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Sample records for automated thrombin generation

  1. Calibrated automated thrombin generation measurement in clotting plasma.

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    Hemker, H Coenraad; Giesen, Peter; Al Dieri, Raed; Regnault, Véronique; de Smedt, Eric; Wagenvoord, Rob; Lecompte, Thomas; Béguin, Suzette

    2003-01-01

    Calibrated automated thrombography displays the concentration of thrombin in clotting plasma with or without platelets (platelet-rich plasma/platelet-poor plasma, PRP/PPP) in up to 48 samples by monitoring the splitting of a fluorogenic substrate and comparing it to a constant known thrombin activity in a parallel, non-clotting sample. Thus, the non-linearity of the reaction rate with thrombin concentration is compensated for, and adding an excess of substrate can be avoided. Standard conditions were established at which acceptable experimental variation accompanies sensitivity to pathological changes. The coefficients of variation of the surface under the curve (endogenous thrombin potential) are: within experiment approximately 3%; intra-individual: AVK, heparin(-likes), direct inhibitors]. In PRP, it is diminished in von Willebrand's disease, but it also shows the effect of platelet inhibitors (e.g. aspirin and abciximab). Addition of activated protein C (APC) or thrombomodulin inhibits thrombin generation and reflects disorders of the APC system (congenital and acquired resistance, deficiencies and lupus antibodies) independent of concomitant inhibition of the procoagulant pathway as for example by anticoagulants.

  2. Platelet-induced thrombin generation by the calibrated automated thrombogram assay is increased in patients with essential thrombocythemia and polycythemia vera.

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    Panova-Noeva, Marina; Marchetti, Marina; Spronk, Henri Maria; Russo, Laura; Diani, Erika; Finazzi, Guido; Finazzi, Good; Salmoiraghi, Silvia; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Rambaldi, Aueesandrd; Barbui, Tiziano; Barbui, Titiano; Ten Cate, Hugo; Ten Cate, Huao; Falanga, Anna

    2011-04-01

    The platelet contribution to the thrombophilic state of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), i.e., essential thrombocythemia (ET) and polycythemia vera (PV), remains uncertain. In this study we aimed to characterize the thrombin generation (TG) potential expressed by platelets from these subjects, compare it to normal platelets, and identify what factors might be responsible for platelet TG. In a group of 140 MPN patients (80 ET and 60 PV) and 72 healthy subjects, we measured the global procoagulant potential of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) utilizing the TG assay by the calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT). To characterize the procoagulant contribution of platelets in PRP, the TG of both isolated platelets and platelet-poor plasma was measured, and the platelet surface expression of TF was determined. Finally, the activation status of platelets was assessed by the levels of P-selectin expressed on platelet surface. MPN patients had significantly increased PRP and isolated platelet TG potential compared to controls. This was associated to the occurrence of platelet activation. Patients carriers of the JAK2V617F mutation showed the highest values of TG and platelet surface TF and P-selectin. Platelet TG potential was significantly lower in hydroxyurea(HU) compared to non-HU-treated patients and was lowest in HU-treated JAK2V617F carriers. In subjects not receiving HU, platelet TG significantly increased by JAK2V617F allele burden increment (P < 0.05).This study demonstrates a platelet-dependent form of hypercoagulability in MPN patients, particularly in those carriers of the JAK2V617F mutation. The cytoreductive therapy with HU significantly affects this prothrombotic phenotype.

  3. Poor prognosis of hypocoagulability assessed by thrombin generation assay in disseminated intravascular coagulation.

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    Lee, Kyunghoon; Kim, Ji-Eun; Kwon, Jihyun; Kim, Inho; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Park, Seonyang; Han, Kyou-Sup; Kim, Hyun Kyung

    2014-04-01

    Overall assessment of the hemostatic system including procoagulant and anticoagulant changes may help assess the clinical status and prognosis of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The thrombin generation assay provides useful information about the global hemostatic status. Therefore, we measured several parameters of global hemostatic potential by the thrombin generation assay in patients suspected of having DIC. A total of 114 patients with suspected DIC were included. The thrombin generation assay was performed on the calibrated automated thrombogram using tissue factor with or without the addition of thrombomodulin, showing three parameters: lag time, endogenous thrombin potential (ETP), and peak thrombin. Both 1 and 5 pmol/l tissue factor-stimulated ETP and peak thrombin were well correlated with DIC severity. Interestingly, antithrombin level greatly affected ETP, whereas protein C influenced lag time. Prognostic analysis revealed that the area under the curve of peak thrombin stimulated by 1 pmol/l tissue factor was superior to that of D-dimer. Moreover, multivariate Cox analysis showed that the lag time and time to peak with both 1 and 5 pmol/l tissue factor were independent prognostic markers. ETP and peak thrombin well reflect DIC severity. Hypocoagulability manifesting as prolonged lag time and time to peak is expected to be an independent prognostic marker in DIC.

  4. Dynamic changes in thrombin generation in abdominal sepsis in mice.

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    Wang, Yongzhi; Braun, Oscar O; Zhang, Su; Luo, Lingtao; Norström, Eva; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-10-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome and severe infections are associated with major derangements in the coagulation system. The purpose of this study was to examine the dynamic alterations in thrombin generation in abdominal sepsis. Abdominal sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in C57/Bl6 mice. Cecal ligation and puncture caused a systemic inflammatory response, with neutrophil recruitment and tissue damage in the lung as well as thrombocytopenia and leukocytopenia. Thrombin generation, coagulation factors, lung histology, and myeloperoxidase activity was determined 1, 3, 6, and 24 h after induction of CLP. It was found that thrombin generation was increased 1 h after CLP and that thrombin generation started to decrease at 3 h and was markedly reduced 6 and 24 h after CLP induction. Platelet-poor plasma from healthy mice could completely reverse the inhibitory effect of CLP on thrombin generation, suggesting that sepsis caused a decrease in the levels of plasma factors regulating thrombin generation in septic animals. Indeed, it was found that CLP markedly decreased plasma levels of prothrombin, factor V, and factor X at 6 and 24 h. Moreover, we observed that CLP increased plasma levels of activated protein C at 6 h, which returned to baseline levels 24 h after CLP induction. Finally, pretreatment with imipenem/cilastatin attenuated the CLP-evoked decrease in thrombin generation and consumption of prothrombin 24 h after CLP induction. Our novel findings suggest that thrombin generation is initially increased and later decreased in abdominal sepsis. Sepsis-induced reduction in thrombin generation is correlated to changes in the plasma levels of coagulation factors and activated protein C. These findings help explain the dynamic changes in global hemostasis in abdominal sepsis.

  5. The modification of the thrombin generation test for the clinical assessment of dabigatran etexilate efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribkova, Irina V.; Lipets, Elena N.; Rekhtina, Irina G.; Bernakevich, Alex I.; Ayusheev, Dorzho B.; Ovsepyan, Ruzanna A.; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I.; Sinauridze, Elena I.

    2016-01-01

    A new oral anticoagulant, dabigatran etexilate (DE, a prodrug of direct thrombin inhibitor (DTI) dabigatran), has been used clinically to prevent thrombosis. The assessment of dabigatran efficiency is necessary in some clinical cases, such as renal insufficiency, risk of bleeding, and drug interactions. However, a specific thrombin generation test (TGT) that is one of the most informative and sensitive to anticoagulant therapy (calibrated automated thrombinography (САТ)) shows a paradoxical increase of test parameters, such as endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) and peak thrombin, in patients receiving DE. The paradoxical behaviour of ETP and peak thrombin in these patients in the presence of DTIs is mostly caused by a decrease in the activity of thrombin in the α2-macroglobulin-thrombin complex that is used as a calibrator in CAT. For a correct estimation of the TGT parameters in patient’s plasma containing DTIs we proposed to use our previously described alternative calibration method that is based on the measurement of the fluorescence signal of a well-known concentration of the reaction product (7-amino-4-methylcoumarin). In this study, the validity of such approach was demonstrated in an ex vivo study in patients with knee replacement and two special patients with multiple myeloma, who received DE for thrombosis prophylaxis. PMID:27377013

  6. Thrombin generation in the Glasgow Myocardial Infarction Study.

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    Machiel Smid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thrombin is a key protease in coagulation also implicated in complex pathology including atherosclerosis. To address the role of thrombin in relation to myocardial infarction (MI we explored thrombin generation analysis in plasma from patients and controls that had participated in the Glasgow MI Study (GLAMIS. METHODS: Thrombin generation at 1 and 2 pM TF and with and without thrombomodulin (TM was performed on plasmas from 356 subjects (171 cases, 185 age and sex matched controls from GLAMIS collected between 3 and 9 months after the MI event. RESULTS: Although thrombin generation was slightly delayed in cases (lag time increased from 3.3 to 3.6 min at the highest trigger, the overall potential to generate thrombin was increased by 7% for the ETP and by 15% for the peak height (both at the 1 pM TF trigger in cases. Addition of TM did not reveal differences. Furthermore, an increased thrombin generation was associated with MI [normalized ETP: adjusted OR for the highest percentile = 2.4 (95% CI 1.3-4.5 and normalized peak height: adjusted OR = 2.6 (1.3-5.0] at the lowest trigger; normalized ETP and peak height being 2.1 (1.1-3.8 and 2.0 (1.0-4.1 at the higher 2 pM trigger. CONCLUSION: In GLAMIS, patients with a previous MI had an increased thrombin generation compared to controls. The absence of a clear difference in TM reduction suggests an unaltered anticoagulant activity in these patients. Further research is needed in order to unravel the underlying mechanisms of enhanced thrombin generation after MI.

  7. Defining the boundaries of normal thrombin generation: investigations into hemostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Danforth

    Full Text Available In terms of its soluble precursors, the coagulation proteome varies quantitatively among apparently healthy individuals. The significance of this variability remains obscure, in part because it is the backdrop against which the hemostatic consequences of more dramatic composition differences are studied. In this study we have defined the consequences of normal range variation of components of the coagulation proteome by using a mechanism-based computational approach that translates coagulation factor concentration data into a representation of an individual's thrombin generation potential. A novel graphical method is used to integrate standard measures that characterize thrombin generation in both empirical and computational models (e.g max rate, max level, total thrombin, time to 2 nM thrombin ("clot time" to visualize how normal range variation in coagulation factors results in unique thrombin generation phenotypes. Unique ensembles of the 8 coagulation factors encompassing the limits of normal range variation were used as initial conditions for the computational modeling, each ensemble representing "an individual" in a theoretical healthy population. These "individuals" with unremarkable proteome composition was then compared to actual normal and "abnormal" individuals, i.e. factor ensembles measured in apparently healthy individuals, actual coagulopathic individuals or artificially constructed factor ensembles representing individuals with specific factor deficiencies. A sensitivity analysis was performed to rank either individual factors or all possible pairs of factors in terms of their contribution to the overall distribution of thrombin generation phenotypes. Key findings of these analyses include: normal range variation of coagulation factors yields thrombin generation phenotypes indistinguishable from individuals with some, but not all, coagulopathies examined; coordinate variation of certain pairs of factors within their normal ranges

  8. Red blood cells and thrombin generation in sickle cell disease.

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    Whelihan, Matthew F; Lim, Ming Y; Key, Nigel S

    2014-05-01

    The prothrombotic nature of sickle cell disease (SCD) is evidenced by the chronically elevated levels of almost all coagulation activation biomarkers, and an increased incidence of certain thrombotic events, including venous thromboembolism. Numerous studies have attempted to define the extent and elucidate the mechanism of the observed increase in thrombin generation in SCD patients in vivo. In general, these studies were performed using thrombin generation assays in platelet poor or platelet rich plasma and showed little difference in endogenous thrombin potential between the SCD cohort and healthy matched controls. In SCD, erythrocytes and monocytes have been demonstrated to exhibit procoagulant characteristics. Thus, the absence of these cellular components in standard thrombin generation assays may fail to reflect global hypercoagulability in the whole blood of patients with SCD. We were therefore surprised to see no difference in net thrombin generation in tissue factor-initiated initiated clotting of whole blood from patients with SCD. However, we are continuing to reconcile these seemingly disparate observations by slight modifications of the whole blood model that include alternative coagulation triggers and a re-examination of the net thrombin generation when the protein/protein S system is simultaneously interrogated.

  9. Thrombin generation and procoagulant phospholipids in patients with essential thrombocythemia and reactive thrombocytosis.

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    Mignon, I; Grand, F; Boyer, F; Hunault-Berger, M; Hamel, J F; Macchi, L

    2013-12-01

    Thrombocytosis is a commonly encountered clinical scenario and can be either a secondary process (reactive thrombocytosis), or due to clonal disorder (i.e., essential thrombocythemia). This distinction is important as it carries implications for evaluation, prognosis and treatment. In this study we compared procoagulant potential in essential thrombocythemia and reactive thrombocytosis by measuring the thrombin generation and the level of circulating procoagulant phospholipids with functional tests. Twenty nine patients with essential thrombocythemia and 24 with reactive thrombocytosis were studied. Thrombin generation was determined by calibrated automated thrombography. Procoagulant phospholipids were detected by a chronometric standardised method (STA-Procoag-PPL). Patients with reactive thrombocytosis had a longer lag time, higher endogenous thrombin potential, peak of thrombin generation and velocity index than patients with essential thrombocythemia. The level of circulating procoagulant phospholipids was increased in patients with essential thrombocythemia as observed with the procoagulant phospholipids assay. Each parameter was analysed using ROC curves. Highest areas under the curve (AUC) were found for lag time and procoagulant phospholipids ratio (0.817 and 0.853, respectively), associated with high negative predictive value for ET (92.3% and 80%, respectively). In conclusion, patients with essential thrombocythemia and reactive thrombocytosis displayed significant differences in terms of thrombin generation and levels of procoagulant phospholipids. Among these parameters, lag time and procoagulant phospholipids ratio could help to differentiate between reactive thrombocytosis and essential thrombocythemia patients.

  10. Investigation of the thrombin-generating capacity, evaluated by thrombogram, and clot formation evaluated by thrombelastography of platelets stored in the blood bank for up to 7 days

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Per Ingemar; Svendsen, M.S.; Salado, J.

    2008-01-01

    , in part, depend on its reflection of the dynamics of thrombin generation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The kinetics of thrombin generation of platelets stored for 2 and 7 days, respectively, was assessed by calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) and the lag time (min), time to peak (ttPeak; min), peak (nm...

  11. Thrombin generation in abdominal sepsis is Rho-kinase-dependent.

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    Wang, Yongzhi; Braun, Oscar Ö; Zhang, Su; Norström, Eva; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2015-05-08

    Sepsis causes severe derangements of the coagulation system. However, the signaling mechanisms regulating sepsis-induced thrombin generation remain elusive. Herein, we hypothesized that Rho-kinase might be an important regulator of thrombin generation in abdominal sepsis. Abdominal sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in C57Bl/6 mice. Thrombin generation, coagulation factors, lung histology and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were determined 6 h and 24 h after induction of CLP. Induction of CLP triggered a systemic inflammatory response characterized by neutrophil accumulation and tissue injury in the lung as well as thrombocytopenia and leukocytopenia. Administration of Y-27632, a Rho-kinase inhibitor, attenuated these markers of systemic inflammation in CLP animals. Moreover, peak thrombin formation was decreased by 77% and 81% in plasma from mice 6 h and 24 h after induction of CLP. Total thrombin generation was reduced by 64% and 67% 6 h and 24 h after CLP induction, respectively. Notably, administration of Y-27632 increased peak formation by 99% and total thrombin generation by 66% in plasma from septic animals. In addition, CLP markedly decreased plasma levels of prothrombin, factor V and factor X at 6 h and 24 h. Interestingly, Rho-kinase inhibition significantly enhanced levels of prothrombin, factor V and factor X in plasma from septic mice. In addition, inhibition of Rho-kinase decreased CLP-induced elevations of CXCL2 by 36% and interleukin-6 by 38%. These novel findings suggest that sepsis-induced thrombin generation is regulated by Rho-kinase. Moreover, inhibition of Rho-kinase reverses sepsis-evoked consumption of coagulation factors. Thus, our results show that targeting Rho-kinase signaling might protect against coagulation dysfunction in abdominal sepsis.

  12. Real-time measurement of thrombin generation using continuous droplet microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Jiaqing; Tao, Ding; Ng, Ee Xing; Drum, Chester L.; Liu, Ai Qun; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Thrombin, which has the leading role in the blood coagulation cascade, is an important biomarker in hemostasis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) development. In this study, a measurement system capable of continuously monitoring individual thrombin generation using droplet microfluidic technology is manipulated. The thrombin generation assay based on fluogenic substrate is performed within the droplets and the thrombin generation curve of plasma sample activated by tissue factor is measured in...

  13. Thrombin generation and low-molecular-weight heparin prophylaxis in pregnant women with thrombophilia.

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    Selmeczi, Anna; Roach, Rachel E J; Móré, Csaba; Batta, Zoltán; Hársfalvi, Jolán; van der Bom, Johanna G; Boda, Zoltán; Oláh, Zsolt

    2015-02-01

    Pregnancy is associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolism, especially in the presence of thrombophilia. However, there is no consensus on the optimal approach for thromboprophylaxis in this population. Recent evidence suggests that thrombin generation correlates with the overall procoagulant state of the plasma. Our aim was to evaluate thrombin generation in a prospective cohort of thrombophilic pregnant women, and investigate the effectiveness of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) prophylaxis in pregnancy. Women with severe (n=8), mild (n=47) and no (n=15) thrombophilia were followed throughout their pregnancies. Thrombin generation was evaluated in each trimester as well as five days and eight weeks postpartum (as a reference category). In women undergoing LMWH prophylaxis, thrombin generation and anti-Factor-Xa activity were measured just before and 4 hours after administration (peak effect). Thrombin generation was determined using Technothrombin TGA assay system. For the analysis, median peak thrombin and endogenous thrombin potential were used. Peak thrombin and endogenous thrombin potential were increased during pregnancy compared to the non-pregnant state with the highest results in the severe thrombophilia group. In women receiving LMWH prophylaxis a decrease was observed in thrombin generation at peak effect but over the progression of pregnancy the extent of this decrease reduced in a stepwise fashion. Our results show that thrombin generation demonstrates the hypercoagulable state in thrombophilic pregnancies. In addition, we found the effect of LMWH prophylaxis to progressively decrease with advancing stages of pregnancy.

  14. Increased thrombin generation in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen; Lambaa Altinok, Magda

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) which may be modified by the use of metformin and oral contraceptives (OC). Thrombin generation (TG) measures are risk markers of CVD and address the composite of multiple factors...... adjustment for these potential confounders. Treatment with OC and metformin +OC further increased ETP (Paffect TG...... significantly. Conclusions. PCOS is associated with increase in TG measures independent of other risk factors of CVD. OC increases TG measures further and may thus add to the increased risk of CVD already present in women with PCOS....

  15. Low paediatric thrombin generation is caused by an attenuation of prothrombin conversion.

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    Kremers, Romy M W; Wagenvoord, Rob J; de Laat, H Bas; Monagle, Paul; Hemker, H Coenraad; Ignjatovic, Vera

    2016-06-01

    Thrombin generation (TG) is decreased in children. TG is determined by two underlying processes: the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin and the inactivation of thrombin. Therefore, lower TG capacity in children can either be caused by a reduction of prothrombin conversion, an increase of thrombin inactivation, or both. In 36 children and 8 adults, TG and the factors that determine thrombin inactivation (antithrombin, α2Macroglobulin (α2M) and fibrinogen) were measured. Prothrombin conversion, thrombin inhibitor complex formation, and the overall thrombin decay capacity were determined. In silico modelling was performed to determine the contribution prothrombin conversion and thrombin inactivation to deviant paediatric TG. Both the amount of prothrombin converted and the maximal prothrombin conversion rate are significantly reduced in children as compared to adults. This is partly due to the prothrombin levels being lower and partly to a lower prothrombin conversion rate. The overall thrombin decay capacity is not significantly different in children, but α2Macroglobulin plays a more important role than it does in adults. In silico experiments demonstrate that reduced prothrombin conversion and to a lesser extent elevated α2M levels provide an explanation for low TG in children. Young age has a dual effect on prothrombin conversion. Lower plasma prothrombin levels result in decreased prothrombin conversion but the rate of prothrombin conversion is also decreased, i. e. the development of prothrombinase is lower than in adults.

  16. Factor Xa generation by computational modeling: an additional discriminator to thrombin generation evaluation.

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    Kathleen E Brummel-Ziedins

    Full Text Available Factor (fXa is a critical enzyme in blood coagulation that is responsible for the initiation and propagation of thrombin generation. Previously we have shown that analysis of computationally generated thrombin profiles is a tool to investigate hemostasis in various populations. In this study, we evaluate the potential of computationally derived time courses of fXa generation as another approach for investigating thrombotic risk. Utilizing the case (n = 473 and control (n = 426 population from the Leiden Thrombophilia Study and each individual's plasma protein factor composition for fII, fV, fVII, fVIII, fIX, fX, antithrombin and tissue factor pathway inhibitor, tissue factor-initiated total active fXa generation was assessed using a mathematical model. FXa generation was evaluated by the area under the curve (AUC, the maximum rate (MaxR and level (MaxL and the time to reach these, TMaxR and TMaxL, respectively. FXa generation was analyzed in the entire populations and in defined subgroups (by sex, age, body mass index, oral contraceptive use. The maximum rates and levels of fXa generation occur over a 10- to 12- fold range in both cases and controls. This variation is larger than that observed with thrombin (3-6 fold in the same population. The greatest risk association was obtained using either MaxR or MaxL of fXa generation; with an ∼2.2 fold increased risk for individuals exceeding the 90(th percentile. This risk was similar to that of thrombin generation(MaxR OR 2.6. Grouping defined by oral contraceptive (OC use in the control population showed the biggest differences in fXa generation; a >60% increase in the MaxR upon OC use. FXa generation can distinguish between a subset of individuals characterized by overlapping thrombin generation profiles. Analysis of fXa generation is a phenotypic characteristic which may prove to be a more sensitive discriminator than thrombin generation among all individuals.

  17. Plasma Thrombin Generation and Sensitivity to Activated Protein C Among Patients With Myeloma and Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance.

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    Crowley, Maeve P; Kevane, Barry; O'Shea, Susan I; Quinn, Shane; Egan, Karl; Gilligan, Oonagh M; Ní Áinle, Fionnuala

    2016-09-01

    The etiology of the prothrombotic state in myeloma has yet to be definitively characterized. Similarly, while recent evidence suggests that patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) may also be at increased risk of thrombosis, the magnitude and the etiology of this risk have also yet to be defined. The present study aims to characterize patterns of plasma thrombin generation and sensitivity to the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C (APC) at the time of initial diagnosis of myeloma and in response to therapy in comparison to that observed among patients with MGUS and matched, healthy volunteers. Patients presenting with newly diagnosed/newly relapsed myeloma (n = 8), MGUS (n = 8), and matched healthy volunteers (n = 8) were recruited. Plasma thrombin generation was determined by calibrated automated thrombography. Peak thrombin generation was significantly higher in patients with myeloma (383.4 ± 33.4 nmol/L) and MGUS (353.4 ± 16.5 nmol/L) compared to healthy volunteers (276.7 ± 20.8 nmol/L; P < .05). In the presence of APC, endogenous thrombin potential was significantly lower in control plasma (228.6 ± 44.5 nmol/L × min) than in either myeloma (866.2 ± 241.3 nmol/L × min, P = .01) or MGUS plasma (627 ± 91.5 nmol/L × min, P = .003). Within the myeloma cohort, peak thrombin generation was significantly higher at diagnosis (353.2 ± 15.9 nmol/L) than following completion of the third cycle of therapy (282.1 ± 15.2 nmol/L; P < .005). Moreover, sensitivity to APC increased progressively with each cycle of chemotherapy. Further study of the etiology and evolving patterns of hypercoagulability among patients with these conditions is warranted and may have future implications for thromboprophylaxis strategies.

  18. Protamine sulfate down-regulates thrombin generation by inhibiting factor V activation.

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    Ni Ainle, Fionnuala

    2009-08-20

    Protamine sulfate is a positively charged polypeptide widely used to reverse heparin-induced anticoagulation. Paradoxically, prospective randomized trials have shown that protamine administration for heparin neutralization is associated with increased bleeding, particularly after cardiothoracic surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. The molecular mechanism(s) through which protamine mediates this anticoagulant effect has not been defined. In vivo administration of pharmacologic doses of protamine to BALB\\/c mice significantly reduced plasma thrombin generation and prolonged tail-bleeding time (from 120 to 199 seconds). Similarly, in pooled normal human plasma, protamine caused significant dose-dependent prolongations of both prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time. Protamine also markedly attenuated tissue factor-initiated thrombin generation in human plasma, causing a significant decrease in endogenous thrombin potential (41% +\\/- 7%). As expected, low-dose protamine effectively reversed the anticoagulant activity of unfractionated heparin in plasma. However, elevated protamine concentrations were associated with progressive dose-dependent reduction in thrombin generation. To assess the mechanism by which protamine mediates down-regulation of thrombin generation, the effect of protamine on factor V activation was assessed. Protamine was found to significantly reduce the rate of factor V activation by both thrombin and factor Xa. Protamine mediates its anticoagulant activity in plasma by down-regulation of thrombin generation via a novel mechanism, specifically inhibition of factor V activation.

  19. Automated Test Case Generation

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    I would like to present the concept of automated test case generation. I work on it as part of my PhD and I think it would be interesting also for other people. It is also the topic of a workshop paper that I am introducing in Paris. (abstract below) Please note that the talk itself would be more general and not about the specifics of my PhD, but about the broad field of Automated Test Case Generation. I would introduce the main approaches (combinatorial testing, symbolic execution, adaptive random testing) and their advantages and problems. (oracle problem, combinatorial explosion, ...) Abstract of the paper: Over the last decade code-based test case generation techniques such as combinatorial testing or dynamic symbolic execution have seen growing research popularity. Most algorithms and tool implementations are based on finding assignments for input parameter values in order to maximise the execution branch coverage. Only few of them consider dependencies from outside the Code Under Test’s scope such...

  20. The effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on fibrin and thrombin generation in healthy subjects and subjects with cardiovascular disease.

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    McEwen, Bradley J; Morel-Kopp, Marie-Christine; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Ward, Christopher M

    2015-04-01

    Hypercoagulability plays a key role in the progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake has been inversely related to the risk of cardiovascular events, the mechanisms are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of omega-3 on novel markers of global coagulation. The generation of fibrin and thrombin, measured via overall hemostasis potential (OHP) assay and calibrated automated thrombography, respectively, was determined in 40 healthy subjects and 16 patients with CVD at baseline and after 4 weeks of 640 mg/day omega-3 PUFA. In healthy subjects, fibrin generation was significantly reduced, as measured by overall coagulation potential (p = 0.013), OHP (p omega-3 PUFA significantly reduced OHP and significantly increased the lag time to thrombin generation (both p omega-3 PUFA had no effect on other fibrin and thrombin generation parameters in CVD patients. Four-week omega-3 PUFA supplementation reduced thrombotic potential in healthy subjects, as shown by reduced fibrin generation and peak thrombin. There was a greater effect on fibrin generation in healthy subjects compared with those with CVD.

  1. Alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor M358R reduces thrombin generation when displayed on the surface of cells expressing tissue factor.

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    Gierczak, Richard F; Pepler, Laura; Bhagirath, Vinai; Liaw, Patricia C; Sheffield, William P

    2014-11-01

    The M358R variant of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (API) is a potent soluble inhibitor of thrombin. Previously we engineered AR-API M358R, a membrane-bound form of this protein and showed that it inhibited exogenous thrombin when expressed on transfected cells lacking tissue factor (TF). To determine the suitability of AR-API M358R for gene transfer to vascular cells to limit thrombogenicity, we tested the ability of AR-API M358R to inhibit endogenous thrombin generated in plasma via co-expression co-expressing it on the surface of cells expressing TF. Transfected AR-API M358R formed inhibitory complexes with thrombin following exposure of recalcified, defibrinated plasma to TF on T24/83 cells, but discontinuously monitored thrombin generation was unaffected. Similarly, AR-API M358R expression did not reduce continuously monitored thrombin generation by T24/83 cell suspensions exposed to recalcified normal plasma in a Thrombogram-Thrombinoscope-type thrombin generation assay (TGA); in contrast, 1 μM hirudin variant 3 or soluble API M358R abolished thrombin generation. Gene transfer of TF to HEK 293 conferred the ability to support TF-dependent thrombin generation on HEK 293 cells. Co-transfection of HEK 293 cells with a 9:1 excess of DNA encoding AR-API M358R to that encoding TF reduced peak thrombin generation approximately 3-fold compared to controls. These in vitro results suggest that surface display of API M358R inhibits thrombin generation when the tethered serpin is expressed in excess of TF, and suggest its potential to limit thrombosis in appropriate vascular beds in animal models.

  2. Thrombin cleaves recombinant human thrombopoietin: One of the proteolytic events that generates truncated forms of thrombopoietin

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    A heterogeneity in the molecular weight (Mr) of thrombopoietin (TPO) has been reported. We found several thrombin cleavage sites in human, rat, murine, and canine TPOs, and also found that human TPO undergoes selective proteolysis by thrombin. Recombinant human TPO (rhTPO) was incubated with human platelets in the presence of calcium ions to allow the generation of thrombin, and was cleaved into low Mr peptide fragments. The cleavage was completely inhibited by hirudin, indicating that the pr...

  3. Systems biology of coagulation initiation: kinetics of thrombin generation in resting and activated human blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manash S Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Blood function defines bleeding and clotting risks and dictates approaches for clinical intervention. Independent of adding exogenous tissue factor (TF, human blood treated in vitro with corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI, to block Factor XIIa will generate thrombin after an initiation time (T(i of 1 to 2 hours (depending on donor, while activation of platelets with the GPVI-activator convulxin reduces T(i to ∼20 minutes. Since current kinetic models fail to generate thrombin in the absence of added TF, we implemented a Platelet-Plasma ODE model accounting for: the Hockin-Mann protease reaction network, thrombin-dependent display of platelet phosphatidylserine, VIIa function on activated platelets, XIIa and XIa generation and function, competitive thrombin substrates (fluorogenic detector and fibrinogen, and thrombin consumption during fibrin polymerization. The kinetic model consisting of 76 ordinary differential equations (76 species, 57 reactions, 105 kinetic parameters predicted the clotting of resting and convulxin-activated human blood as well as predicted T(i of human blood under 50 different initial conditions that titrated increasing levels of TF, Xa, Va, XIa, IXa, and VIIa. Experiments with combined anti-XI and anti-XII antibodies prevented thrombin production, demonstrating that a leak of XIIa past saturating amounts of CTI (and not "blood-borne TF" alone was responsible for in vitro initiation without added TF. Clotting was not blocked by antibodies used individually against TF, VII/VIIa, P-selectin, GPIb, protein disulfide isomerase, cathepsin G, nor blocked by the ribosome inhibitor puromycin, the Clk1 kinase inhibitor Tg003, or inhibited VIIa (VIIai. This is the first model to predict the observed behavior of CTI-treated human blood, either resting or stimulated with platelet activators. CTI-treated human blood will clot in vitro due to the combined activity of XIIa and XIa, a process enhanced by platelet activators and which proceeds

  4. Placental vascular pathology and increased thrombin generation as mechanisms of disease in obstetrical syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Andrea Mastrolia

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Obstetrical complications including preeclampsia, fetal growth restriction, preterm labor, preterm prelabor rupture of membranes and fetal demise are all the clinical endpoint of several underlying mechanisms (i.e., infection, inflammation, thrombosis, endocrine disorder, immunologic rejection, genetic, and environmental, therefore, they may be regarded as syndromes. Placental vascular pathology and increased thrombin generation were reported in all of these obstetrical syndromes. Moreover, elevated concentrations of thrombin-anti thrombin III complexes and changes in the coagulation as well as anticoagulation factors can be detected in the maternal circulation prior to the clinical development of the disease in some of these syndromes. In this review, we will assess the changes in the hemostatic system during normal and complicated pregnancy in maternal blood, maternal–fetal interface and amniotic fluid, and describe the contribution of thrombosis and vascular pathology to the development of the great obstetrical syndromes.

  5. Protein disulfide isomerase inhibition blocks thrombin generation in humans by interfering with platelet factor V activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopa, Jack D.; Neuberg, Donna; Puligandla, Maneka; Furie, Bruce; Zwicker, Jeffrey I.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is required for thrombus formation. We previously demonstrated that glycosylated quercetin flavonoids such as isoquercetin inhibit PDI activity and thrombus formation in animal models, but whether extracellular PDI represents a viable anticoagulant target in humans and how its inhibition affects blood coagulation remain unknown. METHODS: We evaluated effects of oral administration of isoquercetin on platelet-dependent thrombin generation in healthy subjects and patients with persistently elevated anti-phospholipid antibodies. RESULTS: Following oral administration of 1,000 mg isoquercetin to healthy adults, the measured peak plasma quercetin concentration (9.2 μM) exceeded its IC50 for inhibition of PDI by isoquercetin in vitro (2.5 ± 0.4 μM). Platelet-dependent thrombin generation decreased by 51% in the healthy volunteers compared with baseline (P = 0.0004) and by 64% in the anti-phospholipid antibody cohort (P = 0.015) following isoquercetin ingestion. To understand how PDI affects thrombin generation, we evaluated substrates of PDI identified using an unbiased mechanistic-based substrate trapping approach. These studies identified platelet factor V as a PDI substrate. Isoquercetin blocked both platelet factor Va and thrombin generation with an IC50 of ~5 μM. Inhibition of PDI by isoquercetin ingestion resulted in a 53% decrease in the generation of platelet factor Va (P = 0.001). Isoquercetin-mediated inhibition was reversed with addition of exogenous factor Va. CONCLUSION: These studies show that oral administration of isoquercetin inhibits PDI activity in plasma and diminishes platelet-dependent thrombin generation predominantly by blocking the generation of platelet factor Va. These pharmacodynamic and mechanistic observations represent an important step in the development of a novel class of antithrombotic agents targeting PDI. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01722669) FUNDING: National Heart

  6. Impaired thrombin generation and fibrin clot formation in patients with dilutional coagulopathy during major surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schols, S.E.; Lance, M.D.; Feijge, M.A.; Damoiseaux, J.; Marcus, M.A.; Hamulyak, K.; Cate, H. ten; Heemskerk, J.W.M.; Pampus, E.C.M. van

    2010-01-01

    Patients subjected to haemodilution during surgery are at increased risk of bleeding. We hypothesised that, in the acquired dilutional coagulopathy, insufficient haemostasis is due to either insufficient thrombin generation or insufficient fibrin clot formation. In tissue factor-activated plasmas fr

  7. Hypercoagulability following major partial liver resection - detected by thrombomodulin-modified thrombin generation testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potze, W.; Alkozai, E. M.; Adelmeijer, J.; Porte, R. J.; Lisman, T.

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundConventional coagulation tests are frequently prolonged after liver surgery, suggesting a post-operative hypocoagulability. However, these tests are unreliable for assessment of the haemostatic status in these patients. In contrast, thrombin generation testing measures the true balance bet

  8. Thrombin generation capacity of prothrombin complex concentrate in an in vitro dilutional model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Grottke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of PCC for the treatment of trauma-induced coagulopathy potentially increase the risk of thromboembolism and disseminated intravascular coagulation, which is addressed to an imbalance of both pro- and anticoagulants. As PCCs differ in composition, we used an in vitro dilutional approach to assess the overall thrombin generation of five different PCCs through various laboratory assays. METHODS: The vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors, heparin, and antithrombin were assessed in five commercially available PCCs. The procoagulant potential of the PCCs was assessed in plasma and whole blood from 4 healthy donors by means of classical coagulation assays, thrombin generation assay and thromboelastometry. In order to reflect coagulopathy, whole blood was diluted to 80, 60, 40, and 20% with Ringer's lactate solution. RESULTS: The five different PCCs were characterised by comparable levels of factors II, VII, IX and X (all around 20-30 IU/mL, whereas the heparin (0 to 17.6 IU/mL and antithrombin (0.06 to 1.29 IU/mL levels were remarkably different between manufactures. In vitro dilution of blood induced a prolongation of the PT and aPTT, and attenuation of thrombin generation and ExTem induced thromboelastometry. Overall, non- or low-heparin containing PCCs restored the in vitro dilutional coagulopathy, whereas PCCs containing heparin have an anticoagulant effect. The thrombin generation assay showed to be the most sensitive method for assessment of PCC effects. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that most available PCCs are not balanced regarding their pro- and anticoagulants. The effect of measured differences in thrombin generation among different PCCs requires further investigations to elaborate the clinical meaning of this finding in the treatment of trauma induced coagulopathy.

  9. Longitudinal assessment of thrombin generation potential in response to alteration of antiplatelet therapy after TIA or ischaemic stroke.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tobin, W O

    2013-02-01

    The impact of changing antiplatelet therapy on thrombin generation potential in patients with ischaemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is unclear. We assessed patients within 4 weeks of TIA or ischaemic stroke (baseline), and then 14 days (14d) and >90 days (90d) after altering antiplatelet therapy. Thrombin generation was assessed in platelet poor plasma. Ninety-one patients were recruited. Twenty-four were initially assessed on no antiplatelet therapy, and then after 14d (N = 23) and 90d (N = 8) on aspirin monotherapy; 52 were assessed on aspirin monotherapy, and after 14 and 90 days on aspirin and dipyridamole combination therapy; 21 patients were assessed on aspirin and after 14 days (N = 21) and 90 days (N = 19) on clopidogrel. Peak thrombin generation and endogenous thrombin potential were reduced at 14 and 90 days (p ≤ 0.04) in the overall cohort. We assessed the impact of individual antiplatelet regimens on thrombin generation parameters to investigate the cause of this effect. Lag time and time-to-peak thrombin generation were unchanged at 14 days, but reduced 90 days after commencing aspirin (p ≤ 0.009). Lag time, peak thrombin generation and endogenous thrombin potential were reduced at both 14 and 90 days after adding dipyridamole to aspirin (p ≤ 0.01). Lag time was reduced 14 days after changing from aspirin to clopidogrel (p = 0.045), but this effect was not maintained at 90 days (p = 0.2). This pilot study did not show any consistent effects of commencing aspirin, or of changing from aspirin to clopidogrel on thrombin generation potential during follow-up. The addition of dipyridamole to aspirin led to a persistent reduction in peak and total thrombin generation ex vivo, and illustrates the diverse, potentially beneficial, newly recognised \\'anti-coagulant\\' effects of dipyridamole in ischaemic CVD.

  10. Association between Stable Coronary Artery Disease and In Vivo Thrombin Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Valente-Acosta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Thrombin has been implicated as a key molecule in atherosclerotic progression. Clinical evidence shows that thrombin generation is enhanced in atherosclerosis, but its role as a risk factor for coronary atherosclerotic burden has not been proven in coronary artery disease (CAD stable patients. Objectives. To evaluate the association between TAT levels and homocysteine levels and the presence of coronary artery disease diagnosed by coronary angiography in patients with stable CAD. Methods and Results. We included 95 stable patients admitted to the Haemodynamics Department, including 63 patients with significant CAD and 32 patients without. We measured the thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT and homocysteine concentrations in all the patients. The CAD patients exhibited higher concentrations of TAT (40.76 μg/L versus 20.81 μg/L, p=0.002 and homocysteine (11.36 μmol/L versus 8.81 μmol/L, p<0.01 compared to the patients without significant CAD. Specifically, in patients with CAD+ the level of TAT level was associated with the severity of CAD being 36.17 ± 24.48 μg/L in the patients with bivascular obstruction and 42.77 ± 31.81 μg/L in trivascular coronary obstruction, p=0.002. Conclusions. The level of in vivo thrombin generation, quantified as TAT complexes, is associated with the presence and severity of CAD assessed by coronary angiography in stable CAD patients.

  11. Computational Analysis of Intersubject Variability and Thrombin Generation in Dilutional Coagulopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    T R A N S F U S I O N P R A C T I C E Computational analysis of intersubject variability and thrombin generation in dilutional coagulopathy_3610 2475... intersubject variability. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A thoroughly vali- dated computational model was used to simulate throm- bin generation curves for 472...parameters in diluted blood plasma displayed significant intersubject variabil- ity (with a coefficient of variation up to approx. 28%). Nevertheless

  12. Thrombin generation by activated factor VII on platelet activated by different agonists. Extending the cell-based model of hemostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrera Maria

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet activation is crucial in normal hemostasis. Using a clotting system free of external tissue factor, we investigated whether activated Factor VII in combination with platelet agonists increased thrombin generation (TG in vitro. Methods and results TG was quantified by time parameters: lag time (LT and time to peak (TTP, and by amount of TG: peak of TG (PTG and area under thrombin formation curve after 35 minutes (AUC→35min in plasma from 29 healthy volunteers using the calibrated automated thrombography (CAT technique. TG parameters were measured at basal conditions and after platelet stimulation by sodium arachidonate (AA, ADP, and collagen (Col. In addition, the effects of recombinant activated FVII (rFVIIa alone or combined with the other platelet agonists on TG parameters were investigated. We found that LT and TTP were significantly decreased (p 35min were significantly increased (p 35min (but not PTG when compared to platelet rich plasma activated with agonists in the absence of rFVIIa. Conclusion Platelets activated by AA, ADP, Col or rFVIIa triggered TG. This effect was increased by combining rFVIIa with other agonists. Our intrinsic coagulation system produced a burst in TG independent of external tissue factor activity an apparent hemostatic effect with little thrombotic capacity. Thus we suggest a modification in the cell-based model of hemostasis.

  13. Thrombin generation by exposure of blood to endotoxin: a simple model to study disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, T W

    2006-04-01

    Pathologic disseminated intravascular coagulation (PDIC) is a serious complication in sepsis. In an in-vitro system consisting of incubation of fresh citrated blood with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) or glucans and subsequent plasma recalcification plasmatic thrombin was quantified. Five hundred microliters of freshly drawn citrated blood of healthy donors were incubated with up to 800 ng/mL LPS (Escherichia coli) or up to 80 microg/mL Zymosan A (ZyA; Candida albicans) for 30 minutes at room temperature (RT). The samples were centrifuged, and 30 microL plasma were recalcified with 1 volume or less of CaCl(2) (25 micromoles Ca(2+)/mL plasma). After 0 to 12 minutes (37 degrees C), 20 microL 2.5 M arginine, pH 8.6, were added. Thirty microliters 0.9 mM HD-CHG-Ala-Arg-pNA in 2.3 M arginine were added, and the absorbance increase at 405 nm was determined. Fifty microliters plasma were also incubated with 5 microL 250 mM CaCl2 for 5, 10, or 15 minutes (37 degrees C). Fifty microliters 2.5 M arginine stops coagulation, and 50 microL 0.77 mM HD-CHG-Ala-Arg-pNA in 2.3 M arginine starts the thrombin detection. The standard was 1 IU/mL thrombin in 7% human albumin instead of plasma. Arginine was also added in the endotoxin exposure time (EET) or in the plasma coagulation reaction time (CRT). Tissue factor (TF)-antigen and soluble CD14 were determined. LPS at blood concentrations greater than 10 ng/mL or ZyA at greater than 1 microg/mL severalfold enhance thrombin generation, when the respective plasmas are recalcified. After 30 minutes EET at RT, the thrombin activity at 12 minutes CRT generated by the addition of 200 ng/mL LPS or 20 microg/mL ZyA is approximately 200 mIU/mL compared to approximately 20 mIU/mL without addition of endotoxin, or compared to about 7 mIU/mL thrombin at 0 minutes CRT. Arginine added to blood or to plasma inhibits thrombin generation; the inhibitory concentration 50% (IC 50) is approximately 15 mM plasma concentration. Endotoxin incubation of blood

  14. Automated Chat Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    WordNet 1 with the chat generator. WordNet is a simple lexical resource that organizes nouns, adjectives, adverbs, and verbs into sets of cognitive...DELTA_TAO> Will keep an eye out [01:04] <BRAVO_TAO> Received intel from Sao Paulo. South Korean vessels are operating in this region. [01:11

  15. Thrombin generation in Cushing's Syndrome: do the conventional clotting indices tell the whole truth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutroumpi, S; Spiezia, L; Albiger, N; Barbot, M; Bon, M; Maggiolo, S; Gavasso, S; Simioni, P; Frigo, A; Mantero, F; Scaroni, C

    2014-02-01

    Cushing's Syndrome (CS) is associated with an increased mortality, where hypercoagulability seems to have a crucial role in both arterial and venous thrombosis. Parameters of in vitro thrombin generation (TG) such as lag time, peak thrombin and endogenous thrombin potential (ETP), that describe the time until thrombin burst, the peak amount of TG and the total amount of thrombin generated, respectively as well as classical clotting markers were evaluated in 33 CS patients compared to both a group of 28 patients matched for the features of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and 31 healthy individuals. CS and MetS patients had shorter lag time (p < 0.0001), higher peak and ETP (p < 0.0001) than healthy controls, though lag time was less shortened in CS (p < 0.0001) respect to MetS group. Prothrombin time (PT) was increased (p < 0.0001) in both CS and MetS patients, while partial thromboplastin time (PTT) was shorter (p < 0.0001) in CS compared to both MetS and healthy group (p < 0.0001). Factor VIII (FVIII), Antithrombin (AT), protein C and S were increased only in CS patients (p < 0.0001). lag time, AT and FVIII correlated to night salivary cortisol (r = + 0.59; p = 0.0005, r = + 0.40; p = 0.003, r = + 0.40; p = 0.04, respectively); PTT correlated inversely to urinary free cortisol (r = -0.45; p = 0.009). BMI correlated negatively to lag time (r = -0.40; p = 0.0001) and positively to peak and ETP (r = + 0.34; p = 0.001, r = + 0.28; p = 0.008, respectively). Obese and diabetic patients had shorter lag time (p = 0.0005; p = 0.0002, respectively), higher ETP (p = 0.0006; p = 0.007, respectively) and peak (p = 0.0003; p = 0.0005, respectively) as well as a more prolonged PT (p = 0.04; p = 0.009, respectively). Hypertensive individuals had higher ETP (p = 0.004), peak (p = 0.0008) and FVIII (p = 0.001). Our findings confirm a prothrombotic state in both CS and MetS patients, though lag time was less shortened in

  16. Cassini Tour Atlas Automated Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazier, Kevin R.; Roumeliotis, Chris; Lange, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    During the Cassini spacecraft s cruise phase and nominal mission, the Cassini Science Planning Team developed and maintained an online database of geometric and timing information called the Cassini Tour Atlas. The Tour Atlas consisted of several hundreds of megabytes of EVENTS mission planning software outputs, tables, plots, and images used by mission scientists for observation planning. Each time the nominal mission trajectory was altered or tweaked, a new Tour Atlas had to be regenerated manually. In the early phases of Cassini s Equinox Mission planning, an a priori estimate suggested that mission tour designers would develop approximately 30 candidate tours within a short period of time. So that Cassini scientists could properly analyze the science opportunities in each candidate tour quickly and thoroughly so that the optimal series of orbits for science return could be selected, a separate Tour Atlas was required for each trajectory. The task of manually generating the number of trajectory analyses in the allotted time would have been impossible, so the entire task was automated using code written in five different programming languages. This software automates the generation of the Cassini Tour Atlas database. It performs with one UNIX command what previously took a day or two of human labor.

  17. Factor XIa and Thrombin Generation Are Elevated in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome and Predict Recurrent Cardiovascular Events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinske Loeffen

    Full Text Available In acute coronary syndrome (ACS cardiac cell damage is preceded by thrombosis. Therefore, plasma coagulation markers may have additional diagnostic relevance in ACS. By using novel coagulation assays this study aims to gain more insight into the relationship between the coagulation system and ACS.We measured plasma thrombin generation, factor XIa and D-dimer levels in plasma from ACS (n = 104 and non-ACS patients (n = 42. Follow-up measurements (n = 73 were performed at 1 and 6 months. Associations between coagulation markers and recurrent cardiovascular events were calculated by logistic regression analysis.Thrombin generation was significantly enhanced in ACS compared to non-ACS patients: peak height 148±53 vs. 122±42 nM. There was a significantly diminished ETP reduction (32 vs. 41% and increased intrinsic coagulation activation (25 vs. 7% in ACS compared to non-ACS patients. Furthermore, compared to non-ACS patients factor XIa and D-dimer levels were significantly elevated in ACS patients: 1.9±1.1 vs. 1.4±0.7 pM and 495(310-885 vs. 380(235-540 μg/L. Within the ACS spectrum, ST-elevated myocardial infarction patients had the highest prothrombotic profile. During the acute event, thrombin generation was significantly increased compared to 1 and 6 months afterwards: peak height 145±52 vs. 100±44 vs. 98±33 nM. Both peak height and factor XIa levels on admission predicted recurrent cardiovascular events (OR: 4.9 [95%CI 1.2-20.9] and 4.5 [1.1-18.9].ACS patients had an enhanced prothrombotic profile, demonstrated by an increased thrombin generation potential, factor XIa and D-dimer levels. This study is the first to demonstrate the positive association between factor XIa, thrombin generation and recurrent cardiovascular events.

  18. Factor XIa and Thrombin Generation Are Elevated in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome and Predict Recurrent Cardiovascular Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffen, Rinske; van Oerle, René; Leers, Mathie P. G.; Kragten, Johannes A.; Crijns, Harry; Spronk, Henri M. H.; ten Cate, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Objective In acute coronary syndrome (ACS) cardiac cell damage is preceded by thrombosis. Therefore, plasma coagulation markers may have additional diagnostic relevance in ACS. By using novel coagulation assays this study aims to gain more insight into the relationship between the coagulation system and ACS. Methods We measured plasma thrombin generation, factor XIa and D-dimer levels in plasma from ACS (n = 104) and non-ACS patients (n = 42). Follow-up measurements (n = 73) were performed at 1 and 6 months. Associations between coagulation markers and recurrent cardiovascular events were calculated by logistic regression analysis. Results Thrombin generation was significantly enhanced in ACS compared to non-ACS patients: peak height 148±53 vs. 122±42 nM. There was a significantly diminished ETP reduction (32 vs. 41%) and increased intrinsic coagulation activation (25 vs. 7%) in ACS compared to non-ACS patients. Furthermore, compared to non-ACS patients factor XIa and D-dimer levels were significantly elevated in ACS patients: 1.9±1.1 vs. 1.4±0.7 pM and 495(310–885) vs. 380(235–540) μg/L. Within the ACS spectrum, ST-elevated myocardial infarction patients had the highest prothrombotic profile. During the acute event, thrombin generation was significantly increased compared to 1 and 6 months afterwards: peak height 145±52 vs. 100±44 vs. 98±33 nM. Both peak height and factor XIa levels on admission predicted recurrent cardiovascular events (OR: 4.9 [95%CI 1.2–20.9] and 4.5 [1.1–18.9]). Conclusion ACS patients had an enhanced prothrombotic profile, demonstrated by an increased thrombin generation potential, factor XIa and D-dimer levels. This study is the first to demonstrate the positive association between factor XIa, thrombin generation and recurrent cardiovascular events. PMID:27419389

  19. Potentiation of thrombin generation in hemophilia A plasma by coagulation factor VIII and characterization of antibody-specific inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavya S Doshi

    Full Text Available Development of inhibitory antibodies to coagulation factor VIII (fVIII is the primary obstacle to the treatment of hemophilia A in the developed world. This adverse reaction occurs in 20-30% of persons with severe hemophilia A treated with fVIII-replacement products and is characterized by the development of a humoral and neutralizing immune response to fVIII. Patients with inhibitory anti-fVIII antibodies are treated with bypassing agents including recombinant factor VIIa (rfVIIa. However, some patients display poor hemostatic response to bypass therapy and improved treatment options are needed. Recently, we demonstrated that fVIII inhibitors display widely variable kinetics of inhibition that correlate with their respective target epitopes. Thus, it was hypothesized that for antibodies that display slow rates of inhibition, supplementation of rfVIIa with fVIII would result in improved thrombin generation and be predictive of clinical responses to this novel treatment regimen. In order to test this hypothesis, 10 murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs with non-overlapping epitopes spanning fVIII, differential inhibition titers, and inhibition kinetics were studied using a thrombin generation assay. Of the 3 MAbs with high inhibitory titers, only the one with fast and complete (classically defined as "type I" kinetics displayed significant inhibition of thrombin generation with no improvement upon supplementation of rfVIIa with fVIII. The other two MAbs that displayed incomplete (classically defined as "type II" inhibition did not suppress the potentiation of thrombin generation by fVIII. All antibodies that did not completely inhibit fVIII activity demonstrated potentiation of thrombin generation by the addition of fVIII as compared to rfVIIa alone. In conclusion, fVIII alone or in combination with rfVIIa corrects the thrombin generation defect produced by the majority of anti-fVIII MAbs better than single agent rfVIIa. Therefore, combined f

  20. Statins but not aspirin reduce thrombotic risk assessed by thrombin generation in diabetic patients without cardiovascular events: the RATIONAL trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Macchia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The systematic use of aspirin and statins in patients with diabetes and no previous cardiovascular events is controversial. We sought to assess the effects of aspirin and statins on the thrombotic risk assessed by thrombin generation (TG among patients with type II diabetes mellitus and no previous cardiovascular events. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Prospective, randomized, open, blinded to events evaluation, controlled, 2×2 factorial clinical trial including 30 patients randomly allocated to aspirin 100 mg/d, atorvastatin 40 mg/d, both or none. Outcome measurements included changes in TG levels after treatment (8 to 10 weeks, assessed by a calibrated automated thrombogram. At baseline all groups had similar clinical and biochemical profiles, including TG levels. There was no interaction between aspirin and atorvastatin. Atorvastatin significantly reduced TG measured as peak TG with saline (85.09±55.34 nmol vs 153.26±75.55 nmol for atorvastatin and control groups, respectively; p = 0.018. On the other hand, aspirin had no effect on TG (121.51±81.83 nmol vs 116.85±67.66 nmol, for aspirin and control groups, respectively; p = 0.716. The effects of treatments on measurements of TG using other agonists were consistent. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: While waiting for data from ongoing large clinical randomized trials to definitively outline the role of aspirin in primary prevention, our study shows that among diabetic patients without previous vascular events, statins but not aspirin reduce thrombotic risk assessed by TG. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00793754.

  1. The impact of thrombin generation and rotation thromboelastometry on assessment of severity of factor XI deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livnat, Tami; Shenkman, Boris; Martinowitz, Uri; Zivelin, Ariella; Dardik, Rima; Tamarin, Ilia; Mansharov, Rachel; Budnik, Ivan; Salomon, Ophira

    2015-08-01

    The phenotype of bleeding in patients with severe FXI deficiency is unpredictable and unlike other bleeding disorders, it is not directly correlated with levels of FXI. In this study we analyzed whether the global coagulation assays can serve as a clinical tool in predicting bleeding tendency in patients with severe FXI deficiency undergoing surgery, taking into account the large inter-individual variability of FXI levels and genotypes. Thrombin generation (TG) was measured in 39 platelet-poor plasma with or without tissue factor (TF) and in the presence or absence of corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI). Rotation thromboelastometry (ROTEM) was performed with fresh whole blood of 26 patients applying NATEM and INTEM tests. TG induced by recalcification can distinguish between bleeding and non-bleeding patients with severe FXI deficiency particularly among those with FXI activity of 2-20IU/dl. The addition of TF or TF and CTI to the TG assay masked the ability to differentiate between XI activity, genotype as well as bleeding and non-bleeding patients. ROTEM assays failed to distinguish bleeding from non-bleeding patients but could do so between different FXI activity levels and genotypes. In conclusion, in the current study we found a sensitive tool to distinguish between bleeding and non-bleeding patients. In order to recommend TG as a predictive tool for treatment tailoring, a larger patient group is required.

  2. Random Forests Are Able to Identify Differences in Clotting Dynamics from Kinetic Models of Thrombin Generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayavel Arumugam

    Full Text Available Current methods for distinguishing acute coronary syndromes such as heart attack from stable coronary artery disease, based on the kinetics of thrombin formation, have been limited to evaluating sensitivity of well-established chemical species (e.g., thrombin using simple quantifiers of their concentration profiles (e.g., maximum level of thrombin concentration, area under the thrombin concentration versus time curve. In order to get an improved classifier, we use a 34-protein factor clotting cascade model and convert the simulation data into a high-dimensional representation (about 19000 features using a piecewise cubic polynomial fit. Then, we systematically find plausible assays to effectively gauge changes in acute coronary syndrome/coronary artery disease populations by introducing a statistical learning technique called Random Forests. We find that differences associated with acute coronary syndromes emerge in combinations of a handful of features. For instance, concentrations of 3 chemical species, namely, active alpha-thrombin, tissue factor-factor VIIa-factor Xa ternary complex, and intrinsic tenase complex with factor X, at specific time windows, could be used to classify acute coronary syndromes to an accuracy of about 87.2%. Such a combination could be used to efficiently assay the coagulation system.

  3. DABIGATRAN ETEXILATE: NEW DIRECT THROMBIN INHIBITORS ANTICOAGULANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Patel Kinjal B; Galani Varsha; Patel Paresh B; Mehta Hiren R

    2011-01-01

    Thrombin plays a key role in thrombotic events, and therefore thrombin inhibition represents a therapeutic target for numerous thromboembolic diseases. Thrombin is responsible for the conversion of soluble fibrinogen to fibrin; clot stabilization through activation of factor XIII and the formation of cross-linkage among fibrin molecules; and the generation of additional thrombin through activation of factors V, VIII, and XI. Direct thrombin inhibitors are an innovative class of anticoagulant...

  4. Automated Test Requirement Document Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    DIAGNOSTICS BASED ON THE PRINCIPLES OF ARTIFICIAL INTELIGENCE ", 1984 International Test Conference, 01Oct84, (A3, 3, Cs D3, E2, G2, H2, 13, J6, K) 425...j0O GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS 0 ABBREVIATION DEFINITION AFSATCOM Air Force Satellite Communication Al Artificial Intelligence ASIC Application Specific...In-Test Equipment (BITE) and AI ( Artificial Intelligence) - Expert Systems - need to be fully applied before a completely automated process can be

  5. Automated Liquibase Generator And ValidatorALGV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manik Jain

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents an automation tool namely ALGV Automated Liquibase Generator and Validator for the automated generation and verification of liquibase scripts. Liquibase is one of the most efficient ways of applying and persisting changes to a database schema. Since its invention by Nathan Voxland 1 it has become de facto standard for database change management. The advantages of using liquibase scripts over traditional sql queries ranges from version control to reusing the same scripts over multiple database platforms. Irrespective of its advantages manual creation of liquibase scripts takes a lot of effort and sometimes is error-prone. ALGV helps to reduce the time consuming liquibase script generation manual typing efforts possible error occurrence and manual verification process and time by 75. Automating the liquibase generation process also helps to remove the burden of recollecting specific tags to be used for a particular change. Moreover developers can concentrate on the business logic and business data rather than wasting their precious efforts in writing files.

  6. Automating defence generation for risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadyatskaya, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Efficient risk assessment requires automation of its most tedious tasks: identification of vulnerabilities, attacks that can exploit these vulnerabilities, and countermeasures that can mitigate the attacks. E.g., the attack tree generation by policy invalidation approach looks at systematic automati

  7. Association of thrombin generation potential with platelet PAR-1 regulation and P-selectin expression in patients on dual antiplatelet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr Eslam, Roza; Posch, Florian; Lang, Irene M; Gremmel, Thomas; Eichelberger, Beate; Ay, Cihan; Panzer, Simon

    2014-02-01

    We studied the association of thrombin generation potential with platelet protease activated receptor (PAR)-1 regulation and platelet activation in 52 stable coronary artery disease patients on continuous therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel (n = 42) or prasugrel (n = 10). Compared to controls, peak thrombin generation potential was elevated in only 11 patients (p > 0.05), while F1.2 was elevated in 26 patients (p P-selectin expression were significantly elevated in patients compared to controls (p P-selectin (p = 0.002), suggesting in vivo depletion of platelet alpha granules due to ongoing platelet activation.

  8. Automated generation of lattice QCD Feynman rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, A.; Mueller, E.H. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy; von Hippel, G.M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Horgan, R.R. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). DAMTP, CMS

    2009-04-15

    The derivation of the Feynman rules for lattice perturbation theory from actions and operators is complicated, especially for highly improved actions such as HISQ. This task is, however, both important and particularly suitable for automation. We describe a suite of software to generate and evaluate Feynman rules for a wide range of lattice field theories with gluons and (relativistic and/or heavy) quarks. Our programs are capable of dealing with actions as complicated as (m)NRQCD and HISQ. Automated differentiation methods are used to calculate also the derivatives of Feynman diagrams. (orig.)

  9. Monitoring low molecular weight heparins at therapeutic levels: dose-responses of, and correlations and differences between aPTT, anti-factor Xa and thrombin generation assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owain Thomas

    Full Text Available Low molecular weight heparins (LMWH's are used to prevent and treat thrombosis. Tests for monitoring LMWH's include anti-factor Xa (anti-FXa, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT and thrombin generation. Anti-FXa is the current gold standard despite LMWH's varying affinities for FXa and thrombin.To examine the effects of two different LMWH's on the results of 4 different aPTT-tests, anti-FXa activity and thrombin generation and to assess the tests' concordance.Enoxaparin and tinzaparin were added ex-vivo in concentrations of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 anti-FXa international units (IU/mL, to blood from 10 volunteers. aPTT was measured using two whole blood methods (Free oscillation rheometry (FOR and Hemochron Jr (HCJ and an optical plasma method using two different reagents (ActinFSL and PTT-Automat. Anti-FXa activity was quantified using a chromogenic assay. Thrombin generation (Endogenous Thrombin Potential, ETP was measured on a Ceveron Alpha instrument using the TGA RB and more tissue-factor rich TGA RC reagents.Methods' mean aPTT at 1.0 IU/mL LMWH varied between 54s (SD 11 and 69s (SD 14 for enoxaparin and between 101s (SD 21 and 140s (SD 28 for tinzaparin. ActinFSL gave significantly shorter aPTT results. aPTT and anti-FXa generally correlated well. ETP as measured with the TGA RC reagent but not the TGA RB reagent showed an inverse exponential relationship to the concentration of LMWH. The HCJ-aPTT results had the weakest correlation to anti-FXa and thrombin generation (Rs0.62-0.87, whereas the other aPTT methods had similar correlation coefficients (Rs0.80-0.92.aPTT displays a linear dose-response to LMWH. There is variation between aPTT assays. Tinzaparin increases aPTT and decreases thrombin generation more than enoxaparin at any given level of anti-FXa activity, casting doubt on anti-FXa's present gold standard status. Thrombin generation with tissue factor-rich activator is a promising method for monitoring LMWH's.

  10. Patients with deep venous thrombosis and thrombophilia risk factors have a specific prolongation of the lag time in a chromogenic thrombin generation assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, F.J.L.M.; Kluft, C.; Biesma, D.H.; Schutgens, R.E.G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of thrombophilia risk factors on variables of a chromogenic thrombin generation assay (ETP) in a setting with acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and non-DVT patients. In 152 outpatients suspected for DVT, the results of thrombophilia i

  11. Automated cognome construction and semi-automated hypothesis generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voytek, Jessica B; Voytek, Bradley

    2012-06-30

    Modern neuroscientific research stands on the shoulders of countless giants. PubMed alone contains more than 21 million peer-reviewed articles with 40-50,000 more published every month. Understanding the human brain, cognition, and disease will require integrating facts from dozens of scientific fields spread amongst millions of studies locked away in static documents, making any such integration daunting, at best. The future of scientific progress will be aided by bridging the gap between the millions of published research articles and modern databases such as the Allen brain atlas (ABA). To that end, we have analyzed the text of over 3.5 million scientific abstracts to find associations between neuroscientific concepts. From the literature alone, we show that we can blindly and algorithmically extract a "cognome": relationships between brain structure, function, and disease. We demonstrate the potential of data-mining and cross-platform data-integration with the ABA by introducing two methods for semi-automated hypothesis generation. By analyzing statistical "holes" and discrepancies in the literature we can find understudied or overlooked research paths. That is, we have added a layer of semi-automation to a part of the scientific process itself. This is an important step toward fundamentally incorporating data-mining algorithms into the scientific method in a manner that is generalizable to any scientific or medical field.

  12. Different Recovery Profiles of Coagulation Factors, Thrombin Generation, and Coagulation Function After Hemorrhagic Shock in Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    automated water delivery system. On day 2, the animals were tranquilized with diazepam (0.5 mg/kg intramuscularly) before being transferred to the study room...Comparative efficacy of fibrinogen and platelet supplementation on the in vitro reversibility of competitive glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (alphaIIb/beta3

  13. Automated Word Puzzle Generation via Topic Dictionaries

    CERN Document Server

    Pinter, Balazs; Szabo, Zoltan; Lorincz, Andras

    2012-01-01

    We propose a general method for automated word puzzle generation. Contrary to previous approaches in this novel field, the presented method does not rely on highly structured datasets obtained with serious human annotation effort: it only needs an unstructured and unannotated corpus (i.e., document collection) as input. The method builds upon two additional pillars: (i) a topic model, which induces a topic dictionary from the input corpus (examples include e.g., latent semantic analysis, group-structured dictionaries or latent Dirichlet allocation), and (ii) a semantic similarity measure of word pairs. Our method can (i) generate automatically a large number of proper word puzzles of different types, including the odd one out, choose the related word and separate the topics puzzle. (ii) It can easily create domain-specific puzzles by replacing the corpus component. (iii) It is also capable of automatically generating puzzles with parameterizable levels of difficulty suitable for, e.g., beginners or intermedia...

  14. Lyso-Sulfatide Binds Factor Xa and Inhibits Thrombin Generation by the Prothrombinase Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Yegneswaran

    Full Text Available Blood coagulation reactions are strongly influenced by phospholipids, but little is known about the influence of sphingolipids on coagulation mechanisms. Lysosulfatide (lyso-SF (sulfogalactosyl sphingosine prolonged factor Xa (fXa 1-stage plasma clotting assays, showing it had robust anticoagulant activity. In studies using purified clotting factors, lyso-SF inhibited >90% of prothrombin (II activation for reaction mixtures containing fXa/factor Va (fVa/II, and also inhibited II activation generation by fXa/ phospholipids and by Gla-domainless-fXa/fVa/phospholipids. When lyso-SF analogs were tested, results showed that N-acetyl-sulfatide was not anticoagulant, implying that the free amine group was essential for the anticoagulant effects of lyso-SF. Lyso-SF did not inhibit fXa enzymatic hydrolysis of small peptide substrates, showing it did not directly inhibit the fXa activity. In surface plasmon resonance studies, lyso-SF bound to immobilized inactivated fXa as well as inactivated Gla-domainless-fXa. Confirming this lyso-SF:fXa interaction, fluorescence studies showed that fluorescently-labeled-fXa in solution bound to lyso-SF. Thus, lyso-SF is an anticoagulant lipid that inhibits fXa when this enzyme is bound to either phospholipids or to fVa. Mechanisms for inhibition of procoagulant activity are likely to involve lyso-SF binding to fXa domain(s that are distinct from the fXa Gla domain. This suggests that certain sphingolipids, including lyso-SF and some of its analogs, may down-regulate fXa activity without inhibiting the enzyme's active site or binding to the fXa Gla domain.

  15. Integrated, Automated Distributed Generation Technologies Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Kevin [Atk Launch Systems Inc., Brigham City, UT (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the NETL Project was to develop a diverse combination of distributed renewable generation technologies and controls and demonstrate how the renewable generation could help manage substation peak demand at the ATK Promontory plant site. The Promontory plant site is located in the northwestern Utah desert approximately 25 miles west of Brigham City, Utah. The plant encompasses 20,000 acres and has over 500 buildings. The ATK Promontory plant primarily manufactures solid propellant rocket motors for both commercial and government launch systems. The original project objectives focused on distributed generation; a 100 kW (kilowatt) wind turbine, a 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit, a 500 kW energy storage system, and an intelligent system-wide automation system to monitor and control the renewable energy devices then release the stored energy during the peak demand time. The original goal was to reduce peak demand from the electrical utility company, Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), by 3.4%. For a period of time we also sought to integrate our energy storage requirements with a flywheel storage system (500 kW) proposed for the Promontory/RMP Substation. Ultimately the flywheel storage system could not meet our project timetable, so the storage requirement was switched to a battery storage system (300 kW.) A secondary objective was to design/install a bi-directional customer/utility gateway application for real-time visibility and communications between RMP, and ATK. This objective was not achieved because of technical issues with RMP, ATK Information Technology Department’s stringent requirements based on being a rocket motor manufacturing facility, and budget constraints. Of the original objectives, the following were achieved: • Installation of a 100 kW wind turbine. • Installation of a 300 kW battery storage system. • Integrated control system installed to offset electrical demand by releasing stored energy from renewable sources

  16. Integrated, Automated Distributed Generation Technologies Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Kevin

    2014-09-30

    The purpose of the NETL Project was to develop a diverse combination of distributed renewable generation technologies and controls and demonstrate how the renewable generation could help manage substation peak demand at the ATK Promontory plant site. The Promontory plant site is located in the northwestern Utah desert approximately 25 miles west of Brigham City, Utah. The plant encompasses 20,000 acres and has over 500 buildings. The ATK Promontory plant primarily manufactures solid propellant rocket motors for both commercial and government launch systems. The original project objectives focused on distributed generation; a 100 kW (kilowatt) wind turbine, a 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit, a 500 kW energy storage system, and an intelligent system-wide automation system to monitor and control the renewable energy devices then release the stored energy during the peak demand time. The original goal was to reduce peak demand from the electrical utility company, Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), by 3.4%. For a period of time we also sought to integrate our energy storage requirements with a flywheel storage system (500 kW) proposed for the Promontory/RMP Substation. Ultimately the flywheel storage system could not meet our project timetable, so the storage requirement was switched to a battery storage system (300 kW.) A secondary objective was to design/install a bi-directional customer/utility gateway application for real-time visibility and communications between RMP, and ATK. This objective was not achieved because of technical issues with RMP, ATK Information Technology Department’s stringent requirements based on being a rocket motor manufacturing facility, and budget constraints. Of the original objectives, the following were achieved: • Installation of a 100 kW wind turbine. • Installation of a 300 kW battery storage system. • Integrated control system installed to offset electrical demand by releasing stored energy from renewable sources

  17. Automation Framework for Flight Dynamics Products Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Robert E.; Esposito, Timothy C.; Watson, John S.; Jun, Linda; Shoan, Wendy; Matusow, Carla

    2010-01-01

    XFDS provides an easily adaptable automation platform. To date it has been used to support flight dynamics operations. It coordinates the execution of other applications such as Satellite TookKit, FreeFlyer, MATLAB, and Perl code. It provides a mechanism for passing messages among a collection of XFDS processes, and allows sending and receiving of GMSEC messages. A unified and consistent graphical user interface (GUI) is used for the various tools. Its automation configuration is stored in text files, and can be edited either directly or using the GUI.

  18. DABIGATRAN ETEXILATE: NEW DIRECT THROMBIN INHIBITORS ANTICOAGULANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Kinjal B

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Thrombin plays a key role in thrombotic events, and therefore thrombin inhibition represents a therapeutic target for numerous thromboembolic diseases. Thrombin is responsible for the conversion of soluble fibrinogen to fibrin; clot stabilization through activation of factor XIII and the formation of cross-linkage among fibrin molecules; and the generation of additional thrombin through activation of factors V, VIII, and XI. Direct thrombin inhibitors are an innovative class of anticoagulants that bind directly to thrombin to inhibit its actions and impede the clotting process. Dabigatran is the first direct thrombin inhibitor, orally available first approval by US Food and Drugs Administration in 2010. Specifically and reversibly inhibits thrombin, so the duration of action is predictable. The anticoagulant effect correlates well with plasma drug concentrations, which implies an effective anticoagulation with low bleeding risk without major problems of interactions with other drugs. The predictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics characteristics of dabigatran may facilitate dental management of patients who until now have been in treatment with traditional anticoagulants, given that it doesn’t require routine laboratory monitoring in the vast majority of patients treated. They also present a profile of drug interactions very favorable.

  19. Influenza virus H1N1 activates platelets through FcγRIIA signaling and thrombin generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boilard, Eric; Paré, Guillaume; Rousseau, Matthieu; Cloutier, Nathalie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Lévesque, Tania; Borgeat, Pierre; Flamand, Louis

    2014-05-01

    Platelets play crucial functions in hemostasis and the prevention of bleeding. During H1N1 influenza A virus infection, platelets display activation markers. The platelet activation triggers during H1N1 infection remain elusive. We observed that H1N1 induces surface receptor activation, lipid mediator synthesis, and release of microparticles from platelets. These activation processes require the presence of serum/plasma, pointing to the contribution of soluble factor(s). Considering that immune complexes in the H1N1 pandemic were reported to play a pathogenic role, we assessed their contribution in H1N1-induced platelet activation. In influenza-immunized subjects, we observed that the virus scaffolds with immunoglobulin G (IgG) to form immune complexes that promote platelet activation. Mechanistically, this activation occurs through stimulation of low-affinity type 2 receptor for Fc portion of IgG (FcγRIIA), a receptor for immune complexes, independently of thrombin. Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, we found that the antibodies from H3N2-immunized mice activate transgenic mouse platelets that express FcγRIIA when put in the presence of H1N1, suggesting that cross-reacting influenza antibodies suffice. Alternatively, H1N1 can activate platelets via thrombin formation, independently of complement and FcγRIIA. These observations identify both the adaptive immune response and the innate response against pathogens as 2 intertwined processes that activate platelets during influenza infections.

  20. Automated Test Case Generation for an Autopilot Requirement Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Rungta, Neha; Feary, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Designing safety-critical automation with robust human interaction is a difficult task that is susceptible to a number of known Human-Automation Interaction (HAI) vulnerabilities. It is therefore essential to develop automated tools that provide support both in the design and rapid evaluation of such automation. The Automation Design and Evaluation Prototyping Toolset (ADEPT) enables the rapid development of an executable specification for automation behavior and user interaction. ADEPT supports a number of analysis capabilities, thus enabling the detection of HAI vulnerabilities early in the design process, when modifications are less costly. In this paper, we advocate the introduction of a new capability to model-based prototyping tools such as ADEPT. The new capability is based on symbolic execution that allows us to automatically generate quality test suites based on the system design. Symbolic execution is used to generate both user input and test oracles user input drives the testing of the system implementation, and test oracles ensure that the system behaves as designed. We present early results in the context of a component in the Autopilot system modeled in ADEPT, and discuss the challenges of test case generation in the HAI domain.

  1. Cerebellum engages in automation of verb-generation skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi; Wu, Paula; Weng, Xuchu; Bandettini, Peter A

    2014-03-01

    Numerous studies have shown cerebellar involvement in item-specific association, a form of explicit learning. However, very few have demonstrated cerebellar participation in automation of non-motor cognitive tasks. Applying fMRI to a repeated verb-generation task, we sought to distinguish cerebellar involvement in learning of item-specific noun-verb association and automation of verb generation skill. The same set of nouns was repeated in six verb-generation blocks so that subjects practiced generating verbs for the nouns. The practice was followed by a novel block with a different set of nouns. The cerebellar vermis (IV/V) and the right cerebellar lobule VI showed decreased activation following practice; activation in the right cerebellar Crus I was significantly lower in the novel challenge than in the initial verb-generation task. Furthermore, activation in this region during well-practiced blocks strongly correlated with improvement of behavioral performance in both the well-practiced and the novel blocks, suggesting its role in the learning of general mental skills not specific to the practiced noun-verb pairs. Therefore, the cerebellum processes both explicit verbal associative learning and automation of cognitive tasks. Different cerebellar regions predominate in this processing: lobule VI during the acquisition of item-specific association, and Crus I during automation of verb-generation skills through practice.

  2. Unfavorably Altered Fibrin Clot Properties in Patients with Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss Syndrome: Association with Thrombin Generation and Eosinophilia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucyna Mastalerz

    Full Text Available Given reports on the increased prevalence of thromboembolic incidents in patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA; Churg-Strauss syndrome, we investigated whether fibrin clot properties are unfavorably altered in EGPA.Ex vivo plasma fibrin clot characteristics, including clot permeability, turbidimetry and efficiency of fibrinolysis using two assays, were investigated in 34 consecutive patients with remission in EGPA according to the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score version 3 (23 female, 11 male, aged 48 (range, 21-80 years. The control group comprised 34 age- and sex- matched volunteers.Compared with controls, patients with EGPA were characterized by denser fiber clots (estimated pore size, Ks, 7.30±0.93 vs 10.14±1.07 10-9 cm2, faster fibrin polymerization (lag phase in a turbidimetric curve, 41.8±3.6 vs 47.4±2.9 s, thicker fibrin fibers (maximum absorbance, ΔAbs, 0.87±0.09 vs 0.72±0.07, higher maximum levels of D-dimer released from clots (DDmax 4.10±0.46 vs 3.54±0.35 mg/L, and prolonged clot lysis time (t50%; 9.50±1.45 vs 7.56±0.87 min; all p<0.0001. Scanning electron microscopy images confirmed denser plasma fibrin networks composed of thinner fibers formed in EGPA. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody status and C-reactive protein did not affect clot variables. Multivariate analysis adjusted for fibrinogen showed that Ks was predicted by eosinophil count, peak thrombin generation, factor VIII, and soluble CD40 ligand, whereas eosinophil count, peak thrombin generation and antiplasmin predicted t50%.This study is the first to show that EGPA is associated with prothrombotic plasma fibrin clot phenotype, which may contribute to thromboembolic manifestations reported in this disease.

  3. Automated Layout Generation of Analogue and Mixed-Signal ASIC's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Rene

    The research and development carried out in this Ph.D. study focusses on two key areas of the design flow for analogue and mixed-signal integrated circuit design, the mixed-signal floorplanning and the analogue layout generation.A novel approach to floorplanning is presented which provides true...... flow.A new design flow for automated layout generation of general analogue integrated circuits is presented. The design flow provides an automated design path from a sized circuit schematic to the final layout containing the placed, but unrouted, devices of the circuit. The analogue circuit layout...... interactive floorplanning capabilities due to a new implementation variant of a Genetic Algorithm. True interactive floorplanning allows the designer to communicate with existing floorplans during optimization. By entering the "ideas" and expertise of the designer into the optimization algorithm the automated...

  4. Automated Environment Generation for Software Model Checking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachuk, Oksana; Dwyer, Matthew B.; Pasareanu, Corina S.

    2003-01-01

    A key problem in model checking open systems is environment modeling (i.e., representing the behavior of the execution context of the system under analysis). Software systems are fundamentally open since their behavior is dependent on patterns of invocation of system components and values defined outside the system but referenced within the system. Whether reasoning about the behavior of whole programs or about program components, an abstract model of the environment can be essential in enabling sufficiently precise yet tractable verification. In this paper, we describe an approach to generating environments of Java program fragments. This approach integrates formally specified assumptions about environment behavior with sound abstractions of environment implementations to form a model of the environment. The approach is implemented in the Bandera Environment Generator (BEG) which we describe along with our experience using BEG to reason about properties of several non-trivial concurrent Java programs.

  5. Automated mass spectrum generation for new physics

    CERN Document Server

    Alloul, Adam; De Causmaecker, Karen; Fuks, Benjamin; de Traubenberg, Michel Rausch

    2013-01-01

    We describe an extension of the FeynRules package dedicated to the automatic generation of the mass spectrum associated with any Lagrangian-based quantum field theory. After introducing a simplified way to implement particle mixings, we present a new class of FeynRules functions allowing both for the analytical computation of all the model mass matrices and for the generation of a C++ package, dubbed ASperGe. This program can then be further employed for a numerical evaluation of the rotation matrices necessary to diagonalize the field basis. We illustrate these features in the context of the Two-Higgs-Doublet Model, the Minimal Left-Right Symmetric Standard Model and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model.

  6. Blood coagulation: hemostasis and thrombin regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenichi A; Key, Nigel S; Levy, Jerrold H

    2009-05-01

    Perioperative bleeding is a major challenge particularly because of increasing clinical use of potent antithrombotic drugs. Understanding current concepts of coagulation is important in determining the preoperative bleeding risk of patients, and in managing hemostatic therapy perioperatively. The serine protease thrombin plays pivotal roles in the activation of additional serine protease zymogens (inactive enzymatic precursors), cofactors, and cell-surface receptors. Thrombin generation is closely regulated to locally achieve rapid hemostasis after injury without causing uncontrolled systemic thrombosis. During surgery, there are major disturbances in coagulation and inflammatory systems because of hemorrhage/hemodilution, blood transfusion, and surgical stresses. Postoperative bleeding often requires allogeneic blood transfusions, which support thrombin generation and hemostasis. However, procoagulant activity and inflammation are increased postoperatively; thus, antithrombotic therapy may be required to prevent perioperative thrombotic complications. There have been significant advances in the management of perioperative hemostasis and thrombosis because of the introduction of novel hemostatic and antithrombotic drugs. However, a limitation of current treatment is that conventional clotting tests do not reflect the entire physiological processes of coagulation making optimal pharmacologic therapy difficult. Understanding the in vivo regulatory mechanisms and pharmacologic modulation of thrombin generation may help control bleeding without potentially increasing prothrombotic risks. In this review, we focus on the regulatory mechanisms of hemostasis and thrombin generation using multiple, simplified models of coagulation.

  7. Endogenous thrombin potential in polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aziz, Mubeena; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen; Wissing, Marie Louise Muff;

    2015-01-01

    : Endogenous thrombin potential (ETP). RESULTS: PCOS women with phenotype BMI > 25 + IR have increased potential of thrombin generation. ETP is associated with total body fat mass, IR, and CRP. CONCLUSIONS: Obese and insulin resistant women with PCOS have elevated level of ETP corresponding to increased risk......OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to investigate plasma endogenous thrombin generation in four different phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) defined by Body Mass Index (BMI) and insulin resistance (IR). PCOS is diagnosed according to the Rotterdam criteria. DESIGN: Multicenter...... cross-sectional study. SETTING: Two major University Hospitals in the Capital region of Denmark. PATIENTS: Hundred forty-eight European women with PCOS were consecutively recruited during April 2010-February 2012. Clinical examination, blood sampling, and DEXA scan were performed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES...

  8. Automated Generation of User Guidance by Combining Computation and Deduction

    CERN Document Server

    Neuper, Walther

    2012-01-01

    Herewith, a fairly old concept is published for the first time and named "Lucas Interpretation". This has been implemented in a prototype, which has been proved useful in educational practice and has gained academic relevance with an emerging generation of educational mathematics assistants (EMA) based on Computer Theorem Proving (CTP). Automated Theorem Proving (ATP), i.e. deduction, is the most reliable technology used to check user input. However ATP is inherently weak in automatically generating solutions for arbitrary problems in applied mathematics. This weakness is crucial for EMAs: when ATP checks user input as incorrect and the learner gets stuck then the system should be able to suggest possible next steps. The key idea of Lucas Interpretation is to compute the steps of a calculation following a program written in a novel CTP-based programming language, i.e. computation provides the next steps. User guidance is generated by combining deduction and computation: the latter is performed by a specific l...

  9. A scheme on automated test data generation and its evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    By analyzing some existing test data generation methods, a new automated test data generation approach was presented. The linear predicate functions on a given path was directly used to construct a linear constrain system for input variables. Only when the predicate function is nonlinear, does the linear arithmetic representation need to be computed. If the entire predicate functions on the given path are linear, either the desired test data or the guarantee that the path is infeasible can be gotten from the solution of the constrain system. Otherwise, the iterative refining for the input is required to obtain the desired test data. Theoretical analysis and test results show that the approach is simple and effective, and takes less computation. The scheme can also be used to generate path-based test data for the programs with arrays and loops.

  10. Automated 3D model generation for urban environments [online

    OpenAIRE

    Frueh, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Abstract In this thesis, we present a fast approach to automated generation of textured 3D city models with both high details at ground level and complete coverage for bird’s-eye view. A ground-based facade model is acquired by driving a vehicle equipped with two 2D laser scanners and a digital camera under normal traffic conditions on public roads. One scanner is mounted horizontally and is used to determine the approximate component of relative motion along the move...

  11. Fully integrated, fully automated generation of short tandem repeat profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The generation of short tandem repeat profiles, also referred to as ‘DNA typing,’ is not currently performed outside the laboratory because the process requires highly skilled technical operators and a controlled laboratory environment and infrastructure with several specialized instruments. The goal of this work was to develop a fully integrated system for the automated generation of short tandem repeat profiles from buccal swab samples, to improve forensic laboratory process flow as well as to enable short tandem repeat profile generation to be performed in police stations and in field-forward military, intelligence, and homeland security settings. Results An integrated system was developed consisting of an injection-molded microfluidic BioChipSet cassette, a ruggedized instrument, and expert system software. For each of five buccal swabs, the system purifies DNA using guanidinium-based lysis and silica binding, amplifies 15 short tandem repeat loci and the amelogenin locus, electrophoretically separates the resulting amplicons, and generates a profile. No operator processing of the samples is required, and the time from swab insertion to profile generation is 84 minutes. All required reagents are contained within the BioChipSet cassette; these consist of a lyophilized polymerase chain reaction mix and liquids for purification and electrophoretic separation. Profiles obtained from fully automated runs demonstrate that the integrated system generates concordant short tandem repeat profiles. The system exhibits single-base resolution from 100 to greater than 500 bases, with inter-run precision with a standard deviation of ±0.05 - 0.10 bases for most alleles. The reagents are stable for at least 6 months at 22°C, and the instrument has been designed and tested to Military Standard 810F for shock and vibration ruggedization. A nontechnical user can operate the system within or outside the laboratory. Conclusions The integrated system represents the

  12. Automated Reference File Generation for HST STIS Using OPUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swam, Michael S.; Goodfrooij, Paul; Diaz-Miller, Rosa I.

    A project has been undertaken at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) to automatically generate some types of instrument reference files as soon as the raw exposures are received from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This project will start by automatically producing bias and dark reference files for some of the modes of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph's (STIS) CCD camera. Using database tables of planned and received exposures, scripts developed by the STIS instrument group, and the process automation and monitoring features of OPUS, this system will allow monitoring of reference file creation as it occurs on the production systems at STScI. This monitoring occurs through the OPUS Observation Manager (OMG), a Java application running on a potentially remote workstation or personal computer. The automation of the process will not only reduce considerably the time it takes to create these reference files, but also will allow the delivery of accurate bias and dark reference files for STIS shortly after the observations occur, resulting in a much better calibration of the data. This paper will describe the features of the system architecture and the software technologies used to implement them.

  13. Loft: An Automated Mesh Generator for Stiffened Shell Aerospace Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.

    2011-01-01

    Loft is an automated mesh generation code that is designed for aerospace vehicle structures. From user input, Loft generates meshes for wings, noses, tanks, fuselage sections, thrust structures, and so on. As a mesh is generated, each element is assigned properties to mark the part of the vehicle with which it is associated. This property assignment is an extremely powerful feature that enables detailed analysis tasks, such as load application and structural sizing. This report is presented in two parts. The first part is an overview of the code and its applications. The modeling approach that was used to create the finite element meshes is described. Several applications of the code are demonstrated, including a Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) wing-sizing study, a lunar lander stage study, a launch vehicle shroud shape study, and a two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) orbiter. Part two of the report is the program user manual. The manual includes in-depth tutorials and a complete command reference.

  14. Automated Generation of User Guidance by Combining Computation and Deduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walther Neuper

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Herewith, a fairly old concept is published for the first time and named "Lucas Interpretation". This has been implemented in a prototype, which has been proved useful in educational practice and has gained academic relevance with an emerging generation of educational mathematics assistants (EMA based on Computer Theorem Proving (CTP. Automated Theorem Proving (ATP, i.e. deduction, is the most reliable technology used to check user input. However ATP is inherently weak in automatically generating solutions for arbitrary problems in applied mathematics. This weakness is crucial for EMAs: when ATP checks user input as incorrect and the learner gets stuck then the system should be able to suggest possible next steps. The key idea of Lucas Interpretation is to compute the steps of a calculation following a program written in a novel CTP-based programming language, i.e. computation provides the next steps. User guidance is generated by combining deduction and computation: the latter is performed by a specific language interpreter, which works like a debugger and hands over control to the learner at breakpoints, i.e. tactics generating the steps of calculation. The interpreter also builds up logical contexts providing ATP with the data required for checking user input, thus combining computation and deduction. The paper describes the concepts underlying Lucas Interpretation so that open questions can adequately be addressed, and prerequisites for further work are provided.

  15. Toward the Automated Generation of Components from Existing Source Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinlan, D; Yi, Q; Kumfert, G; Epperly, T; Dahlgren, T; Schordan, M; White, B

    2004-12-02

    A major challenge to achieving widespread use of software component technology in scientific computing is an effective migration strategy for existing, or legacy, source code. This paper describes initial work and challenges in automating the identification and generation of components using the ROSE compiler infrastructure and the Babel language interoperability tool. Babel enables calling interfaces expressed in the Scientific Interface Definition Language (SIDL) to be implemented in, and called from, an arbitrary combination of supported languages. ROSE is used to build specialized source-to-source translators that (1) extract a SIDL interface specification from information implicit in existing C++ source code and (2) transform Babel's output to include dispatches to the legacy code.

  16. Automating Initial Guess Generation for High Fidelity Trajectory Optimization Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Benjamin; Lantoine, Gregory; Sims, Jon; Whiffen, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Many academic studies in spaceflight dynamics rely on simplified dynamical models, such as restricted three-body models or averaged forms of the equations of motion of an orbiter. In practice, the end result of these preliminary orbit studies needs to be transformed into more realistic models, in particular to generate good initial guesses for high-fidelity trajectory optimization tools like Mystic. This paper reviews and extends some of the approaches used in the literature to perform such a task, and explores the inherent trade-offs of such a transformation with a view toward automating it for the case of ballistic arcs. Sample test cases in the libration point regimes and small body orbiter transfers are presented.

  17. Automating the Generation of Heterogeneous Aviation Safety Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney, Ewen W.; Pai, Ganesh J.; Pohl, Josef M.

    2012-01-01

    A safety case is a structured argument, supported by a body of evidence, which provides a convincing and valid justification that a system is acceptably safe for a given application in a given operating environment. This report describes the development of a fragment of a preliminary safety case for the Swift Unmanned Aircraft System. The construction of the safety case fragment consists of two parts: a manually constructed system-level case, and an automatically constructed lower-level case, generated from formal proof of safety-relevant correctness properties. We provide a detailed discussion of the safety considerations for the target system, emphasizing the heterogeneity of sources of safety-relevant information, and use a hazard analysis to derive safety requirements, including formal requirements. We evaluate the safety case using three classes of metrics for measuring degrees of coverage, automation, and understandability. We then present our preliminary conclusions and make suggestions for future work.

  18. Methodical Approaches to Creation of Dividing Automation at Industrial Enterprises with Generating Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Kalentionok

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a problem pertaining to creation of dividing automation at industrial enterprises which have their own generating plants. Algorithms for action of dividing automation that permit to ensure minimum possible power non-balance while using generating plants for autonomous operation and possible parameters for its response are proposed in the paper.

  19. Toward Fully Automated Multicriterial Plan Generation: A Prospective Clinical Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voet, Peter W.J., E-mail: p.voet@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center–Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, Rotterdam 3075EA (Netherlands); Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Fransen, Dennie; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center–Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, Rotterdam 3075EA (Netherlands)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To prospectively compare plans generated with iCycle, an in-house-developed algorithm for fully automated multicriterial intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beam profile and beam orientation optimization, with plans manually generated by dosimetrists using the clinical treatment planning system. Methods and Materials: For 20 randomly selected head-and-neck cancer patients with various tumor locations (of whom 13 received sequential boost treatments), we offered the treating physician the choice between an automatically generated iCycle plan and a manually optimized plan using standard clinical procedures. Although iCycle used a fixed “wish list” with hard constraints and prioritized objectives, the dosimetrists manually selected the beam configuration and fine tuned the constraints and objectives for each IMRT plan. Dosimetrists were not informed in advance whether a competing iCycle plan was made. The 2 plans were simultaneously presented to the physician, who then selected the plan to be used for treatment. For the patient group, differences in planning target volume coverage and sparing of critical tissues were quantified. Results: In 32 of 33 plan comparisons, the physician selected the iCycle plan for treatment. This highly consistent preference for the automatically generated plans was mainly caused by the improved sparing for the large majority of critical structures. With iCycle, the normal tissue complication probabilities for the parotid and submandibular glands were reduced by 2.4% ± 4.9% (maximum, 18.5%, P=.001) and 6.5% ± 8.3% (maximum, 27%, P=.005), respectively. The reduction in the mean oral cavity dose was 2.8 ± 2.8 Gy (maximum, 8.1 Gy, P=.005). For the swallowing muscles, the esophagus and larynx, the mean dose reduction was 3.3 ± 1.1 Gy (maximum, 9.2 Gy, P<.001). For 15 of the 20 patients, target coverage was also improved. Conclusions: In 97% of cases, automatically generated plans were selected for treatment because of

  20. Automated Generation and Assessment of Autonomous Systems Test Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barltrop, Kevin J.; Friberg, Kenneth H.; Horvath, Gregory A.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the issues concerning verification and validation testing of autonomous spacecraft routinely culminates in the exploration of anomalous or faulted mission-like scenarios using the work involved during the Dawn mission's tests as examples. Prioritizing which scenarios to develop usually comes down to focusing on the most vulnerable areas and ensuring the best return on investment of test time. Rules-of-thumb strategies often come into play, such as injecting applicable anomalies prior to, during, and after system state changes; or, creating cases that ensure good safety-net algorithm coverage. Although experience and judgment in test selection can lead to high levels of confidence about the majority of a system's autonomy, it's likely that important test cases are overlooked. One method to fill in potential test coverage gaps is to automatically generate and execute test cases using algorithms that ensure desirable properties about the coverage. For example, generate cases for all possible fault monitors, and across all state change boundaries. Of course, the scope of coverage is determined by the test environment capabilities, where a faster-than-real-time, high-fidelity, software-only simulation would allow the broadest coverage. Even real-time systems that can be replicated and run in parallel, and that have reliable set-up and operations features provide an excellent resource for automated testing. Making detailed predictions for the outcome of such tests can be difficult, and when algorithmic means are employed to produce hundreds or even thousands of cases, generating predicts individually is impractical, and generating predicts with tools requires executable models of the design and environment that themselves require a complete test program. Therefore, evaluating the results of large number of mission scenario tests poses special challenges. A good approach to address this problem is to automatically score the results

  1. Thrombin inhibitor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, P E; Naylor-Olsen, A M

    1998-08-01

    Recently, iv formulated direct thrombin inhibitors have been shown to be safe and efficacious alternatives to heparin. These results have fueled the hopes for an orally active compound. Such a compound could be a significant advance over warfarin if it had predictable pharmacokinetics and a duration of action sufficient for once or twice a day dosing. In order to develop an orally active compound which meets these criteria, the deficiencies of the prototype inhibitor efegatran have had to be addressed. First, using a combination of structure based design and empirical structure optimization, more selective compounds have been identified by modifying the P1 group or by incorporating different peptidomimetic P2/P3 scaffolds. Secondly, this optimization has resulted in the development of potent and selective non-covalent inhibitors, thus bypassing the liabilities of the serine trap. Thirdly, oral bioavailability has been achieved while maintaining selectivity and efficacy through the incorporation of progressively less basic P1 groups. The duration of action of these compounds remains to be optimized. Other advances in thrombin inhibitor design have included the development of uncharged P1 groups and the discovery of two non-peptide templates.

  2. Thrombin, a mediator of cerebrovascular inflammation in AD and hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debjani eTripathy

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Considerable evidence implicates hypoxia and vascular inflammation in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Thrombin, a multifunctional inflammatory mediator, is demonstrable in the brains of AD patients both in the vessel walls and senile plaques. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α, a key regulator of the cellular response to hypoxia, is also upregulated in the vasculature of human AD brains. The objective of this study is to investigate inflammatory protein expression in the cerebrovasculature of transgenic AD mice and to explore the role of thrombin as a mediator of cerebrovascular inflammation and oxidative stress in AD and in hypoxia-induced changes in brain endothelial cells. Immunofluorescent analysis of the cerebrovasculature in AD mice demonstrates significant (p<0.01-0.001 increases in thrombin, HIF-1α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, and reactive oxygen species (ROS compared to controls. Administration of the thrombin inhibitor dabigatran (100 mg/kg to AD mice for 34 wks significantly decreases expression of inflammatory proteins and ROS. Exposure of cultured brain endothelial cells to hypoxia for 6 h causes an upregulation of thrombin, HIF-1α, MCP-1, IL-6 and MMP2 and ROS. Treatment of endothelial cells with the dabigatran (1 nM reduces ROS generation and inflammatory protein expression (p<0.01-0.001. The data demonstrate that inhibition of thrombin in culture blocks the increase in inflammatory protein expression and ROS generation evoked by hypoxia. Also, administration of dabigatran to transgenic AD mice diminishes expression of inflammatory proteins and ROS in the cerebromicrovasculature. Taken together, these results suggest that inhibiting thrombin generation could have therapeutic value in AD and other disorders where hypoxia, inflammation and oxidative stress are involved.

  3. Automated Test Input Generation for Android: Are We There Yet?

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhary, Shauvik Roy; Gorla, Alessandra; Orso, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Mobile applications, often simply called "apps", are increasingly widespread, and we use them daily to perform a number of activities. Like all software, apps must be adequately tested to gain confidence that they behave correctly. Therefore, in recent years, researchers and practitioners alike have begun to investigate ways to automate apps testing. In particular, because of Android's open source nature and its large share of the market, a great deal of research has been performed on input g...

  4. Inactivation of thrombin by a fucosylated chondroitin sulfate from echinoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourão, P A; Boisson-Vidal, C; Tapon-Bretaudière, J; Drouet, B; Bros, A; Fischer, A

    2001-04-15

    A polysaccharide extracted from the sea cucumber body wall has the same backbone structure as the mammalian chondroitin sulfate, but some of the glucuronic acid residues display sulfated fucose branches. These branches confer high anticoagulant activity to the polysaccharide. Since the sea cucumber chondroitin sulfate has analogy in structure with mammalian glycosaminoglycans and sulfated fucans from brown algae, we compared its anticoagulant action with that of heparin and of a homopolymeric sulfated fucan with approximately the same level of sulfation as the sulfated fucose branches found in the sea cucumber polysaccharide. These various compounds differ not only in their anticoagulant potencies but also in the mechanisms of thrombin inhibition. Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate, like heparin, requires antithrombin or heparin cofactor II for thrombin inhibition. Sulfated fucans from brown algae have an antithrombin effect mediated by antithrombin and heparin cofactor II, plus a direct antithrombin effect more pronounced for some fractions. But even in the case of these two polysaccharides, we observed some differences. In contrast with heparin, total inhibition of thrombin in the presence of antithrombin is not achieved with fucosylated chondroitin sulfate, possibly reflecting a less specific interaction. Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate is able to inhibit thrombin generation after stimulation by both contact-activated and thromboplastin-activated systems. It delayed only the contact-induced thrombin generation, as expected for an anticoagulant without direct thrombin inhibition. Overall, the specific spatial array of the sulfated fucose branches in the fucosylated chondroitin sulfate not only confer high anticoagulant activity to the polysaccharide but also determine differences in the way it inhibits thrombin.

  5. Intracellular Ascorbate Prevents Endothelial Barrier Permeabilization by Thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, William H; Qu, Zhi-chao; May, James M

    2015-08-28

    Intracellular ascorbate (vitamin C) has previously been shown to tighten the endothelial barrier and maintain barrier integrity during acute inflammation in vitro. However, the downstream effectors of ascorbate in the regulation of endothelial permeability remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated ascorbate as a mediator of thrombin-induced barrier permeabilization in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and their immortalized hybridoma line, EA.hy926. We found that the vitamin fully prevented increased permeability to the polysaccharide inulin by thrombin in a dose-dependent manner, and it took effect both before and after subjection to thrombin. Thrombin exposure consumed intracellular ascorbate but not the endogenous antioxidant GSH. Likewise, the antioxidants dithiothreitol and tempol did not reverse permeabilization. We identified a novel role for ascorbate in preserving cAMP during thrombin stimulation, resulting in two downstream effects. First, ascorbate maintained the cortical actin cytoskeleton in a Rap1- and Rac1-dependent manner, thus preserving stable adherens junctions between adjacent cells. Second, ascorbate prevented actin polymerization and formation of stress fibers by reducing the activation of RhoA and phosphorylation of myosin light chain. Although ascorbate and thrombin both required calcium for their respective effects, ascorbate did not prevent thrombin permeabilization by obstructing calcium influx. However, preservation of cAMP by ascorbate was found to depend on both the production of nitric oxide by endothelial nitric-oxide synthase, which ascorbate is known to activate, and the subsequent generation cGMP by guanylate cyclase. Together, these data implicate ascorbate in the prevention of inflammatory endothelial barrier permeabilization and explain the underlying signaling mechanism.

  6. Automated quadrilateral mesh generation for digital image structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    With the development of advanced imaging technology, digital images are widely used. This paper proposes an automatic quadrilateral mesh generation algorithm for multi-colour imaged structures. It takes an original arbitrary digital image as an input for automatic quadrilateral mesh generation, this includes removing the noise, extracting and smoothing the boundary geometries between different colours, and automatic all-quad mesh generation with the above boundaries as constraints. An application example is...

  7. Automated Generation of Kempe Linkage and Its Complexity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高小山; 朱长才

    1999-01-01

    It is a famous result of Kempe that a linkage can be designed to generate any given plane algebraic curve.In this paper,Kempe's result is improved to give a precise algorithm for generating Kempe linkage.We proved that for an algebraic plane curve of degrenn n,Kempe linkage uses at most O(n4) links.Efforts to implement a program which may generate Kempe linkage and simulation of the generation process of the plane curves are presented in the paper.

  8. Automated Generation of Safety Requirements from Railway Interlocking Tables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxthausen, Anne Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a tool for extracting formal safety conditions from interlocking tables for railway interlocking systems. The tool has been applied to generate safety conditions for the interlocking system at Stenstrup station in Denmark, and the generated conditions were then checked to hold...... by the SAL model checker tool....

  9. Automated Diagnosis and Classification of Steam Generator Tube Defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Gabe V. Garcia

    2004-10-01

    A major cause of failure in nuclear steam generators is tube degradation. Tube defects are divided into seven categories, one of which is intergranular attack/stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC). Defects of this type usually begin on the outer surface of the tubes and propagate both inward and laterally. In many cases these defects occur at or near the tube support plates. Several different methods exist for the nondestructive evaluation of nuclear steam generator tubes for defect characterization.

  10. Automated generation of formal safety conditions from railway interlocking tables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxthausen, Anne Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a tool for extracting formal safety conditions from interlocking tables for railway interlocking systems. The tool has been applied to generate safety conditions for the interlocking system at Stenstrup station in Denmark, and the SAL model checker tool has been used to check...

  11. Automated generation of program translation and verification tools using annotated grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordonez Camacho, D.; Mens, K.; Brand, M.G.J. van den; Vinju, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Automatically generating program translators from source and target language specifications is a non-trivial problem. In this paper we focus on the problem of automating the process of building translators between operations languages, a family of DSLs used to program satellite operations procedures

  12. Challenges of the management of severe hemophilia A with inhibitors: two case reports emphasizing the potential interest of a high-purity human Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate and individually tailored prophylaxis guided by thrombin-generation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Sophie; Crampe, Carine; Dargaud, Yesim; Lavigne-Lissalde, Géraldine; Escuriola-Ettingshausen, Carmen; Tardy, Brigitte; Meley, Roland; Thouvenin, Sandrine; Stephan, Jean L; Berger, Claire

    2015-12-01

    Severe hemophilia A is an X-linked bleeding disorder. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the best strategy of treatment when patients develop inhibitors. The objective is to illustrate the benefit of a high-purity human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor (VWF) concentrate (Octanate) in the management of ITI. We also wanted to raise the potential interest of laboratory assays such as thrombin-generation test (TGT) and epitope mapping. Two patients were treated during ITI, first with a recombinant FVIII and then with plasma-derived factor VIII without success, and, finally, with Octanate. Bypassing agents were used based on the results of TGT. Epitope mapping was performed during ITI therapy. These observations suggest the potential contribution of Octanate in the management of ITI in difficult cases. The use of bypassing agents can be necessary in prophylaxis or to treat bleedings, and may be guided by TGT results. Epitope mapping is used to describe the inhibitor. This article shows a decrease of the inhibitor directed against the C2 domain after initiation of Octanate. A high-purity human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate (Octanate) may be a valuable therapeutical option for ITI therapy. TGT and epitope mapping could be of help in the management of ITI.

  13. Automated Testcase Generation for Numerical Support Functions in Embedded Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Johann; Schnieder, Stefan-Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We present a tool for the automatic generation of test stimuli for small numerical support functions, e.g., code for trigonometric functions, quaternions, filters, or table lookup. Our tool is based on KLEE to produce a set of test stimuli for full path coverage. We use a method of iterative deepening over abstractions to deal with floating-point values. During actual testing the stimuli exercise the code against a reference implementation. We illustrate our approach with results of experiments with low-level trigonometric functions, interpolation routines, and mathematical support functions from an open source UAS autopilot.

  14. An automated framework for hypotheses generation using literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abedi Vida

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bio-medicine, exploratory studies and hypothesis generation often begin with researching existing literature to identify a set of factors and their association with diseases, phenotypes, or biological processes. Many scientists are overwhelmed by the sheer volume of literature on a disease when they plan to generate a new hypothesis or study a biological phenomenon. The situation is even worse for junior investigators who often find it difficult to formulate new hypotheses or, more importantly, corroborate if their hypothesis is consistent with existing literature. It is a daunting task to be abreast with so much being published and also remember all combinations of direct and indirect associations. Fortunately there is a growing trend of using literature mining and knowledge discovery tools in biomedical research. However, there is still a large gap between the huge amount of effort and resources invested in disease research and the little effort in harvesting the published knowledge. The proposed hypothesis generation framework (HGF finds “crisp semantic associations” among entities of interest - that is a step towards bridging such gaps. Methodology The proposed HGF shares similar end goals like the SWAN but are more holistic in nature and was designed and implemented using scalable and efficient computational models of disease-disease interaction. The integration of mapping ontologies with latent semantic analysis is critical in capturing domain specific direct and indirect “crisp” associations, and making assertions about entities (such as disease X is associated with a set of factors Z. Results Pilot studies were performed using two diseases. A comparative analysis of the computed “associations” and “assertions” with curated expert knowledge was performed to validate the results. It was observed that the HGF is able to capture “crisp” direct and indirect associations, and provide knowledge

  15. ADVANTG An Automated Variance Reduction Parameter Generator, Rev. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, Scott W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Seth R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevill, Aaron M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ibrahim, Ahmad M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Daily, Charles R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Evans, Thomas M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wagner, John C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Jeffrey O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Grove, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The primary objective of ADVANTG is to reduce both the user effort and the computational time required to obtain accurate and precise tally estimates across a broad range of challenging transport applications. ADVANTG has been applied to simulations of real-world radiation shielding, detection, and neutron activation problems. Examples of shielding applications include material damage and dose rate analyses of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor (Risner and Blakeman 2013) and the ITER Tokamak (Ibrahim et al. 2011). ADVANTG has been applied to a suite of radiation detection, safeguards, and special nuclear material movement detection test problems (Shaver et al. 2011). ADVANTG has also been used in the prediction of activation rates within light water reactor facilities (Pantelias and Mosher 2013). In these projects, ADVANTG was demonstrated to significantly increase the tally figure of merit (FOM) relative to an analog MCNP simulation. The ADVANTG-generated parameters were also shown to be more effective than manually generated geometry splitting parameters.

  16. Validation of fully automated VMAT plan generation for library-based plan-of-the-day cervical cancer radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W.M. Sharfo (Abdul Wahab M.); S. Breedveld (Sebastiaan); P.W.J. Voet (Peter W.J.); S.T. Heijkoop (Sabrina); J.W.M. Mens (Jan); M.S. Hoogeman (Mischa); B.J.M. Heijmen (Ben)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To develop and validate fully automated generation of VMAT plan-libraries for plan-of-the-day adaptive radiotherapy in locally-advanced cervical cancer. Material and Methods: Our framework for fully automated treatment plan generation (Erasmus-iCycle) was adapted to create dual-

  17. Thrombin interaction with fibrin polymerization sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, K

    1997-05-15

    Thrombin is central to hemostasis, and postclotting fibrinolysis and wound healing. During clotting, thrombin transforms plasma fibrinogen into polymerizing fibrin, which selectively adsorbs the enzyme into the clot. This protects thrombin from heparin-antithrombin inactivation, thus preserving the enzyme for postclotting events. To determine how the fibrin N-terminal polymerization sites of A alpha 17-23 (GPRVVER) and B beta 15-25 (GHRPLDKKREE) and their analogs may interact with thrombin, amidolysis vs. plasma- and fibrinogen-clotting assays were used to differentiate blockade of catalytic site vs. other thrombin domains. Amidolysis studies suggest GPRVVER inhibition of thrombin catalytic site through hydrophobic interaction, and GPRVVER inhibited clotting. Neither GPRP nor VVER nor the B beta 15-25 homologs inhibited amidolysis. Contrary to heparin, acyl-DKKREE promoted plasma-clotting, but inhibited fibrinogen-clotting. In addition, acyl-DKKREE reversed the anticoagulant effect of heparin (0.1 U/ml) in plasma. The results suggest fibrin B beta 15-25 interaction with thrombin, possibly by blocking the heparin-binding site. Together with the reported fibrin A alpha 27-50 binding to thrombin, polymerizing fibrin appears to initially bind to thrombin catalytic site and exosite-1 through A alpha 17-50, and to another thrombin site through B beta 15-25. As these fibrin sites are also involved in polymerization, competition of the polymerization process with thrombin-binding could subsequently dislodge thrombin from fibrin alpha-chain. This may re-expose the catalytic site and exosite-1, thus explaining the thrombogenicity of clot-bound thrombin. The implications of these findings in polymerization mechanism and anticoagulant design are discussed.

  18. An automated algorithm for the generation of dynamically reconstructed trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komalapriya, C.; Romano, M. C.; Thiel, M.; Marwan, N.; Kurths, J.; Kiss, I. Z.; Hudson, J. L.

    2010-03-01

    The lack of long enough data sets is a major problem in the study of many real world systems. As it has been recently shown [C. Komalapriya, M. Thiel, M. C. Romano, N. Marwan, U. Schwarz, and J. Kurths, Phys. Rev. E 78, 066217 (2008)], this problem can be overcome in the case of ergodic systems if an ensemble of short trajectories is available, from which dynamically reconstructed trajectories can be generated. However, this method has some disadvantages which hinder its applicability, such as the need for estimation of optimal parameters. Here, we propose a substantially improved algorithm that overcomes the problems encountered by the former one, allowing its automatic application. Furthermore, we show that the new algorithm not only reproduces the short term but also the long term dynamics of the system under study, in contrast to the former algorithm. To exemplify the potential of the new algorithm, we apply it to experimental data from electrochemical oscillators and also to analyze the well-known problem of transient chaotic trajectories.

  19. M073: Monte Carlo generated spectra for QA/QC of automated NAA routine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackman, K. R. (Kevin R.); Biegalski, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    A quality check for an automated system of analyzing large sets of neutron activated samples has been developed. Activated samples are counted with an HPGe detector, in conjunction with an automated sample changer and spectral analysis tools, controlled by the Canberra GENIE 2K and REXX software. After each sample is acquired and analyzed, a Microsoft Visual Basic program imports the results into a template Microsoft Excel file where the final concentrations, uncertainties, and detection limits are determined. Standard reference materials are included in each set of 40 samples as a standard quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) test. A select group of sample spectra are also visually reviewed to check the peak fitting routines. A reference spectrum was generated in MCNP 4c2 using an F8, pulse height, tally with a detector model of the actual detector used in counting. The detector model matches the detector resolution, energy calibration, and counting geometry. The generated spectrum also contained a radioisotope matrix that was similar to what was expected in the samples. This spectrum can then be put through the automated system and analyzed along with the other samples. The automated results are then compared to expected results for QA/QC assurance.

  20. Investigation of the selectivity of thrombin-binding aptamers for thrombin titration in murine plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapaidze, Ana; Hérault, Jean-Pascal; Herbert, Jean-Marc; Bancaud, Aurélien; Gué, Anne-Marie

    2016-04-15

    Detection of thrombin in plasma raises timely challenges to enable therapeutic management of thrombosis in patients under vital threat. Thrombin binding aptamers represent promising candidates as sensing elements for the development of real-time thrombin biosensors; however implementation of such biosensor requires the clear understanding of thrombin-aptamer interaction properties in real-like environment. In this study, we used Surface Plasmon Resonance technique to answer the questions of specificity and sensitivity of thrombin detection by the thrombin-binding aptamers HD1, NU172 and HD22. We systematically characterized their properties in the presence of thrombin, as well as interfering molecular species such as the thrombin precursor prothrombin, thrombin in complex with some of its natural inhibitors, nonspecific serum proteins, and diluted plasma. Kinetic experiments show the multiple binding modes of HD1 and NU172, which both interact with multiple sites of thrombin with low nanomolar affinities and show little specificity of interaction for prothrombin vs. thrombin. HD22, on the other hand, binds specifically to thrombin exosite II and has no affinity to prothrombin at all. While thrombin in complex with some of its inhibitors could not be recognized by any aptamer, the binding of HD1 and NU172 properties is compromised by thrombin inhibitors alone, as well as with serum albumin. Finally, the complex nature of plasma was overwhelming for HD1, but we define conditions for the thrombin detection at 10nM range in 100-fold diluted plasma by HD22. Consequently HD22 showed key advantage over HD1 and NU172, and appears as the only alternative to design an aptasensor.

  1. STIM1 and Orai1 mediate thrombin-induced Ca(2+) influx in rat cortical astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Claudia; Sampieri, Alicia; Vivas, Oscar; Peña-Segura, Claudia; Vaca, Luis

    2012-12-01

    In astrocytes, thrombin leads to cytoplasmic Ca(2+) elevations modulating a variety of cytoprotective and cytotoxic responses. Astrocytes respond to thrombin stimulation with a biphasic Ca(2+) increase generated by an interplay between ER-Ca(2+) release and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE). In many cell types, STIM1 and Orai1 have been demonstrated to be central components of SOCE. STIM1 senses the ER-Ca(2+) depletion and binds Orai1 to activate Ca(2+) influx. Here we used immunocytochemistry, overexpression and siRNA assays to investigate the role of STIM1 and Orai1 in the thrombin-induced Ca(2+) response in primary cultures of rat cortical astrocytes. We found that STIM1 and Orai1 are endogenously expressed in cortical astrocytes and distribute accordingly with other mammalian cells. Importantly, native and overexpressed STIM1 reorganized in puncta under thrombin stimulation and this reorganization was reversible. In addition, the overexpression of STIM1 and Orai1 increased by twofold the Ca(2+) influx evoked by thrombin, while knockdown of endogenous STIM1 and Orai1 significantly decreased this Ca(2+) influx. These results indicate that STIM1 and Orai1 underlie an important fraction of the Ca(2+) response that astrocytes exhibit in the presence of thrombin. Thrombin stimulation in astrocytes leads to ER-Ca(2+) release which causes STIM1 reorganization allowing the activation of Orai1 and the subsequent Ca(2+) influx.

  2. Automated importance generation and biasing techniques for Monte Carlo shielding techniques by the TRIPOLI-3 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Both, J.P.; Nimal, J.C.; Vergnaud, T. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service d' Etudes des Reacteurs et de Mathematiques Appliquees)

    1990-01-01

    We discuss an automated biasing procedure for generating the parameters necessary to achieve efficient Monte Carlo biasing shielding calculations. The biasing techniques considered here are exponential transform and collision biasing deriving from the concept of the biased game based on the importance function. We use a simple model of the importance function with exponential attenuation as the distance to the detector increases. This importance function is generated on a three-dimensional mesh including geometry and with graph theory algorithms. This scheme is currently being implemented in the third version of the neutron and gamma ray transport code TRIPOLI-3. (author).

  3. Implementing the WebSocket Protocol Based on Formal Modelling and Automated Code Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kent Inge; Kristensen, Lars Michael

    2014-01-01

    protocols. Furthermore, we perform formal verification of the CPN model prior to code generation, and test the implementation for interoperability against the Autobahn WebSocket test-suite resulting in 97% and 99% success rate for the client and server implementation, respectively. The tests show...... with pragmatic annotations for automated code generation of protocol software. The contribution of this paper is an application of the approach as implemented in the PetriCode tool to obtain protocol software implementing the IETF WebSocket protocol. This demonstrates the scalability of our approach to real...

  4. A method to measure thrombin activity in a mixture of fibrinogen and thrombin powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAnglis, Ashley P.; Nur, Israel; Gorman, Anne J.; Meidler, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Thrombin and fibrinogen powders are the active components of advanced surgical hemostasis products including the EVARREST Fibrin Sealant Patch. Measuring the enzymatic activity of thrombin in the presence of fibrinogen is challenging, as hydration of the powders in a neutral aqueous environment will cause the enzyme to rapidly react with the fibrinogen to form a fibrin clot, which in turn binds and entraps the enzyme thus preventing subsequent measurement of thrombin activity. A novel approach has been developed to overcome this challenge. After isolation of the mixture of powders, an alkaline carbonate solution is used to solubilize the proteins, while reversibly inhibiting the activity of thrombin and preventing clot formation. Once the powders have been fully solubilized, thrombin activity can be restored by neutralization in a buffered fibrinogen solution resulting in fibrin clot formulation. The rate of clot formation can be quantified in a coagulometer to determine the thrombin activity of the original powder. Samples coated with powders containing fibrinogen and varying amounts of thrombin were tested using the method described herein. The results demonstrated that the method could consistently measure the activity of (alpha) thrombin in the presence of fibrinogen over a broad range of thrombin activity levels. The test was successfully validated according to International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use Guidelines and thus is suitable for use as part of a commercial manufacturing process. A method has been developed that enables thrombin activity to be measured in a mixture of fibrinogen and thrombin powders. PMID:26991860

  5. Automated test data generation for branch testing using incremental genetic algorithm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T MANIKUMAR; A JOHN SANJEEV KUMAR; R MARUTHAMUTHU

    2016-09-01

    Cost of software testing can be reduced by automated test data generation to find a minimal set of data that has maximum coverage. Search-based software testing (SBST) is one of the techniques recently used for automated testing task. SBST makes use of control flow graph (CFG) and meta-heuristic search algorithms to accomplish the process. This paper focuses on test data generation for branch coverage. A major drawback in using meta-heuristic techniques is that the CFG paths have to be traversed from the starting node to end node for each automated test data. This kind of traversal could be improved by branch ordering, together with elitism. But still the population size and the number of iterations are maintained as the same to keep all the branches alive. In this paper, we present an incremental genetic algorithm (IGA) for branch coverage testing. Initially, a classical genetic algorithm (GA) is used to construct the population with the best parents for each branch node, and the IGA is started with these parents as the initial population. Hence, it is not necessary to maintain a huge population size and large number of iterations to cover all the branches. The performance is analyzed with five benchmark programs studied from the literature. The experimental results indicate that the proposed IGA search technique outperforms the other meta-heuristic search techniques in terms of memory usage and scalability.

  6. Aptamer Based Microsphere Biosensor for Thrombin Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Fan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an optical microsphere resonator biosensor using aptamer asreceptor for the measurement of the important biomolecule thrombin. The sphere surface ismodified with anti-thrombin aptamer, which has excellent binding affinity and selectivityfor thrombin. Binding of the thrombin at the sphere surface is monitored by the spectralposition of the microsphere’s whispering gallery mode resonances. A detection limit on theorder of 1 NIH Unit/mL is demonstrated. Control experiments with non-aptameroligonucleotide and BSA are also carried out to confirm the specific binding betweenaptamer and thrombin. We expect that this demonstration will lead to the development ofhighly sensitive biomarker sensors based on aptamer with lower cost and higher throughputthan current technology.

  7. An automation of design and modelling tasks in NX Siemens environment with original software - generator module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbiciak, M.; Grabowik, C.; Janik, W.

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays the design constructional process is almost exclusively aided with CAD/CAE/CAM systems. It is evaluated that nearly 80% of design activities have a routine nature. These design routine tasks are highly susceptible to automation. Design automation is usually made with API tools which allow building original software responsible for adding different engineering activities. In this paper the original software worked out in order to automate engineering tasks at the stage of a product geometrical shape design is presented. The elaborated software works exclusively in NX Siemens CAD/CAM/CAE environment and was prepared in Microsoft Visual Studio with application of the .NET technology and NX SNAP library. The software functionality allows designing and modelling of spur and helicoidal involute gears. Moreover, it is possible to estimate relative manufacturing costs. With the Generator module it is possible to design and model both standard and non-standard gear wheels. The main advantage of the model generated in such a way is its better representation of an involute curve in comparison to those which are drawn in specialized standard CAD systems tools. It comes from fact that usually in CAD systems an involute curve is drawn by 3 points that respond to points located on the addendum circle, the reference diameter of a gear and the base circle respectively. In the Generator module the involute curve is drawn by 11 involute points which are located on and upper the base and the addendum circles therefore 3D gear wheels models are highly accurate. Application of the Generator module makes the modelling process very rapid so that the gear wheel modelling time is reduced to several seconds. During the conducted research the analysis of differences between standard 3 points and 11 points involutes was made. The results and conclusions drawn upon analysis are shown in details.

  8. Theoretical modeling and experimental validation of surface stress in thrombin aptasensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yang Choon; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Kaynak, Akif; Dai, Xiujuan J; Littlefair, Guy; Duan, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Adsorption of target molecules on the immobilized microcantilever surface produced beam displacement due to the differential surface stress generated between the immobilized and non-immobilized surface. Surface stress is caused by the intermolecular forces between the molecules. Van der Waals, electrostatic forces, hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic effect and steric hindrance are some of the intermolecular forces involved. A theoretical framework describing the adsorption-induced microcantilever displacement is derived in this paper. Experimental displacement of thrombin aptamer-thrombin interactions was carried out. The relation between the electrostatic interactions involved between adsorbates (thrombin) as well as adsorbates and substrates (thrombin aptamer) and the microcantilever beam displacement utilizing the proposed mathematical model was quantified and compared to the experimental value. This exercise is important to aid the designers in microcantilever sensing performance optimization.

  9. Vacuum pressure generation via microfabricated converging-diverging nozzles for operation of automated pneumatic logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforidis, Theodore; Werner, Erik M; Hui, Elliot E; Eddington, David T

    2016-08-01

    Microfluidic devices with integrated pneumatic logic enable automated fluid handling without requiring external control instruments. These chips offer the additional advantage that they may be powered by vacuum and do not require an electricity source. This work describes a microfluidic converging-diverging (CD) nozzle optimized to generate vacuum at low input pressures, making it suitable for microfluidic applications including powering integrated pneumatic logic. It was found that efficient vacuum pressure was generated for high aspect ratios of the CD nozzle constriction (or throat) width to height and diverging angle of 3.6(o). In specific, for an inlet pressure of 42.2 psia (290.8 kPa) and a volumetric flow rate of approximately 1700 sccm, a vacuum pressure of 8.03 psia (55.3 kPa) was generated. To demonstrate the capabilities of our converging - diverging nozzle device, we connected it to a vacuum powered peristaltic pump driven by integrated pneumatic logic and obtained tunable flow rates from 0 to 130 μL/min. Finally, we demonstrate a proof of concept system for use where electricity and vacuum pressure are not readily available by powering a CD nozzle with a bicycle tire pump and pressure regulator. This system is able to produce a stable vacuum sufficient to drive pneumatic logic, and could be applied to power automated microfluidics in limited resource settings.

  10. ATTEMPTS TO AUTOMATE THE PROCESS OF GENERATION OF ORTHOIMAGES OF OBJECTS OF CULTURAL HERITAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Markiewicz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available At present, digital documentation recorded in the form of raster or vector files is the obligatory way of inventorying historical objects. The orthoimage is a cartometric form of photographic presentation of information in the two-dimensional reference system. The paper will discuss the issue of automation of the orthoimage generation basing on the TLS data and digital images. At present attempts are made to apply modern technologies not only for the needs of surveys, but also during the data processing. This paper will present attempts aiming at utilisation of appropriate algorithms and the author’s application for automatic generation of the projection plane, for the needs of acquisition of intensity orthoimages from the TLS data. Such planes are defined manually in the majority of popular TLS data processing applications. A separate issue related to the RGB image generation is the orientation of digital images in relation to scans. It is important, in particular in such cases when scans and photographs are not taken simultaneously. This paper will present experiments concerning the utilisation of the SIFT algorithm for automatic matching of intensity orthoimages of the intensity and digital (RGB photographs. Satisfactory results of the process of automation, as well as in relation to the quality of resulting orthoimages have been obtained.

  11. Automation of labelling of Lipiodol with high-activity generator-produced 188Re.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepareur, Nicolas; Ardisson, Valérie; Noiret, Nicolas; Boucher, Eveline; Raoul, Jean-Luc; Clément, Bruno; Garin, Etienne

    2011-02-01

    This work describes optimisation of the kit formulation for labelling of Lipiodol with high-activity generator-produced rhenium-188. Radiochemical purity (RCP) was 92.52±2.3% and extraction yield was 98.56±1.2%. The synthesis has been automated with a TADDEO module (Comecer) giving a mean final yield of 52.68±9.6%, and reducing radiation burden to the radiochemist by 80%. Radiolabelled Lipiodol ((188)Re-SSS/Lipiodol) is stable for at least 7 days (RCP=91.07±0.9%).

  12. Aptaligner: automated software for aligning pseudorandom DNA X-aptamers from next-generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Emily; Elizondo-Riojas, Miguel-Angel; Chang, Jeffrey T; Volk, David E

    2014-06-10

    Next-generation sequencing results from bead-based aptamer libraries have demonstrated that traditional DNA/RNA alignment software is insufficient. This is particularly true for X-aptamers containing specialty bases (W, X, Y, Z, ...) that are identified by special encoding. Thus, we sought an automated program that uses the inherent design scheme of bead-based X-aptamers to create a hypothetical reference library and Markov modeling techniques to provide improved alignments. Aptaligner provides this feature as well as length error and noise level cutoff features, is parallelized to run on multiple central processing units (cores), and sorts sequences from a single chip into projects and subprojects.

  13. Automation of labelling of Lipiodol with high-activity generator-produced {sup 188}Re

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepareur, Nicolas, E-mail: n.lepareur@rennes.fnclcc.f [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer Eugene Marquis, CS 44229, 35042 Rennes (France); INSERM U-991, Foie, Metabolismes et Cancer, 35033 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Rennes (France); Ardisson, Valerie [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer Eugene Marquis, CS 44229, 35042 Rennes (France); INSERM U-991, Foie, Metabolismes et Cancer, 35033 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Rennes (France); Noiret, Nicolas [Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Rennes (France); Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Rennes, UMR CNRS 6226, Chimie Organique et Supramoleculaire, Avenue du General Leclerc, CS 50837, 35708 Rennes Cedex 7 (France); Boucher, Eveline; Raoul, Jean-Luc [INSERM U-991, Foie, Metabolismes et Cancer, 35033 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Rennes (France); Service d' Oncologie Digestive, Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer Eugene Marquis, CS 44229, 35042 Rennes (France); Clement, Bruno [INSERM U-991, Foie, Metabolismes et Cancer, 35033 Rennes (France); Garin, Etienne [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer Eugene Marquis, CS 44229, 35042 Rennes (France); INSERM U-991, Foie, Metabolismes et Cancer, 35033 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Rennes (France)

    2011-02-15

    This work describes optimisation of the kit formulation for labelling of Lipiodol with high-activity generator-produced rhenium-188. Radiochemical purity (RCP) was 92.52{+-}2.3% and extraction yield was 98.56{+-}1.2%. The synthesis has been automated with a TADDEO module (Comecer) giving a mean final yield of 52.68{+-}9.6%, and reducing radiation burden to the radiochemist by 80%. Radiolabelled Lipiodol ({sup 188}Re-SSS/Lipiodol) is stable for at least 7 days (RCP=91.07{+-}0.9%).

  14. Reversible thrombin detection by aptamer functionalized STING sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Paolo; Rogers, Adam; Nivala, Jeff; Vilozny, Boaz; Seger, R Adam; Jejelowo, Olufisayo; Pourmand, Nader

    2011-07-15

    Signal Transduction by Ion NanoGating (STING) is a label-free technology based on functionalized quartz nanopipettes. The nanopipette pore can be decorated with a variety of recognition elements and the molecular interaction is transduced via a simple electrochemical system. A STING sensor can be easily and reproducibly fabricated and tailored at the bench starting from inexpensive quartz capillaries. The analytical application of this new biosensing platform, however, was limited due to the difficult correlation between the measured ionic current and the analyte concentration in solution. Here we show that STING sensors functionalized with aptamers allow the quantitative detection of thrombin. The binding of thrombin generates a signal that can be directly correlated to its concentration in the bulk solution.

  15. Automated system for generation of soil moisture products for agricultural drought assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja Shekhar, S. S.; Chandrasekar, K.; Sesha Sai, M. V. R.; Diwakar, P. G.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    Drought is a frequently occurring disaster affecting lives of millions of people across the world every year. Several parameters, indices and models are being used globally to forecast / early warning of drought and monitoring drought for its prevalence, persistence and severity. Since drought is a complex phenomenon, large number of parameter/index need to be evaluated to sufficiently address the problem. It is a challenge to generate input parameters from different sources like space based data, ground data and collateral data in short intervals of time, where there may be limitation in terms of processing power, availability of domain expertise, specialized models & tools. In this study, effort has been made to automate the derivation of one of the important parameter in the drought studies viz Soil Moisture. Soil water balance bucket model is in vogue to arrive at soil moisture products, which is widely popular for its sensitivity to soil conditions and rainfall parameters. This model has been encoded into "Fish-Bone" architecture using COM technologies and Open Source libraries for best possible automation to fulfill the needs for a standard procedure of preparing input parameters and processing routines. The main aim of the system is to provide operational environment for generation of soil moisture products by facilitating users to concentrate on further enhancements and implementation of these parameters in related areas of research, without re-discovering the established models. Emphasis of the architecture is mainly based on available open source libraries for GIS and Raster IO operations for different file formats to ensure that the products can be widely distributed without the burden of any commercial dependencies. Further the system is automated to the extent of user free operations if required with inbuilt chain processing for every day generation of products at specified intervals. Operational software has inbuilt capabilities to automatically

  16. Automated Generation of Digital Terrain Model using Point Clouds of Digital Surface Model in Forest Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Kamiya

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available At present, most of the digital data acquisition methods generate Digital Surface Model (DSM and not a Digital Elevation Model (DEM. Conversion from DSM to DEM still has some drawbacks, especially the removing of off terrain point clouds and subsequently the generation of DEM within these spaces even though the methods are automated. In this paper it was intended to overcome this issue by attempting to project off terrain point clouds to the terrain in forest areas using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN instead of removing them and then filling gaps by interpolation. Five sites were tested and accuracies assessed. They all give almost the same results. In conclusion, the ANN has ability to obtain the DEM by projecting the DSM point clouds and greater accuracies of DEMs were obtained. If the size of the hollow areas resulting from the removal of DSM point clouds are larger the accuracies are reduced.

  17. Extending and automating a Systems-Theoretic hazard analysis for requirements generation and analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, John (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

    2012-05-01

    Systems Theoretic Process Analysis (STPA) is a powerful new hazard analysis method designed to go beyond traditional safety techniques - such as Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) - that overlook important causes of accidents like flawed requirements, dysfunctional component interactions, and software errors. While proving to be very effective on real systems, no formal structure has been defined for STPA and its application has been ad-hoc with no rigorous procedures or model-based design tools. This report defines a formal mathematical structure underlying STPA and describes a procedure for systematically performing an STPA analysis based on that structure. A method for using the results of the hazard analysis to generate formal safety-critical, model-based system and software requirements is also presented. Techniques to automate both the analysis and the requirements generation are introduced, as well as a method to detect conflicts between the safety and other functional model-based requirements during early development of the system.

  18. Automated Generation of Formal Models from ST Control Programs for Verification Purposes

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez Adiego, B; Tournier, J-C; Blanco Vinuela, E; Blech, J-O; Gonzalez Suarez, V

    2014-01-01

    In large industrial control systems such as the ones installed at CERN, one of the main issues is the ability to verify the correct behaviour of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) programs. While manual and automated testing can achieve good results, some obvious problems remain unsolved such as the difficulty to check safety or liveness properties. This paper proposes a general methodology and a tool to verify PLC programs by automatically generating formal models for different model checkers out of ST code. The proposed methodology defines an automata-based formalism used as intermediate model (IM) to transform PLC programs written in ST language into different formal models for verification purposes. A tool based on Xtext has been implemented that automatically generates models for the NuSMV and UPPAAL model checkers and the BIP framework.

  19. Study on an electrochemical biosensor for thrombin recognition based on aptamers and nano particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a high specific, sensitive electrochemical biosensor for recognition of protein such as thrombin based on aptamers and nano particles. Two different aptamers were chosen to construct a sandwich manner for detecting thrombin. Aptamer I was immobilized on nano magnetic particle for capturing thrombin, and aptamer II labled with nano gold was used for detection. The electrical current generated from gold after the formation of the complex of magnetic particle, thrombin and nano gold, and then an electrochemical cell designed by ourselves was used for separating, gathering, and electrochemical detecting. Through magnetic separation, high specific and sensitive detection of the target protein, thrombin, was achieved. Linear response was observed over the range 5.6×10-12―1.12×10-9 mol/L, with a detection limit of 1.42×10-12 mol/L. The presence of other protein as BSA did not affect the detection, which indicates that high selective recognition of thrombin can be achieved in complex biological samples such as human plasma.

  20. Study on an electrochemical biosensor for thrombin recognition based on aptamers and nano particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jing; LIN Li; CHENG GuiFang; WANG AnBao; TAN XueLian; HE PinGang; FANG YuZhi

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a high specific, sensitive electrochemical biosensor for recognition of protein such as thrombin based on aptamers and nano particles. Two different aptamers were chosen to construct a sandwich manner for detecting thrombin. Aptamer Ⅰ was immobilized on nano magnetic particle for capturing thrombin, and aptamer Ⅱ labled with nano gold was used for detection. The electrical current generated from gold after the formation of the complex of magnetic particle, thrombin and nano gold,and then an electrochemical cell designed by ourselves was used for separating, gathering, and electrochemical detecting. Through magnetic separation, high specific and sensitive detection of the target protein, thrombin, was achieved. Linear response was observed over the range 5.6×10-12-1.12×10-9mol/L, with a detection limit of 1.42×10-12 mol/L. The presence of other protein as BSA did not affect the detection, which indicates that high selective recognition of thrombin can be achieved in complex biological samples such as human plasma.

  1. Automating methods to improve precision in Monte-Carlo event generation for particle colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleisberg, Tanju

    2008-07-01

    The subject of this thesis was the development of tools for the automated calculation of exact matrix elements, which are a key for the systematic improvement of precision and confidence for theoretical predictions. Part I of this thesis concentrates on the calculations of cross sections at tree level. A number of extensions have been implemented in the matrix element generator AMEGIC++, namely new interaction models such as effective loop-induced couplings of the Higgs boson with massless gauge bosons, required for a number of channels for the Higgs boson search at LHC and anomalous gauge couplings, parameterizing a number of models beyond th SM. Further a special treatment to deal with complicated decay chains of heavy particles has been constructed. A significant effort went into the implementation of methods to push the limits on particle multiplicities. Two recursive methods have been implemented, the Cachazo-Svrcek-Witten recursion and the colour dressed Berends-Giele recursion. For the latter the new module COMIX has been added to the SHERPA framework. The Monte-Carlo phase space integration techniques have been completely revised, which led to significantly reduced statistical error estimates when calculating cross sections and a greatly improved unweighting efficiency for the event generation. Special integration methods have been developed to cope with the newly accessible final states. The event generation framework SHERPA directly benefits from those new developments, improving the precision and the efficiency. Part II was addressed to the automation of QCD calculations at next-to-leading order. A code has been developed, that, for the first time fully automates the real correction part of a NLO calculation. To calculate the correction for a m-parton process obeying the Catani-Seymour dipole subtraction method the following components are provided: 1. the corresponding m+1-parton tree level matrix elements, 2. a number dipole subtraction terms to remove

  2. Automated biphasic morphological assessment of hepatitis B-related liver fibrosis using second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong-Hong; Chen, Tse-Ching; Teng, Xiao; Liang, Kung-Hao; Yeh, Chau-Ting

    2015-08-01

    Liver fibrosis assessment by biopsy and conventional staining scores is based on histopathological criteria. Variations in sample preparation and the use of semi-quantitative histopathological methods commonly result in discrepancies between medical centers. Thus, minor changes in liver fibrosis might be overlooked in multi-center clinical trials, leading to statistically non-significant data. Here, we developed a computer-assisted, fully automated, staining-free method for hepatitis B-related liver fibrosis assessment. In total, 175 liver biopsies were divided into training (n = 105) and verification (n = 70) cohorts. Collagen was observed using second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy without prior staining, and hepatocyte morphology was recorded using two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy. The training cohort was utilized to establish a quantification algorithm. Eleven of 19 computer-recognizable SHG/TPEF microscopic morphological features were significantly correlated with the ISHAK fibrosis stages (P 0.82 for liver cirrhosis detection. Since no subjective gradings are needed, interobserver discrepancies could be avoided using this fully automated method.

  3. Automated COBOL code generation for SNAP-I CAI development and maintenance procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhrmaster, M.A.; Duncan, L.D.; Hume, R.; Huntley, A.F.

    1988-07-01

    In designing and implementing a computer aided instruction (CAI) prototype for the Navy Management System Support Office (NAVMASSO) as part of the Shipboard Nontactical ADP Program (SNAP), Data Systems Engineering Organization (DSEO) personnel developed techniques for automating the production of COBOL source code for CAI applications. This report discusses the techniques applied, which incorporate the use of a database management system (DBMS) to store, access, and manipulate the data necessary for producing COBOL source code automatically. The objective for developing the code generation techniques is to allow for the production of future applications in an efficient and reliable manner. This report covers the standards and conventions defined, database tables created, and the host language interface program used for generating COBOL source files. The approach is responsible for producing 85 percent of an 830,000 line COBOL application, in approximately one year's time. This code generation program generated transaction processing routines to be executed under the DM6TP NAVMASSO distributed processing environment on the Honeywell DPS-6 minicomputers, representing the standard SNAP-I environment.

  4. A Logic Design Automation System for Generating Logic Diagram from Hardware Description

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘明业; 郭书明; 杨淮; 贾良玉; 洪恩宇

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses a logic design automation system (LODAS) implemented on APOLLO DOMAIN workstation. LODAS can generate VLSI logic diagram from the hardware description. The system accepts many kinds of input description such as DDL or AHPL language description, functinual array (truth table), covering array , Boolean equations or state transition tables. The system first simulates the functional description to verify the functional description of the system designed, then the translator translates the fnnctional descriptong into register transfer equations, Boolean equatinos and state transition equations antomatically.Logic synthesis software partitions the translation result into a series of blocks, and transforma every small block into a mnlti-level NAND/NOR network according to the fan - in and fan - out restriction.

  5. A Logic Design Automation System for Generating Logic Diagram from Hardware Description

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘明业; 郭书明; 等

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses a logic design automation system(LODAS) implemented on APOLLO DOMAIN workstation.LODAS can generate VLSI logic diagram from the hardware description.The system accepts many kinds of input description such as DDL or AHPL language description.Functional array(truth table).covering array,Boolean equations or state transition tables,The system first simulates the functional desecription to verify the functional description of the system designed.then translator translates the functional description into resgister transfer equation.Boolean equations and state transition equations automatically.Logic synthesis software partitions the translation result into a series of blocks,and transforms every small block into a multi-level NAND /NOR network according to the fan-in and fan-out restriction.

  6. Automated determinations of selenium in thermal power plant wastewater by sequential hydride generation and chemiluminescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezoe, Kentaro; Ohyama, Seiichi; Hashem, Md Abul; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Toda, Kei

    2016-02-01

    After the Fukushima disaster, power generation from nuclear power plants in Japan was completely stopped and old coal-based power plants were re-commissioned to compensate for the decrease in power generation capacity. Although coal is a relatively inexpensive fuel for power generation, it contains high levels (mgkg(-1)) of selenium, which could contaminate the wastewater from thermal power plants. In this work, an automated selenium monitoring system was developed based on sequential hydride generation and chemiluminescence detection. This method could be applied to control of wastewater contamination. In this method, selenium is vaporized as H2Se, which reacts with ozone to produce chemiluminescence. However, interference from arsenic is of concern because the ozone-induced chemiluminescence intensity of H2Se is much lower than that of AsH3. This problem was successfully addressed by vaporizing arsenic and selenium individually in a sequential procedure using a syringe pump equipped with an eight-port selection valve and hot and cold reactors. Oxidative decomposition of organoselenium compounds and pre-reduction of the selenium were performed in the hot reactor, and vapor generation of arsenic and selenium were performed separately in the cold reactor. Sample transfers between the reactors were carried out by a pneumatic air operation by switching with three-way solenoid valves. The detection limit for selenium was 0.008 mg L(-1) and calibration curve was linear up to 1.0 mg L(-1), which provided suitable performance for controlling selenium in wastewater to around the allowable limit (0.1 mg L(-1)). This system consumes few chemicals and is stable for more than a month without any maintenance. Wastewater samples from thermal power plants were collected, and data obtained by the proposed method were compared with those from batchwise water treatment followed by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

  7. Automated Mosaicking of Multiple 3d Point Clouds Generated from a Depth Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Yoon, W.; Kim, T.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a method for automated mosaicking of multiple 3D point clouds generated from a depth camera. A depth camera generates depth data by using ToF (Time of Flight) method and intensity data by using intensity of returned signal. The depth camera used in this paper was a SR4000 from MESA Imaging. This camera generates a depth map and intensity map of 176 x 44 pixels. Generated depth map saves physical depth data with mm of precision. Generated intensity map contains texture data with many noises. We used texture maps for extracting tiepoints and depth maps for assigning z coordinates to tiepoints and point cloud mosaicking. There are four steps in the proposed mosaicking method. In the first step, we acquired multiple 3D point clouds by rotating depth camera and capturing data per rotation. In the second step, we estimated 3D-3D transformation relationships between subsequent point clouds. For this, 2D tiepoints were extracted automatically from the corresponding two intensity maps. They were converted into 3D tiepoints using depth maps. We used a 3D similarity transformation model for estimating the 3D-3D transformation relationships. In the third step, we converted local 3D-3D transformations into a global transformation for all point clouds with respect to a reference one. In the last step, the extent of single depth map mosaic was calculated and depth values per mosaic pixel were determined by a ray tracing method. For experiments, 8 depth maps and intensity maps were used. After the four steps, an output mosaicked depth map of 454x144 was generated. It is expected that the proposed method would be useful for developing an effective 3D indoor mapping method in future.

  8. Automated hexahedral mesh generation from biomedical image data: applications in limb prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, S G; Sanders, J E; Turkiyyah, G M

    1996-06-01

    A general method to generate hexahedral meshes for finite element analysis of residual limbs and similar biomedical geometries is presented. The method utilizes skeleton-based subdivision of cross-sectional domains to produce simple subdomains in which structured meshes are easily generated. Application to a below-knee residual limb and external prosthetic socket is described. The residual limb was modeled as consisting of bones, soft tissue, and skin. The prosthetic socket model comprised a socket wall with an inner liner. The geometries of these structures were defined using axial cross-sectional contour data from X-ray computed tomography, optical scanning, and mechanical surface digitization. A tubular surface representation, using B-splines to define the directrix and generator, is shown to be convenient for definition of the structure geometries. Conversion of cross-sectional data to the compact tubular surface representation is direct, and the analytical representation simplifies geometric querying and numerical optimization within the mesh generation algorithms. The element meshes remain geometrically accurate since boundary nodes are constrained to lie on the tubular surfaces. Several element meshes of increasing mesh density were generated for two residual limbs and prosthetic sockets. Convergence testing demonstrated that approximately 19 elements are required along a circumference of the residual limb surface for a simple linear elastic model. A model with the fibula absent compared with the same geometry with the fibula present showed differences suggesting higher distal stresses in the absence of the fibula. Automated hexahedral mesh generation algorithms for sliced data represent an advancement in prosthetic stress analysis since they allow rapid modeling of any given residual limb and optimization of mesh parameters.

  9. Toward the automated generation of genome-scale metabolic networks in the SEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gould John

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current methods for the automated generation of genome-scale metabolic networks focus on genome annotation and preliminary biochemical reaction network assembly, but do not adequately address the process of identifying and filling gaps in the reaction network, and verifying that the network is suitable for systems level analysis. Thus, current methods are only sufficient for generating draft-quality networks, and refinement of the reaction network is still largely a manual, labor-intensive process. Results We have developed a method for generating genome-scale metabolic networks that produces substantially complete reaction networks, suitable for systems level analysis. Our method partitions the reaction space of central and intermediary metabolism into discrete, interconnected components that can be assembled and verified in isolation from each other, and then integrated and verified at the level of their interconnectivity. We have developed a database of components that are common across organisms, and have created tools for automatically assembling appropriate components for a particular organism based on the metabolic pathways encoded in the organism's genome. This focuses manual efforts on that portion of an organism's metabolism that is not yet represented in the database. We have demonstrated the efficacy of our method by reverse-engineering and automatically regenerating the reaction network from a published genome-scale metabolic model for Staphylococcus aureus. Additionally, we have verified that our method capitalizes on the database of common reaction network components created for S. aureus, by using these components to generate substantially complete reconstructions of the reaction networks from three other published metabolic models (Escherichia coli, Helicobacter pylori, and Lactococcus lactis. We have implemented our tools and database within the SEED, an open-source software environment for comparative

  10. An automated pipeline for cortical surface generation and registration of the cerebral cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Ibanez, Luis; Gelas, Arnaud; Yeo, B. T. Thomas; Niethammer, Marc; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Magnotta, Vincent A.

    2011-03-01

    The human cerebral cortex is one of the most complicated structures in the body. It has a highly convoluted structure with much of the cortical sheet buried in sulci. Based on cytoarchitectural and functional imaging studies, it is possible to segment the cerebral cortex into several subregions. While it is only possible to differentiate the true anatomical subregions based on cytoarchitecture, the surface morphometry aligns closely with the underlying cytoarchitecture and provides features that allow the surface of the cortex to be parcellated based on the sulcal and gyral patterns that are readily visible on the MR images. We have developed a fully automated pipeline for the generation and registration of cortical surfaces in the spherical domain. The pipeline initiates with the BRAINS AutoWorkup pipeline. Subsequently, topology correction and surface generation is performed to generate a genus zero surface and mapped to a sphere. Several surface features are then calculated to drive the registration between the atlas surface and other datasets. A spherical diffeomorphic demons algorithm is used to co-register an atlas surface onto a subject surface. A lobar based atlas of the cerebral cortex was created from a manual parcellation of the cortex. The atlas surface was then co-registered to five additional subjects using a spherical diffeomorphic demons algorithm. The labels from the atlas surface were warped on the subject surface and compared to the manual raters. The average Dice overlap index was 0.89 across all regions.

  11. SEMANTIC WEB-BASED SOFTWARE ENGINEERING BY AUTOMATED REQUIREMENTS ONTOLOGY GENERATION IN SOA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Rastgoo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach for automated generation of requirements ontology using UML diagrams in service-oriented architecture (SOA. The goal of this paper is to convenience progress of software engineering processes like software design, software reuse, service discovering and etc. The proposed method is based on a four conceptual layers. The first layer includes requirements achieved by stakeholders, the second one designs service-oriented diagrams from the data in first layer and extracts XMI codes of them. The third layer includes requirement ontology and protocol ontology to describe behavior of services and relationships between them semantically. Finally the forth layer makes standard the concepts exists in ontologies of previous layer. The generated ontology exceeds absolute domain ontology because it considers the behavior of services moreover the hierarchical relationship of them. Experimental results conducted on a set of UML4Soa diagrams in different scopes demonstrate the improvement of the proposed approach from different points of view such as: completeness of requirements ontology, automatic generation and considering SOA.

  12. Automated generation of curved planar reformations from MR images of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrtovec, Tomaz [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Trzaska 25, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ourselin, Sebastien [CSIRO ICT Centre, Autonomous Systems Laboratory, BioMedIA Lab, Locked Bag 17, North Ryde, NSW 2113 (Australia); Gomes, Lavier [Department of Radiology, Westmead Hospital, University of Sydney, Hawkesbury Road, Westmead NSW 2145 (Australia); Likar, Bostjan [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Trzaska 25, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pernus, Franjo [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Trzaska 25, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2007-05-21

    A novel method for automated curved planar reformation (CPR) of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the spine is presented. The CPR images, generated by a transformation from image-based to spine-based coordinate system, follow the structural shape of the spine and allow the whole course of the curved anatomy to be viewed in individual cross-sections. The three-dimensional (3D) spine curve and the axial vertebral rotation, which determine the transformation, are described by polynomial functions. The 3D spine curve passes through the centres of vertebral bodies, while the axial vertebral rotation determines the rotation of vertebrae around the axis of the spinal column. The optimal polynomial parameters are obtained by a robust refinement of the initial estimates of the centres of vertebral bodies and axial vertebral rotation. The optimization framework is based on the automatic image analysis of MR spine images that exploits some basic anatomical properties of the spine. The method was evaluated on 21 MR images from 12 patients and the results provided a good description of spine anatomy, with mean errors of 2.5 mm and 1.7{sup 0} for the position of the 3D spine curve and axial rotation of vertebrae, respectively. The generated CPR images are independent of the position of the patient in the scanner while comprising both anatomical and geometrical properties of the spine.

  13. Automated generation of curved planar reformations from MR images of the spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrtovec, Tomaz; Ourselin, Sébastien; Gomes, Lavier; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo

    2007-05-01

    A novel method for automated curved planar reformation (CPR) of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the spine is presented. The CPR images, generated by a transformation from image-based to spine-based coordinate system, follow the structural shape of the spine and allow the whole course of the curved anatomy to be viewed in individual cross-sections. The three-dimensional (3D) spine curve and the axial vertebral rotation, which determine the transformation, are described by polynomial functions. The 3D spine curve passes through the centres of vertebral bodies, while the axial vertebral rotation determines the rotation of vertebrae around the axis of the spinal column. The optimal polynomial parameters are obtained by a robust refinement of the initial estimates of the centres of vertebral bodies and axial vertebral rotation. The optimization framework is based on the automatic image analysis of MR spine images that exploits some basic anatomical properties of the spine. The method was evaluated on 21 MR images from 12 patients and the results provided a good description of spine anatomy, with mean errors of 2.5 mm and 1.7° for the position of the 3D spine curve and axial rotation of vertebrae, respectively. The generated CPR images are independent of the position of the patient in the scanner while comprising both anatomical and geometrical properties of the spine.

  14. Automated As-Built Model Generation of Subway Tunnels from Mobile LiDAR Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arastounia, Mostafa

    2016-09-13

    This study proposes fully-automated methods for as-built model generation of subway tunnels employing mobile Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. The employed dataset is acquired by a Velodyne HDL 32E and covers 155 m of a subway tunnel containing six million points. First, the tunnel's main axis and cross sections are extracted. Next, a preliminary model is created by fitting an ellipse to each extracted cross section. The model is refined by employing residual analysis and Baarda's data snooping method to eliminate outliers. The final model is then generated by applying least squares adjustment to outlier-free data. The obtained results indicate that the tunnel's main axis and 1551 cross sections at 0.1 m intervals are successfully extracted. Cross sections have an average semi-major axis of 7.8508 m with a standard deviation of 0.2 mm and semi-minor axis of 7.7509 m with a standard deviation of 0.1 mm. The average normal distance of points from the constructed model (average absolute error) is also 0.012 m. The developed algorithm is applicable to tunnels with any horizontal orientation and degree of curvature since it makes no assumptions, nor does it use any a priori knowledge regarding the tunnel's curvature and horizontal orientation.

  15. Laser materials processing of complex components. From reverse engineering via automated beam path generation to short process development cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgl, R.; Brandstätter, E.

    2016-03-01

    The article presents an overview of what is possible nowadays in the field of laser materials processing. The state of the art in the complete process chain is shown, starting with the generation of a specific components CAD data and continuing with the automated motion path generation for the laser head carried by a CNC or robot system. Application examples from laser welding, laser cladding and additive laser manufacturing are given.

  16. A NOVEL METHOD FOR AUTOMATION OF 3D HYDRO BREAK LINE GENERATION FROM LIDAR DATA USING MATLAB

    OpenAIRE

    Toscano, G. J.; U. Gopalam; V. Devarajan

    2013-01-01

    Water body detection is necessary to generate hydro break lines, which are in turn useful in creating deliverables such as TINs, contours, DEMs from LiDAR data. Hydro flattening follows the detection and delineation of water bodies (lakes, rivers, ponds, reservoirs, streams etc.) with hydro break lines. Manual hydro break line generation is time consuming and expensive. Accuracy and processing time depend on the number of vertices marked for delineation of break lines. Automation wit...

  17. Discovery of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertina, R.M.; Tilburg, N.H. van; Haverkate, F.; Bouma, B.N.; Borne, P.A.K. von dem; Meijers, J.C.M.; Campbell, W.; Eaton, D.; Hendriks, D.F.; Willemse, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    CAS: blood clotting factor 11, 9013-55-2; thrombin, 9002-04-4; tissue plasminogen activator, 105913-11-9; protein C, 60202-16-6; Carboxypeptidase U, 3.4.17.20; Protein C; Tissue Plasminogen Activator, 3.4.21.68

  18. [Assessment of endogenous thrombin potential and influence on it of different regimens of heparin therapy in patients with abdominal sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamzatov, Kh A; Gurzhiĭ, D V; Lazarev, S M; Nemestnikov, Iu A; Gurzhiĭ, A A; Panaian, L P; Golovina, O G; Khait, E A; Smirnova, O A; Matvienko, O Iu

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal sepsis (AS) is a systemic inflammatory reaction of organism in response to the development of infectious process in organs of the abdominal cavity. The course of AS is complicated by hypercoagulation syndrome which facilitates progression of endogenous intoxication. The investigation included 26 patients (14 men and 12 women, mean age 65.5 +/- 16.4 years) with AS. The test of thrombin generation (TTG) used in patients with AS allows assessment of changes in the hemostasis system and control of the heparin dose. It was established that TTG revealed elevated endogenous thrombin potential of blood practically in all patients with AS. In the patients given 25 000 IU of heparin the TTG indices showed a reliably decreased endogenous thrombin potential and peak thrombin concentration as compared with a group of patients given 10 000 IU of heparin.

  19. A script for automated 3-dimentional structure generation and conformer search from 2- dimentional chemical drawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    Building 3-dimensional (3D) molecules is the starting point in molecular modeling. Conformer search and identification of a global energy minimum structure are often performed computationally during spectral analysis of data from NMR, IR, and VCD or during rational drug design through ligand-based, structure-based, and QSAR approaches. I herein report a convenient script that allows for automated building of 3D structures and conformer searching from 2-dimensional (2D) drawing of chemical structures. With this Bash shell script, which runs on Mac OS X and the Linux platform, the tasks are consecutively and iteratively executed without a 3D molecule builder via the command line interface of the free (academic) software OpenBabel, Balloon, and MOPAC2012. A large number of 2D chemical drawing files can be processed simultaneously, and the script functions with stereoisomers. Semi-empirical quantum chemical calculation ensures reliable ranking of the generated conformers on the basis of energy. In addition to an energy-sorted list of file names of the conformers, their Gaussian input files are provided for ab initio and density functional theory calculations to predict rigorous electronic energies, structures, and properties. This script is freely available to all scientists.

  20. Automated Generation of Fault Management Artifacts from a Simple System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Andrew K.; Day, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of off-nominal behavior - failure modes and fault propagation - in complex systems is often based purely on engineering intuition; specific cases are assessed in an ad hoc fashion as a (fallible) fault management engineer sees fit. This work is an attempt to provide a more rigorous approach to this understanding and assessment by automating the creation of a fault management artifact, the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) through querying a representation of the system in a SysML model. This work builds off the previous development of an off-nominal behavior model for the upcoming Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) mission at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. We further developed the previous system model to more fully incorporate the ideas of State Analysis, and it was restructured in an organizational hierarchy that models the system as layers of control systems while also incorporating the concept of "design authority". We present software that was developed to traverse the elements and relationships in this model to automatically construct an FMEA spreadsheet. We further discuss extending this model to automatically generate other typical fault management artifacts, such as Fault Trees, to efficiently portray system behavior, and depend less on the intuition of fault management engineers to ensure complete examination of off-nominal behavior.

  1. Automated scene generated background context for near-nadir look angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Jonathan D.; Stanfill, S. Robert

    2016-05-01

    Multi-INT fusion of GEOINT and IMINT can enable performance optimization of target detection and target tracking problem domains1, amongst others. Contextual information, which defines the relationship of foreground to background scene content, is a source of GEOINT for which various online repositories exist today including but not limited to the following: Open Street Maps (OSM)2 and the United States Geological Survey (USGS)3. However, as the nature of the world's landscape is dynamic and ever-changing, such contextual information can easily become stagnant and irrelevant if not maintained. In this paper we discuss our approach to providing the latest relevant context by performing automated scene generated background context segmentation and classification for near-nadir look angles for the purpose of defining roadways or parking lots, buildings, and natural areas. This information can be used in a variety of ways including augmenting context data from repositories, performing mission pre-planning, and for real-time missions such that GEOINT and IMINT fusion can occur and enable significant performance advantages in target detection and tracking applications in all areas of the world.

  2. Remote automated multi-generational growth and observation of an animal in low Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oczypok, Elizabeth A; Etheridge, Timothy; Freeman, Jacob; Stodieck, Louis; Johnsen, Robert; Baillie, David; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J

    2012-03-07

    The ultimate survival of humanity is dependent upon colonization of other planetary bodies. Key challenges to such habitation are (patho)physiologic changes induced by known, and unknown, factors associated with long-duration and distance space exploration. However, we currently lack biological models for detecting and studying these changes. Here, we use a remote automated culture system to successfully grow an animal in low Earth orbit for six months. Our observations, over 12 generations, demonstrate that the multi-cellular soil worm Caenorhabditis elegans develops from egg to adulthood and produces progeny with identical timings in space as on the Earth. Additionally, these animals display normal rates of movement when fully fed, comparable declines in movement when starved, and appropriate growth arrest upon starvation and recovery upon re-feeding. These observations establish C. elegans as a biological model that can be used to detect changes in animal growth, development, reproduction and behaviour in response to environmental conditions during long-duration spaceflight. This experimental system is ready to be incorporated on future, unmanned interplanetary missions and could be used to study cost-effectively the effects of such missions on these biological processes and the efficacy of new life support systems and radiation shielding technologies.

  3. Thrombin-Mediated Direct Activation of Proteinase-Activated Receptor-2: Another Target for Thrombin Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Hansen, Kristina K; Renaux, Bernard; Polley, Danny; Gibson, Stacy; Vanderboor, Christina; Hollenberg, Morley D

    2016-05-01

    Thrombin is known to signal to cells by cleaving/activating a G-protein-coupled family of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs). The signaling mechanism involves the proteolytic unmasking of an N-terminal receptor sequence that acts as a tethered receptor-activating ligand. To date, the recognized targets of thrombin cleavage and activation for signaling are PAR1 and PAR4, in which thrombin cleaves at a conserved target arginine to reveal a tethered ligand. PAR2, which like PAR1 is also cleaved at an N-terminal arginine to unmask its tethered ligand, is generally regarded as a target for trypsin but not for thrombin signaling. We now show that thrombin, at concentrations that can be achieved at sites of acute injury or in a tumor microenvironment, can directly activate PAR2 vasorelaxation and signaling, stimulating calcium and mitogen-activated protein kinase responses along with triggeringβ-arrestin recruitment. Thus, PAR2 can be added alongside PAR1 and PAR4 to the targets, whereby thrombin can affect tissue function.

  4. Automated Euler and Navier-Stokes Database Generation for a Glide-Back Booster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaderjian, Neal M.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Aftosmis, Mike J.; Pandya, Shishir A.; Ahmad, Jasim U.; Tejnil, Edward

    2004-01-01

    The past two decades have seen a sustained increase in the use of high fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in basic research, aircraft design, and the analysis of post-design issues. As the fidelity of a CFD method increases, the number of cases that can be readily and affordably computed greatly diminishes. However, computer speeds now exceed 2 GHz, hundreds of processors are currently available and more affordable, and advances in parallel CFD algorithms scale more readily with large numbers of processors. All of these factors make it feasible to compute thousands of high fidelity cases. However, there still remains the overwhelming task of monitoring the solution process. This paper presents an approach to automate the CFD solution process. A new software tool, AeroDB, is used to compute thousands of Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions for a 2nd generation glide-back booster in one week. The solution process exploits a common job-submission grid environment, the NASA Information Power Grid (IPG), using 13 computers located at 4 different geographical sites. Process automation and web-based access to a MySql database greatly reduces the user workload, removing much of the tedium and tendency for user input errors. The AeroDB framework is shown. The user submits/deletes jobs, monitors AeroDB's progress, and retrieves data and plots via a web portal. Once a job is in the database, a job launcher uses an IPG resource broker to decide which computers are best suited to run the job. Job/code requirements, the number of CPUs free on a remote system, and queue lengths are some of the parameters the broker takes into account. The Globus software provides secure services for user authentication, remote shell execution, and secure file transfers over an open network. AeroDB automatically decides when a job is completed. Currently, the Cart3D unstructured flow solver is used for the Euler equations, and the Overflow structured overset flow solver is used for the

  5. Computer vision: automating DEM generation of active lava flows and domes from photos

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, M. R.; Varley, N. R.; Tuffen, H.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate digital elevation models (DEMs) form fundamental data for assessing many volcanic processes. We present a photo-based approach developed within the computer vision community to produce DEMs from a consumer-grade digital camera and freely available software. Two case studies, based on the Volcán de Colima lava dome and the Puyehue Cordón-Caulle obsidian flow, highlight the advantages of the technique in terms of the minimal expertise required, the speed of data acquisition and the automated processing involved. The reconstruction procedure combines structure-from-motion and multi-view stereo algorithms (SfM-MVS) and can generate dense 3D point clouds (millions of points) from multiple photographs of a scene taken from different positions. Processing is carried out by automated software (e.g. http://blog.neonascent.net/archives/bundler-photogrammetry-package/). SfM-MVS reconstructions are initally un-scaled and un-oriented so additional geo-referencing software has been developed. Although this step requires the presence of some control points, the SfM-MVS approach has significantly easier image acquisition and control requirements than traditional photogrammetry, facilitating its use in a broad range of difficult environments. At Colima, the lava dome surface was reconstructed from recent and archive images taken from light aircraft over flights (2007-2011). Scaling and geo-referencing was carried out using features identified in web-sourced ortho-imagery obtained as a basemap layer in ArcMap - no ground-based measurements were required. Average surface measurement densities are typically 10-40 points per m2. Over mean viewing distances of ~500-2500 m (for different surveys), RMS error on the control features is ~1.5 m. The derived DEMs (with 1-m grid resolution) are sufficient to quantify volumetric change, as well as to highlight the structural evolution of the upper surface of the dome following an explosion in June 2011. At Puyehue Cord

  6. Large-scale preparation of active caspase-3 in E. coli by designing its thrombin-activatable precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Sung

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caspase-3, a principal apoptotic effector that cleaves the majority of cellular substrates, is an important medicinal target for the treatment of cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. Large amounts of the protein are required for drug discovery research. However, previous efforts to express the full-length caspase-3 gene in E. coli have been unsuccessful. Results Overproducers of thrombin-activatable full-length caspase-3 precursors were prepared by engineering the auto-activation sites of caspase-3 precursor into a sequence susceptible to thrombin hydrolysis. The engineered precursors were highly expressed as soluble proteins in E. coli and easily purified by affinity chromatography, to levels of 10–15 mg from 1 L of E. coli culture, and readily activated by thrombin digestion. Kinetic evaluation disclosed that thrombin digestion enhanced catalytic activity (kcat/KM of the precursor proteins by two orders of magnitude. Conclusion A novel method for a large-scale preparation of active caspase-3 was developed by a strategic engineering to lack auto-activation during expression with amino acid sequences susceptible to thrombin, facilitating high-level expression in E. coli. The precursor protein was easily purified and activated through specific cleavage at the engineered sites by thrombin, generating active caspase-3 in high yields.

  7. The use of thrombin in the radiology department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, E.; Buckley, O.; Browne, R.F. [Adelaide and Meath Hospitals incorporating the National Children' s Hospital (AMNCH), Department of Radiology, Dublin 24 (Ireland); Collins, A. [Royal Victoria Hospital, Department of Radiology, Belfast (United Kingdom); Torreggiani, W.C. [Adelaide and Meath Hospitals incorporating the National Children' s Hospital (AMNCH), Department of Radiology, Dublin 24 (Ireland)]|[Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin 24 (Ireland)

    2009-03-15

    Thrombin is a naturally occurring coagulation protein that converts soluble fibrinogen into insoluble fibrin and plays a vital role in the coagulation cascade and in turn haemostasis. Thrombin also promotes platelet activation. In the last few years, there has been a rapid increase in the use of thrombin by radiologists in a variety of clinical circumstances. It is best known for its use in the treatment of pseudoaneurysms following angiography. However, there are now a variety of cases in the literature describing the treatment of traumatic, inflammatory and infected aneurysms with thrombin in a variety of locations within the human body. There have even been recent reports describing the use of thrombin in conventional aneurysms as well as ruptured aneurysms. Its use has also been described in the treatment of endoleaks (type II) following aneurysm repair. In nearly all of these cases, treatment with thrombin requires imaging guidance. Recently, thrombin has also been used as a topical treatment post-percutaneous intervention to reduce or stop bleeding. Most radiologists have only a limited knowledge of the pharmacodynamics of thrombin, its wide range of utilisation and its limitations. Apart from a few case reports and case series, there is little in the radiological literature encompassing the wide range of applications that thrombin may have in the radiology department. In this review article, we comprehensively describe the role and pathophysiology of thrombin, describing with examples many of its potential uses. Techniques of usage as well as pitfalls and limitations are also described. (orig.)

  8. The use of thrombin in the radiology department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ward, E

    2009-03-01

    Thrombin is a naturally occurring coagulation protein that converts soluble fibrinogen into insoluble fibrin and plays a vital role in the coagulation cascade and in turn haemostasis. Thrombin also promotes platelet activation. In the last few years, there has been a rapid increase in the use of thrombin by radiologists in a variety of clinical circumstances. It is best known for its use in the treatment of pseudoaneurysms following angiography. However, there are now a variety of cases in the literature describing the treatment of traumatic, inflammatory and infected aneurysms with thrombin in a variety of locations within the human body. There have even been recent reports describing the use of thrombin in conventional aneurysms as well as ruptured aneurysms. Its use has also been described in the treatment of endoleaks (type II) following aneurysm repair. In nearly all of these cases, treatment with thrombin requires imaging guidance. Recently, thrombin has also been used as a topical treatment post-percutaneous intervention to reduce or stop bleeding. Most radiologists have only a limited knowledge of the pharmacodynamics of thrombin, its wide range of utilisation and its limitations. Apart from a few case reports and case series, there is little in the radiological literature encompassing the wide range of applications that thrombin may have in the radiology department. In this review article, we comprehensively describe the role and pathophysiology of thrombin, describing with examples many of its potential uses. Techniques of usage as well as pitfalls and limitations are also described.

  9. Comparison between a second generation automated multicapillary electrophoresis system with an automated agarose gel electrophoresis system for the detection of M-components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Anders; Hansson, Lars-Olof

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade, capillary electrophoresis (CE) has emerged as an interesting alternative to traditional analysis of serum, plasma and urine proteins by agarose gel electrophoresis. Initially there was a considerable difference in resolution between the two methods but the quality of CE has improved significantly. We thus wanted to evaluate a second generation of automated multicapillary instruments (Capillarys, Sebia, Paris, France) and the high resolution (HR) buffer for serum or plasma protein analysis with an automated agarose gel electrophoresis system for the detection of M-components. The comparison between the two systems was performed with patients samples with and without M-components. The comparison included 76 serum samples with M-components > 1 g/L. There was a total agreement between the two methods for detection of these M-components. When studying samples containing oligoclonal bands/small M-components, there were differences between the two systems. The capillary electrophoresis system detected a slightly higher number of samples with oligoclonal bands but the two systems found oligoclonal bands in different samples. When looking at resolution, the agarose gel electrophoresis system yielded a slightly better resolution in the alpha and beta regions, but it required an experienced interpreter to be able to benefit from the increased resolution. The capillary electrophoresis has shorter turn-around times and bar-code reader that allows positive sample identification. The Capillarys in combination with HR buffer gives better resolution of the alpha and beta regions than the same instrument with the beta1-beta2+ buffer or the Paragon CZE2000 (Beckman) which was the first generation of capillary electrophoresis systems.

  10. Speciation analysis of arsenic in biological matrices by automated hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes an automated system for the oxidation state specific speciation of inorganic and methylated arsenicals by selective hydride generation - cryotrapping- gas chromatography - atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer. The corresponding arsines are ge...

  11. Topical thrombin preparations and their use in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianne L Dunn

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Brianne L Dunn1, Walter E Uber1, John S Ikonomidis21Department of Pharmacy Services and 2Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USAAbstract: Coagulopathic bleeding may lead to increased morbidity and mortality after cardiac surgery. Topical bovine thrombin has been used to promote hemostasis after surgical procedures for over 60 years and is used frequently as a topical hemostatic agent in cardiac surgery. Recently, use of bovine thrombin has been reported to be associated with increased risk for anaphylaxis, thrombosis, and immune-mediated coagulopathy thought secondary to the production of antifactor V and antithrombin antibodies. In patients who develop bovine thrombin-induced immune-mediated coagulopathy, clinical manifestations may range from asymptomatic alterations in coagulation tests to severe hemorrhage and death. Patients undergoing cardiac surgical procedures may be at increased risk for development of antibodies to bovine thrombin products and associated complications. This adverse immunologic profile has led to the development of alternative preparations including a human and a recombinant thrombin which have been shown to be equally efficacious to bovine thrombin and have reduced antigenicity. However, the potential benefit associated with reduced antigenicity is not truly known secondary to the lack of long-term experience with these products. Given the potentially higher margin of safety and less stringent storage concerns compared to human thrombin, recombinant thrombin may be the most reasonable approach in cardiac surgery.Keywords: bovine thrombin, human thrombin, recombinant thrombin, immune-mediated coagulopathy, topical hemostatic agents, thrombin 

  12. Heuristic Approach of Automated Test Data Generation for Program having Array of Different Dimensions and Loops with Variable Number of Iteration

    OpenAIRE

    Hitesh Tahbildar; Bichitra Kalita

    2010-01-01

    Normally, program execution spends most of the time on loops. Automated test data generation devotes special attention to loops for better coverage. Automated test data generation for programs having loops with variable number of iteration and variable length array is a challenging problem. It is so because the number of paths may increase exponentially with the increase of array size for some programming constructs, like merge sort. We propose a method that finds heuristic for different type...

  13. Automated Generation of Phase Diagrams for Binary Systems with Azeotropic Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cismondi, Martin; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Zabaloy, Marcelo S.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we propose a computational strategy and methods for the automated calculation of complete loci of homogeneous azeotropy of binary mixtures and the related Pxy and Txy diagrams for models of the equation-of-state (EOS) type. The strategy consists of first finding the system's azeotro...

  14. a Novel Method for Automation of 3d Hydro Break Line Generation from LIDAR Data Using Matlab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, G. J.; Gopalam, U.; Devarajan, V.

    2013-08-01

    Water body detection is necessary to generate hydro break lines, which are in turn useful in creating deliverables such as TINs, contours, DEMs from LiDAR data. Hydro flattening follows the detection and delineation of water bodies (lakes, rivers, ponds, reservoirs, streams etc.) with hydro break lines. Manual hydro break line generation is time consuming and expensive. Accuracy and processing time depend on the number of vertices marked for delineation of break lines. Automation with minimal human intervention is desired for this operation. This paper proposes using a novel histogram analysis of LiDAR elevation data and LiDAR intensity data to automatically detect water bodies. Detection of water bodies using elevation information was verified by checking against LiDAR intensity data since the spectral reflectance of water bodies is very small compared with that of land and vegetation in near infra-red wavelength range. Detection of water bodies using LiDAR intensity data was also verified by checking against LiDAR elevation data. False detections were removed using morphological operations and 3D break lines were generated. Finally, a comparison of automatically generated break lines with their semi-automated/manual counterparts was performed to assess the accuracy of the proposed method and the results were discussed.

  15. Human cytomegalovirus increases HUVEC sensitivity to thrombin and modulates expression of thrombin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Milan; Paskas, Svetlana; Zivković, Maja; Burysek, Ladislav; Laumonnier, Yves

    2010-08-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) establishes a life-long persistent infection. HCMV infection could be associated with chronic inflammatory diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. Here we observed that in HCMV (AD-169) pre-exposed human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), thrombin-induced expression of IL-1alpha and M-CSF is markedly enhanced compared to the un-exposed cells. Study of the expression of thrombin receptor genes in HUVEC showed that HCMV triggered a time- and concentration-dependent expression of the thrombin receptors PAR1, PAR3 and PAR4 at the mRNA level. Induction of PAR1 and PAR3 mRNA expression is due to transcriptional activation of their promoters as shown by gene reporter assay. Furthermore, the virus induced expression of PAR1 and PAR3 but not PAR4 proteins, as analyzed by Western immunoblotting. However, flow cytometric analysis revealed that only PAR3, expressed at very low level in control HUVEC, is induced at the surface during the exposure to the virus. Our data suggest that although exposure to HCMV induces a minor increase of cell-surface receptors expression, it does make endothelial cells more responsive to additional thrombin stimulation.

  16. XIMELAGATRAN: A NEW DIRECT THROMBIN INHIBITOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Hiren R

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism is a serious illness that affects patient morbidity and mortality and presents a significant management challenge to healthcare providers world-wide. Despite major achievements in the significant reduction of thromboembolic complications, the most common therapies currently used for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism – heparins and vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin – have several limitations. Warfarin sodium is an effective oral anticoagulant drug. However, warfarin has a narrow therapeutic window with significant risks of hemorrhage at therapeutic concentrations. Dosing is difficult and requires frequent monitoring. New oral anticoagulant agents are required to improve current anticoagulant therapy. Furthermore, while warfarin is effective in venous disease, it does not provide more than 60% risk reduction compared with placebo in venous thrombosis prophylaxis and considerably lower risk reduction in terms of arterial thrombosis. Unlike warfarin and heparin, these direct thrombin inhibitors are able to inhibit fibrin-bound thrombin and so produce more effective inhibition of coagulation. Importantly, some members of this class of drugs have been developed for oral administration. Ximelagatran is an oral pro-drug of melagatran, a synthetic small peptidomimetic with direct thrombin inhibitory actions and anticoagulant activity. As an oral agent, ximelagatran has a number of desirable properties including a rapid onset of action, fixed dosing, stable absorption, apparent low potential for medication interactions, and no requirement for monitoring of drug levels or dose adjustment. It has a short plasma elimination half-life of about 4 hours in cases of unexpected hemorrhage or need for reversal.

  17. Automated Monte Carlo biasing for photon-generated electrons near surfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Brian Claude; Crawford, Martin James; Kensek, Ronald Patrick

    2009-09-01

    This report describes efforts to automate the biasing of coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo particle transport calculations. The approach was based on weight-windows biasing. Weight-window settings were determined using adjoint-flux Monte Carlo calculations. A variety of algorithms were investigated for adaptivity of the Monte Carlo tallies. Tree data structures were used to investigate spatial partitioning. Functional-expansion tallies were used to investigate higher-order spatial representations.

  18. Acidosis, magnesium and acetylsalicylic acid: Effects on thrombin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisevich, Nikolaj; Loznikova, Svetlana; Sukhodola, Aleksandr; Halets, Inessa; Bryszewska, Maria; Shcharbin, Dzmitry

    2013-03-01

    Thrombin, an enzyme from the hydrolase family, is the main component of the blood coagulation system. In ischemic stroke it acts as a serine protease that converts soluble fibrinogen into insoluble strands of fibrin forming blood clots in the brain. It has been found to phosphoresce at room temperature in the millisecond and microsecond ranges. The phosphorescence of thrombin was studied under physiological conditions, in acidosis (decrease of pH from 8.0 to 5.0) and on the addition of salts (magnesium sulfate and sodium chloride) and of acetylsalicylic acid, and its connection with thrombin function is discussed. Acidosis significantly increased the internal dynamics of thrombin. We propose that lactate-acidosis plays a protective role in stroke, preventing the formation of clots. The addition of NaCl and MgSO4 in different concentrations increased the internal dynamics of thrombin. Also, the addition of MgSO4 decreased thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. However, magnesium sulfate and acetylsalicylic acid in the therapeutic concentrations used for treatment of ischemic stroke had no effect on thrombin internal dynamics. The data obtained will help to elucidate the conformational stability of thrombin under conditions modulating lactate-acidosis and in the presence of magnesium sulfate.

  19. Planar Hall magnetoresistive aptasensor for thrombin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, B; Ramulu, T S; Kim, K W; Venu, R; Lee, J J; Kim, C G

    2014-09-15

    The use of aptamer-based assays is an emerging and attractive approach in disease research and clinical diagnostics. A sensitive aptamer-based sandwich-type sensor is presented to detect human thrombin using a planar Hall magnetoresistive (PHR) sensor in cooperation with superparamagnetic labels. A PHR sensor has the great advantages of a high signal-to-noise ratio, a small offset voltage and linear response in the low-field region, allowing it to act as a high-resolution biosensor. In the system presented here, the sensor has an active area of 50 µm × 50 µm with a 10-nm gold layer deposited onto the sensor surface prior to the binding of thiolated DNA primary aptamer. A polydimethylsiloxane well of 600-µm radius and 1-mm height was prepared around the sensor surface to maintain the same specific area and volume for each sensor. The sensor response was traced in real time upon the addition of streptavidin-functionalized magnetic labels on the sensor. A linear response to the thrombin concentration in the range of 86 pM-8.6 µM and a lower detection limit down to 86 pM was achieved by the proposed present method with a sample volume consumption of 2 µl. The proposed aptasensor has a strong potential for application in clinical diagnosis.

  20. The Toxic Effect of Thrombin on Periventricular Tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of thrombin on periventricular tissue. Methods Thrombin solution (10U/10μl) was infused into the ventricles of rats. Then, the local cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in the area of basal ganglia and thalamus were measured. In separate experiments neurons were cultured in the medium with thrombin, and lactate dehydrogenase was determined. Results The thrombin induced blood-brain barrier disruption and neuron death in the culture, whereas cerebral blood flow did not drop to the injury level. Conclusion Periventricular tissue damage suffering from the thrombin and blood-brain barrier disruption and cell toxicity could elicit pathological mechanisms.

  1. Automated Gel Size Selection to Improve the Quality of Next-generation Sequencing Libraries Prepared from Environmental Water Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyaguari-Diaz, Miguel I; Slobodan, Jared R; Nesbitt, Matthew J; Croxen, Matthew A; Isaac-Renton, Judith; Prystajecky, Natalie A; Tang, Patrick

    2015-04-17

    Next-generation sequencing of environmental samples can be challenging because of the variable DNA quantity and quality in these samples. High quality DNA libraries are needed for optimal results from next-generation sequencing. Environmental samples such as water may have low quality and quantities of DNA as well as contaminants that co-precipitate with DNA. The mechanical and enzymatic processes involved in extraction and library preparation may further damage the DNA. Gel size selection enables purification and recovery of DNA fragments of a defined size for sequencing applications. Nevertheless, this task is one of the most time-consuming steps in the DNA library preparation workflow. The protocol described here enables complete automation of agarose gel loading, electrophoretic analysis, and recovery of targeted DNA fragments. In this study, we describe a high-throughput approach to prepare high quality DNA libraries from freshwater samples that can be applied also to other environmental samples. We used an indirect approach to concentrate bacterial cells from environmental freshwater samples; DNA was extracted using a commercially available DNA extraction kit, and DNA libraries were prepared using a commercial transposon-based protocol. DNA fragments of 500 to 800 bp were gel size selected using Ranger Technology, an automated electrophoresis workstation. Sequencing of the size-selected DNA libraries demonstrated significant improvements to read length and quality of the sequencing reads.

  2. Automated Generation of Machine Verifiable and Readable Proofs: A Case Study of Tarski's Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Stojanovic Durdevic, Sana; Narboux, Julien; Janicic, Predrag

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The power of state-of-the-art automated and interactive the-orem provers has reached the level at which a significant portion of non-trivial mathematical contents can be formalized almost fully automat-ically. In this paper we present our framework for the formalization of mathematical knowledge that can produce machine verifiable proofs (for different proof assistants) but also human-readable (nearly textbook-like) proofs. As a case study, we focus on one of the twent...

  3. Generation of orientation tools for automated zebrafish screening assays using desktop 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The zebrafish has been established as the main vertebrate model system for whole organism screening applications. However, the lack of consistent positioning of zebrafish embryos within wells of microtiter plates remains an obstacle for the comparative analysis of images acquired in automated screening assays. While technical solutions to the orientation problem exist, dissemination is often hindered by the lack of simple and inexpensive ways of distributing and duplicating tools. Results Here, we provide a cost effective method for the production of 96-well plate compatible zebrafish orientation tools using a desktop 3D printer. The printed tools enable the positioning and orientation of zebrafish embryos within cavities formed in agarose. Their applicability is demonstrated by acquiring lateral and dorsal views of zebrafish embryos arrayed within microtiter plates using an automated screening microscope. This enables the consistent visualization of morphological phenotypes and reporter gene expression patterns. Conclusions The designs are refined versions of previously demonstrated devices with added functionality and strongly reduced production costs. All corresponding 3D models are freely available and digital design can be easily shared electronically. In combination with the increasingly widespread usage of 3D printers, this provides access to the developed tools to a wide range of zebrafish users. Finally, the design files can serve as templates for other additive and subtractive fabrication methods. PMID:24886511

  4. APTAMER-BASED SERRS SENSOR FOR THROMBIN DETECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, H; Baker, B R; Wachsmann-Hogiu, S; Pagba, C V; Laurence, T A; Lane, S M; Lee, L P; Tok, J B

    2008-07-02

    We describe an aptamer-based Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) sensor with high sensitivity, specificity, and stability for the detection of a coagulation protein, human a-thrombin. The sensor achieves high sensitivity and a limit of detection of 100 pM by monitoring the SERRS signal change upon the single step of thrombin binding to immobilized thrombin binding aptamer. The selectivity of the sensor is demonstrated by the specific discrimination of thrombin from other protein analytes. The specific recognition and binding of thrombin by the thrombin binding aptamer is essential to the mechanism of the aptamer-based sensor, as shown through measurements using negative control oligonucleotides. In addition, the sensor can detect 1 nM thrombin in the presence of complex biofluids, such as 10% fetal calf serum, demonstrating that the immobilized, 5{prime}-capped, 3{prime}-capped aptamer is sufficiently robust for clinical diagnostic applications. Furthermore, the proposed sensor may be implemented for multiplexed detection using different aptamer-Raman probe complexes.

  5. Label-free aptamer biosensor for selective detection of thrombin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Weidan; Liu, Xiaotong; Wang, Lei; Su, Xingguang, E-mail: suxg@jlu.edu.cn

    2015-10-29

    We fabricated a novel fluorescence biosensor for the selective detection of thrombin by using bovine serum albumin-capped CdS quantum dots (BSA-CdS QDs). Two kinds of designed DNA (DNA1 and DNA2) could bind to CdS QDs through the electrostatic interaction between DNA and Cd{sup 2+} on the surface of CdS QDs. The obtained DNA/BSA-CdS QDs kept stable in the solution with the fluorescence intensity obviously enhanced. Hairpin structure of DNA1contained two domains, one is the aptamer sequence of thrombin and the other is the complementary sequence of DNA2. When thrombin was added, it would bind to DNA1 and induce the hairpin structure of DNA1 changed into G-quadplex structure. Meanwhile, DNA2 would transfer from the surface of CdS QDs to DNA1 via hybridization, which resulted in the removal of DNA1 and DNA2 from the surface of CdS QDs, and led to the fluorescence intensity of CdS QDs reduced. Thus, the determination of thrombin could be achieved by monitoring the change of the fluorescence intensity of CdS QDs. The present method is simple and fast, and exhibits good selectivity for thrombin over other proteins. We have successfully detected thrombin in human serum samples with satisfactory results. - Highlights: • A novel strategy for the detection of thrombin was established based on BSA-CdS QDs. • DNA could serve as the co-ligands to stabilize CdS QDs and enhance the fluorescence intensity. • Thrombin could change the structure of DNA1 and quench the fluorescence of CdS QDs. • Thrombin in real sample was detected with satisfactory results.

  6. Heuristic Approach of Automated Test Data Generation for Program having Array of Different Dimensions and Loops with Variable Number of Iteration

    CERN Document Server

    Tahbildar, Hitesh

    2010-01-01

    Normally, program execution spends most of the time on loops. Automated test data generation devotes special attention to loops for better coverage. Automated test data generation for programs having loops with variable number of iteration and variable length array is a challenging problem. It is so because the number of paths may increase exponentially with the increase of array size for some programming constructs, like merge sort. We propose a method that finds heuristic for different types of programming constructs with loops and arrays. Linear search, Bubble sort, merge sort, and matrix multiplication programs are included in an attempt to highlight the difference in execution between single loop, variable length array and nested loops with one and two dimensional arrays. We have used two parameters/heuristics to predict the minimum number of iterations required for generating automated test data. They are longest path level (kL) and saturation level (kS). The proceedings of our work includes the instrum...

  7. TAPDANCE: An automated tool to identify and annotate transposon insertion CISs and associations between CISs from next generation sequence data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarver Aaron L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next generation sequencing approaches applied to the analyses of transposon insertion junction fragments generated in high throughput forward genetic screens has created the need for clear informatics and statistical approaches to deal with the massive amount of data currently being generated. Previous approaches utilized to 1 map junction fragments within the genome and 2 identify Common Insertion Sites (CISs within the genome are not practical due to the volume of data generated by current sequencing technologies. Previous approaches applied to this problem also required significant manual annotation. Results We describe Transposon Annotation Poisson Distribution Association Network Connectivity Environment (TAPDANCE software, which automates the identification of CISs within transposon junction fragment insertion data. Starting with barcoded sequence data, the software identifies and trims sequences and maps putative genomic sequence to a reference genome using the bowtie short read mapper. Poisson distribution statistics are then applied to assess and rank genomic regions showing significant enrichment for transposon insertion. Novel methods of counting insertions are used to ensure that the results presented have the expected characteristics of informative CISs. A persistent mySQL database is generated and utilized to keep track of sequences, mappings and common insertion sites. Additionally, associations between phenotypes and CISs are also identified using Fisher’s exact test with multiple testing correction. In a case study using previously published data we show that the TAPDANCE software identifies CISs as previously described, prioritizes them based on p-value, allows holistic visualization of the data within genome browser software and identifies relationships present in the structure of the data. Conclusions The TAPDANCE process is fully automated, performs similarly to previous labor intensive approaches

  8. A mathematical basis for automated structured grid generation with close coupling to the flow solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnette, D.W.

    1998-02-01

    The first two truncation error terms resulting from finite differencing the convection terms in the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations are examined for the purpose of constructing two-dimensional grid generation schemes. These schemes are constructed such that the resulting grid distributions drive the error terms to zero. Two sets of equations result, one for each error term, that show promise in generating grids that provide more accurate flow solutions and possibly faster convergence. One set results in an algebraic scheme that drives the first truncation term to zero, and the other a hyperbolic scheme that drives the second term to zero. Also discussed is the possibility of using the schemes in sequentially constructing a grid in an iterative algorithm involving the flow solver. In essence, the process is envisioned to generate not only a flow field solution but the grid as well, rendering the approach a hands-off method for grid generation

  9. Low cost home automation system: a support to the ecological electricity generation in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmer Alejandro Parada Prieto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Context/Objective: In Colombia, consumption of residential electricity accounts for about 40% of the national demand; therefore, alternatives to reduce this consumption are needed. The goal of this study was to develop a home automation prototype to control the illumination of a household and to foster the efficient use of energy.Method: The system consists of independent control modules and an information manager module; the control module regulates the luminaires using a microcontroller and a presence sensor, and exchanges data by means of a radio frequency transceiver; the manager module allows the access to the control modules from a Web interface. The prototype was implemented in a household located in the city of San José de Cúcuta, Colombia, during a 60 days period.Results: The operation of the system diminished the total electricity consumption by 3,75 %, with a z-score of -1,93 that was obtained from the statistical analysis.Conclusions: We concluded that the prototype is inexpensive in comparison to similar technologies available in the national and international markets, and it reduces the waste of electrical energy due to the consumption habits of the residents in the case study.

  10. An automated process for generating archival data files from MATLAB figures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, G. M.; Greenwald, M.; Stillerman, J.

    2016-10-01

    A new directive from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy requires that all publications supported by federal funding agencies (e.g. Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation) include machine-readable datasets for figures and tables. An automated script was developed at the PSFC to make this process easier for authors using the MATLAB plotting environment to create figures. All relevant data (x, y, z, errorbars) and metadata (line style, color, symbol shape, labels) are contained within the MATLAB .fig file created when saving a figure. The export_fig script extracts data and metadata from a .fig file and exports it into an HDF5 data file with no additional user input required. Support is included for a number of plot types including 2-D and 3-D line, contour, and surface plots, quiver plots, bar graphs, and histograms. This work supported by US Department of Energy cooperative agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512 using the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, a DOE Office of Science user facility.

  11. Generation and Performance of Automated Jarosite Mineral Detectors for Vis/NIR Spectrometers at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, M. S.; Bornstein, B.; Merrill, M. D.; Castano, R.; Greenwood, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfate salt discoveries at the Eagle and Endurance craters in Meridiani Planum by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity have proven mineralogically the existence and involvement of water in Mars past. Visible and near infrared spectrometers like the Mars Express OMEGA, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter CRISM and the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory Rover cameras are powerful tools for the identification of water-bearing salts and other high priority minerals at Mars. The increasing spectral resolution and rover mission lifetimes represented by these missions currently necessitate data compression in order to ease downlink restrictions. On board data processing techniques can be used to guide the selection, measurement and return of scientifically important data from relevant targets, thus easing bandwidth stress and increasing scientific return. We have developed an automated support vector machine (SVM) detector operating in the visible/near-infrared (VisNIR, 300-2500 nm) spectral range trained to recognize the mineral jarosite (typically KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6), positively identified by the Mossbauer spectrometer at Meridiani Planum. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  12. Expression screening of bacterial libraries of recombinant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor variants for candidates with thrombin inhibitory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Varsha; Gierczak, Richard F; Sheffield, William P

    2013-12-01

    Exhaustive mutagenesis studies of the reactive centre loop (RCL), a key structural component of proteins belonging to the serpin superfamily of protease inhibitors, are complicated by the size of the RCL, serpin conformational complexity, and, for most serpins, the lack of a serpin-dependent phenotype of expressing cells. Here, we describe a thrombin capture assay that distinguished thrombin-inhibitory recombinant human alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API M358R) from non-inhibitory API variants in Escherichia coli lysates prepared from either single clones or pools. Binding of API proteins in the lysates to thrombin immobilized on microtiter plate wells was quantified via colour generated by a peroxidase-coupled anti-API antibody. Bacterial expression plasmids encoding inhibitory API M358R were mixed 1:99 with plasmids encoding non-inhibitory API T345R/M358R and the resulting library screened in pools of 10. All above-background signals arising from pools or subsequently re-probed single clones were linked to the presence of plasmids encoding API M358R. Screening of a portion of another expression library encoding hypervariable API with all possibilities at codons 352-358 also yielded only novel, thrombin-inhibitory variants. Probing a smaller library expressing all possible codons at Ala347 yielded the wild type, 6 different functional variants, one partially active variant, and two variants with no thrombin-inhibitory activity. API antigen levels varied considerably less among Ala347 variants than activity levels, and comparison of rate constants of inhibition of purified API variants to their corresponding thrombin capture assay lysate values was used to establish the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. The results indicate that the approach is sufficiently robust to correctly identify functional versus non-functional candidates in API expression libraries, and could be of value in systematically probing structure/function relationships not only in the API

  13. Antithrombotic effects of bromophenol, an alga-derived thrombin inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dayong; Li, Xiaohong; Li, Jing; Guo, Shuju; Su, Hua; Fan, Xiao

    2010-01-01

    Thrombin, the ultimate proteinase of the coagulation cascade, is an attractive target for the treatment of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. A bromophenol derivative named (+)-3-(2,3-dibromo-4, 5-dihydroxy-phenyl)-4-bromo-5,6-dihydroxy-1,3-dihydroiso-benzofuran 1, isolated from the brown alga Leathesia nana exhibited significant thrombin inhibitory activity. In this study, we investigated the inhibition of human thrombin in vitro with this bromophenol derivative, and its antithrombotic efficacy in vivo using the arteriovenous shunt model and the ferric chloride-induced arterial thrombosis model in rats. The results show that the bromophenol derivative is a potential inhibitor of thrombin (IC50=1.03 nmol/L). In antithrombotic experiments in vivo, the bromophenol derivative also shows good effect comparing with the control group. These data indicate that the bromophenol derivative is a potential drug for prophylaxis and the treatment of thrombotic diseases.

  14. Hierarchical Testing with Automated Document Generation for Amanzi, ASCEM's Subsurface Flow and Reactive Transport Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, J. D.; Steefel, C. I.; Yabusaki, S.; Castleton, K.; Scheibe, T. D.; Keating, E. H.; Freedman, V. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Advanced Simulation Capabililty for Environmental Management (ASCEM) program is developing an approach and open-source tool suite for standardized risk and performance assessments at legacy nuclear waste sites. These assessments use a graded and iterative approach, beginning with simplified highly abstracted models, and adding geometric and geologic complexity as understanding is gained. To build confidence in this assessment capability, extensive testing of the underlying tools is needed. Since the tools themselves, such as the subsurface flow and reactive-transport simulator, Amanzi, are under active development, testing must be both hierarchical and highly automated. In this presentation we show how we have met these requirements, by leveraging the python-based open-source documentation system called Sphinx with several other open-source tools. Sphinx builds on the reStructured text tool docutils, with important extensions that include high-quality formatting of equations, and integrated plotting through matplotlib. This allows the documentation, as well as the input files for tests, benchmark and tutorial problems, to be maintained with the source code under a version control system. In addition, it enables developers to build documentation in several different formats (e.g., html and pdf) from a single source. We will highlight these features, and discuss important benefits of this approach for Amanzi. In addition, we'll show that some of ASCEM's other tools, such as the sampling provided by the Uncertainty Quantification toolset, are naturally leveraged to enable more comprehensive testing. Finally, we will highlight the integration of this hiearchical testing and documentation framework with our build system and tools (CMake, CTest, and CDash).

  15. Automated Generation of the Alaska Coastline Using High-Resolution Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, G.; Porter, C. C.; Cloutier, M. D.; Clementz, M. E.; Reim, C.; Morin, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Previous campaigns to map Alaska's coast at high resolution have relied on airborne, marine, or ground-based surveying and manual digitization. The coarse temporal resolution, inability to scale geographically, and high cost of field data acquisition in these campaigns is inadequate for the scale and speed of recent coastal change in Alaska. Here, we leverage the Polar Geospatial Center (PGC) archive of DigitalGlobe, Inc. satellite imagery to produce a state-wide coastline at 2 meter resolution. We first select multispectral imagery based on time and quality criteria. We then extract the near-infrared (NIR) band from each processed image, and classify each pixel as water or land with a pre-determined NIR threshold value. Processing continues with vectorizing the water-land boundary, removing extraneous data, and attaching metadata. Final coastline raster and vector products maintain the original accuracy of the orthorectified satellite data, which is often within the local tidal range. The repeat frequency of coastline production can range from 1 month to 3 years, depending on factors such as satellite capacity, cloud cover, and floating ice. Shadows from trees or structures complicate the output and merit further data cleaning. The PGC's imagery archive, unique expertise, and computing resources enabled us to map the Alaskan coastline in a few months. The DigitalGlobe archive allows us to update this coastline as new imagery is acquired, and facilitates baseline data for studies of coastal change and improvement of topographic datasets. Our results are not simply a one-time coastline, but rather a system for producing multi-temporal, automated coastlines. Workflows and tools produced with this project can be freely distributed and utilized globally. Researchers and government agencies must now consider how they can incorporate and quality-control this high-frequency, high-resolution data to meet their mapping standards and research objectives.

  16. Development of Closed-Loop Simulation Methods for a Next-Generation Terminal Area Automation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, John E., III; Isaacson, Douglas R.

    2002-01-01

    A next-generation air traffic decision support tool, known as the Active Final Approach Spacing Tool (aFAST), will generate heading, speed and altitude commands to achieve more precise separation of aircraft in the terminal area. The techniques used to analyze the performance of earlier generation decision support tools are not adequate to analyze the performance of aFAST. This paper summarizes the development of a new and innovative fully closed-loop testing method for aFAST. This method, called trajectory feedback testing, closes each aircraft's control loop inside of the aFAST scheduling algorithm. Validation of trajectory feedback testing by examination of the variation of aircraft time-of-arrival predictions between schedule updates and the variation of aircraft excess separation distances between simulation runs is presented.

  17. Steam generation process control and automation; Automacao e controle no processo de geracao de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Junior, Jose Cleodon de; Silva, Walmy Andre C.M. da [PETROBRAS S.A., Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes the implementation of the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition System (SCADA) in the steam generation process for injection in heavy oil fields of the Alto do Rodrigues Production Asset, developed by PETROBRAS/E and P/UN-RNCE. This Asset is located in the northeastern region of Brazil, in Rio Grande do Norte State. It addresses to the steam generators for injection in oil wells and the upgrade project that installed remote terminal units and a new panel controlled by PLC, changed all the pneumatic transmitters by electronic and incorporated the steam quality and oxygen control, providing the remote supervision of the process. It also discusses the improvements obtained in the steam generation after the changes in the conception of the control and safety systems. (author)

  18. Integrated Design Engineering Analysis (IDEA) Environment Automated Generation of Structured CFD Grids using Topology Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hilmi N.

    2012-01-01

    This report documents the work performed from March 2010 to March 2012. The Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis (IDEA) environment is a collaborative environment based on an object-oriented, multidisciplinary, distributed framework using the Adaptive Modeling Language (AML) as a framework and supporting the configuration design and parametric CFD grid generation. This report will focus on describing the work in the area of parametric CFD grid generation using novel concepts for defining the interaction between the mesh topology and the geometry in such a way as to separate the mesh topology from the geometric topology while maintaining the link between the mesh topology and the actual geometry.

  19. Cleavage of a specific bond in troponin C by thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavis, P C; Rosenfeld, S; Lu, R C

    1978-08-21

    Limited proteolysis of rabbit skeletal troponin C with bovine thrombin yielded two fragments, TH1 (Mr = 11000) containing Ca2+ binding regions I--III and TH2 (Mr = 6000) containing region IV. Determination of the partial sequences of the fragments established the site of cleavage at Arg120-Ala121. Secondary cleavage by thrombin at other arginyl or lysyl residues in troponin C was ruled out by the sequence data and by the amino acid compositions of the two fragments.

  20. Endovascular Thrombin Injection for a Pulmonary Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jin Ho; Shin, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Hyun Ki [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Massive hemoptysis caused by pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysms is uncommon, and endovascular treatment such as coil embolization is the first choice for treating pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysms. Various embolic agents could be used according to the angiographic findings, yet embolization with thrombin injection is very rare. Herein, we describe a case of a pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm that was successfully treated by endovascular thrombin injection using a microcatheter because of the difficulty in performing a coil embolization due to a short feeding artery.

  1. Molecular modeling studies, synthesis and biological evaluation of dabigatran analogues as thrombin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ming-Hui; Chen, Hai-Feng; Ren, Yu-Jie; Shao, Fang-Ming

    2016-01-15

    In this work, 48 thrombin inhibitors based on the structural scaffold of dabigatran were analyzed using a combination of molecular modeling techniques. We generated three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models based on three alignments for both comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity index analysis (CoMSIA) to highlight the structural requirements for thrombin protein inhibition. In addition to the 3D-QSAR study, Topomer CoMFA model also was established with a higher leave-one-out cross-validation q(2) and a non-cross-validation r(2), which suggest that the three models have good predictive ability. The results indicated that the steric, hydrophobic and electrostatic fields play key roles in QSAR model. Furthermore, we employed molecular docking and re-docking simulation explored the binding relationship of the ligand and the receptor protein in detail. Molecular docking simulations identified several key interactions that were also indicated through 3D-QSAR analysis. On the basis of the obtained results, two compounds were designed and predicted by three models, the biological evaluation in vitro (IC50) demonstrated that these molecular models were effective for the development of novel potent thrombin inhibitors.

  2. An automated tetrahedral mesh generator for computer simulation in Odontology based on the Delaunay's algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Massayoshi Sakamoto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a software package based on the Delaunay´s algorithm is described. The main feature of this package is the capability in applying discretization in geometric domains of teeth taking into account their complex inner structures and the materials with different hardness. Usually, the mesh generators reported in literature treat molars and other teeth by using simplified geometric models, or even considering the teeth as homogeneous structures.

  3. Grayscale lithography-automated mask generation for complex three-dimensional topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, James; Ratnayake, Dilan; McKenna, Curtis; Walsh, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Grayscale lithography is a relatively underutilized technique that enables fabrication of three-dimensional (3-D) microstructures in photosensitive polymers (photoresists). By spatially modulating ultraviolet (UV) dosage during the writing process, one can vary the depth at which photoresist is developed. This means complex structures and bioinspired designs can readily be produced that would otherwise be cost prohibitive or too time intensive to fabricate. The main barrier to widespread grayscale implementation, however, stems from the laborious generation of mask files required to create complex surface topography. We present a process and associated software utility for automatically generating grayscale mask files from 3-D models created within industry-standard computer-aided design (CAD) suites. By shifting the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) design onus to commonly used CAD programs ideal for complex surfacing, engineering professionals already familiar with traditional 3-D CAD software can readily utilize their pre-existing skills to make valuable contributions to the MEMS community. Our conversion process is demonstrated by prototyping several samples on a laser pattern generator-capital equipment already in use in many foundries. Finally, an empirical calibration technique is shown that compensates for nonlinear relationships between UV exposure intensity and photoresist development depth as well as a thermal reflow technique to help smooth microstructure surfaces.

  4. Toward Automated FAÇADE Texture Generation for 3d Photorealistic City Modelling with Smartphones or Tablet Pcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.

    2012-07-01

    An automated model-image fitting algorithm is proposed in this paper for generating façade texture image from pictures taken by smartphones or tablet PCs. The façade texture generation requires tremendous labour work and thus, has been the bottleneck of 3D photo-realistic city modelling. With advanced developments of the micro electro mechanical system (MEMS), camera, global positioning system (GPS), and gyroscope (G-sensors) can all be integrated into a smartphone or a table PC. These sensors bring the possibility of direct-georeferencing for the pictures taken by smartphones or tablet PCs. Since the accuracy of these sensors cannot compared to the surveying instruments, the image position and orientation derived from these sensors are not capable of photogrammetric measurements. This paper adopted the least-squares model-image fitting (LSMIF) algorithm to iteratively improve the image's exterior orientation. The image position from GPS and the image orientation from gyroscope are treated as the initial values. By fitting the projection of the wireframe model to the extracted edge pixels on image, the image exterior orientation elements are solved when the optimal fitting achieved. With the exact exterior orientation elements, the wireframe model of the building can be correctly projected on the image and, therefore, the façade texture image can be extracted from the picture.

  5. A Framework for Semi-Automated Generation of a Virtual Combine Harvester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Dan; Bilde, M.L.; Andersen, Nils Axel

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a generic data-driven model of the threshing, separation and cleaning process in a combine harvester. The aim is a model that describes the actual material flow and sensor values for relevant actuator configurations and measured environmental disturbances in order to facilitate...... Hardware In the Loop (HIL) simulation and sensor based material flow estimation. A modular data-driven model structure is chosen as it maintains the actual steady-state values and facilitates verification and debugging using laboratory and field data. The overall model structure, model generation procedure......, and estimation of parameters from field data are described, as well as simulation results are presented....

  6. Automated Music Video Generation Using Multi-level Feature-based Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jong-Chul; Lee, In-Kwon; Byun, Siwoo

    The expansion of the home video market has created a requirement for video editing tools to allow ordinary people to assemble videos from short clips. However, professional skills are still necessary to create a music video, which requires a stream to be synchronized with pre-composed music. Because the music and the video are pre-generated in separate environments, even a professional producer usually requires a number of trials to obtain a satisfactory synchronization, which is something that most amateurs are unable to achieve.

  7. Automated grid generation from models of complex geologic structure and stratigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gable, C.; Trease, H.; Cherry, T.

    1996-04-01

    The construction of computational grids which accurately reflect complex geologic structure and stratigraphy for flow and transport models poses a formidable task. With an understanding of stratigraphy, material properties and boundary and initial conditions, the task of incorporating this data into a numerical model can be difficult and time consuming. Most GIS tools for representing complex geologic volumes and surfaces are not designed for producing optimal grids for flow and transport computation. We have developed a tool, GEOMESH, for generating finite element grids that maintain the geometric integrity of input volumes, surfaces, and geologic data and produce an optimal (Delaunay) tetrahedral grid that can be used for flow and transport computations. GEOMESH also satisfies the constraint that the geometric coupling coefficients of the grid are positive for all elements. GEOMESH generates grids for two dimensional cross sections, three dimensional regional models, represents faults and fractures, and has the capability of including finer grids representing tunnels and well bores into grids. GEOMESH also permits adaptive grid refinement in three dimensions. The tools to glue, merge and insert grids together demonstrate how complex grids can be built from simpler pieces. The resulting grid can be utilized by unstructured finite element or integrated finite difference computational physics codes.

  8. On random field Completely Automated Public Turing Test to Tell Computers and Humans Apart generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouritzin, Michael A; Newton, Fraser; Wu, Biao

    2013-04-01

    Herein, we propose generating CAPTCHAs through random field simulation and give a novel, effective and efficient algorithm to do so. Indeed, we demonstrate that sufficient information about word tests for easy human recognition is contained in the site marginal probabilities and the site-to-nearby-site covariances and that these quantities can be embedded directly into certain conditional probabilities, designed for effective simulation. The CAPTCHAs are then partial random realizations of the random CAPTCHA word. We start with an initial random field (e.g., randomly scattered letter pieces) and use Gibbs resampling to re-simulate portions of the field repeatedly using these conditional probabilities until the word becomes human-readable. The residual randomness from the initial random field together with the random implementation of the CAPTCHA word provide significant resistance to attack. This results in a CAPTCHA, which is unrecognizable to modern optical character recognition but is recognized about 95% of the time in a human readability study.

  9. Automated generation of node-splitting models for assessment of inconsistency in network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Valkenhoef, Gert; Dias, Sofia; Ades, A E; Welton, Nicky J

    2016-03-01

    Network meta-analysis enables the simultaneous synthesis of a network of clinical trials comparing any number of treatments. Potential inconsistencies between estimates of relative treatment effects are an important concern, and several methods to detect inconsistency have been proposed. This paper is concerned with the node-splitting approach, which is particularly attractive because of its straightforward interpretation, contrasting estimates from both direct and indirect evidence. However, node-splitting analyses are labour-intensive because each comparison of interest requires a separate model. It would be advantageous if node-splitting models could be estimated automatically for all comparisons of interest. We present an unambiguous decision rule to choose which comparisons to split, and prove that it selects only comparisons in potentially inconsistent loops in the network, and that all potentially inconsistent loops in the network are investigated. Moreover, the decision rule circumvents problems with the parameterisation of multi-arm trials, ensuring that model generation is trivial in all cases. Thus, our methods eliminate most of the manual work involved in using the node-splitting approach, enabling the analyst to focus on interpreting the results.

  10. Enhanced thrombin generation in children with sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, M; Plaat, B E; ten Cate, H; Wolters, H J; Weening, R S; Brandjes, D P

    1994-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that increased activity of the coagulation system, measured with sensitive assays for activation markers, may be important in the pathogenesis of vascular occlusion in sickle cell disease (SCD). Since most of these studies were carried out in adult patients and SCD is an inher

  11. Mechanistic Modeling of the Effects of Acidosis on Thrombin Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    the compu- tational model using the data on clotting factor composition for 472 subjects from the Leiden Thrombophilia Study. To compare acidosis...trick, MD. The Leiden Thrombophilia Study, completed previously (FRR), was funded by the Netherlands Heart Foundation (89-063). The authors declare... Thrombophilia Study. To compare acidosis-induced relative parameter changes in individual (???virtual???) subjects, we estimated the probabilities of

  12. Automated Learning of Subcellular Variation among Punctate Protein Patterns and a Generative Model of Their Relation to Microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R Johnson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the spatial distribution of proteins directly from microscopy images is a difficult problem with numerous applications in cell biology (e.g. identifying motor-related proteins and clinical research (e.g. identification of cancer biomarkers. Here we describe the design of a system that provides automated analysis of punctate protein patterns in microscope images, including quantification of their relationships to microtubules. We constructed the system using confocal immunofluorescence microscopy images from the Human Protein Atlas project for 11 punctate proteins in three cultured cell lines. These proteins have previously been characterized as being primarily located in punctate structures, but their images had all been annotated by visual examination as being simply "vesicular". We were able to show that these patterns could be distinguished from each other with high accuracy, and we were able to assign to one of these subclasses hundreds of proteins whose subcellular localization had not previously been well defined. In addition to providing these novel annotations, we built a generative approach to modeling of punctate distributions that captures the essential characteristics of the distinct patterns. Such models are expected to be valuable for representing and summarizing each pattern and for constructing systems biology simulations of cell behaviors.

  13. Thrombin Increases Expression of Fibronectin Antigen on the Platelet Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Mark H.; Painter, Richard G.; Forsyth, Jane; Birdwell, Charles; Plow, Edward F.

    1980-02-01

    Fibronectins (fn) are adhesive glycoproteins which bind to collagen and to fibrin and appear to be important in cellular adhesion to other cells or surfaces. Fn-related antigen is present in human platelets, suggesting a possible role for fn in the adhesive properties of platelets. We have studied the localization of fn in resting and thrombin-stimulated platelets by immunofluorescence and quantitative binding of radiolabeled antibody. In resting fixed platelets, variable light surface staining for fn was observed. When these cells were made permeable to antibody with detergent, staining for fn was markedly enhanced and was present in a punctate distribution, suggesting intracellular localization. Stimulation with thrombin, which is associated with increased platelet adhesiveness, resulted in increased staining for fn antigen on intact platelets. These stimulated cells did not leak 51Cr nor did they stain for F-actin, thus documenting that the increased fn staining was not due to loss of plasma membrane integrity. The thrombin-induced increase in accessible platelet fn antigen was confirmed by quantitative antibody binding studies in which thrombin-stimulated platelets specifically bound 15 times as much radiolabeled F(ab')2 anti-fn as did resting cells. Thus, thrombin stimulation results in increased expression of fn antigen on the platelet surface. Here it may participate in interactions with fibrin, connective tissue, or other cells.

  14. A Novel Photoelectrochemical Biosensor for Tyrosinase and Thrombin Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiexia Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel photoelectrochemical biosensor for step-by-step assay of tyrosinase and thrombin was fabricated based on the specific interactions between the designed peptide and the target enzymes. A peptide chain with a special sequence which contains a positively charged lysine-labeled terminal, tyrosine at the other end and a cleavage site recognized by thrombin between them was designed. The designed peptide can be fixed on surface of the CdTe quantum dots (QDs-modified indium-tin oxide (ITO electrode through electrostatic attraction to construct the photoelectrochemical biosensor. The tyrosinase target can catalyze the oxidization of tyrosine by oxygen into ortho-benzoquinone residues, which results in a decrease in the sensor photocurrent. Subsequently, the cleavage site could be recognized and cut off by another thrombin target, restoring the sensor photocurrent. The decrease or increase of photocurrent in the sensor enables us to assay tyrosinase and thrombin. Thus, the detection of tyrosinase and thrombin can be achieved in the linear range from 2.6 to 32 μg/mL and from 4.5 to 100 μg/mL with detection limits of 1.5 μg/mL and 1.9 μg/mL, respectively. Most importantly, this strategy shall allow us to detect different classes of enzymes simultaneously by designing various enzyme-specific peptide substrates.

  15. Automated pattern recognition to support geological mapping and exploration target generation - A case study from southern Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Detlef; Hutchins, David; Das, Sonali; Majumdar, Anandamayee; Paasche, Hendrik

    2015-06-01

    to the result obtained from unsupervised fuzzy clustering. Furthermore, a comparison of the aposterior probability of class assignment with the trustworthiness values provided by fuzzy clustering also indicates only slight differences. These observed differences can be explained by the exponential class probability term which tends to deliver either fairly high or low probability values. The methodology and results presented here demonstrate that automated objective pattern recognition can essentially contribute to geological mapping of large study areas and mineral exploration target generation. This methodology is considered well suited to a number of African countries whose large territories have recently been covered by high resolution airborne geophysical data, but where existing geological mapping is poor, incomplete or outdated.

  16. An anti-fouling aptasensor for detection of thrombin by dual polarization interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Hu, Tao; Chen, Chuanxia; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xiurong

    2015-04-04

    An anti-fouling surface was designed to effectively resist nonspecific protein adsorption using dual polarization interferometry, based on which the aptasensor for detection of thrombin was fabricated according to the specific interaction between thrombin and its 15-mer aptamer.

  17. Human thrombin for the treatment of gastric and ectopic varices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Norma C McAvoy; John N Plevris; Peter C Hayes

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the efficacy of human thrombin in the treatment of bleeding gastric and ectopic varices.METHODS:Retrospective observational study in a Tertiary Referral Centre.Between January 1999-October 2005,we identified 37 patients who were endoscopically treated with human thrombin injection therapy for bleeding gastric and ectopic varices.Patient details including age,gender and aetiology of liver disease/ segmental portal hypertension were documented.The thrombin was obtained from the Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service and prepared to give a solution of 250 IU/mL which was injected via a standard injection needle.All patient case notes were reviewed and the total dose of thrombin given along with the number of endoscopy sessions was recorded.Initial haemostasis rates,rebleeding rates and mortality were catalogued along with the incidence of any immediate complications which could be attributable to the thrombin therapy.The duration of follow up was also listed.The study was conducted according to the United Kingdom research ethics guidelines.RESULTS:Thirty-seven patients were included.33 patients (89%) had thrombin (250 U/mL) for gastric varices,2 (5.4%) for duodenal varices,1 for rectal varices and 1 for gastric and rectal varices.(1) Gastric varices,an average of 15.2 mL of thrombin was used per patient.Re-bleeding occurred in 4 patients (10.8%),managed in 2 by a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPSS) (one unsuccessfully who died) and in other 2 by a distal splenorenal shunt; (2) Duodenal varices (or type 2 isolated gastric varices),an average of 12.5 mL was used per patient over 2-3 endoscopy sessions.Re-bleeding occurred in one patient,which was treated by TIPSS; and (3) Rectal varices,an average of 18.3 mL was used per patient over 3 endoscopy sessions.No re-bleeding occurred in this group.CONCLUSION:Human thrombin is a safe,easy to use and effective therapeutic option to control haemorrhage from gastric and ectopic varices.

  18. Concentration-Dependent Dual Role of Thrombin In Protection of Cultured Rat Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Paul S.; Ciavatta, Vincent T.; Fidler, Jonathan A.; Woodbury, Anna; Levy, Jerrold H.; Tyor, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Thrombin’s role in the nervous system is not well understood. Under conditions of blood-brain barrier compromise (e.g., neurosurgery or stroke), thrombin can result in neuroapoptosis and the formation of glial scars. Despite this, preconditioning with thrombin has been found to be neuroprotective in models of cerebral ischemia and intracerebral hemorrhage. Methods We investigated the effects of physiologically relevant concentrations of thrombin on cortical neurons using two culture-based assays. We examined thrombin’s effect on neurites by quantitative analysis of fluorescently labeled neurons. To characterize thrombin’s effects on neuron survival, we spectrophotometrically measured changes in enzymatic activity. Using receptor agonists and thrombin inhibitors, we separately examined the role of thrombin and its receptor in neuroprotection. Results We found that low concentrations of thrombin (1 nM) enhances neurite growth and branching, neuron viability, and protects against excitotoxic damage. In contrast, higher concentrations of thrombin (100 nM) are potentially detrimental to neuronal health as evidenced by inhibition of neurite growth. Lower concentrations of thrombin resulted in equivalent neuroprotection as the antifibrinolytic, aprotinin, and the direct thrombin inhibitor, argatroban. Interestingly, exogenous application of the species-specific thrombin inhibitor, antithrombin III, was detrimental to neuronal health; suggesting that some endogenous thrombin is necessary for optimal neuron health in our culture system. Activation of the thrombin receptor, protease-activated receptor - 1 (PAR-1), via micromolar concentrations of the thrombin receptor agonist peptide, TRAP, did not adversely affect neuronal viability. Conclusions An optimal concentration of thrombin exists to enhance neuronal health. Neurotoxic effects of thrombin do not involve activation of PAR receptors and thus separate pharmacologic manipulation of thrombin’s receptor

  19. Automated Synthetic Scene Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Föerstner, 1999), environmental modeling (Brenner, 1999), navigation (Auer, et al., 2010; Brenner, 2005), games and entertainment (Hearn and Baker, 1997...city planning, games and entertainment, and military planning, scenes have the additional requirement to be accurately attributed with visible color...Observation Platform (AOP) Pathfinder 2010 data release, National Ecological Observatory Network, URL: http://neoninc.org/pds/files/NEON.AOP.015068

  20. A second-generation device for automated training and quantitative behavior analyses of molecularly-tractable model organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Blackiston

    Full Text Available A deep understanding of cognitive processes requires functional, quantitative analyses of the steps leading from genetics and the development of nervous system structure to behavior. Molecularly-tractable model systems such as Xenopus laevis and planaria offer an unprecedented opportunity to dissect the mechanisms determining the complex structure of the brain and CNS. A standardized platform that facilitated quantitative analysis of behavior would make a significant impact on evolutionary ethology, neuropharmacology, and cognitive science. While some animal tracking systems exist, the available systems do not allow automated training (feedback to individual subjects in real time, which is necessary for operant conditioning assays. The lack of standardization in the field, and the numerous technical challenges that face the development of a versatile system with the necessary capabilities, comprise a significant barrier keeping molecular developmental biology labs from integrating behavior analysis endpoints into their pharmacological and genetic perturbations. Here we report the development of a second-generation system that is a highly flexible, powerful machine vision and environmental control platform. In order to enable multidisciplinary studies aimed at understanding the roles of genes in brain function and behavior, and aid other laboratories that do not have the facilities to undergo complex engineering development, we describe the device and the problems that it overcomes. We also present sample data using frog tadpoles and flatworms to illustrate its use. Having solved significant engineering challenges in its construction, the resulting design is a relatively inexpensive instrument of wide relevance for several fields, and will accelerate interdisciplinary discovery in pharmacology, neurobiology, regenerative medicine, and cognitive science.

  1. Increased anticoagulant activity of thrombin-binding DNA aptamers by nanoscale organization on DNA nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rangnekar, Abhijit; Zhang, Alex M.; Shiyuan Li, Susan;

    2012-01-01

    Control over thrombin activity is much desired to regulate blood clotting in surgical and therapeutic situations. Thrombin-binding RNA and DNA aptamers have been used to inhibit thrombin activity and thus the coagulation cascade. Soluble DNA aptamers, as well as two different aptamers tethered by...

  2. Enzyme-guided plasmonic biosensor based on dual-functional nanohybrid for sensitive detection of thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing; Wang, Lida; Tang, Longhua; Lin, Lei; Liu, Yang; Li, Jinghong

    2015-08-15

    Rapid and sensitive methodologies for the detection of protein are in urgent requirement for clinic diagnostics. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of metal nanostructures has the potential to circumvent this problem due to its sensitive optical properties and strong electromagnetic near-field enhancements. In this work, an enzyme mediated plasmonic biosensor on the basis of a dual-functional nanohybrid was developed for the detection of thrombin. By utilizing LSPR-responsive nanohybrid and anaptamer-enzyme conjugated reporting probe, the sensing platform brings enhanced signal, stability as well as simplicity. Enzymatic reaction catalyzed the reduction of Au(3+) to Au° in situ, further leading to the rapid crystal growth of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The LSPR absorbance band and color changed company with the nanoparticle generation, which can be real-time monitoring by UV-visible spectrophotometer and naked eye. Nanohybrid constructed by gold and magnetic nanoparticles acts as a dual functional plasmonic unit, which not only plays the role of signal production, but also endows the sensor with the function of magnetic separation. Simultaneously, the introduction of enzyme effectively regulates the programming crystal growth of AuNPs. In addition, enzyme also serves as signal amplifier owing to its high catalysis efficiency. The response of the plasmonic sensor varies linearly with the logarithmic thrombin concentration up to 10nM with a limit of detection of 200 pM. The as-proposed strategy shows good analytical performance for thrombin determination. This simple, disposable method is promising in developing universal platforms for protein monitoring, drug discovery and point-of-care diagnostics.

  3. Structure and behavior of human α-thrombin upon ligand recognition: thermodynamic and molecular dynamics studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian de Almeira Silva

    Full Text Available Thrombin is a serine proteinase that plays a fundamental role in coagulation. In this study, we address the effects of ligand site recognition by alpha-thrombin on conformation and energetics in solution. Active site occupation induces large changes in secondary structure content in thrombin as shown by circular dichroism. Thrombin-D-Phe-Pro-Arg-chloromethyl ketone (PPACK exhibits enhanced equilibrium and kinetic stability compared to free thrombin, whose difference is rooted in the unfolding step. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS measurements in solution reveal an overall similarity in the molecular envelope of thrombin and thrombin-PPACK, which differs from the crystal structure of thrombin. Molecular dynamics simulations performed with thrombin lead to different conformations than the one observed in the crystal structure. These data shed light on the diversity of thrombin conformers not previously observed in crystal structures with distinguished catalytic and conformational behaviors, which might have direct implications on novel strategies to design direct thrombin inhibitors.

  4. Benchmarks on automated system and software generation higher flexibility increased productivity and shorter time-to-market by ScaPable software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlich, Rainer

    2002-07-01

    "ScaPable" is an acronym derived from "scalable" and "portable". The attribute "scalable" indicates that specific application software can automatically be built from scratch and verified without writing any statement in a programming language like C, thereby covering a large variety of embedded and/or distributed applications. The term "portable" addresses the capability to automatically port parts of such an application from one physical node to another one - the processor and operating system type may change - only requiring the names of the nodes, their processor type and operating system. This way the infrastructure of an embedded / distributed system can be built just by provision of literals and figures which define the system interaction, communication, topology and performance. Moreover, dedicated application software like needed for on-board command handling, data acquisition and processing, and telemetry handling can be built from generic templates. The generation time range from less than one second up to about twenty minutes on a PC/Linux platform (800 MHz). By this extremely short generation time risks can be identified early because the executable application is immediately available for validation. A rough estimation shows that one hour of automated system and software generation is equivalent to about 5 .. 50 man years. Currently, about 50% of a typical space embedded system can be covered by the available automated approach. However, the more it is applied, the more can be covered by automation. A system is constructed by applying a formal transformation to the few information as delivered by the user. This approach is not limited to the space domain, although the first industrial application was a space project. Quite different domains can take advantage of such principles of system construction. This paper explains the approach, compares it with other approaches, and provides figures on productivity, duration of system generation and reliability.

  5. Thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor as a bleeding predictor in liver transplantation: a pilot observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedel, Wagner Luis; Rodrigues Filho, Edison Moraes; Pasqualotto, Alessandro Comarú

    2016-01-01

    Objective To correlate the levels of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor in the immediate postoperative period and at 24 hours postoperatively with the volume of intraoperative bleeding. Methods Twenty-one patients allocated immediately before (elective or emergency) liver transplantation were analyzed. Blood samples were collected for thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor analysis at three different time points: immediately before liver transplantation (preoperative thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor), immediately after the surgical procedure (immediate postoperative thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor), and 24 hours after surgery (thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor 24 hours after surgery). The primary outcome of the study was to correlate the preoperative and immediate postoperative levels of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor with intraoperative blood loss. Results There was a correlation between the preoperative thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor levels and bleeding volume (ρ = -0.469; p = 0.05) but no correlation between the immediate postoperative thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor and bleeding volume (ρ = -0.062; p = 0.79). No variable included in the linear regression analysis (prehemoglobin, prefibrinogen and preoperative thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor) was a bleeding predictor. There was a similar trend in the variation between the levels of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor at the three different time points and fibrinogen levels. Patients who died within 6 months (14.3%) showed decreased preoperative and immediate postoperative levels of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis compared with survivors (preoperative: 1.3 ± 0.15 versus 2.55 ± 0.53, p = 0.06; immediate postoperative: 1.2 ± 0.15 versus 2.5 ± 0.42, p = 0.007). Conclusion There was a moderate correlation between preoperative thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor and intraoperative bleeding in liver

  6. DG-AMMOS: A New tool to generate 3D conformation of small molecules using Distance Geometry and Automated Molecular Mechanics Optimization for in silico Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villoutreix Bruno O

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discovery of new bioactive molecules that could enter drug discovery programs or that could serve as chemical probes is a very complex and costly endeavor. Structure-based and ligand-based in silico screening approaches are nowadays extensively used to complement experimental screening approaches in order to increase the effectiveness of the process and facilitating the screening of thousands or millions of small molecules against a biomolecular target. Both in silico screening methods require as input a suitable chemical compound collection and most often the 3D structure of the small molecules has to be generated since compounds are usually delivered in 1D SMILES, CANSMILES or in 2D SDF formats. Results Here, we describe the new open source program DG-AMMOS which allows the generation of the 3D conformation of small molecules using Distance Geometry and their energy minimization via Automated Molecular Mechanics Optimization. The program is validated on the Astex dataset, the ChemBridge Diversity database and on a number of small molecules with known crystal structures extracted from the Cambridge Structural Database. A comparison with the free program Balloon and the well-known commercial program Omega generating the 3D of small molecules is carried out. The results show that the new free program DG-AMMOS is a very efficient 3D structure generator engine. Conclusion DG-AMMOS provides fast, automated and reliable access to the generation of 3D conformation of small molecules and facilitates the preparation of a compound collection prior to high-throughput virtual screening computations. The validation of DG-AMMOS on several different datasets proves that generated structures are generally of equal quality or sometimes better than structures obtained by other tested methods.

  7. Thrombin-cleaved COOH(-) terminal osteopontin peptide binds with cyclophilin C to CD147 in murine breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Zhiyong; Oliver, Tim; Guo, Hongtao; Gao, Chengjiang; Kuo, Paul C

    2007-05-01

    Osteopontin is a glycoprotein that has been linked to metastatic function in breast, lung, and prostate cancers. However, the mechanism by which osteopontin acts to induce metastatic properties is largely unknown. One intriguing feature of osteopontin is the presence of a conserved thrombin cleavage site that is COOH-terminal from a well-characterized RGD domain. Although the COOH-terminal fragment may bind to cell surface CD44 receptors, little is known about the COOH-terminal osteopontin fragment. In the current study, we use the murine mammary epithelial tumor cell lines 4T1 and 4T07; these cells are thioguanine-resistant sublines derived from the parental population of 410.4 cells from Balb/cfC3H mice. Using flow cytometry and Forster resonance energy transfer, we show that the COOH-terminal fragment of osteopontin binds with another marker of metastatic function (cyclophilin C or rotamase) to the CD147 cell surface glycoprotein (also known as extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer), to activate Akt1/2 and matrix metalloproteinase-2. In in vitro assays, thrombin cleavage of osteopontin to generate short COOH-terminal osteopontin in the presence of cyclophilin C increases migration and invasion of both 4T07 and 4T1 cells. This interaction between osteopontin peptide and cyclophilin C has not been previously described but assigns a heretofore unknown function for the thrombin-cleaved osteopontin COOH-terminal fragment.

  8. Thrombin-Based Hemostatic Agent in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Tian, Peng; Xu, Gui-Jun; Sun, Xiao-Lei; Ma, Xin-Long

    2017-02-01

    The present meta-analysis pooled the results from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to identify and assess the efficacy and safety of thrombin-based hemostatic agent in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Potential academic articles were identified from the Cochrane Library, Medline (1966-2015.5), PubMed (1966-2015.5), Embase (1980-2015.5), and ScienceDirect (1966-2015.5). Relevant journals and the recommendations of expert panels were also searched by using Google search engine. RCTs assessing the efficacy and safety of thrombin-based hemostatic agent in primary TKA were included. Pooling of data was analyzed by RevMan 5.1 (The Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK). A total of four RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis revealed significant differences in postoperative hemoglobin decline (p < 0.00001), total blood loss (p < 0.00001), drainage volume (p = 0.01), and allogenic blood transfusion (p = 0.01) between the treatment group and the control group. No significant differences were found regarding incidence of infection (p = 0.45) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT; p = 0.80) between the groups. Meta-analysis indicated that the application of thrombin-based hemostatic agent before wound closure decreased postoperative hemoglobin decline, drainage volume, total blood loss, and transfusion rate and did not increase the risk of infection, DVT, or other complications. Therefore, the reviewers believe that thrombin-based hemostatic agent is effective and safe in primary TKA.

  9. Thrombin regulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity: implications for health and disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina eBen Shimon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Thrombin, a serine protease involved in the blood coagulation cascade has been shown to affect neural function following blood-brain barrier breakdown. However, several lines of evidence exist that thrombin is also expressed in the brain under physiological conditions, suggesting an involvement of thrombin in the regulation of normal brain functions. Here, we review ours’ as well as others' recent work on the role of thrombin in synaptic transmission and plasticity through direct or indirect activation of Protease-Activated Receptor-1 (PAR1. These studies propose a novel role of thrombin in synaptic plasticity, both in physiology as well as in neurological diseases associated with increased brain thrombin/PAR1 levels.

  10. Spacial isolation of protein kinase C activation in thrombin stimulated human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, M F; Lapetina, E G

    1988-10-14

    Thrombin stimulation of human platelets is associated with turnover of inositol phospholipids, mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ stores, and activation of protein kinase C. However, within 5 minutes, the thrombin receptor desensitizes, but can be re-coupled to its effectors by stimulation of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors (Crouch and Lapetina, J. Biol. Chem. 263, 3363-3371, 1988). This effect of epinephrine was found to be inhibited by preincubation of platelets with phorbol ester, suggesting that protein kinase C was inhibitory. However, since thrombin also activated protein kinase C and epinephrine was active following thrombin stimulation of platelets, this implied that thrombin activation of protein kinase C may have been spacially isolated near the thrombin receptor and could not inactivate alpha 2-receptor activity. In the present paper, we have tested this possibility, and we present evidence which strongly favours the possibility that protein kinase C activation by receptors induces its local translocation to the cell membrane.

  11. Argatroban-coupled Affi-Gel matrix for the purification of thrombin from plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkowitz, Jerry B

    2005-10-01

    Sometimes it is necessary to obtain thrombin from limited amounts of human plasma for laboratory assay. None of the available purification methods easily deals with this subject. The procedure described in the present paper uses a readily available pharmaceutical agent, argatroban, to construct an affinity matrix. Argatroban has a high affinity for thrombin and its thrombin binding is reversible. Prothrombin derived from a Ba(2+) precipitate of human plasma is used as the starting material. The crude prothrombin can be bulk activated to thrombin using taipan-snake (Oxyuranus scutellatus) venom and bound to the argatroban-coupled matrix without further processing steps. The thrombin product eluted from the argatroban matrix is very pure as judged by high specific activity and by electrophoresis. This purification scheme is rapid, yielding purified thrombin within 2 days.

  12. AG-NGS: a powerful and user-friendly computing application for the semi-automated preparation of next-generation sequencing libraries using open liquid handling platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callejas, Sergio; Álvarez, Rebeca; Benguria, Alberto; Dopazo, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is becoming one of the most widely used technologies in the field of genomics. Library preparation is one of the most critical, hands-on, and time-consuming steps in the NGS workflow. Each library must be prepared in an independent well, increasing the number of hours required for a sequencing run and the risk of human-introduced error. Automation of library preparation is the best option to avoid these problems. With this in mind, we have developed automatic genomics NGS (AG-NGS), a computing application that allows an open liquid handling platform to be transformed into a library preparation station without losing the potential of an open platform. Implementation of AG-NGS does not require programming experience, and the application has also been designed to minimize implementation costs. Automated library preparation with AG-NGS generated high-quality libraries from different samples, demonstrating its efficiency, and all quality control parameters fell within the range of optimal values.

  13. Fast and Efficient Fragment-Based Lead Generation by Fully Automated Processing and Analysis of Ligand-Observed NMR Binding Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chen; Frommlet, Alexandra; Perez, Manuel; Cobas, Carlos; Blechschmidt, Anke; Dominguez, Santiago; Lingel, Andreas

    2016-04-14

    NMR binding assays are routinely applied in hit finding and validation during early stages of drug discovery, particularly for fragment-based lead generation. To this end, compound libraries are screened by ligand-observed NMR experiments such as STD, T1ρ, and CPMG to identify molecules interacting with a target. The analysis of a high number of complex spectra is performed largely manually and therefore represents a limiting step in hit generation campaigns. Here we report a novel integrated computational procedure that processes and analyzes ligand-observed proton and fluorine NMR binding data in a fully automated fashion. A performance evaluation comparing automated and manual analysis results on (19)F- and (1)H-detected data sets shows that the program delivers robust, high-confidence hit lists in a fraction of the time needed for manual analysis and greatly facilitates visual inspection of the associated NMR spectra. These features enable considerably higher throughput, the assessment of larger libraries, and shorter turn-around times.

  14. Warehouse automation

    OpenAIRE

    Pogačnik, Jure

    2017-01-01

    An automated high bay warehouse is commonly used for storing large number of material with a high throughput. In an automated warehouse pallet movements are mainly performed by a number of automated devices like conveyors systems, trolleys, and stacker cranes. From the introduction of the material to the automated warehouse system to its dispatch the system requires no operator input or intervention since all material movements are done automatically. This allows the automated warehouse to op...

  15. Task of generation of variants of subsystems in to the automated hydrometeorological system on basis of morphological synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Доронина, Юлия Валентиновна

    2011-01-01

    The aspects of generation of variants of subsystems are examined for  the hydrometeorological system. Principles of generation of variants are rotined on the basis of morphological synthesis, statements of genetic algorithm

  16. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Thrombin Injection in Iatrogenic Arterial Pseudoaneurysms: Effectiveness and Complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Young Hwan [Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Soo; Kim, Hyung Sik; Min, Seung Kee [Gachon Medical School, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    To evaluate and describe the efficacy and side effects of a percutaneous thrombin injection under ultrasonography guidance for the treatment of iatrogenic pseudo aneurysms Eighteen consecutive iatrogenic pseudo aneurysm cases were treated with a thrombin injection. The thrombin was injected into the pseudo aneurysm cavity using a 22-gauge needle under ultrasonographic guidance. The causes of the pseudo aneurysms are as follows: post coronary angiography (9 cases), percutaneous coronary balloon angioplasty (5 cases), cerebral angiography (1 case), transhepatic chemo embolization (1 case), percutaneous trans femoral arterial stent insertion (1 case) and bone marrow aspiration for a marrow transplant (1 case). Only one case required a secondary thrombin injection due to recurrent flow in the pseudo aneurysm lumen, which was detected at the follow up Doppler ultrasound. Other seventeen cases were successfully treated on the first trial. There were no technical failures or complication related to the procedure. The average amount of thrombin injected was 733 IU. Nine out of 18 treated patients (50%) showed mild reactions to the thrombin including mild fever (4 cases), chilling sensation (3 cases), a chilling sensation with mild dyspnea (1 case), mild chest discomfort (1 case) after the thrombin injection. All these side effects were transient and improved several hours later. All the iatrogenic pseudo aneurysms were treated successfully with an ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection. There was a high rate of hypersensitivity to the bovine thrombin, which precaution should be taken to prevent more serious side effects

  17. Binding of thrombin-activated platelets to a fibrin scaffold through α(IIbβ₃ evokes phosphatidylserine exposure on their cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Brzoska

    Full Text Available Recently, by employing intra-vital confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that platelets expose phosphatidylserine (PS and fibrin accumulate only in the center of the thrombus but not in its periphery. To address the question how exposure of platelet anionic phospholipids is regulated within the thrombus, an in-vitro experiment using diluted platelet-rich plasma was employed, in which the fibrin network was formed in the presence of platelets, and PS exposure on the platelet surface was analyzed using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy. Almost all platelets exposed PS after treatment with tissue factor, thrombin or ionomycin. Argatroban abrogated fibrin network formation in all samples, however, platelet PS exposure was inhibited only in tissue factor- and thrombin-treated samples but not in ionomycin-treated samples. FK633, an α(IIbβ₃ antagonist, and cytochalasin B impaired platelet binding to the fibrin scaffold and significantly reduced PS exposure evoked by thrombin. Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro amide abrogated not only fibrin network formation, but also PS exposure on platelets without suppressing platelet binding to fibrin/fibrinogen. These results suggest that outside-in signals in platelets generated by their binding to the rigid fibrin network are essential for PS exposure after thrombin treatment.

  18. Proteolytic modulation of thrombopoietin activity: comparison of thrombin, plasmin, and urokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, A P; Aramaki, K M

    2000-06-01

    Several observations suggest that limited proteolysis of full-length 70 kD human thrombopoietin (Tpo) may be important for Tpo biology. Recently, it was reported that thrombin cleaves full-length recombinant human Tpo (rhTpo) sequentially at two sites, Arg(195) within the glycan domain followed by Arg(117) within the cytokine domain, and that these cleavages modulate Tpo activity in vitro. We demonstrate that urokinase and plasmin also cleave rhTpo in a time-dependent manner. Urokinase cleavage is confined to the glycan domain, and generates a 35 kD N-terminal fragment that contains the intact cytokine domain, and is associated with increased Tpo activity. In contrast, plasmin cleaves Tpo sequentially at two specific sites (Arg(205) within the glycan domain followed by Lys(52) within the cytokine domain), and is associated with a marked decrease in Tpo activity. These proteolytic events have potential implications for regulation of Tpo activity in vivo.

  19. Arsenic fractionation in agricultural soil using an automated three-step sequential extraction method coupled to hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Castor, J M; Portugal, L; Ferrer, L; Guzmán-Mar, J L; Hernández-Ramírez, A; Cerdà, V; Hinojosa-Reyes, L

    2015-05-18

    A fully automated modified three-step BCR flow-through sequential extraction method was developed for the fractionation of the arsenic (As) content from agricultural soil based on a multi-syringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) system coupled to hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). Critical parameters that affect the performance of the automated system were optimized by exploiting a multivariate approach using a Doehlert design. The validation of the flow-based modified-BCR method was carried out by comparison with the conventional BCR method. Thus, the total As content was determined in the following three fractions: fraction 1 (F1), the acid-soluble or interchangeable fraction; fraction 2 (F2), the reducible fraction; and fraction 3 (F3), the oxidizable fraction. The limits of detection (LOD) were 4.0, 3.4, and 23.6 μg L(-1) for F1, F2, and F3, respectively. A wide working concentration range was obtained for the analysis of each fraction, i.e., 0.013-0.800, 0.011-0.900 and 0.079-1.400 mg L(-1) for F1, F2, and F3, respectively. The precision of the automated MSFIA-HG-AFS system, expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD), was evaluated for a 200 μg L(-1) As standard solution, and RSD values between 5 and 8% were achieved for the three BCR fractions. The new modified three-step BCR flow-based sequential extraction method was satisfactorily applied for arsenic fractionation in real agricultural soil samples from an arsenic-contaminated mining zone to evaluate its extractability. The frequency of analysis of the proposed method was eight times higher than that of the conventional BCR method (6 vs 48 h), and the kinetics of lixiviation were established for each fraction.

  20. Arsenic fractionation in agricultural soil using an automated three-step sequential extraction method coupled to hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosas-Castor, J.M. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, UANL, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 Nuevo León (Mexico); Group of Analytical Chemistry, Automation and Environment, University of Balearic Islands, Cra. Valldemossa km 7.5, 07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Portugal, L.; Ferrer, L. [Group of Analytical Chemistry, Automation and Environment, University of Balearic Islands, Cra. Valldemossa km 7.5, 07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Guzmán-Mar, J.L.; Hernández-Ramírez, A. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, UANL, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 Nuevo León (Mexico); Cerdà, V. [Group of Analytical Chemistry, Automation and Environment, University of Balearic Islands, Cra. Valldemossa km 7.5, 07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Hinojosa-Reyes, L., E-mail: laura.hinojosary@uanl.edu.mx [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, UANL, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 Nuevo León (Mexico)

    2015-05-18

    Highlights: • A fully automated flow-based modified-BCR extraction method was developed to evaluate the extractable As of soil. • The MSFIA–HG-AFS system included an UV photo-oxidation step for organic species degradation. • The accuracy and precision of the proposed method were found satisfactory. • The time analysis can be reduced up to eight times by using the proposed flow-based BCR method. • The labile As (F1 + F2) was <50% of total As in soil samples from As-contaminated-mining zones. - Abstract: A fully automated modified three-step BCR flow-through sequential extraction method was developed for the fractionation of the arsenic (As) content from agricultural soil based on a multi-syringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) system coupled to hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). Critical parameters that affect the performance of the automated system were optimized by exploiting a multivariate approach using a Doehlert design. The validation of the flow-based modified-BCR method was carried out by comparison with the conventional BCR method. Thus, the total As content was determined in the following three fractions: fraction 1 (F1), the acid-soluble or interchangeable fraction; fraction 2 (F2), the reducible fraction; and fraction 3 (F3), the oxidizable fraction. The limits of detection (LOD) were 4.0, 3.4, and 23.6 μg L{sup −1} for F1, F2, and F3, respectively. A wide working concentration range was obtained for the analysis of each fraction, i.e., 0.013–0.800, 0.011–0.900 and 0.079–1.400 mg L{sup −1} for F1, F2, and F3, respectively. The precision of the automated MSFIA–HG-AFS system, expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD), was evaluated for a 200 μg L{sup −1} As standard solution, and RSD values between 5 and 8% were achieved for the three BCR fractions. The new modified three-step BCR flow-based sequential extraction method was satisfactorily applied for arsenic fractionation in real agricultural

  1. Active Data Archive Product Tracking and Automated SPASE Metadata Generation in Support of the Heliophysics Data Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2013-12-01

    The understanding of Solar interaction with the Earth and other bodies in the solar system is a primary goal of Heliophysics as outlined in the NASA Science Mission Directive Science Plan. Heliophysics researchers need access to a vast collection of satellite and ground-based observations coupled with numerical simulation data to study complex processes some of which, as in the case of space weather, pose danger to physical elements of modern society. The infrastructure of the Heliophysics data environment plays a vital role in furthering the understanding of space physics processes by providing researchers with means for data discovery and access. The Heliophysics data environment is highly dynamic with thousands of data products involved. Access to data is facilitated via the Heliophysics Virtual Observatories (VxO) but routine access is possible only if the VxO SPASE metadata repositories contain accurate and up to date information. The Heliophysics Data Consortium has the stated goal of providing routine access to all relevant data products inclusively. Currently, only a small fraction of the data products relevant to Heliophysics studies have been described and registered in a VxO repository. And, for those products that have been described in SPASE, there is a significant time lag from when new data becomes available to when VxO metadata are updated to provide access. It is possible to utilize automated tools to shorten the response time of VxO data product registration via active data archive product tracking. Such a systematic approach is designed to address data access reliability by embracing the highly dynamic nature of the Heliophysics data environment. For example, the CDAWEB data repository located at the NASA Space Science Physics Data facility maintains logs of the data products served to the community. These files include two that pertain to full directory list information, updated daily, and a set of SHA1SUM hash value files, one for each of more

  2. Automated Calculation Scheme for alpha^n Contributions of QED to Lepton g-2: Generating Renormalized Amplitudes for Diagrams without Lepton Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Aoyama, T; Kinoshita, T; Nio, M

    2006-01-01

    Among 12672 Feynman diagrams contributing to the electron anomalous magnetic moment at the tenth order, 6354 are the diagrams having no lepton loops, i.e., those of quenched type. Because the renormalization structure of these diagrams is very complicated, some automation scheme is inevitable to calculate them. We developed an algorithm to write down FORTRAN programs for numerical evaluation of these diagrams, where the necessary counterterms to subtract out ultraviolet subdivergence are generated according to Zimmermann's forest formula. Thus far we have evaluated crudely integrals of 2232 tenth-order vertex diagrams which require vertex renormalization only. Remaining 4122 diagrams, which have ultraviolet-divergent self-energy subdiagrams and infrared-divergent subdiagrams, are being evaluated by giving small mass lambda to photons to control the infrared problem.

  3. Thrombin stimulates VSMC proliferation through an EGFR-dependent pathway: involvement of MMP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiljanic, Katarina; Obradovic, Milan; Jovanovic, Aleksandra; Djordjevic, Jelena; Dobutovic, Branislava; Jevremovic, Danimir; Marche, Pierre; Isenovic, Esma R

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF), general metalloproteinases, matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2) in mediating the mitogenic action of thrombin in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) was investigated. The incubation of rat VSMC with thrombin (1 U/ml) for 5 min resulted in significant (p EGFR phosphorylation by 8.5 ± 1.3-fold (p EGFR tyrosine kinase irreversible inhibitor, 10 µM PD169540 (PD), and 20 µM anti-HB-EGF antibody significantly reduced thrombin-stimulated EGFR and ERK1/2 phosphorylation by 81, 72 % and by 48 and 61 %, respectively. Furthermore, the same pretreatments with PD or anti-HB-EGF antibody reduced thrombin-induced VSMC proliferation by 44 and 45 %, respectively. In addition, 30-min pretreatments with 10 µM specific MMP-2 inhibitor significantly reduced thrombin-stimulated phosphorylation of both EGFR and ERK1/2 by 25 %. Moreover, the same pretreatment with MMP-2 inhibitor reduced thrombin-induced VSMC proliferation by 45 %. These results show that the thrombin-induced DNA synthesis correlates with the level of ERK1/2 activation rather than EGFR activation. These results further suggest that thrombin acts through EGFR and ERK 1/2 signaling pathways involving MMP-2 to upregulate proliferation of VSMC.

  4. Three different signal amplification strategies for the impedimetric sandwich detection of thrombin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocaña, Cristina; Valle, Manel del, E-mail: manel.delvalle@uab.cat

    2016-03-17

    In this work, we report a comparative study on three highly specific amplification strategies for the ultrasensitive detection of thrombin with the use of aptamer sandwich protocol. The protocol consisted on the use of a first thrombin aptamer immobilized on the electrode surface, the recognition of thrombin protein, and the reaction with a second biotinylated thrombin aptamer forming the sandwich. Through the exposed biotin end, three variants have been tested to amplify the electrochemical impedance signal. The strategies included (a) silver enhancement treatment, (b) gold enhancement treatment and (c) insoluble product produced by the combination of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and 3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole (AEC). The properties of the sensing surface were probed by electrochemical impedance measurements in the presence of the ferrocyanide/ferricyanide redox marker. Insoluble product strategy and silver enhancement treatment resulted in the lowest detection limit (0.3 pM), while gold enhancement method resulted in the highest reproducibility, 8.8% RSD at the pM thrombin concentration levels. Results of silver and gold enhancement treatment also permitted direct inspection by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). - Highlights: • Aptasensor to detect thrombin reaching the femtomolar level. • Biosensing protocol employs two thrombin aptamers in a sandwich capture scheme. • Use of second biotinylated aptamer allows many amplification and detection variants. • Precipitation reaction provides the highest signal amplification of ca. 3 times. • Double recognition event improves remarkably selectivity for thrombin detection.

  5. Using Automated Processes to Generate Test Items And Their Associated Solutions and Rationales to Support Formative Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Gierl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Automatic item generation is the process of using item models to produce assessment tasks using computer technology. An item model is similar to a template that highlights the elements in the task that must be manipulated to produce new items. The purpose of our study is to describe an innovative method for generating large numbers of diverse and heterogeneous items along with their solutions and associated rationales to support formative feedback. We demonstrate the method by generating items in two diverse content areas, mathematics and nonverbal reasoning

  6. Accounting Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Laynebaril1

    2017-01-01

    Accounting Automation   Click Link Below To Buy:   http://hwcampus.com/shop/accounting-automation/  Or Visit www.hwcampus.com Accounting Automation” Please respond to the following: Imagine you are a consultant hired to convert a manual accounting system to an automated system. Suggest the key advantages and disadvantages of automating a manual accounting system. Identify the most important step in the conversion process. Provide a rationale for your response. ...

  7. Automated tube voltage selection for radiation dose and contrast medium reduction at coronary CT angiography using 3{sup rd} generation dual-source CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangold, Stefanie [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Wichmann, Julian L. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States); Poole, Zachary B.; Varga-Szemes, Akos; De Cecco, Carlo N. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Canstein, Christian [Siemens Medical Solutions, Malvern, PA (United States); Caruso, Damiano [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Rome (Italy); Bamberg, Fabian; Nikolaou, Konstantin [Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    To investigate the relationship between automated tube voltage selection (ATVS) and body mass index (BMI) and its effect on image quality and radiation dose of coronary CT angiography (CCTA). We evaluated 272 patients who underwent CCTA with 3{sup rd} generation dual-source CT (DSCT). Prospectively ECG-triggered spiral acquisition was performed with automated tube current selection and advanced iterative reconstruction. Tube voltages were selected by ATVS (70-120 kV). BMI, effective dose (ED), and vascular attenuation in the coronary arteries were recorded. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Five-point scales were used for subjective image quality analysis. Image quality was rated good to excellent in 98.9 % of examinations without significant differences for proximal and distal attenuation (all p ≥.0516), whereas image noise was rated significantly higher at 70 kV compared to ≥100 kV (all p <.0266). However, no significant differences were observed in SNR or CNR at 70-120 kV (all p ≥.0829). Mean ED at 70-120 kV was 1.5 ± 1.2 mSv, 2.4 ± 1.5 mSv, 3.6 ± 2.7 mSv, 5.9 ± 4.0 mSv, 7.9 ± 4.2 mSv, and 10.7 ± 4.1 mSv, respectively (all p ≤.0414). Correlation analysis showed a moderate association between tube voltage and BMI (r =.639). ATVS allows individual tube voltage adaptation for CCTA performed with 3{sup rd} generation DSCT, resulting in significantly decreased radiation exposure while maintaining image quality. (orig.)

  8. Enzyme engineering: A synthetic biology approach for more effective library generation and automated high-throughput screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Maximilian C. C. J. C.; Mugford, Paul F.; Pelletier, Joelle N.

    2017-01-01

    The Golden Gate strategy entails the use of type IIS restriction enzymes, which cut outside of their recognition sequence. It enables unrestricted design of unique DNA fragments that can be readily and seamlessly recombined. Successfully employed in other synthetic biology applications, we demonstrate its advantageous use to engineer a biocatalyst. Hot-spots for mutations were individuated in three distinct regions of Candida antarctica lipase A (Cal-A), the biocatalyst chosen as a target to demonstrate the versatility of this recombination method. The three corresponding gene segments were subjected to the most appropriate method of mutagenesis (targeted or random). Their straightforward reassembly allowed combining products of different mutagenesis methods in a single round for rapid production of a series of diverse libraries, thus facilitating directed evolution. Screening to improve discrimination of short-chain versus long-chain fatty acid substrates was aided by development of a general, automated method for visual discrimination of the hydrolysis of varied substrates by whole cells. PMID:28178357

  9. DEFINITION OF A SEMANTIC PLATAFORM FOR AUTOMATED CODE GENERATION BASED ON UML CLASS DIAGRAMS AND DSL SEMANTIC ANNOTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDRÉS MUÑETÓN

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se propone una plataforma semántica de servicios que implementan los pasos de un método para la generación automática de código. El método se basa en información semántica y en MDA (model-driven architecture. La generación de código se logra relacionando semánticamente operaciones en diagramas de clases en UML (unified modeling language con operaciones implementadas. La relación entre operaciones se hace consultando operaciones implementadas que tengan la misma postcondición de la operación bajo implementación. El código resultante es una secuencia de invocaciones a operaciones implementadas que, en conjunto, alcancen la postcondición de la operación bajo implementación. La semántica se especifica mediante un DSL (domain-specific language, también definido en este artículo. Los servicios de la plataforma y el método se prueban mediante un caso de estudio.

  10. Home Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Zeeshan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I briefly discuss the importance of home automation system. Going in to the details I briefly present a real time designed and implemented software and hardware oriented house automation research project, capable of automating house's electricity and providing a security system to detect the presence of unexpected behavior.

  11. Rule-based programming and strategies for automated generation of detailed kinetic models for gas phase combustion of polycyclic hydrocarbon molecules; Programmation par regles et strategies pour la generation automatique de mecanismes de combustion d'hydrocarbures polycycliques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanescu, L.

    2004-06-15

    The primary objective of this thesis is to explore the approach of using rule-based systems and strategies, for a complex problem of chemical kinetic: the automated generation of reaction mechanisms. The chemical reactions are naturally expressed as conditional rewriting rules. The control of the chemical reactions chaining is easy to describe using a strategies language, such as the one of the ELAN system, developed in the Protheo team. The thesis presents the basic concepts of the chemical kinetics, the chemical and computational problems related to the conception and validation of a reaction mechanism, and gives a general structure for the generator of reaction mechanisms called GasEI. Our research focuses on the primary mechanism generator. We give solutions for encoding the chemical species, the reactions and their chaining, and we present the prototype developed in ELAN. The representation of the chemical species uses the notion of molecular graphs, encoded by a term structure called GasEI terms. The chemical reactions are expressed by rewriting rules on molecular graphs, encoded by a set of conditional rewriting rules on GasEI terms. The strategies language of the ELAN system is used to express the reactions chaining in the primary mechanism generator. This approach is illustrated by coding ten generic reactions of the oxidizing pyrolysis. Qualitative chemical validations of the prototype show that our approach gives, for acyclic molecules, the same results as the existing mechanism generators, and for polycyclic molecules produces original results.

  12. Application of Discrete Control System in Automation of 200 MW Power Generating Set%分散控制系统在200 MW机组自动化中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李维群; 陈勇; 赖建明; 王志兵; 孙德利

    2000-01-01

    Justifies the automation of 200 MW power generating set, illustrates the automation scheme for 200 MW power generating set, its technical specisl features, technical problems to be solved, operational efficiency with typical examples, and suggests further actions for future automation.%阐述200 MW机组自动化改造的必要性,通过实例介绍了200 MW机组自动化改造的技术方案、技术特点、解决的技术问题、运行效果以及对今后自动化改造的一些探讨性建议。

  13. Photoactivation by visible light of CdTe quantum dots for inline generation of reactive oxygen species in an automated multipumping flow system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, David S.M.; Frigerio, Christian; Santos, Joao L.M. [Requimte, Department of Chemical Sciences, Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira no. 228, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Prior, Joao A.V., E-mail: joaoavp@ff.up.pt [Requimte, Department of Chemical Sciences, Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira no. 228, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal)

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CdTe quantum dots generate free radical species upon exposure to visible radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high power visible LED lamp was used as photoirradiation element. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laboratory-made LED photocatalytic unit was implemented inline in a MPFS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Free radical species oxidize luminol producing a strong chemiluminescence emission. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Epinephrine scavenges free radical species quenching chemiluminescence emission. - Abstract: Quantum dots (QD) are semiconductor nanocrystals able to generate free radical species upon exposure to an electromagnetic radiation, usually in the ultraviolet wavelength range. In this work, CdTe QD were used as highly reactive oxygen species (ROS) generators for the control of pharmaceutical formulations containing epinephrine. The developed approach was based on the chemiluminometric monitoring of the quenching effect of epinephrine on the oxidation of luminol by the produced ROS. Due to the relatively low energy band-gap of this chalcogenide a high power visible light emitting diode (LED) lamp was used as photoirradiation element and assembled in a laboratory-made photocatalytic unit. Owing to the very short lifetime of ROS and to ensure both reproducible generation and time-controlled reaction implementation and development, all reactional processes were implemented inline by using an automated multipumping micro-flow system. A linear working range for epinephrine concentration of up to 2.28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1} (r = 0.9953; n = 5) was verified. The determination rate was about 79 determinations per hour and the detection limit was about 8.69 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} mol L{sup -1}. The results obtained in the analysis of epinephrine pharmaceutical formulations by using the proposed methodology were in good agreement with those furnished by the reference procedure, with

  14. Computed tomography landmark-based semi-automated mesh morphing and mapping techniques: generation of patient specific models of the human pelvis without segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, Zoryana; Beek, Maarten; Wright, David; Whyne, Cari Marisa

    2015-04-13

    Current methods for the development of pelvic finite element (FE) models generally are based upon specimen specific computed tomography (CT) data. This approach has traditionally required segmentation of CT data sets, which is time consuming and necessitates high levels of user intervention due to the complex pelvic anatomy. The purpose of this research was to develop and assess CT landmark-based semi-automated mesh morphing and mapping techniques to aid the generation and mechanical analysis of specimen-specific FE models of the pelvis without the need for segmentation. A specimen-specific pelvic FE model (source) was created using traditional segmentation methods and morphed onto a CT scan of a different (target) pelvis using a landmark-based method. The morphed model was then refined through mesh mapping by moving the nodes to the bone boundary. A second target model was created using traditional segmentation techniques. CT intensity based material properties were assigned to the morphed/mapped model and to the traditionally segmented target models. Models were analyzed to evaluate their geometric concurrency and strain patterns. Strains generated in a double-leg stance configuration were compared to experimental strain gauge data generated from the same target cadaver pelvis. CT landmark-based morphing and mapping techniques were efficiently applied to create a geometrically multifaceted specimen-specific pelvic FE model, which was similar to the traditionally segmented target model and better replicated the experimental strain results (R(2)=0.873). This study has shown that mesh morphing and mapping represents an efficient validated approach for pelvic FE model generation without the need for segmentation.

  15. Organotin speciation in environmental matrices by automated on-line hydride generation-programmed temperature vaporization-capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, H; Nogueira, J M F

    2005-11-11

    In the present contribution, a new automated on-line hydride generation methodology was developed for dibutyltin and tributyltin speciation at the trace level, using a programmable temperature-vaporizing inlet followed by capillary gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in the selected ion-monitoring mode acquisition (PTV-GC/MS(SIM)). The methodology involves a sequence defined by two running methods, the first one configured for hydride generation with sodium tetrahydroborate as derivatising agent and the second configured for speciation purposes, using a conventional autosampler and data acquisition controlled by the instrument's software. From the method-development experiments, it had been established that injector configuration has a great effect on the speciation of the actual methodology, particularly, the initial inlet temperature (-20 degrees C; He: 150 ml/min), injection volume (2 microl) and solvent characteristics using the solvent venting mode. Under optimized conditions, a remarkable instrumental performance including very good precision (RSD CRM 462, Nr. 330 dibutyltin: 68+/-12 ng/g; tributyltin: 54+/-15 ng/g on dry mass basis), using liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) sample enrichment and multiple injections (2 x 5 microl) for sensitivity enhancement. The methodology evidenced high reproducibility, is easy to work-up, sensitive and showed to be a suitable alternative to replace the currently dedicated analytical systems for organotin speciation in environmental matrices at the trace level.

  16. Different approaches toward an automatic structural alignment of drug molecules: Applications to sterol mimics, thrombin and thermolysin inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebe, Gerhard; Mietzner, Thomas; Weber, Frank

    1994-12-01

    A relative comparison of the binding properties of different drug molecules requires their mutual superposition with respect to various alignment criteria. In order to validate the results of different alignment methods, the crystallographically observed binding geometries of ligands in the pocket of a common protein receptor have been used. The alignment function in the program SEAL that calculates the mutual superposition of molecules has been optimized with respect to these references. Across the reference data set, alignments could be produced that show mean rms deviations of approximately 1 Å compared to the experimental situation. For structures with obvious skeletal similarities a multiple-flexible fit, linking common pharmacophoric groups by virtual springs, has been incorporated into the molecular mechanics program MOMO. In order to combine conformational searching with comparative alignments, the optimized SEAL approach has been applied to sets of conformers generated by MIMUMBA, a program for conformational analysis. Multiple-flexible fits have been calculated for inhibitors of ergosterol biosynthesis. Sets of different thrombin and thermolysin inhibitors have been conformationally analyzed and subsequently aligned by a combined MIMUMBA/SEAL approach. Since for these examples crystallographic data on their mutual alignment are available, an objective assessment of the computed results could be performed. Among the generated conformers, one geometry could be selected for the thrombin and thermolysin inhibitors that approached reasonably well the experimentally observed alignment.

  17. A chronocoulometric aptasensor based on gold nanoparticles as a signal amplification strategy for detection of thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiao Xia; Chen, Jing Rong; Zhang, Xi Yuan; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2013-10-15

    A sensitive chronocoulometric aptasensor for the detection of thrombin has been developed based on gold nanoparticle amplification. The functional gold nanoparticles, loaded with link DNA (LDNA) and report DNA (RDNA), were immobilized on an electrode by thrombin aptamers performing as a recognition element and capture probe. LDNA was complementary to the thrombin aptamers and RDNA was noncomplementary, but could combine with [Ru(NH₃)₆]³⁺ (RuHex) cations. Electrochemical signals obtained by RuHex that bound quantitatively to the negatively charged phosphate backbone of DNA via electrostatic interactions were measured by chronocoulometry. In the presence of thrombin, the combination of thrombin and thrombin aptamers and the release of the functional gold nanoparticles could induce a significant decrease in chronocoulometric signal. The incorporation of gold nanoparticles in the chronocoulometric aptasensor significantly enhanced the sensitivity. The performance of the aptasensor was further increased by the optimization of the surface density of aptamers. Under optimum conditions, the chronocoulometric aptasensor exhibited a wide linear response range of 0.1-18.5 nM with a detection limit of 30 pM. The results demonstrated that this nanoparticle-based amplification strategy offers a simple and effective approach to detect thrombin.

  18. Molecular advances in plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 interaction with thrombin and tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, A; van Meijer, M; Horrevoets, A J; Pannekoek, H

    1997-02-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a glycoprotein that controls the activity of the key enzymes of the fibrinolytic system, the serine proteases tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA). Inhibition is accomplished by rapid formation of inactive, equimolar PAI-1/PA complexes. The physiological importance of PAI-1 for the fibrinolytic system has been underscored by the observation that in humans, a homozygous defect results in hemorrhagic episodes. In addition to its function in surveillance of the integrity of clots, PAI-1 efficiently inhibits the serine protease thrombin in vitro, provided that either the high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan heparin or the glycoprotein vitronectin is present. These cofactors accelerate the rate of thrombin inhibition by PAI-1 by more than two orders of magnitude. Inhibition of thrombin by PAI-1 proceeds according to a "suicide substrate mechanism," typified by a branched reaction pathway, leading either to stable PAI-1/thrombin complexes or to degradation of the inhibitor and recycling of enzyme. The cofactors heparin and vitronectin, although increasing inhibition through different mechanisms, essentially promote PAI-1 degradation by thrombin. In view of the multitude of functions attributed to thrombin, the authors propose that the relevance of thrombin inhibition by PAI-1 is to restrict its mitogenic activity, rather than to affect its coagulation function in plasma. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:47-51). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  19. Thrombostatin FM compounds: direct thrombin inhibitors - mechanism of action in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieman, M T; Burke, F; Warnock, M; Zhou, Y; Sweigart, J; Chen, A; Ricketts, D; Lucchesi, B R; Chen, Z; Cera, E Di; Hilfinger, J; Kim, J S; Mosberg, H I; Schmaier, A H [Case Western; (Michigan); (TSRL); (WU-MED)

    2008-04-29

    Novel pentapeptides called Thrombostatin FM compounds consisting mostly of D-isomers and unusual amino acids were prepared based upon the stable angiotensin converting enzyme breakdown product of bradykinin - RPPGF. These peptides are direct thrombin inhibitors prolonging the thrombin clotting time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and prothrombin time at ≥0.78, 1.6, and 1.6 μm, respectively. They competitively inhibit α-thrombin-induced cleavage of a chromogenic substrate at 4.4--8.2 μm. They do not significantly inhibit plasma kallikrein, factor (F) XIIa, FXIa, FIXa, FVIIa-TF, FXa, plasmin or cathepsin G. One form, FM19 [rOicPaF(p-Me)], blocks α-thrombin-induced calcium flux in fibroblasts with an IC50 of 6.9 ± 1.2 μm. FM19 achieved 100% inhibition of threshold α- or γ-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation at 8.4 ± 4.7 μm and 16 ± 4 μm, respectively. The crystal structure of thrombin in complex with FM19 shows that the N-terminal D-Arg retrobinds into the S1 pocket, its second residue Oic interacts with His-57, Tyr-60a and Trp-60d, and its C-terminal p-methyl Phe engages thrombin's aryl binding site composed of Ile-174, Trp-215, and Leu-99. When administered intraperitoneal, intraduodenal, or orally to mice, FM19 prolongs thrombin clotting times and delays carotid artery thrombosis. FM19, a low affinity reversible direct thrombin inhibitor, might be useful as an add-on agent to address an unmet need in platelet inhibition in acute coronary syndromes in diabetics and others who with all current antiplatelet therapy still have reactive platelets.

  20. Thrombin-inhibiting nanoparticles rapidly constitute versatile and detectable anticlotting surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley Myerson, Jacob; He, Li; Allen, John Stacy; Williams, Todd; Lanza, Gregory; Tollefsen, Douglas; Caruthers, Shelton; Wickline, Samuel

    2014-09-01

    Restoring an antithrombotic surface to suppress ongoing thrombosis is an appealing strategy for treatment of acute cardiovascular disorders such as erosion of atherosclerotic plaque. An antithrombotic surface would present an alternative to systemic anticoagulation with attendant risks of bleeding. We have designed thrombin-targeted nanoparticles (NPs) that bind to sites of active clotting to extinguish local thrombin activity and inhibit platelet deposition while exhibiting only transient systemic anticoagulant effects. Perfluorocarbon nanoparticles (PFC NP) were functionalized with thrombin inhibitors (either D-phenylalanyl-L-prolyl-L-arginyl-chloromethyl ketone or bivalirudin) by covalent attachment of more than 15 000 inhibitors to each PFC NP. Fibrinopeptide A (FPA) ELISA demonstrated that thrombin-inhibiting NPs prevented cleavage of fibrinogen by both free and clot-bound thrombin. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed that a layer of thrombin-inhibiting NPs prevented growth of clots in vitro. Thrombin-inhibiting NPs were administered in vivo to C57BL6 mice subjected to laser injury of the carotid artery. NPs significantly delayed thrombotic occlusion of the artery, whereas an equivalent bolus of free inhibitor was ineffective. For thrombin-inhibiting NPs, only a short-lived (˜10 min) systemic effect on bleeding time was observed, despite prolonged clot inhibition. Imaging and quantification of in vivo antithrombotic NP layers was demonstrated by MRI of the PFC NP. 19F MRI confirmed colocalization of particles with arterial thrombi, and quantitative 19F spectroscopy demonstrated specific binding and retention of thrombin-inhibiting NPs in injured arteries. The ability to rapidly form and image a new antithrombotic surface in acute vascular syndromes while minimizing risks of bleeding would permit a safer method of passivating active lesions than current systemic anticoagulant regimes.

  1. Greater Buyer Effectiveness through Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    FOB = free on board FPAC = Federal Procurement Automation Council FPDS = Federal Procurement Data System 4GL = fourth generation language GAO = General...Procurement Automation Council ( FPAC ), entitled Compendium of Automated Procurement Systems in Federal Agencies. The FPAC inventory attempted to identify...In some cases we have updated descriptions of systems identified by the FPAC study, but many of the newer systems are identified here for the first

  2. Measurements and automated mechanism generation modeling of OH production in photolytically initiated oxidation of the neopentyl radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petway, Sarah V; Ismail, Huzeifa; Green, William H; Estupiñan, Edgar G; Jusinski, Leonard E; Taatjes, Craig A

    2007-05-17

    Production of OH in the reaction of the neopentyl radical with O2 has been measured by a laser photolysis/cw absorption method for various pressures and oxygen concentrations at 673, 700, and 725 K. The MIT Reaction Mechanism Generator (RMG) was used to automatically generate a model for this system, and the predicted OH concentration profiles are compared to present and literature experimental results. Several reactions significantly affect the OH profile. The experimental data provide useful constraints on the rate coefficient for the formally direct chemical activation reaction of neopentyl radical with O2 to form OH (CH3)3CCH2 + O2 --> OH + 3,3-dimethyloxetane (Rxn 1) At 673 K and 60 Torr, log k(1) (cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)) = -13.7 +/- 0.5. Absolute absorbance measurements on OH and I indicate that the branching ratio for R + O2 to OH is about 0.03 under these conditions. The data suggest that the ab initio neopentyl + O2 potential energy surface of Sun and Bozzelli is accurate to within 2 kcal mol(-1).

  3. A linear programming approach to reconstructing subcellular structures from confocal images for automated generation of representative 3D cellular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott T; Dean, Brian C; Dean, Delphine

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a novel computer vision algorithm to analyze 3D stacks of confocal images of fluorescently stained single cells. The goal of the algorithm is to create representative in silico model structures that can be imported into finite element analysis software for mechanical characterization. Segmentation of cell and nucleus boundaries is accomplished via standard thresholding methods. Using novel linear programming methods, a representative actin stress fiber network is generated by computing a linear superposition of fibers having minimum discrepancy compared with an experimental 3D confocal image. Qualitative validation is performed through analysis of seven 3D confocal image stacks of adherent vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) grown in 2D culture. The presented method is able to automatically generate 3D geometries of the cell's boundary, nucleus, and representative F-actin network based on standard cell microscopy data. These geometries can be used for direct importation and implementation in structural finite element models for analysis of the mechanics of a single cell to potentially speed discoveries in the fields of regenerative medicine, mechanobiology, and drug discovery.

  4. Antithrombotic effects of bromophenol,an alga-derived thrombin inhibitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史大永; 李晓红; 李敬; 郭书举; 苏华; 范晓

    2010-01-01

    Thrombin,the ultimate proteinase of the coagulation cascade,is an attractive target for the treatment of a variety of cardiovascular diseases.A bromophenol derivative named (+)-3-(2,3-dibromo-4,5-dihydroxy-phenyl)-4-bromo-5,6-dihydroxy-1,3-dihydroiso-benzofuran 1,isolated from the brown alga Leathesia nana exhibited significant thrombin inhibitory activity.In this study,we investigated the inhibition of human thrombin in vitro with this bromophenol derivative,and its antithrombotic efficacy in vivo using th...

  5. Automated generation of IMRT treatment plans for prostate cancer patients with metal hip prostheses: Comparison of different planning strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voet, Peter W. J.; Dirkx, Maarten L. P.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben J. M. [Erasmus MC - Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To compare IMRT planning strategies for prostate cancer patients with metal hip prostheses.Methods: All plans were generated fully automatically (i.e., no human trial-and-error interactions) using iCycle, the authors' in-house developed algorithm for multicriterial selection of beam angles and optimization of fluence profiles, allowing objective comparison of planning strategies. For 18 prostate cancer patients (eight with bilateral hip prostheses, ten with a right-sided unilateral prosthesis), two planning strategies were evaluated: (i) full exclusion of beams containing beamlets that would deliver dose to the target after passing a prosthesis (IMRT{sub remove}) and (ii) exclusion of those beamlets only (IMRT{sub cut}). Plans with optimized coplanar and noncoplanar beam arrangements were generated. Differences in PTV coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs) were quantified. The impact of beam number on plan quality was evaluated.Results: Especially for patients with bilateral hip prostheses, IMRT{sub cut} significantly improved rectum and bladder sparing compared to IMRT{sub remove}. For 9-beam coplanar plans, rectum V{sub 60Gy} reduced by 17.5%{+-} 15.0% (maximum 37.4%, p= 0.036) and rectum D{sub mean} by 9.4%{+-} 7.8% (maximum 19.8%, p= 0.036). Further improvements in OAR sparing were achievable by using noncoplanar beam setups, reducing rectum V{sub 60Gy} by another 4.6%{+-} 4.9% (p= 0.012) for noncoplanar 9-beam IMRT{sub cut} plans. Large reductions in rectum dose delivery were also observed when increasing the number of beam directions in the plans. For bilateral implants, the rectum V{sub 60Gy} was 37.3%{+-} 12.1% for coplanar 7-beam plans and reduced on average by 13.5% (maximum 30.1%, p= 0.012) for 15 directions.Conclusions: iCycle was able to automatically generate high quality plans for prostate cancer patients with prostheses. Excluding only beamlets that passed through the prostheses (IMRT{sub cut} strategy) significantly improved

  6. An Automated Approach to the Generation of Structured Building Information Models from Unstructured 3d Point Cloud Scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present and evaluate an approach for the automatic generation of building models in IFC BIM format from unstructured Point Clouds scans, as they result from 3D laser scans of buildings. While the actual measurement process is relatively fast, 85% of the overall time are spend...... on the interpretation and transformation of the resulting Point Cloud data into information, which can be used in architectural and engineering design workflows. Our approach to tackle this problem, is in contrast to existing ones which work on the levels of points, based on the detection of building elements......, such as walls, ceilings, doors, windows, and spaces and the relation between these. We present use cases with our software prototype, evaluate the results, and discuss future work, that will bring the research further towards the aim to create automatically semantic links between the conception of building...

  7. An efficient approach to bioconversion kinetic model generation based on automated microscale experimentation integrated with model driven experimental design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, B. H.; Micheletti, M.; Baganz, F.;

    2009-01-01

    design. It incorporates a model driven approach to the experimental design that minimises the number of experiments to be performed, while still generating accurate values of kinetic parameters. The approach has been illustrated with the transketolase mediated asymmetric synthesis of L...... experimental design.]it comparison with conventional methodology, the modelling approach enabled a nearly 4-fold decrease in the number of experiments while the microwell experimentation enabled a 45-fold decrease in material requirements and a significant increase in experimental throughput. The approach......Reliable models of enzyme kinetics are required for the effective design of bioconversion processes. Kinetic expressions of the enzyme-catalysed reaction rate however, are frequently complex and establishing accurate values of kinetic parameters normally requires a large number of experiments...

  8. An Automated Approach to the Generation of Structured Building Information Models from Unstructured 3d Point Cloud Scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Evers, Henrik Leander; Wessel, Raoul

    2016-01-01

    , such as walls, ceilings, doors, windows, and spaces and the relation between these. We present use cases with our software prototype, evaluate the results, and discuss future work, that will bring the research further towards the aim to create automatically semantic links between the conception of building......In this paper we present and evaluate an approach for the automatic generation of building models in IFC BIM format from unstructured Point Cloud scans, as they result from 3dlaser scans of buildings. While the actual measurement process is relatively fast, 85% of the overall time are spend...... on the interpretation and transformation of the resulting Point Cloud data into information, which can be used in architectural and engineering design workflows. Our approach to tackle this problem, is in contrast to existing ones which work on the levels of points, based on the detection of building elements...

  9. ESBL Detection: Comparison of a Commercially Available Chromogenic Test for Third Generation Cephalosporine Resistance and Automated Susceptibility Testing in Enterobactericeae

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jade, Mohamed Ramadan; Parcina, Marijo; Schmithausen, Ricarda Maria; Stein, Christoph; Meilaender, Alina; Hoerauf, Achim; Molitor, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    Rapid detection and reporting of third generation cephalosporine resistance (3GC-R) and of extended spectrum betalactamases in Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) is a diagnostic and therapeutic priority to avoid inefficacy of the initial antibiotic regimen. In this study we evaluated a commercially available chromogenic screen for 3GC-R as a predictive and/or confirmatory test for ESBL and AmpC activity in clinical and veterinary Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The test was highly reliable in the prediction of cefotaxime and cefpodoxime resistance, but there was no correlation with ceftazidime and piperacillin/tazobactam minimal inhibitory concentrations. All human and porcine ESBL-E tested were detected with exception of one genetically positive but phenotypically negative isolate. By contrast, AmpC detection rates lay below 30%. Notably, exclusion of piperacillin/tazobactam resistant, 3GC susceptible K1+ Klebsiella isolates increased the sensitivity and specificity of the test for ESBL detection. Our data further imply that in regions with low prevalence of AmpC and K1 positive E. coli strains chromogenic testing for 3GC-R can substitute for more time consuming ESBL confirmative testing in E. coli isolates tested positive by Phoenix or VITEK2 ESBL screen. We, therefore, suggest a diagnostic algorithm that distinguishes 3GC-R screening from primary culture and species-dependent confirmatory ESBL testing by βLACTATM and discuss the implications of MIC distribution results on the choice of antibiotic regimen. PMID:27494134

  10. ESBL Detection: Comparison of a Commercially Available Chromogenic Test for Third Generation Cephalosporine Resistance and Automated Susceptibility Testing in Enterobactericeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jade, Mohamed Ramadan; Parcina, Marijo; Schmithausen, Ricarda Maria; Stein, Christoph; Meilaender, Alina; Hoerauf, Achim; Molitor, Ernst; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Rapid detection and reporting of third generation cephalosporine resistance (3GC-R) and of extended spectrum betalactamases in Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) is a diagnostic and therapeutic priority to avoid inefficacy of the initial antibiotic regimen. In this study we evaluated a commercially available chromogenic screen for 3GC-R as a predictive and/or confirmatory test for ESBL and AmpC activity in clinical and veterinary Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The test was highly reliable in the prediction of cefotaxime and cefpodoxime resistance, but there was no correlation with ceftazidime and piperacillin/tazobactam minimal inhibitory concentrations. All human and porcine ESBL-E tested were detected with exception of one genetically positive but phenotypically negative isolate. By contrast, AmpC detection rates lay below 30%. Notably, exclusion of piperacillin/tazobactam resistant, 3GC susceptible K1+ Klebsiella isolates increased the sensitivity and specificity of the test for ESBL detection. Our data further imply that in regions with low prevalence of AmpC and K1 positive E. coli strains chromogenic testing for 3GC-R can substitute for more time consuming ESBL confirmative testing in E. coli isolates tested positive by Phoenix or VITEK2 ESBL screen. We, therefore, suggest a diagnostic algorithm that distinguishes 3GC-R screening from primary culture and species-dependent confirmatory ESBL testing by βLACTATM and discuss the implications of MIC distribution results on the choice of antibiotic regimen.

  11. Automated generation of a World Wide Web-based data entry and check program for medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, T; Kaihara, S

    1997-02-01

    The World Wide Web-based form is a promising method for the construction of an on-line data collection system for clinical and epidemiological research. It is, however, laborious to prepare a common gateway interface (CGI) program for each project, which the World Wide Web server needs to handle the submitted data. In medicine, it is even more laborious because the CGI program must check deficits, type, ranges, and logical errors (bad combination of data) of entered data for quality assurance as well as data length and meta-characters of the entered data to enhance the security of the server. We have extended the specification of the hypertext markup language (HTML) form to accommodate information necessary for such data checking and we have developed software named AUTOFORM for this purpose. The software automatically analyzes the extended HTML form and generates the corresponding ordinary HTML form, 'Makefile', and C source of CGI programs. The resultant CGI program checks the entered data through the HTML form, records them in a computer, and returns them to the end-user. AUTOFORM drastically reduces the burden of development of the World Wide Web-based data entry system and allows the CGI programs to be more securely and reliably prepared than had they been written from scratch.

  12. Classification of Automated Search Traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehrer, Greg; Stokes, Jack W.; Chellapilla, Kumar; Platt, John C.

    As web search providers seek to improve both relevance and response times, they are challenged by the ever-increasing tax of automated search query traffic. Third party systems interact with search engines for a variety of reasons, such as monitoring a web site’s rank, augmenting online games, or possibly to maliciously alter click-through rates. In this paper, we investigate automated traffic (sometimes referred to as bot traffic) in the query stream of a large search engine provider. We define automated traffic as any search query not generated by a human in real time. We first provide examples of different categories of query logs generated by automated means. We then develop many different features that distinguish between queries generated by people searching for information, and those generated by automated processes. We categorize these features into two classes, either an interpretation of the physical model of human interactions, or as behavioral patterns of automated interactions. Using the these detection features, we next classify the query stream using multiple binary classifiers. In addition, a multiclass classifier is then developed to identify subclasses of both normal and automated traffic. An active learning algorithm is used to suggest which user sessions to label to improve the accuracy of the multiclass classifier, while also seeking to discover new classes of automated traffic. Performance analysis are then provided. Finally, the multiclass classifier is used to predict the subclass distribution for the search query stream.

  13. Library Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Dhakne, B. N.; Giri, V. V.; Waghmode, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    New technologies library provides several new materials, media and mode of storing and communicating the information. Library Automation reduces the drudgery of repeated manual efforts in library routine. By use of library automation collection, Storage, Administration, Processing, Preservation and communication etc.

  14. An Automated Technique for Generating Georectified Mosaics from Ultra-High Resolution Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV Imagery, Based on Structure from Motion (SfM Point Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Watson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs are an exciting new remote sensing tool capable of acquiring high resolution spatial data. Remote sensing with UAVs has the potential to provide imagery at an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. The small footprint of UAV imagery, however, makes it necessary to develop automated techniques to geometrically rectify and mosaic the imagery such that larger areas can be monitored. In this paper, we present a technique for geometric correction and mosaicking of UAV photography using feature matching and Structure from Motion (SfM photogrammetric techniques. Images are processed to create three dimensional point clouds, initially in an arbitrary model space. The point clouds are transformed into a real-world coordinate system using either a direct georeferencing technique that uses estimated camera positions or via a Ground Control Point (GCP technique that uses automatically identified GCPs within the point cloud. The point cloud is then used to generate a Digital Terrain Model (DTM required for rectification of the images. Subsequent georeferenced images are then joined together to form a mosaic of the study area. The absolute spatial accuracy of the direct technique was found to be 65–120 cm whilst the GCP technique achieves an accuracy of approximately 10–15 cm.

  15. Thrombin Cleavage of Osteopontin Modulates Its Activities in Human Cells In Vitro and Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggio, Elena; Dianzani, Chiara; Gigliotti, Casimiro Luca; Soluri, Maria Felicia; Clemente, Nausicaa; Cappellano, Giuseppe; Toth, Erika; Raineri, Davide; Ferrara, Benedetta; Comi, Cristoforo; Dianzani, Umberto; Chiocchetti, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin is a proinflammatory cytokine and plays a pathogenetic role in multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), by recruiting autoreactive T cells into the central nervous system. Osteopontin functions are modulated by thrombin cleavage generating N- and C-terminal fragment, whose individual roles are only partly known. Published data are difficult to compare since they have been obtained with heterogeneous approaches. Interestingly, thrombin cleavage of osteopontin unmasks a cryptic domain of interaction with α 4 β 1 integrin that is the main adhesion molecule involved in lymphocyte transmigration to the brain and is the target for natalizumab, the most potent drug preventing relapses. We produced recombinant osteopontin and its N- and C-terminal fragments in an eukaryotic system in order to allow their posttranslational modifications. We investigated, in vitro, their effect on human cells and in vivo in EAE. We found that the osteopontin cleavage plays a key role in the function of this cytokine and that the two fragments exert distinct effects both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that drugs targeting each fragment may be used to fine-tune the pathological effects of osteopontin in several diseases.

  16. Modeling the microscopic electrical properties of thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) for label-free biosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Alfinito, Eleonora; Cataldo, Rosella; De Nunzio, Giorgio; Giotta, Livia; Guascito, Maria Rachele

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are chemically produced oligonucleotides, able to bind a variety of targets such as drugs, proteins and pathogens with high sensitivity and selectivity. Therefore, aptamers are largely employed for producing label-free biosensors, with significant applications in diagnostics and drug delivery. In particular, the anti-thrombin aptamers are biomolecules of high interest for clinical use, because of their ability to recognize and bind the thrombin enzyme. Among them, the DNA 15-mer thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA), has been widely explored concerning both its structure, which was resolved with different techniques, and its function, especially about the possibility of using it as the active part of biosensors. This paper proposes a microscopic model of the electrical properties of TBA and the aptamer-thrombin complex, combining information from both structure and function. The novelty consists in describing both the aptamer alone and the complex as an impedance network, thus going deeper inside the issues...

  17. Discovery of benzothiazole guanidines as novel inhibitors of thrombin and trypsin IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karle, Michael; Knecht, Wolfgang; Xue, Yafeng

    2012-07-15

    In a project to find novel neutral P1 fragments for the synthesis of thrombin inhibitors with improved pharmacokinetic properties, fragments containing a benzothiazole guanidine scaffold were identified as weak thrombin inhibitors. WaterLOGSY (Water-Ligand Observed via Gradient SpectroscopY) NMR was used to detect fragments binding to thrombin and these fragments were followed up by Biacore A100 affinity measurements and enzyme assays. A crystal structure of the most potent compound with thrombin was obtained and revealed an unexpected binding mode as well as the key interactions of the fragment with the protein. Based on these results, the structure-based design and synthesis of a small series of optimized novel substituted benzothiazole guanidines with comparatively low pK(a) values was accomplished. Testing of these compounds against human trypsin I and human trypsin IV revealed unexpected inhibitory activity and selectivity of some of the compounds, making them attractive starting points for selective trypsin inhibitors.

  18. Ratiometric activatable cell-penetrating peptides provide rapid in vivo readout of thrombin activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Michael; Savariar, Elamprakash N; Friedman, Beth; Levin, Rachel A; Crisp, Jessica L; Glasgow, Heather L; Lefkowitz, Roy; Adams, Stephen R; Steinbach, Paul; Nashi, Nadia; Nguyen, Quyen T; Tsien, Roger Y

    2013-01-02

    In real time: thrombin activation in vivo can be imaged in real time with ratiometric activatable cell penetrating peptides (RACPPs). RACPPs are designed to combine 1) dual-emission ratioing, 2) far red to infrared wavelengths for in vivo mammalian imaging, and 3) cleavage-dependent spatial localization. The most advanced RACPP uses norleucine (Nle)-TPRSFL as a linker that increases sensitivity to thrombin by about 90-fold.

  19. Membrane lipid peroxidation in neurodegeneration: Role of thrombin and proteinase-activated receptor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citron, Bruce A; Ameenuddin, Syed; Uchida, K; Suo, William Z; SantaCruz, Karen; Festoff, Barry W

    2016-07-15

    Thrombin and membrane lipid peroxidation (MLP) have been implicated in various central nervous system (CNS) disorders from CNS trauma to stroke, Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's (PD) diseases. Because thrombin also induces MLP in platelets and its involvement in neurodegenerative diseases we hypothesized that its deleterious effects might, in part, involve formation of MLP in neuronal cells. We previously showed that thrombin induced caspase-3 mediated apoptosis in motor neurons, via a proteinase-activated receptor (PAR1). We have now investigated thrombin's influence on the oxidative state of neurons leading to induction of MLP-protein adducts. Translational relevance of thrombin-induced MLP is supported by increased levels of 4-hydroxynonenal-protein adducts (HNEPA) in AD and PD brains. We now report for the first time that thrombin dose-dependently induces formation of HNEPA in NSC34 mouse motor neuron cells using anti-HNE and anti-acrolein monoclonal antibodies. The most prominent immunoreactive band, in SDS-PAGE, was at ∼54kDa. Membrane fractions displayed higher amounts of the protein-adduct than cytosolic fractions. Thrombin induced MLP was mediated, at least in part, through PAR1 since a PAR1 active peptide, PAR1AP, also elevated HNEPA levels. Of interest, glutamate and Fe2SO4 also increased the ∼54kDa HNEPA band in these cells but to a lesser extent. Taken together our results implicate the involvement of thrombin and MLP in neuronal cell loss observed in various CNS degenerative and traumatic pathologies.

  20. Nanoparticles That Sense Thrombin Activity As Synthetic Urinary Biomarkers of Thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Kevin Y.; Kwong, Gabriel A.; Warren, Andrew D.; Wood, David K.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2013-01-01

    Thrombin is a serine protease and regulator of hemostasis that plays a critical role in the formation of obstructive blood clots, or thrombosis, that is a life-threatening condition associated with numerous diseases such as atherosclerosis and stroke. To detect thrombi in living animals, we design and conjugate thrombin-sensitive peptide substrates to the surface of nanoparticles. Following intravenous infusion, these “synthetic biomarkers” survey the host vasculature for coagulation and, in ...

  1. Highly specific detection of thrombin using an aptamer-based suspension array and the interaction analysis via microscale thermophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanan; Liu, Nan; Ma, Xinhua; Li, Xiaoli; Ma, Jia; Li, Ya; Zhou, Zhijiang; Gao, Zhixian

    2015-04-21

    A novel aptamer-based suspension array detection platform was designed for the sensitive, specific and rapid detection of human α-thrombin as a model. Thrombin was first recognized by a 29-mer biotinylated thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) in solution. Then 15-mer TBA modified magnetic beads (MBs) captured the former TBA-thrombin to form an aptamer-thrombin-aptamer sandwich complex. The median fluorescence intensity obtained via suspension array technology was positively correlated with the thrombin concentration. The interactions between TBAs and thrombin were analyzed using microscale thermophoresis (MST). The dissociation constants could be respectively achieved to be 44.2 ± 1.36 nM (TBA1-thrombin) and 15.5 ± 0.637 nM (TBA2-thrombin), which demonstrated the high affinities of TBA-thrombin and greatly coincided with previous reports. Interaction conditions such as temperature, reaction time, and coupling protocol were optimized. The dynamic quantitative working range of the aptamer-based suspension array was 18.37-554.31 nM, and the coefficients of determination R(2) were greater than 0.9975. The lowest detection limit of thrombin was 5.4 nM. This method was highly specific for thrombin without being affected by other analogs and interfering proteins. The recoveries of thrombin spiked in diluted human serum were in the range 82.6-114.2%. This innovative aptamer-based suspension array detection platform not only exhibits good sensitivity based on MBs facilitating highly efficient separation and amplification, but also suggests high specificity by the selective aptamer binding, thereby suggesting the expansive application prospects in research and clinical fields.

  2. Use of gelatin-thrombin matrix haemostatic sealant in neurosurgery: Anaesthetic implications and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Khanna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The topical haemostatic agents have been developed to be used as adjunctive measures to promote haemostasis. These include bone wax, absorbable gel sponges, microfibrillar collagen, oxidised regenerated cellulose, gelatin sponges with thrombin, gelatin-thrombin matrix sealant or fibrin sealants. Gelatin-thrombin matrix sealant is a mixture of a bovine-derived gelatin matrix and human-derived thrombin component that are mixed together at the time of use. This agent has been found to be more effective haemostat than thrombin-soaked gelatine sponges. The possible adverse effects of this can be transmission of diseases from human or bovine sources, allergic reactions, thromboembolism, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC, perilesional oedema, and compression of neural tissue. Although it is used routinely in the operating room, there is little literature available on the perioperative implications with use of intraoperative gelatin-thrombin matrix sealant. Here, we present clinical report of 20 neurosurgical patients where the sealant was used and literature in view of current evidence has been reviewed.

  3. Unimolecular, soluble semiconductor nanoparticle-based biosensors for thrombin using charge/electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Marla D; Octain, Jashain; Benson, David E

    2008-12-01

    Duplex DNA was attached to semiconductor nanoparticles providing selective detection of thrombin. Using the method reported here, semiconductor nanoparticles can have selective sensory functions for a host of additional analytes in the future. The system uses one DNA strand that selectively binds an analyte (thrombin), while the complementary DNA strand contains a redox-active metal complex. The accessibility of the metal complex to the nanoparticle surface is increased upon thrombin binding due to unravelling of the duplex DNA secondary structure. Increased interactions between the metal complex and the nanoparticle surface will decrease nanoparticle emission intensity, through charge transfer. Initially, water-soluble nanoparticles with carboxylate-terminated monolayers showed thrombin-specific responses in emission intensity (-30% for 1:1 nanoparticle to DNA, +50% for 1:5). Despite the selective responses, the thrombin binding isotherms indicated multiple binding equilibria and more than likely nanoparticle aggregation. The need for a nonaggregative system comes from the potential employment of these sensors in live cell or living system fluorescence assays. By changing the nanoparticle capping ligand to provide an ethylene glycol-terminated monolayer, the binding isotherms fit a two-state binding model with a thrombin dissociation constant of 3 nM in a physiologically relevant buffer. This article demonstrates the need to consider capping ligand effects in designing biosensors based on semiconductor nanoparticles and demonstrates an initial DNA-attached semiconductor nanoparticle system that uses DNA-analyte binding interactions (aptamers).

  4. Thrombin modulates persistent sodium current in CA1 pyramidal neurons of young and adult rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunko, O O; Isaev, D S; Krishtal, O O; Isaeva, E V

    2015-01-01

    Serine protease thrombin, a key factor of blood coagulation, participates in many neuronal processes important for normal brain functioning and during pathological conditions involving abnormal neuronal synchronization, neurodegeneration and inflammation. Our previous study on CA3 pyramidal neurons showed that application ofthrombin through the activation of specific protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) produces a significant hyperpolarizing shift of the activation of the TTX-sensitive persistent voltage-gated Na+ current (I(Nap)) thereby affecting membrane potential and seizure threshold at the network level. It was shown that PAR1 is also expressed in CA1 area of hippocampus and can be implicated in neuronal damage in this area after status epilepticus. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of thrombin on I(NaP) in CA1 pyramidal neurons from adult and young rats. Using whole cell patch-clamp technique we demonstrate that thrombin application results in the hyperpolarization shift of I(NaP) activation as well as increase in the I(NaP) amplitude in both age groups. We have found that I(NaP) in pyramidal neurons of hippocampal CA 1 region is more vulnerable to the thrombin action than I(NaP) in pyramidal neurons of hippocampal CA3 region. We have also found that the immature hippocampus is more sensitive to thrombin action which emphasizes the contribution of thrombin-dependent pathway to the regulation of neuronal activity in immature brain.

  5. Interaction of alpha-thrombin and prethrombin 2, with phosphatidylserine-containing monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecompte, M F

    1984-02-01

    Prothrombin activation complex is located at a phospholipid surface on activated platelets. To see whether the thrombin domain of the molecule plays a role in the interaction with lipids, we investigated the direct interaction of human alpha-thrombin and its precursor prethrombin 2 with phospholipid monolayers of various compositions (PS/PC). Adsorption of the labeled proteins was determined by surface radioactivity measurements. Penetration of the proteins in the lipid layer was inferred from capacitance variation of the monolayer, measured by a.c. polarography. Disulfide bridges reduced at the electrode were determined by cyclic voltametry. In all the cases studied, although in different manners thrombin was found both to adsorb and penetrate the lipid layer, whereas prethrombin 2 did not penetrate pure phosphatidylcholine (PC). In the case of thrombin, but not of prethrombin 2, penetration is accompanied by S-S reduction which is maximum at 10 per cent of phosphatidylserine (PS). This indicates a different orientation for prethrombin 2 and thrombin in the lipid layer. This observation might be of importance for the comprehension of the architecture of the prothrombin activation complex and for the regulation of thrombin formation within the complex.

  6. Thrombin Production and Human Neutrophil Elastase Sequestration by Modified Cellulosic Dressings and Their Electrokinetic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolette Prevost

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a complex series of biochemical and cellular events. Optimally, functional material design addresses the overlapping acute and inflammatory stages of wound healing based on molecular, cellular, and bio-compatibility issues. In this paper the issues addressed are uncontrolled hemostasis and inflammation which can interfere with the orderly flow of wound healing. In this regard, we review the serine proteases thrombin and elastase relative to dressing functionality that improves wound healing and examine the effects of charge in cotton/cellulosic dressing design on thrombin production and elastase sequestration (uptake by the wound dressing. Thrombin is central to the initiation and propagation of coagulation, and elastase is released from neutrophils that can function detrimentally in a stalled inflammatory phase characteristic of chronic wounds. Electrokinetic fiber surface properties of the biomaterials of this study were determined to correlate material charge and polarity with function relative to thrombin production and elastase sequestration. Human neutrophil elastase sequestration was assessed with an assay representative of chronic wound concentration with cotton gauze cross-linked with three types of polycarboxylic acids and one phosphorylation finish; thrombin production, which was assessed in a plasma-based assay via a fluorogenic peptide substrate, was determined for cotton, cotton-grafted chitosan, chitosan, rayon/polyester, and two kaolin-treated materials including a commercial hemorrhage control dressing (QuickClot Combat Gauze. A correlation in thrombin production to zeta potential was found. Two polycarboxylic acid cross linked and a phosphorylated cotton dressing gave high elastase sequestration.

  7. Active but inoperable thrombin is accumulated in a plasma protein layer surrounding Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Clément; Hurley, Sinead M; Malmström, Erik; Plug, Tom; Shannon, Oonagh; Meijers, Joost C M; Mörgelin, Matthias; Björck, Lars; Herwald, Heiko

    2015-10-01

    Activation of thrombin is a critical determinant in many physiological and pathological processes including haemostasis and inflammation. Under physiological conditions many of these functions are involved in wound healing or eradication of an invading pathogen. However, when activated systemically, thrombin can contribute to severe and life-threatening conditions by causing complications such as multiple multi-organ failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. In the present study we investigated how the activity of thrombin is modulated when it is bound to the surface of Streptococcus pyogenes. Our data show that S. pyogenes bacteria become covered with a proteinaceous layer when incubated with human plasma, and that thrombin is a constituent of this layer. Though the coagulation factor is found attached to the bacteria with a functional active site, thrombin has lost its capacity to interact with its natural substrates and inhibitors. Thus, the interaction of bacteria with human plasma renders thrombin completely inoperable at the streptococcal surface. This could represent a host defense mechanism to avoid systemic activation of coagulation which could be otherwise induced when bacteria enter the circulation and cause systemic infection.

  8. Expression of thrombin and its associated protein in cerebellum of human and rat after intracerebral hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-yi; QI Ji-ping; ZHU Hong; SONG Yue-jia; WU He; JIA Ying; ZHANG Guang-mei

    2010-01-01

    Background Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) can cause brain damage through a number of pathways.The purpose of the study was to explore the effect of thrombin, protease nexin-1 (PN-1) and protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) in rat and human cerebellum after ICH.Methods A model of ICH was produced in adult Sprague-Dawley rats by direct injection of autologous blood (50 μl) into caudate nucleus.Patients with injured hemorrhage were also enrolled in this study.Different expressions of thrombin,PAR-1, PN-1 were detected in rat and human cerebellum by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization.Results In rat cerebellum, thrombin protein significantly increased at 6 hours and reached the maximum 2 days afterICH.The expression of PAR-1 protein reached the maximum at 24-48 hours, and then began to decrease.The expression of PN-1 protein reached the maximum at 3 hours, decreased somewhat after that and increased a little at 5days after ICH.While in human cerebellum, the changing tendency of thrombin, PAR-1 and PN-1 was almost conform to the rat.Conclusion In cerebellum, thrombin can activate PAR-1 expression after ICH, and PN-1 appears quickly after ICH in order to control the deleterious effect of thrombin.

  9. A cascade signal amplification strategy for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy detection of thrombin based on DNAzyme assistant DNA recycling and rolling circle amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fenglei; Du, Lili; Tang, Daoquan; Lu, Yao; Zhang, Yanzhuo; Zhang, Lixian

    2015-04-15

    A sensitive protocol for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection of thrombin is designed with R6G-Ag NPs as a signal tag by combining DNAzyme assistant DNA recycling and rolling circle amplification (RCA). Molecular beacon (MB) as recognition probe immobilizes on the glass slides and performs the amplification procedure. After thrombin-induced structure-switching DNA hairpins of probe 1, the DNAzyme is liberated from the caged structure, which hybridizes with the MB for cleavage of the MB in the presence of cofactor Zn(2+) and initiates the DNA recycling process, leading to the cleavage of a large number of MB and the generation of numerous primers for triggering RCA reaction. The long amplified RCA product which contained hundreds of tandem-repeat sequences, which can bind with oligonucleotide functionalized Ag NPs reporters. The attached signal tags can be easily read out by SERS. Because of the cascade signal amplification, these newly designed protocols provides a sensitive SERS detection of thrombin down to the femolar level (2.3fM) with a linear range of 5 orders of magnitude (from 10(-14) to 10(-9)M) and have high selectivity toward its target protein. The proposed method is expected to be a good clinical tool for the diagnosis of a thrombotic disease.

  10. Automation or De-automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlach, Igor; Wessel, Oliver

    2008-09-01

    In the global automotive industry, for decades, vehicle manufacturers have continually increased the level of automation of production systems in order to be competitive. However, there is a new trend to decrease the level of automation, especially in final car assembly, for reasons of economy and flexibility. In this research, the final car assembly lines at three production sites of Volkswagen are analysed in order to determine the best level of automation for each, in terms of manufacturing costs, productivity, quality and flexibility. The case study is based on the methodology proposed by the Fraunhofer Institute. The results of the analysis indicate that fully automated assembly systems are not necessarily the best option in terms of cost, productivity and quality combined, which is attributed to high complexity of final car assembly systems; some de-automation is therefore recommended. On the other hand, the analysis shows that low automation can result in poor product quality due to reasons related to plant location, such as inadequate workers' skills, motivation, etc. Hence, the automation strategy should be formulated on the basis of analysis of all relevant aspects of the manufacturing process, such as costs, quality, productivity and flexibility in relation to the local context. A more balanced combination of automated and manual assembly operations provides better utilisation of equipment, reduces production costs and improves throughput.

  11. Thrombin-Binding Aptamer Quadruplex Formation: AFM and Voltammetric Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Constantin Diculescu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption and the redox behaviour of thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA and extended TBA (eTBA were studied using atomic force microscopy and voltammetry at highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and glassy carbon. The different adsorption patterns and degree of surface coverage were correlated with the sequence base composition, presence/absence of K+, and voltammetric behaviour of TBA and eTBA. In the presence of K+, only a few single-stranded sequences present adsorption, while the majority of the molecules forms stable and rigid quadruplexes with no adsorption. Both TBA and eTBA are oxidized and the only anodic peak corresponds to guanine oxidation. Upon addition of K+ ions, TBA and eTBA fold into a quadruplex, causing the decrease of guanine oxidation peak and occurrence of a new peak at a higher potential due to the oxidation of G-quartets. The higher oxidation potential of G-quartets is due to the greater difficulty of electron transfer from the inside of the quadruplex to the electrode surface than electron transfer from the more flexible single strands.

  12. Semantics-based Automated Web Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Feng Guo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We present TAO, a software testing tool performing automated test and oracle generation based on a semantic approach. TAO entangles grammar-based test generation with automated semantics evaluation using a denotational semantics framework. We show how TAO can be incorporated with the Selenium automation tool for automated web testing, and how TAO can be further extended to support automated delta debugging, where a failing web test script can be systematically reduced based on grammar-directed strategies. A real-life parking website is adopted throughout the paper to demonstrate the effectivity of our semantics-based web testing approach.

  13. Automated Integrated Analog Filter Design Issues

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of modern automated integrated analog circuits design methods and their use in integrated filter design is done. Current modern analog circuits automated tools are based on optimization algorithms and/or new circuit generation methods. Most automated integrated filter design methods are only suited to gmC and switched current filter topologies. Here, an algorithm for an active RC integrated filter design is proposed, that can be used in automated filter designs. The algorithm is t...

  14. Automated Generation of Attack Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigo, Roberto; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2014-01-01

    Attack trees are widely used to represent threat scenarios in a succinct and intuitive manner, suitable for conveying security information to non-experts. The manual construction of such objects relies on the creativity and experience of specialists, and therefore it is error-prone and impractica......Attack trees are widely used to represent threat scenarios in a succinct and intuitive manner, suitable for conveying security information to non-experts. The manual construction of such objects relies on the creativity and experience of specialists, and therefore it is error...

  15. Construction of photoelectrochemical thrombin aptasensor via assembling multilayer of graphene-CdS nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, Li; Zhu, Wei; Xue, Yanchun; Liu, Songqin

    2015-02-15

    A photoelectrochemical (PEC) aptasensor for highly sensitive and specific detection of thrombin was developed by using graphene–CdS nanocomposites multilayer as photoactive species and electroactive mediator hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride (Ru(NH(3))(6)(3+)) as signal enhancer. Graphene–CdS nanocomposites (G–CdS) were synthesized by one-pot reduction of oxide graphene and CdCl2 with thioacetamide. The photoactive multilayer was prepared by alternative assembly of the negatively charged 3-mercaptopropionic acid modified graphene–CdS nanocomposites (MPA-G–CdS) and the positively charged polyethylenimine (PEI) on ITO electrode. This layer-by-layer assembly method enhanced the stability and homogeneity of the photocurrent readout of G–CdS. Thrombin aptamer was covalently bound to the multilayer by using glutaraldehyde as cross-linking. Electroactive mediator (Ru(NH(3))(6)(3+)) could interact with the DNA phosphate backbone and thus facilitated the electron transfer between G–CdS multilayer and electrode and enhanced the photocurrent. Hybridizing of a long complementary DNA with thrombin aptamer could increase the adsorption amount of (Ru(NH(3))(6)(3+)), which in turn boosted the signal readout. In the presence of target thrombin, the affinity interaction between thrombin and its aptamer resulted in the long complementary DNA releasing from the G–CdS multilayer and decreasing of photocurrent signal. On the basis of G–CdS multilayer as the photoactive species, (Ru (NH(3))(6)(3+)) as an electroactive mediator, and aptamer as a recognition module, a high sensitive PEC aptasensor for thrombin detection was proposed. The thrombin aptasensor displayed a linear range from 2.0 pM to 600.0 pM and a detection limit of 1.0 pM. The present strategy provided a promising ideology for the future development of PEC biosensor.

  16. Nanocomplexation of thrombin with cationic amylose derivative for improved stability and hemostatic efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang B

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Baoxiong Zhuang,1,* Zhihua Li,1,* Jiadong Pang,2,* Wenbin Li,1 Pinbo Huang,1 Jie Wang,1 Yu Zhou,1 Qing Lin,1 Quanbo Zhou,1 Xiao Ye,1 Huilin Ye,1 Yimin Liu,1 Li-Ming Zhang,2 Rufu Chen1 1Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Billiary Surgery, Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2DSAPM Lab and PCFM Lab, Institute of Polymer Science, Department of Polymer and Materials Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *Authors share co-first authorship Abstract: As a topical hemostatic agent, thrombin has wide application for many surgical treatments. However, native thrombin always suffers from its physical and chemical instabilities. In this work, a nanocomplexation strategy was developed for modifying the stability and hemostatic efficacy of thrombin, in which a water-soluble cationic amylose derivative containing poly(l-lysine dendrons was prepared by a click reaction and then used to complex thrombin in an aqueous system. For resultant thrombin nanocomplexes, their morphology and particle size distribution were investigated. Their stabilities were studied in terms of activity retention percentages under different storage time, pH values, and illumination time. In addition, their ability to achieve in vitro fibrinogen and blood coagulation were evaluated. Via a rat hepatic hemorrhage model and a rat iliac artery hemorrhage model, these thrombin nanocomplexes were confirmed to have good tissue biocompatibility and in vivo hemostatic effectiveness. Keywords: thrombin, nanoparticles, amylose derivative, complexation, stability, hemostatic activity

  17. Materials Testing and Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Wayne D.; Zweigoron, Ronald B.

    1980-07-01

    The advent of automation in materials testing has been in large part responsible for recent radical changes in the materials testing field: Tests virtually impossible to perform without a computer have become more straightforward to conduct. In addition, standardized tests may be performed with enhanced efficiency and repeatability. A typical automated system is described in terms of its primary subsystems — an analog station, a digital computer, and a processor interface. The processor interface links the analog functions with the digital computer; it includes data acquisition, command function generation, and test control functions. Features of automated testing are described with emphasis on calculated variable control, control of a variable that is computed by the processor and cannot be read directly from a transducer. Three calculated variable tests are described: a yield surface probe test, a thermomechanical fatigue test, and a constant-stress-intensity range crack-growth test. Future developments are discussed.

  18. Ultrasound-guided Thrombin Injection: An Alternative Treatment for Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysm with Better Efficiency and Safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinghai YAO; Hongliang CONG; Shangqin WU; Shan SUN; Qike DONG; Dongmei CHEN; Peng LI

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency and safety of ultrasound-guided thrombin injection on femoral pseudoaneurysm (FPA) as compared to ultrasound-guided local oppression. Eleven cases of FPA were enrolled and 7 cases received ultrasound-guide thrombin injection (injection group), and the remaining 4 cases were treated with local oppression (oppression group). Efficiency and safety were analyzed by ultrasound and subsequent follow-up. The results showed that 1 case relapsed in oppression group while no relapse occurred in thrombin injection group. Ultrasound-guided thrombin injection is better for treatment of FPA in terms of effectiveness and safety.

  19. An electrochemical label-free and sensitive thrombin aptasensor based on graphene oxide modified pencil graphite electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahour, F; Ahsani, M K

    2016-12-15

    In this work, we tactfully constructed a novel label-free electrochemical aptasensor for rapid and facile detection of thrombin using graphene oxide (GO) and thrombin binding aptamer (TBA). The strategy relies on the preferential adsorption of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to GO over aptamer-target complexes. The TBA-thrombin complex formation was monitored by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) using the guanine oxidation signal. In the absence of thrombin, the aptamers adsorbed onto the surface of GO leading to a strong background guanine oxidation signal. Conversely, in the presence of thrombin, the conformational transformation of TBA after incubating with the thrombin solution and formation of the aptamer-thrombin complexes which had weak binding ability to GO, leads to the desorption of TBA-thrombin complex from electrode surface and significant oxidation signal decrease. The selectivity of the biosensor was studied using other biological substances. The biosensor's signal was proportional to the thrombin concentration from 0.1 to 10nM with a detection limit of 0.07nM. Particularly, the proposed method could be widely applied to the aptamer-based determination of other target analytes.

  20. A mathematical model of thrombin production in blood coagulation, Part I: The sparsely covered membrane case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, S A; Basmadjian, D

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the first attempt to model the blood coagulation reactions in flowing blood. The model focuses on the common pathway and includes activation of factor X and prothrombin, including feedback activation of cofactors VIII and V by thrombin, and plasma inhibition of factor Xa and thrombin. In this paper, the first of two, the sparsely covered membrane (SCM) case is presented. This considers the limiting situation where platelet membrane binding sites are in excess, such that no membrane saturation or binding competition occurs. Under these conditions, the model predicts that the two positive feedback loops lead to multiple steady-state behavior in the range of intermediate mass transfer rates. It will be shown that this results in three parameter regions exhibiting very different thrombin production patterns. The model predicts the effect of flow on steady-state and dynamic thrombin production and attempts to explain the difference between venous and arterial thrombi. The reliance of thrombin production on precursor procoagulant protein concentrations is also assessed.

  1. A model of thrombin inactivation in heparinized and nonheparinized tubes with consequences for thrombus formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basmadjian, D; Sefton, M V

    1986-01-01

    The role of flow and mass transport in determining procoagulant concentration at the wall of synthetic and natural cylindrical blood vessels is analyzed theoretically. The model assumes steady laminar flow and considers, in addition to the fluid dynamic parameters, three rate-determining steps: production of procoagulant (thrombin) and its inactivation at the wall, as well as inactivation in the fluid bulk. The ratio of thrombin wall concentration to production rate Cw/N emerges as a critical parameter in characterizing the behavior of the tube wall. With a wall-inactivation rate typical of heparinized materials, Cw/N = 11.1 s/cm, independent of flow (shear rate) and axial position. This is significantly less than the range of Cw/N (50-500 s/cm) for which the thrombin concentration is high enough to result in significant fibrin formation and thrombosis. Hence little fibrin formation and a high degree of thromboresistance is expected for heparinized materials. Nonheparinized materials have Cw/N values above this range, which are only weakly dependent on shear rate and diameter, suggesting that flow-induced dispersion of thrombin (or other procoagulants) has limited impact on the thrombin wall concentration. These latter results appear to refute the conventional wisdom that attributes the relative patency of large-diameter vessels and differences between venous and arterial thrombi to such flow effects. It is likely that additional factors such as flow pulsatility and wall geometry must be considered to account for these observations.

  2. Smashing the Stovepipe: Leveraging the GMSEC Open Architecture and Advanced IT Automation to Rapidly Prototype, Develop and Deploy Next-Generation Multi-Mission Ground Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Satellite/Payload Ground Systems - Typically highly-customized to a specific mission's use cases - Utilize hundreds (or thousands!) of specialized point-to-point interfaces for data flows / file transfers Documentation and tracking of these complex interfaces requires extensive time to develop and extremely high staffing costs Implementation and testing of these interfaces are even more cost-prohibitive, and documentation often lags behind implementation resulting in inconsistencies down the road With expanding threat vectors, IT Security, Information Assurance and Operational Security have become key Ground System architecture drivers New Federal security-related directives are generated on a daily basis, imposing new requirements on current / existing ground systems - These mandated activities and data calls typically carry little or no additional funding for implementation As a result, Ground System Sustaining Engineering groups and Information Technology staff continually struggle to keep up with the rolling tide of security Advancing security concerns and shrinking budgets are pushing these large stove-piped ground systems to begin sharing resources - I.e. Operational / SysAdmin staff, IT security baselines, architecture decisions or even networks / hosting infrastructure Refactoring these existing ground systems into multi-mission assets proves extremely challenging due to what is typically very tight coupling between legacy components As a result, many "Multi-Mission" ops. environments end up simply sharing compute resources and networks due to the difficulty of refactoring into true multi-mission systems Utilizing continuous integration / rapid system deployment technologies in conjunction with an open architecture messaging approach allows System Engineers and Architects to worry less about the low-level details of interfaces between components and configuration of systems GMSEC messaging is inherently designed to support multi-mission requirements, and

  3. Comparison of the 'chemical' and 'structural' approaches to the optimization of the thrombin-binding aptamer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Tatarinova

    Full Text Available Noncanonically structured DNA aptamers to thrombin were examined. Two different approaches were used to improve stability, binding affinity and biological activity of a known thrombin-binding aptamer. These approaches are chemical modification and the addition of a duplex module to the aptamer core structure. Several chemically modified aptamers and the duplex-bearing ones were all studied under the same conditions by a set of widely known and some relatively new methods. A number of the thrombin-binding aptamer analogs have demonstrated improved characteristics. Most importantly, the study allowed us to compare directly the two approaches to aptamer optimization and to analyze their relative advantages and disadvantages as well as their potential in drug design and fundamental studies.

  4. A Universal Base in a Specific Role: Tuning up a Thrombin Aptamer with 5-Nitroindole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, Vladimir B.; Varizhuk, Anna M.; Pozmogova, Galina E.; Smirnov, Igor P.; Kolganova, Natalia A.; Timofeev, Edward N.

    2015-11-01

    In this study we describe new modified analogs of the thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) containing 5-nitroindole residues. It has been shown that all modified TBAs form an anti-parallel G-quadruplex structure and retain the ability to inhibit thrombin. The most advanced TBA variant (TBA-N8) has a substantially increased clotting time and two-fold lower IC50 value compared to the unmodified prototype. Molecular modelling studies suggest that the improved anticoagulant properties of TBA-N8 result from changes in the binding mode of the analog. A modified central loop in TBA-N8 is presumed to participate in the binding of the target protein. Studies of FAM labelled TBA and TBA-N8 showed an improved binding affinity of the modified aptamer and provided evidence of a direct interaction between the modified central loop and thrombin. Our findings have implications for the design of new aptamers with improved binding affinities.

  5. Through-bond effects in the ternary complexes of thrombin sandwiched by two DNA aptamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Andrea; Russo Krauss, Irene; Parente, Valeria; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Sugimoto, Naoki; Sica, Filomena

    2017-01-01

    Aptamers directed against human thrombin can selectively bind to two different exosites on the protein surface. The simultaneous use of two DNA aptamers, HD1 and HD22, directed to exosite I and exosite II respectively, is a very powerful approach to exploit their combined affinity. Indeed, strategies to link HD1 and HD22 together have been proposed in order to create a single bivalent molecule with an enhanced ability to control thrombin activity. In this work, the crystal structures of two ternary complexes, in which thrombin is sandwiched between two DNA aptamers, are presented and discussed. The structures shed light on the cross talk between the two exosites. The through-bond effects are particularly evident at exosite II, with net consequences on the HD22 structure. Moreover, thermodynamic data on the binding of the two aptamers are also reported and analyzed. PMID:27899589

  6. Through-bond effects in the ternary complexes of thrombin sandwiched by two DNA aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Andrea; Russo Krauss, Irene; Parente, Valeria; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Sugimoto, Naoki; Sica, Filomena

    2017-01-09

    Aptamers directed against human thrombin can selectively bind to two different exosites on the protein surface. The simultaneous use of two DNA aptamers, HD1 and HD22, directed to exosite I and exosite II respectively, is a very powerful approach to exploit their combined affinity. Indeed, strategies to link HD1 and HD22 together have been proposed in order to create a single bivalent molecule with an enhanced ability to control thrombin activity. In this work, the crystal structures of two ternary complexes, in which thrombin is sandwiched between two DNA aptamers, are presented and discussed. The structures shed light on the cross talk between the two exosites. The through-bond effects are particularly evident at exosite II, with net consequences on the HD22 structure. Moreover, thermodynamic data on the binding of the two aptamers are also reported and analyzed.

  7. Modeling the microscopic electrical properties of thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) for label-free biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfinito, Eleonora; Reggiani, Lino; Cataldo, Rosella; De Nunzio, Giorgio; Giotta, Livia; Guascito, Maria Rachele

    2017-02-01

    Aptamers are chemically produced oligonucleotides, able to bind a variety of targets such as drugs, proteins and pathogens with high sensitivity and selectivity. Therefore, aptamers are largely employed for producing label-free biosensors (aptasensors), with significant applications in diagnostics and drug delivery. In particular, the anti-thrombin aptamers are biomolecules of high interest for clinical use, because of their ability to recognize and bind the thrombin enzyme. Among them, the DNA 15-mer aptamer (TBA), has been widely explored around the possibility of using it in aptasensors. This paper proposes a microscopic model of the electrical properties of TBA and of the aptamer-thrombin complex, combining information from both structure and function, following the issues addressed in an emerging branch of electronics known as proteotronics. The theoretical results are compared and validated with measurements reported in the literature. Finally, the model suggests resistance measurements as a novel tool for testing aptamer-target affinity.

  8. Evaluation of antithrombotic activity of thrombin DNA aptamers by a murine thrombosis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Zavyalova

    Full Text Available Aptamers are nucleic acid based molecular recognition elements with a high potential for the theranostics. Some of the aptamers are under development for therapeutic applications as promising antithrombotic agents; and G-quadruplex DNA aptamers, which directly inhibit the thrombin activity, are among them. RA-36, the 31-meric DNA aptamer, consists of two thrombin binding pharmacophores joined with the thymine linker. It has been shown earlier that RA-36 directly inhibits thrombin in the reaction of fibrinogen hydrolysis, and also it inhibits plasma and blood coagulation. Studies of both inhibitory and anticoagulation effects had indicated rather high species specificity of the aptamer. Further R&D of RA-36 requires exploring its efficiency in vivo. Therefore the development of a robust and adequate animal model for effective physiological studies of aptamers is in high current demand. This work is devoted to in vivo study of the antithrombotic effect of RA-36 aptamer. A murine model of thrombosis has been applied to reveal a lag and even prevention of thrombus formation when RA-36 was intravenous bolus injected in high doses of 1.4-7.1 µmol/kg (14-70 mg/kg. A comparative study of RA-36 aptamer and bivalirudin reveals that both direct thrombin inhibitors have similar antithrombotic effects for the murine model of thrombosis; though in vitro bivalirudin has anticoagulation activity several times higher compared to RA-36. The results indicate that both RA-36 aptamer and bivalirudin are direct thrombin inhibitors of different potency, but possible interactions of the thrombin-inhibitor complex with other components of blood coagulation cascade level the physiological effects for both inhibitors.

  9. Evaluation of antithrombotic activity of thrombin DNA aptamers by a murine thrombosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavyalova, Elena; Samoylenkova, Nadezhda; Revishchin, Alexander; Golovin, Andrey; Pavlova, Galina; Kopylov, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are nucleic acid based molecular recognition elements with a high potential for the theranostics. Some of the aptamers are under development for therapeutic applications as promising antithrombotic agents; and G-quadruplex DNA aptamers, which directly inhibit the thrombin activity, are among them. RA-36, the 31-meric DNA aptamer, consists of two thrombin binding pharmacophores joined with the thymine linker. It has been shown earlier that RA-36 directly inhibits thrombin in the reaction of fibrinogen hydrolysis, and also it inhibits plasma and blood coagulation. Studies of both inhibitory and anticoagulation effects had indicated rather high species specificity of the aptamer. Further R&D of RA-36 requires exploring its efficiency in vivo. Therefore the development of a robust and adequate animal model for effective physiological studies of aptamers is in high current demand. This work is devoted to in vivo study of the antithrombotic effect of RA-36 aptamer. A murine model of thrombosis has been applied to reveal a lag and even prevention of thrombus formation when RA-36 was intravenous bolus injected in high doses of 1.4-7.1 µmol/kg (14-70 mg/kg). A comparative study of RA-36 aptamer and bivalirudin reveals that both direct thrombin inhibitors have similar antithrombotic effects for the murine model of thrombosis; though in vitro bivalirudin has anticoagulation activity several times higher compared to RA-36. The results indicate that both RA-36 aptamer and bivalirudin are direct thrombin inhibitors of different potency, but possible interactions of the thrombin-inhibitor complex with other components of blood coagulation cascade level the physiological effects for both inhibitors.

  10. The calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT): a universal routine test for hyper- and hypocoagulability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemker, H C; Giesen, P; AlDieri, R; Regnault, V; de Smed, E; Wagenvoord, R; Lecompte, T; Béguin, S

    2002-01-01

    By using a "slow" fluorogenic thrombin substrate and continuous comparison to a simultaneously run calibrator, thrombin generation can be monitored automatically, on line, in clotting PPP or PRP at a throughput of up to 100 samples per hour. The resulting "Thrombogram" in PPP measures hypocoagulability (haemophilias, oral anticoagulants, heparins (-likes), direct inhibitors) and hypercoagulabilities (AT deficiency, prothrombin hyperexpression, prot. C and S deficiency, factor V Leiden, oral contraceptives). In PRP it is diminished in thrombopathies, in von Willebrand disease, by antibodies blocking GPIIb-IIIa or GPIb, or by antiplatelet drugs like aspirin and clopidogrel. Lupus anticoagulant both retards and increases thrombin generation. The thrombogram thus appears to be a broad function test of the haemostatic-thrombotic mechanism of the blood.

  11. Thrombin stimulation of inflammatory breast cancer cells leads to aggressiveness via the EGFR-PAR1-Pak1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro, Kazufumi; Bui-Nguyen, Tri M; Divijendra Natha, Reddy S; Schwartz, Arnold M; Levine, Paul; Kumar, Rakesh

    2012-12-27

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) accounts for a small fraction but aggressive form of epithelial breast cancer. Although the role of thrombin in cancer is beginning to be unfolded, its impact on the biology of IBC remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to establish the role of thrombin on the invasiveness of IBC cells. The IBC SUM149 cell line was treated with thrombin in the absence or presence of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor erlotinib and protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) inhibitor. The effects of pharmacological inhibitors on the ability of thrombin to stimulate the growth rate and invasiveness were examined. We found that the inhibition of putative cellular targets of thrombin action suppresses both the growth and invasiveness of SUM149 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, thrombin-mediated increased invasion of SUM149 cells was routed through EGFR phosphorylation, and in turn, stimulation of the p21-activated kinase (Pak1) activity in a EGFR-sensitive manner. Interestingly, thrombin-mediated activation of the Pak1 pathway stimulation was blocked by erlotinib and PAR1 inhibitor. For proof-of-principle studies, we found immunohistochemical evidence of Pak1 activation as well as expression of PAR1 in IBC. Thrombin utilizes EGFR to relay signals promoting SUM149 cell growth and invasion via the Pak1 pathway. The study provides the rationale for future therapeutic approaches in mitigating the invasive nature of IBC by targeting Pak1 and/or EGFR.

  12. Automating Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John

    2007-01-01

    In past years, higher education's financial management side has been riddled with manual processes and aging mainframe applications. This article discusses schools which had taken advantage of an array of technologies that automate billing, payment processing, and refund processing in the case of overpayment. The investments are well worth it:…

  13. Computer based screening of compound databases: 1. Preselection of benzamidine-based thrombin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, T; Haaksma, E E

    2000-07-01

    We present a computational protocol which uses the known three-dimensional structure of a target enzyme to identify possible ligands from databases of compounds with low molecular weight. This is accomplished by first mapping the essential interactions in the binding site with the program GRID. The resulting regions of favorable interaction between target and ligand are translated into a database query, and with UNITY a flexible 3D database search is performed. The feasibility of this approach is calibrated with thrombin as the target. Our results show that the resulting hit lists are enriched with thrombin inhibitors compared to the total database.

  14. Bioregulatory Functions of Thrombin (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Volume 485)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-29

    Eldor .’ With permission from the American Journal of Hematology.) 422 MARX: MODULATION OF THROMBIN 423 .C Thrombin .05 u/mI 2 Kv 35uM FIGURE 2A...7. BAR-SHAVIT, R., A. KAHN, M. S. MUDD, C. WILNER, K. G. MANN & J. W. FENTON II. 1984. Biochemistry 23: 397-400. 8. HEYNS, A. DUP., A. ELDOR , R. YAROM...G. MARX. 1985. Blood 66: 213-219. 9. MARX, G. & A. ELDOR . 1985. Am. J. Hematol. 19: 151-159. 10. KAZIMIERCZAK, W. & C. MASLINSKL. 1974. Agents

  15. Combined endovascular intervention and percutaneous thrombin injection in the treatment of iatrogenic pseudoaneurysm. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, M; Juszkat, R; Pukacki, F; Waliszewski, K

    2007-06-01

    One of the basic techniques of treatment of iatrogenic pseudoaneurysms is percutaneous thrombin injection. Unfortunately, success rate of this treatment can be limited in cases associated with extensive damage to arterial wall. Our paper presents one case of combined treatment involving endovascular occlusion of the entry to the false aneurysm and percutaneous thrombin injection into the pseudoaneurysm chamber. In our opinion this technique can be successfully applied in patients with contraindications for compression therapy, surgical intervention or failure of traditional injection due to large entry, multiple arterial wall damage or accompanying arteriovenous fistula.

  16. Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession.

  17. Myths in test automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazmine Francis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myths in automation of software testing is an issue of discussion that echoes about the areas of service in validation of software industry. Probably, the first though that appears in knowledgeable reader would be Why this old topic again? What's New to discuss the matter? But, for the first time everyone agrees that undoubtedly automation testing today is not today what it used to be ten or fifteen years ago, because it has evolved in scope and magnitude. What began as a simple linear scripts for web applications today has a complex architecture and a hybrid framework to facilitate the implementation of testing applications developed with various platforms and technologies. Undoubtedly automation has advanced, but so did the myths associated with it. The change in perspective and knowledge of people on automation has altered the terrain. This article reflects the points of views and experience of the author in what has to do with the transformation of the original myths in new versions, and how they are derived; also provides his thoughts on the new generation of myths.

  18. Heating automation

    OpenAIRE

    Tomažič, Tomaž

    2013-01-01

    This degree paper presents usage and operation of peripheral devices with microcontroller for heating automation. The main goal is to make a quality system control for heating three house floors and with that, increase efficiency of heating devices and lower heating expenses. Heat pump, furnace, boiler pump, two floor-heating pumps and two radiator pumps need to be controlled by this system. For work, we have chosen a development kit stm32f4 - discovery with five temperature sensors, LCD disp...

  19. Automation Security

    OpenAIRE

    Mirzoev, Dr. Timur

    2014-01-01

    Web-based Automated Process Control systems are a new type of applications that use the Internet to control industrial processes with the access to the real-time data. Supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) networks contain computers and applications that perform key functions in providing essential services and commodities (e.g., electricity, natural gas, gasoline, water, waste treatment, transportation) to all Americans. As such, they are part of the nation s critical infrastructu...

  20. Marketing automation

    OpenAIRE

    Raluca Dania TODOR

    2017-01-01

    The automation of the marketing process seems to be nowadays, the only solution to face the major changes brought by the fast evolution of technology and the continuous increase in supply and demand. In order to achieve the desired marketing results, businessis have to employ digital marketing and communication services. These services are efficient and measurable thanks to the marketing technology used to track, score and implement each campaign. Due to the...

  1. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate decreases thrombin/paclitaxel-induced endothelial tissue factor expression via the inhibition of c-Jun terminal NH2 kinase phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huang-Joe [Institute of Biotechnology, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, No. 2, Yuh-Der Road, Taichung 40447, Taiwan (China); Lo, Wan-Yu [Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, No. 2, Yuh-Der Road, Taichung 40447, Taiwan (China); Graduate Integration of Chinese and Western Medicine, China Medical University, No. 91, Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Lu, Te-Ling [School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, No. 91, Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Huang, Haimei, E-mail: hmhuang@life.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Biotechnology, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2010-01-01

    Patients with paclitaxel-eluting stents are concerned with stent thrombosis caused by premature discontinuation of dual antiplatelet therapy or clopidogrel resistance. This study investigates the effect of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the expression of thrombin/paclitaxel-induced endothelial tissue factor (TF) expressions in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). EGCG was nontoxic to HAECs at 6 h up to a concentration of 25 {mu}mol/L. At a concentration of 25 {mu}mol/L, EGCG pretreatment potently inhibited both thrombin-stimulated and thrombin/paclitaxel-stimulated endothelial TF protein expression. Thrombin and thrombin/paclitaxel-induced 2.6-fold and 2.9-fold increases in TF activity compared with the control. EGCG pretreatment caused a 29% and 38% decrease in TF activity on thrombin and thrombin/paclitaxel treatment, respectively. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed that thrombin and thrombin/paclitaxel-induced 3.0-fold and 4.6-fold TF mRNA expressions compared with the control. EGCG pretreatment caused an 82% and 72% decrease in TF mRNA expression on thrombin and thrombin/paclitaxel treatment, respectively. The c-Jun terminal NH2 kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 reduced thrombin/paclitaxel-induced TF expression. Furthermore, EGCG significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of JNK to 49% of thrombin/paclitaxel-stimulated HAECs at 60 min. Immunofluorescence assay did not show an inhibitory effect of EGCG on P65 NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation in the thrombin/paclitaxel-stimulated endothelial cells. In conclusion, EGCG can inhibit TF expression in thrombin/paclitaxel-stimulated endothelial cells via the inhibition of JNK phosphorylation. The unique property of EGCG may be used to develop a new drug-eluting stent by co-coating EGCG and paclitaxel.

  2. The role of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor in diabetic wound healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J.N. Verkleij; J.J.T.H. Roelofs; S.R. Havik; J.C.M. Meijers; P.F. Marx

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: One of the major complications in patients with diabetes mellitus is impaired wound healing. The fibrinolytic system is involved in parts of the wound healing process and deficiency of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) results in delayed wound closure. Moreover, levels

  3. Effects of fused hirudin on activity of thrombin and function of platelets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Li; CHEN Shao-ping; CAI Zai-long; YANG Sheng-sheng; QIN Yong-wen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether fused hirudin peptide has both antithrombin and antiplatelet functions. Methods: The core region of fused hirudin was the C-terminal tail of hirudin(hirudin53-64),which could bind to the anion binding exosite (ABE) of thrombin.Arg-Pro-Pro-Gly-Phe(RPPGF) amino acid sequence,a metabolite of bradykinin,was added to the N-terminus of hirudin53-64.It bound to the active site of thrombin.Additionally,Arg-Gly-Asp(RGD)amino acid sequence,an inibitor of glycoprotein Ⅱb/Ⅲa( GP Ⅱb/Ⅲa) receptor,was linked to C-terminus of hirudin53-64.This 26-animo acid-fused hirudin peptide was artificially synthesized,purified and analysed. Results: Fused hirudin peptide significantly lengthened the activated partial thromboplastin time(APTT),thrombin time(TT)and prothrombin time(PT) and inhibited the amidolytic activity of thrombin.The ADP-induced platelet aggregation was markedly inhibited by fused hirudin peptide. Conclusion: Fused hirudin peptide has activity of antithrombin as well as antiplatelet.Therefore bifunctional anticoagulation peptide has capacity to target various components of haemostatic process and may become more powerful antithrombosis agent.

  4. The tick-derived anticoagulant madanin is processed by thrombin and factor Xa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C Figueiredo

    Full Text Available The cysteine-less peptidic anticoagulants madanin-1 and madanin-2 from the bush tick Haemaphysalis longicornis are the founding members of the MEROPS inhibitor family I53. It has been previously suggested that madanins exert their functional activity by competing with physiological substrates for binding to the positively charged exosite I (fibrinogen-binding exosite of α-thrombin. We hereby demonstrate that competitive inhibition of α-thrombin by madanin-1 or madanin-2 involves binding to the enzyme's active site. Moreover, the blood coagulation factors IIa and Xa are shown to hydrolyze both inhibitors at different, although partially overlapping cleavage sites. Finally, the three-dimensional structure of the complex formed between human α-thrombin and a proteolytic fragment of madanin-1, determined by X-ray crystallography, elucidates the molecular details of madanin-1 recognition and processing by the proteinase. Taken together, the current findings establish the mechanism of action of madanins, natural anticoagulants that behave as cleavable competitive inhibitors of thrombin.

  5. Microfluidic chip-based silver nanoparticles aptasensor for colorimetric detection of thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yaju; Liu, Xiaohui; Li, Jie; Qiang, Weibing; Sun, Liang; Li, Hui; Xu, Danke

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a colorimetric silver nanoparticles aptasensor (aptamer-AgNPs) was developed for simple and straightforward detection of protein in microfluidic chip. Surface-functionalized microfluidic channels were employed as the capture platform. Then the mixture of target protein and aptamer-AgNPs were injected into the microfluidic channels for colorimetric detection. To demonstrate the performance of this detection platform, thrombin was chosen as a model target protein. Introduction of thrombin could form a sandwich-type complex involving immobilized AgNPs. The amount of aptamer-AgNPs on the complex augmented along with the increase of the thrombin concentration causing different color change that can be analyzed both by naked eyes and a flatbed scanner. This method is featured with low sample consumption, simple processes of microfluidic platform and straightforward colorimetric detection with aptamer-AgNPs. Thrombin at concentrations as low as 20pM can be detected using this aptasensor without signal amplification. This work demonstrated that it had good selectivity over other proteins and it could be a useful strategy to detect other targets with two affinity binding sites for ligands as well.

  6. A sensitive bioimmunoassay for thrombin-cleaved two-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braat, E.A.M.; Nauland, U.; Dooijewaard, G.; Rijken, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    Thrombin cleaves single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator (scu-PA) into a virtually inactive two-chain form (tcu-PA/T). Little is known about the physiological importance of tcu-PA/T. To examine the occurrence of tcu-PA/T in vivo, we developed a sensitive and specific bioimmunoassay (BIA) f

  7. A novel purification method for histidine-tagged proteins containing a thrombin cleavage site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hefti, M.H.; Vugt-Toorn, van der C.J.; Dixon, R.; Vervoort, J.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    A general procedure for the purification of histidine-tagged proteins has been developed using immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography. This two-step purification method can be used for proteins containing a hexahistidine tag and a thrombin cleavage site, yielding high amounts of purified prot

  8. Aptamer modified organic-inorganic hybrid silica monolithic capillary columns for highly selective recognition of thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Nan; Liang, Zhen; Liang, Yu; Sui, Zhigang; Zhang, Liyuan; Wu, Qi; Yang, Kaiguang; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2012-12-04

    A novel kind of aptamer modified organic-inorganic hybrid silica monolithic capillary column has been developed, via the covalent bonding of 5'-NH(2)-modified aptamer for human α-thrombin on hybrid silica monolith, prepared by sol-gel method, with tetraethoxysilane and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane as precursors. Due to the large specific surface area of the hybrid matrix, the average coverage density of aptamer reached 568 pmol/μL, and the thrombin binding capacity was 1.15 μg/μL, 14 times higher than that of aptamer modified open tubular capillaries. By such an affinity capillary column, the limit of detection of thrombin was decreased to 3.4 nM with a UV detector. Furthermore, even when thrombin was mixed with 1000 times more concentrated human serum, it could be selectively enriched and detected with the signal-to-noise ratio as ca.10. These results indicate that the developed preparation strategy for aptamer based hybrid silica monolithic capillary column might provide an effective method to achieve highly selective recognition of trace targets.

  9. EFFICACY OF THROMBIN FIBRIN GLUE AND SCLE ROSANT IN THE MANAGEMENT OF BLEEDI NG GASTRIC VARICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric varices are noted in up to 20 % of patents with portal hypertension , and are more common in those with non - cirrhotic etiology 1 . They bleed at lower portal pressures , bleed more severely and are associated with higher rates of rebleed , encephalopathy and mortality 1,2,3 . Variceal obliteration using tissue adhesives such as N - butyl cyanoacrylate leading to plugging and thrombosis of the gastric varices is currently the first line management option for obliteration of the gastric varices 3 . Although various options have been proposed , gold standard for management of gastric variceal bleeds is yet to be defined. We theorized that injection of the gastric varices using thrombin based glue followed by injection of a sclerosant shall be effective in optimum sclerotherapy and eradication of gastric varices. MATERIAL AND METHODS : All patients presenting with gastric variceal bleed were offered sclerotherapy with Thrombin fibrin based glue and sclerosant (TFG/S . During the study period 18 patients were enrolled in the TGF/S group. 21 patients underwent variceal plugging with n - butyl cyanoacrylate (NBC . There was no significant difference in age/ sex , duration of bleed or time interval between onset of bleed and endotherapy. RESULTS: Patients undergoing endotherapy with TGF/S had less episodes of bleed , and greater eradication of varices. CONCLUSION: The results with thrombin / fibrin glue and sclerotherapy are highly encouraging. Well - designed trials need to be performed KEYWORDS:Gastric varices; Thrombin Sclerotherapy

  10. Regulation of Thrombin-Induced Lung Endothelial Cell Barrier Disruption by Protein Kinase C Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lishi; Chiang, Eddie T.; Kelly, Gabriel T.; Kanteti, Prasad; Singleton, Patrick A.; Camp, Sara M.; Zhou, Tingting; Dudek, Steven M.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Wang, Ting; Black, Steven M.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Protein Kinase C (PKC) plays a significant role in thrombin-induced loss of endothelial cell (EC) barrier integrity; however, the existence of more than 10 isozymes of PKC and tissue–specific isoform expression has limited our understanding of this important second messenger in vascular homeostasis. In this study, we show that PKCδ isoform promotes thrombin-induced loss of human pulmonary artery EC barrier integrity, findings substantiated by PKCδ inhibitory studies (rottlerin), dominant negative PKCδ construct and PKCδ silencing (siRNA). In addition, we identified PKCδ as a signaling mediator upstream of both thrombin-induced MLC phosphorylation and Rho GTPase activation affecting stress fiber formation, cell contraction and loss of EC barrier integrity. Our inhibitor-based studies indicate that thrombin-induced PKCδ activation exerts a positive feedback on Rho GTPase activation and contributes to Rac1 GTPase inhibition. Moreover, PKD (or PKCμ) and CPI-17, two known PKCδ targets, were found to be activated by PKCδ in EC and served as modulators of cytoskeleton rearrangement. These studies clarify the role of PKCδ in EC cytoskeleton regulation, and highlight PKCδ as a therapeutic target in inflammatory lung disorders, characterized by the loss of barrier integrity, such as acute lung injury and sepsis. PMID:27442243

  11. Regulation of Thrombin-Induced Lung Endothelial Cell Barrier Disruption by Protein Kinase C Delta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lishi Xie

    Full Text Available Protein Kinase C (PKC plays a significant role in thrombin-induced loss of endothelial cell (EC barrier integrity; however, the existence of more than 10 isozymes of PKC and tissue-specific isoform expression has limited our understanding of this important second messenger in vascular homeostasis. In this study, we show that PKCδ isoform promotes thrombin-induced loss of human pulmonary artery EC barrier integrity, findings substantiated by PKCδ inhibitory studies (rottlerin, dominant negative PKCδ construct and PKCδ silencing (siRNA. In addition, we identified PKCδ as a signaling mediator upstream of both thrombin-induced MLC phosphorylation and Rho GTPase activation affecting stress fiber formation, cell contraction and loss of EC barrier integrity. Our inhibitor-based studies indicate that thrombin-induced PKCδ activation exerts a positive feedback on Rho GTPase activation and contributes to Rac1 GTPase inhibition. Moreover, PKD (or PKCμ and CPI-17, two known PKCδ targets, were found to be activated by PKCδ in EC and served as modulators of cytoskeleton rearrangement. These studies clarify the role of PKCδ in EC cytoskeleton regulation, and highlight PKCδ as a therapeutic target in inflammatory lung disorders, characterized by the loss of barrier integrity, such as acute lung injury and sepsis.

  12. Genetic and pharmacological modifications of thrombin formation in apolipoprotein e-deficient mice determine atherosclerosis severity and atherothrombosis onset in a neutrophil-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian I Borissoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Variations in the blood coagulation activity, determined genetically or by medication, may alter atherosclerotic plaque progression, by influencing pleiotropic effects of coagulation proteases. Published experimental studies have yielded contradictory findings on the role of hypercoagulability in atherogenesis. We therefore sought to address this matter by extensively investigating the in vivo significance of genetic alterations and pharmacologic inhibition of thrombin formation for the onset and progression of atherosclerosis, and plaque phenotype determination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated transgenic atherosclerosis-prone mice with diminished coagulant or hypercoagulable phenotype and employed two distinct models of atherosclerosis. Gene-targeted 50% reduction in prothrombin (FII(-/WT:ApoE(-/- was remarkably effective in limiting disease compared to control ApoE(-/- mice, associated with significant qualitative benefits, including diminished leukocyte infiltration, altered collagen and vascular smooth muscle cell content. Genetically-imposed hypercoagulability in TM(Pro/Pro:ApoE(-/- mice resulted in severe atherosclerosis, plaque vulnerability and spontaneous atherothrombosis. Hypercoagulability was associated with a pronounced neutrophilia, neutrophil hyper-reactivity, markedly increased oxidative stress, neutrophil intraplaque infiltration and apoptosis. Administration of either the synthetic specific thrombin inhibitor Dabigatran etexilate, or recombinant activated protein C (APC, counteracted the pro-inflammatory and pro-atherogenic phenotype of pro-thrombotic TM(Pro/Pro:ApoE(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide new evidence highlighting the importance of neutrophils in the coagulation-inflammation interplay during atherogenesis. Our findings reveal that thrombin-mediated proteolysis is an unexpectedly powerful determinant of atherosclerosis in multiple distinct settings. These studies suggest that

  13. Modulation of 3D Fibrin Matrix Stiffness by Intrinsic Fibrinogen–Thrombin Compositions and by Extrinsic Cellular Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Haison; Wu, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Fibrin is a substance formed through catalytic conversion of coagulation constituents: fibrinogen and thrombin. The kinetics of the two constituents determines the structural properties of the fibrin architecture. We have shown previously that changing the fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations in the final three-dimensional (3D) fibrin matrix influenced cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we further examined the effect of changing fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations in the absence or presence of fibroblasts on the structural modulus or stiffness of 3D fibrin matrices. We have prepared fibroblast-free and fibroblast-embedded 3D fibrin matrices of different fibrinogen and thrombin formulations, and tested the stiffness of these constructs using standard mechanical testing assays. Results showed that there was a corresponding increase in stiffness with increasing thrombin and fibrinogen concentrations; the increase was more notable with fibrinogen and to a lesser degree with thrombin. The effect of fibroblasts on the stiffness of the fibrin construct was also examined. We have observed a small increase in the stiffness of the fibroblast-incorporated fibrin construct as they proliferated and exhibited spreading morphology. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive report detailing the relationship between fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations, cell proliferation, and stiffness in 3D fibrin matrices. The data obtained may lead to optimally design suitable bioscaffolds where we can control both cell proliferation and structural integrity for a variety of tissue engineering applications. PMID:19309239

  14. The automation of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ross D; Rowland, Jem; Oliver, Stephen G; Young, Michael; Aubrey, Wayne; Byrne, Emma; Liakata, Maria; Markham, Magdalena; Pir, Pinar; Soldatova, Larisa N; Sparkes, Andrew; Whelan, Kenneth E; Clare, Amanda

    2009-04-03

    The basis of science is the hypothetico-deductive method and the recording of experiments in sufficient detail to enable reproducibility. We report the development of Robot Scientist "Adam," which advances the automation of both. Adam has autonomously generated functional genomics hypotheses about the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and experimentally tested these hypotheses by using laboratory automation. We have confirmed Adam's conclusions through manual experiments. To describe Adam's research, we have developed an ontology and logical language. The resulting formalization involves over 10,000 different research units in a nested treelike structure, 10 levels deep, that relates the 6.6 million biomass measurements to their logical description. This formalization describes how a machine contributed to scientific knowledge.

  15. INCREASED RISK OF THROMBOEMBOLISM AS A RESULT OF HIGH THROMBIN PRODUCTION IS ASSOCIATED WITH SHORT ACTIVATED PARTIAL THROMBOPLASTIN TIME IN CANCER PATIENTS ON AND AFTER CHEMOTHERAPY: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indranil

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available : To investigate wheather cancer patients during and following chemotherapy with short activated partial thromboplastin times (aPTTs have increased thrombin generation and are at increased risk for thromboembolism, this prospective study was designed. Routine coagulation specimens of such patients were screened for the presence of short or normal aPTT for 5-month period, and, accordingly, 250 specimens were collected. Prothrombin fragment F1+2 (F1+2 was measured to evaluate thrombin activation, and a second aPTT was performed with a different reagent. Clinical history were obtained from medical records after conclusion of sample collection. 6 to12months later, patients were questioned on thromboembolic events during the previous 18 months by questionnaire. F1+2 and the incidence of venous thromboses were elevated significantly in the short aPTT group. Patients with acute bleeding had short aPTTs, but 36% of these also had thromboembolic events during the 18 months proximal to blood collection. These findings were confirmed with the second aPTT reagent. Patients with short aPTTs have increased thrombin generation and are at increased risk for thromboembolism, mainly venous thromboses, despite the fact that a short aPTT can occur in the acute setting of bleeding.

  16. Maneuver Automation Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uffelman, Hal; Goodson, Troy; Pellegrin, Michael; Stavert, Lynn; Burk, Thomas; Beach, David; Signorelli, Joel; Jones, Jeremy; Hahn, Yungsun; Attiyah, Ahlam; Illsley, Jeannette

    2009-01-01

    The Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) automates the process of generating commands for maneuvers to keep the spacecraft of the Cassini-Huygens mission on a predetermined prime mission trajectory. Before MAS became available, a team of approximately 10 members had to work about two weeks to design, test, and implement each maneuver in a process that involved running many maneuver-related application programs and then serially handing off data products to other parts of the team. MAS enables a three-member team to design, test, and implement a maneuver in about one-half hour after Navigation has process-tracking data. MAS accepts more than 60 parameters and 22 files as input directly from users. MAS consists of Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) scripts that link, sequence, and execute the maneuver- related application programs: "Pushing a single button" on a graphical user interface causes MAS to run navigation programs that design a maneuver; programs that create sequences of commands to execute the maneuver on the spacecraft; and a program that generates predictions about maneuver performance and generates reports and other files that enable users to quickly review and verify the maneuver design. MAS can also generate presentation materials, initiate electronic command request forms, and archive all data products for future reference.

  17. Salmon and human thrombin differentially regulate radicular pain, glial-induced inflammation and spinal neuronal excitability through protease-activated receptor-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenell R Smith

    Full Text Available Chronic neck pain is a major problem with common causes including disc herniation and spondylosis that compress the spinal nerve roots. Cervical nerve root compression in the rat produces sustained behavioral hypersensitivity, due in part to the early upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the sustained hyperexcitability of neurons in the spinal cord and degeneration in the injured nerve root. Through its activation of the protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1, mammalian thrombin can enhance pain and inflammation; yet at lower concentrations it is also capable of transiently attenuating pain which suggests that PAR1 activation rate may affect pain maintenance. Interestingly, salmon-derived fibrin, which contains salmon thrombin, attenuates nerve root-induced pain and inflammation, but the mechanisms of action leading to its analgesia are unknown. This study evaluates the effects of salmon thrombin on nerve root-mediated pain, axonal degeneration in the root, spinal neuronal hyperexcitability and inflammation compared to its human counterpart in the context of their enzymatic capabilities towards coagulation substrates and PAR1. Salmon thrombin significantly reduces behavioral sensitivity, preserves neuronal myelination, reduces macrophage infiltration in the injured nerve root and significantly decreases spinal neuronal hyperexcitability after painful root compression in the rat; whereas human thrombin has no effect. Unlike salmon thrombin, human thrombin upregulates the transcription of IL-1β and TNF-α and the secretion of IL-6 by cortical cultures. Salmon and human thrombins cleave human fibrinogen-derived peptides and form clots with fibrinogen with similar enzymatic activities, but salmon thrombin retains a higher enzymatic activity towards coagulation substrates in the presence of antithrombin III and hirudin compared to human thrombin. Conversely, salmon thrombin activates a PAR1-derived peptide more weakly than human thrombin. These

  18. Common variants in the human platelet PAR4 thrombin receptor alter platelet function and differ by race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Leonard C.; Simon, Lukas M.; Lindsay, Cory R.; Kong, Xianguo; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Tourdot, Benjamin E.; Chen, Edward S.; Ma, Lin; Coughlin, Shaun; Nieman, Marvin; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    Human platelets express 2 thrombin receptors: protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR4. Recently, we reported 3.7-fold increased PAR4-mediated aggregation kinetics in platelets from black subjects compared with white subjects. We now show that platelets from blacks (n = 70) express 14% more PAR4 protein than those from whites (n = 84), but this difference is not associated with platelet PAR4 function. Quantitative trait locus analysis identified 3 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PAR4 gene (F2RL3) associated with PAR4-induced platelet aggregation. Among these single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs773902 determines whether residue 120 in transmembrane domain 2 is an alanine (Ala) or threonine (Thr). Compared with the Ala120 variant, Thr120 was more common in black subjects than in white subjects (63% vs 19%), was associated with higher PAR4-induced human platelet aggregation and Ca2+ flux, and generated greater inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate in transfected cells. A second, less frequent F2RL3 variant, Phe296Val, was only observed in blacks and abolished the enhanced PAR4-induced platelet aggregation and 1,4,5-triphosphate generation associated with PAR4-Thr120. PAR4 genotype did not affect vorapaxar inhibition of platelet PAR1 function, but a strong pharmacogenetic effect was observed with the PAR4-specific antagonist YD-3 [1-benzyl-3(ethoxycarbonylphenyl)-indazole]. These findings may have an important pharmacogenetic effect on the development of new PAR antagonists. PMID:25293779

  19. Automated Integrated Analog Filter Design Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolis Kiela

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of modern automated integrated analog circuits design methods and their use in integrated filter design is done. Current modern analog circuits automated tools are based on optimization algorithms and/or new circuit generation methods. Most automated integrated filter design methods are only suited to gmC and switched current filter topologies. Here, an algorithm for an active RC integrated filter design is proposed, that can be used in automated filter designs. The algorithm is tested by designing an integrated active RC filter in a 65 nm CMOS technology.

  20. Automated High Throughput Drug Target Crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupp, B

    2005-02-18

    The molecular structures of drug target proteins and receptors form the basis for 'rational' or structure guided drug design. The majority of target structures are experimentally determined by protein X-ray crystallography, which as evolved into a highly automated, high throughput drug discovery and screening tool. Process automation has accelerated tasks from parallel protein expression, fully automated crystallization, and rapid data collection to highly efficient structure determination methods. A thoroughly designed automation technology platform supported by a powerful informatics infrastructure forms the basis for optimal workflow implementation and the data mining and analysis tools to generate new leads from experimental protein drug target structures.

  1. Comparative evaluation of direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors with antiplatelet agents under flow and static conditions: an in vitro flow chamber model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Kazuya; Ohnishi, Tomoko; Sameshima, Hisayo; Miura, Naoki; Koide, Takehiko; Maruyama, Ikuro; Tanaka, Kenichi A

    2014-01-01

    Dabigatran and rivaroxaban are novel oral anticoagulants that specifically inhibit thrombin and factor Xa, respectively. The aim of this study is to elucidate antithrombotic properties of these anticoagulant agents under arterial and venous shear conditions. Whole blood samples treated with dabigatran or rivaroxaban at 250, 500, and 1000 nM, with/without aspirin and AR-C66096, a P2Y12 antagonist, were perfused over a microchip coated with collagen and tissue thromboplastin at shear rates of 240 and 600 s(-1). Fibrin-rich platelet thrombus formation was quantified by monitoring flow pressure changes. Dabigatran at higher concentrations (500 and 1000 nM) potently inhibited thrombus formation at both shear rates, whereas 1000 nM of rivaroxaban delayed, but did not completely inhibit, thrombus formation. Dual antiplatelet agents weakly suppressed thrombus formation at both shear rates, but intensified the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran and rivaroxaban. The anticoagulant effects of dabigatran and rivaroxaban were also evaluated under static conditions using thrombin generation (TG) assay. In platelet-poor plasma, dabigatran at 250 and 500 nM efficiently prolonged the lag time (LT) and moderately reduce peak height (PH) of TG, whereas rivaroxaban at 250 nM efficiently prolonged LT and reduced PH of TG. In platelet-rich plasma, however, both anticoagulants efficiently delayed LT and reduced PH of TG. Our results suggest that dabigatran and rivaroxaban may exert distinct antithrombotic effects under flow conditions, particularly in combination with dual antiplatelet therapy.

  2. Comparative evaluation of direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors with antiplatelet agents under flow and static conditions: an in vitro flow chamber model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Hosokawa

    Full Text Available Dabigatran and rivaroxaban are novel oral anticoagulants that specifically inhibit thrombin and factor Xa, respectively. The aim of this study is to elucidate antithrombotic properties of these anticoagulant agents under arterial and venous shear conditions. Whole blood samples treated with dabigatran or rivaroxaban at 250, 500, and 1000 nM, with/without aspirin and AR-C66096, a P2Y12 antagonist, were perfused over a microchip coated with collagen and tissue thromboplastin at shear rates of 240 and 600 s(-1. Fibrin-rich platelet thrombus formation was quantified by monitoring flow pressure changes. Dabigatran at higher concentrations (500 and 1000 nM potently inhibited thrombus formation at both shear rates, whereas 1000 nM of rivaroxaban delayed, but did not completely inhibit, thrombus formation. Dual antiplatelet agents weakly suppressed thrombus formation at both shear rates, but intensified the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran and rivaroxaban. The anticoagulant effects of dabigatran and rivaroxaban were also evaluated under static conditions using thrombin generation (TG assay. In platelet-poor plasma, dabigatran at 250 and 500 nM efficiently prolonged the lag time (LT and moderately reduce peak height (PH of TG, whereas rivaroxaban at 250 nM efficiently prolonged LT and reduced PH of TG. In platelet-rich plasma, however, both anticoagulants efficiently delayed LT and reduced PH of TG. Our results suggest that dabigatran and rivaroxaban may exert distinct antithrombotic effects under flow conditions, particularly in combination with dual antiplatelet therapy.

  3. A general review of major global coagulation assays : thrombelastography, thrombin generation test and clot waveform analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancé, Marcus D

    2015-01-01

    Thrombosis and hemorrhage are major contributors to morbidity and mortality. The traditional laboratory tests do not supply enough information to diagnose and treat patients timely and according to their phenotype. Global hemostasis tests might improve this circumstance. The viscoelastic tests (ROTE

  4. Thrombotic risk assessment in antiphospholipid syndrome: the role of new antibody specificities and thrombin generation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciascia, Savino; Baldovino, Simone; Schreiber, Karen; Solfietti, Laura; Radin, Massimo; Cuadrado, Maria J; Menegatti, Elisa; Erkan, Doruk; Roccatello, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune condition characterized by the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in subjects presenting with thrombosis and/or pregnancy loss. The currently used classification criteria were updated in the international consensus held in Sidney in 2005. Vascular events seem to result of local procoagulative alterations upon triggers influence (the so called "second-hit theory"), while placental thrombosis and complement activation seem to lead to pregnancy morbidity. The laboratory tests suggested by the current classification criteria include lupus anticoagulant, a functional coagulation assay, and anticardiolipin and anti-β2-glycoprotein-I antibodies, generally detected by solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The real challenge for treating physicians is understanding what is the actual weight of aPL in provoking clinical manifestations in each case. As thrombosis has a multi-factorial cause, each patient needs a risk-stratified approach. In this review we discuss the role of thrombotic risk assessment in primary and secondary prevention of venous and arterial thromboembolic disease in patients with APS, focusing on new antibody specificities, available risk scoring models and new coagulation assays.

  5. Increased thrombin generation and fibrinogen level after therapeutic plasma transfusion: relation to bleeding.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schols, S.E.; Meijden, PE van der; Oerle, R. van; Curvers, J.; Heemskerk, J.W.M.; Pampus, EC van

    2008-01-01

    In a clinical setting, fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is transfused to diluted patients with complicated surgery or trauma, as guided by prolonged conventional coagulation times or low fibrinogen levels. However, the limited sensitivity of these coagulation tests may restrict their use in measuring the e

  6. Thrombotic risk assessment in antiphospholipid syndrome the role of new antibody specificities and thrombin generation assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sciascia, Savino; Baldovino, Simone; Schreiber, Karen

    2016-01-01

    . Vascular events seem to result of local procoagulative alterations upon triggers influence (the so called "second-hit theory"), while placental thrombosis and complement activation seem to lead to pregnancy morbidity. The laboratory tests suggested by the current classification criteria include lupus...... anticoagulant, a functional coagulation assay, and anticardiolipin and anti-β2-glycoprotein-I antibodies, generally detected by solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The real challenge for treating physicians is understanding what is the actual weight of aPL in provoking clinical manifestations in each...

  7. Automated Budget System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Automated Budget System (ABS) automates management and planning of the Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center (MMAC) budget by providing enhanced capability to plan,...

  8. Cardiovascular and biochemical studies on the effects of thrombin and dabigatran and the interaction with vasopressor molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Anand

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: The thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran reduces vascular oxidative stress and inflammation, improves endothelial function, and decreases atherosclerosis in rodents. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(5.000: 874-878

  9. An improved method for the determination of trace levels of arsenic and antimony in geological materials by automated hydride generation-atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crock, J.G.; Lichte, F.E.

    1982-01-01

    An improved, automated method for the determination of arsenic and antimony in geological materials is described. After digestion of the material in sulfuric, nitric, hydrofluoric and perchloric acids, a hydrochloric acid solution of the sample is automatically mixed with reducing agents, acidified with additional hydrochloric acid, and treated with a sodium tetrahydroborate solution to form arsine and stibine. The hydrides are decomposed in a heated quartz tube in the optical path of an atomic absorption spectrometer. The absorbance peak height for arsenic or antimony is measured. Interferences that exist are minimized to the point where most geological materials including coals, soils, coal ashes, rocks and sediments can be analyzed directly without use of standard additions. The relative standard deviation of the digestion and the instrumental procedure is less than 2% at the 50 ??g l-1 As or Sb level. The reagent-blank detection limit is 0.2 ??g l-1 As or Sb. ?? 1982.

  10. Automation 2017

    CERN Document Server

    Zieliński, Cezary; Kaliczyńska, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    This book consists of papers presented at Automation 2017, an international conference held in Warsaw from March 15 to 17, 2017. It discusses research findings associated with the concepts behind INDUSTRY 4.0, with a focus on offering a better understanding of and promoting participation in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Each chapter presents a detailed analysis of a specific technical problem, in most cases followed by a numerical analysis, simulation and description of the results of implementing the solution in a real-world context. The theoretical results, practical solutions and guidelines presented are valuable for both researchers working in the area of engineering sciences and practitioners looking for solutions to industrial problems. .

  11. Marketing automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TODOR Raluca Dania

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The automation of the marketing process seems to be nowadays, the only solution to face the major changes brought by the fast evolution of technology and the continuous increase in supply and demand. In order to achieve the desired marketing results, businessis have to employ digital marketing and communication services. These services are efficient and measurable thanks to the marketing technology used to track, score and implement each campaign. Due to the technical progress, the marketing fragmentation, demand for customized products and services on one side and the need to achieve constructive dialogue with the customers, immediate and flexible response and the necessity to measure the investments and the results on the other side, the classical marketing approached had changed continue to improve substantially.

  12. Salmon Thrombin as a Treatment to Attenuate Acute Pain and Promote Tissue Healing by Modulating Local Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    trauma and in association with the absence of pain . Early cleavage of PAR1 by thrombin may provide its anti- nociceptive properties. We were very...1-1002 TITLE: Salmon Thrombin as a Treatment to Attenuate Acute Pain and Promote Tissue Healing by Modulating Local Inflammation... Pain and 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Promote Tissue Healing by Modulating Local Inflammation 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-1002 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  13. Trypsin, Tryptase, and Thrombin Polarize Macrophages towards a Pro-Fibrotic M2a Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J V White

    Full Text Available For both wound healing and the formation of a fibrotic lesion, circulating monocytes enter the tissue and differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes and pro-fibrotic M2a macrophages, which together with fibroblasts form scar tissue. Monocytes can also differentiate into classically activated M1 macrophages and alternatively activated M2 macrophages. The proteases thrombin, which is activated during blood clotting, and tryptase, which is released by activated mast cells, potentiate fibroblast proliferation and fibrocyte differentiation, but their effect on macrophages is unknown. Here we report that thrombin, tryptase, and the protease trypsin bias human macrophage differentiation towards a pro-fibrotic M2a phenotype expressing high levels of galectin-3 from unpolarized monocytes, or from M1 and M2 macrophages, and that these effects appear to operate through protease-activated receptors. These results suggest that proteases can initiate scar tissue formation by affecting fibroblasts, fibrocytes, and macrophages.

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound guided thrombin injection of angiographically occult pancreatitis associated visceral artery pseudoaneurysms:Case series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shivanand; Gamanagatti; Usha; Thingujam; Pramod; Garg; Surajkumar; Nongthombam; Nihar; Ranjan; Dash

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm is a known complication of pancreatitis associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and management. Computed tomography(CT) helps localize the lesion and the severity of the background pancreatitis but digital subtraction angiography with coil embolization is recommended to avoid bleeding and inadvertent surgery. However, in cases where angiographic coil embolization is not feasible due to technical reasons, thrombin injection via CT or ultrasound guidance remains a viable option and often described in literature. In this series, effort has been made to highlight the role of endoscopic ultrasound guided thrombin instillation especially in patients with poorly visualized pseudoaneurysm on ultrasound thereby avoiding surgery and the associated mortality and morbidity.

  15. Implications of Dabigatran, a direct thrombin inhibitor, for oral surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Clayton; Robertson, Chad; Shivakumar, Sudeep; Lee, Min

    2013-01-01

    Direct thrombin inhibitors, specifically orally administered dabigatran etexilate, are emerging as alternatives to warfarin for anticoagulation in the management of atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism. The risk associated with bleeding events while taking dabigatran has been documented in multiple randomized controlled trials, but to date, no studies have focused on the risk of bleeding after dental extraction. Extraction of teeth is one of the most common surgical procedures and may cause significant bleeding, so a thorough understanding of the pharmacology of anticoagulant medications is required to prevent complications. With the increasing use of direct thrombin inhibitors, the safe management of patients taking these anticoagulants must be delineated. This review compares dabigatran and warfarin, especially in terms of their effects on dental and oral surgery practice, and examines best management of these patients in light of the existing literature.

  16. Automated Clustering of Similar Amendments

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The Italian Senate is clogged by computer-generated amendments. This talk will describe a simple strategy to cluster them in an automated fashion, so that the appropriate Senate procedures can be used to get rid of them in one sweep.

  17. Effect of thrombin concentration on the adhesion strength and clinical application of fibrin glue-soaked sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Francia; Fujio, Shingo; Sugata, Sei; Tokimura, Hiroshi; Hanaya, Ryosuke; Bohara, Manoj; Arita, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Fibrin glue-soaked gelatin sponge (FGGS) has been used for tissue sealing in neurosurgical practice, but too rapid clotting of fibrin glue occasionally prevents good fixation of FGGS. Dilution of thrombin may provide adequate manipulation time between mixing fibrinogen and thrombin on gelatin sponge and application into the tissue defects. The present study characterized the effect of thrombin dilution on the adhesion strength of FGGS and retrospectively assessed the clinical usage of the dilution for filling dead space or sealing arachnoid defect in 255 cases who underwent transsphenoidal surgery for the last 66 months. FGGS was prepared using three different concentrations of thrombin: 250 (standard), 50 (1:5 dilution), and 25 (1:10 dilution) units/ml, and incubated for three different periods (5, 20, and 60 seconds). FGGSs were applied over two adjacently positioned porcine skins placed on two metallic plates. The adhesion strength was evaluated by measuring maximum tensile strength during pulling out the sliding plate at a constant rate of displacement. The maximum adhesion strength was greater for FGGS with 1:10 diluted thrombin solution than for FGGS prepared with higher concentrations (p < 0.05). Adhesion strength did not decay for 20 seconds after the mixture. Only four of 255 cases (1.6%) required second reconstruction of sella floor due to the cerebrospinal fluid leakage. FGGS prepared with diluted thrombin solution can provide adequate adhesion strength for clinical use.

  18. A label-free and high sensitive aptamer biosensor based on hyperbranched polyester microspheres for thrombin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chong; Han, Qiaorong; Wang, Daoying; Xu, Weimin; Wang, Weijuan; Zhao, Wenbo; Zhou, Min

    2014-11-19

    In this paper, we have synthesized hyperbranched polyester microspheres with carboxylic acid functional groups (HBPE-CA) and developed a label-free electrochemical aptamer biosensor using thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) as receptor for the measurement of thrombin in whole blood. The indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode surface modified with HBPE-CA microspheres was grafted with TBA, which has excellent binding affinity and selectivity for thrombin. Binding of the thrombin at the modified ITO electrode surface greatly restrained access of electrons for a redox probe of [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-). Moreover, the aptamer biosensor could be used for detection of thrombin in whole blood, a wide detection range (10fM-100nM) and a detection limit on the order of 0.90fM were demonstrated. Control experiments were also carried out by using bull serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme in the absence of thrombin. The good stability and repeatability of this aptamer biosensor were also proved. We expect that this demonstration will lead to the development of highly sensitive label-free sensors based on aptamer with lower cost than current technology. The integration of the technologies, which include anticoagulant, sensor and nanoscience, will bring significant input to high-performance biosensors relevant to diagnostics and therapy of interest for human health.

  19. Spontaneous pseudoaneurysm of the uterine artery during pregnancy treated by direct thrombin injection: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jung Hee; Kim, See Hyung; Kim, Young Hwan [Dept. Radiology, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Pseudoaneurysm of uterine artery during pregnancy is a very rare disease. It is mostly associated with uterine artery injury, usually occurring after proceeding conditions such as history of gynecologic operation and infection. However, the best treatment modality has not been established yet. Herein, we reported a case of spontaneous formation of uterine artery pseudoaneurysm during pregnancy treated by direct thrombin injection without any complication or recurrence.

  20. Successful endovascular treatment of a hemodialysis graft pseudoaneurysm by covered stent and direct percutaneous thrombin injection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Aoife N

    2011-07-25

    Vascular access for hemodialysis remains a challenge for nephrologists, vascular surgeons, and interventional radiologists alike. Arteriovenous fistula and synthetic grafts remain the access of choice for long-term hemodialysis; however, they are subject to complications from infection and repeated needle cannulation. Pseudoaneurysms are an increasingly recognized adverse event. At present, there are many minimally invasive methods to repair these wall defects. We present a graft pseudoaneurysm, which required a combination of endovascular stent graft placement and percutaneous thrombin injection for successful occlusion.

  1. A New Potent Inhibitor of Thrombin from the Leech Haemendipsa Yanyuanensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Two components of anticoagulant protein were isolated from the leech Haemendipsa yanyuanensis by heparin agarose affinity chromatography and ultracentrifugation. The determination of anticoagulant activity and characterization analysis of the pro tein using the method of chromogenic substrate indicates that the anticoagulant protein is thrombin-specific but not factor Xa-specific. The results lay a foundation for the research of the anticoagulant mechanism and application of anticoagulant protein from H. yanyua nensis.

  2. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of the thrombin-binding aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsai-Chin; Vasudev, Milana; Dutta, Mitra; Stroscio, Michael A

    2013-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering is used to study the Raman spectra and peak shifts the thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) on substrates having two different geometries; one with a single stranded sequence and one with double stranded sequence. The Raman signals of the deoxyribonucleic acids on both substrates are enhanced and specific peaks of bases are identified. These results are highly reproducible and have promising applications in low cost nucleic acid detection.

  3. Posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm of medial plantar artery in a child: treatment with percutaneous thrombin injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Neto Ladeira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoaneurysms of the medial plantar artery are rare. The authors describe a case of a pseudoaneurysm of the medial plantar artery of a child who had suffered a penetrating laceration injury. Diagnosis can be confirmed using Doppler ultrasound and magnetic resonance angiography. As an alternative to the conventional surgery technique, percutaneous Doppler ultrasound-guided thrombin injection is a safe and effective treatment.

  4. Nanogravimetric and Optical Characterizations of Thrombin Interaction with a Self-Assembled Thiolated Aptamer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Politi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient biorecognition of thrombin (TB, a serine protease with crucial role in physiological and pathological blood coagulation, is a hot topic in medical diagnostics. In this work, we investigate the ability of synthetic thrombin aptamer (TBA, immobilized on a gold substrate, to bind thrombin by two different label-free techniques: the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM and the spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE. By QCM characterization in the range from 20 to 110 nM, we demonstrate high specificity of TBA-TB interaction and determine affinity constant (Kd of 17.7±0.3 nM, system sensitivity of 0.42±0.03 Hz nM−1, and limit of detection (LOD of 240±20 pM. The interaction between TBA and TB is also investigated by SE, an all-optical method, by quantifying the thickness increase of the TBA film assembled on gold substrate. AFM characterization of TBA and TB molecules deposited on flat silicon surface is also supplied.

  5. A Kazal-type inhibitor with thrombin specificity from Rhodnius prolixus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, T; Kröger, B; Bialojan, S; Lemaire, H G; Höffken, H W; Reuschenbach, P; Otte, M; Dodt, J

    1993-08-01

    A thrombin-specific inhibitor with an apparent molecular mass of 11 kDa has been purified from the insect Rhodnius prolixus. Amino-terminal protein sequence analysis allowed the molecular cloning of the corresponding cDNA. The open reading frame codes for a protein of about 103 amino acid residues and displays an internal sequence homology of residues 6-48 with residues 57-101 indicating a two-domain structure. Based on the amino acid sequence the two domains exhibit high homology to protease inhibitors belonging to the Kazal-type family. Model building suggests that the first domain binds to the active site with residue His10 pointing into the specificity pocket. From gel filtration and tight-binding inhibition experiments the inhibitor appears to form 1:1 complexes with thrombin. Periplasma-directed heterologous expression of the rhodniin cDNA in Escherichia coli yields the intact thrombin inhibitor. Natural and recombinant rhodniin both display inhibition constants of about 2 x 10(-13) M.

  6. Elevated Cytokines, Thrombin and PAI-1 in Severe HCPS Patients Due to Sin Nombre Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Bondu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sin Nombre Hantavirus (SNV, Bunyaviridae Hantavirus is a Category A pathogen that causes Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome (HCPS with case fatality ratios generally ranging from 30% to 50%. HCPS is characterized by vascular leakage due to dysregulation of the endothelial barrier function. The loss of vascular integrity results in non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, shock, multi-organ failure and death. Using Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS measurements, we found that plasma samples drawn from University of New Mexico Hospital patients with serologically-confirmed HCPS, induce loss of cell-cell adhesion in confluent epithelial and endothelial cell monolayers grown in ECIS cultureware. We show that the loss of cell-cell adhesion is sensitive to both thrombin and plasmin inhibitors in mild cases, and to thrombin only inhibition in severe cases, suggesting an increasing prothrombotic state with disease severity. A proteomic profile (2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry of HCPS plasma samples in our cohort revealed robust antifibrinolytic activity among terminal case patients. The prothrombotic activity is highlighted by acute ≥30 to >100 fold increases in active plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1 which, preceded death of the subjects within 48 h. Taken together, this suggests that PAI-1 might be a response to the severe pathology as it is expected to reduce plasmin activity and possibly thrombin activity in the terminal patients.

  7. Allosteric Partial Inhibition of Monomeric Proteases. Sulfated Coumarins Induce Regulation, not just Inhibition, of Thrombin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verespy III, Stephen; Mehta, Akul Y.; Afosah, Daniel; Al-Horani, Rami A.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteases can offer major regulatory advantages, but remains a concept on paper to date; although it has been routinely documented for receptors and oligomeric proteins. Thrombin, a key protease of the coagulation cascade, displays significant conformational plasticity, which presents an attractive opportunity to discover small molecule probes that induce sub-maximal allosteric inhibition. We synthesized a focused library of some 36 sulfated coumarins to discover two agents that display sub-maximal efficacy (~50%), high potency (150-fold). Michaelis-Menten, competitive inhibition, and site-directed mutagenesis studies identified exosite 2 as the site of binding for the most potent sulfated coumarin. Stern-Volmer quenching of active site-labeled fluorophore suggested that the allosteric regulators induce intermediate structural changes in the active site as compared to those that display ~80–100% efficacy. Antithrombin inactivation of thrombin was impaired in the presence of the sulfated coumarins suggesting that allosteric partial inhibition arises from catalytic dysfunction of the active site. Overall, sulfated coumarins represent first-in-class, sub-maximal inhibitors of thrombin. The probes establish the concept of allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteins. This concept may lead to a new class of anticoagulants that are completely devoid of bleeding. PMID:27053426

  8. Automating CPM-GOMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Bonnie; Vera, Alonso; Matessa, Michael; Freed, Michael; Remington, Roger

    2002-01-01

    CPM-GOMS is a modeling method that combines the task decomposition of a GOMS analysis with a model of human resource usage at the level of cognitive, perceptual, and motor operations. CPM-GOMS models have made accurate predictions about skilled user behavior in routine tasks, but developing such models is tedious and error-prone. We describe a process for automatically generating CPM-GOMS models from a hierarchical task decomposition expressed in a cognitive modeling tool called Apex. Resource scheduling in Apex automates the difficult task of interleaving the cognitive, perceptual, and motor resources underlying common task operators (e.g. mouse move-and-click). Apex's UI automatically generates PERT charts, which allow modelers to visualize a model's complex parallel behavior. Because interleaving and visualization is now automated, it is feasible to construct arbitrarily long sequences of behavior. To demonstrate the process, we present a model of automated teller interactions in Apex and discuss implications for user modeling. available to model human users, the Goals, Operators, Methods, and Selection (GOMS) method [6, 21] has been the most widely used, providing accurate, often zero-parameter, predictions of the routine performance of skilled users in a wide range of procedural tasks [6, 13, 15, 27, 28]. GOMS is meant to model routine behavior. The user is assumed to have methods that apply sequences of operators and to achieve a goal. Selection rules are applied when there is more than one method to achieve a goal. Many routine tasks lend themselves well to such decomposition. Decomposition produces a representation of the task as a set of nested goal states that include an initial state and a final state. The iterative decomposition into goals and nested subgoals can terminate in primitives of any desired granularity, the choice of level of detail dependent on the predictions required. Although GOMS has proven useful in HCI, tools to support the

  9. ELECTRIC WELDING EQUIPMENT AND AUTOMATION OF WELDING IN CONSTRUCTION,

    Science.gov (United States)

    WELDING , *ARC WELDING , AUTOMATION, CONSTRUCTION, INDUSTRIES, POWER EQUIPMENT, GENERATORS, POWER TRANSFORMERS, RESISTANCE WELDING , SPOT WELDING , MACHINES, AUTOMATIC, STRUCTURES, WIRING DIAGRAMS, USSR.

  10. Free software: an alternative to automate information units

    OpenAIRE

    Chinchilla Arley, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    The document begins by describing the problem of budget information units and the high cost of commercial software that specializes in library automation. Describes the origins of free software and its meaning. Mentioned the three levels of automation in library: catalog automation, generation of repositories and full automation. Mentioned the various free software applications for each of the levels and offers a number of advantages and disadvantages in the use of these products. Concludes t...

  11. Robust Automated Image Co-Registration of Optical Multi-Sensor Time Series Data: Database Generation for Multi-Temporal Landslide Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Behling

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Reliable multi-temporal landslide detection over longer periods of time requires multi-sensor time series data characterized by high internal geometric stability, as well as high relative and absolute accuracy. For this purpose, a new methodology for fully automated co-registration has been developed allowing efficient and robust spatial alignment of standard orthorectified data products originating from a multitude of optical satellite remote sensing data of varying spatial resolution. Correlation-based co-registration uses world-wide available terrain corrected Landsat Level 1T time series data as the spatial reference, ensuring global applicability. The developed approach has been applied to a multi-sensor time series of 592 remote sensing datasets covering an approximately 12,000 km2 area in Southern Kyrgyzstan (Central Asia strongly affected by landslides. The database contains images acquired during the last 26 years by Landsat (ETM, ASTER, SPOT and RapidEye sensors. Analysis of the spatial shifts obtained from co-registration has revealed sensor-specific alignments ranging between 5 m and more than 400 m. Overall accuracy assessment of these alignments has resulted in a high relative image-to-image accuracy of 17 m (RMSE and a high absolute accuracy of 23 m (RMSE for the whole co-registered database, making it suitable for multi-temporal landslide detection at a regional scale in Southern Kyrgyzstan.

  12. Automating quantum experiment control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kelly E.; Amini, Jason M.; Doret, S. Charles; Mohler, Greg; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.

    2017-03-01

    The field of quantum information processing is rapidly advancing. As the control of quantum systems approaches the level needed for useful computation, the physical hardware underlying the quantum systems is becoming increasingly complex. It is already becoming impractical to manually code control for the larger hardware implementations. In this chapter, we will employ an approach to the problem of system control that parallels compiler design for a classical computer. We will start with a candidate quantum computing technology, the surface electrode ion trap, and build a system instruction language which can be generated from a simple machine-independent programming language via compilation. We incorporate compile time generation of ion routing that separates the algorithm description from the physical geometry of the hardware. Extending this approach to automatic routing at run time allows for automated initialization of qubit number and placement and additionally allows for automated recovery after catastrophic events such as qubit loss. To show that these systems can handle real hardware, we present a simple demonstration system that routes two ions around a multi-zone ion trap and handles ion loss and ion placement. While we will mainly use examples from transport-based ion trap quantum computing, many of the issues and solutions are applicable to other architectures.

  13. Rational design and characterization of D-Phe-Pro-D-Arg-derived direct thrombin inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C Figueiredo

    Full Text Available The tremendous social and economic impact of thrombotic disorders, together with the considerable risks associated to the currently available therapies, prompt for the development of more efficient and safer anticoagulants. Novel peptide-based thrombin inhibitors were identified using in silico structure-based design and further validated in vitro. The best candidate compounds contained both L- and D-amino acids, with the general sequence D-Phe(P3-Pro(P2-D-Arg(P1-P1'-CONH₂. The P1' position was scanned with L- and D-isomers of natural or unnatural amino acids, covering the major chemical classes. The most potent non-covalent and proteolysis-resistant inhibitors contain small hydrophobic or polar amino acids (Gly, Ala, Ser, Cys, Thr at the P1' position. The lead tetrapeptide, D-Phe-Pro-D-Arg-D-Thr-CONH₂, competitively inhibits α-thrombin's cleavage of the S2238 chromogenic substrate with a K(i of 0.92 µM. In order to understand the molecular details of their inhibitory action, the three-dimensional structure of three peptides (with P1' L-isoleucine (fPrI, L-cysteine (fPrC or D-threonine (fPrt in complex with human α-thrombin were determined by X-ray crystallography. All the inhibitors bind in a substrate-like orientation to the active site of the enzyme. The contacts established between the D-Arg residue in position P1 and thrombin are similar to those observed for the L-isomer in other substrates and inhibitors. However, fPrC and fPrt disrupt the active site His57-Ser195 hydrogen bond, while the combination of a P1 D-Arg and a bulkier P1' residue in fPrI induce an unfavorable geometry for the nucleophilic attack of the scissile bond by the catalytic serine. The experimental models explain the observed relative potency of the inhibitors, as well as their stability to proteolysis. Moreover, the newly identified direct thrombin inhibitors provide a novel pharmacophore platform for developing antithrombotic agents by exploring the

  14. A label-free and high sensitive aptamer biosensor based on hyperbranched polyester microspheres for thrombin detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Chong [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, Biomedical Functional Materials Collaborative Innovation Center, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Institute of Agricultural Products Processing, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanjing 210014 (China); Han, Qiaorong [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, Biomedical Functional Materials Collaborative Innovation Center, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Wang, Daoying; Xu, Weimin [Institute of Agricultural Products Processing, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanjing 210014 (China); Wang, Weijuan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, Biomedical Functional Materials Collaborative Innovation Center, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhao, Wenbo, E-mail: zhaowenbo@njnu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, Biomedical Functional Materials Collaborative Innovation Center, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhou, Min, E-mail: zhouminnju@126.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, the Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2014-11-19

    Highlights: • A label-free thrombin aptamer biosensor applied in whole blood has been developed. • The aptamer biosensor showed a wide detection range and a low detection limit. • The antibiofouling idea utilized for biosensor is significant for diagnostics. - Abstract: In this paper, we have synthesized hyperbranched polyester microspheres with carboxylic acid functional groups (HBPE-CA) and developed a label-free electrochemical aptamer biosensor using thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) as receptor for the measurement of thrombin in whole blood. The indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode surface modified with HBPE-CA microspheres was grafted with TBA, which has excellent binding affinity and selectivity for thrombin. Binding of the thrombin at the modified ITO electrode surface greatly restrained access of electrons for a redox probe of [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−/4−}. Moreover, the aptamer biosensor could be used for detection of thrombin in whole blood, a wide detection range (10 fM–100 nM) and a detection limit on the order of 0.90 fM were demonstrated. Control experiments were also carried out by using bull serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme in the absence of thrombin. The good stability and repeatability of this aptamer biosensor were also proved. We expect that this demonstration will lead to the development of highly sensitive label-free sensors based on aptamer with lower cost than current technology. The integration of the technologies, which include anticoagulant, sensor and nanoscience, will bring significant input to high-performance biosensors relevant to diagnostics and therapy of interest for human health.

  15. Detection of BRAF Mutations Using a Fully Automated Platform and Comparison with High Resolution Melting, Real-Time Allele Specific Amplification, Immunohistochemistry and Next Generation Sequencing Assays, for Patients with Metastatic Melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Harlé

    Full Text Available Metastatic melanoma is a severe disease with one of the highest mortality rate in skin diseases. Overall survival has significantly improved with immunotherapy and targeted therapies. Kinase inhibitors targeting BRAF V600 showed promising results. BRAF genotyping is mandatory for the prescription of anti-BRAF therapies.Fifty-nine formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded melanoma samples were assessed using High-Resolution-Melting (HRM PCR, Real-time allele-specific amplification (RT-ASA PCR, Next generation sequencing (NGS, immunohistochemistry (IHC and the fully-automated molecular diagnostics platform IdyllaTM. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were calculated using NGS as the reference standard to compare the different assays.BRAF mutations were found in 28(47.5%, 29(49.2%, 31(52.5%, 29(49.2% and 27(45.8% samples with HRM, RT-ASA, NGS, IdyllaTM and IHC respectively. Twenty-six (81.2% samples were found bearing a c.1799T>A (p.Val600Glu mutation, three (9.4% with a c.1798_1799delinsAA (p.Val600Lys mutation and one with c.1789_1790delinsTC (p.Leu597Ser mutation. Two samples were found bearing complex mutations.HRM appears the less sensitive assay for the detection of BRAF V600 mutations. The RT-ASA, IdyllaTM and IHC assays are suitable for routine molecular diagnostics aiming at the prescription of anti-BRAF therapies. IdyllaTM assay is fully-automated and requires less than 2 minutes for samples preparation and is the fastest of the tested assays.

  16. Manufacturing and automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Córdoba Nieto

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents concepts and definitions from different sources concerning automation. The work approaches automation by virtue of the author’s experience in manufacturing production; why and how automation prolects are embarked upon is considered. Technological reflection regarding the progressive advances or stages of automation in the production area is stressed. Coriat and Freyssenet’s thoughts about and approaches to the problem of automation and its current state are taken and examined, especially that referring to the problem’s relationship with reconciling the level of automation with the flexibility and productivity demanded by competitive, worldwide manufacturing.

  17. Fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations are critical for fibrin glue adherence in rat high-risk colon anastomoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliseo Portilla-de Buen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Fibrin glues have not been consistently successful in preventing the dehiscence of high-risk colonic anastomoses. Fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations in glues determine their ability to function as sealants, healers, and/or adhesives. The objective of the current study was to compare the effects of different concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin on bursting pressure, leaks, dehiscence, and morphology of high-risk ischemic colonic anastomoses using fibrin glue in rats. METHODS: Colonic anastomoses in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (weight, 250-350 g treated with fibrin glue containing different concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin were evaluated at post-operative day 5. The interventions were low-risk (normal or high-risk (ischemic end-to-end colonic anastomoses using polypropylene sutures and topical application of fibrinogen at high (120 mg/mL or low (40 mg/mL concentrations and thrombin at high (1000 IU/mL or low (500 IU/mL concentrations. RESULTS: Ischemia alone, anastomosis alone, or both together reduced the bursting pressure. Glues containing a low fibrinogen concentration improved this parameter in all cases. High thrombin in combination with low fibrinogen also improved adherence exclusively in low-risk anastomoses. No differences were detected with respect to macroscopic parameters, histopathology, or hydroxyproline content at 5 days post-anastomosis. CONCLUSIONS: Fibrin glue with a low fibrinogen content normalizes the bursting pressure of high-risk ischemic left-colon anastomoses in rats at day 5 after surgery.

  18. A novel nanosensor composed of aptamer bio-dots and gold nanoparticles for determination of thrombin with multiple signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Lan; Cao, Shu-Ping; Zhang, Li; Li, Qiu-Hong; Liu, Zhi-Chao; Liang, Ru-Ping; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2016-11-15

    Thrombin is a crucial multifunctional enzyme involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Its detection is of great importance. In this work, a novel bio-dots nanosensor for detection of thrombin with colorimetric, fluorometric and light-scattering signals is developed. This nanosensor is composed of thrombin-binding aptamer bio-dots (TBA-dots) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), where TBA-dots serve as fluorometric reporter and AuNPs function as multiple roles as colorimetric reporter, light scattering reporter and fluorescence quencher. TBA-dots retain inherent structures of aptamer to specifically interact with thrombin and simultaneously induce the aggregation of AuNPs. The mechanism of the sensing system is based on distance-dependent aggregation of AuNPs and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The nanosensor needs no further surface functionalization required for the as-prepared bio-dots and AuNPs, which provides a sensitive method for the selective detection of thrombin with a detection limit as low as 0.59nM. In addition, it provides a brand new perspective for bio-dots and its potential use in bioanalysis.

  19. Effects of thrombin, PAR-1 activating peptide and a PAR-1 antagonist on umbilical artery resistance in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott John T

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The non-thrombotic effects of thrombin in cardiovascular tissues, as mediated via the protease activated receptors (PARs, and particularly PAR-1, have been the focus of much recent research. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of thrombin, a specific PAR-1 activating peptide (PAR1-AP, and a PAR-1 antagonist on human umbilical artery tone in vitro. Methods Human umbilical artery samples were obtained from 17 women at term. Arterial rings were suspended under physiologic conditions for isometric recording. The in vitro effects of thrombin (0.5 units/mL to 3 units/mL, PAR1-AP TFLLR-NH2 [10(-9 to 10(-6 M], and PAR-1 antagonist (N-trans cinnamoyl- p-fluoroPhe-p-guanidinoPhe-Leu-Arg-Orn-NH2 [10(-9 M to 10(-5 M] on umbilical artery tone were measured. Results Both thrombin and TFLLR-NH2 exerted a potent cumulative vasodilatory effect on human umbilical artery resistance (P 0.05. Conclusion These findings highlight a potential role for thrombin and PAR-1 receptors in vascular regulation of feto-placental blood flow in normal pregnancy, and in association with the vascular lesions associated with IUGR and pre-eclampsia.

  20. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A comparative study of polidocanol and thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, G; Sablich, R; Lacchin, T

    1991-01-01

    To date several agents have been used to achieve haemostasis in patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding using endoscopic sclerotherapy techniques. Polidocanol has been widely used but local complications have been reported after treatment. We have compared the efficacy and safety of thrombin and polidocanol in 82 consecutive patients with ongoing or recent bleeding from duodenal, gastric, or anastomotic ulcers. Primary control of haemostasis from spurting vessels was achieved in 90% of cases using polidocanol and in 86.6% using thrombin. Definitive haemostasis was obtained in 80% of patients in both groups. When a non-bleeding vessel was visible, injection of polidocanol or thrombin effectively prevented rebleeding in 90.9% and 85.7% of cases, respectively. When a non-bleeding sentinel clot was present, injection of polidocanol or thrombin provided definitive haemostasis in 100% and 92.8% of cases, respectively. No statistically significant difference was evident between the two agents. In the polidocanol group, one local haemorrhagic complication was noted. No general or local complications were recorded in the thrombin group.

  1. Thrombin inhibits HMGB1-mediated proinflammatory signaling responses when endothelial protein C receptor is occupied by its natural ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Sup Bae

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 is involved in thepathogenesis of vascular diseases. Unlike activated protein C(APC, the activation of PAR-1 by thrombin is known to elicitproinflammatory responses. To determine whether the occupancyof EPCR by the Gla-domain of APC is responsible for thePAR-1-dependent antiinflammatory activity of the protease, wepretreated HUVECs with the PC zymogen and then activatedPAR-1 with thrombin. It was found that thrombin downregulatesthe HMGB1-mediated induction of both TNF-α andIL-6 and inhibits the activation of both p38 MAPK and NF-κB inHUVECs pretreated with PC. Furthermore, thrombin inhibitedHMGB1-mediated hyperpermeability and leukocyte adhesion/migration by inhibiting the expression of cell adhesion moleculesin HUVECs if EPCR was occupied. Collectively, theseresults suggest the concept that thrombin can initiate proinflammatoryresponses in vascular endothelial cells through theactivation of PAR-1 may not hold true for normal vesselsexpressing EPCR under in vivo conditions. [BMB Reports 2013;46(11: 544-549

  2. Apoferritin Protein Nanoparticles Dually labeled with Aptamer and Horseradish Peroxidase as a Sensing Probe for Thrombin Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jie; Liu, Meiling; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Haitao; Lin, Yuehe; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2013-01-08

    A sandwich-type electrochemical aptasensor has been developed for the detection of thrombin, based on dual signal-amplification using HRP and apoferritin. Aptamer1 (Apt1) loaded on core/shell Fe3O4/Au magnetic nanoparticle (AuMNP) was used as recognition elements, and apoferritin dually labeled with Aptamer2 (Apt2) and HRP was used as a detection probe. Sandwich-type complex, Apt1/thrombin/Apt2–apoferritin NPs–HRP was formed by the affinity reactions between AuMNPs–Apt1, thrombin, and Apt2–apoferritin–HRP. The complex was anchored on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE). Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to monitor the electrode response. The proposed aptasensor yielded a linear current response to thrombin concentrations over a broad range of 0.5 pM to 100 pM with a detection limit of 0.07 pM (S/N = 3). The detection signal was amplified by using apoferritin and HRP. This nanoparticle-based aptasensor offers a new method for rapid, sensitive, selective, and inexpensive quantification of thrombin, and offers a promising potential in biomarker detection and disease diagnosis. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  3. A brief exposure to tryptase or thrombin potentiates fibrocyte differentiation in the presence of serum or serum amyloid p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael J V; Galvis-Carvajal, Elkin; Gomer, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    A key question in both wound healing and fibrosis is the trigger for the initial formation of scar tissue. To help form scar tissue, circulating monocytes enter the tissue and differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes, but fibrocyte differentiation is strongly inhibited by the plasma protein serum amyloid P (SAP), and healthy tissues contain very few fibrocytes. In wounds and fibrotic lesions, mast cells degranulate to release tryptase, and thrombin mediates blood clotting in early wounds. Tryptase and thrombin are upregulated in wound healing and fibrotic lesions, and inhibition of these proteases attenuates fibrosis. We report that tryptase and thrombin potentiate human fibrocyte differentiation at biologically relevant concentrations and exposure times, even in the presence of concentrations of serum and SAP that normally completely inhibit fibrocyte differentiation. Fibrocyte potentiation by thrombin and tryptase is mediated by protease-activated receptors 1 and 2, respectively. Together, these results suggest that tryptase and thrombin may be an initial trigger to override SAP inhibition of fibrocyte differentiation to initiate scar tissue formation.

  4. Automated Postediting of Documents

    CERN Document Server

    Knight, K; Knight, Kevin; Chander, Ishwar

    1994-01-01

    Large amounts of low- to medium-quality English texts are now being produced by machine translation (MT) systems, optical character readers (OCR), and non-native speakers of English. Most of this text must be postedited by hand before it sees the light of day. Improving text quality is tedious work, but its automation has not received much research attention. Anyone who has postedited a technical report or thesis written by a non-native speaker of English knows the potential of an automated postediting system. For the case of MT-generated text, we argue for the construction of postediting modules that are portable across MT systems, as an alternative to hardcoding improvements inside any one system. As an example, we have built a complete self-contained postediting module for the task of article selection (a, an, the) for English noun phrases. This is a notoriously difficult problem for Japanese-English MT. Our system contains over 200,000 rules derived automatically from online text resources. We report on l...

  5. Thrombin in combination with intensive nursing in treating upper gastrointestinal bleeding in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F; Xiang, M L; Liu, Y M

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric upper gastrointestinal bleeding, a commonly seen pediatric emergency, needs timely symptomatic treatment to avoid a worse outcome. To discuss the clinical effect of thrombin treatment in combination with intensive nursing on pediatric upper gastrointestinal bleeding, this study analyzed 128 children who were treated in the second ward of the Children’s Internal Medical Department in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University between February 2012 and December 2014. The patients were divided into two groups, an experimental group and a control group. Besides thrombin, the experimental group was given intensive nursing, consisting of regular nursing and targeted nursing, while the control group was given regular nursing only. Clinical indexes of the two groups, such as effective rate, nursing satisfaction and side effect rate, were compared. Relevant clinical indexes such as duration of hospital stay, time to stopping of bleeding and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) score, as well as overall satisfaction level of the observation group were all better than those of the control group and differences between the two groups had statistical significance (P less than 0.05). Furthermore, difference of overall effective rate between the experimental group (90.63%) and the control group (68.75%) was significant. Difference of incidence of side effects between the two groups was statistically significant. Thus thrombin treatment in combination with intensive nursing proved to have a remarkable clinical effect and high safety level in treating pediatric upper gastrointestinal bleeding and, moreover, it shortens treatment time and enhances the patients’ quality of life.

  6. Rapid Detection of Thrombin and Other Protease Activity Directly in Whole Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Johnson Chung Sing

    Thrombin is a serine protease that plays a key role in the clotting cascade to promote hemostasis following injury to the endothelium. From a clinical diagnostic perspective, in-vivo thrombin activity is linked to various blood clotting disorders, as well as cardiovascular disease (DVT, arteriosclerosis, etc). Thus, the ability to rapidly measure protease activity directly in whole blood will provide important new diagnostics, and clinical researchers with a powerful tool to further elucidate the relationship between circulating protease levels and disease. The ultimate goal is to design novel point of care (POC) diagnostic devices that are capable of monitoring protease activities directly in whole blood and biological sample. A charge-changing substrate specific to the thrombin enzyme was engineered and its functionality was confirmed by a series of experiments. This led to the preliminary design, construction, and testing of two device platforms deemed fully functional for the electrophoretic separation and focusing of charged peptide fragments. The concept of using the existing charge-changing substrate platform for bacterial protease detection was also investigated. Certain strains of E coli are associated with severe symptoms such as abdominal cramps, bloody diarrhea, and vomiting. The OmpT protease is expressed on the outer membrane of E coli and plays a role in the cleavage of antimicrobial peptides, the degradation of recombinant heterologous proteins, and the activation of plasminogen in the host. Thus, a synthetic peptide substrate specific to the OmpT protease was designed and modeled for the purpose of detecting E coli in biological sample.

  7. NGS-QCbox and Raspberry for Parallel, Automated and Rapid Quality Control Analysis of Large-Scale Next Generation Sequencing (Illumina Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan A V S K Katta

    Full Text Available Rapid popularity and adaptation of next generation sequencing (NGS approaches have generated huge volumes of data. High throughput platforms like Illumina HiSeq produce terabytes of raw data that requires quick processing. Quality control of the data is an important component prior to the downstream analyses. To address these issues, we have developed a quality control pipeline, NGS-QCbox that scales up to process hundreds or thousands of samples. Raspberry is an in-house tool, developed in C language utilizing HTSlib (v1.2.1 (http://htslib.org, for computing read/base level statistics. It can be used as stand-alone application and can process both compressed and uncompressed FASTQ format files. NGS-QCbox integrates Raspberry with other open-source tools for alignment (Bowtie2, SNP calling (SAMtools and other utilities (bedtools towards analyzing raw NGS data at higher efficiency and in high-throughput manner. The pipeline implements batch processing of jobs using Bpipe (https://github.com/ssadedin/bpipe in parallel and internally, a fine grained task parallelization utilizing OpenMP. It reports read and base statistics along with genome coverage and variants in a user friendly format. The pipeline developed presents a simple menu driven interface and can be used in either quick or complete mode. In addition, the pipeline in quick mode outperforms in speed against other similar existing QC pipeline/tools. The NGS-QCbox pipeline, Raspberry tool and associated scripts are made available at the URL https://github.com/CEG-ICRISAT/NGS-QCbox and https://github.com/CEG-ICRISAT/Raspberry for rapid quality control analysis of large-scale next generation sequencing (Illumina data.

  8. NGS-QCbox and Raspberry for Parallel, Automated and Rapid Quality Control Analysis of Large-Scale Next Generation Sequencing (Illumina) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katta, Mohan A. V. S. K.; Khan, Aamir W.; Doddamani, Dadakhalandar; Thudi, Mahendar; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid popularity and adaptation of next generation sequencing (NGS) approaches have generated huge volumes of data. High throughput platforms like Illumina HiSeq produce terabytes of raw data that requires quick processing. Quality control of the data is an important component prior to the downstream analyses. To address these issues, we have developed a quality control pipeline, NGS-QCbox that scales up to process hundreds or thousands of samples. Raspberry is an in-house tool, developed in C language utilizing HTSlib (v1.2.1) (http://htslib.org), for computing read/base level statistics. It can be used as stand-alone application and can process both compressed and uncompressed FASTQ format files. NGS-QCbox integrates Raspberry with other open-source tools for alignment (Bowtie2), SNP calling (SAMtools) and other utilities (bedtools) towards analyzing raw NGS data at higher efficiency and in high-throughput manner. The pipeline implements batch processing of jobs using Bpipe (https://github.com/ssadedin/bpipe) in parallel and internally, a fine grained task parallelization utilizing OpenMP. It reports read and base statistics along with genome coverage and variants in a user friendly format. The pipeline developed presents a simple menu driven interface and can be used in either quick or complete mode. In addition, the pipeline in quick mode outperforms in speed against other similar existing QC pipeline/tools. The NGS-QCbox pipeline, Raspberry tool and associated scripts are made available at the URL https://github.com/CEG-ICRISAT/NGS-QCbox and https://github.com/CEG-ICRISAT/Raspberry for rapid quality control analysis of large-scale next generation sequencing (Illumina) data. PMID:26460497

  9. NGS-QCbox and Raspberry for Parallel, Automated and Rapid Quality Control Analysis of Large-Scale Next Generation Sequencing (Illumina) Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katta, Mohan A V S K; Khan, Aamir W; Doddamani, Dadakhalandar; Thudi, Mahendar; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2015-01-01

    Rapid popularity and adaptation of next generation sequencing (NGS) approaches have generated huge volumes of data. High throughput platforms like Illumina HiSeq produce terabytes of raw data that requires quick processing. Quality control of the data is an important component prior to the downstream analyses. To address these issues, we have developed a quality control pipeline, NGS-QCbox that scales up to process hundreds or thousands of samples. Raspberry is an in-house tool, developed in C language utilizing HTSlib (v1.2.1) (http://htslib.org), for computing read/base level statistics. It can be used as stand-alone application and can process both compressed and uncompressed FASTQ format files. NGS-QCbox integrates Raspberry with other open-source tools for alignment (Bowtie2), SNP calling (SAMtools) and other utilities (bedtools) towards analyzing raw NGS data at higher efficiency and in high-throughput manner. The pipeline implements batch processing of jobs using Bpipe (https://github.com/ssadedin/bpipe) in parallel and internally, a fine grained task parallelization utilizing OpenMP. It reports read and base statistics along with genome coverage and variants in a user friendly format. The pipeline developed presents a simple menu driven interface and can be used in either quick or complete mode. In addition, the pipeline in quick mode outperforms in speed against other similar existing QC pipeline/tools. The NGS-QCbox pipeline, Raspberry tool and associated scripts are made available at the URL https://github.com/CEG-ICRISAT/NGS-QCbox and https://github.com/CEG-ICRISAT/Raspberry for rapid quality control analysis of large-scale next generation sequencing (Illumina) data.

  10. A study of the conditions and accuracy of the thrombin time assay of plasma fibrinogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, J; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen

    1982-01-01

    The conditions, accuracy, precision and possible error of the thrombin time assay of plasma fibrinogen are determined. Comparison with an estimation of clottable protein by absorbance at 280 nm gave a correlation coefficient of 0.96 and the regression line y = 1.00 x + 0.56 (n = 34). Comparison...... with a radial immunodiffusion method yielded the correlation coefficient 0.97 and the regression line y = 1.18 x = 2.47 (n = 26). The presence of heparin in clinically applied concentrations produced a slight shortening of the clotting times. The resulting error in the estimated concentrations of fibrinogen...

  11. An automated swimming respirometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    STEFFENSEN, JF; JOHANSEN, K; BUSHNELL, PG

    1984-01-01

    An automated respirometer is described that can be used for computerized respirometry of trout and sharks.......An automated respirometer is described that can be used for computerized respirometry of trout and sharks....

  12. Configuration Management Automation (CMA) -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Configuration Management Automation (CMA) will provide an automated, integrated enterprise solution to support CM of FAA NAS and Non-NAS assets and investments. CMA...

  13. Autonomy and Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Jay

    2017-01-01

    A significant level of debate and confusion has surrounded the meaning of the terms autonomy and automation. Automation is a multi-dimensional concept, and we propose that Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) automation should be described with reference to the specific system and task that has been automated, the context in which the automation functions, and other relevant dimensions. In this paper, we present definitions of automation, pilot in the loop, pilot on the loop and pilot out of the loop. We further propose that in future, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) RPAS Panel avoids the use of the terms autonomy and autonomous when referring to automated systems on board RPA. Work Group 7 proposes to develop, in consultation with other workgroups, a taxonomy of Levels of Automation for RPAS.

  14. DETERMINATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC PARAMETERS AND PHASE RELATIONS IN TURBO-GENERATORS BY THE AUTOMATED CALCULATION OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE SOFTWARE ENVIRONMENT FEMM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Milykh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical bases of calculation of electromagnetic quantities and time-phase relationship are presented for the turbo-generators. This is done by numerical calculations of the magnetic field in the software environment package FEMM (Finite Element Method Magnetics. A program which controls calculations and organizes the issuance of the results to a text file is created on the algorithmic language Lua. The program is universal in terms of a turbo-generator models, as well as steady-state modes of their work with a minimum of input data. The exciting current of the rotor and the phase currents of three-phase stator winding in accordance with their initial phase are given for the calculation of the magnetic field. The key function for the analysis of electromagnetic parameters is the calculated angular function of the magnetic flux phase stator winding. The expansion in the harmonic series is carried out and amplitude and initial phase are received for this function. Next, the phase EMF and voltage, phase shifts between all values, active power, electromagnetic torque, the magnetic flux in the gap and other parameters are determined. The presented Lua script is a prototype for a similar calculation software of electric machines of other types.

  15. pHAST (pH-Driven Aptamer Switch for Thrombin) Catch-and-Release of Target Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, E M; Bolzon, R; Mezin, P; Frahm, G; Johnston, M; DeRosa, M C

    2016-06-15

    A pH-driven DNA nanomachine based on the human α-thrombin binding aptamer was designed for the specific catch-and-release of human α-thrombin at neutral and acidic pH, respectively. In neutral conditions, the thrombin aptamer component of the nanomachine is exposed and exists in the G-quadruplex conformation required to bind to the target protein. At slightly acidic pH, the polyadenine tail of the nanomachine becomes partially protonated and A+(anti)•G(syn) mispairing results in a conformational change, causing the target protein to be released. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used to monitor conformational switching over multiple pH cycles. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and fluorescence anisotropy were used to show pH dependent protein binding and release by the nanomachine. This approach could be applied generally to existing G-rich aptamers to develop novel biosensors, theranostics, and nanoswitches.

  16. Protein kinase C is differentially regulated by thrombin, insulin, and epidermal growth factor in human mammary tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, M.L.; Tellez-Inon, M.T. (Instituto de Ingenieria Genetica y Biologia Molecular, Buenos Aires (Argentina)); Medrano, E.E.; Cafferatta, E.G.A. (Instituto de Investigaciones Bioquimicas Fundacion Campomar, Buenos Aires (Argentina))

    1988-03-01

    The exposure of serum-deprived mammary tumor cells MCF-7 and T-47D to insulin, thrombin, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) resulted in dramatic modifications in the activity and in the translocation capacity of protein kinase C from cytosol to membrane fractions. Insulin induces a 600% activation of the enzyme after 5 h of exposure to the hormone in MCF-7 cells; thrombin either activates (200% in MCF-7) or down-regulates (in T-47D), and EGF exerts only a moderate effect. Thus, the growth factors studied modulate differentially the protein kinase C activity in human mammary tumor cells. The physiological significance of the results obtained are discussed in terms of the growth response elicited by insulin, thrombin, and EGF.

  17. Automated Standard Hazard Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebler, Shane

    2014-01-01

    The current system used to generate standard hazard reports is considered cumbersome and iterative. This study defines a structure for this system's process in a clear, algorithmic way so that standard hazard reports and basic hazard analysis may be completed using a centralized, web-based computer application. To accomplish this task, a test server is used to host a prototype of the tool during development. The prototype is configured to easily integrate into NASA's current server systems with minimal alteration. Additionally, the tool is easily updated and provides NASA with a system that may grow to accommodate future requirements and possibly, different applications. Results of this project's success are outlined in positive, subjective reviews complete by payload providers and NASA Safety and Mission Assurance personnel. Ideally, this prototype will increase interest in the concept of standard hazard automation and lead to the full-scale production of a user-ready application.

  18. Automated electronic filter design

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Amal

    2017-01-01

    This book describes a novel, efficient and powerful scheme for designing and evaluating the performance characteristics of any electronic filter designed with predefined specifications. The author explains techniques that enable readers to eliminate complicated manual, and thus error-prone and time-consuming, steps of traditional design techniques. The presentation includes demonstration of efficient automation, using an ANSI C language program, which accepts any filter design specification (e.g. Chebyschev low-pass filter, cut-off frequency, pass-band ripple etc.) as input and generates as output a SPICE(Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis) format netlist. Readers then can use this netlist to run simulations with any version of the popular SPICE simulator, increasing accuracy of the final results, without violating any of the key principles of the traditional design scheme.

  19. Automated software development using the HALDEN prover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivertsen, Terje

    2002-08-15

    This report presents the HALDEN (Halden Algebraic Language and Design ENvironment) Prover and provides a guide to its application in automated software development. A frame- work for formal software development based on the algebraic specification language HALDEN ASL, the HALDEN Prover supports many different tasks related to formal software development, including automated theorem proving, transformation of specifications, translation of specifications into Prolog, generation of formatted text documents, integration of Petri nets and algebraic specifications, etc. Formal methods and automated code generation constitute the basis of the automation-based paradigm, which represents a promising approach to ensuring traceability and correct implementation of requirements. Formal development with the HALDEN Prover can be carried out in a manner that reflects this paradigm. Accordingly, formal specifications are first developed from informal requirements, then elaborated into detailed formal descriptions by repeated validation, which are finally translated into some conventional programming language. Integrating formal methods with automated software development, the HALDEN Prover supports a methodology where formality is utilized in the automation of the software process. This is reflected in the report, which gives guidance to the tool support provided for the different elements of the process, including specification,animation, walk-through, automated theorem proving, translation, and documentation. The present report is complemented by HWR-646, which covers transformation and combination of specifications, and the Petri net support tool HALDEN CE. (Author)

  20. DOLFIN: Automated Finite Element Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Logg, Anders; 10.1145/1731022.1731030

    2011-01-01

    We describe here a library aimed at automating the solution of partial differential equations using the finite element method. By employing novel techniques for automated code generation, the library combines a high level of expressiveness with efficient computation. Finite element variational forms may be expressed in near mathematical notation, from which low-level code is automatically generated, compiled and seamlessly integrated with efficient implementations of computational meshes and high-performance linear algebra. Easy-to-use object-oriented interfaces to the library are provided in the form of a C++ library and a Python module. This paper discusses the mathematical abstractions and methods used in the design of the library and its implementation. A number of examples are presented to demonstrate the use of the library in application code.

  1. Automation of hydroelectric power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasser, H.S. (Consolidated Papers, Inc., Wisconsin Rapids, WI (US))

    1990-03-01

    This paper describes how the author's company has been automating its hydroelectric generating plants. The early automations were achieved with a relay-type supervisory control system, relay logic, dc tachometer, and a pneumatic gate-position controller. While this system allowed the units to be started and stopped from a remote location, they were operated at an output that was preset by the pneumatic control at the generating site. The supervisory control system at the site provided such information as unit status, generator breaker status, and a binary coded decimal (BCD) value of the pond level. The generating units are started by energizing an on-site relay that sets the pneumatic gate controller to a preset value above the synchronous speed of the hydroelectric generator. The pneumatic controller then opens the water-wheel wicket gates to the preset startup position. As the hydroelectric generator starts to turn, the machine-mounted dc tachometer produces a voltage. At a dc voltage equivalent to synchronous speed, the generator main breaker closes, and a contact from the main breaker starts a field-delay timer. Within a few seconds, the field breaker closes. Once the cycle is complete, a relay changes the pneumatic setpoint to a preset operating point of about 8/10 wicket gate opening.

  2. Workflow automation architecture standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moshofsky, R.P.; Rohen, W.T. [Boeing Computer Services Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-11-14

    This document presents an architectural standard for application of workflow automation technology. The standard includes a functional architecture, process for developing an automated workflow system for a work group, functional and collateral specifications for workflow automation, and results of a proof of concept prototype.

  3. Thermodynamic and biological evaluation of a thrombin binding aptamer modified with several unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) monomers and a 2′-C-piperazino-UNA monomer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Troels B.; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Rasmussen, Bjarne E.;

    2011-01-01

    Thrombin binding aptamer is a DNA 15-mer which forms a G-quadruplex structure and possess promising anticoagulant properties due to specific interactions with thrombin. Herein we present the influence of a single 2′-C-piperazino-UNA residue and UNA residues incorporated in several positions on th...

  4. Automated Scheduling Via Artificial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biefeld, Eric W.; Cooper, Lynne P.

    1991-01-01

    Artificial-intelligence software that automates scheduling developed in Operations Mission Planner (OMP) research project. Software used in both generation of new schedules and modification of existing schedules in view of changes in tasks and/or available resources. Approach based on iterative refinement. Although project focused upon scheduling of operations of scientific instruments and other equipment aboard spacecraft, also applicable to such terrestrial problems as scheduling production in factory.

  5. Electrical and optical characterization of thrombin-induced permeability of cultured endothelial cell monolayers on semiconductor electrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillebrandt, H.; Abdelghani, A.; Abdelghani-Jacquin, C.; Aepfelbacher, M.; Sackmann, E.

    Impedance spectroscopy and phase-contrast microscopy are combined to monitor the electrical and morphological properties of human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers. The cells were cultured on optically transparent indium-tin-oxide (ITO) semiconductor electrode arrays coated with collagen IV, and the effect of the inflammatory mediator thrombin on monolayer permeability was monitored in real time. ITO electrodes provide several advantages for these kinds of experiments, because they are optically transparent, polarizable and highly sensitive due to the absence of insulating oxide layers. A qualitative correlation between the thrombin-induced gap formation and the electrical parameters of the cell layer is established.

  6. Modulation of human uterine smooth muscle cell collagen contractility by thrombin, Y-27632, TNF alpha and indomethacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Terry J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm labour occurs in approximately 10% of pregnancies and is a major cause of infant morbidity and mortality. However, the pathways involved in regulating contractility in normal and preterm labour are not fully elucidated. Our aim was to utilise a human myometrial contractility model to investigate the effect of a number of uterine specific contractility agents in this system. Therefore, we investigated the contractile response of human primary uterine smooth muscle cells or immortalised myometrial smooth muscle cells cultured within collagen lattices, to known mediators of uterine contractility, which included thrombin, the ROCK-1 inhibitor Y-27632, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha and the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory indomethacin. Methods Cell contractility was calculated over time, with the collagen gel contraction assay, utilising human primary uterine smooth muscle cells (hUtSMCs and immortalised myometrial smooth muscle cells (hTERT-HM: a decrease in collagen gel area equated to an increase in contractility. RNA was isolated from collagen embedded cells and gene expression changes were analysed by real time fluorescence reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Scanning electron and fluorescence microscopy were employed to observe cell morphology and cell collagen gel interactions. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc tests. Results TNF alpha increased collagen contractility in comparison to the un-stimulated collagen embedded hUtSMC cells, which was inhibited by indomethacin, while indomethacin alone significantly inhibited contraction. Thrombin augmented the contractility of uterine smooth muscle cell and hTERT-HM collagen gels, this effect was inhibited by the thrombin specific inhibitor, hirudin. Y-27632 decreased both basal and thrombin-induced collagen contractility in the hTERT-HM embedded gels. mRNA expression of the thrombin receptor, F2R was up

  7. Biocompatibility and Effectiveness Evaluation of a New Hemostatic Embolization Agent: Thrombin Loaded Alginate Calcium Microsphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengqi Xuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Until now, there has been no ideal embolization agent for hemorrhage in interventional treatment. In this study, the thrombin was encapsulated in alginate calcium microsphere using electrostatic droplet technique to produce new embolization agent: thrombin loaded alginate calcium microspheres (TACMs. Objectives. The present work was to evaluate the biocompatibility and hemostatic efficiency of TACMs. Methods. Cell cytotoxicity, hemolysis, and superselective embolization of dog liver arteries were performed to investigate the biocompatibility of TACMs. To clarify the embolic effect of TACMs mixed thrombus in vivo, hepatic artery injury animal model of 6 beagles was established and transcatheter artery embolization for bleeding was performed. Results. Coculture with VECs revealed the noncytotoxicity of TACMs, and the hemolysis experiment was negligible. Moreover, the histological study of TACMs in liver blood vessel showed signs of a slight inflammatory reaction. The results of transcatheter application of TACMs mixed thrombus for bleeding showed that the blood flow was shut down completely after the TACMs mixed thrombus was delivered and the postprocedural survival rate of animal models at 12 weeks was 100%. Conclusions. With their good biocompatibility and superior hemostatic efficiency, TACMs might be a promising new hemostatic agent with a wide range of potential applications.

  8. Biocompatibility and Effectiveness Evaluation of a New Hemostatic Embolization Agent: Thrombin Loaded Alginate Calcium Microsphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Fengqi; Rong, Jingjing; Liang, Ming; Zhang, Xuwen; Sun, Jingyang; Zhao, Lijun; Li, Yang; Liu, Dan; Li, Fei; Wang, Xiaozeng

    2017-01-01

    Background. Until now, there has been no ideal embolization agent for hemorrhage in interventional treatment. In this study, the thrombin was encapsulated in alginate calcium microsphere using electrostatic droplet technique to produce new embolization agent: thrombin loaded alginate calcium microspheres (TACMs). Objectives. The present work was to evaluate the biocompatibility and hemostatic efficiency of TACMs. Methods. Cell cytotoxicity, hemolysis, and superselective embolization of dog liver arteries were performed to investigate the biocompatibility of TACMs. To clarify the embolic effect of TACMs mixed thrombus in vivo, hepatic artery injury animal model of 6 beagles was established and transcatheter artery embolization for bleeding was performed. Results. Coculture with VECs revealed the noncytotoxicity of TACMs, and the hemolysis experiment was negligible. Moreover, the histological study of TACMs in liver blood vessel showed signs of a slight inflammatory reaction. The results of transcatheter application of TACMs mixed thrombus for bleeding showed that the blood flow was shut down completely after the TACMs mixed thrombus was delivered and the postprocedural survival rate of animal models at 12 weeks was 100%. Conclusions. With their good biocompatibility and superior hemostatic efficiency, TACMs might be a promising new hemostatic agent with a wide range of potential applications. PMID:28303245

  9. A sensitive HIV-1 envelope induced fusion assay identifies fusion enhancement of thrombin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, De-Chun; Zhong, Guo-Cai; Su, Ju-Xiang [Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Liu, Yan-Hong [Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xuefu Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Li, Yan; Wang, Jia-Ye [Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Hattori, Toshio [Department of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Division of Internal Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai 9808574 (Japan); Ling, Hong, E-mail: lingh@ems.hrbmu.edu.cn [Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Department of Parasitology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Key Lab of Heilongjiang Province for Infection and Immunity, Key Lab of Heilongjiang Province Education Bureau for Etiology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Zhang, Feng-Min, E-mail: fengminzhang@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Key Lab of Heilongjiang Province for Infection and Immunity, Key Lab of Heilongjiang Province Education Bureau for Etiology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China)

    2010-01-22

    To evaluate the interaction between HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) and target cell receptors, various cell-cell-fusion assays have been developed. In the present study, we established a novel fusion system. In this system, the expression of the sensitive reporter gene, firefly luciferase (FL) gene, in the target cells was used to evaluate cell fusion event. Simultaneously, constitutively expressed Renilla luciferase (RL) gene was used to monitor effector cell number and viability. FL gave a wider dynamic range than other known reporters and the introduction of RL made the assay accurate and reproducible. This system is especially beneficial for investigation of potential entry-influencing agents, for its power of ruling out the false inhibition or enhancement caused by the artificial cell-number variation. As a case study, we applied this fusion system to observe the effect of a serine protease, thrombin, on HIV Env-mediated cell-cell fusion and have found the fusion enhancement activity of thrombin over two R5-tropic HIV strains.

  10. Biochemical characterization of bovine plasma thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen Torsten

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TAFI is a plasma protein assumed to be an important link between coagulation and fibrinolysis. The three-dimensional crystal structures of authentic mature bovine TAFI (TAFIa in complex with tick carboxypeptidase inhibitor, authentic full lenght bovine plasma thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI, and recombinant human TAFI have recently been solved. In light of these recent advances, we have characterized authentic bovine TAFI biochemically and compared it to human TAFI. Results The four N-linked glycosylation sequons within the activation peptide were all occupied in bovine TAFI, similar to human TAFI, while the sequon located within the enzyme moiety of the bovine protein was non-glycosylated. The enzymatic stability and the kinetic constants of TAFIa differed somewhat between the two proteins, as did the isoelectric point of TAFI, but not TAFIa. Equivalent to human TAFI, bovine TAFI was a substrate for transglutaminases and could be proteolytically cleaved by trypsin or thrombin/solulin complex, although small differences in the fragmentation patterns were observed. Furthermore, bovine TAFI exhibited intrinsic activity and TAFIa attenuated tPA-mediated fibrinolysis similar to the human protein. Conclusion The findings presented here suggest that the properties of these two orthologous proteins are similar and that conclusions reached using the bovine TAFI may be extrapolated to the human protein.

  11. Automation in Clinical Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledeboer, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the trend toward automation in clinical pathology laboratories has largely bypassed the clinical microbiology laboratory. In this article, we review the historical impediments to automation in the microbiology laboratory and offer insight into the reasons why we believe that we are on the cusp of a dramatic change that will sweep a wave of automation into clinical microbiology laboratories. We review the currently available specimen-processing instruments as well as the total laboratory automation solutions. Lastly, we outline the types of studies that will need to be performed to fully assess the benefits of automation in microbiology laboratories. PMID:23515547

  12. Implementation of a semi-automated strategy for the annotation of metabolomic fingerprints generated by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry from biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courant, Frédérique; Royer, Anne-Lise; Chéreau, Sylvain; Morvan, Marie-Line; Monteau, Fabrice; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2012-11-07

    -eight compounds were identified successfully in the generated chemical phenotypes, among which five were found to be candidate markers of the administration of these anabolic agents, demonstrating the efficiency of the developed strategy to reveal and confirm metabolite structures according to the high-throughput objective expected from these integrative biological approaches.

  13. Automated mass action model space generation and analysis methods for two-reactant combinatorially complex equilibriums: An analysis of ATP-induced ribonucleotide reductase R1 hexamerization data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radivoyevitch Tomas

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ribonucleotide reductase is the main control point of dNTP production. It has two subunits, R1, and R2 or p53R2. R1 has 5 possible catalytic site states (empty or filled with 1 of 4 NDPs, 5 possible s-site states (empty or filled with ATP, dATP, dTTP or dGTP, 3 possible a-site states (empty or filled with ATP or dATP, perhaps two possible h-site states (empty or filled with ATP, and all of this is folded into an R1 monomer-dimer-tetramer-hexamer equilibrium where R1 j-mers can be bound by variable numbers of R2 or p53R2 dimers. Trillions of RNR complexes are possible as a result. The problem is to determine which are needed in models to explain available data. This problem is intractable for 10 reactants, but it can be solved for 2 and is here for R1 and ATP. Results Thousands of ATP-induced R1 hexamerization models with up to three (s, a and h ATP binding sites per R1 subunit were automatically generated via hypotheses that complete dissociation constants are infinite and/or that binary dissociation constants are equal. To limit the model space size, it was assumed that s-sites are always filled in oligomers and never filled in monomers, and to interpret model terms it was assumed that a-sites fill before h-sites. The models were fitted to published dynamic light scattering data. As the lowest Akaike Information Criterion (AIC of the 3-parameter models was greater than the lowest of the 2-parameter models, only models with up to 3 parameters were fitted. Models with sums of squared errors less than twice the minimum were then partitioned into two groups: those that contained no occupied h-site terms (508 models and those that contained at least one (1580 models. Normalized AIC densities of these two groups of models differed significantly in favor of models that did not include an h-site term (Kolmogorov-Smirnov p -15; consistent with this, 28 of the top 30 models (ranked by AICs did not include an h-site term and 28

  14. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  15. Automation tools for flexible aircraft maintenance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prentice, William J.; Drotning, William D.; Watterberg, Peter A.; Loucks, Clifford S.; Kozlowski, David M.

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 26546 at Sandia, during the period FY01 through FY03. The project team visited four DoD depots that support extensive aircraft maintenance in order to understand critical needs for automation, and to identify maintenance processes for potential automation or integration opportunities. From the visits, the team identified technology needs and application issues, as well as non-technical drivers that influence the application of automation in depot maintenance of aircraft. Software tools for automation facility design analysis were developed, improved, extended, and integrated to encompass greater breadth for eventual application as a generalized design tool. The design tools for automated path planning and path generation have been enhanced to incorporate those complex robot systems with redundant joint configurations, which are likely candidate designs for a complex aircraft maintenance facility. A prototype force-controlled actively compliant end-effector was designed and developed based on a parallel kinematic mechanism design. This device was developed for demonstration of surface finishing, one of many in-contact operations performed during aircraft maintenance. This end-effector tool was positioned along the workpiece by a robot manipulator, programmed for operation by the automated planning tools integrated for this project. Together, the hardware and software tools demonstrate many of the technologies required for flexible automation in a maintenance facility.

  16. A sensitive bioimmunoassay for thrombin-cleaved two-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator in human body fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braat, E.A.M.; Nauland, U.; Dooijewaard, G.; Rijken, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    Thrombin cleaves single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator (scu-PA) into a two-chain form (tcu-PA/T), which is virtually inactive in plasminogen activator assays. Little is known about the physiological importance of tcu-PA/T. To examine the occurrence of tcu-PA/T in vivo, we developed a sen

  17. Mechanism of poly(acrylic acid) acceleration of antithrombin inhibition of thrombin: implications for the design of novel heparin mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monien, Bernhard H; Cheang, Kai I; Desai, Umesh R

    2005-08-11

    The bridging mechanism of antithrombin inhibition of thrombin is a dominant mechanism contributing a massive approximately 2500-fold acceleration in the reaction rate and is also a key reason for the clinical usage of heparin. Our recent study of the antithrombin-activating properties of a carboxylic acid-based polymer, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), demonstrated a surprisingly high acceleration in thrombin inhibition (Monien, B. H.; Desai, U. R. J. Med. Chem. 2005, 48, 1269). To better understand this interesting phenomenon, we have studied the mechanism of PAA-dependent acceleration in antithrombin inhibition of thrombin. Competitive binding studies with low-affinity heparin and a heparin tetrasaccharide suggest that PAA binds antithrombin in both the pentasaccharide- and the extended heparin-binding sites, and these results are corroborated by molecular modeling. The salt-dependence of the K(D) of the PAA-antithrombin interaction shows the formation of five ionic interactions. In contrast, the contribution of nonionic forces is miniscule, resulting in an interaction that is significantly weaker than that observed for heparins. A bell-shaped profile of the observed rate constant for antithrombin inhibition of thrombin as a function of PAA concentration was observed, suggesting that inhibition proceeds through the "bridging" mechanism. The knowledge gained in this mechanistic study highlights important rules for the rational design of orally available heparin mimics.

  18. INVOLVEMENT OF BACTERICIDAL FACTORS FROM THROMBIN-STIMULATED PLATELETS IN CLEARANCE OF ADHERENT VIRIDANS STREPTOCOCCI IN EXPERIMENTAL INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERWERFF, J; ZAAT, SAJ; JOLDERSMA, W; HESS, J

    1995-01-01

    Platelets activated with thrombin release bactericidal factors. We studied the role of the susceptibility of viridans streptococci to these bactericidal factors in the development of infective endocarditis (IE). By using the experimental endocarditis rabbit model, the initial adherence and the devel

  19. Binding characteristics of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor to streptococcal surface collagen-like proteins A and B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seron, Mercedes Valls; Plug, Tom; Marquart, J. Arnoud; Marx, Pauline F.; Herwald, Heiko; de Groot, Philip G.; Meijers, Joost C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is the causative agent in a wide range of diseases in humans. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) binds to collagen-like proteins ScIA and ScIB at the surface of S. pyogenes. Activation of TAFI at this surface redirects inflammation from a transient to chronic s

  20. Aptamer-based organic-silica hybrid affinity monolith prepared via "thiol-ene" click reaction for extraction of thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Jin-cheng; Lian, Hong-zhen; Chen, Hong-yuan

    2015-06-01

    A novel strategy for preparing aptamer-based organic-silica hybrid monolithic column was developed via "thiol-ene" click chemistry. Due to the large specific surface area of the hybrid matrix and the simplicity, rapidness and high efficiency of "thiol-ene" click reaction, the average coverage density of aptamer on the organic-silica hybrid monolith reached 420 pmol μL(-1). Human α-thrombin can be captured on the prepared affinity monolithic column with high specificity and eluted by NaClO4 solution. N-p-tosyl-Gly-Pro-Arg p-nitroanilide acetate was used as the sensitive chromogenic substrate of thrombin. The thrombin enriched by this affinity column was detected with a detection of limit of 0.01 μM by spectrophotometry. Furthermore, the extraction recovery of thrombin at 0.15 μM in human serum was 91.8% with a relative standard deviation of 4.0%. These results indicated that "thiol-ene" click chemistry provided a promising technique to immobilize aptamer on organic-inorganic hybrid monolith and the easily-assembled affinity monolithic material could be used to realize highly selective recognition of trace proteins.

  1. Automated sugar analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeu Alcides MARQUES

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sugarcane monosaccharides are reducing sugars, and classical analytical methodologies (Lane-Eynon, Benedict, complexometric-EDTA, Luff-Schoorl, Musson-Walker, Somogyi-Nelson are based on reducing copper ions in alkaline solutions. In Brazil, certain factories use Lane-Eynon, others use the equipment referred to as “REDUTEC”, and additional factories analyze reducing sugars based on a mathematic model. The objective of this paper is to understand the relationship between variations in millivolts, mass and tenors of reducing sugars during the analysis process. Another objective is to generate an automatic model for this process. The work herein uses the equipment referred to as “REDUTEC”, a digital balance, a peristaltic pump, a digital camcorder, math programs and graphics programs. We conclude that the millivolts, mass and tenors of reducing sugars exhibit a good mathematical correlation, and the mathematical model generated was benchmarked to low-concentration reducing sugars (<0.3%. Using the model created herein, reducing sugars analyses can be automated using the new equipment.

  2. Automated illustration of patients instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Duy; Nakamura, Carlos; Bray, Bruce E; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A picture can be a powerful communication tool. However, creating pictures to illustrate patient instructions can be a costly and time-consuming task. Building on our prior research in this area, we developed a computer application that automatically converts text to pictures using natural language processing and computer graphics techniques. After iterative testing, the automated illustration system was evaluated using 49 previously unseen cardiology discharge instructions. The completeness of the system-generated illustrations was assessed by three raters using a three-level scale. The average inter-rater agreement for text correctly represented in the pictograph was about 66 percent. Since illustration in this context is intended to enhance rather than replace text, these results support the feasibility of conducting automated illustration.

  3. Design, synthesis and antithrombotic evaluation of novel dabigatran etexilate analogs, a new series of non-peptides thrombin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongxing; Wang, Shaochi; Diao, Xiaojuan; Zhu, Qihua; Shen, Huiliang; Han, Xueqing; Wang, Yiwei; Gong, Guoqing; Xu, Yungen

    2015-12-01

    Thrombin is a serine protease that plays a key role in blood clotting, which makes it a promising target for the treatment of thrombotic diseases. Dabigatran is direct potent thrombin inhibitor. Based on bioisosteric and scaffold hopping principle, two dabigatran mimics (I-1 and II-1) in which the benzamidine moiety of dabigatran was replaced by a tricyclic fused scaffold were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro activities for inhibiting thrombin. The results reveal that compounds I-1 (IC50=9.20nM) and II-1 (IC50=7.48nM) are potent direct thrombin inhibitors and the activity is in the range of reference drug. On this basis, twenty-two ester and carbamate derivatives of I-1 or II-1 were prepared and evaluated for their anticoagulant activity. Prodrugs I-4a (IC50=0.73μM), I-4b (IC50=0.75μM), II-2a (IC50=1.44μM) and II-2b (IC50=0.91μM) display excellent effects of inhibiting thrombin induced-platelet aggregation. Moreover, compounds I-9 and II-4, which contain a cleavable moiety with anti-platelet activity, show the best anticoagulant efficacy among the tested compounds in the rat venous thrombosis model. The compounds which have better in vitro and in vivo activity were subjected to rat tail bleeding test, and the result demonstrates that compound I-9 is less likely to have bleeding risk than dabigatran etexilate.

  4. Rapid Upregulation of Orai1 Abundance in the Plasma Membrane of Platelets Following Activation with Thrombin and Collagen Related Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilai Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood platelets accomplish primary hemostasis following vascular injury and contribute to the orchestration of occlusive vascular disease. Platelets are activated by an increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i, which is accomplished by Ca2+-release from intracellular stores and subsequent store operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE through Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channel moiety Orai1. Powerful activators of platelets include thrombin and collagen related peptide (CRP, which are in part effective by activation of small G- protein Rac1. The present study explored the influence of thrombin and CRP on Orai1 protein abundance and cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i in platelets drawn from wild type mice. Methods: Orai1 protein surface abundance was quantified utilizing CF™488A conjugated antibodies, and [Ca2+]i was determined with Fluo3-fluorescence. Results: In resting platelets, Orai1 protein abundance and [Ca2+]i were low. Thrombin (0.02 U/ml and CRP (5ug/ml within 2 min increased [Ca2+]i and Orai1 protein abundance at the platelet surface. [Ca2+]i was further increased by Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (1 µM and by store depletion with the sarcoendoplasmatic Ca2+ ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin (1 µM. However, Orai1 protein abundance at the platelet surface was not significantly affected by ionomycin and only slightly increased by thapsigargin. The effect of thrombin and CRP on Orai1 abundance and [Ca2+]i was significantly blunted by Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 (50 µM. Conclusion: The increase of [Ca2+]i following stimulation of platelets with thrombin and collagen related peptide is potentiated by ultrarapid Rac1 sensitive translocation of Orai1 into the cell membrane.

  5. Ultrasensitive electrochemical aptasensor for the detection of thrombin based on dual signal amplification strategy of Au@GS and DNA-CoPd NPs conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaoguang; Zhang, Yong; Yan, Tao; Fan, Dawei; Du, Bin; Ma, Hongmin; Wei, Qin

    2016-06-15

    In this work, an ultrasensitive electrochemical aptasensor for the detection of thrombin was developed based on Au nanoparticles decorated graphene sheet (Au@GS) and CoPd binary nanoparticles (CoPd NPs). A sulfydryl-labeled thrombin capture probe (Apt1) and a biotin-labeled thrombin reporter probe (Apt2) were designed to achieve a sandwich-type strategy. Au@GS was used as a sensing platform for the facile immobilization of Apt1 through Au-S bond, forming a sensing interface for thrombin. The specific recognition of thrombin induced the attachment of Apt2-CoPd NPs to the electrode. The labeled CoPd NPs showed good catalytic properties toward the reduction of H2O2, resulting in an amperometric signal. The amperometric response was correlated to the thrombin concentration in sample solutions. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) confirmed the successful fabrication of the aptasensor. A linear response to thrombin in the range of 0.01-2.00 ng mL(-1) with a low detection limit (5 pg mL(-1)) was achieved. The proposed aptasensor showed good selectivity, good reproducibility and acceptable stability. This proposed strategy may find many potential applications in the detection of other biomolecules.

  6. Thrombin as important factor for cutaneous wound healing: comparison of fibrin biomatrices in vitro and in a rat excisional wound healing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugerell, Alfred; Pasteiner, Waltraud; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Kober, Johanna; Meinl, Alexandra; Pfeifer, Sabine; Hartinger, Joachim; Wolbank, Susanne; Goppelt, Andreas; Redl, Heinz; Mittermayr, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Fibrin biomatrices have been used for many years for hemostasis and sealing and are a well-established surgical tool. The objective of the present study was to compare two commercially available fibrin biomatrices regarding the effect of their thrombin concentration on keratinocytes and wound healing in vitro and in vivo. Keratinocytes showed significant differences in adhesion, viability, and morphology in the presence of the fibrin matrices in vitro. A high thrombin concentration (800-1,200 IU/mL) caused deteriorated cell compatibility. By using a thrombin inhibitor, those differences could be reversed. In a rat excisional wound healing model, we observed more rapid wound closure and less wound severity in wounds treated with a fibrin matrix containing a lower concentration of thrombin (4 IU/mL). Furthermore, fewer new functional vessels and a lower level of vascular endothelial growth factor were measured in wounds after 7 days treated with the matrix with higher thrombin concentration. These in vivo results may be partially explained by the in vitro biocompatibility data. Additionally, results show that low thrombin biomatrices were degraded faster than the high thrombin material. Hence, we conclude that the composition of fibrin biomatrices influences keratinocytes and therefore has an impact on wound healing.

  7. Structural Dynamics of Thrombin-Binding DNA Aptamer d(GGTTGGTGTGGTTGG) Quadruplex DNA Studied by Large-Scale Explicit Solvent Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, Roman; Golovin, Andrey; Spiridonova, Vera; Kopylov, Alexei; Šponer, Jiří

    2010-10-12

    The thrombin-binding aptamer (15-TBA) is a 15-mer DNA oligonucleotide with sequence d(GGTTGGTGTGGTTGG). 15-TBA folds into a quadruplex DNA (G-DNA) structure with two planar G-quartets connected by three single-stranded loops. The arrangement of the 15-TBA-thrombin complex is unclear, particularly with respect to the precise 15-TBA residues that interact with the thrombin structure. Our present understanding suggests either the 15-TBA single stranded loops containing sequential thymidines (TT) or alternatively a single-stranded loop, containing a guanine flanked by 2 thymidines (TGT), physically associates with thrombin protein. In the present study, the explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method was utilized to further analyze the 15-TBA-thrombin three-dimensional structure. Functional annotation of the loop residues was made with long simulations in the parmbsc0 force field. In total, the elapsed time of simulations carried out in this study exceeds 12 microseconds, substantially surpassing previous G-DNA simulation reports. Our simulations suggest that the TGT-loop function is to stabilize the structure of the aptamer, while the TT-loops participate in direct binding to thrombin. The findings of the present report advance our understanding of the molecular structure of the 15-TBA-thrombin structure further enabling the construction of biosensors for aptamer bases and the development of anticoagulant agents.

  8. Thrombin inhibition with melagatran does not attenuate renal ischaemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nitescu, Nicoletta; Grimberg, Elisabeth; Ricksten, Sven-Erik;

    2007-01-01

    to renal IR. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats underwent renal IR (35 min of bilateral renal arterial clamping), or sham surgery. Treatment groups were: (i) IR-Saline, (ii) IR-Melagatran, (iii) Sham-Saline, and (iv) Sham-Melagatran. Twenty minutes prior to renal IR, the rats were administered a bolus dose......BACKGROUND: Renal ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) is associated with activation of the coagulation system and inflammation within the kidney. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of selective thrombin inhibition with melagatran on kidney morphology and function in rats subjected...... of saline vehicle or melagatran [0.5 mumol/kg, subcutaneously (s.c.)] followed by a continuous infusion throughout (0.08 micromol/kg/h, s.c.). Forty-eight hours after IR, renal function was assessed in anaesthetized animals and kidney histology was analysed semi-quantitatively. RESULTS: Rats in group IR...

  9. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor activity in healthy and diseased dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Lisbeth Rem; Wiinberg, Bo; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads

    2010-01-01

    Background: In people, increased thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) antigen has been associated with increased risk of thrombosis, and decreased TAFI may contribute to bleeding diathesis. TAFI activity in dogs has been described in experimental models, but not in dogs...... with spontaneous disease. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare TAFI activity in healthy dogs with TAFI activity in dogs with spontaneous disease. Methods: Plasma samples from 20 clinically healthy Beagles and from 35 dogs with various diseases were analyzed using a commercial chromogenic assay...... that measured TAFI activity relative to activity in standardized pooled human plasma. Results: Median TAFI activity for the 20 Beagles was 46.1% (range 32.2-70.8%) compared with 62.6% (29.1-250%) for the 35 diseased dogs, and 14/35 (40%) had TAFI activities >the upper limit for controls. The highest individual...

  10. Dynamics Govern Specificity of a Protein-Protein Interface: Substrate Recognition by Thrombin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian E Fuchs

    Full Text Available Biomolecular recognition is crucial in cellular signal transduction. Signaling is mediated through molecular interactions at protein-protein interfaces. Still, specificity and promiscuity of protein-protein interfaces cannot be explained using simplistic static binding models. Our study rationalizes specificity of the prototypic protein-protein interface between thrombin and its peptide substrates relying solely on binding site dynamics derived from molecular dynamics simulations. We find conformational selection and thus dynamic contributions to be a key player in biomolecular recognition. Arising entropic contributions complement chemical intuition primarily reflecting enthalpic interaction patterns. The paradigm "dynamics govern specificity" might provide direct guidance for the identification of specific anchor points in biomolecular recognition processes and structure-based drug design.

  11. Dynamics Govern Specificity of a Protein-Protein Interface: Substrate Recognition by Thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Julian E; Huber, Roland G; Waldner, Birgit J; Kahler, Ursula; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R

    2015-01-01

    Biomolecular recognition is crucial in cellular signal transduction. Signaling is mediated through molecular interactions at protein-protein interfaces. Still, specificity and promiscuity of protein-protein interfaces cannot be explained using simplistic static binding models. Our study rationalizes specificity of the prototypic protein-protein interface between thrombin and its peptide substrates relying solely on binding site dynamics derived from molecular dynamics simulations. We find conformational selection and thus dynamic contributions to be a key player in biomolecular recognition. Arising entropic contributions complement chemical intuition primarily reflecting enthalpic interaction patterns. The paradigm "dynamics govern specificity" might provide direct guidance for the identification of specific anchor points in biomolecular recognition processes and structure-based drug design.

  12. Historical perspective and contemporary management of acute coronary syndromes: from MONA to THROMBINS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Kristopher P; Conti, C Richard; Winchester, David E

    2015-01-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remains a major burden on morbidity and mortality in the United States. Medical professionals and students often use the mnemonic 'MONA' (morphine, oxygen, nitroglycerin and aspirin) to recall treatments for ACS; however, this list of therapies is outdated. We provide a historical perspective on 'MONA,' attempt to uncover its origin in the medical literature, and demonstrate the myriad changes that have occurred over the last 50 years of ACS management. We have developed a novel mnemonic, 'THROMBINS2' (thienopyridines, heparin/enoxaparin, renin-angiotensin system blockers, oxygen, morphine, beta blocker, intervention, nitroglycerin, statin/salicylate) to help bedside clinicians recall all the elements of contemporary ACS management. We demonstrate the mortality benefit for each component of contemporary ACS management, correlating the continued improvement with historical data on mortality after myocardial infarction. We encourage providers to utilize this mnemonic to explore options and guide treatments in ACS patients.

  13. Automated washing of FTA Card punches and PCR setup for reference samples using a LIMS-controlled Sias Xantus automated liquid handler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Olsen, Addie Nina; Frøslev, Tobias G.;

    2009-01-01

    We have implemented and validated automated methods for washing FTA Card punches containing buccal samples and subsequent PCR setup using a Sias Xantus automated liquid handler. The automated methods were controlled by worklists generated by our LabWare Laboratory Information Management System (L...

  14. Laboratory Automation and Middleware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riben, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The practice of surgical pathology is under constant pressure to deliver the highest quality of service, reduce errors, increase throughput, and decrease turnaround time while at the same time dealing with an aging workforce, increasing financial constraints, and economic uncertainty. Although not able to implement total laboratory automation, great progress continues to be made in workstation automation in all areas of the pathology laboratory. This report highlights the benefits and challenges of pathology automation, reviews middleware and its use to facilitate automation, and reviews the progress so far in the anatomic pathology laboratory.

  15. Characterization of Ixophilin, a thrombin inhibitor from the gut of Ixodes scapularis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanya Narasimhan

    Full Text Available Ixodes scapularis, the black-legged tick, vectors several human pathogens including Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease in North America. Pathogen transmission to the vertebrate host occurs when infected ticks feed on the mammalian host to obtain a blood meal. Efforts to understand how the tick confronts host hemostatic mechanisms and imbibes a fluid blood meal have largely focused on the anticoagulation strategies of tick saliva. The blood meal that enters the tick gut remains in a fluid state for several days during the process of feeding, and the role of the tick gut in maintaining the blood-meal fluid is not understood. We now demonstrate that the tick gut produces a potent inhibitor of thrombin, a key enzyme in the mammalian coagulation cascade. Chromatographic fractionation of engorged tick gut proteins identified one predominant thrombin inhibitory activity associated with an approximately 18 kDa protein, henceforth referred to as Ixophilin. The ixophilin gene was preferentially transcribed in the guts of feeding nymphs. Expression began after 24 hours of feeding, coincident with the flow of host blood into the tick gut. Immunity against Ixophilin delayed tick feeding, and decreased feeding efficiency significantly. Surprisingly, immunity against Ixophilin resulted in increased Borrelia burgdorferi transmission to the host, possibly due to delayed feeding and increased transmission opportunity. These observations illuminate the potential drawbacks of targeting individual tick proteins in a functional suite. They also underscore the need to identify the "anticoagulome" of the tick gut, and to prioritize a critical subset of anticoagulants that could be targeted to efficiently thwart tick feeding, and block pathogen transmission to the vertebrate host.

  16. Management of major bleedings during anticoagulant treatment with the oral direct thrombin inhibitor ximelagatran or warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernlöf, Gunilla; Sjöström, Britta M; Lindell, Klas M; Wall, Ulrika E

    2009-12-01

    Several new oral anticoagulants are currently investigated in phase III programmes, mainly with inhibition of factor Xa or thrombin as their pharmacological target. Advantages are expected with these new drugs compared with vitamin K antagonists, but one potential drawback is the lack of specific antidotes. During the clinical studies with ximelagatran, an oral direct thrombin inhibitor withdrawn due to hepatic side effects, investigators were instructed to manage bleedings with routine measures. We have retrospectively tried to assess whether this was sufficient or whether there was a need for reversal strategies. The study population consisted of patients with major bleedings in three long-term studies (104 ximelagatran, 155 warfarin). All individual patient narratives were reviewed with respect to management of the bleeding. Complementary data were retrieved from the data-based case report forms. Approximately, two of three of the patients in both groups were subject to some kind of treatment. One-third (1/3) in both groups had transfusions documented and/or received specific medication. Vitamin K was given more often to warfarin patients. Two ximelagatran patients received prothrombin complex (four-factor concentrate), but one was a patient with a severe hepatopathy suspected to be drug-induced. Overall, the case descriptions did not reveal any apparent differences in the course of events between groups. We found no indications that the lack of an antidote posed a clinical problem in patients treated with ximelagatran as compared with warfarin. The relatively short half-life of melagatran, the active metabolite of ximelagatran, may have contributed to these results.

  17. Automated Camouflage Pattern Generation Technology Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    in their liquid state. Additionally, the use of a spray gun to apply the paint creates a mist which is even more highly ignitable. This safety hazard...RequirementsOperting Environment: data for 34,000 points of working 460 VAC. 1 Ok VA 3 Phase,.with fan cooling: 5* - 38* C memory. The Controller’s user...10800 (wrist rotation) P =1800 (wrist yaw) F = 10800 ( fan rotation) SHYDRAULIC SERVE*DRIVE Figure IV-8. GMF NC Painter IV-23 THE BDM CORPORATION 8

  18. Automated Knowledge Generation with Persistent Surveillance Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-26

    48] noted semantic content being used. It allowed the products being viewed to be sorted by different category, price, and brand . As a result, an...choices that we use to segment products into different sections to include category, price, brand , color, shape, or popularity. Each is tailored by the... Volker Haarslev, Kay Hidde, Prof. Dr. Ralf Moller and Michael Wessel who in September 2004 founded the Racer Systems GmbH & Co. KG to give the RacerPro

  19. Automated Testing with Targeted Event Sequence Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Svenning; Prasad, Mukul R.; Møller, Anders

    2013-01-01

    of the individual event handlers of the application. The second phase builds event sequences backward from the target, using the summaries together with a UI model of the application. Our experiments on a collection of open source Android applications show that this technique can successfully produce event...

  20. Methodology for Automatic Generation of Models for Large Urban Spaces Based on GIS Data/Metodología para la generación automática de modelos de grandes espacios urbanos desde información SIG/

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Arturo Ordóñez Medina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the planning and evaluation stages of infrastructure projects, it is necessary to manage huge quantities of information. Cities are very complex systems, which need to be modeled when an intervention is required. Suchmodels allow us to measure the impact of infrastructure changes, simulating hypothetic scenarios and evaluating results. This paper describes a methodology for the automatic generation of urban space models from GIS sources. A Voronoi diagram is used to partition large urban regions and subsequently define zones of interest. Finally, some examples of application models are presented, one used for microsimulation of traffic and another for air pollution simulation.En las etapas de planeación y evaluación de proyectos de infraestructura es necesario manejar grandes cantidades de información. Las ciudades son sistemas complejos que deben ser modeladas para ser intervenidas. Estos modelos permitirón medir el impacto de los cambios de infraestructura, simular escenarios hipotéticos y evaluar resultados. Este artículo describe una metodología para generar automáticamente modelos espaciales urbanos desde fuentes SIG: Un diagrama de Voronoi es usado para dividir grandes regiones urbanas, y a continuación serán definidas las zonas de interés. Finalmente, algunos ejemplos de modelos de aplicación serán presentados, uno usado para microsimulación de tráfico y el otro para simular contaminación atmosférica.

  1. Determination of the Optimized Automation Rate considering Effects of Automation on Human Operators in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Min; Seong, Poong Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hyun [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Seosaeng (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Man Cheol [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Automation refers to the use of a device or a system to perform a function previously performed by a human operator. It is introduced to reduce the human errors and to enhance the performance in various industrial fields, including the nuclear industry. However, these positive effects are not always achieved in complex systems such as nuclear power plants (NPPs). An excessive introduction of automation can generate new roles for human operators and change activities in unexpected ways. As more automation systems are accepted, the ability of human operators to detect automation failures and resume manual control is diminished. This disadvantage of automation is called the Out-of-the- Loop (OOTL) problem. We should consider the positive and negative effects of automation at the same time to determine the appropriate level of the introduction of automation. Thus, in this paper, we suggest an estimation method to consider the positive and negative effects of automation at the same time to determine the appropriate introduction of automation. This concept is limited in that it does not consider the effects of automation on human operators. Thus, a new estimation method for automation rate was suggested to overcome this problem.

  2. Thrombin induces Egr-1 expression in fibroblasts involving elevation of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, phosphorylation of ERK and activation of ternary complex factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiel Gerald

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The serine protease thrombin catalyzes fibrin clot formation by converting fibrinogen into fibrin. Additionally, thrombin stimulation leads to an activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors in different cell types, indicating that the gene expression pattern is changed in thrombin-stimulated cells. The objective of this study was to analyze the signaling cascade leading to the expression of the zinc finger transcription factor Egr-1 in thrombin-stimulated lung fibroblasts. Results Stimulation of 39M1-81 fibroblasts with thrombin induced a robust and transient biosynthesis of Egr-1. Reporter gene analysis revealed that the newly synthesized Egr-1 was biologically active. The signaling cascade connecting thrombin stimulation with Egr-1 gene expression required elevated levels of cytosolic Ca2+, the activation of diacylgycerol-dependent protein kinase C isoenzymes, and the activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK. Stimulation of the cells with thrombin triggered the phosphorylation of the transcription factor Elk-1. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant of Elk-1 completely prevented Egr-1 expression in stimulated 39M1-81 cells, indicating that Elk-1 or related ternary complex factors connect the intracellular signaling cascade elicited by activation of protease-activated receptors with transcription of the Egr-1 gene. Lentiviral-mediated expression of MAP kinase phosphatase-1, a dual-specific phosphatase that dephosphorylates and inactivates ERK in the nucleus, prevented Elk-1 phosphorylation and Egr-1 biosynthesis in thrombin stimulated 39M1-81 cells, confirming the importance of nuclear ERK and Elk-1 for the upregulation of Egr-1 expression in thrombin-stimulated lung fibroblasts. 39M1-81 cells additionally express M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. A comparison between the signaling cascades induced by thrombin or carbachol showed no differences, except that signal transduction via M

  3. 妊娠期高血压疾病血浆凝血酶生成活性检测的意义%The clinical significance of thrombin detection in hypertensive disorders complicating pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚波; 杜景云; 俞菁; 张昕明; 李海川; 李俊; 谭美玉; 王萍

    2011-01-01

    Objective To approach a method of evaluating and predicting the severity and the prognosis of HDP cases by detecting the plasma thrombin formation.Methods Automated fluorogenic substrate analysis was used to analyze thrombin formation rate and amount in 32 cases of gestational hypertension, 35 cases of moderate pre-eclampsia, 38 cases of severe pre-eclampsia, and 50 cases of midterm or late-term normal pregnancy in the Shanghai Changning Miaternity & Infant Health Hospital between January 2004 and December 2009.Results Normal pregnancy thrombin peaked at (362.0 ± 29.6) mol/L, in HDP was ( 385.0 ± 33.5 ) nmol/L, in mild pre-eclampsia thrombin was ( 412.0 ± 41.5 )nmol/L, severe pre-eclampsia thrombin was (624.0 ± 67.6)nmol/L.mild and severe pre-eclampsia thrombin was substantially elevated when compared with normal pregnancy ( P < 0.05, P < 0.01 ).Thrombin elevation also accompanied with fibrinogen and decomposed D-dimer(D-D) change, in severe pre-eclampsia thrombin formation amount peaked and fibrinogen showed significant correlation ( r = 0.894, P < 0.05 ).Conclusion Mild and severe pre-eclampsia patients showed different degree of Prethrombotic state, especially in severe pre-eclampsia.Special precaution should be taken for these patients to prevent DIC occurrence.%目的 探讨妊娠期高血压疾病(HDP)患者应用血浆凝血酶生成活性.判断HDP患者病情发展及预后.方法 2004年1月至2009年12月对上海市长宁区妇幼保健院、上海市宝山区罗店医院住院的妊娠妇女应用荧光发色底物分析方法,对妊娠期高血压疾病患者32例、轻度子痫前期35例、重度子痫前期38例(其中4例围产期发生急性DIC)和正常晚期孕妇50例血浆凝血酶生成活性进行检测.测定分析各组研究对象凝血酶生成的量和速度,并进行比较研究.结果 正常孕妇凝血酶生成峰值为(362.0±29.6)nmoL/L,妊娠期高血压疾病为(385.0±33.5)nmol/L,轻度子痫前期为(412.0±41.5)nmoL

  4. Automating checks of plan check automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halabi, Tarek; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2014-07-08

    While a few physicists have designed new plan check automation solutions for their clinics, fewer, if any, managed to adapt existing solutions. As complex and varied as the systems they check, these programs must gain the full confidence of those who would run them on countless patient plans. The present automation effort, planCheck, therefore focuses on versatility and ease of implementation and verification. To demonstrate this, we apply planCheck to proton gantry, stereotactic proton gantry, stereotactic proton fixed beam (STAR), and IMRT treatments.

  5. Automation in Warehouse Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamberg, R.; Verriet, J.

    2012-01-01

    The warehouses of the future will come in a variety of forms, but with a few common ingredients. Firstly, human operational handling of items in warehouses is increasingly being replaced by automated item handling. Extended warehouse automation counteracts the scarcity of human operators and support

  6. Automate functional testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kalindri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, software engineers are increasingly turning to the option of automating functional tests, but not always have successful in this endeavor. Reasons range from low planning until over cost in the process. Some principles that can guide teams in automating these tests are described in this article.

  7. More Benefits of Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Malcolm

    1988-01-01

    Describes a study that measured the benefits of an automated catalog and automated circulation system from the library user's point of view in terms of the value of time saved. Topics discussed include patterns of use, access time, availability of information, search behaviors, and the effectiveness of the measures used. (seven references)…

  8. Automated Gas Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, Allen; Clark, Henry

    2012-10-01

    The cyclotron of Texas A&M University is one of the few and prized cyclotrons in the country. Behind the scenes of the cyclotron is a confusing, and dangerous setup of the ion sources that supplies the cyclotron with particles for acceleration. To use this machine there is a time consuming, and even wasteful step by step process of switching gases, purging, and other important features that must be done manually to keep the system functioning properly, while also trying to maintain the safety of the working environment. Developing a new gas distribution system to the ion source prevents many of the problems generated by the older manually setup process. This developed system can be controlled manually in an easier fashion than before, but like most of the technology and machines in the cyclotron now, is mainly operated based on software programming developed through graphical coding environment Labview. The automated gas distribution system provides multi-ports for a selection of different gases to decrease the amount of gas wasted through switching gases, and a port for the vacuum to decrease the amount of time spent purging the manifold. The Labview software makes the operation of the cyclotron and ion sources easier, and safer for anyone to use.

  9. Advances in inspection automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Walter H.; Mair, H. Douglas; Jansen, Dion; Lombardi, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    This new session at QNDE reflects the growing interest in inspection automation. Our paper describes a newly developed platform that makes the complex NDE automation possible without the need for software programmers. Inspection tasks that are tedious, error-prone or impossible for humans to perform can now be automated using a form of drag and drop visual scripting. Our work attempts to rectify the problem that NDE is not keeping pace with the rest of factory automation. Outside of NDE, robots routinely and autonomously machine parts, assemble components, weld structures and report progress to corporate databases. By contrast, components arriving in the NDT department typically require manual part handling, calibrations and analysis. The automation examples in this paper cover the development of robotic thickness gauging and the use of adaptive contour following on the NRU reactor inspection at Chalk River.

  10. Automation in immunohematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Meenu; Kaur, Ravneet; Gupta, Ekta

    2012-07-01

    There have been rapid technological advances in blood banking in South Asian region over the past decade with an increasing emphasis on quality and safety of blood products. The conventional test tube technique has given way to newer techniques such as column agglutination technique, solid phase red cell adherence assay, and erythrocyte-magnetized technique. These new technologies are adaptable to automation and major manufacturers in this field have come up with semi and fully automated equipments for immunohematology tests in the blood bank. Automation improves the objectivity and reproducibility of tests. It reduces human errors in patient identification and transcription errors. Documentation and traceability of tests, reagents and processes and archiving of results is another major advantage of automation. Shifting from manual methods to automation is a major undertaking for any transfusion service to provide quality patient care with lesser turnaround time for their ever increasing workload. This article discusses the various issues involved in the process.

  11. Automated model building

    CERN Document Server

    Caferra, Ricardo; Peltier, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    This is the first book on automated model building, a discipline of automated deduction that is of growing importance Although models and their construction are important per se, automated model building has appeared as a natural enrichment of automated deduction, especially in the attempt to capture the human way of reasoning The book provides an historical overview of the field of automated deduction, and presents the foundations of different existing approaches to model construction, in particular those developed by the authors Finite and infinite model building techniques are presented The main emphasis is on calculi-based methods, and relevant practical results are provided The book is of interest to researchers and graduate students in computer science, computational logic and artificial intelligence It can also be used as a textbook in advanced undergraduate courses

  12. Automation in Warehouse Development

    CERN Document Server

    Verriet, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    The warehouses of the future will come in a variety of forms, but with a few common ingredients. Firstly, human operational handling of items in warehouses is increasingly being replaced by automated item handling. Extended warehouse automation counteracts the scarcity of human operators and supports the quality of picking processes. Secondly, the development of models to simulate and analyse warehouse designs and their components facilitates the challenging task of developing warehouses that take into account each customer’s individual requirements and logistic processes. Automation in Warehouse Development addresses both types of automation from the innovative perspective of applied science. In particular, it describes the outcomes of the Falcon project, a joint endeavour by a consortium of industrial and academic partners. The results include a model-based approach to automate warehouse control design, analysis models for warehouse design, concepts for robotic item handling and computer vision, and auton...

  13. Automation in Immunohematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Bajpai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been rapid technological advances in blood banking in South Asian region over the past decade with an increasing emphasis on quality and safety of blood products. The conventional test tube technique has given way to newer techniques such as column agglutination technique, solid phase red cell adherence assay, and erythrocyte-magnetized technique. These new technologies are adaptable to automation and major manufacturers in this field have come up with semi and fully automated equipments for immunohematology tests in the blood bank. Automation improves the objectivity and reproducibility of tests. It reduces human errors in patient identification and transcription errors. Documentation and traceability of tests, reagents and processes and archiving of results is another major advantage of automation. Shifting from manual methods to automation is a major undertaking for any transfusion service to provide quality patient care with lesser turnaround time for their ever increasing workload. This article discusses the various issues involved in the process.

  14. Thrombin mediates migration of rat brain astrocytes via PLC, Ca²⁺, CaMKII, PKCα, and AP-1-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Lee, I-Ta; Wu, Wen-Bin; Liu, Chiung-Ju; Hsieh, Hsi-Lung; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chien-Chung; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2013-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays a crucial role in pathological processes of brain inflammation, injury, and neurodegeneration. Thrombin has been known as a regulator of MMP-9 expression and cells migration. However, the mechanisms underlying thrombin-induced MMP-9 expression in rat brain astrocytes (RBA-1 cells) remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that thrombin induced the expression of pro-form MMP-9 and migration of RBA-1 cells, which were inhibited by pretreatment with the inhibitor of Gq-coupled receptor (GPAnt2A), Gi/o-coupled receptor (GPAnt2), PC-PLC (D609), PI-PLC (U73122), Ca(2+)-ATPase (thapsigargin, TG), calmodulin (CaMI), CaMKII (KN62), PKC (Gö6976 or GF109203X), MEK1/2 (PD98059), p38 MAPK (SB202190), JNK1/2 (SP600125), or AP-1 (Tanshinone IIA) or the intracellular calcium chelator (BAPTA/AM) and transfection with siRNA of PKCα, Erk2, JNK1, p38 MAPK, c-Jun, or c-Fos. In addition, thrombin-induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was attenuated by PPACK (a thrombin inhibitor). Thrombin further induced CaMKII phosphorylation and PKCα translocation, which were inhibited by U73122, D609, KN62, TG, or BAPTA/AM. Thrombin also induced PKCα-dependent p42/p44 MAPK and JNK1/2, but not p38 MAPK activation. Finally, we showed that thrombin enhanced c-Fos expression and c-Jun phosphorylation. c-Fos mRNA levels induced by thrombin were reduced by PD98059, SP600125, and Gö6976, but not SB202190. Thrombin stimulated in vivo binding of c-Fos to the MMP-9 promoter, which was reduced by pretreatment with SP600125 or PD98059, but not SB202190. These results concluded that thrombin activated a PLC/Ca(2+)/CaMKII/PKCα/p42/p44 MAPK and JNK1/2 pathway, which in turn triggered AP-1 activation and ultimately induced MMP-9 expression in RBA-1 cells.

  15. Automated ISS Flight Utilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offermann, Jan Tuzlic

    2016-01-01

    During my internship at NASA Johnson Space Center, I worked in the Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG), where I was tasked with a number of projects focused on the automation of tasks and activities related to the operation of the International Space Station (ISS). As I worked on a number of projects, I have written short sections below to give a description for each, followed by more general remarks on the internship experience. My first project is titled "General Exposure Representation EVADOSE", also known as "GEnEVADOSE". This project involved the design and development of a C++/ ROOT framework focused on radiation exposure for extravehicular activity (EVA) planning for the ISS. The utility helps mission managers plan EVAs by displaying information on the cumulative radiation doses that crew will receive during an EVA as a function of the egress time and duration of the activity. SRAG uses a utility called EVADOSE, employing a model of the space radiation environment in low Earth orbit to predict these doses, as while outside the ISS the astronauts will have less shielding from charged particles such as electrons and protons. However, EVADOSE output is cumbersome to work with, and prior to GEnEVADOSE, querying data and producing graphs of ISS trajectories and cumulative doses versus egress time required manual work in Microsoft Excel. GEnEVADOSE automates all this work, reading in EVADOSE output file(s) along with a plaintext file input by the user providing input parameters. GEnEVADOSE will output a text file containing all the necessary dosimetry for each proposed EVA egress time, for each specified EVADOSE file. It also plots cumulative dose versus egress time and the ISS trajectory, and displays all of this information in an auto-generated presentation made in LaTeX. New features have also been added, such as best-case scenarios (egress times corresponding to the least dose), interpolated curves for trajectories, and the ability to query any time in the

  16. A Fully Automated Penumbra Segmentation Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagenthiraja, Kartheeban; Ribe, Lars Riisgaard; Hougaard, Kristina Dupont

    2012-01-01

    salavageable tissue, quickly and accurately. We present a fully Automated Penumbra Segmentation (APS) algorithm using PWI and DWI images. We compare automatically generated PWI-DWI mismatch mask to mask outlined manually by experts, in 168 patients. Method: The algorithm initially identifies PWI lesions...

  17. Potential of Automated Writing Evaluation Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotos, Elena

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical evaluation of automated writing evaluation (AWE) feedback used for L2 academic writing teaching and learning. It introduces the Intelligent Academic Discourse Evaluator (IADE), a new web-based AWE program that analyzes the introduction section to research articles and generates immediate, individualized, and…

  18. Systematic review automation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects. We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time. PMID:25005128

  19. Purification and Characterization of Jararassin-I,A Thrombin-like Enzyme from Bothrops jararaca Snake Venom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Débora F. VIEIRA; Leandra WATANABE; Carolina D. SANT'ANA; Silvana MARCUSSI; Suely V. SAMPAIO; Andreimar M. SOARES; Raghuvir K. ARNI

    2004-01-01

    A thrombin-like serine protease, jararassin-I, was isolated from the venom of Bothrops jararaca. The protein was obtained in high yield and purity by a single chromatographic step using the affinity resin Benzamidine-Sepharose CL-6B. SDS-PAGE and dynamic light scattering analyses indicated that the molecular mass of the enzyme was about 30 kD. The enzyme possessed fibrinogenolytic and coagulant activities. The jararassin-I degraded the Bβ chain of fibrinogen while the Aα chain and γ chain were unchanged.Proteases inhibitors, PMSF and benzamidine inhibited the coagulant activity. These results showed jararassinI is a serine protease similar to coagulating thrombin-like snake venom proteases, but it specifically cleaves Bβ chain of bovine fibrinogen. Single crystals of enzyme were obtained (0.2 mm×0.2 mm×0.2 mm) and used for X-ray diffraction experiments.

  20. A colorimetric sandwich-type assay for sensitive thrombin detection based on enzyme-linked aptamer assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Hee; Cho, Yea Seul; Kang, Sungmuk; Lee, Eun Jeong; Lee, Gwan-Ho; Hah, Sang Soo

    2014-10-01

    A colorimetric sandwich-type assay based on enzyme-linked aptamer assay has been developed for the fast and sensitive detection of as low as 25 fM of thrombin with high linearity. Aptamer-immobilized glass was used to capture the target analyte, whereas a second aptamer, functionalized with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), was employed for the conventional 3,5,3',5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB)-based colorimetric detection. Without the troublesome antibody requirement of the conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), as low as 25 fM of thrombin could be rapidly and reproducibly detected. This assay has superior, or at least equal, recovery and accuracy to that of conventional antibody-based ELISA.

  1. Spectroscopic and Electrochemical Detection of Thrombin/5'-SH or 3'-SH Aptamer Immobilized on (porous) Gold Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Buem Jin; Sa, Young Seung; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Young Hun [Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Thrombin is a serine protease that catalyzes the conversion of soluble fibrinogen to insoluble fibrin, and thus induces physiological and pathological blood coagulation. Therefore, it is important to detect thrombin in blood serum for purposes of diagnosis. To achieve this goal, it has been suggested that a 15-mer aptamer strongly binds with thrombin to form a G-quartet structure of the aptamer. Generally, 5'-end thiol-functionalized aptamer has been used as an anti-thrombin binder. Herein, we evaluate the possibility of utilizing a 3'-SH aptasensor for thrombin detection using SPR spectroscopy, and compare the enhancement of the electrochemical signal of the thrombin-aptamer bound on a porous gold substrate. Although the two aptamers have similar configurations, in SPR analysis, the 3'-SH aptamer was a effective aptasensor as well as 5'-SH aptamer. Results from electrochemical analysis showed that the porous gold substrate acted as a good substrate for an aptasensor and demonstrated 5-fold enhancement of current change, as compared to gold thin film.

  2. Anti-thrombin III, Protein C, and Protein S deficiency in acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasnan Ismail

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The final most common pathway for the majority of coronary artery disease is occlusion of a coronary vessel. Under normal conditions, antithrombin III (AT III, protein C, and protein S as an active protein C cofactor, are natural anticoagulants (hemostatic control that balances procoagulant activity (thrombin antithrombin complex balance to prevent thrombosis. If the condition becomes unbalanced, natural anticoagulants and the procoagulants can lead to thrombosis. Thirty subjects with acute coronary syndrome (ACS were studied for the incidence of antithrombin III (AT III, protein C, and protein S deficiencies, and the result were compare to the control group. Among patients with ACS, the frequency of distribution of AT-III with activity < 75% were 23,3% (7 of 30, and only 6,7% ( 2 of 30 in control subject. No one of the 30 control subject have protein C activity deficient, in ACS with activity < 70% were 13,3% (4 of 30. Fifteen out of the 30 (50% control subjects had protein S activity deficiency, while protein S deficiency activity < 70% was found 73.3.% (22 out of 30. On linear regression, the deterministic coefficient of AT-III activity deficiency to the development ACS was 13,25 %, and the deterministic coefficient of protein C activity deficient to the development of ACS was 9,06 %. The cut-off point for AT-III without protein S deficiency expected to contribute to the development of vessel disease was 45%. On discriminant analysis, protein C activity deficiency posed a risk for ACS of 4,5 greater than non deficient subjects, and AT-III activity deficiency posed a risk for ACS of 3,5 times greater than non deficient subjects. On binary logistic regression, protein S activity acted only as a reinforcing factor of AT-III activity deficiency in the development of ACS. Protein C and AT III deficiency can trigger ACS, with determinant coefficients of 9,06% and 13,25% respectively. Low levels of protein C posed a greater risk of

  3. Shc adaptor proteins are key transducers of mitogenic signaling mediated by the G protein-coupled thrombin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Y; Grall, D; Salcini, A E

    1996-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin activates G protein signaling systems that lead to Ras activation and, in certain cells, proliferation. Whereas the steps leading to Ras activation by G protein-coupled receptors are not well defined, the mechanisms of Ras activation by receptor tyrosine kinases have...... kinase activation, gene induction and cell growth. From these data, we conclude that Shc represents a crucial point of convergence between signaling pathways activated by receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors....

  4. Comparison of ultrasound-guided thrombin injection and compression repair in treatment of iatrogenic femoral arterial pseudoaneurysms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Jun; GAO Yun-hua; ZHUO Zhong-xiong; HUANG Lan; LI Ai-min; SONG Yao-ming; JIN Jun; YU Xue-jun; GENG Zhao-hua; ZHOU Xia-bo; LIN Chun-mei

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To retrospectively compare the efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided thrombin injection (UGTI) with ultrasound-guided compression repair (UGCR) in patients with postcatheterizational femoral arterial pseudoaneurysms (PSA). Methods: Thirty patients of this iatrogenic PSA [8males, 22 females, average age (66.5± 5.2) years] in our nstitution from 1997 to 2004 were retrospectively analyzed. Among them, 11 patients were treated with UGCR, 2 under continuous ultrasonographic (US) guidance and 9 under the guidance of femoral arterial bruit auscultation and dorsalis pedis artery palpation. Because UGCR was failed in 5 patients, consecutively 24 patients were treated with UGTI. Wine thrombin solution at a concentration of 200 U/ml was injected percutaneously using 22-25 gauge needles under color Doppler US. Demographics, clinical variables, pseudoaneurysm characteristics, and results of the 2 groups were compared by using Fisher's exact test and Student's t test. Results: The initial success rate of UGCR was 36.4% (4/11) nd the overall success rate was 45.5% (5/11). Ten of 11 patients suffered from local pain during the compression, but there was no any complication in UGTI group. The average dose of injected thrombin was (180±82) U for PSA of a single loculus and (315±150) U for multiloculated PSA. The initial success rate of UGTI was 89.5% (17/19) and the verall uccess rate was 100% (24/24). Conclusion:UGTI offers a safe, quick and effective means of definitively treating femoral pseudoaneurysms and seems superior to UGCR. The amount of thrombin applied on our people seems smaller compared with others' work.

  5. Chef infrastructure automation cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Marschall, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Chef Infrastructure Automation Cookbook contains practical recipes on everything you will need to automate your infrastructure using Chef. The book is packed with illustrated code examples to automate your server and cloud infrastructure.The book first shows you the simplest way to achieve a certain task. Then it explains every step in detail, so that you can build your knowledge about how things work. Eventually, the book shows you additional things to consider for each approach. That way, you can learn step-by-step and build profound knowledge on how to go about your configuration management

  6. Automated Periodicals System at a Community College Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Harp

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available Automated systems need not be extensive to save time and improve efficiency. Moraine Valley's off-line operation, based on a file of 715 periodical titles, generates renewal orders, sends claims, and records subscription histories.

  7. Automated planar patch-clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Carol J; Möller, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    Ion channels are integral membrane proteins that regulate the flow of ions across the plasma membrane and the membranes of intracellular organelles of both excitable and non-excitable cells. Ion channels are vital to a wide variety of biological processes and are prominent components of the nervous system and cardiovascular system, as well as controlling many metabolic functions. Furthermore, ion channels are known to be involved in many disease states and as such have become popular therapeutic targets. For many years now manual patch-clamping has been regarded as one of the best approaches for assaying ion channel function, through direct measurement of ion flow across these membrane proteins. Over the last decade there have been many remarkable breakthroughs in the development of technologies enabling the study of ion channels. One of these breakthroughs is the development of automated planar patch-clamp technology. Automated platforms have demonstrated the ability to generate high-quality data with high throughput capabilities, at great efficiency and reliability. Additional features such as simultaneous intracellular and extracellular perfusion of the cell membrane, current clamp operation, fast compound application, an increasing rate of parallelization, and more recently temperature control have been introduced. Furthermore, in addition to the well-established studies of over-expressed ion channel proteins in cell lines, new generations of planar patch-clamp systems have enabled successful studies of native and primary mammalian cells. This technology is becoming increasingly popular and extensively used both within areas of drug discovery as well as academic research. Many platforms have been developed including NPC-16 Patchliner(®) and SyncroPatch(®) 96 (Nanion Technologies GmbH, Munich), CytoPatch™ (Cytocentrics AG, Rostock), PatchXpress(®) 7000A, IonWorks(®) Quattro and IonWorks Barracuda™, (Molecular Devices, LLC); Dynaflow(®) HT (Cellectricon

  8. Label-free triple-helix aptamer as sensing platform for "signal-on" fluorescent detection of thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nan; Wang, Quanbo; Lei, Jianping; Liu, Lin; Ju, Huangxian

    2015-01-01

    The design of a label-free aptamer for separation of recognition sequence from signal reporter is significant to ensure the high-efficiency affinity between aptamer and target. This work develops a label-free triple-helix aptamer (THA) as sensing platform for "signal-on" fluorescent detection of thrombin. THA was composed of aptamer sequence and help DNA 1 (H1), which contained the complementary sequence of hexachloro-fluorescein (HEX) labeled help DNA 2 (H2). The specific recognition event between aptamer and thrombin triggered the dismission of THA to release H1. The released H1 then reacted with the signal probe of H2/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite to form H1-H2 duplex, leading to the fluorescence recovery of H2 due to the detachment of H1-H2 duplex from the surface of GO. With employment of THA as a signal transducer and GO as a "superquencher", this method shows a sensitive response to thrombin with a wide concentration range from 5 to 1200 nM. The limit of detection is 1.8 nM (S/N=3) with excellent selectivity. Considering the universality of THA, the proposed aptasensor would provide a platform for homogeneous fluorescent detection of a wide range of analytes.

  9. A sensitive electrochemical aptasensor based on water soluble CdSe quantum dots (QDs) for thrombin determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yanfen; Han Min [Jiangsu Laboratory of New Power Batteries, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofuctional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); Bai Hongyan [Jiangsu Laboratory of New Power Batteries, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofuctional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); College of Biological and Chemical Engineering, Jiaxing College, Jiaxing 314001 (China); Wu Yong [Jiangsu Laboratory of New Power Batteries, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofuctional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); Dai Zhihui, E-mail: daizhihuii@njnu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Laboratory of New Power Batteries, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofuctional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); Bao Jianchun, E-mail: baojianchun@njnu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Laboratory of New Power Batteries, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofuctional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China)

    2011-08-01

    A novel aptamer biosensor with easy operation and good sensitivity, specificity, stability and reproducibility was developed by immobilizing the aptamer on water soluble CdSe quantum dots (QDs) modified on the top of the glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Methylene blue (MB) was intercalated into the aptamer sequence and used as an electrochemical marker. CdSe QDs improved the electrochemical signal because of their larger surface area and ion centers of CdSe QDs may also had a major role on amplifying the signal. The higher ion concentration caused more combination of aptamer which caused larger signal. The thrombin was detected by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) quantitatively. Under optimal conditions, the two linear ranges were obtained from 3 to 13 {mu}g mL{sup -1} and from 14 to 31 {mu}g mL{sup -1}, respectively. The detection limit was 0.08 {mu}g mL{sup -1} at 3{sigma}. The constructed biosensor had better responses compared with that in the absence of the CdSe QDs immobilizing. The control experiment was also carried out by using BSA, casein and IgG in the absence of thrombin. The results showed that the aptasensor had good specificity, stability and reproducibility to the thrombin. Moreover, the aptasensor could be used for detection of real sample with consistent results in comparison with those obtained by fluorescence method which could provide a promising platform for fabrication of aptamer based biosensors.

  10. Effect of the oral thrombin inhibitor dabigatran on allergic lung inflammation induced by repeated house dust mite administration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Johannes D; Berkhout, Lea C; de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; Yang, Jack; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Meijers, Joost C M; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-10-15

    Asthma is a chronic disease of the airways; asthma patients are hampered by recurrent symptoms of dyspnoea and wheezing caused by bronchial obstruction. Most asthma patients suffer from chronic allergic lung inflammation triggered by allergens such as house dust mite (HDM). Coagulation activation in the pulmonary compartment is currently recognized as a feature of allergic lung inflammation, and data suggest that coagulation proteases further drive inflammatory mechanisms. Here, we tested whether treatment with the oral thrombin inhibitor dabigatran attenuates allergic lung inflammation in a recently developed HDM-based murine asthma model. Mice were fed dabigatran (10 mg/g) or placebo chow during a 3-wk HDM airway exposure model. Dabigatran treatment caused systemic thrombin inhibitory activity corresponding with dabigatran levels reported in human trials. Surprisingly, dabigatran did not lead to inhibition of HDM-evoked coagulation activation in the lung as measured by levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes and D-dimer. Repeated HDM administration caused an influx of eosinophils and neutrophils into the lungs, mucus production in the airways, and a T helper 2 response, as reflected by a rise in bronchoalveolar IL-4 and IL-5 levels and a systemic rise in IgE and HDM-IgG1. Dabigatran modestly improved HDM-induced lung pathology (P dabigatran in spite of adequate plasma levels, these results argue against clinical evaluation of dabigatran in patients with asthma.

  11. The Clinical Research in Advanced Stage Gastric Cancer Accompanying Hemorrhage with EHLF Chemotherapy and Thrombin to Take Orally

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Huoguo

    2003-01-01

    Purpose:Study therapeutic effectiveness about EHLF chemotherapy and thrombin to take orally in advanced stage gastriccancer accompanying hemorrhage.Methods:76 cases were divided into two groups at random,that were diagnosed by pathology andclinical. Research group included medicine:(etoposide)VP-16,100 mg intravenous drip,d1~3;(hydroxycamptothecin)HCPT, 10mg,ivtravenous drip,d1~5;(calciumfolinate)CF, 100 mg,intravenous drip,d1~5;(fluorouracil)5-Fu,0.5,intravenous drip,d1~5;thrombin,5oou,oral administration,three times in a day, d1~7.Matched control:normal regulation to medicine in gastric hemorrhye.Results:Effective rate in research group was 78.4%,obvious better than one in matched control 28.2%(P<0.01),bad reaction wasslight, life quantity was obvious exaltation.Conclusion:EHLF chemotherapy and thrombin to take orally was used as treatment project inadranced stage gastric cancer accompanying hemorrhage,good result in research group. It is worthy to deserve further reseach.

  12. Microfluidic Chip-Based Online Screening Coupled to Mass Spectrometry: Identification of Inhibitors of Thrombin and Factor Xa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Janaki Krishnamoorthy; Otvos, Reka A; Kool, Jeroen; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2016-02-01

    Thrombin and factor Xa (FXa) are critical enzymes of the blood coagulation cascade and are excellent targets of anticoagulant agents. Natural sources present an array of anticoagulants that can be developed as antithrombotic drugs. High-resolution, online screening techniques have been developed for the identification of drug leads from complex mixtures. In this study, we have developed and optimized a microfluidic online screening technique coupled to nano-liquid chromatography (LC) and in parallel with a mass spectrometer for the identification of thrombin and FXa inhibitors in mixtures. Inhibitors eluting from the nano-LC were split postcolumn in a 1:1 ratio; half was fed into a mass spectrometer (where its mass is detected), and the other half was fed into a microfluidic chip (which acts as a microreactor for the online assays). With our platform, thrombin and FXa inhibitors were detected in the assay in parallel with their mass identification. These methods are suitable for the identification of inhibitors from sample amounts as low as sub-microliter volumes.

  13. Mapping the affinity landscape of Thrombin-binding aptamers on 2'F-ANA/DNA chimeric G-Quadruplex microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietard, Jory; Abou Assi, Hala; Gómez-Pinto, Irene; González, Carlos; Somoza, Mark M; Damha, Masad J

    2017-01-18

    In situ fabricated nucleic acids microarrays are versatile and very high-throughput platforms for aptamer optimization and discovery, but the chemical space that can be probed against a given target has largely been confined to DNA, while RNA and non-natural nucleic acid microarrays are still an essentially uncharted territory. 2'-Fluoroarabinonucleic acid (2'F-ANA) is a prime candidate for such use in microarrays. Indeed, 2'F-ANA chemistry is readily amenable to photolithographic microarray synthesis and its potential in high affinity aptamers has been recently discovered. We thus synthesized the first microarrays containing 2'F-ANA and 2'F-ANA/DNA chimeric sequences to fully map the binding affinity landscape of the TBA1 thrombin-binding G-quadruplex aptamer containing all 32 768 possible DNA-to-2'F-ANA mutations. The resulting microarray was screened against thrombin to identify a series of promising 2'F-ANA-modified aptamer candidates with Kds significantly lower than that of the unmodified control and which were found to adopt highly stable, antiparallel-folded G-quadruplex structures. The solution structure of the TBA1 aptamer modified with 2'F-ANA at position T3 shows that fluorine substitution preorganizes the dinucleotide loop into the proper conformation for interaction with thrombin. Overall, our work strengthens the potential of 2'F-ANA in aptamer research and further expands non-genomic applications of nucleic acids microarrays.

  14. Architectures and design patterns for functional design of logic control and diagnostics in industrial automation

    OpenAIRE

    Sartini, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    Recently in most of the industrial automation process an ever increasing degree of automation has been observed. This increasing is motivated by the higher requirement of systems with great performance in terms of quality of products/services generated, productivity, efficiency and low costs in the design, realization and maintenance. This trend in the growth of complex automation systems is rapidly spreading over automated manufacturing systems (AMS), where the integration of the mechanic...

  15. Automated Vehicles Symposium 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Beiker, Sven

    2016-01-01

    This edited book comprises papers about the impacts, benefits and challenges of connected and automated cars. It is the third volume of the LNMOB series dealing with Road Vehicle Automation. The book comprises contributions from researchers, industry practitioners and policy makers, covering perspectives from the U.S., Europe and Japan. It is based on the Automated Vehicles Symposium 2015 which was jointly organized by the Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) and the Transportation Research Board (TRB) in Ann Arbor, Michigan, in July 2015. The topical spectrum includes, but is not limited to, public sector activities, human factors, ethical and business aspects, energy and technological perspectives, vehicle systems and transportation infrastructure. This book is an indispensable source of information for academic researchers, industrial engineers and policy makers interested in the topic of road vehicle automation.

  16. I-94 Automation FAQs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — In order to increase efficiency, reduce operating costs and streamline the admissions process, U.S. Customs and Border Protection has automated Form I-94 at air and...

  17. Automated Vehicles Symposium 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Beiker, Sven; Road Vehicle Automation 2

    2015-01-01

    This paper collection is the second volume of the LNMOB series on Road Vehicle Automation. The book contains a comprehensive review of current technical, socio-economic, and legal perspectives written by experts coming from public authorities, companies and universities in the U.S., Europe and Japan. It originates from the Automated Vehicle Symposium 2014, which was jointly organized by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) and the Transportation Research Board (TRB) in Burlingame, CA, in July 2014. The contributions discuss the challenges arising from the integration of highly automated and self-driving vehicles into the transportation system, with a focus on human factors and different deployment scenarios. This book is an indispensable source of information for academic researchers, industrial engineers, and policy makers interested in the topic of road vehicle automation.

  18. Hydrometeorological Automated Data System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of Hydrologic Development of the National Weather Service operates HADS, the Hydrometeorological Automated Data System. This data set contains the last 48...

  19. Automating the Media Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need to develop more efficient information retrieval skills by the use of new technology. Lists four stages used in automating the media center. Describes North Carolina's pilot programs. Proposes benefits and looks at the media center's future. (MVL)

  20. Isolated pregnancy-induced anti-thrombin deficiency in a woman with twin pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Kosuke; Morikawa, Mamoru; Yamada, Takahiro; Minakami, Hisanori

    2016-06-01

    A woman with twin pregnancy had a gradual decline in anti-thrombin (AT) activity from 72% at gestational week (GW) 29(-3/7) , to 53% at GW31(-2/7) , and to 41% at GW32(-2/7) , at which time hypertension (148/90 mmHg) and proteinuria (protein-to-creatinine ratio [P/Cr], 0.79 mg/mg) developed in the presence of normal platelet count (159 × 10(9) /L) and serum aspartate aminotransferase/lactate dehydrogenase (22/164 IU/L). AT product was given three times to maintain AT activity >50% and blood pressure was maintained below 155/95 mmHg with no treatment, but generalized edema with a weekly weight gain of 4.9 kg and increased proteinuria (to P/Cr, 7.6 mg/mg) required cesarean section at GW33(-3/7) . This case highlights the occurrence of pregnancy-induced AT deficiency alone in the absence of any other abnormality, including hypertension, proteinuria, or thrombocytopenia. Measurement of AT activity was considered helpful for determination of the appropriate time for delivery in this patient.

  1. Thrombin antithrombin complex and IL-18 serum levels in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ornella Piazza

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The complex picture of inflammation and coagulation alterations comes to life in acute stroke phases. Increasing evidence points to a strong interaction and extensive crosstalk between the inflammation and coagulation systems: the interest towards this relationship has increased since recent experimental research showed that the early administration of antithrombin III (ATIII decreases the volume of ischemia in mice and might be neuroprotective, playing an antiinflammatory role. We aimed to establish the extent of the relationship among markers of inflammation (S100B and IL-18 and procoagulant and fibrinolytic markers (ATIII, thrombin-antithrombin III complex (TAT, Fibrin Degradation Products (FDP, D-dimer in 13 comatose patients affected by focal cerebral ischemia. Plasma levels of TAT, D-dimer and FDP, IL18 and S100B were increased. IL-18 and S100B high serum levels in ischemic patients suggest an early activation of the inflammatory cascade in acute ischemic injury. The basic principles of the interaction between inflammatory and coagulation systems are revised, from the perspective that simultaneous modulation of both coagulation and inflammation, rather than specific therapies aimed at one of these systems could be more successful in stroke therapy.

  2. Thrombin Activatable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor in Preeclmapsia and Gestational Hypertension throughout the Gestation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinghong ZHANG; Yu HU; Tao GUO; Wenning WEI; Xiaoping ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    To clarify the role of TAFI in hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, 22 subjects, including 10 with pre-eclampsia (PE) and 12 with gestational hypertension were examined for the levels of TAFI and thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complex. Thirty normal pregnant women served as controls. ELISA was employed for the detection. The results showed that the TAFI antigen levels in normal pregnancy group, gestational hypertension group and PE group were (85.35±24.69)%, (99.65±18.27)%, (110.12±23.36)%; (97.06±21.40)%, (114.08±27.76)%, (125.49±24.70)%; (106.6±19.21)%, (129.2±25.07)%, (139.1±30.12)%, in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd trimester respectively. No significant differences were found between the normal pregnancy group and gestational hypertension group but significant difference existed between normal pregnancy group and PE group in each tri- mester (P<0.05). TAT complexes were significantly higher in patients with PE than that in controls (P<0.05), but no correlation was found between TAT and TAFI. It is concluded that TAFI may con- tributed to the impairment of fibrinolysis in the patients with PE and may serves as a sensitive indi- cator for PE, but it may not help in the diagnosis of the gestational hypertension.

  3. Thrombin antithrombin complex and IL-18 serum levels in stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Ornella; Scarpati, Giuliana; Cotena, Simona; Lonardo, Maria; Tufano, Rosalba

    2010-01-01

    The complex picture of inflammation and coagulation alterations comes to life in acute stroke phases. Increasing evidence points to a strong interaction and extensive crosstalk between the inflammation and coagulation systems: the interest towards this relationship has increased since recent experimental research showed that the early administration of antithrombin III (ATIII) decreases the volume of ischemia in mice and might be neuroprotective, playing an antiinflammatory role. We aimed to establish the extent of the relationship among markers of inflammation (S100B and IL-18) and procoagulant and fibrinolytic markers (ATIII, thrombin-antithrombin III complex (TAT), Fibrin Degradation Products (FDP), D-dimer) in 13 comatose patients affected by focal cerebral ischemia. Plasma levels of TAT, D-dimer and FDP, IL18 and S100B were increased. IL-18 and S100B high serum levels in ischemic patients suggest an early activation of the inflammatory cascade in acute ischemic injury. The basic principles of the interaction between inflammatory and coagulation systems are revised, from the perspective that simultaneous modulation of both coagulation and inflammation, rather than specific therapies aimed at one of these systems could be more successful in stroke therapy. PMID:21577333

  4. DIRECT SMEAR VS CELL BLOCK (PLASMA- THROMBIN CLOT METHOD: DIAGNOSTIC VALUE IN SEROSAL CAVITIES FLUIDS CYTOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P MAHZOUNI

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. To improve testing sensitivity, most laboratories use two or more preparation methods but in our laboratories only one method is used which is "direct smear". In this study we tried to evaluate the diagnostic value of cell block as adjunct to direct smear in the cytologic investigation of serosal cavities fluids. Methods. In a clinical trial study 62 specimens of serosal cavity fluids were investigated in AL-Zahrapathology laboratory (Get. 1998 to Get. 1999. Cytologic slides from each specimens were prepared in two methods: direct smear and cell block (plasma- thrombin clot method. Smears and cell blocks were studied separately by the same cytopathologist. The diagnosis were categorized as positive, negative, suspicious or unsatisfactory. Also, the time required for studing of each slides were noted. Findings. The findings indicated that there are discrepancy between direct smear and cell block methods in the number of "suspicious" cases. Also there is significant difference between the mean time needed for studing of direct smear and cell block. Conclusion. It is recommended that the remainer of each specimen should be kept in refrigerator in order to prepare cell blocks in suspicious cases of direct smear. This method facilitates making a more definite diagnosis and reducing the number of suspicious cases.

  5. Disassembly automation automated systems with cognitive abilities

    CERN Document Server

    Vongbunyong, Supachai

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a number of aspects to be considered in the development of disassembly automation, including the mechanical system, vision system and intelligent planner. The implementation of cognitive robotics increases the flexibility and degree of autonomy of the disassembly system. Disassembly, as a step in the treatment of end-of-life products, can allow the recovery of embodied value left within disposed products, as well as the appropriate separation of potentially-hazardous components. In the end-of-life treatment industry, disassembly has largely been limited to manual labor, which is expensive in developed countries. Automation is one possible solution for economic feasibility. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  6. ACCOUNTING AUTOMATIONS RISKS

    OpenAIRE

    Муравський, В. В.; Хома, Н. Г.

    2015-01-01

    Accountant accepts active voice in organization of the automated account in the conditions of the informative systems introduction in enterprise activity. Effective accounting automation needs identification and warning of organizational risks. Authors researched, classified and generalized the risks of introduction of the informative accounting systems. The ways of liquidation of the organizational risks sources andminimization of their consequences are gives. The method of the effective con...

  7. Instant Sikuli test automation

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. A concise guide written in an easy-to follow style using the Starter guide approach.This book is aimed at automation and testing professionals who want to use Sikuli to automate GUI. Some Python programming experience is assumed.

  8. Automated security management

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Shaer, Ehab; Xie, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    In this contributed volume, leading international researchers explore configuration modeling and checking, vulnerability and risk assessment, configuration analysis, and diagnostics and discovery. The authors equip readers to understand automated security management systems and techniques that increase overall network assurability and usability. These constantly changing networks defend against cyber attacks by integrating hundreds of security devices such as firewalls, IPSec gateways, IDS/IPS, authentication servers, authorization/RBAC servers, and crypto systems. Automated Security Managemen

  9. Automation of Diagrammatic Reasoning

    OpenAIRE

    Jamnik, Mateja; Bundy, Alan; Green, Ian

    1997-01-01

    Theorems in automated theorem proving are usually proved by logical formal proofs. However, there is a subset of problems which humans can prove in a different way by the use of geometric operations on diagrams, so called diagrammatic proofs. Insight is more clearly perceived in these than in the corresponding algebraic proofs: they capture an intuitive notion of truthfulness that humans find easy to see and understand. We are identifying and automating this diagrammatic reasoning on mathemat...

  10. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  11. Marketing automation supporting sales

    OpenAIRE

    Sandell, Niko

    2016-01-01

    The past couple of decades has been a time of major changes in marketing. Digitalization has become a permanent part of marketing and at the same time enabled efficient collection of data. Personalization and customization of content are playing a crucial role in marketing when new customers are acquired. This has also created a need for automation to facilitate the distribution of targeted content. As a result of successful marketing automation more information of the customers is gathered ...

  12. Boosting Affinity by Correct Ligand Preorganization for the S2 Pocket of Thrombin: A Study by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry, Molecular Dynamics, and High-Resolution Crystal Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühmann, Eggert H; Rupp, Melinda; Betz, Michael; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard

    2016-02-01

    Structural preorganization to fix bioactive conformations at protein binding sites is a popular strategy to enhance binding affinity during late-stage optimization. The rationale for this enhancement relates to entropic advantages assigned to rigidified versus flexible ligands. We analyzed a narrow series of peptidomimetics binding to thrombin. The individual ligands exhibit at P2 a conformationally flexible glycine, more restricted alanine, N-methylglycine, N-methylhomoalanine, and largely rigidified proline moiety. Overall, affinity was found to increase by a factor of 1000, explained partly by an entropic advantage. All ligands adopt the same binding mode with small deviations. The residual mobility of the bound ligands is decreased across the series, and a protein side chain differs in its order/disorder behavior along with changes in the surface-water network pattern established across the newly generated protein-ligand surfaces. The enthalpy/entropy inventory displays a rather complex picture and emphasizes that thermodynamics can only be compared in terms of relative differences within a structurally similar ligand series.

  13. Porous platinum nanotubes labeled with hemin/G-quadruplex based electrochemical aptasensor for sensitive thrombin analysis via the cascade signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Aili; Qi, Qingan; Wang, Xuannian; Bie, Ping

    2014-07-15

    For the first time, a sensitive electrochemical aptasensor for thrombin (TB) was developed by using porous platinum nanotubes (PtNTs) labeled with hemin/G-quadruplex and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) as labels. Porous PtNTs with large surface area exhibited the peroxidase-like activity. Coupling with GDH and hemin/G-quadruplex as NADH oxidase and HRP-mimicking DNAzyme, the cascade signal amplification was achieved by the following ways: in the presence of glucose and NAD(+) in the working buffer, GDH electrocatalyzed the oxidation of glucose with the production of NADH. Then, hemin/G-quadruplex as NADH oxidase catalyzed the oxidation of NADH to in situ generate H2O2. Based on the corporate electrocatalysis of PtNTs and hemin/G-quadruplex toward H2O2, the electrochemical signal was significantly amplified, allowing the detection limit of TB down to 0.15 pM level. Moreover, the proposed strategy was simple because the intercalated hemin offered the readout signal, avoiding the adding of additional redox mediator as signal donator. Such an electrochemical aptasensor is highly promising for sensitive detection of other proteins in clinical diagnostics.

  14. A novel electrochemical aptasensor for highly sensitive detection of thrombin based on the autonomous assembly of hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shunbi; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Yali; Bai, Lijuan; Yuan, Ruo

    2014-06-17

    In this work, a new signal amplified strategy was constructed based on isothermal exponential amplification reaction (EXPAR) and hybridization chain reaction (HCR) generating the hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme (HRP-mimicking DNAzyme) nanowires as signal output component for the sensitive detection of thrombin (TB). We employed EXPAR's ultra-high amplification efficiency to produce a large amount of two hairpin helper DNAs within a minutes. And then the resultant two hairpin helper DNAs could autonomously assemble the hemin/G-quadruplex HRP-mimicking DNAzymes nanowires as the redox-active reporter units on the electrode surface via hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hemin/G-quadruplex structures simultaneously served as electron transfer medium and electrocatalyst to amplify the signal in the presence of H2O2. Specifically, only when the EXPAR reaction process has occurred, the HCR could be achieved and the hemin/G-quadruplex complexes could be formed on the surface of an electrode to give a detectable signal. The proposed strategy combines the amplification power of the EXPAR, HCR, and the inherent high sensitivity of the electrochemical detection. With such design, the proposed assay showed a good linear relationship within the range of 0.1 pM-50 nM with a detection limit of 33 fM (defined as S/N=3) for TB.

  15. Elements of EAF automation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioana, A.; Constantin, N.; Dragna, E. C.

    2017-01-01

    Our article presents elements of Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) automation. So, we present and analyze detailed two automation schemes: the scheme of electrical EAF automation system; the scheme of thermic EAF automation system. The application results of these scheme of automation consists in: the sensitive reduction of specific consummation of electrical energy of Electric Arc Furnace, increasing the productivity of Electric Arc Furnace, increase the quality of the developed steel, increasing the durability of the building elements of Electric Arc Furnace.

  16. Owl: electronic datasheet generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, Evan; Tao, Jenhan; Wheatley, F Carter; Desai, Devina H; Lozanoski, Thomas M; Shah, Pooja D; Awtry, Jake A; Jin, Shawn S; Haddock, Traci L; Densmore, Douglas M

    2014-12-19

    Owl ( www.owlcad.org ) is a biodesign automation tool that generates electronic datasheets for synthetic biological parts using common formatting. Data can be retrieved automatically from existing repositories and modified in the Owl user interface (UI). Owl uses the data to generate an HTML page with standard typesetting that can be saved as a PDF file. Here we present the Owl software tool in its alpha version, its current UI, its description of input data for generating a datasheet, its example datasheets, and the vision of the tool's role in biodesign automation.

  17. A quantum dot-aptamer beacon using a DNA intercalating dye as the FRET reporter: application to label-free thrombin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chun-Wei; Lao, Yeh-Hsing; Li, Yi-Shan; Chen, Lin-Chi

    2011-03-15

    A new quantum dot (QD)-aptamer (apt) beacon that acts by folding-induced dissociation of a DNA intercalating dye, BOBO-3(B), is demonstrated with label-free thrombin detection. The beacon, denoted as QD-apt:B, is constructed by (1) coupling of a single-stranded thrombin aptamer to Qdot 565 via EDC/Sulfo-NHS chemistry and (2) staining the duplex regions of the aptamer on QD with excess BOBO-3 before thrombin binding. When mixing a thrombin sample with QD-apt:B, BOBO-3 is competed away from the beacon due to target-induced aptamer folding, which then causes a decrease in QD fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-mediated BOBO-3 emission and achieves thrombin quantitation. In this work, the effects of Mg(2+), coupling time, and aptamer type on the beacon's performances are investigated and discussed thoroughly with various methods, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and two-color differential gel electrophoresis. Using the best aptamer beacon (HTQ37), we attain highly specific and wide-range detection (from nM to μM) of thrombin in buffer, and the beacon can sense nM-range thrombin in 15% diluted serum. Compared to the reported QD aptamer assays, our method is advantageous from the aspect of using a simple sensory unit design without losing the detection sensitivity. Therefore, we consider the QD-apt:B beacon a potential alternative to immuno-reagents and an effective tool to study nucleic acid folding on QD as well.

  18. Adequacy and adjustment of electromechanical elements of a X radiation generator for automation of system of additional filtration; Adequacao e ajuste dos elementos eletromecanicos de um gerador de radiacao X para automacao do sistema de filtracao adicional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves Junior, Iremar; Santos, Lucas dos; Potiens, Maria da Penha A.; Vivolo, Vitor, E-mail: iremarjr@usp.b, E-mail: lucas.se@usp.b, E-mail: mppalbu@ipen.b, E-mail: vivolo@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper dimensioned the filter wheel components and the adequacy of additional filtrations for the implantation of the OTW automated system with complete replacement of previous used filtration by new set of machine-made filters to be used as the qualities already implanted at the Instrument Calibration Laboratory of the IPEN, Sao Paulo, Brazil. In the sequence, it was performed the measurements of kerma i the air in each quality to be used as reference values

  19. Computational Analysis of the Effects of Reduced Temperature on Thrombin Generation: The Contributions of Hypothermia to Coagulopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    hypothermia-induced dif- ferences (for each parameter, except PH, tested independently): normal tempera- ture parameter values versus hypother- mic ...activated clotting time in detecting clinically relevant clotting abnormali- ties after hypothermia, hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in pigs . J...Macaitis JM, Bliss J, Wojtaszczyk J, Christensen S, Currier H, Pusateri AE. Effect of recombinant FVIIa in hypothermic, coagulo- pathic pigs with liver

  20. Three months of strictly controlled daily endurance exercise reduces thrombin generation and fibrinolytic risk markers in younger moderately overweight men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Anne Sofie; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Skov, Jane;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular disease, but dose dependency of long-term physical exercise on biomarkers within coagulation and fibrinolysis is unknown. We aimed to investigate effects of two doses of daily endurance exercise on biomarkers...

  1. Fibrinogen-thrombin collagen patch reinforcement of high-risk colonic anastomoses in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Grau, Juan Manuel; Bernardos García, Carlos; Cepeda Franco, Carmen; Mendez García, Cristina; García Ruiz, Salud; Docobo Durantez, Fernando; Morales-Conde, Salvador; Padillo Ruiz, Javier

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effectiveness of human fibrinogen-thrombin collagen patch (TachoSil®) in the reinforcement of high-risk colon anastomoses. METHODS A quasi-experimental study was conducted in Wistar rats (n = 56) that all underwent high-risk anastomoses (anastomosis with only two sutures) after colectomies. The rats were divided into two randomized groups: Control group (24 rats) and treatment group (24 rats). In the treatment group, high-risk anastomosis was reinforced with TachoSil® (a piece of TachoSil® was applied over this high-risk anastomosis, covering the gap). Leak incidence, overall survival, intra-abdominal adhesions, and histologic healing of anastomoses were analyzed. Survivors were divided into two subgroups and euthanized at 15 and 30 d after intervention in order to analyze the adhesions and histologic changes. RESULTS Overall survival was 71.4% and 57.14% in the TachoSil® group and control group, respectively (P = 0.29); four rats died from other causes and six rats in the treatment group and 10 in the control group experienced colonic leakage (P > 0.05). The intra-abdominal adhesion score was similar in both groups, with no differences between subgroups. We found non-significant differences in the healing process according to the histologic score used in both groups (P = 0.066). CONCLUSION In our study, the use of TachoSil® was associated with a non-statistically significant reduction in the rate of leakage in high-risk anastomoses. TachoSil® has been shown to be a safe product because it does not affect the histologic healing process or increase intra-abdominal adhesions. PMID:27721926

  2. Antithrombotic properties of SSR182289A, a new, orally active thrombin inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorrain, J; Millet, L; Lechaire, I; Lochot, S; Ferrari, P; Visconte, C; Sainte-Marie, M; Lunven, C; Berry, C N; Schaeffer, P; Herbert, J-M; O'Connor, S E

    2003-02-01

    N-[3-[[[(1S)-4-(5-Amino-2-pyridinyl)-1-[[4-difluoromethylene)-1-piperidinyl]carbonyl]butyl]amino]sulfonyl][1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl]acetamide hydrochloride (SSR182289A) is a novel, potent, and selective thrombin inhibitor. We have examined the antithrombotic properties of SSR182289A administered by i.v. and p.o. routes in several different animal thrombosis models in comparison with reference antithrombotic agents. Oral administration of SSR182289A produced dose-related antithrombotic effects in the following models; rat venous thrombosis (ED(50) 0.9 mg/kg p.o.), rat silk thread arterio-venous (AV) shunt (ED(50) 3.8 mg/kg p.o.), rat thromboplastin-induced AV shunt (ED(50) 3.1 mg/kg p.o.), rat carotid artery thrombosis (ED(200) 5.9 mg/kg p.o.), and rabbit venous thrombosis (ED(50) 7.5 mg/kg p.o.). Administered as an i.v. bolus, SSR182289A showed antithrombotic activity in the above models with ED(50)/ED(200) values in the range of 0.2 to 1.9 mg/kg i.v. SSR182289A increased rat tail transection bleeding time at doses > or =10 mg/kg p.o. In the rat thromboplastin-induced AV shunt model, SSR182289A 10 mg/kg p.o. produced marked antithrombotic effects at 30, 60, 120, and 240 min after administration. Hence, SSR182289A demonstrates potent oral antithrombotic properties in animal venous, AV-shunt, and arterial thrombosis models.

  3. Phage display of the serpin alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor randomized at consecutive residues in the reactive centre loop and biopanned with or without thrombin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Scott

    Full Text Available In spite of the power of phage display technology to identify variant proteins with novel properties in large libraries, it has only been previously applied to one member of the serpin superfamily. Here we describe phage display of human alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API in a T7 bacteriophage system. API M358R fused to the C-terminus of T7 capsid protein 10B was directly shown to form denaturation-resistant complexes with thrombin by electrophoresis and immunoblotting following exposure of intact phages to thrombin. We therefore developed a biopanning protocol in which thrombin-reactive phages were selected using biotinylated anti-thrombin antibodies and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. A library consisting of displayed API randomized at residues 357 and 358 (P2-P1 yielded predominantly Pro-Arg at these positions after five rounds of thrombin selection; in contrast the same degree of mock selection yielded only non-functional variants. A more diverse library of API M358R randomized at residues 352-356 (P7-P3 was also probed, yielding numerous variants fitting a loose consensus of DLTVS as judged by sequencing of the inserts of plaque-purified phages. The thrombin-selected sequences were transferred en masse into bacterial expression plasmids, and lysates from individual colonies were screening for API-thrombin complexing. The most active candidates from this sixth round of screening contained DITMA and AAFVS at P7-P3 and inhibited thrombin 2.1-fold more rapidly than API M358R with no change in reaction stoichiometry. Deep sequencing using the Ion Torrent platform confirmed that over 800 sequences were significantly enriched in the thrombin-panned versus naïve phage display library, including some detected using the combined phage display/bacterial lysate screening approach. Our results show that API joins Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 as a serpin amenable to phage display and suggest the utility of this approach for the selection

  4. Automation of Taxiing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Bursík

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the possibility of automation of taxiing, which is the part of a flight, which, under adverse weather conditions, greatly reduces the operational usability of an airport, and is the only part of a flight that has not been affected by automation, yet. Taxiing is currently handled manually by the pilot, who controls the airplane based on information from visual perception. The article primarily deals with possible ways of obtaining navigational information, and its automatic transfer to the controls. Analyzed wand assessed were currently available technologies such as computer vision, Light Detection and Ranging and Global Navigation Satellite System, which are useful for navigation and their general implementation into an airplane was designed. Obstacles to the implementation were identified, too. The result is a proposed combination of systems along with their installation into airplane’s systems so that it is possible to use the automated taxiing.

  5. Complex Domains Call for Automation but Automation Requires More Knowledge and Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Skov; Mikkelsen, Lars Lindegaard

    studies investigate operation and automation of oil and gas production in the North Sea. Semi-structured interviews, surveys, and observations are the main methods used. The paper provides a novel conceptual framework around which management may generate discussions about productivity and the need...

  6. Preliminary Framework for Human-Automation Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna Helene [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Le Blanc, Katya Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spielman, Zachary Alexander [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Department of Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technologies Program sponsors research, development and deployment activities through its Next Generation Nuclear Plant, Advanced Reactor Concepts, and Advanced Small Modular Reactor (aSMR) Programs to promote safety, technical, economical, and environmental advancements of innovative Generation IV nuclear energy technologies. The Human Automation Collaboration (HAC) Research Project is located under the aSMR Program, which identifies developing advanced instrumentation and controls and human-machine interfaces as one of four key research areas. It is expected that the new nuclear power plant designs will employ technology significantly more advanced than the analog systems in the existing reactor fleet as well as utilizing automation to a greater extent. Moving towards more advanced technology and more automation does not necessary imply more efficient and safer operation of the plant. Instead, a number of concerns about how these technologies will affect human performance and the overall safety of the plant need to be addressed. More specifically, it is important to investigate how the operator and the automation work as a team to ensure effective and safe plant operation, also known as the human-automation collaboration (HAC). The focus of the HAC research is to understand how various characteristics of automation (such as its reliability, processes, and modes) effect an operator’s use and awareness of plant conditions. In other words, the research team investigates how to best design the collaboration between the operators and the automated systems in a manner that has the greatest positive impact on overall plant performance and reliability. This report addresses the Department of Energy milestone M4AT-15IN2302054, Complete Preliminary Framework for Human-Automation Collaboration, by discussing the two phased development of a preliminary HAC framework. The framework developed in the first phase was used as the

  7. Automating the CMS DAQ

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Gerry; Behrens, Ulf; Branson, James; Chaze, Olivier; Cittolin, Sergio; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Deldicque, Christian; Dobson, Marc; Dupont, Aymeric; Erhan, Samim; Gigi, Dominique; Glege, Frank; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Hartl, Christian; Hegeman, Jeroen Guido; Holzner, Andre Georg; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Franciscus; Meschi, Emilio; Mommsen, Remigius; Morovic, Srecko; Nunez Barranco Fernandez, Carlos; O'Dell, Vivian; Orsini, Luciano; Ozga, Wojciech Andrzej; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Petrucci, Andrea; Pieri, Marco; Racz, Attila; Raginel, Olivier; Sakulin, Hannes; Sani, Matteo; Schwick, Christoph; Spataru, Andrei Cristian; Stieger, Benjamin Bastian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Veverka, Jan; Wakefield, Christopher Colin; Zejdl, Petr

    2014-01-01

    We present the automation mechanisms that have been added to the Data Acquisition and Run Control systems of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment during Run 1 of the LHC, ranging from the automation of routine tasks to automatic error recovery and context-sensitive guidance to the operator. These mechanisms helped CMS to maintain a data taking efficiency above 90\\% and to even improve it to 95\\% towards the end of Run 1, despite an increase in the occurrence of single-event upsets in sub-detector electronics at high LHC luminosity.

  8. Automating the CMS DAQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, G.; et al.

    2014-01-01

    We present the automation mechanisms that have been added to the Data Acquisition and Run Control systems of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment during Run 1 of the LHC, ranging from the automation of routine tasks to automatic error recovery and context-sensitive guidance to the operator. These mechanisms helped CMS to maintain a data taking efficiency above 90% and to even improve it to 95% towards the end of Run 1, despite an increase in the occurrence of single-event upsets in sub-detector electronics at high LHC luminosity.

  9. Altering user' acceptance of automation through prior automation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekier, Marek; Molesworth, Brett R C

    2016-08-22

    Air navigation service providers worldwide see increased use of automation as one solution to overcome the capacity constraints imbedded in the present air traffic management (ATM) system. However, increased use of automation within any system is dependent on user acceptance. The present research sought to determine if the point at which an individual is no longer willing to accept or cooperate with automation can be manipulated. Forty participants underwent training on a computer-based air traffic control programme, followed by two ATM exercises (order counterbalanced), one with and one without the aid of automation. Results revealed after exposure to a task with automation assistance, user acceptance of high(er) levels of automation ('tipping point') decreased; suggesting it is indeed possible to alter automation acceptance. Practitioner Summary: This paper investigates whether the point at which a user of automation rejects automation (i.e. 'tipping point') is constant or can be manipulated. The results revealed after exposure to a task with automation assistance, user acceptance of high(er) levels of automation decreased; suggesting it is possible to alter automation acceptance.

  10. A novel hemostatic sealant composed of gelatin,transglutaminase and thrombin effectively controls liver trauma-induced bleeding in dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia XIE; Jiang-ke TIAN; Fa-qin LV; Rong WU; Wen-bo TANG; Yu-kun LUO; Ya-qin HUANG

    2013-01-01

    Aim:A novel hemostatic sealant based on the in situ gel formation of gelatin catalyzed by thrombin and crosslinked by transglutaminase was designed.The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of the hemostatic sealant in control of bleeding caused by liver trauma in dogs.Methods:Hepatic trauma that mimicked the grade Ⅲ-Ⅳ rupture of liver was made in 20 dogs.The traumatic lesion was topically administered the hemostatic sealant (treatment group,n=10),or a thrombin solution (control group,n=10).The time to achieve hemostasis and the blood loss were measured.Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) examination was performed in each animal on d 3,d 7,and d 10 d postoperatively to study the healing of the lesions.Results:The mean time to achieve hemostasis in the treatment group was significantly shorter than that in the control group (1.20±0.33 vs 6.70±0.64 min,P<0.05).The mean blood loss in the treatment group was significantly less than that in the control group (47.22±8.61 vs 79.29±11.97 mL,P<0.05).In CEUS examination,the traumatic lesions in the treatment group became significantly smaller on d 3,and disappeared on d 7,whereas the lesions in the control group still existed on d 10.Ascites were never found during 10 d follow-up in the treatment group but were observed on d 3 and d 7 in the control group.Conclusion:Compared with thrombin,the novel hemostatic sealant shows much better efficacy in hemostasis and may promote wound healing in dog liver trauma.

  11. Novel magnetic fibrin hydrogel scaffolds containing thrombin and growth factors conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziv-Polat O

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ofra Ziv-Polat1, Hadas Skaat1, Abraham Shahar2, Shlomo Margel11Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel; 2NVR Research Ltd, Nes-Ziona 74031, IsraelAbstract: Novel tissue-engineered magnetic fibrin hydrogel scaffolds were prepared by the interaction of thrombin-conjugated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles with fibrinogen. In addition, stabilization of basal fibroblast growth factor (bFGF was achieved by the covalent and physical conjugation of the growth factor to the magnetic nanoparticles. Adult nasal olfactory mucosa (NOM cells were seeded in the transparent fibrin scaffolds in the absence or presence of the free or conjugated bFGF-iron oxide nanoparticles. The conjugated bFGF enhanced significantly the growth and differentiation of the NOM cells in the fibrin scaffolds, compared to the same or even five times higher concentration of the free bFGF. In the presence of the bFGF-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles, the cultured NOM cells proliferated and formed a three-dimensional interconnected network composed mainly of tapered bipolar cells. The magnetic properties of these matrices are due to the integration of the thrombin- and bFGF-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles within the scaffolds. The magnetic properties of these scaffolds may be used in future work for various applications, such as magnetic resonance visualization of the scaffolds after implantation and reloading the scaffolds via magnetic forces with bioactive agents, eg, growth factors bound to the iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles.Keywords: thrombin, fibroblast growth factor, fibrin scaffold, iron oxide nanoparticles, tissue engineering, magnetism, bioactive nanoparticle

  12. Acyclic identification of aptamers for human alpha-thrombin using over-represented libraries and deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian V Kupakuwana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aptamers are oligonucleotides that bind proteins and other targets with high affinity and selectivity. Twenty years ago elements of natural selection were adapted to in vitro selection in order to distinguish aptamers among randomized sequence libraries. The primary bottleneck in traditional aptamer discovery is multiple cycles of in vitro evolution. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that over-representation of sequences in aptamer libraries and deep sequencing enables acyclic identification of aptamers. We demonstrated this by isolating a known family of aptamers for human α-thrombin. Aptamers were found within a library containing an average of 56,000 copies of each possible randomized 15mer segment. The high affinity sequences were counted many times above the background in 2-6 million reads. Clustering analysis of sequences with more than 10 counts distinguished two sequence motifs with candidates at high abundance. Motif I contained the previously observed consensus 15mer, Thb1 (46,000 counts, and related variants with mostly G/T substitutions; secondary analysis showed that affinity for thrombin correlated with abundance (K(d = 12 nM for Thb1. The signal-to-noise ratio for this experiment was roughly 10,000∶1 for Thb1. Motif II was unrelated to Thb1 with the leading candidate (29,000 counts being a novel aptamer against hexose sugars in the storage and elution buffers for Concanavilin A (K(d = 0.5 µM for α-methyl-mannoside; ConA was used to immobilize α-thrombin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Over-representation together with deep sequencing can dramatically shorten the discovery process, distinguish aptamers having a wide range of affinity for the target, allow an exhaustive search of the sequence space within a simplified library, reduce the quantity of the target required, eliminate cycling artifacts, and should allow multiplexing of sequencing experiments and targets.

  13. Policy challenges of increasing automation in driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ata M. Khan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The convergence of information and communication technologies (ICT with automotive technologies has already resulted in automation features in road vehicles and this trend is expected to continue in the future owing to consumer demand, dropping costs of components, and improved reliability. While the automation features that have taken place so far are mainly in the form of information and driver warning technologies (classified as level I pre-2010, future developments in the medium term (level II 2010–2025 are expected to exhibit connected cognitive vehicle features and encompass increasing degree of automation in the form of advanced driver assistance systems. Although autonomous vehicles have been developed for research purposes and are being tested in controlled driving missions, the autonomous driving case is only a long term (level III 2025+ scenario. This paper contributes knowledge on technological forecasts regarding automation, policy challenges for each level of technology development and application context, and the essential instrument of cost-effectiveness for policy analysis which enables policy decisions on the automation systems to be assessed in a consistent and balanced manner. The cost of a system per vehicle is viewed against its effectiveness in meeting policy objectives of improving safety, efficiency, mobility, convenience and reducing environmental effects. Example applications are provided that illustrate the contribution of the methodology in providing information for supporting policy decisions. Given the uncertainties in system costs as well as effectiveness, the tool for assessing policies for future generation features probabilistic and utility-theoretic analysis capability. The policy issues defined and the assessment framework enable the resolution of policy challenges while allowing worthy innovative automation in driving to enhance future road transportation.

  14. Automation of finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Korelc, Jože

    2016-01-01

    New finite elements are needed as well in research as in industry environments for the development of virtual prediction techniques. The design and implementation of novel finite elements for specific purposes is a tedious and time consuming task, especially for nonlinear formulations. The automation of this process can help to speed up this process considerably since the generation of the final computer code can be accelerated by order of several magnitudes. This book provides the reader with the required knowledge needed to employ modern automatic tools like AceGen within solid mechanics in a successful way. It covers the range from the theoretical background, algorithmic treatments to many different applications. The book is written for advanced students in the engineering field and for researchers in educational and industrial environments.

  15. An Intelligent Automation Platform for Rapid Bioprocess Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tianyi; Zhou, Yuhong

    2014-08-01

    Bioprocess development is very labor intensive, requiring many experiments to characterize each unit operation in the process sequence to achieve product safety and process efficiency. Recent advances in microscale biochemical engineering have led to automated experimentation. A process design workflow is implemented sequentially in which (1) a liquid-handling system performs high-throughput wet lab experiments, (2) standalone analysis devices detect the data, and (3) specific software is used for data analysis and experiment design given the user's inputs. We report an intelligent automation platform that integrates these three activities to enhance the efficiency of such a workflow. A multiagent intelligent architecture has been developed incorporating agent communication to perform the tasks automatically. The key contribution of this work is the automation of data analysis and experiment design and also the ability to generate scripts to run the experiments automatically, allowing the elimination of human involvement. A first-generation prototype has been established and demonstrated through lysozyme precipitation process design. All procedures in the case study have been fully automated through an intelligent automation platform. The realization of automated data analysis and experiment design, and automated script programming for experimental procedures has the potential to increase lab productivity.

  16. mRNA expression of genes involved in inflammation and haemostasis in equine fibroblast-like synoviocytes following exposure to lipopolysaccharide, fibrinogen and thrombin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Stine Mandrup; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose;

    2015-01-01

    to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), fibrinogen and thrombin. Synovial membranes were collected from metacarpo-phalangeal joints of 6 skeletally mature horses euthanized for non-orthopaedic reasons. Passage 4 fibroblast-like synoviocytes were left non-treated or treated with either 0.1 μ g/ml LPS, 5 mg/ml fibrinogen or 5 U...... in increased mRNA expression of SAA, IL-6, MCP-1 and PAI-1, and a decreased PAR-1 expression compared to non-treated cells. The fibrinogen-treated synoviocytes showed significantly increased mRNA expression of IL-6, MCP-1, TF and PAI-1, and decreased PAR-1 expression compared to non-treated cells. Conclusion......: LPS, fibrinogen and thrombin induced an increased gene expression of inflammatory markers in isolated equine fibroblast-like synoviocytes. LPS caused changes in gene expression promoting increased fibrinolysis, while fibrinogen and thrombin changed the gene expression resulting potentially in reduced...

  17. Effect of NaC1 on inactivation of bovine thrombin by antithrombin III in the presence of low affinity-heparin or dextran sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, G; Nagasawa, K

    1986-02-01

    Heparin with low affinity (LA-heparin) to antithrombin III (AT III) enhanced the rate of inactivation of thrombin by AT III. The enhancement of the rate was saturable with AT III and was proportional to the LA-heparin concentration. Although the rate-enhancement in the presence of LA-heparin decreased with increase in NaC1 concentration, it was comparable with that in the presence of high affinity-heparin (HA-heparin) in the absence of NaC1. Inactivation of thrombin by AT III in the presence of dextran sulfate (DS) was also sensitive to NaC1 concentration. These findings indicate that free AT III is favorable for binding to the complexes of thrombin and highly sulfated polysaccharides having low affinities to AT III in the absence of NaC1.

  18. Microcontroller for automation application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    The description of a microcontroller currently being developed for automation application was given. It is basically an 8-bit microcomputer with a 40K byte random access memory/read only memory, and can control a maximum of 12 devices through standard 15-line interface ports.

  19. Automated Composite Column Wrapping

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    The Automated Composite Column Wrapping is performed by a patented machine known as Robo-Wrapper. Currently there are three versions of the machine available for bridge retrofit work depending on the size of the columns being wrapped. Composite column retrofit jacket systems can be structurally just as effective as conventional steel jacketing in improving the seismic response characteristics of substandard reinforced concrete columns.

  20. Automated Web Applications Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Dan CĂPRIŢĂ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Unit tests are a vital part of several software development practicesand processes such as Test-First Programming, Extreme Programming andTest-Driven Development. This article shortly presents the software quality andtesting concepts as well as an introduction to an automated unit testingframework for PHP web based applications.