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Sample records for automatic likelihood model

  1. PALM: a paralleled and integrated framework for phylogenetic inference with automatic likelihood model selectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Hwa Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selecting an appropriate substitution model and deriving a tree topology for a given sequence set are essential in phylogenetic analysis. However, such time consuming, computationally intensive tasks rely on knowledge of substitution model theories and related expertise to run through all possible combinations of several separate programs. To ensure a thorough and efficient analysis and avert tedious manipulations of various programs, this work presents an intuitive framework, the phylogenetic reconstruction with automatic likelihood model selectors (PALM, with convincing, updated algorithms and a best-fit model selection mechanism for seamless phylogenetic analysis. METHODOLOGY: As an integrated framework of ClustalW, PhyML, MODELTEST, ProtTest, and several in-house programs, PALM evaluates the fitness of 56 substitution models for nucleotide sequences and 112 substitution models for protein sequences with scores in various criteria. The input for PALM can be either sequences in FASTA format or a sequence alignment file in PHYLIP format. To accelerate the computing of maximum likelihood and bootstrapping, this work integrates MPICH2/PhyML, PalmMonitor and Palm job controller across several machines with multiple processors and adopts the task parallelism approach. Moreover, an intuitive and interactive web component, PalmTree, is developed for displaying and operating the output tree with options of tree rooting, branches swapping, viewing the branch length values, and viewing bootstrapping score, as well as removing nodes to restart analysis iteratively. SIGNIFICANCE: The workflow of PALM is straightforward and coherent. Via a succinct, user-friendly interface, researchers unfamiliar with phylogenetic analysis can easily use this server to submit sequences, retrieve the output, and re-submit a job based on a previous result if some sequences are to be deleted or added for phylogenetic reconstruction. PALM results in an inference of

  2. PALM: a paralleled and integrated framework for phylogenetic inference with automatic likelihood model selectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Hwa; Su, Sheng-Yao; Lo, Chen-Zen; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Huang, Teng-Jay; Kuo, Bo-Han; Lin, Chung-Yen

    2009-12-07

    Selecting an appropriate substitution model and deriving a tree topology for a given sequence set are essential in phylogenetic analysis. However, such time consuming, computationally intensive tasks rely on knowledge of substitution model theories and related expertise to run through all possible combinations of several separate programs. To ensure a thorough and efficient analysis and avert tedious manipulations of various programs, this work presents an intuitive framework, the phylogenetic reconstruction with automatic likelihood model selectors (PALM), with convincing, updated algorithms and a best-fit model selection mechanism for seamless phylogenetic analysis. As an integrated framework of ClustalW, PhyML, MODELTEST, ProtTest, and several in-house programs, PALM evaluates the fitness of 56 substitution models for nucleotide sequences and 112 substitution models for protein sequences with scores in various criteria. The input for PALM can be either sequences in FASTA format or a sequence alignment file in PHYLIP format. To accelerate the computing of maximum likelihood and bootstrapping, this work integrates MPICH2/PhyML, PalmMonitor and Palm job controller across several machines with multiple processors and adopts the task parallelism approach. Moreover, an intuitive and interactive web component, PalmTree, is developed for displaying and operating the output tree with options of tree rooting, branches swapping, viewing the branch length values, and viewing bootstrapping score, as well as removing nodes to restart analysis iteratively. The workflow of PALM is straightforward and coherent. Via a succinct, user-friendly interface, researchers unfamiliar with phylogenetic analysis can easily use this server to submit sequences, retrieve the output, and re-submit a job based on a previous result if some sequences are to be deleted or added for phylogenetic reconstruction. PALM results in an inference of phylogenetic relationship not only by vanquishing the

  3. Maximum Likelihood Fusion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-09

    Symposium of Robotics Re- search. Sienna, Italy: Springer, 2003. [12] D. Hall and J. Llinas, “An introduction to multisensor data fusion ,” Proceed- ings of...a data fusion approach for combining Gaussian metric models of an environment constructed by multiple agents that operate outside of a global... data fusion , hypothesis testing,maximum likelihood estimation, mobile robot navigation REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT

  4. Earthquake likelihood model testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorlemmer, D.; Gerstenberger, M.C.; Wiemer, S.; Jackson, D.D.; Rhoades, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONThe Regional Earthquake Likelihood Models (RELM) project aims to produce and evaluate alternate models of earthquake potential (probability per unit volume, magnitude, and time) for California. Based on differing assumptions, these models are produced to test the validity of their assumptions and to explore which models should be incorporated in seismic hazard and risk evaluation. Tests based on physical and geological criteria are useful but we focus on statistical methods using future earthquake catalog data only. We envision two evaluations: a test of consistency with observed data and a comparison of all pairs of models for relative consistency. Both tests are based on the likelihood method, and both are fully prospective (i.e., the models are not adjusted to fit the test data). To be tested, each model must assign a probability to any possible event within a specified region of space, time, and magnitude. For our tests the models must use a common format: earthquake rates in specified “bins” with location, magnitude, time, and focal mechanism limits.Seismology cannot yet deterministically predict individual earthquakes; however, it should seek the best possible models for forecasting earthquake occurrence. This paper describes the statistical rules of an experiment to examine and test earthquake forecasts. The primary purposes of the tests described below are to evaluate physical models for earthquakes, assure that source models used in seismic hazard and risk studies are consistent with earthquake data, and provide quantitative measures by which models can be assigned weights in a consensus model or be judged as suitable for particular regions.In this paper we develop a statistical method for testing earthquake likelihood models. A companion paper (Schorlemmer and Gerstenberger 2007, this issue) discusses the actual implementation of these tests in the framework of the RELM initiative.Statistical testing of hypotheses is a common task and a

  5. Model fit after pairwise maximum likelihood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendse, M. T.; Ligtvoet, R.; Timmerman, M. E.; Oort, F. J.

    2016-01-01

    Maximum likelihood factor analysis of discrete data within the structural equation modeling framework rests on the assumption that the observed discrete responses are manifestations of underlying continuous scores that are normally distributed. As maximizing the likelihood of multivariate response

  6. Model fit after pairwise maximum likelihood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendse, M.T.; Ligtvoet, R.; Timmerman, M.E.; Oort, F.J.

    Maximum likelihood factor analysis of discrete data within the structural equation modeling framework rests on the assumption that the observed discrete responses are manifestations of underlying continuous scores that are normally distributed. As maximizing the likelihood of multivariate response

  7. Model fit after pairwise maximum likelihood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. eBarendse

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Maximum likelihood factor analysis of discrete data within the structural equation modeling framework rests on the assumption that the observed discrete responses are manifestations of underlying continuous scores that are normally distributed. As maximizing the likelihood of multivariate response patterns is computationally very intensive, the sum of the log--likelihoods of the bivariate response patterns is maximized instead. Little is yet known about how to assess model fit when the analysis is based on such a pairwise maximum likelihood (PML of two--way contingency tables. We propose new fit criteria for the PML method and conduct a simulation study to evaluate their performance in model selection. With large sample sizes (500 or more, PML performs as well the robust weighted least squares analysis of polychoric correlations.

  8. Likelihood analysis of the I(2) model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    The I(2) model is defined as a submodel of the general vector autoregressive model, by two reduced rank conditions. The model describes stochastic processes with stationary second difference. A parametrization is suggested which makes likelihood inference feasible. Consistency of the maximum...

  9. Estimation for stochastic volatility model: Quasi-likelihood and asymptotic quasi-likelihood approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed Alzghool

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For estimation of the stochastic volatility model (SVM, this paper suggests the quasi-likelihood (QL and asymptotic quasi-likelihood (AQL methods. The QL approach is quite simple and does not require full knowledge of the likelihood functions of the SVM. The AQL technique is based on the QL method and is used when the covariance matrix Σ is unknown. The AQL approach replaces the true variance–covariance matrix Σ by nonparametric kernel estimator of Σ in QL.

  10. Likelihood analysis of the minimal AMSB model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagnaschi, E.; Weiglein, G. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Borsato, M.; Chobanova, V.; Lucio, M.; Santos, D.M. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Sakurai, K. [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, University of Durham, Science Laboratories, Department of Physics, Durham (United Kingdom); University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Buchmueller, O.; Citron, M.; Costa, J.C.; Richards, A. [Imperial College, High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, London (United Kingdom); Cavanaugh, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); University of Illinois at Chicago, Physics Department, Chicago, IL (United States); De Roeck, A. [Experimental Physics Department, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Antwerp University, Wilrijk (Belgium); Dolan, M.J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, Melbourne (Australia); Ellis, J.R. [King' s College London, Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); CERN, Theoretical Physics Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Flaecher, H. [University of Bristol, H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Bristol (United Kingdom); Heinemeyer, S. [Campus of International Excellence UAM+CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM-CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Cantabria (Spain); Isidori, G. [Physik-Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland); Luo, F. [Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Olive, K.A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-04-15

    We perform a likelihood analysis of the minimal anomaly-mediated supersymmetry-breaking (mAMSB) model using constraints from cosmology and accelerator experiments. We find that either a wino-like or a Higgsino-like neutralino LSP, χ{sup 0}{sub 1}, may provide the cold dark matter (DM), both with similar likelihoods. The upper limit on the DM density from Planck and other experiments enforces m{sub χ{sup 0}{sub 1}} 0) but the scalar mass m{sub 0} is poorly constrained. In the wino-LSP case, m{sub 3/2} is constrained to about 900 TeV and m{sub χ{sup 0}{sub 1}} to 2.9 ± 0.1 TeV, whereas in the Higgsino-LSP case m{sub 3/2} has just a lower limit >or similar 650 TeV (>or similar 480 TeV) and m{sub χ{sup 0}{sub 1}} is constrained to 1.12 (1.13) ± 0.02 TeV in the μ > 0 (μ < 0) scenario. In neither case can the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, (g-2){sub μ}, be improved significantly relative to its Standard Model (SM) value, nor do flavour measurements constrain the model significantly, and there are poor prospects for discovering supersymmetric particles at the LHC, though there are some prospects for direct DM detection. On the other hand, if the χ{sup 0}{sub 1} contributes only a fraction of the cold DM density, future LHC E{sub T}-based searches for gluinos, squarks and heavier chargino and neutralino states as well as disappearing track searches in the wino-like LSP region will be relevant, and interference effects enable BR(B{sub s,d} → μ{sup +}μ{sup -}) to agree with the data better than in the SM in the case of wino-like DM with μ > 0. (orig.)

  11. Practical likelihood analysis for spatial generalized linear mixed models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonat, W. H.; Ribeiro, Paulo Justiniano

    2016-01-01

    , respectively, examples of binomial and count datasets modeled by spatial generalized linear mixed models. Our results show that the Laplace approximation provides similar estimates to Markov Chain Monte Carlo likelihood, Monte Carlo expectation maximization, and modified Laplace approximation. Some advantages...

  12. Tapered composite likelihood for spatial max-stable models

    KAUST Repository

    Sang, Huiyan

    2014-05-01

    Spatial extreme value analysis is useful to environmental studies, in which extreme value phenomena are of interest and meaningful spatial patterns can be discerned. Max-stable process models are able to describe such phenomena. This class of models is asymptotically justified to characterize the spatial dependence among extremes. However, likelihood inference is challenging for such models because their corresponding joint likelihood is unavailable and only bivariate or trivariate distributions are known. In this paper, we propose a tapered composite likelihood approach by utilizing lower dimensional marginal likelihoods for inference on parameters of various max-stable process models. We consider a weighting strategy based on a "taper range" to exclude distant pairs or triples. The "optimal taper range" is selected to maximize various measures of the Godambe information associated with the tapered composite likelihood function. This method substantially reduces the computational cost and improves the efficiency over equally weighted composite likelihood estimators. We illustrate its utility with simulation experiments and an analysis of rainfall data in Switzerland.

  13. Likelihood functions for state space models with diffuse initial conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, S.J.; Shephard, N.; de Vos, A.F.

    2010-01-01

    State space models with non-stationary processes and/or fixed regression effects require a state vector with diffuse initial conditions. Different likelihood functions can be adopted for the estimation of parameters in time-series models with diffuse initial conditions. In this article, we consider

  14. Likelihood functions for state space models with diffuse initial conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, M.K.; Koopmans, S.J.; de Vos, A.F.

    2008-01-01

    State space models with nonstationary processes and fixed regression effects require a state vector with diffuse initial conditions. Different likelihood functions can be adopted for the estimation of parameters in time series models with diffuse initial conditions. In this paper we consider

  15. Robustness of the approximate likelihood of the protracted speciation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simonet, C.; Scherrer, R.; Rego-Costa, A.; Etienne, R. S.

    The protracted speciation model presents a realistic and parsimonious explanation for the observed slowdown in lineage accumulation through time, by accounting for the fact that speciation takes time. A method to compute the likelihood for this model given a phylogeny is available and allows

  16. Modeling gene expression measurement error: a quasi-likelihood approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strimmer Korbinian

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using suitable error models for gene expression measurements is essential in the statistical analysis of microarray data. However, the true probabilistic model underlying gene expression intensity readings is generally not known. Instead, in currently used approaches some simple parametric model is assumed (usually a transformed normal distribution or the empirical distribution is estimated. However, both these strategies may not be optimal for gene expression data, as the non-parametric approach ignores known structural information whereas the fully parametric models run the risk of misspecification. A further related problem is the choice of a suitable scale for the model (e.g. observed vs. log-scale. Results Here a simple semi-parametric model for gene expression measurement error is presented. In this approach inference is based an approximate likelihood function (the extended quasi-likelihood. Only partial knowledge about the unknown true distribution is required to construct this function. In case of gene expression this information is available in the form of the postulated (e.g. quadratic variance structure of the data. As the quasi-likelihood behaves (almost like a proper likelihood, it allows for the estimation of calibration and variance parameters, and it is also straightforward to obtain corresponding approximate confidence intervals. Unlike most other frameworks, it also allows analysis on any preferred scale, i.e. both on the original linear scale as well as on a transformed scale. It can also be employed in regression approaches to model systematic (e.g. array or dye effects. Conclusions The quasi-likelihood framework provides a simple and versatile approach to analyze gene expression data that does not make any strong distributional assumptions about the underlying error model. For several simulated as well as real data sets it provides a better fit to the data than competing models. In an example it also

  17. Likelihood inference for a nonstationary fractional autoregressive model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren; Ørregård Nielsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses model-based inference in an autoregressive model for fractional processes which allows the process to be fractional of order d or d-b. Fractional differencing involves infinitely many past values and because we are interested in nonstationary processes we model the data X1......,...,X_{T} given the initial values X_{-n}, n=0,1,..., as is usually done. The initial values are not modeled but assumed to be bounded. This represents a considerable generalization relative to all previous work where it is assumed that initial values are zero. For the statistical analysis we assume...... the conditional Gaussian likelihood and for the probability analysis we also condition on initial values but assume that the errors in the autoregressive model are i.i.d. with suitable moment conditions. We analyze the conditional likelihood and its derivatives as stochastic processes in the parameters, including...

  18. Gaussian copula as a likelihood function for environmental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, O.; Espadas, G.; Cecinati, F.; Rieckermann, J.

    2017-12-01

    Parameter estimation of environmental models always comes with uncertainty. To formally quantify this parametric uncertainty, a likelihood function needs to be formulated, which is defined as the probability of observations given fixed values of the parameter set. A likelihood function allows us to infer parameter values from observations using Bayes' theorem. The challenge is to formulate a likelihood function that reliably describes the error generating processes which lead to the observed monitoring data, such as rainfall and runoff. If the likelihood function is not representative of the error statistics, the parameter inference will give biased parameter values. Several uncertainty estimation methods that are currently being used employ Gaussian processes as a likelihood function, because of their favourable analytical properties. Box-Cox transformation is suggested to deal with non-symmetric and heteroscedastic errors e.g. for flow data which are typically more uncertain in high flows than in periods with low flows. Problem with transformations is that the results are conditional on hyper-parameters, for which it is difficult to formulate the analyst's belief a priori. In an attempt to address this problem, in this research work we suggest learning the nature of the error distribution from the errors made by the model in the "past" forecasts. We use a Gaussian copula to generate semiparametric error distributions . 1) We show that this copula can be then used as a likelihood function to infer parameters, breaking away from the practice of using multivariate normal distributions. Based on the results from a didactical example of predicting rainfall runoff, 2) we demonstrate that the copula captures the predictive uncertainty of the model. 3) Finally, we find that the properties of autocorrelation and heteroscedasticity of errors are captured well by the copula, eliminating the need to use transforms. In summary, our findings suggest that copulas are an

  19. Marginal Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Item Response Models in R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S. Johnson

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Item response theory (IRT models are a class of statistical models used by researchers to describe the response behaviors of individuals to a set of categorically scored items. The most common IRT models can be classified as generalized linear fixed- and/or mixed-effect models. Although IRT models appear most often in the psychological testing literature, researchers in other fields have successfully utilized IRT-like models in a wide variety of applications. This paper discusses the three major methods of estimation in IRT and develops R functions utilizing the built-in capabilities of the R environment to find the marginal maximum likelihood estimates of the generalized partial credit model. The currently available R packages ltm is also discussed.

  20. Likelihood-Based Inference in Nonlinear Error-Correction Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Dennis; Rahbæk, Anders

    We consider a class of vector nonlinear error correction models where the transfer function (or loadings) of the stationary relation- ships is nonlinear. This includes in particular the smooth transition models. A general representation theorem is given which establishes the dynamic properties...... and a linear trend in general. Gaussian likelihood-based estimators are considered for the long- run cointegration parameters, and the short-run parameters. Asymp- totic theory is provided for these and it is discussed to what extend asymptotic normality and mixed normaity can be found. A simulation study...

  1. Likelihood inference for a fractionally cointegrated vector autoregressive model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren; Ørregård Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    such that the process X_{t} is fractional of order d and cofractional of order d-b; that is, there exist vectors ß for which ß'X_{t} is fractional of order d-b, and no other fractionality order is possible. We define the statistical model by 0inference when the true values satisfy b0¿1/2 and d0-b0......We consider model based inference in a fractionally cointegrated (or cofractional) vector autoregressive model with a restricted constant term, ¿, based on the Gaussian likelihood conditional on initial values. The model nests the I(d) VAR model. We give conditions on the parameters...... process in the parameters when errors are i.i.d. with suitable moment conditions and initial values are bounded. When the limit is deterministic this implies uniform convergence in probability of the conditional likelihood function. If the true value b0>1/2, we prove that the limit distribution of (ß...

  2. Calibration of two complex ecosystem models with different likelihood functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidy, Dóra; Haszpra, László; Pintér, Krisztina; Nagy, Zoltán; Barcza, Zoltán

    2014-05-01

    The biosphere is a sensitive carbon reservoir. Terrestrial ecosystems were approximately carbon neutral during the past centuries, but they became net carbon sinks due to climate change induced environmental change and associated CO2 fertilization effect of the atmosphere. Model studies and measurements indicate that the biospheric carbon sink can saturate in the future due to ongoing climate change which can act as a positive feedback. Robustness of carbon cycle models is a key issue when trying to choose the appropriate model for decision support. The input parameters of the process-based models are decisive regarding the model output. At the same time there are several input parameters for which accurate values are hard to obtain directly from experiments or no local measurements are available. Due to the uncertainty associated with the unknown model parameters significant bias can be experienced if the model is used to simulate the carbon and nitrogen cycle components of different ecosystems. In order to improve model performance the unknown model parameters has to be estimated. We developed a multi-objective, two-step calibration method based on Bayesian approach in order to estimate the unknown parameters of PaSim and Biome-BGC models. Biome-BGC and PaSim are a widely used biogeochemical models that simulate the storage and flux of water, carbon, and nitrogen between the ecosystem and the atmosphere, and within the components of the terrestrial ecosystems (in this research the developed version of Biome-BGC is used which is referred as BBGC MuSo). Both models were calibrated regardless the simulated processes and type of model parameters. The calibration procedure is based on the comparison of measured data with simulated results via calculating a likelihood function (degree of goodness-of-fit between simulated and measured data). In our research different likelihood function formulations were used in order to examine the effect of the different model

  3. Menyoal Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM dan Teori Retorika

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudi Perbawaningsih

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Persuasion is a communication process to establish or change attitudes, which can be understood through theory of Rhetoric and theory of Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM. This study elaborates these theories in a Public Lecture series which to persuade the students in choosing their concentration of study. The result shows that in term of persuasion effectiveness it is not quite relevant to separate the message and its source. The quality of source is determined by the quality of the message, and vice versa. Separating the two routes of the persuasion process as described in the ELM theory would not be relevant. Abstrak: Persuasi adalah proses komunikasi untuk membentuk atau mengubah sikap, yang dapat dipahami dengan teori Retorika dan teori Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM. Penelitian ini mengelaborasi teori tersebut dalam Kuliah Umum sebagai sarana mempersuasi mahasiswa untuk memilih konsentrasi studi studi yang didasarkan pada proses pengolahan informasi. Menggunakan metode survey, didapatkan hasil yaitu tidaklah cukup relevan memisahkan pesan dan narasumber dalam melihat efektivitas persuasi. Keduanya menyatu yang berarti bahwa kualitas narasumber ditentukan oleh kualitas pesan yang disampaikannya, dan sebaliknya. Memisahkan proses persuasi dalam dua lajur seperti yang dijelaskan dalam ELM teori menjadi tidak relevan.

  4. Weighted likelihood copula modeling of extreme rainfall events in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojing; Gebremichael, Mekonnen; Yan, Jun

    2010-08-01

    SummaryCopulas have recently emerged as a practical method for multivariate modeling. To date, only limited amount of work has been done to apply copula-based modeling in the context of extreme rainfall analysis, and no work exists on modeling multiple characteristics of rainfall events from data at resolutions finer than hourly. In this study, trivariate copula-based modeling is applied to annual extreme rainfall events constructed from 15-min time series precipitation data at 12 stations within the state of Connecticut. Three characteristics (volume, duration, and peak intensity) are modeled by a multivariate distribution specified by three marginal distributions and a dependence structure via copula. A major issue in this application is that, because the 15-min precipitation data are only available fairly recently, the sample size at most stations is small, ranging from 10 to 33 years. For each station, we estimate the model parameters by maximizing a weighted likelihood, which assigns weight to data at stations nearby, borrowing strengths from them. The weights are assigned by a kernel function whose bandwidth is chosen by cross-validation in terms of predictive loglikelihood. The fitted model and sampling algorithms provide new knowledge on design storms and risk assessment in Connecticut.

  5. Likelihood ratio model for classification of forensic evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zadora, G., E-mail: gzadora@ies.krakow.pl [Institute of Forensic Research, Westerplatte 9, 31-033 Krakow (Poland); Neocleous, T., E-mail: tereza@stats.gla.ac.uk [University of Glasgow, Department of Statistics, 15 University Gardens, Glasgow G12 8QW (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-29

    One of the problems of analysis of forensic evidence such as glass fragments, is the determination of their use-type category, e.g. does a glass fragment originate from an unknown window or container? Very small glass fragments arise during various accidents and criminal offences, and could be carried on the clothes, shoes and hair of participants. It is therefore necessary to obtain information on their physicochemical composition in order to solve the classification problem. Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with an Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer and the Glass Refractive Index Measurement method are routinely used in many forensic institutes for the investigation of glass. A natural form of glass evidence evaluation for forensic purposes is the likelihood ratio-LR = p(E|H{sub 1})/p(E|H{sub 2}). The main aim of this paper was to study the performance of LR models for glass object classification which considered one or two sources of data variability, i.e. between-glass-object variability and(or) within-glass-object variability. Within the proposed model a multivariate kernel density approach was adopted for modelling the between-object distribution and a multivariate normal distribution was adopted for modelling within-object distributions. Moreover, a graphical method of estimating the dependence structure was employed to reduce the highly multivariate problem to several lower-dimensional problems. The performed analysis showed that the best likelihood model was the one which allows to include information about between and within-object variability, and with variables derived from elemental compositions measured by SEM-EDX, and refractive values determined before (RI{sub b}) and after (RI{sub a}) the annealing process, in the form of dRI = log{sub 10}|RI{sub a} - RI{sub b}|. This model gave better results than the model with only between-object variability considered. In addition, when dRI and variables derived from elemental compositions were used, this

  6. Likelihood ratio model for classification of forensic evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadora, G.; Neocleous, T.

    2009-01-01

    One of the problems of analysis of forensic evidence such as glass fragments, is the determination of their use-type category, e.g. does a glass fragment originate from an unknown window or container? Very small glass fragments arise during various accidents and criminal offences, and could be carried on the clothes, shoes and hair of participants. It is therefore necessary to obtain information on their physicochemical composition in order to solve the classification problem. Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with an Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer and the Glass Refractive Index Measurement method are routinely used in many forensic institutes for the investigation of glass. A natural form of glass evidence evaluation for forensic purposes is the likelihood ratio-LR = p(E|H 1 )/p(E|H 2 ). The main aim of this paper was to study the performance of LR models for glass object classification which considered one or two sources of data variability, i.e. between-glass-object variability and(or) within-glass-object variability. Within the proposed model a multivariate kernel density approach was adopted for modelling the between-object distribution and a multivariate normal distribution was adopted for modelling within-object distributions. Moreover, a graphical method of estimating the dependence structure was employed to reduce the highly multivariate problem to several lower-dimensional problems. The performed analysis showed that the best likelihood model was the one which allows to include information about between and within-object variability, and with variables derived from elemental compositions measured by SEM-EDX, and refractive values determined before (RI b ) and after (RI a ) the annealing process, in the form of dRI = log 10 |RI a - RI b |. This model gave better results than the model with only between-object variability considered. In addition, when dRI and variables derived from elemental compositions were used, this model outperformed two other

  7. Music genre classification via likelihood fusion from multiple feature models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Yu; Kuo, C.-C. J.

    2005-01-01

    Music genre provides an efficient way to index songs in a music database, and can be used as an effective means to retrieval music of a similar type, i.e. content-based music retrieval. A new two-stage scheme for music genre classification is proposed in this work. At the first stage, we examine a couple of different features, construct their corresponding parametric models (e.g. GMM and HMM) and compute their likelihood functions to yield soft classification results. In particular, the timbre, rhythm and temporal variation features are considered. Then, at the second stage, these soft classification results are integrated to result in a hard decision for final music genre classification. Experimental results are given to demonstrate the performance of the proposed scheme.

  8. Reducing the computational cost of automatic calibration through model preemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Saman; Tolson, Bryan A.; Matott, L. Shawn; Thomson, Neil R.; Maclean, Angela; Seglenieks, Frank R.

    2010-11-01

    Computational budget is frequently a limiting factor in both uncertainty-based (e.g., through generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE)) and optimization-based (e.g., through least squares minimization) calibration of computationally intensive environmental simulation models. This study introduces and formalizes the concept of simulation model preemption during automatic calibration. The proposed "model preemption" method terminates a simulation model early to save computational budget if it is recognized through intermediate simulation model results that a given solution (model parameter set) is so poor that it will not benefit the search strategy. The methodology proposed here is referred to as deterministic model preemption because it leads to exactly the same calibration result as when deterministic preemption is not applied. As such, deterministic preemption-enabled calibration algorithms which make no approximations to the mathematical simulation model are a simple alternative to the increasingly common and more complex approach of metamodeling for computationally constrained model calibration. Despite its simplicity, the deterministic model preemption concept is a promising concept that has yet to be formalized in the environmental simulation model automatic calibration literature. The model preemption concept can be applied to a subset of uncertainty-based and optimization-based automatic calibration strategies using a variety of different objective functions. Results across multiple calibration case studies demonstrate actual preemption computational savings ranging from 14% to 49%, 34% to 59%, and 52% to 96% for the dynamically dimensioned search, particle swarm optimization, and GLUE automatic calibration methods, respectively.

  9. Quantifying uncertainty, variability and likelihood for ordinary differential equation models

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Weisse, Andrea Y

    2010-10-28

    Abstract Background In many applications, ordinary differential equation (ODE) models are subject to uncertainty or variability in initial conditions and parameters. Both, uncertainty and variability can be quantified in terms of a probability density function on the state and parameter space. Results The partial differential equation that describes the evolution of this probability density function has a form that is particularly amenable to application of the well-known method of characteristics. The value of the density at some point in time is directly accessible by the solution of the original ODE extended by a single extra dimension (for the value of the density). This leads to simple methods for studying uncertainty, variability and likelihood, with significant advantages over more traditional Monte Carlo and related approaches especially when studying regions with low probability. Conclusions While such approaches based on the method of characteristics are common practice in other disciplines, their advantages for the study of biological systems have so far remained unrecognized. Several examples illustrate performance and accuracy of the approach and its limitations.

  10. Profile-Likelihood Approach for Estimating Generalized Linear Mixed Models with Factor Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Minjeong; Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors suggest a profile-likelihood approach for estimating complex models by maximum likelihood (ML) using standard software and minimal programming. The method works whenever setting some of the parameters of the model to known constants turns the model into a standard model. An important class of models that can be…

  11. A neurocomputational model of automatic sequence production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helie, Sebastien; Roeder, Jessica L; Vucovich, Lauren; Rünger, Dennis; Ashby, F Gregory

    2015-07-01

    Most behaviors unfold in time and include a sequence of submovements or cognitive activities. In addition, most behaviors are automatic and repeated daily throughout life. Yet, relatively little is known about the neurobiology of automatic sequence production. Past research suggests a gradual transfer from the associative striatum to the sensorimotor striatum, but a number of more recent studies challenge this role of the BG in automatic sequence production. In this article, we propose a new neurocomputational model of automatic sequence production in which the main role of the BG is to train cortical-cortical connections within the premotor areas that are responsible for automatic sequence production. The new model is used to simulate four different data sets from human and nonhuman animals, including (1) behavioral data (e.g., RTs), (2) electrophysiology data (e.g., single-neuron recordings), (3) macrostructure data (e.g., TMS), and (4) neurological circuit data (e.g., inactivation studies). We conclude with a comparison of the new model with existing models of automatic sequence production and discuss a possible new role for the BG in automaticity and its implication for Parkinson's disease.

  12. Model Modification in Covariance Structure Modeling: A Comparison among Likelihood Ratio, Lagrange Multiplier, and Wald Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chih-Ping; Bentler, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    The empirical performance under null/alternative hypotheses of the likelihood ratio difference test (LRDT); Lagrange Multiplier test (evaluating the impact of model modification with a specific model); and Wald test (using a general model) were compared. The new tests for covariance structure analysis performed as well as did the LRDT. (RLC)

  13. Automatic terrain modeling using transfinite element analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Nathan

    2010-05-31

    An automatic procedure for modeling terrain is developed based on L2 projection-based interpolation of discrete terrain data onto transfinite function spaces. The function space is refined automatically by the use of image processing techniques to detect regions of high error and the flexibility of the transfinite interpolation to add degrees of freedom to these areas. Examples are shown of a section of the Palo Duro Canyon in northern Texas.

  14. LOCAL INDEPENDENCE FEATURE SCREENING FOR NONPARAMETRIC AND SEMIPARAMETRIC MODELS BY MARGINAL EMPIRICAL LIKELIHOOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jinyuan; Tang, Cheng Yong; Wu, Yichao

    2015-01-01

    We consider an independence feature screening technique for identifying explanatory variables that locally contribute to the response variable in high-dimensional regression analysis. Without requiring a specific parametric form of the underlying data model, our approach accommodates a wide spectrum of nonparametric and semiparametric model families. To detect the local contributions of explanatory variables, our approach constructs empirical likelihood locally in conjunction with marginal nonparametric regressions. Since our approach actually requires no estimation, it is advantageous in scenarios such as the single-index models where even specification and identification of a marginal model is an issue. By automatically incorporating the level of variation of the nonparametric regression and directly assessing the strength of data evidence supporting local contribution from each explanatory variable, our approach provides a unique perspective for solving feature screening problems. Theoretical analysis shows that our approach can handle data dimensionality growing exponentially with the sample size. With extensive theoretical illustrations and numerical examples, we show that the local independence screening approach performs promisingly. PMID:27242388

  15. Existence and uniqueness of the maximum likelihood estimator for models with a Kronecker product covariance structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, B.P.; Bijma, F.; de Munck, J.C.; de Gunst, M.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with multivariate Gaussian models for which the covariance matrix is a Kronecker product of two matrices. We consider maximum likelihood estimation of the model parameters, in particular of the covariance matrix. There is no explicit expression for the maximum likelihood estimator

  16. Automatic Flight Controller With Model Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, George; Smith, G. Allan

    1992-01-01

    Automatic digital electronic control system based on inverse-model-follower concept being developed for proposed vertical-attitude-takeoff-and-landing airplane. Inverse-model-follower control places inverse mathematical model of dynamics of controlled plant in series with control actuators of controlled plant so response of combination of model and plant to command is unity. System includes feedback to compensate for uncertainties in mathematical model and disturbances imposed from without.

  17. Fast inference in generalized linear models via expected log-likelihoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Alexandro D.; Paninski, Liam

    2015-01-01

    Generalized linear models play an essential role in a wide variety of statistical applications. This paper discusses an approximation of the likelihood in these models that can greatly facilitate computation. The basic idea is to replace a sum that appears in the exact log-likelihood by an expectation over the model covariates; the resulting “expected log-likelihood” can in many cases be computed significantly faster than the exact log-likelihood. In many neuroscience experiments the distribution over model covariates is controlled by the experimenter and the expected log-likelihood approximation becomes particularly useful; for example, estimators based on maximizing this expected log-likelihood (or a penalized version thereof) can often be obtained with orders of magnitude computational savings compared to the exact maximum likelihood estimators. A risk analysis establishes that these maximum EL estimators often come with little cost in accuracy (and in some cases even improved accuracy) compared to standard maximum likelihood estimates. Finally, we find that these methods can significantly decrease the computation time of marginal likelihood calculations for model selection and of Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for sampling from the posterior parameter distribution. We illustrate our results by applying these methods to a computationally-challenging dataset of neural spike trains obtained via large-scale multi-electrode recordings in the primate retina. PMID:23832289

  18. Empirical likelihood

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, Art B

    2001-01-01

    Empirical likelihood provides inferences whose validity does not depend on specifying a parametric model for the data. Because it uses a likelihood, the method has certain inherent advantages over resampling methods: it uses the data to determine the shape of the confidence regions, and it makes it easy to combined data from multiple sources. It also facilitates incorporating side information, and it simplifies accounting for censored, truncated, or biased sampling.One of the first books published on the subject, Empirical Likelihood offers an in-depth treatment of this method for constructing confidence regions and testing hypotheses. The author applies empirical likelihood to a range of problems, from those as simple as setting a confidence region for a univariate mean under IID sampling, to problems defined through smooth functions of means, regression models, generalized linear models, estimating equations, or kernel smooths, and to sampling with non-identically distributed data. Abundant figures offer vi...

  19. POPE: post optimization posterior evaluation of likelihood free models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeds, Edward; Chiang, Michael; Lee, Mary; Cinquin, Olivier; Lowengrub, John; Welling, Max

    2015-08-20

    In many domains, scientists build complex simulators of natural phenomena that encode their hypotheses about the underlying processes. These simulators can be deterministic or stochastic, fast or slow, constrained or unconstrained, and so on. Optimizing the simulators with respect to a set of parameter values is common practice, resulting in a single parameter setting that minimizes an objective subject to constraints. We propose algorithms for post optimization posterior evaluation (POPE) of simulators. The algorithms compute and visualize all simulations that can generate results of the same or better quality than the optimum, subject to constraints. These optimization posteriors are desirable for a number of reasons among which are easy interpretability, automatic parameter sensitivity and correlation analysis, and posterior predictive analysis. Our algorithms are simple extensions to an existing simulation-based inference framework called approximate Bayesian computation. POPE is applied two biological simulators: a fast and stochastic simulator of stem-cell cycling and a slow and deterministic simulator of tumor growth patterns. POPE allows the scientist to explore and understand the role that constraints, both on the input and the output, have on the optimization posterior. As a Bayesian inference procedure, POPE provides a rigorous framework for the analysis of the uncertainty of an optimal simulation parameter setting.

  20. Approximate Likelihood

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Most physics results at the LHC end in a likelihood ratio test. This includes discovery and exclusion for searches as well as mass, cross-section, and coupling measurements. The use of Machine Learning (multivariate) algorithms in HEP is mainly restricted to searches, which can be reduced to classification between two fixed distributions: signal vs. background. I will show how we can extend the use of ML classifiers to distributions parameterized by physical quantities like masses and couplings as well as nuisance parameters associated to systematic uncertainties. This allows for one to approximate the likelihood ratio while still using a high dimensional feature vector for the data. Both the MEM and ABC approaches mentioned above aim to provide inference on model parameters (like cross-sections, masses, couplings, etc.). ABC is fundamentally tied Bayesian inference and focuses on the “likelihood free” setting where only a simulator is available and one cannot directly compute the likelihood for the dat...

  1. A MIXTURE LIKELIHOOD APPROACH FOR GENERALIZED LINEAR-MODELS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WEDEL, M; DESARBO, WS

    1995-01-01

    A mixture model approach is developed that simultaneously estimates the posterior membership probabilities of observations to a number of unobservable groups or latent classes, and the parameters of a generalized linear model which relates the observations, distributed according to some member of

  2. Statistical modelling of survival data with random effects h-likelihood approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ha, Il Do; Lee, Youngjo

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a groundbreaking introduction to the likelihood inference for correlated survival data via the hierarchical (or h-) likelihood in order to obtain the (marginal) likelihood and to address the computational difficulties in inferences and extensions. The approach presented in the book overcomes shortcomings in the traditional likelihood-based methods for clustered survival data such as intractable integration. The text includes technical materials such as derivations and proofs in each chapter, as well as recently developed software programs in R (“frailtyHL”), while the real-world data examples together with an R package, “frailtyHL” in CRAN, provide readers with useful hands-on tools. Reviewing new developments since the introduction of the h-likelihood to survival analysis (methods for interval estimation of the individual frailty and for variable selection of the fixed effects in the general class of frailty models) and guiding future directions, the book is of interest to research...

  3. The fine-tuning cost of the likelihood in SUSY models

    CERN Document Server

    Ghilencea, D M

    2013-01-01

    In SUSY models, the fine tuning of the electroweak (EW) scale with respect to their parameters gamma_i={m_0, m_{1/2}, mu_0, A_0, B_0,...} and the maximal likelihood L to fit the experimental data are usually regarded as two different problems. We show that, if one regards the EW minimum conditions as constraints that fix the EW scale, this commonly held view is not correct and that the likelihood contains all the information about fine-tuning. In this case we show that the corrected likelihood is equal to the ratio L/Delta of the usual likelihood L and the traditional fine tuning measure Delta of the EW scale. A similar result is obtained for the integrated likelihood over the set {gamma_i}, that can be written as a surface integral of the ratio L/Delta, with the surface in gamma_i space determined by the EW minimum constraints. As a result, a large likelihood actually demands a large ratio L/Delta or equivalently, a small chi^2_{new}=chi^2_{old}+2*ln(Delta). This shows the fine-tuning cost to the likelihood ...

  4. Generalized Empirical Likelihood-Based Focused Information Criterion and Model Averaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Sueishi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops model selection and averaging methods for moment restriction models. We first propose a focused information criterion based on the generalized empirical likelihood estimator. We address the issue of selecting an optimal model, rather than a correct model, for estimating a specific parameter of interest. Then, this study investigates a generalized empirical likelihood-based model averaging estimator that minimizes the asymptotic mean squared error. A simulation study suggests that our averaging estimator can be a useful alternative to existing post-selection estimators.

  5. Maximum likelihood estimation of the parameters of nonminimum phase and noncausal ARMA models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Klaus Bolding

    1994-01-01

    The well-known prediction-error-based maximum likelihood (PEML) method can only handle minimum phase ARMA models. This paper presents a new method known as the back-filtering-based maximum likelihood (BFML) method, which can handle nonminimum phase and noncausal ARMA models. The BFML method...... is identical to the PEML method in the case of a minimum phase ARMA model, and it turns out that the BFML method incorporates a noncausal ARMA filter with poles outside the unit circle for estimation of the parameters of a causal, nonminimum phase ARMA model...

  6. Generalized linear models with random effects unified analysis via H-likelihood

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Youngjo; Pawitan, Yudi

    2006-01-01

    Since their introduction in 1972, generalized linear models (GLMs) have proven useful in the generalization of classical normal models. Presenting methods for fitting GLMs with random effects to data, Generalized Linear Models with Random Effects: Unified Analysis via H-likelihood explores a wide range of applications, including combining information over trials (meta-analysis), analysis of frailty models for survival data, genetic epidemiology, and analysis of spatial and temporal models with correlated errors.Written by pioneering authorities in the field, this reference provides an introduction to various theories and examines likelihood inference and GLMs. The authors show how to extend the class of GLMs while retaining as much simplicity as possible. By maximizing and deriving other quantities from h-likelihood, they also demonstrate how to use a single algorithm for all members of the class, resulting in a faster algorithm as compared to existing alternatives. Complementing theory with examples, many of...

  7. Improved Likelihood Ratio Tests for Cointegration Rank in the VAR Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boswijk, H. Peter; Jansson, Michael; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    We suggest improved tests for cointegration rank in the vector autoregressive (VAR) model and develop asymptotic distribution theory and local power results. The tests are (quasi-)likelihood ratio tests based on a Gaussian likelihood, but of course the asymptotic results apply more generally....... The power gains relative to existing tests are due to two factors. First, instead of basing our tests on the conditional (with respect to the initial observations) likelihood, we follow the recent unit root literature and base our tests on the full likelihood as in, e.g., Elliott, Rothenberg, and Stock...... (1996). Secondly, our tests incorporate a “sign”restriction which generalizes the one-sided unit root test. We show that the asymptotic local power of the proposed tests dominates that of existing cointegration rank tests....

  8. Choosing the observational likelihood in state-space stock assessment models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Christoffer Moesgaard; Nielsen, Anders; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro

    By implementing different observational likelihoods in a state-space age-based stock assessment model, we are able to compare the goodness-of-fit and effects on estimated fishing mortallity for different model choices. Model fit is improved by estimating suitable correlations between agegroups. We...

  9. Maximum Likelihood Dynamic Factor Modeling for Arbitrary "N" and "T" Using SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkle, Manuel C.; Oud, Johan H. L.; von Oertzen, Timo; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2012-01-01

    This article has 3 objectives that build on each other. First, we demonstrate how to obtain maximum likelihood estimates for dynamic factor models (the direct autoregressive factor score model) with arbitrary "T" and "N" by means of structural equation modeling (SEM) and compare the approach to existing methods. Second, we go beyond standard time…

  10. Uncertainty in urban stormwater quality modelling: the influence of likelihood measure formulation in the GLUE methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freni, Gabriele; Mannina, Giorgio; Viviani, Gapare

    2009-12-15

    In the last years, the attention on integrated analysis of sewer networks, wastewater treatment plants and receiving waters has been growing. However, the common lack of data in the urban water-quality field and the incomplete knowledge regarding the interpretation of the main phenomena taking part in integrated urban water systems draw attention to the necessity of evaluating the reliability of model results. Uncertainty analysis can provide useful hints and information regarding the best model approach to be used by assessing its degrees of significance and reliability. Few studies deal with uncertainty assessment in the integrated urban-drainage field. In order to fill this gap, there has been a general trend towards transferring the knowledge and the methodologies from other fields. In this respect, the Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Evaluation (GLUE) methodology, which is widely applied in the field of hydrology, can be a possible candidate for providing a solution to the above problem. However, the methodology relies on several user-defined hypotheses in the selection of a specific formulation of the likelihood measure. This paper presents a survey aimed at evaluating the influence of the likelihood measure formulation in the assessment of uncertainty in integrated urban-drainage modelling. To accomplish this objective, a home-made integrated urban-drainage model was applied to the Savena case study (Bologna, IT). In particular, the integrated urban-drainage model uncertainty was evaluated employing different likelihood measures. The results demonstrate that the subjective selection of the likelihood measure greatly affects the GLUE uncertainty analysis.

  11. Next Generation Model 8800 Automatic TLD Reader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velbeck, K.J.; Streetz, K.L.; Rotunda, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    BICRON NE has developed an advanced version of the Model 8800 Automatic TLD Reader. Improvements in the reader include a Windows NT TM -based operating system and a Pentium microprocessor for the host controller, a servo-controlled transport, a VGA display, mouse control, and modular assembly. This high capacity reader will automatically read fourteen hundred TLD Cards in one loading. Up to four elements in a card can be heated without mechanical contact, using hot nitrogen gas. Improvements in performance include an increased throughput rate and more precise card positioning. Operation is simplified through easy-to-read Windows-type screens. Glow curves are displayed graphically along with light intensity, temperature, and channel scaling. Maintenance and diagnostic aids are included for easier troubleshooting. A click of a mouse will command actions that are displayed in easy-to-understand English words. Available options include an internal 90 Sr irradiator, automatic TLD calibration, and two different extremity monitoring modes. Results from testing include reproducibility, reader stability, linearity, detection threshold, residue, primary power supply voltage and frequency, transient voltage, drop testing, and light leakage. (author)

  12. Driving the Model to Its Limit: Profile Likelihood Based Model Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiwald, Tim; Hass, Helge; Steiert, Bernhard; Vanlier, Joep; Engesser, Raphael; Raue, Andreas; Kipkeew, Friederike; Bock, Hans H; Kaschek, Daniel; Kreutz, Clemens; Timmer, Jens

    2016-01-01

    In systems biology, one of the major tasks is to tailor model complexity to information content of the data. A useful model should describe the data and produce well-determined parameter estimates and predictions. Too small of a model will not be able to describe the data whereas a model which is too large tends to overfit measurement errors and does not provide precise predictions. Typically, the model is modified and tuned to fit the data, which often results in an oversized model. To restore the balance between model complexity and available measurements, either new data has to be gathered or the model has to be reduced. In this manuscript, we present a data-based method for reducing non-linear models. The profile likelihood is utilised to assess parameter identifiability and designate likely candidates for reduction. Parameter dependencies are analysed along profiles, providing context-dependent suggestions for the type of reduction. We discriminate four distinct scenarios, each associated with a specific model reduction strategy. Iterating the presented procedure eventually results in an identifiable model, which is capable of generating precise and testable predictions. Source code for all toy examples is provided within the freely available, open-source modelling environment Data2Dynamics based on MATLAB available at http://www.data2dynamics.org/, as well as the R packages dMod/cOde available at https://github.com/dkaschek/. Moreover, the concept is generally applicable and can readily be used with any software capable of calculating the profile likelihood.

  13. Driving the Model to Its Limit: Profile Likelihood Based Model Reduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Maiwald

    Full Text Available In systems biology, one of the major tasks is to tailor model complexity to information content of the data. A useful model should describe the data and produce well-determined parameter estimates and predictions. Too small of a model will not be able to describe the data whereas a model which is too large tends to overfit measurement errors and does not provide precise predictions. Typically, the model is modified and tuned to fit the data, which often results in an oversized model. To restore the balance between model complexity and available measurements, either new data has to be gathered or the model has to be reduced. In this manuscript, we present a data-based method for reducing non-linear models. The profile likelihood is utilised to assess parameter identifiability and designate likely candidates for reduction. Parameter dependencies are analysed along profiles, providing context-dependent suggestions for the type of reduction. We discriminate four distinct scenarios, each associated with a specific model reduction strategy. Iterating the presented procedure eventually results in an identifiable model, which is capable of generating precise and testable predictions. Source code for all toy examples is provided within the freely available, open-source modelling environment Data2Dynamics based on MATLAB available at http://www.data2dynamics.org/, as well as the R packages dMod/cOde available at https://github.com/dkaschek/. Moreover, the concept is generally applicable and can readily be used with any software capable of calculating the profile likelihood.

  14. The fine-tuning cost of the likelihood in SUSY models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghilencea, D.M.; Ross, G.G.

    2013-01-01

    In SUSY models, the fine-tuning of the electroweak (EW) scale with respect to their parameters γ i ={m 0 ,m 1/2 ,μ 0 ,A 0 ,B 0 ,…} and the maximal likelihood L to fit the experimental data are usually regarded as two different problems. We show that, if one regards the EW minimum conditions as constraints that fix the EW scale, this commonly held view is not correct and that the likelihood contains all the information about fine-tuning. In this case we show that the corrected likelihood is equal to the ratio L/Δ of the usual likelihood L and the traditional fine-tuning measure Δ of the EW scale. A similar result is obtained for the integrated likelihood over the set {γ i }, that can be written as a surface integral of the ratio L/Δ, with the surface in γ i space determined by the EW minimum constraints. As a result, a large likelihood actually demands a large ratio L/Δ or equivalently, a small χ new 2 =χ old 2 +2lnΔ. This shows the fine-tuning cost to the likelihood (χ new 2 ) of the EW scale stability enforced by SUSY, that is ignored in data fits. A good χ new 2 /d.o.f.≈1 thus demands SUSY models have a fine-tuning amount Δ≪exp(d.o.f./2), which provides a model-independent criterion for acceptable fine-tuning. If this criterion is not met, one can thus rule out SUSY models without a further χ 2 /d.o.f. analysis. Numerical methods to fit the data can easily be adapted to account for this effect.

  15. Block Empirical Likelihood for Longitudinal Single-Index Varying-Coefficient Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunquan Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider a single-index varying-coefficient model with application to longitudinal data. In order to accommodate the within-group correlation, we apply the block empirical likelihood procedure to longitudinal single-index varying-coefficient model, and prove a nonparametric version of Wilks’ theorem which can be used to construct the block empirical likelihood confidence region with asymptotically correct coverage probability for the parametric component. In comparison with normal approximations, the proposed method does not require a consistent estimator for the asymptotic covariance matrix, making it easier to conduct inference for the model's parametric component. Simulations demonstrate how the proposed method works.

  16. Maximum likelihood Bayesian model averaging and its predictive analysis for groundwater reactive transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Gary P.; Lu, Dan; Ye, Ming

    2015-01-01

    While Bayesian model averaging (BMA) has been widely used in groundwater modeling, it is infrequently applied to groundwater reactive transport modeling because of multiple sources of uncertainty in the coupled hydrogeochemical processes and because of the long execution time of each model run. To resolve these problems, this study analyzed different levels of uncertainty in a hierarchical way, and used the maximum likelihood version of BMA, i.e., MLBMA, to improve the computational efficiency. This study demonstrates the applicability of MLBMA to groundwater reactive transport modeling in a synthetic case in which twenty-seven reactive transport models were designed to predict the reactive transport of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) based on observations at a former uranium mill site near Naturita, CO. These reactive transport models contain three uncertain model components, i.e., parameterization of hydraulic conductivity, configuration of model boundary, and surface complexation reactions that simulate U(VI) adsorption. These uncertain model components were aggregated into the alternative models by integrating a hierarchical structure into MLBMA. The modeling results of the individual models and MLBMA were analyzed to investigate their predictive performance. The predictive logscore results show that MLBMA generally outperforms the best model, suggesting that using MLBMA is a sound strategy to achieve more robust model predictions relative to a single model. MLBMA works best when the alternative models are structurally distinct and have diverse model predictions. When correlation in model structure exists, two strategies were used to improve predictive performance by retaining structurally distinct models or assigning smaller prior model probabilities to correlated models. Since the synthetic models were designed using data from the Naturita site, the results of this study are expected to provide guidance for real-world modeling. Limitations of applying MLBMA to the

  17. Polytomous IRT models and monotone likelihood ratio of the total score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemker, BT; Sijtsma, Klaas; Molenaar, Ivo W; Junker, BW

    1996-01-01

    In a broad class of item response theory (IRT) models for dichotomous items the unweighted total score has monotone likelihood ratio (MLR) in the latent trait theta. In this study, it is shown that for polytomous items MLR holds for the partial credit model and a trivial generalization of this

  18. Maximum Likelihood Item Easiness Models for Test Theory without an Answer Key

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Stephen L.; Batchelder, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Cultural consensus theory (CCT) is a data aggregation technique with many applications in the social and behavioral sciences. We describe the intuition and theory behind a set of CCT models for continuous type data using maximum likelihood inference methodology. We describe how bias parameters can be incorporated into these models. We introduce…

  19. Likelihood analysis of spatial capture-recapture models for stratified or class structured populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, J. Andrew; Sutherland, Christopher S.; Fuller, Angela K.; Sun, Catherine C.

    2015-01-01

    We develop a likelihood analysis framework for fitting spatial capture-recapture (SCR) models to data collected on class structured or stratified populations. Our interest is motivated by the necessity of accommodating the problem of missing observations of individual class membership. This is particularly problematic in SCR data arising from DNA analysis of scat, hair or other material, which frequently yields individual identity but fails to identify the sex. Moreover, this can represent a large fraction of the data and, given the typically small sample sizes of many capture-recapture studies based on DNA information, utilization of the data with missing sex information is necessary. We develop the class structured likelihood for the case of missing covariate values, and then we address the scaling of the likelihood so that models with and without class structured parameters can be formally compared regardless of missing values. We apply our class structured model to black bear data collected in New York in which sex could be determined for only 62 of 169 uniquely identified individuals. The models containing sex-specificity of both the intercept of the SCR encounter probability model and the distance coefficient, and including a behavioral response are strongly favored by log-likelihood. Estimated population sex ratio is strongly influenced by sex structure in model parameters illustrating the importance of rigorous modeling of sex differences in capture-recapture models.

  20. A Composite Likelihood Inference in Latent Variable Models for Ordinal Longitudinal Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasdekis, Vassilis G. S.; Cagnone, Silvia; Moustaki, Irini

    2012-01-01

    The paper proposes a composite likelihood estimation approach that uses bivariate instead of multivariate marginal probabilities for ordinal longitudinal responses using a latent variable model. The model considers time-dependent latent variables and item-specific random effects to be accountable for the interdependencies of the multivariate…

  1. Inferring fixed effects in a mixed linear model from an integrated likelihood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gianola, Daniel; Sorensen, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    A new method for likelihood-based inference of fixed effects in mixed linear models, with variance components treated as nuisance parameters, is presented. The method uses uniform-integration of the likelihood; the implementation employs the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm for elimination...... of all nuisances, viewing random effects and variance components as missing data. In a simulation of a grazing trial, the procedure was compared with four widely used estimators of fixed effects in mixed models, and found to be competitive. An analysis of body weight in freshwater crayfish was conducted...

  2. A new machine condition monitoring method based on likelihood change of a stochastic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kyu Hwan; Lee, Jong Min; Hwang, Yoha

    2013-12-01

    In industry, a machine condition monitoring system has become more important with ever-increasing requirements on productivity and cost saving. Although researches have been very active, many currently available intelligent monitoring methods have common drawbacks, which are the requirement of defect model for every interested defect type and inaccurate diagnostic performance. To overcome those drawbacks, authors propose a new machine condition monitoring method based on likelihood change of a stochastic model using only normal operation data. Hidden Markov model (HMM) has been selected as a stochastic model based on its accurate and robust diagnostic performance. By observing the likelihood change of a pre-trained normal HMM on incoming data in unknown condition, defect can be precisely detected from sudden drop of likelihood value. Therefore, though the types of defect cannot be identified, defects can be precisely detected with only normal model. Defect models can also be used when defect data are available. And in this case, not only the precise detection of defect but also the correct identification of defect type is possible. In this paper, the proposed monitoring method based on likelihood change of normal continuous HMM have been successfully applied to monitoring of the machine condition and weld condition, proving its great potential with accurate and robust diagnostic performance results.

  3. Analyzing multivariate survival data using composite likelihood and flexible parametric modeling of the hazard functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan; Parner, Erik

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we model multivariate time-to-event data by composite likelihood of pairwise frailty likelihoods and marginal hazards using natural cubic splines. Both right- and interval-censored data are considered. The suggested approach is applied on two types of family studies using the gamma......- and stable frailty distribution: The first study is on adoption data where the association between survival in families of adopted children and their adoptive and biological parents is studied. The second study is a cross-sectional study of the occurrence of back and neck pain in twins, illustrating...

  4. Maximum likelihood estimation for Cox's regression model under nested case-control sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheike, Thomas; Juul, Anders

    2004-01-01

    -like growth factor I was associated with ischemic heart disease. The study was based on a population of 3784 Danes and 231 cases of ischemic heart disease where controls were matched on age and gender. We illustrate the use of the MLE for these data and show how the maximum likelihood framework can be used......Nested case-control sampling is designed to reduce the costs of large cohort studies. It is important to estimate the parameters of interest as efficiently as possible. We present a new maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) for nested case-control sampling in the context of Cox's proportional hazards...... model. The MLE is computed by the EM-algorithm, which is easy to implement in the proportional hazards setting. Standard errors are estimated by a numerical profile likelihood approach based on EM aided differentiation. The work was motivated by a nested case-control study that hypothesized that insulin...

  5. Evaluation of Smoking Prevention Television Messages Based on the Elaboration Likelihood Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Brian S.; Worden, John K.; Bunn, Janice Yanushka; Connolly, Scott W.; Dorwaldt, Anne L.

    2011-01-01

    Progress in reducing youth smoking may depend on developing improved methods to communicate with higher risk youth. This study explored the potential of smoking prevention messages based on the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) to address these needs. Structured evaluations of 12 smoking prevention messages based on three strategies derived from…

  6. Marginal Maximum Likelihood Estimation for a Psychometric Model of Discontinuous Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mislevy, Robert J.; Wilson, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Marginal maximum likelihood estimation equations are derived for the structural parameters of the Saltus model, and a computing approximation is suggested based on the EM algorithm. The solution is illustrated with simulated data and an example from the domain of mixed number subtraction. (SLD)

  7. On the Relationships between Jeffreys Modal and Weighted Likelihood Estimation of Ability under Logistic IRT Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magis, David; Raiche, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on two estimators of ability with logistic item response theory models: the Bayesian modal (BM) estimator and the weighted likelihood (WL) estimator. For the BM estimator, Jeffreys' prior distribution is considered, and the corresponding estimator is referred to as the Jeffreys modal (JM) estimator. It is established that under…

  8. Statistical power of likelihood ratio and Wald tests in latent class models with covariates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gudicha, D.W.; Schmittmann, V.D.; Vermunt, J.K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses power and sample-size computation for likelihood ratio and Wald testing of the significance of covariate effects in latent class models. For both tests, asymptotic distributions can be used; that is, the test statistic can be assumed to follow a central Chi-square under the null

  9. Genetic Programming for Automatic Hydrological Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadalawada, Jayashree; Babovic, Vladan

    2017-04-01

    One of the recent challenges for the hydrologic research community is the need for the development of coupled systems that involves the integration of hydrologic, atmospheric and socio-economic relationships. This poses a requirement for novel modelling frameworks that can accurately represent complex systems, given, the limited understanding of underlying processes, increasing volume of data and high levels of uncertainity. Each of the existing hydrological models vary in terms of conceptualization and process representation and is the best suited to capture the environmental dynamics of a particular hydrological system. Data driven approaches can be used in the integration of alternative process hypotheses in order to achieve a unified theory at catchment scale. The key steps in the implementation of integrated modelling framework that is influenced by prior understanding and data, include, choice of the technique for the induction of knowledge from data, identification of alternative structural hypotheses, definition of rules, constraints for meaningful, intelligent combination of model component hypotheses and definition of evaluation metrics. This study aims at defining a Genetic Programming based modelling framework that test different conceptual model constructs based on wide range of objective functions and evolves accurate and parsimonious models that capture dominant hydrological processes at catchment scale. In this paper, GP initializes the evolutionary process using the modelling decisions inspired from the Superflex framework [Fenicia et al., 2011] and automatically combines them into model structures that are scrutinized against observed data using statistical, hydrological and flow duration curve based performance metrics. The collaboration between data driven and physical, conceptual modelling paradigms improves the ability to model and manage hydrologic systems. Fenicia, F., D. Kavetski, and H. H. Savenije (2011), Elements of a flexible approach

  10. Maximum likelihood pixel labeling using a spatially variant finite mixture model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopal, S.S.; Hebert, T.J.

    1996-01-01

    We propose a spatially-variant mixture model for pixel labeling. Based on this spatially-variant mixture model we derive an expectation maximization algorithm for maximum likelihood estimation of the pixel labels. While most algorithms using mixture models entail the subsequent use of a Bayes classifier for pixel labeling, the proposed algorithm yields maximum likelihood estimates of the labels themselves and results in unambiguous pixel labels. The proposed algorithm is fast, robust, easy to implement, flexible in that it can be applied to any arbitrary image data where the number of classes is known and, most importantly, obviates the need for an explicit labeling rule. The algorithm is evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively on simulated data and on clinical magnetic resonance images of the human brain

  11. Estimation of Financial Agent-Based Models with Simulated Maximum Likelihood

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kukačka, Jiří; Baruník, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 1 (2017), s. 21-45 ISSN 0165-1889 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP402/12/G097 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : heterogeneous agent model, * simulated maximum likelihood * switching Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Finance Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/E/kukacka-0478481.pdf

  12. Computation of the Likelihood in Biallelic Diffusion Models Using Orthogonal Polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Vogl

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In population genetics, parameters describing forces such as mutation, migration and drift are generally inferred from molecular data. Lately, approximate methods based on simulations and summary statistics have been widely applied for such inference, even though these methods waste information. In contrast, probabilistic methods of inference can be shown to be optimal, if their assumptions are met. In genomic regions where recombination rates are high relative to mutation rates, polymorphic nucleotide sites can be assumed to evolve independently from each other. The distribution of allele frequencies at a large number of such sites has been called “allele-frequency spectrum” or “site-frequency spectrum” (SFS. Conditional on the allelic proportions, the likelihoods of such data can be modeled as binomial. A simple model representing the evolution of allelic proportions is the biallelic mutation-drift or mutation-directional selection-drift diffusion model. With series of orthogonal polynomials, specifically Jacobi and Gegenbauer polynomials, or the related spheroidal wave function, the diffusion equations can be solved efficiently. In the neutral case, the product of the binomial likelihoods with the sum of such polynomials leads to finite series of polynomials, i.e., relatively simple equations, from which the exact likelihoods can be calculated. In this article, the use of orthogonal polynomials for inferring population genetic parameters is investigated.

  13. Fitting Cox Models with Doubly Censored Data Using Spline-Based Sieve Marginal Likelihood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiguo; Owzar, Kouros

    2015-01-01

    In some applications, the failure time of interest is the time from an originating event to a failure event, while both event times are interval censored. We propose fitting Cox proportional hazards models to this type of data using a spline-based sieve maximum marginal likelihood, where the time to the originating event is integrated out in the empirical likelihood function of the failure time of interest. This greatly reduces the complexity of the objective function compared with the fully semiparametric likelihood. The dependence of the time of interest on time to the originating event is induced by including the latter as a covariate in the proportional hazards model for the failure time of interest. The use of splines results in a higher rate of convergence of the estimator of the baseline hazard function compared with the usual nonparametric estimator. The computation of the estimator is facilitated by a multiple imputation approach. Asymptotic theory is established and a simulation study is conducted to assess its finite sample performance. It is also applied to analyzing a real data set on AIDS incubation time. PMID:27239090

  14. Quasi-maximum likelihood estimator of Laplace (1, 1 for GARCH models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Haiyan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the quasi-maximum likelihood estimator (QMLE for the generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedastic (GARCH model based on the Laplace (1,1 residuals. The QMLE is proposed to the parameter vector of the GARCH model with the Laplace (1,1 firstly. Under some certain conditions, the strong consistency and asymptotic normality of QMLE are then established. In what follows, a real example with Laplace and normal distribution is analyzed to evaluate the performance of the QMLE and some comparison results on the performance are given. In the end the proofs of some theorem are presented.

  15. Pseudo-partial likelihood estimators for the Cox regression model with missing covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaodong; Tsai, Wei Yann; Xu, Qiang

    2009-09-01

    By embedding the missing covariate data into a left-truncated and right-censored survival model, we propose a new class of weighted estimating functions for the Cox regression model with missing covariates. The resulting estimators, called the pseudo-partial likelihood estimators, are shown to be consistent and asymptotically normal. A simulation study demonstrates that, compared with the popular inverse-probability weighted estimators, the new estimators perform better when the observation probability is small and improve efficiency of estimating the missing covariate effects. Application to a practical example is reported.

  16. Maximum-likelihood model averaging to profile clustering of site types across discrete linear sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A major analytical challenge in computational biology is the detection and description of clusters of specified site types, such as polymorphic or substituted sites within DNA or protein sequences. Progress has been stymied by a lack of suitable methods to detect clusters and to estimate the extent of clustering in discrete linear sequences, particularly when there is no a priori specification of cluster size or cluster count. Here we derive and demonstrate a maximum likelihood method of hierarchical clustering. Our method incorporates a tripartite divide-and-conquer strategy that models sequence heterogeneity, delineates clusters, and yields a profile of the level of clustering associated with each site. The clustering model may be evaluated via model selection using the Akaike Information Criterion, the corrected Akaike Information Criterion, and the Bayesian Information Criterion. Furthermore, model averaging using weighted model likelihoods may be applied to incorporate model uncertainty into the profile of heterogeneity across sites. We evaluated our method by examining its performance on a number of simulated datasets as well as on empirical polymorphism data from diverse natural alleles of the Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase gene. Our method yielded greater power for the detection of clustered sites across a breadth of parameter ranges, and achieved better accuracy and precision of estimation of clusters, than did the existing empirical cumulative distribution function statistics.

  17. Elaboration Likelihood Model and an Analysis of the Contexts of Its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslıhan Kıymalıoğlu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM, which supports the existence of two routes to persuasion: central and peripheral routes, has been one of the major models on persuasion. As the number of studies in the Turkish literature on ELM is limited, a detailed explanation of the model together with a comprehensive literature review was considered to be contributory for this gap. The findings of the review reveal that the model was mostly used in marketing and advertising researches, that the concept most frequently used in elaboration process was involvement, and that argument quality and endorser credibility were the factors most often employed in measuring their effect on the dependant variables. The review provides valuable insights as it presents a holistic view of the model and the variables used in the model.

  18. Change point models for cognitive tests using semi-parametric maximum likelihood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hout, Ardo; Muniz-Terrera, Graciela; Matthews, Fiona E

    2013-01-01

    Random-effects change point models are formulated for longitudinal data obtained from cognitive tests. The conditional distribution of the response variable in a change point model is often assumed to be normal even if the response variable is discrete and shows ceiling effects. For the sum score of a cognitive test, the binomial and the beta-binomial distributions are presented as alternatives to the normal distribution. Smooth shapes for the change point models are imposed. Estimation is by marginal maximum likelihood where a parametric population distribution for the random change point is combined with a non-parametric mixing distribution for other random effects. An extension to latent class modelling is possible in case some individuals do not experience a change in cognitive ability. The approach is illustrated using data from a longitudinal study of Swedish octogenarians and nonagenarians that began in 1991. Change point models are applied to investigate cognitive change in the years before death.

  19. Maximum likelihood fitting of FROC curves under an initial-detection-and-candidate-analysis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, Darrin C.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Metz, Charles E.; Nishikawa, Robert M.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a model for FROC curve fitting that relates the observer's FROC performance not to the ROC performance that would be obtained if the observer's responses were scored on a per image basis, but rather to a hypothesized ROC performance that the observer would obtain in the task of classifying a set of 'candidate detections' as positive or negative. We adopt the assumptions of the Bunch FROC model, namely that the observer's detections are all mutually independent, as well as assumptions qualitatively similar to, but different in nature from, those made by Chakraborty in his AFROC scoring methodology. Under the assumptions of our model, we show that the observer's FROC performance is a linearly scaled version of the candidate analysis ROC curve, where the scaling factors are just given by the FROC operating point coordinates for detecting initial candidates. Further, we show that the likelihood function of the model parameters given observational data takes on a simple form, and we develop a maximum likelihood method for fitting a FROC curve to this data. FROC and AFROC curves are produced for computer vision observer datasets and compared with the results of the AFROC scoring method. Although developed primarily with computer vision schemes in mind, we hope that the methodology presented here will prove worthy of further study in other applications as well

  20. Discrete Model Reference Adaptive Control System for Automatic Profiling Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic profiling machine is a movement system that has a high degree of parameter variation and high frequency of transient process, and it requires an accurate control in time. In this paper, the discrete model reference adaptive control system of automatic profiling machine is discussed. Firstly, the model of automatic profiling machine is presented according to the parameters of DC motor. Then the design of the discrete model reference adaptive control is proposed, and the control rules are proven. The results of simulation show that adaptive control system has favorable dynamic performances.

  1. Automatic Assessment of 3D Modeling Exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, A.; Lamberti, F.; Paravati, G.; Demartini, C.

    2012-01-01

    Computer-based assessment of exams provides teachers and students with two main benefits: fairness and effectiveness in the evaluation process. This paper proposes a fully automatic evaluation tool for the Graphic and Virtual Design (GVD) curriculum at the First School of Architecture of the Politecnico di Torino, Italy. In particular, the tool is…

  2. The likelihood ratio test for cointegration ranks in the I(2) model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Heino Bohn; Rahbek, Anders Christian

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the likelihood ratio (LR) test for the number of cointegrating relations in the I(2) vector autoregressive model. It is shown that the asymptotic distribution of the LR test for the cointegration ranks is identical to the asymptotic distribution of the much applied test...... statistic based on the two-step estimation procedure in Johansen (1995, Econometric Theory 11, 25-59), Paruolo (1996, Journal of Econometrics 72, 313-356), and Rahbek, Kongsted, and Jørgensen (1999, Journal of Econometrics 90, 265-289). By construction the LR test statistic is smaller than the non-LR test...

  3. Automatic conversion of CAD model into neutronics model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Haimin; Wu Yican; Chen Mingliang; Zheng Shanliang; Zeng Qin; Ding Aiping; Li Ying

    2007-01-01

    It is a time-consuming and error-prone task to prepare neutronics model for the discrete ordinates transport codes (S N codes) in manual way. A more efficient solution is presented in this paper, while shift geometric modeling to computer aided design (CAD) system, and to use an interface program for S N codes to convert the CAD model to neutronics model, and then generate the input file of S N code automatically. The detailed conversion method is described and some kernel algorithms are implemented in SNAM, an interface program between CAD system and S N codes. The method has been used to convert the ITER benchmark model to the input file of S N code successfully. It is shown that the conversion method is a correct, efficient and potential solution for S N code modelling. (author)

  4. Assessing Individual Weather Risk-Taking and Its Role in Modeling Likelihood of Hurricane Evacuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A. E.

    2017-12-01

    This research focuses upon measuring an individual's level of perceived risk of different severe and extreme weather conditions using a new self-report measure, the Weather Risk-Taking Scale (WRTS). For 32 severe and extreme situations in which people could perform an unsafe behavior (e. g., remaining outside with lightning striking close by, driving over roadways covered with water, not evacuating ahead of an approaching hurricane, etc.), people rated: 1.their likelihood of performing the behavior, 2. The perceived risk of performing the behavior, 3. the expected benefits of performing the behavior, and 4. whether the behavior has actually been performed in the past. Initial development research with the measure using 246 undergraduate students examined its psychometric properties and found that it was internally consistent (Cronbach's a ranged from .87 to .93 for the four scales) and that the scales possessed good temporal (test-retest) reliability (r's ranged from .84 to .91). A second regression study involving 86 undergraduate students found that taking weather risks was associated with having taken similar risks in one's past and with the personality trait of sensation-seeking. Being more attentive to the weather and perceiving its risks when it became extreme was associated with lower likelihoods of taking weather risks (overall regression model, R2adj = 0.60). A third study involving 334 people examined the contributions of weather risk perceptions and risk-taking in modeling the self-reported likelihood of complying with a recommended evacuation ahead of a hurricane. Here, higher perceptions of hurricane risks and lower perceived benefits of risk-taking along with fear of severe weather and hurricane personal self-efficacy ratings were all statistically significant contributors to the likelihood of evacuating ahead of a hurricane. Psychological rootedness and attachment to one's home also tend to predict lack of evacuation. This research highlights the

  5. Statistical power of likelihood ratio and Wald tests in latent class models with covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudicha, Dereje W; Schmittmann, Verena D; Vermunt, Jeroen K

    2017-10-01

    This paper discusses power and sample-size computation for likelihood ratio and Wald testing of the significance of covariate effects in latent class models. For both tests, asymptotic distributions can be used; that is, the test statistic can be assumed to follow a central Chi-square under the null hypothesis and a non-central Chi-square under the alternative hypothesis. Power or sample-size computation using these asymptotic distributions requires specification of the non-centrality parameter, which in practice is rarely known. We show how to calculate this non-centrality parameter using a large simulated data set from the model under the alternative hypothesis. A simulation study is conducted evaluating the adequacy of the proposed power analysis methods, determining the key study design factor affecting the power level, and comparing the performance of the likelihood ratio and Wald test. The proposed power analysis methods turn out to perform very well for a broad range of conditions. Moreover, apart from effect size and sample size, an important factor affecting the power is the class separation, implying that when class separation is low, rather large sample sizes are needed to achieve a reasonable power level.

  6. Observation Likelihood Model Design and Failure Recovery Scheme Toward Reliable Localization of Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-bae Moon

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Although there have been many researches on mobile robot localization, it is still difficult to obtain reliable localization performance in a human co-existing real environment. Reliability of localization is highly dependent upon developer's experiences because uncertainty is caused by a variety of reasons. We have developed a range sensor based integrated localization scheme for various indoor service robots. Through the experience, we found out that there are several significant experimental issues. In this paper, we provide useful solutions for following questions which are frequently faced with in practical applications: 1 How to design an observation likelihood model? 2 How to detect the localization failure? 3 How to recover from the localization failure? We present design guidelines of observation likelihood model. Localization failure detection and recovery schemes are presented by focusing on abrupt wheel slippage. Experiments were carried out in a typical office building environment. The proposed scheme to identify the localizer status is useful in practical environments. Moreover, the semi-global localization is a computationally efficient recovery scheme from localization failure. The results of experiments and analysis clearly present the usefulness of proposed solutions.

  7. Observation Likelihood Model Design and Failure Recovery Scheme toward Reliable Localization of Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-bae Moon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there have been many researches on mobile robot localization, it is still difficult to obtain reliable localization performance in a human co-existing real environment. Reliability of localization is highly dependent upon developer's experiences because uncertainty is caused by a variety of reasons. We have developed a range sensor based integrated localization scheme for various indoor service robots. Through the experience, we found out that there are several significant experimental issues. In this paper, we provide useful solutions for following questions which are frequently faced with in practical applications: 1 How to design an observation likelihood model? 2 How to detect the localization failure? 3 How to recover from the localization failure? We present design guidelines of observation likelihood model. Localization failure detection and recovery schemes are presented by focusing on abrupt wheel slippage. Experiments were carried out in a typical office building environment. The proposed scheme to identify the localizer status is useful in practical environments. Moreover, the semi-global localization is a computationally efficient recovery scheme from localization failure. The results of experiments and analysis clearly present the usefulness of proposed solutions.

  8. Effects of deceptive packaging and product involvement on purchase intention: an elaboration likelihood model perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, H B

    2000-04-01

    From an Elaboration Likelihood Model perspective, it was hypothesized that postexposure awareness of deceptive packaging claims would have a greater negative effect on scores for purchase intention by consumers lowly involved rather than highly involved with a product (n = 40). Undergraduates who were classified as either highly or lowly (ns = 20 and 20) involved with M&Ms examined either a deceptive or non-deceptive package design for M&Ms candy and were subsequently informed of the deception employed in the packaging before finally rating their intention to purchase. As anticipated, highly deceived subjects who were low in involvement rated intention to purchase lower than their highly involved peers. Overall, the results attest to the robustness of the model and suggest that the model has implications beyond advertising effects and into packaging effects.

  9. Bayesian Monte Carlo and Maximum Likelihood Approach for Uncertainty Estimation and Risk Management: Application to Lake Oxygen Recovery Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Model uncertainty estimation and risk assessment is essential to environmental management and informed decision making on pollution mitigation strategies. In this study, we apply a probabilistic methodology, which combines Bayesian Monte Carlo simulation and Maximum Likelihood e...

  10. ABC of SV: Limited Information Likelihood Inference in Stochastic Volatility Jump-Diffusion Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creel, Michael; Kristensen, Dennis

    We develop novel methods for estimation and filtering of continuous-time models with stochastic volatility and jumps using so-called Approximate Bayesian Computation which build likelihoods based on limited information. The proposed estimators and filters are computationally attractive relative...... and latent variables. We show how the methods can incorporate intra-daily information to improve on the estimation and filtering. In particular, the availability of realized volatility measures help us in learning about parameters and latent states. The method is employed in the estimation of a flexible...... stochastic volatility model for the dynamics of the S&P 500 equity index. We find evidence of the presence of a dynamic jump rate and in favor of a structural break in parameters at the time of the recent financial crisis. We find evidence that possible measurement error in log price is small and has little...

  11. Bayesian Inference using Neural Net Likelihood Models for Protein Secondary Structure Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Gon Kim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Several techniques such as Neural Networks, Genetic Algorithms, Decision Trees and other statistical or heuristic methods have been used to approach the complex non-linear task of predicting Alpha-helicies, Beta-sheets and Turns of a proteins secondary structure in the past. This project introduces a new machine learning method by using an offline trained Multilayered Perceptrons (MLP as the likelihood models within a Bayesian Inference framework to predict secondary structures proteins. Varying window sizes are used to extract neighboring amino acid information and passed back and forth between the Neural Net models and the Bayesian Inference process until there is a convergence of the posterior secondary structure probability.

  12. The likelihood of achieving quantified road safety targets: a binary logistic regression model for possible factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, N N; Wong, S C; Lee, C Y

    2014-12-01

    In past several decades, many countries have set quantified road safety targets to motivate transport authorities to develop systematic road safety strategies and measures and facilitate the achievement of continuous road safety improvement. Studies have been conducted to evaluate the association between the setting of quantified road safety targets and road fatality reduction, in both the short and long run, by comparing road fatalities before and after the implementation of a quantified road safety target. However, not much work has been done to evaluate whether the quantified road safety targets are actually achieved. In this study, we used a binary logistic regression model to examine the factors - including vehicle ownership, fatality rate, and national income, in addition to level of ambition and duration of target - that contribute to a target's success. We analyzed 55 quantified road safety targets set by 29 countries from 1981 to 2009, and the results indicate that targets that are in progress and with lower level of ambitions had a higher likelihood of eventually being achieved. Moreover, possible interaction effects on the association between level of ambition and the likelihood of success are also revealed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Maximum likelihood estimation of semiparametric mixture component models for competing risks data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sangbum; Huang, Xuelin

    2014-09-01

    In the analysis of competing risks data, the cumulative incidence function is a useful quantity to characterize the crude risk of failure from a specific event type. In this article, we consider an efficient semiparametric analysis of mixture component models on cumulative incidence functions. Under the proposed mixture model, latency survival regressions given the event type are performed through a class of semiparametric models that encompasses the proportional hazards model and the proportional odds model, allowing for time-dependent covariates. The marginal proportions of the occurrences of cause-specific events are assessed by a multinomial logistic model. Our mixture modeling approach is advantageous in that it makes a joint estimation of model parameters associated with all competing risks under consideration, satisfying the constraint that the cumulative probability of failing from any cause adds up to one given any covariates. We develop a novel maximum likelihood scheme based on semiparametric regression analysis that facilitates efficient and reliable estimation. Statistical inferences can be conveniently made from the inverse of the observed information matrix. We establish the consistency and asymptotic normality of the proposed estimators. We validate small sample properties with simulations and demonstrate the methodology with a data set from a study of follicular lymphoma. © 2014, The International Biometric Society.

  14. A likelihood-based biostatistical model for analyzing consumer movement in simultaneous choice experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Adam R; Olson, Dawn M; Andow, David A

    2014-08-01

    Consumer feeding preference among resource choices has critical implications for basic ecological and evolutionary processes, and can be highly relevant to applied problems such as ecological risk assessment and invasion biology. Within consumer choice experiments, also known as feeding preference or cafeteria experiments, measures of relative consumption and measures of consumer movement can provide distinct and complementary insights into the strength, causes, and consequences of preference. Despite the distinct value of inferring preference from measures of consumer movement, rigorous and biologically relevant analytical methods are lacking. We describe a simple, likelihood-based, biostatistical model for analyzing the transient dynamics of consumer movement in a paired-choice experiment. With experimental data consisting of repeated discrete measures of consumer location, the model can be used to estimate constant consumer attraction and leaving rates for two food choices, and differences in choice-specific attraction and leaving rates can be tested using model selection. The model enables calculation of transient and equilibrial probabilities of consumer-resource association, which could be incorporated into larger scale movement models. We explore the effect of experimental design on parameter estimation through stochastic simulation and describe methods to check that data meet model assumptions. Using a dataset of modest sample size, we illustrate the use of the model to draw inferences on consumer preference as well as underlying behavioral mechanisms. Finally, we include a user's guide and computer code scripts in R to facilitate use of the model by other researchers.

  15. Likelihood-free inference of population structure and local adaptation in a Bayesian hierarchical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazin, Eric; Dawson, Kevin J; Beaumont, Mark A

    2010-06-01

    We address the problem of finding evidence of natural selection from genetic data, accounting for the confounding effects of demographic history. In the absence of natural selection, gene genealogies should all be sampled from the same underlying distribution, often approximated by a coalescent model. Selection at a particular locus will lead to a modified genealogy, and this motivates a number of recent approaches for detecting the effects of natural selection in the genome as "outliers" under some models. The demographic history of a population affects the sampling distribution of genealogies, and therefore the observed genotypes and the classification of outliers. Since we cannot see genealogies directly, we have to infer them from the observed data under some model of mutation and demography. Thus the accuracy of an outlier-based approach depends to a greater or a lesser extent on the uncertainty about the demographic and mutational model. A natural modeling framework for this type of problem is provided by Bayesian hierarchical models, in which parameters, such as mutation rates and selection coefficients, are allowed to vary across loci. It has proved quite difficult computationally to implement fully probabilistic genealogical models with complex demographies, and this has motivated the development of approximations such as approximate Bayesian computation (ABC). In ABC the data are compressed into summary statistics, and computation of the likelihood function is replaced by simulation of data under the model. In a hierarchical setting one may be interested both in hyperparameters and parameters, and there may be very many of the latter--for example, in a genetic model, these may be parameters describing each of many loci or populations. This poses a problem for ABC in that one then requires summary statistics for each locus, which, if used naively, leads to a consequent difficulty in conditional density estimation. We develop a general method for applying

  16. An automatic composition model of Chinese folk music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaomei; Li, Dongyang; Wang, Lei; Shen, Lin; Gao, Yanyuan; Zhu, Yuanyuan

    2017-03-01

    The automatic composition has achieved rich results in recent decades, including Western and some other areas of music. However, the automatic composition of Chinese music is less involved. After thousands of years of development, Chinese folk music has a wealth of resources. To design an automatic composition mode, learn the characters of Chinese folk melody and imitate the creative process of music is of some significance. According to the melodic features of Chinese folk music, a Chinese folk music composition based on Markov model is proposed to analyze Chinese traditional music. Folk songs with typical Chinese national characteristics are selected for analysis. In this paper, an example of automatic composition is given. The experimental results show that this composition model can produce music with characteristics of Chinese folk music.

  17. Inter Genre Similarity Modelling For Automatic Music Genre Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Bagci, Ulas; Erzin, Engin

    2009-01-01

    Music genre classification is an essential tool for music information retrieval systems and it has been finding critical applications in various media platforms. Two important problems of the automatic music genre classification are feature extraction and classifier design. This paper investigates inter-genre similarity modelling (IGS) to improve the performance of automatic music genre classification. Inter-genre similarity information is extracted over the mis-classified feature population....

  18. Automatic Prosodic Segmentation by F0 Clustering Using Superpositional Modeling.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakai, Mitsuru; Harald, Singer; Sagisaka, Yoshinori; Shimodaira, Hiroshi

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an automatic method for detecting accent phrase boundaries in Japanese continuous speech by using F0 information. In the training phase, hand labeled accent patterns are parameterized according to a superpositional model proposed by Fujisaki, and assigned to some clusters by a clustering method, in which accent templates are calculated as centroid of each cluster. In the segmentation phase, automatic N-best extraction of boundaries is performe...

  19. Use of empirical likelihood to calibrate auxiliary information in partly linear monotone regression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baojiang; Qin, Jing

    2014-05-10

    In statistical analysis, a regression model is needed if one is interested in finding the relationship between a response variable and covariates. When the response depends on the covariate, then it may also depend on the function of this covariate. If one has no knowledge of this functional form but expect for monotonic increasing or decreasing, then the isotonic regression model is preferable. Estimation of parameters for isotonic regression models is based on the pool-adjacent-violators algorithm (PAVA), where the monotonicity constraints are built in. With missing data, people often employ the augmented estimating method to improve estimation efficiency by incorporating auxiliary information through a working regression model. However, under the framework of the isotonic regression model, the PAVA does not work as the monotonicity constraints are violated. In this paper, we develop an empirical likelihood-based method for isotonic regression model to incorporate the auxiliary information. Because the monotonicity constraints still hold, the PAVA can be used for parameter estimation. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed method can yield more efficient estimates, and in some situations, the efficiency improvement is substantial. We apply this method to a dementia study. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Inverse Modeling of Respiratory System during Noninvasive Ventilation by Maximum Likelihood Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Saatci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a procedure to estimate the model parameters of presented nonlinear Resistance-Capacitance (RC and the widely used linear Resistance-Inductance-Capacitance (RIC models of the respiratory system by Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE. The measurement noise is assumed to be Generalized Gaussian Distributed (GGD, and the variance and the shape factor of the measurement noise are estimated by MLE and Kurtosis method, respectively. The performance of the MLE algorithm is also demonstrated by the Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB with artificially produced respiratory signals. Airway flow, mask pressure, and lung volume are measured from patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD under the noninvasive ventilation and from healthy subjects. Simulations show that respiratory signals from healthy subjects are better represented by the RIC model compared to the nonlinear RC model. On the other hand, the Patient group respiratory signals are fitted to the nonlinear RC model with lower measurement noise variance, better converged measurement noise shape factor, and model parameter tracks. Also, it is observed that for the Patient group the shape factor of the measurement noise converges to values between 1 and 2 whereas for the Control group shape factor values are estimated in the super-Gaussian area.

  1. Likelihood-based gene annotations for gap filling and quality assessment in genome-scale metabolic models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew N Benedict

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Genome-scale metabolic models provide a powerful means to harness information from genomes to deepen biological insights. With exponentially increasing sequencing capacity, there is an enormous need for automated reconstruction techniques that can provide more accurate models in a short time frame. Current methods for automated metabolic network reconstruction rely on gene and reaction annotations to build draft metabolic networks and algorithms to fill gaps in these networks. However, automated reconstruction is hampered by database inconsistencies, incorrect annotations, and gap filling largely without considering genomic information. Here we develop an approach for applying genomic information to predict alternative functions for genes and estimate their likelihoods from sequence homology. We show that computed likelihood values were significantly higher for annotations found in manually curated metabolic networks than those that were not. We then apply these alternative functional predictions to estimate reaction likelihoods, which are used in a new gap filling approach called likelihood-based gap filling to predict more genomically consistent solutions. To validate the likelihood-based gap filling approach, we applied it to models where essential pathways were removed, finding that likelihood-based gap filling identified more biologically relevant solutions than parsimony-based gap filling approaches. We also demonstrate that models gap filled using likelihood-based gap filling provide greater coverage and genomic consistency with metabolic gene functions compared to parsimony-based approaches. Interestingly, despite these findings, we found that likelihoods did not significantly affect consistency of gap filled models with Biolog and knockout lethality data. This indicates that the phenotype data alone cannot necessarily be used to discriminate between alternative solutions for gap filling and therefore, that the use of other information

  2. Automatic Model Generation Framework for Computational Simulation of Cochlear Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangado Lopez, Nerea; Ceresa, Mario; Duchateau, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    's CT image, an accurate model of the patient-specific cochlea anatomy is obtained. An algorithm based on the parallel transport frame is employed to perform the virtual insertion of the cochlear implant. Our automatic framework also incorporates the surrounding bone and nerve fibers and assigns....... To address such a challenge, we propose an automatic framework for the generation of patient-specific meshes for finite element modeling of the implanted cochlea. First, a statistical shape model is constructed from high-resolution anatomical μCT images. Then, by fitting the statistical model to a patient...

  3. A likelihood ratio model for the determination of the geographical origin of olive oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Własiuk, Patryk; Martyna, Agnieszka; Zadora, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Food fraud or food adulteration may be of forensic interest for instance in the case of suspected deliberate mislabeling. On account of its potential health benefits and nutritional qualities, geographical origin determination of olive oil might be of special interest. The use of a likelihood ratio (LR) model has certain advantages in contrast to typical chemometric methods because the LR model takes into account the information about the sample rarity in a relevant population. Such properties are of particular interest to forensic scientists and therefore it has been the aim of this study to examine the issue of olive oil classification with the use of different LR models and their pertinence under selected data pre-processing methods (logarithm based data transformations) and feature selection technique. This was carried out on data describing 572 Italian olive oil samples characterised by the content of 8 fatty acids in the lipid fraction. Three classification problems related to three regions of Italy (South, North and Sardinia) have been considered with the use of LR models. The correct classification rate and empirical cross entropy were taken into account as a measure of performance of each model. The application of LR models in determining the geographical origin of olive oil has proven to be satisfactorily useful for the considered issues analysed in terms of many variants of data pre-processing since the rates of correct classifications were close to 100% and considerable reduction of information loss was observed. The work also presents a comparative study of the performance of the linear discriminant analysis in considered classification problems. An approach to the choice of the value of the smoothing parameter is highlighted for the kernel density estimation based LR models as well. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Semantic Likelihood Models for Bayesian Inference in Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Nicholas

    Autonomous systems, particularly unmanned aerial systems (UAS), remain limited in au- tonomous capabilities largely due to a poor understanding of their environment. Current sensors simply do not match human perceptive capabilities, impeding progress towards full autonomy. Recent work has shown the value of humans as sources of information within a human-robot team; in target applications, communicating human-generated 'soft data' to autonomous systems enables higher levels of autonomy through large, efficient information gains. This requires development of a 'human sensor model' that allows soft data fusion through Bayesian inference to update the probabilistic belief representations maintained by autonomous systems. Current human sensor models that capture linguistic inputs as semantic information are limited in their ability to generalize likelihood functions for semantic statements: they may be learned from dense data; they do not exploit the contextual information embedded within groundings; and they often limit human input to restrictive and simplistic interfaces. This work provides mechanisms to synthesize human sensor models from constraints based on easily attainable a priori knowledge, develops compression techniques to capture information-dense semantics, and investigates the problem of capturing and fusing semantic information contained within unstructured natural language. A robotic experimental testbed is also developed to validate the above contributions.

  5. Automatic Detection and Resolution of Lexical Ambiguity in Process Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pittke, F.; Leopold, H.; Mendling, J.

    2015-01-01

    System-related engineering tasks are often conducted using process models. In this context, it is essential that these models do not contain structural or terminological inconsistencies. To this end, several automatic analysis techniques have been proposed to support quality assurance. While formal

  6. A general maximum likelihood analysis of variance components in generalized linear models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitkin, M

    1999-03-01

    This paper describes an EM algorithm for nonparametric maximum likelihood (ML) estimation in generalized linear models with variance component structure. The algorithm provides an alternative analysis to approximate MQL and PQL analyses (McGilchrist and Aisbett, 1991, Biometrical Journal 33, 131-141; Breslow and Clayton, 1993; Journal of the American Statistical Association 88, 9-25; McGilchrist, 1994, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series B 56, 61-69; Goldstein, 1995, Multilevel Statistical Models) and to GEE analyses (Liang and Zeger, 1986, Biometrika 73, 13-22). The algorithm, first given by Hinde and Wood (1987, in Longitudinal Data Analysis, 110-126), is a generalization of that for random effect models for overdispersion in generalized linear models, described in Aitkin (1996, Statistics and Computing 6, 251-262). The algorithm is initially derived as a form of Gaussian quadrature assuming a normal mixing distribution, but with only slight variation it can be used for a completely unknown mixing distribution, giving a straightforward method for the fully nonparametric ML estimation of this distribution. This is of value because the ML estimates of the GLM parameters can be sensitive to the specification of a parametric form for the mixing distribution. The nonparametric analysis can be extended straightforwardly to general random parameter models, with full NPML estimation of the joint distribution of the random parameters. This can produce substantial computational saving compared with full numerical integration over a specified parametric distribution for the random parameters. A simple method is described for obtaining correct standard errors for parameter estimates when using the EM algorithm. Several examples are discussed involving simple variance component and longitudinal models, and small-area estimation.

  7. Likelihood analysis of species occurrence probability from presence-only data for modelling species distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, J. Andrew; Chandler, Richard B.; Yackulic, Charles; Nichols, James D.

    2012-01-01

    1. Understanding the factors affecting species occurrence is a pre-eminent focus of applied ecological research. However, direct information about species occurrence is lacking for many species. Instead, researchers sometimes have to rely on so-called presence-only data (i.e. when no direct information about absences is available), which often results from opportunistic, unstructured sampling. MAXENT is a widely used software program designed to model and map species distribution using presence-only data. 2. We provide a critical review of MAXENT as applied to species distribution modelling and discuss how it can lead to inferential errors. A chief concern is that MAXENT produces a number of poorly defined indices that are not directly related to the actual parameter of interest – the probability of occurrence (ψ). This focus on an index was motivated by the belief that it is not possible to estimate ψ from presence-only data; however, we demonstrate that ψ is identifiable using conventional likelihood methods under the assumptions of random sampling and constant probability of species detection. 3. The model is implemented in a convenient r package which we use to apply the model to simulated data and data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey. We demonstrate that MAXENT produces extreme under-predictions when compared to estimates produced by logistic regression which uses the full (presence/absence) data set. We note that MAXENT predictions are extremely sensitive to specification of the background prevalence, which is not objectively estimated using the MAXENT method. 4. As with MAXENT, formal model-based inference requires a random sample of presence locations. Many presence-only data sets, such as those based on museum records and herbarium collections, may not satisfy this assumption. However, when sampling is random, we believe that inference should be based on formal methods that facilitate inference about interpretable ecological quantities

  8. Using suggestion to model different types of automatic writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, E; Mehta, M A; Oakley, D A; Guilmette, D N; Gabay, A; Halligan, P W; Deeley, Q

    2014-05-01

    Our sense of self includes awareness of our thoughts and movements, and our control over them. This feeling can be altered or lost in neuropsychiatric disorders as well as in phenomena such as "automatic writing" whereby writing is attributed to an external source. Here, we employed suggestion in highly hypnotically suggestible participants to model various experiences of automatic writing during a sentence completion task. Results showed that the induction of hypnosis, without additional suggestion, was associated with a small but significant reduction of control, ownership, and awareness for writing. Targeted suggestions produced a double dissociation between thought and movement components of writing, for both feelings of control and ownership, and additionally, reduced awareness of writing. Overall, suggestion produced selective alterations in the control, ownership, and awareness of thought and motor components of writing, thus enabling key aspects of automatic writing, observed across different clinical and cultural settings, to be modelled. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Comparison of Statistical Data Models for Identifying Differentially Expressed Genes Using a Generalized Likelihood Ratio Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Yong Seng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, statistical techniques for analysis of microarray-generated data sets have deficiencies due to limited understanding of errors inherent in the data. A generalized likelihood ratio (GLR test based on an error model has been recently proposed to identify differentially expressed genes from microarray experiments. However, the use of different error structures under the GLR test has not been evaluated, nor has this method been compared to commonly used statistical tests such as the parametric t-test. The concomitant effects of varying data signal-to-noise ratio and replication number on the performance of statistical tests also remain largely unexplored. In this study, we compared the effects of different underlying statistical error structures on the GLR test’s power in identifying differentially expressed genes in microarray data. We evaluated such variants of the GLR test as well as the one sample t-test based on simulated data by means of receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves. Further, we used bootstrapping of ROC curves to assess statistical significance of differences between the areas under the curves. Our results showed that i the GLR tests outperformed the t-test for detecting differential gene expression, ii the identity of the underlying error structure was important in determining the GLR tests’ performance, and iii signal-to-noise ratio was a more important contributor than sample replication in identifying statistically significant differential gene expression.

  10. Results of the Regional Earthquake Likelihood Models (RELM) test of earthquake forecasts in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Ting; Turcotte, Donald L; Holliday, James R; Sachs, Michael K; Rundle, John B; Chen, Chien-Chih; Tiampo, Kristy F

    2011-10-04

    The Regional Earthquake Likelihood Models (RELM) test of earthquake forecasts in California was the first competitive evaluation of forecasts of future earthquake occurrence. Participants submitted expected probabilities of occurrence of M ≥ 4.95 earthquakes in 0.1° × 0.1° cells for the period 1 January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2010. Probabilities were submitted for 7,682 cells in California and adjacent regions. During this period, 31 M ≥ 4.95 earthquakes occurred in the test region. These earthquakes occurred in 22 test cells. This seismic activity was dominated by earthquakes associated with the M = 7.2, April 4, 2010, El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in northern Mexico. This earthquake occurred in the test region, and 16 of the other 30 earthquakes in the test region could be associated with it. Nine complete forecasts were submitted by six participants. In this paper, we present the forecasts in a way that allows the reader to evaluate which forecast is the most "successful" in terms of the locations of future earthquakes. We conclude that the RELM test was a success and suggest ways in which the results can be used to improve future forecasts.

  11. Model-Based Reasoning in Humans Becomes Automatic with Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Economides

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Model-based and model-free reinforcement learning (RL have been suggested as algorithmic realizations of goal-directed and habitual action strategies. Model-based RL is more flexible than model-free but requires sophisticated calculations using a learnt model of the world. This has led model-based RL to be identified with slow, deliberative processing, and model-free RL with fast, automatic processing. In support of this distinction, it has recently been shown that model-based reasoning is impaired by placing subjects under cognitive load--a hallmark of non-automaticity. Here, using the same task, we show that cognitive load does not impair model-based reasoning if subjects receive prior training on the task. This finding is replicated across two studies and a variety of analysis methods. Thus, task familiarity permits use of model-based reasoning in parallel with other cognitive demands. The ability to deploy model-based reasoning in an automatic, parallelizable fashion has widespread theoretical implications, particularly for the learning and execution of complex behaviors. It also suggests a range of important failure modes in psychiatric disorders.

  12. Model-Based Reasoning in Humans Becomes Automatic with Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübbert, Annika; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Model-based and model-free reinforcement learning (RL) have been suggested as algorithmic realizations of goal-directed and habitual action strategies. Model-based RL is more flexible than model-free but requires sophisticated calculations using a learnt model of the world. This has led model-based RL to be identified with slow, deliberative processing, and model-free RL with fast, automatic processing. In support of this distinction, it has recently been shown that model-based reasoning is impaired by placing subjects under cognitive load—a hallmark of non-automaticity. Here, using the same task, we show that cognitive load does not impair model-based reasoning if subjects receive prior training on the task. This finding is replicated across two studies and a variety of analysis methods. Thus, task familiarity permits use of model-based reasoning in parallel with other cognitive demands. The ability to deploy model-based reasoning in an automatic, parallelizable fashion has widespread theoretical implications, particularly for the learning and execution of complex behaviors. It also suggests a range of important failure modes in psychiatric disorders. PMID:26379239

  13. Automatic 3D Modeling of the Urban Landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esteban, I.; Dijk, J.; Groen, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a fully automatic system for building 3D models of urban areas at the street level. We propose a novel approach for the accurate estimation of the scale consistent camera pose given two previous images. We employ a new method for global optimization and use a novel sampling

  14. Small-Scale Helicopter Automatic Autorotation : Modeling, Guidance, and Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taamallah, S.

    2015-01-01

    Our research objective consists in developing a, model-based, automatic safety recovery system, for a small-scale helicopter Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) in autorotation, i.e. an engine OFF flight condition, that safely flies and lands the helicopter to a pre-specified ground location. In pursuit

  15. Automatic Performance Model Generation for Java Enterprise Edition (EE) Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Brunnert, Andreas;Vögele, Christian;Krcmar, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The effort required to create performance models for enterprise applications is often out of proportion compared to their benefits. This work aims to reduce this effort by introducing an approach to automatically generate component-based performance models for running Java EE applications. The approach is applicable for all Java EE server products as it relies on standardized component types and interfaces to gather the required data for modeling an application. The feasibility of the approac...

  16. Using UML to Model Web Services for Automatic Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Amal Elgammal; Mohamed El-Sharkawi

    2010-01-01

    There is a great interest paid to the web services paradigm nowadays. One of the most important problems related to the web service paradigm is the automatic composition of web services. Several frameworks have been proposed to achieve this novel goal. The most recent and richest framework (model) is the Colombo model. However, even for experienced developers, working with Colombo formalisms is low-level, very complex and timeconsuming. We propose to use UML (Unified Modeling Language) to mod...

  17. Automatization of hydrodynamic modelling in a Floreon+ system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronovsky, Ales; Kuchar, Stepan; Podhoranyi, Michal; Vojtek, David

    2017-07-01

    The paper describes fully automatized hydrodynamic modelling as a part of the Floreon+ system. The main purpose of hydrodynamic modelling in the disaster management is to provide an accurate overview of the hydrological situation in a given river catchment. Automatization of the process as a web service could provide us with immediate data based on extreme weather conditions, such as heavy rainfall, without the intervention of an expert. Such a service can be used by non scientific users such as fire-fighter operators or representatives of a military service organizing evacuation during floods or river dam breaks. The paper describes the whole process beginning with a definition of a schematization necessary for hydrodynamic model, gathering of necessary data and its processing for a simulation, the model itself and post processing of a result and visualization on a web service. The process is demonstrated on a real data collected during floods in our Moravian-Silesian region in 2010.

  18. Applying the elaboration likelihood model of persuasion to a videotape-based eating disorders primary prevention program for adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Giselle F; Wertheim, Eleanor H

    2004-01-01

    This study applied principles from the Elaboration Likelihood Model of Persuasion to the prevention of disordered eating. Early adolescent girls watched either a preventive videotape only (n=114) or video plus post-video activity (verbal discussion, written exercises, or control discussion) (n=187); or had no intervention (n=104). Significantly more body image and knowledge improvements occurred at post video and follow-up in the intervention groups compared to no intervention. There were no outcome differences among intervention groups, or between girls with high or low elaboration likelihood. Further research is needed in integrating the videotape into a broader prevention package.

  19. Developing Automatic Student Motivation Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destarianto, P.; Etikasari, B.; Agustianto, K.

    2018-01-01

    Achievement motivation is one of the internal factors in encouraging a person to perform the best activity in achieving its goals. The importance of achievement motivation must be possessed as an incentive to compete so that the person will always strive to achieve success and avoid failure. Based on this, the system is developed to determine the achievement motivation of students, so that students can do self-reflection in improving achievement motivation. The test results of the system using Naïve Bayes Classifier showed an average rate of accuracy of 91,667% in assessing student achievement motivation. By modeling the students ‘motivation generated by the system, students’ achievement motivation level can be known. This class of motivation will be used to determine appropriate counseling decisions, and ultimately is expected to improve student achievement motivation.

  20. Computing maximum likelihood estimates of loglinear models from marginal sums with special attention to loglinear item response theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelderman, Henk

    1992-01-01

    In this paper algorithms are described for obtaining the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters in loglinear models. Modified versions of the iterative proportional fitting and Newton-Raphson algorithms are described that work on the minimal sufficient statistics rather than on the usual

  1. Computing maximum likelihood estimates of loglinear models from marginal sums with special attention to loglinear item response theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelderman, Henk

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, algorithms are described for obtaining the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters in log-linear models. Modified versions of the iterative proportional fitting and Newton-Raphson algorithms are described that work on the minimal sufficient statistics rather than on the usual

  2. Evaluating score- and feature-based likelihood ratio models for multivariate continuous data: applied to forensic MDMA comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolck, A.; Ni, H.; Lopatka, M.

    2015-01-01

    Likelihood ratio (LR) models are moving into the forefront of forensic evidence evaluation as these methods are adopted by a diverse range of application areas in forensic science. We examine the fundamentally different results that can be achieved when feature- and score-based methodologies are

  3. Automatic Relevance Determination for multi-way models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2009-01-01

    Estimating the adequate number of components is an important yet difficult problem in multi-way modelling. We demonstrate how a Bayesian framework for model selection based on Automatic Relevance Determination (ARD) can be adapted to the Tucker and CP models. By assigning priors for the model...... parameters and learning the hyperparameters of these priors the method is able to turn off excess components and simplify the core structure at a computational cost of fitting the conventional Tucker/CP model. To investigate the impact of the choice of priors we based the ARD on both Laplace and Gaussian...

  4. An EM Algorithm for Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Process Factor Analysis Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taehun

    2010-01-01

    In this dissertation, an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm is developed and implemented to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters and the associated standard error estimates characterizing temporal flows for the latent variable time series following stationary vector ARMA processes, as well as the parameters defining the…

  5. Straight line fitting and predictions: On a marginal likelihood approach to linear regression and errors-in-variables models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Bo

    2015-04-01

    Linear regression methods are without doubt the most used approaches to describe and predict data in the physical sciences. They are often good first order approximations and they are in general easier to apply and interpret than more advanced methods. However, even the properties of univariate regression can lead to debate over the appropriateness of various models as witnessed by the recent discussion about climate reconstruction methods. Before linear regression is applied important choices have to be made regarding the origins of the noise terms and regarding which of the two variables under consideration that should be treated as the independent variable. These decisions are often not easy to make but they may have a considerable impact on the results. We seek to give a unified probabilistic - Bayesian with flat priors - treatment of univariate linear regression and prediction by taking, as starting point, the general errors-in-variables model (Christiansen, J. Clim., 27, 2014-2031, 2014). Other versions of linear regression can be obtained as limits of this model. We derive the likelihood of the model parameters and predictands of the general errors-in-variables model by marginalizing over the nuisance parameters. The resulting likelihood is relatively simple and easy to analyze and calculate. The well known unidentifiability of the errors-in-variables model is manifested as the absence of a well-defined maximum in the likelihood. However, this does not mean that probabilistic inference can not be made; the marginal likelihoods of model parameters and the predictands have, in general, well-defined maxima. We also include a probabilistic version of classical calibration and show how it is related to the errors-in-variables model. The results are illustrated by an example from the coupling between the lower stratosphere and the troposphere in the Northern Hemisphere winter.

  6. Automatic generation of Fortran programs for algebraic simulation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schopf, W.; Rexer, G.; Ruehle, R.

    1978-04-01

    This report documents a generator program by which econometric simulation models formulated in an application-orientated language can be transformed automatically in a Fortran program. Thus the model designer is able to build up, test and modify models without the need of a Fortran programmer. The development of a computer model is therefore simplified and shortened appreciably; in chapter 1-3 of this report all rules are presented for the application of the generator to the model design. Algebraic models including exogeneous and endogeneous time series variables, lead and lag function can be generated. In addition, to these language elements, Fortran sequences can be applied to the formulation of models in the case of complex model interrelations. Automatically the generated model is a module of the program system RSYST III and is therefore able to exchange input and output data with the central data bank of the system and in connection with the method library modules can be used to handle planning problems. (orig.) [de

  7. Reliable likelihood ratios for statistical model-based voice activity detector with low false-alarm rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Younggwan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The role of the statistical model-based voice activity detector (SMVAD is to detect speech regions from input signals using the statistical models of noise and noisy speech. The decision rule of SMVAD is based on the likelihood ratio test (LRT. The LRT-based decision rule may cause detection errors because of statistical properties of noise and speech signals. In this article, we first analyze the reasons why the detection errors occur and then propose two modified decision rules using reliable likelihood ratios (LRs. We also propose an effective weighting scheme considering spectral characteristics of noise and speech signals. In the experiments proposed in this study, with almost no additional computations, the proposed methods show significant performance improvement in various noise conditions. Experimental results also show that the proposed weighting scheme provides additional performance improvement over the two proposed SMVADs.

  8. Reliable likelihood ratios for statistical model-based voice activity detector with low false-alarm rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younggwan; Suh, Youngjoo; Kim, Hoirin

    2011-12-01

    The role of the statistical model-based voice activity detector (SMVAD) is to detect speech regions from input signals using the statistical models of noise and noisy speech. The decision rule of SMVAD is based on the likelihood ratio test (LRT). The LRT-based decision rule may cause detection errors because of statistical properties of noise and speech signals. In this article, we first analyze the reasons why the detection errors occur and then propose two modified decision rules using reliable likelihood ratios (LRs). We also propose an effective weighting scheme considering spectral characteristics of noise and speech signals. In the experiments proposed in this study, with almost no additional computations, the proposed methods show significant performance improvement in various noise conditions. Experimental results also show that the proposed weighting scheme provides additional performance improvement over the two proposed SMVADs.

  9. Improved Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Heston Model and Pricing Efficiency Test: Hong Kong Hang Seng Index Option

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper selects improved maximum likelihood method to conduct parameter estimation of Heston model, and results show that the share option pricing performance of Hang Seng Index is better and pricing error of at-the-money options is the smallest. By comparing parameter estimation of samples in different intervals, it has been found that parameter estimated results of two-year market data are obviously inferior to estimated effect of one-year data.

  10. The phylogenetic likelihood library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouri, T; Izquierdo-Carrasco, F; Darriba, D; Aberer, A J; Nguyen, L-T; Minh, B Q; Von Haeseler, A; Stamatakis, A

    2015-03-01

    We introduce the Phylogenetic Likelihood Library (PLL), a highly optimized application programming interface for developing likelihood-based phylogenetic inference and postanalysis software. The PLL implements appropriate data structures and functions that allow users to quickly implement common, error-prone, and labor-intensive tasks, such as likelihood calculations, model parameter as well as branch length optimization, and tree space exploration. The highly optimized and parallelized implementation of the phylogenetic likelihood function and a thorough documentation provide a framework for rapid development of scalable parallel phylogenetic software. By example of two likelihood-based phylogenetic codes we show that the PLL improves the sequential performance of current software by a factor of 2-10 while requiring only 1 month of programming time for integration. We show that, when numerical scaling for preventing floating point underflow is enabled, the double precision likelihood calculations in the PLL are up to 1.9 times faster than those in BEAGLE. On an empirical DNA dataset with 2000 taxa the AVX version of PLL is 4 times faster than BEAGLE (scaling enabled and required). The PLL is available at http://www.libpll.org under the GNU General Public License (GPL). © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists.

  11. PROCOV: maximum likelihood estimation of protein phylogeny under covarion models and site-specific covarion pattern analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Huai-Chun

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The covarion hypothesis of molecular evolution holds that selective pressures on a given amino acid or nucleotide site are dependent on the identity of other sites in the molecule that change throughout time, resulting in changes of evolutionary rates of sites along the branches of a phylogenetic tree. At the sequence level, covarion-like evolution at a site manifests as conservation of nucleotide or amino acid states among some homologs where the states are not conserved in other homologs (or groups of homologs. Covarion-like evolution has been shown to relate to changes in functions at sites in different clades, and, if ignored, can adversely affect the accuracy of phylogenetic inference. Results PROCOV (protein covarion analysis is a software tool that implements a number of previously proposed covarion models of protein evolution for phylogenetic inference in a maximum likelihood framework. Several algorithmic and implementation improvements in this tool over previous versions make computationally expensive tree searches with covarion models more efficient and analyses of large phylogenomic data sets tractable. PROCOV can be used to identify covarion sites by comparing the site likelihoods under the covarion process to the corresponding site likelihoods under a rates-across-sites (RAS process. Those sites with the greatest log-likelihood difference between a 'covarion' and an RAS process were found to be of functional or structural significance in a dataset of bacterial and eukaryotic elongation factors. Conclusion Covarion models implemented in PROCOV may be especially useful for phylogenetic estimation when ancient divergences between sequences have occurred and rates of evolution at sites are likely to have changed over the tree. It can also be used to study lineage-specific functional shifts in protein families that result in changes in the patterns of site variability among subtrees.

  12. An Automatic Registration Algorithm for 3D Maxillofacial Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Luwen; Zhou, Zhongwei; Guo, Jixiang; Lv, Jiancheng

    2016-09-01

    3D image registration aims at aligning two 3D data sets in a common coordinate system, which has been widely used in computer vision, pattern recognition and computer assisted surgery. One challenging problem in 3D registration is that point-wise correspondences between two point sets are often unknown apriori. In this work, we develop an automatic algorithm for 3D maxillofacial models registration including facial surface model and skull model. Our proposed registration algorithm can achieve a good alignment result between partial and whole maxillofacial model in spite of ambiguous matching, which has a potential application in the oral and maxillofacial reparative and reconstructive surgery. The proposed algorithm includes three steps: (1) 3D-SIFT features extraction and FPFH descriptors construction; (2) feature matching using SAC-IA; (3) coarse rigid alignment and refinement by ICP. Experiments on facial surfaces and mandible skull models demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of our algorithm.

  13. Modelling of risk events with uncertain likelihoods and impacts in large infrastructure projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    to prevent future budget overruns. One of the central ideas is to introduce improved risk management processes and the present paper addresses this particular issue. A relevant cost function in terms of unit prices and quantities is developed and an event impact matrix with uncertain impacts from independent......This paper presents contributions to the mathematical core of risk and uncertainty management in compliance with the principles of New Budgeting laid out in 2008 by the Danish Ministry of Transport to be used in large infrastructure projects. Basically, the new principles are proposed in order...... uncertain risk events is used to calculate the total uncertain risk budget. Cost impacts from the individual risk events on the individual project activities are kept precisely track of in order to comply with the requirements of New Budgeting. Additionally, uncertain likelihoods for the occurrence of risk...

  14. R and D on automatic modeling methods for Monte Carlo codes FLUKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dianxi; Hu Liqin; Wang Guozhong; Zhao Zijia; Nie Fanzhi; Wu Yican; Long Pengcheng

    2013-01-01

    FLUKA is a fully integrated particle physics Monte Carlo simulation package. It is necessary to create the geometry models before calculation. However, it is time- consuming and error-prone to describe the geometry models manually. This study developed an automatic modeling method which could automatically convert computer-aided design (CAD) geometry models into FLUKA models. The conversion program was integrated into CAD/image-based automatic modeling program for nuclear and radiation transport simulation (MCAM). Its correctness has been demonstrated. (authors)

  15. Automatic relative RPC image model bias compensation through hierarchical image matching for improving DEM quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Myoung-Jong; Howat, Ian M.

    2018-02-01

    The quality and efficiency of automated Digital Elevation Model (DEM) extraction from stereoscopic satellite imagery is critically dependent on the accuracy of the sensor model used for co-locating pixels between stereo-pair images. In the absence of ground control or manual tie point selection, errors in the sensor models must be compensated with increased matching search-spaces, increasing both the computation time and the likelihood of spurious matches. Here we present an algorithm for automatically determining and compensating the relative bias in Rational Polynomial Coefficients (RPCs) between stereo-pairs utilizing hierarchical, sub-pixel image matching in object space. We demonstrate the algorithm using a suite of image stereo-pairs from multiple satellites over a range stereo-photogrammetrically challenging polar terrains. Besides providing a validation of the effectiveness of the algorithm for improving DEM quality, experiments with prescribed sensor model errors yield insight into the dependence of DEM characteristics and quality on relative sensor model bias. This algorithm is included in the Surface Extraction through TIN-based Search-space Minimization (SETSM) DEM extraction software package, which is the primary software used for the U.S. National Science Foundation ArcticDEM and Reference Elevation Model of Antarctica (REMA) products.

  16. Pengolahan Film Radiografi Secara Otomatis Menggunakan Automatic X-Ray Film Processor Model Jp-33

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoucella Andre Afani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A research on the process of forming an image on a radiographic film and processing techniques automatically has been done. The study was conducted using an X-ray plane Toshiba E 7239, Fil AGFA Healtcare HV Septestraat 27B2640 Mortsel and an automatic film processing "Automatic X-Ray Film Processor Model JP-33". The experimental results showed that the principle of automatic film processing is the same as the principle of film processing manually, except in automatic film processing there is no rinsing stage. Automatic film processing can save time and costs; also it can reduce the possibility of errors due to human factors.

  17. Model Considerations for Memory-based Automatic Music Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Štěpán; Šmídl, Václav

    2009-12-01

    The problem of automatic music description is considered. The recorded music is modeled as a superposition of known sounds from a library weighted by unknown weights. Similar observation models are commonly used in statistics and machine learning. Many methods for estimation of the weights are available. These methods differ in the assumptions imposed on the weights. In Bayesian paradigm, these assumptions are typically expressed in the form of prior probability density function (pdf) on the weights. In this paper, commonly used assumptions about music signal are summarized and complemented by a new assumption. These assumptions are translated into pdfs and combined into a single prior density using combination of pdfs. Validity of the model is tested in simulation using synthetic data.

  18. An automatic fault management model for distribution networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtonen, M.; Haenninen, S. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Seppaenen, M. [North-Carelian Power Co (Finland); Antila, E.; Markkila, E. [ABB Transmit Oy (Finland)

    1998-08-01

    An automatic computer model, called the FI/FL-model, for fault location, fault isolation and supply restoration is presented. The model works as an integrated part of the substation SCADA, the AM/FM/GIS system and the medium voltage distribution network automation systems. In the model, three different techniques are used for fault location. First, by comparing the measured fault current to the computed one, an estimate for the fault distance is obtained. This information is then combined, in order to find the actual fault point, with the data obtained from the fault indicators in the line branching points. As a third technique, in the absence of better fault location data, statistical information of line section fault frequencies can also be used. For combining the different fault location information, fuzzy logic is used. As a result, the probability weights for the fault being located in different line sections, are obtained. Once the faulty section is identified, it is automatically isolated by remote control of line switches. Then the supply is restored to the remaining parts of the network. If needed, reserve connections from other adjacent feeders can also be used. During the restoration process, the technical constraints of the network are checked. Among these are the load carrying capacity of line sections, voltage drop and the settings of relay protection. If there are several possible network topologies, the model selects the technically best alternative. The FI/IL-model has been in trial use at two substations of the North-Carelian Power Company since November 1996. This chapter lists the practical experiences during the test use period. Also the benefits of this kind of automation are assessed and future developments are outlined

  19. Semiparametric profile likelihood estimation for continuous outcomes with excess zeros in a random-threshold damage-resistance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, John D; Tsodikov, Alex

    2017-05-30

    Continuous outcome data with a proportion of observations equal to zero (often referred to as semicontinuous data) arise frequently in biomedical studies. Typical approaches involve two-part models, with one part a logistic model for the probability of observing a zero and some parametric continuous distribution for modeling the positive part of the data. We propose a semiparametric model based on a biological system with competing damage manifestation and resistance processes. This allows us to derive a closed-form profile likelihood based on the retro-hazard function, leading to a flexible procedure for modeling continuous data with a point mass at zero. A simulation study is presented to examine the properties of the method in finite samples. We apply the method to a data set consisting of pulmonary capillary hemorrhage area in lab rats subjected to diagnostic ultrasound. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Parameterizing Spatial Models of Infectious Disease Transmission that Incorporate Infection Time Uncertainty Using Sampling-Based Likelihood Approximations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Malik

    Full Text Available A class of discrete-time models of infectious disease spread, referred to as individual-level models (ILMs, are typically fitted in a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC framework. These models quantify probabilistic outcomes regarding the risk of infection of susceptible individuals due to various susceptibility and transmissibility factors, including their spatial distance from infectious individuals. The infectious pressure from infected individuals exerted on susceptible individuals is intrinsic to these ILMs. Unfortunately, quantifying this infectious pressure for data sets containing many individuals can be computationally burdensome, leading to a time-consuming likelihood calculation and, thus, computationally prohibitive MCMC-based analysis. This problem worsens when using data augmentation to allow for uncertainty in infection times. In this paper, we develop sampling methods that can be used to calculate a fast, approximate likelihood when fitting such disease models. A simple random sampling approach is initially considered followed by various spatially-stratified schemes. We test and compare the performance of our methods with both simulated data and data from the 2001 foot-and-mouth disease (FMD epidemic in the U.K. Our results indicate that substantial computation savings can be obtained--albeit, of course, with some information loss--suggesting that such techniques may be of use in the analysis of very large epidemic data sets.

  1. Quasi-Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Bootstrap Inference in Fractional Time Series Models with Heteroskedasticity of Unknown Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaliere, Giuseppe; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard; Taylor, Robert

    of the estimator now depends on nuisance parameters derived both from the weak dependence and heteroskedasticity present in the shocks. We then investigate classical methods of inference based on the Wald, likelihood ratio and Lagrange multiplier tests for linear hypotheses on either or both of the long and short...... memory parameters of the model. The limiting null distributions of these test statistics are shown to be non-pivotal under heteroskedasticity, while that of a robustWald statistic (based around a sandwich estimator of the variance) is pivotal. We show that wild bootstrap implementations of the tests...

  2. Risk analysis of Leksell Gamma Knife Model C with automatic positioning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetsch, Steven J.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This study was conducted to evaluate the decrease in risk from misadministration of the new Leksell Gamma Knife Model C with Automatic Positioning System compared with previous models. Methods and Materials: Elekta Instruments, A.B. of Stockholm has introduced a new computer-controlled Leksell Gamma Knife Model C which uses motor-driven trunnions to reposition the patient between isocenters (shots) without human intervention. Previous models required the operators to manually set coordinates from a printed list, permitting opportunities for coordinate transposition, incorrect helmet size, incorrect treatment times, missing shots, or repeated shots. Results: A risk analysis was conducted between craniotomy involving hospital admission and outpatient Gamma Knife radiosurgery. A report of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies dated November 29, 1999 estimated that medical errors kill between 44,000 and 98,000 people each year in the United States. Another report from the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System estimates that 2.1 million nosocomial infections occur annually in the United States in acute care hospitals alone, with 31 million total admissions. Conclusions: All medical procedures have attendant risks of morbidity and possibly mortality. Each patient should be counseled as to the risk of adverse effects as well as the likelihood of good results for alternative treatment strategies. This paper seeks to fill a gap in the existing medical literature, which has a paucity of data involving risk estimates for stereotactic radiosurgery

  3. Deconvolving the wedge: maximum-likelihood power spectra via spherical-wave visibility modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, A.; Mertens, F. G.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2018-03-01

    Direct detection of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) via the red-shifted 21-cm line will have unprecedented implications on the study of structure formation in the infant Universe. To fulfil this promise, current and future 21-cm experiments need to detect this weak EoR signal in the presence of foregrounds that are several orders of magnitude larger. This requires extreme noise control and improved wide-field high dynamic-range imaging techniques. We propose a new imaging method based on a maximum likelihood framework which solves for the interferometric equation directly on the sphere, or equivalently in the uvw-domain. The method uses the one-to-one relation between spherical waves and spherical harmonics (SpH). It consistently handles signals from the entire sky, and does not require a w-term correction. The SpH coefficients represent the sky-brightness distribution and the visibilities in the uvw-domain, and provide a direct estimate of the spatial power spectrum. Using these spectrally smooth SpH coefficients, bright foregrounds can be removed from the signal, including their side-lobe noise, which is one of the limiting factors in high dynamics-range wide-field imaging. Chromatic effects causing the so-called `wedge' are effectively eliminated (i.e. deconvolved) in the cylindrical (k⊥, k∥) power spectrum, compared to a power spectrum computed directly from the images of the foreground visibilities where the wedge is clearly present. We illustrate our method using simulated Low-Frequency Array observations, finding an excellent reconstruction of the input EoR signal with minimal bias.

  4. Maximum Likelihood in a Generalized Linear Finite Mixture Model by Using the EM Algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.C.

    A generalized linear finite mixture model and an EM algorithm to fit the model to data are described. By this approach the finite mixture model is embedded within the general framework of generalized linear models (GLMs). Implementation of the proposed EM algorithm can be readily done in statistical

  5. Power Analysis for the Likelihood-Ratio Test in Latent Markov Models: Shortcutting the Bootstrap p-Value-Based Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudicha, Dereje W; Schmittmann, Verena D; Tekle, Fetene B; Vermunt, Jeroen K

    2016-01-01

    The latent Markov (LM) model is a popular method for identifying distinct unobserved states and transitions between these states over time in longitudinally observed responses. The bootstrap likelihood-ratio (BLR) test yields the most rigorous test for determining the number of latent states, yet little is known about power analysis for this test. Power could be computed as the proportion of the bootstrap p values (PBP) for which the null hypothesis is rejected. This requires performing the full bootstrap procedure for a large number of samples generated from the model under the alternative hypothesis, which is computationally infeasible in most situations. This article presents a computationally feasible shortcut method for power computation for the BLR test. The shortcut method involves the following simple steps: (1) obtaining the parameters of the model under the null hypothesis, (2) constructing the empirical distributions of the likelihood ratio under the null and alternative hypotheses via Monte Carlo simulations, and (3) using these empirical distributions to compute the power. We evaluate the performance of the shortcut method by comparing it to the PBP method and, moreover, show how the shortcut method can be used for sample-size determination.

  6. Efficient Word Reading: Automaticity of Print-Related Skills Indexed by Rapid Automatized Naming through Cusp-Catastrophe Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridis, Georgios D.; Simos, Panagiotis; Mouzaki, Angeliki; Stamovlasis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The study explored the moderating role of rapid automatized naming (RAN) in reading achievement through a cusp-catastrophe model grounded on nonlinear dynamic systems theory. Data were obtained from a community sample of 496 second through fourth graders who were followed longitudinally over 2 years and split into 2 random subsamples (validation…

  7. Automatic anatomy recognition via multiobject oriented active shape models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinjian; Udupa, Jayaram K; Alavi, Abass; Torigian, Drew A

    2010-12-01

    This paper studies the feasibility of developing an automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) system in clinical radiology and demonstrates its operation on clinical 2D images. The anatomy recognition method described here consists of two main components: (a) multiobject generalization of OASM and (b) object recognition strategies. The OASM algorithm is generalized to multiple objects by including a model for each object and assigning a cost structure specific to each object in the spirit of live wire. The delineation of multiobject boundaries is done in MOASM via a three level dynamic programming algorithm, wherein the first level is at pixel level which aims to find optimal oriented boundary segments between successive landmarks, the second level is at landmark level which aims to find optimal location for the landmarks, and the third level is at the object level which aims to find optimal arrangement of object boundaries over all objects. The object recognition strategy attempts to find that pose vector (consisting of translation, rotation, and scale component) for the multiobject model that yields the smallest total boundary cost for all objects. The delineation and recognition accuracies were evaluated separately utilizing routine clinical chest CT, abdominal CT, and foot MRI data sets. The delineation accuracy was evaluated in terms of true and false positive volume fractions (TPVF and FPVF). The recognition accuracy was assessed (1) in terms of the size of the space of the pose vectors for the model assembly that yielded high delineation accuracy, (2) as a function of the number of objects and objects' distribution and size in the model, (3) in terms of the interdependence between delineation and recognition, and (4) in terms of the closeness of the optimum recognition result to the global optimum. When multiple objects are included in the model, the delineation accuracy in terms of TPVF can be improved to 97%-98% with a low FPVF of 0.1%-0.2%. Typically, a

  8. Choosing the observational likelihood in state-space stock assessment models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Christoffer Moesgaard; Nielsen, Anders; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro

    2017-01-01

    Data used in stock assessment models result from combinations of biological, ecological, fishery, and sampling processes. Since different types of errors propagate through these processes it can be difficult to identify a particular family of distributions for modelling errors on observations a p...... differs for different stocks, and the choice is important for the short-term conclusions drawn from the assessment model; in particular, the choice can influence total allowable catch advise based on reference points....

  9. A Gaussian Process Data Modelling and Maximum Likelihood Data Fusion Method for Multi-Sensor CMM Measurement of Freeform Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyu Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the use of freeform surfaces in various functional applications has become more widespread. Multi-sensor coordinate measuring machines (CMMs are becoming popular and are produced by many CMM manufacturers since their measurement ability can be significantly improved with the help of different kinds of sensors. Moreover, the measurement accuracy after data fusion for multiple sensors can be improved. However, the improvement is affected by many issues in practice, especially when the measurement results have bias and there exists uncertainty regarding the data modelling method. This paper proposes a generic data modelling and data fusion method for the measurement of freeform surfaces using multi-sensor CMMs and attempts to study the factors which affect the fusion result. Based on the data modelling method for the original measurement datasets and the statistical Bayesian inference data fusion method, this paper presents a Gaussian process data modelling and maximum likelihood data fusion method for supporting multi-sensor CMM measurement of freeform surfaces. The datasets from different sensors are firstly modelled with the Gaussian process to obtain the mean surfaces and covariance surfaces, which represent the underlying surfaces and associated measurement uncertainties. Hence, the mean surfaces and the covariance surfaces are fused together with the maximum likelihood principle so as to obtain the statistically best estimated underlying surface and associated measurement uncertainty. With this fusion method, the overall measurement uncertainty after fusion is smaller than each of the single-sensor measurements. The capability of the proposed method is demonstrated through a series of simulations and real measurements of freeform surfaces on a multi-sensor CMM. The accuracy of the Gaussian process data modelling and the influence of the form error and measurement noise are also discussed and demonstrated in a series of experiments

  10. Maximum likelihood estimators for extended growth curve model with orthogonal between-individual design matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Daniel; Zezula, Ivan

    The extended growth curve model is discussed in this paper. There are two versions of the model studied in the literature, which differ in the way how the column spaces of the design matrices are nested. The nesting is applied either to the between-individual or to the within-individual design

  11. The early maximum likelihood estimation model of audiovisual integration in speech perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    integration to speech perception along with three model variations. In early MLE, integration is based on a continuous internal representation before categorization, which can make the model more parsimonious by imposing constraints that reflect experimental designs. The study also shows that cross......Speech perception is facilitated by seeing the articulatory mouth movements of the talker. This is due to perceptual audiovisual integration, which also causes the McGurk−MacDonald illusion, and for which a comprehensive computational account is still lacking. Decades of research have largely......-validation can evaluate models of audiovisual integration based on typical data sets taking both goodness-of-fit and model flexibility into account. All models were tested on a published data set previously used for testing the FLMP. Cross-validation favored the early MLE while more conventional error measures...

  12. Modeling and Maximum Likelihood Fitting of Gamma-Ray and Radio Light Curves of Millisecond Pulsars Detected with Fermi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. J.; Harding, A. K.; Venter, C.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed gamma rays have been detected with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) from more than 20 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), some of which were discovered in radio observations of bright, unassociated LAT sources. We have fit the radio and gamma-ray light curves of 19 LAT-detected MSPs in the context of geometric, outermagnetospheric emission models assuming the retarded vacuum dipole magnetic field using a Markov chain Monte Carlo maximum likelihood technique. We find that, in many cases, the models are able to reproduce the observed light curves well and provide constraints on the viewing geometries that are in agreement with those from radio polarization measurements. Additionally, for some MSPs we constrain the altitudes of both the gamma-ray and radio emission regions. The best-fit magnetic inclination angles are found to cover a broader range than those of non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars.

  13. Maximum profile likelihood estimation of differential equation parameters through model based smoothing state estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D A; Chkrebtii, O

    2013-12-01

    Statistical inference for biochemical models often faces a variety of characteristic challenges. In this paper we examine state and parameter estimation for the JAK-STAT intracellular signalling mechanism, which exemplifies the implementation intricacies common in many biochemical inference problems. We introduce an extension to the Generalized Smoothing approach for estimating delay differential equation models, addressing selection of complexity parameters, choice of the basis system, and appropriate optimization strategies. Motivated by the JAK-STAT system, we further extend the generalized smoothing approach to consider a nonlinear observation process with additional unknown parameters, and highlight how the approach handles unobserved states and unevenly spaced observations. The methodology developed is generally applicable to problems of estimation for differential equation models with delays, unobserved states, nonlinear observation processes, and partially observed histories. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Maximum likelihood Bayesian averaging of airflow models in unsaturated fractured tuff using Occam and variance windows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales-Casique, E.; Neuman, S.P.; Vesselinov, V.V.

    2010-01-01

    We use log permeability and porosity data obtained from single-hole pneumatic packer tests in six boreholes drilled into unsaturated fractured tuff near Superior, Arizona, to postulate, calibrate and compare five alternative variogram models (exponential, exponential with linear drift, power,

  15. Automatic image equalization and contrast enhancement using Gaussian mixture modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Turgay; Tjahjadi, Tardi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an adaptive image equalization algorithm that automatically enhances the contrast in an input image. The algorithm uses the Gaussian mixture model to model the image gray-level distribution, and the intersection points of the Gaussian components in the model are used to partition the dynamic range of the image into input gray-level intervals. The contrast equalized image is generated by transforming the pixels' gray levels in each input interval to the appropriate output gray-level interval according to the dominant Gaussian component and the cumulative distribution function of the input interval. To take account of the hypothesis that homogeneous regions in the image represent homogeneous silences (or set of Gaussian components) in the image histogram, the Gaussian components with small variances are weighted with smaller values than the Gaussian components with larger variances, and the gray-level distribution is also used to weight the components in the mapping of the input interval to the output interval. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm produces better or comparable enhanced images than several state-of-the-art algorithms. Unlike the other algorithms, the proposed algorithm is free of parameter setting for a given dynamic range of the enhanced image and can be applied to a wide range of image types.

  16. A model based method for automatic facial expression recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuilenburg, H. van; Wiering, M.A.; Uyl, M. den

    2006-01-01

    Automatic facial expression recognition is a research topic with interesting applications in the field of human-computer interaction, psychology and product marketing. The classification accuracy for an automatic system which uses static images as input is however largely limited by the image

  17. Maximum likelihood model based on minor allele frequencies and weighted Max-SAT formulation for haplotype assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Sayyed R; Khodadadi, Ilnaz; Falsafain, Hossein; Nadimi, Reza; Ghadiri, Nasser

    2014-06-07

    Human haplotypes include essential information about SNPs, which in turn provide valuable information for such studies as finding relationships between some diseases and their potential genetic causes, e.g., for Genome Wide Association Studies. Due to expensiveness of directly determining haplotypes and recent progress in high throughput sequencing, there has been an increasing motivation for haplotype assembly, which is the problem of finding a pair of haplotypes from a set of aligned fragments. Although the problem has been extensively studied and a number of algorithms have already been proposed for the problem, more accurate methods are still beneficial because of high importance of the haplotypes information. In this paper, first, we develop a probabilistic model, that incorporates the Minor Allele Frequency (MAF) of SNP sites, which is missed in the existing maximum likelihood models. Then, we show that the probabilistic model will reduce to the Minimum Error Correction (MEC) model when the information of MAF is omitted and some approximations are made. This result provides a novel theoretical support for the MEC, despite some criticisms against it in the recent literature. Next, under the same approximations, we simplify the model to an extension of the MEC in which the information of MAF is used. Finally, we extend the haplotype assembly algorithm HapSAT by developing a weighted Max-SAT formulation for the simplified model, which is evaluated empirically with positive results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Automatic Modelling of Rubble Mound Breakwaters from LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, M.; Díaz-Vilariño, L.; González-Jorge, H.; Martínez-Sánchez, J.; Arias, P.

    2015-08-01

    Rubble mound breakwaters maintenance is critical to the protection of beaches and ports. LiDAR systems provide accurate point clouds from the emerged part of the structure that can be modelled to make it more useful and easy to handle. This work introduces a methodology for the automatic modelling of breakwaters with armour units of cube shape. The algorithm is divided in three main steps: normal vector computation, plane segmentation, and cube reconstruction. Plane segmentation uses the normal orientation of the points and the edge length of the cube. Cube reconstruction uses the intersection of three perpendicular planes and the edge length. Three point clouds cropped from the main point cloud of the structure are used for the tests. The number of cubes detected is around 56 % for two of the point clouds and 32 % for the third one over the total physical cubes. Accuracy assessment is done by comparison with manually drawn cubes calculating the differences between the vertexes. It ranges between 6.4 cm and 15 cm. Computing time ranges between 578.5 s and 8018.2 s. The computing time increases with the number of cubes and the requirements of collision detection.

  19. Automatic detection of interictal spikes using data mining models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Pablo; Cazamajou, Enrique; Scarpettini, Marcelo; Aizemberg, Ariel; Silva, Walter; Kochen, Silvia

    2006-01-15

    A prospective candidate for epilepsy surgery is studied both the ictal and interictal spikes (IS) to determine the localization of the epileptogenic zone. In this work, data mining (DM) classification techniques were utilized to build an automatic detection model. The selected DM algorithms are: Decision Trees (J 4.8), and Statistical Bayesian Classifier (naïve model). The main objective was the detection of IS, isolating them from the EEG's base activity. On the other hand, DM has an attractive advantage in such applications, in that the recognition of epileptic discharges does not need a clear definition of spike morphology. Furthermore, previously 'unseen' patterns could be recognized by the DM with proper 'training'. The results obtained showed that the efficacy of the selected DM algorithms is comparable to the current visual analysis used by the experts. Moreover, DM is faster than the time required for the visual analysis of the EEG. So this tool can assist the experts by facilitating the analysis of a patient's information, and reducing the time and effort required in the process.

  20. Use of Maximum Likelihood-Mixed Models to select stable reference genes: a case of heat stress response in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salces Judit

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reference genes with stable expression are required to normalize expression differences of target genes in qPCR experiments. Several procedures and companion software have been proposed to find the most stable genes. Model based procedures are attractive because they provide a solid statistical framework. NormFinder, a widely used software, uses a model based method. The pairwise comparison procedure implemented in GeNorm is a simpler procedure but one of the most extensively used. In the present work a statistical approach based in Maximum Likelihood estimation under mixed models was tested and compared with NormFinder and geNorm softwares. Sixteen candidate genes were tested in whole blood samples from control and heat stressed sheep. Results A model including gene and treatment as fixed effects, sample (animal, gene by treatment, gene by sample and treatment by sample interactions as random effects with heteroskedastic residual variance in gene by treatment levels was selected using goodness of fit and predictive ability criteria among a variety of models. Mean Square Error obtained under the selected model was used as indicator of gene expression stability. Genes top and bottom ranked by the three approaches were similar; however, notable differences for the best pair of genes selected for each method and the remaining genes of the rankings were shown. Differences among the expression values of normalized targets for each statistical approach were also found. Conclusions Optimal statistical properties of Maximum Likelihood estimation joined to mixed model flexibility allow for more accurate estimation of expression stability of genes under many different situations. Accurate selection of reference genes has a direct impact over the normalized expression values of a given target gene. This may be critical when the aim of the study is to compare expression rate differences among samples under different environmental

  1. Control of automatic processes: A parallel distributed-processing model of the stroop effect. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, J.D.; Dunbar, K.; McClelland, J.L.

    1988-06-16

    A growing body of evidence suggests that traditional views of automaticity are in need of revision. For example, automaticity has often been treated as an all-or-none phenomenon, and traditional theories have held that automatic processes are independent of attention. Yet recent empirial data suggests that automatic processes are continuous, and furthermore are subject to attentional control. In this paper we present a model of attention which addresses these issues. Using a parallel distributed processing framework we propose that the attributes of automaticity depend upon the strength of a process and that strength increases with training. Using the Stroop effect as an example, we show how automatic processes are continuous and emerge gradually with practice. Specifically, we present a computational model of the Stroop task which simulates the time course of processing as well as the effects of learning.

  2. CAD-based automatic modeling method for Geant4 geometry model through MCAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.; Nie, F.; Wang, G.; Long, P.; LV, Z.

    2013-01-01

    The full text of publication follows. Geant4 is a widely used Monte Carlo transport simulation package. Before calculating using Geant4, the calculation model need be established which could be described by using Geometry Description Markup Language (GDML) or C++ language. However, it is time-consuming and error-prone to manually describe the models by GDML. Automatic modeling methods have been developed recently, but there are some problems that exist in most present modeling programs, specially some of them were not accurate or adapted to specifically CAD format. To convert the GDML format models to CAD format accurately, a Geant4 Computer Aided Design (CAD) based modeling method was developed for automatically converting complex CAD geometry model into GDML geometry model. The essence of this method was dealing with CAD model represented with boundary representation (B-REP) and GDML model represented with constructive solid geometry (CSG). At first, CAD model was decomposed to several simple solids which had only one close shell. And then the simple solid was decomposed to convex shell set. Then corresponding GDML convex basic solids were generated by the boundary surfaces getting from the topological characteristic of a convex shell. After the generation of these solids, GDML model was accomplished with series boolean operations. This method was adopted in CAD/Image-based Automatic Modeling Program for Neutronics and Radiation Transport (MCAM), and tested with several models including the examples in Geant4 install package. The results showed that this method could convert standard CAD model accurately, and can be used for Geant4 automatic modeling. (authors)

  3. A hybrid model for automatic emotion recognition in suicide notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Willis, Alistair; de Roeck, Anne; Nuseibeh, Bashar

    2012-01-01

    We describe the Open University team's submission to the 2011 i2b2/VA/Cincinnati Medical Natural Language Processing Challenge, Track 2 Shared Task for sentiment analysis in suicide notes. This Shared Task focused on the development of automatic systems that identify, at the sentence level, affective text of 15 specific emotions from suicide notes. We propose a hybrid model that incorporates a number of natural language processing techniques, including lexicon-based keyword spotting, CRF-based emotion cue identification, and machine learning-based emotion classification. The results generated by different techniques are integrated using different vote-based merging strategies. The automated system performed well against the manually-annotated gold standard, and achieved encouraging results with a micro-averaged F-measure score of 61.39% in textual emotion recognition, which was ranked 1st place out of 24 participant teams in this challenge. The results demonstrate that effective emotion recognition by an automated system is possible when a large annotated corpus is available.

  4. Automatic prediction of facial trait judgments: appearance vs. structural models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Rojas

    Full Text Available Evaluating other individuals with respect to personality characteristics plays a crucial role in human relations and it is the focus of attention for research in diverse fields such as psychology and interactive computer systems. In psychology, face perception has been recognized as a key component of this evaluation system. Multiple studies suggest that observers use face information to infer personality characteristics. Interactive computer systems are trying to take advantage of these findings and apply them to increase the natural aspect of interaction and to improve the performance of interactive computer systems. Here, we experimentally test whether the automatic prediction of facial trait judgments (e.g. dominance can be made by using the full appearance information of the face and whether a reduced representation of its structure is sufficient. We evaluate two separate approaches: a holistic representation model using the facial appearance information and a structural model constructed from the relations among facial salient points. State of the art machine learning methods are applied to a derive a facial trait judgment model from training data and b predict a facial trait value for any face. Furthermore, we address the issue of whether there are specific structural relations among facial points that predict perception of facial traits. Experimental results over a set of labeled data (9 different trait evaluations and classification rules (4 rules suggest that a prediction of perception of facial traits is learnable by both holistic and structural approaches; b the most reliable prediction of facial trait judgments is obtained by certain type of holistic descriptions of the face appearance; and c for some traits such as attractiveness and extroversion, there are relationships between specific structural features and social perceptions.

  5. Penalized-Likelihood Reconstruction With High-Fidelity Measurement Models for High-Resolution Cone-Beam Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Steven; Jacobson, Matthew; Cao, Qian; Brehler, Michael; Sisniega, Alejandro; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Stayman, J Webster

    2018-04-01

    We present a novel reconstruction algorithm based on a general cone-beam CT forward model, which is capable of incorporating the blur and noise correlations that are exhibited in flat-panel CBCT measurement data. Specifically, the proposed model may include scintillator blur, focal-spot blur, and noise correlations due to light spread in the scintillator. The proposed algorithm (GPL-BC) uses a Gaussian Penalized-Likelihood objective function, which incorporates models of blur and correlated noise. In a simulation study, GPL-BC was able to achieve lower bias as compared with deblurring followed by FDK as well as a model-based reconstruction method without integration of measurement blur. In the same study, GPL-BC was able to achieve better line-pair reconstructions (in terms of segmented-image accuracy) as compared with deblurring followed by FDK, a model-based method without blur, and a model-based method with blur but not noise correlations. A prototype extremities quantitative cone-beam CT test-bench was used to image a physical sample of human trabecular bone. These data were used to compare reconstructions using the proposed method and model-based methods without blur and/or correlation to a registered CT image of the same bone sample. The GPL-BC reconstructions resulted in more accurate trabecular bone segmentation. Multiple trabecular bone metrics, including trabecular thickness (Tb.Th.) were computed for each reconstruction approach as well as the CT volume. The GPL-BC reconstruction provided the most accurate Tb.Th. measurement, 0.255 mm, as compared with the CT derived value of 0.193 mm, followed by the GPL-B reconstruction, the GPL-I reconstruction, and then the FDK reconstruction (0.271 mm, 0.309 mm, and 0.335 mm, respectively).

  6. Constrained Maximum Likelihood Estimation for Model Calibration Using Summary-level Information from External Big Data Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chen, Yi-Hau; Maas, Paige; Carroll, Raymond J

    2016-03-01

    Information from various public and private data sources of extremely large sample sizes are now increasingly available for research purposes. Statistical methods are needed for utilizing information from such big data sources while analyzing data from individual studies that may collect more detailed information required for addressing specific hypotheses of interest. In this article, we consider the problem of building regression models based on individual-level data from an "internal" study while utilizing summary-level information, such as information on parameters for reduced models, from an "external" big data source. We identify a set of very general constraints that link internal and external models. These constraints are used to develop a framework for semiparametric maximum likelihood inference that allows the distribution of covariates to be estimated using either the internal sample or an external reference sample. We develop extensions for handling complex stratified sampling designs, such as case-control sampling, for the internal study. Asymptotic theory and variance estimators are developed for each case. We use simulation studies and a real data application to assess the performance of the proposed methods in contrast to the generalized regression (GR) calibration methodology that is popular in the sample survey literature.

  7. Automatic component calibration and error diagnostics for model-based accelerator control. Phase I final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl Stern; Martin Lee

    1999-01-01

    Phase I work studied the feasibility of developing software for automatic component calibration and error correction in beamline optics models. A prototype application was developed that corrects quadrupole field strength errors in beamline models

  8. Improving on hidden Markov models: An articulatorily constrained, maximum likelihood approach to speech recognition and speech coding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogden, J.

    1996-11-05

    The goal of the proposed research is to test a statistical model of speech recognition that incorporates the knowledge that speech is produced by relatively slow motions of the tongue, lips, and other speech articulators. This model is called Maximum Likelihood Continuity Mapping (Malcom). Many speech researchers believe that by using constraints imposed by articulator motions, we can improve or replace the current hidden Markov model based speech recognition algorithms. Unfortunately, previous efforts to incorporate information about articulation into speech recognition algorithms have suffered because (1) slight inaccuracies in our knowledge or the formulation of our knowledge about articulation may decrease recognition performance, (2) small changes in the assumptions underlying models of speech production can lead to large changes in the speech derived from the models, and (3) collecting measurements of human articulator positions in sufficient quantity for training a speech recognition algorithm is still impractical. The most interesting (and in fact, unique) quality of Malcom is that, even though Malcom makes use of a mapping between acoustics and articulation, Malcom can be trained to recognize speech using only acoustic data. By learning the mapping between acoustics and articulation using only acoustic data, Malcom avoids the difficulties involved in collecting articulator position measurements and does not require an articulatory synthesizer model to estimate the mapping between vocal tract shapes and speech acoustics. Preliminary experiments that demonstrate that Malcom can learn the mapping between acoustics and articulation are discussed. Potential applications of Malcom aside from speech recognition are also discussed. Finally, specific deliverables resulting from the proposed research are described.

  9. The design of control algorithm for automatic start-up model of HWRR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Wenqi

    1990-01-01

    The design of control algorithm for automatic start-up model of HWRR (Heavy Water Research Reactor), the calculation of μ value and the application of digital compensator are described. Finally The flow diagram of the automatic start-up and digital compensator program for HWRR are given

  10. Evaluation of Model Recognition for Grammar-Based Automatic 3d Building Model Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qian; Helmholz, Petra; Belton, David

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, 3D city models are in high demand by many public and private organisations, and the steadily growing capacity in both quality and quantity are increasing demand. The quality evaluation of these 3D models is a relevant issue both from the scientific and practical points of view. In this paper, we present a method for the quality evaluation of 3D building models which are reconstructed automatically from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data based on an attributed building grammar. The entire evaluation process has been performed in all the three dimensions in terms of completeness and correctness of the reconstruction. Six quality measures are introduced to apply on four datasets of reconstructed building models in order to describe the quality of the automatic reconstruction, and also are assessed on their validity from the evaluation point of view.

  11. Obtaining the maximum likelihood estimates in incomplete R x C contingency tables using a Poisson generalized linear model

    OpenAIRE

    Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Parzen, Michael; Molenberghs, Geert

    1998-01-01

    This article describes estimation of the cell probabilities in an R x C contingency table with ignorable missing data. Popular methods for maximizing the incomplete data likelihood are the EM-algorithm and the Newton--Raphson algorithm. Both of these methods require some modification of existing statistical software to get the MLEs of the cell probabilities as well as the variance estimates. We make the connection between the multinomial and Poisson likelihoods to show that the MLEs can be ob...

  12. Impact of Animated Spokes-Characters in Print Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Advertising: An Elaboration Likelihood Model Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutada, Nilesh S; Rollins, Brent L; Perri, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    A randomized, posttest-only online survey study of adult U.S. consumers determined the advertising effectiveness (attitude toward ad, brand, company, spokes-characters, attention paid to the ad, drug inquiry intention, and perceived product risk) of animated spokes-characters in print direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising of prescription drugs and the moderating effects of consumers' involvement. Consumers' responses (n = 490) were recorded for animated versus nonanimated (human) spokes-characters in a fictitious DTC ad. Guided by the elaboration likelihood model, data were analyzed using a 2 (spokes-character type: animated/human) × 2 (involvement: high/low) factorial multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). The MANCOVA indicated significant main effects of spokes-character type and involvement on the dependent variables after controlling for covariate effects. Of the several ad effectiveness variables, consumers only differed on their attitude toward the spokes-characters between the two spokes-character types (specifically, more favorable attitudes toward the human spokes-character). Apart from perceived product risk, high-involvement consumers reacted more favorably to the remaining ad effectiveness variables compared to the low-involvement consumers, and exhibited significantly stronger drug inquiry intentions during their next doctor visit. Further, the moderating effect of consumers' involvement was not observed (nonsignificant interaction effect between spokes-character type and involvement).

  13. An enhanced model for automatically extracting topic phrase from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The key benefit foreseen from this automatic document classification is not only related to search engines, but also to many other fields like, document organization, text filtering and semantic index managing. Key words: Keyphrase extraction, machine learning, search engine snippet, document classification, topic tracking ...

  14. Path Tracking Control of Automatic Parking Cloud Model considering the Influence of Time Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiding Hua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper establishes the kinematic model of the automatic parking system and analyzes the kinematic constraints of the vehicle. Furthermore, it solves the problem where the traditional automatic parking system model fails to take into account the time delay. Firstly, based on simulating calculation, the influence of time delay on the dynamic trajectory of a vehicle in the automatic parking system is analyzed under the transverse distance Dlateral between different target spaces. Secondly, on the basis of cloud model, this paper utilizes the tracking control of an intelligent path closer to human intelligent behavior to further study the Cloud Generator-based parking path tracking control method and construct a vehicle path tracking control model. Moreover, tracking and steering control effects of the model are verified through simulation analysis. Finally, the effectiveness and timeliness of automatic parking controller in the aspect of path tracking are tested through a real vehicle experiment.

  15. Modeling and Prototyping of Automatic Clutch System for Light Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, S.; Jothi Prakash, V. M.; Vishal, S.

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, recycling or regenerating the waste in to something useful is appreciated all around the globe. It reduces greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global climate change. This study deals with provision of the automatic clutch mechanism in vehicles to facilitate the smooth changing of gears. This study proposed to use the exhaust gases which are normally expelled out as a waste from the turbocharger to actuate the clutch mechanism in vehicles to facilitate the smooth changing of gears. At present, clutches are operated automatically by using an air compressor in the four wheelers. In this study, a conceptual design is proposed in which the clutch is operated by the exhaust gas from the turbocharger and this will remove the usage of air compressor in the existing system. With this system, usage of air compressor is eliminated and the riders need not to operate the clutch manually. This work involved in development, analysation and validation of the conceptual design through simulation software. Then the developed conceptual design of an automatic pneumatic clutch system is tested with proto type.

  16. TMB: Automatic differentiation and laplace approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Nielsen, Anders; Berg, Casper Willestofte

    2016-01-01

    are automatically integrated out. This approximation, and its derivatives, are obtained using automatic differentiation (up to order three) of the joint likelihood. The computations are designed to be fast for problems with many random effects (approximate to 10(6)) and parameters (approximate to 10...... computations. The user defines the joint likelihood for the data and the random effects as a C++ template function, while all the other operations are done in R; e.g., reading in the data. The package evaluates and maximizes the Laplace approximation of the marginal likelihood where the random effects......(3)). Computation times using ADMB and TMB are compared on a suite of examples ranging from simple models to large spatial models where the random effects are a Gaussian random field. Speedups ranging from 1.5 to about 100 are obtained with increasing gains for large problems...

  17. Modeling forest bird species' likelihood of occurrence in Utah with Forest Inventory and Analysis and Landfire map products and ecologically based pseudo-absence points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoebe L. Zarnetske; Thomas C., Jr. Edwards; Gretchen G. Moisen

    2007-01-01

    Estimating species likelihood of occurrence across extensive landscapes is a powerful management tool. Unfortunately, available occurrence data for landscape-scale modeling is often lacking and usually only in the form of observed presences. Ecologically based pseudo-absence points were generated from within habitat envelopes to accompany presence-only data in habitat...

  18. Extended likelihood inference in reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martz, H.F. Jr.; Beckman, R.J.; Waller, R.A.

    1978-10-01

    Extended likelihood methods of inference are developed in which subjective information in the form of a prior distribution is combined with sampling results by means of an extended likelihood function. The extended likelihood function is standardized for use in obtaining extended likelihood intervals. Extended likelihood intervals are derived for the mean of a normal distribution with known variance, the failure-rate of an exponential distribution, and the parameter of a binomial distribution. Extended second-order likelihood methods are developed and used to solve several prediction problems associated with the exponential and binomial distributions. In particular, such quantities as the next failure-time, the number of failures in a given time period, and the time required to observe a given number of failures are predicted for the exponential model with a gamma prior distribution on the failure-rate. In addition, six types of life testing experiments are considered. For the binomial model with a beta prior distribution on the probability of nonsurvival, methods are obtained for predicting the number of nonsurvivors in a given sample size and for predicting the required sample size for observing a specified number of nonsurvivors. Examples illustrate each of the methods developed. Finally, comparisons are made with Bayesian intervals in those cases where these are known to exist

  19. A new approach for automatic control modeling, analysis and design in fully fuzzy environment

    OpenAIRE

    Gabr, Walaa Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a new approach for the modeling, analysis and design of automatic control systems in fully fuzzy environment based on the normalized fuzzy matrices. The approach is also suitable for determining the propagation of fuzziness in automatic control and dynamical systems where all system coefficients are expressed as fuzzy parameters. A new consolidity chart is suggested based on the recently newly developed system consolidity index for testing the susceptibility of the system t...

  20. A Full-Body Layered Deformable Model for Automatic Model-Based Gait Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haiping; Plataniotis, Konstantinos N.; Venetsanopoulos, Anastasios N.

    2007-12-01

    This paper proposes a full-body layered deformable model (LDM) inspired by manually labeled silhouettes for automatic model-based gait recognition from part-level gait dynamics in monocular video sequences. The LDM is defined for the fronto-parallel gait with 22 parameters describing the human body part shapes (widths and lengths) and dynamics (positions and orientations). There are four layers in the LDM and the limbs are deformable. Algorithms for LDM-based human body pose recovery are then developed to estimate the LDM parameters from both manually labeled and automatically extracted silhouettes, where the automatic silhouette extraction is through a coarse-to-fine localization and extraction procedure. The estimated LDM parameters are used for model-based gait recognition by employing the dynamic time warping for matching and adopting the combination scheme in AdaBoost.M2. While the existing model-based gait recognition approaches focus primarily on the lower limbs, the estimated LDM parameters enable us to study full-body model-based gait recognition by utilizing the dynamics of the upper limbs, the shoulders and the head as well. In the experiments, the LDM-based gait recognition is tested on gait sequences with differences in shoe-type, surface, carrying condition and time. The results demonstrate that the recognition performance benefits from not only the lower limb dynamics, but also the dynamics of the upper limbs, the shoulders and the head. In addition, the LDM can serve as an analysis tool for studying factors affecting the gait under various conditions.

  1. Automatic 3d Building Model Generations with Airborne LiDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yastikli, N.; Cetin, Z.

    2017-11-01

    LiDAR systems become more and more popular because of the potential use for obtaining the point clouds of vegetation and man-made objects on the earth surface in an accurate and quick way. Nowadays, these airborne systems have been frequently used in wide range of applications such as DEM/DSM generation, topographic mapping, object extraction, vegetation mapping, 3 dimensional (3D) modelling and simulation, change detection, engineering works, revision of maps, coastal management and bathymetry. The 3D building model generation is the one of the most prominent applications of LiDAR system, which has the major importance for urban planning, illegal construction monitoring, 3D city modelling, environmental simulation, tourism, security, telecommunication and mobile navigation etc. The manual or semi-automatic 3D building model generation is costly and very time-consuming process for these applications. Thus, an approach for automatic 3D building model generation is needed in a simple and quick way for many studies which includes building modelling. In this study, automatic 3D building models generation is aimed with airborne LiDAR data. An approach is proposed for automatic 3D building models generation including the automatic point based classification of raw LiDAR point cloud. The proposed point based classification includes the hierarchical rules, for the automatic production of 3D building models. The detailed analyses for the parameters which used in hierarchical rules have been performed to improve classification results using different test areas identified in the study area. The proposed approach have been tested in the study area which has partly open areas, forest areas and many types of the buildings, in Zekeriyakoy, Istanbul using the TerraScan module of TerraSolid. The 3D building model was generated automatically using the results of the automatic point based classification. The obtained results of this research on study area verified that automatic 3D

  2. AUTOMATIC 3D BUILDING MODEL GENERATIONS WITH AIRBORNE LiDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yastikli

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available LiDAR systems become more and more popular because of the potential use for obtaining the point clouds of vegetation and man-made objects on the earth surface in an accurate and quick way. Nowadays, these airborne systems have been frequently used in wide range of applications such as DEM/DSM generation, topographic mapping, object extraction, vegetation mapping, 3 dimensional (3D modelling and simulation, change detection, engineering works, revision of maps, coastal management and bathymetry. The 3D building model generation is the one of the most prominent applications of LiDAR system, which has the major importance for urban planning, illegal construction monitoring, 3D city modelling, environmental simulation, tourism, security, telecommunication and mobile navigation etc. The manual or semi-automatic 3D building model generation is costly and very time-consuming process for these applications. Thus, an approach for automatic 3D building model generation is needed in a simple and quick way for many studies which includes building modelling. In this study, automatic 3D building models generation is aimed with airborne LiDAR data. An approach is proposed for automatic 3D building models generation including the automatic point based classification of raw LiDAR point cloud. The proposed point based classification includes the hierarchical rules, for the automatic production of 3D building models. The detailed analyses for the parameters which used in hierarchical rules have been performed to improve classification results using different test areas identified in the study area. The proposed approach have been tested in the study area which has partly open areas, forest areas and many types of the buildings, in Zekeriyakoy, Istanbul using the TerraScan module of TerraSolid. The 3D building model was generated automatically using the results of the automatic point based classification. The obtained results of this research on study area verified

  3. Towards the Availability of the Distributed Cluster Rendering System: Automatic Modeling and Verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Kemin; Jiang, Zhengtao; Wang, Yongbin

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we proposed a Continuous Time Markov Chain Model towards the availability of n-node clusters of Distributed Rendering System. It's an infinite one, we formalized it, based on the model, we implemented a software, which can automatically model with PRISM language. With the tool, whe...

  4. Obtaining reliable Likelihood Ratio tests from simulated likelihood functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Laura Mørch

    It is standard practice by researchers and the default option in many statistical programs to base test statistics for mixed models on simulations using asymmetric draws (e.g. Halton draws). This paper shows that when the estimated likelihood functions depend on standard deviations of mixed...... of the quasirandom draws in the simulation of the restricted likelihood. Again this is not standard in research or statistical programs. The paper therefore recommends using fully antithetic draws replicating the relevant dimensions of the quasi-random draws in the simulation of the restricted likelihood...... parameters this practice is very likely to cause misleading test results for the number of draws usually used today. The paper shows that increasing the number of draws is a very inefficient solution strategy requiring very large numbers of draws to ensure against misleading test statistics. The paper shows...

  5. Application of a semi-automatic cartilage segmentation method for biomechanical modeling of the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liukkonen, Mimmi K; Mononen, Mika E; Tanska, Petri; Saarakkala, Simo; Nieminen, Miika T; Korhonen, Rami K

    2017-10-01

    Manual segmentation of articular cartilage from knee joint 3D magnetic resonance images (MRI) is a time consuming and laborious task. Thus, automatic methods are needed for faster and reproducible segmentations. In the present study, we developed a semi-automatic segmentation method based on radial intensity profiles to generate 3D geometries of knee joint cartilage which were then used in computational biomechanical models of the knee joint. Six healthy volunteers were imaged with a 3T MRI device and their knee cartilages were segmented both manually and semi-automatically. The values of cartilage thicknesses and volumes produced by these two methods were compared. Furthermore, the influences of possible geometrical differences on cartilage stresses and strains in the knee were evaluated with finite element modeling. The semi-automatic segmentation and 3D geometry construction of one knee joint (menisci, femoral and tibial cartilages) was approximately two times faster than with manual segmentation. Differences in cartilage thicknesses, volumes, contact pressures, stresses, and strains between segmentation methods in femoral and tibial cartilage were mostly insignificant (p > 0.05) and random, i.e. there were no systematic differences between the methods. In conclusion, the devised semi-automatic segmentation method is a quick and accurate way to determine cartilage geometries; it may become a valuable tool for biomechanical modeling applications with large patient groups.

  6. Obtaining reliable likelihood ratio tests from simulated likelihood functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Laura Mørch

    2014-01-01

    programs - to base test statistics for mixed models on simulations using asymmetric draws (e.g. Halton draws). Problem 1: Inconsistent LR tests due to asymmetric draws: This paper shows that when the estimated likelihood functions depend on standard deviations of mixed parameters this practice is very......Mixed models: Models allowing for continuous heterogeneity by assuming that value of one or more parameters follow a specified distribution have become increasingly popular. This is known as ‘mixing’ parameters, and it is standard practice by researchers - and the default option in many statistical...... are used, models reducing the dimension of the mixing distribution must replicate the relevant dimensions of the quasi-random draws in the simulation of the restricted likelihood. Again this is not standard in research or statistical programs. The paper therefore recommends using fully antithetic draws...

  7. Towards an automatic model transformation mechanism from UML state machines to DEVS models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel González

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of complex event-driven systems requires studies and analysis prior to deployment with the goal of detecting unwanted behavior. UML is a language widely used by the software engineering community for modeling these systems through state machines, among other mechanisms. Currently, these models do not have appropriate execution and simulation tools to analyze the real behavior of systems. Existing tools do not provide appropriate libraries (sampling from a probability distribution, plotting, etc. both to build and to analyze models. Modeling and simulation for design and prototyping of systems are widely used techniques to predict, investigate and compare the performance of systems. In particular, the Discrete Event System Specification (DEVS formalism separates the modeling and simulation; there are several tools available on the market that run and collect information from DEVS models. This paper proposes a model transformation mechanism from UML state machines to DEVS models in the Model-Driven Development (MDD context, through the declarative QVT Relations language, in order to perform simulations using tools, such as PowerDEVS. A mechanism to validate the transformation is proposed. Moreover, examples of application to analyze the behavior of an automatic banking machine and a control system of an elevator are presented.

  8. Logic of likelihood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, M.J.W.

    1992-07-01

    The notion of {open_quotes}probability{close_quotes} is generalized to that of {open_quotes}likelihood,{close_quotes} and a natural logical structure is shown to exist for any physical theory which predicts likelihoods. Two physically based axioms are given for this logical structure to form an orthomodular poset, with an order-determining set of states. The results strengthen the basis of the quantum logic approach to axiomatic quantum theory. 25 refs.

  9. A multifactorial likelihood model for MMR gene variant classification incorporating probabilities based on sequence bioinformatics and tumor characteristics: a report from the Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Bryony A; Goldgar, David E; Paterson, Carol; Clendenning, Mark; Walters, Rhiannon; Arnold, Sven; Parsons, Michael T; Michael D, Walsh; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Lemarchand, Loic; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Young, Joanne P; Buchanan, Daniel D; Tavtigian, Sean V; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2013-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) gene sequence variants of uncertain clinical significance are often identified in suspected Lynch syndrome families, and this constitutes a challenge for both researchers and clinicians. Multifactorial likelihood model approaches provide a quantitative measure of MMR variant pathogenicity, but first require input of likelihood ratios (LRs) for different MMR variation-associated characteristics from appropriate, well-characterized reference datasets. Microsatellite instability (MSI) and somatic BRAF tumor data for unselected colorectal cancer probands of known pathogenic variant status were used to derive LRs for tumor characteristics using the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CFR) resource. These tumor LRs were combined with variant segregation within families, and estimates of prior probability of pathogenicity based on sequence conservation and position, to analyze 44 unclassified variants identified initially in Australasian Colon CFR families. In addition, in vitro splicing analyses were conducted on the subset of variants based on bioinformatic splicing predictions. The LR in favor of pathogenicity was estimated to be ~12-fold for a colorectal tumor with a BRAF mutation-negative MSI-H phenotype. For 31 of the 44 variants, the posterior probabilities of pathogenicity were such that altered clinical management would be indicated. Our findings provide a working multifactorial likelihood model for classification that carefully considers mode of ascertainment for gene testing. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Automatic fitting of spiking neuron models to electrophysiological recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrille Rossant

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Spiking models can accurately predict the spike trains produced by cortical neurons in response to somatically injected currents. Since the specific characteristics of the model depend on the neuron, a computational method is required to fit models to electrophysiological recordings. The fitting procedure can be very time consuming both in terms of computer simulations and in terms of code writing. We present algorithms to fit spiking models to electrophysiological data (time-varying input and spike trains that can run in parallel on graphics processing units (GPUs. The model fitting library is interfaced with Brian, a neural network simulator in Python. If a GPU is present it uses just-in-time compilation to translate model equations into optimized code. Arbitrary models can then be defined at script level and run on the graphics card. This tool can be used to obtain empirically validated spiking models of neurons in various systems. We demonstrate its use on public data from the INCF Quantitative Single-Neuron Modeling 2009 competition by comparing the performance of a number of neuron spiking models.

  11. Towards automatic model based controller design for reconfigurable plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Axel Gottlieb; Stoustrup, Jakob; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces model-based Plug and Play Process Control, a novel concept for process control, which allows a model-based control system to be reconfigured when a sensor or an actuator is plugged into a controlled process. The work reported in this paper focuses on composing a monolithic m...

  12. On the Control of Automatic Processes: A Parallel Distributed Processing Model of the Stroop Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-16

    F.N. (1973). The Stroop phenomenon and its use in the study of perceptual, cognitive , and response processes. Memory and Cognition , 1, 106-120. Gatti...189-207. Logan, G.D. (1980). Attention and automaticity in Stroop and priming tasks: Theory and data. Cognitive Psychology, 12, 523-553. Logan, D.G...Dlh’i! FILE COI’_ C0 ON THE CONTROL OF AUTOMATIC PROCESSES: (N A PARALLEL DISTRIBUTED PROCESSING MODEL OF THE STROOP EFFECT Technical Report AIP - 40

  13. Unidirectional high fiber content composites: Automatic 3D FE model generation and damage simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2009-01-01

    A new method and a software code for the automatic generation of 3D micromechanical FE models of unidirectional long-fiber-reinforced composite (LFRC) with high fiber volume fraction with random fiber arrangement are presented. The fiber arrangement in the cross-section is generated through random...

  14. Constraint optimization model of a scheduling problem for a robotic arm in automatic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Ewa; Smith, Stephen F.; Kristiansen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    . The scheduling model is implemented as a stand-alone module using constraint programming, and integrated with a larger automatic system. The results of a number of simulation experiments with simple parts are reported, both to characterize the functionality of the scheduler and to illustrate the operation...

  15. Automatic generation of medium-detailed 3D models of buildings based on CAD data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominguez-Martin, B.; Van Oosterom, P.; Feito-Higueruela, F.R.; Garcia-Fernandez, A.L.; Ogayar-Anguita, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    We present the preliminary results of a work in progress which aims to obtain a software system able to automatically generate a set of diverse 3D building models with a medium level of detail, that is, more detailed that a mere parallelepiped, but not as detailed as a complete geometric

  16. A Stochastic Approach for Automatic and Dynamic Modeling of Students' Learning Styles in Adaptive Educational Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorça, Fabiano Azevedo; Lima, Luciano Vieira; Fernandes, Márcia Aparecida; Lopes, Carlos Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Considering learning and how to improve students' performances, an adaptive educational system must know how an individual learns best. In this context, this work presents an innovative approach for student modeling through probabilistic learning styles combination. Experiments have shown that our approach is able to automatically detect and…

  17. Automatic Traffic-Based Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) Model Generation for ns-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    more protocols (especially at different layers of the OSI model ), implementing an inference engine to extract inter- and intrapacket dependencies, and...ARL-TR-7543 ● DEC 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Automatic Traffic-Based Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) Model ...ICMP) Model Generation for ns-3 by Jaime C Acosta and Felipe Jovel Survivability/Lethality Analysis Directorate, ARL Felipe Sotelo and Caesar

  18. CAD-based Monte Carlo automatic modeling method based on primitive solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dong; Song, Jing; Yu, Shengpeng; Long, Pengcheng; Wang, Yongliang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We develop a method which bi-convert between CAD model and primitive solid. • This method was improved from convert method between CAD model and half space. • This method was test by ITER model and validated the correctness and efficiency. • This method was integrated in SuperMC which could model for SuperMC and Geant4. - Abstract: Monte Carlo method has been widely used in nuclear design and analysis, where geometries are described with primitive solids. However, it is time consuming and error prone to describe a primitive solid geometry, especially for a complicated model. To reuse the abundant existed CAD models and conveniently model with CAD modeling tools, an automatic modeling method for accurate prompt modeling between CAD model and primitive solid is needed. An automatic modeling method for Monte Carlo geometry described by primitive solid was developed which could bi-convert between CAD model and Monte Carlo geometry represented by primitive solids. While converting from CAD model to primitive solid model, the CAD model was decomposed into several convex solid sets, and then corresponding primitive solids were generated and exported. While converting from primitive solid model to the CAD model, the basic primitive solids were created and related operation was done. This method was integrated in the SuperMC and was benchmarked with ITER benchmark model. The correctness and efficiency of this method were demonstrated.

  19. Automatic shape model building based on principal geodesic analysis bootstrapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Erik B; Fletcher, P Thomas; Pizer, Stephen M

    2008-01-01

    shape representation is deformed into the training shapes followed by computation of the shape mean and modes of shape variation. In the first iteration, a generic shape model is used as starting point - in the following iterations in the bootstrap method, the resulting mean and modes from the previous...

  20. Automatic age and gender classification using supervised appearance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukar, Ali Maina; Ugail, Hassan; Connah, David

    2016-11-01

    Age and gender classification are two important problems that recently gained popularity in the research community, due to their wide range of applications. Research has shown that both age and gender information are encoded in the face shape and texture, hence the active appearance model (AAM), a statistical model that captures shape and texture variations, has been one of the most widely used feature extraction techniques for the aforementioned problems. However, AAM suffers from some drawbacks, especially when used for classification. This is primarily because principal component analysis (PCA), which is at the core of the model, works in an unsupervised manner, i.e., PCA dimensionality reduction does not take into account how the predictor variables relate to the response (class labels). Rather, it explores only the underlying structure of the predictor variables, thus, it is no surprise if PCA discards valuable parts of the data that represent discriminatory features. Toward this end, we propose a supervised appearance model (sAM) that improves on AAM by replacing PCA with partial least-squares regression. This feature extraction technique is then used for the problems of age and gender classification. Our experiments show that sAM has better predictive power than the conventional AAM.

  1. On Automatic Modeling and Use of Domain-specific Ontologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Troels; Knappe, Rasmus; Bulskov, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we firstly introduce an approach to the modeling of a domain-specific ontology for use in connection with a given document collection. Secondly, we present a methodology for deriving conceptual similarity from the domain-specific ontology. Adopted for ontology representation is a s...

  2. CADLIVE toolbox for MATLAB: automatic dynamic modeling of biochemical networks with comprehensive system analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kentaro; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Miyabe, Takaaki; Matsuoka, Yu; Kurata, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    Mathematical modeling has become a standard technique to understand the dynamics of complex biochemical systems. To promote the modeling, we had developed the CADLIVE dynamic simulator that automatically converted a biochemical map into its associated mathematical model, simulated its dynamic behaviors and analyzed its robustness. To enhance the feasibility by CADLIVE and extend its functions, we propose the CADLIVE toolbox available for MATLAB, which implements not only the existing functions of the CADLIVE dynamic simulator, but also the latest tools including global parameter search methods with robustness analysis. The seamless, bottom-up processes consisting of biochemical network construction, automatic construction of its dynamic model, simulation, optimization, and S-system analysis greatly facilitate dynamic modeling, contributing to the research of systems biology and synthetic biology. This application can be freely downloaded from http://www.cadlive.jp/CADLIVE_MATLAB/ together with an instruction.

  3. Semi-Automatic Modelling of Building FAÇADES with Shape Grammars Using Historic Building Information Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, C.; Murphy, M.

    2013-02-01

    This paper outlines a new approach for generating digital heritage models from laser scan or photogrammetric data using Historic Building Information Modelling (HBIM). HBIM is a plug-in for Building Information Modelling (BIM) software that uses parametric library objects and procedural modelling techniques to automate the modelling stage. The HBIM process involves a reverse engineering solution whereby parametric interactive objects representing architectural elements are mapped onto laser scan or photogrammetric survey data. A library of parametric architectural objects has been designed from historic manuscripts and architectural pattern books. These parametric objects were built using an embedded programming language within the ArchiCAD BIM software called Geometric Description Language (GDL). Procedural modelling techniques have been implemented with the same language to create a parametric building façade which automatically combines library objects based on architectural rules and proportions. Different configurations of the façade are controlled by user parameter adjustment. The automatically positioned elements of the façade can be subsequently refined using graphical editing while overlaying the model with orthographic imagery. Along with this semi-automatic method for generating façade models, manual plotting of library objects can also be used to generate a BIM model from survey data. After the 3D model has been completed conservation documents such as plans, sections, elevations and 3D views can be automatically generated for conservation projects.

  4. Strategies to Automatically Derive a Process Model from a Configurable Process Model Based on Event Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Arriagada-Benítez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Configurable process models are frequently used to represent business workflows and other discrete event systems among different branches of large organizations: they unify commonalities shared by all branches and describe their differences, at the same time. The configuration of such models is usually done manually, which is challenging. On the one hand, when the number of configurable nodes in the configurable process model grows, the size of the search space increases exponentially. On the other hand, the person performing the configuration may lack the holistic perspective to make the right choice for all configurable nodes at the same time, since choices influence each other. Nowadays, information systems that support the execution of business processes create event data reflecting how processes are performed. In this article, we propose three strategies (based on exhaustive search, genetic algorithms and a greedy heuristic that use event data to automatically derive a process model from a configurable process model that better represents the characteristics of the process in a specific branch. These strategies have been implemented in our proposed framework and tested in both business-like event logs as recorded in a higher educational enterprise resource planning system and a real case scenario involving a set of Dutch municipalities.

  5. A generic method for automatic translation between input models for different versions of simulation codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serfontein, Dawid E.; Mulder, Eben J.; Reitsma, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    A computer code was developed for the semi-automatic translation of input models for the VSOP-A diffusion neutronics simulation code to the format of the newer VSOP 99/05 code. In this paper, this algorithm is presented as a generic method for producing codes for the automatic translation of input models from the format of one code version to another, or even to that of a completely different code. Normally, such translations are done manually. However, input model files, such as for the VSOP codes, often are very large and may consist of many thousands of numeric entries that make no particular sense to the human eye. Therefore the task, of for instance nuclear regulators, to verify the accuracy of such translated files can be very difficult and cumbersome. This may cause translation errors not to be picked up, which may have disastrous consequences later on when a reactor with such a faulty design is built. Therefore a generic algorithm for producing such automatic translation codes may ease the translation and verification process to a great extent. It will also remove human error from the process, which may significantly enhance the accuracy and reliability of the process. The developed algorithm also automatically creates a verification log file which permanently record the names and values of each variable used, as well as the list of meanings of all the possible values. This should greatly facilitate reactor licensing applications

  6. Bridging Automatic Speech Recognition and Psycholinguistics: Extending Shortlist to an End-to-End Model of Human Speech Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharenborg, O.E.; Bosch, L.F.M. ten; Boves, L.W.J.; Norris, D.

    2003-01-01

    This letter evaluates potential benefits of combining human speech recognition (HSR) and automatic speech recognition by building a joint model of an automatic phone recognizer (APR) and a computational model of HSR, viz. Shortlist (Norris, 1994). Experiments based on 'real-life' speech highlight

  7. Likelihood inference for unions of interacting discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Helisova, K.

    2010-01-01

    This is probably the first paper which discusses likelihood inference for a random set using a germ-grain model, where the individual grains are unobservable, edge effects occur and other complications appear. We consider the case where the grains form a disc process modelled by a marked point...... with respect to a given marked Poisson model (i.e. a Boolean model). We show how edge effects and other complications can be handled by considering a certain conditional likelihood. Our methodology is illustrated by analysing Peter Diggle's heather data set, where we discuss the results of simulation......-based maximum likelihood inference and the effect of specifying different reference Poisson models....

  8. Automatic segmentation of vertebral arteries in CT angiography using combined circular and cylindrical model fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Jin; Hong, Helen; Chung, Jin Wook

    2014-03-01

    We propose an automatic vessel segmentation method of vertebral arteries in CT angiography using combined circular and cylindrical model fitting. First, to generate multi-segmented volumes, whole volume is automatically divided into four segments by anatomical properties of bone structures along z-axis of head and neck. To define an optimal volume circumscribing vertebral arteries, anterior-posterior bounding and side boundaries are defined as initial extracted vessel region. Second, the initial vessel candidates are tracked using circular model fitting. Since boundaries of the vertebral arteries are ambiguous in case the arteries pass through the transverse foramen in the cervical vertebra, the circle model is extended along z-axis to cylinder model for considering additional vessel information of neighboring slices. Finally, the boundaries of the vertebral arteries are detected using graph-cut optimization. From the experiments, the proposed method provides accurate results without bone artifacts and eroded vessels in the cervical vertebra.

  9. Component simulation in problems of calculated model formation of automatic machine mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telegin Igor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the problems of the component simulation method application in the problems of the automation of the mechanical system model formation with the further possibility of their CAD-realization. The purpose of the investigations mentioned consists in the automation of the CAD-model formation of high-speed mechanisms in automatic machines and in the analysis of dynamic processes occurred in their units taking into account their elasto-inertial properties, power dissipation, gaps in kinematic pairs, friction forces, design and technological loads. As an example in the paper there are considered a formalization of stages in the computer model formation of the cutting mechanism in cold stamping automatic machine AV1818 and methods of for the computation of their parameters on the basis of its solid-state model.

  10. Preclinical Biokinetic Modelling of Tc-99m Radiophamaceuticals Obtained from Semi-Automatic Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo-Aragón, Luz G; Santos-Cuevas, Clara L; Ocampo-García, Blanca E; Chairez-Oria, Isaac; Diaz-Nieto, Lorenza; García-Quiroz, Janice

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a semi automatic image processing algorithm (AIPA) based on the simultaneous information provided by X-ray and radioisotopic images to determine the biokinetic models of Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals from quantification of image radiation activity in murine models. These radioisotopic images were obtained by a CCD (charge couple device) camera coupled to an ultrathin phosphorous screen in a preclinical multimodal imaging system (Xtreme, Bruker). The AIPA consisted of different image processing methods for background, scattering and attenuation correction on the activity quantification. A set of parametric identification algorithms was used to obtain the biokinetic models that characterize the interaction between different tissues and the radiopharmaceuticals considered in the study. The set of biokinetic models corresponded to the Tc-99m biodistribution observed in different ex vivo studies. This fact confirmed the contribution of the semi-automatic image processing technique developed in this study.

  11. Component simulation in problems of calculated model formation of automatic machine mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Telegin Igor; Kozlov Alexander; Zhirkov Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with the problems of the component simulation method application in the problems of the automation of the mechanical system model formation with the further possibility of their CAD-realization. The purpose of the investigations mentioned consists in the automation of the CAD-model formation of high-speed mechanisms in automatic machines and in the analysis of dynamic processes occurred in their units taking into account their elasto-inertial properties, power dissipation, gap...

  12. Modelling the adoption of automatic milking systems in Noord-Holland

    OpenAIRE

    Matteo Floridi; Fabio Bartolini; Jack Peerlings; Nico Polman; Davide Viaggi

    2013-01-01

    Innovation and new technology adoption represent two central elements for the business and industry development process in agriculture. One of the most relevant innovations in dairy farms is the robotisation of the milking process through the adoption of Automatic Milking Systems (AMS). The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of selected Common Agricultural Policy measures on the adoption of AMS in dairy farms. The model developed is a dynamic farm-household model that is able to si...

  13. Progressive sampling-based Bayesian optimization for efficient and automatic machine learning model selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xueqiang; Luo, Gang

    2017-12-01

    Machine learning is broadly used for clinical data analysis. Before training a model, a machine learning algorithm must be selected. Also, the values of one or more model parameters termed hyper-parameters must be set. Selecting algorithms and hyper-parameter values requires advanced machine learning knowledge and many labor-intensive manual iterations. To lower the bar to machine learning, miscellaneous automatic selection methods for algorithms and/or hyper-parameter values have been proposed. Existing automatic selection methods are inefficient on large data sets. This poses a challenge for using machine learning in the clinical big data era. To address the challenge, this paper presents progressive sampling-based Bayesian optimization, an efficient and automatic selection method for both algorithms and hyper-parameter values. We report an implementation of the method. We show that compared to a state of the art automatic selection method, our method can significantly reduce search time, classification error rate, and standard deviation of error rate due to randomization. This is major progress towards enabling fast turnaround in identifying high-quality solutions required by many machine learning-based clinical data analysis tasks.

  14. Maximum likelihood scaling (MALS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefsloot, Huub C. J.; Verouden, Maikel P. H.; Westerhuis, Johan A.; Smilde, Age K.

    2006-01-01

    A filtering procedure is introduced for multivariate data that does not suffer from noise amplification by scaling. A maximum likelihood principal component analysis (MLPCA) step is used as a filter that partly removes noise. This filtering can be used prior to any subsequent scaling and

  15. Automatic prediction of catalytic residues by modeling residue structural neighborhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passerini Andrea

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of catalytic residues is a major step in characterizing the function of enzymes. In its simpler formulation, the problem can be cast into a binary classification task at the residue level, by predicting whether the residue is directly involved in the catalytic process. The task is quite hard also when structural information is available, due to the rather wide range of roles a functional residue can play and to the large imbalance between the number of catalytic and non-catalytic residues. Results We developed an effective representation of structural information by modeling spherical regions around candidate residues, and extracting statistics on the properties of their content such as physico-chemical properties, atomic density, flexibility, presence of water molecules. We trained an SVM classifier combining our features with sequence-based information and previously developed 3D features, and compared its performance with the most recent state-of-the-art approaches on different benchmark datasets. We further analyzed the discriminant power of the information provided by the presence of heterogens in the residue neighborhood. Conclusions Our structure-based method achieves consistent improvements on all tested datasets over both sequence-based and structure-based state-of-the-art approaches. Structural neighborhood information is shown to be responsible for such results, and predicting the presence of nearby heterogens seems to be a promising direction for further improvements.

  16. Progress and applications of MCAM. Monte Carlo automatic modeling program for particle transport simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guozhong; Zhang Junjun; Xiong Jian

    2010-01-01

    MCAM (Monte Carlo Automatic Modeling program for particle transport simulation) was developed by FDS Team as a CAD based bi-directional interface program between general CAD systems and Monte Carlo particle transport simulation codes. The physics and material modeling and void space modeling functions were improved and the free form surfaces processing function was developed recently. The applications to the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) building model and FFHR (Force Free Helical Reactor) model have demonstrated the feasibility, effectiveness and maturity of MCAM latest version for nuclear applications with complex geometry. (author)

  17. GAUSSIAN MIXTURE MODELS FOR ADAPTATION OF DEEP NEURAL NETWORK ACOUSTIC MODELS IN AUTOMATIC SPEECH RECOGNITION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A. Tomashenko

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. We study speaker adaptation of deep neural network (DNN acoustic models in automatic speech recognition systems. The aim of speaker adaptation techniques is to improve the accuracy of the speech recognition system for a particular speaker. Method. A novel method for training and adaptation of deep neural network acoustic models has been developed. It is based on using an auxiliary GMM (Gaussian Mixture Models model and GMMD (GMM-derived features. The principle advantage of the proposed GMMD features is the possibility of performing the adaptation of a DNN through the adaptation of the auxiliary GMM. In the proposed approach any methods for the adaptation of the auxiliary GMM can be used, hence, it provides a universal method for transferring adaptation algorithms developed for GMMs to DNN adaptation.Main Results. The effectiveness of the proposed approach was shown by means of one of the most common adaptation algorithms for GMM models – MAP (Maximum A Posteriori adaptation. Different ways of integration of the proposed approach into state-of-the-art DNN architecture have been proposed and explored. Analysis of choosing the type of the auxiliary GMM model is given. Experimental results on the TED-LIUM corpus demonstrate that, in an unsupervised adaptation mode, the proposed adaptation technique can provide, approximately, a 11–18% relative word error reduction (WER on different adaptation sets, compared to the speaker-independent DNN system built on conventional features, and a 3–6% relative WER reduction compared to the SAT-DNN trained on fMLLR adapted features.

  18. A nonparametric random coefficient approach for life expectancy growth using a hierarchical mixture likelihood model with application to regional data from North Rhine-Westphalia (Germany).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhning, Dankmar; Karasek, Sarah; Terschüren, Claudia; Annuß, Rolf; Fehr, Rainer

    2013-03-09

    Life expectancy is of increasing prime interest for a variety of reasons. In many countries, life expectancy is growing linearly, without any indication of reaching a limit. The state of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW) in Germany with its 54 districts is considered here where the above mentioned growth in life expectancy is occurring as well. However, there is also empirical evidence that life expectancy is not growing linearly at the same level for different regions. To explore this situation further a likelihood-based cluster analysis is suggested and performed. The modelling uses a nonparametric mixture approach for the latent random effect. Maximum likelihood estimates are determined by means of the EM algorithm and the number of components in the mixture model are found on the basis of the Bayesian Information Criterion. Regions are classified into the mixture components (clusters) using the maximum posterior allocation rule. For the data analyzed here, 7 components are found with a spatial concentration of lower life expectancy levels in a centre of NRW, formerly an enormous conglomerate of heavy industry, still the most densely populated area with Gelsenkirchen having the lowest level of life expectancy growth for both genders. The paper offers some explanations for this fact including demographic and socio-economic sources. This case study shows that life expectancy growth is widely linear, but it might occur on different levels.

  19. Predictive Factors in Conflict: Assessing the Likelihood of a Preemptive Strike by Israel on Iran Using a Computer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Proliferation Treaty OSINT Open Source Intelligence SAFF Safing, Arming, Fuzing, Firing SIAM Situational Influence Assessment Module SME Subject...assisting with the framework for this venture during our influence modeling class. The thoughtful insight provided by the group when we first worked... framework for modeling conflict in general, the near-term objective is to produce a model that provides a simplistic input and a single output to

  20. Fully-automated fibroglandular tissue segmentation and volumetric density estimation in breast MRI by integrating a continuous max-flow model and a likelihood atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shandong; Weinstein, Susan P.; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2013-02-01

    Studies suggest that the relative amount of fibroglandular tissue in the breast as quantified in breast MRI can be predictive of the risk for developing breast cancer. Automated segmentation of the fibroglandular tissue from breast MRI data could therefore be an essential component in quantitative risk assessment. In this work we propose a new fullyautomated 3D segmentation algorithm, namely the continuous max-flow (CMF)-Atlas method, to estimate the volumetric amount of fibroglandular tissue in breast MRI. Our method goes through a first step of applying a continuous max-flow model in the MR image intensity space to produce an initial voxel-wise likelihood map of being fibroglandular tissue. Then we further incorporate an a-priori learned fibroglandular tissue likelihood atlas to refine the initial likelihood map to achieve enhanced segmentation, from which the relative (e.g., percent) volumetric amount of fibroglandular tissue (FT%) in the breast is computed. Our method is evaluated by a representative dataset of 16 3D bilateral breast MRI scans (32 breasts, 896 tomographic MR slices in total). A high correlation (r=0.95) is achieved in FT% estimation, and the overall averaged spatial segmentation agreement is 0.77 in terms of Dice's coefficient, between the automated segmentation and the manual segmentation obtained from an experienced breast imaging radiologist. The automated segmentation method also runs time-efficiently at ~1 minute for each 3D MR scan (56 slices), compared to ~15 minutes needed for manual segmentation. Our method can serve as an effective tool for processing large scale clinical breast MR datasets for quantitative fibroglandular tissue estimation.

  1. Automatic Multi-Scale Calibration Procedure for Nested Hydrological-Hydrogeological Regional Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labarthe, B.; Abasq, L.; Flipo, N.; de Fouquet, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    Large hydrosystem modelling and understanding is a complex process depending on regional and local processes. A nested interface concept has been implemented in the hydrosystem modelling platform for a large alluvial plain model (300 km2) part of a 11000 km2 multi-layer aquifer system, included in the Seine basin (65000 km2, France). The platform couples hydrological and hydrogeological processes through four spatially distributed modules (Mass balance, Unsaturated Zone, River and Groundwater). An automatic multi-scale calibration procedure is proposed. Using different data sets from regional scale (117 gauging stations and 183 piezometers over the 65000 km2) to the intermediate scale(dense past piezometric snapshot), it permits the calibration and homogenization of model parameters over scales.The stepwise procedure starts with the optimisation of the water mass balance parameters at regional scale using a conceptual 7 parameters bucket model coupled with the inverse modelling tool PEST. The multi-objective function is derived from river discharges and their de-composition by hydrograph separation. The separation is performed at each gauging station using an automatic procedure based one Chapman filter. Then, the model is run at the regional scale to provide recharge estimate and regional fluxes to the groundwater local model. Another inversion method is then used to determine the local hydrodynamic parameters. This procedure used an initial kriged transmissivity field which is successively updated until the simulated hydraulic head distribution equals a reference one obtained by krigging. Then, the local parameters are upscaled to the regional model by renormalisation procedure.This multi-scale automatic calibration procedure enhances both the local and regional processes representation. Indeed, it permits a better description of local heterogeneities and of the associated processes which are transposed into the regional model, improving the overall performances

  2. Automatic reconstruction of physiological gestures used in a model of birdsong production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boari, Santiago; Perl, Yonatan Sanz; Amador, Ana; Margoliash, Daniel; Mindlin, Gabriel B

    2015-11-01

    Highly coordinated learned behaviors are key to understanding neural processes integrating the body and the environment. Birdsong production is a widely studied example of such behavior in which numerous thoracic muscles control respiratory inspiration and expiration: the muscles of the syrinx control syringeal membrane tension, while upper vocal tract morphology controls resonances that modulate the vocal system output. All these muscles have to be coordinated in precise sequences to generate the elaborate vocalizations that characterize an individual's song. Previously we used a low-dimensional description of the biomechanics of birdsong production to investigate the associated neural codes, an approach that complements traditional spectrographic analysis. The prior study used algorithmic yet manual procedures to model singing behavior. In the present work, we present an automatic procedure to extract low-dimensional motor gestures that could predict vocal behavior. We recorded zebra finch songs and generated synthetic copies automatically, using a biomechanical model for the vocal apparatus and vocal tract. This dynamical model described song as a sequence of physiological parameters the birds control during singing. To validate this procedure, we recorded electrophysiological activity of the telencephalic nucleus HVC. HVC neurons were highly selective to the auditory presentation of the bird's own song (BOS) and gave similar selective responses to the automatically generated synthetic model of song (AUTO). Our results demonstrate meaningful dimensionality reduction in terms of physiological parameters that individual birds could actually control. Furthermore, this methodology can be extended to other vocal systems to study fine motor control. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Likelihood Inflating Sampling Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Entezari, Reihaneh; Craiu, Radu V.; Rosenthal, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling from a posterior distribution corresponding to a massive data set can be computationally prohibitive since producing one sample requires a number of operations that is linear in the data size. In this paper, we introduce a new communication-free parallel method, the Likelihood Inflating Sampling Algorithm (LISA), that significantly reduces computational costs by randomly splitting the dataset into smaller subsets and running MCMC methods independently ...

  4. LEARNING VECTOR QUANTIZATION FOR ADAPTED GAUSSIAN MIXTURE MODELS IN AUTOMATIC SPEAKER IDENTIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IMEN TRABELSI

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Speaker Identification (SI aims at automatically identifying an individual by extracting and processing information from his/her voice. Speaker voice is a robust a biometric modality that has a strong impact in several application areas. In this study, a new combination learning scheme has been proposed based on Gaussian mixture model-universal background model (GMM-UBM and Learning vector quantization (LVQ for automatic text-independent speaker identification. Features vectors, constituted by the Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCC extracted from the speech signal are used to train the New England subset of the TIMIT database. The best results obtained (90% for gender- independent speaker identification, 97 % for male speakers and 93% for female speakers for test data using 36 MFCC features.

  5. Estimating rate uncertainty with maximum likelihood: differences between power-law and flicker–random-walk models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, John O.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have documented that global positioning system (GPS) time series of position estimates have temporal correlations which have been modeled as a combination of power-law and white noise processes. When estimating quantities such as a constant rate from GPS time series data, the estimated uncertainties on these quantities are more realistic when using a noise model that includes temporal correlations than simply assuming temporally uncorrelated noise. However, the choice of the specific representation of correlated noise can affect the estimate of uncertainty. For many GPS time series, the background noise can be represented by either: (1) a sum of flicker and random-walk noise or, (2) as a power-law noise model that represents an average of the flicker and random-walk noise. For instance, if the underlying noise model is a combination of flicker and random-walk noise, then incorrectly choosing the power-law model could underestimate the rate uncertainty by a factor of two. Distinguishing between the two alternate noise models is difficult since the flicker component can dominate the assessment of the noise properties because it is spread over a significant portion of the measurable frequency band. But, although not necessarily detectable, the random-walk component can be a major constituent of the estimated rate uncertainty. None the less, it is possible to determine the upper bound on the random-walk noise.

  6. Grammar-based Automatic 3D Model Reconstruction from Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Q.; Helmholz, P.; Belton, D.; West, G.

    2014-04-01

    The automatic reconstruction of 3D buildings has been an important research topic during the last years. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to automatically reconstruct the 3D building models from segmented data based on pre-defined formal grammar and rules. Such segmented data can be extracted e.g. from terrestrial or mobile laser scanning devices. Two steps are considered in detail. The first step is to transform the segmented data into 3D shapes, for instance using the DXF (Drawing Exchange Format) format which is a CAD data file format used for data interchange between AutoCAD and other program. Second, we develop a formal grammar to describe the building model structure and integrate the pre-defined grammars into the reconstruction process. Depending on the different segmented data, the selected grammar and rules are applied to drive the reconstruction process in an automatic manner. Compared with other existing approaches, our proposed method allows the model reconstruction directly from 3D shapes and takes the whole building into account.

  7. GIS Data Based Automatic High-Fidelity 3D Road Network Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    3D road models are widely used in many computer applications such as racing games and driving simulations_ However, almost all high-fidelity 3D road models were generated manually by professional artists at the expense of intensive labor. There are very few existing methods for automatically generating 3D high-fidelity road networks, especially those existing in the real world. This paper presents a novel approach thai can automatically produce 3D high-fidelity road network models from real 2D road GIS data that mainly contain road. centerline in formation. The proposed method first builds parametric representations of the road centerlines through segmentation and fitting . A basic set of civil engineering rules (e.g., cross slope, superelevation, grade) for road design are then selected in order to generate realistic road surfaces in compliance with these rules. While the proposed method applies to any types of roads, this paper mainly addresses automatic generation of complex traffic interchanges and intersections which are the most sophisticated elements in the road networks

  8. Usefulness and limitations of dK random graph models to predict interactions and functional homogeneity in biological networks under a pseudo-likelihood parameter estimation approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luan Yihui

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many aspects of biological functions can be modeled by biological networks, such as protein interaction networks, metabolic networks, and gene coexpression networks. Studying the statistical properties of these networks in turn allows us to infer biological function. Complex statistical network models can potentially more accurately describe the networks, but it is not clear whether such complex models are better suited to find biologically meaningful subnetworks. Results Recent studies have shown that the degree distribution of the nodes is not an adequate statistic in many molecular networks. We sought to extend this statistic with 2nd and 3rd order degree correlations and developed a pseudo-likelihood approach to estimate the parameters. The approach was used to analyze the MIPS and BIOGRID yeast protein interaction networks, and two yeast coexpression networks. We showed that 2nd order degree correlation information gave better predictions of gene interactions in both protein interaction and gene coexpression networks. However, in the biologically important task of predicting functionally homogeneous modules, degree correlation information performs marginally better in the case of the MIPS and BIOGRID protein interaction networks, but worse in the case of gene coexpression networks. Conclusion Our use of dK models showed that incorporation of degree correlations could increase predictive power in some contexts, albeit sometimes marginally, but, in all contexts, the use of third-order degree correlations decreased accuracy. However, it is possible that other parameter estimation methods, such as maximum likelihood, will show the usefulness of incorporating 2nd and 3rd degree correlations in predicting functionally homogeneous modules.

  9. Data base structure and Management for Automatic Calculation of 210Pb Dating Methods Applying Different Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco, C.; Anton, M. P.; Ampudia, J.

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of macros in try calculation sheets allows the automatic application of various dating models using unsupported ''210 Pb data from a data base. The calculation books the contain the models have been modified to permit the implementation of these macros. The Marine and Aquatic Radioecology group of CIEMAT (MARG) will be involved in new European Projects, thus new models have been developed. This report contains a detailed description of: a) the new implement macros b) the design of a dating Menu in the calculation sheet and c) organization and structure of the data base. (Author) 4 refs

  10. A fast fiducial marker tracking model for fully automatic alignment in electron tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Renmin

    2017-10-20

    Automatic alignment, especially fiducial marker-based alignment, has become increasingly important due to the high demand of subtomogram averaging and the rapid development of large-field electron microscopy. Among the alignment steps, fiducial marker tracking is a crucial one that determines the quality of the final alignment. Yet, it is still a challenging problem to track the fiducial markers accurately and effectively in a fully automatic manner.In this paper, we propose a robust and efficient scheme for fiducial marker tracking. Firstly, we theoretically prove the upper bound of the transformation deviation of aligning the positions of fiducial markers on two micrographs by affine transformation. Secondly, we design an automatic algorithm based on the Gaussian mixture model to accelerate the procedure of fiducial marker tracking. Thirdly, we propose a divide-and-conquer strategy against lens distortions to ensure the reliability of our scheme. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt that theoretically relates the projection model with the tracking model. The real-world experimental results further support our theoretical bound and demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm. This work facilitates the fully automatic tracking for datasets with a massive number of fiducial markers.The C/C ++ source code that implements the fast fiducial marker tracking is available at https://github.com/icthrm/gmm-marker-tracking. Markerauto 1.6 version or later (also integrated in the AuTom platform at http://ear.ict.ac.cn/) offers a complete implementation for fast alignment, in which fast fiducial marker tracking is available by the

  11. A fast fiducial marker tracking model for fully automatic alignment in electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Renmin; Zhang, Fa; Gao, Xin

    2018-03-01

    Automatic alignment, especially fiducial marker-based alignment, has become increasingly important due to the high demand of subtomogram averaging and the rapid development of large-field electron microscopy. Among the alignment steps, fiducial marker tracking is a crucial one that determines the quality of the final alignment. Yet, it is still a challenging problem to track the fiducial markers accurately and effectively in a fully automatic manner. In this paper, we propose a robust and efficient scheme for fiducial marker tracking. Firstly, we theoretically prove the upper bound of the transformation deviation of aligning the positions of fiducial markers on two micrographs by affine transformation. Secondly, we design an automatic algorithm based on the Gaussian mixture model to accelerate the procedure of fiducial marker tracking. Thirdly, we propose a divide-and-conquer strategy against lens distortions to ensure the reliability of our scheme. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt that theoretically relates the projection model with the tracking model. The real-world experimental results further support our theoretical bound and demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm. This work facilitates the fully automatic tracking for datasets with a massive number of fiducial markers. The C/C ++ source code that implements the fast fiducial marker tracking is available at https://github.com/icthrm/gmm-marker-tracking. Markerauto 1.6 version or later (also integrated in the AuTom platform at http://ear.ict.ac.cn/) offers a complete implementation for fast alignment, in which fast fiducial marker tracking is available by the '-t' option. xin.gao@kaust.edu.sa. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. A formal likelihood function for parameter and predictive inference of hydrologic models with correlated, heteroscedastic, and non-Gaussian errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoups, G.; Vrugt, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Estimation of parameter and predictive uncertainty of hydrologic models has traditionally relied on several simplifying assumptions. Residual errors are often assumed to be independent and to be adequately described by a Gaussian probability distribution with a mean of zero and a constant variance.

  13. GEM System: automatic prototyping of cell-wide metabolic pathway models from genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakayama Yoichi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful realization of a "systems biology" approach to analyzing cells is a grand challenge for our understanding of life. However, current modeling approaches to cell simulation are labor-intensive, manual affairs, and therefore constitute a major bottleneck in the evolution of computational cell biology. Results We developed the Genome-based Modeling (GEM System for the purpose of automatically prototyping simulation models of cell-wide metabolic pathways from genome sequences and other public biological information. Models generated by the GEM System include an entire Escherichia coli metabolism model comprising 968 reactions of 1195 metabolites, achieving 100% coverage when compared with the KEGG database, 92.38% with the EcoCyc database, and 95.06% with iJR904 genome-scale model. Conclusion The GEM System prototypes qualitative models to reduce the labor-intensive tasks required for systems biology research. Models of over 90 bacterial genomes are available at our web site.

  14. Automaticity in acute ischemia: Bifurcation analysis of a human ventricular model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Sylvain; Jacquemet, Vincent; Vinet, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Acute ischemia (restriction in blood supply to part of the heart as a result of myocardial infarction) induces major changes in the electrophysiological properties of the ventricular tissue. Extracellular potassium concentration ([Ko+]) increases in the ischemic zone, leading to an elevation of the resting membrane potential that creates an “injury current” (IS) between the infarcted and the healthy zone. In addition, the lack of oxygen impairs the metabolic activity of the myocytes and decreases ATP production, thereby affecting ATP-sensitive potassium channels (IKatp). Frequent complications of myocardial infarction are tachycardia, fibrillation, and sudden cardiac death, but the mechanisms underlying their initiation are still debated. One hypothesis is that these arrhythmias may be triggered by abnormal automaticity. We investigated the effect of ischemia on myocyte automaticity by performing a comprehensive bifurcation analysis (fixed points, cycles, and their stability) of a human ventricular myocyte model [K. H. W. J. ten Tusscher and A. V. Panfilov, Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.AJPHAP0363-613510.1152/ajpheart.00109.2006 291, H1088 (2006)] as a function of three ischemia-relevant parameters [Ko+], IS, and IKatp. In this single-cell model, we found that automatic activity was possible only in the presence of an injury current. Changes in [Ko+] and IKatp significantly altered the bifurcation structure of IS, including the occurrence of early-after depolarization. The results provide a sound basis for studying higher-dimensional tissue structures representing an ischemic heart.

  15. APPROACH FOR THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC VERIFICATION OF 3D BUILDING MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Helmholz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the field of spatial sciences, there are a large number of disciplines and techniques for capturing data to solve a variety of different tasks and problems for different applications. Examples include: traditional survey for boundary definitions, aerial imagery for building models, and laser scanning for heritage facades. These techniques have different attributes such as the number of dimensions, accuracy and precision, and the format of the data. However, because of the number of applications and jobs, often over time these data sets captured from different sensor platforms and for different purposes will overlap in some way. In most cases, while this data is archived, it is not used in future applications to value add to the data capture campaign of current projects. It is also the case that newly acquire data are often not used to combine and improve existing models and data integrity. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a methodology and infrastructure to automatically support this concept. That is, based on a job specification, to automatically query existing and newly acquired data based on temporal and spatial relations, and to automatically combine and generate the best solution. To this end, there are three main challenges to examine; change detection, thematic accuracy and data matching.

  16. New semi-automatic ROI setting system for brain PET images based on elastic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanizaki, Naoaki; Okamura, Tetsuya (Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd., Kanagawa (Japan). Research and Development Center); Senda, Michio; Toyama, Hinako; Ishii, Kenji

    1994-10-01

    We have developed a semi-automatic ROI setting system for brain PET images. It is based on the elastic network model that fits the standard ROI atlas into individual brain image. The standard ROI atlas is a set of segments that represent each anatomical region. For transformation, the operator needs to set only three kinds of district anatomical features: manually determined midsagittal line, brain contour line determined with SNAKES algorithm semi-automatically, a few manually determined specific ROIs to be used for exact transformation. Improvement of the operation time and the inter-operator variance were demonstrated in the experiment by comparing with the conventional manual ROI setting. The operation time was reduced to 50% in almost all cases. And the inter-operator variance was reduced to one seventh in the maximum case. (author).

  17. An automatic rat brain extraction method based on a deformable surface model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiehua; Liu, Xiaofeng; Zhuo, Jiachen; Gullapalli, Rao P; Zara, Jason M

    2013-08-15

    The extraction of the brain from the skull in medical images is a necessary first step before image registration or segmentation. While pre-clinical MR imaging studies on small animals, such as rats, are increasing, fully automatic imaging processing techniques specific to small animal studies remain lacking. In this paper, we present an automatic rat brain extraction method, the Rat Brain Deformable model method (RBD), which adapts the popular human brain extraction tool (BET) through the incorporation of information on the brain geometry and MR image characteristics of the rat brain. The robustness of the method was demonstrated on T2-weighted MR images of 64 rats and compared with other brain extraction methods (BET, PCNN, PCNN-3D). The results demonstrate that RBD reliably extracts the rat brain with high accuracy (>92% volume overlap) and is robust against signal inhomogeneity in the images. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Modeling and monitoring of pipelines and networks advanced tools for automatic monitoring and supervision of pipelines

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, Lizeth

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the analysis and design of advanced techniques for on-line automatic computational monitoring of pipelines and pipe networks. It discusses how to improve the systems’ security considering mathematical models of the flow, historical flow rate and pressure data, with the main goal of reducing the number of sensors installed along a pipeline. The techniques presented in the book have been implemented in digital systems to enhance the abilities of the pipeline network’s operators in recognizing anomalies. A real leak scenario in a Mexican water pipeline is used to illustrate the benefits of these techniques in locating the position of a leak. Intended for an interdisciplinary audience, the book addresses researchers and professionals in the areas of mechanical, civil and control engineering. It covers topics on fluid mechanics, instrumentation, automatic control, signal processing, computing, construction and diagnostic technologies.

  19. Reliability modelling of redundant safety systems without automatic diagnostics incorporating common cause failures and process demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Siamak; Sriramula, Srinivas

    2017-11-01

    Redundant safety systems are commonly used in the process industry to respond to hazardous events. In redundant systems composed of identical units, Common Cause Failures (CCFs) can significantly influence system performance with regards to reliability and safety. However, their impact has been overlooked due to the inherent complexity of modelling common cause induced failures. This article develops a reliability model for a redundant safety system using Markov analysis approach. The proposed model incorporates process demands in conjunction with CCF for the first time and evaluates their impacts on the reliability quantification of safety systems without automatic diagnostics. The reliability of the Markov model is quantified by considering the Probability of Failure on Demand (PFD) as a measure for low demand systems. The safety performance of the model is analysed using Hazardous Event Frequency (HEF) to evaluate the frequency of entering a hazardous state that will lead to an accident if the situation is not controlled. The utilisation of Markov model for a simple case study of a pressure protection system is demonstrated and it is shown that the proposed approach gives a sufficiently accurate result for all demand rates, durations, component failure rates and corresponding repair rates for low demand mode of operation. The Markov model proposed in this paper assumes the absence of automatic diagnostics, along with multiple stage repair strategy for CCFs and restoration of the system from hazardous state to the "as good as new" state. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Automatic Generation of Cycle-Approximate TLMs with Timed RTOS Model Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yonghyun; Schirner, Gunar; Abdi, Samar

    This paper presents a technique for automatically generating cycle-approximate transaction level models (TLMs) for multi-process applications mapped to embedded platforms. It incorporates three key features: (a) basic block level timing annotation, (b) RTOS model integration, and (c) RTOS overhead delay modeling. The inputs to TLM generation are application C processes and their mapping to processors in the platform. A processor data model, including pipelined datapath, memory hierarchy and branch delay model is used to estimate basic block execution delays. The delays are annotated to the C code, which is then integrated with a generated SystemC RTOS model. Our abstract RTOS provides dynamic scheduling and inter-process communication (IPC) with processor- and RTOS-specific pre-characterized timing. Our experiments using a MP3 decoder and a JPEG encoder show that timed TLMs, with integrated RTOS models, can be automatically generated in less than a minute. Our generated TLMs simulated three times faster than real-time and showed less than 10% timing error compared to board measurements.

  1. Automatic creation of Markov models for reliability assessment of safety instrumented systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Haitao; Yang Xianhui

    2008-01-01

    After the release of new international functional safety standards like IEC 61508, people care more for the safety and availability of safety instrumented systems. Markov analysis is a powerful and flexible technique to assess the reliability measurements of safety instrumented systems, but it is fallible and time-consuming to create Markov models manually. This paper presents a new technique to automatically create Markov models for reliability assessment of safety instrumented systems. Many safety related factors, such as failure modes, self-diagnostic, restorations, common cause and voting, are included in Markov models. A framework is generated first based on voting, failure modes and self-diagnostic. Then, repairs and common-cause failures are incorporated into the framework to build a complete Markov model. Eventual simplification of Markov models can be done by state merging. Examples given in this paper show how explosively the size of Markov model increases as the system becomes a little more complicated as well as the advancement of automatic creation of Markov models

  2. The impact of risk-averse operation on the likelihood of extreme events in a simple model of infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, B. A.; Newman, D. E.; Dobson, Ian; Zeidenberg, Matthew

    2009-12-01

    A simple dynamic model of agent operation of an infrastructure system is presented. This system evolves over a long time scale by a daily increase in consumer demand that raises the overall load on the system and an engineering response to failures that involves upgrading of the components. The system is controlled by adjusting the upgrading rate of the components and the replacement time of the components. Two agents operate the system. Their behavior is characterized by their risk-averse and risk-taking attitudes while operating the system, their response to large events, and the effect of learning time on adapting to new conditions. A risk-averse operation causes a reduction in the frequency of failures and in the number of failures per unit time. However, risk aversion brings an increase in the probability of extreme events.

  3. Performance of Lynch syndrome predictive models in quantifying the likelihood of germline mutations in patients with abnormal MLH1 immunoexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabreira, Verónica; Pinto, Carla; Pinheiro, Manuela; Lopes, Paula; Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Veiga, Isabel; Rocha, Patrícia; Pinto, Pedro; Henrique, Rui; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2017-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) accounts for up to 4 % of all colorectal cancers (CRC). Detection of a pathogenic germline mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes is the definitive criterion for LS diagnosis, but it is time-consuming and expensive. Immunohistochemistry is the most sensitive prescreening test and its predictive value is very high for loss of expression of MSH2, MSH6, and (isolated) PMS2, but not for MLH1. We evaluated if LS predictive models have a role to improve the molecular testing algorithm in this specific setting by studying 38 individuals referred for molecular testing and who were subsequently shown to have loss of MLH1 immunoexpression in their tumors. For each proband we calculated a risk score, which represents the probability that the patient with CRC carries a pathogenic MLH1 germline mutation, using the PREMM 1,2,6 and MMRpro predictive models. Of the 38 individuals, 18.4 % had a pathogenic MLH1 germline mutation. MMRpro performed better for the purpose of this study, presenting a AUC of 0.83 (95 % CI 0.67-0.9; P < 0.001) compared with a AUC of 0.68 (95 % CI 0.51-0.82, P = 0.09) for PREMM 1,2,6 . Considering a threshold of 5 %, MMRpro would eliminate unnecessary germline mutation analysis in a significant proportion of cases while keeping very high sensitivity. We conclude that MMRpro is useful to correctly predict who should be screened for a germline MLH1 gene mutation and propose an algorithm to improve the cost-effectiveness of LS diagnosis.

  4. Automatic Assessment of Craniofacial Growth in a Mouse Model of Crouzon Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Signe Strann; Larsen, Rasmus; Darvann, Tron Andre

    2009-01-01

    -rigid volumetric image registration was applied to micro-CT scans of ten 4-week and twenty 6-week euthanized mice for growth modeling. Each age group consisted of 50% normal and 50% Crouzon mice. Four 3D mean shapes, one for each mouse-type and age group were created. Extracting a dense field of growth vectors...... a tool for spatially detailed automatic phenotyping. MAIN OBJECTIVES OF PRESENTATION: We will present a 3D growth model of normal and Crouzon mice, and differences will be statistically and visually compared....

  5. Likelihood estimators for multivariate extremes

    KAUST Repository

    Huser, Raphaël

    2015-11-17

    The main approach to inference for multivariate extremes consists in approximating the joint upper tail of the observations by a parametric family arising in the limit for extreme events. The latter may be expressed in terms of componentwise maxima, high threshold exceedances or point processes, yielding different but related asymptotic characterizations and estimators. The present paper clarifies the connections between the main likelihood estimators, and assesses their practical performance. We investigate their ability to estimate the extremal dependence structure and to predict future extremes, using exact calculations and simulation, in the case of the logistic model.

  6. Development of the Automatic Modeling System for Reaction Mechanisms Using REX+JGG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takahiro; Kawai, Kohei; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Ema, Yoshinori

    The identification of appropriate reaction models is very helpful for developing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. In this study, we developed an automatic modeling system that analyzes experimental data on the cross- sectional shapes of films deposited on substrates with nanometer- or micrometer-sized trenches. The system then identifies a suitable reaction model to describe the film deposition. The inference engine used by the system to model the reaction mechanism was designed using real-coded genetic algorithms (RCGAs): a generation alternation model named "just generation gap" (JGG) and a real-coded crossover named "real-coded ensemble crossover" (REX). We studied the effect of REX+JGG on the system's performance, and found that the system with REX+JGG was the most accurate and reliable at model identification among the algorithms that we studied.

  7. AUTOMATIC TEXTURE RECONSTRUCTION OF 3D CITY MODEL FROM OBLIQUE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the photorealistic 3D city models are increasingly important in various geospatial applications related to virtual city tourism, 3D GIS, urban planning, real-estate management. Besides the acquisition of high-precision 3D geometric data, texture reconstruction is also a crucial step for generating high-quality and visually realistic 3D models. However, most of the texture reconstruction approaches are probably leading to texture fragmentation and memory inefficiency. In this paper, we introduce an automatic framework of texture reconstruction to generate textures from oblique images for photorealistic visualization. Our approach include three major steps as follows: mesh parameterization, texture atlas generation and texture blending. Firstly, mesh parameterization procedure referring to mesh segmentation and mesh unfolding is performed to reduce geometric distortion in the process of mapping 2D texture to 3D model. Secondly, in the texture atlas generation step, the texture of each segmented region in texture domain is reconstructed from all visible images with exterior orientation and interior orientation parameters. Thirdly, to avoid color discontinuities at boundaries between texture regions, the final texture map is generated by blending texture maps from several corresponding images. We evaluated our texture reconstruction framework on a dataset of a city. The resulting mesh model can get textured by created texture without resampling. Experiment results show that our method can effectively mitigate the occurrence of texture fragmentation. It is demonstrated that the proposed framework is effective and useful for automatic texture reconstruction of 3D city model.

  8. Automatic Texture Reconstruction of 3d City Model from Oblique Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Junhua; Deng, Fei; Li, Xinwei; Wan, Fang

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, the photorealistic 3D city models are increasingly important in various geospatial applications related to virtual city tourism, 3D GIS, urban planning, real-estate management. Besides the acquisition of high-precision 3D geometric data, texture reconstruction is also a crucial step for generating high-quality and visually realistic 3D models. However, most of the texture reconstruction approaches are probably leading to texture fragmentation and memory inefficiency. In this paper, we introduce an automatic framework of texture reconstruction to generate textures from oblique images for photorealistic visualization. Our approach include three major steps as follows: mesh parameterization, texture atlas generation and texture blending. Firstly, mesh parameterization procedure referring to mesh segmentation and mesh unfolding is performed to reduce geometric distortion in the process of mapping 2D texture to 3D model. Secondly, in the texture atlas generation step, the texture of each segmented region in texture domain is reconstructed from all visible images with exterior orientation and interior orientation parameters. Thirdly, to avoid color discontinuities at boundaries between texture regions, the final texture map is generated by blending texture maps from several corresponding images. We evaluated our texture reconstruction framework on a dataset of a city. The resulting mesh model can get textured by created texture without resampling. Experiment results show that our method can effectively mitigate the occurrence of texture fragmentation. It is demonstrated that the proposed framework is effective and useful for automatic texture reconstruction of 3D city model.

  9. Automatic geometric modeling, mesh generation and FE analysis for pipelines with idealized defects and arbitrary location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, R.S.; Afonso, S.M.B.; Willmersdorf, R.B.; Lyra, P.R.M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Cabral, H.L.D. [TRANSPETRO, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Andrade, E.Q. [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Although the Finite Element Method (FEM) has proved to be a powerful tool to predict the failure pressure of corroded pipes, the generation of good computational models of pipes with corrosion defects can take several days. This makes the use of computational simulation procedure difficult to apply in practice. The main purpose of this work is to develop a set of computational tools to produce automatically models of pipes with defects, ready to be analyzed with commercial FEM programs, starting from a few parameters that locate and provide the main dimensions of the defect or a series of defects. Here these defects can be internal and external and also assume general spatial locations along the pipe. Idealized rectangular and elliptic geometries can be generated. These tools were based on MSC.PATRAN pre and post-processing programs and were written with PCL (Patran Command Language). The program for the automatic generation of models (PIPEFLAW) has a simplified and customized graphical interface, so that an engineer with basic notions of computational simulation with the FEM can generate rapidly models that result in precise and reliable simulations. Some examples of models of pipes with defects generated by the PIPEFLAW system are shown, and the results of numerical analyses, done with the tools presented in this work, are compared with, empiric results. (author)

  10. Development of an Algorithm for Automatic Analysis of the Impedance Spectrum Based on a Measurement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Tohru S.

    2018-03-01

    A new algorithm for the automatic estimation of an equivalent circuit and the subsequent parameter optimization is developed by combining the data-mining concept and complex least-squares method. In this algorithm, the program generates an initial equivalent-circuit model based on the sampling data and then attempts to optimize the parameters. The basic hypothesis is that the measured impedance spectrum can be reproduced by the sum of the partial-impedance spectra presented by the resistor, inductor, resistor connected in parallel to a capacitor, and resistor connected in parallel to an inductor. The adequacy of the model is determined by using a simple artificial-intelligence function, which is applied to the output function of the Levenberg-Marquardt module. From the iteration of model modifications, the program finds an adequate equivalent-circuit model without any user input to the equivalent-circuit model.

  11. Automatic reasoning for geometric constraints in 3D city models with uncertain observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch-Dehbi, Sandra; Plümer, Lutz

    This paper presents a novel approach to automated geometric reasoning for 3D building models. Geometric constraints like orthogonality or parallelity play a prominent role in man-made objects such as buildings. Thus, constraint based modelling, that specifies buildings by their individual components and the constraints between them, is a common approach in 3D city models. Since prototyped building models allow one to incorporate a priori knowledge they support the 3D reconstruction of buildings from point clouds and allow the construction of virtual cities. However, high level building models have a high degree of complexity and consequently are not easily manageable. Interactive tools are needed which facilitate the development of consistent models that, for instance, do not entail internal logical contradictions. Furthermore, there is often an interest in a compact, redundancy-free representation. We propose an approach that uses algebraic methods to prove that a constraint is deducible from a set of premises. While automated reasoning in 2D models is practical, a substantial increase in complexity can be observed in the transition to the three-dimensional space. Apart from that, algebraic theorem provers are restricted to crisp constraints so far. Thus, they are unable to handle quality issues, which are, however, an important aspect of GIS data and models. In this article we present an approach to automatic 3D reasoning which explicitly addresses uncertainty. Hereby, our aim is to support the interactive modelling of 3D city models and the automatic reconstruction of buildings. Geometric constraints are represented by multivariate polynomials whereas algebraic reasoning is based on Wu's method of pseudodivision and characteristic sets. The reasoning process is further supported by logical inference rules. In order to cope with uncertainty and to address quality issues the reasoner integrates uncertain projective geometry and statistical hypothesis tests

  12. USING AFFORDABLE DATA CAPTURING DEVICES FOR AUTOMATIC 3D CITY MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Alizadehashrafi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this research project, many movies from UTM Kolej 9, Skudai, Johor Bahru (See Figure 1 were taken by AR. Drone 2. Since the AR drone 2.0 has liquid lens, while flying there were significant distortions and deformations on the converted pictures of the movies. Passive remote sensing (RS applications based on image matching and Epipolar lines such as Agisoft PhotoScan have been tested to create the point clouds and mesh along with 3D models and textures. As the result was not acceptable (See Figure 2, the previous Dynamic Pulse Function based on Ruby programming language were enhanced and utilized to create the 3D models automatically in LoD3. The accuracy of the final 3D model is almost 10 to 20 cm. After rectification and parallel projection of the photos based on some tie points and targets, all the parameters were measured and utilized as an input to the system to create the 3D model automatically in LoD3 in a very high accuracy.

  13. A 6D CAD Model for the Automatic Assessment of Building Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Yung

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Current building assessment methods limit themselves in their environmental impact by failing to consider the other two aspects of sustainability: the economic and the social. They tend to be complex and costly to run, and therefore are of limited value in comparing design options. This paper proposes and develops a model for the automatic assessment of a building's sustainability life cycle with the building information modelling (BIM approach and its enabling technologies. A 6D CAD model is developed which could be used as a design aid instead of as a post-construction evaluation tool. 6D CAD includes 3D design as well as a fourth dimension (schedule, a fifth dimension (cost and a sixth dimension (sustainability. The model can automatically derive quantities (5D, calculate economic (5D and 6D, environmental and social impacts (6D, and evaluate the sustainability performance of alternative design options. The sustainability assessment covers the life cycle stages of a building, namely material production, construction, operation, maintenance, demolition and disposal.

  14. Using Affordable Data Capturing Devices for Automatic 3d City Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadehashrafi, B.; Abdul-Rahman, A.

    2017-11-01

    In this research project, many movies from UTM Kolej 9, Skudai, Johor Bahru (See Figure 1) were taken by AR. Drone 2. Since the AR drone 2.0 has liquid lens, while flying there were significant distortions and deformations on the converted pictures of the movies. Passive remote sensing (RS) applications based on image matching and Epipolar lines such as Agisoft PhotoScan have been tested to create the point clouds and mesh along with 3D models and textures. As the result was not acceptable (See Figure 2), the previous Dynamic Pulse Function based on Ruby programming language were enhanced and utilized to create the 3D models automatically in LoD3. The accuracy of the final 3D model is almost 10 to 20 cm. After rectification and parallel projection of the photos based on some tie points and targets, all the parameters were measured and utilized as an input to the system to create the 3D model automatically in LoD3 in a very high accuracy.

  15. CT-based patient modeling for head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: Manual versus automatic normal-tissue-segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaart, René F.; Fortunati, Valerio; Verduijn, Gerda M.; Walsum, Theo van; Veenland, Jifke F.; Paulides, Margarethus M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Clinical trials have shown that hyperthermia, as adjuvant to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, improves treatment of patients with locally advanced or recurrent head and neck (H and N) carcinoma. Hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) guided H and N hyperthermia is being investigated, which requires patient specific 3D patient models derived from Computed Tomography (CT)-images. To decide whether a recently developed automatic-segmentation algorithm can be introduced in the clinic, we compared the impact of manual- and automatic normal-tissue-segmentation variations on HTP quality. Material and methods: CT images of seven patients were segmented automatically and manually by four observers, to study inter-observer and intra-observer geometrical variation. To determine the impact of this variation on HTP quality, HTP was performed using the automatic and manual segmentation of each observer, for each patient. This impact was compared to other sources of patient model uncertainties, i.e. varying gridsizes and dielectric tissue properties. Results: Despite geometrical variations, manual and automatic generated 3D patient models resulted in an equal, i.e. 1%, variation in HTP quality. This variation was minor with respect to the total of other sources of patient model uncertainties, i.e. 11.7%. Conclusions: Automatically generated 3D patient models can be introduced in the clinic for H and N HTP

  16. A note on the relationships between multiple imputation, maximum likelihood and fully Bayesian methods for missing responses in linear regression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingxia; Ibrahim, Joseph G

    2014-07-01

    Multiple Imputation, Maximum Likelihood and Fully Bayesian methods are the three most commonly used model-based approaches in missing data problems. Although it is easy to show that when the responses are missing at random (MAR), the complete case analysis is unbiased and efficient, the aforementioned methods are still commonly used in practice for this setting. To examine the performance of and relationships between these three methods in this setting, we derive and investigate small sample and asymptotic expressions of the estimates and standard errors, and fully examine how these estimates are related for the three approaches in the linear regression model when the responses are MAR. We show that when the responses are MAR in the linear model, the estimates of the regression coefficients using these three methods are asymptotically equivalent to the complete case estimates under general conditions. One simulation and a real data set from a liver cancer clinical trial are given to compare the properties of these methods when the responses are MAR.

  17. Automatic Method for Building Indoor Boundary Models from Dense Point Clouds Collected by Laser Scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Valero

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a method that automatically yields Boundary Representation Models (B-rep for indoors after processing dense point clouds collected by laser scanners from key locations through an existing facility. Our objective is particularly focused on providing single models which contain the shape, location and relationship of primitive structural elements of inhabited scenarios such as walls, ceilings and floors. We propose a discretization of the space in order to accurately segment the 3D data and generate complete B-rep models of indoors in which faces, edges and vertices are coherently connected. The approach has been tested in real scenarios with data coming from laser scanners yielding promising results. We have deeply evaluated the results by analyzing how reliably these elements can be detected and how accurately they are modeled.

  18. A Model for Semi-Automatic Composition of Educational Content from Open Repositories of Learning Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Andrea Rodríguez Marín

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Learning objects (LOs repositories are important in building educational content and should allow search, retrieval and composition processes to be successfully developed to reach educational goals. However, such processes require so much time-consuming and not always provide the desired results. Thus, the aim of this paper is to propose a model for the semiautomatic composition of LOs, which are automatically recovered from open repositories. For the development of model, various text similarity measures are discussed, while for calibration and validation some comparison experiments were performed using the results obtained by teachers. Experimental results show that when using a value of k (number of LOs selected of at least 3, the percentage of similarities between the model and such made by experts exceeds 75%. To conclude, it can be established that the model proposed allows teachers to save time and effort for LOs selection by performing a pre-filter process.

  19. Automatic Assessment of Craniofacial Growth in a Mouse Model of Crouzon Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Signe Strann; Larsen, Rasmus; Darvann, Tron Andre

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND & PURPOSE: Crouzon syndrome is characterized by growth disturbances caused by premature craniosynostosis. A mouse model with mutation Fgfr2C342Y, equivalent to the most common Crouzon syndrome mutation (henceforth called the Crouzon mouse model), has a phenotype showing many parallels...... to the human counterpart. Quantifying growth in the Crouzon mouse model could test hypotheses of the relationship between craniosynostosis and dysmorphology, leading to better understanding of the causes of Crouzon syndrome as well as providing knowledge relevant for surgery planning. METHODS: Automatic non......-rigid volumetric image registration was applied to micro-CT scans of ten 4-week and twenty 6-week euthanized mice for growth modeling. Each age group consisted of 50% normal and 50% Crouzon mice. Four 3D mean shapes, one for each mouse-type and age group were created. Extracting a dense field of growth vectors...

  20. A mathematical model of an automatic assembler to stack fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, R.G.; Joynes, R.; Bretzlaff, C.I.

    1980-11-01

    Fuel elements for CANDU reactors are assembled from stacks of cylindrical UO 2 pellets, with close tolerances on lengths and diameters. Present stacking techniques involve extensive manual operations and they can be speeded up and reduced in cost by an automated device. If gamma-active fuel is handled such a device is essential. An automatic fuel pellet assembly process was modelled mathematically. The model indicated a suitable sequence of pellet manipulations to arrive at a stack length that was always within tolerance. This sequence was used as the inital input for the design of mechanical hardware. The mechanical design and the refinement of the mathematical model proceeded simultaneously. Mechanical constraints were allowed for in the model, and its optimized sequence of operations was incorporated in a microcomputer program to control the mechanical hardware. (auth)

  1. Automatic Method for Building Indoor Boundary Models from Dense Point Clouds Collected by Laser Scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Enrique; Adán, Antonio; Cerrada, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a method that automatically yields Boundary Representation Models (B-rep) for indoors after processing dense point clouds collected by laser scanners from key locations through an existing facility. Our objective is particularly focused on providing single models which contain the shape, location and relationship of primitive structural elements of inhabited scenarios such as walls, ceilings and floors. We propose a discretization of the space in order to accurately segment the 3D data and generate complete B-rep models of indoors in which faces, edges and vertices are coherently connected. The approach has been tested in real scenarios with data coming from laser scanners yielding promising results. We have deeply evaluated the results by analyzing how reliably these elements can be detected and how accurately they are modeled. PMID:23443369

  2. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF THE UNPUT DEVICES IN AUTOMATIC LOCOMOTIVE SIGNALING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Gololobova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To examine the operation of the automatic locomotive signaling system (ALS, to find out the influence of external factors on the devices operation and the quality of the code information derived from track circuit information, as well as to enable modeling of failure occurrences that may appear during operation. Methodology. To achieve this purpose, the main obstacles in ALS operation and the reasons for their occurrence were considered and the system structure principle was researched. The mathematical model for input equipment of the continuous automatic locomotive signaling system (ALS with the number coding was developed. It was designed taking into account all the types of code signals “R”, “Y”, “RY” and equivalent scheme of replacing the filter with a frequency of 50 Hz. Findings. The operation of ALSN with a signal current frequency of 50 Hz was examined. The adequate mathematical model of input equipment of ALS with a frequency of 50 Hz was developed. Originality. The computer model of input equipment of ALS system in the environment of MATLAB+Simulink was developed. The results of the computer modeling on the outlet of the filter during delivering every type of code combination were given in the article. Practical value. With the use of developed mathematical model of ALS system operation we have an opportunity to study, research and determine behavior of the circuit during the normal operation mode and failure occurrences. Also there is a possibility to develop and apply different scheme decisions in modeling environment MATLAB+Simulink for reducing the influence of obstacles on the functional capability of ALS and to model the occurrence of possible difficulties.

  3. A chest-shape target automatic detection method based on Deformable Part Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mo; Jin, Weiqi; Li, Li

    2016-10-01

    Automatic weapon platform is one of the important research directions at domestic and overseas, it needs to accomplish fast searching for the object to be shot under complex background. Therefore, fast detection for given target is the foundation of further task. Considering that chest-shape target is common target of shoot practice, this paper treats chestshape target as the target and studies target automatic detection method based on Deformable Part Models. The algorithm computes Histograms of Oriented Gradient(HOG) features of the target and trains a model using Latent variable Support Vector Machine(SVM); In this model, target image is divided into several parts then we can obtain foot filter and part filters; Finally, the algorithm detects the target at the HOG features pyramid with method of sliding window. The running time of extracting HOG pyramid with lookup table can be shorten by 36%. The result indicates that this algorithm can detect the chest-shape target in natural environments indoors or outdoors. The true positive rate of detection reaches 76% with many hard samples, and the false positive rate approaches 0. Running on a PC (Intel(R)Core(TM) i5-4200H CPU) with C++ language, the detection time of images with the resolution of 640 × 480 is 2.093s. According to TI company run library about image pyramid and convolution for DM642 and other hardware, our detection algorithm is expected to be implemented on hardware platform, and it has application prospect in actual system.

  4. Semi-automatic registration of 3D orthodontics models from photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destrez, Raphaël.; Treuillet, Sylvie; Lucas, Yves; Albouy-Kissi, Benjamin

    2013-03-01

    In orthodontics, a common practice used to diagnose and plan the treatment is the dental cast. After digitization by a CT-scan or a laser scanner, the obtained 3D surface models can feed orthodontics numerical tools for computer-aided diagnosis and treatment planning. One of the pre-processing critical steps is the 3D registration of dental arches to obtain the occlusion of these numerical models. For this task, we propose a vision based method to automatically compute the registration based on photos of patient mouth. From a set of matched singular points between two photos and the dental 3D models, the rigid transformation to apply to the mandible to be in contact with the maxillary may be computed by minimizing the reprojection errors. During a precedent study, we established the feasibility of this visual registration approach with a manual selection of singular points. This paper addresses the issue of automatic point detection. Based on a priori knowledge, histogram thresholding and edge detection are used to extract specific points in 2D images. Concurrently, curvatures information detects 3D corresponding points. To improve the quality of the final registration, we also introduce a combined optimization of the projection matrix with the 2D/3D point positions. These new developments are evaluated on real data by considering the reprojection errors and the deviation angles after registration in respect to the manual reference occlusion realized by a specialist.

  5. A new approach for automatic control modeling, analysis and design in fully fuzzy environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa Ibrahim Gabr

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new approach for the modeling, analysis and design of automatic control systems in fully fuzzy environment based on the normalized fuzzy matrices. The approach is also suitable for determining the propagation of fuzziness in automatic control and dynamical systems where all system coefficients are expressed as fuzzy parameters. A new consolidity chart is suggested based on the recently newly developed system consolidity index for testing the susceptibility of the system to withstand changes due to any system or input parameters changes effects. Implementation procedures are elaborated for the consolidity analysis of existing control systems and the design of new ones, including systems comparisons based on such implementation consolidity results. Application of the proposed methodology is demonstrated through illustrative examples, covering fuzzy impulse response of systems, fuzzy Routh–Hurwitz stability criteria, fuzzy controllability and observability. Moreover, the use of the consolidity chart for the appropriate design of control system is elaborated through handling the stabilization of inverted pendulum through pole placement technique. It is also shown that the regions comparison in consolidity chart is based on type of consolidity region shape such as elliptical or circular, slope or angle in degrees of the centerline of the geometric shape, the centroid of the geometric shape, area of the geometric shape, length of principal diagonals of the shape, and the diversity ratio of consolidity points for each region. Finally, it is recommended that the proposed consolidity chart approach be extended as a unified theory for modeling, analysis and design of continuous and digital automatic control systems operating in fully fuzzy environment.

  6. SEMI-AUTOMATIC BUILDING MODELS AND FAÇADE TEXTURE MAPPING FROM MOBILE PHONE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jeong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Research on 3D urban modelling has been actively carried out for a long time. Recently the need of 3D urban modelling research is increased rapidly due to improved geo-web services and popularized smart devices. Nowadays 3D urban models provided by, for example, Google Earth use aerial photos for 3D urban modelling but there are some limitations: immediate update for the change of building models is difficult, many buildings are without 3D model and texture, and large resources for maintaining and updating are inevitable. To resolve the limitations mentioned above, we propose a method for semi-automatic building modelling and façade texture mapping from mobile phone images and analyze the result of modelling with actual measurements. Our method consists of camera geometry estimation step, image matching step, and façade mapping step. Models generated from this method were compared with actual measurement value of real buildings. Ratios of edge length of models and measurements were compared. Result showed 5.8% average error of length ratio. Through this method, we could generate a simple building model with fine façade textures without expensive dedicated tools and dataset.

  7. Likelihood inference for unions of interacting discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Helisová, Katarina

    To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper which discusses likelihood inference or a random set using a germ-grain model, where the individual grains are unobservable edge effects occur, and other complications appear. We consider the case where the grains form a disc process modelled...... is specified with respect to a given marked Poisson model (i.e. a Boolean model). We show how edge effects and other complications can be handled by considering a certain conditional likelihood. Our methodology is illustrated by analyzing Peter Diggle's heather dataset, where we discuss the results...... of simulation-based maximum likelihood inference and the effect of specifying different reference Poisson models....

  8. LHC-GCS a model-driven approach for automatic PLC and SCADA code generation

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Geraldine; Barillère, Renaud; Cabaret, Sebastien; Kulman, Nikolay; Pons, Xavier; Rochez, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    The LHC experiments’ Gas Control System (LHC GCS) project [1] aims to provide the four LHC experiments (ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb) with control for their 23 gas systems. To ease the production and maintenance of 23 control systems, a model-driven approach has been adopted to generate automatically the code for the Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) and for the Supervision Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. The first milestones of the project have been achieved. The LHC GCS framework [4] and the generation tools have been produced. A first control application has actually been generated and is in production, and a second is in preparation. This paper describes the principle and the architecture of the model-driven solution. It will in particular detail how the model-driven solution fits with the LHC GCS framework and with the UNICOS [5] data-driven tools.

  9. Learning to Automatically Detect Features for Mobile Robots Using Second-Order Hidden Markov Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Washington

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new method based on Hidden Markov Models to interpret temporal sequences of sensor data from mobile robots to automatically detect features. Hidden Markov Models have been used for a long time in pattern recognition, especially in speech recognition. Their main advantages over other methods (such as neural networks are their ability to model noisy temporal signals of variable length. We show in this paper that this approach is well suited for interpretation of temporal sequences of mobile-robot sensor data. We present two distinct experiments and results: the first one in an indoor environment where a mobile robot learns to detect features like open doors or T- intersections, the second one in an outdoor environment where a different mobile robot has to identify situations like climbing a hill or crossing a rock.

  10. Dynamic document object model formation technique for corporate website protection against automatic coping of information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galushka Vasily

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes solution path of the problem of information automatic copying from web-sites in the Internet, which is implemented using parsing techniques based on regular expressions or function libraries. To protecting against this type of information security threat, it is proposed to dynamically generate and periodically change the object model of the HTML document when generated and sent to the browser. These changes should affect the values of the identifying tag attributes and the structure of the object model tree. As attribute values it is offered to use character sets of limited length obtained as a result of random numbers hashing; change of the structure of the object model should be done by adding of additional tags at the corresponding levels of the hierarchy of the tree representing it. The simultaneous application of these methods excludes the possibility of algorithm compile for the necessary information extraction in the overall structure of the web page.

  11. Learning to Automatically Detect Features for Mobile Robots Using Second-Order Hidden Markov Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Aycard

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new method based on Hidden Markov Models to interpret temporal sequences of sensor data from mobile robots to automatically detect features. Hidden Markov Models have been used for a long time in pattern recognition, especially in speech recognition. Their main advantages over other methods (such as neural networks are their ability to model noisy temporal signals of variable length. We show in this paper that this approach is well suited for interpretation of temporal sequences of mobile-robot sensor data. We present two distinct experiments and results: the first one in an indoor environment where a mobile robot learns to detect features like open doors or T-intersections, the second one in an outdoor environment where a different mobile robot has to identify situations like climbing a hill or crossing a rock.

  12. AUTOMATIC GENERATION OF BUILDING MODELS WITH LEVELS OF DETAIL 1-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Nguatem

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a workflow for the automatic generation of building models with levels of detail (LOD 1 to 3 according to the CityGML standard (Gröger et al., 2012. We start with orienting unsorted image sets employing (Mayer et al., 2012, we compute depth maps using semi-global matching (SGM (Hirschmüller, 2008, and fuse these depth maps to reconstruct dense 3D point clouds (Kuhn et al., 2014. Based on planes segmented from these point clouds, we have developed a stochastic method for roof model selection (Nguatem et al., 2013 and window model selection (Nguatem et al., 2014. We demonstrate our workflow up to the export into CityGML.

  13. Comparison of models of automatic classification of textural patterns of mineral presents in Colombian coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Carvajal, Jaime; Branch Bedoya, John Willian

    2005-01-01

    The automatic classification of objects is a very interesting approach under several problem domains. This paper outlines some results obtained under different classification models to categorize textural patterns of minerals using real digital images. The data set used was characterized by a small size and noise presence. The implemented models were the Bayesian classifier, Neural Network (2-5-1), support vector machine, decision tree and 3-nearest neighbors. The results after applying crossed validation show that the Bayesian model (84%) proved better predictive capacity than the others, mainly due to its noise robustness behavior. The neuronal network (68%) and the SVM (67%) gave promising results, because they could be improved increasing the data amount used, while the decision tree (55%) and K-NN (54%) did not seem to be adequate for this problem, because of their sensibility to noise

  14. Automatic Extraction of Contours of Buildings on Oblique View Maps Based on 3D City Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Yuanyuan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to deal with the problem that manual extraction of contours of buildings on oblique view maps are expensive and ineffective with low accuracy and coarse detail, we present a method of automatic extraction of contours buildings on oblique view maps which based on 3D city models. We employ depth-buffers to obtain a building object's color-buffers concerning the occlusion blocked by other buildings and the existence of groups of buildings, and then we trace building contours based on color-buffers. And in order to keep the occlusion consistency and match the traced contours with the map, we propose loading 3D city models by block on projection plane. Finally, the validity and feasibility of this method are proved through the experiments on 3D city models of Wuhan.

  15. Model-based vision system for automatic recognition of structures in dental radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Raj S.; Samarabandu, Jagath K.; Hausmann, E.; Allen, K. A.

    1991-07-01

    X-ray diagnosis of destructive periodontal disease requires assessing serial radiographs by an expert to determine the change in the distance between cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) and the bone crest. To achieve this without the subjectivity of a human expert, a knowledge based system is proposed to automatically locate the two landmarks which are the CEJ and the level of alveolar crest at its junction with the periodontal ligament space. This work is a part of an ongoing project to automatically measure the distance between CEJ and the bone crest along a line parallel to the axis of the tooth. The approach presented in this paper is based on identifying a prominent feature such as the tooth boundary using local edge detection and edge thresholding to establish a reference and then using model knowledge to process sub-regions in locating the landmarks. Segmentation techniques invoked around these regions consists of a neural-network like hierarchical refinement scheme together with local gradient extraction, multilevel thresholding and ridge tracking. Recognition accuracy is further improved by first locating the easily identifiable parts of the bone surface and the interface between the enamel and the dentine and then extending these boundaries towards the periodontal ligament space and the tooth boundary respectively. The system is realized as a collection of tools (or knowledge sources) for pre-processing, segmentation, primary and secondary feature detection and a control structure based on the blackboard model to coordinate the activities of these tools.

  16. Automatic Lung Tumor Segmentation on PET/CT Images Using Fuzzy Markov Random Field Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of positron emission tomography (PET and CT images provides complementary functional and anatomical information of human tissues and it has been used for better tumor volume definition of lung cancer. This paper proposed a robust method for automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images. The new method is based on fuzzy Markov random field (MRF model. The combination of PET and CT image information is achieved by using a proper joint posterior probability distribution of observed features in the fuzzy MRF model which performs better than the commonly used Gaussian joint distribution. In this study, the PET and CT simulation images of 7 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients were used to evaluate the proposed method. Tumor segmentations with the proposed method and manual method by an experienced radiation oncologist on the fused images were performed, respectively. Segmentation results obtained with the two methods were similar and Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC was 0.85 ± 0.013. It has been shown that effective and automatic segmentations can be achieved with this method for lung tumors which locate near other organs with similar intensities in PET and CT images, such as when the tumors extend into chest wall or mediastinum.

  17. Automatic segmentation of corpus callosum using Gaussian mixture modeling and Fuzzy C means methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İçer, Semra

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of the success and performance of the Gaussian mixture modeling and Fuzzy C means methods to determine the volume and cross-sectionals areas of the corpus callosum (CC) using simulated and real MR brain images. The Gaussian mixture model (GMM) utilizes weighted sum of Gaussian distributions by applying statistical decision procedures to define image classes. In the Fuzzy C means (FCM), the image classes are represented by certain membership function according to fuzziness information expressing the distance from the cluster centers. In this study, automatic segmentation for midsagittal section of the CC was achieved from simulated and real brain images. The volume of CC was obtained using sagittal sections areas. To compare the success of the methods, segmentation accuracy, Jaccard similarity and time consuming for segmentation were calculated. The results show that the GMM method resulted by a small margin in more accurate segmentation (midsagittal section segmentation accuracy 98.3% and 97.01% for GMM and FCM); however the FCM method resulted in faster segmentation than GMM. With this study, an accurate and automatic segmentation system that allows opportunity for quantitative comparison to doctors in the planning of treatment and the diagnosis of diseases affecting the size of the CC was developed. This study can be adapted to perform segmentation on other regions of the brain, thus, it can be operated as practical use in the clinic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Lightning Protection Performance Assessment of Transmission Line Based on ATP model Automatic Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Hanwu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method to solve the initial lightning breakdown current by combing ATP and MATLAB simulation software effectively, with the aims to evaluate the lightning protection performance of transmission line. Firstly, the executable ATP simulation model is generated automatically according to the required information such as power source parameters, tower parameters, overhead line parameters, grounding resistance and lightning current parameters, etc. through an interface program coded by MATLAB. Then, the data are extracted from the generated LIS files which can be obtained by executing the ATP simulation model, the occurrence of transmission lie breakdown can be determined by the relative data in LIS file. The lightning current amplitude should be reduced when the breakdown occurs, and vice the verse. Thus the initial lightning breakdown current of a transmission line with given parameters can be determined accurately by continuously changing the lightning current amplitude, which is realized by a loop computing algorithm that is coded by MATLAB software. The method proposed in this paper can generate the ATP simulation program automatically, and facilitates the lightning protection performance assessment of transmission line.

  19. Automatic 3D high-fidelity traffic interchange modeling using 2D road GIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-03-01

    3D road models are widely used in many computer applications such as racing games and driving simulations. However, almost all high-fidelity 3D road models were generated manually by professional artists at the expense of intensive labor. There are very few existing methods for automatically generating 3D high-fidelity road networks, especially for those existing in the real world. Real road network contains various elements such as road segments, road intersections and traffic interchanges. Among them, traffic interchanges present the most challenges to model due to their complexity and the lack of height information (vertical position) of traffic interchanges in existing road GIS data. This paper proposes a novel approach that can automatically produce 3D high-fidelity road network models, including traffic interchange models, from real 2D road GIS data that mainly contain road centerline information. The proposed method consists of several steps. The raw road GIS data are first preprocessed to extract road network topology, merge redundant links, and classify road types. Then overlapped points in the interchanges are detected and their elevations are determined based on a set of level estimation rules. Parametric representations of the road centerlines are then generated through link segmentation and fitting, and they have the advantages of arbitrary levels of detail with reduced memory usage. Finally a set of civil engineering rules for road design (e.g., cross slope, superelevation) are selected and used to generate realistic road surfaces. In addition to traffic interchange modeling, the proposed method also applies to other more general road elements. Preliminary results show that the proposed method is highly effective and useful in many applications.

  20. Rational automatic search method for stable docking models of protein and ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, M Y; Tomioka, N; Itai, A

    1994-10-21

    An efficient automatic method has been developed for docking a ligand molecule to a protein molecule. The method can construct energetically favorable docking models, considering specific interactions between the two molecules and conformational flexibility in the ligand. In the first stage of docking, likely binding modes are searched and estimated effectively in terms of hydrogen bonds, together with conformations in part of the ligand structure that includes hydrogen bonding groups. After that part is placed in the protein cavity and is optimized, conformations in the remaining part are also examined systematically. Finally, several stable docking models are obtained after optimization of the position, orientation and conformation of the whole ligand molecule. In all the screening processes, the total potential energy including intra- and intermolecular interaction energy, consisting of van der Waals, electrostatic and hydrogen bonding energies, is used as the index. The characteristics of our docking method are high accuracy of the results, fully automatic generation of models and short computational time. The efficiency of the method was confirmed by four docking trials using two enzyme systems. In two attempts to dock methotrexate to dihydrofolate reductase and 2'-GMP to ribonuclease T1, the exact structures of complexes in crystals were reproduced as the most stable docking models, without any assumptions concerning the binding modes and ligand conformations. The most stable docking models of dihydrofolate and trimethoprim, respectively, to dihydrofolate reductase were also in good agreement with those suggested by experiment. In all test cases, it was shown that our method can accurately predict the correct docking structures, discriminating the correct model from incorrect ones. The efficiency of our method was further tested from the viewpoint of ability to predict the relative stability of the docking structures of two triazine derivatives to

  1. Meta-server for automatic analysis, scoring and ranking of docking models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anashkina, Anastasia A; Kravatsky, Yuri; Kuznetsov, Eugene; Makarov, Alexander A; Adzhubei, Alexei A

    2017-09-18

    Modelling with multiple servers that use different algorithms for docking results in more reliable predictions of interaction sites. However, the scoring and comparison of all models by an expert is time-consuming and is not feasible for large volumes of data generated by such modelling. QASDOM Server (Quality ASsessment of DOcking Models) is a simple and efficient tool for real-time simultaneous analysis, scoring and ranking of datasets of receptor-ligand complexes built by a range of docking techniques. This meta-server is designed to analyse large datasets of docking models and rank them by scoring criteria developed in this study. It produces two types of output showing the likelihood of specific residues and clusters of residues to be involved in receptor-ligand interactions, and the ranking of models. The server also allows visualising residues that form interaction sites in the receptor and ligand sequence, and displays three-dimensional model structures of the receptor-ligand complexes. http://qasdom.eimb.ru. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  2. A method for automatic feature points extraction of human vertebrae three-dimensional model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen; Wu, Junsheng

    2017-05-01

    A method for automatic extraction of the feature points of the human vertebrae three-dimensional model is presented. Firstly, the statistical model of vertebrae feature points is established based on the results of manual vertebrae feature points extraction. Then anatomical axial analysis of the vertebrae model is performed according to the physiological and morphological characteristics of the vertebrae. Using the axial information obtained from the analysis, a projection relationship between the statistical model and the vertebrae model to be extracted is established. According to the projection relationship, the statistical model is matched with the vertebrae model to get the estimated position of the feature point. Finally, by analyzing the curvature in the spherical neighborhood with the estimated position of feature points, the final position of the feature points is obtained. According to the benchmark result on multiple test models, the mean relative errors of feature point positions are less than 5.98%. At more than half of the positions, the error rate is less than 3% and the minimum mean relative error is 0.19%, which verifies the effectiveness of the method.

  3. Automatic generation of groundwater model hydrostratigraphy from AEM resistivity and boreholes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marker, Pernille Aabye; Foged, N.; Christiansen, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    distribution govern groundwater flow. The coupling between hydrological and geophysical parameters is managed using a translator function with spatially variable parameters followed by a 3D zonation. The translator function translates geophysical resistivities into clay fractions and is calibrated...... with observed lithological data. Principal components are computed for the translated clay fractions and geophysical resistivities. Zonation is carried out by k-means clustering on the principal components. The hydraulic parameters of the zones are determined in a hydrological model calibration using head...... and discharge observations. The method was applied to field data collected at a Danish field site. Our results show that a competitive hydrological model can be constructed from the AEM dataset using the automatic procedure outlined above....

  4. Automatic generation of groundwater model hydrostratigraphy from AEM resistivity and boreholes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marker, Pernille Aabye; Foged, N.; Christiansen, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    and heterogeneity, which spatially scarce borehole lithology data may overlook, are well resolved in AEM surveys. This study presents a semi-automatic sequential hydrogeophysical inversion method for the integration of AEM and borehole data into regional groundwater models in sedimentary areas, where sand/ clay...... distribution govern groundwater flow. The coupling between hydrological and geophysical parameters is managed using a translator function with spatially variable parameters followed by a 3D zonation. The translator function translates geophysical resistivities into clay fractions and is calibrated...... with observed lithological data. Principal components are computed for the translated clay fractions and geophysical resistivities. Zonation is carried out by k-means clustering on the principal components. The hydraulic parameters of the zones are determined in a hydrological model calibration using head...

  5. Accelerated maximum likelihood parameter estimation for stochastic biochemical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daigle Bernie J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A prerequisite for the mechanistic simulation of a biochemical system is detailed knowledge of its kinetic parameters. Despite recent experimental advances, the estimation of unknown parameter values from observed data is still a bottleneck for obtaining accurate simulation results. Many methods exist for parameter estimation in deterministic biochemical systems; methods for discrete stochastic systems are less well developed. Given the probabilistic nature of stochastic biochemical models, a natural approach is to choose parameter values that maximize the probability of the observed data with respect to the unknown parameters, a.k.a. the maximum likelihood parameter estimates (MLEs. MLE computation for all but the simplest models requires the simulation of many system trajectories that are consistent with experimental data. For models with unknown parameters, this presents a computational challenge, as the generation of consistent trajectories can be an extremely rare occurrence. Results We have developed Monte Carlo Expectation-Maximization with Modified Cross-Entropy Method (MCEM2: an accelerated method for calculating MLEs that combines advances in rare event simulation with a computationally efficient version of the Monte Carlo expectation-maximization (MCEM algorithm. Our method requires no prior knowledge regarding parameter values, and it automatically provides a multivariate parameter uncertainty estimate. We applied the method to five stochastic systems of increasing complexity, progressing from an analytically tractable pure-birth model to a computationally demanding model of yeast-polarization. Our results demonstrate that MCEM2 substantially accelerates MLE computation on all tested models when compared to a stand-alone version of MCEM. Additionally, we show how our method identifies parameter values for certain classes of models more accurately than two recently proposed computationally efficient methods

  6. Automatic corpus callosum segmentation using a deformable active Fourier contour model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachet, Clement; Yvernault, Benjamin; Bhatt, Kshamta; Smith, Rachel G; Gerig, Guido; Hazlett, Heather Cody; Styner, Martin

    2012-03-23

    The corpus callosum (CC) is a structure of interest in many neuroimaging studies of neuro-developmental pathology such as autism. It plays an integral role in relaying sensory, motor and cognitive information from homologous regions in both hemispheres. We have developed a framework that allows automatic segmentation of the corpus callosum and its lobar subdivisions. Our approach employs constrained elastic deformation of flexible Fourier contour model, and is an extension of Szekely's 2D Fourier descriptor based Active Shape Model. The shape and appearance model, derived from a large mixed population of 150+ subjects, is described with complex Fourier descriptors in a principal component shape space. Using MNI space aligned T1w MRI data, the CC segmentation is initialized on the mid-sagittal plane using the tissue segmentation. A multi-step optimization strategy, with two constrained steps and a final unconstrained step, is then applied. If needed, interactive segmentation can be performed via contour repulsion points. Lobar connectivity based parcellation of the corpus callosum can finally be computed via the use of a probabilistic CC subdivision model. Our analysis framework has been integrated in an open-source, end-to-end application called CCSeg both with a command line and Qt-based graphical user interface (available on NITRC). A study has been performed to quantify the reliability of the semi-automatic segmentation on a small pediatric dataset. Using 5 subjects randomly segmented 3 times by two experts, the intra-class correlation coefficient showed a superb reliability (0.99). CCSeg is currently applied to a large longitudinal pediatric study of brain development in autism.

  7. Fully Automatic Myocardial Segmentation of Contrast Echocardiography Sequence Using Random Forests Guided by Shape Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanwei; Ho, Chin Pang; Toulemonde, Matthieu; Chahal, Navtej; Senior, Roxy; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2017-09-26

    Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) is an imaging technique that assesses left ventricle function and myocardial perfusion for the detection of coronary artery diseases. Automatic MCE perfusion quantification is challenging and requires accurate segmentation of the myocardium from noisy and time-varying images. Random forests (RF) have been successfully applied to many medical image segmentation tasks. However, the pixel-wise RF classifier ignores contextual relationships between label outputs of individual pixels. RF which only utilizes local appearance features is also susceptible to data suffering from large intensity variations. In this paper, we demonstrate how to overcome the above limitations of classic RF by presenting a fully automatic segmentation pipeline for myocardial segmentation in full-cycle 2D MCE data. Specifically, a statistical shape model is used to provide shape prior information that guide the RF segmentation in two ways. First, a novel shape model (SM) feature is incorporated into the RF framework to generate a more accurate RF probability map. Second, the shape model is fitted to the RF probability map to refine and constrain the final segmentation to plausible myocardial shapes. We further improve the performance by introducing a bounding box detection algorithm as a preprocessing step in the segmentation pipeline. Our approach on 2D image is further extended to 2D+t sequences which ensures temporal consistency in the final sequence segmentations. When evaluated on clinical MCE datasets, our proposed method achieves notable improvement in segmentation accuracy and outperforms other state-of-the-art methods including the classic RF and its variants, active shape model and image registration.

  8. Automatic corpus callosum segmentation using a deformable active Fourier contour model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachet, Clement; Yvernault, Benjamin; Bhatt, Kshamta; Smith, Rachel G.; Gerig, Guido; Cody Hazlett, Heather; Styner, Martin

    2012-03-01

    The corpus callosum (CC) is a structure of interest in many neuroimaging studies of neuro-developmental pathology such as autism. It plays an integral role in relaying sensory, motor and cognitive information from homologous regions in both hemispheres. We have developed a framework that allows automatic segmentation of the corpus callosum and its lobar subdivisions. Our approach employs constrained elastic deformation of flexible Fourier contour model, and is an extension of Szekely's 2D Fourier descriptor based Active Shape Model. The shape and appearance model, derived from a large mixed population of 150+ subjects, is described with complex Fourier descriptors in a principal component shape space. Using MNI space aligned T1w MRI data, the CC segmentation is initialized on the mid-sagittal plane using the tissue segmentation. A multi-step optimization strategy, with two constrained steps and a final unconstrained step, is then applied. If needed, interactive segmentation can be performed via contour repulsion points. Lobar connectivity based parcellation of the corpus callosum can finally be computed via the use of a probabilistic CC subdivision model. Our analysis framework has been integrated in an open-source, end-to-end application called CCSeg both with a command line and Qt-based graphical user interface (available on NITRC). A study has been performed to quantify the reliability of the semi-automatic segmentation on a small pediatric dataset. Using 5 subjects randomly segmented 3 times by two experts, the intra-class correlation coefficient showed a superb reliability (0.99). CCSeg is currently applied to a large longitudinal pediatric study of brain development in autism.

  9. AUTOMATIC TAGGING OF PERSIAN WEB PAGES BASED ON N-GRAM LANGUAGE MODELS USING MAPREDUCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Shahrivari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Page tagging is one of the most important facilities for increasing the accuracy of information retrieval in the web. Tags are simple pieces of data that usually consist of one or several words, and briefly describe a page. Tags provide useful information about a page and can be used for boosting the accuracy of searching, document clustering, and result grouping. The most accurate solution to page tagging is using human experts. However, when the number of pages is large, humans cannot be used, and some automatic solutions should be used instead. We propose a solution called PerTag which can automatically tag a set of Persian web pages. PerTag is based on n-gram models and uses the tf-idf method plus some effective Persian language rules to select proper tags for each web page. Since our target is huge sets of web pages, PerTag is built on top of the MapReduce distributed computing framework. We used a set of more than 500 million Persian web pages during our experiments, and extracted tags for each page using a cluster of 40 machines. The experimental results show that PerTag is both fast and accurate

  10. Model design and simulation of automatic sorting machine using proximity sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bankole I. Oladapo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The automatic sorting system has been reported to be complex and a global problem. This is because of the inability of sorting machines to incorporate flexibility in their design concept. This research therefore designed and developed an automated sorting object of a conveyor belt. The developed automated sorting machine is able to incorporate flexibility and separate species of non-ferrous metal objects and at the same time move objects automatically to the basket as defined by the regulation of the Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC with a capacitive proximity sensor to detect a value range of objects. The result obtained shows that plastic, wood, and steel were sorted into their respective and correct position with an average, sorting, time of 9.903 s, 14.072 s and 18.648 s respectively. The proposed developed model of this research could be adopted at any institution or industries, whose practices are based on mechatronics engineering systems. This is to guide the industrial sector in sorting of object and teaching aid to institutions and hence produce the list of classified materials according to the enabled sorting program commands.

  11. An Automatic User Grouping Model for a Group Recommender System in Location-Based Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Khazaei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Spatial group recommendation refers to suggesting places to a given set of users. In a group recommender system, members of a group should have similar preferences in order to increase the level of satisfaction. Location-based social networks (LBSNs provide rich content, such as user interactions and location/event descriptions, which can be leveraged for group recommendations. In this paper, an automatic user grouping model is introduced that obtains information about users and their preferences through an LBSN. The preferences of the users, proximity of the places the users have visited in terms of spatial range, users’ free days, and the social relationships among users are extracted automatically from location histories and users’ profiles in the LBSN. These factors are combined to determine the similarities among users. The users are partitioned into groups based on these similarities. Group size is the key to coordinating group members and enhancing their satisfaction. Therefore, a modified k-medoids method is developed to cluster users into groups with specific sizes. To evaluate the efficiency of the proposed method, its mean intra-cluster distance and its distribution of cluster sizes are compared to those of general clustering algorithms. The results reveal that the proposed method compares favourably with general clustering approaches, such as k-medoids and spectral clustering, in separating users into groups of a specific size with a lower mean intra-cluster distance.

  12. Bridging automatic speech recognition and psycholinguistics: Extending Shortlist to an end-to-end model of human speech recognition (L)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharenborg, Odette; ten Bosch, Louis; Boves, Lou; Norris, Dennis

    2003-12-01

    This letter evaluates potential benefits of combining human speech recognition (HSR) and automatic speech recognition by building a joint model of an automatic phone recognizer (APR) and a computational model of HSR, viz., Shortlist [Norris, Cognition 52, 189-234 (1994)]. Experiments based on ``real-life'' speech highlight critical limitations posed by some of the simplifying assumptions made in models of human speech recognition. These limitations could be overcome by avoiding hard phone decisions at the output side of the APR, and by using a match between the input and the internal lexicon that flexibly copes with deviations from canonical phonemic representations.

  13. Likelihoods for fixed rank nomination networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Peter; Fosdick, Bailey; Volfovsky, Alex; Stovel, Katherine

    2013-12-01

    Many studies that gather social network data use survey methods that lead to censored, missing, or otherwise incomplete information. For example, the popular fixed rank nomination (FRN) scheme, often used in studies of schools and businesses, asks study participants to nominate and rank at most a small number of contacts or friends, leaving the existence of other relations uncertain. However, most statistical models are formulated in terms of completely observed binary networks. Statistical analyses of FRN data with such models ignore the censored and ranked nature of the data and could potentially result in misleading statistical inference. To investigate this possibility, we compare Bayesian parameter estimates obtained from a likelihood for complete binary networks with those obtained from likelihoods that are derived from the FRN scheme, and therefore accommodate the ranked and censored nature of the data. We show analytically and via simulation that the binary likelihood can provide misleading inference, particularly for certain model parameters that relate network ties to characteristics of individuals and pairs of individuals. We also compare these different likelihoods in a data analysis of several adolescent social networks. For some of these networks, the parameter estimates from the binary and FRN likelihoods lead to different conclusions, indicating the importance of analyzing FRN data with a method that accounts for the FRN survey design.

  14. Automatic lung segmentation in functional SPECT images using active shape models trained on reference lung shapes from CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheimariotis, Grigorios-Aris; Al-Mashat, Mariam; Haris, Kostas; Aletras, Anthony H; Jögi, Jonas; Bajc, Marika; Maglaveras, Nicolaos; Heiberg, Einar

    2018-02-01

    Image segmentation is an essential step in quantifying the extent of reduced or absent lung function. The aim of this study is to develop and validate a new tool for automatic segmentation of lungs in ventilation and perfusion SPECT images and compare automatic and manual SPECT lung segmentations with reference computed tomography (CT) volumes. A total of 77 subjects (69 patients with obstructive lung disease, and 8 subjects without apparent perfusion of ventilation loss) performed low-dose CT followed by ventilation/perfusion (V/P) SPECT examination in a hybrid gamma camera system. In the training phase, lung shapes from the 57 anatomical low-dose CT images were used to construct two active shape models (right lung and left lung) which were then used for image segmentation. The algorithm was validated in 20 patients, comparing its results to reference delineation of corresponding CT images, and by comparing automatic segmentation to manual delineations in SPECT images. The Dice coefficient between automatic SPECT delineations and manual SPECT delineations were 0.83 ± 0.04% for the right and 0.82 ± 0.05% for the left lung. There was statistically significant difference between reference volumes from CT and automatic delineations for the right (R = 0.53, p = 0.02) and left lung (R = 0.69, p automatic quantification of wide range of measurements.

  15. Man vs. Machine: An interactive poll to evaluate hydrological model performance of a manual and an automatic calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesemann, Johannes; Burgholzer, Reinhard; Herrnegger, Mathew; Schulz, Karsten

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, a lot of research in hydrological modelling has been invested to improve the automatic calibration of rainfall-runoff models. This includes for example (1) the implementation of new optimisation methods, (2) the incorporation of new and different objective criteria and signatures in the optimisation and (3) the usage of auxiliary data sets apart from runoff. Nevertheless, in many applications manual calibration is still justifiable and frequently applied. The hydrologist performing the manual calibration, with his expert knowledge, is able to judge the hydrographs simultaneously concerning details but also in a holistic view. This integrated eye-ball verification procedure available to man can be difficult to formulate in objective criteria, even when using a multi-criteria approach. Comparing the results of automatic and manual calibration is not straightforward. Automatic calibration often solely involves objective criteria such as Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency Coefficient or the Kling-Gupta-Efficiency as a benchmark during the calibration. Consequently, a comparison based on such measures is intrinsically biased towards automatic calibration. Additionally, objective criteria do not cover all aspects of a hydrograph leaving questions concerning the quality of a simulation open. This contribution therefore seeks to examine the quality of manually and automatically calibrated hydrographs by interactively involving expert knowledge in the evaluation. Simulations have been performed for the Mur catchment in Austria with the rainfall-runoff model COSERO using two parameter sets evolved from a manual and an automatic calibration. A subset of resulting hydrographs for observation and simulation, representing the typical flow conditions and events, will be evaluated in this study. In an interactive crowdsourcing approach experts attending the session can vote for their preferred simulated hydrograph without having information on the calibration method that

  16. Maximum likelihood estimation of fractionally cointegrated systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasak, Katarzyna

    In this paper we consider a fractionally cointegrated error correction model and investigate asymptotic properties of the maximum likelihood (ML) estimators of the matrix of the cointe- gration relations, the degree of fractional cointegration, the matrix of the speed of adjustment to the equilib......In this paper we consider a fractionally cointegrated error correction model and investigate asymptotic properties of the maximum likelihood (ML) estimators of the matrix of the cointe- gration relations, the degree of fractional cointegration, the matrix of the speed of adjustment...

  17. Phylogenetics, likelihood, evolution and complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, A P Jason; Gu, Wanjun; Castoe, Todd A; Pollock, David D

    2012-11-15

    Phylogenetics, likelihood, evolution and complexity (PLEX) is a flexible and fast Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo software program for large-scale analysis of nucleotide and amino acid data using complex evolutionary models in a phylogenetic framework. The program gains large speed improvements over standard approaches by implementing 'partial sampling of substitution histories', a data augmentation approach that can reduce data analysis times from months to minutes on large comparative datasets. A variety of nucleotide and amino acid substitution models are currently implemented, including non-reversible and site-heterogeneous mixture models. Due to efficient algorithms that scale well with data size and model complexity, PLEX can be used to make inferences from hundreds to thousands of taxa in only minutes on a desktop computer. It also performs probabilistic ancestral sequence reconstruction. Future versions will support detection of co-evolutionary interactions between sites, probabilistic tests of convergent evolution and rigorous testing of evolutionary hypotheses in a Bayesian framework. PLEX v1.0 is licensed under GPL. Source code and documentation will be available for download at www.evolutionarygenomics.com/ProgramsData/PLEX. PLEX is implemented in C++ and supported on Linux, Mac OS X and other platforms supporting standard C++ compilers. Example data, control files, documentation and accessory Perl scripts are available from the website. David.Pollock@UCDenver.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  18. Toward Automatic Recognition of Children's Affective State Using Physiological Parameters and Fuzzy Model of Emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SCHIPOR, O.-A.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Affective computing � the ability of a system to recognize, understand and simulate human emotional intelligence � is one of the most dynamic fields of HCI � Human Computer Interaction. These characteristics find their applicability in those areas where it is necessary to extend traditional cognitive communication with emotional features. That is why, Computer Based Speech Therapy Systems (CBST, and especially those involving children with speech disorders, require this qualitative shift. So in this paper we propose an original emotional framework recognition as an extension for our previous developed system � Logomon. A fuzzy model is used in order to interpret the values of specific physiological parameters and to obtain the emotional state of the subject. Moreover, an experiment that indicates the emotion pattern (average fuzzy sets for each therapeutic sequence is also presented. The obtained results encourage us to continue working on automatic emotion recognition and provide important clues regarding the future development of our CBST.

  19. A semi-automatic multiple view texture mapping for the surface model extracted by laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhichao; Huang, Xianfeng; Zhang, Fan; Chang, Yongmin; Li, Deren

    2008-12-01

    Laser scanning is an effective way to acquire geometry data of the cultural heritage with complex architecture. After generating the 3D model of the object, it's difficult to do the exactly texture mapping for the real object. we take effort to create seamless texture maps for a virtual heritage of arbitrary topology. Texture detail is acquired directly from the real object in a light condition as uniform as we can make. After preprocessing, images are then registered on the 3D mesh by a semi-automatic way. Then we divide the mesh into mesh patches overlapped with each other according to the valid texture area of each image. An optimal correspondence between mesh patches and sections of the acquired images is built. Then, a smoothing approach is proposed to erase the seam between different images that map on adjacent mesh patches, based on texture blending. The obtained result with a Buddha of Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes is presented and discussed.

  20. Four-bar linkage-based automatic tool changer: Dynamic modeling and torque optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sangho; Seo, TaeWon [Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-Won; Kim, Jongwon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    An Automatic tool changer (ATC) is a device used in a tapping machine to reduce process time. This paper presents the optimization of a Peak torque reduction mechanism (PTRM) for an ATC. It is necessary to reduce the fatigue load and energy consumed, which is related to the peak torque. The PTRM uses a torsion spring to reduce the peak torque and was applied to a novel ATC mechanism, which was modeled using inverse dynamics. Optimization of the PTRM is required to minimize the peak torque. The design parameters are the initial angle and stiffness of the torsion spring, and the objective function is the peak torque of the input link. The torque was simulated, and the peak torque was decreased by 10 %. The energy consumed was reduced by the optimization.

  1. Assess and Predict Automatic Generation Control Performances for Thermal Power Generation Units Based on Modeling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Yang, Zijiang; Gao, Song; Liu, Jinbiao

    2018-02-01

    Automatic generation control(AGC) is a key technology to maintain real time power generation and load balance, and to ensure the quality of power supply. Power grids require each power generation unit to have a satisfactory AGC performance, being specified in two detailed rules. The two rules provide a set of indices to measure the AGC performance of power generation unit. However, the commonly-used method to calculate these indices is based on particular data samples from AGC responses and will lead to incorrect results in practice. This paper proposes a new method to estimate the AGC performance indices via system identification techniques. In addition, a nonlinear regression model between performance indices and load command is built in order to predict the AGC performance indices. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated through industrial case studies.

  2. Automatic Generation and Validation of an ITER Neutronics Model from CAD Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsige-Tamirat, H.; Fischer, U.; Serikov, A.; Stickel, S.

    2006-01-01

    Quality assurance rules request the consistency of the geometry model used in neutronics Monte Carlo calculations and the underlying engineering CAD model. This can be ensured by automatically converting the CAD geometry data into the representation used by Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP. Suitable conversion algorithms have been previously developed at FZK and were implemented into an interface program. This paper describes the application of the interface program to a CAD model of a 40 degree ITER torus sector for the generation of a neutronics geometry model for MCNP. A CAD model provided by ITER consisting of all significant components was analyzed, pre-processed, and converted into MCNP geometry representation. The analysis and pre-processing steps include the checking of the adequacy of the CAD model for neutronics calculations in terms of geometric representation and complexity, and of corresponding corrections. This step is followed by the conversion of the CAD model into MCNP geometry including error detection and correction as well as the completion of the model by voids. The conversion process does not introduce any approximations so that the resulting MCNP geometry is fully equivalent to the original CAD geometry. However, there is a moderate increase of the complexity measured in terms of the number of cell and surfaces. The validity of the converted geometry model was shown by comparing the results of stochastic MCNP volume calculations and the volumes provided by the CAD kernel of the interface programme. Furthermore, successful MCNP test calculations have been performed for verifying the converted ITER model in application calculations. (author)

  3. Automatically extracting cancer disease characteristics from pathology reports into a Disease Knowledge Representation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coden, Anni; Savova, Guergana; Sominsky, Igor; Tanenblatt, Michael; Masanz, James; Schuler, Karin; Cooper, James; Guan, Wei; de Groen, Piet C

    2009-10-01

    We introduce an extensible and modifiable knowledge representation model to represent cancer disease characteristics in a comparable and consistent fashion. We describe a system, MedTAS/P which automatically instantiates the knowledge representation model from free-text pathology reports. MedTAS/P is based on an open-source framework and its components use natural language processing principles, machine learning and rules to discover and populate elements of the model. To validate the model and measure the accuracy of MedTAS/P, we developed a gold-standard corpus of manually annotated colon cancer pathology reports. MedTAS/P achieves F1-scores of 0.97-1.0 for instantiating classes in the knowledge representation model such as histologies or anatomical sites, and F1-scores of 0.82-0.93 for primary tumors or lymph nodes, which require the extractions of relations. An F1-score of 0.65 is reported for metastatic tumors, a lower score predominantly due to a very small number of instances in the training and test sets.

  4. Simulating the human body's microclimate using automatic coupling of CFD and an advanced thermoregulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, C; Alsaad, H

    2018-05-01

    This study aims to develop an approach to couple a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver to the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) thermal comfort model to accurately evaluate thermal comfort. The coupling was made using an iterative JavaScript to automatically transfer data for each individual segment of the human body back and forth between the CFD solver and the UCB model until reaching convergence defined by a stopping criterion. The location from which data are transferred to the UCB model was determined using a new approach based on the temperature difference between subsequent points on the temperature profile curve in the vicinity of the body surface. This approach was used because the microclimate surrounding the human body differs in thickness depending on the body segment and the surrounding environment. To accurately simulate the thermal environment, the numerical model was validated beforehand using experimental data collected in a climate chamber equipped with a thermal manikin. Furthermore, an example of the practical implementations of this coupling is reported in this paper through radiant floor cooling simulation cases, in which overall and local thermal sensation and comfort were investigated using the coupled UCB model. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Automatic generation of virtual worlds from architectural and mechanical CAD models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szepielak, D.

    2003-12-01

    Accelerator projects like the XFEL or the planned linear collider TESLA involve extensive architectural and mechanical design work, resulting in a variety of CAD models. The CAD models will be showing different parts of the project, like e.g. the different accelerator components or parts of the building complexes, and they will be created and stored by different groups in different formats. A complete CAD model of the accelerator and its buildings is thus difficult to obtain and would also be extremely huge and difficult to handle. This thesis describes the design and prototype development of a tool which automatically creates virtual worlds from different CAD models. The tool will enable the user to select a required area for visualization on a map, and then create a 3D-model of the selected area which can be displayed in a web-browser. The thesis first discusses the system requirements and provides some background on data visualization. Then, it introduces the system architecture, the algorithms and the used technologies, and finally demonstrates the capabilities of the system using two case studies. (orig.)

  6. Focusing on media body ideal images triggers food intake among restrained eaters: a test of restraint theory and the elaboration likelihood model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Jessica A; Kuijer, Roeline G

    2014-04-01

    Although research consistently shows that images of thin women in the media (media body ideals) affect women negatively (e.g., increased weight dissatisfaction and food intake), this effect is less clear among restrained eaters. The majority of experiments demonstrate that restrained eaters - identified with the Restraint Scale - consume more food than do other participants after viewing media body ideal images; whereas a minority of experiments suggest that such images trigger restrained eaters' dietary restraint. Weight satisfaction and mood results are just as variable. One reason for these inconsistent results might be that different methods of image exposure (e.g., slideshow vs. film) afford varying levels of attention. Therefore, we manipulated attention levels and measured participants' weight satisfaction and food intake. We based our hypotheses on the elaboration likelihood model and on restraint theory. We hypothesised that advertent (i.e., processing the images via central routes of persuasion) and inadvertent (i.e., processing the images via peripheral routes of persuasion) exposure would trigger differing degrees of weight dissatisfaction and dietary disinhibition among restrained eaters (cf. restraint theory). Participants (N = 174) were assigned to one of four conditions: advertent or inadvertent exposure to media or control images. The dependent variables were measured in a supposedly unrelated study. Although restrained eaters' weight satisfaction was not significantly affected by either media exposure condition, advertent (but not inadvertent) media exposure triggered restrained eaters' eating. These results suggest that teaching restrained eaters how to pay less attention to media body ideal images might be an effective strategy in media-literary interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. AN APPROACH THAT AUTOMATICALLY DETERMINES PART CONTACT RELATIONS IN COMPUTER AIDED ASSEMBLY MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem SİNANOĞLU

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available This study describes an approach for modeling of an assembly system which is, one of the main problems encountered during assembly. In this approach the wire-frame modeling of the assembly system is used. In addition, each part is drawn in a different color. Assembly drawing and its various approaches are scanned along three different (-x, -y, -z axis. Scanning is done automatically the software developed. The color codes obtained by scanning and representing different assembly parts are assessed by the software along the six axes of Cartesian coordinate. Then contact matrices are formed to represent the relations among the assembly parts. These matrices are complete enough to represent an assembly modeling. This approach was applied for various assembly systems. These assembly systems are as follows; pincer, hinge and clutch systems. One of the basic advantages of this approach is that the wire-frame modeling of the assembly system can be formed through various CAD programs; and it can be applied to assembly systems contain many parts.

  8. Semi-automatic road extraction from very high resolution remote sensing imagery by RoadModeler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao

    Accurate and up-to-date road information is essential for both effective urban planning and disaster management. Today, very high resolution (VHR) imagery acquired by airborne and spaceborne imaging sensors is the primary source for the acquisition of spatial information of increasingly growing road networks. Given the increased availability of the aerial and satellite images, it is necessary to develop computer-aided techniques to improve the efficiency and reduce the cost of road extraction tasks. Therefore, automation of image-based road extraction is a very active research topic. This thesis deals with the development and implementation aspects of a semi-automatic road extraction strategy, which includes two key approaches: multidirectional and single-direction road extraction. It requires a human operator to initialize a seed circle on a road and specify a extraction approach before the road is extracted by automatic algorithms using multiple vision cues. The multidirectional approach is used to detect roads with different materials, widths, intersection shapes, and degrees of noise, but sometimes it also interprets parking lots as road areas. Different from the multidirectional approach, the single-direction approach can detect roads with few mistakes, but each seed circle can only be used to detect one road. In accordance with this strategy, a RoadModeler prototype was developed. Both aerial and GeoEye-1 satellite images of seven different types of scenes with various road shapes in rural, downtown, and residential areas were used to evaluate the performance of the RoadModeler. The experimental results demonstrated that the RoadModeler is reliable and easy-to-use by a non-expert operator. Therefore, the RoadModeler is much better than the object-oriented classification. Its average road completeness, correctness, and quality achieved 94%, 97%, and 94%, respectively. These results are higher than those of Hu et al. (2007), which are 91%, 90%, and 85

  9. Modelling Diverse Soil Attributes with Visible to Longwave Infrared Spectroscopy Using PLSR Employed by an Automatic Modelling Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Kopačková

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The study tested a data mining engine (PARACUDA® to predict various soil attributes (BC, CEC, BS, pH, Corg, Pb, Hg, As, Zn and Cu using reflectance data acquired for both optical and thermal infrared regions. The engine was designed to utilize large data in parallel and automatic processing to build and process hundreds of diverse models in a unified manner while avoiding bias and deviations caused by the operator(s. The system is able to systematically assess the effect of diverse preprocessing techniques; additionally, it analyses other parameters, such as different spectral resolutions and spectral coverages that affect soil properties. Accordingly, the system was used to extract models across both optical and thermal infrared spectral regions, which holds significant chromophores. In total, 2880 models were evaluated where each model was generated with a different preprocessing scheme of the input spectral data. The models were assessed using statistical parameters such as coefficient of determination (R2, square error of prediction (SEP, relative percentage difference (RPD and by physical explanation (spectral assignments. It was found that the smoothing procedure is the most beneficial preprocessing stage, especially when combined with spectral derivation (1st or 2nd derivatives. Automatically and without the need of an operator, the data mining engine enabled the best prediction models to be found from all the combinations tested. Furthermore, the data mining approach used in this study and its processing scheme proved to be efficient tools for getting a better understanding of the geochemical properties of the samples studied (e.g., mineral associations.

  10. Automatic calibration of a global flow routing model in the Amazon basin using virtual SWOT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogel, P. Y.; Mouffe, M.; Getirana, A.; Ricci, S. M.; Lion, C.; Mognard, N. M.; Biancamaria, S.; Boone, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) wide swath altimetry mission will provide a global coverage of surface water elevation, which will be used to help correct water height and discharge prediction from hydrological models. Here, the aim is to investigate the use of virtually generated SWOT data to improve water height and discharge simulation using calibration of model parameters (like river width, river depth and roughness coefficient). In this work, we use the HyMAP model to estimate water height and discharge on the Amazon catchment area. Before reaching the river network, surface and subsurface runoff are delayed by a set of linear and independent reservoirs. The flow routing is performed by the kinematic wave equation.. Since the SWOT mission has not yet been launched, virtual SWOT data are generated with a set of true parameters for HyMAP as well as measurement errors from a SWOT data simulator (i.e. a twin experiment approach is implemented). These virtual observations are used to calibrate key parameters of HyMAP through the minimization of a cost function defining the difference between the simulated and observed water heights over a one-year simulation period. The automatic calibration procedure is achieved using the MOCOM-UA multicriteria global optimization algorithm as well as the local optimization algorithm BC-DFO that is considered as a computational cost saving alternative. First, to reduce the computational cost of the calibration procedure, each spatially distributed parameter (Manning coefficient, river width and river depth) is corrupted through the multiplication of a spatially uniform factor that is the only factor optimized. In this case, it is shown that, when the measurement errors are small, the true water heights and discharges are easily retrieved. Because of equifinality, the true parameters are not always identified. A spatial correction of the model parameters is then investigated and the domain is divided into 4 regions

  11. Modelling the adoption of automatic milking systems in Noord-Holland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Floridi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Innovation and new technology adoption represent two central elements for the business and industry development process in agriculture. One of the most relevant innovations in dairy farms is the robotisation of the milking process through the adoption of Automatic Milking Systems (AMS. The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of selected Common Agricultural Policy measures on the adoption of AMS in dairy farms. The model developed is a dynamic farm-household model that is able to simulate the adoption of AMS taking into account the allocation of productive factors between on-farm and off-farm activities. The model simulates the decision to replace a traditional milking system with AMS using a Real Options approach that allows farmers to choose the optimal timing of investments. Results show that the adoption of AMS, and the timing of such a decision, is strongly affected by policy uncertainty and market conditions. The effect of this uncertainty is to postpone the decision to adopt the new technology until farmers have gathered enough information to reduce the negative effects of the technological lock-in. AMS adoption results in an increase in farm size and herd size due to the reduction in the labour required for milking operations.

  12. Automatic Sex Determination of Skulls Based on a Statistical Shape Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sex determination from skeletons is an important research subject in forensic medicine. Previous skeletal sex assessments are through subjective visual analysis by anthropologists or metric analysis of sexually dimorphic features. In this work, we present an automatic sex determination method for 3D digital skulls, in which a statistical shape model for skulls is constructed, which projects the high-dimensional skull data into a low-dimensional shape space, and Fisher discriminant analysis is used to classify skulls in the shape space. This method combines the advantages of metrical and morphological methods. It is easy to use without professional qualification and tedious manual measurement. With a group of Chinese skulls including 127 males and 81 females, we choose 92 males and 58 females to establish the discriminant model and validate the model with the other skulls. The correct rate is 95.7% and 91.4% for females and males, respectively. Leave-one-out test also shows that the method has a high accuracy.

  13. The behavior of the likelihood ratio test for testing missingness

    OpenAIRE

    Hens, Niel; Aerts, Marc; Molenberghs, Geert; Thijs, Herbert

    2003-01-01

    To asses the sensitivity of conclusions to model choices in the context of selection models for non-random dropout, one can oppose the different missing mechanisms to each other; e.g. by the likelihood ratio tests. The finite sample behavior of the null distribution and the power of the likelihood ratio test is studied under a variety of missingness mechanisms. missing data; sensitivity analysis; likelihood ratio test; missing mechanisms

  14. Piloted Simulation Evaluation of a Model-Predictive Automatic Recovery System to Prevent Vehicle Loss of Control on Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Liu, Yuan; Sowers, Thomas S.; Owen, A. Karl; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a model-predictive automatic recovery system for aircraft on the verge of a loss-of-control situation. The system determines when it must intervene to prevent an imminent accident, resulting from a poor approach. It estimates the altitude loss that would result from a go-around maneuver at the current flight condition. If the loss is projected to violate a minimum altitude threshold, the maneuver is automatically triggered. The system deactivates to allow landing once several criteria are met. Piloted flight simulator evaluation showed the system to provide effective envelope protection during extremely unsafe landing attempts. The results demonstrate how flight and propulsion control can be integrated to recover control of the vehicle automatically and prevent a potential catastrophe.

  15. Predicting heat stress index in Sasso hens using automatic linear modeling and artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubu, A; Oluremi, O I A; Ekpo, E I

    2018-03-17

    There is an increasing use of robust analytical algorithms in the prediction of heat stress. The present investigation therefore, was carried out to forecast heat stress index (HSI) in Sasso laying hens. One hundred and sixty seven records on the thermo-physiological parameters of the birds were utilized. They were reared on deep litter and battery cage systems. Data were collected when the birds were 42- and 52-week of age. The independent variables fitted were housing system, age of birds, rectal temperature (RT), pulse rate (PR), and respiratory rate (RR). The response variable was HSI. Data were analyzed using automatic linear modeling (ALM) and artificial neural network (ANN) procedures. The ALM model building method involved Forward Stepwise using the F Statistic criterion. As regards ANN, multilayer perceptron (MLP) with back-propagation network was used. The ANN network was trained with 90% of the data set while 10% were dedicated to testing for model validation. RR and PR were the two parameters of utmost importance in the prediction of HSI. However, the fractional importance of RR was higher than that of PR in both ALM (0.947 versus 0.053) and ANN (0.677 versus 0.274) models. The two models also predicted HSI effectively with high degree of accuracy [r = 0.980, R 2  = 0.961, adjusted R 2  = 0.961, and RMSE = 0.05168 (ALM); r = 0.983, R 2  = 0.966; adjusted R 2  = 0.966, and RMSE = 0.04806 (ANN)]. The present information may be exploited in the development of a heat stress chart based largely on RR. This may aid detection of thermal discomfort in a poultry house under tropical and subtropical conditions.

  16. Automatic extraction of soft tissues from 3D MRI head images using model driven analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Hao; Yamamoto, Shinji; Imao, Masanao.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an automatic extraction system (called TOPS-3D : Top Down Parallel Pattern Recognition System for 3D Images) of soft tissues from 3D MRI head images by using model driven analysis algorithm. As the construction of system TOPS we developed, two concepts have been considered in the design of system TOPS-3D. One is the system having a hierarchical structure of reasoning using model information in higher level, and the other is a parallel image processing structure used to extract plural candidate regions for a destination entity. The new points of system TOPS-3D are as follows. (1) The TOPS-3D is a three-dimensional image analysis system including 3D model construction and 3D image processing techniques. (2) A technique is proposed to increase connectivity between knowledge processing in higher level and image processing in lower level. The technique is realized by applying opening operation of mathematical morphology, in which a structural model function defined in higher level by knowledge representation is immediately used to the filter function of opening operation as image processing in lower level. The system TOPS-3D applied to 3D MRI head images consists of three levels. First and second levels are reasoning part, and third level is image processing part. In experiments, we applied 5 samples of 3D MRI head images with size 128 x 128 x 128 pixels to the system TOPS-3D to extract the regions of soft tissues such as cerebrum, cerebellum and brain stem. From the experimental results, the system is robust for variation of input data by using model information, and the position and shape of soft tissues are extracted corresponding to anatomical structure. (author)

  17. Predicting heat stress index in Sasso hens using automatic linear modeling and artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubu, A.; Oluremi, O. I. A.; Ekpo, E. I.

    2018-03-01

    There is an increasing use of robust analytical algorithms in the prediction of heat stress. The present investigation therefore, was carried out to forecast heat stress index (HSI) in Sasso laying hens. One hundred and sixty seven records on the thermo-physiological parameters of the birds were utilized. They were reared on deep litter and battery cage systems. Data were collected when the birds were 42- and 52-week of age. The independent variables fitted were housing system, age of birds, rectal temperature (RT), pulse rate (PR), and respiratory rate (RR). The response variable was HSI. Data were analyzed using automatic linear modeling (ALM) and artificial neural network (ANN) procedures. The ALM model building method involved Forward Stepwise using the F Statistic criterion. As regards ANN, multilayer perceptron (MLP) with back-propagation network was used. The ANN network was trained with 90% of the data set while 10% were dedicated to testing for model validation. RR and PR were the two parameters of utmost importance in the prediction of HSI. However, the fractional importance of RR was higher than that of PR in both ALM (0.947 versus 0.053) and ANN (0.677 versus 0.274) models. The two models also predicted HSI effectively with high degree of accuracy [r = 0.980, R 2 = 0.961, adjusted R 2 = 0.961, and RMSE = 0.05168 (ALM); r = 0.983, R 2 = 0.966; adjusted R 2 = 0.966, and RMSE = 0.04806 (ANN)]. The present information may be exploited in the development of a heat stress chart based largely on RR. This may aid detection of thermal discomfort in a poultry house under tropical and subtropical conditions.

  18. Automatic Query Generation and Query Relevance Measurement for Unsupervised Language Model Adaptation of Speech Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Motoyuki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We are developing a method of Web-based unsupervised language model adaptation for recognition of spoken documents. The proposed method chooses keywords from the preliminary recognition result and retrieves Web documents using the chosen keywords. A problem is that the selected keywords tend to contain misrecognized words. The proposed method introduces two new ideas for avoiding the effects of keywords derived from misrecognized words. The first idea is to compose multiple queries from selected keyword candidates so that the misrecognized words and correct words do not fall into one query. The second idea is that the number of Web documents downloaded for each query is determined according to the "query relevance." Combining these two ideas, we can alleviate bad effect of misrecognized keywords by decreasing the number of downloaded Web documents from queries that contain misrecognized keywords. Finally, we examine a method of determining the number of iterative adaptations based on the recognition likelihood. Experiments have shown that the proposed stopping criterion can determine almost the optimum number of iterations. In the final experiment, the word accuracy without adaptation (55.29% was improved to 60.38%, which was 1.13 point better than the result of the conventional unsupervised adaptation method (59.25%.

  19. Automatic Query Generation and Query Relevance Measurement for Unsupervised Language Model Adaptation of Speech Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Ito

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We are developing a method of Web-based unsupervised language model adaptation for recognition of spoken documents. The proposed method chooses keywords from the preliminary recognition result and retrieves Web documents using the chosen keywords. A problem is that the selected keywords tend to contain misrecognized words. The proposed method introduces two new ideas for avoiding the effects of keywords derived from misrecognized words. The first idea is to compose multiple queries from selected keyword candidates so that the misrecognized words and correct words do not fall into one query. The second idea is that the number of Web documents downloaded for each query is determined according to the “query relevance.” Combining these two ideas, we can alleviate bad effect of misrecognized keywords by decreasing the number of downloaded Web documents from queries that contain misrecognized keywords. Finally, we examine a method of determining the number of iterative adaptations based on the recognition likelihood. Experiments have shown that the proposed stopping criterion can determine almost the optimum number of iterations. In the final experiment, the word accuracy without adaptation (55.29% was improved to 60.38%, which was 1.13 point better than the result of the conventional unsupervised adaptation method (59.25%.

  20. CRYPTOGRAPHIC SECURE CLOUD STORAGE MODEL WITH ANONYMOUS AUTHENTICATION AND AUTOMATIC FILE RECOVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmiya Murthy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We propose a secure cloud storage model that addresses security and storage issues for cloud computing environments. Security is achieved by anonymous authentication which ensures that cloud users remain anonymous while getting duly authenticated. For achieving this goal, we propose a digital signature based authentication scheme with a decentralized architecture for distributed key management with multiple Key Distribution Centers. Homomorphic encryption scheme using Paillier public key cryptosystem is used for encrypting the data that is stored in the cloud. We incorporate a query driven approach for validating the access policies defined by an individual user for his/her data i.e. the access is granted to a requester only if his credentials matches with the hidden access policy. Further, since data is vulnerable to losses or damages due to the vagaries of the network, we propose an automatic retrieval mechanism where lost data is recovered by data replication and file replacement with string matching algorithm. We describe a prototype implementation of our proposed model.

  1. Composite likelihood estimation of demographic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrigan Daniel

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most existing likelihood-based methods for fitting historical demographic models to DNA sequence polymorphism data to do not scale feasibly up to the level of whole-genome data sets. Computational economies can be achieved by incorporating two forms of pseudo-likelihood: composite and approximate likelihood methods. Composite likelihood enables scaling up to large data sets because it takes the product of marginal likelihoods as an estimator of the likelihood of the complete data set. This approach is especially useful when a large number of genomic regions constitutes the data set. Additionally, approximate likelihood methods can reduce the dimensionality of the data by summarizing the information in the original data by either a sufficient statistic, or a set of statistics. Both composite and approximate likelihood methods hold promise for analyzing large data sets or for use in situations where the underlying demographic model is complex and has many parameters. This paper considers a simple demographic model of allopatric divergence between two populations, in which one of the population is hypothesized to have experienced a founder event, or population bottleneck. A large resequencing data set from human populations is summarized by the joint frequency spectrum, which is a matrix of the genomic frequency spectrum of derived base frequencies in two populations. A Bayesian Metropolis-coupled Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMCMC method for parameter estimation is developed that uses both composite and likelihood methods and is applied to the three different pairwise combinations of the human population resequence data. The accuracy of the method is also tested on data sets sampled from a simulated population model with known parameters. Results The Bayesian MCMCMC method also estimates the ratio of effective population size for the X chromosome versus that of the autosomes. The method is shown to estimate, with reasonable

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF THE MODEL OF AN AUTOMATIC GENERATION OF TOTAL AMOUNTS OF COMMISSIONS IN INTERNATIONAL INTERBANK PAYMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry N. Bolotov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the main form of international payment - bank transfer and features when it is charging by banks correspondent fees for transit funds in their correspondent accounts. In order to optimize the cost of expenses for international money transfers there is a need to develop models and toolkit of automatic generation of the total amount of commissions in international interbank settlements. Accordingly, based on graph theory, approach to the construction of the model was developed.

  3. A transition-constrained discrete hidden Markov model for automatic sleep staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Shing-Tai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately one-third of the human lifespan is spent sleeping. To diagnose sleep problems, all-night polysomnographic (PSG recordings including electroencephalograms (EEGs, electrooculograms (EOGs and electromyograms (EMGs, are usually acquired from the patient and scored by a well-trained expert according to Rechtschaffen & Kales (R&K rules. Visual sleep scoring is a time-consuming and subjective process. Therefore, the development of an automatic sleep scoring method is desirable. Method The EEG, EOG and EMG signals from twenty subjects were measured. In addition to selecting sleep characteristics based on the 1968 R&K rules, features utilized in other research were collected. Thirteen features were utilized including temporal and spectrum analyses of the EEG, EOG and EMG signals, and a total of 158 hours of sleep data were recorded. Ten subjects were used to train the Discrete Hidden Markov Model (DHMM, and the remaining ten were tested by the trained DHMM for recognition. Furthermore, the 2-fold cross validation was performed during this experiment. Results Overall agreement between the expert and the results presented is 85.29%. With the exception of S1, the sensitivities of each stage were more than 81%. The most accurate stage was SWS (94.9%, and the least-accurately classified stage was S1 ( Conclusion The results of the experiments demonstrate that the proposed method significantly enhances the recognition rate when compared with prior studies.

  4. A new preprocessing parameter estimation based on geodesic active contour model for automatic vestibular neuritis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Slama, Amine; Mouelhi, Aymen; Sahli, Hanene; Manoubi, Sondes; Mbarek, Chiraz; Trabelsi, Hedi; Fnaiech, Farhat; Sayadi, Mounir

    2017-07-01

    The diagnostic of the vestibular neuritis (VN) presents many difficulties to traditional assessment methods This paper deals with a fully automatic VN diagnostic system based on nystagmus parameter estimation using a pupil detection algorithm. A geodesic active contour model is implemented to find an accurate segmentation region of the pupil. Hence, the novelty of the proposed algorithm is to speed up the standard segmentation by using a specific mask located on the region of interest. This allows a drastically computing time reduction and a great performance and accuracy of the obtained results. After using this fast segmentation algorithm, the obtained estimated parameters are represented in temporal and frequency settings. A useful principal component analysis (PCA) selection procedure is then applied to obtain a reduced number of estimated parameters which are used to train a multi neural network (MNN). Experimental results on 90 eye movement videos show the effectiveness and the accuracy of the proposed estimation algorithm versus previous work. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Performance of maximum likelihood mixture models to estimate nursery habitat contributions to fish stocks: a case study on sea bream Sparus aurata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin J. Niklitschek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Mixture models (MM can be used to describe mixed stocks considering three sets of parameters: the total number of contributing sources, their chemical baseline signatures and their mixing proportions. When all nursery sources have been previously identified and sampled for juvenile fish to produce baseline nursery-signatures, mixing proportions are the only unknown set of parameters to be estimated from the mixed-stock data. Otherwise, the number of sources, as well as some/all nursery-signatures may need to be also estimated from the mixed-stock data. Our goal was to assess bias and uncertainty in these MM parameters when estimated using unconditional maximum likelihood approaches (ML-MM, under several incomplete sampling and nursery-signature separation scenarios. Methods We used a comprehensive dataset containing otolith elemental signatures of 301 juvenile Sparus aurata, sampled in three contrasting years (2008, 2010, 2011, from four distinct nursery habitats. (Mediterranean lagoons Artificial nursery-source and mixed-stock datasets were produced considering: five different sampling scenarios where 0–4 lagoons were excluded from the nursery-source dataset and six nursery-signature separation scenarios that simulated data separated 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5 and 5.5 standard deviations among nursery-signature centroids. Bias (BI and uncertainty (SE were computed to assess reliability for each of the three sets of MM parameters. Results Both bias and uncertainty in mixing proportion estimates were low (BI ≤ 0.14, SE ≤ 0.06 when all nursery-sources were sampled but exhibited large variability among cohorts and increased with the number of non-sampled sources up to BI = 0.24 and SE = 0.11. Bias and variability in baseline signature estimates also increased with the number of non-sampled sources, but tended to be less biased, and more uncertain than mixing proportion ones, across all sampling scenarios (BI < 0.13, SE < 0

  6. Performance of maximum likelihood mixture models to estimate nursery habitat contributions to fish stocks: a case study on sea breamSparus aurata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklitschek, Edwin J; Darnaude, Audrey M

    2016-01-01

    Mixture models (MM) can be used to describe mixed stocks considering three sets of parameters: the total number of contributing sources, their chemical baseline signatures and their mixing proportions. When all nursery sources have been previously identified and sampled for juvenile fish to produce baseline nursery-signatures, mixing proportions are the only unknown set of parameters to be estimated from the mixed-stock data. Otherwise, the number of sources, as well as some/all nursery-signatures may need to be also estimated from the mixed-stock data. Our goal was to assess bias and uncertainty in these MM parameters when estimated using unconditional maximum likelihood approaches (ML-MM), under several incomplete sampling and nursery-signature separation scenarios. We used a comprehensive dataset containing otolith elemental signatures of 301 juvenile Sparus aurata , sampled in three contrasting years (2008, 2010, 2011), from four distinct nursery habitats. (Mediterranean lagoons) Artificial nursery-source and mixed-stock datasets were produced considering: five different sampling scenarios where 0-4 lagoons were excluded from the nursery-source dataset and six nursery-signature separation scenarios that simulated data separated 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5 and 5.5 standard deviations among nursery-signature centroids. Bias ( BI ) and uncertainty ( SE ) were computed to assess reliability for each of the three sets of MM parameters. Both bias and uncertainty in mixing proportion estimates were low ( BI ≤ 0.14, SE ≤ 0.06) when all nursery-sources were sampled but exhibited large variability among cohorts and increased with the number of non-sampled sources up to BI = 0.24 and SE = 0.11. Bias and variability in baseline signature estimates also increased with the number of non-sampled sources, but tended to be less biased, and more uncertain than mixing proportion ones, across all sampling scenarios ( BI < 0.13, SE < 0.29). Increasing separation among nursery

  7. Color Image Segmentation Based on Different Color Space Models Using Automatic GrabCut

    OpenAIRE

    Khattab, Dina; Ebied, Hala Mousher; Hussein, Ashraf Saad; Tolba, Mohamed Fahmy

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative study using different color spaces to evaluate the performance of color image segmentation using the automatic GrabCut technique. GrabCut is considered as one of the semiautomatic image segmentation techniques, since it requires user interaction for the initialization of the segmentation process. The automation of the GrabCut technique is proposed as a modification of the original semiautomatic one in order to eliminate the user interaction. The automatic Gra...

  8. Metodology of identification parameters of models control objects of automatic trailing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Zimchuk

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The determining factor for the successful solution of the problem of synthesis of optimal control systems of different processes are adequacy of mathematical model of control object. In practice, the options can differ from the objects taken priori, causing a need to clarification of them. In this context, the article presents the results of the development and application of methods parameters identification of mathematical models of control object of automatic trailing system. The stated problem in the article is solved provided that control object is fully controlled and observed, and a differential equation of control object is known a priori. The coefficients of this equation to be determined. Identifying quality criterion is to minimize the integral value of squared error of identification. The method is based on a description of the dynamics of the object in space state. Equation of identification synthesized using the vector-matrix representation of model. This equation describes the interconnection of coefficients of matrix state and control with inputs and outputs of object. The initial data for calculation are the results of experimental investigation of the reaction of phase coordinates of control object at a typical input signal. The process of calculating the model parameters is reduced to solving the system of equations of the first order each. Application the above approach is illustrated in the example identification of coefficients transfer function of control object first order. Results of digital simulation are presented, they are confirming the justice of set out mathematical calculations. The approach enables to do the identification of models of one-dimensional and multidimensional objects and does not require a large amount of calculation for its implementation. The order of identified model is limited capabilities of measurement phase coordinates of corresponding control object. The practical significance of the work is

  9. Modelling Pasture-based Automatic Milking System Herds: Grazeable Forage Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Islam

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges to increase milk production in a large pasture-based herd with an automatic milking system (AMS is to grow forages within a 1-km radius, as increases in walking distance increases milking interval and reduces yield. The main objective of this study was to explore sustainable forage option technologies that can supply high amount of grazeable forages for AMS herds using the Agricultural Production Systems Simulator (APSIM model. Three different basic simulation scenarios (with irrigation were carried out using forage crops (namely maize, soybean and sorghum for the spring-summer period. Subsequent crops in the three scenarios were forage rape over-sown with ryegrass. Each individual simulation was run using actual climatic records for the period from 1900 to 2010. Simulated highest forage yields in maize, soybean and sorghum- (each followed by forage rape-ryegrass based rotations were 28.2, 22.9, and 19.3 t dry matter/ha, respectively. The simulations suggested that the irrigation requirement could increase by up to 18%, 16%, and 17% respectively in those rotations in El-Niño years compared to neutral years. On the other hand, irrigation requirement could increase by up to 25%, 23%, and 32% in maize, soybean and sorghum based rotations in El-Nino years compared to La-Nina years. However, irrigation requirement could decrease by up to 8%, 7%, and 13% in maize, soybean and sorghum based rotations in La-Nina years compared to neutral years. The major implication of this study is that APSIM models have potentials in devising preferred forage options to maximise grazeable forage yield which may create the opportunity to grow more forage in small areas around the AMS which in turn will minimise walking distance and milking interval and thus increase milk production. Our analyses also suggest that simulation analysis may provide decision support during climatic uncertainty.

  10. Automatic detection of alpine rockslides in continuous seismic data using hidden Markov models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammeier, Franziska; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Hammer, Conny; Haslinger, Florian; Loew, Simon

    2016-02-01

    Data from continuously recording permanent seismic networks can contain information about rockslide occurrence and timing complementary to eyewitness observations and thus aid in construction of robust event catalogs. However, detecting infrequent rockslide signals within large volumes of continuous seismic waveform data remains challenging and often requires demanding manual intervention. We adapted an automatic classification method using hidden Markov models to detect rockslide signals in seismic data from two stations in central Switzerland. We first processed 21 known rockslides, with event volumes spanning 3 orders of magnitude and station event distances varying by 1 order of magnitude, which resulted in 13 and 19 successfully classified events at the two stations. Retraining the models to incorporate seismic noise from the day of the event improved the respective results to 16 and 19 successful classifications. The missed events generally had low signal-to-noise ratio and small to medium volumes. We then processed nearly 14 years of continuous seismic data from the same two stations to detect previously unknown events. After postprocessing, we classified 30 new events as rockslides, of which we could verify three through independent observation. In particular, the largest new event, with estimated volume of 500,000 m3, was not generally known within the Swiss landslide community, highlighting the importance of regional seismic data analysis even in densely populated mountainous regions. Our method can be easily implemented as part of existing earthquake monitoring systems, and with an average event detection rate of about two per month, manual verification would not significantly increase operational workload.

  11. Modelling Pasture-based Automatic Milking System Herds: Grazeable Forage Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. R.; Garcia, S. C.; Clark, C. E. F.; Kerrisk, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges to increase milk production in a large pasture-based herd with an automatic milking system (AMS) is to grow forages within a 1-km radius, as increases in walking distance increases milking interval and reduces yield. The main objective of this study was to explore sustainable forage option technologies that can supply high amount of grazeable forages for AMS herds using the Agricultural Production Systems Simulator (APSIM) model. Three different basic simulation scenarios (with irrigation) were carried out using forage crops (namely maize, soybean and sorghum) for the spring-summer period. Subsequent crops in the three scenarios were forage rape over-sown with ryegrass. Each individual simulation was run using actual climatic records for the period from 1900 to 2010. Simulated highest forage yields in maize, soybean and sorghum- (each followed by forage rape-ryegrass) based rotations were 28.2, 22.9, and 19.3 t dry matter/ha, respectively. The simulations suggested that the irrigation requirement could increase by up to 18%, 16%, and 17% respectively in those rotations in El-Niño years compared to neutral years. On the other hand, irrigation requirement could increase by up to 25%, 23%, and 32% in maize, soybean and sorghum based rotations in El-Nino years compared to La-Nina years. However, irrigation requirement could decrease by up to 8%, 7%, and 13% in maize, soybean and sorghum based rotations in La-Nina years compared to neutral years. The major implication of this study is that APSIM models have potentials in devising preferred forage options to maximise grazeable forage yield which may create the opportunity to grow more forage in small areas around the AMS which in turn will minimise walking distance and milking interval and thus increase milk production. Our analyses also suggest that simulation analysis may provide decision support during climatic uncertainty. PMID:25924963

  12. GAMBIT. The global and modular beyond-the-standard-model inference tool. Addendum for GAMBIT 1.1. Mathematica backends, SUSYHD interface and updated likelihoods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athron, Peter; Balazs, Csaba; Bringmann, Torsten; Dal, Lars A.; Gonzalo, Tomas E.; Krislock, Abram; Raklev, Are; Buckley, Andy; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Conrad, Jan; Edsjoe, Joakim; Farmer, Ben; Lundberg, Johan; Cornell, Jonathan M.; Dickinson, Hugh; Jackson, Paul; White, Martin; Kvellestad, Anders; Savage, Christopher; McKay, James; Mahmoudi, Farvah; Martinez, Gregory D.; Putze, Antje; Ripken, Joachim; Rogan, Christopher; Saavedra, Aldo; Scott, Pat; Seo, Seon-Hee; Serra, Nicola; Weniger, Christoph; Wild, Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    In Ref. (GAMBIT Collaboration: Athron et. al., Eur. Phys. J. C.arXiv:1705.07908, 2017) we introduced the global-fitting framework GAMBIT. In this addendum, we describe a new minor version increment of this package. GAMBIT 1.1 includes full support for Mathematica backends, which we describe in some detail here. As an example, we backend SUSYHD (Vega and Villadoro, JHEP 07:159, 2015), which calculates the mass of the Higgs boson in the MSSM from effective field theory. We also describe updated likelihoods in PrecisionBit and DarkBit, and updated decay data included in DecayBit. (orig.)

  13. GAMBIT: the global and modular beyond-the-standard-model inference tool. Addendum for GAMBIT 1.1: Mathematica backends, SUSYHD interface and updated likelihoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athron, Peter; Balazs, Csaba; Bringmann, Torsten; Buckley, Andy; Chrząszcz, Marcin; Conrad, Jan; Cornell, Jonathan M.; Dal, Lars A.; Dickinson, Hugh; Edsjö, Joakim; Farmer, Ben; Gonzalo, Tomás E.; Jackson, Paul; Krislock, Abram; Kvellestad, Anders; Lundberg, Johan; McKay, James; Mahmoudi, Farvah; Martinez, Gregory D.; Putze, Antje; Raklev, Are; Ripken, Joachim; Rogan, Christopher; Saavedra, Aldo; Savage, Christopher; Scott, Pat; Seo, Seon-Hee; Serra, Nicola; Weniger, Christoph; White, Martin; Wild, Sebastian

    2018-02-01

    In Ref. (GAMBIT Collaboration: Athron et. al., Eur. Phys. J. C. arXiv:1705.07908, 2017) we introduced the global-fitting framework GAMBIT. In this addendum, we describe a new minor version increment of this package. GAMBIT 1.1 includes full support for Mathematica backends, which we describe in some detail here. As an example, we backend SUSYHD (Vega and Villadoro, JHEP 07:159, 2015), which calculates the mass of the Higgs boson in the MSSM from effective field theory. We also describe updated likelihoods in PrecisionBit and DarkBit, and updated decay data included in DecayBit.

  14. Automatic sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Haeseler, Friedrich

    2003-01-01

    Automatic sequences are sequences which are produced by a finite automaton. Although they are not random they may look as being random. They are complicated, in the sense of not being not ultimately periodic, they may look rather complicated, in the sense that it may not be easy to name the rule by which the sequence is generated, however there exists a rule which generates the sequence. The concept automatic sequences has special applications in algebra, number theory, finite automata and formal languages, combinatorics on words. The text deals with different aspects of automatic sequences, in particular:· a general introduction to automatic sequences· the basic (combinatorial) properties of automatic sequences· the algebraic approach to automatic sequences· geometric objects related to automatic sequences.

  15. Penalized Maximum Likelihood Estimation for univariate normal mixture distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridolfi, A.; Idier, J.

    2001-01-01

    Due to singularities of the likelihood function, the maximum likelihood approach for the estimation of the parameters of normal mixture models is an acknowledged ill posed optimization problem. Ill posedness is solved by penalizing the likelihood function. In the Bayesian framework, it amounts to incorporating an inverted gamma prior in the likelihood function. A penalized version of the EM algorithm is derived, which is still explicit and which intrinsically assures that the estimates are not singular. Numerical evidence of the latter property is put forward with a test

  16. MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF AUTOMATIC FLIGHT OF POLIKOPTER UAV NAU PKF "AURORA"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Bo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Development of mathematical and experimental models of polikopter UAV NAU PKF "Aurora" of oktakopter scheme for experimental flights in manual, semi-automatic and unmanned mode.                  Methods: 14/03/2016 - 21/03/2016 held a serіe of experiental flights (10 flights of 10 rats on altitude 700 meters on polіkopter (oktakopter NAU PKF "Aurora" in germetic kabіn with the study of his somatic,  nevrologіcal status after the flight. Flights also carried out with experimental animals on board for such a safety assessment. Results: The obtained logs of 'black box' of the autopilot indicate very small (almost invisible fluctuations in pitch, roll and yaw during the flight, minor variations on altitude during almost stationary hovering of polikopter at different altitudes, and fully adequate to movements and maneuvers of aircraft vibrations and parameters of these sensors. Discussion: In the course of these studies demonstrated experimentally the possibility of completely safe flight of the mammals (rats on polikopter vehicle, even in the open cockpit. With appropriate refinement possible in the future to raise the issue of the development and construction of passenger polikopter flyers for totally safe air transportation of people [6,7,8]. In terms of adverse mechanical effects on the human body (acceleration overload fluctuations, vibrations polikopter transport is safer and less harmful to the passengers than road transport, which is particularly important in the delivery of patient of neurosurgical, politravmatological, cardiologycal and critical care profile at critical condition in intensive care units and operating hospitals and medical centers.

  17. Model of automatic fuel management for the Atucha II nuclear central with the PUMA IV code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marconi G, J.F.; Tarazaga, A.E.; Romero, L.D.

    2007-01-01

    The Atucha II central is a heavy water power station and natural uranium. For this reason and due to the first floor reactivity excess that have this type of reactors, it is necessary to carry out a continuous fuel management and with the central in power (for the case of Atucha II every 0.7 days approximately). To maintain in operation these centrals and to achieve a good fuels economy, different types of negotiate of fuels that include areas and roads where the fuels displace inside the core are proved; it is necessary to prove the great majority of these managements in long periods in order to corroborate the behavior of the power station and the burnt of extraction of the fuel elements. To carry out this work it is of great help that a program implements the approaches to continue in each replacement, using the roads and areas of each administration type to prove, and this way to obtain as results the one regulations execution in the time and the average burnt of extraction of the fuel elements, being fundamental this last data for the operator company of the power station. To carry out the previous work it is necessary that a physicist with experience in fuel management proves each one of the possible managements, even those that quickly can be discarded if its don't fulfill with the regulatory standards or its possess an average extraction burnt too much low. For this it is of fundamental help that with an automatic model the different administrations are proven and lastly the physicist analyzes the more important cases. The pattern in question not only allows to program different types of roads and areas of fuel management, but rather it also foresees the possibility to disable some of the approaches. (Author)

  18. A transition-constrained discrete hidden Markov model for automatic sleep staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shing-Tai; Kuo, Chih-En; Zeng, Jian-Hong; Liang, Sheng-Fu

    2012-08-21

    Approximately one-third of the human lifespan is spent sleeping. To diagnose sleep problems, all-night polysomnographic (PSG) recordings including electroencephalograms (EEGs), electrooculograms (EOGs) and electromyograms (EMGs), are usually acquired from the patient and scored by a well-trained expert according to Rechtschaffen & Kales (R&K) rules. Visual sleep scoring is a time-consuming and subjective process. Therefore, the development of an automatic sleep scoring method is desirable. The EEG, EOG and EMG signals from twenty subjects were measured. In addition to selecting sleep characteristics based on the 1968 R&K rules, features utilized in other research were collected. Thirteen features were utilized including temporal and spectrum analyses of the EEG, EOG and EMG signals, and a total of 158  hours of sleep data were recorded. Ten subjects were used to train the Discrete Hidden Markov Model (DHMM), and the remaining ten were tested by the trained DHMM for recognition. Furthermore, the 2-fold cross validation was performed during this experiment. Overall agreement between the expert and the results presented is 85.29%. With the exception of S1, the sensitivities of each stage were more than 81%. The most accurate stage was SWS (94.9%), and the least-accurately classified stage was S1 (<34%). In the majority of cases, S1 was classified as Wake (21%), S2 (33%) or REM sleep (12%), consistent with previous studies. However, the total time of S1 in the 20 all-night sleep recordings was less than 4%. The results of the experiments demonstrate that the proposed method significantly enhances the recognition rate when compared with prior studies.

  19. Finite element analysis of osteosynthesis screw fixation in the bone stock: an appropriate method for automatic screw modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Wieding

    Full Text Available The use of finite element analysis (FEA has grown to a more and more important method in the field of biomedical engineering and biomechanics. Although increased computational performance allows new ways to generate more complex biomechanical models, in the area of orthopaedic surgery, solid modelling of screws and drill holes represent a limitation of their use for individual cases and an increase of computational costs. To cope with these requirements, different methods for numerical screw modelling have therefore been investigated to improve its application diversity. Exemplarily, fixation was performed for stabilization of a large segmental femoral bone defect by an osteosynthesis plate. Three different numerical modelling techniques for implant fixation were used in this study, i.e. without screw modelling, screws as solid elements as well as screws as structural elements. The latter one offers the possibility to implement automatically generated screws with variable geometry on arbitrary FE models. Structural screws were parametrically generated by a Python script for the automatic generation in the FE-software Abaqus/CAE on both a tetrahedral and a hexahedral meshed femur. Accuracy of the FE models was confirmed by experimental testing using a composite femur with a segmental defect and an identical osteosynthesis plate for primary stabilisation with titanium screws. Both deflection of the femoral head and the gap alteration were measured with an optical measuring system with an accuracy of approximately 3 µm. For both screw modelling techniques a sufficient correlation of approximately 95% between numerical and experimental analysis was found. Furthermore, using structural elements for screw modelling the computational time could be reduced by 85% using hexahedral elements instead of tetrahedral elements for femur meshing. The automatically generated screw modelling offers a realistic simulation of the osteosynthesis fixation with

  20. Finite element analysis of osteosynthesis screw fixation in the bone stock: an appropriate method for automatic screw modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieding, Jan; Souffrant, Robert; Fritsche, Andreas; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The use of finite element analysis (FEA) has grown to a more and more important method in the field of biomedical engineering and biomechanics. Although increased computational performance allows new ways to generate more complex biomechanical models, in the area of orthopaedic surgery, solid modelling of screws and drill holes represent a limitation of their use for individual cases and an increase of computational costs. To cope with these requirements, different methods for numerical screw modelling have therefore been investigated to improve its application diversity. Exemplarily, fixation was performed for stabilization of a large segmental femoral bone defect by an osteosynthesis plate. Three different numerical modelling techniques for implant fixation were used in this study, i.e. without screw modelling, screws as solid elements as well as screws as structural elements. The latter one offers the possibility to implement automatically generated screws with variable geometry on arbitrary FE models. Structural screws were parametrically generated by a Python script for the automatic generation in the FE-software Abaqus/CAE on both a tetrahedral and a hexahedral meshed femur. Accuracy of the FE models was confirmed by experimental testing using a composite femur with a segmental defect and an identical osteosynthesis plate for primary stabilisation with titanium screws. Both deflection of the femoral head and the gap alteration were measured with an optical measuring system with an accuracy of approximately 3 µm. For both screw modelling techniques a sufficient correlation of approximately 95% between numerical and experimental analysis was found. Furthermore, using structural elements for screw modelling the computational time could be reduced by 85% using hexahedral elements instead of tetrahedral elements for femur meshing. The automatically generated screw modelling offers a realistic simulation of the osteosynthesis fixation with screws in the adjacent

  1. Automatic thoracic anatomy segmentation on CT images using hierarchical fuzzy models and registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kaiqiong; Udupa, Jayaram K; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Zhao, Liming; Torigian, Drew A

    2016-03-01

    In an attempt to overcome several hurdles that exist in organ segmentation approaches, the authors previously described a general automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) methodology for segmenting all major organs in multiple body regions body-wide [J. K. Udupa et al., "Body-wide hierarchical fuzzy modeling, recognition, and delineation of anatomy in medical images," Med. Image Anal. 18(5), 752-771 (2014)]. That approach utilized fuzzy modeling strategies, a hierarchical organization of organs, and divided the segmentation task into a recognition step to localize organs which was then followed by a delineation step to demarcate the boundary of organs. It achieved speed and accuracy without employing image/object registration which is commonly utilized in many reported methods, particularly atlas-based. In this paper, our aim is to study how registration may influence performance of the AAR approach. By tightly coupling the recognition and delineation steps, by performing registration in the hierarchical order of the organs, and through several object-specific refinements, the authors demonstrate that improved accuracy for recognition and delineation can be achieved by judicial use of image/object registration. The presented approach consists of three processes: model building, hierarchical recognition, and delineation. Labeled binary images for each organ are registered and aligned into a 3D fuzzy set representing the fuzzy shape model for the organ. The hierarchical relation and mean location relation between different organs are captured in the model. The gray intensity distributions of the corresponding regions of the organ in the original image are also recorded in the model. Following the hierarchical structure and location relation, the fuzzy shape model of different organs is registered to the given target image to achieve object recognition. A fuzzy connectedness delineation method is then employed to obtain the final segmentation result of organs with seed

  2. Automatic left-atrial segmentation from cardiac 3D ultrasound: a dual-chamber model-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Nuno; Sarvari, Sebastian I.; Orderud, Fredrik; Gérard, Olivier; D'hooge, Jan; Samset, Eigil

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic solution for segmentation and quantification of the left atrium (LA) from 3D cardiac ultrasound. A model-based framework is applied, making use of (deformable) active surfaces to model the endocardial surfaces of cardiac chambers, allowing incorporation of a priori anatomical information in a simple fashion. A dual-chamber model (LA and left ventricle) is used to detect and track the atrio-ventricular (AV) plane, without any user input. Both chambers are represented by parametric surfaces and a Kalman filter is used to fit the model to the position of the endocardial walls detected in the image, providing accurate detection and tracking during the whole cardiac cycle. This framework was tested in 20 transthoracic cardiac ultrasound volumetric recordings of healthy volunteers, and evaluated using manual traces of a clinical expert as a reference. The 3D meshes obtained with the automatic method were close to the reference contours at all cardiac phases (mean distance of 0.03+/-0.6 mm). The AV plane was detected with an accuracy of -0.6+/-1.0 mm. The LA volumes assessed automatically were also in agreement with the reference (mean +/-1.96 SD): 0.4+/-5.3 ml, 2.1+/-12.6 ml, and 1.5+/-7.8 ml at end-diastolic, end-systolic and pre-atrial-contraction frames, respectively. This study shows that the proposed method can be used for automatic volumetric assessment of the LA, considerably reducing the analysis time and effort when compared to manual analysis.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis using parsimony and likelihood methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z

    1996-02-01

    The assumptions underlying the maximum-parsimony (MP) method of phylogenetic tree reconstruction were intuitively examined by studying the way the method works. Computer simulations were performed to corroborate the intuitive examination. Parsimony appears to involve very stringent assumptions concerning the process of sequence evolution, such as constancy of substitution rates between nucleotides, constancy of rates across nucleotide sites, and equal branch lengths in the tree. For practical data analysis, the requirement of equal branch lengths means similar substitution rates among lineages (the existence of an approximate molecular clock), relatively long interior branches, and also few species in the data. However, a small amount of evolution is neither a necessary nor a sufficient requirement of the method. The difficulties involved in the application of current statistical estimation theory to tree reconstruction were discussed, and it was suggested that the approach proposed by Felsenstein (1981, J. Mol. Evol. 17: 368-376) for topology estimation, as well as its many variations and extensions, differs fundamentally from the maximum likelihood estimation of a conventional statistical parameter. Evidence was presented showing that the Felsenstein approach does not share the asymptotic efficiency of the maximum likelihood estimator of a statistical parameter. Computer simulations were performed to study the probability that MP recovers the true tree under a hierarchy of models of nucleotide substitution; its performance relative to the likelihood method was especially noted. The results appeared to support the intuitive examination of the assumptions underlying MP. When a simple model of nucleotide substitution was assumed to generate data, the probability that MP recovers the true topology could be as high as, or even higher than, that for the likelihood method. When the assumed model became more complex and realistic, e.g., when substitution rates were

  4. Photogrammetric Model Based Method of Automatic Orientation of Space Cargo Ship Relative to the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokhinov, Y. B.; Chernyavskiy, A. S.; Zheltov, S. Y.

    2012-07-01

    The technical problem of creating the new Russian version of an automatic Space Cargo Ship (SCS) for the International Space Station (ISS) is inseparably connected to the development of a digital video system for automatically measuring the SCS position relative to ISS in the process of spacecraft docking. This paper presents a method for estimating the orientation elements based on the use of a highly detailed digital model of the ISS. The input data are digital frames from a calibrated video system and the initial values of orientation elements, these can be estimated from navigation devices or by fast-and-rough viewpoint-dependent algorithm. Then orientation elements should be defined precisely by means of algorithmic processing. The main idea is to solve the exterior orientation problem mainly on the basis of contour information of the frame image of ISS instead of ground control points. A detailed digital model is used for generating raster templates of ISS nodes; the templates are used to detect and locate the nodes on the target image with the required accuracy. The process is performed for every frame, the resulting parameters are considered to be the orientation elements. The Kalman filter is used for statistical support of the estimation process and real time pose tracking. Finally, the modeling results presented show that the proposed method can be regarded as one means to ensure the algorithmic support of automatic space ships docking.

  5. PHOTOGRAMMETRIC MODEL BASED METHOD OF AUTOMATIC ORIENTATION OF SPACE CARGO SHIP RELATIVE TO THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. B. Blokhinov

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The technical problem of creating the new Russian version of an automatic Space Cargo Ship (SCS for the International Space Station (ISS is inseparably connected to the development of a digital video system for automatically measuring the SCS position relative to ISS in the process of spacecraft docking. This paper presents a method for estimating the orientation elements based on the use of a highly detailed digital model of the ISS. The input data are digital frames from a calibrated video system and the initial values of orientation elements, these can be estimated from navigation devices or by fast-and-rough viewpoint-dependent algorithm. Then orientation elements should be defined precisely by means of algorithmic processing. The main idea is to solve the exterior orientation problem mainly on the basis of contour information of the frame image of ISS instead of ground control points. A detailed digital model is used for generating raster templates of ISS nodes; the templates are used to detect and locate the nodes on the target image with the required accuracy. The process is performed for every frame, the resulting parameters are considered to be the orientation elements. The Kalman filter is used for statistical support of the estimation process and real time pose tracking. Finally, the modeling results presented show that the proposed method can be regarded as one means to ensure the algorithmic support of automatic space ships docking.

  6. SU-E-T-50: Automatic Validation of Megavoltage Beams Modeled for Clinical Use in Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melchior, M [Terapia Radiante S.A., La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Salinas Aranda, F [Vidt Centro Medico, Ciudad Autonoma De Buenos Aires (Argentina); 21st Century Oncology, Ft. Myers, FL (United States); Sciutto, S [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dodat, D [Centro Medico Privado Dean Funes, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Larragueta, N [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Centro Medico Privado Dean Funes, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To automatically validate megavoltage beams modeled in XiO™ 4.50 (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) and Varian Eclipse™ Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) (Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA, USA), reducing validation time before beam-on for clinical use. Methods: A software application that can automatically read and analyze DICOM RT Dose and W2CAD files was developed using MatLab integrated development environment.TPS calculated dose distributions, in DICOM RT Dose format, and dose values measured in different Varian Clinac beams, in W2CAD format, were compared. Experimental beam data used were those acquired for beam commissioning, collected on a water phantom with a 2D automatic beam scanning system.Two methods were chosen to evaluate dose distributions fitting: gamma analysis and point tests described in Appendix E of IAEA TECDOC-1583. Depth dose curves and beam profiles were evaluated for both open and wedged beams. Tolerance parameters chosen for gamma analysis are 3% and 3 mm dose and distance, respectively.Absolute dose was measured independently at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 to validate software results. Results: TPS calculated depth dose distributions agree with measured beam data under fixed precision values at all depths analyzed. Measured beam dose profiles match TPS calculated doses with high accuracy in both open and wedged beams. Depth and profile dose distributions fitting analysis show gamma values < 1. Relative errors at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 meet therein recommended tolerances.Independent absolute dose measurements at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 confirm software results. Conclusion: Automatic validation of megavoltage beams modeled for their use in the clinic was accomplished. The software tool developed proved efficient, giving users a convenient and reliable environment to decide whether to accept or not a beam model for clinical use. Validation time before beam-on for clinical use

  7. SU-E-T-50: Automatic Validation of Megavoltage Beams Modeled for Clinical Use in Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melchior, M; Salinas Aranda, F; Sciutto, S; Dodat, D; Larragueta, N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To automatically validate megavoltage beams modeled in XiO™ 4.50 (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) and Varian Eclipse™ Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) (Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA, USA), reducing validation time before beam-on for clinical use. Methods: A software application that can automatically read and analyze DICOM RT Dose and W2CAD files was developed using MatLab integrated development environment.TPS calculated dose distributions, in DICOM RT Dose format, and dose values measured in different Varian Clinac beams, in W2CAD format, were compared. Experimental beam data used were those acquired for beam commissioning, collected on a water phantom with a 2D automatic beam scanning system.Two methods were chosen to evaluate dose distributions fitting: gamma analysis and point tests described in Appendix E of IAEA TECDOC-1583. Depth dose curves and beam profiles were evaluated for both open and wedged beams. Tolerance parameters chosen for gamma analysis are 3% and 3 mm dose and distance, respectively.Absolute dose was measured independently at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 to validate software results. Results: TPS calculated depth dose distributions agree with measured beam data under fixed precision values at all depths analyzed. Measured beam dose profiles match TPS calculated doses with high accuracy in both open and wedged beams. Depth and profile dose distributions fitting analysis show gamma values < 1. Relative errors at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 meet therein recommended tolerances.Independent absolute dose measurements at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 confirm software results. Conclusion: Automatic validation of megavoltage beams modeled for their use in the clinic was accomplished. The software tool developed proved efficient, giving users a convenient and reliable environment to decide whether to accept or not a beam model for clinical use. Validation time before beam-on for clinical use

  8. A Predictive Likelihood Approach to Bayesian Averaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Jeřábek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate time series forecasting is applied in a wide range of economic activities related to regional competitiveness and is the basis of almost all macroeconomic analysis. In this paper we combine multivariate density forecasts of GDP growth, inflation and real interest rates from four various models, two type of Bayesian vector autoregression (BVAR models, a New Keynesian dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE model of small open economy and DSGE-VAR model. The performance of models is identified using historical dates including domestic economy and foreign economy, which is represented by countries of the Eurozone. Because forecast accuracy of observed models are different, the weighting scheme based on the predictive likelihood, the trace of past MSE matrix, model ranks are used to combine the models. The equal-weight scheme is used as a simple combination scheme. The results show that optimally combined densities are comparable to the best individual models.

  9. Modelling the adoption of automatic milking systems in Noord-Holland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Floridi, M.; Bartolini, F.; Peerlings, J.H.M.; Polman, N.B.P.; Viaggi, D.

    2013-01-01

    Innovation and new technology adoption represent two central elements for the business and industry development process in agriculture. One of the most relevant innovations in dairy farms is the robotisation of the milking process through the adoption of Automatic Milking Systems (AMS). The purpose

  10. 76 FR 8917 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Automatic Speed Protection for Design Dive Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ...; Automatic Speed Protection for Design Dive Speed AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... design features include a high speed protection system. These proposed special conditions contain the... Design Features The GVI is equipped with a high speed protection system that limits nose down pilot...

  11. Machine Beats Experts: Automatic Discovery of Skill Models for Data-Driven Online Course Refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Noboru; Furukawa, Tadanobu; Bier, Norman; Faloutsos, Christos

    2015-01-01

    How can we automatically determine which skills must be mastered for the successful completion of an online course? Large-scale online courses (e.g., MOOCs) often contain a broad range of contents frequently intended to be a semester's worth of materials; this breadth often makes it difficult to articulate an accurate set of skills and knowledge…

  12. Performance Modelling of Automatic Identification System with Extended Field of View

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauersen, Troels; Mortensen, Hans Peter; Pedersen, Nikolaj Bisgaard

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with AIS (Automatic Identification System) behavior, to investigate the severity of packet collisions in an extended field of view (FOV). This is an important issue for satellite-based AIS, and the main goal is a feasibility study to find out to what extent an increased FOV...

  13. Automatic Service Derivation from Business Process Model Repositories via Semantic Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leopold, H.; Pittke, F.; Mendling, J.

    2015-01-01

    Although several approaches for service identification have been defined in research and practice, there is a notable lack of fully automated techniques. In this paper, we address the problem of manual work in the context of service derivation and present an approach for automatically deriving

  14. Automatic Promotion and Student Dropout: Evidence from Uganda, Using Propensity Score in Difference in Differences Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okurut, Jeje Moses

    2018-01-01

    The impact of automatic promotion practice on students dropping out of Uganda's primary education was assessed using propensity score in difference in differences analysis technique. The analysis strategy was instrumental in addressing the selection bias problem, as well as biases arising from common trends over time, and permanent latent…

  15. Improved automatic filtering methodology for an optimal pharmacokinetic modelling of DCE-MR images of the prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez Martinez, V.; Bosch Roig, I.; Sanz Requena, R.

    2016-07-01

    In Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance (DCEMR) studies with high temporal resolution, images are quite noisy due to the complicate balance between temporal and spatial resolution. For this reason, the temporal curves extracted from the images present remarkable noise levels and, because of that, the pharmacokinetic parameters calculated by least squares fitting from the curves and the arterial phase (a useful marker in tumour diagnosis which appears in curves with high arterial contribution) are affected. In order to solve these limitations, an automatic filtering method was developed by our group. In this work, an advanced automatic filtering methodology is presented to further improve noise reduction of the temporal curves in order to obtain more accurate kinetic parameters and a proper modelling of the arterial phase. (Author)

  16. Efficient Detection of Repeating Sites to Accelerate Phylogenetic Likelihood Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobert, K; Stamatakis, A; Flouri, T

    2017-03-01

    The phylogenetic likelihood function (PLF) is the major computational bottleneck in several applications of evolutionary biology such as phylogenetic inference, species delimitation, model selection, and divergence times estimation. Given the alignment, a tree and the evolutionary model parameters, the likelihood function computes the conditional likelihood vectors for every node of the tree. Vector entries for which all input data are identical result in redundant likelihood operations which, in turn, yield identical conditional values. Such operations can be omitted for improving run-time and, using appropriate data structures, reducing memory usage. We present a fast, novel method for identifying and omitting such redundant operations in phylogenetic likelihood calculations, and assess the performance improvement and memory savings attained by our method. Using empirical and simulated data sets, we show that a prototype implementation of our method yields up to 12-fold speedups and uses up to 78% less memory than one of the fastest and most highly tuned implementations of the PLF currently available. Our method is generic and can seamlessly be integrated into any phylogenetic likelihood implementation. [Algorithms; maximum likelihood; phylogenetic likelihood function; phylogenetics]. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists.

  17. AUTOCASK (AUTOmatic Generation of 3-D CASK models). A microcomputer based system for shipping cask design review analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerhard, M.A.; Sommer, S.C.

    1995-04-01

    AUTOCASK (AUTOmatic Generation of 3-D CASK models) is a microcomputer-based system of computer programs and databases developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the structural analysis of shipping casks for radioactive material. Model specification is performed on the microcomputer, and the analyses are performed on an engineering workstation or mainframe computer. AUTOCASK is based on 80386/80486 compatible microcomputers. The system is composed of a series of menus, input programs, display programs, a mesh generation program, and archive programs. All data is entered through fill-in-the-blank input screens that contain descriptive data requests

  18. AUTOCASK (AUTOmatic Generation of 3-D CASK models). A microcomputer based system for shipping cask design review analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhard, M.A.; Sommer, S.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    AUTOCASK (AUTOmatic Generation of 3-D CASK models) is a microcomputer-based system of computer programs and databases developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the structural analysis of shipping casks for radioactive material. Model specification is performed on the microcomputer, and the analyses are performed on an engineering workstation or mainframe computer. AUTOCASK is based on 80386/80486 compatible microcomputers. The system is composed of a series of menus, input programs, display programs, a mesh generation program, and archive programs. All data is entered through fill-in-the-blank input screens that contain descriptive data requests.

  19. MATHEMATICAL MODELING AND SIMULATION OF AUTOMATIC CONTROL FOR QUINTUPLE EFFECT EVAPORATION OF CENTRAL SUGAR “EL PALMAR” IN VENEZUELA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisoviett Pérez Pinto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the mathematical modeling and simulation of the automatic control of the quintuple effect of evaporation of a sugar mill “El Palmar” in Venezuela is made. The multiple effect consist of 5 evaporators Robert type, with equal characteristics, connected in series. Starting from the desired operating conditions and control requirements: level in each evaporator vessel, cane syrup concentration and pressure in the fifth evaporator vessel using mass balances, balance on solids for each evaporator and energy to the barometric condenser is present at the output of the fifth vessel, the nonlinear model of the process is obtained, resulting in a system of multiple inputs and multiple outputs, with strong interactions between variables. In the design of the system of the automatic process control, we are interested in maintaining the variables that characterize the performance of it and they are regulated in an operating point; we proceed to linearize the model around an equilibrium point, resulting in a new model in terms of the variables variations around an environment from that point. Then, it is processed the model obtained in terms of input and output relations, based on the characterization of it in terms of variables and transfer relationships in the complex frequency domain. Finally, the evaporation process is simulated, establishing the adequacy of the model to the real process.

  20. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan

    2012-06-21

    In multiple plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies of bladder cancer, a library of plans corresponding to different bladder volumes is created based on images acquired in early treatment sessions. Subsequently, the plan for the smallest PTV safely covering the bladder on cone-beam CT (CBCT) is selected as the plan of the day. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic bladder segmentation approach suitable for CBCT scans and test its ability to select the appropriate plan from the library of plans for such an ART procedure. Twenty-three bladder cancer patients with a planning CT and on average 11.6 CBCT scans were included in our study. For each patient, all CBCT scans were matched to the planning CT on bony anatomy. Bladder contours were manually delineated for each planning CT (for model building) and CBCT (for model building and validation). The automatic segmentation method consisted of two steps. A patient-specific bladder deformation model was built from the training data set of each patient (the planning CT and the first five CBCT scans). Then, the model was applied to automatically segment bladders in the validation data of the same patient (the remaining CBCT scans). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the training data to model patient-specific bladder deformation patterns. The number of PCA modes for each patient was chosen such that the bladder shapes in the training set could be represented by such number of PCA modes with less than 0.1 cm mean residual error. The automatic segmentation started from the bladder shape of a reference CBCT, which was adjusted by changing the weight of each PCA mode. As a result, the segmentation contour was deformed consistently with the training set to fit the bladder in the validation image. A cost function was defined by the absolute difference between the directional gradient field of reference CBCT sampled on the corresponding bladder contour and the directional gradient field of validation

  1. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Xiangfei; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan; Van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja

    2012-01-01

    In multiple plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies of bladder cancer, a library of plans corresponding to different bladder volumes is created based on images acquired in early treatment sessions. Subsequently, the plan for the smallest PTV safely covering the bladder on cone-beam CT (CBCT) is selected as the plan of the day. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic bladder segmentation approach suitable for CBCT scans and test its ability to select the appropriate plan from the library of plans for such an ART procedure. Twenty-three bladder cancer patients with a planning CT and on average 11.6 CBCT scans were included in our study. For each patient, all CBCT scans were matched to the planning CT on bony anatomy. Bladder contours were manually delineated for each planning CT (for model building) and CBCT (for model building and validation). The automatic segmentation method consisted of two steps. A patient-specific bladder deformation model was built from the training data set of each patient (the planning CT and the first five CBCT scans). Then, the model was applied to automatically segment bladders in the validation data of the same patient (the remaining CBCT scans). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the training data to model patient-specific bladder deformation patterns. The number of PCA modes for each patient was chosen such that the bladder shapes in the training set could be represented by such number of PCA modes with less than 0.1 cm mean residual error. The automatic segmentation started from the bladder shape of a reference CBCT, which was adjusted by changing the weight of each PCA mode. As a result, the segmentation contour was deformed consistently with the training set to fit the bladder in the validation image. A cost function was defined by the absolute difference between the directional gradient field of reference CBCT sampled on the corresponding bladder contour and the directional gradient field of validation

  2. Modelling in 3D the olive trees cultures in order to establish the forces (interval) needed for automatic harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babanatsas, T.; Glăvan, D. O.; Babanatis Merce, R. M.; Maris, S. A.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to bring as much as possible, close to real situation the 3D modelling for the olive trees in order to establish the necessary forces for automatic harvesting (harvesting robots). To fulfil our goal we have at our disposal different ways to do modelling very close to the real situation. One way is to use reality capture software (its results being photos) that are converted into a real 3D model, the disadvantage of the method being a mesh model that is not accurate enough. The reasonable alternative is to develop an experiment by measuring a sample orchard of olive trees (experiment who took place in Halkidiki, Greece, measuring over 120 trees). After establishing the real dimensions, we adopted as model the media that we have measured (the height of the tree, the thickness of branches, number of branches, etc.), model which we consider closer to the reality and therefor more suitable for our simulation.

  3. Automatic iterative segmentation of multiple sclerosis lesions using Student's t mixture models and probabilistic anatomical atlases in FLAIR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Paulo G L; Ferrari, Ricardo J

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating autoimmune disease that attacks the central nervous system (CNS) and affects more than 2 million people worldwide. The segmentation of MS lesions in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a very important task to assess how a patient is responding to treatment and how the disease is progressing. Computational approaches have been proposed over the years to segment MS lesions and reduce the amount of time spent on manual delineation and inter- and intra-rater variability and bias. However, fully-automatic segmentation of MS lesions still remains an open problem. In this work, we propose an iterative approach using Student's t mixture models and probabilistic anatomical atlases to automatically segment MS lesions in Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) images. Our technique resembles a refinement approach by iteratively segmenting brain tissues into smaller classes until MS lesions are grouped as the most hyperintense one. To validate our technique we used 21 clinical images from the 2015 Longitudinal Multiple Sclerosis Lesion Segmentation Challenge dataset. Evaluation using Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), True Positive Ratio (TPR), False Positive Ratio (FPR), Volume Difference (VD) and Pearson's r coefficient shows that our technique has a good spatial and volumetric agreement with raters' manual delineations. Also, a comparison between our proposal and the state-of-the-art shows that our technique is comparable and, in some cases, better than some approaches, thus being a viable alternative for automatic MS lesion segmentation in MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Likelihood analysis of parity violation in the compound nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, D.; Sharapov, E.

    1993-01-01

    We discuss the determination of the root mean-squared matrix element of the parity-violating interaction between compound-nuclear states using likelihood analysis. We briefly review the relevant features of the statistical model of the compound nucleus and the formalism of likelihood analysis. We then discuss the application of likelihood analysis to data on panty-violating longitudinal asymmetries. The reliability of the extracted value of the matrix element and errors assigned to the matrix element is stressed. We treat the situations where the spins of the p-wave resonances are not known and known using experimental data and Monte Carlo techniques. We conclude that likelihood analysis provides a reliable way to determine M and its confidence interval. We briefly discuss some problems associated with the normalization of the likelihood function

  5. Automatic multiorgan segmentation in CT images of the male pelvis using region-specific hierarchical appearance cluster models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dengwang; Zang, Pengxiao; Chai, Xiangfei; Cui, Yi; Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Accurate segmentation of pelvic organs in CT images is of great importance in external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The aim of this studying is to develop a novel method for automatic, multiorgan segmentation of the male pelvis. The authors' segmentation method consists of several stages. First, a pretreatment includes parameterization, principal component analysis (PCA), and an established process of region-specific hierarchical appearance cluster (RSHAC) model which was executed on the training dataset. After the preprocessing, online automatic segmentation of new CT images is achieved by combining the RSHAC model with the PCA-based point distribution model. Fifty pelvic CT from eight prostate cancer patients were used as the training dataset. From another 20 prostate cancer patients, 210 CT images were used for independent validation of the segmentation method. In the training dataset, 15 PCA modes were needed to represent 95% of shape variations of pelvic organs. When tested on the validation dataset, the authors' segmentation method had an average Dice similarity coefficient and mean absolute distance of 0.751 and 0.371 cm, 0.783 and 0.303 cm, 0.573 and 0.604 cm for prostate, bladder, and rectum, respectively. The automated segmentation process took on average 5 min on a personal computer equipped with Core 2 Duo CPU of 2.8 GHz and 8 GB RAM. The authors have developed an efficient and reliable method for automatic segmentation of multiple organs in the male pelvis. This method should be useful for treatment planning and adaptive replanning for prostate cancer radiotherapy. With this method, the physicist can improve the work efficiency and stability.

  6. An automatic and accurate method of full heart segmentation from CT image based on linear gradient model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zili

    2017-07-01

    Heart segmentation is an important auxiliary method in the diagnosis of many heart diseases, such as coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation, and in the planning of tumor radiotherapy. Most of the existing methods for full heart segmentation treat the heart as a whole part and cannot accurately extract the bottom of the heart. In this paper, we propose a new method based on linear gradient model to segment the whole heart from the CT images automatically and accurately. Twelve cases were tested in order to test this method and accurate segmentation results were achieved and identified by clinical experts. The results can provide reliable clinical support.

  7. Automatic requirements traceability

    OpenAIRE

    Andžiulytė, Justė

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on automatic requirements traceability and algorithms that automatically find recommendation links for requirements. The main objective of this paper is the evaluation of these algorithms and preparation of the method defining algorithms to be used in different cases. This paper presents and examines probabilistic, vector space and latent semantic indexing models of information retrieval and association rule mining using authors own implementations of these algorithms and o...

  8. Automatically quantifying the scientific quality and sensationalism of news records mentioning pandemics: validating a maximum entropy machine-learning model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Steven J; Justicz, Victoria

    2016-07-01

    To develop and validate a method for automatically quantifying the scientific quality and sensationalism of individual news records. After retrieving 163,433 news records mentioning the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and H1N1 pandemics, a maximum entropy model for inductive machine learning was used to identify relationships among 500 randomly sampled news records that correlated with systematic human assessments of their scientific quality and sensationalism. These relationships were then computationally applied to automatically classify 10,000 additional randomly sampled news records. The model was validated by randomly sampling 200 records and comparing human assessments of them to the computer assessments. The computer model correctly assessed the relevance of 86% of news records, the quality of 65% of records, and the sensationalism of 73% of records, as compared to human assessments. Overall, the scientific quality of SARS and H1N1 news media coverage had potentially important shortcomings, but coverage was not too sensationalizing. Coverage slightly improved between the two pandemics. Automated methods can evaluate news records faster, cheaper, and possibly better than humans. The specific procedure implemented in this study can at the very least identify subsets of news records that are far more likely to have particular scientific and discursive qualities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Spurious Latent Class Problem in the Mixed Rasch Model: A Comparison of Three Maximum Likelihood Estimation Methods under Different Ability Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sedat

    2018-01-01

    Recent research has shown that over-extraction of latent classes can be observed in the Bayesian estimation of the mixed Rasch model when the distribution of ability is non-normal. This study examined the effect of non-normal ability distributions on the number of latent classes in the mixed Rasch model when estimated with maximum likelihood…

  10. Automatic annotation of histopathological images using a latent topic model based on non-negative matrix factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Roa, Angel; Díaz, Gloria; Romero, Eduardo; González, Fabio A

    2011-01-01

    Histopathological images are an important resource for clinical diagnosis and biomedical research. From an image understanding point of view, the automatic annotation of these images is a challenging problem. This paper presents a new method for automatic histopathological image annotation based on three complementary strategies, first, a part-based image representation, called the bag of features, which takes advantage of the natural redundancy of histopathological images for capturing the fundamental patterns of biological structures, second, a latent topic model, based on non-negative matrix factorization, which captures the high-level visual patterns hidden in the image, and, third, a probabilistic annotation model that links visual appearance of morphological and architectural features associated to 10 histopathological image annotations. The method was evaluated using 1,604 annotated images of skin tissues, which included normal and pathological architectural and morphological features, obtaining a recall of 74% and a precision of 50%, which improved a baseline annotation method based on support vector machines in a 64% and 24%, respectively.

  11. Automatic annotation of histopathological images using a latent topic model based on non-negative matrix factorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Cruz-Roa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Histopathological images are an important resource for clinical diagnosis and biomedical research. From an image understanding point of view, the automatic annotation of these images is a challenging problem. This paper presents a new method for automatic histopathological image annotation based on three complementary strategies, first, a part-based image representation, called the bag of features, which takes advantage of the natural redundancy of histopathological images for capturing the fundamental patterns of biological structures, second, a latent topic model, based on non-negative matrix factorization, which captures the high-level visual patterns hidden in the image, and, third, a probabilistic annotation model that links visual appearance of morphological and architectural features associated to 10 histopathological image annotations. The method was evaluated using 1,604 annotated images of skin tissues, which included normal and pathological architectural and morphological features, obtaining a recall of 74% and a precision of 50%, which improved a baseline annotation method based on support vector machines in a 64% and 24%, respectively.

  12. Automatic selection of localized region-based active contour models using image content analysis applied to brain tumor segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilunga-Mbuyamba, Elisee; Avina-Cervantes, Juan Gabriel; Cepeda-Negrete, Jonathan; Ibarra-Manzano, Mario Alberto; Chalopin, Claire

    2017-12-01

    Brain tumor segmentation is a routine process in a clinical setting and provides useful information for diagnosis and treatment planning. Manual segmentation, performed by physicians or radiologists, is a time-consuming task due to the large quantity of medical data generated presently. Hence, automatic segmentation methods are needed, and several approaches have been introduced in recent years including the Localized Region-based Active Contour Model (LRACM). There are many popular LRACM, but each of them presents strong and weak points. In this paper, the automatic selection of LRACM based on image content and its application on brain tumor segmentation is presented. Thereby, a framework to select one of three LRACM, i.e., Local Gaussian Distribution Fitting (LGDF), localized Chan-Vese (C-V) and Localized Active Contour Model with Background Intensity Compensation (LACM-BIC), is proposed. Twelve visual features are extracted to properly select the method that may process a given input image. The system is based on a supervised approach. Applied specifically to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) images, the experiments showed that the proposed system is able to correctly select the suitable LRACM to handle a specific image. Consequently, the selection framework achieves better accuracy performance than the three LRACM separately. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Neural networks for action representation underlying automatic mimicry: A functional magnetic-resonance imaging and dynamic causal modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro T Sasaki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Automatic mimicry is based on the tight linkage between motor and perception action representations in which internal models play a key role. Based on the anatomical connection, we hypothesized that the direct effective connectivity from the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS to the ventral premotor area (PMv formed an inverse internal model, converting visual representation into a motor plan, and that reverse connectivity formed a forward internal model, converting the motor plan into a sensory outcome of action. To test this hypothesis, we employed dynamic causal-modeling analysis with functional magnetic-resonance imaging. Twenty-four normal participants underwent a change-detection task involving two visually-presented balls that were either manually rotated by the investigator’s right hand (‘Hand’ or automatically rotated. The effective connectivity from the pSTS to the PMv was enhanced by hand observation and suppressed by execution, corresponding to the inverse model. Opposite effects were observed from the PMv to the pSTS, suggesting the forward model. Additionally, both execution and hand observation commonly enhanced the effective connectivity from the pSTS to the inferior parietal lobule (IPL, the IPL to the primary sensorimotor cortex (S/M1, the PMv to the IPL, and the PMv to the S/M1. Representation of the hand action therefore was implemented in the motor system including the S/M1. During hand observation, effective connectivity toward the pSTS was suppressed whereas that toward the PMv and S/M1 was enhanced. Thus the action-representation network acted as a dynamic feedback-control system during action observation.

  14. Improving SAR Automatic Target Recognition Models with Transfer Learning from Simulated Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmgren-Hansen, David; Kusk, Anders; Dall, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    SAR images of sufficient size, simulated data play a big role in SAR ATR development, but the transferability of knowledge learned on simulated data to real data remains to be studied further. In this letter, we show the first study of Transfer Learning between a simulated data set and a set of real....... These results encourage SAR ATR development to continue the improvement of simulated data sets of greater size and complex scenarios in order to build robust algorithms for real life SAR ATR applications.......Data-driven classification algorithms have proved to do well for automatic target recognition (ATR) in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. Collecting data sets suitable for these algorithms is a challenge in itself as it is difficult and expensive. Due to the lack of labeled data sets with real...

  15. LIKEDM: Likelihood calculator of dark matter detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoyuan; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Yuan, Qiang

    2017-04-01

    With the large progress in searches for dark matter (DM) particles with indirect and direct methods, we develop a numerical tool that enables fast calculations of the likelihoods of specified DM particle models given a number of observational data, such as charged cosmic rays from space-borne experiments (e.g., PAMELA, AMS-02), γ-rays from the Fermi space telescope, and underground direct detection experiments. The purpose of this tool - LIKEDM, likelihood calculator for dark matter detection - is to bridge the gap between a particle model of DM and the observational data. The intermediate steps between these two, including the astrophysical backgrounds, the propagation of charged particles, the analysis of Fermi γ-ray data, as well as the DM velocity distribution and the nuclear form factor, have been dealt with in the code. We release the first version (v1.0) focusing on the constraints from indirect detection of DM with charged cosmic and gamma rays. Direct detection will be implemented in the next version. This manual describes the framework, usage, and related physics of the code.

  16. A semi-automatic image-based close range 3D modeling pipeline using a multi-camera configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Jiann-Yeou; Yeh, Po-Chia

    2012-01-01

    The generation of photo-realistic 3D models is an important task for digital recording of cultural heritage objects. This study proposes an image-based 3D modeling pipeline which takes advantage of a multi-camera configuration and multi-image matching technique that does not require any markers on or around the object. Multiple digital single lens reflex (DSLR) cameras are adopted and fixed with invariant relative orientations. Instead of photo-triangulation after image acquisition, calibration is performed to estimate the exterior orientation parameters of the multi-camera configuration which can be processed fully automatically using coded targets. The calibrated orientation parameters of all cameras are applied to images taken using the same camera configuration. This means that when performing multi-image matching for surface point cloud generation, the orientation parameters will remain the same as the calibrated results, even when the target has changed. Base on this invariant character, the whole 3D modeling pipeline can be performed completely automatically, once the whole system has been calibrated and the software was seamlessly integrated. Several experiments were conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed system. Images observed include that of a human being, eight Buddhist statues, and a stone sculpture. The results for the stone sculpture, obtained with several multi-camera configurations were compared with a reference model acquired by an ATOS-I 2M active scanner. The best result has an absolute accuracy of 0.26 mm and a relative accuracy of 1:17,333. It demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed low-cost image-based 3D modeling pipeline and its applicability to a large quantity of antiques stored in a museum.

  17. Generic method for automatic bladder segmentation on cone beam CT using a patient-specific bladder shape model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoot, A. J. A. J. van de; Schooneveldt, G.; Wognum, S.; Stalpers, L. J. A.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Bel, A.; Hoogeman, M. S.; Chai, X.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop and validate a generic method for automatic bladder segmentation on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), independent of gender and treatment position (prone or supine), using only pretreatment imaging data. Methods: Data of 20 patients, treated for tumors in the pelvic region with the entire bladder visible on CT and CBCT, were divided into four equally sized groups based on gender and treatment position. The full and empty bladder contour, that can be acquired with pretreatment CT imaging, were used to generate a patient-specific bladder shape model. This model was used to guide the segmentation process on CBCT. To obtain the bladder segmentation, the reference bladder contour was deformed iteratively by maximizing the cross-correlation between directional grey value gradients over the reference and CBCT bladder edge. To overcome incorrect segmentations caused by CBCT image artifacts, automatic adaptations were implemented. Moreover, locally incorrect segmentations could be adapted manually. After each adapted segmentation, the bladder shape model was expanded and new shape patterns were calculated for following segmentations. All available CBCTs were used to validate the segmentation algorithm. The bladder segmentations were validated by comparison with the manual delineations and the segmentation performance was quantified using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), surface distance error (SDE) and SD of contour-to-contour distances. Also, bladder volumes obtained by manual delineations and segmentations were compared using a Bland-Altman error analysis. Results: The mean DSC, mean SDE, and mean SD of contour-to-contour distances between segmentations and manual delineations were 0.87, 0.27 cm and 0.22 cm (female, prone), 0.85, 0.28 cm and 0.22 cm (female, supine), 0.89, 0.21 cm and 0.17 cm (male, supine) and 0.88, 0.23 cm and 0.17 cm (male, prone), respectively. Manual local adaptations improved the segmentation

  18. Generic method for automatic bladder segmentation on cone beam CT using a patient-specific bladder shape model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoot, A. J. A. J. van de, E-mail: a.j.schootvande@amc.uva.nl; Schooneveldt, G.; Wognum, S.; Stalpers, L. J. A.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Bel, A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hoogeman, M. S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Erasmus Medical Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands); Chai, X. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Palo Alto, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop and validate a generic method for automatic bladder segmentation on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), independent of gender and treatment position (prone or supine), using only pretreatment imaging data. Methods: Data of 20 patients, treated for tumors in the pelvic region with the entire bladder visible on CT and CBCT, were divided into four equally sized groups based on gender and treatment position. The full and empty bladder contour, that can be acquired with pretreatment CT imaging, were used to generate a patient-specific bladder shape model. This model was used to guide the segmentation process on CBCT. To obtain the bladder segmentation, the reference bladder contour was deformed iteratively by maximizing the cross-correlation between directional grey value gradients over the reference and CBCT bladder edge. To overcome incorrect segmentations caused by CBCT image artifacts, automatic adaptations were implemented. Moreover, locally incorrect segmentations could be adapted manually. After each adapted segmentation, the bladder shape model was expanded and new shape patterns were calculated for following segmentations. All available CBCTs were used to validate the segmentation algorithm. The bladder segmentations were validated by comparison with the manual delineations and the segmentation performance was quantified using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), surface distance error (SDE) and SD of contour-to-contour distances. Also, bladder volumes obtained by manual delineations and segmentations were compared using a Bland-Altman error analysis. Results: The mean DSC, mean SDE, and mean SD of contour-to-contour distances between segmentations and manual delineations were 0.87, 0.27 cm and 0.22 cm (female, prone), 0.85, 0.28 cm and 0.22 cm (female, supine), 0.89, 0.21 cm and 0.17 cm (male, supine) and 0.88, 0.23 cm and 0.17 cm (male, prone), respectively. Manual local adaptations improved the segmentation

  19. Comparison of the frequentist properties of Bayes and the maximum likelihood estimators in an age-structured fish stock assessment model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders; Lewy, Peter

    2002-01-01

    A simulation study was carried out for a separable fish stock assessment model including commercial and survey catch-at-age and effort data. All catches are considered stochastic variables subject to sampling and process variations. The results showed that the Bayes estimator of spawning biomass ...

  20. Language modeling for automatic speech recognition of inflective languages an applications-oriented approach using lexical data

    CERN Document Server

    Donaj, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    This book covers language modeling and automatic speech recognition for inflective languages (e.g. Slavic languages), which represent roughly half of the languages spoken in Europe. These languages do not perform as well as English in speech recognition systems and it is therefore harder to develop an application with sufficient quality for the end user. The authors describe the most important language features for the development of a speech recognition system. This is then presented through the analysis of errors in the system and the development of language models and their inclusion in speech recognition systems, which specifically address the errors that are relevant for targeted applications. The error analysis is done with regard to morphological characteristics of the word in the recognized sentences. The book is oriented towards speech recognition with large vocabularies and continuous and even spontaneous speech. Today such applications work with a rather small number of languages compared to the nu...

  1. Automatic media-adventitia IVUS image segmentation based on sparse representation framework and dynamic directional active contour model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Fahimeh Sadat; Setarehdan, Seyed Kamaledin; Norouzi, Somayye

    2017-10-01

    Segmentation of the arterial wall boundaries from intravascular ultrasound images is an important image processing task in order to quantify arterial wall characteristics such as shape, area, thickness and eccentricity. Since manual segmentation of these boundaries is a laborious and time consuming procedure, many researchers attempted to develop (semi-) automatic segmentation techniques as a powerful tool for educational and clinical purposes in the past but as yet there is no any clinically approved method in the market. This paper presents a deterministic-statistical strategy for automatic media-adventitia border detection by a fourfold algorithm. First, a smoothed initial contour is extracted based on the classification in the sparse representation framework which is combined with the dynamic directional convolution vector field. Next, an active contour model is utilized for the propagation of the initial contour toward the interested borders. Finally, the extracted contour is refined in the leakage, side branch openings and calcification regions based on the image texture patterns. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated by comparing the results to those manually traced borders by an expert on 312 different IVUS images obtained from four different patients. The statistical analysis of the results demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed method in the media-adventitia border detection with enough consistency in the leakage and calcification regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Maximum Likelihood Estimator of a Markov Model for Disease Activity in Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis for Annually Aggregated Partial Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Søren; Persson, U.; Jess, T.

    2010-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory bowel diseases that have a remitting, relapsing nature. During relapse, they are treated with drugs and surgery. The present study was based on individual data from patients diagnosed with CD or UC at Herlev University...... Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark, during 1991 to 1993. The data were aggregated over calendar years; for each year, the number of relapses and the number of surgical operations were recorded. Our aim was to estimate Markov models for disease activity in CD and UC, in terms of relapse and remission...... data and has good face validity. The disease activity model is less suitable for UC due to its transient nature through the presence of curative surgery...

  3. Four-chamber heart modeling and automatic segmentation for 3-D cardiac CT volumes using marginal space learning and steerable features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yefeng; Barbu, Adrian; Georgescu, Bogdan; Scheuering, Michael; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2008-11-01

    We propose an automatic four-chamber heart segmentation system for the quantitative functional analysis of the heart from cardiac computed tomography (CT) volumes. Two topics are discussed: heart modeling and automatic model fitting to an unseen volume. Heart modeling is a nontrivial task since the heart is a complex nonrigid organ. The model must be anatomically accurate, allow manual editing, and provide sufficient information to guide automatic detection and segmentation. Unlike previous work, we explicitly represent important landmarks (such as the valves and the ventricular septum cusps) among the control points of the model. The control points can be detected reliably to guide the automatic model fitting process. Using this model, we develop an efficient and robust approach for automatic heart chamber segmentation in 3-D CT volumes. We formulate the segmentation as a two-step learning problem: anatomical structure localization and boundary delineation. In both steps, we exploit the recent advances in learning discriminative models. A novel algorithm, marginal space learning (MSL), is introduced to solve the 9-D similarity transformation search problem for localizing the heart chambers. After determining the pose of the heart chambers, we estimate the 3-D shape through learning-based boundary delineation. The proposed method has been extensively tested on the largest dataset (with 323 volumes from 137 patients) ever reported in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, our system is the fastest with a speed of 4.0 s per volume (on a dual-core 3.2-GHz processor) for the automatic segmentation of all four chambers.

  4. Automatic CT-based finite element model generation for temperature-based death time estimation: feasibility study and sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkl, Sebastian; Muggenthaler, Holger; Hubig, Michael; Erdmann, Bodo; Weiser, Martin; Zachow, Stefan; Heinrich, Andreas; Güttler, Felix Victor; Teichgräber, Ulf; Mall, Gita

    2017-05-01

    Temperature-based death time estimation is based either on simple phenomenological models of corpse cooling or on detailed physical heat transfer models. The latter are much more complex but allow a higher accuracy of death time estimation, as in principle, all relevant cooling mechanisms can be taken into account.Here, a complete workflow for finite element-based cooling simulation is presented. The following steps are demonstrated on a CT phantom: Computer tomography (CT) scan Segmentation of the CT images for thermodynamically relevant features of individual geometries and compilation in a geometric computer-aided design (CAD) model Conversion of the segmentation result into a finite element (FE) simulation model Computation of the model cooling curve (MOD) Calculation of the cooling time (CTE) For the first time in FE-based cooling time estimation, the steps from the CT image over segmentation to FE model generation are performed semi-automatically. The cooling time calculation results are compared to cooling measurements performed on the phantoms under controlled conditions. In this context, the method is validated using a CT phantom. Some of the phantoms' thermodynamic material parameters had to be determined via independent experiments.Moreover, the impact of geometry and material parameter uncertainties on the estimated cooling time is investigated by a sensitivity analysis.

  5. Engineering model of the electric drives of separation device for simulation of automatic control systems of reactive power compensation by means of serially connected capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juromskiy, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    It is developed a mathematical model for an electric drive of high-speed separation device in terms of the modeling dynamic systems Simulink, MATLAB. The model is focused on the study of the automatic control systems of the power factor (Cosφ) of an actuator by compensating the reactive component of the total power by switching a capacitor bank in series with the actuator. The model is based on the methodology of the structural modeling of dynamic processes.

  6. EMBuilder: A Template Matching-based Automatic Model-building Program for High-resolution Cryo-Electron Microscopy Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Niyun; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Jiawei

    2017-06-01

    The resolution of electron-potential maps in single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) is approaching atomic or near- atomic resolution. However, no program currently exists for de novo cryoEM model building at resolutions exceeding beyond 3.5 Å. Here, we present a program, EMBuilder, based on template matching, to generate cryoEM models at high resolution. The program identifies features in both secondary-structure and Cα stages. In the secondary structure stage, helices and strands are identified with pre-computed templates, and the voxel size of the entire map is then refined to account for microscopic magnification errors. The identified secondary structures are then extended from both ends in the Cα stage via a log-likelihood (LLK) target function, and if possible, the side chains are also assigned. This program can build models of large proteins (~1 MDa) in a reasonable amount of time (~1 day) and thus has the potential to greatly decrease the manual workload required for model building of high-resolution cryoEM maps.

  7. Automatic delineation of geomorphological slope units with r.slopeunits v1.0 and their optimization for landslide susceptibility modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alvioli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Automatic subdivision of landscapes into terrain units remains a challenge. Slope units are terrain units bounded by drainage and divide lines, but their use in hydrological and geomorphological studies is limited because of the lack of reliable software for their automatic delineation. We present the r.slopeunits software for the automatic delineation of slope units, given a digital elevation model and a few input parameters. We further propose an approach for the selection of optimal parameters controlling the terrain subdivision for landslide susceptibility modeling. We tested the software and the optimization approach in central Italy, where terrain, landslide, and geo-environmental information was available. The software was capable of capturing the variability of the landscape and partitioning the study area into slope units suited for landslide susceptibility modeling and zonation. We expect r.slopeunits to be used in different physiographical settings for the production of reliable and reproducible landslide susceptibility zonations.

  8. An Automatic Segmentation and Classification Framework Based on PCNN Model for Single Tooth in MicroCT Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liansheng Wang

    Full Text Available Accurate segmentation and classification of different anatomical structures of teeth from medical images plays an essential role in many clinical applications. Usually, the anatomical structures of teeth are manually labelled by experienced clinical doctors, which is time consuming. However, automatic segmentation and classification is a challenging task because the anatomical structures and surroundings of the tooth in medical images are rather complex. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an effective framework which is designed to segment the tooth with a Selective Binary and Gaussian Filtering Regularized Level Set (GFRLS method improved by fully utilizing three dimensional (3D information, and classify the tooth by employing unsupervised learning Pulse Coupled Neural Networks (PCNN model. In order to evaluate the proposed method, the experiments are conducted on the different datasets of mandibular molars and the experimental results show that our method can achieve better accuracy and robustness compared to other four state of the art clustering methods.

  9. Determination of aortic compliance from magnetic resonance images using an automatic active contour model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, Roland; Boese, Jan M; Schad, Lothar R

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of monitoring changes in aortic elasticity in humans has important applications for clinical trials because it estimates the efficacy of plaque-reducing therapies. The elasticity is usually quantified by compliance measurements. Therefore, the relative temporal change in the vessel cross-sectional area throughout the cardiac cycle has to be determined. In this work we determined and compared the compliance between three magnetic resonance (MR) methods (FLASH, TrueFISP and pulse-wave). Since manual outlining of the aortic wall area is a very time-consuming process and depends on an operator's variability, an algorithm for the automatic segmentation of the artery wall from MR images through the entire heart cycle is presented. The reliable detection of the artery cross-sectional area over the whole heart cycle was possible with a relative error of about 1%. Optimizing the temporal resolution to 60 ms we obtained a relative error in compliance of about 7% from TrueFISP (1.0 x 1.0 x 10 mm 3 , signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) > 12) and FLASH (0.7 x 0.7 x 10 mm 3 , SNR > 12) measurements in volunteers. Pulse-wave measurements yielded an error of more than 9%. In a study of ten volunteers, a compliance between C = 3 x 10 -5 Pa -1 and C = 8 x 10 -5 Pa -1 was determined, depending on age. The results of the TrueFISP and the pulse-wave measurements agreed very well with one another (confidence interval of 1 x 10 -5 Pa -1 ) while the results of the FLASH method more clearly deviated from the TrueFISP and pulse-wave (confidence interval of more than 2 x 10 -5 Pa -1 )

  10. Automatic 3D City Modeling Using a Digital Map and Panoramic Images from a Mobile Mapping System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyungki Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional city models are becoming a valuable resource because of their close geospatial, geometrical, and visual relationship with the physical world. However, ground-oriented applications in virtual reality, 3D navigation, and civil engineering require a novel modeling approach, because the existing large-scale 3D city modeling methods do not provide rich visual information at ground level. This paper proposes a new framework for generating 3D city models that satisfy both the visual and the physical requirements for ground-oriented virtual reality applications. To ensure its usability, the framework must be cost-effective and allow for automated creation. To achieve these goals, we leverage a mobile mapping system that automatically gathers high-resolution images and supplements sensor information such as the position and direction of the captured images. To resolve problems stemming from sensor noise and occlusions, we develop a fusion technique to incorporate digital map data. This paper describes the major processes of the overall framework and the proposed techniques for each step and presents experimental results from a comparison with an existing 3D city model.

  11. Optimized Large-scale CMB Likelihood and Quadratic Maximum Likelihood Power Spectrum Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerløw, E.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Eriksen, H. K.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Jewell, J. B.; Plaszczynski, S.; Wehus, I. K.

    2015-11-01

    We revisit the problem of exact cosmic microwave background (CMB) likelihood and power spectrum estimation with the goal of minimizing computational costs through linear compression. This idea was originally proposed for CMB purposes by Tegmark et al., and here we develop it into a fully functioning computational framework for large-scale polarization analysis, adopting WMAP as a working example. We compare five different linear bases (pixel space, harmonic space, noise covariance eigenvectors, signal-to-noise covariance eigenvectors, and signal-plus-noise covariance eigenvectors) in terms of compression efficiency, and find that the computationally most efficient basis is the signal-to-noise eigenvector basis, which is closely related to the Karhunen-Loeve and Principal Component transforms, in agreement with previous suggestions. For this basis, the information in 6836 unmasked WMAP sky map pixels can be compressed into a smaller set of 3102 modes, with a maximum error increase of any single multipole of 3.8% at ℓ ≤ 32 and a maximum shift in the mean values of a joint distribution of an amplitude-tilt model of 0.006σ. This compression reduces the computational cost of a single likelihood evaluation by a factor of 5, from 38 to 7.5 CPU seconds, and it also results in a more robust likelihood by implicitly regularizing nearly degenerate modes. Finally, we use the same compression framework to formulate a numerically stable and computationally efficient variation of the Quadratic Maximum Likelihood implementation, which requires less than 3 GB of memory and 2 CPU minutes per iteration for ℓ ≤ 32, rendering low-ℓ QML CMB power spectrum analysis fully tractable on a standard laptop.

  12. Nearly Efficient Likelihood Ratio Tests of the Unit Root Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Michael; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    Seemingly absent from the arsenal of currently available "nearly efficient" testing procedures for the unit root hypothesis, i.e. tests whose local asymptotic power functions are indistinguishable from the Gaussian power envelope, is a test admitting a (quasi-)likelihood ratio interpretation. We...... show that the likelihood ratio unit root test derived in a Gaussian AR(1) model with standard normal innovations is nearly efficient in that model. Moreover, these desirable properties carry over to more complicated models allowing for serially correlated and/or non-Gaussian innovations....

  13. Automatically updating predictive modeling workflows support decision-making in drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muegge, Ingo; Bentzien, Jörg; Mukherjee, Prasenjit; Hughes, Robert O

    2016-09-01

    Using predictive models for early decision-making in drug discovery has become standard practice. We suggest that model building needs to be automated with minimum input and low technical maintenance requirements. Models perform best when tailored to answering specific compound optimization related questions. If qualitative answers are required, 2-bin classification models are preferred. Integrating predictive modeling results with structural information stimulates better decision making. For in silico models supporting rapid structure-activity relationship cycles the performance deteriorates within weeks. Frequent automated updates of predictive models ensure best predictions. Consensus between multiple modeling approaches increases the prediction confidence. Combining qualified and nonqualified data optimally uses all available information. Dose predictions provide a holistic alternative to multiple individual property predictions for reaching complex decisions.

  14. The Laplace Likelihood Ratio Test for Heteroscedasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Martin van Zyl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the likelihood ratio test for heteroscedasticity, assuming the Laplace distribution, gives good results for Gaussian and fat-tailed data. The likelihood ratio test, assuming normality, is very sensitive to any deviation from normality, especially when the observations are from a distribution with fat tails. Such a likelihood test can also be used as a robust test for a constant variance in residuals or a time series if the data is partitioned into groups.

  15. Improved maximum likelihood reconstruction of complex multi-generational pedigrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Nuala A; Bartlett, Mark; Cussens, James

    2014-11-01

    The reconstruction of pedigrees from genetic marker data is relevant to a wide range of applications. Likelihood-based approaches aim to find the pedigree structure that gives the highest probability to the observed data. Existing methods either entail an exhaustive search and are hence restricted to small numbers of individuals, or they take a more heuristic approach and deliver a solution that will probably have high likelihood but is not guaranteed to be optimal. By encoding the pedigree learning problem as an integer linear program we can exploit efficient optimisation algorithms to construct pedigrees guaranteed to have maximal likelihood for the standard situation where we have complete marker data at unlinked loci and segregation of genes from parents to offspring is Mendelian. Previous work demonstrated efficient reconstruction of pedigrees of up to about 100 individuals. The modified method that we present here is not so restricted: we demonstrate its applicability with simulated data on a real human pedigree structure of over 1600 individuals. It also compares well with a very competitive approximate approach in terms of solving time and accuracy. In addition to identifying a maximum likelihood pedigree, we can obtain any number of pedigrees in decreasing order of likelihood. This is useful for assessing the uncertainty of a maximum likelihood solution and permits model averaging over high likelihood pedigrees when this would be appropriate. More importantly, when the solution is not unique, as will often be the case for large pedigrees, it enables investigation into the properties of maximum likelihood pedigree estimates which has not been possible up to now. Crucially, we also have a means of assessing the behaviour of other approximate approaches which all aim to find a maximum likelihood solution. Our approach hence allows us to properly address the question of whether a reasonably high likelihood solution that is easy to obtain is practically as

  16. Automatic Insall-Salvati ratio measurement on lateral knee x-ray images using model-guided landmark localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Wu, Chia-Hsing; Sun, Yung-Nien [Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chii-Jeng [Department of Orthopedics, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, 138 Sheng Li Road, Tainan 704, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chien-Kuo, E-mail: ynsun@mail.ncku.edu.t, E-mail: wale1212@gmail.co, E-mail: btmage@gmail.co, E-mail: mark@mail.ncku.edu.t, E-mail: n044206@mail.hosp.ncku.edu.t [Department of Radiology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, 138 Sheng Li Road, Tainan 704, Taiwan (China)

    2010-11-21

    The Insall-Salvati ratio (ISR) is important for detecting two common clinical signs of knee disease: patella alta and patella baja. Furthermore, large inter-operator differences in ISR measurement make an objective measurement system necessary for better clinical evaluation. In this paper, we define three specific bony landmarks for determining the ISR and then propose an x-ray image analysis system to localize these landmarks and measure the ISR. Due to inherent artifacts in x-ray images, such as unevenly distributed intensities, which make landmark localization difficult, we hence propose a registration-assisted active-shape model (RAASM) to localize these landmarks. We first construct a statistical model from a set of training images based on x-ray image intensity and patella shape. Since a knee x-ray image contains specific anatomical structures, we then design an algorithm, based on edge tracing, for patella feature extraction in order to automatically align the model to the patella image. We can estimate the landmark locations as well as the ISR after registration-assisted model fitting. Our proposed method successfully overcomes drawbacks caused by x-ray image artifacts. Experimental results show great agreement between the ISRs measured by the proposed method and by orthopedic clinicians.

  17. Automatic Insall-Salvati ratio measurement on lateral knee x-ray images using model-guided landmark localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Wu, Chia-Hsing; Sun, Yung-Nien; Lin, Chii-Jeng; Wang, Chien-Kuo

    2010-01-01

    The Insall-Salvati ratio (ISR) is important for detecting two common clinical signs of knee disease: patella alta and patella baja. Furthermore, large inter-operator differences in ISR measurement make an objective measurement system necessary for better clinical evaluation. In this paper, we define three specific bony landmarks for determining the ISR and then propose an x-ray image analysis system to localize these landmarks and measure the ISR. Due to inherent artifacts in x-ray images, such as unevenly distributed intensities, which make landmark localization difficult, we hence propose a registration-assisted active-shape model (RAASM) to localize these landmarks. We first construct a statistical model from a set of training images based on x-ray image intensity and patella shape. Since a knee x-ray image contains specific anatomical structures, we then design an algorithm, based on edge tracing, for patella feature extraction in order to automatically align the model to the patella image. We can estimate the landmark locations as well as the ISR after registration-assisted model fitting. Our proposed method successfully overcomes drawbacks caused by x-ray image artifacts. Experimental results show great agreement between the ISRs measured by the proposed method and by orthopedic clinicians.

  18. Dynamic Price Vector Formation Model-Based Automatic Demand Response Strategy for PV-Assisted EV Charging Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qifang; Wang, Fei; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Zhang, Jianhua; Li, Zhigang; Shafie-Khah, Miadreza; Catalao, Joao P. S.

    2017-11-01

    A real-time price (RTP)-based automatic demand response (ADR) strategy for PV-assisted electric vehicle (EV) Charging Station (PVCS) without vehicle to grid is proposed. The charging process is modeled as a dynamic linear program instead of the normal day-ahead and real-time regulation strategy, to capture the advantages of both global and real-time optimization. Different from conventional price forecasting algorithms, a dynamic price vector formation model is proposed based on a clustering algorithm to form an RTP vector for a particular day. A dynamic feasible energy demand region (DFEDR) model considering grid voltage profiles is designed to calculate the lower and upper bounds. A deduction method is proposed to deal with the unknown information of future intervals, such as the actual stochastic arrival and departure times of EVs, which make the DFEDR model suitable for global optimization. Finally, both the comparative cases articulate the advantages of the developed methods and the validity in reducing electricity costs, mitigating peak charging demand, and improving PV self-consumption of the proposed strategy are verified through simulation scenarios.

  19. Automatic 3D segmentation of the kidney in MR images using wavelet feature extraction and probability shape model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Hamed; Fei, Baowei

    2012-02-01

    Numerical estimation of the size of the kidney is useful in evaluating conditions of the kidney, especially, when serial MR imaging is performed to evaluate the kidney function. This paper presents a new method for automatic segmentation of the kidney in three-dimensional (3D) MR images, by extracting texture features and statistical matching of geometrical shape of the kidney. A set of Wavelet-based support vector machines (W-SVMs) is trained on the MR images. The W-SVMs capture texture priors of MRI for classification of the kidney and non-kidney tissues in different zones around the kidney boundary. In the segmentation procedure, these W-SVMs are trained to tentatively label each voxel around the kidney model as a kidney or non-kidney voxel by texture matching. A probability kidney model is created using 10 segmented MRI data. The model is initially localized based on the intensity profiles in three directions. The weight functions are defined for each labeled voxel for each Wavelet-based, intensity-based, and model-based label. Consequently, each voxel has three labels and three weights for the Wavelet feature, intensity, and probability model. Using a 3D edge detection method, the model is re-localized and the segmented kidney is modified based on a region growing method in the model region. The probability model is re-localized based on the results and this loop continues until the segmentation converges. Experimental results with mouse MRI data show the good performance of the proposed method in segmenting the kidney in MR images.

  20. Deep Learning Based Regression and Multiclass Models for Acute Oral Toxicity Prediction with Automatic Chemical Feature Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Youjun; Pei, Jianfeng; Lai, Luhua

    2017-11-27

    Median lethal death, LD 50 , is a general indicator of compound acute oral toxicity (AOT). Various in silico methods were developed for AOT prediction to reduce costs and time. In this study, we developed an improved molecular graph encoding convolutional neural networks (MGE-CNN) architecture to construct three types of high-quality AOT models: regression model (deepAOT-R), multiclassification model (deepAOT-C), and multitask model (deepAOT-CR). These predictive models highly outperformed previously reported models. For the two external data sets containing 1673 (test set I) and 375 (test set II) compounds, the R 2 and mean absolute errors (MAEs) of deepAOT-R on the test set I were 0.864 and 0.195, and the prediction accuracies of deepAOT-C were 95.5% and 96.3% on test sets I and II, respectively. The two external prediction accuracies of deepAOT-CR are 95.0% and 94.1%, while the R 2 and MAE are 0.861 and 0.204 for test set I, respectively. We then performed forward and backward exploration of deepAOT models for deep fingerprints, which could support shallow machine learning methods more efficiently than traditional fingerprints or descriptors. We further performed automatic feature learning, a key essence of deep learning, to map the corresponding activation values into fragment space and derive AOT-related chemical substructures by reverse mining of the features. Our deep learning architecture for AOT is generally applicable in predicting and exploring other toxicity or property end points of chemical compounds. The two deepAOT models are freely available at http://repharma.pku.edu.cn/DLAOT/DLAOThome.php or http://www.pkumdl.cn/DLAOT/DLAOThome.php .

  1. Automatic Prediction of Protein 3D Structures by Probabilistic Multi-template Homology Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Armin; Söding, Johannes

    2015-10-01

    Homology modeling predicts the 3D structure of a query protein based on the sequence alignment with one or more template proteins of known structure. Its great importance for biological research is owed to its speed, simplicity, reliability and wide applicability, covering more than half of the residues in protein sequence space. Although multiple templates have been shown to generally increase model quality over single templates, the information from multiple templates has so far been combined using empirically motivated, heuristic approaches. We present here a rigorous statistical framework for multi-template homology modeling. First, we find that the query proteins' atomic distance restraints can be accurately described by two-component Gaussian mixtures. This insight allowed us to apply the standard laws of probability theory to combine restraints from multiple templates. Second, we derive theoretically optimal weights to correct for the redundancy among related templates. Third, a heuristic template selection strategy is proposed. We improve the average GDT-ha model quality score by 11% over single template modeling and by 6.5% over a conventional multi-template approach on a set of 1000 query proteins. Robustness with respect to wrong constraints is likewise improved. We have integrated our multi-template modeling approach with the popular MODELLER homology modeling software in our free HHpred server http://toolkit.tuebingen.mpg.de/hhpred and also offer open source software for running MODELLER with the new restraints at https://bitbucket.org/soedinglab/hh-suite.

  2. Maximum likelihood estimation of the attenuated ultrasound pulse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Klaus Bolding

    1994-01-01

    The attenuated ultrasound pulse is divided into two parts: a stationary basic pulse and a nonstationary attenuation pulse. A standard ARMA model is used for the basic pulse, and a nonstandard ARMA model is derived for the attenuation pulse. The maximum likelihood estimator of the attenuated...

  3. Multilevel maximum likelihood estimation with application to covariance matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Turčičová, Marie; Mandel, J.; Eben, Kryštof

    Published online: 23 January (2018) ISSN 0361-0926 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-34856S Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : Fisher information * High dimension * Hierarchical maximum likelihood * Nested parameter spaces * Spectral diagonal covariance model * Sparse inverse covariance model Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.311, year: 2016

  4. An Automatic Algorithm for Segmentation of the Boundaries of Corneal Layers in Optical Coherence Tomography Images using Gaussian Mixture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Mahdi Kazemian; Kafieh, Raheleh; Rabbani, Hossein; Dehnavi, Alireza Mehri; Peyman, Alireza; Hajizadeh, Fedra; Ommani, Mohammadreza

    2014-07-01

    Diagnosis of corneal diseases is possible by measuring and evaluation of corneal thickness in different layers. Thus, the need for precise segmentation of corneal layer boundaries is inevitable. Obviously, manual segmentation is time-consuming and imprecise. In this paper, the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) is used for automatic segmentation of three clinically important corneal boundaries on optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. For this purpose, we apply the GMM method in two consequent steps. In the first step, the GMM is applied on the original image to localize the first and the last boundaries. In the next step, gradient response of a contrast enhanced version of the image is fed into another GMM algorithm to obtain a more clear result around the second boundary. Finally, the first boundary is traced toward down to localize the exact location of the second boundary. We tested the performance of the algorithm on images taken from a Heidelberg OCT imaging system. To evaluate our approach, the automatic boundary results are compared with the boundaries that have been segmented manually by two corneal specialists. The quantitative results show that the proposed method segments the desired boundaries with a great accuracy. Unsigned mean errors between the results of the proposed method and the manual segmentation are 0.332, 0.421, and 0.795 for detection of epithelium, Bowman, and endothelium boundaries, respectively. Unsigned mean errors of the inter-observer between two corneal specialists have also a comparable unsigned value of 0.330, 0.398, and 0.534, respectively.

  5. A maximum likelihood algorithm for reconstructing 3D structures of human chromosomes from chromosomal contact data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwadare, Oluwatosin; Zhang, Yuxiang; Cheng, Jianlin

    2018-02-23

    The development of chromosomal conformation capture techniques, particularly, the Hi-C technique, has made the analysis and study of the spatial conformation of a genome an important topic in bioinformatics and computational biology. Aided by high-throughput next generation sequencing techniques, the Hi-C technique can generate genome-wide, large-scale intra- and inter-chromosomal interaction data capable of describing in details the spatial interactions within a genome. These data can be used to reconstruct 3D structures of chromosomes that can be used to study DNA replication, gene regulation, genome interaction, genome folding, and genome function. Here, we introduce a maximum likelihood algorithm called 3DMax to construct the 3D structure of a chromosome from Hi-C data. 3DMax employs a maximum likelihood approach to infer the 3D structures of a chromosome, while automatically re-estimating the conversion factor (α) for converting Interaction Frequency (IF) to distance. Our results show that the models generated by 3DMax from a simulated Hi-C dataset match the true models better than most of the existing methods. 3DMax is more robust to structural variability and noise. Compared on a real Hi-C dataset, 3DMax constructs chromosomal models that fit the data better than most methods, and it is faster than all other methods. The models reconstructed by 3DMax were consistent with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments and existing knowledge about the organization of human chromosomes, such as chromosome compartmentalization. 3DMax is an effective approach to reconstructing 3D chromosomal models. The results, and the models generated for the simulated and real Hi-C datasets are available here: http://sysbio.rnet.missouri.edu/bdm_download/3DMax/ . The source code is available here: https://github.com/BDM-Lab/3DMax . A short video demonstrating how to use 3DMax can be found here: https://youtu.be/ehQUFWoHwfo .

  6. Automatic Rule Identification for Agent-Based Crowd Models Through Gene Expression Programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhong, J.; Luo, L.; Cai, W.; Lees, M.; Lomuscio, A.; Scerri, P.; Bazzan, A.; Huhns, M.

    2014-01-01

    Agent-based modelling of human crowds has now become an important and active research field, with a wide range of applications such as military training, evacuation analysis and digital game. One of the significant and challenging tasks in agent-based crowd modelling is the design of decision rules

  7. An improved likelihood model for eye tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammoud, Riad I.; Hansen, Dan Witzner

    2007-01-01

    While existing eye detection and tracking algorithms can work reasonably well in a controlled environment, they tend to perform poorly under real world imaging conditions where the lighting produces shadows and the person's eyes can be occluded by e.g. glasses or makeup. As a result, pixel clusters...... associated with the eyes tend to be grouped together with background-features. This problem occurs both for eye detection and eye tracking. Problems that especially plague eye tracking include head movement, eye blinking and light changes, all of which can cause the eyes to suddenly disappear. The usual...... approach in such cases is to abandon the tracking routine and re-initialize eye detection. Of course this may be a difficult process due to missed data problem. Accordingly, what is needed is an efficient method of reliably tracking a person's eyes between successively produced video image frames, even...

  8. Essays on empirical likelihood in economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Z.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis intends to exploit the roots of empirical likelihood and its related methods in mathematical programming and computation. The roots will be connected and the connections will induce new solutions for the problems of estimation, computation, and generalization of empirical likelihood.

  9. Composite likelihood method for inferring local pedigrees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ko, Amy; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    such as polygamous families, multi-generational families, and pedigrees in which many of the member individuals are missing. Computational speed is greatly enhanced by the use of a composite likelihood function which approximates the full likelihood. We validate our method on simulated data and show that it can...

  10. MODELING OF PATTERN FORMING PROCESS OF AUTOMATIC RADIO DIRECTION FINDER OF PHASE VHF IN THE DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENT OF LabVIEW APPLIED PROGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Aslanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article is developed the model demonstrating the forming process of pattern of antenna system of aerodrome quasidopler automatic radiodirection-finder station in the development environment of LabVIEW applied programs of National Instrument company. 

  11. Modelling of the automatic stabilization system of the aircraft course by a fuzzy logic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamonova, T.; Syryamkin, V.; Vasilyeva, T.

    2016-04-01

    The problem of the present paper concerns the development of a fuzzy model of the system of an aircraft course stabilization. In this work modelling of the aircraft course stabilization system with the application of fuzzy logic is specified. Thus the authors have used the data taken for an ordinary passenger plane. As a result of the study the stabilization system models were realised in the environment of Matlab package Simulink on the basis of the PID-regulator and fuzzy logic. The authors of the paper have shown that the use of the method of artificial intelligence allows reducing the time of regulation to 1, which is 50 times faster than the time when standard receptions of the management theory are used. This fact demonstrates a positive influence of the use of fuzzy regulation.

  12. Automatic pattern identification of rock moisture based on the Staff-RF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Tao, Kai; Jiang, Wei

    2018-04-01

    Studies on the moisture and damage state of rocks generally focus on the qualitative description and mechanical information of rocks. This method is not applicable to the real-time safety monitoring of rock mass. In this study, a musical staff computing model is used to quantify the acoustic emission signals of rocks with different moisture patterns. Then, the random forest (RF) method is adopted to form the staff-RF model for the real-time pattern identification of rock moisture. The entire process requires only the computing information of the AE signal and does not require the mechanical conditions of rocks.

  13. THE AUTOMATIC SYSTEM’S MODEL OF DECISION-MAKING SUPPORT FOR DISPATCHING CONTROL OF THE CITY PASSENGER TRAFFIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Lakhno

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This scientific work considers the further development of mathematical models and algorithms for automatic decision support for dispatching management of the city passenger traffic. Methodology. Systems of dispatching management for the city passenger transport are to provide the carrying out of the routes according schedules with minimal deviations from the planned ones through the using of appropriate control actions. The systems’ algorithm focuses on the selection of control actions that compensate the disturbances. It is proposed to use the index of the waiting time minimum for passengers of buses and taxis at stops as a criterion for evaluating of dispatching control systems work. Findings. Based on the conducted analysis of the research within the existing theory of traffic flow of vehicles, it was proposed the model for the system of dispatching management for urban passenger moving units considering the effect of the most important stochastic factors on the schedule of buses and taxis movement in large cities. The obtained system of equations that models the parameter of movement on the bus routes allows you to assess quickly the influence of disturbing effects on the service quality indicators of passengers and, if necessary, to draw up the optimal schedule. Originality. The authors propose a new model for decision support of dispatching management for the city passenger transport. They take into account the effect of the most important stochastic factors, such as the overflowing buses and taxis, their descent from the lines, delays, deviations from the speed limit on the route, etc., on indicators of service quality, as well as optimizing the schedule. Practical value. The results allow to improve approaches to building models using in the systems of dispatching management of urban bus routes, as well as to improve the selection of control actions for similar systems in large cities of Ukraine.

  14. Automatic modelling of building façade objects via primitive shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetti Arachchige, N.; Perera, S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a new approach to recognize individual façade objects and to reconstruct such objects in 3D using MLS point clouds. Core of the approach is a primitive shape based algorithm, which introduces building primitives, to identify the façade objects separately from other irrelevant objects and then to model the correct topology. The primitive shape is identified against defined different primitive shapes by using the Douglas-Peucker algorithm. The advantage of this process is that it offers an ability not only to model correct geometric shapes but also to remove occlusion effects from the final model. To evaluate the validity of the proposed approach, experiments have been conducted using two types of street scene point clouds captured by Optech Lynx Mobile Mapper System and Z+F laser scanner. Results of the experiments show that the completeness, correctness, and quality of the reconstructed building façade objects are well over 90 %, proving the proposed method is a promising solution for modelling 3D façade objects with different geometric shapes.

  15. Arabic Language Modeling with Stem-Derived Morphemes for Automatic Speech Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintz, Ilana

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation is to introduce a method for deriving morphemes from Arabic words using stem patterns, a feature of Arabic morphology. The motivations are three-fold: modeling with morphemes rather than words should help address the out-of-vocabulary problem; working with stem patterns should prove to be a cross-dialectally valid…

  16. Automatic 3D Building Detection and Modeling from Airborne LiDAR Point Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shaohui

    2013-01-01

    Urban reconstruction, with an emphasis on man-made structure modeling, is an active research area with broad impact on several potential applications. Urban reconstruction combines photogrammetry, remote sensing, computer vision, and computer graphics. Even though there is a huge volume of work that has been done, many problems still remain…

  17. AUTOMATIZATION OF DECISION MAKING SUPPORT OF EDUCATIONAL ONTOLOGY’ DEVELOPMENT BASED ON INTERMEDIATE MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina O. Artemova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is about an algorithm of educational ontology’s development based on intermediate models – mind maps and concept maps. It is offered to use different metrics such as subjective metrics and graph topology’s metrics for automated optimization of mind maps. 

  18. Automatic generation of groundwater model hydrostratigraphy from AEM resistivity and boreholes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marker, Pernille Aabye; Foged, N.; Christiansen, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    with observed lithological data. Principal components are computed for the translated clay fractions and geophysical resistivities. Zonation is carried out by k-means clustering on the principal components. The hydraulic parameters of the zones are determined in a hydrological model calibration using head...

  19. On the Integration of Automatic Deployment into the ABS Modeling Language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.P.T. de Gouw (Stijn); M. Lienhardt; J. Mauro (Jacopo); B. Nobakht (Behrooz); G. Zavattaro (Gianluigi); S. Dustdar; F. Leymann; M. Villari

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractIn modern software systems, deployment is an integral and critical part of application development (see, e.g., the DevOps approach to software development). Nevertheless, deployment is usually overlooked at the modeling level, thus losing the possibility to perform deployment conscious

  20. Semi-automatic segmentation of vertebral bodies in volumetric MR images using a statistical shape+pose model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzani, Amin; Rasoulian, Abtin; Fels, Sidney; Rohling, Robert N.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2014-03-01

    Segmentation of vertebral structures in magnetic resonance (MR) images is challenging because of poor con­trast between bone surfaces and surrounding soft tissue. This paper describes a semi-automatic method for segmenting vertebral bodies in multi-slice MR images. In order to achieve a fast and reliable segmentation, the method takes advantage of the correlation between shape and pose of different vertebrae in the same patient by using a statistical multi-vertebrae anatomical shape+pose model. Given a set of MR images of the spine, we initially reduce the intensity inhomogeneity in the images by using an intensity-correction algorithm. Then a 3D anisotropic diffusion filter smooths the images. Afterwards, we extract edges from a relatively small region of the pre-processed image with a simple user interaction. Subsequently, an iterative Expectation Maximization tech­nique is used to register the statistical multi-vertebrae anatomical model to the extracted edge points in order to achieve a fast and reliable segmentation for lumbar vertebral bodies. We evaluate our method in terms of speed and accuracy by applying it to volumetric MR images of the spine acquired from nine patients. Quantitative and visual results demonstrate that the method is promising for segmentation of vertebral bodies in volumetric MR images.

  1. A Combined Random Forests and Active Contour Model Approach for Fully Automatic Segmentation of the Left Atrium in Volumetric MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation of the left atrium (LA from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI datasets is of great importance for image guided atrial fibrillation ablation, LA fibrosis quantification, and cardiac biophysical modelling. However, automated LA segmentation from cardiac MRI is challenging due to limited image resolution, considerable variability in anatomical structures across subjects, and dynamic motion of the heart. In this work, we propose a combined random forests (RFs and active contour model (ACM approach for fully automatic segmentation of the LA from cardiac volumetric MRI. Specifically, we employ the RFs within an autocontext scheme to effectively integrate contextual and appearance information from multisource images together for LA shape inferring. The inferred shape is then incorporated into a volume-scalable ACM for further improving the segmentation accuracy. We validated the proposed method on the cardiac volumetric MRI datasets from the STACOM 2013 and HVSMR 2016 databases and showed that it outperforms other latest automated LA segmentation methods. Validation metrics, average Dice coefficient (DC and average surface-to-surface distance (S2S, were computed as 0.9227±0.0598 and 1.14±1.205 mm, versus those of 0.6222–0.878 and 1.34–8.72 mm, obtained by other methods, respectively.

  2. Automatic 3D Building Detection and Modeling from Airborne LiDAR Point Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shaohui

    Urban reconstruction, with an emphasis on man-made structure modeling, is an active research area with broad impact on several potential applications. Urban reconstruction combines photogrammetry, remote sensing, computer vision, and computer graphics. Even though there is a huge volume of work that has been done, many problems still remain unsolved. Automation is one of the key focus areas in this research. In this work, a fast, completely automated method to create 3D watertight building models from airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) point clouds is presented. The developed method analyzes the scene content and produces multi-layer rooftops, with complex rigorous boundaries and vertical walls, that connect rooftops to the ground. The graph cuts algorithm is used to separate vegetative elements from the rest of the scene content, which is based on the local analysis about the properties of the local implicit surface patch. The ground terrain and building rooftop footprints are then extracted, utilizing the developed strategy, a two-step hierarchical Euclidean clustering. The method presented here adopts a "divide-and-conquer" scheme. Once the building footprints are segmented from the terrain and vegetative areas, the whole scene is divided into individual pendent processing units which represent potential points on the rooftop. For each individual building region, significant features on the rooftop are further detected using a specifically designed region-growing algorithm with surface smoothness constraints. The principal orientation of each building rooftop feature is calculated using a minimum bounding box fitting technique, and is used to guide the refinement of shapes and boundaries of the rooftop parts. Boundaries for all of these features are refined for the purpose of producing strict description. Once the description of the rooftops is achieved, polygonal mesh models are generated by creating surface patches with outlines defined by detected

  3. An automatic image-based modelling method applied to forensic infography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Zancajo-Blazquez

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method based on 3D reconstruction from images that demonstrates the utility and integration of close-range photogrammetry and computer vision as an efficient alternative to modelling complex objects and scenarios of forensic infography. The results obtained confirm the validity of the method compared to other existing alternatives as it guarantees the following: (i flexibility, permitting work with any type of camera (calibrated and non-calibrated, smartphone or tablet and image (visible, infrared, thermal, etc.; (ii automation, allowing the reconstruction of three-dimensional scenarios in the absence of manual intervention, and (iii high quality results, sometimes providing higher resolution than modern laser scanning systems. As a result, each ocular inspection of a crime scene with any camera performed by the scientific police can be transformed into a scaled 3d model.

  4. Automatic generation of design structure matrices through the evolution of product models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gopsill, James A.; Snider, Chris; McMahon, Chris

    2016-01-01

    sense. For these reasons, tools and methods to support the identification and monitoring of component interactions and dependencies continues to be an active area of research. In particular, design structure matrices (DSMs) have been extensively applied to identify and visualize product...... update the DSM structure as a product develops. It follows that the proposition of this paper is to investigate whether an automated and continuously evolving DSM can be generated by monitoring the changes in the digital models that represent the product. This includes models that are generated from......, and lengthy redesigns. Thus, the management and monitoring of these dependencies remains a crucial activity in engineering projects and is becoming ever more challenging with the increase in the number of components, component interactions, and component dependencies, in both a structural and a functional...

  5. Automatic Cell Segmentation Using a Shape-Classification Model in Immunohistochemically Stained Cytological Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shishir

    This paper presents a segmentation method for detecting cells in immunohistochemically stained cytological images. A two-phase approach to segmentation is used where an unsupervised clustering approach coupled with cluster merging based on a fitness function is used as the first phase to obtain a first approximation of the cell locations. A joint segmentation-classification approach incorporating ellipse as a shape model is used as the second phase to detect the final cell contour. The segmentation model estimates a multivariate density function of low-level image features from training samples and uses it as a measure of how likely each image pixel is to be a cell. This estimate is constrained by the zero level set, which is obtained as a solution to an implicit representation of an ellipse. Results of segmentation are presented and compared to ground truth measurements.

  6. Genetic algorithms used for PWRs refuel management automatic optimization: a new modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapot, Jorge Luiz C.; Schirru, Roberto; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da

    1996-01-01

    A Genetic Algorithms-based system, linking the computer codes GENESIS 5.0 and ANC through the interface ALGER, has been developed aiming the PWRs fuel management optimization. An innovative codification, the Lists Model, has been incorporated to the genetic system, which avoids the use of variants of the standard crossover operator and generates only valid loading patterns in the core. The GENESIS/ALGER/ANC system has been successfully tested in an optimization study for Angra-1 second cycle. (author)

  7. PROBADO3D – Towards an automatic multimedia indexing workflow for architectural 3D models

    OpenAIRE

    R. Berndt; I. Blümel; R. Wessel

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a repository for architectural 3D-CAD models which is currently set up at the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB), Hannover, as part of the larger German PROBADO digital library initiative: The proposed PROBADO-framework is integrating different types of multimedia content-repositories and adding features available in text-based digital libraries. A workflow for automated content-based data analysis and indexing is proposed.

  8. AN AUTOMATIC FEATURE BASED MODEL FOR CELL SEGMENTATION FROM CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY VOLUMES

    OpenAIRE

    Delibaltov, Diana; Ghosh, Pratim; Veeman, Michael; Smith, William; Manjunath, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    We present a model for the automated segmentation of cells from confocal microscopy volumes of biological samples. The segmentation task for these images is exceptionally challenging due to weak boundaries and varying intensity during the imaging process. To tackle this, a two step pruning process based on the Fast Marching Method is first applied to obtain an over-segmented image. This is followed by a merging step based on an effective feature representation. The algorithm is applied on two...

  9. Analysis of DGNB-DK criteria for BIM-based Model Checking automatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Peter Nørkjær; Svidt, Kjeld; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    This report includes the results of an analysis of the automation potential of the Danish edition of building sustainability assessment method Deutsche Gesellschaft für Nachhaltiges Bauen (DGNB) for office buildings version 2014 1.1. The analysis investigate the criteria related to DGNB-DK and if......-DK and if they would be suited for automation through the technological concept BIM-based Model Checking (BMC)....

  10. Experimental assessment of an automatic approach for stereo models generation using directly measured orientation parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio M. G. Tommaselli

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available With the evolution of digital image acquisition devices, satellite positioning systems (GPS and space orientation by the inertial navigation systems (INS, new applications of fast cartography, became feasible, as disaster management and environment monitoring. Such applications require periodic georeferenced information with characteristics of speed and reliability that can be obtained by digital photogrammetry, using additional data from sensors of direct orientation. However, the exterior orientation parameters (EO provided by these sensors are under the required accuracy to remove the vertical parallax in the model. This paper presents an experimental evaluation of an approach for removing the vertical parallax of the model. This appoach is based on the reprocessing of the EO parameters provided by the sensors, using a modified coplanarity model. Some experiments with simulated and real data are presented. The experiments with simulated data were performed in order to assess the acceptable errors in the exterior orientation parameters. The experiments with real data were carried out to evaluate the vertical parallax effect, before and after the reprocessing of the EO parameters, and to access the accuracy of check points calculated by photogrammetric intersection.

  11. Automatic Language Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    hundreds guish one language from another. The reader is referred of input languages would need to be supported , the cost of to the linguistics literature...eventually obtained bet- 108 TRAINING FRENCH GERMAN ITRAIING FRENCH M- ALGORITHM - __ GERMAN NHSPANISH TRAINING SPEECH SET OF MODELS: UTTERANCES ONE MODEL...i.e. vowels ) for each speech utterance are located malized to be insensitive to overall amplitude, pitch and automatically. Next, feature vectors

  12. Cognitive model application for automatic system of methanol supply to flowlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakhova, M. Yu; Khoroshavina, E. A.; Krasnov, A. N.; Zakirnichnaya, M. M.

    2017-10-01

    The main problem during natural gas extraction is hydrating risk. The hydrates could be formed at every stage of extraction: from gas foundation to Central Processing Facility (CPF). The hydrating is quite unwanted process, because it decreases the efficiency of field operations and causes accidents. The process operating procedure of any production field provides some measures to prevent hydrating. Mostly different hydrate growth inhibitors are used to prevent hydrating, for example methanol or water-methanol solution. At this time the most important problem is evaluation of the optimal methanol flow rate or water-methanol solution concentration for current conditions. The cognitive model application for hydrating diagnosis is discussed in the article. It is based on real time analysis of head temperature and pressure, temperature and pressure in the entrance of the CPF and ambient temperature. In this case, current parameters and their dynamic are analyzed. The hydrating conditions are diagnosed by the algorithm, offered in this article. This algorithm includes the results of temperature and pressure dynamic analysis and the cognitive model, based on expert knowledge. This system was tested in the Yamburg gas condensate field. These tests approved real methanol saving.

  13. An Interactive Tool for Automatic Predimensioning and Numerical Modeling of Arch Dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction of double-curvature arch dams is an attractive solution from an economic viewpoint due to the reduced volume of concrete necessary for their construction as compared to conventional gravity dams. Due to their complex geometry, many criteria have arisen for their design. However, the most widespread methods are based on recommendations of traditional technical documents without taking into account the possibilities of computer-aided design. In this paper, an innovative software tool to design FEM models of double-curvature arch dams is presented. Several capabilities are allowed: simplified geometry creation (interesting for academic purposes, preliminary geometrical design, high-detailed model construction, and stochastic calculation performance (introducing uncertainty associated with material properties and other parameters. This paper specially focuses on geometrical issues describing the functionalities of the tool and the fundamentals of the design procedure with regard to the following aspects: topography, reference cylinder, excavation depth, crown cantilever thickness and curvature, horizontal arch curvature, excavation and concrete mass volume, and additional elements such as joints or spillways. Examples of application on two Spanish dams are presented and the results obtained analyzed.

  14. Likelihood-based inference for clustered line transect data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waagepetersen, Rasmus Plenge; Schweder, Tore

    The uncertainty in estimation of spatial animal density from line transect surveys depends on the degree of spatial clustering in the animal population. To quantify the clustering we model line transect data as independent thinnings of spatial shot-noise Cox processes. Likelihood-based inference...... is implemented using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to obtain efficient estimates of spatial clustering parameters. Uncertainty is addressed using parametric bootstrap or by consideration of posterior distributions in a Bayesian setting. Maximum likelihood estimation and Bayesian inference is compared...

  15. Likelihood Analysis of Supersymmetric SU(5) GUTs

    CERN Document Server

    Bagnaschi, E.

    2017-01-01

    We perform a likelihood analysis of the constraints from accelerator experiments and astrophysical observations on supersymmetric (SUSY) models with SU(5) boundary conditions on soft SUSY-breaking parameters at the GUT scale. The parameter space of the models studied has 7 parameters: a universal gaugino mass $m_{1/2}$, distinct masses for the scalar partners of matter fermions in five- and ten-dimensional representations of SU(5), $m_5$ and $m_{10}$, and for the $\\mathbf{5}$ and $\\mathbf{\\bar 5}$ Higgs representations $m_{H_u}$ and $m_{H_d}$, a universal trilinear soft SUSY-breaking parameter $A_0$, and the ratio of Higgs vevs $\\tan \\beta$. In addition to previous constraints from direct sparticle searches, low-energy and flavour observables, we incorporate constraints based on preliminary results from 13 TeV LHC searches for jets + MET events and long-lived particles, as well as the latest PandaX-II and LUX searches for direct Dark Matter detection. In addition to previously-identified mechanisms for bringi...

  16. Penalized maximum likelihood estimation for generalized linear point processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels Richard

    2010-01-01

    A generalized linear point process is specified in terms of an intensity that depends upon a linear predictor process through a fixed non-linear function. We present a framework where the linear predictor is parametrized by a Banach space and give results on Gateaux differentiability of the log......-likelihood. Of particular interest is when the intensity is expressed in terms of a linear filter parametrized by a Sobolev space. Using that the Sobolev spaces are reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces we derive results on the representation of the penalized maximum likelihood estimator in a special case and the gradient...... of the negative log-likelihood in general. The latter is used to develop a descent algorithm in the Sobolev space. We conclude the paper by extensions to multivariate and additive model specifications. The methods are implemented in the R-package ppstat....

  17. Penalized maximum likelihood estimation for generalized linear point processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels Richard

    2010-01-01

    A generalized linear point process is specified in terms of an intensity that depends upon a linear predictor process through a fixed non-linear function. We present a framework where the linear predictor is parametrized by a Banach space and give results on Gateaux differentiability of the log...... of the negative log-likelihood in general. The latter is used to develop a descent algorithm in the Sobolev space. We conclude the paper by extensions to multivariate and additive model specifications. The methods are implemented in the R-package ppstat.......-likelihood. Of particular interest is when the intensity is expressed in terms of a linear filter parametrized by a Sobolev space. Using that the Sobolev spaces are reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces we derive results on the representation of the penalized maximum likelihood estimator in a special case and the gradient...

  18. A modification of the restricted maximum likelihood method in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The existing Restricted Maximum Likelihood Method of obtaining variance component estimates in generalized linear models with random effects is a complicated procedure requiring the value of the parameter it is intended to estimate. This paper addresses this problem by providing a modification to the existing Restricted ...

  19. Modelling and automatic reactive power control of isolated wind-diesel hybrid power systems using ANN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansal, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an artificial neural network (ANN) based approach to tune the parameters of the static var compensator (SVC) reactive power controller over a wide range of typical load model parameters. The gains of PI (proportional integral) based SVC are optimised for typical values of the load voltage characteristics (n q ) by conventional techniques. Using the generated data, the method of multi-layer feed forward ANN with error back propagation training is employed to tune the parameters of the SVC. An ANN tuned SVC controller has been applied to control the reactive power of a variable slip/speed isolated wind-diesel hybrid power system. It is observed that the maximum deviations of all parameters are more for larger values of n q . It has been shown that initially synchronous generator supplies the reactive power required by the induction generator and/or load, and the latter reactive power is purely supplied by the SVC

  20. Automatic learning of mortality in a CPN model of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Logan; Paul, Mical; Andreassen, Steen

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to apply machine learning as a method to refine a manually constructed CPN for the assessment of the severity of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS).The goal of tuning the CPN is to create a scoring system that uses only objective data, compares favourably with other severity-scoring systems and differentiates between sepsis and non-infectious SIRS. The resulting model, the Learned-Age (L A ) -Sepsis CPN has good discriminatory ability for the prediction of 30-day mortality with an area under the ROC curve of 0.79. This result compares well to existing scoring systems. The L A -Sepsis CPN also has a modest ability to discriminate between sepsis and non-infectious SIRS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Automatic annotation of histopathological images using a latent topic model based on non-negative matrix factorization

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz-Roa, Angel; Díaz, Gloria; Romero, Eduardo; González, Fabio A.

    2012-01-01

    Histopathological images are an important resource for clinical diagnosis and biomedical research. From an image understanding point of view, the automatic annotation of these images is a challenging problem. This paper presents a new method for automatic histopathological image annotation based on three complementary strategies, first, a part-based image representation, called the bag of features, which takes advantage of the natural redundancy of histopathological images for capturing the f...

  2. Evaluation of plan quality assurance models for prostate cancer patients based on fully automatically generated Pareto-optimal treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yibing; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben; Petit, Steven F

    2016-06-07

    IMRT planning with commercial Treatment Planning Systems (TPSs) is a trial-and-error process. Consequently, the quality of treatment plans may not be consistent among patients, planners and institutions. Recently, different plan quality assurance (QA) models have been proposed, that could flag and guide improvement of suboptimal treatment plans. However, the performance of these models was validated using plans that were created using the conventional trail-and-error treatment planning process. Consequently, it is challenging to assess and compare quantitatively the accuracy of different treatment planning QA models. Therefore, we created a golden standard dataset of consistently planned Pareto-optimal IMRT plans for 115 prostate patients. Next, the dataset was used to assess the performance of a treatment planning QA model that uses the overlap volume histogram (OVH). 115 prostate IMRT plans were fully automatically planned using our in-house developed TPS Erasmus-iCycle. An existing OVH model was trained on the plans of 58 of the patients. Next it was applied to predict DVHs of the rectum, bladder and anus of the remaining 57 patients. The predictions were compared with the achieved values of the golden standard plans for the rectum D mean, V 65, and V 75, and D mean of the anus and the bladder. For the rectum, the prediction errors (predicted-achieved) were only  -0.2  ±  0.9 Gy (mean  ±  1 SD) for D mean,-1.0  ±  1.6% for V 65, and  -0.4  ±  1.1% for V 75. For D mean of the anus and the bladder, the prediction error was 0.1  ±  1.6 Gy and 4.8  ±  4.1 Gy, respectively. Increasing the training cohort to 114 patients only led to minor improvements. A dataset of consistently planned Pareto-optimal prostate IMRT plans was generated. This dataset can be used to train new, and validate and compare existing treatment planning QA models, and has been made publicly available. The OVH model was highly accurate

  3. Automatic Fabric Defect Detection with a Multi-Scale Convolutional Denoising Autoencoder Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Mei

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Fabric defect detection is a necessary and essential step of quality control in the textile manufacturing industry. Traditional fabric inspections are usually performed by manual visual methods, which are low in efficiency and poor in precision for long-term industrial applications. In this paper, we propose an unsupervised learning-based automated approach to detect and localize fabric defects without any manual intervention. This approach is used to reconstruct image patches with a convolutional denoising autoencoder network at multiple Gaussian pyramid levels and to synthesize detection results from the corresponding resolution channels. The reconstruction residual of each image patch is used as the indicator for direct pixel-wise prediction. By segmenting and synthesizing the reconstruction residual map at each resolution level, the final inspection result can be generated. This newly developed method has several prominent advantages for fabric defect detection. First, it can be trained with only a small amount of defect-free samples. This is especially important for situations in which collecting large amounts of defective samples is difficult and impracticable. Second, owing to the multi-modal integration strategy, it is relatively more robust and accurate compared to general inspection methods (the results at each resolution level can be viewed as a modality. Third, according to our results, it can address multiple types of textile fabrics, from simple to more complex. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed model is robust and yields good overall performance with high precision and acceptable recall rates.

  4. Automatic segmentation of lymph vessel wall using optimal surface graph cut and hidden Markov Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jonathan-Lee; Essa, Ehab; Xie, Xianghua

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel method to segment the lymph vessel wall in confocal microscopy images using Optimal Surface Segmentation (OSS) and hidden Markov Models (HMM). OSS is used to preform a pre-segmentation on the images, to act as the initial state for the HMM. We utilize a steerable filter to determine edge based filters for both of these segmentations, and use these features to build Gaussian probability distributions for both the vessel walls and the background. From this we infer the emission probability for the HMM, and the transmission probability is learned using a Baum-Welch algorithm. We transform the segmentation problem into one of cost minimization, with each node in the graph corresponding to one state, and the weight for each node being defined using its emission probability. We define the inter-relations between neighboring nodes using the transmission probability. Having constructed the problem, it is solved using the Viterbi algorithm, allowing the vessel to be reconstructed. The optimal solution can be found in polynomial time. We present qualitative and quantitative analysis to show the performance of the proposed method.

  5. Asymptotic Likelihood Distribution for Correlated & Constrained Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Ujjwal

    2016-01-01

    It describes my work as summer student at CERN. The report discusses the asymptotic distribution of the likelihood ratio for total no. of parameters being h and 2 out of these being are constrained and correlated.

  6. Design of patient rooms and automatic radioiodine-131 waste water management system for a thyroid cancer treatment ward: 'Suandok Model'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilasdechanon, N; Ua-Apisitwong, S; Chatnampet, K; Ekmahachai, M; Vilasdechanon, J

    2014-09-01

    The great benefit of (131)I radionuclide treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) was acknowledged by the long survival rate. The main requirements for (131)I therapy in hospital were treatment facilities and a radiation safety plan that assured radiation protection and safety to patient, hospital worker, public, and environment. To introduce the concepts and methods of radiation safety design for a patient's room in a (131)I treatment ward and a system of radioactive waste water management in hospital. The design was based on principles of external and internal radiation protection for unsealed source and radioactive waste management. Planning for treatment facilities was concluded from clinical evidence, physical and physiological information for (131)I, radiation safety criteria, hospital resources and budget. The three phases of the working process were: construction, software development, and radiation safety assessment. The (131)I treatment facility and automatic radioactive waste water management system was completely implemented in 2009. The radiation waste water management system known as the 'Suandok Model' was highly recommended by the national regulator to hospitals who desire to provide (131)I treatment for thyroid cancer. In 2011, the Nuclear Medicine Division, Chiang Mai University was rewarded by the national authority for a very good radiation practice in development of safe working conditions and environment. The Suandok Model was a facility design that fulfilled requirements for the safe use of high radiation (131)I doses for thyroid cancer treatment in hospital. The facility presented in this study may not be suitable for all hospitals but the design concepts could be applied according to an individual hospital context and resources. People who use or gain benefit from radiation applications have to emphasise the responsibility to control and monitor radiation effects on individuals, communities and the environment.

  7. Likelihood analysis of supersymmetric SU(5) GUTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagnaschi, E.; Weiglein, G. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Costa, J.C.; Buchmueller, O.; Citron, M.; Richards, A.; De Vries, K.J. [Imperial College, High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, London (United Kingdom); Sakurai, K. [University of Durham, Science Laboratories, Department of Physics, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Borsato, M.; Chobanova, V.; Lucio, M.; Martinez Santos, D. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Cavanaugh, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); University of Illinois at Chicago, Physics Department, Chicago, IL (United States); Roeck, A. de [CERN, Experimental Physics Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Antwerp University, Wilrijk (Belgium); Dolan, M.J. [University of Melbourne, ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, School of Physics, Parkville (Australia); Ellis, J.R. [King' s College London, Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); Theoretical Physics Department, CERN, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Flaecher, H. [University of Bristol, H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Bristol (United Kingdom); Heinemeyer, S. [Campus of International Excellence UAM+CSIC, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM-CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander (Spain); Isidori, G. [Universitaet Zuerich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Olive, K.A. [University of Minnesota, William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-02-15

    We perform a likelihood analysis of the constraints from accelerator experiments and astrophysical observations on supersymmetric (SUSY) models with SU(5) boundary conditions on soft SUSY-breaking parameters at the GUT scale. The parameter space of the models studied has seven parameters: a universal gaugino mass m{sub 1/2}, distinct masses for the scalar partners of matter fermions in five- and ten-dimensional representations of SU(5), m{sub 5} and m{sub 10}, and for the 5 and anti 5 Higgs representations m{sub H{sub u}} and m{sub H{sub d}}, a universal trilinear soft SUSY-breaking parameter A{sub 0}, and the ratio of Higgs vevs tan β. In addition to previous constraints from direct sparticle searches, low-energy and flavour observables, we incorporate constraints based on preliminary results from 13 TeV LHC searches for jets + E{sub T} events and long-lived particles, as well as the latest PandaX-II and LUX searches for direct Dark Matter detection. In addition to previously identified mechanisms for bringing the supersymmetric relic density into the range allowed by cosmology, we identify a novel u{sub R}/c{sub R} - χ{sup 0}{sub 1} coannihilation mechanism that appears in the supersymmetric SU(5) GUT model and discuss the role of ν{sub τ} coannihilation. We find complementarity between the prospects for direct Dark Matter detection and SUSY searches at the LHC. (orig.)

  8. Exclusion probabilities and likelihood ratios with applications to mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slooten, Klaas-Jan; Egeland, Thore

    2016-01-01

    The statistical evidence obtained from mixed DNA profiles can be summarised in several ways in forensic casework including the likelihood ratio (LR) and the Random Man Not Excluded (RMNE) probability. The literature has seen a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of likelihood ratios and exclusion probabilities, and part of our aim is to bring some clarification to this debate. In a previous paper, we proved that there is a general mathematical relationship between these statistics: RMNE can be expressed as a certain average of the LR, implying that the expected value of the LR, when applied to an actual contributor to the mixture, is at least equal to the inverse of the RMNE. While the mentioned paper presented applications for kinship problems, the current paper demonstrates the relevance for mixture cases, and for this purpose, we prove some new general properties. We also demonstrate how to use the distribution of the likelihood ratio for donors of a mixture, to obtain estimates for exceedance probabilities of the LR for non-donors, of which the RMNE is a special case corresponding to L R>0. In order to derive these results, we need to view the likelihood ratio as a random variable. In this paper, we describe how such a randomization can be achieved. The RMNE is usually invoked only for mixtures without dropout. In mixtures, artefacts like dropout and drop-in are commonly encountered and we address this situation too, illustrating our results with a basic but widely implemented model, a so-called binary model. The precise definitions, modelling and interpretation of the required concepts of dropout and drop-in are not entirely obvious, and we attempt to clarify them here in a general likelihood framework for a binary model.

  9. epiModel: a system to build automatically systems of differential equations of compartmental type-epidemiological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Juan-C; Sánchez-Sánchez, Almudena; Santonja, Francisco-J; Villanueva, Rafael-J

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we describe epiModel, a code developed in Mathematica that facilitates the building of systems of differential equations corresponding to type-epidemiological linear or quadratic models whose characteristics are defined in text files following an easy syntax. It includes the possibility of obtaining the equations of models involving age and/or sex groups. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Automatic individual arterial input functions calculated from PCA outperform manual and population-averaged approaches for the pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Requena, Roberto; Prats-Montalbán, José Manuel; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Alberich-Bayarri, Ángel; García-Martí, Gracián; Pérez, Rosario; Ferrer, Alberto

    2015-08-01

    To introduce a segmentation method to calculate an automatic arterial input function (AIF) based on principal component analysis (PCA) of dynamic contrast enhanced MR (DCE-MR) imaging and compare it with individual manually selected and population-averaged AIFs using calculated pharmacokinetic parameters. The study included 65 individuals with prostate examinations (27 tumors and 38 controls). Manual AIFs were individually extracted and also averaged to obtain a population AIF. Automatic AIFs were individually obtained by applying PCA to volumetric DCE-MR imaging data and finding the highest correlation of the PCs with a reference AIF. Variability was assessed using coefficients of variation and repeated measures tests. The different AIFs were used as inputs to the pharmacokinetic model and correlation coefficients, Bland-Altman plots and analysis of variance tests were obtained to compare the results. Automatic PCA-based AIFs were successfully extracted in all cases. The manual and PCA-based AIFs showed good correlation (r between pharmacokinetic parameters ranging from 0.74 to 0.95), with differences below the manual individual variability (RMSCV up to 27.3%). The population-averaged AIF showed larger differences (r from 0.30 to 0.61). The automatic PCA-based approach minimizes the variability associated to obtaining individual volume-based AIFs in DCE-MR studies of the prostate. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Determining the likelihood of pauses and surges in global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurer, Andrew P.; Hegerl, Gabriele C.; Obrochta, Stephen P.

    2015-07-01

    The recent warming "hiatus" is subject to intense interest, with proposed causes including natural forcing and internal variability. Here we derive samples of all natural and internal variability from observations and a recent proxy reconstruction to investigate the likelihood that these two sources of variability could produce a hiatus or rapid warming in surface temperature. The likelihood is found to be consistent with that calculated previously for models and exhibits a similar spatial pattern, with an Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation-like structure, although with more signal in the Atlantic than in model patterns. The number and length of events increases if natural forcing is also considered, particularly in the models. From the reconstruction it can be seen that large eruptions, such as Mount Tambora in 1815, or clusters of eruptions, may result in a hiatus of over 20 years, a finding supported by model results.

  12. Applying exclusion likelihoods from LHC searches to extended Higgs sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtle, Philip; Heinemeyer, Sven; Stål, Oscar; Stefaniak, Tim; Weiglein, Georg

    2015-09-01

    LHC searches for non-standard Higgs bosons decaying into tau lepton pairs constitute a sensitive experimental probe for physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM), such as supersymmetry (SUSY). Recently, the limits obtained from these searches have been presented by the CMS collaboration in a nearly model-independent fashion - as a narrow resonance model - based on the full dataset. In addition to publishing a exclusion limit, the full likelihood information for the narrow resonance model has been released. This provides valuable information that can be incorporated into global BSM fits. We present a simple algorithm that maps an arbitrary model with multiple neutral Higgs bosons onto the narrow resonance model and derives the corresponding value for the exclusion likelihood from the CMS search. This procedure has been implemented into the public computer code HiggsBounds (version 4.2.0 and higher). We validate our implementation by cross-checking against the official CMS exclusion contours in three Higgs benchmark scenarios in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), and find very good agreement. Going beyond validation, we discuss the combined constraints of the search and the rate measurements of the SM-like Higgs at in a recently proposed MSSM benchmark scenario, where the lightest Higgs boson obtains SM-like couplings independently of the decoupling of the heavier Higgs states. Technical details for how to access the likelihood information within HiggsBounds are given in the appendix. The program is available at http://higgsbounds.hepforge.org.

  13. Comparison of likelihood testing procedures for parallel systems with covariances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayman Baklizi; Isa Daud; Noor Akma Ibrahim

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we considered investigating and comparing the behavior of the likelihood ratio, the Rao's and the Wald's statistics for testing hypotheses on the parameters of the simple linear regression model based on parallel systems with covariances. These statistics are asymptotically equivalent (Barndorff-Nielsen and Cox, 1994). However, their relative performances in finite samples are generally known. A Monte Carlo experiment is conducted to stimulate the sizes and the powers of these statistics for complete samples and in the presence of time censoring. Comparisons of the statistics are made according to the attainment of assumed size of the test and their powers at various points in the parameter space. The results show that the likelihood ratio statistics appears to have the best performance in terms of the attainment of the assumed size of the test. Power comparisons show that the Rao statistic has some advantage over the Wald statistic in almost all of the space of alternatives while likelihood ratio statistic occupies either the first or the last position in term of power. Overall, the likelihood ratio statistic appears to be more appropriate to the model under study, especially for small sample sizes

  14. A neural network model for the automatic detection and forecast of convective cells based on meteosat second generation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puca, S.; de Leonibus, L.; Zauli, F.; Rosci, P.; Musmanno, L.

    The Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs) are often correlated with heavy rainfall, thunderstorms and hail showers, frequently causing significant damages. The most intensive weather activities occur during the maturing stage of the development, which can be found in the case of a multi-cell storm in the centre of the convective complex systems. These convective systems may occur in several different unstable air mass; in a cold air mass behind a polar cold front, in the frontal zone of a polar front and in warm air ahead of a polar warm front. To understand the meteorological situation and apply the best conceptual model, the knowledge of the convective cluster is often not enough. In many cases the forecasters need to know the distribution of the convective cells in the cloudy cluster. A model, running in operational mode at the Italian Air Force Meteorological Service (UGM/CNMCA), for the automatic detection and forecast of the convective cells, is here proposed. The application relays on the Meteosat Second Generation infrared (IR) windows (10.8 μ m, 7.3 μ m) and the two water vapour (WV) channels (6.2 μ m and 7.3 μ m), giving as output the detection of the convective cells and their evolution for the next 15 and 30 minutes. The format of the output of the product is the last IR (10.8 μ m) image where the detected cells, their development and their tracking are represented. This multispectral method, based on a variable threshold method during the detection phase and a neural network algorithm during the forecast phase, allowed us to define a model able to detect the convective cells present in a convective cluster, plot their distribution and forecast the evolution of them for the next 15 and 30 minutes with a good efficiency. For analysing the performance of the model with the Meteosat Second Generation data, different error functions have been evaluated for various meteorological cloud contexts (i.e. high layer and cirrus clouds). Some methods for

  15. Fully automatic segmentation of the mitral leaflets in 3D transesophageal echocardiographic images using multi-atlas joint label fusion and deformable medial modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouch, A M; Wang, H; Takabe, M; Jackson, B M; Gorman, J H; Gorman, R C; Yushkevich, P A; Sehgal, C M

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive visual and quantitative analysis of in vivo human mitral valve morphology is central to the diagnosis and surgical treatment of mitral valve disease. Real-time 3D transesophageal echocardiography (3D TEE) is a practical, highly informative imaging modality for examining the mitral valve in a clinical setting. To facilitate visual and quantitative 3D TEE image analysis, we describe a fully automated method for segmenting the mitral leaflets in 3D TEE image data. The algorithm integrates complementary probabilistic segmentation and shape modeling techniques (multi-atlas joint label fusion and deformable modeling with continuous medial representation) to automatically generate 3D geometric models of the mitral leaflets from 3D TEE image data. These models are unique in that they establish a shape-based coordinate system on the valves of different subjects and represent the leaflets volumetrically, as structures with locally varying thickness. In this work, expert image analysis is the gold standard for evaluating automatic segmentation. Without any user interaction, we demonstrate that the automatic segmentation method accurately captures patient-specific leaflet geometry at both systole and diastole in 3D TEE data acquired from a mixed population of subjects with normal valve morphology and mitral valve disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mineral Mapping Using the Automatized Gaussian Model (AGM—Application to Two Industrial French Sites at Gardanne and Thann

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolphe Marion

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification and mapping of the mineral composition of by-products and residues on industrial sites is a topic of growing interest because it may provide information on plant-processing activities and their impact on the surrounding environment. Imaging spectroscopy can provide such information based on the spectral signatures of soil mineral markers. In this study, we use the automatized Gaussian model (AGM, an automated, physically based method relying on spectral deconvolution. Originally developed for the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR range, it has been extended to include information from the visible and near-infrared (VNIR range to take iron oxides/hydroxides into account. We present the results of its application to two French industrial sites: (i the Altéo Environnement site in Gardanne, southern France, dedicated to the extraction of alumina from bauxite; and (ii the Millennium Inorganic Chemicals site in Thann, eastern France, which produces titanium dioxide from ilmenite and rutile, and its associated Séché Éco Services site used to neutralize the resulting effluents, producing gypsum. HySpex hyperspectral images were acquired over Gardanne in September 2013 and an APEX image was acquired over Thann in June 2013. In both cases, reflectance spectra were measured and samples were collected in the field and analyzed for mineralogical and chemical composition. When applying the AGM to the images, both in the VNIR and SWIR ranges, we successfully identified and mapped minerals of interest characteristic of each site: bauxite, Bauxaline® and alumina for Gardanne; and red and white gypsum and calcite for Thann. Identifications and maps were consistent with in situ measurements.

  17. Automatic Segmentation of the Eye in 3D Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Novel Statistical Shape Model for Treatment Planning of Retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciller, Carlos; De Zanet, Sandro I; Rüegsegger, Michael B; Pica, Alessia; Sznitman, Raphael; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Maeder, Philippe; Munier, Francis L; Kowal, Jens H; Cuadra, Meritxell Bach

    2015-07-15

    Proper delineation of ocular anatomy in 3-dimensional (3D) imaging is a big challenge, particularly when developing treatment plans for ocular diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is presently used in clinical practice for diagnosis confirmation and treatment planning for treatment of retinoblastoma in infants, where it serves as a source of information, complementary to the fundus or ultrasonographic imaging. Here we present a framework to fully automatically segment the eye anatomy for MRI based on 3D active shape models (ASM), and we validate the results and present a proof of concept to automatically segment pathological eyes. Manual and automatic segmentation were performed in 24 images of healthy children's eyes (3.29 ± 2.15 years of age). Imaging was performed using a 3-T MRI scanner. The ASM consists of the lens, the vitreous humor, the sclera, and the cornea. The model was fitted by first automatically detecting the position of the eye center, the lens, and the optic nerve, and then aligning the model and fitting it to the patient. We validated our segmentation method by using a leave-one-out cross-validation. The segmentation results were evaluated by measuring the overlap, using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the mean distance error. We obtained a DSC of 94.90 ± 2.12% for the sclera and the cornea, 94.72 ± 1.89% for the vitreous humor, and 85.16 ± 4.91% for the lens. The mean distance error was 0.26 ± 0.09 mm. The entire process took 14 seconds on average per eye. We provide a reliable and accurate tool that enables clinicians to automatically segment the sclera, the cornea, the vitreous humor, and the lens, using MRI. We additionally present a proof of concept for fully automatically segmenting eye pathology. This tool reduces the time needed for eye shape delineation and thus can help clinicians when planning eye treatment and confirming the extent of the tumor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Automatic Segmentation of the Eye in 3D Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Novel Statistical Shape Model for Treatment Planning of Retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciller, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.cillerruiz@unil.ch [Department of Radiology, Lausanne University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Ophthalmic Technology Group, ARTORG Center of the University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Centre d’Imagerie BioMédicale, University of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); De Zanet, Sandro I.; Rüegsegger, Michael B. [Ophthalmic Technology Group, ARTORG Center of the University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Department of Ophthalmology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, Bern (Switzerland); Pica, Alessia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, Bern (Switzerland); Sznitman, Raphael [Ophthalmic Technology Group, ARTORG Center of the University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Department of Ophthalmology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, Bern (Switzerland); Thiran, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiology, Lausanne University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Signal Processing Laboratory, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Maeder, Philippe [Department of Radiology, Lausanne University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Munier, Francis L. [Unit of Pediatric Ocular Oncology, Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Kowal, Jens H. [Ophthalmic Technology Group, ARTORG Center of the University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Department of Ophthalmology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, Bern (Switzerland); and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Proper delineation of ocular anatomy in 3-dimensional (3D) imaging is a big challenge, particularly when developing treatment plans for ocular diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is presently used in clinical practice for diagnosis confirmation and treatment planning for treatment of retinoblastoma in infants, where it serves as a source of information, complementary to the fundus or ultrasonographic imaging. Here we present a framework to fully automatically segment the eye anatomy for MRI based on 3D active shape models (ASM), and we validate the results and present a proof of concept to automatically segment pathological eyes. Methods and Materials: Manual and automatic segmentation were performed in 24 images of healthy children's eyes (3.29 ± 2.15 years of age). Imaging was performed using a 3-T MRI scanner. The ASM consists of the lens, the vitreous humor, the sclera, and the cornea. The model was fitted by first automatically detecting the position of the eye center, the lens, and the optic nerve, and then aligning the model and fitting it to the patient. We validated our segmentation method by using a leave-one-out cross-validation. The segmentation results were evaluated by measuring the overlap, using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the mean distance error. Results: We obtained a DSC of 94.90 ± 2.12% for the sclera and the cornea, 94.72 ± 1.89% for the vitreous humor, and 85.16 ± 4.91% for the lens. The mean distance error was 0.26 ± 0.09 mm. The entire process took 14 seconds on average per eye. Conclusion: We provide a reliable and accurate tool that enables clinicians to automatically segment the sclera, the cornea, the vitreous humor, and the lens, using MRI. We additionally present a proof of concept for fully automatically segmenting eye pathology. This tool reduces the time needed for eye shape delineation and thus can help clinicians when planning eye treatment and confirming the extent of the tumor.

  19. Automatic Segmentation of the Eye in 3D Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Novel Statistical Shape Model for Treatment Planning of Retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciller, Carlos; De Zanet, Sandro I.; Rüegsegger, Michael B.; Pica, Alessia; Sznitman, Raphael; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Maeder, Philippe; Munier, Francis L.; Kowal, Jens H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Proper delineation of ocular anatomy in 3-dimensional (3D) imaging is a big challenge, particularly when developing treatment plans for ocular diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is presently used in clinical practice for diagnosis confirmation and treatment planning for treatment of retinoblastoma in infants, where it serves as a source of information, complementary to the fundus or ultrasonographic imaging. Here we present a framework to fully automatically segment the eye anatomy for MRI based on 3D active shape models (ASM), and we validate the results and present a proof of concept to automatically segment pathological eyes. Methods and Materials: Manual and automatic segmentation were performed in 24 images of healthy children's eyes (3.29 ± 2.15 years of age). Imaging was performed using a 3-T MRI scanner. The ASM consists of the lens, the vitreous humor, the sclera, and the cornea. The model was fitted by first automatically detecting the position of the eye center, the lens, and the optic nerve, and then aligning the model and fitting it to the patient. We validated our segmentation method by using a leave-one-out cross-validation. The segmentation results were evaluated by measuring the overlap, using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the mean distance error. Results: We obtained a DSC of 94.90 ± 2.12% for the sclera and the cornea, 94.72 ± 1.89% for the vitreous humor, and 85.16 ± 4.91% for the lens. The mean distance error was 0.26 ± 0.09 mm. The entire process took 14 seconds on average per eye. Conclusion: We provide a reliable and accurate tool that enables clinicians to automatically segment the sclera, the cornea, the vitreous humor, and the lens, using MRI. We additionally present a proof of concept for fully automatically segmenting eye pathology. This tool reduces the time needed for eye shape delineation and thus can help clinicians when planning eye treatment and confirming the extent of the tumor

  20. Composite likelihood and two-stage estimation in family studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elisabeth Anne Wreford

    2004-01-01

    In this paper register based family studies provide the motivation for linking a two-stage estimation procedure in copula models for multivariate failure time data with a composite likelihood approach. The asymptotic properties of the estimators in both parametric and semi-parametric models...... are derived, combining the approaches of Parner (2001) and Andersen (2003). The method is mainly studied when the families consist of groups of exchangeable members (e.g. siblings) or members at different levels (e.g. parents and children). The advantages of the proposed method are especially clear...... in this last case where very flexible modelling is possible. The suggested method is also studied in simulations and found to be efficient compared to maximum likelihood. Finally, the suggested method is applied to a family study of deep venous thromboembolism where it is seen that the association between ages...

  1. Cases in which ancestral maximum likelihood will be confusingly misleading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelman, Tomer; Chor, Benny

    2017-05-07

    Ancestral maximum likelihood (AML) is a phylogenetic tree reconstruction criteria that "lies between" maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML). ML has long been known to be statistically consistent. On the other hand, Felsenstein (1978) showed that MP is statistically inconsistent, and even positively misleading: There are cases where the parsimony criteria, applied to data generated according to one tree topology, will be optimized on a different tree topology. The question of weather AML is statistically consistent or not has been open for a long time. Mossel et al. (2009) have shown that AML can "shrink" short tree edges, resulting in a star tree with no internal resolution, which yields a better AML score than the original (resolved) model. This result implies that AML is statistically inconsistent, but not that it is positively misleading, because the star tree is compatible with any other topology. We show that AML is confusingly misleading: For some simple, four taxa (resolved) tree, the ancestral likelihood optimization criteria is maximized on an incorrect (resolved) tree topology, as well as on a star tree (both with specific edge lengths), while the tree with the original, correct topology, has strictly lower ancestral likelihood. Interestingly, the two short edges in the incorrect, resolved tree topology are of length zero, and are not adjacent, so this resolved tree is in fact a simple path. While for MP, the underlying phenomenon can be described as long edge attraction, it turns out that here we have long edge repulsion. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Automaticity or active control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tudoran, Ana Alina; Olsen, Svein Ottar

    This study addresses the quasi-moderating role of habit strength in explaining action loyalty. A model of loyalty behaviour is proposed that extends the traditional satisfaction–intention–action loyalty network. Habit strength is conceptualised as a cognitive construct to refer to the psychological...... aspects of the construct, such as routine, inertia, automaticity, or very little conscious deliberation. The data consist of 2962 consumers participating in a large European survey. The results show that habit strength significantly moderates the association between satisfaction and action loyalty, and......, respectively, between intended loyalty and action loyalty. At high levels of habit strength, consumers are more likely to free up cognitive resources and incline the balance from controlled to routine and automatic-like responses....

  3. Incorporating Learning Characteristics into Automatic Essay Scoring Models: What Individual Differences and Linguistic Features Tell Us about Writing Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Scott A.; Allen, Laura K.; Snow, Erica L.; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates a novel approach to automatically assessing essay quality that combines natural language processing approaches that assess text features with approaches that assess individual differences in writers such as demographic information, standardized test scores, and survey results. The results demonstrate that combining text…

  4. Supplementary Material for: High-Order Composite Likelihood Inference for Max-Stable Distributions and Processes

    KAUST Repository

    Castruccio, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    In multivariate or spatial extremes, inference for max-stable processes observed at a large collection of points is a very challenging problem and current approaches typically rely on less expensive composite likelihoods constructed from small subsets of data. In this work, we explore the limits of modern state-of-the-art computational facilities to perform full likelihood inference and to efficiently evaluate high-order composite likelihoods. With extensive simulations, we assess the loss of information of composite likelihood estimators with respect to a full likelihood approach for some widely used multivariate or spatial extreme models, we discuss how to choose composite likelihood truncation to improve the efficiency, and we also provide recommendations for practitioners. This article has supplementary material online.

  5. High-order Composite Likelihood Inference for Max-Stable Distributions and Processes

    KAUST Repository

    Castruccio, Stefano

    2015-09-29

    In multivariate or spatial extremes, inference for max-stable processes observed at a large collection of locations is a very challenging problem in computational statistics, and current approaches typically rely on less expensive composite likelihoods constructed from small subsets of data. In this work, we explore the limits of modern state-of-the-art computational facilities to perform full likelihood inference and to efficiently evaluate high-order composite likelihoods. With extensive simulations, we assess the loss of information of composite likelihood estimators with respect to a full likelihood approach for some widely-used multivariate or spatial extreme models, we discuss how to choose composite likelihood truncation to improve the efficiency, and we also provide recommendations for practitioners. This article has supplementary material online.

  6. Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference With Examples in R, SAS and ADMB

    CERN Document Server

    Millar, Russell B

    2011-01-01

    This book takes a fresh look at the popular and well-established method of maximum likelihood for statistical estimation and inference. It begins with an intuitive introduction to the concepts and background of likelihood, and moves through to the latest developments in maximum likelihood methodology, including general latent variable models and new material for the practical implementation of integrated likelihood using the free ADMB software. Fundamental issues of statistical inference are also examined, with a presentation of some of the philosophical debates underlying the choice of statis

  7. Iterative weighted maximum likelihood denoising with probabilistic patch-based weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deledalle, Charles-Alban; Denis, Loïc; Tupin, Florence

    2009-12-01

    Image denoising is an important problem in image processing since noise may interfere with visual or automatic interpretation. This paper presents a new approach for image denoising in the case of a known uncorrelated noise model. The proposed filter is an extension of the nonlocal means (NL means) algorithm introduced by Buades , which performs a weighted average of the values of similar pixels. Pixel similarity is defined in NL means as the Euclidean distance between patches (rectangular windows centered on each two pixels). In this paper, a more general and statistically grounded similarity criterion is proposed which depends on the noise distribution model. The denoising process is expressed as a weighted maximum likelihood estimation problem where the weights are derived in a data-driven way. These weights can be iteratively refined based on both the similarity between noisy patches and the similarity of patches extracted from the previous estimate. We show that this iterative process noticeably improves the denoising performance, especially in the case of low signal-to-noise ratio images such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Numerical experiments illustrate that the technique can be successfully applied to the classical case of additive Gaussian noise but also to cases such as multiplicative speckle noise. The proposed denoising technique seems to improve on the state of the art performance in that latter case.

  8. A composite likelihood approach for spatially correlated survival data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Jane; Ying, Zhiliang

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a composite likelihood approach to handle spatially correlated survival data using pairwise joint distributions. With e-commerce data, a recent question of interest in marketing research has been to describe spatially clustered purchasing behavior and to assess whether geographic distance is the appropriate metric to describe purchasing dependence. We present a model for the dependence structure of time-to-event data subject to spatial dependence to characterize purchasing behavior from the motivating example from e-commerce data. We assume the Farlie-Gumbel-Morgenstern (FGM) distribution and then model the dependence parameter as a function of geographic and demographic pairwise distances. For estimation of the dependence parameters, we present pairwise composite likelihood equations. We prove that the resulting estimators exhibit key properties of consistency and asymptotic normality under certain regularity conditions in the increasing-domain framework of spatial asymptotic theory.

  9. A composite likelihood approach for spatially correlated survival data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Jane; Ying, Zhiliang

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a composite likelihood approach to handle spatially correlated survival data using pairwise joint distributions. With e-commerce data, a recent question of interest in marketing research has been to describe spatially clustered purchasing behavior and to assess whether geographic distance is the appropriate metric to describe purchasing dependence. We present a model for the dependence structure of time-to-event data subject to spatial dependence to characterize purchasing behavior from the motivating example from e-commerce data. We assume the Farlie-Gumbel-Morgenstern (FGM) distribution and then model the dependence parameter as a function of geographic and demographic pairwise distances. For estimation of the dependence parameters, we present pairwise composite likelihood equations. We prove that the resulting estimators exhibit key properties of consistency and asymptotic normality under certain regularity conditions in the increasing-domain framework of spatial asymptotic theory. PMID:24223450

  10. WEIBULL MULTIPLICATIVE MODEL AND MACHINE LEARNING MODELS FOR FULL-AUTOMATIC DARK-SPOT DETECTION FROM SAR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Taravat

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As a major aspect of marine pollution, oil release into the sea has serious biological and environmental impacts. Among remote sensing systems (which is a tool that offers a non-destructive investigation method, synthetic aperture radar (SAR can provide valuable synoptic information about the position and size of the oil spill due to its wide area coverage and day/night, and all-weather capabilities. In this paper we present a new automated method for oil-spill monitoring. A new approach is based on the combination of Weibull Multiplicative Model and machine learning techniques to differentiate between dark spots and the background. First, the filter created based on Weibull Multiplicative Model is applied to each sub-image. Second, the sub-image is segmented by two different neural networks techniques (Pulsed Coupled Neural Networks and Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks. As the last step, a very simple filtering process is used to eliminate the false targets. The proposed approaches were tested on 20 ENVISAT and ERS2 images which contained dark spots. The same parameters were used in all tests. For the overall dataset, the average accuracies of 94.05 % and 95.20 % were obtained for PCNN and MLP methods, respectively. The average computational time for dark-spot detection with a 256 × 256 image in about 4 s for PCNN segmentation using IDL software which is the fastest one in this field at present. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach is very fast, robust and effective. The proposed approach can be applied to the future spaceborne SAR images.

  11. Weibull Multiplicative Model and Machine Learning Models for Full-Automatic Dark-Spot Detection from SAR Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taravat, A.; Del Frate, F.

    2013-09-01

    As a major aspect of marine pollution, oil release into the sea has serious biological and environmental impacts. Among remote sensing systems (which is a tool that offers a non-destructive investigation method), synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can provide valuable synoptic information about the position and size of the oil spill due to its wide area coverage and day/night, and all-weather capabilities. In this paper we present a new automated method for oil-spill monitoring. A new approach is based on the combination of Weibull Multiplicative Model and machine learning techniques to differentiate between dark spots and the background. First, the filter created based on Weibull Multiplicative Model is applied to each sub-image. Second, the sub-image is segmented by two different neural networks techniques (Pulsed Coupled Neural Networks and Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks). As the last step, a very simple filtering process is used to eliminate the false targets. The proposed approaches were tested on 20 ENVISAT and ERS2 images which contained dark spots. The same parameters were used in all tests. For the overall dataset, the average accuracies of 94.05 % and 95.20 % were obtained for PCNN and MLP methods, respectively. The average computational time for dark-spot detection with a 256 × 256 image in about 4 s for PCNN segmentation using IDL software which is the fastest one in this field at present. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach is very fast, robust and effective. The proposed approach can be applied to the future spaceborne SAR images.

  12. The likelihood for supernova neutrino analyses

    CERN Document Server

    Ianni, A; Strumia, A; Torres, F R; Villante, F L; Vissani, F

    2009-01-01

    We derive the event-by-event likelihood that allows to extract the complete information contained in the energy, time and direction of supernova neutrinos, and specify it in the case of SN1987A data. We resolve discrepancies in the previous literature, numerically relevant already in the concrete case of SN1987A data.

  13. Maintaining symmetry of simulated likelihood functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Laura Mørch

    This paper suggests solutions to two different types of simulation errors related to Quasi-Monte Carlo integration. Likelihood functions which depend on standard deviations of mixed parameters are symmetric in nature. This paper shows that antithetic draws preserve this symmetry and thereby...

  14. Maximum likelihood estimation of exponential distribution under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maximum likelihood estimation of exponential distribution under type-ii censoring from imprecise data. ... Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences ... This paper deals with the estimation of exponential mean parameter under Type-II censoring scheme when the lifetime observations are fuzzy and are assumed to be ...

  15. Efficient Bit-to-Symbol Likelihood Mappings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moision, Bruce E.; Nakashima, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    This innovation is an efficient algorithm designed to perform bit-to-symbol and symbol-to-bit likelihood mappings that represent a significant portion of the complexity of an error-correction code decoder for high-order constellations. Recent implementation of the algorithm in hardware has yielded an 8- percent reduction in overall area relative to the prior design.

  16. Modeling and simulation of the generation automatic control of electric power systems; Modelado y simulacion del control automatico de generacion de sistemas electricos de potencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero Ortiz, Ezequiel

    2002-12-01

    This work is devoted to the analysis of the Automatic Control of Electrical Systems Generation of power, as of the information that generates the loop with Load-Frequency Control and the Automatic Voltage Regulator loop. To accomplish the analysis, the control classical theory and feedback control systems concepts are applied. Thus also, the modern theory concepts are employed. The studies are accomplished in the digital computer through the MATLAB program and the available simulation technique in the SIMULINK tool. In this thesis the theoretical and physical concepts of the automatic control of generation are established; dividing it in load frequency control and automatic voltage regulator loops. The mathematical models of the two control loops are established. Later, the models of the elements are interconnected in order to integrate the loop with load frequency control and the digital simulation of the system is carried out. In first instance, the function of the primary control in are - machine, area - multi machine and multi area - multi machine power systems, is analyzed. Then, the automatic control of generation of the area and multi area power systems is studied. The economic dispatch concept is established and with this plan the power system multi area is simulated, there in after the energy exchange among areas in stationary stage is studied. The mathematical models of the component elements of the control loop of the automatic voltage regulator are interconnected. Data according to the nature of each component are generated and their behavior is simulated to analyze the system response. The two control loops are interconnected and a simulation is carry out with data generated previously, examining the performance of the automatic control of generation and the interaction between the two control loops. Finally, the Poles Positioning and the Optimum Control techniques of the modern control theory are applied to the automatic control of an area generation

  17. Vibrational mode analysis using maximum likelihood and maximum entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redondo, A.; Sinha, D.N.

    1993-01-01

    A simple algorithm is presented that uses the maximum likelihood and maximum entropy approaches to determine the vibrational modes of elastic bodies. This method assumes that the vibrational frequencies have been previously determined, but the modes to which they correspond are unknown. Although the method is illustrated through the analysis of simulated vibrational modes for a flat rectangular plate, it has broad applicability to any experimental technique in which spectral frequencies can be associated to specific modes by means of a mathematical model

  18. Use of deterministic sampling for exploring likelihoods in linkage analysis for quantitative traits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mackinnon, M.J.; Beek, van der S.; Kinghorn, B.P.

    1996-01-01

    Deterministic sampling was used to numerically evaluate the expected log-likelihood surfaces of QTL-marker linkage models in large pedigrees with simple structures. By calculating the expected values of likelihoods, questions of power of experimental designs, bias in parameter estimates, approximate

  19. Improved Likelihood Function in Particle-based IR Eye Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satria, R.; Sorensen, J.; Hammoud, R.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we propose a log likelihood-ratio function of foreground and background models used in a particle filter to track the eye region in dark-bright pupil image sequences. This model fuses information from both dark and bright pupil images and their difference image into one model. Our...... enhanced tracker overcomes the issues of prior selection of static thresholds during the detection of feature observations in the bright-dark difference images. The auto-initialization process is performed using cascaded classifier trained using adaboost and adapted to IR eye images. Experiments show good...

  20. Semi-automatic mapping of fault rocks on a Digital Outcrop Model, Gole Larghe Fault Zone (Southern Alps, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittempergher, Silvia; Vho, Alice; Bistacchi, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    A quantitative analysis of fault-rock distribution in outcrops of exhumed fault zones is of fundamental importance for studies of fault zone architecture, fault and earthquake mechanics, and fluid circulation. We present a semi-automatic workflow for fault-rock mapping on a Digital Outcrop Model (DOM), developed on the Gole Larghe Fault Zone (GLFZ), a well exposed strike-slip fault in the Adamello batholith (Italian Southern Alps). The GLFZ has been exhumed from ca. 8-10 km depth, and consists of hundreds of individual seismogenic slip surfaces lined by green cataclasites (crushed wall rocks cemented by the hydrothermal epidote and K-feldspar) and black pseudotachylytes (solidified frictional melts, considered as a marker for seismic slip). A digital model of selected outcrop exposures was reconstructed with photogrammetric techniques, using a large number of high resolution digital photographs processed with VisualSFM software. The resulting DOM has a resolution up to 0.2 mm/pixel. Most of the outcrop was imaged using images each one covering a 1 x 1 m2 area, while selected structural features, such as sidewall ripouts or stepovers, were covered with higher-resolution images covering 30 x 40 cm2 areas.Image processing algorithms were preliminarily tested using the ImageJ-Fiji package, then a workflow in Matlab was developed to process a large collection of images sequentially. Particularly in detailed 30 x 40 cm images, cataclasites and hydrothermal veins were successfully identified using spectral analysis in RGB and HSV color spaces. This allows mapping the network of cataclasites and veins which provided the pathway for hydrothermal fluid circulation, and also the volume of mineralization, since we are able to measure the thickness of cataclasites and veins on the outcrop surface. The spectral signature of pseudotachylyte veins is indistinguishable from that of biotite grains in the wall rock (tonalite), so we tested morphological analysis tools to discriminate

  1. An eigenvalue approach for the automatic scaling of unknowns in model-based reconstructions: Application to real-time phase-contrast flow MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhengguo; Hohage, Thorsten; Kalentev, Oleksandr; Joseph, Arun A; Wang, Xiaoqing; Voit, Dirk; Merboldt, K Dietmar; Frahm, Jens

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an automatic method for the scaling of unknowns in model-based nonlinear inverse reconstructions and to evaluate its application to real-time phase-contrast (RT-PC) flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Model-based MRI reconstructions of parametric maps which describe a physical or physiological function require the solution of a nonlinear inverse problem, because the list of unknowns in the extended MRI signal equation comprises multiple functional parameters and all coil sensitivity profiles. Iterative solutions therefore rely on an appropriate scaling of unknowns to numerically balance partial derivatives and regularization terms. The scaling of unknowns emerges as a self-adjoint and positive-definite matrix which is expressible by its maximal eigenvalue and solved by power iterations. The proposed method is applied to RT-PC flow MRI based on highly undersampled acquisitions. Experimental validations include numerical phantoms providing ground truth and a wide range of human studies in the ascending aorta, carotid arteries, deep veins during muscular exercise and cerebrospinal fluid during deep respiration. For RT-PC flow MRI, model-based reconstructions with automatic scaling not only offer velocity maps with high spatiotemporal acuity and much reduced phase noise, but also ensure fast convergence as well as accurate and precise velocities for all conditions tested, i.e. for different velocity ranges, vessel sizes and the simultaneous presence of signals with velocity aliasing. In summary, the proposed automatic scaling of unknowns in model-based MRI reconstructions yields quantitatively reliable velocities for RT-PC flow MRI in various experimental scenarios. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Calibrating spectral images using penalized likelihood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Glasbey, C.

    2003-01-01

    A new method is presented for automatic correction of distortions and for spectral calibration (which band corresponds to which wavelength) of spectral images recorded by means of a spectrograph. The method consists of recording a bar-like pattern with an illumination source with spectral bands

  3. Automatic Calibration of a Distributed Rainfall-Runoff Model, Using the Degree-Day Formulation for Snow Melting, Within DMIP2 Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frances, F.; Orozco, I.

    2010-12-01

    This work presents the assessment of the TETIS distributed hydrological model in mountain basins of the American and Carson rivers in Sierra Nevada (USA) at hourly time discretization, as part of the DMIP2 Project. In TETIS each cell of the spatial grid conceptualizes the water cycle using six tanks connected among them. The relationship between tanks depends on the case, although at the end in most situations, simple linear reservoirs and flow thresholds schemes are used with exceptional results (Vélez et al., 1999; Francés et al., 2002). In particular, within the snow tank, snow melting is based in this work on the simple degree-day method with spatial constant parameters. The TETIS model includes an automatic calibration module, based on the SCE-UA algorithm (Duan et al., 1992; Duan et al., 1994) and the model effective parameters are organized following a split structure, as presented by Francés and Benito (1995) and Francés et al. (2007). In this way, the calibration involves in TETIS up to 9 correction factors (CFs), which correct globally the different parameter maps instead of each parameter cell value, thus reducing drastically the number of variables to be calibrated. This strategy allows for a fast and agile modification in different hydrological processes preserving the spatial structure of each parameter map. With the snowmelt submodel, automatic model calibration was carried out in three steps, separating the calibration of rainfall-runoff and snowmelt parameters. In the first step, the automatic calibration of the CFs during the period 05/20/1990 to 07/31/1990 in the American River (without snow influence), gave a Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) index of 0.92. The calibration of the three degree-day parameters was done using all the SNOTEL stations in the American and Carson rivers. Finally, using previous calibrations as initial values, the complete calibration done in the Carson River for the period 10/01/1992 to 07/31/1993 gave a NSE index of

  4. Applying exclusion likelihoods from LHC searches to extended Higgs sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtle, Philip; Heinemeyer, Sven; Staal, Oscar; Stefaniak, Tim; Weiglein, Georg

    2015-01-01

    LHC searches for non-standard Higgs bosons decaying into tau lepton pairs constitute a sensitive experimental probe for physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM), such as supersymmetry (SUSY). Recently, the limits obtained from these searches have been presented by the CMS collaboration in a nearly model-independent fashion - as a narrow resonance model - based on the full 8 TeV dataset. In addition to publishing a 95 % C.L. exclusion limit, the full likelihood information for the narrowresonance model has been released. This provides valuable information that can be incorporated into global BSM fits. We present a simple algorithm that maps an arbitrary model with multiple neutral Higgs bosons onto the narrow resonance model and derives the corresponding value for the exclusion likelihood from the CMS search. This procedure has been implemented into the public computer code HiggsBounds (version 4.2.0 and higher). We validate our implementation by cross-checking against the official CMS exclusion contours in three Higgs benchmark scenarios in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), and find very good agreement. Going beyond validation, we discuss the combined constraints of the ττ search and the rate measurements of the SM-like Higgs at 125 GeV in a recently proposed MSSM benchmark scenario, where the lightest Higgs boson obtains SM-like couplings independently of the decoupling of the heavier Higgs states. Technical details for how to access the likelihood information within HiggsBounds are given in the appendix. The program is available at http:// higgsbounds.hepforge.org. (orig.)

  5. A systematic error in maximum likelihood fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, U.C.; Riisager, K.

    2002-01-01

    The maximum likelihood method is normally regarded as the safest method for parameter estimation. We show that this method will give a bias in the often occurring situation where a spectrum of counts is fitted with a theoretical function, unless the fit function is very simple. The bias can become significant when the spectrum contains less than about 100 counts or when the fit interval is too short

  6. Modelling Pasture-based Automatic Milking System Herds: The Impact of Large Herd on Milk Yield and Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Islam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this modelling study was to investigate the effect of large herd size (and land areas on walking distances and milking interval (MI, and their impact on milk yield and economic penalties when 50% of the total diets were provided from home grown feed either as pasture or grazeable complementary forage rotation (CFR in an automatic milking system (AMS. Twelve scenarios consisting of 3 AMS herds (400, 600, 800 cows, 2 levels of pasture utilisation (current AMS utilisation of 15.0 t dry matter [DM]/ha, termed as ‘moderate’; optimum pasture utilisation of 19.7 t DM/ha, termed as ‘high’ and 2 rates of incorporation of grazeable complementary forage system (CFS: 0, 30%; CFS = 65% farm is CFR and 35% of farm is pasture were investigated. Walking distances, energy loss due to walking, MI, reduction in milk yield and income loss were calculated for each treatment based on information available in the literature. With moderate pasture utilisation and 0% CFR, increasing the herd size from 400 to 800 cows resulted in an increase in total walking distances between the parlour and the paddock from 3.5 to 6.3 km. Consequently, MI increased from 15.2 to 16.4 h with increased herd size from 400 to 800 cows. High pasture utilisation (allowing for an increased stocking density reduced the total walking distances up to 1 km, thus reduced the MI by up to 0.5 h compared to the moderate pasture, 800 cow herd combination. The high pasture utilisation combined with 30% of the farm in CFR in the farm reduced the total walking distances by up to 1.7 km and MI by up to 0.8 h compared to the moderate pasture and 800 cow herd combination. For moderate pasture utilisation, increasing the herd size from 400 to 800 cows resulted in more dramatic milk yield penalty as yield increasing from c.f. 2.6 and 5.1 kg/cow/d respectively, which incurred a loss of up to $AU 1.9/cow/d. Milk yield losses of 0.61 kg and 0.25 kg for every km increase in total walking distance

  7. Conflicts versus analytical redundancy relations: a comparative analysis of the model based diagnosis approach from the artificial intelligence and automatic control perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, Marie-Odile; Dague, Philippe; Lévy, François; Montmain, Jacky; Staroswiecki, Marcel; Travé-Massuyès, Louise

    2004-10-01

    Two distinct and parallel research communities have been working along the lines of the model-based diagnosis approach: the fault detection and isolation (FDI) community and the diagnostic (DX) community that have evolved in the fields of automatic control and artificial intelligence, respectively. This paper clarifies and links the concepts and assumptions that underlie the FDI analytical redundancy approach and the DX consistency-based logical approach. A formal framework is proposed in order to compare the two approaches and the theoretical proof of their equivalence together with the necessary and sufficient conditions is provided.

  8. Nonparametric likelihood based estimation of linear filters for point processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels Richard

    2015-01-01

    We consider models for multivariate point processes where the intensity is given nonparametrically in terms of functions in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. The likelihood function involves a time integral and is consequently not given in terms of a finite number of kernel evaluations. The main...... the implementation relies crucially on the use of sparse matrices. As an illustration we consider neuron network modeling, and we use this example to investigate how the computational costs of the approximations depend on the resolution of the time discretization. The implementation is available in the R package...

  9. Maximum likelihood estimation of motor unit firing pattern statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navallas, Javier; Malanda, Armando; Rodriguez-Falces, Javier

    2014-05-01

    Estimation of motor unit firing pattern statistics is a valuable method in physiological studies and a key procedure in electromyographic (EMG) decomposition algorithms. However, if any firings within the pattern are undetected or missed during the decomposition process, the estimation procedure can be disrupted. In order to provide an optimal solution, we present a maximum likelihood estimator of EMG firing pattern statistics, taking into account that some firings may be undetected. A model of the inter-discharge interval (IDI) probability density function with missing firings has been employed to derive the maximum likelihood estimator of the mean and standard deviation of the IDIs. Actual calculation of the maximum likelihood solution has been obtained by means of numerical optimization. The proposed estimator has been evaluated and compared to other previously developed algorithms by means of simulation experiments and has been tested on real signals. The new estimator was found to be robust and reliable in diverse conditions: IDI distributions with a high coefficient of variance or considerable skewness. Moreover, the proposed estimator outperforms previous algorithms both in simulated and real conditions.

  10. AUTOMATIC ARCHITECTURAL STYLE RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mathias

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Procedural modeling has proven to be a very valuable tool in the field of architecture. In the last few years, research has soared to automatically create procedural models from images. However, current algorithms for this process of inverse procedural modeling rely on the assumption that the building style is known. So far, the determination of the building style has remained a manual task. In this paper, we propose an algorithm which automates this process through classification of architectural styles from facade images. Our classifier first identifies the images containing buildings, then separates individual facades within an image and determines the building style. This information could then be used to initialize the building reconstruction process. We have trained our classifier to distinguish between several distinct architectural styles, namely Flemish Renaissance, Haussmannian and Neoclassical. Finally, we demonstrate our approach on various street-side images.

  11. Automatic Voice Pathology Detection With Running Speech by Using Estimation of Auditory Spectrum and Cepstral Coefficients Based on the All-Pole Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Zulfiqar; Elamvazuthi, Irraivan; Alsulaiman, Mansour; Muhammad, Ghulam

    2016-11-01

    Automatic voice pathology detection using sustained vowels has been widely explored. Because of the stationary nature of the speech waveform, pathology detection with a sustained vowel is a comparatively easier task than that using a running speech. Some disorder detection systems with running speech have also been developed, although most of them are based on a voice activity detection (VAD), that is, itself a challenging task. Pathology detection with running speech needs more investigation, and systems with good accuracy (ACC) are required. Furthermore, pathology classification systems with running speech have not received any attention from the research community. In this article, automatic pathology detection and classification systems are developed using text-dependent running speech without adding a VAD module. A set of three psychophysics conditions of hearing (critical band spectral estimation, equal loudness hearing curve, and the intensity loudness power law of hearing) is used to estimate the auditory spectrum. The auditory spectrum and all-pole models of the auditory spectrums are computed and analyzed and used in a Gaussian mixture model for an automatic decision. In the experiments using the Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary database, an ACC of 99.56% is obtained for pathology detection, and an ACC of 93.33% is obtained for the pathology classification system. The results of the proposed systems outperform the existing running-speech-based systems. The developed system can effectively be used in voice pathology detection and classification systems, and the proposed features can visually differentiate between normal and pathological samples. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Indian Summer Monsoon Simulations: Usefulness of Increasing Horizontal Resolution, Manual Tuning, and Semi-Automatic Tuning in Reducing Present-Day Model Biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Abhishek; Mishra, Saroj K; Sahany, Sandeep; Bhowmick, Mansi; Rawat, Janmejai Singh; Dash, S K

    2018-02-23

    Coupled Global Climate Models (CGCMs) of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) are unable to resolve the spatial and temporal characteristics of the South Asian Monsoon satisfactorily. A CGCM with the capability to reliably project the global as well as the regional climatic features would be a valuable tool for scientists and policymakers. Analysis of 28 CMIP5 models highlights varying degree of biases in precipitation and 2 m surface air temperature (T2m) over south Asia, and the Community Earth System Model (CESM) developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research is found to be one of the best performing models. However, like all other CMIP5 models, CESM also has some inherent model biases. Using CESM, it is found that the precipitation and T2M biases reduce with increase in the model horizontal resolution from 2° to 0.5°. Further, a few deep convective parameters in the Zhang-McFarlane convection scheme are tuned for 2° and 1° model resolutions using both manual and semi-automatic model tuning methods. Comparing results from the two tuning methods we find that the performance of the manually tuned model is better than that of the semi-automated one.

  13. Massive optimal data compression and density estimation for scalable, likelihood-free inference in cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsing, Justin; Wandelt, Benjamin; Feeney, Stephen

    2018-03-01

    Many statistical models in cosmology can be simulated forwards but have intractable likelihood functions. Likelihood-free inference methods allow us to perform Bayesian inference from these models using only forward simulations, free from any likelihood assumptions or approximations. Likelihood-free inference generically involves simulating mock data and comparing to the observed data; this comparison in data-space suffers from the curse of dimensionality and requires compression of the data to a small number of summary statistics to be tractable. In this paper we use massive asymptotically-optimal data compression to reduce the dimensionality of the data-space to just one number per parameter, providing a natural and optimal framework for summary statistic choice for likelihood-free inference. Secondly, we present the first cosmological application of Density Estimation Likelihood-Free Inference (DELFI), which learns a parameterized model for joint distribution of data and parameters, yielding both the parameter posterior and the model evidence. This approach is conceptually simple, requires less tuning than traditional Approximate Bayesian Computation approaches to likelihood-free inference and can give high-fidelity posteriors from orders of magnitude fewer forward simulations. As an additional bonus, it enables parameter inference and Bayesian model comparison simultaneously. We demonstrate Density Estimation Likelihood-Free Inference with massive data compression on an analysis of the joint light-curve analysis supernova data, as a simple validation case study. We show that high-fidelity posterior inference is possible for full-scale cosmological data analyses with as few as ˜104 simulations, with substantial scope for further improvement, demonstrating the scalability of likelihood-free inference to large and complex cosmological datasets.

  14. Automatic fluid dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellaris, P. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Fluid automatically flows to individual dispensing units at predetermined times from a fluid supply and is available only for a predetermined interval of time after which an automatic control causes the fluid to drain from the individual dispensing units. Fluid deprivation continues until the beginning of a new cycle when the fluid is once again automatically made available at the individual dispensing units.

  15. Marginal Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Item Parameters: Application of an EM Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, R. Darrell; Aitkin, Murray

    1981-01-01

    The practicality of using the EM algorithm for maximum likelihood estimation of item parameters in the marginal distribution is presented. The EM procedure is shown to apply to general item-response models. (Author/JKS)

  16. Effects of parameter estimation on maximum-likelihood bootstrap analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripplinger, Jennifer; Abdo, Zaid; Sullivan, Jack

    2010-08-01

    Bipartition support in maximum-likelihood (ML) analysis is most commonly assessed using the nonparametric bootstrap. Although bootstrap replicates should theoretically be analyzed in the same manner as the original data, model selection is almost never conducted for bootstrap replicates, substitution-model parameters are often fixed to their maximum-likelihood estimates (MLEs) for the empirical data, and bootstrap replicates may be subjected to less rigorous heuristic search strategies than the original data set. Even though this approach may increase computational tractability, it may also lead to the recovery of suboptimal tree topologies and affect bootstrap values. However, since well-supported bipartitions are often recovered regardless of method, use of a less intensive bootstrap procedure may not significantly affect the results. In this study, we investigate the impact of parameter estimation (i.e., assessment of substitution-model parameters and tree topology) on ML bootstrap analysis. We find that while forgoing model selection and/or setting substitution-model parameters to their empirical MLEs may lead to significantly different bootstrap values, it probably would not change their biological interpretation. Similarly, even though the use of reduced search methods often results in significant differences among bootstrap values, only omitting branch swapping is likely to change any biological inferences drawn from the data. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Do Judgments of Learning Predict Automatic Influences of Memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undorf, Monika; Böhm, Simon; Cüpper, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Current memory theories generally assume that memory performance reflects both recollection and automatic influences of memory. Research on people's predictions about the likelihood of remembering recently studied information on a memory test, that is, on judgments of learning (JOLs), suggests that both magnitude and resolution of JOLs are linked…

  18. A combined deep-learning and deformable-model approach to fully automatic segmentation of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendi, M R; Kheradvar, Arash; Jafarkhani, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Segmentation of the left ventricle (LV) from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets is an essential step for calculation of clinical indices such as ventricular volume and ejection fraction. In this work, we employ deep learning algorithms combined with deformable models to develop and evaluate a fully automatic LV segmentation tool from short-axis cardiac MRI datasets. The method employs deep learning algorithms to learn the segmentation task from the ground true data. Convolutional networks are employed to automatically detect the LV chamber in MRI dataset. Stacked autoencoders are used to infer the LV shape. The inferred shape is incorporated into deformable models to improve the accuracy and robustness of the segmentation. We validated our method using 45 cardiac MR datasets from the MICCAI 2009 LV segmentation challenge and showed that it outperforms the state-of-the art methods. Excellent agreement with the ground truth was achieved. Validation metrics, percentage of good contours, Dice metric, average perpendicular distance and conformity, were computed as 96.69%, 0.94, 1.81 mm and 0.86, versus those of 79.2-95.62%, 0.87-0.9, 1.76-2.97 mm and 0.67-0.78, obtained by other methods, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dimension-Independent Likelihood-Informed MCMC

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Tiangang

    2015-01-07

    Many Bayesian inference problems require exploring the posterior distribution of high-dimensional parameters, which in principle can be described as functions. By exploiting low-dimensional structure in the change from prior to posterior [distributions], we introduce a suite of MCMC samplers that can adapt to the complex structure of the posterior distribution, yet are well-defined on function space. Posterior sampling in nonlinear inverse problems arising from various partial di erential equations and also a stochastic differential equation are used to demonstrate the e ciency of these dimension-independent likelihood-informed samplers.

  20. Approximate maximum parsimony and ancestral maximum likelihood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alon, Noga; Chor, Benny; Pardi, Fabio; Rapoport, Anat

    2010-01-01

    We explore the maximum parsimony (MP) and ancestral maximum likelihood (AML) criteria in phylogenetic tree reconstruction. Both problems are NP-hard, so we seek approximate solutions. We formulate the two problems as Steiner tree problems under appropriate distances. The gist of our approach is the succinct characterization of Steiner trees for a small number of leaves for the two distances. This enables the use of known Steiner tree approximation algorithms. The approach leads to a 16/9 approximation ratio for AML and asymptotically to a 1.55 approximation ratio for MP.