effects of histamine are exerted through the activation of four G protein-coupled receptors (H1, H2, H3 and H4), and in the central nervous system the first three receptors are widely expressed. The H3 receptor (H3R) is found exclusively in neuronal cells, where it functions as auto- and hetero-receptor. One remarkable characteristic of the H3R is the existence of isoforms, generated by alternative splicing of the messenger RNA. For the human H3R, 20 isoforms have been reported; although a significant number lack those regions required for agonist binding or receptor signaling, at least five isoforms appear functional upon heterologous expression. In this work we review the evidence for the generation of human H3R isoforms, their expression, and the available information regarding the functionality of such receptors.

  11. [Autonomic control and functional condition of suprasegmental structures of the brain in patients with heart rhythm disorders and vasculo-autonomic dystonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener, I P; Mymrenko, S N; Goloven'ko, T L

    2003-01-01

    A study was made by the method of combination of electroencephalography (EEG) and variational pulsimetry in 157 patients to determine the background vegetative tone and that very tone during conducting functional tests aimed at activating of sympathetic and parasympathetic portions of the nervous system. Criteria have been established characterizing the vegetative tone. Particular features are described of changes in the power of the EEG wave spectra while conducting tests in those groups being different in their baseline vegetative tone. The percentage is estimated of the incidence rate of the cardiac rhythm disturbances in those groups being different in their vegetative tone.

  12. Peptides in the nervous systems of cnidarians: structure, function, and biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Leviev, I; Carstensen, Kathrine

    1996-01-01

    molecule. In addition to well-known, "classical" processing enzymes, novel prohormone processing enzymes must be present in cnidarian neurons. These include a processing enzyme hydrolyzing at the C-terminal sides of acidic (Asp and Glu) residues and a dipeptidyl aminopeptidase digesting at the C......-terminal sides of N-terminally located X-Pro and X-Ala sequences. All this shows that the primitive nervous systems of cnidarians are already quite complex, and that neuropeptides play a central role in the physiology of these animals....

  13. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of equilibrium in abstract non-autonomous functional differential equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    non-autonomous finite-delay functional differential equations without any monotone conditions assumed.A minimal set is constructed in terms of which necessary and sufficient conditions for a continuous equilibrium to exist are also obtained.Several illustrative examples are employed to demonstrate our results.

  14. Emotional Responses to Odors in Children with High-Functioning Autism: Autonomic Arousal, Facial Behavior and Self-Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legisa, Jasna; Messinger, Daniel S.; Kermol, Enzo; Marlier, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Although emotional functioning is impaired in children with autism, it is unclear if this impairment is due to difficulties with facial expression, autonomic responsiveness, or the verbal description of emotional states. To shed light on this issue, we examined responses to pleasant and unpleasant odors in eight children (8-14 years) with…

  15. A STUDY OF AUTONOMIC FUNCTION TESTS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC SEVERE ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramamurthy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM AND OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY: The present study is aimed at detecting the association of autonomic dysfunction occurs in chronic severe anemia. All patients with hemoglobin less than 6 gm % and symptoms referable to anemia for > 6 months duration were included in the study. Patients with cardiac, hepatic, renal disease, leprosy, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and those on sympathomimetic, parasympatholytic, antihypertensive drugs and also patients below the age of 13 year were excluded from the study. Sample size is 50. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: A total of fifty patients were included in the study. Among them, 20 (40% were males and 30(60% were females with male to female ratio of 1:1.5. majority of the patients were in the age group of 21- 30years with mean age of 33 years. Dimorphic anemia was the most frequent type of anemia in 56% of cases: microcytic hypochromic anemia 42% and macrocytic seen only in 2%. Resting tachycardia of more than 100 per min was observed in 62% cases. Most of the cases (86% had prolonged QTc interval of more than 0.40sec. 44% cases had abnormal valsalva response, 60% had abnormal 30/15 ratio, inspiration and expiration ratio was abnormal in 38% cases, and postural hypotension was observed in 86% cases. Diastolic raise in blood pressure to sustained hand grip was abnormal in 78% cases. Atropine test was abnormal in 26% cases. Two or more autonomic function tests were abnormal in all the cases. All the cases had combined sympathetic and parasympathetic involvement. 42% cases had involvement of afferent limb of parasympathetic reflex arc. The common abnormality found in cases of chronic severe anemia are postural hypotension and abnormal heart rate response to valsalva and standing are due to blunting of carotid body chemoreceptor and baroreceptor indicating of both sympathetic and parasympathetic involvement.

  16. The effect of biofeedback training on patients with functional constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Meihong; Lin, Zheng; Lin, Lin; Zhang, Hongjie; Wang, Meihfeng

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this prospective quasi-experimental study was to explore the influence of biofeedback training on patients with functional constipation (FC). Changes in clinical symptoms, psychological status, quality of life, and autonomic nervous function in 21 FC patients before and after biofeedback training were investigated. The psychological status and quality of life were evaluated with the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), and a Chinese version of the MOS 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey. Autonomic nervous function was assessed on the basis of heart rate variability recorded with a HANS-1000 autonomic nervous biofeedback apparatus. After a complete course of training (10 sessions), clinical symptoms were greatly improved (p biofeedback (p .05). We conclude that biofeedback training can improve clinical symptoms, psychological status, and quality of life in FC patients, but further research is needed to determine whether biofeedback training can improve the autonomic nervous function in FC patients.

  17. Catecholamines and diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1995-01-01

    In diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy plasma noradrenaline concentration, used as an index of sympathetic nervous activity, is low. This decrease is, however, only found in patients with a long duration of diabetes with clinically severe autonomic neuropathy. This apparent insensitivity...... of plasma catecholamine measurements is not due to changes in the clearance of catecholamines in diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The physiological responses to infused adrenaline and to noradrenaline are enhanced, for noradrenaline mainly cardiovascular responses. Adrenoceptors (alpha and beta adrenoceptors...

  18. Memories and Promises of the Enteric Nervous System and Its Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    This is a very personal reminiscence of the long period of Enteric Nervous System research in which I have been involved. I started to work on the gut in the early 60s really because in Turin when I arrived from Argentina, where my family migrated temporarily after the WWII, nobody was seriously working on the brain. In Anatomy they were studying the neural "intramural plexuses" and that for me was close enough to the nervous system. I grew up in the mountains near Turin near the French border where our ex-family house still bears our name. I joined the Department of Anatomy as an intern student and I was privileged to seat at a desk where a previous generation of young scientists, who studied under the professor of Anatomy A. Levi, the founder of the methods for culturing neural tissue. They were Salvador Luria, Renato Dulbecco and Rita Levi-Montalcini, who, after migrating to the USA, were each were given the Noble prize.

  19. Burnout versus work engagement in their effects on 24-hour ambulatory monitored cardiac autonomic function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J.P. van Doornen (Lorenz); J.H. Houtveen (Jan); S. Langelaan (Saar); A.B. Bakker (Arnold); W. van Rhenen (Willem); W.B. Schaufeli (Wilmar)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBurnout has been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This relationship may be mediated by a stress-related disruption in cardiac autonomic activity. The aim of the present study was to assess cardiac autonomic activity (sympathetic and parasympathetic) during a work

  20. Modulation of autonomic activity in neurological conditions: Epilepsy and Tourette syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko eNagai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript considers the central but neglected role of the autonomic nervous system in the expression and control of seizures in Epilepsy and tics in Tourette Syndrome (TS. In epilepsy, consideration of autonomic involvement is typically confined to differential diagnoses (e.g. syncope, or in relation to Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP. Investigation is more limited in Tourette Syndrome. The role of the autonomic nervous system in the generation and prevention of epileptic seizures is largely overlooked. Emotional stimuli such as anxiety and stress are potent causes of seizures and tic activity in TS, respectively. This manuscript will describe a possible neural mechanism by which afferent autonomic projections linked to cognition and behaviour influence central nervous system thalamo-cortical regulation, which appears to be an important means for controlling both seizure and tic activity. It also summarizes the link between the integrity of the default mode network and autonomic regulation in patients with epilepsy as well as the link between impaired motor control and autonomic regulation in patients with TS. Two neurological conditions; epilepsy and TS were chosen, as seizures and tics represent parameters that can be easily measured to investigate influences of autonomic functions. The EDA biofeedback approach is anticipated

  1. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heung Yong Jin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN. Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed.

  2. Designing Dual-functionalized Gels for Self-reconfiguration and Autonomous Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2015-04-01

    Human motion is enabled by the concerted expansion and contraction of interconnected muscles that are powered by inherent biochemical reactions. One of the challenges in the field of biomimicry is eliciting this form of motion from purely synthetic materials, which typically do not generate internalized reactions to drive mechanical action. Moreover, for practical applications, this bio-inspired motion must be readily controllable. Herein, we develop a computational model to design a new class of polymer gels where structural reconfigurations and internalized reactions are intimately linked to produce autonomous motion, which can be directed with light. These gels contain both spirobenzopyran (SP) chromophores and the ruthenium catalysts that drive the oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. Importantly, both the SP moieties and the BZ reaction are photosensitive. When these dual-functionalized gels are exposed to non-uniform illumination, the localized contraction of the gel (due to the SP moieties) in the presence of traveling chemical waves (due to the BZ reaction) leads to new forms of spontaneous, self-sustained movement, which cannot be achieved by either of the mono-functionalized networks.

  3. Effective components of Chinese herbs reduce central nervous system function decline induced by iron overload

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-hui Dong; Cong Liu; Jiang-tao Bai; Wei-na Kong; Xiao-ping He; Peng Yan; Tie-mei Shao; Wen-guo Yu; Xi-qing Chai; Yan-hua Wu

    2015-01-01

    Abnormally increased levels of iron in the brain trigger cascade ampliifcation in Alzheimer’s dis-ease patients, resulting in neuronal death. This study investigated whether components extracted from the Chinese herbs epimedium herb, milkvetch root and kudzuvine root could relieve the abnormal expression of iron metabolism-related protein in Alzheimer’s disease patients. An APPswe/PS1ΔE9 double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease was used. The intragas-tric administration of compounds from epimedium herb, milkvetch root and kudzuvine root improved pathological alterations such as neuronal edema, increased the number of neurons, downregulated divalent metal transporter 1 expression, upregulated ferroportin 1 expression, and inhibited iron overload in the cerebral cortex of mice with Alzheimer’s disease. These com-pounds reduced iron overload-induced impairment of the central nervous system, indicating a new strategy for developing novel drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

  4. Effective components of Chinese herbs reduce central nervous system function decline induced by iron overload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-hui Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormally increased levels of iron in the brain trigger cascade amplification in Alzheimer′s disease patients, resulting in neuronal death. This study investigated whether components extracted from the Chinese herbs epimedium herb, milkvetch root and kudzuvine root could relieve the abnormal expression of iron metabolism-related protein in Alzheimer′s disease patients. An APP swe/PS1ΔE9 double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer′s disease was used. The intragastric administration of compounds from epimedium herb, milkvetch root and kudzuvine root improved pathological alterations such as neuronal edema, increased the number of neurons, downregulated divalent metal transporter 1 expression, upregulated ferroportin 1 expression, and inhibited iron overload in the cerebral cortex of mice with Alzheimer′s disease. These compounds reduced iron overload-induced impairment of the central nervous system, indicating a new strategy for developing novel drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer′s disease.

  5. Assesment of Autonomic Function in Metabolic Syndrome using Combination Heart Rate Variability and Heart Rate Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Aydın

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Metabolic syndrome (MetS is described as a group of various abnormal metabolic risk factors such as obesity, dyslipidemia, increased blood pressure, increased plasma glucose levels, prothrombotic condition and proinflammatory state. These parameters are related to decreased parasympathetic and increased sympathetic activity. We aimed to evaluate autonomic function using a combination with heart rate variability (HRV and heart rate turbulence (HRT in metabolic syndrome to compare non-metabolic syndrome(non-MetS. METHODS: We selected consecutive 50 patients with MetS and 50 patients with healthy non-MetS individuals. All patients underwent 24 hours holter monitoring to evaluate HRT and HRV parameters. RESULTS: Age of patients was not different in two groups. Mean age of MetS patients was 57,50±12,13 and 54,6±10,25 in non- MetS individuals. Sex of patients was non different in MetS compared to non-MetS (37 female and 13 male vs. 22 female, 28 male p<0,05 respectively. SDNN and RMSSD was lower in MetS compared to those without MetS (131,96±49,12 vs 179,59±85,83 p=0,03 and 78,64±35,22 vs 112,73±81,24 p=0,08 respectively. SDANN, pNN50,Mean RR, mean heart rate, count of ventricular premature complex(VPC were not different between two groups. Turbulence Slope(TS was not different in two groups. Turbulence Onset(TO was higher in MetS compared to non-MetS (2,01±15,29 and -6,21±13,5 p=0,005. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: We showed that autonomic function in MetS was impaired using a combination with HRT and HRV. These patients should be followed closely for adverse cardiovascular outcome especially including cardiac arrhythmia.

  6. Effects of Sweet Bee Venom on the Central Nervous System in Rats -using the Functional Observational Battery-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joong Chul An

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was performed to analyse the effects of Sweet Bee Venom(Sweet BV-pure melittin, the major component of honey bee venom on the central nervous system in rats. Methods: All experiments were conducted at Biotoxtech Company, a non-clinical studies authorized institution, under the regulations of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP. Male rats of 5 weeks old were chosen for this study and after confirming condition of rats was stable, Sweet BV was administered in thigh muscle of rats. And checked the effects of Sweet BV on the central nervous system using the functional observational battery (FOB, which is a neuro-toxicity screening assay composed of 30 descriptive, scalar, binary, and continuous endpoints. And home cage observations, home cage removal and handling, open field activity, sensorimotor reflex test/physiological measurements were conducted. Results: 1. In the home cage observation, there was not observed any abnormal signs in rats. 2. In the observation of open field activity, the reduction of number of unit areas crossed and rearing count was observed caused by Sweet BV treatment. 3. In the observation of handling reactivity, there was not observed any abnormal signs in rats. 4. In the observation of sensorimotor reflex tests/physiological measurements, there was not observed any neurotoxic signs in rats. 5. In the measurement of rectal temperature, treatment of Sweet BV did not showed great influences in the body temperature of rats. Conclusions: Above findings suggest that Sweet BV is relatively safe treatment in the central nervous system. But in the using of over dose, Sweet BV may the cause of local pain and disturbance of movement. Further studies on the subject should be conducted to yield more concrete evidences.

  7. Alteration of cardiac autonomic function in patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goit, Rajesh K; Jha, Santosh K; Pant, Bhawana N

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if heart rate variability (HRV) showed any changes in patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy in comparison with controls. Sixty-five patients with epilepsy (38 males and 27 females), aged 30-50 years, who had never previously received treatment with antiepileptic drugs were eligible for inclusion in this study. Resting electrocardiogram (ECG) at spontaneous respiration was recorded for 5 min in supine position. Time-domain analysis, frequency-domain analysis, and Poincare plot of HRV were recorded from ECG In time-domain measures, the square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent RR intervals (RMSSD) and percentage of consecutive RR intervals that differ by more than 50 msec (pNN50) were significantly less in patients with epilepsy. In frequency-domain measures, high frequency [(HF) msec(2)], HF (nu), and low frequency [LF (msec(2))] were significantly less in patients with epilepsy while LF (nu) and LF/HF were significantly high in patients with epilepsy. In Poincare plot, standard deviation perpendicular to line of Poincare plot (SD1) and standard deviation along the line of entity in Poincare plot (SD2) were significantly less in patients with epilepsy. Our results suggest that epileptic patients have an impact on the cardiac autonomic function as measured by HRV.

  8. Immune and nervous systems share molecular and functional similarities: memory storage mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, L; Ebtekar, M; Jameie, S B

    2009-04-01

    One of the most complex and important features of both the nervous and immune systems is their data storage and retrieval capability. Both systems encounter a common and complex challenge on how to overcome the cumbersome task of data management. Because each neuron makes many synapses with other neurons, they are capable of receiving data from thousands of synaptic connections. The immune system B and T cells have to deal with a similar level of complexity because of their unlimited task of recognizing foreign antigens. As for the complexity of memory storage, it has been proposed that both systems may share a common set of molecular mechanisms. Here, we review the molecular bases of memory storage in neurons and immune cells based on recent studies and findings. The expression of certain molecules and mechanisms shared between the two systems, including cytokine networks, and cell surface receptors, are reviewed. Intracellular signaling similarities and certain mechanisms such as diversity, memory storage, and their related molecular properties are briefly discussed. Moreover, two similar genetic mechanisms used by both systems is discussed, putting forward the idea that DNA recombination may be an underlying mechanism involved in CNS memory storage.

  9. Influence of sympathetic nervous system on sensorimotor function: whiplash associated disorders (WAD) as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passatore, Magda; Roatta, Silvestro

    2006-11-01

    There is increasing interest about the possible involvement of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in initiation and maintenance of chronic muscle pain syndromes of different aetiology. Epidemiological data show that stresses of different nature, e.g. work-related, psychosocial, etc., typically characterised by SNS activation, may be a co-factor in the development of the pain syndrome and/or negatively affect its time course. In spite of their clear traumatic origin, whiplash associated disorders (WAD) appear to share many common features with other chronic pain syndromes affecting the musculo-skeletal system. These features do not only include symptoms, like type of pain or sensory and motor dysfunctions, but possibly also some of the pathophysiological mechanisms that may concur to establish the chronic pain syndrome. This review focuses on WAD, particular emphasis being devoted to sensorimotor symptoms, and on the actions exerted by the sympathetic system at muscle level. Besides its well-known action on muscle blood flow, the SNS is able to affect the contractility of muscle fibres, to modulate the proprioceptive information arising from the muscle spindle receptors and, under certain conditions, to modulate nociceptive information. Furthermore, the activity of the SNS itself is in turn affected by muscle conditions, such as its current state of activity, fatigue and pain signals originating in the muscle. The possible involvement of the SNS in the development of WAD is discussed in light of the several positive feedback loops in which it is implicated.

  10. Cardiovascular parasympathetic nervous system dysfunction in female rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswathi, P V; Neelambikai, N; Mahesh, Arjun; Govindarajan, K

    2013-01-01

    The autonomic dysfunction has been reported in patients with (rheumatoid arthritis) RA and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) like connective tissue disorders and it may be due to the vasculitis of vasa nervorum and secondary amyloidosis. The pathogenesis may also have an immune component that affects autonomic functions. In the present study, three standard cardiovascular parasympathetic function tests were performed in 207 RA patients and in 106 healthy controls. 14.45% patients were presented with symptoms related to cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. Heart rate variation to deep breathing (DBD), standing (30:15 ratio), Valsalva ratio (VR) were found to be significantly reduced in RA patients and was weakly associated with female RA patients (r = 0.165, p = 0.018) and was not correlated to disease duration, RF positivity & severity of the disease. In conclusion, this study has confirmed the presence of significant subclinical cardiovascular parasympathetic nervous dysfunction in RA patients and its positive association with female gender. Hence, inclusion of cardiovascular autonomic function tests in the routine clinical examination may be helpful in the early detection of autonomic dysfunction in RA.

  11. A meta-analysis of non-invasive brain stimulation and autonomic functioning: Implications for brain-heart pathways to cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makovac, Elena; Thayer, Julian F; Ottaviani, Cristina

    2017-03-01

    Given the intrinsic connection between the brain and the heart, a recent body of research emerged with the aim to influence cardiovascular system functioning by non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) methods such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. Despite the implications of cardiovascular activity modulation for therapeutic purposes, such effects of NIBS have not yet been quantified. The aim of this study was to meta-analyze studies on NIBS effects on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR) and its variability (HRV). PubMed and Scopus databases were searched for English language studies conducted in humans. Twenty-nine studies were eligible for the analyses. Pooled effect sizes (Hedges' g) were compared. Random effect models were used. NIBS was effective in reducing HR (g=0.17) and enhancing HRV (g=0.30). A marginal effect emerged for BP (g=0.21). Significant moderators were the stimulation technique and the site of stimulation. Results show that NIBS affects cardiovascular and autonomic nervous system activity, confirming a potential pathogenic brain-heart pathway to cardiovascular disease.

  12. Epidemiology of Gait and Daily Functioning : The role of the nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.J.A. Verlinden (Vincent)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAcross the world, people continue to live longer, resulting in increasing numbers of older people. Age-related functional deficiencies, such as problems in gait and daily functioning, will therefore become a major issue for society. People with problems in gait and daily functioning

  13. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemssen, Tjalf; Reichmann, Heinz

    2010-02-15

    Symptoms of cardiovascular dysautonomia are a common occurrence in Parkinson's disease (PD). In addition to this dysautonomia as part of PD itself, dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) can be triggered as a side-effect of drug treatment interacting with the ANS or - if prominent and early - an indication of a different disease such as multiple system atrophy (MSA). Various diagnostic tests are available to demonstrate autonomic failure. While autonomic function tests can differentiate parasympathetic from sympathetic dysfunction, cardiac imaging can define the pathophysiologically involved site of a lesion. Standard tests such as 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurements can identify significant autonomic failure which needs treatment. The most frequent and disturbing symptom of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is orthostatic hypotension. Symptoms include generalized weakness, light-headiness, mental "clouding" up to syncope. Factors like heat, food, alcohol, exercise, activities which increase intrathoraric pressure (e.g. defecation, coughing) and certain drugs (e.g. vasodilators) can worsen a probably asymptomatic orthostatic hypotension. Non-medical and medical therapies can help the patient to cope with a disabling symptomatic orthostatic hypotension. Supine hypertension is often associated with orthostatic hypotension. The prognostic role of cardiovagal and baroreflex dysfunction is still not yet known.

  14. High-frequency limit of non-autonomous gradient flows of functionals with time-periodic forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plazotta, Simon; Zinsl, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    We study the high-frequency limit of non-autonomous gradient flows in metric spaces of energy functionals comprising an explicitly time-dependent perturbation term which might oscillate in a rapid way. On grounds of the existence results by Ferreira and Guevara (2015) on non-autonomous gradient flows (which we also extend to a broader range of energy functionals), we prove that the associated solution curves converge to a solution of the time-averaged evolution equation in the limit of infinite frequency. Under additional assumptions on the energy, we obtain an explicit rate of convergence. Furthermore, we specifically investigate nonlinear drift-diffusion equations with time-dependent drift which formally are gradient flows with respect to the L2-Wasserstein distance. We prove that a family of weak solutions obtained as a limit of the Minimizing Movements scheme exhibits the above-mentioned behavior in the high-frequency limit.

  15. No response of pancreatic hormones to hypoglycemia in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S; Krarup, T

    1982-01-01

    The responses of pancreatic hormones (i.e. glucagon, pancreatic polypeptide, and somatostatin) to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were investigated in 18 insulin-dependent diabetics without residual beta-cell function and in 6 normal subjects. Nine of the diabetics had autonomic neuropathy, and 9 had...... no neuropathy. After hypoglycemia, no significant increase in any of the 3 pancreatic hormones was found in the diabetics with autonomic neuropathy, whereas significant increments were found in the diabetics without neuropathy and in the normal subjects. These results suggest that autonomic nervous activity...

  16. Abnormal Cardiac Autonomic Regulation in Mice Lacking ASIC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Feng Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Integration of sympathetic and parasympathetic outflow is essential in maintaining normal cardiac autonomic function. Recent studies demonstrate that acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3 is a sensitive acid sensor for cardiac ischemia and prolonged mild acidification can open ASIC3 and evoke a sustained inward current that fires action potentials in cardiac sensory neurons. However, the physiological role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic regulation is not known. In this study, we elucidate the role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic function using Asic3−/− mice. Asic3−/− mice showed normal baseline heart rate and lower blood pressure as compared with their wild-type littermates. Heart rate variability analyses revealed imbalanced autonomic regulation, with decreased sympathetic function. Furthermore, Asic3−/− mice demonstrated a blunted response to isoproterenol-induced cardiac tachycardia and prolonged duration to recover to baseline heart rate. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression in sensory ganglia and heart revealed that no gene compensation for muscarinic acetylcholines receptors and beta-adrenalin receptors were found in Asic3−/− mice. In summary, we unraveled an important role of ASIC3 in regulating cardiac autonomic function, whereby loss of ASIC3 alters the normal physiological response to ischemic stimuli, which reveals new implications for therapy in autonomic nervous system-related cardiovascular diseases.

  17. The cell-autonomous role of excitatory synaptic transmission in the regulation of neuronal structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Bushong, Eric A; Shih, Tiffany P; Ellisman, Mark H; Nicoll, Roger A

    2013-05-08

    The cell-autonomous role of synaptic transmission in the regulation of neuronal structural and electrical properties is unclear. We have now employed a genetic approach to eliminate glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto individual CA1 pyramidal neurons in a mosaic fashion in vivo. Surprisingly, while electrical properties are profoundly affected in these neurons, as well as inhibitory synaptic transmission, we found little perturbation of neuronal morphology, demonstrating a functional segregation of excitatory synaptic transmission from neuronal morphological development.

  18. The cell-autonomous role of excitatory synaptic transmission in the regulation of neuronal structure and function

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The cell-autonomous role of synaptic transmission in the regulation of neuronal structural and electrical properties is unclear. We have now employed a genetic approach to eliminate glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto individual CA1 pyramidal neurons in a mosaic fashion in vivo. Surprisingly, while electrical properties are profoundly affected in these neurons, as well as inhibitory synaptic transmission, we found little perturbation of neuronal morphology, demonstrating a functional seg...

  19. Psychobiology of PTSD in the acute aftermath of trauma: Integrating research on coping, HPA function and sympathetic nervous system activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Matthew C; Rao, Uma

    2013-02-01

    Research on the psychobiological sequelae of trauma has typically focused on long-term alterations in individuals with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Far less is known about the nature and course of psychobiological risk factors for PTSD during the acute aftermath of trauma. In this review, we summarize data from prospective studies focusing on the relationships among sympathetic nervous system activity, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function, coping strategies and PTSD symptoms during the early recovery (or non-recovery) phase. Findings from pertinent studies are integrated to inform psychobiological profiles of PTSD-risk in children and adults in the context of existing models of PTSD-onset and maintenance. Data regarding bidirectional relations between coping strategies and stress hormones is reviewed. Limitations of existing literature and recommendations for future research are discussed.

  20. Item condition of the autonomic nervous system in patients with hypertension stage II low additional cardiovascular risk depending on the status of smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Poznanskaya

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Beckground. This century is characterized by steady growth in the number of patients who have cardiac pathology combined with other factors, aggravating the disease and prognosis. High prevalence of smoking among young patients with hypertension. Research devoted to the study of influence of risk factors , including smoking, on the structural and geometric and functional changes of the heart is not enough. Aim. Explore the contribution of modifiable risk factors for smoking in a pathological process of structural and geometrical and functional restructuring infarction in hypertensive patients. Material and methods. Examined by transthoracic echocardiography 100 patients (30 smokers and 70 non-smokers with essential hypertension stage II, 53 men and 47 women. Group of patients matched for age, sex, body mass index, level of fasting glucose, value "office" SBP, DBP, PAP, mean arterial pressure, heart rate. For data analysis methods of parametric (t-test for dependent and independent variables, ANOVA ANOVA and nonparametric (Wald-Wolfowitz runs test, Kolmogorov-Smirnov two-sample test, Mann-Whitney U test statistics. Differences considered statistically significant at a value of p<0,05. Results. Hypertensive patients who had smoking status, revealed significantly larger left atrial diastolic by 8.1 % (p = 0.014, systolic 10.8% (p = 0.026, the prevalence of thickness PWLVs 6.1% ( p = 0.028, the thickness IVSd 11.6 % (p = 0.004 , the thickness PWLVs 10.7 % (p = 0.034 LVMI 12.2% (p = 0.034 and diastolic intramyocardial stresses 13.9 % (p = 0.025 , lengthening of the period of isometric relaxation by 33.3 % (p = 0.026 compared with those in non-smoking hypertensive patients. Conclusion. Modulatory effect of smoking on the pathological processes of cardiac remodeling in hypertensive patients manifested by an increase in systolic and diastolic dimensions of the left atrium, wall thickness and left ventricular mass, without an extension of the heart

  1. Cerebrospinal Fluid Orexin A Levels and Autonomic Function in Kleine-Levin Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing Yu; Han, Fang; Dong, Song X.; Li, Jing; An, Pei; Zhang, Xiao Zhe; Chang, Yuan; Zhao, Long; Zhang, Xue Li; Liu, Ya Nan; Yan, Han; Li, Qing Hua; Hu, Yan; Lv, Chang Jun; Gao, Zhan Cheng; Strohl, Kingman P.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS) is a rare disorder of relapsing sleepiness. The hypothesis was that the syndrome is related to a change in the vigilance peptide orexin A. Methods: From 2002 to 2013, 57 patients with relapsing hypersomnolence were clinically assessed in a referral academic center in Beijing, China, and 44 (28 males and 16 females; mean age 18.3 ± 8.9 y (mean ± standard deviation, range 9–57 y) were determined to have clinical and behavioral criteria consistent with KLS. Cerebrospinal fluid orexin A levels and diurnal blood pressure were measured in relapse versus remission in a subgroup of patients. Results: Presenting symptoms included relapsing or remitting excessive sleepiness–associated parallel complaints of cognitive changes (82%), eating disorders (84%); depression (45%); irritability (36%); hypersexuality (18%); and compulsions (11%). Episodes were 8.2 ± 3.3 days in duration. In relapse, diurnal values for blood pressure and heart rate were lower (P < 0.001). In a subgroup (n = 34), cerebrospinal fluid orexin A levels were ∼31% lower in a relapse versus remission (215.7 ± 81.5 versus 319.2 ± 95.92 pg/ml, P < 0.001); in three patients a pattern of lower levels during subsequent relapses was documented. Conclusions: There are lower orexin A levels in the symptomatic phase than in remission and a fall and rise in blood pressure and heart rate, suggesting a role for orexin dysregulation in KLS pathophysiology. Citation: Wang JY, Han F, Dong SX, Li J, An P, Zhang XZ, Chang Y, Zhao L, Zhang XL, Liu YN, Yan H, Li QH, Hu Y, Lv CJ, Gao ZC, Strohl KP. Cerebrospinal fluid orexin A levels and autonomic function in Kleine-Levin syndrome. SLEEP 2016;39(4):855–860. PMID:26943469

  2. Autonomic Function Predicts Fitness Response to Short-Term High-Intensity Interval Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, A M; Tulppo, M P; Eskelinen, J J; Savolainen, A M; Kapanen, J; Heinonen, I H A; Hautala, A J; Hannukainen, J C; Kalliokoski, K K

    2015-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that baseline cardiac autonomic function and its acute response to all-out interval exercise explains individual fitness responses to high-intensity interval training (HIT). Healthy middle-aged sedentary men performed HIT (n=12, 4-6×30 s of all-out cycling efforts with 4-min recovery) or aerobic training (AET, n=9, 40-60 min at 60% of peak workload in exercise test [Loadpeak]), comprising 6 sessions within 2 weeks. Low (LF) and high frequency (HF) power of R-R interval oscillation were analyzed from data recorded at supine and standing position (5+5 min) every morning during the intervention. A significant training effect (ptraining*group interaction, was observed in Loadpeak and peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak). Pre-training supine LF/HF ratio, an estimate of sympathovagal balance, correlated with training outcome in Loadpeak (Spearman's rho [rs]=-0.74, p=0.006) and VO2peak (rs=- 0.59, p=0.042) in the HIT but not the AET group. Also, the mean change in the standing LF/HF ratio in the morning after an acute HIT exercise during the 1(st) week of intervention correlated with training response in Loadpeak (rs=- 0.68, p=0.014) and VO2peak (rs=-0.60, p=0.039) with HIT but not with AET. In conclusion, pre-training cardiac sympathovagal balance and its initial alterations in response to acute HIT exercise were related to fitness responses to short-term HIT.

  3. [14C]deoxyglucose labelling of functional activity in the cephalopod central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novicki, A; Messenger, J B; Budelmann, B U; Terrell, M L; Kadekaro, M

    1992-07-22

    For the first time, the [14C]deoxyglucose radioautographic technique has been successfully used to map physiological activity in cephalopod brains. In unilaterally blinded octopus and cuttlefish, the optic lobe of the deprived side showed a decreased uptake of the labelled tracer. This suggests that the uptake is related to functional activity. The potential of the [14C]deoxyglucose technique as a powerful tool in studying the functional organization of cephalopod brains is discussed.

  4. The Role of Deubiquitinating Enzymes in Synaptic Function and Nervous System Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R. Kowalski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttranslational modification of proteins by ubiquitin has emerged as a critical regulator of synapse development and function. Ubiquitination is a reversible modification mediated by the concerted action of a large number of specific ubiquitin ligases and ubiquitin proteases, called deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs. The balance of activity of these enzymes determines the localization, function, and stability of target proteins. While some DUBs counter the action of specific ubiquitin ligases by removing ubiquitin and editing ubiquitin chains, other DUBs function more generally to maintain the cellular pool of free ubiquitin monomers. The importance of DUB function at the synapse is underscored by the association of specific mutations in DUB genes with several neurological disorders. Over the last decade, although much research has led to the identification and characterization of many ubiquitin ligases at the synapse, our knowledge of the relevant DUBs that act at the synapse has lagged. This review is focused on highlighting our current understanding of DUBs that regulate synaptic function and the diseases that result from dysfunction of these DUBs.

  5. Autonomous and in trans functions for the two halves of Srv2/CAP in promoting actin turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Faisal; Jansen, Silvia; Little, Kristin; Suarez, Cristian; Boujemaa-Paterski, Rajaa; Blanchoin, Laurent; Goode, Bruce L

    2014-06-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that Srv2/CAP (cyclase-associated protein) has two distinct functional roles in regulating actin turnover, with its N-terminus enhancing cofilin-mediated severing of actin filaments and its C-terminus catalyzing actin monomer recycling. However, it has remained unclear to what degree these two activities are coordinated by being linked in one molecule, or whether they can function autonomously. To address this, we physically divided the protein into two separate halves, N-Srv2 and C-Srv2, and asked whether they are able to function in trans both in living cells and in reconstituted assays for F-actin turnover and actin-based motility. Remarkably, in F-actin turnover assays the stimulatory effects of N-Srv2 and C-Srv2 functioning in trans were quantitatively similar to those of intact full-length Srv2. Further, in bead motility assays and in vivo, the fragments again functioned in trans, although not with the full effectiveness of intact Srv2. From these data, we conclude that the functions of the two halves of Srv2/CAP are largely autonomous, although their linkage improves coordination of the two functions in specific settings, possibly explaining why the linkage is conserved across distant plant, animal, and fungal species.

  6. Bypassing damaged nervous tissue

    CERN Document Server

    Shneider, M N

    2016-01-01

    We show the principal ability of bypassing damaged demyelinated portions of nervous tissue, thereby restoring its normal function for the passage of action potentials. We carry out a theoretical analysis on the basis of the synchronization mechanism of action potential propagation along a bundle of neurons, proposed recently in [1]. And we discuss the feasibility of implement a bypass to restore damaged nervous tissue and creating an artificial neuron network.

  7. A Measure for Brain Complexity: Relating Functional Segregation and Integration in the Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tononi, Giulio; Sporns, Olaf; Edelman, Gerald M.

    1994-05-01

    In brains of higher vertebrates, the functional segregation of local areas that differ in their anatomy and physiology contrasts sharply with their global integration during perception and behavior. In this paper, we introduce a measure, called neural complexity (C_N), that captures the interplay between these two fundamental aspects of brain organization. We express functional segregation within a neural system in terms of the relative statistical independence of small subsets of the system and functional integration in terms of significant deviations from independence of large subsets. C_N is then obtained from estimates of the average deviation from statistical independence for subsets of increasing size. C_N is shown to be high when functional segregation coexists with integration and to be low when the components of a system are either completely independent (segregated) or completely dependent (integrated). We apply this complexity measure in computer simulations of cortical areas to examine how some basic principles of neuroanatomical organization constrain brain dynamics. We show that the connectivity patterns of the cerebral cortex, such as a high density of connections, strong local connectivity organizing cells into neuronal groups, patchiness in the connectivity among neuronal groups, and prevalent reciprocal connections, are associated with high values of C_N. The approach outlined here may prove useful in analyzing complexity in other biological domains such as gene regulation and embryogenesis.

  8. Impact of aging on cardiac function in a female rat model of menopause: role of autonomic control, inflammation, and oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machi JF

    2016-03-01

    groups when compared with young controls, indicating an increased oxidative stress. A negative correlation was found between GSH/GSSG and tumor necrosis factor-α (r=-0.6, P<0.003. Correlations were found between interleukin-6 with adipose tissue (r=0.5, P<0.009 and vagal tonus (r=-0.7, P<0.0002; and among myocardial performance index with interleukin-6 (r=0.65, P<0.0002, sympathetic tonus (r=0.55, P<0.006, and physical capacity (r=-0.55, P<0.003. The findings in this trial showed that ovariectomy aggravated the impairment of cardiac and functional effects of aging in female rats, probably associated with exacerbated autonomic dysfunction, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Keywords: autonomic nervous system, aging, aerobic exercise, female rats

  9. Effect of Yoga on migraine: A comprehensive study using clinical profile and cardiac autonomic functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikiran Kisan

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Intervention showed significant clinical improvement in both groups. Headache frequency and intensity were reduced more in Yoga with conventional care than the conventional care group alone. Furthermore, Yoga therapy enhanced the vagal tone and decreased the sympathetic drive, hence improving the cardiac autonomic balance. Thus, Yoga therapy can be effectively incorporated as an adjuvant therapy in migraine patients.

  10. Method to measure autonomic control of cardiac function using time interval parameters from impedance cardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J.H.; Boesveldt, S.; Elbertse, E.; Berendse, H.W.

    2008-01-01

    The time difference between the electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram can be considered as a measure for the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activities of the heart. This time interval, characterized by the pre-ejection period (PEP), is related to the sympathetic autonomous ner

  11. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type O regulates development and function of the sensory nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Brito, Manuel R; Bixby, John L

    2009-12-01

    The roles of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) in differentiation and axon targeting by dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are essentially unknown. The type III transmembrane PTP, PTPRO, is expressed in DRG neurons, and is implicated in the guidance of motor and retinal axons. We examined the role of PTPRO in DRG development and function using PTPRO(-/-) mice. The number of peptidergic nociceptive neurons in the DRG of PTPRO(-/-) mice was significantly decreased, while the total number of sensory neurons appeared unchanged. In addition, spinal pathfinding by both peptidergic and proprioceptive neurons was abnormal in PTPRO(-/-) mice. Lastly, PTPRO(-/-) mice performed abnormally on tests of thermal pain and sensorimotor coordination, suggesting that both nociception and proprioception were perturbed. Our data indicate that PTPRO is required for peptidergic differentiation and process outgrowth of sensory neurons, as well as mature sensory function, and provide the first evidence that RPTPs regulate DRG development.

  12. Roles of LIM kinases in central nervous system function and dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuberos, H; Vallée, B; Vourc'h, P; Tastet, J; Andres, C R; Bénédetti, H

    2015-12-21

    LIM kinase 1 (LIMK1) and LIM kinase 2 (LIMK2) regulate actin dynamics by phosphorylating cofilin. In this review, we outline studies that have shown an involvement of LIMKs in neuronal function and we detail some of the pathways and molecular mechanisms involving LIMKs in neurodevelopment and synaptic plasticity. We also review the involvement of LIMKs in neuronal diseases and emphasize the differences in the regulation of LIMKs expression and mode of action. We finally present the existence of a cofilin-independent pathway also involved in neuronal function. A better understanding of the differences between both LIMKs and of the precise molecular mechanisms involved in their mode of action and regulation is now required to improve our understanding of the physiopathology of the neuronal diseases associated with LIMKs.

  13. Measures of Autonomic Nervous System Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Tension-Release Practices Trauma Resiliency Model (TRM)* X* X* Trauma and Tension Releasing Exercises (TRE) Yoga (Asana...Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) Yoga Nidra (iRest) X X *Study currently in progress utilizing these measures 7...pulse oximeter have the benefit of being more portable; they do not require a trained technician and are more durable than the traditional EKG. The

  14. Amyloid-beta peptide decreases expression and function of glutamate transporters in nervous system cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Huichun; Zhang, Xiuping; Meng, Xingjun; Xu, Pingyi; Zou, Xiaoming; Qu, Shaogang

    2017-02-08

    Glutamate is an essential excitatory neurotransmitter that regulates brain functions, and its activity is tightly regulated by glutamate transporters. Excess glutamate in the synaptic cleft and dysfunction of excitatory amino acid transporters have been shown to be involved in development of Alzheimer's disease, but the precise regulatory mechanism is poorly understood. Using a D-[(3)H]-aspartic acid uptake assay, we found that Aβ1-42 oligomers impaired glutamate uptake in astrocytes and neurons. In astrocytes, this process was accompanied by reduced expression of GLT-1 and GLAST as detected by Western blot and immunocytofluorescence. However, mRNA levels of EAATs detected by qPCR in astrocytes and neurons were not altered, which suggests that this process is post-translational. Co-localization analysis using immunocytofluorescence showed that ubiquitylation of GLT-1 significantly increased. Therefore, we hypothesized that Aβ1-42 oligomers-induced endocytosis of astrocytic GLT-1 may be involved in ubiquitylation. In addition, Aβ1-42 oligomers enhanced secretion of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 into culture supernatant, which may be correlated with an inflammatory response and altered EAATs expression or function in Alzheimer's disease. These findings support the idea that dysregulation of the glutamatergic system may play a significant role in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, enhancing expression or function of EAATs in astrocytes and neurons might be a new therapeutic approach in treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Effect of tDCS with an extracephalic reference electrode on cardio-respiratory and autonomic functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamart Jacques

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is used in human physiological studies and for therapeutic trials in patients with abnormalities of cortical excitability. Its safety profile places tDCS in the pole-position for translating in real-world therapeutic application. However, an episode of transient respiratory depression in a subject receiving tDCS with an extracephalic electrode led to the suggestion that such an electrode montage could modulate the brainstem autonomic centres. We investigated whether tDCS applied over the midline frontal cortex in 30 healthy volunteers (sham n = 10, cathodal n = 10, anodal n = 10 with an extracephalic reference electrode would modulate brainstem activity as reflected by the monitoring and stringent analysis of vital parameters: heart rate (variability, respiratory rate, blood pressure and sympatho-vagal balance. We reasoned that this study could lead to two opposite but equally interesting outcomes: 1 If tDCS with an extracephalic electrode modulated vital parameters, it could be used as a new tool to explore the autonomic nervous system and, even, to modulate its activity for therapeutic purposes. 2 On the opposite, if applying tDCS with an extracephalic electrode had no effect, it could thus be used safely in healthy human subjects. This outcome would significantly impact the field of non-invasive brain stimulation with tDCS. Indeed, on the one hand, using an extracephalic electrode as a genuine neutral reference (as opposed to the classical "bi-cephalic" tDCS montages which deliver bi-polar stimulation of the brain would help to comfort the conclusions of several modern studies regarding the spatial location and polarity of tDCS. On the other hand, using an extracephalic reference electrode may impact differently on a given cortical target due to the change of direct current flow direction; this may enlarge the potential interventions with tDCS. Results Whereas the respiratory

  16. Uterine autonomic nerve innervation plays a crucial role in regulating rat uterine mast cell functions during embryo implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xue-Jun; Huang, Li-Bo; Qiao, Hui-Li; Deng, Ze-Pei; Fa, Jing-Jing

    2009-12-01

    To explore the potential mechanism of how uterine innervations would affect the uterine mast cell (MC) population and functions during the periimplantation. We herein first examined the consequence of uterine neurectomy on embryo implantation events. We observed that amputation of autonomic nerves innervating the uterus led to on-time implantation failure in rats. Exploiting MC culture and ELISA approaches, we then further analyzed the effect of neurectomy on cellular histamine levels and its release from uterine MCs, to elucidate the relation of the autonomic nerves and local cellular immunity in the uterine during early pregnancy. We observed that disconnection of autonomic nerve innervation significantly increased the population of uterine MCs. Most interestingly, these increased number of uterine MCs in neuroectomized rats contained a much reduced cellular level of histamine. Our subsequent challenge experiments revealed that uterine MCs in nerve amputated rats exhibited enhanced histamine releasing rate in response to substance P and antiIgE, suggesting loss of nerve innervation in the uterus not only increases the population of uterine MCs, but also facilitates the release of histamine from MCs, thus subsequently interfere with the normal implantation process. Collectively, our findings provide a new line of evidence supporting the concept that immune-neuro-endocrine network plays important role during pregnancy establishment and maintenance.

  17. Functional Requirements for Heparan Sulfate Biosynthesis in Morphogenesis and Nervous System Development in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Cassandra R.; Thackeray, Andrea; Perrat, Paola N.; Hekimi, Siegfried; Bénard, Claire Y.

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of cell migration is essential to animal development and physiology. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans shape the interactions of morphogens and guidance cues with their respective receptors to elicit appropriate cellular responses. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans consist of a protein core with attached heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan chains, which are synthesized by glycosyltransferases of the exostosin (EXT) family. Abnormal HS chain synthesis results in pleiotropic consequences, including abnormal development and tumor formation. In humans, mutations in either of the exostosin genes EXT1 and EXT2 lead to osteosarcomas or multiple exostoses. Complete loss of any of the exostosin glycosyltransferases in mouse, fish, flies and worms leads to drastic morphogenetic defects and embryonic lethality. Here we identify and study previously unavailable viable hypomorphic mutations in the two C. elegans exostosin glycosyltransferases genes, rib-1 and rib-2. These partial loss-of-function mutations lead to a severe reduction of HS levels and result in profound but specific developmental defects, including abnormal cell and axonal migrations. We find that the expression pattern of the HS copolymerase is dynamic during embryonic and larval morphogenesis, and is sustained throughout life in specific cell types, consistent with HSPGs playing both developmental and post-developmental roles. Cell-type specific expression of the HS copolymerase shows that HS elongation is required in both the migrating neuron and neighboring cells to coordinate migration guidance. Our findings provide insights into general principles underlying HSPG function in development. PMID:28068429

  18. The subtle body: an interoceptive map of central nervous system function and meditative mind-brain-body integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizzo, Joseph J

    2016-06-01

    Meditation research has begun to clarify the brain effects and mechanisms of contemplative practices while generating a range of typologies and explanatory models to guide further study. This comparative review explores a neglected area relevant to current research: the validity of a traditional central nervous system (CNS) model that coevolved with the practices most studied today and that provides the first comprehensive neural-based typology and mechanistic framework of contemplative practices. The subtle body model, popularly known as the chakra system from Indian yoga, was and is used as a map of CNS function in traditional Indian and Tibetan medicine, neuropsychiatry, and neuropsychology. The study presented here, based on the Nalanda tradition, shows that the subtle body model can be cross-referenced with modern CNS maps and challenges modern brain maps with its embodied network model of CNS function. It also challenges meditation research by: (1) presenting a more rigorous, neural-based typology of contemplative practices; (2) offering a more refined and complete network model of the mechanisms of contemplative practices; and (3) serving as an embodied, interoceptive neurofeedback aid that is more user friendly and complete than current teaching aids for clinical and practical applications of contemplative practice.

  19. The Effect of the Human Peptide GHK on Gene Expression Relevant to Nervous System Function and Cognitive Decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren Pickart

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration, the progressive death of neurons, loss of brain function, and cognitive decline is an increasing problem for senior populations. Its causes are poorly understood and therapies are largely ineffective. Neurons, with high energy and oxygen requirements, are especially vulnerable to detrimental factors, including age-related dysregulation of biochemical pathways caused by altered expression of multiple genes. GHK (glycyl-l-histidyl-l-lysine is a human copper-binding peptide with biological actions that appear to counter aging-associated diseases and conditions. GHK, which declines with age, has health promoting effects on many tissues such as chondrocytes, liver cells and human fibroblasts, improves wound healing and tissue regeneration (skin, hair follicles, stomach and intestinal linings, boney tissue, increases collagen, decorin, angiogenesis, and nerve outgrowth, possesses anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-pain and anti-anxiety effects, increases cellular stemness and the secretion of trophic factors by mesenchymal stem cells. Studies using the Broad Institute Connectivity Map show that GHK peptide modulates expression of multiple genes, resetting pathological gene expression patterns back to health. GHK has been recommended as a treatment for metastatic cancer, Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, inflammation, acute lung injury, activating stem cells, pain, and anxiety. Here, we present GHK’s effects on gene expression relevant to the nervous system health and function.

  20. Spruce Needle Polyprenols Protect Against Atorvastatin-Induced Muscle Weakness and do not Influence Central Nervous System Functions in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansone Baiba

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Polyprenols (PPs have been identified in almost all living organisms. The richest source of PPs is the needles of conifer trees. Endogenously, PPs, similarly to cholesterol, are synthesised in human and animal cells via the mevalonate pathway. Previous studies have demonstrated the anti-oxidant properties of PPs. To our knowledge, no studies have been published on the influence of PPs on muscle strength. We hypothesised that administration of PPs could prevent changes in muscle functioning caused by statins (weakness, etc.. In the present study, atorvastatin (80 mg/kg was used as a model compound. PPs at doses 1, 10 and 20 mg/kg were administered. Both drugs were given per os for 16 days. The influence of atorvastatin, PPs and their combination on behaviour, muscle strength, plasma cholesterol and creatine kinase activity was assessed in female Wistar rats. Our data demonstrated that atorvastatin considerably impaired muscle strength, whereas PPs protected that effect. Neither PPs, nor atorvastatin influenced plasma cholesterol levels, whereas PPs at dose 20 mg/kg elevated creatine kinase activity by about 25%. PPs at the tested doses did not alter behaviour, indicating safety of central nervous system functions. The obtained data suggest usefulness of PPs as a complement in statin therapy to reduce muscle-related side effects.

  1. The Effect of the Human Peptide GHK on Gene Expression Relevant to Nervous System Function and Cognitive Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickart, Loren; Vasquez-Soltero, Jessica Michelle; Margolina, Anna

    2017-02-15

    Neurodegeneration, the progressive death of neurons, loss of brain function, and cognitive decline is an increasing problem for senior populations. Its causes are poorly understood and therapies are largely ineffective. Neurons, with high energy and oxygen requirements, are especially vulnerable to detrimental factors, including age-related dysregulation of biochemical pathways caused by altered expression of multiple genes. GHK (glycyl-l-histidyl-l-lysine) is a human copper-binding peptide with biological actions that appear to counter aging-associated diseases and conditions. GHK, which declines with age, has health promoting effects on many tissues such as chondrocytes, liver cells and human fibroblasts, improves wound healing and tissue regeneration (skin, hair follicles, stomach and intestinal linings, boney tissue), increases collagen, decorin, angiogenesis, and nerve outgrowth, possesses anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-pain and anti-anxiety effects, increases cellular stemness and the secretion of trophic factors by mesenchymal stem cells. Studies using the Broad Institute Connectivity Map show that GHK peptide modulates expression of multiple genes, resetting pathological gene expression patterns back to health. GHK has been recommended as a treatment for metastatic cancer, Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, inflammation, acute lung injury, activating stem cells, pain, and anxiety. Here, we present GHK's effects on gene expression relevant to the nervous system health and function.

  2. The Effect of the Human Peptide GHK on Gene Expression Relevant to Nervous System Function and Cognitive Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickart, Loren; Vasquez-Soltero, Jessica Michelle; Margolina, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegeneration, the progressive death of neurons, loss of brain function, and cognitive decline is an increasing problem for senior populations. Its causes are poorly understood and therapies are largely ineffective. Neurons, with high energy and oxygen requirements, are especially vulnerable to detrimental factors, including age-related dysregulation of biochemical pathways caused by altered expression of multiple genes. GHK (glycyl-l-histidyl-l-lysine) is a human copper-binding peptide with biological actions that appear to counter aging-associated diseases and conditions. GHK, which declines with age, has health promoting effects on many tissues such as chondrocytes, liver cells and human fibroblasts, improves wound healing and tissue regeneration (skin, hair follicles, stomach and intestinal linings, boney tissue), increases collagen, decorin, angiogenesis, and nerve outgrowth, possesses anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-pain and anti-anxiety effects, increases cellular stemness and the secretion of trophic factors by mesenchymal stem cells. Studies using the Broad Institute Connectivity Map show that GHK peptide modulates expression of multiple genes, resetting pathological gene expression patterns back to health. GHK has been recommended as a treatment for metastatic cancer, Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, inflammation, acute lung injury, activating stem cells, pain, and anxiety. Here, we present GHK’s effects on gene expression relevant to the nervous system health and function. PMID:28212278

  3. The sympathetic nervous system in obesity hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmeier, Thomas E; Iliescu, Radu

    2013-08-01

    Abundant evidence supports a role of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathogenesis of obesity-related hypertension. However, the nature and temporal progression of mechanisms underlying this sympathetically mediated hypertension are incompletely understood. Recent technological advances allowing direct recordings of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in conscious animals, together with direct suppression of RSNA by renal denervation and reflex-mediated global sympathetic inhibition in experimental animals and human subjects have been especially valuable in elucidating these mechanisms. These studies strongly support the concept that increased RSNA is the critical mechanism by which increased central sympathetic outflow initiates and maintains reductions in renal excretory function, causing obesity hypertension. Potential determinants of renal sympathoexcitation and the differential mechanisms mediating the effects of renal-specific versus reflex-mediated, global sympathetic inhibition on renal hemodynamics and cardiac autonomic function are discussed. These differential mechanisms may impact the efficacy of current device-based approaches for hypertension therapy.

  4. [The prognostic significance of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) for phobic anxiety disorders, vegetative and cognitive impairments during conservative treatment including adaptol of some functional and organic diseases of nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhivolupov, S A; Samartsev, I N; Marchenko, A A; Puliatkina, O V

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the efficacy of adaptol in the treatment of 45 patients with somatoform dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system and 30 patients with closed head injury. The condition of patients during the treatment was evaluated with clinical and neuropsychological scales. The serum level of BDNF before and after the treatment has been studied as well. Adaptol has been shown to enhance the production of BDNF, reduce significantly the intensity of anxiety, autonomic disorders and improve intellectual processes. The dose-dependent effect of the drug has been demonstrated. In conclusion, adaptol can be recommended for treatment of diseases that demand stimulation of neuroplasticity in the CNS.

  5. Adenosine A(1) Receptors in the Central Nervous System : Their Functions in Health and Disease, and Possible Elucidation by PET Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, S.; Elsinga, P. H.; Ishiwata, K.; Dierckx, R. A. J. O.; van Waarde, A.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine is a neuromodulator with several functions in the central nervous system (CNS), such as inhibition of neuronal activity in many signaling pathways. Most of the sedating, anxiolytic, seizure-inhibiting and protective actions of adenosine are mediated by adenosine A(1) receptors (A(1)R) on t

  6. Central nervous system action of peptides to influence gastrointestinal motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taché, Y; Garrick, T; Raybould, H

    1990-02-01

    The central action of peptides to influence GI motility in experimental animals is summarized in Table 1. TRH stimulates gastric, intestinal, and colonic contractility in rats and in several experimental species. A number of peptides including calcitonin, CGRP, neurotensin, NPY, and mu opioid peptides act centrally to induce a fasted MMC pattern of intestinal motility in fed animals while GRF and substance P shorten its duration. The dorsal vagal complex is site of action for TRH-, bombesin-, and somatostatin-induced stimulation of gastric contractility, and for CCK-, oxytocin- and substance P-induced decrease in gastric contractions or intraluminal pressure. The mechanisms through which TRH, bombesin, calcitonin, neurotensin, CCK, and oxytocin alter GI motility are vagally mediated. An involvement of central peptidergic neurons in the regulation of gut motility has recently been demonstrated in Aplysia, indicating that such regulatory mechanisms are important in the phylogenesis. Alterations of the pattern of GI motor activity are associated with functional changes in transit. TRH is so far the only centrally acting peptide stimulating simultaneously gastric, intestinal, and colonic transit in various animals species. Opioid peptides acting on mu receptor subtypes in the brain exert the opposite effect and inhibit concomitantly gastric, intestinal, and colonic transit. Bombesin and CRF were found to act centrally to inhibit gastric and intestinal transit and to stimulate colonic transit in the rat. The antitransit effect of calcitonin and CGRP is limited to the stomach and small intestine. The delay in GI transit is associated with reduced GI contractility for most of the peptides except central bombesin that increases GI motility. Nothing is known about brain sites through which these peptides act to alter gastric emptying and colonic transit. Regarding brain sites influencing intestinal transit, TRH-induced stimulation of intestinal transit in the rat is

  7. Training-induced Autonomic Nervous System Adaptations in Combat Sport Athletes%格斗对抗性项目运动员自主神经系统的运动性适应研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄彩华; 归予恒; 张漓; 陈琦; 林建新; 陈俊钦

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cardiac autonomic profile in athletes of combat and noncombat disciplines, and to determine the impact of long term different training patterns and skill levels on cardiac autonomic function by using heart rate variability(HRV). Methods Time and frequency HRV data -were collected in 38 male athletes(mean age 21. 67 years old) , including 29 combat sports athletes (6 boxers, 13 fencers and 10 Sanda players) and 9 sprint athletes as non-combat control. Results There were significant (P<0. 05) higher in several parasympathetic-related time and frequency domain variables (RMSSD, SDSD, PNN50, HFn. U. ), while LFn. U. , a sympathetic tone variable, was lower (P = 0. 02) in combat sports as compared -with sprint group. Two-factor analyses of variance showed difference only for the main effect of training pattern (combat or non-combat sport) but not for skill level or their interaction in PNN50. Furthermore, elite athletes in combat group appeared to have higher PNN50 than those of sprint athletes. Conclusion Combat sport athletes have high parasympathetic tone, especially in elite athletes, indicating that these kinds of sports disciplines may have a more substantially favorable effect on the cardiac autonomic profile, and PNN50 might be a valuable parameter for the practitioner to use in assessing an athlete's training-induced autonomic adaptation to combat training regimen.%目的 比较格斗和非格斗项目运动员之间自主神经系统的活性.方法 选取38名男性运动员,其中格斗项目运动员29名(拳击6名、击剑13名,散打10名)、非格斗项目运动员9名(短跑运动员),测量并比较心率变异性(HRV)时域和频域指标.结果 与非格斗项目运动员比较,格斗项目运动员HRV时域指标相邻N-N间期差值均方根值(RMSSD)、相邻间期差值的标准差(SDSD)、相邻心动周期差值>50 ms的比例(PNN50)和频域指标[JP2]标准化高频功率(HFn.u.)等较高(P<0.05),而交感神经

  8. Assessment of cardiac autonomic functions by heart rate recovery, heart rate variability and QT dynamicity parameters in patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dural, Muhammet; Kabakcı, Giray; Cınar, Neşe; Erbaş, Tomris; Canpolat, Uğur; Gürses, Kadri Murat; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Oto, Ali; Kaya, Ergün Barış; Yorgun, Hikmet; Sahiner, Levent; Dağdelen, Selçuk; Aytemir, Kudret

    2014-04-01

    Cardiovascular complications are the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in acromegaly. However, there is little data regarding cardiac autonomic functions in these patients. Herein, we aimed to investigate several parameters of cardiac autonomic functions in patients with acromegaly compared to healthy subjects. We enrolled 20 newly diagnosed acromegalic patients (55% female, age:45.7 ± 12.6 years) and 32 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent 24 h Holter recording. Heart rate recovery (HRR) indices were calculated by subtracting 1st, 2nd and 3rd minute heart rates from maximal heart rate. All patients underwent heart rate variability (HRV) and QT dynamicity analysis. Baseline characteristics were similar except diabetes mellitus and hypertension among groups. Mean HRR1 (29.2 ± 12.3 vs 42.6 ± 6.5, p = 0.001), HRR2 (43.5 ± 15.6 vs 61.1 ± 10.8, p = 0.001) and HRR3 (46.4 ± 16.2 vs 65.8 ± 9.8, p = 0.001) values were significantly higher in control group. HRV parameters as, SDNN [standard deviation of all NN intervals] (p = 0.001), SDANN [SD of the 5 min mean RR intervals] (p = 0.001), RMSSD [root square of successive differences in RR interval] (p = 0.001), PNN50 [proportion of differences in successive NN intervals >50 ms] (p = 0.001) and high-frequency [HF] (p = 0.001) were significantly decreased in patients with acromegaly; but low frequency [LF] (p = 0.046) and LF/HF (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in acromegaly patients. QTec (p = 0.009), QTac/RR slope (p = 0.017) and QTec/RR slope (p = 0.01) were significantly higher in patients with acromegaly. Additionally, there were significant negative correlation of disease duration with HRR2, HRR3, SDNN, PNN50, RMSSD, variability index. Our study results suggest that cardiac autonomic functions are impaired in patients with acromegaly. Further large scale studies are needed to exhibit the prognostic significance of impaired autonomic functions in patients with

  9. Types of neurons in the enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furness, J B

    2000-07-01

    This paper, written for the symposium in honour of more than 40 years' contribution to autonomic research by Professor Geoffrey Burnstock, highlights the progress made in understanding the organisation of the enteric nervous system over this time. Forty years ago, the prevailing view was that the neurons within the gut wall were post-ganglionic neurons of parasympathetic pathways. This view was replaced as evidence accrued that the neurons are part of the enteric nervous system and are involved in reflex and integrative activities that can occur even in the absence of neuronal influence from extrinsic sources. Work in Burnstock's laboratory led to the discovery of intrinsic inhibitory neurons with then novel pharmacology of transmission, and precipitated investigation of neuron types in the enteric nervous system. All the types of neurons in the enteric nervous system of the small intestine of the guinea-pig have now been identified in terms of their morphologies, projections, primary neurotransmitters and physiological identification. In this region there are 14 functionally defined neuron types, each with a characteristic combination of morphological, neurochemical and biophysical properties. The nerve circuits underlying effects on motility, blood flow and secretion that are mediated through the enteric nervous system are constructed from these neurons. The circuits for simple motility reflexes are now known, and progress has been made in analysing those involved in local control of blood flow and transmucosal fluid movement in the small intestine.

  10. Autonomic and surgical substrate modulation of atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, S.P.J.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the effects of fibrosis and the autonomic nervous system on conduction in patients with atrial fibrillation and the surgical ablation of the atria and autonomic nervous system as treatment of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia and results fr

  11. [Autonomic neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, T; Penzlin, A I; Illigens, B M W

    2013-07-01

    Autonomic neuropathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases that involve damage of small peripheral autonomic Aδ- and C-fibers. Causes of autonomic nerve fiber damage are disorders such as diabetes mellitus and HIV-infection. Predominant symptoms of autonomic neuropathy are orthostatic hypotension, gastro-intestinal problems, urogenital dysfunction, and cardiac arrhythmia, which can severely impair the quality of life in affected patients. Furthermore, autonomic neuropathies can be induced by autoimmune diseases such as acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, hereditary disorders such as the lysosomal storage disorder Fabry disease and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies, as well as certain toxins and drugs.

  12. 美托洛尔对急性ST段抬高型心肌梗死患者自主神经失衡的影响%Influence of Metoprolol in Treating Autonomic Nervous System Imbalance of Patients with Acute ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施巍

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨急性ST段抬高型心肌梗死患者服用美托洛尔后的自主神经失衡的改善和临床疗效。方法选取2013年5月至2014年5月就诊的急性ST段抬高型心肌梗死患者101例,随机分为治疗组50例和对照组51例。两组患者入院后均给予抗凝、调脂、抗血小板药物治疗,在此基础上对照组应用硝苯地平缓释片,治疗组应用琥珀酸美托洛尔缓释片。结果治疗后,治疗组心率变异性( HRV )时域、频域指标的积分均优于对照组( P<0.05,P<0.01);两组心功能均有不同程度改善( P<0.05),治疗组心肌梗死复发率为6.00%,低于对照组的11.10%,两组治疗后心脏标志物、血脂参数(除高密度脂蛋白胆固醇)、超敏C反应蛋白(hs-CRP)比较,差异均有统计学意义( P<0.05)。结论美托洛尔可提高急性ST段抬高型心肌梗死的HRV指标,恢复自主神经失衡,且在心功能恢复、减少复发次数、改善血脂及hs-CRP水平方面具有较好的疗效。%Objective To investigate the efficacy of metoprolol in Treating autonomic nervous system imbalance of patients with acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. Methods A 101 cases of patients with acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction from May 2013 to May 2014 were selected and randomly divided into the treatment group of 50 cases and the control group with 50 cases. After admission,all patients were treated with anticoagulation,lipid-lowering and anti-platelet drugs,on this basis,the control group was given nifedipine(Ⅱ)and the treatment group metoprolol succinate. Results After treatment,HRV time domain and the fre-quency domain indicators of the treatment groups were obviously better than the control group ( P < 0. 05,P < 0. 01);the cardiac function of the two groups showed different degrees of improvement ( P < 0. 05);the reoccurrence rate of myocardial infarction in the treatment group was 6. 00

  13. Cardiac autonomic functions and the emergence of violence in a highly realistic model of social conflict in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozsef eHaller

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Among the multitude of factors that can transform human social interactions into violent conflicts, biological features received much attention in recent years as correlates of decision making and aggressiveness especially in critical situations. We present here a highly realistic new model of human aggression and violence, where genuine acts of aggression are readily performed and which at the same time allows the parallel recording of biological concomitants. Particularly, we studied police officers trained at the International Training Centre (Budapest, Hungary, who are prepared to perform operations under extreme conditions of stress. We found that aggressive arousal can transform a basically peaceful social encounter into a violent conflict. Autonomic recordings show that this change is accompanied by increased heart rates, which was associated earlier with reduced cognitive complexity of perceptions (attentional myopia and promotes a bias towards hostile attributions and aggression. We also observed reduced heart rate variability in violent subjects, which is believed to signal a poor functioning of prefrontal-subcortical inhibitory circuits and reduces self-control. Importantly, these autonomic particularities were observed already at the beginning of social encounters i.e. before aggressive acts were initiated, suggesting that individual characteristics of the stress-response define the way in which social pressure affects social behavior, particularly the way in which this develops into violence. Taken together, these findings suggest that cardiac autonomic functions are valuable external symptoms of internal motivational states and decision making processes, and raise the possibility that behavior under social pressure can be predicted by the individual characteristics of stress responsiveness.

  14. Intron-specific patterns of divergence of lin-11 regulatory function in the C. elegans nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amon, Siavash; Gupta, Bhagwati P

    2017-04-01

    The diversity of neurons in the nervous system is specified by many genes, including those that encode transcription factors (TFs) and play crucial roles in coordinating gene transcription. To understand how the spatiotemporal expression of TF genes is regulated to generate neuronal diversity, we used one member of the LIM-Hox family, lin-11, as a model that is necessary for the differentiation of amphid neurons in the nematode C. elegans and a related species C. briggsae. We characterized transcriptional regulation of lin-11 and uncovered regulatory roles of two of the largest introns, intron 3 and intron 7. These introns promote lin-11 expression in non-overlapping sets of neurons. Phenotypic rescue experiments in C. elegans revealed that intron 3 is capable of restoring lin-11 function based on gene expression patterns and behavioral assays. Interestingly, intron 3-driven reporter expression showed differences in neuronal cell types between C. briggsae and C. elegans, indicating evolutionary changes in lin-11 regulation between the two species. Reciprocal transformation experiments provided further evidence consistent with functional changes in both cis and trans regulation of lin-11. To further investigate transcriptional regulation of lin-11, we dissected the intronic regions in C. elegans and identified cell-specific enhancers. These enhancers possess multiple sequence blocks that are conserved among Caenorhabditis species and possess TF binding sites. We tested the role of a subset of predicted TFs and discovered that while three of them (SKN-1, CEH-6, and CRH-1) act via the intron 3 enhancer to negatively regulate lin-11 expression in neurons, another TF (CES-1) acts positively via the intron 7 enhancer. Overall, our findings demonstrate that neuronal expression of lin-11 involves multiple TF regulators and regulatory modules some of which have diverged in Caenorhabditis nematodes.

  15. Determination of the functional domain of a mouse autonomous replicating sequence.