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Sample records for automated sample preparation

  1. Precise and automated microfluidic sample preparation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, Robert W.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Mosier, Bruce P.; Harnett, Cindy K.

    2004-07-01

    Autonomous bio-chemical agent detectors require sample preparation involving multiplex fluid control. We have developed a portable microfluidic pump array for metering sub-microliter volumes at flowrates of 1-100 {micro}L/min. Each pump is composed of an electrokinetic (EK) pump and high-voltage power supply with 15-Hz feedback from flow sensors. The combination of high pump fluid impedance and active control results in precise fluid metering with nanoliter accuracy. Automated sample preparation will be demonstrated by labeling proteins with fluorescamine and subsequent injection to a capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) chip.

  2. Digital microfluidic hub for automated nucleic acid sample preparation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jim; Bartsch, Michael S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Kittlaus, Eric A.; Remillared, Erin M.; Pezzola, Genevieve L.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Kim, Hanyoup

    2010-07-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and characterized a digital microfluidic (DMF) platform to function as a central hub for interfacing multiple lab-on-a-chip sample processing modules towards automating the preparation of clinically-derived DNA samples for ultrahigh throughput sequencing (UHTS). The platform enables plug-and-play installation of a two-plate DMF device with consistent spacing, offers flexible connectivity for transferring samples between modules, and uses an intuitive programmable interface to control droplet/electrode actuations. Additionally, the hub platform uses transparent indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrodes to allow complete top and bottom optical access to the droplets on the DMF array, providing additional flexibility for various detection schemes.

  3. Components for automated microfluidics sample preparation and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, M.; Erickson, J. S.; Hilliard, L. R.; Howell, P. B., Jr.; Stenger, D. A.; Ligler, F. S.; Lin, B.

    2008-02-01

    The increasing demand for portable devices to detect and identify pathogens represents an interdisciplinary effort between engineering, materials science, and molecular biology. Automation of both sample preparation and analysis is critical for performing multiplexed analyses on real world samples. This paper selects two possible components for such automated portable analyzers: modified silicon structures for use in the isolation of nucleic acids and a sheath flow system suitable for automated microflow cytometry. Any detection platform that relies on the genetic content (RNA and DNA) present in complex matrices requires careful extraction and isolation of the nucleic acids in order to ensure their integrity throughout the process. This sample pre-treatment step is commonly performed using commercially available solid phases along with various molecular biology techniques that require multiple manual steps and dedicated laboratory space. Regardless of the detection scheme, a major challenge in the integration of total analysis systems is the development of platforms compatible with current isolation techniques that will ensure the same quality of nucleic acids. Silicon is an ideal candidate for solid phase separations since it can be tailored structurally and chemically to mimic the conditions used in the laboratory. For analytical purposes, we have developed passive structures that can be used to fully ensheath one flow stream with another. As opposed to traditional flow focusing methods, our sheath flow profile is truly two dimensional, making it an ideal candidate for integration into a microfluidic flow cytometer. Such a microflow cytometer could be used to measure targets captured on either antibody- or DNA-coated beads.

  4. Current advances and strategies towards fully automated sample preparation for regulated LC-MS/MS bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Naiyu; Jiang, Hao; Zeng, Jianing

    2014-09-01

    Robotic liquid handlers (RLHs) have been widely used in automated sample preparation for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) bioanalysis. Automated sample preparation for regulated bioanalysis offers significantly higher assay efficiency, better data quality and potential bioanalytical cost-savings. For RLHs that are used for regulated bioanalysis, there are additional requirements, including 21 CFR Part 11 compliance, software validation, system qualification, calibration verification and proper maintenance. This article reviews recent advances in automated sample preparation for regulated bioanalysis in the last 5 years. Specifically, it covers the following aspects: regulated bioanalysis requirements, recent advances in automation hardware and software development, sample extraction workflow simplification, strategies towards fully automated sample extraction, and best practices in automated sample preparation for regulated bioanalysis. PMID:25384595

  5. A fully automated plasma protein precipitation sample preparation method for LC-MS/MS bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ji; Shi, Jianxia; Le, Hoa; Cho, Robert; Huang, Judy Chi-jou; Miao, Shichang; Wong, Bradley K

    2008-02-01

    This report describes the development and validation of a robust robotic system that fully integrates all peripheral devices needed for the automated preparation of plasma samples by protein precipitation. The liquid handling system consisted of a Tecan Freedom EVO 200 liquid handling platform equipped with an 8-channel liquid handling arm, two robotic plate-handling arms, and two plate shakers. Important additional components integrated into the platform were a robotic temperature-controlled centrifuge, a plate sealer, and a plate seal piercing station. These enabled unattended operation starting from a stock solution of the test compound, a set of test plasma samples and associated reagents. The stock solution of the test compound was used to prepare plasma calibration and quality control samples. Once calibration and quality control samples were prepared, precipitation of plasma proteins was achieved by addition of three volumes of acetonitrile. Integration of the peripheral devices allowed automated sequential completion of the centrifugation, plate sealing, piercing and supernatant transferral steps. The method produced a sealed, injection-ready 96-well plate of plasma extracts. Accuracy and precision of the automated system were satisfactory for the intended use: intra-day and the inter-day precision were excellent (C.V.<5%), while the intra-day and inter-day accuracies were acceptable (relative error<8%). The flexibility of the platform was sufficient to accommodate pharmacokinetic studies of different numbers of animals and time points. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first complete automation of the protein precipitation method for plasma sample analysis. PMID:18226589

  6. Fully Automated Sample Preparation for Ultrafast N-Glycosylation Analysis of Antibody Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szigeti, Marton; Lew, Clarence; Roby, Keith; Guttman, Andras

    2016-04-01

    There is a growing demand in the biopharmaceutical industry for high-throughput, large-scale N-glycosylation profiling of therapeutic antibodies in all phases of product development, but especially during clone selection when hundreds of samples should be analyzed in a short period of time to assure their glycosylation-based biological activity. Our group has recently developed a magnetic bead-based protocol for N-glycosylation analysis of glycoproteins to alleviate the hard-to-automate centrifugation and vacuum-centrifugation steps of the currently used protocols. Glycan release, fluorophore labeling, and cleanup were all optimized, resulting in a process with excellent yield and good repeatability. This article demonstrates the next level of this work by automating all steps of the optimized magnetic bead-based protocol from endoglycosidase digestion, through fluorophore labeling and cleanup with high-throughput sample processing in 96-well plate format, using an automated laboratory workstation. Capillary electrophoresis analysis of the fluorophore-labeled glycans was also optimized for rapid (processing of the automated sample preparation workflow. Ultrafast N-glycosylation analyses of several commercially relevant antibody therapeutics are also shown and compared to their biosimilar counterparts, addressing the biological significance of the differences. PMID:26429557

  7. Fast detection of Noroviruses using a real-time PCR assay and automated sample preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Michael

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses (NoV have become one of the most commonly reported causative agents of large outbreaks of non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis worldwide as well as sporadic gastroenteritis in the community. Currently, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assays have been implemented in NoV diagnosis, but improvements that simplify and standardize sample preparation, amplification, and detection will be further needed. The combination of automated sample preparation and real-time PCR offers such refinements. Methods We have designed a new real-time RT-PCR assay on the LightCycler (LC with SYBR Green detection and melting curve analysis (Tm to detect NoV RNA in patient stool samples. The performance of the real-time PCR assay was compared with that obtained in parallel with a commercially available enzyme immunoassay (ELISA for antigen detection by testing a panel of 52 stool samples. Additionally, in a collaborative study with the Baden-Wuerttemberg State Health office, Stuttgart (Germany the real-time PCR results were blindly assessed using a previously well-established nested PCR (nPCR as the reference method, since PCR-based techniques are now considered as the "gold standard" for NoV detection in stool specimens. Results Analysis of 52 clinical stool samples by real-time PCR yielded results that were consistent with reference nPCR results, while marked differences between the two PCR-based methods and antigen ELISA were observed. Our results indicate that PCR-based procedures are more sensitive and specific than antigen ELISA for detecting NoV in stool specimens. Conclusions The combination of automated sample preparation and real-time PCR provided reliable diagnostic results in less time than conventional RT-PCR assays. These benefits make it a valuable tool for routine laboratory practice especially in terms of rapid and appropriate outbreak-control measures in health-care facilities and other settings.

  8. Two Methods for High-Throughput NGS Template Preparation for Small and Degraded Clinical Samples Without Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Kamberov, E.; Tesmer, T.; Mastronardi, M.; Langmore, John

    2012-01-01

    Clinical samples are difficult to prepare for NGS, because of the small amounts or degraded states of formalin-fixed tissue, plasma, urine, and single-cell DNA. Conventional whole genome amplification methods are too biased for NGS applications, and the existing NGS preparation kits require intermediate purifications and excessive time to prepare hundreds of samples in a day without expensive automation. We have tested two 96-well manual methods to make NGS templates from FFPE tissue, plasma,...

  9. Automated sample preparation and analysis using a sequential-injection-capillary electrophoresis (SI-CE) interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulka, Stephan; Quintás, Guillermo; Lendl, Bernhard

    2006-06-01

    A fully automated sequential-injection-capillary electrophoresis (SI-CE) system was developed using commercially available components as the syringe pump, the selection and injection valves and the high voltage power supply. The interface connecting the SI with the CE unit consisted of two T-pieces, where the capillary was inserted in one T-piece and a Pt electrode in the other (grounded) T-piece. By pressurising the whole system using a syringe pump, hydrodynamic injection was feasible. For characterisation, the system was applied to a mixture of adenosine and adenosine monophosphate at different concentrations. The calibration curve obtained gave a detection limit of 0.5 microg g(-1) (correlation coefficient of 0.997). The reproducibility of the injection was also assessed, resulting in a RSD value (5 injections) of 5.4%. The total time of analysis, from injection, conditioning and separation to cleaning the capillary again was 15 minutes. In another application, employing the full power of the automated SIA-CE system, myoglobin was mixed directly using the flow system with different concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), a known denaturing agent. The different conformations obtained in this way were analysed with the CE system and a distinct shift in migration time and decreasing of the native peak of myoglobin (Mb) could be observed. The protein samples prepared were also analysed with off-line infrared spectroscopy (IR), confirming these results. PMID:16732362

  10. Validation of a fully automated robotic setup for preparation of whole blood samples for LC-MS toxicology analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, David Wederkinck; Rasmussen, Brian; Linnet, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    A fully automated setup was developed for preparing whole blood samples using a Tecan Evo workstation. By integrating several add-ons to the robotic platform, the flexible setup was able to prepare samples from sample tubes to a 96-well sample plate ready for injection on liquid chromatography......-mass spectrometry using several preparation techniques, including protein precipitation, solid-phase extraction and centrifugation, without any manual intervention. Pipetting of a known aliquot of whole blood was achieved by integrating a balance and performing gravimetric measurements. The system was able to...

  11. Automated Sample Preparation for Radiogenic and Non-Traditional Metal Isotopes: Removing an Analytical Barrier for High Sample Throughput

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, M. Paul; Romaniello, Stephen; Gordon, Gwyneth W.; Anbar, Ariel D.; Herrmann, Achim; Martinez-Boti, Miguel A.; Anagnostou, Eleni; Foster, Gavin L.

    2014-05-01

    MC-ICP-MS has dramatically improved the analytical throughput for high-precision radiogenic and non-traditional isotope ratio measurements, compared to TIMS. The generation of large data sets, however, remains hampered by tedious manual drip chromatography required for sample purification. A new, automated chromatography system reduces the laboratory bottle neck and expands the utility of high-precision isotope analyses in applications where large data sets are required: geochemistry, forensic anthropology, nuclear forensics, medical research and food authentication. We have developed protocols to automate ion exchange purification for several isotopic systems (B, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, Pb and U) using the new prepFAST-MC™ (ESI, Nebraska, Omaha). The system is not only inert (all-flouropolymer flow paths), but is also very flexible and can easily facilitate different resins, samples, and reagent types. When programmed, precise and accurate user defined volumes and flow rates are implemented to automatically load samples, wash the column, condition the column and elute fractions. Unattended, the automated, low-pressure ion exchange chromatography system can process up to 60 samples overnight. Excellent reproducibility, reliability, recovery, with low blank and carry over for samples in a variety of different matrices, have been demonstrated to give accurate and precise isotopic ratios within analytical error for several isotopic systems (B, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, Pb and U). This illustrates the potential of the new prepFAST-MC™ (ESI, Nebraska, Omaha) as a powerful tool in radiogenic and non-traditional isotope research.

  12. A user-friendly robotic sample preparation program for fully automated biological sample pipetting and dilution to benefit the regulated bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Ouyang, Zheng; Zeng, Jianing; Yuan, Long; Zheng, Naiyu; Jemal, Mohammed; Arnold, Mark E

    2012-06-01

    Biological sample dilution is a rate-limiting step in bioanalytical sample preparation when the concentrations of samples are beyond standard curve ranges, especially when multiple dilution factors are needed in an analytical run. We have developed and validated a Microsoft Excel-based robotic sample preparation program (RSPP) that automatically transforms Watson worklist sample information (identification, sequence and dilution factor) to comma-separated value (CSV) files. The Freedom EVO liquid handler software imports and transforms the CSV files to executable worklists (.gwl files), allowing the robot to perform sample dilutions at variable dilution factors. The dynamic dilution range is 1- to 1000-fold and divided into three dilution steps: 1- to 10-, 11- to 100-, and 101- to 1000-fold. The whole process, including pipetting samples, diluting samples, and adding internal standard(s), is accomplished within 1 h for two racks of samples (96 samples/rack). This platform also supports online sample extraction (liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction, protein precipitation, etc.) using 96 multichannel arms. This fully automated and validated sample dilution and preparation process has been applied to several drug development programs. The results demonstrate that application of the RSPP for fully automated sample processing is efficient and rugged. The RSPP not only saved more than 50% of the time in sample pipetting and dilution but also reduced human errors. The generated bioanalytical data are accurate and precise; therefore, this application can be used in regulated bioanalysis. PMID:22357562

  13. Automated sample preparation in a microfluidic culture device for cellular metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filla, Laura A; Sanders, Katherine L; Filla, Robert T; Edwards, James L

    2016-06-21

    Sample pretreatment in conventional cellular metabolomics entails rigorous lysis and extraction steps which increase the duration as well as limit the consistency of these experiments. We report a biomimetic cell culture microfluidic device (MFD) which is coupled with an automated system for rapid, reproducible cell lysis using a combination of electrical and chemical mechanisms. In-channel microelectrodes were created using facile fabrication methods, enabling the application of electric fields up to 1000 V cm(-1). Using this platform, average lysing times were 7.12 s and 3.03 s for chips with no electric fields and electric fields above 200 V cm(-1), respectively. Overall, the electroporation MFDs yielded a ∼10-fold improvement in lysing time over standard chemical approaches. Detection of multiple intracellular nucleotides and energy metabolites in MFD lysates was demonstrated using two different MS platforms. This work will allow for the integrated culture, automated lysis, and metabolic analysis of cells in an MFD which doubles as a biomimetic model of the vasculature. PMID:27118418

  14. A self-contained polymeric cartridge for automated biological sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guolin; Lee, Daniel Yoke San; Xie, Hong; Chiew, Deon; Hsieh, Tseng-Ming; Ali, Emril Mohamed; Lun Looi, Xing; Li, Mo-Huang; Ying, Jackie Y

    2011-09-01

    Sample preparation is one of the most crucial processes for nucleic acids based disease diagnosis. Several steps are required for nucleic acids extraction, impurity washes, and DNA/RNA elution. Careful sample preparation is vital to the obtaining of reliable diagnosis, especially with low copies of pathogens and cells. This paper describes a low-cost, disposable lab cartridge for automatic sample preparation, which is capable of handling flexible sample volumes of 10 μl to 1 ml. This plastic cartridge contains all the necessary reagents for pathogen and cell lysis, DNA/RNA extraction, impurity washes, DNA/RNA elution and waste processing in a completely sealed cartridge. The entire sample preparation processes are automatically conducted within the cartridge on a desktop unit using a pneumatic fluid manipulation approach. Reagents transportation is achieved with a combination of push and pull forces (with compressed air and vacuum, respectively), which are connected to the pneumatic inlets at the bottom of the cartridge. These pneumatic forces are regulated by pinch valve manifold and two pneumatic syringe pumps within the desktop unit. The performance of this pneumatic reagent delivery method was examined. We have demonstrated the capability of the on-cartridge RNA extraction and cancer-specific gene amplification from 10 copies of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The on-cartridge DNA recovery efficiency was 54-63%, which was comparable to or better than the conventional manual approach using silica spin column. The lab cartridge would be suitable for integration with lab-chip real-time polymerase chain reaction devices in providing a portable system for decentralized disease diagnosis. PMID:22662036

  15. Automation and integration of multiplexed on-line sample preparation with capillary electrophoresis for DNA sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, H.

    1999-03-31

    The purpose of this research is to develop a multiplexed sample processing system in conjunction with multiplexed capillary electrophoresis for high-throughput DNA sequencing. The concept from DNA template to called bases was first demonstrated with a manually operated single capillary system. Later, an automated microfluidic system with 8 channels based on the same principle was successfully constructed. The instrument automatically processes 8 templates through reaction, purification, denaturation, pre-concentration, injection, separation and detection in a parallel fashion. A multiplexed freeze/thaw switching principle and a distribution network were implemented to manage flow direction and sample transportation. Dye-labeled terminator cycle-sequencing reactions are performed in an 8-capillary array in a hot air thermal cycler. Subsequently, the sequencing ladders are directly loaded into a corresponding size-exclusion chromatographic column operated at {approximately} 60 C for purification. On-line denaturation and stacking injection for capillary electrophoresis is simultaneously accomplished at a cross assembly set at {approximately} 70 C. Not only the separation capillary array but also the reaction capillary array and purification columns can be regenerated after every run. DNA sequencing data from this system allow base calling up to 460 bases with accuracy of 98%.

  16. Automated sample preparation station for studying self-diffusion in porous solids with NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In studies of gas diffusion in porous solids with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy the sample preparation procedure becomes very important. An apparatus is presented here that pretreats the sample ex situ and accurately sets the desired pressure and temperature within the NMR tube prior to its introduction in the spectrometer. The gas manifold that supplies the NMR tube is also connected to a microbalance containing another portion of the same sample, which is kept at the same temperature as the sample in the NMR tube. This arrangement permits the simultaneous measurement of the adsorption loading on the sample, which is required for the interpretation of the NMR diffusion experiments. Furthermore, to ensure a good seal of the NMR tube, a hybrid valve design composed of titanium, a Teflon registered seat, and Kalrez registered O-rings is utilized. A computer controlled algorithm ensures the accuracy and reproducibility of all the procedures, enabling the NMR diffusion experiments to be performed at well controlled conditions of pressure, temperature, and amount of gas adsorbed on the porous sample

  17. Solid recovered fuels in the cement industry--semi-automated sample preparation unit as a means for facilitated practical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrian, Alexia; Sarc, Renato; Pomberger, Roland; Lorber, Karl E; Sipple, Ernst-Michael

    2016-03-01

    One of the challenges for the cement industry is the quality assurance of alternative fuel (e.g., solid recovered fuel, SRF) in co-incineration plants--especially for inhomogeneous alternative fuels with large particle sizes (d95⩾100 mm), which will gain even more importance in the substitution of conventional fuels due to low production costs. Existing standards for sampling and sample preparation do not cover the challenges resulting from these kinds of materials. A possible approach to ensure quality monitoring is shown in the present contribution. For this, a specially manufactured, automated comminution and sample divider device was installed at a cement plant in Rohožnik. In order to prove its practical suitability with methods according to current standards, the sampling and sample preparation process were validated for alternative fuel with a grain size >30 mm (i.e., d95=approximately 100 mm), so-called 'Hotdisc SRF'. Therefore, series of samples were taken and analysed. A comparison of the analysis results with the yearly average values obtained through a reference investigation route showed good accordance. Further investigations during the validation process also showed that segregation or enrichment of material throughout the comminution plant does not occur. The results also demonstrate that compliance with legal standards regarding the minimum sample amount is not sufficient for inhomogeneous and coarse particle size alternative fuels. Instead, higher sample amounts after the first particle size reduction step are strongly recommended in order to gain a representative laboratory sample. PMID:26759433

  18. Adjustable virtual pore-size filter for automated sample preparation using acoustic radiation force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, B; Fisher, K; Ness, K; Rose, K; Mariella, R

    2008-05-22

    We present a rapid and robust size-based separation method for high throughput microfluidic devices using acoustic radiation force. We developed a finite element modeling tool to predict the two-dimensional acoustic radiation force field perpendicular to the flow direction in microfluidic devices. Here we compare the results from this model with experimental parametric studies including variations of the PZT driving frequencies and voltages as well as various particle sizes and compressidensities. These experimental parametric studies also provide insight into the development of an adjustable 'virtual' pore-size filter as well as optimal operating conditions for various microparticle sizes. We demonstrated the separation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and MS2 bacteriophage using acoustic focusing. The acoustic radiation force did not affect the MS2 viruses, and their concentration profile remained unchanged. With optimized design of our microfluidic flow system we were able to achieve yields of > 90% for the MS2 with > 80% of the S. cerevisiae being removed in this continuous-flow sample preparation device.

  19. Automated Sample Preparation Platform for Mass Spectrometry-Based Plasma Proteomics and Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilém Guryča

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The identification of novel biomarkers from human plasma remains a critical need in order to develop and monitor drug therapies for nearly all disease areas. The discovery of novel plasma biomarkers is, however, significantly hampered by the complexity and dynamic range of proteins within plasma, as well as the inherent variability in composition from patient to patient. In addition, it is widely accepted that most soluble plasma biomarkers for diseases such as cancer will be represented by tissue leakage products, circulating in plasma at low levels. It is therefore necessary to find approaches with the prerequisite level of sensitivity in such a complex biological matrix. Strategies for fractionating the plasma proteome have been suggested, but improvements in sensitivity are often negated by the resultant process variability. Here we describe an approach using multidimensional chromatography and on-line protein derivatization, which allows for higher sensitivity, whilst minimizing the process variability. In order to evaluate this automated process fully, we demonstrate three levels of processing and compare sensitivity, throughput and reproducibility. We demonstrate that high sensitivity analysis of the human plasma proteome is possible down to the low ng/mL or even high pg/mL level with a high degree of technical reproducibility.

  20. Low-Cost 3D Printers Enable High-Quality and Automated Sample Preparation and Molecular Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamfai Chan

    Full Text Available Most molecular diagnostic assays require upfront sample preparation steps to isolate the target's nucleic acids, followed by its amplification and detection using various nucleic acid amplification techniques. Because molecular diagnostic methods are generally rather difficult to perform manually without highly trained users, automated and integrated systems are highly desirable but too costly for use at point-of-care or low-resource settings. Here, we showcase the development of a low-cost and rapid nucleic acid isolation and amplification platform by modifying entry-level 3D printers that cost between $400 and $750. Our modifications consisted of replacing the extruder with a tip-comb attachment that houses magnets to conduct magnetic particle-based nucleic acid extraction. We then programmed the 3D printer to conduct motions that can perform high-quality extraction protocols. Up to 12 samples can be processed simultaneously in under 13 minutes and the efficiency of nucleic acid isolation matches well against gold-standard spin-column-based extraction technology. Additionally, we used the 3D printer's heated bed to supply heat to perform water bath-based polymerase chain reactions (PCRs. Using another attachment to hold PCR tubes, the 3D printer was programmed to automate the process of shuttling PCR tubes between water baths. By eliminating the temperature ramping needed in most commercial thermal cyclers, the run time of a 35-cycle PCR protocol was shortened by 33%. This article demonstrates that for applications in resource-limited settings, expensive nucleic acid extraction devices and thermal cyclers that are used in many central laboratories can be potentially replaced by a device modified from inexpensive entry-level 3D printers.

  1. Low-Cost 3D Printers Enable High-Quality and Automated Sample Preparation and Molecular Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kamfai; Coen, Mauricio; Hardick, Justin; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Wong, Kah-Yat; Smith, Clayton; Wilson, Scott A; Vayugundla, Siva Praneeth; Wong, Season

    2016-01-01

    Most molecular diagnostic assays require upfront sample preparation steps to isolate the target's nucleic acids, followed by its amplification and detection using various nucleic acid amplification techniques. Because molecular diagnostic methods are generally rather difficult to perform manually without highly trained users, automated and integrated systems are highly desirable but too costly for use at point-of-care or low-resource settings. Here, we showcase the development of a low-cost and rapid nucleic acid isolation and amplification platform by modifying entry-level 3D printers that cost between $400 and $750. Our modifications consisted of replacing the extruder with a tip-comb attachment that houses magnets to conduct magnetic particle-based nucleic acid extraction. We then programmed the 3D printer to conduct motions that can perform high-quality extraction protocols. Up to 12 samples can be processed simultaneously in under 13 minutes and the efficiency of nucleic acid isolation matches well against gold-standard spin-column-based extraction technology. Additionally, we used the 3D printer's heated bed to supply heat to perform water bath-based polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). Using another attachment to hold PCR tubes, the 3D printer was programmed to automate the process of shuttling PCR tubes between water baths. By eliminating the temperature ramping needed in most commercial thermal cyclers, the run time of a 35-cycle PCR protocol was shortened by 33%. This article demonstrates that for applications in resource-limited settings, expensive nucleic acid extraction devices and thermal cyclers that are used in many central laboratories can be potentially replaced by a device modified from inexpensive entry-level 3D printers. PMID:27362424

  2. Low-Cost 3D Printers Enable High-Quality and Automated Sample Preparation and Molecular Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kamfai; Coen, Mauricio; Hardick, Justin; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Wong, Kah-Yat; Smith, Clayton; Wilson, Scott A.; Vayugundla, Siva Praneeth; Wong, Season

    2016-01-01

    Most molecular diagnostic assays require upfront sample preparation steps to isolate the target’s nucleic acids, followed by its amplification and detection using various nucleic acid amplification techniques. Because molecular diagnostic methods are generally rather difficult to perform manually without highly trained users, automated and integrated systems are highly desirable but too costly for use at point-of-care or low-resource settings. Here, we showcase the development of a low-cost and rapid nucleic acid isolation and amplification platform by modifying entry-level 3D printers that cost between $400 and $750. Our modifications consisted of replacing the extruder with a tip-comb attachment that houses magnets to conduct magnetic particle-based nucleic acid extraction. We then programmed the 3D printer to conduct motions that can perform high-quality extraction protocols. Up to 12 samples can be processed simultaneously in under 13 minutes and the efficiency of nucleic acid isolation matches well against gold-standard spin-column-based extraction technology. Additionally, we used the 3D printer’s heated bed to supply heat to perform water bath-based polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). Using another attachment to hold PCR tubes, the 3D printer was programmed to automate the process of shuttling PCR tubes between water baths. By eliminating the temperature ramping needed in most commercial thermal cyclers, the run time of a 35-cycle PCR protocol was shortened by 33%. This article demonstrates that for applications in resource-limited settings, expensive nucleic acid extraction devices and thermal cyclers that are used in many central laboratories can be potentially replaced by a device modified from inexpensive entry-level 3D printers. PMID:27362424

  3. On-site detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus using a portable, automated sample preparation and PCR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and economically devastating disease of farm livestock. The etiological agent, FMD virus (FMDV), is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus belonging to the genus Aphthovirus within the family Picornaviridae. Rapid and accurate confirmation of the presence of FMDV is needed for effective control and eradication of the disease. An on-site detection test would be highly advantageous as the time taken to transport suspect clinical material to a central laboratory can often be lengthy, thus delaying a definitive diagnosis in the event of an outbreak. This study describes the development of a molecular assay for the detection of all seven serotypes of FMDV using novel technology, namely: Linear-After-The- Exponential (LATE)-PCR, for transfer onto a portable, easy-to-use, fully automated sample preparation and RT-PCR instrument. Primers and a mismatch tolerant probe were designed from consensus sequences in the FMDV 3D (RNA polymerase) gene to detect the target and its variants at low temperature. An internal control (IC) was included to validate negative results. After demonstrating that the LATE RT-PCR signal at end-point was proportional to number of target molecules over the range 10 to 1 million copies, the assay was compared with a one-step real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assay (also targeting the 3D) used routinely by reference laboratories. The LATE RT-PCR assay amplified RNA extracted from multiple strains of all FMDV serotypes. Of the 121 FMDV-positive samples tested, 119 were positive by both rRT-PCR and LATE RT-PCR tests while 118 had tested positive by virus isolation at the time of receipt. Twenty-eight FMDVnegative samples failed to react in all 3 tests. There were no false positive signals with RNA from other vesicular disease-causing viruses. Each FMDV-negative sample generated a signal from the IC, ruling out amplification failures. A dilution series of an FMDV reference strain demonstrated

  4. Manual versus automated blood sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilmann, A C; Kalliokoski, Otto; Sørensen, Dorte B;

    2014-01-01

    corticosterone metabolites, and expressed more anxious behavior than did the mice of the other groups. Plasma corticosterone levels of mice subjected to tail blood sampling were also elevated, although less significantly. Mice subjected to automated blood sampling were less affected with regard to the parameters......Facial vein (cheek blood) and caudal vein (tail blood) phlebotomy are two commonly used techniques for obtaining blood samples from laboratory mice, while automated blood sampling through a permanent catheter is a relatively new technique in mice. The present study compared physiological parameters......, glucocorticoid dynamics as well as the behavior of mice sampled repeatedly for 24 h by cheek blood, tail blood or automated blood sampling from the carotid artery. Mice subjected to cheek blood sampling lost significantly more body weight, had elevated levels of plasma corticosterone, excreted more fecal...

  5. Influence of sample preparation and reliability of automated numerical refocusing in stain-free analysis of dissected tissues with quantitative phase digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn; Lenz, Philipp; Bettenworth, Dominik; Krausewitz, Philipp; Domagk, Dirk; Ketelhut, Steffi

    2015-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has been demonstrated to be a versatile tool for high resolution non-destructive quantitative phase imaging of surfaces and multi-modal minimally-invasive monitoring of living cell cultures in-vitro. DHM provides quantitative monitoring of physiological processes through functional imaging and structural analysis which, for example, gives new insight into signalling of cellular water permeability and cell morphology changes due to toxins and infections. Also the analysis of dissected tissues quantitative DHM phase contrast prospects application fields by stain-free imaging and the quantification of tissue density changes. We show that DHM allows imaging of different tissue layers with high contrast in unstained tissue sections. As the investigation of fixed samples represents a very important application field in pathology, we also analyzed the influence of the sample preparation. The retrieved data demonstrate that the quality of quantitative DHM phase images of dissected tissues depends strongly on the fixing method and common staining agents. As in DHM the reconstruction is performed numerically, multi-focus imaging is achieved from a single digital hologram. Thus, we evaluated the automated refocussing feature of DHM for application on different types of dissected tissues and revealed that on moderately stained samples highly reproducible holographic autofocussing can be achieved. Finally, it is demonstrated that alterations of the spatial refractive index distribution in murine and human tissue samples represent a reliable absolute parameter that is related of different degrees of inflammation in experimental colitis and Crohn's disease. This paves the way towards the usage of DHM in digital pathology for automated histological examinations and further studies to elucidate the translational potential of quantitative phase microscopy for the clinical management of patients, e.g., with inflammatory bowel disease.

  6. Final Report BW Sample Collection& Preparation Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, R P; Belgrader, P; Meyer, G; Benett, W J; Richards, J B; Hadley, D R; Stratton, P L; Milanovich, F P

    2002-01-31

    The objective of this project was to develop the technique needed to prepare a field collected sample for laboratory analysis and build a portable integrated biological detection instrument with new miniaturized and automated sample purification capabilities. The device will prepare bacterial spores, bacterial vegetative cells, and viral particles for PCR amplification.

  7. Modular microfluidic system for biological sample preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Klint A.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Ness, Kevin Dean

    2015-09-29

    A reconfigurable modular microfluidic system for preparation of a biological sample including a series of reconfigurable modules for automated sample preparation adapted to selectively include a) a microfluidic acoustic focusing filter module, b) a dielectrophoresis bacteria filter module, c) a dielectrophoresis virus filter module, d) an isotachophoresis nucleic acid filter module, e) a lyses module, and f) an isotachophoresis-based nucleic acid filter.

  8. Automated system for fractionation of blood samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, N. E.; Genung, R. K.; Johnson, W. F.; Mrochek, J. E.; Scott, C. D.

    1978-01-01

    A prototype system for preparing multiple fractions of blood components (plasma, washed red cells, and hemolysates) using automated techniques has been developed. The procedure is based on centrifugal separation and differential pressure-induced transfer in a rotor that has been designed to process numerous samples simultaneously. Red cells are sedimented against the outer walls of the sample chamber, and plasma is syphoned, by imposition of eithr a slight positive or negative pressure, into individual reservoirs in a collection ring. Washing of cells is performed in situ; samples of washed cells, either packed or in saline solution, can be recovered. Cellular hemolysates are prepared and automatically transferred to individual, commercially available collection vials ready for storage in liquid nitrogen or immediate analysis. The system has potential application in any biomedical area which requires high sample throughput and in which one or more of the blood fractions will be used. A separate unit has been designed and developed for the semiautomated cleaning of the blood processing vessel.

  9. Differential proteomic analysis of mouse macrophages exposed to adsorbate-loaded heavy fuel oil derived combustion particles using an automated sample-preparation workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanashova, Tamara; Popp, Oliver; Orasche, Jürgen; Karg, Erwin; Harndorf, Horst; Stengel, Benjamin; Sklorz, Martin; Streibel, Thorsten; Zimmermann, Ralf; Dittmar, Gunnar

    2015-08-01

    Ship diesel combustion particles are known to cause broad cytotoxic effects and thereby strongly impact human health. Particles from heavy fuel oil (HFO) operated ships are considered as particularly dangerous. However, little is known about the relevant components of the ship emission particles. In particular, it is interesting to know if the particle cores, consisting of soot and metal oxides, or the adsorbate layers, consisting of semi- and low-volatile organic compounds and salts, are more relevant. We therefore sought to relate the adsorbates and the core composition of HFO combustion particles to the early cellular responses, allowing for the development of measures that counteract their detrimental effects. Hence, the semi-volatile coating of HFO-operated ship diesel engine particles was removed by stepwise thermal stripping using different temperatures. RAW 264.7 macrophages were exposed to native and thermally stripped particles in submersed culture. Proteomic changes were monitored by two different quantitative mass spectrometry approaches, stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and dimethyl labeling. Our data revealed that cells reacted differently to native or stripped HFO combustion particles. Cells exposed to thermally stripped particles showed a very differential reaction with respect to the composition of the individual chemical load of the particle. The cellular reactions of the HFO particles included reaction to oxidative stress, reorganization of the cytoskeleton and changes in endocytosis. Cells exposed to the 280 °C treated particles showed an induction of RNA-related processes, a number of mitochondria-associated processes as well as DNA damage response, while the exposure to 580 °C treated HFO particles mainly induced the regulation of intracellular transport. In summary, our analysis based on a highly reproducible automated proteomic sample-preparation procedure shows a diverse cellular response, depending on the

  10. Universal Sample Preparation Module for Molecular Analysis in Space Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lynntech proposes to develop and demonstrate the ability of a compact, light-weight, and automated universal sample preparation module (USPM) to process samples...

  11. Automated sampling and control of gaseous simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Ruoguan

    2013-05-04

    In this work, we describe a method that automates the sampling and control of gaseous fluid simulations. Several recent approaches have provided techniques for artists to generate high-resolution simulations based on a low-resolution simulation. However, often in applications the overall flow in the low-resolution simulation that an animator observes and intends to preserve is composed of even lower frequencies than the low resolution itself. In such cases, attempting to match the low-resolution simulation precisely is unnecessarily restrictive. We propose a new sampling technique to efficiently capture the overall flow of a fluid simulation, at the scale of user\\'s choice, in such a way that the sampled information is sufficient to represent what is virtually perceived and no more. Thus, by applying control based on the sampled data, we ensure that in the resulting high-resolution simulation, the overall flow is matched to the low-resolution simulation and the fine details on the high resolution are preserved. The samples we obtain have both spatial and temporal continuity that allows smooth keyframe matching and direct manipulation of visible elements such as smoke density through temporal blending of samples. We demonstrate that a user can easily configure a simulation with our system to achieve desired results. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  12. Microfluidic Sample Preparation for Immunoassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visuri, S; Benett, W; Bettencourt, K; Chang, J; Fisher, K; Hamilton, J; Krulevitch, P; Park, C; Stockton, C; Tarte, L; Wang, A; Wilson, T

    2001-08-09

    Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are developing means to collect and identify fluid-based biological pathogens in the forms of proteins, viruses, and bacteria. to support detection instruments, they are developing a flexible fluidic sample preparation unit. The overall goal of this Microfluidic Module is to input a fluid sample, containing background particulates and potentially target compounds, and deliver a processed sample for detection. They are developing techniques for sample purification, mixing, and filtration that would be useful to many applications including immunologic and nucleic acid assays. Many of these fluidic functions are accomplished with acoustic radiation pressure or dielectrophoresis. They are integrating these technologies into packaged systems with pumps and valves to control fluid flow through the fluidic circuit.

  13. Ultra-Fast Sample Preparation for High-Throughput Proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Hixson, Kim K.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-06-21

    Sample preparation oftentimes can be the Achilles Heel of any analytical process and in the field of proteomics, preparing samples for mass spectrometric analysis is no exception. Current goals, concerning proteomic sample preparation on a large scale, include efforts toward improving reproducibility, reducing the time of processing and ultimately the automation of the entire workflow. This chapter reviews an array of recent approaches applied to bottom-up proteomics sample preparation to reduce the processing time down from hours to minutes. The current state-of-the-art in the field uses different energy inputs like microwave, ultrasound or pressure to perform the four basic steps in sample preparation: protein extraction, denaturation, reduction and alkylation, and digestion. No single energy input for enhancement of proteome sample preparation has become the universal gold standard. Instead, a combination of different energy inputs tend to produce the best results. This chapter further describes the future trends in the field such as the hyphenation of sample preparation with downstream detection and analysis systems. Finally, a detailed protocol describing the combined use of both pressure cycling technology and ultrasonic energy inputs to hasten proteomic sample preparation is presented.

  14. Automated preparation of DNA sequences for publication.

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, M B; Senapathy, P

    1986-01-01

    A computer program which draws DNA sequences is described. A simple method is used which enables the user to highlight or annotate specific parts of a sequence. The sizes of the characters in the sequence to be drawn are specified by the user. In addition, vertical spacing between lines and horizontal spacing between characters can be specified. Sequences can be prepared and high quality output produced on a plotter in a short period of time, making the program advantageous to use over typing...

  15. Robotic, MEMS-based Multi Utility Sample Preparation Instrument for ISS Biological Workstation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop a multi-functional, automated sample preparation instrument for biological wet-lab workstations on the ISS. The instrument is based on a...

  16. Field Sample Preparation Method Development for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-proliferation and International Security (NA-241) established a working group of researchers from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to evaluate the utilization of in-field mass spectrometry for safeguards applications. The survey of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) mass spectrometers (MS) revealed no instrumentation existed capable of meeting all the potential safeguards requirements for performance, portability, and ease of use. Additionally, fieldable instruments are unlikely to meet the International Target Values (ITVs) for accuracy and precision for isotope ratio measurements achieved with laboratory methods. The major gaps identified for in-field actinide isotope ratio analysis were in the areas of: 1. sample preparation and/or sample introduction, 2. size reduction of mass analyzers and ionization sources, 3. system automation, and 4. decreased system cost. Development work in 2 through 4, numerated above continues, in the private and public sector. LANL is focusing on developing sample preparation/sample introduction methods for use with the different sample types anticipated for safeguard applications. Addressing sample handling and sample preparation methods for MS analysis will enable use of new MS instrumentation as it becomes commercially available. As one example, we have developed a rapid, sample preparation method for dissolution of uranium and plutonium oxides using ammonium bifluoride (ABF). ABF is a significantly safer and faster alternative to digestion with boiling combinations of highly concentrated mineral acids. Actinides digested with ABF yield fluorides, which can then be analyzed directly or chemically converted and separated using established column chromatography techniques as needed prior to isotope analysis. The reagent volumes and the sample processing steps associated with ABF sample digestion lend themselves to automation and field

  17. The MEGAPIE PIE sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the way towards Accelerator-driven Systems (ADS), the MEGAPIE (Mega-Watt Pilot Experiment) project is one of the key milestones. The MEGAPIE project aimed to prove that a liquid Lead-Bismuth-Eutectic (LBE) spallation target can be licensed, planned, built, operated, dismantled, examined and disposed. The project has finished the phase of producing the samples for Post-irradiation Examination (PIE). Samples to study structural material property changes due to the harsh environment of high temperatures, contact with flowing liquid metal (LBE), proton and neutron irradiation will be investigated by all partner laboratories (CEA, CNRS, ENEA, KIT, PSI and SCK-CEN). (authors)

  18. Automated PolyU Palmprint sample Registration and Coarse Classification

    CERN Document Server

    M., Dhananjay D; Muralikrishna, I V

    2011-01-01

    Biometric based authentication for secured access to resources has gained importance, due to their reliable, invariant and discriminating features. Palmprint is one such biometric entity. Prior to classification and identification registering a sample palmprint is an important activity. In this paper we propose a computationally effective method for automated registration of samples from PlolyU palmprint database. In our approach we preprocess the sample and trace the border to find the nearest point from center of sample. Angle between vector representing the nearest point and vector passing through the center is used for automated palm sample registration. The angle of inclination between start and end point of heart line and life line is used for basic classification of palmprint samples in left class and right class.

  19. A New Era for Cytogenetics Laboratories: Automated Specimen Preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Shaunnessey, M.S.; Martin, A.O.; Sabrin, H.W.; Cimino, M.C.; Rissman, A

    1981-01-01

    The current capacity of clinical cytogenetics laboratories is limited by the labor intensiveness of the process. Specimen preparation for analysis consists of several steps: culture initiation, culture “harvest” (transfer of cells in culture to microscope slides), and staining. Steps in the analysis include cell location and selection, counting, and examination of chromosomes. In this report we will present preliminary results of evaluations and development of a Computer Automated Specimen Pr...

  20. Innovative methods for inorganic sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procedures and guidelines are given for the dissolution of a variety of selected materials using fusion, microwave, and Parr bomb techniques. These materials include germanium glass, corium-concrete mixtures, and zeolites. Emphasis is placed on sample-preparation approaches that produce a single master solution suitable for complete multielement characterization of the sample. In addition, data are presented on the soil microwave digestion method approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Advantages and disadvantages of each sample-preparation technique are summarized

  1. Automated Sampling and Extraction of Krypton from Small Air Samples for Kr-85 Measurement Using Atom Trap Trace Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atom-Trap-Trace-Analysis (ATTA) provides the capability of measuring the Krypton-85 concentration in microlitre amounts of krypton extracted from air samples of about 1 litre. This sample size is sufficiently small to allow for a range of applications, including on-site spot sampling and continuous sampling over periods of several hours. All samples can be easily handled and transported to an off-site laboratory for ATTA measurement, or stored and analyzed on demand. Bayesian sampling methodologies can be applied by blending samples for bulk measurement and performing in-depth analysis as required. Prerequisite for measurement is the extraction of a pure krypton fraction from the sample. This paper introduces an extraction unit able to isolate the krypton in small ambient air samples with high speed, high efficiency and in a fully automated manner using a combination of cryogenic distillation and gas chromatography. Air samples are collected using an automated smart sampler developed in-house to achieve a constant sampling rate over adjustable time periods ranging from 5 minutes to 3 hours per sample. The smart sampler can be deployed in the field and operate on battery for one week to take up to 60 air samples. This high flexibility of sampling and the fast, robust sample preparation are a valuable tool for research and the application of Kr-85 measurements to novel Safeguards procedures. (author)

  2. An automated 55 GHz cryogenic Josephson sampling oscilloscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodin, P.; Jacobsen, M. L.; Kyhle, Anders; Hansen, Jørn Bindslev; Davidson, A.; Brady, M.; Olsen, L.; Qualmann, Werner

    1993-01-01

    A computer-automated superconductive 55 GHz sampling oscilloscope based on 4 kA/cm2, Nb/Nb2O5/Pb edge Josephson junctions is presented. The Josephson sampler chip was flip-chip bonded to a carrier chip with a coplanar transmission line by use of a novel flip-chip bonding machine. A 5.6 ps step...

  3. High-throughput sample processing and sample management; the functional evolution of classical cytogenetic assay towards automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakumar, Adarsh; Subramanian, Uma; Prasanna, Pataje G S

    2015-11-01

    High-throughput individual diagnostic dose assessment is essential for medical management of radiation-exposed subjects after a mass casualty. Cytogenetic assays such as the Dicentric Chromosome Assay (DCA) are recognized as the gold standard by international regulatory authorities. DCA is a multi-step and multi-day bioassay. DCA, as described in the IAEA manual, can be used to assess dose up to 4-6 weeks post-exposure quite accurately but throughput is still a major issue and automation is very essential. The throughput is limited, both in terms of sample preparation as well as analysis of chromosome aberrations. Thus, there is a need to design and develop novel solutions that could utilize extensive laboratory automation for sample preparation, and bioinformatics approaches for chromosome-aberration analysis to overcome throughput issues. We have transitioned the bench-based cytogenetic DCA to a coherent process performing high-throughput automated biodosimetry for individual dose assessment ensuring quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) aspects in accordance with international harmonized protocols. A Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) is designed, implemented and adapted to manage increased sample processing capacity, develop and maintain standard operating procedures (SOP) for robotic instruments, avoid data transcription errors during processing, and automate analysis of chromosome-aberrations using an image analysis platform. Our efforts described in this paper intend to bridge the current technological gaps and enhance the potential application of DCA for a dose-based stratification of subjects following a mass casualty. This paper describes one such potential integrated automated laboratory system and functional evolution of the classical DCA towards increasing critically needed throughput. PMID:26520383

  4. Sample preparation for single molecule localization microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John R; Ross, Stephen T; Davidson, Michael W

    2013-11-21

    Single molecule localization-based optical nanoscopy was introduced in 2006, surpassing traditional diffraction-limited resolutions by an order of magnitude. Seven years later, this superresolution technique is continuing to follow a trend of increasing popularity and pervasiveness, with the proof-of-concept work long finished and commercial implementations now available. However one important aspect that tends to become lost in translation is the importance of proper sample preparation, with very few resources addressing the considerations that must be made when preparing samples for imaging with single molecule level sensitivity. Presented here is a an in-depth analysis of all aspects of sample preparation for single molecule superresolution, including both live and fixed cell preparation, choice of fluorophore, fixation and staining techniques, and imaging buffer considerations. PMID:24084850

  5. Preparation of honey sample for tritium monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of preparation of honey sample for tritium monitoring was described. The equipments consist of an air and honey supply system, a quartz combustor with CM-type monolithic combustion catalyst and a condensation system. In the equipments, honey sample was converted into cooling water by the distilling, cracking and carbonizing procedures for tritium counting. The recovery ratio is 99.0 ± 4.5 percent for tritiated water and 96.0 ± 2.0 for tritiated organic compounds. It is a feasible preparing method for the total tritium monitoring in honey sample

  6. Automated processing of whole blood samples for the determination of immunosuppressants by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Vogeser, Michael; Spöhrer, Ute

    2006-01-01

    Background: Liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is an efficient technology for routine determination of immunosuppressants in whole blood; however, time-consuming manual sample preparation remains a significant limitation of this technique. Methods: Using a commercially available robotic pipetting system (Tecan Freedom EVO), we developed an automated sample-preparation protocol for quantification of tacrolimus in whole blood by LC-MS/MS. Barcode reading, sample resuspens...

  7. Sample preparation for x-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In my experience over many years it is not uncommon for a geologist to present a suite of rocks or powders for analysis and demand results of high analytical precision which are not warranted for the following reasons: 1. Sample collection is unsatisfactory. 2. Little or no attention has been given to cleaning and splitting the sample. The ultimate aim of the preparation laboratory is to produce a homogeneous, uncontaminated aliquot of the total sample pulverised to a grain size of less than 10 microns. Clearly this is not possible as the grinding equipment will always impart some level of contamination to the sample and there is no grinder available which can produce powders of grain size less than 10 microns without imparting unacceptable levels of contamination to the sample. Modern x-ray spectrometers are extremely stable instruments. Most laboratories run a drift monitor at the start of each shift or when starting analyses requiring a different calibration. Depending on the method of sample preparation errors from this source can be up to two orders of magnitude greater than instrumental errors. For this reason it is imperative that sample preparation methods for a particular analysis are carefully set up and that these procedures are followed implicitly by the sample preparation laboratory. All too often sample preparation is relegated to a secondary role carried out in poorly designed work areas with inappropriate equipment by poorly trained unsupervised staff. Over the past few years staffing reductions and the requirement to crush an increasingly large volume of sample has given the impetus to develop improved jaw crushers. An example of this is the Boyd Crusher which has been designed to minimise these problems, ie this crusher has high throughput, can be easily cleaned and produces minimal contamination. Copyright (1999) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  8. An Automated Home Made Low Cost Vibrating Sample Magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kundu, S

    2011-01-01

    The design and operation of a homemade low cost vibrating sample magnetometer is described here. The sensitivity of this instrument is better than 10-2 emu and found to be very efficient for the measurement of magnetization of most of the ferromagnetic and other magnetic materials as a function of temperature down to 77 K and magnetic field upto 800 Oe. Both M(H) and M(T) data acquisition are fully automated employing computer and Labview software

  9. Trends and applications of integrated automated ultra-trace sample handling and analysis (T9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Automated analysis, sub-ppt detection limits, and the trend toward speciated analysis (rather than just elemental analysis) force the innovation of sophisticated and integrated sample preparation and analysis techniques. Traditionally, the ability to handle samples at ppt and sub-ppt levels has been limited to clean laboratories and special sample handling techniques and equipment. The world of sample handling has passed a threshold where older or 'old fashioned' traditional techniques no longer provide the ability to see the sample due to the influence of the analytical blank and the fragile nature of the analyte. When samples require decomposition, extraction, separation and manipulation, application of newer more sophisticated sample handling systems are emerging that enable ultra-trace analysis and species manipulation. In addition, new instrumentation has emerged which integrate sample preparation and analysis to enable on-line near real-time analysis. Examples of those newer sample-handling methods will be discussed and current examples provided as alternatives to traditional sample handling. Two new techniques applying ultra-trace microwave energy enhanced sample handling have been developed that permit sample separation and refinement while performing species manipulation during decomposition. A demonstration, that applies to semiconductor materials, will be presented. Next, a new approach to the old problem of sample evaporation without losses will be demonstrated that is capable of retaining all elements and species tested. Both of those methods require microwave energy manipulation in specialized systems and are not accessible through convection, conduction, or other traditional energy applications. A new automated integrated method for handling samples for ultra-trace analysis has been developed. An on-line near real-time measurement system will be described that enables many new automated sample handling and measurement capabilities. This

  10. Sample preparations for spark source mass spectrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods have been developed for the preparation of various materials for spark source mass spectrography. The essential features of these preparations (all which can provide adequate precision in a cost-effective manner) consist in obtaining spark-stable electrode sample pieces, a common matrix, a reduction of anomolous effects in the spark, the incorporation of a suitable internal standard for plate response normalization, and a reduction in time

  11. Automated spike preparation system for Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) is a method frequently employed to measure dissolved, irradiated nuclear materials. A known quantity of a unique isotope of the element to be measured (referred to as the ''spike'') is added to the solution containing the analyte. The resulting solution is chemically purified then analyzed by mass spectrometry. By measuring the magnitude of the response for each isotope and the response for the ''unique spike'' then relating this to the known quantity of the ''spike'', the quantity of the nuclear material can be determined. An automated spike preparation system was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to dispense spikes for use in IDMS analytical methods. Prior to this development, technicians weighed each individual spike manually to achieve the accuracy required. This procedure was time-consuming and subjected the master stock solution to evaporation. The new system employs a high precision SMI Model 300 Unipump dispenser interfaced with an electronic balance and a portable Epson HX-20 notebook computer to automate spike preparation

  12. Automating Groundwater Sampling At Hanford, The Next Step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historically, the groundwater monitoring activities at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State have been very 'people intensive.' Approximately 1500 wells are sampled each year by field personnel or 'samplers.' These individuals have been issued pre-printed forms showing information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from 2 official electronic databases: the Hanford Well information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and other personnel posted the collected information onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. A pilot project for automating this extremely tedious process was lauched in 2008. Initially, the automation was focused on water-level measurements. Now, the effort is being extended to automate the meta-data associated with collecting groundwater samples. The project allowed electronic forms produced in the field by samplers to be used in a work flow process where the data is transferred to the database and electronic form is filed in managed records - thus eliminating manually completed forms. Elimating the manual forms and streamlining the data entry not only improved the accuracy of the information recorded, but also enhanced the efficiency and sampling capacity of field office personnel.

  13. AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD THE NEXT STEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CONNELL CW; CONLEY SF; HILDEBRAND RD; CUNNINGHAM DE; R_D_Doug_Hildebrand@rl.gov; DeVon_E_Cunningham@rl.gov

    2010-01-21

    Historically, the groundwater monitoring activities at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State have been very "people intensive." Approximately 1500 wells are sampled each year by field personnel or "samplers." These individuals have been issued pre-printed forms showing information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from 2 official electronic databases: the Hanford Well information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and other personnel posted the collected information onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. A pilot project for automating this extremely tedious process was lauched in 2008. Initially, the automation was focused on water-level measurements. Now, the effort is being extended to automate the meta-data associated with collecting groundwater samples. The project allowed electronic forms produced in the field by samplers to be used in a work flow process where the data is transferred to the database and electronic form is filed in managed records - thus eliminating manually completed forms. Elimating the manual forms and streamlining the data entry not only improved the accuracy of the information recorded, but also enhanced the efficiency and sampling capacity of field office personnel.

  14. Sample preparation method for scanning force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Jankov, I R; Szente, R N; Carreno, M N P; Swart, J W; Landers, R

    2001-01-01

    We present a method of sample preparation for studies of ion implantation on metal surfaces. The method, employing a mechanical mask, is specially adapted for samples analysed by Scanning Force Microscopy. It was successfully tested on polycrystalline copper substrates implanted with phosphorus ions at an acceleration voltage of 39 keV. The changes of the electrical properties of the surface were measured by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy and the surface composition was analysed by Auger Electron Spectroscopy.

  15. An automated 55 GHz cryogenic Josephson sampling oscilloscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer-automated superconductive 55 GHz sampling oscilloscope based on 4 kA/cm2, Nb/Nb2O5/Pb edge Josephson junctions is presented. The Josephson sampler chip was flip-chip bonded to a carrier chip with a coplanar transmission line by use of a novel flip-chip bonding machine. A 5.6 ps step pulse was successfully coupled in to the transmission line and 18.5 GHz multiple reflections plus a parasitic oscillation at 43 GHz were observed

  16. On-chip Ultrasonic Sample Preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Iranmanesh, Ida Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Acoustofluidics has become a well-established technology in the lab-on-a-chip scientific community. The technology involves primarily the manipulation of fluids and/or particles in microfluidic systems. It is used today for variety of applications such as handling, sorting, washing and separation of cells or micro-particles, and for mixing and pumping of fluids. When such manipulation functions are integrated in micro-devices, the technology has been used for clinical sample preparation as we...

  17. Total Integrated Sample Preparation for Microfluidic Immunoassays in Complex Biological Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Apori, Akwasi Asare

    2011-01-01

    A high-throughput protein analysis platform with integrated sample preparation is developed to address the identified technology gaps in biomarker validation, clinical and point-of-care diagnostics. The goals of the technology are to automate and integrate protein sample preparation with electrokinetic separations, implement immunoassays capable of processing raw biological fluids, and perform high-throughput protein assays targeted for disease diagnosis.Integration of multiple functions is ...

  18. Preparation of biological samples for SIMS analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: For the first time at ANSTO, a program of SIMS analysis of biological samples was undertaken. This presentation will discuss how the wide variety of samples were prepared, and the methods used to gain useful information from SIMS analysis. Lack of matrix-matched standards made quantification difficult, but the strength of SIMS lies in the ability to detect a wide range of stable isotopes with good spatial resolution. This makes the technique suitable for studying organisms that archive signature elements in their structure. Samples such as bivalve shells and crocodile osteoderms were vacuum-impregnated in resin to a size suitable for the SIMS sample holder. Polishing was followed by a sputter coating with gold to alleviate charging of the sample during SIMS analysis. Some samples were introduced directly on the sample holder, either stuck to a glass slide or simply held in place with spring and backing plate. The only treatment in this case was gold coating and degassing in a vacuum pumping station. The porous nature of materials such as leaves and stromatolites requires a period of time under vacuum to remove gases which could interfere with the ultra high vacuum required for SIMS analysis. A calcite standard was used for comparison of oxygen isotopic ratios, but the only matrix-matched standard was available for metal analysis of coral skeletons. Otherwise, the calcium content of the material was assumed to be uniform and acted as an internal standard from which isotopic ratios of other elements could be determined. SIMS analysis of biological samples demonstrated that some matrices could reveal an archive of pollution histories. These samples require matrix-matched standards if the trends observed from analyses are to be quantified

  19. Automated CBED processing: Sample thickness estimation based on analysis of zone-axis CBED pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automated processing of convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns is presented. The proposed methods are used in an automated tool for estimating the thickness of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples by matching an experimental zone-axis CBED pattern with a series of patterns simulated for known thicknesses. The proposed tool detects CBED disks, localizes a pattern in detected disks and unifies the coordinate system of the experimental pattern with the simulated one. The experimental pattern is then compared disk-by-disk with a series of simulated patterns each corresponding to different known thicknesses. The thickness of the most similar simulated pattern is then taken as the thickness estimate. The tool was tested on [0 1 1] Si, [0 1 0] α-Ti and [0 1 1] α-Ti samples prepared using different techniques. Results of the presented approach were compared with thickness estimates based on analysis of CBED patterns in two beam conditions. The mean difference between these two methods was 4.1% for the FIB-prepared silicon samples, 5.2% for the electro-chemically polished titanium and 7.9% for Ar+ ion-polished titanium. The proposed techniques can also be employed in other established CBED analyses. Apart from the thickness estimation, it can potentially be used to quantify lattice deformation, structure factors, symmetry, defects or extinction distance. - Highlights: • Automated TEM sample thickness estimation using zone-axis CBED is presented. • Computer vision and artificial intelligence are employed in CBED processing. • This approach reduces operator effort, analysis time and increases repeatability. • Individual parts can be employed in other analyses of CBED/diffraction pattern

  20. Automated CBED processing: Sample thickness estimation based on analysis of zone-axis CBED pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinger, M., E-mail: klinger@post.cz; Němec, M.; Polívka, L.; Gärtnerová, V.; Jäger, A.

    2015-03-15

    An automated processing of convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns is presented. The proposed methods are used in an automated tool for estimating the thickness of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples by matching an experimental zone-axis CBED pattern with a series of patterns simulated for known thicknesses. The proposed tool detects CBED disks, localizes a pattern in detected disks and unifies the coordinate system of the experimental pattern with the simulated one. The experimental pattern is then compared disk-by-disk with a series of simulated patterns each corresponding to different known thicknesses. The thickness of the most similar simulated pattern is then taken as the thickness estimate. The tool was tested on [0 1 1] Si, [0 1 0] α-Ti and [0 1 1] α-Ti samples prepared using different techniques. Results of the presented approach were compared with thickness estimates based on analysis of CBED patterns in two beam conditions. The mean difference between these two methods was 4.1% for the FIB-prepared silicon samples, 5.2% for the electro-chemically polished titanium and 7.9% for Ar{sup +} ion-polished titanium. The proposed techniques can also be employed in other established CBED analyses. Apart from the thickness estimation, it can potentially be used to quantify lattice deformation, structure factors, symmetry, defects or extinction distance. - Highlights: • Automated TEM sample thickness estimation using zone-axis CBED is presented. • Computer vision and artificial intelligence are employed in CBED processing. • This approach reduces operator effort, analysis time and increases repeatability. • Individual parts can be employed in other analyses of CBED/diffraction pattern.

  1. Ergonomic analysis of radiopharmaceuticals samples preparation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The doses of radioisotopes to be administrated in patients for diagnostic effect or therapy are prepared in the radiopharmacological sector. The preparation process adopts techniques that are aimed to reduce the exposition time of the professionals and the absorption of excessive doses for patients. The ergonomic analysis of this process contributes in the prevention of occupational illnesses and to prevent risks of accidents during the routines, providing welfare and security to the involved users and conferring to the process an adequate working standard. In this context it is perceived relevance of studies that deal with the analysis of factors that point with respect to the solution of problems and for establishing proposals that minimize risks in the exercise of the activities. Through a methodology that considers the application of the concepts of Ergonomics, it is searched the improvement of the effectiveness or the quality and reduction of the difficulties lived for the workers. The work prescribed, established through norms and procedures codified will be faced with the work effectively carried through, the real work, shaped to break the correct appreciation, with focus in the activities. This work has as objective to argue an ergonomic analysis of samples preparation process of radioisotopes in the Setor de Radiofarmacia do Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ). (author)

  2. Sample preparation for SEM of plant surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Pathan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant tissues must be dehydrated for observation in most electron microscopes. Although a number of sample processing techniques have been developed for preserving plant tissues in their original form and structure, none of them are guaranteed artefact-free. The current paper reviews common scanning electron microscopy techniques and the sample preparation methods employed for visualisation of leaves under specific types of electron microscopes. Common artefacts introduced by specific techniques on different leaf types are discussed. Comparative examples are depicted from our lab using similar techniques; the pros and cons for specific techniques are discussed. New promising techniques and microscopes, which can alleviate some of the problems encountered in conventional methods of leaf sample processing and visualisation, are also discussed. It is concluded that the choice of technique for a specific leaf sample is dictated by the surface features that need to be preserved (such as trichomes, epidermal cells or wax microstructure, the resolution to be achieved, availability of the appropriate processing equipment and the technical capabilities of the available electron microscope.

  3. Automated combustion accelerator mass spectrometry for the analysis of biomedical samples in the low attomole range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijn, Esther; Sandman, Hugo; Grossouw, Dimitri; Mocking, Johannes A J; Coulier, Leon; Vaes, Wouter H J

    2014-08-01

    The increasing role of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in biomedical research necessitates modernization of the traditional sample handling process. AMS was originally developed and used for carbon dating, therefore focusing on a very high precision but with a comparably low sample throughput. Here, we describe the combination of automated sample combustion with an elemental analyzer (EA) online coupled to an AMS via a dedicated interface. This setup allows direct radiocarbon measurements for over 70 samples daily by AMS. No sample processing is required apart from the pipetting of the sample into a tin foil cup, which is placed in the carousel of the EA. In our system, up to 200 AMS analyses are performed automatically without the need for manual interventions. We present results on the direct total (14)C count measurements in <2 μL human plasma samples. The method shows linearity over a range of 0.65-821 mBq/mL, with a lower limit of quantification of 0.65 mBq/mL (corresponding to 0.67 amol for acetaminophen). At these extremely low levels of activity, it becomes important to quantify plasma specific carbon percentages. This carbon percentage is automatically generated upon combustion of a sample on the EA. Apparent advantages of the present approach include complete omission of sample preparation (reduced hands-on time) and fully automated sample analysis. These improvements clearly stimulate the standard incorporation of microtracer research in the drug development process. In combination with the particularly low sample volumes required and extreme sensitivity, AMS strongly improves its position as a bioanalysis method. PMID:25033319

  4. 7 CFR 27.21 - Preparation of samples of cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preparation of samples of cotton. 27.21 Section 27.21... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.21 Preparation of samples of cotton. The samples from each bale shall be prepared as specified in this...

  5. Semicontinuous automated measurement of organic carbon in atmospheric aerosol samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chao; Rashinkar, Shilpa M; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2010-02-15

    A fully automated measurement system for ambient aerosol organic carbon, capable of unattended operation over extended periods, is described. Particles are collected in a cyclone with water as the collection medium. The collected sample is periodically aspirated by a syringe pump into a holding loop and then delivered to a wet oxidation reactor (WOR). Acid is added, and the WOR is purged to measure dissolved CO(2) or inorganic carbonates (IC) as evolved CO(2). The IC background can often be small and sufficiently constant to be corrected for, without separate measurement, by a blank subtraction. The organic material is now oxidized stepwise or in one step to CO(2). The one-step oxidation involves UV-persulfate treatment in the presence of ozone. This treatment converts organic carbon (OC) to CO(2), but elemental carbon is not oxidized. The CO(2) is continuously purged from solution and collected by two sequential miniature diffusion scrubbers (DSs), a short DS preceding a longer one. Each DS consists of a LiOH-filled porous hydrophobic membrane tube with terminal stainless steel tubes that function as conductance-sensing electrodes. As CO(2) is collected by the LiOH-filled DSs, hydroxide is converted into carbonate and the resulting decrease in conductivity is monitored. The simultaneous use of the dual short and long DS units bearing different concentrations of LiOH permits both good sensitivity and a large dynamic range. The limit of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) is approximately 140 ng of C. With a typical sampling period of 30 min at a sampling rate of 30 L/min, this corresponds to an LOD of 160 ng/m(3). The approach also provides information on the ease of oxidation of the carbonaceous aerosol and hence the nature of the carbon contained therein. Ambient aerosol organic carbon data are presented. PMID:20092351

  6. Automated sampling assessment for molecular simulations using the effective sample size

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xin; Zuckerman, Daniel M

    2010-01-01

    To quantify the progress in development of algorithms and forcefields used in molecular simulations, a method for the assessment of the sampling quality is needed. We propose a general method to assess the sampling quality through the estimation of the number of independent samples obtained from molecular simulations. This method is applicable to both dynamic and nondynamic methods and utilizes the variance in the populations of physical states to determine the ESS. We test the correctness and robustness of our procedure in a variety of systems--two-state toy model, all-atom butane, coarse-grained calmodulin, all-atom dileucine and Met-enkaphalin. We also introduce an automated procedure to obtain approximate physical states from dynamic trajectories: this procedure allows for sample--size estimation for systems for which physical states are not known in advance.

  7. Reducing Workload in Systematic Review Preparation Using Automated Citation Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, A M; Hersh, W R; Peterson, K; Yen, Po-Yin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether automated classification of document citations can be useful in reducing the time spent by experts reviewing journal articles for inclusion in updating systematic reviews of drug class efficacy for treatment of disease.

  8. Design Automation Systems for Production Preparation : Applied on the Rotary Draw Bending Process

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Intensive competition on the global market puts great pressure on manufacturing companies to develop and produce products that meet requirements from customers and investors. One key factor in meeting these requirements is the efficiency of the product development and the production preparation process. Design automation is a powerful tool to increase efficiency in these two processes. The benefits of automating the production preparation process are shortened led-time, improved product perfo...

  9. Automated MALDI Matrix Coating System for Multiple Tissue Samples for Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounfield, William P.; Garrett, Timothy J.

    2012-03-01

    Uniform matrix deposition on tissue samples for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is key for reproducible analyte ion signals. Current methods often result in nonhomogenous matrix deposition, and take time and effort to produce acceptable ion signals. Here we describe a fully-automated method for matrix deposition using an enclosed spray chamber and spray nozzle for matrix solution delivery. A commercial air-atomizing spray nozzle was modified and combined with solenoid controlled valves and a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) to control and deliver the matrix solution. A spray chamber was employed to contain the nozzle, sample, and atomized matrix solution stream, and to prevent any interference from outside conditions as well as allow complete control of the sample environment. A gravity cup was filled with MALDI matrix solutions, including DHB in chloroform/methanol (50:50) at concentrations up to 60 mg/mL. Various samples (including rat brain tissue sections) were prepared using two deposition methods (spray chamber, inkjet). A linear ion trap equipped with an intermediate-pressure MALDI source was used for analyses. Optical microscopic examination showed a uniform coating of matrix crystals across the sample. Overall, the mass spectral images gathered from tissues coated using the spray chamber system were of better quality and more reproducible than from tissue specimens prepared by the inkjet deposition method.

  10. Establishing a novel automated magnetic bead-based method for the extraction of DNA from a variety of forensic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Sebastian; Neumann, Jan; Zierdt, Holger; Gébel, Gabriella; Röscheisen, Christiane

    2012-09-01

    Automated systems have been increasingly utilized for DNA extraction by many forensic laboratories to handle growing numbers of forensic casework samples while minimizing the risk of human errors and assuring high reproducibility. The step towards automation however is not easy: The automated extraction method has to be very versatile to reliably prepare high yields of pure genomic DNA from a broad variety of sample types on different carrier materials. To prevent possible cross-contamination of samples or the loss of DNA, the components of the kit have to be designed in a way that allows for the automated handling of the samples with no manual intervention necessary. DNA extraction using paramagnetic particles coated with a DNA-binding surface is predestined for an automated approach. For this study, we tested different DNA extraction kits using DNA-binding paramagnetic particles with regard to DNA yield and handling by a Freedom EVO(®)150 extraction robot (Tecan) equipped with a Te-MagS magnetic separator. Among others, the extraction kits tested were the ChargeSwitch(®)Forensic DNA Purification Kit (Invitrogen), the PrepFiler™Automated Forensic DNA Extraction Kit (Applied Biosystems) and NucleoMag™96 Trace (Macherey-Nagel). After an extensive test phase, we established a novel magnetic bead extraction method based upon the NucleoMag™ extraction kit (Macherey-Nagel). The new method is readily automatable and produces high yields of DNA from different sample types (blood, saliva, sperm, contact stains) on various substrates (filter paper, swabs, cigarette butts) with no evidence of a loss of magnetic beads or sample cross-contamination. PMID:22310206

  11. Automated sampling and data processing derived from biomimetic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Mark; Vissing, Thomas; Boesen, P.;

    2009-01-01

    data processing software to analyze and organize the large amounts of data generated. In this work, we developed an automated instrumental voltage clamp solution based on a custom-designed software controller application (the WaveManager), which enables automated on-line voltage clamp data acquisition...... combined solution provides a cost efficient and fast way to acquire, process and administrate large amounts of voltage clamp data that may be too laborious and time consuming to handle manually....... applicable to long-time series experiments. We designed another software program for off-line data processing. The automation of the on-line voltage clamp data acquisition and off-line processing was furthermore integrated with a searchable database (DiscoverySheet (TM)) for efficient data management. The...

  12. The preparation of cervical scrape material for automated cytology using gallocyanin chrome-alum stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, P J; Tucker, J H

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for preparing cervical scrape specimens for automated analysis on the Cerviscan prescreening system. In order to reduce the cellular clumping found in cervical scrape material, cells are collected in suspension, syringed to disaggregate the cell clumps, and then pipetted onto a glass to give a monolayer of cells. The cells are then stained with gallocyanin chrome-alum to give the required quantitation of nucleic acid content, using a rapid staining procedure. Experimental results are given which show that specimens prepared by this method are more suitable for automated analysis than the conventional Papanicolaou stained preparation. PMID:86562

  13. Sample preparation system for microfluidic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosier, Bruce P. (San Francisco, CA); Crocker, Robert W. (Fremont, CA); Patel, Kamlesh D. (Dublin, CA); Harnett, Cindy K. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-05-08

    An apparatus that couples automated injection with flow feedback to provide nanoliter accuracy in controlling microliter volumes. The apparatus comprises generally a source of hydraulic fluid pressure, a fluid isolator joined to the outlet of the hydraulic pressure source and a flow sensor to provide pressure-driven analyte metering. For operation generally and particularly in microfluidic systems the hydraulic pressure source is typically an electrokinetic (EK) pump that incorporates gasless electrodes. The apparatus is capable of metering sub-microliter volumes at flowrates of 1 100 .mu.L/min into microsystem load pressures of up to 1000 50 psi, respectively. Flowrates can be specified within 0.5 .mu.L/min and volumes as small as 80 nL can be metered.

  14. Influences of sample preparations on dentine ESR signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work is to study influences of sample preparations on dentine ESR (electron spin resonance) signals, in order to use dentine samples for dose reconstruction, which has been performed with enamel samples. The dentine and enamel samples were collected from non-irradiated adult teeth and prepared by mechanical or mechanical plus chemical methods. The samples were scanned by an ESR spectrometer before and after their irradiation by 60Co γ-rays. The sensitivities of ESR signals of dentine and enamel samples to irradiation dose differed significantly among different sample preparation methods. The results show that dentine samples mechanically and chemically prepared have good enough ESR response to low dose γ-ray irradiations, and it is possible to use the dentine samples for dose reconstruction, as a substitution to enamel samples when they are short of supply. (authors)

  15. Automated washing of FTA Card punches and PCR setup for reference samples using a LIMS-controlled Sias Xantus automated liquid handler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Olsen, Addie Nina; Frøslev, Tobias G.;

    2009-01-01

    We have implemented and validated automated methods for washing FTA Card punches containing buccal samples and subsequent PCR setup using a Sias Xantus automated liquid handler. The automated methods were controlled by worklists generated by our LabWare Laboratory Information Management System...

  16. Fluidics platform and method for sample preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benner, Henry W.; Dzenitis, John M.

    2016-06-21

    Provided herein are fluidics platforms and related methods for performing integrated sample collection and solid-phase extraction of a target component of the sample all in one tube. The fluidics platform comprises a pump, particles for solid-phase extraction and a particle-holding means. The method comprises contacting the sample with one or more reagents in a pump, coupling a particle-holding means to the pump and expelling the waste out of the pump while the particle-holding means retains the particles inside the pump. The fluidics platform and methods herein described allow solid-phase extraction without pipetting and centrifugation.

  17. The NOSAMS sample preparation laboratory in the next millenium: Progress after the WOCE program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1991, the primary charge of the National Ocean Sciences AMS (NOSAMS) facility at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has been to supply high throughput, high precision AMS 14C analyses for seawater samples collected as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE). Approximately 13,000 samples taken as part of WOCE should be fully analyzed by the end of Y2K. Additional sample sources and techniques must be identified and incorporated if NOSAMS is to continue in its present operation mode. A trend in AMS today is the ability to routinely process and analyze radiocarbon samples that contain tiny amounts (14C analysis has been recognized as a major facility goal. The installation of a new 134-position MC-SNICS ion source, which utilizes a smaller graphite target cartridge than presently used, is one step towards realizing this goal. New preparation systems constructed in the sample preparation laboratory (SPL) include an automated bank of 10 small-volume graphite reactors, an automated system to process organic carbon samples, and a multi-dimensional preparative capillary gas chromatograph (PCGC)

  18. Automated Training Sample Extraction for Global Land Cover Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Julien Radoux; Céline Lamarche; Eric Van Bogaert; Sophie Bontemps; Carsten Brockmann; Pierre Defourny

    2014-01-01

    Land cover is one of the essential climate variables of the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI). In this context, the Land Cover CCI (LC CCI) project aims at building global land cover maps suitable for climate modeling based on Earth observation by satellite sensors.  The  challenge  is  to  generate  a  set  of  successive  maps  that  are  both  accurate and consistent over time. To do so, operational methods for the automated classification of optical images are investigated. The pr...

  19. Preparation of protein samples for gel electrophoresis by sequential extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟伯雄; 翁宏飚; 等

    2002-01-01

    Since preparation and solubilization of protein samples are crucial factors in proteome research,the authors established a sequential extraction technique to prepare protein samples from the body wall of the 5th instar larvae of silkworm.Bombyx mori.Two kinds of protein samples were obtained from the body wall using the method.Between the two types of samples only about 15% proteins were identical;the majority were different,indicating that more species of proteins could be obtained with the sequential extraction method;which will be useful for preparation of protein samples for proteome study.

  20. Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Automation in the 21st Century - Amat Victoria curam (Victory loves careful preparation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, David A; Overcash, David R; Reyes, Jaime

    2014-08-01

    The era of automation arrived with the introduction of the AutoAnalyzer using continuous flow analysis and the Robot Chemist that automated the traditional manual analytical steps. Successive generations of stand-alone analysers increased analytical speed, offered the ability to test high volumes of patient specimens, and provided large assay menus. A dichotomy developed, with a group of analysers devoted to performing routine clinical chemistry tests and another group dedicated to performing immunoassays using a variety of methodologies. Development of integrated systems greatly improved the analytical phase of clinical laboratory testing and further automation was developed for pre-analytical procedures, such as sample identification, sorting, and centrifugation, and post-analytical procedures, such as specimen storage and archiving. All phases of testing were ultimately combined in total laboratory automation (TLA) through which all modules involved are physically linked by some kind of track system, moving samples through the process from beginning-to-end. A newer and very powerful, analytical methodology is liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). LC-MS/MS has been automated but a future automation challenge will be to incorporate LC-MS/MS into TLA configurations. Another important facet of automation is informatics, including middleware, which interfaces the analyser software to a laboratory information systems (LIS) and/or hospital information systems (HIS). This software includes control of the overall operation of a TLA configuration and combines analytical results with patient demographic information to provide additional clinically useful information. This review describes automation relevant to clinical chemistry, but it must be recognised that automation applies to other specialties in the laboratory, e.g. haematology, urinalysis, microbiology. It is a given that automation will continue to evolve in the clinical laboratory

  1. 7 CFR 61.34 - Drawing and preparation of sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Drawing and preparation of sample. 61.34 Section 61.34 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Cottonseed Samplers § 61.34 Drawing and preparation of sample. Each licensed cottonseed sampler shall...

  2. Miniaturized sample preparation based on carbon nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Cárdenas Soledad

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of analytical methodologies has been driven by the objective to reduce the complexity of sample treatment while increasing the efficiency of the overall analytical process. For this reason, the analytical chemist takes into consideration advances in other scientific areas and systematically evaluates the potential influence that such discoveries might have on its own discipline. This is the present situation with nanostructured materials, which have alrea...

  3. Conceptual design for comprehensive automation in radiochemical analysis of bioassay samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioassay Laboratory of Health Physics Division is entrusted with the task of carrying out the bioassay monitoring of occupational workers from various plants/divisions of BARC for various radionuclides like Pu, U, Th, 90Sr, 3H etc. On the average about 1400-1500 analyses are performed on 700-800 urine samples collected annually from radiation workers. The workload has increased by 1.5 to 2.0 times in recent past and is expected to increase further due to expanding nuclear programmes of the Department. Therefore, it was planned to carry out automation in various stages of bioassay sample handling, processing and analysis under the XI plan programme. Automation work in Bioassay Lab. is planned to be taken-up in three stages namely, automation in initial processing of i) urine samples, ii) fecal samples and iii) automation in radiochemical analysis of bioassay samples. In the initial phase, automation in radiochemical analysis of bioassay samples has been taken up

  4. Development of an automated data processing method for sample to sample comparison of seized methamphetamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Sanggil; Lee, Jaesin; Choi, Hyeyoung; Park, Yujin; Lee, Heesang; Pyo, Jaesung; Jo, Jiyeong; Park, Yonghoon; Choi, Hwakyung; Kim, Suncheun

    2012-11-30

    The information about the sources of supply, trafficking routes, distribution patterns and conspiracy links can be obtained from methamphetamine profiling. The precursor and synthetic method for the clandestine manufacture can be estimated from the analysis of minor impurities contained in methamphetamine. Also, the similarity between samples can be evaluated using the peaks that appear in chromatograms. In South Korea, methamphetamine was the most popular drug but the total seized amount of methamphetamine whole through the country was very small. Therefore, it would be more important to find the links between samples than the other uses of methamphetamine profiling. Many Asian countries including Japan and South Korea have been using the method developed by National Research Institute of Police Science of Japan. The method used gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID), DB-5 column and four internal standards. It was developed to increase the amount of impurities and minimize the amount of methamphetamine. After GC-FID analysis, the raw data have to be processed. The data processing steps are very complex and require a lot of time and effort. In this study, Microsoft Visual Basic Application (VBA) modules were developed to handle these data processing steps. This module collected the results from the data into an Excel file and then corrected the retention time shift and response deviation generated from the sample preparation and instruments analysis. The developed modules were tested for their performance using 10 samples from 5 different cases. The processed results were analyzed with Pearson correlation coefficient for similarity assessment and the correlation coefficient of the two samples from the same case was more than 0.99. When the modules were applied to 131 seized methamphetamine samples, four samples from two different cases were found to have the common origin and the chromatograms of the four samples were appeared visually identical

  5. γ-ray spectrometry results versus sample preparation methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    According to recommended conditions two bio-samples, tea leave and flour, are prepared with different methods: grounding into powder and reducing to ash, then they were analyzed by γ ray spectrometry. Remarkable difference was shown between the measured values of tea samples prepared with these different methods. One of the reasons may be that the method of reducing to ash makes some nuclides lost. Compared with the "non-destructive"method of grounding into powder, the method of reducing to ash can be much more sensible to the loss of some nuclides. The probable reasons are discussed for the varied influences of different preparation methods of tea leave and flour samples.

  6. γ-ray spectrometry results versus sample preparation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to recommended conditions two bio-samples, tea leave and flour, are prepared with different methods: grounding into powder and reducing to ash, then they were analyzed by γ ray spectrometry. Remarkable difference was shown between the measured values of tea samples prepared with these different methods. One of the reasons may be that the method of reducing to ash makes some nuclides lost. Compared with the 'non-destructive' method of grounding into powder, the method of reducing to ash can be much more sensible to the loss of some nuclides. The probable reasons are discussed for the varied influences of different preparation methods of tea leave and flour samples

  7. An automated atmospheric sampling system operating on 747 airliners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, P. J.; Gustafsson, U. R. C.

    1976-01-01

    An air sampling system that automatically measures the temporal and spatial distribution of particulate and gaseous constituents of the atmosphere is collecting data on commercial air routes covering the world. Measurements are made in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (6 to 12 km) of constituents related to aircraft engine emissions and other pollutants. Aircraft operated by different airlines sample air at latitudes from the Arctic to Australia. This unique system includes specialized instrumentation, a special air inlet probe for sampling outside air, a computerized automatic control, and a data acquisition system. Air constituent and related flight data are tape recorded in flight for later computer processing on the ground.

  8. An automated atmospheric sampling system operating on 747 airliners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, P.; Gustafsson, U. R. C.

    1975-01-01

    An air sampling system that automatically measures the temporal and spatial distribution of selected particulate and gaseous constituents of the atmosphere has been installed on a number of commercial airliners and is collecting data on commercial air routes covering the world. Measurements of constituents related to aircraft engine emissions and other pollutants are made in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (6 to 12 km) in support of the Global Air Sampling Program (GASP). Aircraft operated by different airlines sample air at latitudes from the Arctic to Australia. This system includes specialized instrumentation for measuring carbon monoxide, ozone, water vapor, and particulates, a special air inlet probe for sampling outside air, a computerized automatic control, and a data acquisition system. Air constituents and related flight data are tape recorded in flight for later computer processing on the ground.

  9. Automated biowaste sampling system, solids subsystem operating model, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogal, G. L.; Mangialardi, J. K.; Stauffer, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The detail design and fabrication of the Solids Subsystem were implemented. The system's capacity for the collection, storage or sampling of feces and vomitus from six subjects was tested and verified.

  10. SASSI: Subsystems for Automated Subsurface Sampling Instruments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Autonomous surface sampling systems are necessary, near term, to construct a historical view of planetary significant events; as well as allow for the...

  11. SASSI: Subsystems for Automated Subsurface Sampling Instruments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future robotic planetary exploration missions will benefit greatly from the ability to capture rock and/or regolith core samples that deliver the stratigraphy of...

  12. Integrating Electrochemical Detection with Centrifugal Microfluidics for Real-Time and Fully Automated Sample Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Sune Zoëga; Kwasny, Dorota; Amato, Letizia; Brøgger, Anna Line; Bosco, Filippo; Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Boisen, Anja

    2015-01-01

    experiments, even when the microfluidic disc is spinning at high velocities. Automated sample handling is achieved by designing a microfluidic system to release analyte sequentially, utilizing on-disc passive valving. In addition, the microfluidic system is designed to trap and keep the liquid sample...

  13. Sequential automated fusion/extraction chromatography methodology for the dissolution of uranium in environmental samples for mass spectrometric determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved methodology has been developed, based on dissolution by automated fusion followed by extraction chromatography for the detection and quantification of uranium in environmental matrices by mass spectrometry. A rapid fusion protocol (2/LiBr melts were used. The use of a M4 fusion unit also improved repeatability in sample preparation over muffle furnace fusion. Instrumental issues originating from the presence of high salt concentrations in the digestate after lithium metaborate fusion was also mitigated using an extraction chromatography (EXC) protocol aimed at removing lithium and interfering matrix constituants prior to the elution of uranium. The sequential methodology, which can be performed simultaneously on three samples, requires less than 20 min per sample for fusion and separation. It was successfully coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) achieving detection limits below 100 pg kg-1 for 5-300 mg of sample.

  14. Automated biowaste sampling system urine subsystem operating model, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogal, G. L.; Mangialardi, J. K.; Rosen, F.

    1973-01-01

    The urine subsystem automatically provides for the collection, volume sensing, and sampling of urine from six subjects during space flight. Verification of the subsystem design was a primary objective of the current effort which was accomplished thru the detail design, fabrication, and verification testing of an operating model of the subsystem.

  15. Laboratory robotics -- An automated tool for preparing ion chromatography calibration standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, J.L.

    1995-04-01

    This paper describes the use of a laboratory robot as an automated tool for preparing multi-level calibration standards for On-Line Ion Chromatography (IC) Systems. The robot is designed for preparation of up to six levels of standards, with each level containing up to eleven ionic species in aqueous solution. The robot is required to add the standards` constituents as both a liquid and solid additions and to keep a record of exactly what goes into making up every standard. Utilizing a laboratory robot to prepare calibration standards provides significant benefits to the testing environment. These benefits include: accurate and precise calibration standards in individually capped containers with preparation traceability; automated and unattended multi-specie preparation for both anion and cation analytical channels; the ability to free up a test operator from a repetitive routine and re-apply those efforts to test operations; The robot uses a single channel IC to analyze each prepared standard for specie content and concentration. Those results are later used as a measure of quality control. System requirements and configurations, robotic operations, manpower requirements, analytical verification, accuracy and precision of prepared solutions, and robotic downtime are discussed in detail.

  16. Efficient Sample Preparation from Complex Biological Samples Using a Sliding Lid for Immobilized Droplet Extractions

    OpenAIRE

    Casavant, Benjamin P.; Guckenberger, David J.; Beebe, David J.; Berry, Scott M

    2014-01-01

    Sample preparation is a major bottleneck in many biological processes. Paramagnetic particles (PMPs) are a ubiquitous method for isolating analytes of interest from biological samples and are used for their ability to thoroughly sample a solution and be easily collected with a magnet. There are three main methods by which PMPs are used for sample preparation: (1) removal of fluid from the analyte-bound PMPs, (2) removal of analyte-bound PMPs from the solution, and (3) removal of the substrate...

  17. A self-contained polymeric cartridge for automated biological sample preparationa

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Guolin; Lee, Daniel Yoke San; Xie, Hong; Chiew, Deon; Hsieh, Tseng-Ming; Ali, Emril Mohamed; Lun Looi, Xing; Li, Mo-Huang; Ying, Jackie Y.

    2011-01-01

    Sample preparation is one of the most crucial processes for nucleic acids based disease diagnosis. Several steps are required for nucleic acids extraction, impurity washes, and DNA/RNA elution. Careful sample preparation is vital to the obtaining of reliable diagnosis, especially with low copies of pathogens and cells. This paper describes a low-cost, disposable lab cartridge for automatic sample preparation, which is capable of handling flexible sample volumes of 10 μl to 1 ml. This plastic ...

  18. FISHprep: A Novel Integrated Device for Metaphase FISH Sample Preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Kwasny, Dorota;

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel integrated device for preparing metaphase chromosomes spread slides (FISHprep). The quality of cytogenetic analysis from patient samples greatly relies on the efficiency of sample pre-treatment and/or slide preparation. In cytogenetic slide preparation, cell cultures are...... a novel device with an integrated expansion chamber to culture, arrest and fix metaphase cells followed by a subsequent splashing protocol leading to ample metaphase chromosome spreads on a glass slide for metaphase FISH analysis. The device provides an easy, disposable, low cost, integrated...

  19. Automated Genotyping of Biobank Samples by Multiplex Amplification of Insertion/Deletion Polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Lucy Mathot; Elin Falk-Sörqvist; Lotte Moens; Marie Allen; Tobias Sjöblom; Mats Nilsson

    2012-01-01

    The genomic revolution in oncology will entail mutational analyses of vast numbers of patient-matched tumor and normal tissue samples. This has meant an increased risk of patient sample mix up due to manual handling. Therefore, scalable genotyping and sample identification procedures are essential to pathology biobanks. We have developed an efficient alternative to traditional genotyping methods suited for automated analysis. By targeting 53 prevalent deletions and insertions found in human p...

  20. Validation of the Sysmex sp-1000i automated slide preparer-stainer in a clinical laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberson Damiao dos Santos de Bitencourt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The speed and quality of information have become essential items in the release of laboratory reports. The Sysmex®SP1000-I device has been developed to prepare and stain smear slides. However, for a device to be cleared for use in the laboratory routine it must pass through a validation process. Objective: To evaluate the performance and reliability of the Sysmex® SP-1000i slide preparer-stainer incorporated into the routine of a hospital laboratory in Porto Alegre. Methods: Peripheral blood samples of patients attending the laboratory for ambulatory exams with leukocyte counts between 7000/°L and 12,000/°L were evaluated, independent of gender and age. Two slides were prepared for each sample using the Sysmex® SP-1000i equipment; one of the slides was used to perform quality control tests using the CellaVision® DM96 device, and the other slide was used to compare pre-classification by the same device and the classification performed by a pharmacist-biochemist. Results: The results of all the slides used as controls were acceptable according to the quality control test as established by the manufacturer of the device. In the comparison between the automated pre-classification and the classification made by the professional, there was an acceptable variation in the differential counts of leukocytes for 90% of the analyzed slides. Pearson correlation coefficient showed a strong correlation for band neutrophils (r = 0.802; p-value < 0.001, segmented neutrophils (r = 0.963; p-value < 0.001, eosinophils (r = 0.958; p-value < 0.001, lymphocytes (r = 0.985; p-value < 0.001 and atypical lymphocytes (r = 0.866; p-value < 0.001 using both methods. The red blood cell analysis was adequate for all slides analyzed by the equipment and by the professional. Conclusion: The new Sysmex®SP1000-i methodology was found to be reliable, fast and safe for the routines of medium and large laboratories, improving the quality of microscopic analysis in

  1. Preparation of privatization samples for envelopes `A` and `C`

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, W.I., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-17

    As part of the TWRS Privatization process, the DOE has committed to provide each of the two contractors who submitted successful bids with ten 125 mL samples of Hanford tank waste meeting chemical and radionuclide criteria specified as Waste Envelope A, B, and C. This test plan describes how the samples will be prepared before shipment.

  2. Development of sample preparation method for honey analysis using PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed an original preparation method for honey samples (samples in paste-like state) specifically designed for PIXE analysis. The results of PIXE analysis of thin targets prepared by adding a standard containing nine elements to honey samples demonstrated that the preparation method bestowed sufficient accuracy on quantitative values. PIXE analysis of 13 kinds of honey was performed, and eight mineral components (Si, P, S, K, Ca, Mn, Cu and Zn) were detected in all honey samples. The principal mineral components were K and Ca, and the quantitative value for K accounted for the majority of the total value for mineral components. K content in honey varies greatly depending on the plant source. Chestnuts had the highest K content. In fact, it was 2-3 times that of Manuka, which is known as a high quality honey. K content of false-acacia, which is produced in the greatest abundance, was 1/20 that of chestnuts. (author)

  3. Experiences from Refurbishment of Metallography Hot Cells and Application of a New Preparation Concept for Materialography Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After more than 30 years of operation the lead shielded metallography hot cells needed a basic renewal and modernisation not least of the specimen preparation equipment. Preparation in hot cells of radioactive samples for metallography and ceramography is challenging and time consuming. It demands a special design and quality of all in-cell equipment and skill and patience from the operator. Essentials in the preparation process are: simplicity and reliability of the machines, and a good quality, reproducibility and efficiency in performance. Desirable is process automation, flexibility and an alara amounto of radioactive waste produced per sample prepared. State of the art preparation equipment for materialography seems to meet most of the demands, however, it cannot be used in hot cells without modifications. Therefore. IFE and Struers in Copenhagen modified a standard model of a Strues precision cutting machine and a microprocessor controlled grinding and polishing machine for Hot Cell application. Hot cell utilisation of the microcomputer controlled grinding and polishing machine and the existing automatic dosing equipment made the task of preparing radioactive samples more attractive. The new grinding and polishing system for hot cells provides good sample preparation quality and reproductibility at reduced preparation time and reduced amount of contaminated waste produced per sample prepared. the sample materials examined were irradiated cladding materials and fuels

  4. Fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benner, W. Henry; Dzenitis, John M.; Bennet, William J.; Baker, Brian R.

    2014-08-19

    Herein provided are fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis. The fluidics platform is capable of analyzing DNA from blood samples using amplification assays such as polymerase-chain-reaction assays and loop-mediated-isothermal-amplification assays. The fluidics platform can also be used for other types of assays and analyzes. In some embodiments, a sample in a sealed tube can be inserted directly. The following isolation, detection, and analyzes can be performed without a user's intervention. The disclosed platform may also comprises a sample preparation system with a magnetic actuator, a heater, and an air-drying mechanism, and fluid manipulation processes for extraction, washing, elution, assay assembly, assay detection, and cleaning after reactions and between samples.

  5. Application of bar codes to the automation of analytical sample data collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Health Protection Department at the Savannah River Plant collects 500 urine samples per day for tritium analyses. Prior to automation, all sample information was compiled manually. Bar code technology was chosen for automating this program because it provides a more accurate, efficient, and inexpensive method for data entry. The system has three major functions: sample labeling is accomplished at remote bar code label stations composed of an Intermec 8220 (Intermec Corp.) interfaced to an IBM-PC, data collection is done on a central VAX 11/730 (Digital Equipment Corp.). Bar code readers are used to log-in samples to be analyzed on liquid scintillation counters. The VAX 11/730 processes the data and generates reports, data storage is on the VAX 11/730 and backed up on the plant's central computer. A brief description of several other bar code applications at the Savannah River Plant is also presented

  6. Rapid and Automated Determination of Plutonium and Neptunium in Environmental Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Jixin

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents improved analytical methods for rapid and automated determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples using sequential injection (SI) based chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The progress of methodology development in this work consists of 5 subjects stated as follows: 1) Development and optimization of an SI-anion exchange chromatographic method for rapid determination of plutonium in environmental samples in combina...

  7. Sample Tracking in an Automated Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory for Radiation Mass Casualties

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, P.R.; Berdychevski, R.E.; Subramanian, U.; Blakely, W F; Prasanna, P.G.S.

    2007-01-01

    Chromosome aberration-based dicentric assay is expected to be used after mass casualty life-threatening radiation exposures to assess radiation dose to individuals. This will require processing of a large number of samples for individual dose assessment and clinical triage to aid treatment decisions. We have established an automated, high-throughput, cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory to process a large number of samples for conducting the dicentric assay using peripheral blood from exposed ...

  8. RapTOR: Automated sequencing library preparation and suppression for rapid pathogen characterization ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Todd [SNL

    2012-06-01

    Todd Lane on "RapTOR: Automated sequencing library preparation and suppression for rapid pathogen characterization" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  9. Sample preparation for special PIE-techniques at ITU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several sample preparation techniques were developed and installed in hot cells. The techniques were conceived to evaluate the performance of highly burnt fuel rods and include: (a) a device for the removal of the fuel, (b) a method for the preparation of the specimen ends for the welding of new end caps and for the careful cleaning of samples for Transmission Electron Microscopy and Glow Discharge Mass Spectroscopy, (c) a sample pressurisation device for long term creep tests, and (d) a diameter measuring device for creep or burst samples. Examples of the determination of the mechanical properties, the behaviour under transient conditions and for the assessment of the corrosion behaviour of high burnup cladding materials are presented. (author)

  10. Sample registration software for process automation in the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Facility in Malaysia nuclear agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) had been established in Nuclear Malaysia since 1980s. Most of the procedures established were done manually including sample registration. The samples were recorded manually in a logbook and given ID number. Then all samples, standards, SRM and blank were recorded on the irradiation vial and several forms prior to irradiation. These manual procedures carried out by the NAA laboratory personnel were time consuming and not efficient. Sample registration software is developed as part of IAEA/CRP project on ‘Development of Process Automation in the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Facility in Malaysia Nuclear Agency (RC17399)’. The objective of the project is to create a pc-based data entry software during sample preparation stage. This is an effective method to replace redundant manual data entries that needs to be completed by laboratory personnel. The software developed will automatically generate sample code for each sample in one batch, create printable registration forms for administration purpose, and store selected parameters that will be passed to sample analysis program. The software is developed by using National Instruments Labview 8.6

  11. Sample registration software for process automation in the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Facility in Malaysia nuclear agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd, E-mail: nur-aira@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Yussup, Nolida; Ibrahim, Maslina Bt. Mohd; Mokhtar, Mukhlis B.; Soh Shaari, Syirrazie Bin Che; Azman, Azraf B. [Technical Support Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000, Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Salim, Nazaratul Ashifa Bt. Abdullah [Division of Waste and Environmental Technology, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000, Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Ismail, Nadiah Binti [Fakulti Kejuruteraan Elektrik, UiTM Pulau Pinang, 13500 Permatang Pauh, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) had been established in Nuclear Malaysia since 1980s. Most of the procedures established were done manually including sample registration. The samples were recorded manually in a logbook and given ID number. Then all samples, standards, SRM and blank were recorded on the irradiation vial and several forms prior to irradiation. These manual procedures carried out by the NAA laboratory personnel were time consuming and not efficient. Sample registration software is developed as part of IAEA/CRP project on ‘Development of Process Automation in the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Facility in Malaysia Nuclear Agency (RC17399)’. The objective of the project is to create a pc-based data entry software during sample preparation stage. This is an effective method to replace redundant manual data entries that needs to be completed by laboratory personnel. The software developed will automatically generate sample code for each sample in one batch, create printable registration forms for administration purpose, and store selected parameters that will be passed to sample analysis program. The software is developed by using National Instruments Labview 8.6.

  12. Preparation of archaeological samples for its dating by thermoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work shows the results of the preparation of archaeological samples for their dating by thermoluminescence (Tl) using the Fine grain technique established by Zimmerman but with the varying of such preparation was realized in normal daylight conditions, only the taking of the Tl readings were realized in dark room and red light. In the chapter 1 basic concepts are described about: matter constitution, radioactivity, units and radiation magnitudes, and thermoluminescence. In the chapter 2 some theoretical aspects on dating are showed. It is described how realizing the samples collection, the fine grain method, the determination of the accumulated dose through the years or paleodoses (P=Q+I) by mean of the increasing to obtain the dose equivalent dose (Q) and the signal regeneration method to obtain the correction factor by supra linearity (1), the determination of the annual dose rate to apply the age equation and the evaluation of the age uncertainty with the error limits. The development of experimental part with samples from the archaeological site named Edzna in Campeche, Mexico is described in the chapter 3. The results are presented in the chapter 4. It was obtained an age for the sample named CH7 it was obtained an age of 389 ± years. In conclusion the preparation of the archaeological samples for their dating by Tl in the conditions before mentioned is reliable, but they must be realized more studies with samples of well known age, preparing them in normal daylight conditions and simultaneously in dark room with red light. In order to observe how respond the minerals present in the sample at different dose rapidity, the same samples must be radiated with radiation sources with different dose rate. (Author)

  13. Sample preparation techniques of biological material for isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sample preparation is an essential step in all isotope-aided experiments but often it is not given enough attention. The methods of sample preparation are very important to obtain reliable and precise analytical data and for further interpretation of results. The size of a sample required for chemical analysis is usually very small (10mg-1500mg). On the other hand the amount of harvested plant material from plots in a field experiment is often bulky (several kilograms) and the entire sample is too large for processing. In addition, while approaching maturity many crops show not only differences in physical consistency but also a non-uniformity in 15N content among plant parts, requiring a plant fractionation or separation into parts (vegetative and reproductive) e.g. shoots and spikes, in case of small grain cereals, shoots and pods in case of grain legumes and tops and roots or beets (including crown) in case of sugar beet, etc. In any case the ultimate goal of these procedures is to obtain representative subsample harvested from greenhouse or field experiments for chemical analysis. Before harvesting an isotopic-aided experiment the method of sampling has to be selected. It should be based on the type of information required in relation to the objectives of the research and the availability of resources (staff, sample preparation equipment, analytical facilities, chemicals and supplies, etc.). 10 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs

  14. An influence of sample preparation on microstructure of dental hydroxylapatite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kallistová, Anna; Skála, Roman; Malíková, R.; Horáček, I.

    Brno: Masaryk University ; Czech Geological Society, 2014 - (Macek, I.). s. 59-60 ISBN N. [Central European Mineralogical Conference /4./. 23.04.2014-26.04.2014, Skalský Dvůr] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : hydroxylapatite * crystallite size * crystallite microstrain * sample preparation Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  15. New Methods of Sample Preparation for Atom Probe Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, Kimberly, R.; Kowalczyk, Robert S.; Ward, Jennifer R.; Wishard, James L.; Martens, Richard L.; Kelly, Thomas F.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetite is a common conductive mineral found on Earth and Mars. Disk-shaped precipitates approximately 40 nm in diameter have been shown to have manganese and aluminum concentrations. Atom-probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM) is the only technique that can potentially quantify the composition of these precipitates. APFIM will be used to characterize geological and planetary materials, analyze samples of interest for geomicrobiology; and, for the metrology of nanoscale instrumentation. Prior to APFIM sample preparation was conducted by electropolishing, the method of sharp shards (MSS), or Bosch process (deep reactive ion etching) with focused ion beam (FIB) milling as a final step. However, new methods are required for difficult samples. Many materials are not easily fabricated using electropolishing, MSS, or the Bosch process, FIB milling is slow and expensive, and wet chemistry and the reactive ion etching are typically limited to Si and other semiconductors. APFIM sample preparation using the dicing saw is commonly used to section semiconductor wafers into individual devices following manufacture. The dicing saw is a time-effective method for preparing high aspect ratio posts of poorly conducting materials. Femtosecond laser micromachining is also suitable for preparation of posts. FIB time required is reduced by about a factor of 10 and multi-tip specimens can easily be fabricated using the dicing saw.

  16. Automated solvent system screening for the preparative countercurrent chromatography of pharmaceutical discovery compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradow, James; Riley, Frank; Philippe, Laurence; Yan, Qi; Schuff, Brandon; Harris, Guy H

    2015-12-01

    A fully automated countercurrent chromatography system has been constructed to rapidly screen the commonly used heptane/ethyl acetate/methanol/water solvent system series and translate the results to preparative scale separations. The system utilizes "on-demand" preparation of the heptane/ethyl acetate/methanol/water solvent system upper and lower phases. Elution-extrusion countercurrent chromatography was combined with non-dynamic equilibrium injection reducing the screening time for each heptane/ethyl acetate/methanol/water system to 17 min. The result enabled solvent system development to be reduced to under 2 h. The countercurrent chromatography system was interfaced with a mass spectrometer to allow selective detection of target components in crude medicinal chemistry reaction mixtures. Mass-directed preparative countercurrent chromatography purification was demonstrated for the first time using a synthetic tetrazole epoxide derived from a routine medicinal chemistry support workflow. PMID:26428946

  17. Design aspects of automation system for initial processing of fecal samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The procedure for initial handling of the fecal samples at Bioassay Lab., Trombay is as follows: overnight fecal samples are collected from the worker in a kit consisting of a polythene bag placed in a wide mouth polythene container closed with an inner lid and a screw cap. Occupational worker collects the sample in the polythene bag. On receiving the sample, the polythene container along with the sample is weighed, polythene bag containing fecal sample is lifted out of the container using a pair of tongs placed inside a crucible and ashed inside a muffle furnace at 450℃. After complete ashing, the crucible containing white ash is taken-up for further radiochemical processing. This paper describes the various steps in developing a prototype automated system for initial handling of fecal samples. The proposed system for handling and processing of fecal samples is proposed to automate the above. The system once developed will help eliminate manual intervention till the ashing stage and reduce the biological hazard involved in handling such samples mentioned procedure

  18. Sampling, storage and sample preparation procedures for X ray fluorescence analysis of environmental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X ray fluorescence (XRF) method is one of the most commonly used nuclear analytical technique because of its multielement and non-destructive character, speed, economy and ease of operation. From the point of view of quality assurance practices, sampling and sample preparation procedures are the most crucial steps in all analytical techniques, (including X ray fluorescence) applied for the analysis of heterogeneous materials. This technical document covers recent modes of the X ray fluorescence method and recent developments in sample preparation techniques for the analysis of environmental materials. Refs, figs, tabs

  19. Microassay for interferon, using [3H]uridine, microculture plates, and a multiple automated sample harvester.

    OpenAIRE

    Richmond, J Y; Polatnick, J; Knudsen, R C

    1980-01-01

    A microassay for interferon is described which uses target cells grown in microculture wells, [3H]uridine to measure vesicular stomatitis virus replication in target cells, and a multiple automated sample harvester to collect the radioactively labeled viral ribonucleic acid onto glass fiber filter disks. The disks were placed in minivials, and radioactivity was counted in a liquid scintillation spectrophotometer. Interferon activity was calculated as the reciprocal of the highest titer which ...

  20. Sample preparation and electron microscopy of hydrocracking catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, S.; McComb, D. W.; Perkins, J. M.; Haswell, R.

    2008-08-01

    This work focuses on the preparation of zeolite and alumina hydrocracking catalysts for investigation by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). EELS can potentially give new insights into the location and structure of coke which can result in catalyst deactivation. Three sample preparation techniques have been used - microtoming, focussed ion beam milling (LIB) and conventional ion beam milling. Crushing and grinding the catalyst pellets has been discounted as a preparation technique as the spatial relationship between the coke and the catalyst is lost using this method. Microtomed sections show some mechanical damage while sections milled in a single beam LIB microscope show gallium decoration in pores and were too thick for EELS. Conventional ion beam milling has proved to be most successful as it results in extensive thin regions and maintains the spatial distribution of the zeolite and alumina phases.

  1. Automated Prediction of Catalytic Mechanism and Rate Law Using Graph-Based Reaction Path Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habershon, Scott

    2016-04-12

    In a recent article [ J. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 143 , 094106 ], we introduced a novel graph-based sampling scheme which can be used to generate chemical reaction paths in many-atom systems in an efficient and highly automated manner. The main goal of this work is to demonstrate how this approach, when combined with direct kinetic modeling, can be used to determine the mechanism and phenomenological rate law of a complex catalytic cycle, namely cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation of ethene. Our graph-based sampling scheme generates 31 unique chemical products and 32 unique chemical reaction pathways; these sampled structures and reaction paths enable automated construction of a kinetic network model of the catalytic system when combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations of free energies and resultant transition-state theory rate constants. Direct simulations of this kinetic network across a range of initial reactant concentrations enables determination of both the reaction mechanism and the associated rate law in an automated fashion, without the need for either presupposing a mechanism or making steady-state approximations in kinetic analysis. Most importantly, we find that the reaction mechanism which emerges from these simulations is exactly that originally proposed by Heck and Breslow; furthermore, the simulated rate law is also consistent with previous experimental and computational studies, exhibiting a complex dependence on carbon monoxide pressure. While the inherent errors of using DFT simulations to model chemical reactivity limit the quantitative accuracy of our calculated rates, this work confirms that our automated simulation strategy enables direct analysis of catalytic mechanisms from first principles. PMID:26938837

  2. RoboDiff: combining a sample changer and goniometer for highly automated macromolecular crystallography experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurizzo, Didier; Bowler, Matthew W.; Caserotto, Hugo; Dobias, Fabien; Giraud, Thierry; Surr, John; Guichard, Nicolas; Papp, Gergely; Guijarro, Matias; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Flot, David; McSweeney, Sean; Cipriani, Florent; Theveneau, Pascal; Leonard, Gordon A.

    2016-01-01

    Automation of the mounting of cryocooled samples is now a feature of the majority of beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography (MX). Robotic sample changers have been developed over many years, with the latest designs increasing capacity, reliability and speed. Here, the development of a new sample changer deployed at the ESRF beamline MASSIF-1 (ID30A-1), based on an industrial six-axis robot, is described. The device, named RoboDiff, includes a high-capacity dewar, acts as both a sample changer and a high-accuracy goniometer, and has been designed for completely unattended sample mounting and diffraction data collection. This aim has been achieved using a high level of diagnostics at all steps of the process from mounting and characterization to data collection. The RoboDiff has been in service on the fully automated endstation MASSIF-1 at the ESRF since September 2014 and, at the time of writing, has processed more than 20 000 samples completely automatically. PMID:27487827

  3. RoboDiff: combining a sample changer and goniometer for highly automated macromolecular crystallography experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurizzo, Didier; Bowler, Matthew W; Caserotto, Hugo; Dobias, Fabien; Giraud, Thierry; Surr, John; Guichard, Nicolas; Papp, Gergely; Guijarro, Matias; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Flot, David; McSweeney, Sean; Cipriani, Florent; Theveneau, Pascal; Leonard, Gordon A

    2016-08-01

    Automation of the mounting of cryocooled samples is now a feature of the majority of beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography (MX). Robotic sample changers have been developed over many years, with the latest designs increasing capacity, reliability and speed. Here, the development of a new sample changer deployed at the ESRF beamline MASSIF-1 (ID30A-1), based on an industrial six-axis robot, is described. The device, named RoboDiff, includes a high-capacity dewar, acts as both a sample changer and a high-accuracy goniometer, and has been designed for completely unattended sample mounting and diffraction data collection. This aim has been achieved using a high level of diagnostics at all steps of the process from mounting and characterization to data collection. The RoboDiff has been in service on the fully automated endstation MASSIF-1 at the ESRF since September 2014 and, at the time of writing, has processed more than 20 000 samples completely automatically. PMID:27487827

  4. Use of compressed fluids for sample preparation: Food applications

    OpenAIRE

    Mendiola, J. A.; Herrero, Miguel; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Ibáñez, Elena

    2007-01-01

    This review attempts to provide an updated overview (including works published till June 2006) on the latest applications of compressed fluids as sample preparation techniques for food analysis. After a general review of the principles of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and pressurized liquid extraction (PLE; also called accelerated solvent extraction, ASE or subcritical water extraction, SWE, when water is employed as extraction solvent), the principal applications of such techniques in...

  5. Collection and preparation of marine samples for radionuclide analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultimate goal of research in radioecology is to be able to predict the pathways of radioactive material in the environment and hence estimate possible doses to the population in various regions. Knowledge of levels of contamination are necessary to maintain control of operations of nuclear facilities. Correct methods of sample collection, handling and preparation are among the most important parts for a correct assessment. On basis of the final results of radionuclide concentrations, scientific, medical and political decisions are taken. (author)

  6. Sample preparation method for induced mutation on orchid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on the induction of mutation in Dendrobium orchid at MINT has produced a number of new orchid mutant cultivars. Tissue culture techniques on orchid seeds and meristem cloning are employed in preparing the samples for the mutation induction. Solid medium based on the Murashige and Skoog (1962) and liquid medium based on Vacin and Went (1949) were found to be suitable in producing protocorm like bodies (PLBs) that are required for the irradiation treatment. (Author)

  7. Preparation of TEM samples for hard ceramic powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang; Kumar, Vikas; de Kruijff, Tom; Jansen, Jacob; Zandbergen, Henny W

    2008-12-01

    It is challenging to prepare a good sample for high-resolution electron microscopy of polycrystalline ceramic powders containing hard particles or particles with a strong preferential cleavage. Here we demonstrate that embedding the particles in a Cu matrix in a pressed pellet allows for straightforward conventional ion milling. The method is applied to powders of Mg10Ir19B16 and Na0.5CoO2 to show its feasibility, whereby transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples with crystalline areas thinner than 10 nm can be obtained easily. PMID:18722061

  8. Preparation of TEM samples for hard ceramic powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is challenging to prepare a good sample for high-resolution electron microscopy of polycrystalline ceramic powders containing hard particles or particles with a strong preferential cleavage. Here we demonstrate that embedding the particles in a Cu matrix in a pressed pellet allows for straightforward conventional ion milling. The method is applied to powders of Mg10Ir19B16 and Na0.5CoO2 to show its feasibility, whereby transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples with crystalline areas thinner than 10 nm can be obtained easily.

  9. Preparation of TEM samples for hard ceramic powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Qiang [National Centre for HREM, Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Lorentzweg 1, Delft (Netherlands)], E-mail: q.xu@tudelft.nl; Kumar, Vikas [National Centre for HREM, Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Lorentzweg 1, Delft (Netherlands)], E-mail: V.Kumar@tudelft.nl; Kruijff, Tom de [National Centre for HREM, Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Lorentzweg 1, Delft (Netherlands)], E-mail: t.r.dekruijff@tudelft.nl; Jansen, Jacob [National Centre for HREM, Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Lorentzweg 1, Delft (Netherlands)], E-mail: joukj@hrem.nano.tudelft.nl; Zandbergen, Henny W. [National Centre for HREM, Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Lorentzweg 1, Delft (Netherlands)], E-mail: h.w.zandbergen@tudelft.nl

    2008-12-15

    It is challenging to prepare a good sample for high-resolution electron microscopy of polycrystalline ceramic powders containing hard particles or particles with a strong preferential cleavage. Here we demonstrate that embedding the particles in a Cu matrix in a pressed pellet allows for straightforward conventional ion milling. The method is applied to powders of Mg{sub 10}Ir{sub 19}B{sub 16} and Na{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 2} to show its feasibility, whereby transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples with crystalline areas thinner than 10 nm can be obtained easily.

  10. Apparatus for preparing a sample for mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for preparing a sample for analysis by a mass spectrometer system. The apparatus has an entry chamber and an ionization chamber separated by a skimmer. A capacitor having two space-apart electrodes followed by one or more ion-imaging lenses is disposed in the ionization chamber. The chamber is evacuated and the capacitor is charged. A valve injects a sample gas in the form of sample pulses into the entry chamber. The pulse is collimated by the skimmer and enters the ionization chamber. When the sample pulse passes through the gap between the electrodes, it discharges the capacitor and is thereby ionized. The ions are focused by the imaging lenses and enter the mass analyzer, where their mass and charge are analyzed.

  11. Sample preparation methods for determination of drugs of abuse in hair samples: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogliardi, Susanna; Tucci, Marianna; Stocchero, Giulia; Ferrara, Santo Davide; Favretto, Donata

    2015-02-01

    Hair analysis has assumed increasing importance in the determination of substances of abuse, both in clinical and forensic toxicology investigations. Hair analysis offers particular advantages over other biological matrices (blood and urine), including a larger window of detection, ease of collection and sample stability. In the present work, an overview of sample preparation techniques for the determination of substances of abuse in hair is provided, specifically regarding the principal steps in hair sample treatment-decontamination, extraction and purification. For this purpose, a survey of publications found in the MEDLINE database from 2000 to date was conducted. The most widely consumed substances of abuse and psychotropic drugs were considered. Trends in simplification of hair sample preparation, washing procedures and cleanup methods are discussed. Alternative sample extraction techniques, such as head-space solid phase microextraction (HS-SPDE), supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) are also reported. PMID:25604816

  12. Novel sample preparation for operando TEM of catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Benjamin K.; Barker, Trevor M. [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-6106 (United States); Crozier, Peter A., E-mail: crozier@asu.edu [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-6106 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    A new TEM sample preparation method is developed to facilitate operando TEM of gas phase catalysis. A porous Pyrex-fiber pellet TEM sample was produced, allowing a comparatively large amount of catalyst to be loaded into a standard Gatan furnace-type tantalum heating holder. The increased amount of catalyst present inside the environmental TEM allows quantitative determination of the gas phase products of a catalytic reaction performed in-situ at elevated temperatures. The product gas concentration was monitored using both electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and residual gas analysis (RGA). Imaging of catalyst particles dispersed over the pellet at atomic resolution is challenging, due to charging of the insulating glass fibers. To overcome this limitation, a metal grid is placed into the holder in addition to the pellet, allowing catalyst particles dispersed over the grid to be imaged, while particles in the pellet, which are assumed to experience identical conditions, contribute to the overall catalytic conversion inside the environmental TEM cell. The gas within the cell is determined to be well-mixed, making this assumption reasonable. - Highlights: • High in-situ conversion of CO to CO{sub 2} achieved by a novel TEM sample preparation method. • A 3 mm fiber pellet increases the TEM sample surface area by 50×. • Operando atomic resolution is maintained by also including a 3 mm grid in the sample. • Evidence for a well-mixed gas composition inside the ETEM cell is given.

  13. Novel sample preparation for operando TEM of catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new TEM sample preparation method is developed to facilitate operando TEM of gas phase catalysis. A porous Pyrex-fiber pellet TEM sample was produced, allowing a comparatively large amount of catalyst to be loaded into a standard Gatan furnace-type tantalum heating holder. The increased amount of catalyst present inside the environmental TEM allows quantitative determination of the gas phase products of a catalytic reaction performed in-situ at elevated temperatures. The product gas concentration was monitored using both electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and residual gas analysis (RGA). Imaging of catalyst particles dispersed over the pellet at atomic resolution is challenging, due to charging of the insulating glass fibers. To overcome this limitation, a metal grid is placed into the holder in addition to the pellet, allowing catalyst particles dispersed over the grid to be imaged, while particles in the pellet, which are assumed to experience identical conditions, contribute to the overall catalytic conversion inside the environmental TEM cell. The gas within the cell is determined to be well-mixed, making this assumption reasonable. - Highlights: • High in-situ conversion of CO to CO2 achieved by a novel TEM sample preparation method. • A 3 mm fiber pellet increases the TEM sample surface area by 50×. • Operando atomic resolution is maintained by also including a 3 mm grid in the sample. • Evidence for a well-mixed gas composition inside the ETEM cell is given

  14. Nitrogen isotope ratio analysis of small samples: sample preparation and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the preparation of samples in the range of 14-100 μg of organic and precipitated N for mass spectrometric isotope ratio analysis is described. In vacuo combustion and molecular sieve trapping of the sample gas into a 0.5 mL mass spectrometer inlet volume are employed. Samples can be processed at a rate of two to three per hour. The standard deviation of 12 analyses of a peptone preparation was 0.10%. The results of an interlaboratory calibration effort are presented. The materials tested were peptone, thiourea, histidine, kerogen, and two (NH4)2SO4 standards. The results of these comparisons were with the range +/-0.12 delta15N or less. Peptone was found to provide a more rigorous test of the combustion and preparation system than nitrogen salts and organic compounds of lower molecular weight. 20 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  15. Some pitfalls in chemical sample preparation for accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sophisticated sample preparation including the determination of stable nuclides are an essential prerequisite for high-accuracy accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) data. Improvements in the low-level regime already paid back, however, some pitfalls still exist or are (re-) appearing due to recent developments: 1.) As most samples prepared for 10Be-AMS need the addition of 9Be in the form of a liquid solution of known 9Be-concentration and commercial solutions contain too much 10Be, solutions from minerals originating from deep mines have been established. Special attention has recently been paid to the preparation of such a 9Be-carrier by the determination of the 9Be-value by an interlaboratory comparison. It could be shown that deviations between different labs exist, thus, it is strongly advised to have such solutions analysed at more than a single lab to prevent incorrect 10Be-results. 2.) In our approach to analyse as many radionuclides as possible in a single meteorite sample, small changes in the established chemical separation have been tested. Though, the secondary formation of partially insoluble compounds of Mg and Al by the pressure digestion is strongly influenced, thus, yielding to too low 27Al-results in the taken aliquot and overall incorrect 26Al-results.

  16. Automation of Sample Transfer and Counting on Fast Neutron ActivationSystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The automation of sample transfer and counting were the transfer processof the sample to the activation and counting place which have been done byswitch (manually) previously, than being developed by automaticallyprogrammed logic instructions. The development was done by constructed theelectronics hardware and software for that communication. Transfer timemeasurement is on seconds and was done automatically with an error 1.6 ms.The counting and activation time were decided by the user on seconds andminutes, the execution error on minutes was 8.2 ms. This development systemwill be possible for measuring short half live elements and cyclic activationprocesses. (author)

  17. Automated low energy photon absorption equipment for measuring internal moisture and density distributions of wood samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Automated equipment for measuring the moisture and density distributions of wood samples was developed. Using a narrow beam of gamma rays, the equipment scans the wood samples, which are placed on the moving belt. The moisture measurement is based on the 241Am photon absorption technique (59.5 keV), where the difference of the linear absorption coefficients of the moist and dry wood is measured. The method requires no knowledge of the thickness of the specimen. The density estimation method is based on the measurement of the linear attenuation coefficient of wood. Comprehensive software including image processing was developed for treatment of the numerical values of the measurements. (author)

  18. Thermophilic Campylobacter spp. in turkey samples: evaluation of two automated enzyme immunoassays and conventional microbiological techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borck, Birgitte; Stryhn, H.; Ersboll, A.K.; Pedersen, Karl

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To determine the sensitivity and specificity of two automated enzyme immunoassays (EIA), EiaFoss and Minividas, and a conventional microbiological culture technique for detecting thermophilic Campylobacter spp. in turkey samples. Methods and Results: A total of 286 samples (faecal, meat......, neckskin and environmental samples) were collected over a period of 4 months at a turkey slaughterhouse and meat-cutting plant in Denmark. Faecal and environmental samples were tested by the conventional culture method and by the two EIAs, whereas meat and neckskin samples were tested by the two EIAs only....... Two enrichment broths were used, Campylobacter Enrichment Broth (CEB) and Preston Broth (PB). Verification of positive test results was carried out by conventional culture on selective solid media. The specificities of all methods were high. The sensitivities of the EIAs were higher than that of the...

  19. Development testing of the chemical analysis automation polychlorinated biphenyl standard analysis method during surface soils sampling at the David Witherspoon 1630 site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) project is developing standardized, software-driven, site-deployable robotic laboratory systems with the objective of lowering the per-sample analysis cost, decreasing sample turnaround time, and minimizing human exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials associated with DOE remediation projects. The first integrated system developed by the CAA project is designed to determine polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) content in soil matrices. A demonstration and development testing of this system was conducted in conjuction with surface soil characterization activities at the David Witherspoon 1630 Site in Knoxville, Tennessee. The PCB system consists of five hardware standard laboratory modules (SLMs), one software SLM, the task sequence controller (TSC), and the human-computer interface (HCI). Four of the hardware SLMs included a four-channel Soxhlet extractor, a high-volume concentrator, a column cleanup, and a gas chromatograph. These SLMs performed the sample preparation and measurement steps within the total analysis protocol. The fifth hardware module was a robot that transports samples between the SLMs and the required consumable supplies to the SLMs. The software SLM is an automated data interpretation module that receives raw data from the gas chromatograph SLM and analyzes the data to yield the analyte information. The TSC is a software system that provides the scheduling, management of system resources, and the coordination of all SLM activities. The HCI is a graphical user interface that presents the automated laboratory to the analyst in terms of the analytical procedures and methods. Human control of the automated laboratory is accomplished via the HCI. Sample information required for processing by the automated laboratory is entered through the HCI. Information related to the sample and the system status is presented to the analyst via graphical icons

  20. An On-Target Desalting and Concentration Sample Preparation Protocol for MALDI-MS and MS/MS Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xumin; Wang, Quanhui; Lou, Xiaomin; Sun, Haidan; Roepstorff, Peter; Liu, Siqi

    2012-01-01

    2DE coupled with MALDI-MS is one of the most widely used and powerful analytic technologies in proteomics study. The MALDI sample preparation method has been developed and optimized towards the combination of simplicity, sample-cleaning, and sample concentration since its introduction. Here we...... present a protocol of the so-called Sample loading, Matrix loading, and on-target Wash (SMW) method which fulfills the three criteria by taking advantage of the AnchorChip™ targets. Our method is extremely simple and no pre-desalting or concentration is needed when dealing with samples prepared from 2DE....... The protocol is amendable for automation and would pave the road for high-throughput MALDI-MS or MS/MS-based proteomics studies with guaranteed sensitivity and high identification rate. The method has been successfully applied to mouse liver proteome study and so far has been employed in other...

  1. Optimization for Peptide Sample Preparation for Urine Peptidomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hsieh, Szu-Chuan; Dai, Hong; Qian, Weijun; Camp, David G.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2014-02-25

    Analysis of native or endogenous peptides in biofluids can provide valuable insights into disease mechanisms. Furthermore, the detected peptides may also have utility as potential biomarkers for non-invasive monitoring of human diseases. The non-invasive nature of urine collection and the abundance of peptides in the urine makes analysis by high-throughput ‘peptidomics’ methods , an attractive approach for investigating the pathogenesis of renal disease. However, urine peptidomics methodologies can be problematic with regards to difficulties associated with sample preparation. The urine matrix can provide significant background interference in making the analytical measurements that it hampers both the identification of peptides and the depth of the peptidomics read when utilizing LC-MS based peptidome analysis. We report on a novel adaptation of the standard solid phase extraction (SPE) method to a modified SPE (mSPE) approach for improved peptide yield and analysis sensitivity with LC-MS based peptidomics in terms of time, cost, clogging of the LC-MS column, peptide yield, peptide quality, and number of peptides identified by each method. Expense and time requirements were comparable for both SPE and mSPE, but more interfering contaminants from the urine matrix were evident in the SPE preparations (e.g., clogging of the LC-MS columns, yellowish background coloration of prepared samples due to retained urobilin, lower peptide yields) when compared to the mSPE method. When we compared data from technical replicates of 4 runs, the mSPE method provided significantly improved efficiencies for the preparation of samples from urine (e.g., mSPE peptide identification 82% versus 18% with SPE; p = 8.92E-05). Additionally, peptide identifications, when applying the mSPE method, highlighted the biology of differential activation of urine peptidases during acute renal transplant rejection with distinct laddering of specific peptides, which was obscured for most proteins

  2. Sample preparation of archaeological materials for PIXE analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method to prepare thin samples of archaeological materials such as potteries and bones for PIXE analysis is presented. In this method fine powder of the matter under analysis is suspended and deposited on polycarbonate filters. The process takes place in a chamber where clean air and the powder are mixed and forced to pass through the filter. Thin samples with typical mass density of about 50 μg cm-2 are obtained. The uniformity of the mass deposit has been optically tested with a He-Ne laser showing fluctuations of the order of one percent. Samples of clay standards from NIST were prepared with this method and analyzed by PIXE. The agreement between these results and NIST values is very good, with linear correlation factors close to unity. The method was applied to study the elemental composition of clay from different fragments of a Chilean pre-Hispanic pottery piece. These results are very consistent showing that the analysis of samples from a small fragment can represent the whole piece. (author) 8 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  3. Preparation of graphene thin films for radioactive samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roteta, Miguel; Fernández-Martínez, Rodolfo; Mejuto, Marcos; Rucandio, Isabel

    2016-03-01

    A new method for the preparation of conductive thin films is presented. The metallization of VYNS films guarantees the electrical conductivity but it results in the breaking of a high proportion of them. Graphene, a two-dimensional nanostructure of monolayer or few layers graphite has attracted a great deal of attention because of its excellent properties such as a good chemical stability, mechanical resistance and extraordinary electronic transport properties. In this work, the possibilities of graphene have been explored as a way to produce electrical conductive thin films without an extra metallization process. The procedure starts with preparing homogenous suspensions of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in conventional VYNS solutions. Ultra-sonication is used to ensure a good dispersibility of rGO. Graphene oxide (GO) is prepared via oxidation of graphite and subsequent exfoliation by sonication. Different chemically rGO were obtained by reaction with hydrazine sulfate, sodium borohydride, ascorbic acid and hydroiodic acid as reducing agents. The preparation of the thin graphene films is done in a similar way as the conventional VYNS foil preparation procedure. Drops of the solution are deposited onto water. The graphene films have been used to prepare sources containing some electron capture radionuclides ((109)Cd, (55)Fe, (139)Ce) with an activity in the order of 3kBq. The samples have been measured to test the attainable low energy electron efficiency and the energy resolution of Auger and conversion electrons by 4π (electron capture)-γ coincidence measurements. The 4π (electron capture)-γ coincidence setup includes a pressurized proportional counter and a NaI(Tl) detector. Tests with different pressures up to 1000kPa were carried out. All these tests show similar values in both parameters (efficiency and resolution) as those obtained by using the conventional metallized films without the drawback of the high percentage of broken films. PMID:26651168

  4. Automated, Ultra-Sterile Solid Sample Handling and Analysis on a Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Maria F.; Stockton, Amanda M.; Willis, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    There are no existing ultra-sterile lab-on-a-chip systems that can accept solid samples and perform complete chemical analyses without human intervention. The proposed solution is to demonstrate completely automated lab-on-a-chip manipulation of powdered solid samples, followed by on-chip liquid extraction and chemical analysis. This technology utilizes a newly invented glass micro-device for solid manipulation, which mates with existing lab-on-a-chip instrumentation. Devices are fabricated in a Class 10 cleanroom at the JPL MicroDevices Lab, and are plasma-cleaned before and after assembly. Solid samples enter the device through a drilled hole in the top. Existing micro-pumping technology is used to transfer milligrams of powdered sample into an extraction chamber where it is mixed with liquids to extract organic material. Subsequent chemical analysis is performed using portable microchip capillary electrophoresis systems (CE). These instruments have been used for ultra-highly sensitive (parts-per-trillion, pptr) analysis of organic compounds including amines, amino acids, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and thiols. Fully autonomous amino acid analyses in liquids were demonstrated; however, to date there have been no reports of completely automated analysis of solid samples on chip. This approach utilizes an existing portable instrument that houses optics, high-voltage power supplies, and solenoids for fully autonomous microfluidic sample processing and CE analysis with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. Furthermore, the entire system can be sterilized and placed in a cleanroom environment for analyzing samples returned from extraterrestrial targets, if desired. This is an entirely new capability never demonstrated before. The ability to manipulate solid samples, coupled with lab-on-a-chip analysis technology, will enable ultraclean and ultrasensitive end-to-end analysis of samples that is orders of magnitude more sensitive than the ppb goal given

  5. Combining electrochemical sensors with miniaturized sample preparation for rapid detection in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyakul, Natinan; Baeumner, Antje J

    2015-01-01

    Clinical analyses benefit world-wide from rapid and reliable diagnostics tests. New tests are sought with greatest demand not only for new analytes, but also to reduce costs, complexity and lengthy analysis times of current techniques. Among the myriad of possibilities available today to develop new test systems, amperometric biosensors are prominent players-best represented by the ubiquitous amperometric-based glucose sensors. Electrochemical approaches in general require little and often enough only simple hardware components, are rugged and yet provide low limits of detection. They thus offer many of the desirable attributes for point-of-care/point-of-need tests. This review focuses on investigating the important integration of sample preparation with (primarily electrochemical) biosensors. Sample clean up requirements, miniaturized sample preparation strategies, and their potential integration with sensors will be discussed, focusing on clinical sample analyses. PMID:25558994

  6. An automated system for the preparation of Large Size Dried (LSD) Spikes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large size dried (LSD) spikes have been produced to fulfill the existing requirement for reliable and traceable isotopic reference materials for nuclear safeguards. A system to produce certified nuclear isotopic reference material as a U/Pu mixture in the form of large size dried spikes, comparable to those produced using traditional methods has been installed in collaboration with Nucomat, a company with a recognized reputation in design and development of integrated automated systems. The major components of the system are a robot, two balances, a dispenser and a drying unit fitted into a glove box. The robot is software driven and designed to control all movements inside the glove-box, to identify unambiguously the penicillin vials with a bar-code reader, to dispense the LSD batch solution into the vials and to weigh the amount dispensed. The system functionality has been evaluated and the performance validated by comparing the results from a series of samples dispensed and weighed by the automated system with the results by manual substitution weighing. After applying the proper correction factors to the data from the automated system balance no significant difference was observed between the two. However, an additional component of uncertainty of 3*10-4 is introduced in the uncertainty budget for the certified weights provided by the automatic system. (authors)

  7. Rapid and Automated Determination of Plutonium and Neptunium in Environmental Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Jixin

    This thesis presents improved analytical methods for rapid and automated determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples using sequential injection (SI) based chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The progress of methodology development...... in this work consists of 5 subjects stated as follows: 1) Development and optimization of an SI-anion exchange chromatographic method for rapid determination of plutonium in environmental samples in combination of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection (Paper II); (2) Methodology development...... and optimization for rapid determination of plutonium in environmental samples using SIextraction chromatography prior to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Paper III); (3) Development of an SI-chromatographic method for simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples...

  8. Construction and calibration of a low cost and fully automated vibrating sample magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low cost vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) has been constructed by using an electromagnet and an audio loud speaker; where both are controlled by a data acquisition device. The constructed VSM records the magnetic hysteresis loop up to 8.3 KG at room temperature. The apparatus has been calibrated and tested by using magnetic hysteresis data of some ferrite samples measured by two scientifically calibrated magnetometers; model (Lake Shore 7410) and model (LDJ Electronics Inc. Troy, MI). Our VSM lab-built new design proved success and reliability. - Highlights: • A low cost automated vibrating sample magnetometer VSM has been constructed. • The VSM records the magnetic hysteresis loop up to 8.3 KG at room temperature. • The VSM has been calibrated and tested by using some measured ferrite samples. • Our VSM lab-built new design proved success and reliability

  9. Construction and calibration of a low cost and fully automated vibrating sample magnetometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Alaily, T.M., E-mail: toson_alaily@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt); El-Nimr, M.K.; Saafan, S.A.; Kamel, M.M.; Meaz, T.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt); Assar, S.T. [Engineering Physics and Mathematics Department, Faculty of Engineering, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt)

    2015-07-15

    A low cost vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) has been constructed by using an electromagnet and an audio loud speaker; where both are controlled by a data acquisition device. The constructed VSM records the magnetic hysteresis loop up to 8.3 KG at room temperature. The apparatus has been calibrated and tested by using magnetic hysteresis data of some ferrite samples measured by two scientifically calibrated magnetometers; model (Lake Shore 7410) and model (LDJ Electronics Inc. Troy, MI). Our VSM lab-built new design proved success and reliability. - Highlights: • A low cost automated vibrating sample magnetometer VSM has been constructed. • The VSM records the magnetic hysteresis loop up to 8.3 KG at room temperature. • The VSM has been calibrated and tested by using some measured ferrite samples. • Our VSM lab-built new design proved success and reliability.

  10. Focused-microwave-assisted sample preparation (M8)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Focused-microwave-assisted sample preparation is a suitable strategy when dealing with high masses of organic samples. However, the final acid concentration of the digestate can difficult routine analytical measurements using spectroscopic techniques. Acids could be evaporated, but this step could be slow even when using microwave-assisted heating and requires a scrubber system for acid vapor collection and neutralization. We are investigating two procedures to decrease the acid concentration of digestates. The first one is based on acid vapor phase digestion of samples contained in PTFE devices' inserted into the microwave flask. The acid solution is heated by absorption of microwave radiation, then the acid vapor partially condenses in the upper part of the reaction flask and it is partially collected in each sample container. Calcium, Fe, Mg, Mn, and Zn were quantitatively recovered in samples of animal and vegetable tissues. Better recoveries were attained when adding a small volume of sodium hypochlorite to the sample. This effect is probably related to the generation of chlorine in the sample container after collecting condensed acid. The second procedure developed is based on the gradual addition of liquid samples to a previously heated acid digestion mixture. This procedure was successfully applied for digestion of milk, fruit juices, and red wine. The main advantage is the possibility of digesting up to four-fold more sample using up to ten-fold lower amounts of concentrated acids. Results obtained using both digestion procedures and measurements by ICP-OES with axial view will be presented. (author)

  11. Biological sample preparation and 41Ca AMS measurement at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium metabolism in biology may be better understood by the use of 41Ca tracer, although requiring detection by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Methodologies for preparation of urine samples and subsequent AMS measurement were investigated. Novel attempts at preparing CaH2 were unsuccessful, but CaF2 of sufficient purity could be produced by precipitation of calcium from urine as oxalate, followed by separation of calcium by cation exchange chromatography and washing the CaF2 precipitate. The presence of some remaining impurities could be compensated for by selecting the appropriate accelerated ion charge state for AMS. The use of projectile X-rays for isobar discrimination was explored as an alternative to the co nventional dE/dx detector. (orig.)

  12. Scalable Transcriptome Preparation for Massive Parallel Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Henrik Stranneheim; Beata Werne; Ellen Sherwood; Joakim Lundeberg

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The tremendous output of massive parallel sequencing technologies requires automated robust and scalable sample preparation methods to fully exploit the new sequence capacity. METHODOLOGY: In this study, a method for automated library preparation of RNA prior to massively parallel sequencing is presented. The automated protocol uses precipitation onto carboxylic acid paramagnetic beads for purification and size selection of both RNA and DNA. The automated sample preparation was co...

  13. Scalable Transcriptome Preparation for Massive Parallel Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Stranneheim, Henrik; Werne, Beata; Sherwood, Ellen; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2011-01-01

    Background The tremendous output of massive parallel sequencing technologies requires automated robust and scalable sample preparation methods to fully exploit the new sequence capacity. Methodology In this study, a method for automated library preparation of RNA prior to massively parallel sequencing is presented. The automated protocol uses precipitation onto carboxylic acid paramagnetic beads for purification and size selection of both RNA and DNA. The automated sample preparation was comp...

  14. Automated sample-changing robot for solution scattering experiments at the EMBL Hamburg SAXS station X33

    OpenAIRE

    Round, A R; D. Franke; S. Moritz; Huchler, R.; Fritsche, M.; Malthan, D.; Klaering, R.; Svergun, D I; Roessle, M.

    2008-01-01

    There is a rapidly increasing interest in the use of synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) for large-scale studies of biological macromolecules in solution, and this requires an adequate means of automating the experiment. A prototype has been developed of an automated sample changer for solution SAXS, where the solutions are kept in thermostatically controlled well plates allowing for operation with up to 192 samples. The measuring protocol involves controlled loading of protein so...

  15. NGSI FY15 Final Report. Innovative Sample Preparation for in-Field Uranium Isotopic Determinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Thomas M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meyers, Lisa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-10

    Our FY14 Final Report included an introduction to the project, background, literature search of uranium dissolution methods, assessment of commercial off the shelf (COTS) automated sample preparation systems, as well as data and results for dissolution of bulk quantities of uranium oxides, and dissolution of uranium oxides from swipe filter materials using ammonium bifluoride (ABF). Also, discussed were reaction studies of solid ABF with uranium oxide that provided a basis for determining the ABF/uranium oxide dissolution mechanism. This report details the final experiments for optimizing dissolution of U3O8 and UO2 using ABF and steps leading to development of a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for dissolution of uranium oxides on swipe filters.

  16. Sampling and sample preparation methods for the analysis of trace elements in biological material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors attempt to give a most systamtic possible treatment of the sample taking and sample preparation of biological material (particularly in human medicine) for trace analysis (e.g. neutron activation analysis, atomic absorption spectrometry). Contamination and loss problems are discussed as well as the manifold problems of the different consistency of solid and liquid biological materials, as well as the stabilization of the sample material. The process of dry and wet ashing is particularly dealt with, where new methods are also described. (RB)

  17. Use of compressed fluids for sample preparation: food applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiola, José A; Herrero, Miguel; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Ibañez, Elena

    2007-06-01

    This review attempts to provide an updated overview (including works published till June 2006) on the latest applications of compressed fluids as sample preparation techniques for food analysis. After a general review of the principles of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and pressurized liquid extraction (PLE; also called accelerated solvent extraction, ASE or subcritical water extraction, SWE, when water is employed as extraction solvent), the principal applications of such techniques in the mentioned fields of food and natural products are described, discussing their main advantages and drawbacks. PMID:17353022

  18. Sample preparation and EFTEM of Meat Samples for Nanoparticle Analysis in Food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticles are used in industry for personal care products and the preparation of food. In the latter application, their functions include the prevention of microbes' growth, increase of the foods nutritional value and sensory quality. EU regulations require a risk assessment of the nanoparticles used in foods and food contact materials before the products can reach the market. However, availability of validated analytical methodologies for detection and characterisation of the nanoparticles in food hampers appropriate risk assessment. As part of a research on the evaluation of the methods for screening and quantification of Ag nanoparticles in meat we have tested a new TEM sample preparation alternative to resin embedding and cryo-sectioning. Energy filtered TEM analysis was applied to evaluate thickness and the uniformity of thin meat layers acquired at increasing input of the sample demonstrating that the protocols used ensured good stability under the electron beam, reliable sample concentration and reproducibility

  19. Sample preparation and EFTEM of Meat Samples for Nanoparticle Analysis in Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lari, L.; Dudkiewicz, A.

    2014-06-01

    Nanoparticles are used in industry for personal care products and the preparation of food. In the latter application, their functions include the prevention of microbes' growth, increase of the foods nutritional value and sensory quality. EU regulations require a risk assessment of the nanoparticles used in foods and food contact materials before the products can reach the market. However, availability of validated analytical methodologies for detection and characterisation of the nanoparticles in food hampers appropriate risk assessment. As part of a research on the evaluation of the methods for screening and quantification of Ag nanoparticles in meat we have tested a new TEM sample preparation alternative to resin embedding and cryo-sectioning. Energy filtered TEM analysis was applied to evaluate thickness and the uniformity of thin meat layers acquired at increasing input of the sample demonstrating that the protocols used ensured good stability under the electron beam, reliable sample concentration and reproducibility.

  20. Mechanical Alteration And Contamination Issues In Automated Subsurface Sample Acquisition And Handling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, B. J.; Cannon, H.; Bonaccorsi, R.; Zacny, K.

    2006-12-01

    The Drilling Automation for Mars Exploration (DAME) project's purpose is to develop and field-test drilling automation and robotics technologies for projected use in missions in the 2011-15 period. DAME includes control of the drilling hardware, and state estimation of both the hardware and the lithography being drilled and the state of the hole. A sister drill was constructed for the Mars Analog Río Tinto Experiment (MARTE) project and demonstrated automated core handling and string changeout in 2005 drilling tests at Rio Tinto, Spain. DAME focused instead on the problem of drill control while actively drilling while not getting stuck. Together, the DAME and MARTE projects demonstrate a fully automated robotic drilling capability, including hands-off drilling, adjustment to different strata and downhole conditions, recovery from drilling faults (binding, choking, etc.), drill string changeouts, core acquisition and removal, and sample handling and conveyance to in-situ instruments. The 2006 top-level goal of DAME drilling in-situ tests was to verify and demonstrate a capability for hands-off automated drilling, at an Arctic Mars-analog site. There were three sets of 2006 test goals, all of which were exceeded during the July 2006 field season. The first was to demonstrate the recognition, while drilling, of at least three of the six known major fault modes for the DAME planetary-prototype drill, and to employ the correct recovery or safing procedure in response. The second set of 2006 goals was to operate for three or more hours autonomously, hands-off. And the third 2006 goal was to exceed 3m depth into the frozen breccia and permafrost with the DAME drill (it had not gone further than 2.2m previously). Five of six faults were detected and corrected, there were 43 hours of hands-off drilling (including a 4 hour sequence with no human presence nearby), and 3.2m was the total depth. And ground truth drilling used small commercial drilling equipment in parallel in

  1. Automated processing of forensic casework samples using robotic workstations equipped with nondisposable tips: contamination prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frégeau, Chantal J; Lett, C Marc; Elliott, Jim; Yensen, Craig; Fourney, Ron M

    2008-05-01

    An automated process has been developed for the analysis of forensic casework samples using TECAN Genesis RSP 150/8 or Freedom EVO liquid handling workstations equipped exclusively with nondisposable tips. Robot tip cleaning routines have been incorporated strategically within the DNA extraction process as well as at the end of each session. Alternative options were examined for cleaning the tips and different strategies were employed to verify cross-contamination. A 2% sodium hypochlorite wash (1/5th dilution of the 10.8% commercial bleach stock) proved to be the best overall approach for preventing cross-contamination of samples processed using our automated protocol. The bleach wash steps do not adversely impact the short tandem repeat (STR) profiles developed from DNA extracted robotically and allow for major cost savings through the implementation of fixed tips. We have demonstrated that robotic workstations equipped with fixed pipette tips can be used with confidence with properly designed tip washing routines to process casework samples using an adapted magnetic bead extraction protocol. PMID:18471209

  2. A continuous flow from sample collection to data acceptability determination using an automated system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its role as regulator, EPA is the recipient of enormous reams of analytical data, especially within the Superfund Program. In order to better manage the volume of paper that comes in daily, Superfund has required its laboratories to provide data that is contained on reporting forms to be delivered also on a diskette for uploading into data bases for various purposes, such as checking for contractual compliance, tracking quality assurance parameters, and, ultimately, for reviewing the data by computer. This last area, automated review of the data, has generated programs that are not necessarily appropriate for use by clients other than Superfund. Such is the case with Los Alamos National Laboratory's Environmental Chemistry Group and its emerging subcontractor community, designed to meet the needs of the remedial action program at LANL. LANL is in the process of implementing an automated system that will be used from the planning stage of sample collection to the production of a project-specific report on analytical data quality. Included are electronic scheduling and tracking of samples, data entry, checking and transmission, data assessment and qualification for use, and report generation that will tie the analytical data quality back to the performance criteria defined prior to sample collection. Industry standard products will be used (e.g., ORACLE, Microsoft Excel) to ensure support for users, prevent dependence on proprietary software, and to protect LANL's investment for the future

  3. Three sample preparation protocols for polymerase chain reaction based detection of Cryptosporidium parvum in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrzynska, M; Sankey, M; Haack, E; Power, C; Aldom, J E; Chagla, A H; Unger, S; Palmateer, G; Lee, H; Trevors, J T; De Grandis, S A

    1999-02-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite responsible for an increasing number of outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness worldwide. In this report, we describe development of sample preparation protocols for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based detection of C. parvum in fecal material and environmental water samples. Two of these methods were found adequate for isolation of Cryptosporidium DNA from filtered water pellet suspensions. The first involved several filtration steps, immunomagnetic separation and freeze-thaw cycles. The second method involved filtration, addition of EnviroAmp lysis reagent, freeze-thaw cycles and precipitation of the DNA with isopropanol. Using nested PCR, we detected 100 oocysts/ml of filtered water pellet suspension, with either of the above sample preparation procedures. Nested PCR increased sensitivity of the assay by two to three orders of magnitude as compared to the primary PCR. The detection limit for seeded fecal samples was 10-fold higher than for filtered environmental water pellet suspension. Nested PCR results showed 62.4 and 91.1% correlation with immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for fecal samples and filtered environmental water pellet suspensions, respectively. This correlation decreased to 47.2% and 44.4%, respectively, when only IFA positive samples were analyzed. However, in fecal samples contaminated with a high number (> 10(5)/g) of C. parvum oocysts, this correlation was 100%. PMID:10076632

  4. S- to N-Palmitoyl Transfer During Proteomic Sample Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuhuan; Bachschmid, Markus M.; Costello, Catherine E.; Lin, Cheng

    2016-04-01

    N-palmitoylation has been reported in a number of proteins and suggested to play an important role in protein localization and functions. However, it remains unclear whether N-palmitoylation is a direct enzyme-catalyzed process, or results from intramolecular S- to N-palmitoyl transfer. Here, using the S-palmitoyl peptide standard, GCpalmLGNAK, as the model system, we observed palmitoyl migration from the cysteine residue to either the peptide N-terminus or the lysine side chain during incubation in both neutral and slightly basic buffers commonly used in proteomic sample preparation. Palmitoyl transfer can take place either intra- or inter-molecularly, with the peptide N-terminus being the preferred migration site, presumably because of its lower basicity. The extent of intramolecular palmitoyl migration was low in the system studied, as it required the formation of an entropically unfavored macrocycle intermediate. Intermolecular palmitoyl transfer, however, remained a tangible problem, and may lead to erroneous reporting of in vivo N-palmitoylation. It was found that addition of the MS-compatible detergent RapiGest could significantly inhibit intermolecular palmitoyl transfer, as well as thioester hydrolysis and DTT-induced thioester cleavage. Finally, palmitoyl transfer from the cysteine residue to the peptide N-terminus can also occur in the gas phase, during collision-induced dissociation, and result in false identification of N-palmitoylation. Therefore, one must be careful with both sample preparation and interpretation of tandem mass spectra in the study of N-palmitoylation.

  5. Preparation of tissue samples for X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwiej, Joanna; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena; Lankosz, Marek; Wojcik, Slawomir; Falkenberg, Gerald; Stegowski, Zdzislaw; Setkowicz, Zuzanna

    2005-12-01

    As is well-known, trace elements, especially metals, play an important role in the pathogenesis of many disorders. The topographic and quantitative elemental analysis of pathologically changed tissues may shed some new light on processes leading to the degeneration of cells in the case of selected diseases. An ideal and powerful tool for such purpose is the Synchrotron Microbeam X-ray Fluorescence technique. It enables the carrying out of investigations of the elemental composition of tissues even at the single cell level. The tissue samples for histopathological investigations are routinely fixed and embedded in paraffin. The authors try to verify the usefulness of such prepared tissue sections for elemental analysis with the use of X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Studies were performed on rat brain samples. Changes in elemental composition caused by fixation in formalin or paraformaldehyde and embedding in paraffin were examined. Measurements were carried out at the bending magnet beamline L of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB in Hamburg. The decrease in mass per unit area of K, Br and the increase in P, S, Fe, Cu and Zn in the tissue were observed as a result of the fixation. For the samples embedded in paraffin, a lower level of most elements was observed. Additionally, for these samples, changes in the composition of some elements were not uniform for different analyzed areas of rat brain.

  6. Waste minimization in analytical chemistry through innovative sample preparation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because toxic solvents and other hazardous materials are commonly used in analytical methods, characterization procedures result in significant and costly amount of waste. We are developing alternative analytical methods in the radiological and organic areas to reduce the volume or form of the hazardous waste produced during sample analysis. For the radiological area, we have examined high-pressure, closed-vessel microwave digestion as a way to minimize waste from sample preparation operations. Heated solutions of strong mineral acids can be avoided for sample digestion by using the microwave approach. Because reactivity increases with pressure, we examined the use of less hazardous solvents to leach selected contaminants from soil for subsequent analysis. We demonstrated the feasibility of this approach by extracting plutonium from a NET reference material using citric and tartaric acids with microwave digestion. Analytical results were comparable to traditional digestion methods, while hazardous waste was reduced by a factor often. We also evaluated the suitability of other natural acids, determined the extraction performance on a wider variety of soil types, and examined the extraction efficiency of other contaminants. For the organic area, we examined ways to minimize the wastes associated with the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in environmental samples. Conventional methods for analyzing semivolatile organic compounds are labor intensive and require copious amounts of hazardous solvents. For soil and sediment samples, we have a method to analyze PCBs that is based on microscale extraction using benign solvents (e.g., water or hexane). The extraction is performed at elevated temperatures in stainless steel cells containing the sample and solvent. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to quantitate the analytes in the isolated extract. More recently, we developed a method utilizing solid-phase microextraction (SPME) for natural

  7. Automation of high-frequency sampling of environmental waters for reactive species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Bishop, J. K.; Wood, T.; Fung, I.; Fong, M.

    2011-12-01

    Trace metals, particularly iron and manganese, play a critical role in some ecosystems as a limiting factor to determine primary productivity, in geochemistry, especially redox chemistry as important electron donors and acceptors, and in aquatic environments as carriers of contaminant transport. Dynamics of trace metals are closely related to various hydrologic events such as rainfall. Storm flow triggers dramatic changes of both dissolved and particulate trace metals concentrations and affects other important environmental parameters linked to trace metal behavior such as dissolved organic carbon (DOC). To improve our understanding of behaviors of trace metals and underlying processes, water chemistry information must be collected for an adequately long period of time at higher frequency than conventional manual sampling (e.g. weekly, biweekly). In this study, we developed an automated sampling system to document the dynamics of trace metals, focusing on Fe and Mn, and DOC for a multiple-year high-frequency geochemistry time series in a small catchment, called Rivendell located at Angelo Coast Range Reserve, California. We are sampling ground and streamwater using the automated sampling system in daily-frequency and the condition of the site is substantially variable from season to season. The ranges of pH of ground and streamwater are pH 5 - 7 and pH 7.8 - 8.3, respectively. DOC is usually sub-ppm, but during rain events, it increases by an order of magnitude. The automated sampling system focuses on two aspects- 1) a modified design of sampler to improve sample integrity for trace metals and DOC and 2) remote controlling system to update sampling volume and timing according to hydrological conditions. To maintain sample integrity, the developed method employed gravity filtering using large volume syringes (140mL) and syringe filters connected to a set of polypropylene bottles and a borosilicate bottle via Teflon tubing. Without filtration, in a few days, the

  8. Review of online coupling of sample preparation techniques with liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jialiang; Zhang, Chengjiang; Zhang, Zhuomin; Li, Gongke

    2014-03-01

    Sample preparation is still considered as the bottleneck of the whole analytical procedure, and efforts has been conducted towards the automation, improvement of sensitivity and accuracy, and low comsuption of organic solvents. Development of online sample preparation techniques (SP) coupled with liquid chromatography (LC) is a promising way to achieve these goals, which has attracted great attention. This article reviews the recent advances on the online SP-LC techniques. Various online SP techniques have been described and summarized, including solid-phase-based extraction, liquid-phase-based extraction assisted with membrane, microwave assisted extraction, ultrasonic assisted extraction, accelerated solvent extraction and supercritical fluids extraction. Specially, the coupling approaches of online SP-LC systems and the corresponding interfaces have been discussed and reviewed in detail, such as online injector, autosampler combined with transport unit, desorption chamber and column switching. Typical applications of the online SP-LC techniques have been summarized. Then the problems and expected trends in this field are attempted to be discussed and proposed in order to encourage the further development of online SP-LC techniques. PMID:24560367

  9. Supporting Sampling and Sample Preparation Tools for Isotope and Nuclear Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear and related techniques can help develop climate-smart agricultural practices by optimizing water and nutrient use efficiency, assessing organic carbon sequestration in soil, and assisting in the evaluation of soil erosion control measures. Knowledge on the behaviour of radioactive materials in soil, water and foodstuffs is also essential in enhancing nuclear emergency preparedness and response. Appropriate sampling and sample preparation are the first steps to ensure the quality and effective use of the measurements and this publication provides comprehensive detail on the necessary steps

  10. Iodine-129: Sample preparation, quality assurance and analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-lived radionuclide 129I (half-live 15.7 Ma) occurs in the environment due to spontaneous fission of uranium in the earth-crust and in oceans, and due to cosmic-ray induced spallation of xenon in the stratosphere. Military and civilian use of induced nuclear fission by man increased natural abundances by two to seven orders of magnitude during the last sixty years. Among that, substantial emissions originate from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Three main goals are pursued by examining 129I in environmental materials: The observation of dimensions and radiological relevances of anthropogenic emissions during the last decades, the use of 129I as a tracer of environmental processes, and the determination of natural, pre-nuclear 129I/127I ratios. For that, precipitation, surface, and ground waters from Lower Saxony, Germany, were systematically investigated from 1997 to 1999, extended by single seawater samples. In addition, a reconstruction of past 129I concentrations and 129I/127I ratios was attempted with archived soil and thyroid samples. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used in this study. Besides the measurements of environmental samples, emphasis was laid upon the refinement of these analytical and chemical procedures: New sample preparation methods, quality assurance, the possibility of a carrier-free sample preparation and measurement with AMS, and a detailed statistical evaluation of raw data

  11. Automated high-volume aerosol sampling station for environmental radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automated high-volume aerosol sampling station, known as CINDERELLA.STUK, for environmental radiation monitoring has been developed by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Finland. The sample is collected on a glass fibre filter (attached into a cassette), the airflow through the filter is 800 m3/h at maximum. During the sampling, the filter is continuously monitored with Na(I) scintillation detectors. After the sampling, the large filter is automatically cut into 15 pieces that form a small sample and after ageing, the pile of filter pieces is moved onto an HPGe detector. These actions are performed automatically by a robot. The system is operated at a duty cycle of 1 d sampling, 1 d decay and 1 d counting. Minimum detectable concentrations of radionuclides in air are typically 1Ae10 x 10-6 Bq/m3. The station is equipped with various sensors to reveal unauthorized admittance. These sensors can be monitored remotely in real time via Internet or telephone lines. The processes and operation of the station are monitored and partly controlled by computer. The present approach fulfils the requirements of CTBTO for aerosol monitoring. The concept suits well for nuclear material safeguards, too

  12. Evaluation of biological sample preparation for immunosignature-based diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Brian Andrew; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Legutki, Joseph Barten

    2012-03-01

    To address the need for a universal system to assess health status, we previously described a method termed "immunosignaturing" which splays the entire humoral antibody repertoire across a peptide microarray. Two important issues relative to the potential broad use of immunosignatures are sample preparation and stability. In the present study, we compared the immunosignatures developed from serum, plasma, saliva, and antibodies eluted from blood dried onto filter paper. We found that serum and plasma provide identical immunosignatures. Immunosignatures derived from dried blood also correlated well with those from nondried serum from the same individual. Immunosignatures derived from dried blood were capable of distinguishing naïve mice from those infected with influenza virus. Saliva was applied to the arrays, and the IgA immunosignature correlated strongly with that from dried blood. Finally, we demonstrate that dried blood retains immunosignature information even when exposed to high temperature. This work expands the potential diagnostic uses for immunosignatures. These features suggest that different forms of archival samples can be used for diagnosis development and that in prospective studies samples can be easily procured. PMID:22237890

  13. Automated high-throughput in vitro screening of the acetylcholine esterase inhibiting potential of environmental samples, mixtures and single compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froment, Jean; Thomas, Kevin V; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2016-08-01

    A high-throughput and automated assay for testing the presence of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibiting compounds was developed, validated and applied to screen different types of environmental samples. Automation involved using the assay in 96-well plates and adapting it for the use with an automated workstation. Validation was performed by comparing the results of the automated assay with that of a previously validated and standardised assay for two known AChE inhibitors (paraoxon and dichlorvos). The results show that the assay provides similar concentration-response curves (CRCs) when run according to the manual and automated protocol. Automation of the assay resulted in a reduction in assay run time as well as in intra- and inter-assay variations. High-quality CRCs were obtained for both of the model AChE inhibitors (dichlorvos IC50=120µM and paraoxon IC50=0.56µM) when tested alone. The effect of co-exposure of an equipotent binary mixture of the two chemicals were consistent with predictions of additivity and best described by the concentration addition model for combined toxicity. Extracts of different environmental samples (landfill leachate, wastewater treatment plant effluent, and road tunnel construction run-off) were then screened for AChE inhibiting activity using the automated bioassay, with only landfill leachate shown to contain potential AChE inhibitors. Potential uses and limitations of the assay were discussed based on the present results. PMID:27085000

  14. Optimal sampling and sample preparation for NIR-based prediction of field scale soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knadel, Maria; Peng, Yi; Schelde, Kirsten; Thomsen, Anton; Deng, Fan; Humlekrog Greve, Mogens

    2013-04-01

    The representation of local soil variability with acceptable accuracy and precision is dependent on the spatial sampling strategy and can vary with a soil property. Therefore, soil mapping can be expensive when conventional soil analyses are involved. Visible near infrared spectroscopy (vis-NIR) is considered a cost-effective method due to labour savings and relative accuracy. However, savings may be offset by the costs associated with number of samples and sample preparation. The objective of this study was to find the most optimal way to predict field scale total organic carbon (TOC) and texture. To optimize the vis-NIR calibrations the effects of sample preparation and number of samples on the predictive ability of models with regard to the spatial distribution of TOC and texture were investigated. Conditioned Latin hypercube sampling (cLHs) method was used to select 125 sampling locations from an agricultural field in Denmark, using electromagnetic induction (EMI) and digital elevation model (DEM) data. The soil samples were scanned in three states (field moist, air dried and sieved to 2 mm) with a vis-NIR spectrophotometer (LabSpec 5100, ASD Inc., USA). The Kennard-Stone algorithm was applied to select 50 representative soil spectra for the laboratory analysis of TOC and texture. In order to investigate how to minimize the costs of reference analysis, additional smaller subsets (15, 30 and 40) of samples were selected for calibration. The performance of field calibrations using spectra of soils at the three states as well as using different numbers of calibration samples was compared. Final models were then used to predict the remaining 75 samples. Maps of predicted soil properties where generated with Empirical Bayesian Kriging. The results demonstrated that regardless the state of the scanned soil, the regression models and the final prediction maps were similar for most of the soil properties. Nevertheless, as expected, models based on spectra from field

  15. Fully Automated Laser Ablation Liquid Capture Sample Analysis using NanoElectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Laser ablation provides for the possibility of sampling a large variety of surfaces with high spatial resolution. This type of sampling when employed in conjunction with liquid capture followed by nanoelectrospray ionization provides the opportunity for sensitive and prolonged interrogation of samples by mass spectrometry as well as the ability to analyze surfaces not amenable to direct liquid extraction. METHODS: A fully automated, reflection geometry, laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling system was achieved by incorporating appropriate laser fiber optics and a focusing lens into a commercially available, liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA ) ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate system. RESULTS: Under optimized conditions about 10% of laser ablated material could be captured in a droplet positioned vertically over the ablation region using the NanoMate robot controlled pipette. The sampling spot size area with this laser ablation liquid capture surface analysis (LA/LCSA) mode of operation (typically about 120 m x 160 m) was approximately 50 times smaller than that achievable by direct liquid extraction using LESA (ca. 1 mm diameter liquid extraction spot). The set-up was successfully applied for the analysis of ink on glass and paper as well as the endogenous components in Alstroemeria Yellow King flower petals. In a second mode of operation with a comparable sampling spot size, termed laser ablation/LESA , the laser system was used to drill through, penetrate, or otherwise expose material beneath a solvent resistant surface. Once drilled, LESA was effective in sampling soluble material exposed at that location on the surface. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating the capability for different laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling modes of operation into a LESA ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate enhanced the spot sampling spatial resolution of this device and broadened the surface types amenable to analysis to include absorbent and solvent resistant

  16. Trends in sample preparation 2002. Development and application. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference comprised topics dealing with sample preparation such as: sample decomposition, solvent extraction, derivatization techniques and uncertainty in sample preparation. In particular microwave assisted sample preparation techniques and equipment were discussed. The papers were organized under the general topics: trace element analysis, trace analysis of organic compounds, high performance instrumentation in sample preparation, speciation analysis and posters session. Those papers of INIS interest are cited individually. (nevyjel)

  17. Microbiological monitoring and automated event sampling at karst springs using LEO-satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, H; Skritek, P; Sommer, R; Mach, R L; Zerobin, W; Farnleitner, A H

    2008-01-01

    Data communication via Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) Satellites between portable hydrometeorological measuring stations is the backbone of our system. This networking allows automated event sampling with short time increments also for E. coli field analysis. All activities of the course of the event-sampling can be observed on an internet platform based on a Linux-Server. Conventionally taken samples compared with the auto-sampling procedure revealed corresponding results and were in agreement with the ISO 9308-1 reference method. E. coli concentrations were individually corrected by event specific inactivation coefficients (0.10-0.14 day(-1)), compensating losses due to sample storage at spring temperature in the auto sampler.Two large summer events in 2005/2006 at an important alpine karst spring (LKAS2) were monitored including detailed analysis of E. coli dynamics (n = 271) together with comprehensive hydrological characterisations. High-resolution time series demonstrated a sudden increase of E. coli concentrations in spring water (approximately 2 log10 units) with a specific time delay after the beginning of the event. Statistical analysis suggested the spectral absorption coefficient measured at 254 nm (SAC254) as an early warning surrogate for real time monitoring of faecal input. Together with the LEO-satellite based system it is a helpful tool for early-warning systems in the field of drinking water protection. PMID:18776628

  18. Use of robotic systems for radiochemical sample changing and for analytical sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two uses of the Perkin-Elmer (PE) robotic system will be presented. In the first, a PE robot functions as an automatic sample changer for up to five low energy photon spectrometry (LEPS) detectors operated with a Nuclear Data ND 6700 system. The entire system, including the robot, is controlled by an IBM PC-AT using software written in compiled BASIC. Problems associated with the development of the system and modifications to the robot will be presented. In the second, an evaluation study was performed to assess the abilities of the PE robotic system for performing complex analytical sample preparation procedures. For this study, a robotic system based upon the PE robot and auxiliary devices was constructed and programmed to perform the preparation of final product samples (UO3) for accountability and impurity specification analyses. These procedures require sample dissolution, dilution, and liquid-liquid extraction steps. The results of an in-depth evaluation of all system components will be presented

  19. Use of robotic systems for radiochemical sample changing and for analytical sample preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmastro, J.R.; Hartenstein, S.D.; Wade, M.A.

    1989-05-15

    Two uses of the Perkin-Elmer (PE) robotic system will be presented. In the first, a PE robot functions as an automatic sample changer for up to five low energy photon spectrometry (LEPS) detectors operated with a Nuclear Data ND 6700 system. The entire system, including the robot, is controlled by an IBM PC-AT using software written in compiled BASIC. Problems associated with the development of the system and modifications to the robot will be presented. In the second, an evaluation study was performed to assess the abilities of the PE robotic system for performing complex analytical sample preparation procedures. For this study, a robotic system based upon the PE robot and auxiliary devices was constructed and programmed to perform the preparation of final product samples (UO{sub 3}) for accountability and impurity specification analyses. These procedures require sample dissolution, dilution, and liquid-liquid extraction steps. The results of an in-depth evaluation of all system components will be presented.

  20. Development of an automated mass spectrometry system for the quantitative analysis of liver microsomal incubation samples: a tool for rapid screening of new compounds for metabolic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfmacher, W A; Palmer, C A; Nardo, C; Dunn-Meynell, K; Grotz, D; Cox, K; Lin, C C; Elicone, C; Liu, C; Duchoslav, E

    1999-01-01

    There is a continuing need for increased throughput in the evaluation of new drug entities in terms of their pharmacokinetic parameters. One useful parameter that can be measured in vitro using liver microsomal preparations is metabolic stability. In this report, we describe an automated system that can be used for unattended quantitative analysis of liver microsomal samples for a series of compounds. This system is based on the Sciex API 150 (single quadrupole) liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry system and utilizes 96-well plate autosampler technology as well as a custom-designed AppleScript which executes the on-line data processing and report generation. It has the capability of analyzing at least 75 compounds per week or 300 compounds per month in an automated fashion. PMID:10353225

  1. Novel sample preparation for operando TEM of catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin K; Barker, Trevor M; Crozier, Peter A

    2015-09-01

    A new TEM sample preparation method is developed to facilitate operando TEM of gas phase catalysis. A porous Pyrex-fiber pellet TEM sample was produced, allowing a comparatively large amount of catalyst to be loaded into a standard Gatan furnace-type tantalum heating holder. The increased amount of catalyst present inside the environmental TEM allows quantitative determination of the gas phase products of a catalytic reaction performed in-situ at elevated temperatures. The product gas concentration was monitored using both electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and residual gas analysis (RGA). Imaging of catalyst particles dispersed over the pellet at atomic resolution is challenging, due to charging of the insulating glass fibers. To overcome this limitation, a metal grid is placed into the holder in addition to the pellet, allowing catalyst particles dispersed over the grid to be imaged, while particles in the pellet, which are assumed to experience identical conditions, contribute to the overall catalytic conversion inside the environmental TEM cell. The gas within the cell is determined to be well-mixed, making this assumption reasonable. PMID:25974880

  2. AMS 14C performance test of a new automated bone preparation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Bone is one of the most complex sample materials for radiocarbon dating. After burial, its physical state and chemical composition can be affected by many environmental processes. In case of our new AMS bone preparation technique, after ultrasonication in distilled water, drying, surface cleaning and grinding, the sample is sieved to get the appropriate sized sample fraction (0.5 - 1 mm) out of which 500 - 1000 mg is measured, depending on the state of the bone. We have developed our own continuous flow bone sample preparation equipment. In this unit OMNIFITTM columns are used as flow cells to construct our own automatic ABA (acid-base-acid) cleaning system. From 3 types of reagent, each one is injected via a 4 way valve and inert plastic tubing to an IsmatechTM IPC 12 channel peristaltic pump to ensure a constant flow rate. Reagents are selectively pumped to the reaction cells containing the powdered bone samples, with a sequence of 0.5 M HCl and 0.1 M NaOH solution, interspersed with flushing with distilled water. During the sixteen-hour-long process, reagents follow a well-defined sequence that is controlled by a computer program and a special electronic driver device. The cleaned sample is inserted into a test tube containing 5 ml, pH 3 aqueous solutions, and it is placed into a heating block at 75 deg C for 24 hours. Dissolved collagen is filtered via a 45 μm glass fibre filter (WhatmanTM AUTOVIAL 5) into a clean vial, and after freezing, it gets freeze-dried, a process which takes at least a day. To investigate the sample-preparation reproducibility and possible extra contamination effect by an optional ultra-filtration process a known-age bone sample, previously dated by an independent method (GPC at HEKAL), was prepared several times using the new AMS preparation line for 14C analyses. The results obtained (Figure 1.) showed very good reproducibility and excellent agreement with the classical GPC measured 14C age in

  3. Novel sample preparation method for molecular detection of Mollicutes in cell culture samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, David; Jouette, Sébastien; Olivieri, Frédéric; Laborde, Sandra; Rofel, Céline; Simon, Emmanuelle; Metz, Didier; Felden, Luc; Ribault, Sébastien

    2010-02-01

    Research laboratories, raw materials and media suppliers as well as the biopharmaceutical industry face recurrent contamination with Mollicutes. Culture-based detection methods are very slow (28 days) and could ideally be replaced by nucleic acid testing (NAT) for rapid result. These methods are nonetheless hampered by their companion sample preparation methods. They are limited by the volume tested (0.1 to 5 mL), the protein/nucleic acid content they can accommodate and are generally performed in an open environment. The processing of low volumes of complex matrices is associated to several issues such as poor representativeness, low sensitivity, inhibition and false positives. The novel sample preparation method described in this study has been developed to overcome these limitations and to process 20-mL samples containing high loads of eukaryotic cells. A dual-membrane device is coupled to magnetic bead purification. In one single and closed device, eukaryotic cells and microorganisms are separated, contaminants are concentrated, lysed and corresponding nucleic acids are collected. This novel sample preparation method has been tested with 9 different Mollicutes. The ability to detect the contaminants down to 0.6 CFU/mL by real-time PCR among hundreds of millions of CHO-S cells (Chinese hamster ovary cells, adapted to serum-free suspension culture), without biological pre-enrichment, has been demonstrated. The novel device has been compared to manual silica spin columns, which remain the gold standard in most laboratories. These columns failed to yield the same limit of detection and reproducible results without separating mammalian cells from contaminants. Co-culture experiments have shown that the novel method allows detection of Mollicutes grown for days in presence of mammalian cells, despite the fact that these microorganisms can adhere to eukaryotic cells or invade them. The co-culture data also suggest that the novel sample preparation device might improve

  4. Rapid and automated determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, J.

    2011-03-15

    This thesis presents improved analytical methods for rapid and automated determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples using sequential injection (SI) based chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The progress of methodology development in this work consists of 5 subjects stated as follows: 1) Development and optimization of an SI-anion exchange chromatographic method for rapid determination of plutonium in environmental samples in combination of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection (Paper II); (2) Methodology development and optimization for rapid determination of plutonium in environmental samples using SI-extraction chromatography prior to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Paper III); (3) Development of an SI-chromatographic method for simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples (Paper IV); (4) Investigation of the suitability and applicability of 242Pu as a tracer for rapid neptunium determination using anion exchange chromatography in an SI-network coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Paper V); (5) Exploration of macro-porous anion exchange chromatography for rapid and simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium within an SI system (Paper VI). The results demonstrate that the developed methods in this study are reliable and efficient for accurate assays of trace levels of plutonium and neptunium as demanded in different situations including environmental risk monitoring and assessment, emergency preparedness and surveillance of contaminated areas. (Author)

  5. Rapid and automated determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents improved analytical methods for rapid and automated determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples using sequential injection (SI) based chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The progress of methodology development in this work consists of 5 subjects stated as follows: 1) Development and optimization of an SI-anion exchange chromatographic method for rapid determination of plutonium in environmental samples in combination of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection (Paper II); (2) Methodology development and optimization for rapid determination of plutonium in environmental samples using SI-extraction chromatography prior to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Paper III); (3) Development of an SI-chromatographic method for simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples (Paper IV); (4) Investigation of the suitability and applicability of 242Pu as a tracer for rapid neptunium determination using anion exchange chromatography in an SI-network coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Paper V); (5) Exploration of macro-porous anion exchange chromatography for rapid and simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium within an SI system (Paper VI). The results demonstrate that the developed methods in this study are reliable and efficient for accurate assays of trace levels of plutonium and neptunium as demanded in different situations including environmental risk monitoring and assessment, emergency preparedness and surveillance of contaminated areas. (Author)

  6. Preparing and measuring ultra-small radiocarbon samples with the ARTEMIS AMS facility in Saclay, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delque-Kolic, E., E-mail: emmanuelle.delque-kolic@cea.fr [LMC14, CEA Saclay, Batiment 450 Porte 4E, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Comby-Zerbino, C.; Ferkane, S.; Moreau, C.; Dumoulin, J.P.; Caffy, I.; Souprayen, C.; Quiles, A.; Bavay, D.; Hain, S.; Setti, V. [LMC14, CEA Saclay, Batiment 450 Porte 4E, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2013-01-15

    The ARTEMIS facility in Saclay France measures, on average, 4500 samples a year for French organizations working in an array of fields, including environmental sciences, archeology and hydrology. In response to an increasing demand for the isolation of specific soil compounds and organic water fractions, we were motivated to evaluate our ability to reduce microgram samples using our standard graphitization lines and to measure the graphite thus obtained with our 3MV NEC Pelletron AMS. Our reduction facility consists of two fully automated graphitization lines. Each line has 12 reduction reactors with a reduction volume of 18 ml for the first line and 12 ml for the second. Under routine conditions, we determined that we could reduce the samples down to 10 {mu}g of carbon, even if the graphitization yield is consequently affected by the lower sample mass. Our results when testing different Fe/C ratios suggest that an amount of 1.5 mg of Fe powder was ideal (instead of lower amounts of catalyst) to prevent the sample from deteriorating too quickly under the Cs+ beam, and to facilitate pressing procedures. Several sets of microsamples produced from HOxI standard, international references and backgrounds were measured. When measuring {sup 14}C-free wood charcoal and HOxI samples we determined that our modern and dead blanks, due to the various preparation steps, were of 1.1 {+-} 0.8 and 0.2 {+-} 0.1 {mu}g, respectively. The results presented here were obtained for IAEA-C1, {sup 14}C-free wood, IAEA-C6, IAEA-C2 and FIRI C.

  7. Design and Development of a Robot-Based Automation System for Cryogenic Crystal Sample Mounting at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray crystallography is the primary method to determine the 3D structures of complex macromolecules at high resolution. In the years to come, the Advanced Photon Source (APS) and similar 3rd-generation synchrotron sources elsewhere will become the most powerful tools for studying atomic structures of biological molecules. One of the major bottlenecks in the x-ray data collection process is the constant need to change and realign the crystal sample. This is a very time- and manpower-consuming task. An automated sample mounting system will help to solve this bottleneck problem. We have developed a novel robot-based automation system for cryogenic crystal sample mounting at the APS. Design of the robot-based automation system, as well as its on-line test results at the Argonne Structural Biology Center (SBC) 19-BM experimental station, are presented in this paper

  8. Sample preparation for measuring cow's progesterone in radioimmunoassay technique application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sample preparation for measuring cow's progesterone in radioimmunoassay technique application has been done. Preparation includes the preparation of samples of cow's milk samples that has been carried out artificial insemination on day 0, 11 and 21. Then the standard making of progesterone in the form of fresh milk or skim milk (non fat) that has been removed its progesterone and through a series of chemical processes. The last is the preparation work on samples using the RIA kit I125. With this milk samples preparation, samples can be counted using RIA counter so that concentration of progesterone hormone can be determined accurately. (author)

  9. Uranium monitoring tool for rapid analysis of environmental samples based on automated liquid-liquid microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Rogelio; Avivar, Jessica; Ferrer, Laura; Leal, Luz O; Cerdà, Víctor

    2015-03-01

    A fully automated in-syringe (IS) magnetic stirring assisted (MSA) liquid-liquid microextraction (LLME) method for uranium(VI) determination was developed, exploiting a long path-length liquid waveguide capillary cell (LWCC) with spectrophotometric detection. On-line extraction of uranium was performed within a glass syringe containing a magnetic stirrer for homogenization of the sample and the successive reagents: cyanex-272 in dodecane as extractant, EDTA as interference eliminator, hydrochloric acid to make the back-extraction of U(VI) and arsenazo-III as chromogenic reagent to accomplish the spectrophotometric detection at 655 nm. Magnetic stirring assistance was performed by a specially designed driving device placed around the syringe body creating a rotating magnetic field in the syringe, and forcing the rotation of the stirring bar located inside the syringe. The detection limit (LOD) of the developed method is 3.2 µg L(-1). Its good interday precision (Relative Standard Deviation, RSD 3.3%), and its high extraction frequency (up to 6 h(-1)) makes of this method an inexpensive and fast screening tool for monitoring uranium(VI) in environmental samples. It was successfully applied to different environmental matrices: channel sediment certified reference material (BCR-320R), soil and phosphogypsum reference materials, and natural water samples, with recoveries close to 100%. PMID:25618721

  10. Sample Preparation Report of the Fourth OPCW Confidence Building Exercise on Biomedical Sample Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udey, R. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Corzett, T. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Alcaraz, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-07-03

    Following the successful completion of the 3rd biomedical confidence building exercise (February 2013 – March 2013), which included the analysis of plasma and urine samples spiked at low ppb levels as part of the exercise scenario, another confidence building exercise was targeted to be conducted in 2014. In this 4th exercise, it was desired to focus specifically on the analysis of plasma samples. The scenario was designed as an investigation of an alleged use of chemical weapons where plasma samples were collected, as plasma has been reported to contain CWA adducts which remain present in the human body for several weeks (Solano et al. 2008). In the 3rd exercise most participants used the fluoride regeneration method to analyze for the presence of nerve agents in plasma samples. For the 4th biomedical exercise it was decided to evaluate the analysis of human plasma samples for the presence/absence of the VX adducts and aged adducts to blood proteins (e.g., VX-butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) and aged BuChE adducts using a pepsin digest technique to yield nonapeptides; or equivalent). As the aging of VX-BuChE adducts is relatively slow (t1/2 = 77 hr at 37 °C [Aurbek et al. 2009]), soman (GD), which ages much more quickly (t1/2 = 9 min at 37 °C [Masson et al. 2010]), was used to simulate an aged VX sample. Additional objectives of this exercise included having laboratories assess novel OP-adducted plasma sample preparation techniques and analytical instrumentation methodologies, as well as refining/designating the reporting formats for these new techniques.

  11. Integrated microfabricated biodevices. New advances in sample preparation (T2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Interdisciplinary science and technologies have converged in the past few years to create exciting challenges and opportunities, which involve novel, integrated microfabricated systems, facilitating large-scale analytical applications. These new devices are referred to as lab-on-a-chip or micro Total Analysis Systems (uTAS). Their development involves both established and evolving technologies, which include microlithography, micromachining, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, microfluidics and nanotechnology. The advent of this extremely powerful and rapid analysis technique opens up new horizons in analytical chemistry and molecular biology, capable of revealing global changes in gene expression levels by enabling genome, proteome and metabolome analysis on microchips. This presentation will provide an overview of the key device subject areas and the basic interdisciplinary technologies. It will also give a better understanding of how to utilize these miniaturized technologies as well as to provide appropriate technical solutions to problems perceived as being more fundamental. Theoretical and practical aspects of integrating sample preparation/purification and analysis units with chemical and biochemical reactors in monolithic microdevices are going to be thoroughly discussed. Important applications for this novel 'synergized' technology in high throughput analysis of biologically important molecules will also be addressed. (author)

  12. Sample preparation methods for quantitative detection of DNA by molecular assays and marine biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • DNA extraction methods affected measured qPCR target recovery. • Recovery and variability differed, sometimes by more than an order of magnitude. • SCODA did not offer significant improvement with PCR-inhibited seawater. • Aggressive lysis did appear to improve target recovery. • Reliable and affordable correction methods are needed for quantitative PCR. -- Abstract: The need for quantitative molecular methods is growing in environmental, food, and medical fields but is hindered by low and variable DNA extraction and by co-extraction of PCR inhibitors. DNA extracts from Enterococcus faecium, seawater, and seawater spiked with E. faecium and Vibrio parahaemolyticus were tested by qPCR for target recovery and inhibition. Conventional and novel methods were tested, including Synchronous Coefficient of Drag Alteration (SCODA) and lysis and purification systems used on an automated genetic sensor (the Environmental Sample Processor, ESP). Variable qPCR target recovery and inhibition were measured, significantly affecting target quantification. An aggressive lysis method that utilized chemical, enzymatic, and mechanical disruption enhanced target recovery compared to commercial kit protocols. SCODA purification did not show marked improvement over commercial spin columns. Overall, data suggested a general need to improve sample preparation and to accurately assess and account for DNA recovery and inhibition in qPCR applications

  13. Automated on-line liquid-liquid extraction system for temporal mass spectrometric analysis of dynamic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Kai-Ta; Liu, Pei-Han; Urban, Pawel L

    2015-09-24

    Most real samples cannot directly be infused to mass spectrometers because they could contaminate delicate parts of ion source and guides, or cause ion suppression. Conventional sample preparation procedures limit temporal resolution of analysis. We have developed an automated liquid-liquid extraction system that enables unsupervised repetitive treatment of dynamic samples and instantaneous analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). It incorporates inexpensive open-source microcontroller boards (Arduino and Netduino) to guide the extraction and analysis process. Duration of every extraction cycle is 17 min. The system enables monitoring of dynamic processes over many hours. The extracts are automatically transferred to the ion source incorporating a Venturi pump. Operation of the device has been characterized (repeatability, RSD = 15%, n = 20; concentration range for ibuprofen, 0.053-2.000 mM; LOD for ibuprofen, ∼0.005 mM; including extraction and detection). To exemplify its usefulness in real-world applications, we implemented this device in chemical profiling of pharmaceutical formulation dissolution process. Temporal dissolution profiles of commercial ibuprofen and acetaminophen tablets were recorded during 10 h. The extraction-MS datasets were fitted with exponential functions to characterize the rates of release of the main and auxiliary ingredients (e.g. ibuprofen, k = 0.43 ± 0.01 h(-1)). The electronic control unit of this system interacts with the operator via touch screen, internet, voice, and short text messages sent to the mobile phone, which is helpful when launching long-term (e.g. overnight) measurements. Due to these interactive features, the platform brings the concept of the Internet-of-Things (IoT) to the chemistry laboratory environment. PMID:26423626

  14. Analysis of zearalenone in cereal and Swine feed samples using an automated flow-through immunosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urraca, Javier L; Benito-Peña, Elena; Pérez-Conde, Concepción; Moreno-Bondi, María C; Pestka, James J

    2005-05-01

    The development of a sensitive flow-though immunosensor for the analysis of the mycotoxin zearalenone in cereal samples is described. The sensor was completely automated and was based on a direct competitive immunosorbent assay and fluorescence detection. The mycotoxin competes with a horseradish-peroxidase-labeled derivative for the binding sites of a rabbit polyclonal antibody. Control pore glass covalently bound to Prot A was used for the oriented immobilization of the antibody-antigen immunocomplexes. The immunosensor shows an IC(50) value of 0.087 ng mL(-1) (RSD = 2.8%, n = 6) and a dynamic range from 0.019 to 0.422 ng mL(-1). The limit of detection (90% of blank signal) of 0.007 ng mL(-1) (RSD = 3.9%, n = 3) is lower than previously published methods. Corn, wheat, and swine feed samples have been analyzed with the device after extraction of the analyte using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). The immunosensor has been validated using a corn certificate reference material and HPLC with fluorescence detection. PMID:15853369

  15. Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) - a fast and automated technique with low solvent consumption for the extraction of solid samples (T12)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) is a modern extraction technique that significantly streamlines sample preparation. A common organic solvent as well as water is used as extraction solvent at elevated temperature and pressure to increase extraction speed and efficiency. The entire extraction process is fully automated and performed within 15 minutes with a solvent consumption of 18 ml for a 10 g sample. For many matrices and for a variety of solutes, ASE has proven to be equivalent or superior to sonication, Soxhlet, and reflux extraction techniques while requiring less time, solvent and labor. First ASE has been applied for the extraction of environmental hazards from solid matrices. Within a very short time ASE was approved by the U.S. EPA for the extraction of BNAs, PAHs, PCBs, pesticides, herbicides, TPH, and dioxins from solid samples in method 3545. Especially for the extraction of dioxins the extraction time with ASE is reduced to 20 minutes in comparison to 18 h using Soxhlet. In food analysis ASE is used for the extraction of pesticide and mycotoxin residues from fruits and vegetables, the fat determination and extraction of vitamins. Time consuming and solvent intensive methods for the extraction of additives from polymers as well as for the extraction of marker compounds from herbal supplements can be performed with higher efficiencies using ASE. For the analysis of chemical weapons the extraction process and sample clean-up including derivatization can be automated and combined with GC-MS using an online ASE-APEC-GC system. (author)

  16. Total airborne mold particle sampling: evaluation of sample collection, preparation and counting procedures, and collection devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godish, Diana; Godish, Thad

    2008-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate (i) procedures used to collect, prepare, and count total airborne mold spore/particle concentrations, and (ii) the relative field performance of three commercially available total airborne mold spore/particle sampling devices. Differences between factory and laboratory airflow calibration values of axial fan-driven sampling instruments (used in the study) indicated a need for laboratory calibration using a mass flow meter to ensure that sample results were accurately calculated. An aniline blue-amended Calberla's solution adjusted to a pH of 4.2-4.4 provided good sample mounting/counting results using Dow Corning high vacuum grease, Dow Corning 280A adhesive, and Dow Corning 316 silicone release spray for samples collected using mini-Burkard and Allergenco samplers. Count variability among analysts was most pronounced in 5% counts of relatively low mold particle deposition density samples and trended downward with increased count percentage and particle deposition density. No significant differences were observed among means of 5, 10, and 20% counts and among analysts; a significant interaction effect was observed between analysts' counts and particle deposition densities. Significantly higher mini-Burkard and Air-O-Cell total mold spore/particle counts for 600x vs. 400x (1.9 and 2.3 x higher, respectively), 1000x vs. 600x (1.9 and 2.2 x higher, respectively) and 1000x vs. 400x (3.6 and 4.6 x higher, respectively) comparisons indicated that 1000x magnification counts best quantified total airborne mold spore/particles using light microscopy, and that lower magnification counts may result in unacceptable underreporting of airborne mold spore/particle concentrations. Modest but significantly higher (1.2x) total mold spore concentrations were observed with Allergenco vs. mini-Burkard samples collected in co-located, concurrently operated sampler studies; moderate but significantly higher mini-Burkard count values (1.4x) were

  17. Pilot study of a rapid and minimally instrumented sputum sample preparation method for molecular diagnosis of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Tanya M; Weigel, Kris M; Lakey Becker, Annie; Ontengco, Delia; Narita, Masahiro; Tolstorukov, Ilya; Doebler, Robert; Cangelosi, Gerard A; Niemz, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) enables rapid and sensitive diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB), which facilitates treatment and mitigates transmission. Nucleic acid extraction from sputum constitutes the greatest technical challenge in TB NAAT for near-patient settings. This report presents preliminary data for a semi-automated sample processing method, wherein sputum is disinfected and liquefied, followed by PureLyse(®) mechanical lysis and solid-phase nucleic acid extraction in a miniaturized, battery-operated bead blender. Sputum liquefaction and disinfection enabled a >10(4) fold reduction in viable load of cultured Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) spiked into human sputum, which mitigates biohazard concerns. Sample preparation via the PureLyse(®) method and a clinically validated manual method enabled positive PCR-based detection for sputum spiked with 10(4) and 10(5) colony forming units (cfu)/mL M.tb. At 10(3) cfu/mL sputum, four of six and two of six samples amplified using the comparator and PureLyse(®) method, respectively. For clinical specimens from TB cases and controls, the two methods provided 100% concordant results for samples with 1 mL input volume (N = 41). The semi-automated PureLyse(®) method therefore performed similarly to a validated manual comparator method, but is faster, minimally instrumented, and can be integrated into TB molecular diagnostic platforms designed for near-patient low-resource settings. PMID:26785769

  18. Final LDRD report : development of sample preparation methods for ChIPMA-based imaging mass spectrometry of tissue samples.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maharrey, Sean P.; Highley, Aaron M.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this short-term LDRD project was to acquire the tools needed to use our chemical imaging precision mass analyzer (ChIPMA) instrument to analyze tissue samples. This effort was an outgrowth of discussions with oncologists on the need to find the cellular origin of signals in mass spectra of serum samples, which provide biomarkers for ovarian cancer. The ultimate goal would be to collect chemical images of biopsy samples allowing the chemical images of diseased and nondiseased sections of a sample to be compared. The equipment needed to prepare tissue samples have been acquired and built. This equipment includes an cyro-ultramicrotome for preparing thin sections of samples and a coating unit. The coating unit uses an electrospray system to deposit small droplets of a UV-photo absorbing compound on the surface of the tissue samples. Both units are operational. The tissue sample must be coated with the organic compound to enable matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and matrix enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry (ME-SIMS) measurements with the ChIPMA instrument Initial plans to test the sample preparation using human tissue samples required development of administrative procedures beyond the scope of this LDRD. Hence, it was decided to make two types of measurements: (1) Testing the spatial resolution of ME-SIMS by preparing a substrate coated with a mixture of an organic matrix and a bio standard and etching a defined pattern in the coating using a liquid metal ion beam, and (2) preparing and imaging C. elegans worms. Difficulties arose in sectioning the C. elegans for analysis and funds and time to overcome these difficulties were not available in this project. The facilities are now available for preparing biological samples for analysis with the ChIPMA instrument. Some further investment of time and resources in sample preparation should make this a useful tool for chemical imaging applications.

  19. Performance verification of the Maxwell 16 Instrument and DNA IQ Reference Sample Kit for automated DNA extraction of known reference samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krnajski, Z; Geering, S; Steadman, S

    2007-12-01

    Advances in automation have been made for a number of processes conducted in the forensic DNA laboratory. However, because most robotic systems are designed for high-throughput laboratories batching large numbers of samples, smaller laboratories are left with a limited number of cost-effective options for employing automation. The Maxwell 16 Instrument and DNA IQ Reference Sample Kit marketed by Promega are designed for rapid, automated purification of DNA extracts from sample sets consisting of sixteen or fewer samples. Because the system is based on DNA capture by paramagnetic particles with maximum binding capacity, it is designed to generate extracts with yield consistency. The studies herein enabled evaluation of STR profile concordance, consistency of yield, and cross-contamination performance for the Maxwell 16 Instrument. Results indicate that the system performs suitably for streamlining the process of extracting known reference samples generally used for forensic DNA analysis and has many advantages in a small or moderate-sized laboratory environment. PMID:25869266

  20. Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Automation in the 21st Century - Amat Victoria curam (Victory loves careful preparation)

    OpenAIRE

    Armbruster, David A; Overcash, David R; Reyes, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The era of automation arrived with the introduction of the AutoAnalyzer using continuous flow analysis and the Robot Chemist that automated the traditional manual analytical steps. Successive generations of stand-alone analysers increased analytical speed, offered the ability to test high volumes of patient specimens, and provided large assay menus. A dichotomy developed, with a group of analysers devoted to performing routine clinical chemistry tests and another group dedicated to performing...

  1. Selecting Sample Preparation Workflows for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Patient Samples with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Hernandez-Valladares

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Global mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies of acute myeloid leukemia (AML biomarkers represent a powerful strategy to identify and confirm proteins and their phosphorylated modifications that could be applied in diagnosis and prognosis, as a support for individual treatment regimens and selection of patients for bone marrow transplant. MS-based studies require optimal and reproducible workflows that allow a satisfactory coverage of the proteome and its modifications. Preparation of samples for global MS analysis is a crucial step and it usually requires method testing, tuning and optimization. Different proteomic workflows that have been used to prepare AML patient samples for global MS analysis usually include a standard protein in-solution digestion procedure with a urea-based lysis buffer. The enrichment of phosphopeptides from AML patient samples has previously been carried out either with immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC or metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC. We have recently tested several methods of sample preparation for MS analysis of the AML proteome and phosphoproteome and introduced filter-aided sample preparation (FASP as a superior methodology for the sensitive and reproducible generation of peptides from patient samples. FASP-prepared peptides can be further fractionated or IMAC-enriched for proteome or phosphoproteome analyses. Herein, we will review both in-solution and FASP-based sample preparation workflows and encourage the use of the latter for the highest protein and phosphorylation coverage and reproducibility.

  2. Sample preparation techniques in trace element analysis by X-ray emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report, written under a research contract with the IAEA, contains a detailed presentation of the most difficult problem encountered in the trace element analysis by methods of the X-ray emission spectroscopy, namely the sample preparation techniques. The following items are covered. Sampling - with specific consideration of aerosols, water, soil, biological materials, petroleum and its products, storage of samples and their handling. Pretreatment of samples - preconcentration, ashing, solvent extraction, ion exchange and electrodeposition. Sample preparations for PIXE - analysis - backings, target uniformity and homogeneity, effects of irradiation, internal standards and specific examples of preparation (aqueous, biological, blood serum and solid samples). Sample preparations for radioactive sources or tube excitation - with specific examples (water, liquid and solid samples, soil, geological, plants and tissue samples). Finally, the problem of standards and reference materials, as well as that of interlaboratory comparisons, is discussed

  3. Improvements in high purity radioxenon sample preparation and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the production and analysis of high purity radioxenon samples. The University of Texas' 1.1 MW TRIGA research reactor is used for radioactive sample production via neutron activation. The reactor's facilities include a pneumatic system for precise irradiation of samples. In order to use the pneumatic facilities, gaseous samples have been encapsulated in quartz to fit into the polyethylene vials designed for the system. Enriched, stable, isotopically pure xenon gas is irradiated with neutrons in order to activate it to radioxenon isotopes, which are then measured with a β-γ coincidence system. The system enhancement and procedures to produce the radioxenon samples are described and examples of first of their kind measurements are shown for 125Xe, 127Xe, 129m Xe, and 137Xe. (author)

  4. ASPIRE: An automated sample positioning and irradiation system for radiation biology experiments at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automated irradiation setup for biology samples has been built at Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi, India. It can automatically load and unload 20 biology samples in a run of experiment. It takes about 20 min [2% of the cell doubling time] to irradiate all the 20 samples. Cell doubling time is the time taken by the cells (kept in the medium) to grow double in numbers. The cells in the samples keep growing during entire of the experiment. The fluence irradiated to the samples is measured with two silicon surface barrier detectors. Tests show that the uniformity of fluence and dose of heavy ions reaches to 2% at the sample area in diameter of 40 mm. The accuracy of mean fluence at the center of the target area is within 1%. The irradiation setup can be used to the studies of radiation therapy, radiation dosimetry and molecular biology at the heavy ion accelerator. - Highlights: • Automated positioning and irradiation setup for biology samples at IUAC is built. • Loading and unloading of 20 biology samples can be automatically carried out. • Biologicals cells keep growing during entire experiment. • Fluence and dose of heavy ions are measured by two silicon barrier detectors. • Uniformity of fluence and dose of heavy ions at sample position reaches to 2%

  5. Using γ spectrometry to study the influence on determination results of samples prepared with different preparation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to condition recommended in references, two bio-samples, the tea leaves and the wheat flour, are prepared with two different methods of ground into powder and reduced to ash. The radionuclides in the samples are analysed by γ spectrometry. The results show that the measured values of tea samples prepared by different method have outstanding difference, and the preparation method of reduced to ash makes some nuclides of the the sample lost. Comparing with the nondestructive method of ground into powder samples, the method of reduced to ash could make the detection sensibility much higher, but its suitability for kinds of samples and nuclides has some limitation, so its application have to be careful. At the same time it is shown in the work that developing the study about influence on determination results of samples prepared with different methods still has very significance. The probable reasons are discussed for widely different influence with different preparation method of the tea leaves and wheat flour. (6 tabs.)

  6. Preview of the NASA NNWG NDE Sample Preparation Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presents a step-by-step how-to fabrication documentation of every kind of sample that is fabricated for MSFC by UA Huntsville, including photos and illustrations. The tabulation of what kind of samples are being fabricated for what NDE method, detailed instructions/documentation of the inclusion/creation of defects, detailed specifications for materials, processes, and equipment, case histories and/or experiences with the different fabrication methods and defect inclusion techniques, discussion of pitfalls and difficulties associated with sample fabrication and defect inclusion techniques, and a discussion of why certain fabrication techniques are needed as related to the specific NDE methods are included in this presentation.

  7. Influence of sample preparation on the assay of isoflavones

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complexity of sample matrices, coexistence of multiple forms of bioactive phytochemicals, and their interaction of with other cellular components pose a significant challenge for optimize extraction and accurate estimation of bioactive phytochemicals in foods and dietary supplements. This artic...

  8. Sample Preparation for Monolithic Refractories Part 1: Refractory Castables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiaohui; Peng Xigao

    2010-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the definition and test methods of flowability of dense and insulating refractory castables,and moulding equipment,moulding methods,curing and drying conditions of castables samples.

  9. Simplified polymer characterization after microwave assisted sample preparation (T9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Beside the determination of fillers and heavy metals in polymers after decomposition more often stabilizers, fire inhibitors and antistatic additive agents are measured alter using fast microwave accelerated solvent extraction. Determination of heavy metal traces for example in food packaging materials needs high sample weight to detect small amounts of impurities. High sample weight is also needed for plastic waste providing the homogeneity for representative analysis. Due to the high concentration of' organic carbon and the fact that the materials swim on the acid surface, closed vessel digestion had limits concerning sample weight. A new vessel insert in combination with extremely fast reaction control allows now to double or triple usual sample weights. High performance vessels can also be used to decompose polymers filled with TiO2, talcum, fibers or similar within short one or two step procedures gaining solutions without precipitates. Additional filtration or sample treatment is not necessary. For the determination of organic components more and more classical, but time consuming methods are replaced by microwave assisted solvent extraction. Instead of hours or even half days using Soxhlet extraction samples can be extracted within minutes using vessels and rotors similar to those used for decomposition. The dual use of one basic microwave instrument for both, analysis of inorganic as well as organic parameters will help to increase efficiency by reduced costs. (author)

  10. Method and Apparatus for Automated Isolation of Nucleic Acids from Small Cell Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Shivshankar; Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Pant, Kapil; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    RNA isolation is a ubiquitous need, driven by current emphasis on microarrays and miniaturization. With commercial systems requiring 100,000 to 1,000,000 cells for successful isolation, there is a growing need for a small-footprint, easy-to-use device that can harvest nucleic acids from much smaller cell samples (1,000 to 10,000 cells). The process of extraction of RNA from cell cultures is a complex, multi-step one, and requires timed, asynchronous operations with multiple reagents/buffers. An added complexity is the fragility of RNA (subject to degradation) and its reactivity to surface. A novel, microfluidics-based, integrated cartridge has been developed that can fully automate the complex process of RNA isolation (lyse, capture, and elute RNA) from small cell culture samples. On-cartridge cell lysis is achieved using either reagents or high-strength electric fields made possible by the miniaturized format. Traditionally, silica-based, porous-membrane formats have been used for RNA capture, requiring slow perfusion for effective capture. In this design, high efficiency capture/elution are achieved using a microsphere-based "microfluidized" format. Electrokinetic phenomena are harnessed to actively mix microspheres with the cell lysate and capture/elution buffer, providing important advantages in extraction efficiency, processing time, and operational flexibility. Successful RNA isolation was demonstrated using both suspension (HL-60) and adherent (BHK-21) cells. Novel features associated with this development are twofold. First, novel designs that execute needed processes with improved speed and efficiency were developed. These primarily encompass electric-field-driven lysis of cells. The configurations include electrode-containing constructs, or an "electrode-less" chip design, which is easy to fabricate and mitigates fouling at the electrode surface; and the "fluidized" extraction format based on electrokinetically assisted mixing and contacting of microbeads

  11. Sample preparation of biological macromolecular assemblies for the determination of high-resolution structures by cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Holger; Chari, Ashwin

    2016-02-01

    Single particle cryo-EM has recently developed into a powerful tool to determine the 3D structure of macromolecular complexes at near-atomic resolution, which allows structural biologists to build atomic models of proteins. All technical aspects of cryo-EM technology have been considerably improved over the last two decades, including electron microscopic hardware, image processing software and the ever growing speed of computers. This leads to a more widespread use of the technique, and it can be anticipated that further automation of electron microscopes and image processing tools will soon fully shift the focus away from the technological aspects, onto biological questions that can be answered. In single particle cryo-EM, no crystals of a macromolecule are required. In contrast to X-ray crystallography, this significantly facilitates structure determination by cryo-EM. Nevertheless, a relatively high level of biochemical control is still essential to obtain high-resolution structures by cryo-EM, and it can be anticipated that the success of the cryo-EM technology goes hand in hand with further developments of sample purification and preparation techniques. This will allow routine high-resolution structure determination of the many macromolecular complexes of the cell that until now represent evasive targets for X-ray crystallographers. Here we discuss the various biochemical tools that are currently available and the existing sample purification and preparation techniques for cryo-EM grid preparation that are needed to obtain high-resolution images for structure determination. PMID:26671943

  12. Performance of optimized McRAPD in identification of 9 yeast species frequently isolated from patient samples: potential for automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koukalova Dagmar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid, easy, economical and accurate species identification of yeasts isolated from clinical samples remains an important challenge for routine microbiological laboratories, because susceptibility to antifungal agents, probability to develop resistance and ability to cause disease vary in different species. To overcome the drawbacks of the currently available techniques we have recently proposed an innovative approach to yeast species identification based on RAPD genotyping and termed McRAPD (Melting curve of RAPD. Here we have evaluated its performance on a broader spectrum of clinically relevant yeast species and also examined the potential of automated and semi-automated interpretation of McRAPD data for yeast species identification. Results A simple fully automated algorithm based on normalized melting data identified 80% of the isolates correctly. When this algorithm was supplemented by semi-automated matching of decisive peaks in first derivative plots, 87% of the isolates were identified correctly. However, a computer-aided visual matching of derivative plots showed the best performance with average 98.3% of the accurately identified isolates, almost matching the 99.4% performance of traditional RAPD fingerprinting. Conclusion Since McRAPD technique omits gel electrophoresis and can be performed in a rapid, economical and convenient way, we believe that it can find its place in routine identification of medically important yeasts in advanced diagnostic laboratories that are able to adopt this technique. It can also serve as a broad-range high-throughput technique for epidemiological surveillance.

  13. An automated synthesis module for preparation of L-3-[I-123]iodo-alpha-methyl tyrosine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luurtsema, G; Jager, PL; Piers, A; de Hooge, MN

    2001-01-01

    L-3-[I-123]iodo-alpha-methyl tyrosine (IMT) is an artificial amino acid suitable for SPECT imaging of various tumours. Manual synthesis of this radiopharmaceutical is reliable, but time-consuming and may require handling of large quantities of radioactivity. We developed an automated IMT synthesis m

  14. Global metabolite analysis of yeast: evaluation of sample preparation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villas-Bôas, Silas Granato; Højer-Pedersen, Jesper; Åkesson, Mats Fredrik;

    2005-01-01

    of intracellular metabolites, and the losses noticed during sample concentration by lyophilization and solvent evaporation. A more reliable procedure is suggested for quenching yeast cells with cold methanol solution, followed by extraction of intracellular metabolites by pure methanol. The method can be combined...

  15. Sample Preparation (SS): SE58_SS01 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 μL injection. After centrifugation, a 200 μL aliquot of the supernatant (∼0.5 mg of DW of each sample) wa... Each isotope compound was adjusted to a final concentration of 15 ng/μL for each

  16. Microsystem strategies for sample preparation in biological detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Conrad D.; Galambos, Paul C.; Bennett, Dawn Jonita (University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD); Manginell, Monica; Okandan, Murat; Acrivos, Andreas (The City College of New York, NY); Brozik, Susan Marie; Khusid, Boris (New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ)

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this LDRD was to develop microdevice strategies for dealing with samples to be examined in biological detection systems. This includes three sub-components: namely, microdevice fabrication, sample delivery to the microdevice, and sample processing within the microdevice. The first component of this work focused on utilizing Sandia's surface micromachining technology to fabricate small volume (nanoliter) fluidic systems for processing small quantities of biological samples. The next component was to develop interfaces for the surface-micromachined silicon devices. We partnered with Micronics, a commercial company, to produce fluidic manifolds for sample delivery to our silicon devices. Pressure testing was completed to examine the strength of the bond between the pressure-sensitive adhesive layer and the silicon chip. We are also pursuing several other methods, both in house and external, to develop polymer-based fluidic manifolds for packaging silicon-based microfluidic devices. The second component, sample processing, is divided into two sub-tasks: cell collection and cell lysis. Cell collection was achieved using dielectrophoresis, which employs AC fields to collect cells at energized microelectrodes, while rejecting non-cellular particles. Both live and dead Staph. aureus bacteria have been collected using RF frequency dielectrophoresis. Bacteria have been separated from polystyrene microspheres using frequency-shifting dielectrophoresis. Computational modeling was performed to optimize device separation performance, and to predict particle response to the dielectrophoretic traps. Cell lysis is continuing to be pursued using microactuators to mechanically disrupt cell membranes. Novel thermal actuators, which can generate larger forces than previously tested electrostatic actuators, have been incorporated with and tested with cell lysis devices. Significant cell membrane distortion has been observed, but more experiments need to be

  17. 9 CFR 147.8 - Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests. 147.8 Section 147.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.8 Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for...

  18. Effects of Sample Preparation on the Infrared Reflectance Spectra of Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Myers, Tanya L.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.

    2015-05-22

    While reflectance spectroscopy is a useful tool in identifying molecular compounds, laboratory measurement of solid (particularly powder) samples often is confounded by sample preparation methods. For example, both the packing density and surface roughness can have an effect on the quantitative reflectance spectra of powdered samples. Recent efforts in our group have focused on developing standard methods for measuring reflectance spectra that accounts for sample preparation, as well as other factors such as particle size and provenance. In this work, the effect of preparation method on sample reflectivity was investigated by measuring the directional-hemispherical spectra of samples that were hand-packed as well as pressed into pellets using an integrating sphere attached to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The results show that the methods used to prepare the sample have a substantial effect on the measured reflectance spectra, as do other factors such as particle size.

  19. Computer-assisted automatic synthesis II. Development of a fully automated apparatus for preparing substituted N-(carboxyalkyl)amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, N; Sugawara, T; Shintani, M; Kato, S

    1989-01-01

    A versatile automated apparatus, equipped with an artificial intelligence has been developed which may be used to prepare and isolate a wide variety of compounds. The prediction of the optimum reaction conditions and the reaction control in real time, are accomplished using novel kinetic equations and substituent effects in an artificial intelligence software which has already reported [1]. This paper deals with the design and construction of the fully automated system, and its application to the synthesis of a substituted N-(carboxyalkyl)amino acid. The apparatus is composed of units for perfoming various tasks, e.g. reagent supply, reaction, purification and separation, each linked to a control system. All synthetic processes including washing and drying of the apparatus after each synthetic run were automatically performed from the mixing of the reactants to the isolation of the products as powders with purities of greater than 98%. The automated apparatus has been able to run for 24 hours per day, and the average rate of synthesis of substituted N-(carboxyalkyl)amino acids has been three compounds daily. The apparatus is extremely valuable for synthesizing many derivatives of one particular compound structure. Even if the chemical yields are low under the optimum conditions, it is still possible to obtain a sufficient amount of the desired product by repetition of the reaction. Moreover it was possible to greatly reduce the manual involvement of the many syntheses which are a necessary part of pharmaceutical research. PMID:18924679

  20. Computer-assisted automatic synthesis II. Development of a fully automated apparatus for preparing substituted N–(carboxyalkyl)amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Nobuyoshi; Sugawara, Tohru; Shintani, Motoaki; Kato, Shinji

    1989-01-01

    A versatile automated apparatus, equipped with an artificial intelligence has been developed which may be used to prepare and isolate a wide variety of compounds. The prediction of the optimum reaction conditions and the reaction control in real time, are accomplished using novel kinetic equations and substituent effects in an artificial intelligence software which has already reported [1]. This paper deals with the design and construction of the fully automated system, and its application to the synthesis of a substituted N-(carboxyalkyl)amino acid. The apparatus is composed of units for perfoming various tasks, e.g. reagent supply, reaction, purification and separation, each linked to a control system. All synthetic processes including washing and drying of the apparatus after each synthetic run were automatically performed from the mixing of the reactants to the isolation of the products as powders with purities of greater than 98%. The automated apparatus has been able to run for 24 hours per day, and the average rate of synthesis of substituted N-(carboxyalkyl)amino acids has been three compounds daily. The apparatus is extremely valuable for synthesizing many derivatives of one particular compound structure. Even if the chemical yields are low under the optimum conditions, it is still possible to obtain a sufficient amount of the desired product by repetition of the reaction. Moreover it was possible to greatly reduce the manual involvement of the many syntheses which are a necessary part of pharmaceutical research. PMID:18924679

  1. Evaluation of two automated enzyme-immunoassays for detection of thermophilic campylobacters in faecal samples from cattle and swine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Nielsen, E.M.; Stryhn, H.; Andersen, S.

    We evaluated the performance of two enzyme-immunoassays (EIA) for the detection of naturally occurring, thermophilic Campylobacter spp. found in faecal samples from cattle (n = 21 and n = 26) and swine (n = 43) relative to the standard culture method, and also assuming that none of the tests was...... the definitive standard. The primary isolation both for the culture and the EIA methods was carried out by overnight selective enrichment in Preston broth. The results showed good sensitivities for both EIA methods in cattle (95% and 84%) and swine (88% and 69%) samples. However, when testing cattle...... samples, EIA-2 method resulted in a rather low specificity (32%). This seemed to be partially due to the isolation of nonthermophilic species. In conclusion, EIA-1 method may provide a simple and fast tool with good accuracy in cattle and swine samples for automated screening of large number of samples....

  2. Alpha spectrometry sample preparation using selectively adsorbing thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several years ago, Switzerland introduced limits for natural radionuclides in food, e.g. 1 Bq/l for 226Ra or 10 Bq/l for the sum of 238U and 234U in drinking water. To make enforcement by regional (cantonal) laboratories more attractive, simplified analytical methods had to be offered, at least for drinking water. A first step has been the development of radium adsorbing sheets. A 20 mm x 20 mm MnO2 film on a polyamide substrate adsorbs more than 80% of the radium present in a 100 ml water sample within 6 h. The film is thin enough to allow for high resolution alpha spectrometry. A second step now under way is to produce thin films, which selectively adsorb uranium. Actually, an ion exchange resin with diphosphonic and sulfonic acid groups is used for this purpose. Although not yet very thin, these films make possible energy resolutions far better than with any liquid scintillation alpha spectrometry method. Adsorption efficiencies are more than 80% after 20 h exposition to a 100 ml water sample (20 mm x 20 mm sheet). A third step is to have a system that measures radionuclide concentrations in water on-line. A prototype is presented where radionuclides are adsorbed on a film in contact with the water. A Si-detector placed on the other side of the film support counts the alphas passing through

  3. Automation impact study of Army training management 2: Extension of sampling and collection of installation resource data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanquist, T.F.; McCallum, M.C.; Hunt, P.S.; Slavich, A.L.; Underwood, J.A.; Toquam, J.L.; Seaver, D.A.

    1989-05-01

    This automation impact study of Army training management (TM) was performed for the Army Development and Employment Agency (ADEA) and the Combined Arms Training Activity (CATA) by the Battelle Human Affairs Research Centers and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The primary objective of the study was to provide the Army with information concerning the potential costs and savings associated with automating the TM process. This study expands the sample of units surveyed in Phase I of the automation impact effort (Sanquist et al., 1988), and presents data concerning installation resource management in relation to TM. The structured interview employed in Phase I was adapted to a self-administered survey. The data collected were compatible with that of Phase I, and both were combined for analysis. Three US sites, one reserve division, one National Guard division, and one unit in the active component outside the continental US (OCONUS) (referred to in this report as forward deployed) were surveyed. The total sample size was 459, of which 337 respondents contributed the most detailed data. 20 figs., 62 tabs.

  4. Rapid sample preparation for detection and identification of avian influenza virus from chicken faecal samples using magnetic bead microsystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhumpa, Raghuram; Bu, Minqiang; Handberg, Kurt;

    2010-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is an infectious agent of birds and mammals. AIV is causing huge economic loss and can be a threat to human health. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has been used as a method for the detection and identification of AIV virus. Although RT-PCR is a...... sensitive method for detection of AIV, it requires sample preparation including separation and purification of AIV and concentrate viral RNA. It is laborious and complex process especially for diagnosis using faecal sample. In this study, magnetic beads were used for immunoseparation of AIV in chicken...... faecal sample by a magnetic microsystem. Using this system, all the 16 hemagglutinin (H) and 9 neuraminidase (N) subtypes of AIV were separated and detected in spiked faecal samples using RT-PCR, without an RNA extraction step. This rapid sample preparation method can be integrated with a total analysis...

  5. Automated sample-changing robot for solution scattering experiments at the EMBL Hamburg SAXS station X33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, A R; Franke, D; Moritz, S; Huchler, R; Fritsche, M; Malthan, D; Klaering, R; Svergun, D I; Roessle, M

    2008-10-01

    There is a rapidly increasing interest in the use of synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) for large-scale studies of biological macromolecules in solution, and this requires an adequate means of automating the experiment. A prototype has been developed of an automated sample changer for solution SAXS, where the solutions are kept in thermostatically controlled well plates allowing for operation with up to 192 samples. The measuring protocol involves controlled loading of protein solutions and matching buffers, followed by cleaning and drying of the cell between measurements. The system was installed and tested at the X33 beamline of the EMBL, at the storage ring DORIS-III (DESY, Hamburg), where it was used by over 50 external groups during 2007. At X33, a throughput of approximately 12 samples per hour, with a failure rate of sample loading of less than 0.5%, was observed. The feedback from users indicates that the ease of use and reliability of the user operation at the beamline were greatly improved compared with the manual filling mode. The changer is controlled by a client-server-based network protocol, locally and remotely. During the testing phase, the changer was operated in an attended mode to assess its reliability and convenience. Full integration with the beamline control software, allowing for automated data collection of all samples loaded into the machine with remote control from the user, is presently being implemented. The approach reported is not limited to synchrotron-based SAXS but can also be used on laboratory and neutron sources. PMID:25484841

  6. Advanced fluidic handling and use of two-phase flow for high throughput structural investigation of proteins on a microfluidic sample preparation platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, Josiane P.; Snakenborg, Detlef; Møller, M.;

    2010-01-01

    Research on the structure of proteins can bring forth a wealth of information about biological function and can be used to better understand the processes in living cells. This paper reports a new microfluidic sample preparation system for the structural investigation of proteins by Small Angle X......-ray Scattering (SAXS). The system includes hardware and software features for precise fluidic control, synchrotron beamline control, UV absorbance measurements and automated data analysis. The precise fluidic handling capabilities are used to transport and precisely position samples as small as 500 nL into the...

  7. Sample preparation by focused ion beam micromachining for transmission electron microscopy imaging in front-view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jublot, Michael; Texier, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with the development of an original sample preparation method for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using focused ion beam (FIB) micromachining. The described method rests on the use of a removable protective shield to prevent the damaging of the sample surface during the FIB lamellae micromachining. It enables the production of thin TEM specimens that are suitable for plan view TEM imaging and analysis of the sample surface, without the deposition of a capping layer. This method is applied to an indented silicon carbide sample for which TEM analyses are presented to illustrate the potentiality of this sample preparation method. PMID:24200984

  8. Potential artifacts associated with historical preparation of joint compound samples and reported airborne asbestos concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorby, G P; Sheehan, P J; Berman, D W; Bogen, K T; Holm, S E

    2011-05-01

    Airborne samples collected in the 1970s for drywall workers using asbestos-containing joint compounds were likely prepared and analyzed according to National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health Method P&CAM 239, the historical precursor to current Method 7400. Experimentation with a re-created, chrysotile-containing, carbonate-based joint compound suggested that analysis following sample preparation by the historical vs. current method produces different fiber counts, likely because of an interaction between the different clearing and mounting chemicals used and the carbonate-based joint compound matrix. Differences were also observed during analysis using Method 7402, depending on whether acetic acid/dimethylformamide or acetone was used during preparation to collapse the filter. Specifically, air samples of sanded chrysotile-containing joint compound prepared by the historical method yielded fiber counts significantly greater (average of 1.7-fold, 95% confidence interval: 1.5- to 2.0-fold) than those obtained by the current method. In addition, air samples prepared by Method 7402 using acetic acid/dimethylformamide yielded fiber counts that were greater (2.8-fold, 95% confidence interval: 2.5- to 3.2-fold) than those prepared by this method using acetone. These results indicated (1) there is an interaction between Method P&CAM 239 preparation chemicals and the carbonate-based joint compound matrix that reveals fibers that were previously bound in the matrix, and (2) the same appeared to be true for Method 7402 preparation chemicals acetic acid/dimethylformamide. This difference in fiber counts is the opposite of what has been reported historically for samples of relatively pure chrysotile dusts prepared using the same chemicals. This preparation artifact should be considered when interpreting historical air samples for drywall workers prepared by Method P&CAM 239. PMID:21462068

  9. Method for sample preparation for cryoelectron microscopy (CEM) microreactor and loading platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandbergen, H.W.; Ahn, C.W.

    2008-01-01

    A method for sample preparation for cryoelectron microscopy (CEM), wherein the sample is held in a microreactor, wherein the conditions in the microreactor are regulated relative to the environment, wherein the sample in the microreactor is frozen according to a quench freeze process, whereupon the

  10. PET imaging of liposomes labeled with an [¹⁸F]-fluorocholesteryl ether probe prepared by automated radiosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Andreas Tue Ingemann; Binderup, Tina; Andresen, Thomas L; Kjær, Andreas; Rasmussen, Palle H

    2012-12-01

    A novel [¹⁸F]-labeled cholesteryl ether lipid probe was prepared by synthesis of the corresponding mesylate, which was [¹⁸F]-fluorinated by a [¹⁸F]KF, Kryptofix-222, K₂CO₃ procedure. Fluorination was done for 10 minutes at 165°C and took place with conversion between 3 and 17%, depending on conditions. Radiolabelling of the probe and subsequent in situ purification on SEP-Paks were done on a custom-built, fully automatic synthesis robot. Long-circulating liposomes were prepared by hydration (magnetic stirring) of a lipid film containing the radiolabeled probe, followed by fully automated extrusion through 100-nm filters. The [¹⁸F]-labeled liposomes were injected into nude, tumor-bearing mice, and positron emission tomography (PET) scans were performed several times over 8 hours to investigate the in vivo biodistribution. Clear tumor accumulation, as well as hepatic and splenic uptake, was observed, corresponding to expected liposomal pharmacokinetics. The tumor accumulation 8 hours postinjection accounted for 2.25 ± 0.23 (mean ± standard error of the mean) percent of injected dose per gram (%ID/g), and the tumor-to-muscle ratio reached 2.20 ± 0.24 after 8 hours, which is satisfactorily high for visualization of pathological lesions. Moreover, the blood concentration was still at a high level (13.9 ± 1.5 %ID/g) at the end of the 8-hour time frame. The present work demonstrates the methodology for automated preparation of radiolabeled liposomes, and shows that [¹⁸F]-labeled liposomes could be suitable as a methodology for visualization of tumors and obtaining short-term pharmacokinetics in vivo. PMID:22803638

  11. Open focused microwave-assisted sample preparation for rapid total and mercury species determination in environmental solid samples

    OpenAIRE

    Tseng, C M; Garraud, H.; D. Amouroux; Donard, O. F. X.; Diego, A

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes rapid, simple microwave-assisted leaching/ digestion procedures for total and mercury species determination in sediment samples and biomaterials. An open focused microwave system allowed the sample preparation time to be dramatically reduced to only 24 min when a power of 40-80 W was applied. Quantitative leaching of methylmercury from sediments by HNO3 solution and complete dissolution of biomaterials by an alkaline solution, such as 25% TMAH solution, were obtained. Met...

  12. Effect of sample preparation methods on photometric determination of the tellurium and cobalt content in the samples of copper concentrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriya Butenko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Methods of determination of cobalt and nickel in copper concentrates currently used in factory laboratories are very labor intensive and time consuming. The limiting stage of the analysis is preliminary chemical sample preparation. Carrying out the decomposition process of industrial samples with concentrated mineral acids in open systems does not allow to improve the metrological characteristics of the methods, for this reason improvement the methods of sample preparation is quite relevant and has a practical interest. The work was dedicated to the determination of the optimal conditions of preliminary chemical preparation of copper concentrate samples for the subsequent determination of cobalt and tellurium in the obtained solution using tellurium-spectrophotometric method. Decomposition of the samples was carried out by acid dissolving in individual mineral acids and their mixtures by heating in an open system as well as by using ultrasonification and microwave radiation in a closed system. In order to select the optimal conditions for the decomposition of the samples in a closed system the phase contact time and ultrasonic generator’s power were varied. Intensification of the processes of decomposition of copper concentrates with nitric acid (1:1, ultrasound and microwave radiation allowed to transfer quantitatively cobalt and tellurium into solution spending 20 and 30 min respectively. This reduced the amount of reactants used and improved the accuracy of determination by running the process in strictly identical conditions.

  13. Preparation and investigation of bulk and thin film samples of strontium ferrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Poorbafrani

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available   In this article, bulk and thin film samples of strontium ferrite have been studied. Due to the high electrical resistivity in strontium ferrite, energy loss due to eddy currents reduces and because of this, it can be used in high frequency magnetic circuits. On the other hand, strontium ferrite has attracted much attention as a permanent magnet. At first, we study the preparation process of bulk samples of strontium ferrite by a solid state reaction technique. In preparation of samples, to optimize the magnetic properties, we have used the stoichiometry factor (n = Fe2O3 / SrO of 5.25. In addition, we have used additives such as CaO and SiO2 to control grain growth. The samples have been prepared in two series: Isotropic and Anisotropic. For preparation of anisotropic samples, the magnetic field of 1T has been used for orientation of the grains during the press. Then, X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, EDAX analysis and Magnetometer, was used for analyzing and comparing of structural and magnetic properties of isotropic and anisotropic samples. The results indicate that, due to the applied magnetic field, the structural and Magnetic properties of anisotropic samples improved efficiently because of the orientation of the grains during the press. In the next stage, we used bulk samples to prepare strontium ferrite thin films by Pulsed Laser Deposition technique (PLD. The Si (111 substrate has been used to prepare the thin films. Then we have studied the microstructure of thin films by X-ray diffraction, SEM and EDAX analysis. These studies on different samples show that for the preparation of crystalline phase of strontium ferrite thin films, the substrate temperature must be higher than 800˚C. The optimum conditions for preparation of strontium, ferrite thin films have been achieved on the substrate temperature of 840˚C and oxygen pressure of 75 mtorr.

  14. Cost analysis of automated long-term sampling in comparison to existing application modes of manual short-term sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinmann, J. [bm becker messtechnik gmbh, Eschborn (Germany); Huang, A. [TUeV Rheinland Taiwan Ltd., Taipeh (Taiwan); Mehl, K.W.

    2004-09-15

    Because of the unsatisfactory informations which are given by manual sampling, some plants are controlled more frequently by manual sampling, by demand of the local authorities. Such more frequently manual samplings lead to an intensive cost increase of the dioxin emission control. As reported in earlier publications, the ROCEPA (Republic if China EPA) was setting up a project for continuous monitoring of PCDD/F. One topic of this project, which is surely also of general international interest, was a cost analysis for the comparison of long-term sampling and different application modes of manual sampling, which are applied practice in Taiwan in different plants. For the project, the long-term sampling system AMESA {sup registered} was chosen and therefore the published results are calculated on the basis of the AMESA {sup registered} system price. Additional other calculations show that also for dioxin inventories in European countries, the costs by using a long-term sampling system would be in an acceptable cost efficient range.

  15. High-frequency, long-duration water sampling in acid mine drainage studies: a short review of current methods and recent advances in automated water samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hand-collected grab samples are the most common water sampling method but using grab sampling to monitor temporally variable aquatic processes such as diel metal cycling or episodic events is rarely feasible or cost-effective. Currently available automated samplers are a proven, widely used technology and typically collect up to 24 samples during a deployment. However, these automated samplers are not well suited for long-term sampling in remote areas or in freezing conditions. There is a critical need for low-cost, long-duration, high-frequency water sampling technology to improve our understanding of the geochemical response to temporally variable processes. This review article will examine recent developments in automated water sampler technology and utilize selected field data from acid mine drainage studies to illustrate the utility of high-frequency, long-duration water sampling.

  16. Diagnostic PCR: validation and sample preparation are two sides of the same coin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Wolffs, Petra; Radstrøm, Peter

    quantitative reference DNA material and reagents, production of stringent protocols and tools for thermal cycler performance testing, uncomplicated sample preparation techniques, and extensive ring trials for assessment of the efficacy of selected matrix/pathogen detection protocols....

  17. Integrated Automation of High-Throughput Screening and Reverse Phase Protein Array Sample Preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marlene Lemvig; Block, Ines; List, Markus; Christiansen, Helle; Schmidt, Steffen; Mollenhauer, Jan

    multiplexing readouts, but this has a natural limitation. High-content screening via image acquisition and analysis allows multiplexing of few parameters, but is connected to substantial time consumption and complex logistics. We report on integration of Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (RPPA)-based readouts into...

  18. Automated Sample Preparation Platform for Mass Spectrometry-Based Plasma Proteomics and Biomarker Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Vilém Guryča; Daniel Roeder; Paolo Piraino; Jens Lamerz; Axel Ducret; Hanno Langen; Paul Cutler

    2014-01-01

    The identification of novel biomarkers from human plasma remains a critical need in order to develop and monitor drug therapies for nearly all disease areas. The discovery of novel plasma biomarkers is, however, significantly hampered by the complexity and dynamic range of proteins within plasma, as well as the inherent variability in composition from patient to patient. In addition, it is widely accepted that most soluble plasma biomarkers for diseases such as cancer will be represented by t...

  19. Effects of preparation methods of biomedical samples on PIXE measurement sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumental sample preparation techniques for PIXE measurements of human blood serum and bovine muscle were investigated. The techniques studied were direct measurement of a drop, drying on a foil and on an Al cup, lyophilization on a foil, pellet pressing of dried material, microtome sectioning and biopsy preparation. The same serum and muscle were used in each procedure allowing the comparison of detection limits between different methods. The most beneficial technique for both samples was lyophilization and pellet pressing. (author)

  20. High throughput detection of Coxiella burnetii by real-time PCR with internal control system and automated DNA preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramme Stefanie

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxiella burnetii is the causative agent of Q-fever, a widespread zoonosis. Due to its high environmental stability and infectivity it is regarded as a category B biological weapon agent. In domestic animals infection remains either asymptomatic or presents as infertility or abortion. Clinical presentation in humans can range from mild flu-like illness to acute pneumonia and hepatitis. Endocarditis represents the most common form of chronic Q-fever. In humans serology is the gold standard for diagnosis but is inadequate for early case detection. In order to serve as a diagnostic tool in an eventual biological weapon attack or in local epidemics we developed a real-time 5'nuclease based PCR assay with an internal control system. To facilitate high-throughput an automated extraction procedure was evaluated. Results To determine the minimum number of copies that are detectable at 95% chance probit analysis was used. Limit of detection in blood was 2,881 copies/ml [95%CI, 2,188–4,745 copies/ml] with a manual extraction procedure and 4,235 copies/ml [95%CI, 3,143–7,428 copies/ml] with a fully automated extraction procedure, respectively. To demonstrate clinical application a total of 72 specimens of animal origin were compared with respect to manual and automated extraction. A strong correlation between both methods was observed rendering both methods suitable. Testing of 247 follow up specimens of animal origin from a local Q-fever epidemic rendered real-time PCR more sensitive than conventional PCR. Conclusion A sensitive and thoroughly evaluated real-time PCR was established. Its high-throughput mode may show a useful approach to rapidly screen samples in local outbreaks for other organisms relevant for humans or animals. Compared to a conventional PCR assay sensitivity of real-time PCR was higher after testing samples from a local Q-fever outbreak.

  1. Cone-beam computed tomography analysis of the apical third of curved roots after mechanical preparation with different automated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Cesar Augusto Pereira; Pascoalato, Cristina [University of Southern Santa Catarina (UNISUL), Tubarao, SC (Brazil); Meurer, Maria Ines [Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Silva, Silvio Rocha Correa, E-mail: silvio@foar.unesp.b [Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present study evaluated by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) the apical canal transportation and centralizing ability of different automated systems after root canal preparation. The mesiobuccal canals of maxillary first molars (n=10 per group) were prepared with: GI - reciprocating system with K-Flexofile; GII - reciprocating system with NiTiFlex files; GIII - rotary system with K3 instruments; GIV - rotary system with RaCe instruments. CBCT scans were taken before and after biomechanical preparation up to a 40.02 diameter. Canal transportation was determined by measuring the smallest distance between the inner canal walls and the mesial and distal sides of the root. The centralization ability corresponded to the difference between the measurements from transportation evaluation, using the linear voxel to voxel method of analysis. The mean transportation was 0.06 +- 0.14 mm, with a tendency to deviate to the mesial side of the root (n=22), with no statistically significant difference among the groups (p=0.4153). The mean centralization index was 0.15 +- 0.65 also without statistically significant difference among the groups (p=0.0881). It may be concluded that apical canal transportation and centralization ability were not influenced by the type of mechanical movement and instruments used. (author)

  2. Method for sample preparation for cryoelectron microscopy (CEM) microreactor and loading platform

    OpenAIRE

    H.W. Zandbergen; Ahn, C. W.

    2008-01-01

    A method for sample preparation for cryoelectron microscopy (CEM), wherein the sample is held in a microreactor, wherein the conditions in the microreactor are regulated relative to the environment, wherein the sample in the microreactor is frozen according to a quench freeze process, whereupon the sample, in frozen condition, is placed in the electron microscope. A microreactor for use with cryoelectron microscopy (CEM), comprising a first and second membrane, which membranes, at least in a ...

  3. Automated production of copper radioisotopes and preparation of high specific activity [64Cu]Cu-ATSM for PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    60Cu and 64Cu are useful radioisotopes for positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceuticals and may be used for the preparation of promising agents for diagnosis and radiotherapy. In this study, the production and purification of 60/64Cu starting from 60/64Ni using a new automated system, namely Alceo, is described. A dynamic process for electrodeposition and dissolution of 60/64Ni/60/64Cu was developed. Preliminary production yields of 60Cu and 64Cu were 400 and 300 mCi, respectively. 64Cu was used to radiolabel the hypoxia detection tracer ATSM with a specific activity of 2.2±1.3 Ci/μmol.

  4. Preparation and validation of gross alpha/beta samples used in EML's quality assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of water and filter samples have been incorporated into the existing Environmental Measurements Laboratory's (EML) Quality Assessment Program (QAP) for gross alpha/beta determinations by participating DOE laboratories. The participating laboratories are evaluated by comparing their results with the EML value. The preferred EML method for measuring water and filter samples, described in this report, uses gas flow proportional counters with 2 in. detectors. Procedures for sample preparation, quality control and instrument calibration are presented. Liquid scintillation (LS) counting is an alternative technique that is suitable for quantifying both the alpha (241Am, 230Th and 238Pu) and beta (90Sr/90Y) activity concentrations in the solutions used to prepare the QAP water and air filter samples. Three LS counting techniques (Cerenkov, dual dpm and full spectrum analysis) are compared. These techniques may be used to validate the activity concentrations of each component in the alpha/beta solution before the QAP samples are actually prepared

  5. Fused glass sample preparation for quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of geologic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a powerful analytical method, but LIBS is subject to a matrix effect which can limit its ability to produce quantitative results in complex materials such as geologic samples. Various methods of sample preparation, calibration, and data processing have been attempted to compensate for the matrix effect and improve LIBS precision. This study focuses on sample preparation by comparing fused glass as a preparation for powdered material to the more commonly used method of pressing powder into pellets for LIBS analysis of major elements in complex geologic materials. Pelletizing powdered material is a common and convenient method for preparing samples but problems with the physical matrix brought on by inconsistencies in the homogeneity, density, and laser absorption, coupled with the chemical matrix problem lead to spectral peak responses that are not always consistent with the absolute concentration of representative elements. Twenty-two mineral and rock samples were analyzed for eight major oxide elements. Samples were prepared under both glass and pellet methods and compared for internal precision and overall accuracy. Fused glass provided a more consistent physical matrix and yielded more reliable peak responses in the LIBS analysis than did the pressed pellet preparation. Statistical comparisons demonstrated that the glass samples expressed stronger separability between different mineral species based on the eight elements than for the pressed pellets and showed better spot-to-spot repeatability. Regression models showed substantially better correlations and predictive ability among the elements for the glass preparation than did those for the pressed pellets. - Highlights: • Glass improves analytical results in LIBS analysis compared to pressed pellets. • Glass yields higher precision and better calibration models than do pressed pellets. • Low concentrations and trace elements remained detectable in fused glass

  6. Magnetic resonance colonography with a limited bowel preparation and automated carbon dioxide insufflation in comparison to conventional colonoscopy: Patient burden and preferences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paardt, M.P. van der, E-mail: m.p.vanderpaardt@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boellaard, T.N., E-mail: t.n.boellaard@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zijta, F.M., E-mail: fmzijta@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Medisch Centrum Haaglanden, Den Haag (Netherlands); Baak, L.C., E-mail: l.c.baak@olvg.nl [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Depla, A.C.T.M., E-mail: actm.depla@slz.nl [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Slotervaartziekenhuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dekker, E., E-mail: e.dekker@amc.uva.nl [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nederveen, A.J., E-mail: a.j.nederveen@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bipat, S., E-mail: s.bipat@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Stoker, J., E-mail: j.stoker@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • MR colonography with a limited bowel preparation and automated carbon dioxide insufflation demonstrated less burden compared to colonoscopy. • When discarding the bowel preparation, the examinations were rated equally burdensome. • The majority of patients preferred MR colonography over colonoscopy for their future examination of the bowel. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate patient burden and preferences for MR colonography with a limited bowel preparation and automated carbon dioxide insufflation in comparison to conventional colonoscopy. Methods: Symptomatic patients were consecutively recruited to undergo MR colonography with automated carbon dioxide insufflation and a limited bowel preparation followed within four weeks by colonoscopy with a standard bowel cleansing preparation. Four questionnaires regarding burden (on a five-point scale) and preferences (on a seven-point scale) were addressed after MR colonography and colonoscopy and five weeks after colonoscopy. Results: Ninety-nine patients (47 men, 52 women; mean age 62.3, SD 8.7) were included. None of the patients experienced severe or extreme burden from the MR colonography bowel preparation compared to 31.5% of the patients for the colonoscopy bowel preparation. Colonoscopy was rated more burdensome (25.6% severe or extreme burden) compared to MR colonography (5.2% severe or extreme burden) (P < 0.0001). When discarding the bowel preparations, the examinations were rated equally burdensome (P = 0.35). The majority of patients (61.4%) preferred MR colonography compared to colonoscopy (29.5%) immediately after the examinations and five weeks later (57.0% versus 39.5%). Conclusion: MR colonography with a limited bowel preparation and automated carbon dioxide insufflation demonstrated less burden compared to colonoscopy. The majority of patients preferred MR colonography over colonoscopy.

  7. Magnetic resonance colonography with a limited bowel preparation and automated carbon dioxide insufflation in comparison to conventional colonoscopy: Patient burden and preferences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • MR colonography with a limited bowel preparation and automated carbon dioxide insufflation demonstrated less burden compared to colonoscopy. • When discarding the bowel preparation, the examinations were rated equally burdensome. • The majority of patients preferred MR colonography over colonoscopy for their future examination of the bowel. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate patient burden and preferences for MR colonography with a limited bowel preparation and automated carbon dioxide insufflation in comparison to conventional colonoscopy. Methods: Symptomatic patients were consecutively recruited to undergo MR colonography with automated carbon dioxide insufflation and a limited bowel preparation followed within four weeks by colonoscopy with a standard bowel cleansing preparation. Four questionnaires regarding burden (on a five-point scale) and preferences (on a seven-point scale) were addressed after MR colonography and colonoscopy and five weeks after colonoscopy. Results: Ninety-nine patients (47 men, 52 women; mean age 62.3, SD 8.7) were included. None of the patients experienced severe or extreme burden from the MR colonography bowel preparation compared to 31.5% of the patients for the colonoscopy bowel preparation. Colonoscopy was rated more burdensome (25.6% severe or extreme burden) compared to MR colonography (5.2% severe or extreme burden) (P < 0.0001). When discarding the bowel preparations, the examinations were rated equally burdensome (P = 0.35). The majority of patients (61.4%) preferred MR colonography compared to colonoscopy (29.5%) immediately after the examinations and five weeks later (57.0% versus 39.5%). Conclusion: MR colonography with a limited bowel preparation and automated carbon dioxide insufflation demonstrated less burden compared to colonoscopy. The majority of patients preferred MR colonography over colonoscopy

  8. Automation and environment of a sample of the modernized installation YuMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New possibilities of the modernized installation YuMO due to automation of separate units are shown. Main unique devices due to modernization are presented. Advantages of the upgraded spectrometer are shown. The basic approaches to creation of control systems by executive mechanisms of spectrometers on the basis of their unification and standardization are formulated. Circuits of the block of management by step-by-step engines, the switchboard-amplifier of step-by-step motors, the circuit of the system of stabilization of the period and phase of the chopper, and the block diagram of the control system of executive mechanisms of the spectrometer YuMO are submitted. Main technical parameters of the basic original mechanical devices are given. (author)

  9. Automation and Environment of a Sample of the Modernized Installation YuMO

    CERN Document Server

    Kuklin, A I; Kirilov, A S; Islamov, A H; Petukhova, N V; Utrobin, P K; Kovalev, Yu S; Gordeliy, V I

    2004-01-01

    New possibilities of the modernized installation YuMO due to automation of separate units are shown. Main unique devices due to modernization are presented. Advantages of the upgraded spectrometer are shown. The basic approaches to creation of control systems by executive mechanisms of spectrometers on the basis of their unification and standardization are formulated. Circuits of the block of management by step-by-step engines, the switchboard-amplifier of step-by-step motors, the circuit of the system of stabilization of the period and phase of the chopper, and the block diagram of the control system of executive mechanisms of the spectrometer YuMO are submitted. Main technical parameters of the basic original mechanical devices are given.

  10. Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Development of the automated microbial metabolism laboratory (AMML) concept is reported. The focus of effort of AMML was on the advanced labeled release experiment. Labeled substrates, inhibitors, and temperatures were investigated to establish a comparative biochemical profile. Profiles at three time intervals on soil and pure cultures of bacteria isolated from soil were prepared to establish a complete library. The development of a strategy for the return of a soil sample from Mars is also reported.

  11. Automated preparation of Kepler time series of planet hosts for asteroseismic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, R.; Lund, M. N.

    2014-01-01

    paper we present the KASOC Filter, which is used to automatically prepare data from the Kepler/K2 mission for asteroseismic analyses of solar-like planet host stars. The methods are very effective at removing unwanted signals of both instrumental and planetary origins and produce significantly cleaner...

  12. Contribution to the sample preparation in the radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis of hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of sample treatment in XRF analysis of hair are studied in view of the effect on analytical results. A new method is proposed based on the incomplete ashing of hair followed by pellet preparation. Its suitability is estimated on the XRF analysis of real hair samples collected from 4 healthy adults. (author) 12 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  13. A new method for preparing thin samples of pottery shards for PIXE analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method, based on the centrifugal precipitation technique, has been used for preparing thin (1 mg/cm2) uniform and homogeneous samples of pottery shards for PIXE analysis. The reproducibility of the results has been tested on standard Perlman-Asaro samples and ancient Greek pottery shards. The abundances of more than 12 elements can be reliably measured. (orig.)

  14. Design and Practices for Use of Automated Drilling and Sample Handling in MARTE While Minimizing Terrestrial and Cross Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David P.; Bonaccorsi, Rosalba; Davis, Kiel

    2008-10-01

    Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE) investigators used an automated drill and sample processing hardware to detect and categorize life-forms found in subsurface rock at Río Tinto, Spain. For the science to be successful, it was necessary for the biomass from other sources -- whether from previously processed samples (cross contamination) or the terrestrial environment (forward contamination) -- to be insignificant. The hardware and practices used in MARTE were designed around this problem. Here, we describe some of the design issues that were faced and classify them into problems that are unique to terrestrial tests versus problems that would also exist for a system that was flown to Mars. Assessment of the biomass at various stages in the sample handling process revealed mixed results; the instrument design seemed to minimize cross contamination, but contamination from the surrounding environment sometimes made its way onto the surface of samples. Techniques used during the MARTE Río Tinto project, such as facing the sample, appear to remove this environmental contamination without introducing significant cross contamination from previous samples.

  15. Before the injection--modern methods of sample preparation for separation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger M

    2003-06-01

    The importance of sample preparation methods as the first stage in an analytical procedure is emphasised and examined. Examples are given of the extraction and concentration of analytes from solid, liquid and gas phase matrices, including solvent phase extractions, such as supercritical fluids and superheated water extraction, solid-phase extraction and solid-phase microextraction, headspace analysis and vapour trapping. The potential role of selective extraction methods, including molecular imprinted phases and affinity columns, are considered. For problem samples alternative approaches, such as derivatisation are discussed, and potential new approaches minimising sample preparation are noted. PMID:12877164

  16. Reducing Spatial Heterogeneity of MALDI Samples with Marangoni Flows During Sample Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yin-Hung; Cai, Yi-Hong; Lee, Hsun; Ou, Yu-Meng; Hsiao, Chih-Hao; Tsao, Chien-Wei; Chang, Huan-Tsung; Wang, Yi-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    This work demonstrates a method to prepare homogeneous distributions of analytes to improve data reproducibility in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). Natural-air drying processes normally result in unwanted heterogeneous spatial distributions of analytes in MALDI crystals and make quantitative analysis difficult. This study demonstrates that inducing Marangoni flows within drying droplets can significantly reduce the heterogeneity problem. The Marangoni flows are accelerated by changing substrate temperatures to create temperature gradients across droplets. Such hydrodynamic flows are analyzed semi-empirically. Using imaging mass spectrometry, changes of heterogeneity of molecules with the change of substrate temperature during drying processes are demonstrated. The observed heterogeneities of the biomolecules reduce as predicted Marangoni velocities increase. In comparison to conventional methods, drying droplets on a 5 °C substrate while keeping the surroundings at ambient conditions typically reduces the heterogeneity of biomolecular ions by 65%-80%. The observation suggests that decreasing substrate temperature during droplet drying processes is a simple and effective means to reduce analyte heterogeneity for quantitative applications. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27126469

  17. Microwave radiation as a factor intensifying sample preparation: analysis of samples with an organic matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific features of SHF-(mirowave) decomposition of a sample to ascertain microcomponents in objects with an organic matrix have been considered. The amount of organic substances remaining in solution after decomposition has been evaluated. It has been shown that they do not affect the subsequent determination of metallic impurities by the ICP-AES and ET-AAS methods. Methods of macro- and microcomponents determination in phyto-objects, vegetable oils, biological liquids, perfumery and cosmetics at the level of contents 10-2-10-3% Sr, 10-5-10-6% Cd have been elaborated

  18. Development of a high vacuum sample preparation system for helium mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high vacuum sample preparation system for the 3He/4He ratio mass spectrometer (Helix SFT) has been developed to remove all the gaseous constituents excluding helium from the field gases. The sample preparation system comprises of turbo molecular pump, ion pump, zirconium getter, pipettes and vacuum gauges with controller. All these are fitted with cylindrical SS chamber using all metal valves. The field samples are initially treated with activated charcoal trap immersed in liquid nitrogen to cutoff major impurities and moisture present in the sample gas. A sample of 5 ml is collected out of this stage at a pressure of 10−2 mbar. This sample is subsequently purified at a reduced pressure of 10−7 mbar before it is injected into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. The sample pressure was maintained below 10−7 mbar with turbo molecular vacuum pumps and ion pumps. The sample gas passes through several getter elements and a cold finger with the help of manual high vacuum valves before it is fed to the mass spectrometer. Thus the high vacuum sample preparation system introduces completely clean, dry and refined helium sample to the mass spectrometer for best possible analysis of isotopic ratio of helium.

  19. Preparation of rock samples for measurement of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross-section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of rock samples for the measurement of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross-section in small cylindrical two-region systems by a pulsed technique is presented. Requirements which should be fulfilled during the preparation of the samples due to physical assumptions of the method are given. A cylindrical vessel is filled with crushed rock and saturated with a medium strongly absorbing thermal neutrons. Water solutions of boric acid of well-known macroscopic absorption cross-section are used. Mass contributions of the components in the sample are specified. This is necessary for the calculation of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross-section of the rock matrix. The conditions necessary for assuring the required accuracy of the measurement are given and the detailed procedure of preparation of the rock sample is described. (author)

  20. Plan view TEM sample preparation using the focused ion beam lift-out technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Localized plan view TEM samples have been prepared from silicon semiconductor wafers using the focused ion beam lift-out technique. Two different methods of sample preparation before FIB machining were found to be successful: mounting cleaved samples sandwiched together or adding silver paint and cleaving through paint and samples. The plan view technique offers site specific TEM capability from a horizontal section rather than a vertical cross section. The sections can be taken from any layer and can be angled if desired. Results have been obtained from metal layers in a semiconductor device structure. TEM micrographs of tungsten plug arrays show non-uniform barrier layer coverage and tungsten grain size across the via. Hundreds of plugs have been cut through in one sample, thereby offering statistical as well as specific structural information. Metal and polysilicon lines have been examined for grain size and uniformity in a single micrograph. Plan view samples from continuous metal layers can also be made

  1. TruSeq Stranded mRNA and Total RNA Sample Preparation Kits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total RNA-Seq enabled by ribosomal RNA (rRNA) reduction is compatible with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples, which contain potentially critical biological information. The family of TruSeq Stranded Total RNA sample preparation kits provides a unique combination of unmatched data quality for both mRNA and whole-transcriptome analyses, robust interrogation of both standard and low-quality samples and workflows compatible with a wide range of study designs.

  2. Collection and preparation of bottom sediment samples for analysis of radionuclides and trace elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication is the first in a series of TECDOCs on sampling and sample handling as part of the IAEA support to improve reliability of nuclear analytical techniques (NATs) in Member State laboratories. The purpose of the document is to provide information on the methods for collecting sediments, the equipment used, and the sample preparation techniques for radionuclide and elemental analysis. The most appropriate procedures for defining the strategies and criteria for selecting sampling locations, for sample storage and transportation are also given. Elements of QA/QC and documentation needs for sampling and sediment analysis are discussed. Collection and preparation of stream and river bottom sediments, lake bottom sediments, estuary bottom sediments, and marine (shallow) bottom sediments are covered. The document is intended to be a comprehensive manual for the collection and preparation of bottom sediments as a prerequisite to obtain representative and meaningful results using NATs. Quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) is emphasized as an important aspect to ensure proper collection, transportation, preservation, and analysis since it forms the basis for interpretation and legislation. Although there are many approaches and methods available for sediment analyses, the scope of the report is limited to sample preparation for (1) analysis of radionuclides (including sediment dating using radionuclides such as Pb-210 and Cs-137) and (2) analysis of trace, minor and major elements using nuclear and related analytical techniques such as NAA, XRF and PIXE

  3. Sample preparation strategies for food and biological samples prior to nanoparticle detection and imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Löschner, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and precise characterization of metrics such as size, mass, shape etc. of nanoparticles (NPs) remains a challenging task. In order to determine quantitative metrics that are relevant in food monitoring or in risk assessment, an instrumental separation method like asymmetric field flow...... AFFF-ICP-MS fractograms, which corresponded to the enzymatic digests, showed a major nano-peak (about 80 % recovery of AgNPs spiked to the meat) plus new smaller peaks that eluted close to the void volume of the fractograms. Small, but significant shifts in retention time of AFFF peaks were observed...... for the meat sample extracts and the corresponding neat AgNP suspension, and rendered sizing by way of calibration with AgNPs as sizing standards inaccurate. In order to gain further insight into the sizes of the separated AgNPs, or their possible dissolved state, fractions of the AFFF eluate were...

  4. A faster sample preparation method for determination of polonium-210 in fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to facilitate Health Canada’s study on background radiation levels in country foods, an in-house radio-analytical method has been developed for determination of polonium-210 (210Po) in fish samples. The method was validated by measurement of 210Po in a certified reference material. It was also evaluated by comparing 210Po concentrations in a number of fish samples by another method. The in-house method offers faster sample dissolution using an automated digestion system compared to currently used wet-ashing on a hot plate. It also utilizes pre-packed Sr-resin® cartridges for rapid and reproducible separation of 210Po versus time-consuming manually packed Sr-resin® columns. (author)

  5. Automated combustion accelerator mass spectrometry for the analysis of biomedical samples in the low attomole range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, E. van; Sandman, H.; Grossouw, D.; Mocking, J.A.J.; Coulier, L.; Vaes, W.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing role of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in biomedical research necessitates modernization of the traditional sample handling process. AMS was originally developed and used for carbon dating, therefore focusing on a very high precision but with a comparably low sample throughput. H

  6. Automated Data Preparation and Physics Mining Tools for Space Weather Studies (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimabadi, H.; Sipes, T.

    2009-12-01

    Heliophysics is a data centric field which relies heavily on the use of spacecraft data for further advances. The prevalent approach to analysis of spacecraft data is based on visual inspection of data. As a result, the vast majority of the collected data from various missions has gone unexplored. The computer aided algorithmic approach to data analysis as facilitated through data mining techniques are essential for analysis of large data sets and enable discovery of hidden information and patterns in the data. Many data analysis problems in space weather stand to benefit from the application of data mining techniques. Examples include identifying spacecraft charging signatures in plasma detectors, identifying plasma frequency lines in wave spectrograms (and hence density), detecting and classifying substorm infection features, among others (R. Friedel, private communication). Thus while the need for advanced algorithmic approach to data exploration and knowledge discovery is generally recognized by experimentalists, the adoption of such techniques (“data mining”) has been slow. This has been partly due to the steep learning curve of some of the techniques and/or the requirement to have a working knowledge of statistics. Another factor is the existence of a plethora of data mining approaches, and it is often a daunting task for a scientist to determine the appropriate technique. Our goal has been to make such tools accessible to non-experts and remove it from gee-whiz domain to a practical tool that will become part of the standard arsenal of data analysis. To this end, we have developed an automated data mining technique called MineTool. Its first deployment to analysis of Cluster has been very successful (Karimabadi et al., JGR, 114, A06216 , 2009) and this tool is gaining adoption among experimentalists. In this talk, we will provide an overview of this tool, illustrate its use through examples, and discuss future directions of research.

  7. Sample preparation method for ICP-MS measurement of 99Tc in a large amount of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sample preparation for measurement of 99Tc in a large amount of soil and water samples by ICP-MS has been developed using 95mTc as a yield tracer. This method is based on the conventional method for a small amount of soil samples using incineration, acid digestion, extraction chromatography (TEVA resin) and ICP-MS measurement. Preliminary concentration of Tc has been introduced by co-precipitation with ferric oxide. The matrix materials in a large amount of samples were more sufficiently removed with keeping the high recovery of Tc than previous method. The recovery of Tc was 70-80% for 100 g soil samples and 60-70% for 500 g of soil and 500 L of water samples. The detection limit of this method was evaluated as 0.054 mBq/kg in 500 g soil and 0.032 μBq/L in 500 L water. The determined value of 99Tc in the IAEA-375 (soil sample collected near the Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor) was 0.25 ± 0.02 Bq/kg. (author)

  8. Analytical characterization of high-level mixed wastes using multiple sample preparation treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in Richland, Washington, is actively involved in performing analytical characterization of high-level mixed waste from Hanford's single shell and double shell tank characterization programs. A full suite of analyses is typically performed on homogenized tank core samples. These analytical techniques include inductively-coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, total organic carbon methods and radiochemistry methods, as well as many others, all requiring some type of remote sample-preparation treatment to solubilize the tank sludge material for analysis. Most of these analytical methods typically use a single sample-preparation treatment, inherently providing elemental information only. To better understand and interpret tank chemistry and assist in identifying chemical compounds, selected analytical methods are performed using multiple sample-preparation treatments. The sample preparation treatments used at Pacific Northwest Laboratory for this work with high-level mixed waste include caustic fusion, acid digestion, and water leach. The type of information available by comparing results from different sample-prep treatments includes evidence for the presence of refractory compounds, acid-soluble compounds, or water-soluble compounds. Problems unique to the analysis of Hanford tank wastes are discussed. Selected results from the Hanford single shell ferrocyanide tank, 241-C-109, are presented, and the resulting conclusions are discussed

  9. A proteomics sample preparation method for mature, recalcitrant leaves of perennial plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Gang

    Full Text Available Sample preparation is key to the success of proteomics studies. In the present study, two sample preparation methods were tested for their suitability on the mature, recalcitrant leaves of six representative perennial plants (grape, plum, pear, peach, orange, and ramie. An improved sample preparation method was obtained: Tris and Triton X-100 were added together instead of CHAPS to the lysis buffer, and a 20% TCA-water solution and 100% precooled acetone were added after the protein extraction for the further purification of protein. This method effectively eliminates nonprotein impurities and obtains a clear two-dimensional gel electrophoresis array. The method facilitates the separation of high-molecular-weight proteins and increases the resolution of low-abundance proteins. This method provides a widely applicable and economically feasible technology for the proteomic study of the mature, recalcitrant leaves of perennial plants.

  10. Rapid DNA analysis for automated processing and interpretation of low DNA content samples

    OpenAIRE

    Turingan, Rosemary S.; Vasantgadkar, Sameer; Palombo, Luke; Hogan, Catherine; Jiang, Hua; Tan, Eugene; Selden, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Short tandem repeat (STR) analysis of casework samples with low DNA content include those resulting from the transfer of epithelial cells from the skin to an object (e.g., cells on a water bottle, or brim of a cap), blood spatter stains, and small bone and tissue fragments. Low DNA content (LDC) samples are important in a wide range of settings, including disaster response teams to assist in victim identification and family reunification, military operations to identify friend or f...

  11. An instrument for automated purification of nucleic acids from contaminated forensic samples

    OpenAIRE

    Broemeling, David J; Pel, Joel; Gunn, Dylan C; Mai, Laura; Thompson, Jason D.; Poon, Hiron; Marziali, Andre

    2008-01-01

    Forensic crime scene sample analysis, by its nature, often deals with samples in which there are low amounts of nucleic acids, on substrates that often lead to inhibition of subsequent enzymatic reactions such as PCR amplification for STR profiling. Common substrates include denim from blue jeans, which yields indigo dye as a PCR inhibitor, and soil, which yields humic substances as inhibitors. These inhibitors frequently co-extract with nucleic acids in standard column or bead-based preps, l...

  12. Automatic microemulsion preparation for metals determination in fuel samples using a flow-batch analyzer and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Micro-emulsion composition phase study to obtain low fuel dilutions. ► Automated and instantaneous in-line preparation of micro-emulsions for metals determinations. ► A versatile piston-driven form of “Flow-batch Analysis”. ► Rheological considerations explored including a mathematical derivation of flow parameters. - Abstract: The principal thermodynamic advantages of using microemulsions over standard emulsions for flow metal analysis are the greatly increased analyte stability and emulsive homogeneity that improve both the ease of sample preparation, and the analytical result. In this study a piston propelled flow-batch analyzer (PFBA) for the determination of Cu, Cr and Pb in gasoline and naphtha by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) was explored. Investigative phase modeling for low dilution was conducted both for gasoline and naphtha microemulsions. Rheological considerations were also explored including a mathematical flow derivation to fine tune the system's operational parameters, and the GF AAS coupling. Both manual and automated procedures for microemulsion preparation were compared. The results of the paired t test at a 95% confidence level showed no significant differences between them. Further recovery test results confirmed a negligible matrix effect of the sample on the analyte absorption signals and an efficient stabilization of the samples (with metals) submitted to microemulsion treatment. The accuracy of the developed procedure was attested by good recovery percentages in the ranges of 100.0 ± 3.5% for Pb in the naphtha samples, and 100.2 ± 3.4% and 100.7 ± 4.6% for Cu and Cr, respectively in gasoline samples.

  13. Automatic microemulsion preparation for metals determination in fuel samples using a flow-batch analyzer and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Francisco Antonio S. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, CCEN, Departamento de Quimica, P. Box 5093, 58051-970, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Sousa, Rafael A. [Institute of Chemistry-University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Harding, David P. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, CCEN, Departamento de Quimica, P. Box 5093, 58051-970, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Cadore, Solange [Institute of Chemistry-University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Almeida, Luciano F. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, CCEN, Departamento de Quimica, P. Box 5093, 58051-970, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Araujo, Mario Cesar U., E-mail: laqa@quimica.ufpb.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, CCEN, Departamento de Quimica, P. Box 5093, 58051-970, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2012-05-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Micro-emulsion composition phase study to obtain low fuel dilutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Automated and instantaneous in-line preparation of micro-emulsions for metals determinations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A versatile piston-driven form of 'Flow-batch Analysis'. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rheological considerations explored including a mathematical derivation of flow parameters. - Abstract: The principal thermodynamic advantages of using microemulsions over standard emulsions for flow metal analysis are the greatly increased analyte stability and emulsive homogeneity that improve both the ease of sample preparation, and the analytical result. In this study a piston propelled flow-batch analyzer (PFBA) for the determination of Cu, Cr and Pb in gasoline and naphtha by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) was explored. Investigative phase modeling for low dilution was conducted both for gasoline and naphtha microemulsions. Rheological considerations were also explored including a mathematical flow derivation to fine tune the system's operational parameters, and the GF AAS coupling. Both manual and automated procedures for microemulsion preparation were compared. The results of the paired t test at a 95% confidence level showed no significant differences between them. Further recovery test results confirmed a negligible matrix effect of the sample on the analyte absorption signals and an efficient stabilization of the samples (with metals) submitted to microemulsion treatment. The accuracy of the developed procedure was attested by good recovery percentages in the ranges of 100.0 {+-} 3.5% for Pb in the naphtha samples, and 100.2 {+-} 3.4% and 100.7 {+-} 4.6% for Cu and Cr, respectively in gasoline samples.

  14. An automated gas exchange tank for determining gas transfer velocities in natural seawater samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Zapp, K.; Salter, M. E.; Upstill-Goddard, R. C.

    2014-07-01

    In order to advance understanding of the role of seawater surfactants in the air-sea exchange of climatically active trace gases via suppression of the gas transfer velocity (kw), we constructed a fully automated, closed air-water gas exchange tank and coupled analytical system. The system allows water-side turbulence in the tank to be precisely controlled with an electronically operated baffle. Two coupled gas chromatographs and an integral equilibrator, connected to the tank in a continuous gas-tight system, allow temporal changes in the partial pressures of SF6, CH4 and N2O to be measured simultaneously in the tank water and headspace at multiple turbulence settings, during a typical experimental run of 3.25 h. PC software developed by the authors controls all operations and data acquisition, enabling the optimisation of experimental conditions with high reproducibility. The use of three gases allows three independent estimates of kw for each turbulence setting; these values are subsequently normalised to a constant Schmidt number for direct comparison. The normalised kw estimates show close agreement. Repeated experiments with Milli-Q water demonstrate a typical measurement accuracy of 4% for kw. Experiments with natural seawater show that the system clearly resolves the effects on kw of spatial and temporal trends in natural surfactant activity. The system is an effective tool with which to probe the relationships between kw, surfactant activity and biogeochemical indices of primary productivity, and should assist in providing valuable new insights into the air-sea gas exchange process.

  15. An automated gas exchange tank for determining gas transfer velocities in natural seawater samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schneider-Zapp

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to advance understanding of the role of seawater surfactants in the air–sea exchange of climatically active trace gases via suppression of the gas transfer velocity (kw, we constructed a fully automated, closed air-water gas exchange tank and coupled analytical system. The system allows water-side turbulence in the tank to be precisely controlled with an electronically operated baffle. Two coupled gas chromatographs and an integral equilibrator, connected to the tank in a continuous gas-tight system, allow temporal changes in the partial pressures of SF6, CH4 and N2O to be measured simultaneously in the tank water and headspace at multiple turbulence settings, during a typical experimental run of 3.25 h. PC software developed by the authors controls all operations and data acquisition, enabling the optimisation of experimental conditions with high reproducibility. The use of three gases allows three independent estimates of kw for each turbulence setting; these values are subsequently normalised to a constant Schmidt number for direct comparison. The normalised kw estimates show close agreement. Repeated experiments with MilliQ water demonstrate a typical measurement accuracy of 4% for kw. Experiments with natural seawater show that the system clearly resolves the effects on kw of spatial and temporal trends in natural surfactant activity. The system is an effective tool with which to probe the relationships between kw, surfactant activity and biogeochemical indices of primary productivity, and should assist in providing valuable new insights into the air–sea gas exchange process.

  16. Sample preparation procedure for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in petroleum vacuum residue and bitumen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilgenast, Ewelina; Boczkaj, Grzegorz; Kaminski, Marian [Gdansk University of Technology, Chemical Faculty, Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Gdansk (Poland); Przyjazny, Andrzej [Kettering University, Chemistry and Biochemistry Department, Flint, MI (United States)

    2011-08-15

    This paper describes a novel method of sample preparation for the determination of trace concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in high-boiling petroleum products. Limits of quantitation of the investigated PAHs in materials of this type range from tens of nanograms per kilogram to <20 {mu}g/kg. The studies revealed that in order to separate most of interferences from the analytes without a significant loss of PAHs, it is necessary to use size exclusion chromatography as the first step of sample preparation, followed by adsorption using normal-phase liquid chromatography. The use of orthogonal separation procedure described in the paper allows the isolation of only a group of unsubstituted and substituted aromatic hydrocarbons with a specific range of molar mass. The lower the required limit of quantitation of PAHs, the larger is the scale of preparative liquid chromatography in both steps of sample preparation needed. The use of internal standard allows quantitative results to be corrected for the degree of recovery of PAHs during the sample preparation step. Final determination can be carried out using HPLC-FLD, GC-MS, or HPLC-UV-VIS/DAD. The last technique provides a degree of identification through the acquired UV-VIS spectra. (orig.)

  17. Development of a full automation solid phase microextraction method for investigating the partition coefficient of organic pollutant in complex sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ruifen; Lin, Wei; Wen, Sijia; Zhu, Fang; Luan, Tiangang; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2015-08-01

    A fully automated solid phase microextraction (SPME) depletion method was developed to study the partition coefficient of organic compound between complex matrix and water sample. The SPME depletion process was conducted by pre-loading the fiber with a specific amount of organic compounds from a proposed standard gas generation vial, and then desorbing the fiber into the targeted samples. Based on the proposed method, the partition coefficients (Kmatrix) of 4 polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) between humic acid (HA)/hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (β-HPCD) and aqueous sample were determined. The results showed that the logKmatrix of 4 PAHs with HA and β-HPCD ranged from 3.19 to 4.08, and 2.45 to 3.15, respectively. In addition, the logKmatrix values decreased about 0.12-0.27 log units for different PAHs for every 10°C increase in temperature. The effect of temperature on the partition coefficient followed van't Hoff plot, and the partition coefficient at any temperature can be predicted based on the plot. Furthermore, the proposed method was applied for the real biological fluid analysis. The partition coefficients of 6 PAHs between the complex matrices in the fetal bovine serum and water were determined, and compared to ones obtained from SPME extraction method. The result demonstrated that the proposed method can be applied to determine the sorption coefficients of hydrophobic compounds between complex matrix and water in a variety of samples. PMID:26118804

  18. Automated Broad-Range Molecular Detection of Bacteria in Clinical Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budding, Andries E; Hoogewerf, Martine; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Savelkoul, Paul H M

    2016-04-01

    Molecular detection methods, such as quantitative PCR (qPCR), have found their way into clinical microbiology laboratories for the detection of an array of pathogens. Most routinely used methods, however, are directed at specific species. Thus, anything that is not explicitly searched for will be missed. This greatly limits the flexibility and universal application of these techniques. We investigated the application of a rapid universal bacterial molecular identification method, IS-pro, to routine patient samples received in a clinical microbiology laboratory. IS-pro is a eubacterial technique based on the detection and categorization of 16S-23S rRNA gene interspace regions with lengths that are specific for each microbial species. As this is an open technique, clinicians do not need to decide in advance what to look for. We compared routine culture to IS-pro using 66 samples sent in for routine bacterial diagnostic testing. The samples were obtained from patients with infections in normally sterile sites (without a resident microbiota). The results were identical in 20 (30%) samples, IS-pro detected more bacterial species than culture in 31 (47%) samples, and five of the 10 culture-negative samples were positive with IS-pro. The case histories of the five patients from whom these culture-negative/IS-pro-positive samples were obtained suggest that the IS-pro findings are highly clinically relevant. Our findings indicate that an open molecular approach, such as IS-pro, may have a high added value for clinical practice. PMID:26763956

  19. The T-lock: automated compensation of radio-frequency induced sample heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern high-field NMR spectrometers can stabilize the nominal sample temperature at a precision of less than 0.1 K. However, the actual sample temperature may differ from the nominal value by several degrees because the sample heating caused by high-power radio frequency pulses is not readily detected by the temperature sensors. Without correction, transfer of chemical shifts between different experiments causes problems in the data analysis. In principle, the temperature differences can be corrected by manual procedures but this is cumbersome and not fully reliable. Here, we introduce the concept of a 'T-lock', which automatically maintains the sample at the same reference temperature over the course of different NMR experiments. The T-lock works by continuously measuring the resonance frequency of a suitable spin and simultaneously adjusting the temperature control, thus locking the sample temperature at the reference value. For three different nuclei, 13C, 17O and 31P in the compounds alanine, water, and phosphate, respectively, the T-lock accuracy was found to be <0.1 K. The use of dummy scan periods with variable lengths allows a reliable establishment of the thermal equilibrium before the acquisition of an experiment starts

  20. Instrument and method for X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and crystal texture analysis without sample preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Keith (Inventor); Martins, Jose Vanderlei (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence instrument for analyzing samples having no sample preparation includes a X-ray source configured to output a collimated X-ray beam comprising a continuum spectrum of X-rays to a predetermined coordinate and a photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer disposed to receive X-rays output from an unprepared sample disposed at the predetermined coordinate upon exposure of the unprepared sample to the collimated X-ray beam. The X-ray source and the photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer are arranged in a reflection geometry relative to the predetermined coordinate.

  1. Automation of the radiation measuring facilities for samples in health physics - MA 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routine radation measurements of samples are performed by the HMI health physics department by means of test stations for individual samples and multiple samples (using a changing equipment). The basic device of these test stations is a SCALER/TIMER system (BF 22/25, BERTHOLD Corp.). This measuring facility has been extended by a CAMAC intrumentation which incorporates an autonomous CAMAC processor (CAPRO-1, INCAA B.V.) for monitoring an automatic control of the system. The programming language is BASIC. A DECwriter (LA 34) is used for user interaction and for printing the measurement results. This report describes the features of this system and present some examples of, the dialogue with the system and the printout of data. (orig.)

  2. Construction and calibration of a low cost and fully automated vibrating sample magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Alaily, T. M.; El-Nimr, M. K.; Saafan, S. A.; Kamel, M. M.; Meaz, T. M.; Assar, S. T.

    2015-07-01

    A low cost vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) has been constructed by using an electromagnet and an audio loud speaker; where both are controlled by a data acquisition device. The constructed VSM records the magnetic hysteresis loop up to 8.3 KG at room temperature. The apparatus has been calibrated and tested by using magnetic hysteresis data of some ferrite samples measured by two scientifically calibrated magnetometers; model (Lake Shore 7410) and model (LDJ Electronics Inc. Troy, MI). Our VSM lab-built new design proved success and reliability.

  3. Combining desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance for differential metabolomics without sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanwen; Pan, Zhengzheng; Talaty, Nari; Raftery, Daniel; Cooks, R Graham

    2006-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are used to provide data on urine examined without sample preparation to allow differentiation between diseased (lung cancer) and healthy mice. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used to shortlist compounds with potential for biomarker screening which are responsible for significant differences between control urine samples and samples from diseased animals. Similar PCA score plots have been achieved by DESI-MS and NMR, using a subset of common detected metabolites. The common compounds detected by DESI and NMR have the same changes in sign of their concentrations thereby indicating the usefulness of corroborative analytical methods. The effects of different solvents and surfaces on the DESI mass spectra are also evaluated and optimized. Over 80 different metabolites were successfully identified by DESI-MS and tandem mass spectrometry experiments, with no prior sample preparation. PMID:16628593

  4. Optimization of Sample Preparation for the Analysis of Selenium Metabolites in Trout

    OpenAIRE

    Bouzas Ramos, Diego

    2014-01-01

    When speciation of ultratrace level compounds is performed, sample preparation often results to be a crucial step in the analysis. The use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) also requires in most cases a sample whose matrix was purified in order to preserve the chromatographic support and thus ensure a proper separation. Analysis of selenium metabolites in blood is a challenge because of the very low concentrations found and the presence of proteins that deteriorate the chromato...

  5. Simple and Reproducible Sample Preparation for Single-Shot Phosphoproteomics with High Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jersie-Christensen, Rosa R; Sultan, Abida; Olsen, Jesper V

    2016-01-01

    The traditional sample preparation workflow for mass spectrometry (MS)-based phosphoproteomics is time consuming and usually requires multiple steps, e.g., lysis, protein precipitation, reduction, alkylation, digestion, fractionation, and phosphopeptide enrichment. Each step can introduce chemical...... artifacts, in vitro protein and peptide modifications, and contaminations. Those often result in sample loss and affect the sensitivity, dynamic range and accuracy of the mass spectrometric analysis. Here we describe a simple and reproducible phosphoproteomics protocol, where lysis, denaturation, reduction...

  6. Highly simplified lateral flow-based nucleic acid sample preparation and passive fluid flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Robert E.

    2015-12-08

    Highly simplified lateral flow chromatographic nucleic acid sample preparation methods, devices, and integrated systems are provided for the efficient concentration of trace samples and the removal of nucleic acid amplification inhibitors. Methods for capturing and reducing inhibitors of nucleic acid amplification reactions, such as humic acid, using polyvinylpyrrolidone treated elements of the lateral flow device are also provided. Further provided are passive fluid control methods and systems for use in lateral flow assays.

  7. Sample preparation for laser-microdissection of soybean shoot apical meristem

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Chui E; Mohan B. Singh; Bhalla, Prem L

    2012-01-01

    The shoot apical meristem houses stem cells responsible for the continuous formation of aerial plant organs including leaves and stems throughout the life of plants. Laser-microdissection in combination with high-throughput technology such as next generation sequencing permits an in-depth analysis of molecular events associated with specific cell type of interest. Sample preparation is the most critical step in ensuring good quality RNA to be extracted from samples following laser-microdissec...

  8. Automated flow-through amperometric immunosensor for highly sensitive and on-line detection of okadaic acid in mussel sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Rocio B; Hayat, Akhtar; Sassolas, Audrey; Alonso, Gustavo A; Munoz, Roberto; Marty, Jean-Louis

    2012-09-15

    An electrochemical immunosensor for okadaic acid (OA) detection has been developed, and used in an indirect competitive immunoassay format under automated flow conditions. The biosensor was fabricated by injecting OA modified magnetic beads onto screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) in the flow system. The OA present in the sample competed with the immobilized OA to bind with anti-okadaic acid monoclonal antibody (anti-OA-MAb). The secondary alkaline phosphatase labeled antibody was used to perform electrochemical detection. The current response obtained from the labeled alkaline phosphatase to 1-naphthyl phosphate decreased proportionally to the concentration of free OA in the sample. The calculated limit of detection (LOD) was 0.15 μg/L with a linear range of 0.19-25 μg/L. The good recoveries percentages validated the immunosensor application for real mussel samples. The developed system automatically controlled the incubation, washing and current measurement steps, showing its potential use for OA determination in field analysis. PMID:22967546

  9. Automated on-line preconcentration of palladium on different sorbents and its determination in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Rojas, Fuensanta; Bosch Ojeda, Catalina; Cano Pavón, José Manuel

    2007-01-01

    The determination of noble metals in environmental samples is of increasing importance. Palladium is often employed as a catalyst in chemical industry and is also used with platinum and rhodium in motor car catalytic converters which might cause environmental pollution problems. Two different sorbents for palladium preconcentration in different samples were investigated: silica gel functionalized with 1,5-bis(di-2-pyridyl)methylene tbiocarbohydrazide (DPTH-gel) and [1,5-Bis(2-pyridyl)-3-sulphophenyI methylene thiocarbonohydrazide (PSTH) immobilised on an anion-exchange resin (Dowex lx8-200)]. The sorbents were tested in a micro-column, placed in the auto-sampler arm, at the flow rate 2.8 mL min(-1). Elution was performed with 4 M HCl and 4 M HNO3, respectively. Satisfactory results were obtained for two sorbents. PMID:17822233

  10. QuEChERS sample preparation approach for mass spectrometric analysis of pesticide residues in foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter describes an easy, rapid, and low-cost sample preparation approach for the determination of pesticide residues in foods using gas and/or liquid chromatographic (GC and/or LC) analytical separation and mass spectrometric (MS) detection. The approach is known as QuEChERS, which stands fo...

  11. On-chip sample preparation by controlled release of antibodies for simple CD4 counting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, M.; Brockhuis, S.; Velde, van der N.; Breukers, C.; Greve, J.; Terstappen, L.W.M.M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple system for CD4 and CD8 counting for point-of-care HIV staging in low-resource settings. Automatic sample preparation is achieved through a dried reagent coating inside a thin (26 μm) counting chamber, allowing the delayed release of fluorochrome conjugated monoclonal antibodies a

  12. Influence of sample preparation on the microstructure of tooth enamel apatite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kallistová, Anna; Skála, Roman; Horáček, I.; Miyajima, N.; Malíková, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 3 (2015), s. 763-768. ISSN 0021-8898 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : X-ray powder diffraction * sample preparation * microstructure * dental hydroxyapatite Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.720, year: 2014

  13. Analysis of aroma compounds of Roselle by Dynamic Headspace Sampling using different preparation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhari, Nurul Hanisah Binti; Varming, Camilla; Petersen, Mikael Agerlin

    2015-01-01

    The influence of different methods of sample preparation on the aroma profiles of dried Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) was studied. Least amounts of aroma compounds were recovered by analysis of whole dry calyxes (WD) followed by ground dry (GD), blended together with water (BTW), and ground and t...

  14. Gas-assisted annular microsprayer for sample preparation for time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy (TRCEM) has emerged as a powerful technique for transient structural characterization of isolated biomacromolecular complexes in their native state within the time scale of seconds to milliseconds. For TRCEM sample preparation, a microfluidic device has been demonstrated to be a promising approach to facilitate TRCEM biological sample preparation. It is capable of achieving rapidly aqueous sample mixing, controlled reaction incubation, and sample deposition on electron microscopy (EM) grids for rapid freezing. One of the critical challenges is to transfer samples to cryo-EM grids from the microfluidic device. By using a microspraying method, the generated droplet size needs to be controlled to facilitate thin ice film formation on the grid surface for efficient data collection, whilst not being so thin that it dries out before freezing, i.e. an optimized mean droplet size needs to be achieved. In this work, we developed a novel monolithic three dimensional (3D) annular gas-assisted microfluidic sprayer using 3D MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical System) fabrication techniques. The microsprayer demonstrated dense and consistent microsprays with average droplet size between 6 and 9 μm, which fulfilled the droplet size requirement for TRCEM sample preparation. With droplet density of around 12–18 per grid window (window size 58  ×  58 μm), and a data collectible thin ice region of >50% total wetted area, we collected ∼800–1000 high quality CCD micrographs in a 6–8 h period of continuous effort. This level of output is comparable to what were routinely achieving using cryo-grids prepared by conventional blotting and manual data collection. In this case, weeks of data collection with the previous device has been shortened to a day or two. And hundreds of microliters of valuable sample consumption can be reduced to only a small fraction. (paper)

  15. Preparation and characterisation of magnetic nanostructured samples for inelastic neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in thin-film structuring techniques have generated significant interest in the dynamics of spin waves in magnetic nanostructures and the possible use of inelastic neutron scattering (INS) for their investigation. This thesis describes the design and implementation, at GKSS Research Centre, of equipment for preparation of large and laterally submicron and nanometre structured magnetic samples for such future INS experiments. After a brief resume on spin waves in nanostructures, the development work on new purpose-designed equipment, including high vacuum (HV) argon ion beam milling and ultra high vacuum (UHV) e-beam evaporation setups, is described. Ni nanodot as well as Ni and novel Gd nanowire samples were prepared using combinations of sputter deposition, laser interference lithography, argon ion beam milling, e-beam evaporation and self organisation techniques. With reference to sample preparation, epitaxial growth studies for Ni on Si(100) substrate were performed, resulting in the development of a new deposition process, which by thermal tuning allows for the direct epitaxial growth of Ni on Si with unprecedented crystalline quality. The results of various characterisation experiments on the prepared nanostructured samples, including Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), microprobe analysis, Atomic and Magnetic Force Microscopy (AFM/MFM), Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Reflectivity (XRR), unpolarised and Polarised Neutron Scattering (PNR) and off-specular scattering by X-rays and neutrons using rocking scans and Time-Of-Flight Grazing Incidence Small Angle Neutron Scattering (TOF-GISANS), together with various analysis procedures such as Distorted-Wave Born Approximation (DWBA), are reported. The analysis of a Gd nanowire sample by TOF-GISANS led to a novel evaluation technique which in comparison with single wavelength methods allows portions of reciprocal space to be scanned without changing the angle of

  16. Preparation and characterisation of magnetic nanostructured samples for inelastic neutron scattering experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzpaintner, Wolfgang

    2010-06-22

    Recent advances in thin-film structuring techniques have generated significant interest in the dynamics of spin waves in magnetic nanostructures and the possible use of inelastic neutron scattering (INS) for their investigation. This thesis describes the design and implementation, at GKSS Research Centre, of equipment for preparation of large and laterally submicron and nanometre structured magnetic samples for such future INS experiments. After a brief resume on spin waves in nanostructures, the development work on new purpose-designed equipment, including high vacuum (HV) argon ion beam milling and ultra high vacuum (UHV) e-beam evaporation setups, is described. Ni nanodot as well as Ni and novel Gd nanowire samples were prepared using combinations of sputter deposition, laser interference lithography, argon ion beam milling, e-beam evaporation and self organisation techniques. With reference to sample preparation, epitaxial growth studies for Ni on Si(100) substrate were performed, resulting in the development of a new deposition process, which by thermal tuning allows for the direct epitaxial growth of Ni on Si with unprecedented crystalline quality. The results of various characterisation experiments on the prepared nanostructured samples, including Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), microprobe analysis, Atomic and Magnetic Force Microscopy (AFM/MFM), Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Reflectivity (XRR), unpolarised and Polarised Neutron Scattering (PNR) and off-specular scattering by X-rays and neutrons using rocking scans and Time-Of-Flight Grazing Incidence Small Angle Neutron Scattering (TOF-GISANS), together with various analysis procedures such as Distorted-Wave Born Approximation (DWBA), are reported. The analysis of a Gd nanowire sample by TOF-GISANS led to a novel evaluation technique which in comparison with single wavelength methods allows portions of reciprocal space to be scanned without changing the angle of

  17. Community-Level Physiological Profiling of Microbial Communities in Constructed Wetlands: Effects of Sample Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Mark; Weber, Kela; Nivala, Jaime; Aubron, Thomas; Müller, Roland Arno

    2016-03-01

    Community-level physiological profiling (CLPP) using BIOLOG® EcoPlates™ has become a popular method for characterizing and comparing the functional diversity, functional potential, and metabolic activity of heterotrophic microbial communities. The method was originally developed for profiling soil communities; however, its usage has expanded into the fields of ecotoxicology, agronomy, and the monitoring and profiling of microbial communities in various wastewater treatment systems, including constructed wetlands for water pollution control. When performing CLPP on aqueous samples from constructed wetlands, a wide variety of sample characteristics can be encountered and challenges may arise due to excessive solids, color, or turbidity. The aim of this study was to investigate the impacts of different sample preparation methods on CLPP performed on a variety of aqueous samples covering a broad range of physical and chemical characteristics. The results show that using filter paper, centrifugation, or settling helped clarify samples for subsequent CLPP analysis, however did not do so as effectively as dilution for the darkest samples. Dilution was able to provide suitable clarity for the darkest samples; however, 100-fold dilution significantly affected the carbon source utilization patterns (CSUPs), particularly with samples that were already partially or fully clear. Ten-fold dilution also had some effect on the CSUPs of samples which were originally clear; however, the effect was minimal. Based on these findings, for this specific set of samples, a 10-fold dilution provided a good balance between ease of use, sufficient clarity (for dark samples), and limited effect on CSUPs. The process and findings outlined here can hopefully serve future studies looking to utilize CLPP for functional analysis of microbial communities and also assist in comparing data from studies where different sample preparation methods were utilized. PMID:26563413

  18. Improved automation of dissolved organic carbon sampling for organic-rich surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Richard P; Holden, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    In-situ UV-Vis spectrophotometers offer the potential for improved estimates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fluxes for organic-rich systems such as peatlands because they are able to sample and log DOC proxies automatically through time at low cost. In turn, this could enable improved total carbon budget estimates for peatlands. The ability of such instruments to accurately measure DOC depends on a number of factors, not least of which is how absorbance measurements relate to DOC and the environmental conditions. Here we test the ability of a S::can Spectro::lyser™ for measuring DOC in peatland streams with routinely high DOC concentrations. Through analysis of the spectral response data collected by the instrument we have been able to accurately measure DOC up to 66 mg L(-1), which is more than double the original upper calibration limit for this particular instrument. A linear regression modelling approach resulted in an accuracy >95%. The greatest accuracy was achieved when absorbance values for several different wavelengths were used at the same time in the model. However, an accuracy >90% was achieved using absorbance values for a single wavelength to predict DOC concentration. Our calculations indicated that, for organic-rich systems, in-situ measurement with a scanning spectrophotometer can improve fluvial DOC flux estimates by 6 to 8% compared with traditional sampling methods. Thus, our techniques pave the way for improved long-term carbon budget calculations from organic-rich systems such as peatlands. PMID:26580726

  19. Preparation of samples taken from the Alshar mine for x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (Macedonia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of samples which contain a large amount of arsenic, antimony and thallium sulphides, by fusion with sodium or lithium tetraborate, for x-ray spectrochemical analysis, could not be applied directly, due to the volatility of the compounds which are of analytical interest and the destruction of Pt-crucibles. To prevent the evaporation of thallium, arsenic and antimony compounds during fusion, two different methods are described: fusion of the sample and the flux with the addition of oxidizing agents; and fusion of the dry residue which remains after dissolving the sample in nitric acid or in 'aqua regia' and evaporation of the excess of acids. (author). 3 refs., 7 tabs

  20. Sample Preparation for Fungal Community Analysis by High-Throughput Sequencing of Barcode Amplicons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmensen, Karina Engelbrecht; Ihrmark, Katarina; Durling, Mikael Brandström; Lindahl, Björn D

    2016-01-01

    Fungal species participate in vast numbers of processes in the landscape around us. However, their often cryptic growth, inside various substrates and in highly diverse species assemblages, has been a major obstacle to thorough analysis of fungal communities, hampering exhaustive description of the fungal kingdom. Recent technological developments allowing rapid, high-throughput sequencing of mixed communities from many samples at once are currently having a tremendous impact in fungal community ecology. Universal DNA extraction followed by amplification and sequencing of fungal species-level barcodes such as the nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region now enable identification and relative quantification of fungal community members across well-replicated experimental settings. Here, we present the sample preparation procedure presently used in our laboratory for fungal community analysis by high-throughput sequencing of amplified ITS2 markers. We focus on the procedure optimized for studies of total fungal communities in humus-rich soils, wood, and litter. However, this procedure can be applied to other sample types and markers. We focus on the laboratory-based part of sample preparation, that is, the procedure from the point where samples enter the laboratory until amplicons are submitted for sequencing. Our procedure comprises four main parts: (1) universal DNA extraction, (2) optimization of PCR conditions, (3) production of tagged ITS amplicons, and (4) preparation of the multiplexed amplicon mix to be sequenced. The presented procedure is independent of the specific high-throughput sequencing technology used, which makes it highly versatile. PMID:26791497

  1. Membrane biofouling characterization: effects of sample preparation procedures on biofilm structure and the microbial community

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Zheng

    2014-07-15

    Ensuring the quality and reproducibility of results from biofilm structure and microbial community analysis is essential to membrane biofouling studies. This study evaluated the impacts of three sample preparation factors (ie number of buffer rinses, storage time at 4°C, and DNA extraction method) on the downstream analysis of nitrifying biofilms grown on ultrafiltration membranes. Both rinse and storage affected biofilm structure, as suggested by their strong correlation with total biovolume, biofilm thickness, roughness and the spatial distribution of EPS. Significant variations in DNA yields and microbial community diversity were also observed among samples treated by different rinses, storage and DNA extraction methods. For the tested biofilms, two rinses, no storage and DNA extraction with both mechanical and chemical cell lysis from attached biofilm were the optimal sample preparation procedures for obtaining accurate information about biofilm structure, EPS distribution and the microbial community. © 2014 © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  2. Membrane biofouling characterization: effects of sample preparation procedures on biofilm structure and the microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zheng; Lu, Huijie; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2014-01-01

    Ensuring the quality and reproducibility of results from biofilm structure and microbial community analysis is essential to membrane biofouling studies. This study evaluated the impacts of three sample preparation factors (ie number of buffer rinses, storage time at 4°C, and DNA extraction method) on the downstream analysis of nitrifying biofilms grown on ultrafiltration membranes. Both rinse and storage affected biofilm structure, as suggested by their strong correlation with total biovolume, biofilm thickness, roughness and the spatial distribution of EPS. Significant variations in DNA yields and microbial community diversity were also observed among samples treated by different rinses, storage and DNA extraction methods. For the tested biofilms, two rinses, no storage and DNA extraction with both mechanical and chemical cell lysis from attached biofilm were the optimal sample preparation procedures for obtaining accurate information about biofilm structure, EPS distribution and the microbial community. PMID:25115516

  3. Are Flow Injection-based Approaches Suitable for Automated Handling of Solid Samples?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miró, Manuel; Hansen, Elo Harald; Cerdà, Victor

    electrolytic or aqueous leaching, on-line dialysis/microdialysis, in-line filtration, and pervaporation-based procedures have been successfully implemented in continuous flow/flow injection systems. In this communication, the new generation of flow analysis, including sequential injection, multicommutated flow......, multisyringe flow injection, and micro-Lab-on-valve are presented as appealing approaches for on-line handling of solid samples. Special emphasis is given to the capability of flow systems to accommodate sequential extraction protocols for partitioning of trace elements and nutrients in environmental solids (e.......g., soils, sediments, sludges), and thus, ascertaining the potential mobility, bioavailability and eventual impact of anthropogenic elements on biota [2]. In this context, the principles of sequential injection-microcolumn extraction (SI-MCE) for dynamic fractionation are explained in detail along with the...

  4. Comparison of in-house and commercial sample preparation and PCR amplification systems for detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA in blood samples from Tanzanian adults.

    OpenAIRE

    Lyamuya, E; Bredberg-Rådén, U; Albert, J.; Grankvist, O; Msangi, V; Kagoma, C.; Mhalu, F; Biberfeld, G

    1997-01-01

    This study compared the performance of several in-house nested PCR systems and the Amplicor human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) PCR kit in the detection of HIV-1 DNA in Tanzanian samples prepared by two different methods. All six of the in-house primer sets evaluated had a higher sensitivity for HIV DNA detection in samples prepared by the Amplicor PCR sample preparation method than in those prepared by the Ficoll-Isopaque (FIP) density gradient centrifugation method. A sensitivity of...

  5. Testing of an automated online EA-IRMS method for fast and simultaneous carbon content and stable isotope measurement of aerosol samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, István; Gyökös, Brigitta; Túri, Marianna; Futó, István; Filep, Ágnes; Hoffer, András; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Comprehensive atmospheric studies have demonstrated that carbonaceous aerosol is one of the main components of atmospheric particulate matter over Europe. Various methods, considering optical or thermal properties, have been developed for quantification of the accurate amount of both organic and elemental carbon constituents of atmospheric aerosol. The aim of our work was to develop an alternative fast and easy method for determination of the total carbon content of individual aerosol samples collected on prebaked quartz filters whereby the mass and surface concentration becomes simply computable. We applied the conventional "elemental analyzer (EA) coupled online with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS)" technique which is ubiquitously used in mass spectrometry. Using this technique we are able to measure simultaneously the carbon stable isotope ratio of the samples, as well. During the developing process, we compared the EA-IRMS technique with an off-line catalytic combustion method worked out previously at Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies (HEKAL). We tested the combined online total carbon content and stable isotope ratio measurement both on standard materials and real aerosol samples. Regarding the test results the novel method assures, on the one hand, at least 95% of carbon recovery yield in a broad total carbon mass range (between 100 and 3000 ug) and, on the other hand, a good reproducibility of stable isotope measurements with an uncertainty of ± 0.2 per mill. Comparing the total carbon results obtained by the EA-IRMS and the off-line catalytic combustion method we found a very good correlation (R2=0.94) that proves the applicability of both preparation method. Advantages of the novel method are the fast and simplified sample preparation steps and the fully automated, simultaneous carbon stable isotope ratio measurement processes. Furthermore stable isotope ratio results can effectively be applied in the source apportionment

  6. Radiostrontium and radium analysis in low-level environmental samples following a multi-stage semi-automated chromatographic sequential separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strontium isotopes, 89Sr and 90Sr, and 226Ra being radiotoxic when ingested, are routinely monitored in milk and drinking water samples collected from different regions in Canada. In order to monitor environmental levels of activity, a novel semi-automated sensitive method has been developed at the Radiation Protection Bureau of Health Canada (Ottawa, Canada). This method allows the separation and quantification of both 89Sr and 90Sr and has also been adapted to quantify 226Ra during the same sample preparation procedure. The method uses a 2-stage purification process during which matrix constituents, such as magnesium and calcium that are rich in milk, are removed as well as the main beta-interferences (e.g., 40K, 87Rb, 134Cs, 137Cs, and 140Ba). The first purification step uses strong cation exchange (SCX) chromatography with commercially available resins. In a second step, fractions containing the radiostrontium analytes are further purified using high-performance ion chromatography (HPIC). While 89Sr is quantified by Cerenkov counting immediately after the second purification stage, the same vial is counted again after a latent period of 10-14 days to quantify the 90Sr activity based on 90Y ingrowth. Similarly, the activity of 226Ra, which is separated by SCX only, is determined via the emanation of 222Rn in a 2-phase aqueous/cocktail system using liquid scintillation counting. The minimum detectable concentration (MDC) for 89Sr and 90Sr for a 200 min count time at 95% confidence interval is 0.03 and 0.02 Bq/L, respectively. The MDC for 226Ra for a 100 min count time is 0.002 Bq/L. Semi-annual intercomparison samples from the USA Department of Energy Mixed Analyte Performance Evaluation Program (MAPEP) were used to validate the method for 89Sr and 90Sr. Spiked water samples prepared in-house and from International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) were used to validate the 226Ra assay.

  7. Semi-automated procedure for the determination of 89,90Sr in environmental samples by Cherenkov counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of new chromatographic resins in the last two decades Sr resin, AnaLig-01 and SuperLig 620 has significantly simplified separation of strontium from various types of samples. These resins, that have principles based on molecular recognition, are highly selective for strontium binding. In combination with appropriate detection methods they enable automatic determination of radioactive strontium. Sequential injection analysis and equilibration based sensor column analysis were developed for the determination of long lived 90Sr (28.8 y) in liquid radioactive waste and water samples. However, 89Sr that has short half-life (50.5 d), can also be present in samples, especially in those exposed to fresh fallout from nuclear reactor. Classical analysis of 89Sr requires isolation of 90Y, usually after attaining of secular equilibrium of 90Sr-90Y and the whole procedure takes at least 16 days. However, by using Cherenkov counting technique, determination time may be significantly reduced. Unlike 90Sr that emits low energy electrons, its daughter 90Y as well as 89Sr, generates Cherenkov photons in aqueous media. Consequently, by successive counting within 64 hours, 89Sr and 90Sr via 90Y can be determined. Therefore, the main aim of this research is development of semi-automated procedure for the determination of 89,90Sr. It includes solid phase extraction (SPE) of strontium from liquid samples and Cherenkov counting of its isotopes. The procedure is based on sample - column equilibration and off-line detection of bound 89,90Sr on the column. Sample is pumped through column at constant flow rate until the breakthrough or saturation point is achieved. The 89,90Sr is determined by counting on column in PE vial. It will be shown how strontium can be selectively bound on the Sr resin, AnaLig-01 and SuperLig 620 resins and separated from interfering radionuclides. Also, influence of column geometry, amount of resin and media in PE vial around the column on quantity

  8. Automated extraction of DNA from blood and PCR setup using a Tecan Freedom EVO liquid handler for forensic genetic STR typing of reference samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Frøslev, Tobias G; Frank-Hansen, Rune;

    2011-01-01

    We have implemented and validated automated protocols for DNA extraction and PCR setup using a Tecan Freedom EVO liquid handler mounted with the Te-MagS magnetic separation device (Tecan, Männedorf, Switzerland). The protocols were validated for accredited forensic genetic work according to ISO...... automated protocols allowed for extraction and addition of PCR master mix of 96 samples within 3.5h. In conclusion, we demonstrated that (1) DNA extraction with magnetic beads and (2) PCR setup for accredited, forensic genetic short tandem repeat typing can be implemented on a simple automated liquid...... 17025 using the Qiagen MagAttract DNA Mini M48 kit (Qiagen GmbH, Hilden, Germany) from fresh whole blood and blood from deceased individuals. The workflow was simplified by returning the DNA extracts to the original tubes minimizing the risk of misplacing samples. The tubes that originally contained the...

  9. Automated Large Scale Parameter Extraction of Road-Side Trees Sampled by a Laser Mobile Mapping System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenbergh, R. C.; Berthold, D.; Sirmacek, B.; Herrero-Huerta, M.; Wang, J.; Ebersbach, D.

    2015-08-01

    In urbanized Western Europe trees are considered an important component of the built-up environment. This also means that there is an increasing demand for tree inventories. Laser mobile mapping systems provide an efficient and accurate way to sample the 3D road surrounding including notable roadside trees. Indeed, at, say, 50 km/h such systems collect point clouds consisting of half a million points per 100m. Method exists that extract tree parameters from relatively small patches of such data, but a remaining challenge is to operationally extract roadside tree parameters at regional level. For this purpose a workflow is presented as follows: The input point clouds are consecutively downsampled, retiled, classified, segmented into individual trees and upsampled to enable automated extraction of tree location, tree height, canopy diameter and trunk diameter at breast height (DBH). The workflow is implemented to work on a laser mobile mapping data set sampling 100 km of road in Sachsen, Germany and is tested on a stretch of road of 7km long. Along this road, the method detected 315 trees that were considered well detected and 56 clusters of tree points were no individual trees could be identified. Using voxels, the data volume could be reduced by about 97 % in a default scenario. Processing the results of this scenario took ~2500 seconds, corresponding to about 10 km/h, which is getting close to but is still below the acquisition rate which is estimated at 50 km/h.

  10. A lab-on-a-chip system integrating tissue sample preparation and multiplex RT-qPCR for gene expression analysis in point-of-care hepatotoxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Geok Soon; Chang, Joseph S; Lei, Zhang; Wu, Ruige; Wang, Zhiping; Cui, Kemi; Wong, Stephen

    2015-10-21

    A truly practical lab-on-a-chip (LOC) system for point-of-care testing (POCT) hepatotoxicity assessment necessitates the embodiment of full-automation, ease-of-use and "sample-in-answer-out" diagnostic capabilities. To date, the reported microfluidic devices for POCT hepatotoxicity assessment remain rudimentary as they largely embody only semi-quantitative or single sample/gene detection capabilities. In this paper, we describe, for the first time, an integrated LOC system that is somewhat close to a practical POCT hepatotoxicity assessment device - it embodies both tissue sample preparation and multiplex real-time RT-PCR. It features semi-automation, is relatively easy to use, and has "sample-in-answer-out" capabilities for multiplex gene expression analysis. Our tissue sample preparation module incorporating both a microhomogenizer and surface-treated paramagnetic microbeads yielded high purity mRNA extracts, considerably better than manual means of extraction. A primer preloading surface treatment procedure and the single-loading inlet on our multiplex real-time RT-PCR module simplify off-chip handling procedures for ease-of-use. To demonstrate the efficacy of our LOC system for POCT hepatotoxicity assessment, we perform a preclinical animal study with the administration of cyclophosphamide, followed by gene expression analysis of two critical protein biomarkers for liver function tests, aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT). Our experimental results depict normalized fold changes of 1.62 and 1.31 for AST and ALT, respectively, illustrating up-regulations in their expression levels and hence validating their selection as critical genes of interest. In short, we illustrate the feasibility of multiplex gene expression analysis in an integrated LOC system as a viable POCT means for hepatotoxicity assessment. PMID:26329655

  11. A comparison of techniques for the metallographic preparation of thermal sprayed samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. F.; McGuffin, D. T.; Henfling, J. A.; Lenling, W. J.

    1993-09-01

    Metallographic preparation of thermal spray coated samples is often difficult because hard and soft materials, which normally require different polishing techniques, are commonly present in a single spraycoated sample. In addition, the microstructures of many spray- deposited materials make them prone to pull-out damage during cutting, grinding, and polishing operations. This study compares alternative metallographic techniques to prepare three common types of thermal sprayed coatings: (1) a plasma sprayed alumina-titania wear coating, (2) a plasma sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coating, and (3) a high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed tungsten- carbide/cobalt (WC/Co) hard coating. Each coating was deposited onto a steel substrate and was prepared with metallographic protocols based on silicon carbide (SiC) papers, bonded diamond platens, and diamond slurries. Polishing with SiC papers generally produced edge rounding and significant pull- out, which increased the apparent porosity of the coatings. Polishing with bonded diamond platens produced less edge rounding, but some pull- out was still observed. Preparation by diamond slurry lapping consistently produced the best overall results. Porosity artifacts produced by polishing with SiC papers and bonded diamond platens also resulted in spuriously low hardness values for the WC/Co samples; however, hardness results for the two ceramic coatings were not affected by the polishing method.

  12. Simultaneous extraction of PCDDs/PCDFs, PCBs and PBDEs. Extension of a sample preparation method for determination of PCDDs/PCDFs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, C.; Nicolaysen, T.; Broadwell, S.L.; Haug, L.S.; Becher, G. [Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo (Norway)

    2004-09-15

    Due to emission controls and regulatory measures, the levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been steadily decreasing in the environment and in human samples the last decades. Nevertheless, the exposure of general populations is still considered to be high and many individuals may have a dietary intake above the established tolerable daily intake. During the recent years, several brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and especially the polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been shown to be potential persistent organic pollutants (POPs)5. In contrast to PCDDs/PCDFs and PCBs, levels of BFRs seem to be increasing in several environmental compartments. Thus it is of great importance to obtain information on levels of both PCDDs/PCDFs, PCBs and BFRs. Traditionally, PCDDs/PCDFs have been extracted together with the non-ortho PCBs, while extracts of other POPs and PCBs have been prepared separately. Recently, efficient automated methods preparing PCDDs/PCDFs and PCBs extracts at the same time, have been described. A simultaneous sample preparation is advantageous in cases where limited amounts of sample is available, e.g. when analysing human milk or blood, and assures comparable results since the different POPs are determined in exactly the same sample aliquot. Also, due to the low concentration of PCDDs/PCDFs and non-ortho PCBs usually present, a relatively large amount of sample is applied for the extraction, which leads to the possibility of detecting other POPs that are normally not found. We present here a simple and inexpensive extension of our sample preparation method used for determination of PCDDs/PCDFs and non-ortho PCBs that leads to inclusion of both ortho PCBs and PBDEs.

  13. Streamlining and automation of radioanalytical methods at a commercial laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through the careful planning and design of laboratory facilities and incorporation of modern instrumentation and robotics systems, properly trained and competent laboratory associates can efficiently and safely handle radioactive and mixed waste samples. This paper addresses the potential improvements radiochemistry and mixed waste laboratories can achieve utilizing robotics for automated sample analysis. Several examples of automated systems for sample preparation and analysis will be discussed

  14. Streamlining and automation of radioanalytical methods at a commercial laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, J.T.; Dillard, J.W. [IT Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Through the careful planning and design of laboratory facilities and incorporation of modern instrumentation and robotics systems, properly trained and competent laboratory associates can efficiently and safely handle radioactive and mixed waste samples. This paper addresses the potential improvements radiochemistry and mixed waste laboratories can achieve utilizing robotics for automated sample analysis. Several examples of automated systems for sample preparation and analysis will be discussed.

  15. Compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with in-situ sample preparation capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jungdae [Department of Physics, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Department of Physics and EHSRC, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Hyoungdo; Schroeder, Allan; Shih, Chih-Kang, E-mail: shih@physics.utexas.edu [Department of Physics, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Qin, Shengyong [Department of Physics, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); ICQD, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Kim, Sang-ui [Department of Physics and EHSRC, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Daejin [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    We report on the design of a compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) having in-situ sample preparation capability. The in-situ sample preparation chamber was designed to be compact allowing quick transfer of samples to the STM stage, which is ideal for preparing temperature sensitive samples such as ultra-thin metal films on semiconductor substrates. Conventional spring suspensions on the STM head often cause mechanical issues. To address this problem, we developed a simple vibration damper consisting of welded metal bellows and rubber pads. In addition, we developed a novel technique to ensure an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) seal between the copper and stainless steel, which provides excellent reliability for cryostats operating in UHV. The performance of the STM was tested from 2 K to 77 K by using epitaxial thin Pb films on Si. Very high mechanical stability was achieved with clear atomic resolution even when using cryostats operating at 77 K. At 2 K, a clean superconducting gap was observed, and the spectrum was easily fit using the BCS density of states with negligible broadening.

  16. Compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with in-situ sample preparation capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungdae; Nam, Hyoungdo; Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Sang-ui; Schroeder, Allan; Eom, Daejin; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2015-09-01

    We report on the design of a compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) having in-situ sample preparation capability. The in-situ sample preparation chamber was designed to be compact allowing quick transfer of samples to the STM stage, which is ideal for preparing temperature sensitive samples such as ultra-thin metal films on semiconductor substrates. Conventional spring suspensions on the STM head often cause mechanical issues. To address this problem, we developed a simple vibration damper consisting of welded metal bellows and rubber pads. In addition, we developed a novel technique to ensure an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) seal between the copper and stainless steel, which provides excellent reliability for cryostats operating in UHV. The performance of the STM was tested from 2 K to 77 K by using epitaxial thin Pb films on Si. Very high mechanical stability was achieved with clear atomic resolution even when using cryostats operating at 77 K. At 2 K, a clean superconducting gap was observed, and the spectrum was easily fit using the BCS density of states with negligible broadening. PMID:26429448

  17. Compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with in-situ sample preparation capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungdae; Nam, Hyoungdo; Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Sang-ui; Schroeder, Allan; Eom, Daejin; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2015-09-01

    We report on the design of a compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) having in-situ sample preparation capability. The in-situ sample preparation chamber was designed to be compact allowing quick transfer of samples to the STM stage, which is ideal for preparing temperature sensitive samples such as ultra-thin metal films on semiconductor substrates. Conventional spring suspensions on the STM head often cause mechanical issues. To address this problem, we developed a simple vibration damper consisting of welded metal bellows and rubber pads. In addition, we developed a novel technique to ensure an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) seal between the copper and stainless steel, which provides excellent reliability for cryostats operating in UHV. The performance of the STM was tested from 2 K to 77 K by using epitaxial thin Pb films on Si. Very high mechanical stability was achieved with clear atomic resolution even when using cryostats operating at 77 K. At 2 K, a clean superconducting gap was observed, and the spectrum was easily fit using the BCS density of states with negligible broadening.

  18. An improved method of sample preparation on AnchorChip targets for MALDI-MS and MS/MS and its application in the liver proteome project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xumin; Shi, Liang; Shu, Shaokung; Wang, Yuan; Zhao, Kang; Xu, Ningzhi; Liu, Siqi; Roepstorff, Peter

    2007-01-01

    An improved method for sample preparation for MALDI-MS and MS/MS using AnchorChip targets is presented. The method, termed the SMW method (sample, matrix wash), results in better sensitivity for peptide mass fingerprinting as well as for sequencing by MS/MS than previously published methods. The ...... solution. The method was validated for protein identification from a 2-DE based liver proteome study. The SMW method resulted in identification of many more proteins and in most cases with a better score than the previously published methods.......An improved method for sample preparation for MALDI-MS and MS/MS using AnchorChip targets is presented. The method, termed the SMW method (sample, matrix wash), results in better sensitivity for peptide mass fingerprinting as well as for sequencing by MS/MS than previously published methods. The...... method allows up-concentration and desalting directly on the mass spectrometric target and should be amenable for automation. A draw back caused by extensive oxidation of methionine and tryptophan in the SMW method can be alleviated by the addition of n-octyl glucopyranoside and DTT to the sample...

  19. Automatic microemulsion preparation for metals determination in fuel samples using a flow-batch analyzer and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Francisco Antônio S; Sousa, Rafael A; Harding, David P; Cadore, Solange; Almeida, Luciano F; Araújo, Mário César U

    2012-05-21

    The principal thermodynamic advantages of using microemulsions over standard emulsions for flow metal analysis are the greatly increased analyte stability and emulsive homogeneity that improve both the ease of sample preparation, and the analytical result. In this study a piston propelled flow-batch analyzer (PFBA) for the determination of Cu, Cr and Pb in gasoline and naphtha by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) was explored. Investigative phase modeling for low dilution was conducted both for gasoline and naphtha microemulsions. Rheological considerations were also explored including a mathematical flow derivation to fine tune the system's operational parameters, and the GF AAS coupling. Both manual and automated procedures for microemulsion preparation were compared. The results of the paired t test at a 95% confidence level showed no significant differences between them. Further recovery test results confirmed a negligible matrix effect of the sample on the analyte absorption signals and an efficient stabilization of the samples (with metals) submitted to microemulsion treatment. The accuracy of the developed procedure was attested by good recovery percentages in the ranges of 100.0±3.5% for Pb in the naphtha samples, and 100.2±3.4% and 100.7±4.6% for Cu and Cr, respectively in gasoline samples. PMID:22541820

  20. HPLC/DAD determination of rosmarinic acid in Salvia officinalis: sample preparation optimization by factorial design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Karina B. de [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacia; Oliveira, Bras H. de, E-mail: bho@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2013-01-15

    Sage (Salvia officinalis) contains high amounts of the biologically active rosmarinic acid (RA) and other polyphenolic compounds. RA is easily oxidized, and may undergo degradation during sample preparation for analysis. The objective of this work was to develop and validate an analytical procedure for determination of RA in sage, using factorial design of experiments for optimizing sample preparation. The statistically significant variables for improving RA extraction yield were determined initially and then used in the optimization step, using central composite design (CCD). The analytical method was then fully validated, and used for the analysis of commercial samples of sage. The optimized procedure involved extraction with aqueous methanol (40%) containing an antioxidant mixture (ascorbic acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)), with sonication at 45 deg C for 20 min. The samples were then injected in a system containing a C{sub 18} column, using methanol (A) and 0.1% phosphoric acid in water (B) in step gradient mode (45A:55B, 0-5 min; 80A:20B, 5-10 min) with flow rate of 1.0 mL min-1 and detection at 330 nm. Using this conditions, RA concentrations were 50% higher when compared to extractions without antioxidants (98.94 {+-} 1.07% recovery). Auto-oxidation of RA during sample extraction was prevented by the use of antioxidants resulting in more reliable analytical results. The method was then used for the analysis of commercial samples of sage. (author)

  1. HPLC/DAD determination of rosmarinic acid in Salvia officinalis: sample preparation optimization by factorial design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sage (Salvia officinalis) contains high amounts of the biologically active rosmarinic acid (RA) and other polyphenolic compounds. RA is easily oxidized, and may undergo degradation during sample preparation for analysis. The objective of this work was to develop and validate an analytical procedure for determination of RA in sage, using factorial design of experiments for optimizing sample preparation. The statistically significant variables for improving RA extraction yield were determined initially and then used in the optimization step, using central composite design (CCD). The analytical method was then fully validated, and used for the analysis of commercial samples of sage. The optimized procedure involved extraction with aqueous methanol (40%) containing an antioxidant mixture (ascorbic acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)), with sonication at 45 deg C for 20 min. The samples were then injected in a system containing a C18 column, using methanol (A) and 0.1% phosphoric acid in water (B) in step gradient mode (45A:55B, 0-5 min; 80A:20B, 5-10 min) with flow rate of 1.0 mL min−1 and detection at 330 nm. Using this conditions, RA concentrations were 50% higher when compared to extractions without antioxidants (98.94 ± 1.07% recovery). Auto-oxidation of RA during sample extraction was prevented by the use of antioxidants resulting in more reliable analytical results. The method was then used for the analysis of commercial samples of sage. (author)

  2. State-of-the-art technologies for rapid and high-throughput sample preparation and analysis of N-glycans from antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aich, Udayanath; Lakbub, Jude; Liu, Aston

    2016-06-01

    Glycosylation is a PTM that occurs during production of many protein-based biologic drugs and can have a profound impact on their biological, clinical, and pharmacological properties. Quality by design, process optimization, and advance in manufacturing technology create a demand for robust, sensitive, and accurate profiling and quantification of antibody glycosylation. Potential drawbacks in antibody glycosylation profiling include the high hands-on time required for sample preparation and several hours for data acquisition and analysis. Rapid and high-throughput (HTP) N-glycan profiling and characterization along with automation for sample preparation and analysis are essential for extensive antibody glycosylation analysis due to the substantial improvement of turnaround time. The first part of this review article will focus on the recent progress in rapid and HTP sample preparation and analysis of antibody glycosylation. Subsequently, the article will cover a brief overview of various separation and mass spectrometric methods for the rapid and HTP analysis of N-glycans in antibodies. Finally, we will discuss the recent developments in process analytical technologies for the screening and quantification of N-glycans in antibodies. PMID:26829758

  3. Automated flow-injection method for cadmium determination with pre-concentration and reagent preparation on-line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María S. Di Nezio

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The spectrophotometric determination of Cd(II using a flow injection system provided with a solid-phase reactor for cadmium preconcentration and on-line reagent preparation, is described. It is based on the formation of a dithizone-Cd complex in basic medium. The calibration curve is linear between 6 and 300 µg L-1 Cd(II, with a detection limit of 5.4 µg L-1, an RSD of 3.7% (10 replicates in duplicate and a sample frequency of 11.4 h-1. The proposed method was satisfactorily applied to the determination of Cd(II in surface, well and drinking waters.

  4. Automated flow-injection method for cadmium determination with pre-concentration and reagent preparation on-line

    OpenAIRE

    María S. Di Nezio; Miriam E. Palomeque; Fernández Band, Beatriz S.

    2005-01-01

    The spectrophotometric determination of Cd(II) using a flow injection system provided with a solid-phase reactor for cadmium preconcentration and on-line reagent preparation, is described. It is based on the formation of a dithizone-Cd complex in basic medium. The calibration curve is linear between 6 and 300 µg L-1 Cd(II), with a detection limit of 5.4 µg L-1, an RSD of 3.7% (10 replicates in duplicate) and a sample frequency of 11.4 h-1. The proposed method was satisfactorily ap...

  5. [Preparation of sub-standard samples and XRF analytical method of powder non-metallic minerals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qin; Chen, Lei; Wang, Ling

    2012-05-01

    In order to solve the problem that standard samples of non-metallic minerals are not satisfactory in practical work by X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRF) analysis with pressed powder pellet, a method was studied how to make sub-standard samples according to standard samples of non-metallic minerals and to determine how they can adapt to analysis of mineral powder samples, taking the K-feldspar ore in Ebian-Wudu, Sichuan as an example. Based on the characteristic analysis of K-feldspar ore and the standard samples by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and chemical methods, combined with the principle of the same or similar between the sub-standard samples and unknown samples, the experiment developed the method of preparation of sub-standard samples: both of the two samples above mentioned should have the same kind of minerals and the similar chemical components, adapt mineral processing, and benefit making working curve. Under the optimum experimental conditions, a method for determination of SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, TiO2, CaO, MgO, K2O and Na2O of K-feldspar ore by XRF was established. Thedetermination results are in good agreement with classical chemical methods, which indicates that this method was accurate. PMID:22827101

  6. imFASP: An integrated approach combining in-situ filter-aided sample pretreatment with microwave-assisted protein digestion for fast and efficient proteome sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qun; Fang, Fei; Wu, Ci; Wu, Qi; Liang, Yu; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-03-17

    An integrated sample preparation method, termed "imFASP", which combined in-situ filter-aided sample pretreatment and microwave-assisted trypsin digestion, was developed for preparation of microgram and even nanogram amounts of complex protein samples with high efficiency in 1 h. For imFASP method, proteins dissolved in 8 M urea were loaded onto a filter device with molecular weight cut off (MWCO) as 10 kDa, followed by in-situ protein preconcentration, denaturation, reduction, alkylation, and microwave-assisted tryptic digestion. Compared with traditional in-solution sample preparation method, imFASP method generated more protein and peptide identifications (IDs) from preparation of 45 μg Escherichia coli protein sample due to the higher efficiency, and the sample preparation throughput was significantly improved by 14 times (1 h vs. 15 h). More importantly, when the starting amounts of E. coli cell lysate decreased to nanogram level (50-500 ng), the protein and peptide identified by imFASP method were improved at least 30% and 44%, compared with traditional in-solution preparation method, suggesting dramatically higher peptide recovery of imFASP method for trace amounts of complex proteome samples. All these results demonstrate that the imFASP method developed here is of high potential for high efficient and high throughput preparation of trace amounts of complex proteome samples. PMID:26920773

  7. Ferromagnetic particles as a rapid and robust sample preparation for the absolute quantification of seven eicosanoids in human plasma by UHPLC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhr, Anna Catharina; Bruegel, Mathias; Maier, Barbara; Holdt, Lesca Miriam; Kleinhempel, Alisa; Teupser, Daniel; Grimm, Stefanie H; Vogeser, Michael

    2016-06-01

    We used ferromagnetic particles as a novel technique to deproteinize plasma samples prior to quantitative UHPLC-MS/MS analysis of seven eicosanoids [thromboxane B2 (TXB2), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), PGD2, 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), 11-HETE, 12-HETE, arachidonic acid (AA)]. A combination of ferromagnetic particle enhanced deproteination and subsequent on-line solid phase extraction (on-line SPE) realized quick and convenient semi-automated sample preparation-in contrast to widely used manual SPE techniques which are rather laborious and therefore impede the investigation of AA metabolism in larger patient cohorts. Method evaluation was performed according to a protocol based on the EMA guideline for bioanalytical method validation, modified for endogenous compounds. Calibrators were prepared in ethanol. The calibration curves were found to be linear in a range of 0.1-80ngmL(-1) (TXB2, PGE2, PGD2), 0.05-40ngmL(-1) (5-HETE, 11-HETE), 0.5-400ngmL(-1) (12-HETE) and 25-9800ngmL(-1) (AA). Regarding all analytes and all quality controls, the resulting precision data (inter-assay 2.6 %-15.5 %; intra-assay 2.5 %-15.1 %, expressed as variation coefficient) as well as the accuracy results (inter-assay 93.3 %-125 %; intra-assay 91.7 %-114 %) were adequate. Further experiments addressing matrix effect, recovery and robustness, yielded also very satisfying results. As a proof of principle, the newly developed LC-MS/MS assay was employed to determine the capacity of AA metabolite release after whole blood stimulation in healthy blood donors. For this purpose, whole blood specimens of 5 healthy blood donors were analyzed at baseline and after a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced blood cell activation. In several baseline samples some eicosanoids levels were below the Lower Limit of Quantification. However, in the stimulated samples all chosen eicosanoids (except PGD2) could be quantified. These results, in context with those obtained in validation, demonstrate the

  8. Applications of Blue Light-curing Acrylic Resin to Forensic Sample Preparation and Microtomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Ethan; Palenik, Christopher S

    2016-03-01

    This study discusses the results of an evaluation of a one-part blue light-curing acrylic resin for embedding trace evidence prior to the preparation of thin sections with a microtome. Through a comparison to several epoxy resins, the physical properties relevant to both trace evidence examination and analytical microscopy in general, including as viscosity, clarity, color, hardness, and cure speed, were explored. Finally, thin sections from paint samples embedded in this acrylic resin were evaluated to determine if, through smearing or impregnation, the resin contributed to the infrared spectra. The results of this study show that blue light-curing acrylic resins provide the desired properties of an embedding medium, generate high-quality thin sections, and can significantly simplify the preparation of paint chips, fibers and a multitude of other types of microscopic samples in the forensic trace evidence laboratory. PMID:27404623

  9. Optimization of proteomic sample preparation procedures for comprehensive protein characterization of pathogenic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Manes, Nathan P.; Ansong, Charles; Shi, Liang; Rikihisa, Yasuko; Kikuchi, Takane; Wong, Scott; Estep, Ryan D.; Heffron, Fred; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-12-19

    The elucidation of critical functional pathways employed by pathogens and hosts during an infectious cycle is both challenging and central to our understanding of infectious diseases. In recent years, mass spectrometry-based proteomics has been used as a powerful tool to identify key pathogenesis-related proteins and pathways. Despite the analytical power of mass spectrometry-based technologies, samples must be appropriately prepared to characterize the functions of interest (e.g. host-response to a pathogen or a pathogen-response to a host). The preparation of these protein samples requires multiple decisions about what aspect of infection is being studied, and it may require the isolation of either host and/or pathogen cellular material.

  10. Sample preparation for the analysis of flavors and off-flavors in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, J G; Conte, E D; Kim, Y; Holcomb, M; Sutherland, J B; Miller, D W

    2000-06-01

    Off-flavors in foods may originate from environmental pollutants, the growth of microorganisms, oxidation of lipids, or endogenous enzymatic decomposition in the foods. The chromatographic analysis of flavors and off-flavors in foods usually requires that the samples first be processed to remove as many interfering compounds as possible. For analysis of foods by gas chromatography (GC), sample preparation may include mincing, homogenation, centrifugation, distillation, simple solvent extraction, supercritical fluid extraction, pressurized-fluid extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, Soxhlet extraction, or methylation. For high-performance liquid chromatography of amines in fish, cheese, sausage and olive oil or aldehydes in fruit juice, sample preparation may include solvent extraction and derivatization. Headspace GC analysis of orange juice, fish, dehydrated potatoes, and milk requires almost no sample preparation. Purge-and-trap GC analysis of dairy products, seafoods, and garlic may require heating, microwave-mediated distillation, purging the sample with inert gases and trapping the analytes with Tenax or C18, thermal desorption, cryofocusing, or elution with ethyl acetate. Solid-phase microextraction GC analysis of spices, milk and fish can involve microwave-mediated distillation, and usually requires adsorption on poly(dimethyl)siloxane or electrodeposition on fibers followed by thermal desorption. For short-path thermal desorption GC analysis of spices, herbs, coffee, peanuts, candy, mushrooms, beverages, olive oil, honey, and milk, samples are placed in a glass-lined stainless steel thermal desorption tube, which is purged with helium and then heated gradually to desorb the volatiles for analysis. Few of the methods that are available for analysis of food flavors and off-flavors can be described simultaneously as cheap, easy and good. PMID:10890508

  11. A sample preparation method of individual aerosol particles in SPM analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for sample preparation of individual aerosol particle in SPM analysis was developed. Aerosol particles were collected directly on the polyvinyl butyral (PVB) foil by using air sampler. Microscopic observation indicates that the particles were separated completely and the interval of particles was reasonable. The SPM experiment proves that PVB foils have excellent stability under proton microbeam bombardment and are a suitable backing material for supporting the single particle for SPM analysis. (authors)

  12. Sample preparation for scanning Kelvin probe microscopy studies on cross sections of organic solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Scherer; Rebecca Saive; Dominik Daume; Michael Kröger; Wolfgang Kowalsky

    2013-01-01

    We prepared cross sections of P3HT:PCBM bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells (OSCs) for the characterization of their potential distribution with scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. We compared results of samples obtained by microtome cutting of OSCs on plastic substrates, cleaving of OSCs on glass substrates, and milling with a focused ion beam. Their potential distributions were in good agreement with each other. Under short circuit conditions, potential gradients were detected in vi...

  13. Sample Preparation for N-Glycosylation Analysis of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies by Electrophoresis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Szekrényes, A.; Partyka, Jan; Varadi, C.; Křenková, Jana; Foret, František; Guttman, András

    vol. 1274. New York: Springer Science+Business Media, 2015, s. 183-195. (Methods in Molecular Biology). ISBN 978-1-4939-2352-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2055 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : capillary electrophoresis * monoclonal antibodies * sample preparation Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation https://link.springer.com/protocol/10.1007%2F978-1-4939-2353-3_16

  14. Sample preparation for accelerator mass spectrometry at the University of Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adaptation of the University of Washington FN tandem Van de Graaff to accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), as well as some of the results obtained, are described in another paper in this volume (Farwell et al., 1981). Here we discuss our experiences in preparing carbon and beryllium samples that give large and stable ion beams when used in our Extrion cesium sputter source with an inverted cesium beam geometry

  15. Automated Fast Screening Method for Cocaine Identification in Seized Drug Samples Using a Portable Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Dipak; Seelenbinder, John

    2016-05-01

    Quick and presumptive identification of seized drug samples without destroying evidence is necessary for law enforcement officials to control the trafficking and abuse of drugs. This work reports an automated screening method to detect the presence of cocaine in seized samples using portable Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometers. The method is based on the identification of well-defined characteristic vibrational frequencies related to the functional group of the cocaine molecule and is fully automated through the use of an expert system. Traditionally, analysts look for key functional group bands in the infrared spectra and characterization of the molecules present is dependent on user interpretation. This implies the need for user expertise, especially in samples that likely are mixtures. As such, this approach is biased and also not suitable for non-experts. The method proposed in this work uses the well-established "center of gravity" peak picking mathematical algorithm and combines it with the conditional reporting feature in MicroLab software to provide an automated method that can be successfully employed by users with varied experience levels. The method reports the confidence level of cocaine present only when a certain number of cocaine related peaks are identified by the automated method. Unlike library search and chemometric methods that are dependent on the library database or the training set samples used to build the calibration model, the proposed method is relatively independent of adulterants and diluents present in the seized mixture. This automated method in combination with a portable FT-IR spectrometer provides law enforcement officials, criminal investigators, or forensic experts a quick field-based prescreening capability for the presence of cocaine in seized drug samples. PMID:27006022

  16. On the preparation of electron sensor using LiRbSO4 samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Muraikhi, M.; Kassem, M. E.; Gaafar, M.; Abdel Gawad, M. M. H.; Ragab, I. M.

    2005-01-01

    The dielectric spectroscopy of metal-metal sulfate LiRbSO4 samples are described with particular emphasis on sensor performance to be used in the field of radiation. The obtained results as the effect of different electron energy beams at fixed dose, 0.5 Gy, showed abrupt change of the electrical properties (electrical conductivity, capacitance, and loss tangent). The results can be explained on the basis of radiation-induced defects followed by radiation quenching. The prepared samples can be used in the field of radiation dosimeter.

  17. DNA isolation and sample preparation for quantification of adduct levels by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingley, Karen H; Ubick, Esther A; Vogel, John S; Ognibene, Ted J; Malfatti, Michael A; Kulp, Kristen; Haack, Kurt W

    2014-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a highly sensitive technique used for the quantification of adducts following exposure to carbon-14- or tritium-labeled chemicals, with detection limits in the range of one adduct per 10(11)-10(12) nucleotides. The protocol described in this chapter provides an optimal method for isolating and preparing DNA samples to measure isotope-labeled DNA adducts by AMS. When preparing samples, special precautions must be taken to avoid cross-contamination of isotope among samples and produce a sample that is compatible with AMS. The DNA isolation method described is based upon digestion of tissue with proteinase K, followed by extraction of DNA using Qiagen isolation columns. The extracted DNA is precipitated with isopropanol, washed repeatedly with 70 % ethanol to remove salt, and then dissolved in water. DNA samples are then converted to graphite or titanium hydride and the isotope content measured by AMS to quantify adduct levels. This method has been used to reliably generate good yields of uncontaminated, pure DNA from animal and human tissues for analysis of adduct levels. PMID:24623226

  18. Preparation of resistance random access memory samples for in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, Masaki, E-mail: masakikudo@ist.hokudai.ac.jp; Arita, Masashi; Ohno, Yuuki; Fujii, Takashi; Hamada, Kouichi; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2013-04-30

    The ion-shadow method, an ion milling process using carbon particles as the mask material, is investigated as a means of preparing resistance random access memory (ReRAM) samples for in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). With a milling time of 1 hour (Ar{sup +}, 5 kV, 1 mA), multiple long needles (> 5 μm), on which there are miniaturized ReRAM devices comprising a ReRAM insulating layer sandwiched by two metallic electrodes, are formed on the substrate. Device sizes of up to several hundreds of nm are easily obtained with the method. The internal part of small devices (i.e., up to 100 nm) can be observed by TEM. Electrical measurements using an in situ TEM holder demonstrate that sufficient electric contact is obtained without any electric shortage between the electrodes due to re-deposition of milled material. The ion-shadow method is confirmed to be a quick and easy method suitable for in situ TEM experiments, especially for ReRAM devices which are highly susceptible to destruction during the switching operation. - Highlights: ► Preparation method of in situ transmission electron microscopy samples is shown. ► Long and sharp needle-shaped samples are formed with the ion-shadow method. ► Resistive switching samples are formed at the tips of needle-shaped samples. ► Current–voltage characteristics obtained in an electron microscope are shown.

  19. Sample Preparation for in vitro Analysis of Iodine in Thyroid Tissue using X-ray Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertrud Berg

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Iodine is enriched and stored in the thyroid gland. Due to several factors, the size of the thyroid iodine pool varies both between individuals and within individuals over time. Excess iodine as well as iodine deficiency may promote thyroid cancer. Therefore, knowledge of iodine content and distribution within thyroid cancer tissue is of interest. X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS are two methods that can be used to assess iodine content in thyroid tissue. With both techniques, choice of sample preparation affects the results. Aldehyde fixatives are required for SIMS analysis while a freezing method might be satisfactory for XRF analysis. The aims of the present study were primarily to evaluate a simple freezing technique for preserving samples for XRF analysis and also to use XRF to evaluate the efficacy of using aldehyde fixatives to prepare samples for SIMS analysis. Ten porcine thyroids were sectioned into four pieces that were either frozen or fixed in formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, or a modified Karnovsky fixative. The frozen samples were assessed for iodine content with XRF after 1 and 2 months, and the fixed samples were analyzed for iodine content after 1 week. Freezing of untreated tissue yielded no significant iodine loss, whereas fixation with aldehydes yielded an iodine loss of 14–30%, with Karnovsky producing the least loss.

  20. Preparation of resistance random access memory samples for in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ion-shadow method, an ion milling process using carbon particles as the mask material, is investigated as a means of preparing resistance random access memory (ReRAM) samples for in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). With a milling time of 1 hour (Ar+, 5 kV, 1 mA), multiple long needles (> 5 μm), on which there are miniaturized ReRAM devices comprising a ReRAM insulating layer sandwiched by two metallic electrodes, are formed on the substrate. Device sizes of up to several hundreds of nm are easily obtained with the method. The internal part of small devices (i.e., up to 100 nm) can be observed by TEM. Electrical measurements using an in situ TEM holder demonstrate that sufficient electric contact is obtained without any electric shortage between the electrodes due to re-deposition of milled material. The ion-shadow method is confirmed to be a quick and easy method suitable for in situ TEM experiments, especially for ReRAM devices which are highly susceptible to destruction during the switching operation. - Highlights: ► Preparation method of in situ transmission electron microscopy samples is shown. ► Long and sharp needle-shaped samples are formed with the ion-shadow method. ► Resistive switching samples are formed at the tips of needle-shaped samples. ► Current–voltage characteristics obtained in an electron microscope are shown

  1. Dopant mapping in thin FIB prepared silicon samples by Off-Axis Electron Holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern semiconductor devices function due to accurate dopant distribution. Off-Axis Electron Holography (OAEH) in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) can map quantitatively the electrostatic potential in semiconductors with high spatial resolution. For the microelectronics industry, ongoing reduction of device dimensions, 3D device geometry, and failure analysis of specific devices require preparation of thin TEM samples, under 70 nm thick, by focused ion beam (FIB). Such thicknesses, which are considerably thinner than the values reported to date in the literature, are challenging due to FIB induced damage and surface depletion effects. Here, we report on preparation of TEM samples of silicon PN junctions in the FIB completed by low-energy (5 keV) ion milling, which reduced amorphization of the silicon to 10 nm thick. Additional perpendicular FIB sectioning enabled a direct measurement of the TEM sample thickness in order to determine accurately the crystalline thickness of the sample. Consequently, we find that the low-energy milling also resulted in a negligible thickness of electrically inactive regions, approximately 4 nm thick. The influence of TEM sample thickness, FIB induced damage and doping concentrations on the accuracy of the OAEH measurements were examined by comparison to secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements as well as to 1D and 3D simulations of the electrostatic potentials. We conclude that for TEM samples down to 100 nm thick, OAEH measurements of Si-based PN junctions, for the doping levels examined here, resulted in quantitative mapping of potential variations, within ∼0.1 V. For thinner TEM samples, down to 20 nm thick, mapping of potential variations is qualitative, due to a reduced accuracy of ∼0.3 V. This article is dedicated to the memory of Zohar Eliyahou. - Highlights: • Quantitative potential mapping of Si PN junctions by Off-Axis Electron Holography in thin FIB prepared samples, down to 50 nm thick. • Reduction of

  2. Validation of three viable-cell counting methods: Manual, semi-automated, and automated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cadena-Herrera

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A viable cell count is essential to evaluate the kinetics of cell growth. Since the hemocytometer was first used for counting blood cells, several variants of the methodology have been developed towards reducing the time of analysis and improving accuracy through automation of both sample preparation and counting. The successful implementation of automated techniques relies in the adjustment of cell staining, image display parameters and cell morphology to obtain equivalent precision, accuracy and linearity with respect to the hemocytometer. In this study we conducted the validation of three trypan blue exclusion-based methods: manual, semi-automated, and fully automated; which were used for the estimation of density and viability of cells employed for the biosynthesis and bioassays of recombinant proteins. Our results showed that the evaluated attributes remained within the same range for the automated methods with respect to the manual, providing an efficient alternative for analyzing a huge number of samples.

  3. Sample preparation of drinking, ground and waste water as well as of sewage sludge, residual materials and wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of the preparation of water and sewage sludge samples consists in reducing the volume of the sample aimed at increasing their activity concentration or specific activity, that means the radionuclide(s) to be determined are to be enriched in the sample in order to reduce the detection limit. As a rule, a simplified preparation procedure may be used, such as evaporation of water samples, drying of sludge samples, because the determination of nuclides by means of gamma spectroscopy is performed parallely and undisturbedly. It is also usual to combine different preparation procedures, e.g. to evaporate a water sample converting it into a measuring preparation in filter geometry for gamma spectroscopy, and further converting it into an yttrium-90 measuring preparation in order to determine strontium-90 via the daughter nuclide. (orig./DG)

  4. Preparation Of Deposited Sediment Sample By Casting Method For Environmental Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of deposited sediment sample by castingmethod for environmental study has been carried out. This method comprises separation of size fraction and casting process. The deposited sediment samples were wet sieved to separate the size fraction of >500 mum, (250-500) mum, (125-250) mum and (63-125) mum and settling procedures were followed for the separation of (40-63) mum, (20-40) mum, (10-20) mum and oC, ashed at 450oC, respectively. In the casting process of sample, it was used polyester rapid cure resin and methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKP) hardener. The moulded sediment sample was poured onto caster, allow for 60 hours long. The aim of this method is to get the casted sample which can be used effectively, efficiently and to be avoided from contamination of each other samples. Before casting, samples were grinded up to be fine. The result shows that casting product is ready to be used for natural radionuclide analysis

  5. Simple and Reproducible Sample Preparation for Single-Shot Phosphoproteomics with High Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jersie-Christensen, Rosa R; Sultan, Abida; Olsen, Jesper V

    2016-01-01

    The traditional sample preparation workflow for mass spectrometry (MS)-based phosphoproteomics is time consuming and usually requires multiple steps, e.g., lysis, protein precipitation, reduction, alkylation, digestion, fractionation, and phosphopeptide enrichment. Each step can introduce chemical artifacts, in vitro protein and peptide modifications, and contaminations. Those often result in sample loss and affect the sensitivity, dynamic range and accuracy of the mass spectrometric analysis. Here we describe a simple and reproducible phosphoproteomics protocol, where lysis, denaturation, reduction, and alkylation are performed in a single step, thus reducing sample loss and increasing reproducibility. Moreover, unlike standard cell lysis procedures the cell harvesting is performed at high temperatures (99 °C) and without detergents and subsequent need for protein precipitation. Phosphopeptides are enriched using TiO2 beads and the orbitrap mass spectrometer is operated in a sensitive mode with higher energy collisional dissociation (HCD). PMID:26584931

  6. Electromembrane extraction as a rapid and selective miniaturized sample preparation technique for biological fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstad, Astrid; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Seip, Knut Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    organic solvent, and into an aqueous receiver solution. The extraction is promoted by application of an electrical field, causing electrokinetic migration of the charged analytes. The method has shown to perform excellent clean-up and selectivity from complicated aqueous matrices like biological fluids......This special report discusses the sample preparation method electromembrane extraction, which was introduced in 2006 as a rapid and selective miniaturized extraction method. The extraction principle is based on isolation of charged analytes extracted from an aqueous sample, across a thin film of....... Technical aspects of electromembrane extraction, important extraction parameters as well as a handful of examples of applications from different biological samples and bioanalytical areas are discussed in the paper....

  7. Enhancing sample preparation capabilities for accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon and radiocalcium studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With support provided by the LLNL Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, the UCR Radiocarbon Laboratory continued its studies involving sample pretreatment and target preparation for both AMS radiocarbon (14C) and radiocalcium (41Ca) involving applications to archaeologically -- and paleoanthropologically- related samples. With regard to AMS 14C-related studies, we have extended the development of a series of procedures which have, as their initial goal, the capability to combust several hundred microgram amounts of a chemically-pretreated organic sample and convert the resultant CO2 to graphitic carbon which will consistently yield relatively high 13C- ion currents and blanks which will yield, on a consistent basis, 14C count rates at or below 0.20% modern, giving an 2 sigma age limit of >50,000 yr BP

  8. Evaluation of Sample Stability and Automated DNA Extraction for Fetal Sex Determination Using Cell-Free Fetal DNA in Maternal Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ordoñez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The detection of paternally inherited sequences in maternal plasma, such as the SRY gene for fetal sexing or RHD for fetal blood group genotyping, is becoming part of daily routine in diagnostic laboratories. Due to the low percentage of fetal DNA, it is crucial to ensure sample stability and the efficiency of DNA extraction. We evaluated blood stability at 4°C for at least 24 hours and automated DNA extraction, for fetal sex determination in maternal plasma. Methods. A total of 158 blood samples were collected, using EDTA-K tubes, from women in their 1st trimester of pregnancy. Samples were kept at 4°C for at least 24 hours before processing. An automated DNA extraction was evaluated, and its efficiency was compared with a standard manual procedure. The SRY marker was used to quantify cfDNA by real-time PCR. Results. Although lower cfDNA amounts were obtained by automated DNA extraction (mean 107,35 GE/mL versus 259,43 GE/mL, the SRY sequence was successfully detected in all 108 samples from pregnancies with male fetuses. Conclusion. We successfully evaluated the suitability of standard blood tubes for the collection of maternal blood and assessed samples to be suitable for analysis at least 24 hours later. This would allow shipping to a central reference laboratory almost from anywhere in Europe.

  9. Novel sample preparation method for surfactant containing suppositories: effect of micelle formation on drug recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmár, Éva; Ueno, Konomi; Forgó, Péter; Szakonyi, Gerda; Dombi, György

    2013-09-01

    Rectal drug delivery is currently at the focus of attention. Surfactants promote drug release from the suppository bases and enhance the formulation properties. The aim of our work was to develop a sample preparation method for HPLC analysis for a suppository base containing 95% hard fat, 2.5% Tween 20 and 2.5% Tween 60. A conventional sample preparation method did not provide successful results as the recovery of the drug failed to fulfil the validation criterion 95-105%. This was caused by the non-ionic surfactants in the suppository base incorporating some of the drug, preventing its release. As guidance for the formulation from an analytical aspect, we suggest a well defined surfactant content based on the turbidimetric determination of the CMC (critical micelle formation concentration) in the applied methanol-water solvent. Our CMC data correlate well with the results of previous studies. As regards the sample preparation procedure, a study was performed of the effects of ionic strength and pH on the drug recovery with the avoidance of degradation of the drug during the procedure. Aminophenazone and paracetamol were used as model drugs. The optimum conditions for drug release from the molten suppository base were found to be 100 mM NaCl, 20-40 mM NaOH and a 30 min ultrasonic treatment of the final sample solution. As these conditions could cause the degradation of the drugs in the solution, this was followed by NMR spectroscopy, and the results indicated that degradation did not take place. The determined CMCs were 0.08 mM for Tween 20, 0.06 mM for Tween 60 and 0.04 mM for a combined Tween 20, Tween 60 system. PMID:23727364

  10. Methods of biological fluids sample preparation - biogenic amines, methylxanthines, water-soluble vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płonka, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    In recent years demands on the amount of information that can be obtained from the analysis of a single sample have increased. For time and economic reasons it is necessary to examine at the same time larger number of compounds, and compounds from different groups. This can best be seen in such areas as clinical analysis. In many diseases, the best results for patients are obtained when treatment fits the individual characteristics of the patient. Dosage monitoring is important at the beginning of therapy and in the full process of treatment. In the treatment of many diseases biogenic amines (dopamine, serotonin) and methylxanthines (theophylline, theobromine, caffeine) play an important role. They are used as drugs separately or in combination with others to support and strengthen the action of other drugs - for example, the combination of caffeine and paracetamol. Vitamin supplementation may be also an integral part of the treatment process. Specification of complete sample preparation parameters for extraction of the above compounds from biological matrices has been reviewed. Particular attention was given to the preparation stage and extraction methods. This review provides universal guidance on establishing a common procedures across laboratories to facilitate the preparation and analysis of all discussed compounds. PMID:25381720

  11. Sample preparation of waste water to determine metallic contaminants by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trace X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy analysis in liquid samples is preceded by sample preparation, which usually consists in the precipitation of the metallic ions and concentration over a thin cellulose filter. The samples preparation of waste water by this method is not efficient, due to the great amount of organic and insoluble matter that they contain. The purpose of this work was to determine the optimal value of pH in order to adsorbe all the insoluble matter contained in a waste water sample in the activated charcoal, so that the metallic ions could be precipitated and concentrated on a thin filter and determinated by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. A survey about the adsorption of some ions in activated charcoal in function of the pH was made for the following: Cr3+, Fe3+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Se2+, Hg2+, and Pb2+. It was observed that at pH 0, the ions are not adsorbed, but Cu2+ and Zn2+ are adsorbed in small amount; at pH 14, the ions are adsorbed, excluding Se, which is not adsorbed at any value of pH. If a waste water sample is treated at pH 0 with activated charcoal to adsorbe the organic and insoluble matter, most of the metallic ions are not adsorbed by the activated charcoal and could be precipitated with APDC (ammonium 1-pirrolidine dithio carbamate salt) and concentrated on a thin filter. The analysis of the metallic ions contained on the filter and those adsorbed in the activated charcoal by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, gave the total amount of the ions in the sample. (author)

  12. Rapid microbial sample preparation from blood using a novel concentration device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, Anna K; Campbell, Jennifer; Wirz, Holger; Sharon, Andre; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate care for bacteremic patients is dictated by the amount of time needed for an accurate diagnosis. However, the concentration of microbes in the blood is extremely low in these patients (1-100 CFU/mL), traditionally requiring growth (blood culture) or amplification (e.g., PCR) for detection. Current culture-based methods can take a minimum of two days, while faster methods like PCR require a sample free of inhibitors (i.e., blood components). Though commercial kits exist for the removal of blood from these samples, they typically capture only DNA, thereby necessitating the use of blood culture for antimicrobial testing. Here, we report a novel, scaled-up sample preparation protocol carried out in a new microbial concentration device. The process can efficiently lyse 10 mL of bacteremic blood while maintaining the microorganisms' viability, giving a 30-μL final output volume. A suite of six microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans) at a range of clinically relevant concentrations was tested. All of the microorganisms had recoveries greater than 55% at the highest tested concentration of 100 CFU/mL, with three of them having over 70% recovery. At the lowest tested concentration of 3 CFU/mL, two microorganisms had recoveries of ca. 40-50% while the other four gave recoveries greater than 70%. Using a Taqman assay for methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA)to prove the feasibility of downstream analysis, we show that our microbial pellets are clean enough for PCR amplification. PCR testing of 56 spiked-positive and negative samples gave a specificity of 0.97 and a sensitivity of 0.96, showing that our sample preparation protocol holds great promise for the rapid diagnosis of bacteremia directly from a primary sample. PMID:25675242

  13. Preparation of carbon-nitride bulk samples in the presence of seed carbon-nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure was developed for preparing bulk carbon-nitride crystals from polymeric α-C3N4.2 at high pressure and high temperature in the presence of seeds of crystalline carbon-nitride films prepared by using a high-voltage discharge plasma combined with pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target. The samples were evaluated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Notably, XPS studies of the film composition before and after thermobaric treatments demonstrated that the nitrogen composition in the α-C3N4.2 material, which initially contained more than 58 % nitrogen, decreased during the annealing process and reached a common, stable composition of ∼ 45 %. The thermobaric experiments were performed at 10 - 77 kbar and 350 - 1200 .deg. C.

  14. Influence of commonly used primer systems on automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis of bacterial communities in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purahong, Witoon; Stempfhuber, Barbara; Lentendu, Guillaume; Francioli, Davide; Reitz, Thomas; Buscot, François; Schloter, Michael; Krüger, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Due to the high diversity of bacteria in many ecosystems, their slow generation times, specific but mostly unknown nutrient requirements and syntrophic interactions, isolation based approaches in microbial ecology mostly fail to describe microbial community structure. Thus, cultivation independent techniques, which rely on directly extracted nucleic acids from the environment, are a well-used alternative. For example, bacterial automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (B-ARISA) is one of the widely used methods for fingerprinting bacterial communities after PCR-based amplification of selected regions of the operon coding for rRNA genes using community DNA. However, B-ARISA alone does not provide any taxonomic information and the results may be severely biased in relation to the primer set selection. Furthermore, amplified DNA stemming from mitochondrial or chloroplast templates might strongly bias the obtained fingerprints. In this study, we determined the applicability of three different B-ARISA primer sets to the study of bacterial communities. The results from in silico analysis harnessing publicly available sequence databases showed that all three primer sets tested are specific to bacteria but only two primers sets assure high bacterial taxa coverage (1406f/23Sr and ITSF/ITSReub). Considering the study of bacteria in a plant interface, the primer set ITSF/ITSReub was found to amplify (in silico) sequences of some important crop species such as Sorghum bicolor and Zea mays. Bacterial genera and plant species potentially amplified by different primer sets are given. These data were confirmed when DNA extracted from soil and plant samples were analyzed. The presented information could be useful when interpreting existing B-ARISA results and planning B-ARISA experiments, especially when plant DNA can be expected. PMID:25749323

  15. Influence of commonly used primer systems on automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis of bacterial communities in environmental samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witoon Purahong

    Full Text Available Due to the high diversity of bacteria in many ecosystems, their slow generation times, specific but mostly unknown nutrient requirements and syntrophic interactions, isolation based approaches in microbial ecology mostly fail to describe microbial community structure. Thus, cultivation independent techniques, which rely on directly extracted nucleic acids from the environment, are a well-used alternative. For example, bacterial automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (B-ARISA is one of the widely used methods for fingerprinting bacterial communities after PCR-based amplification of selected regions of the operon coding for rRNA genes using community DNA. However, B-ARISA alone does not provide any taxonomic information and the results may be severely biased in relation to the primer set selection. Furthermore, amplified DNA stemming from mitochondrial or chloroplast templates might strongly bias the obtained fingerprints. In this study, we determined the applicability of three different B-ARISA primer sets to the study of bacterial communities. The results from in silico analysis harnessing publicly available sequence databases showed that all three primer sets tested are specific to bacteria but only two primers sets assure high bacterial taxa coverage (1406f/23Sr and ITSF/ITSReub. Considering the study of bacteria in a plant interface, the primer set ITSF/ITSReub was found to amplify (in silico sequences of some important crop species such as Sorghum bicolor and Zea mays. Bacterial genera and plant species potentially amplified by different primer sets are given. These data were confirmed when DNA extracted from soil and plant samples were analyzed. The presented information could be useful when interpreting existing B-ARISA results and planning B-ARISA experiments, especially when plant DNA can be expected.

  16. Sample preparation for laser-microdissection of soybean shoot apical meristem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chui E. Wong

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The shoot apical meristem houses stem cells responsible for the continuous formation of aerial plant organs including leaves and stems throughout the life of plants. Laser-microdissection in combination with high-throughput technology such as next generation sequencing permits an in-depth analysis of molecular events associated with specific cell type of interest. Sample preparation is the most critical step in ensuring good quality RNA to be extracted from samples following laser-microdissection. Here, we optimized the sample preparation for a major legume crop, soybean. We used Farmer’s solution as a fixative and paraffin as the embedding medium for soybean shoot apical meristem tissue without the use of any specialized equipment. Shorter time for tissue fixation (two days was found to be critical for the preservation of RNA in soybean shoot apical meristem. We further demonstrated the utility of this method for different tissues derived from soybean and rice. The method outlined here shall facilitate studies on crop plants involving laser-microdissection.

  17. microPREP: a new laser tool for high-volume sample preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Uwe; Petsch, Tino; Krause, Michael; Höche, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Over the past fifty year, lasers have perpetuated to find new, often groundbreaking applications in science and technology. The most important features of lasers are that photons are inherently free of elemental contamination, extremely high energy densities can be focused in very small areas and the laser beam can be precisely positioned using deflection mirrors. By reducing pulse lengths from a few nanoseconds down to the picosecond or femtosecond range, material's ablation is becoming increasingly "athermal", i.e. structure damage by local heating is reduced to well below a few microns. In view of these outstanding characteristics of lasers as tools for micromachining, it is very surprising that sample preparation for microstructure diagnostics so far hasn't made use of laser technology. microPREPTM, the all-new, patented laser-micromachining tool developed by 3D-Micromac is the first instrument to make fast, clean, and efficient laser ablation available for the preparation of samples for microstructure diagnostics. Exemplified for a sample to be investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and following a three-stage approach, a supporting basic structure is cut from the feedstock first. Second, the supported structure is thinned down to a few micron of residual thickness and third, the supported and thinned structure is polished using an ion broad beam. Illustrated by numerous examples, it is shown that this technology is ready to be applied on different areas of microstructure diagnostics and has very high potential for failure diagnostics.

  18. On reactivity of metallic zinc used for preparation of samples for hydrogen isotope ratio measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the reagent which is suitable to the reduction of water to hydrogen for preparing the samples for hydrogen isotope ratio measurement, the supply of the zinc of BDH Co. which has been widely used so far was stopped, consequently, for the purpose of searching for its substitute, several kinds of metallic zinc were obtained, and their reactivity was examined. As the criteria of the reactivity, the points that the experimental setup used so far can be used and that the accuracy of measurement and efficiency similar to those of heretofore can be obtained were selected, then, it was found that the zinc made by Bio Geochemical Laboratory, Indiana University, and the powder zinc on the market satisfied the criteria. In order to measure hydrogen isotope ratio within the measurement error of ±1%, it is necessary to maintain the quantities of zinc and water to be used and reaction temperature constant, to prepare the standard sample and an unknown sample under the same conditions, and to do the mass analysis as quickly as possible. The researches carried out so far, the reactivity test on various kinds of zinc and so on are reported. The optimum reaction conditions are shown. (K.I.)

  19. Preparation and Testing of Impedance-based Fluidic Biochips with RTgill-W1 Cells for Rapid Evaluation of Drinking Water Samples for Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Linda M; Widder, Mark W; McAleer, Michael K; Mayo, Michael W; Greis, Alex P; van der Schalie, William H

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript describes how to prepare fluidic biochips with Rainbow trout gill epithelial (RTgill-W1) cells for use in a field portable water toxicity sensor. A monolayer of RTgill-W1 cells forms on the sensing electrodes enclosed within the biochips. The biochips are then used for testing in a field portable electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) device designed for rapid toxicity testing of drinking water. The manuscript further describes how to run a toxicity test using the prepared biochips. A control water sample and the test water sample are mixed with pre-measured powdered media and injected into separate channels of the biochip. Impedance readings from the sensing electrodes in each of the biochip channels are measured and compared by an automated statistical software program. The screen on the ECIS instrument will indicate either "Contamination Detected" or "No Contamination Detected" within an hour of sample injection. Advantages are ease of use and rapid response to a broad spectrum of inorganic and organic chemicals at concentrations that are relevant to human health concerns, as well as the long-term stability of stored biochips in a ready state for testing. Limitations are the requirement for cold storage of the biochips and limited sensitivity to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides. Applications for this toxicity detector are for rapid field-portable testing of drinking water supplies by Army Preventative Medicine personnel or for use at municipal water treatment facilities. PMID:27023147

  20. Review of sample preparation strategies for MS-based metabolomic studies in industrial biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causon, Tim J; Hann, Stephan

    2016-09-28

    Fermentation and cell culture biotechnology in the form of so-called "cell factories" now play an increasingly significant role in production of both large (e.g. proteins, biopharmaceuticals) and small organic molecules for a wide variety of applications. However, associated metabolic engineering optimisation processes relying on genetic modification of organisms used in cell factories, or alteration of production conditions remain a challenging undertaking for improving the final yield and quality of cell factory products. In addition to genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic workflows, analytical metabolomics continues to play a critical role in studying detailed aspects of critical pathways (e.g. via targeted quantification of metabolites), identification of biosynthetic intermediates, and also for phenotype differentiation and the elucidation of previously unknown pathways (e.g. via non-targeted strategies). However, the diversity of primary and secondary metabolites and the broad concentration ranges encompassed during typical biotechnological processes means that simultaneous extraction and robust analytical determination of all parts of interest of the metabolome is effectively impossible. As the integration of metabolome data with transcriptome and proteome data is an essential goal of both targeted and non-targeted methods addressing production optimisation goals, additional sample preparation steps beyond necessary sampling, quenching and extraction protocols including clean-up, analyte enrichment, and derivatisation are important considerations for some classes of metabolites, especially those present in low concentrations or exhibiting poor stability. This contribution critically assesses the potential of current sample preparation strategies applied in metabolomic studies of industrially-relevant cell factory organisms using mass spectrometry-based platforms primarily coupled to liquid-phase sample introduction (i.e. flow injection, liquid

  1. Particle analysis for uranium isotopes on swipe samples using new generation Cameca IMS 7f SIMS supported by SEM automated uranium detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Recent safeguard issues revealed a need for increasing swipe samples analysis capability within the Agency's Network of Analytical Laboratories (NWAL). Our laboratory is qualified for uranium isotopic analysis of particles based on fission track and Thermo-Ionization Mass Spectrometry method (FT-TIMS). In addition, we recently acquired a Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS) in order to broaden particle analysis capabilities in the laboratory. The SIMS technique enables to lower the response time for urgent analysis and to maintain a swipe sample analysis capacity even when our reactor for neutron irradiation is not available. This presentation focuses on the results that have been obtained on swipes particle analysis for uranium isotopes using our new generation Cameca IMS 7f. In this study, all sample processing steps have been examined with the view to improve the reliability of the results and to shorten analytical response time. The IMS 7f instrument mainly differs from other small radius magnetic sector SIMS by ultra high vacuum conditions (-10 mbar in the sample chamber) likely to improve sensitivity as well as to lower hydride ion formation rates. Sensitivity is critical in particle analysis, considering the very small amounts of uranium to be analyzed (∼ a few pg) whereas isobaric interferences due to uranium hydride ions have been shown to cause dramatic artifacts in 236U/238U ratio determination. Particle extraction and sample mounting -- All sample preparation operations have been conducted in a class 10 clean laboratory. A special attention has been paid to the choice of solvents in order to minimize uranium dissolution during liquid-phase particle extraction. Particle suspensions have been deposited and evaporated onto 1 inch diameter carbon disks. Several deposition techniques have been investigated in order to minimize deposition diameters. Sample mountings have been equipped with an internal reference consisting of 2 aluminum foil

  2. A study of the Perkin-Elmer laboratory robotic system for analytical sample preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartenstein, S.D.; Delmastro, J.R.

    1988-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abilities of a Perkin-Elmer (PE) robotic system in performing complex analytical sample preparation procedures. Until this time, reports have been written describing the physical capabilities of the robotic arm marketed by PE and the use of this arm in a pick-and-place application at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Since the robotic arm is only capable of handling and transporting objects, the ability of the PE system is dependent upon the performance capabilities of the auxiliary devices marketed with the arm. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Evaluation of sample preparation procedures for micro-mechanical testing of trabecular bone

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kytýř, Daniel; Valach, Jaroslav; Doktor, Tomáš; Jiroušek, Ondřej; Zlámal, Petr; Kostelecká, M.

    Chemnitz : Chemnitz University of Technology , 2011 - (Stockmann, M.; Kretzschmar, J.), s. 71-72 ISBN 978-3-941003-34-7. [Youth Symposium on Experimental Solid Mechanics /10./. Chemnitz (DE), 25.05.2011-28.05.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/10/2305 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : micro-mechanical testing * sample preparation * trabecular bone Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials http://www.tu-chemnitz.de/mb/FestKoerpMech/YSESM/proceedings.php

  4. Sample preparation for scanning Kelvin probe microscopy studies on cross sections of organic solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Scherer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We prepared cross sections of P3HT:PCBM bulk heterojunction (BHJ organic solar cells (OSCs for the characterization of their potential distribution with scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. We compared results of samples obtained by microtome cutting of OSCs on plastic substrates, cleaving of OSCs on glass substrates, and milling with a focused ion beam. Their potential distributions were in good agreement with each other. Under short circuit conditions, potential gradients were detected in vicinity of the electrode/organics interfaces, with negligible electric fields within the bulk. We contacted the OSCs in a defined manner and studied their potential distribution under operating conditions.

  5. Preparation of quality control samples in radioimmunoassay for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To days, the radioimmunoassay is becomes the best technique to analysis different concentrations of substance, especially in medical and research laboratories. Although the specificity of RIA techniques, the quality controls must takes place to give good results as possible. In this dissertation i prepared quality control samples of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), to use it in RIA techniques and to control the reliability results of those laboratories which used these methods. We used China production kits of RIA method to determine the level of hormone (low-normal-high) concentration. Statistical parameters were used to drown the control chart of the mean to these data.(Author)

  6. Effects of sample preparation conditions on biomolecular solid-state NMR lineshapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sample preparation conditions with the 46 kDa enzyme complex of 5-enolpyruvyl-shikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase, shikimate-3-phosphate (S3P) and glyphosate (GLP) have been examined in an attempt to reduce linewidths in solid-state NMR spectra. The linewidths of 13P resonances associated with enzyme bound S3P and GLP in the lyophilized ternary complex have been reduced to 150 ± 12 Hz and 125 ± 7 Hz respectively, by a variety of methods involving additives and freezing techniques

  7. Cations in mammalian cells and chromosomes: Sample preparation protocols affect elemental abundances by SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi-Setti, R.; Gavrilov, K. L.; Neilly, M. E.

    2006-07-01

    The focus of our current research aims at detailing and quantifying the presence of cations, primarily Ca and Mg, in mammalian cells and chromosomes throughout the different stages of the cell cycle, using our high resolution scanning ion microprobe, the UC-SIM. The 45 keV Ga + probe of this instrument, typically ˜40 nm in diameter, carries a current of 30-40 pA, appropriate for surface SIMS studies, but limited in sample erosion rate for dynamic SIMS mapping over cell-size areas, of order 100 μm × 100 μm. Practical and reliable use of this probe toward the above SIMS goals requires a careful matching of the latter factors with the physical and chemical consequences of sample preparation protocols. We examine here how the preferred sample cryo-preservation methodologies such as freeze-fracture and lyophilization affect high resolution SIMS analysis, and, from this standpoint, develop and evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of fast alternate approaches to drying frozen samples. The latter include the use of methanol, ethanol, and methanol/acetic acid fixative. Methanol-dried freeze-fractured samples preserve histological morphology and yield Ca and Mg distributions containing reliable differential dynamical information, when compared with those following lyophilization.

  8. Background and Artifacts Generated by the by the Sample Preparation Experiment on SAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmahdi, Imene; Buch, Arnaud; Szopa, Cyril; Freissinet, Caroline; Glavin, Daniel; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; Millan, Maeva; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Stern, Jennifer; Coscia, David; Bonnet, Jean-Yves; Teinturier, Samuel; Morisson, Marietta; Stambouli, Moncef; Dequaire, Tristan; Mahaffy, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) is one of the instruments of the Mars Science Laboratory mission. Three analytical devices composed the SAM experiment: the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS), the Gas Chromatography (GC) and the Mass Spectrometer (MS). To adapt the nature of a sample to the analytical devices used, a sample preparation and gas processing system implemented with (a) a pyrolysis system, (b) wet chemistry: MTBSTFA and TMAH (c) the hydrocarbon trap (silica beads, Tenax® TA and Carbosieve G) and the injection trap (Tenax® GR composed of Tenax® TA and 30% of graphite) are employed to concentrate volatiles released from the sample prior to GC-MS analysis. Our study investigates several propositions for chlorinated hydrocarbon formation detected in the SAM background by looking for: (a) all products coming from the interaction of Tenax® and perchlorates present on Mars, (b) also between some soil sample and perchlorates and (c) sources of chlorinated hydrocarbon precursors. Here we report on the detection of chlorohydrocarbon compounds and their potential origin.

  9. Capacitive deionization on-chip as a method for microfluidic sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Susan H; Kim, Bumjoo; Eijkel, Jan C T; Han, Jongyoon; van den Berg, Albert; Odijk, Mathieu

    2015-03-21

    Desalination as a sample preparation step is essential for noise reduction and reproducibility of mass spectrometry measurements. A specific example is the analysis of proteins for medical research and clinical applications. Salts and buffers that are present in samples need to be removed before analysis to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Capacitive deionization is an electrostatic desalination (CDI) technique which uses two porous electrodes facing each other to remove ions from a solution. Upon the application of a potential of 0.5 V ions migrate to the electrodes and are stored in the electrical double layer. In this article we demonstrate CDI on a chip, and desalinate a solution by the removal of 23% of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions, while the concentration of a larger molecule (FITC-dextran) remains unchanged. For the first time impedance spectroscopy is introduced to monitor the salt concentration in situ in real-time in between the two desalination electrodes. PMID:25607349

  10. Recent developments on field gas extraction and sample preparation methods for radiokrypton dating of groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokochi, Reika

    2016-09-01

    Current and foreseen population growths will lead to an increased demand in freshwater, large quantities of which is stored as groundwater. The ventilation age is crucial to the assessment of groundwater resources, complementing the hydrological model approach based on hydrogeological parameters. Ultra-trace radioactive isotopes of Kr (81 Kr and 85 Kr) possess the ideal physical and chemical properties for groundwater dating. The recent advent of atom trap trace analyses (ATTA) has enabled determination of ultra-trace noble gas radioisotope abundances using 5-10 μ L of pure Kr. Anticipated developments will enable ATTA to analyze radiokrypton isotope abundances at high sample throughput, which necessitates simple and efficient sample preparation techniques that are adaptable to various sample chemistries. Recent developments of field gas extraction devices and simple and rapid Kr separation method at the University of Chicago are presented herein. Two field gas extraction devices optimized for different sampling conditions were recently designed and constructed, aiming at operational simplicity and portability. A newly developed Kr purification system enriches Kr by flowing a sample gas through a moderately cooled (138 K) activated charcoal column, followed by a gentle fractionating desorption. This simple process uses a single adsorbent and separates 99% of the bulk atmospheric gases from Kr without significant loss. The subsequent two stages of gas chromatographic separation and a hot Ti sponge getter further purify the Kr-enriched gas. Abundant CH4 necessitates multiple passages through one of the gas chromatographic separation columns. The presented Kr separation system has a demonstrated capability of extracting Kr with > 90% yield and 99% purity within 75 min from 1.2 to 26.8 L STP of atmospheric air with various concentrations of CH4. The apparatuses have successfully been deployed for sampling in the field and purification of groundwater samples.

  11. Automated determination of the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in aqueous samples: RSIL lab codes 1851 and 1852

    Science.gov (United States)

    Révész, Kinga M.; Doctor, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab codes 1851 and 1852 are to determine the total carbon mass and the ratio of the stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) for total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, lab code 1851) and total nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC, lab code 1852) in aqueous samples. The analysis procedure is automated according to a method that utilizes a total carbon analyzer as a peripheral sample preparation device for analysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas by a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS). The carbon analyzer produces CO2 and determines the carbon mass in parts per million (ppm) of DIC and DOC in each sample separately, and the CF-IRMS determines the carbon isotope ratio of the produced CO2. This configuration provides a fully automated analysis of total carbon mass and δ13C with no operator intervention, additional sample preparation, or other manual analysis. To determine the DIC, the carbon analyzer transfers a specified sample volume to a heated (70 °C) reaction vessel with a preprogrammed volume of 10% phosphoric acid (H3PO4), which allows the carbonate and bicarbonate species in the sample to dissociate to CO2. The CO2 from the reacted sample is subsequently purged with a flow of helium gas that sweeps the CO2 through an infrared CO2 detector and quantifies the CO2. The CO2 is then carried through a high-temperature (650 °C) scrubber reactor, a series of water traps, and ultimately to the inlet of the mass spectrometer. For the analysis of total dissolved organic carbon, the carbon analyzer performs a second step on the sample in the heated reaction vessel during which a preprogrammed volume of sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8) is added, and the hydroxyl radicals oxidize the organics to CO2. Samples containing 2 ppm to 30,000 ppm of carbon are analyzed. The precision of the carbon isotope analysis is within 0.3 per mill for DIC, and within 0.5 per mill for DOC.

  12. Automated Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling-HPLC-MS/MS Analysis of Drugs and Metabolites in Whole-Body Thin Tissue Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    A fully automated liquid extraction-based surface sampling system utilizing a commercially available autosampler coupled to high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) detection is reported. Discrete spots selected for droplet-based sampling and automated sample queue generation for both the autosampler and MS were enabled by using in-house developed software. In addition, co-registration of spatially resolved sampling position and HPLC-MS information to generate heatmaps of compounds monitored for subsequent data analysis was also available in the software. The system was evaluated with whole-body thin tissue sections from propranolol dosed rat. The hands-free operation of the system was demonstrated by creating heatmaps of the parent drug and its hydroxypropranolol glucuronide metabolites with 1 mm resolution in the areas of interest. The sample throughput was approximately 5 min/sample defined by the time needed for chromatographic separation. The spatial distributions of both the drug and its metabolites were consistent with previous studies employing other liquid extraction-based surface sampling methodologies.

  13. Performance Evaluation of Fast Microfluidic Thermal Lysis of Bacteria for Diagnostic Sample Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelyn C. Alocilja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of new diagnostic platforms that incorporate lab-on-a-chip technologies for portable assays is driving the need for rapid, simple, low cost methods to prepare samples for downstream processing or detection. An important component of the sample preparation process is cell lysis. In this work, a simple microfluidic thermal lysis device is used to quickly release intracellular nucleic acids and proteins without the need for additional reagents or beads used in traditional chemical or mechanical methods (e.g., chaotropic salts or bead beating. On-chip lysis is demonstrated in a multi-turn serpentine microchannel with external temperature control via an attached resistive heater. Lysis was confirmed for Escherichia coli by fluorescent viability assay, release of ATP measured with bioluminescent assay, release of DNA measured by fluorometry and qPCR, as well as bacterial culture. Results comparable to standard lysis techniques were achievable at temperatures greater than 65 °C and heating durations between 1 and 60 s.

  14. High-efficiency sample preparation approach to determine acrylamide levels in high-fat foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaodan; Li, Jinwei; Cao, Peirang; Liu, Yuanfa

    2016-08-01

    An improved sample preparation method was developed to enhance acrylamide recovery in high-fat foods. Prior to concentration, distilled deionized water was added to protect acrylamide from degradation, resulting in a higher acrylamide recovery rate from fried potato chips. A Chrome-Matrix C18 column (2.6 μm, 2.1 × 100 mm) was used for the first time to analyze acrylamide levels using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry, displaying good separation of acrylamide from interference. A solid-phase extraction procedure was avoided, and an average recovery of >89.00% was achieved from different food matrices for three different acrylamide spiking levels. Good reproducibility was observed, with an intraday relative standard deviation of 0.04-2.38%, and an interday relative standard deviation of 2.34-3.26%. Thus, combining the improved sample preparation method for acrylamide analysis with the separation on a Chrome-Matrix C18 column (2.6 μm, 2.1 × 100 mm) using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry is highly useful for analyzing acrylamide levels in complex food matrices. PMID:27279364

  15. Matrix compatible solid phase microextraction coating, a greener approach to sample preparation in vegetable matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarato, Attilio; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2016-09-01

    This work proposes the novel PDMS/DVB/PDMS fiber as a greener strategy for analysis by direct immersion solid phase microextraction (SPME) in vegetables. SPME is an established sample preparation approach that has not yet been adequately explored for food analysis in direct immersion mode due to the limitations of the available commercial coatings. The robustness and endurance of this new coating were investigated by direct immersion extractions in raw blended vegetables without any further sample preparation steps. The PDMS/DVB/PDMS coating exhibited superior features related to the capability of the external PDMS layer to protect the commercial coating, and showed improvements in terms of extraction capability and in the cleanability of the coating surface. In addition to having contributed to the recognition of the superior features of this new fiber concept before commercialization, the outcomes of this work serve to confirm advancements in the matrix compatibility of the PDMS-modified fiber, and open new prospects for the development of greener high-throughput analytical methods in food analysis using solid phase microextraction in the near future. PMID:27041299

  16. Automated extraction of DNA from blood and PCR setup using a Tecan Freedom EVO liquid handler for forensic genetic STR typing of reference samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Frøslev, Tobias G; Frank-Hansen, Rune; Hansen, Anders J; Morling, Niels

    2011-04-01

    We have implemented and validated automated protocols for DNA extraction and PCR setup using a Tecan Freedom EVO liquid handler mounted with the Te-MagS magnetic separation device (Tecan, Männedorf, Switzerland). The protocols were validated for accredited forensic genetic work according to ISO 17025 using the Qiagen MagAttract DNA Mini M48 kit (Qiagen GmbH, Hilden, Germany) from fresh whole blood and blood from deceased individuals. The workflow was simplified by returning the DNA extracts to the original tubes minimizing the risk of misplacing samples. The tubes that originally contained the samples were washed with MilliQ water before the return of the DNA extracts. The PCR was setup in 96-well microtiter plates. The methods were validated for the kits: AmpFℓSTR Identifiler, SGM Plus and Yfiler (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA), GenePrint FFFL and PowerPlex Y (Promega, Madison, WI). The automated protocols allowed for extraction and addition of PCR master mix of 96 samples within 3.5h. In conclusion, we demonstrated that (1) DNA extraction with magnetic beads and (2) PCR setup for accredited, forensic genetic short tandem repeat typing can be implemented on a simple automated liquid handler leading to the reduction of manual work, and increased quality and throughput. PMID:21609694

  17. Development of a fully automated open-column chemical-separation system—COLUMNSPIDER—and its application to Sr-Nd-Pb isotope analyses of igneous rock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takashi; Vaglarov, Bogdan Stefanov; Takei, Masakazu; Suzuki, Masahiro; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Ohsawa, Kouzou; Chang, Qing; Takahashi, Toshiro; Hirahara, Yuka; Hanyu, Takeshi; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    A fully automated open-column resin-bed chemical-separation system, named COLUMNSPIDER, has been developed. The system consists of a programmable micropipetting robot that dispenses chemical reagents and sample solutions into an open-column resin bed for elemental separation. After the initial set up of resin columns, chemical reagents, and beakers for the separated chemical components, all separation procedures are automated. As many as ten samples can be eluted in parallel in a single automated run. Many separation procedures, such as radiogenic isotope ratio analyses for Sr and Nd, involve the use of multiple column separations with different resin columns, chemical reagents, and beakers of various volumes. COLUMNSPIDER completes these separations using multiple runs. Programmable functions, including the positioning of the micropipetter, reagent volume, and elution time, enable flexible operation. Optimized movements for solution take-up and high-efficiency column flushing allow the system to perform as precisely as when carried out manually by a skilled operator. Procedural blanks, examined for COLUMNSPIDER separations of Sr, Nd, and Pb, are low and negligible. The measured Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios for JB-2 and Nd isotope ratios for JB-3 and BCR-2 rock standards all fall within the ranges reported previously in high-accuracy analyses. COLUMNSPIDER is a versatile tool for the efficient elemental separation of igneous rock samples, a process that is both labor intensive and time consuming.

  18. PET imaging of liposomes labeled with an [18F]-fluorocholesteryl ether probe prepared by automated radiosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Tue Ingemann; Binderup, Tina; Andresen, Thomas Lars;

    2012-01-01

    automated extrusion through 100-nm filters. The [F-18]-labeled liposomes were injected into nude, tumor-bearing mice, and positron emission tomography (PET) scans were performed several times over 8 hours to investigate the in vivo biodistribution. Clear tumor accumulation, as well as hepatic and splenic...

  19. Modern automated control systems in the oil and gas industry example on installation of preliminary gas preparation Kumli

    OpenAIRE

    Tulyaganov Shuhrat Dilshatovich; Nesterov Igor Valentinovich

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of automation is due to several reasons: the main — and increase gas production system complexity, increase reliability requirements of the systems, the economic effect, stricter environmental requirements. One of the main resource — the continuous development of information technology, the emergence of new ways to solve various problems, new tools.

  20. Evaluation Of ARG-1 Samples Prepared By Cesium Carbonate Dissolution During The Isolok SME Acceptability Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. The Mechanical Systems and Custom Equipment Development (MS and CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently completed the evaluation of one of these opportunities - the possibility of using an Isolok sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard valve for taking DWPF process samples at the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The use of an Isolok for SME sampling has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time, and decrease CPC cycle time. The SME acceptability testing for the Isolok was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 and was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNLRP-2011-00145. RW-0333P QA requirements applied to the task, and the results from the investigation were documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00693. Measurement of the chemical composition of study samples was a critical component of the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. A sampling and analytical plan supported the investigation with the analytical plan directing that the study samples be prepared by a cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) fusion dissolution method and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The use of the cesium carbonate preparation method for the Isolok testing provided an opportunity for an additional assessment of this dissolution method, which is being investigated as a potential replacement for the two methods (i.e., sodium peroxide fusion and mixed acid dissolution) that have been used at the DWPF for the analysis of SME samples. Earlier testing of the Cs2CO3 method yielded promising results which led to a TTR from Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) to SRNL for additional support and an associated TTQAP to direct the SRNL efforts. A technical report resulting from this work was

  1. EVALUATION OF ARG-1 SAMPLES PREPARED BY CESIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION DURING THE ISOLOK SME ACCEPTABILITY TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.

    2011-12-05

    Evaluation of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently completed the evaluation of one of these opportunities - the possibility of using an Isolok sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard valve for taking DWPF process samples at the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The use of an Isolok for SME sampling has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time, and decrease CPC cycle time. The SME acceptability testing for the Isolok was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 and was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNLRP-2011-00145. RW-0333P QA requirements applied to the task, and the results from the investigation were documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00693. Measurement of the chemical composition of study samples was a critical component of the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. A sampling and analytical plan supported the investigation with the analytical plan directing that the study samples be prepared by a cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) fusion dissolution method and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The use of the cesium carbonate preparation method for the Isolok testing provided an opportunity for an additional assessment of this dissolution method, which is being investigated as a potential replacement for the two methods (i.e., sodium peroxide fusion and mixed acid dissolution) that have been used at the DWPF for the analysis of SME samples. Earlier testing of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method yielded promising results which led to a TTR from Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) to SRNL for additional support and an associated TTQAP to direct the SRNL efforts. A technical report resulting

  2. Evaluation of sample preparation methods and optimization of nickel determination in vegetable tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Fernando dos Santos Salazar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Nickel, although essential to plants, may be toxic to plants and animals. It is mainly assimilated by food ingestion. However, information about the average levels of elements (including Ni in edible vegetables from different regions is still scarce in Brazil. The objectives of this study were to: (a evaluate and optimize a method for preparation of vegetable tissue samples for Ni determination; (b optimize the analytical procedures for determination by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (FAAS and by Electrothermal Atomic Absorption (ETAAS in vegetable samples and (c determine the Ni concentration in vegetables consumed in the cities of Lorena and Taubaté in the Vale do Paraíba, State of São Paulo, Brazil. By means of the analytical technique for determination by ETAAS or FAAS, the results were validated by the test of analyte addition and recovery. The most viable method tested for quantification of this element was HClO4-HNO3 wet digestion. All samples but carrot tissue collected in Lorena contained Ni levels above the permitted by the Brazilian Ministry of Health. The most disturbing results, requiring more detailed studies, were the Ni concentrations measured in carrot samples from Taubaté, where levels were five times higher than permitted by Brazilian regulations.

  3. Determination of bromine, fluorine and iodine in mineral supplements using pyrohydrolysis for sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrohydrolysis was employed for mineral supplements decomposition prior to F, Br and I determination. Fluoride determination was carried out by potentiometry using a fluoride-ion selective electrode, whereas Br and I were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The main parameters that influence on pyrohydrolysis were investigated. After evaluation, the following conditions were established: reactor temperature of 1000 deg C during 10 min; sample plus accelerator mass ratio of 1 + 5 and carrier gas (air) flow rate of 200 mL min-1 . The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated by analyte recovery tests and analysis of certified reference materials of phosphate rock and soil. Commercial mineral supplement samples were analyzed. The limits of quantification were 16, 0.3 and 0.07 μg g-1 for F, Br and I, respectively. By using a relatively simple and low cost pyrohydrolysis system up to 5 samples can be processed per hour. The developed sample preparation procedure can be routinely employed for F, Br and I determination in mineral supplements. (author)

  4. Preparation of Magnetic Hollow Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for Detection of Triazines in Food Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aixiang; Lu, Hongzhi; Xu, Shoufang

    2016-06-22

    Novel magnetic hollow molecularly imprinted polymers (M-H-MIPs) were proposed for highly selective recognition and fast enrichment of triazines in food samples. M-H-MIPs were prepared on the basis of multi-step swelling polymerization, followed by in situ growth of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles on the surface of hollow molecularly imprinted polymers (H-MIPs). Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy confirmed the successful immobilization of Fe3O4 nanoparticles on the surface of H-MIPs. M-H-MIPs could be separated simply using an external magnet. The binding adsorption results indicated that M-H-MIPs displayed high binding capacity and fast mass transfer property and class selective property for triazines. Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic models fitted the best adsorption models for M-H-MIPs. M-H-MIPs were used to analyze atrazine, simazine, propazine, and terbuthylazine in corn, wheat, and soybean samples. Satisfactory recoveries were in the range of 80.62-101.69%, and relative standard deviation was lower than 5.2%. Limits of detection from 0.16 to 0.39 μg L(-1) were obtained. When the method was applied to test positive samples that were contaminated with triazines, the results agree well with those obtained from an accredited method. Thus, the M-H-MIP-based dispersive solid-phase extraction method proved to be a convenient and practical platform for detection of triazines in food samples. PMID:27257079

  5. Determination of bromine, fluorine and iodine in mineral supplements using pyrohydrolysis for sample preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taflik, Ticiane; Antes, Fabiane G.; Paniz, Jose N.G.; Flores, Erico M.M.; Dressler, Valderi L., E-mail: valdres@quimica.ufsm.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Duarte, Fabio A. [Escola de Quimica e Alimentos, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Flores, Eder L.M. [Coordenacao de Engenharia de Alimentos, Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana, Medianeira, PR (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Pyrohydrolysis was employed for mineral supplements decomposition prior to F, Br and I determination. Fluoride determination was carried out by potentiometry using a fluoride-ion selective electrode, whereas Br and I were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The main parameters that influence on pyrohydrolysis were investigated. After evaluation, the following conditions were established: reactor temperature of 1000 deg C during 10 min; sample plus accelerator mass ratio of 1 + 5 and carrier gas (air) flow rate of 200 mL min{sup -1} . The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated by analyte recovery tests and analysis of certified reference materials of phosphate rock and soil. Commercial mineral supplement samples were analyzed. The limits of quantification were 16, 0.3 and 0.07 {mu}g g{sup -1} for F, Br and I, respectively. By using a relatively simple and low cost pyrohydrolysis system up to 5 samples can be processed per hour. The developed sample preparation procedure can be routinely employed for F, Br and I determination in mineral supplements. (author)

  6. Preparation of Biological Samples Containing Metoprolol and Bisoprolol for Applying Methods for Quantitative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Mahu Ştefania

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Arterial hypertension is a complex disease with many serious complications, representing a leading cause of mortality. Selective beta-blockers such as metoprolol and bisoprolol are frequently used in the management of hypertension. Numerous analytical methods have been developed for the determination of these substances in biological fluids, such as liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography. Due to the complex composition of biological fluids a biological sample pre-treatment before the use of the method for quantitative determination is required in order to remove proteins and potential interferences. The most commonly used methods for processing biological samples containing metoprolol and bisoprolol were identified through a thorough literature search using PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Willey Journals databases. Articles published between years 2005-2015 were reviewed. Protein precipitation, liquid-liquid extraction and solid phase extraction are the main techniques for the extraction of these drugs from plasma, serum, whole blood and urine samples. In addition, numerous other techniques have been developed for the preparation of biological samples, such as dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, carrier-mediated liquid phase microextraction, hollow fiber-protected liquid phase microextraction, on-line molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction. The analysis of metoprolol and bisoprolol in human plasma, urine and other biological fluids provides important information in clinical and toxicological trials, thus requiring the application of appropriate extraction techniques for the detection of these antihypertensive substances at nanogram and picogram levels.

  7. Preparation of Environmental and Food Samples to Support the Heavy Metals Detection by Stripping Electrochemical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of environmental and food samples to support the heavy metals detection by stripping electrochemistry was done. The water samples taken directly from the ground water were acidified with 1 mL of HNO3 acic suprapure was not digested, while the soils samples which have already dried in the oven at 105 oC, ware grinded and sieved through 150 μm, werte digested with HNO3 acic suprapure in the digestion bomb at 150 oC for 3-4 hours. The mussels samples which have already freezed in the freezer were peeled, dried with N2 liquid, grinded and dried again in the freeze drier at the pressure of ≅ 10-2 mBar, and then were grinded again, weighted, digested with HNO3 acic and HClO4 suprapure in the digestion bomb at 150 oC for 3 hours. Food samples were homogenized by electric mixer, dried with freeze dried, homogenized again by using ZrO2 ball mill, weighted, digested by HPA (high Pressure Asher). The heavy metals in the food samples solution of digestion product were detected by using Polarographic Analyzer EGandG of SWV and DPASV methods, while in the water, soils and the mussels solution were detected by using PDV 2000 and Polarograf E-505, DPASV method. The method validity were tested with SRM materials such as soil-5, soil-7, water W-4, and coppepoda. The heavy metals detection results in the water, soils, mussels, and food by electrochemical method were reported in this paper. (author)

  8. Bioassay alpha spectrometry: energy resolution as a function of sample source preparation and counting geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha particle counting is based on the response of an electronic counting system to an incident alpha particle. Alpha spectrometry is used in our employee surveillance bioassay program to measure the concentration of isotopes of Am, Pu and U contained on sample source preparations. Nuclides of Am, Pu and U are separated from the sample matrix by anion exchange and are electroplated on a stainless steel disc. The plated source diameter is 12.7 mm. A tracer is added to the sample before anion exchange as a quality control procedure to provide a measure of chemical yield. Tracer alpha-particle emissions are recorded in a preassigned calibrated area of the energy spectrum and chemical recovery is calculated by the ratio of tracer counts per second divided by the tracer activity in becquerels (Bq). Percent tracer recovery may also be calculated by introducing the average counting efficiency factor in the denominator. Tracer yield is then used to provide a reliable estimate of the sample's analyte counts that are recorded in other preassigned energy dependent areas of the spectrum. The tracer spectrum in the presence or absence of other nuclides also provides evidence of the performance characteristics of the alpha spectrometer, for example, chamber vacuum and electronics. Electroplated samples are counted in any one of 96 detectors. The backgrounds of these detectors are maintained at less than 3 counts per 70,000 s over a 190 keV energy window to provide a limit of detection of less than 0.37 mBq per sample at the 95% confidence level. In this paper, resolution of the photopeak is shown to be a function of the source to detector distance and a function of degraded alpha energies due to Fe or other extraneous materials on the plated surface

  9. Preparing Electronic Clinical Data for Quality Improvement and Comparative Effectiveness Research: The SCOAP CERTAIN Automation and Validation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Emily Beth; Capurro, Daniel; van Eaton, Erik; Alfonso-Cristancho, Rafael; Devlin, Allison; Yanez, N. David; Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha; Flum, David R.; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background: The field of clinical research informatics includes creation of clinical data repositories (CDRs) used to conduct quality improvement (QI) activities and comparative effectiveness research (CER). Ideally, CDR data are accurately and directly abstracted from disparate electronic health records (EHRs), across diverse health-systems. Objective: Investigators from Washington State’s Surgical Care Outcomes and Assessment Program (SCOAP) Comparative Effectiveness Research Translation Network (CERTAIN) are creating such a CDR. This manuscript describes the automation and validation methods used to create this digital infrastructure. Methods: SCOAP is a QI benchmarking initiative. Data are manually abstracted from EHRs and entered into a data management system. CERTAIN investigators are now deploying Caradigm’s Amalga™ tool to facilitate automated abstraction of data from multiple, disparate EHRs. Concordance is calculated to compare data automatically to manually abstracted. Performance measures are calculated between Amalga and each parent EHR. Validation takes place in repeated loops, with improvements made over time. When automated abstraction reaches the current benchmark for abstraction accuracy - 95% - itwill ‘go-live’ at each site. Progress to Date: A technical analysis was completed at 14 sites. Five sites are contributing; the remaining sites prioritized meeting Meaningful Use criteria. Participating sites are contributing 15–18 unique data feeds, totaling 13 surgical registry use cases. Common feeds are registration, laboratory, transcription/dictation, radiology, and medications. Approximately 50% of 1,320 designated data elements are being automatically abstracted—25% from structured data; 25% from text mining. Conclusion: In semi-automating data abstraction and conducting a rigorous validation, CERTAIN investigators will semi-automate data collection to conduct QI and CER, while advancing the Learning Healthcare System. PMID:25848565

  10. Preparation and examination of monolithic in-needle extraction (MINE) device for the direct analysis of liquid samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •MINE device for isolation of analytes from water samples. •Nine polymer poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) monoliths prepared in stainless steel needles. •High efficiency of in-needle extraction systems based on monolithic materials. •New possibilities in sample preparation area. -- Abstract: Combination of extraction and chromatographic techniques opens NEW possibilities in sample preparation area. Macroporous poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) (PS-DVB) monoliths were prepared by in situ polymerization in stainless steel needles. The surface of stainless steel needle was modified earlier by the silane coupling agent. Monolithic materials located inside needles were used as the in-needle extraction device. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were obtained for nine monoliths. Spectra of prepared materials were also performed with the use of two techniques: Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The new monolithic in-needle extraction (MINE) devices were used in the preparation of a series of test water samples for chromatographic analysis. The extraction of phenolic compounds from water samples was carried out by pumping liquid samples through the MINE device. Obtained results indicate a high efficiency of in-needle extraction systems based on monolithic materials. Breakthrough volume and the sorption efficiency of prepared monolithic in-needle extraction devices were determined experimentally. The achieved recovery was close to 90%, and determined LOQ values varied between 0.4 and 6 μg

  11. Sample preparation with microwave. Experiences in the environmental- and industrial analytics laboratory of Voest Alpine (P1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Since around one and a half year two microwave sample preparation units tested and used in the environmental- and industrial analytics laboratory of Voest Alpine. On basis of the experiences the technique offered good results for the specific applications in a steel company. In comparison with the traditional sample preparation of iron oxides for ICP-OES determination through an open vessel wet-chemical acid pulping sample preparation with closed vessel microwave digestion got a large quantity of advantages. The problem with simultaneously sample preparation and determination of silica and other compounds in ultra-pure iron oxides could be solved. We obtained an excellent recovery and reproducibility with microwave pulping. In the range of environmental analytics the possibilities of microwave sample preparation to prepare typical dusts, landfill wastes, process and waste water of a steel company was analyzed. The microwave sample preparation showed good reproducibility to the conventional techniques, e.g. pulping and Soxleth-extraction. Someone of them are already replaced by the new method. Here also the microwave technique possess a large potential for more uses. (author)

  12. Preparation and examination of monolithic in-needle extraction (MINE) device for the direct analysis of liquid samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrzyńska, Monika, E-mail: monikapietrzynska@gmail.com; Voelkel, Adam; Bielicka-Daszkiewicz, Katarzyna

    2013-05-07

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •MINE device for isolation of analytes from water samples. •Nine polymer poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) monoliths prepared in stainless steel needles. •High efficiency of in-needle extraction systems based on monolithic materials. •New possibilities in sample preparation area. -- Abstract: Combination of extraction and chromatographic techniques opens NEW possibilities in sample preparation area. Macroporous poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) (PS-DVB) monoliths were prepared by in situ polymerization in stainless steel needles. The surface of stainless steel needle was modified earlier by the silane coupling agent. Monolithic materials located inside needles were used as the in-needle extraction device. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were obtained for nine monoliths. Spectra of prepared materials were also performed with the use of two techniques: Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The new monolithic in-needle extraction (MINE) devices were used in the preparation of a series of test water samples for chromatographic analysis. The extraction of phenolic compounds from water samples was carried out by pumping liquid samples through the MINE device. Obtained results indicate a high efficiency of in-needle extraction systems based on monolithic materials. Breakthrough volume and the sorption efficiency of prepared monolithic in-needle extraction devices were determined experimentally. The achieved recovery was close to 90%, and determined LOQ values varied between 0.4 and 6 μg.

  13. Influence of sample preparation on assay of phenolic acids from eggplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthria, Devanand L; Mukhopadhyay, Sudarsan

    2006-01-11

    Sample preparation is often overlooked and is frequently considered as "a means to an end". This systematic study with a phenolic-enriched substrate, eggplant (Solanum melongena L.), was undertaken to evaluate the substantial variations in the extraction techniques, solvents, and parameters as described in the published literature. Direct comparison of over 10 extraction procedures or conditions was performed to show the importance and influence of sample preparation on the assay of phenolic compounds. Chlorogenic acid (CA) was the most abundant phenolic acid accounting for >75% of the total phenolic acids content extracted from the eggplant sample. Optimum extraction of CA and total phenolics (TP) from Black Bell cultivar of eggplant were obtained when extractions were performed with a mixture of MeOH/H2O at a ratio of 80:20% v/v using a pressurized liquid extractor (PLE) at 100 degrees C. The amount of CA and TP extracted from eggplant by the previously reported procedures using a wrist shaker, rotary shaker, stirring, sonication, or reflux with different extraction solvents (acetone or varying composition of MeOH/H2O solvent mixtures) varied significantly between 5 and 95% as compared to PLE. The predominant phenolic acids in the free phenolic acid fraction of Black Beauty cultivar of eggplant were CA isomers. However, caffeic acid isomers were the major phenolic acids extracted from the base-hydrolyzed fraction. The total amount of caffeic acid extracted from the Italian Neon cultivar was more that twice that of four other eggplant cultivars (Orient Express, Calliope Zebra Stripe, Orient Charm Neon, and Black Beauty). PMID:16390175

  14. Alteration in sample preparation to increase the yield of multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction assay for diagnosis of genital ulcer disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Genital Ulcer Disease (GUD is common sexually transmitted infection (STI. Multiple studies have shown that GUDs are strongly associated with the transmission and the acquisition of HIV infection. An accurate diagnosis of common etiology of GUD namely Herpes, syphilis and Chancroid is possible using Multiplex PCR (M-PCR. However, frequent presence of Polymerase Chain Reaction inhibitors in the ulcer swab specimen limits the performance of the assay. In order to overcome this problem, alternative specimen preparation method was used. Materials and Methods: To determine the common etiology, GUD specimens obtained under an STI operations research study were tested with M-PCR after the samples were prepared using Roche Amplicor specimen preparation kit. PCR inhibiting samples were identified from that, which showed negative results. These samples were subjected to phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation before the conduct of M-PCR on them. Results: Of the 237 GUD specimens tested, in 145 etiologies could be detected, whereas 92 samples were found negative. Further spiking with one of the target DNA, 128 of the negative samples were found to contain the inhibitors. These 126 samples were then subjected to phenol chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation followed by M-PCR. Using this method for sample preparation, etiology could be determined in 46 (23% additional samples. This success rate of altered sample preparation method has been lower than that has reported. Conclusion: The results indicate that sample preparation using phenol chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation, prior to M-PCR helps to eliminate the inhibitors and increase the yield of the assay. However, being a laborious procedure, it may be used for samples giving negative results after the screening by Roche Amplicor specimen preparation kit.

  15. On-line ( sup 11 C)methylation using ( sup 11 C)methyl iodide for the automated preparation of sup 11 C-radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, Ren; Pascali, C.; Yuasa, Mitsuaki; Takahashi, Toshihiro; Ido, Tatsuo (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). CYRIC); Yanai, Kazuhiko (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-09-01

    A novel method for the efficient preparation of {sup 11}C-radiopharmaceuticals by on-line ({sup 11}C)methylation using ({sup 11}C)methyl iodide has been developed and applied to a rapid, convenient automated system. ({sup 11}C)Methyl iodide is first trapped in a short column, containing an adsorber and coated substrate, which is connected to an HPLC injector. DMF is then introduced. Alternatively the substrate is added with the DMF. A whole reaction mixture can be easily injected onto a HPLC column for purification by switching the injector valve immediately after the reaction. Thus, radiochemical yields in the preparation of {sup 11}C-labelled doxepin, benztropine, cyproheptadine and N-methylspiperone have been improved remarkably and the synthetic procedure simplified. (author).

  16. On-line [11C]methylation using [11C]methyl iodide for the automated preparation of 11C-radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method for the efficient preparation of 11C-radiopharmaceuticals by on-line [11C]methylation using [11C]methyl iodide has been developed and applied to a rapid, convenient automated system. [11C]Methyl iodide is first trapped in a short column, containing an adsorber and coated substrate, which is connected to an HPLC injector. DMF is then introduced. Alternatively the substrate is added with the DMF. A whole reaction mixture can be easily injected onto a HPLC column for purification by switching the injector valve immediately after the reaction. Thus, radiochemical yields in the preparation of 11C-labelled doxepin, benztropine, cyproheptadine and N-methylspiperone have been improved remarkably and the synthetic procedure simplified. (author)

  17. AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF AQUEOUS SAMPLES CONTAINING PESTICIDES, ACIDIC/BASIC/NEUTRAL SEMIVOLATILES AND VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION COUPLED IN-LINE TO LARGE VOLUME INJECTION GC/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data is presented on the development of a new automated system combining solid phase extraction (SPE) with GC/MS spectrometry for the single-run analysis of water samples containing a broad range of organic compounds. The system uses commercially available automated in-line 10-m...

  18. Laboratory manual on sample preparation procedures for x-ray micro-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray micro fluorescence is a non-destructive and sensitive method for studying the microscopic distribution of different elements in almost all kinds of samples. Since the beginning of this century, x-rays and electrons have been used for the analysis of many different kinds of material. Techniques which rely on electrons are mainly developed for microscopic studies, and are used in conventional Electron Microscopy (EM) or Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), while x-rays are widely used for chemical analysis at the microscopic level. The first chemical analysis by fluorescence spectroscopy using small x-ray beams was conducted in 1928 by Glockner and Schreiber. Since then much work has been devoted to developing different types of optical systems for focusing an x-ray beam, but the efficiency of these systems is still inferior to the conventional electron optical systems. However, even with a poor optical efficiency, the x-ray microbeam has many advantages compared with electron or proton induced x-ray emission methods. These include: The analyses are non-destructive, losses of mass are negligible, and due to the low thermal loading of x-rays, materials which may be thermally degraded can be analysed; Samples can be analysed in air, and no vacuum is required, therefore specimens with volatile components such as water in biological samples, can be imaged at normal pressure and temperature; No charging occurs during analysis and therefore coating of the sample with a conductive layer is not necessary; With these advantages, simpler sample preparation procedures including mounting and preservation can be used

  19. An optimised sample preparation method for NMR-based faecal metabonomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junfang; An, Yanpeng; Yao, Jianwu; Wang, Yulan; Tang, Huiru

    2010-05-01

    Faecal metabonomic NMR analysis plays an essential role in investigating the interactions between mammalian metabolism and symbiotic gut microbiota. However, the faecal metabolite extraction method remains to be optimised and standardised to take into consideration signal-to-noise ratios, pH and chemical shift consistency. In the current investigation, we compared extraction consistency of three homogenisation methods including manual ultrasonication, automatic homogenization with tissuelyser and their combination, and systematically optimised faecal metabolite extraction parameters, including the faeces-to-buffer ratio (W(f) : V(b)), extraction repetition times and duration. We found that automatic homogenisation with tissuelyser was the choice of extraction method owning to its good metabolite extraction consistency and high throughput. We also recommend W(f) : V(b) of 1 : 10 (mg microl(-1)) and use of the combined first two extracts as the resultant samples to represent faecal metabolite composition. Such recommendation is based on considerations of maximisation of the spectral signal-to-noise ratio, pH and chemical shift consistency, completeness of metabolite extraction and sample preparation throughput so that the method is suitable for analysing a large number of samples especially in human population studies. PMID:20419252

  20. A Method to Prepare a Descemet's Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty (DSAEK) Graft Using Donor Corneas With Narrow Scleral Rims

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Hwang, Yih-Shiou; Ma, David Hui-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Donor corneas with narrow scleral rims are often disqualified for Descemet's Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty (DSAEK), mainly because of fluid leak and low pressure when they are mounted onto an artificial anterior chamber (AAC). This report describes a novel method to tight-lock a donor cornea with a narrow scleral rim so that microkeratome cutting is possible, allowing a DSAEK procedure to be completed. A 50-year-old male suffering from Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) endothel...

  1. Study of the first paramagnetic to ferromagnetic transition in as prepared samples of Mn-Fe-P-Si magnetocaloric compounds prepared by different synthesis routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartok, A.; Kustov, M.; Cohen, L. F.; Pasko, A.; Zehani, K.; Bessais, L.; Mazaleyrat, F.; LoBue, M.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetocaloric materials with composition of Mn1.3Fe0.65P0.5 Si0.5 have been prepared by ball milling and solid-state reaction methods and consolidated using powder annealing, and conventional and spark plasma sintering. Magnetic and calorimetric measurements show remarkable differences upon first cooling, and slight differences on second and further coolings between the samples prepared by different synthesis routes. Further measurements using Hall probe imaging in high magnetic field have been also carried out. As-prepared samples have been cooled down just above the critical temperature, and the first phase transition has been induced by application of a magnetic field. Bulk samples show staircase isothermal magnetization curves whereas powders show smoother transition curves.

  2. Ultrastructure of Plant Leaf Cuticles in relation to Sample Preparation as Observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Paula; Fernández, Victoria; García, María Luisa; Fernández, Agustín; Gil, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The leaf cuticular ultrastructure of some plant species has been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in only few studies. Attending to the different cuticle layers and inner structure, plant cuticles have been grouped into six general morphological types. With the aim of critically examining the effect of cuticle isolation and preparation for TEM analysis on cuticular ultrastructure, adaxial leaf cuticles of blue-gum eucalypt, grey poplar, and European pear were assessed, following a membrane science approach. The embedding and staining protocols affected the ultrastructure of the cuticles analysed. The solubility parameter, surface tension, and contact angles with water of pure Spurr's and LR-White resins were within a similar range. Differences were however estimated for resin : solvent mixtures, since Spurr's resin is combined with acetone and LR-White resin is mixed with ethanol. Given the composite hydrophilic and lipophilic nature of plant cuticles, the particular TEM tissue embedding and staining procedures employed may affect sample ultrastructure and the interpretation of the results in physicochemical and biological terms. It is concluded that tissue preparation procedures may be optimised to facilitate the observation of the micro- and nanostructure of cuticular layers and components with different degrees of polarity and hydrophobicity. PMID:24895682

  3. Preparation of a K(+) -imprinted polymer for the selective recognition of K(+) in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Beshare; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Seyedzadeh, Zahra

    2016-05-01

    An analytical method is reported for the preparation of K(+) -imprinted nanoparticles using cryptand 222 as the complexing agent, methacrylic acid as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the crosslinker and 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile as the radical initiator. The prepared particles have a diameter of 200-250 nm. The maximum adsorption capacity of potassium ion-imprinted polymer particles was 120 μmol/g. The optimum pH for quantitative extraction was 9.0. The nature of the eluent, eluent concentration, adsorption and desorption times, weight of the polymer material, aqueous phase, and desorption volumes were also studied. The relative selectivity coefficients of K(+) /Li(+) , K(+) /Na(+) , K(+) /Rb(+) and K(+) /Cs(+) were 48.10, 4.80, 29.70, and 43.4, respectively. The relative standard deviation and limit of detection of the method were obtained 1.61% and 4.62 ng/L, respectively. Finally, the method was applied for the determination of potassium ions from different samples using flame photometry. PMID:27005866

  4. Sample Preparation for Headspace GC Analysis of Residual Solvents in Hyaluronic Acid Derivative Fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hoon Joo; Kim, Dong Min; Yang, Jeong Soo [LG life Sciences, Ltd./R and D Park, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Wha [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    The aim of this study is to develop efficient sample preparation method for HS-GC analysis of residual solvents in HA derivative fiber. Compared to direct extraction of residual solvents from HA derivative fiber, the extraction through the hydrolysis of HA derivative fiber by HAse gave more complete and higher reproducible quantification of residual solvent. To validate HS-GC analysis method of residual solvents, specificity, limits of detection and quantification, linearity, accuracy and precision are investigated in the study. HA derivative fiber was hydrolyzed using HAse for headspace gas chromatographic analysis of residual solvents of ethanol, acetone and isopropanol in HA derivative fiber. This study showed that the developed method had specificity, linearity, accuracy and precision. In addition, it demonstrated that HS-GC coupled with matrix-breaking method such as hydrolysis was available for the determination of residual solvents in a matrix like HA derivative fiber.

  5. Sample preparation and analytical strategies for large-scale phosphoproteomics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanshin, Evgeny; Michnick, Stephen; Thibault, Pierre

    2012-10-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification that controls a wide range of protein functions including enzyme activity, subcellular localisation, protein degradation, intra- and inter-molecular protein interactions. Significant advances in both phosphopeptide enrichment methods and sensitive mass spectrometry instrumentation have been achieved over the past decade to facilitate the large-scale identification of protein phosphorylation in humans and different animal and microbial model systems. While mass spectrometry provides the ability to identify thousands of phosphorylation sites in a single experiment, the further understanding of the functional significance of this modification on protein substrates requires detailed information on the changes in phosphorylation stoichiometry and protein abundance across experimental paradigms. This review presents different sample preparation methods and analytical strategies used in mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics to profile protein phosphorylation and unravel the regulation of this modification on protein function. PMID:22683502

  6. Sample Preparation for Headspace GC Analysis of Residual Solvents in Hyaluronic Acid Derivative Fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to develop efficient sample preparation method for HS-GC analysis of residual solvents in HA derivative fiber. Compared to direct extraction of residual solvents from HA derivative fiber, the extraction through the hydrolysis of HA derivative fiber by HAse gave more complete and higher reproducible quantification of residual solvent. To validate HS-GC analysis method of residual solvents, specificity, limits of detection and quantification, linearity, accuracy and precision are investigated in the study. HA derivative fiber was hydrolyzed using HAse for headspace gas chromatographic analysis of residual solvents of ethanol, acetone and isopropanol in HA derivative fiber. This study showed that the developed method had specificity, linearity, accuracy and precision. In addition, it demonstrated that HS-GC coupled with matrix-breaking method such as hydrolysis was available for the determination of residual solvents in a matrix like HA derivative fiber

  7. Sample preparation for arsenic speciation in terrestrial plants--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Clarice D B; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Nogueira, Ana R A

    2013-10-15

    Arsenic is an element widely present in nature. Additionally, it may be found as different species in several matrices and therefore it is one of the target elements in chemical speciation. Although the number of studies in terrestrial plants is low, compared to matrices such as fish or urine, this number is raising due to the fact that this type of matrix are closely related to the human food chain. In speciation analysis, sample preparation is a critical step and several extraction procedures present drawbacks. In this review, papers dealing with extraction procedures, analytical methods, and studies of species conservation in plants cultivated in terrestrial environment are critically discussed. Analytical procedures based on extractions using water or diluted acid solutions associated with HPLC-ICP-MS are good alternatives, owing to their versatility and sensitivity, even though less expensive strategies are shown as feasible choices. PMID:24054594

  8. Preparation of 15N labelled protein sample by gene engineering technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the advanced multi-dimension heteronuclear pulses and isotope labelled protein technique, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has become an important tool in analysis of the solution conformation of protein. On the basis of the high level expression of a protein-trichosanthin in recombinant E.coli using DNA, 15N was used to label the protein, the 15N labelled trichosanthin was obtained by affinity chromatography on Ni-NTA agarose. Terminating pregnant effect in mice showed that this recombinant protein had the same activity as natural trichosanthin. A 1H-15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC) spectrum was obtained from an AM-500 NMR spectrometer, demonstrating that this method is suitable in preparing labelled protein sample for NMR

  9. Preparation and Application of Novel Magnetic Molecularly Imprinted Composites for Recognition of Sulfadimethoxine in Feed Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Min; Li, Hengye; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Jingyou; Dai, Jianping; Wang, Xiaojin; Zhang, Lingli; Wei, Yunji

    2016-01-01

    Novel magnetic molecularly imprinted composites were prepared through a facile method using sulfadimethoxine (SDM) as template. The inorganic magnetic nanoparticles were linked with the organic molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) through irreversibly covalent bond. So, the resulted composites showed excellent stability and reusability under acidic elution conditions. The magnetic MIP composites showed good selectivity, high binding capacity and excellent kinetics toward SDM. Adopting the magnetic MIP composites as extraction material, an off-line magnetic solid-phase extraction (SPE)/high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was established. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.05 - 15 mg kg(-1) (r(2) = 0.9976). The LOD and LOQ were 0.016 and 0.052 mg kg(-1), respectively, while the recoveries were in the range of 89.3 - 107.0%. These novel magnetic MIP composites may become a powerful tool for the extraction of template from complex samples with good efficiency. PMID:27169650

  10. Development of a harmonised method for the profiling of amphetamines: IV. Optimisation of sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Kjell; Jalava, Kaisa; Lock, Eric; Huizer, Henk; Kaa, Elisabet; Lopes, Alvaro; Poortman-van der Meer, Anneke; Cole, Michael D; Dahlén, Johan; Sippola, Erkki

    2007-06-14

    The suitability of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) for the preparation of impurity extracts intended for gas chromatographic profiling analyses of amphetamine were evaluated. Both techniques were optimised with respect to the extraction of selected target compounds by use of full factorial designs in which the variables affecting the performance were evaluated. Test samples consisted of amphetamine synthesised by the Leuckart reaction, by reductive amination of benzyl methyl ketone and by the nitrostyrene route. The performance of LLE and SPE were comparable in terms of repeatability and recovery of the target compounds. LLE was considered the better choice for the present harmonised amphetamine profiling method due to the lack of information on the long-term stability of SPE columns. PMID:17134863

  11. Shear mechanical anisotropy of side chain liquid-crystal elastomers: Influence of sample preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogez, D.; Francius, G.; Finkelmann, H.; Martinoty, P.

    2006-08-01

    We study the mechanical anisotropy of a series of uniaxial side chain nematic elastomers prepared with the same chemical composition but with different preparation protocols. For all the compounds, the experiments performed as a function of temperature show no discontinuity in both G'// and G'⊥ (the labels // and ⊥ stand for the director parallel, respectively perpendicular to the shear displacement) around the nematic-isotropic (N-I) phase transition temperature determined by DSC. They also all show a small decrease in G'// starting at temperatures well above this temperature (from ˜ 4°C to ˜ 20°C depending on the compound studied) and leading to a small hydrodynamic value of the G'⊥/G'// ratio. The measurements taken as a function of frequency show that the second plateau in G'// and the associated dip in G//” expected from dynamic semi-soft elasticity are not observed. These results can be described by the de Gennes model, which predicts small elastic anisotropy in the hydrodynamic and linear regimes. They correspond to the behavior expected for compounds beyond the mechanical critical point, which is consistent with the NMR and specific heat measurements taken on similar compounds. We also show that a reduction in the cross-linking density does not change the non-soft character of the mechanical response. From the measurements taken as a function of frequency at several temperatures we deduce that the time-temperature superposition method does not apply. From these measurements, we also determine the temperature dependence of the longest relaxation time τE of the network for the situations where the director is either parallel or perpendicular to the shear velocity. Finally, we discuss the influence on the measurements of the mechanical constraint associated with the fact that the samples cannot change their shape around the pseudo phase transition, because of their strong adherence on the sample-bearing glass slides.

  12. Determination of Cd and Pb in food slurries by GFAAS using cryogenic grinding for sample preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, D. Jr.; Barbosa, F. Jr.; Tomazelli, A.C.; Krug, F.J. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Piracicaba (Brazil); Nobrega, J.A. [Departamento de Quimica, UFSCar, Sao Carlos (Brazil); Arruda, M.A.Z. [Instituto de Quimica, UNICAMP, Campinas (Brazil)

    2002-06-01

    A simple method combining slurry sampling after cryogenic grinding and the use of a permanent modification of the integrated platform inside the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) was proposed for the determination of Cd and Pb in foods. Potentialities of the cryogenic grinding were evaluated for grinding different materials of difficult homogenization such as high fat and high fiber tissues. Animal and vegetal samples were cut into small pieces and ground in liquid nitrogen for 2 min. Slurries were prepared directly in the autosampler cup after cryogenic grinding by transferring an exact amount of homogeneous powdered material (5-20 mg) to the cup, followed by 1.00 mL of 0.2% (v/v) HNO{sub 3} containing 0.04% (v/v) Triton X-100 and sonication for 30 s, before transferring into the platform previously coated with 250 {mu}g W and 200 {mu}g Rh. Use of a tungsten carbide-rhodium permanent modifier combined with NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} conventional modifier improves tube lifetime and increases the pyrolysis temperature for Cd. Homogeneity tests, carried out by comparing the between- and within-batch precision for each kind of sample, showed no significant differences at the 95% confidence level, indicating good homogeneity for 5-20 mg masses. Detection limits were 3.3 ng g{sup -1} Cd and 75 ng g{sup -1} Pb for 1% m/v slurries. Results for determination of Cd and Pb in foods slurries were in agreement with those obtained with digested samples, since no statistical differences were found by the paired t-test at the 95% level. (orig.)

  13. Second generation laser-heated microfurnace for the preparation of microgram-sized graphite samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Smith, A. M.; Long, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present construction details and test results for two second-generation laser-heated microfurnaces (LHF-II) used to prepare graphite samples for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at ANSTO. Based on systematic studies aimed at optimising the performance of our prototype laser-heated microfurnace (LHF-I) (Smith et al., 2007 [1]; Smith et al., 2010 [2,3]; Yang et al., 2014 [4]), we have designed the LHF-II to have the following features: (i) it has a small reactor volume of 0.25 mL allowing us to completely graphitise carbon dioxide samples containing as little as 2 μg of C, (ii) it can operate over a large pressure range (0-3 bar) and so has the capacity to graphitise CO2 samples containing up to 100 μg of C; (iii) it is compact, with three valves integrated into the microfurnace body, (iv) it is compatible with our new miniaturised conventional graphitisation furnaces (MCF), also designed for small samples, and shares a common vacuum system. Early tests have shown that the extraneous carbon added during graphitisation in each LHF-II is of the order of 0.05 μg, assuming 100 pMC activity, similar to that of the prototype unit. We use a 'budget' fibre packaged array for the diode laser with custom built focusing optics. The use of a new infrared (IR) thermometer with a short focal length has allowed us to decrease the height of the light-proof safety enclosure. These innovations have produced a cheaper and more compact device. As with the LHF-I, feedback control of the catalyst temperature and logging of the reaction parameters is managed by a LabVIEW interface.

  14. Optical biosensor system with integrated microfluidic sample preparation and TIRF based detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilli, Eduard; Scheicher, Sylvia R.; Suppan, Michael; Pichler, Heinz; Rumpler, Markus; Satzinger, Valentin; Palfinger, Christian; Reil, Frank; Hajnsek, Martin; Köstler, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    There is a steadily growing demand for miniaturized bioanalytical devices allowing for on-site or point-of-care detection of biomolecules or pathogens in applications like diagnostics, food testing, or environmental monitoring. These, so called labs-on-a-chip or micro-total analysis systems (μ-TAS) should ideally enable convenient sample-in - result-out type operation. Therefore, the entire process from sample preparation, metering, reagent incubation, etc. to detection should be performed on a single disposable device (on-chip). In the early days such devices were mainly fabricated using glass or silicon substrates and adapting established fabrication technologies from the electronics and semiconductor industry. More recently, the development focuses on the use of thermoplastic polymers as they allow for low-cost high volume fabrication of disposables. One of the most promising materials for the development of plastic based lab-on-achip systems are cyclic olefin polymers and copolymers (COP/COC) due to their excellent optical properties (high transparency and low autofluorescence) and ease of processing. We present a bioanalytical system for whole blood samples comprising a disposable plastic chip based on TIRF (total internal reflection fluorescence) optical detection. The chips were fabricated by compression moulding of COP and microfluidic channels were structured by hot embossing. These microfluidic structures integrate several sample pretreatment steps. These are the separation of erythrocytes, metering of sample volume using passive valves, and reagent incubation for competitive bioassays. The surface of the following optical detection zone is functionalized with specific capture probes in an array format. The plastic chips comprise dedicated structures for simple and effective coupling of excitation light from low-cost laser diodes. This enables TIRF excitation of fluorescently labeled probes selectively bound to detection spots at the microchannel surface

  15. Site-Specific Cryo-focused Ion Beam Sample Preparation Guided by 3D Correlative Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jan; Mahamid, Julia; Lucic, Vladan; de Marco, Alex; Fernandez, Jose-Jesus; Laugks, Tim; Mayer, Tobias; Hyman, Anthony A; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Plitzko, Jürgen M

    2016-02-23

    The development of cryo-focused ion beam (cryo-FIB) for the thinning of frozen-hydrated biological specimens enabled cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) analysis in unperturbed cells and tissues. However, the volume represented within a typical FIB lamella constitutes a small fraction of the biological specimen. Retaining low-abundance and dynamic subcellular structures or macromolecular assemblies within such limited volumes requires precise targeting of the FIB milling process. In this study, we present the development of a cryo-stage allowing for spinning-disk confocal light microscopy at cryogenic temperatures and describe the incorporation of the new hardware into existing workflows for cellular sample preparation by cryo-FIB. Introduction of fiducial markers and subsequent computation of three-dimensional coordinate transformations provide correlation between light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy/FIB. The correlative approach is employed to guide the FIB milling process of vitrified cellular samples and to capture specific structures, namely fluorescently labeled lipid droplets, in lamellas that are 300 nm thick. The correlation procedure is then applied to localize the fluorescently labeled structures in the transmission electron microscopy image of the lamella. This approach can be employed to navigate the acquisition of cryo-ET data within FIB-lamellas at specific locations, unambiguously identified by fluorescence microscopy. PMID:26769364

  16. Preparation of chitosan grafted graphite composite for sensitive detection of dopamine in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, Selvakumar; Thangavelu, Kokulnathan; Chen, Shen-Ming; Gnanaprakasam, P; Velusamy, Vijayalakshmi; Liu, Xiao-Heng

    2016-10-20

    The accurate detection of dopamine (DA) levels in biological samples such as human serum and urine are essential indicators in medical diagnostics. In this work, we describe the preparation of chitosan (CS) biopolymer grafted graphite (GR) composite for the sensitive and lower potential detection of DA in its sub micromolar levels. The composite modified electrode has been used for the detection of DA in biological samples such as human serum and urine. The GR-CS composite modified electrode shows an enhanced oxidation peak current response and low oxidation potential for the detection of DA than that of electrodes modified with bare, GR and CS discretely. Under optimum conditions, the fabricated GR-CS composite modified electrode shows the DPV response of DA in the linear response ranging from 0.03 to 20.06μM. The detection limit and sensitivity of the sensor were estimated as 0.0045μM and 6.06μA μM(-1)cm(-2), respectively. PMID:27474582

  17. OXI-FLO: an instrument concept for the combined sample preparation and measurement of low energy beta radio-labelled biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the development of the OXI-FLO instrument was to provide an automated system which will produce accurate, reproducible results at a cost which is competitive with current techniques, but which also provides savings in labor. An oxidizer, coupled with a liquid scintillation counter (LSC) has many advantages. The techniques of vial-less LSC was pioneered in this company, during the development of the RSP-β400 Sample Processor, therefore, the technology of transferring and counting a liquid in a stop-flow mode was readily available. The OXI-ONE Sample Oxidizer, also marketed by Radiomatic Instruments, lends itself naturally to the OXI-FLO concept, since the LSC vial is not an integral part of the oxidizer and can be substituted with a different device. These two technologies combined are the basis of the OXI-FLO instrument

  18. Toward a Fieldable Atomic Mass Spectrometer for Safeguards Applications: Sample Preparation and Ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barinaga, Charles J.; Hager, George J.; Hart, Garret L.; Koppenaal, David W.; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Jones, Sarah MH; Manard, Benjamin T.

    2014-10-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA’s) long-term research and development plan calls for the development of new methods to detect misuse at nuclear fuel cycle facilities such as reprocessing and enrichment plants. At enrichment plants, for example, the IAEA’s contemporary safeguards approaches are based on a combination of routine and random inspections that include collection of UF6 samples from in-process material and selected cylinders for subsequent analyses. These analyses include destructive analysis (DA) in a laboratory (typically by mass spectrometry [MS]) for isotopic characterization, and environmental sampling (ES) for subsequent laboratory elemental and isotopic analysis (also both typically by MS). One area of new method development includes moving this kind of isotope ratio analytical capability for DA and ES activities into the field. Some of the reasons for these developments include timeliness of results, avoidance of hazardous material shipments, and guidance for additional sample collecting. However, this capability does not already exist for several reasons, such as that most lab-based chemical and instrumental methods rely on laboratory infrastructure (highly trained staff, power, space, hazardous material handling, etc.) and require significant amounts of consumables (power, compressed gases, etc.). In addition, there are no currently available, fieldable instruments for atomic or isotope ratio analysis. To address these issues, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and collaborator, Clemson University, are studying key areas that limit the fieldability of isotope ratio mass spectrometry for atomic ions: sample preparation and ionization, and reducing the physical size of a fieldable mass spectrometer. PNNL is seeking simple and robust techniques that could be effectively used by inspectors who may have no expertise in analytical MS. In this report, we present and describe the preliminary findings for three candidate

  19. Novel Sample Preparation Method for Safe and Rapid Detection of Bacillus anthracis Spores in Environmental Powders and Nasal Swabs

    OpenAIRE

    Luna, Vicki A.; King, Debra; Davis, Carisa; Rycerz, Tony; Ewert, Matthew; Cannons, Andrew; Amuso, Philip; Cattani, Jacqueline

    2003-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis spores have been used as a biological weapon in the United States. We wanted to develop a safe, rapid method of sample preparation that provided safe DNA for the detection of spores in environmental and clinical specimens. Our method reproducibly detects B. anthracis in samples containing

  20. Introduction to the sampling guide prepared under the NKS project FOREST: Sampling in forests for radionuclide analysis general and practical guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidance for sampling in forests for radionuclide analysis has been prepared for collecting samples of soil, soil solution, runoff water, fungi, understorey vegetation, trees, stand throughfall and litterfall. The guidance is based on standard, recommended or known, scientifically based sampling procedures. The motivation for preparing such a guide was the need for new data on radioactivity in forests to fulfill the requirements for environmental and dose assessments and modeling. Also, no project focusing on sampling methodology in forest ecosystems has earlier been carried out internationally within the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research (NKS) or the EC framework programmes. The guide emphasizes sampling practices applicable in various types of boreal forests, good description of sampling site, and documentation of the origin and details of individual samples. It includes separate chapters with guidelines on sampling in the compartments soil, soil solution and runoff, fungi, understorey and overstorey vegetation, throughfall and litterfall. In annexes some examples on regional sampling, various types of radioactivity studies and monitoring procedures are referenced. The report is based on recently published general guidelines, and expertise and practical experience of the involved organizations. (LN)

  1. Preparation of in-house calibration source for the use in radioactivity analysis of the environmental samples. Consideration of homogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in-house reference material has been prepared in Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research radioecology laboratory, for quality control purposes of gamma spectrometer systems. The material contains a known amount of uranium ore reference material (prepared by the International Atomic Energy Agency and coded as IAEA-RGU-1) which is mixed with marine sediment collected from Kuwait bay. The IAEA-RGU-1 has been certified that it is in equilibrium state with the decay daughters, and stable to be used for quality control purposes. Nevertheless, the homogeneous distribution of the doped material with the prepared source should be verified. This has been examined using gamma spectrometry measurements in conjunction with analysis of variance statistical tools, Dixon, box plots and Grubbs tests. The calculated total uncertainty has been utilized to establish the recommended specific activity ranges of 226Ra, 224Th, 214Pb, 214Bi and 210Pb radioisotopes in the prepared source. The obtained results showed that the estimated uncertainty arising from the sample inhomogeneity has a significant contribution in the total uncertainty. The stability control charts of the ultra-low background gamma spectrometry system demonstrated the suitability of the prepared material for the purpose of quality control. However, the emitted gamma-rays from the prepared source covers the required energy range for determination of natural and artificial radionuclides in different species of environmental samples such as marine sediment, soil samples, and samples contaminated by naturally occurring radioactive material produced by oil industry. In addition, the material might be used for system calibration in case its traceability is proven. The experimental data revealed the significance of the homogeneity in preparing environmental samples for radioactivity measurements; in particular when small sample quantities of environmental samples are required to be analyzed. (author)

  2. A sample preparation protocol for 1H nuclear magnetic resonance studies of water-soluble metabolites in blood and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheedy, John R; Ebeling, Peter R; Gooley, Paul R; McConville, Malcolm J

    2010-03-15

    We describe a general protocol for preparing protein-containing biofluids for (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomic studies. In this protocol, untreated samples are diluted in deuterated solvents to precipitate proteins and recover metabolites quantitated relative to standard reference compounds such as 3-trimethylsilylpropionic acid (TSP) and 2,2-dimethyl-2-silapentane-5-sulfonic acid (DSS). The efficacy of this protocol was tested using a bovine serum albumin/metabolite mix and human serum samples. This sample preparation method can be readily applied to any protein-containing biofluid for (1)H NMR studies. PMID:19941831

  3. Evaluation of Sample Stability and Automated DNA Extraction for Fetal Sex Determination Using Cell-Free Fetal DNA in Maternal Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Ordoñez; Laura Rueda; M. Paz Cañadas; Carme Fuster; Vincenzo Cirigliano

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The detection of paternally inherited sequences in maternal plasma, such as the SRY gene for fetal sexing or RHD for fetal blood group genotyping, is becoming part of daily routine in diagnostic laboratories. Due to the low percentage of fetal DNA, it is crucial to ensure sample stability and the efficiency of DNA extraction. We evaluated blood stability at 4°C for at least 24 hours and automated DNA extraction, for fetal sex determination in maternal plasma. Methods. A total of 15...

  4. Solvent-assisted dispersive solid-phase extraction: A sample preparation method for trace detection of diazinon in urine and environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladaghlo, Zolfaghar; Fakhari, Alireza; Behbahani, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    In this research, a sample preparation method termed solvent-assisted dispersive solid-phase extraction (SA-DSPE) was applied. The used sample preparation method was based on the dispersion of the sorbent into the aqueous sample to maximize the interaction surface. In this approach, the dispersion of the sorbent at a very low milligram level was received by inserting a solution of the sorbent and disperser solvent into the aqueous sample. The cloudy solution created from the dispersion of the sorbent in the bulk aqueous sample. After pre-concentration of the diazinon, the cloudy solution was centrifuged and diazinon in the sediment phase dissolved in ethanol and determined by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector. Under the optimized conditions (pH of solution=7.0, Sorbent: benzophenone, 2%, Disperser solvent: ethanol, 500μL, Centrifuge: centrifuged at 4000rpm for 3min), the method detection limit for diazinon was 0.2, 0.3, 0.3 and 0.3μgL(-1) for distilled water, lake water, waste water and urine sample, respectively. Furthermore, the pre-concentration factor was 363.8, 356.1, 360.7 and 353.38 in distilled water, waste water, lake water and urine sample, respectively. SA-DSPE was successfully used for trace monitoring of diazinon in urine, lake and waste water samples. PMID:27495366

  5. The AS-76 interlaboratory experiment on the alpha spectrometric determinaion of Pu-238. Part 3: Preparation and characterization of samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four plutonium samples containing 0.2, 0.8, 1.6 and 0.9 atom % of 238Pu have been prepared for the Interlaboratory Experiment AS-76. Of these three were input solutions from a reprocessing plant. The fourth sample was from a plutonium product solution. These samples have been characterized by two alpha spectrometry laboratories and two mass spectrometry laboratories to certify the ratio of alpha activities 238Pu/(239Pu + 240Pu) and the isotopic composition, respectively

  6. Estimation of uranium in columbite-tantalite samples: a method for sample solution preparation for fluorimetric estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method has been developed for obtaining a clear solution of columbite-tantalite samples in nitric acid medium before the fluorimetric estimation of uranium. Ammonium hydrogen fluoride is used to keep tantalum, niobium and titanium dissolved in the acid medium. The excess of fluoride is complexed with boric acid. The method has been successfully applied to a number of synthetic and natural columbite-tantalite samples. (author)

  7. Surface Cleaning Techniques: Ultra-Trace ICP-MS Sample Preparation and Assay of HDPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overman, Nicole R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2013-06-01

    The world’s most sensitive radiation detection and assay systems depend upon ultra-low background (ULB) materials to reduce unwanted radiological backgrounds. Herein, we evaluate methods to clean HDPE, a material of interest to ULB systems and the means to provide rapid assay of surface and bulk contamination. ULB level material and ultra-trace level detection of actinide elements is difficult to attain, due to the introduction of contamination from sample preparation equipment such as pipette tips, sample vials, forceps, etc. and airborne particulate. To date, literature available on the cleaning of such polymeric materials and equipment for ULB applications and ultra-trace analyses is limited. For these reasons, a study has been performed to identify an effective way to remove surface contamination from polymers in an effort to provide improved instrumental detection limits. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was utilized to assess the effectiveness of a variety of leachate solutions for removal of inorganic uranium and thorium surface contamination from polymers, specifically high density polyethylene (HDPE). HDPE leaching procedures were tested to optimize contaminant removal of thorium and uranium. Calibration curves for thorium and uranium ranged from 15 ppq (fg/mL) to 1 ppt (pg/mL). Detection limits were calculated at 6 ppq for uranium and 7 ppq for thorium. Results showed the most effective leaching reagent to be clean 6 M nitric acid for 72 hour exposures. Contamination levels for uranium and thorium found in the leachate solutions were significant for ultralow level radiation detection applications.

  8. Surface cleaning techniques. Ultra-trace ICP-MS sample preparation and assay of HDPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world's most sensitive radiation detection and assay systems depend upon ultra-low-background (ULB) materials to reduce unwanted radiological backgrounds. In this study, we evaluate methods to clean HDPE, a material of interest to ULB systems and the means to provide rapid assay of surface and bulk contamination. ULB-level material and ultra-trace-level detection of actinide elements is difficult to attain, due to the introduction of contamination from sample preparation equipment such as pipette tips, sample vials, forceps, etc and airborne particulate. To date, literature available on the cleaning of such polymeric materials and equipment for ULB applications and ultra-trace analyses is limited. For these reasons, a study has been performed to identify an effective way to remove surface contamination from polymers in an effort to provide improved instrumental detection limits. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy was utilized to assess the effectiveness of a variety of leachate solutions for removal of inorganic uranium and thorium surface contamination from polymers, specifically high density polyethylene (HDPE). Leaching procedures for HDPE were tested to optimize contaminant removal of thorium and uranium. Calibration curves for thorium and uranium ranged from 15 ppq (fg/mL) to 1 ppt (pg/mL). Detection limits were calculated at 6 ppq for uranium and 7 ppq for thorium. Results showed the most effective leaching reagent to be clean 6 M nitric acid for 72 h exposures. Contamination levels for uranium and thorium found in the leachate solutions were significant for ultra-low-level radiation detection applications. (author)

  9. Advances in Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of natural glasses: From sample preparation to data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Aulock, F. W.; Kennedy, B. M.; Schipper, C. I.; Castro, J. M.; Martin, D. E.; Oze, C.; Watkins, J. M.; Wallace, P. J.; Puskar, L.; Bégué, F.; Nichols, A. R. L.; Tuffen, H.

    2014-10-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) is an analytical technique utilized to measure the concentrations of H and C species in volcanic glasses. Water and CO2 are the most abundant volatile species in volcanic systems. Water is present in magmas in higher concentrations than CO2 and is also more soluble at lower pressures, and, therefore it is the dominant volatile forming bubbles during volcanic eruptions. Dissolved water affects both phase equilibria and melt physical properties such as density and viscosity, therefore, water is important for understanding magmatic processes. Additionally, quantitative measurements of different volatile species using FTIR can be achieved at high spatial resolution. Recent developments in analytical equipment such as synchrotron light sources and the development of focal plane array (FPA) detectors allow higher resolution measurements and the acquisition of concentration maps. These new capabilities are being used to characterize spatial gradients (or lack thereof) around bubbles and other textural features, which in turn lead to new insights into the behavior of volcanic feeder systems. Here, practical insights about sample preparation and analysis of the distribution and speciation of volatiles in volcanic glasses using FTIR spectroscopy are discussed. New advances in the field of FTIR analysis produce reliable data at high spatial resolution that can be used to produce datasets on the distribution, dissolution and diffusion of volatiles in volcanic materials.

  10. Upgrading the INR hot cell laboratory by new equipment for microanalysis and mechanical testing sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hot cell laboratory at SCN (Romanian acronym for Nuclear Research Branch) has a set of typical methods for post-irradiation examination (PIE) of nuclear fuel and materials. However, to obtain relevant information concerning the safety and reliability of nuclear fuel and materials in nuclear power plants (NPP), three new equipment were installed in the hot cell laboratory: - Leica TELATOM 4 Remote Controlled Inverted Widefield Metallographic Microscope; - Tescan MIRA II LMU CS High Resolution Schottky Field Emission Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope. - DYNA DM1007 Milling Machine with Numerical Process Control System for Preparation of Radioactive Samples. The funds for purchasing these equipment were obtained by SCN NUCLAB project as a result of national competition within the framework of National Program for Research, Development and Innovation. The overall objective of the NUCLAB project is to modernize the extant laboratory by endowment with performing equipment to increase the research capacity and the capability to offer scientific and technological services for nuclear industry. The TELATOM 4 metallographic microscope replaced the old LEITZ MM5RT optical microscope. Prior to installing the new microscope into a steel hot cell, the old microscope was removed and the hot cell was refurbished. The MIRA II SEM will be installed in a lead hot cell and The DYNA DM1007 Milling Machine will be installed in a heavy concrete hot cell. The paper describes the basic parameters of the three new pieces of equipment and some results from irradiated CANDU fuel and unirradiated CANDU pressure tube. (authors)

  11. Relation between γ-ray detection efficiency and the source size of prepared aerosol filter sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By adding revolution of know activity, six disk sources with different diameters are prepared with the filter of 22.5 cm x 45 cm. Several HPGe detectors with different crystal dimensions are employed to detect the nuclides in the disk sources and the relative detection efficiencies are calculated from the experiments. The result indicates that the source with the highest efficiency has the diameter between 50 mm and 60 mm within the energy range from 60 keV to 1116 keV. It is also found that the diameter of optimum source increases slightly with the crystal diameter of detector. Besides, a relatively thicker source disk with smaller diameter is preferred for lower energy rays, compared with higher energy rays. But this tendency is not as obvious for planar HPGe detector as that for coaxial HPGe detector. For above samples, Monte Carlo Simulations for the measurement of one detector are carried out and the result accords with the experiments. Also, by Monte Carlo Simulating for other different area filters, it is known that the diameter of source with optimum efficiencies increases with the area of filter

  12. Sample preparation for N-glycosylation analysis of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies by electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekrényes, Ákos; Partyka, Jan; Varadi, Csaba; Krenkova, Jana; Foret, Frantisek; Guttman, András

    2015-01-01

    There are a considerable number of biopharmaceuticals that have been approved for clinical use in the past decade. Over half of these new generation drugs are glycoproteins, such as monoclonal antibodies or other recombinant glycoproteins, which are mostly produced in mammalian cell lines. The linked carbohydrate moieties affect not only their physicochemical properties and thermal stability but also crucial features like receptor-binding activity, circulating half-life, as well as immunogenicity. The structural diversity of these attached glycans can be manifested in altered monosaccharide composition and linkages/positions among the monosaccharide building blocks. In addition, as more and more biosimilar products hit the market, understanding the effects of their glycosylation modification has become a recent target in efficacy and safety issues. To ensure consistent quality of these products, glycosylation profiles have to be monitored and controlled in all steps of the manufacturing process, i.e., from clone selection to lot release. In this paper, we describe some of the recently introduced and commonly used sample preparation techniques for capillary electrophoresis (CE)-based profiling and structural elucidation of N-glycans. The presented protocols include protein A affinity partitioning of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), enzymatic release of the N-linked glycans, labeling of the liberated carbohydrates, reaction mixture purification techniques to remove the excess labeling reagent, and high-resolution and rapid capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF)-based profiling of the labeled and purified N-glycans. PMID:25673493

  13. Sample preparation for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric determination of the zinc-70 to zinc-68 isotope ratio in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sample preparation was optimized for the 70Zn:68Zn isotope ratio determinations performed with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in blood, faeces and urine from human pre-term babies after oral or intravenous administration of enriched 70Zn. The preparation techniques achieved complete decomposition, matrix separation, maximum preconcentration and minimum contamination. After sample decomposition, Zn was extracted into CCl4 with ammonium pyrrolidin-1-yldithioformate and back extracted into 1.2 mol dm-3 HNO3 for analysis. Residual chloride resulting from dissolved CCl4 in the acid led to interference by 35Cl2+, and the procedure was modified to evaporate the CCl4. Extraction was unnecessary for faecal samples. Under optimized conditions the 70Zn:68Zn isotope ratio can be measured with acceptable precision (200 ng cm-3 in the analytical solution). (Author)

  14. Reproducibility of NMR Analysis of Urine Samples: Impact of Sample Preparation, Storage Conditions, and Animal Health Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Schreier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Spectroscopic analysis of urine samples from laboratory animals can be used to predict the efficacy and side effects of drugs. This employs methods combining 1H NMR spectroscopy with quantification of biomarkers or with multivariate data analysis. The most critical steps in data evaluation are analytical reproducibility of NMR data (collection, storage, and processing and the health status of the animals, which may influence urine pH and osmolarity. Methods. We treated rats with a solvent, a diuretic, or a nephrotoxicant and collected urine samples. Samples were titrated to pH 3 to 9, or salt concentrations increased up to 20-fold. The effects of storage conditions and freeze-thaw cycles were monitored. Selected metabolites and multivariate data analysis were evaluated after 1H NMR spectroscopy. Results. We showed that variation of pH from 3 to 9 and increases in osmolarity up to 6-fold had no effect on the quantification of the metabolites or on multivariate data analysis. Storage led to changes after 14 days at 4°C or after 12 months at −20°C, independent of sample composition. Multiple freeze-thaw cycles did not affect data analysis. Conclusion. Reproducibility of NMR measurements is not dependent on sample composition under physiological or pathological conditions.

  15. Effort versus Reward: Preparing Samples for Fungal Community Characterization in High-Throughput Sequencing Surveys of Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Zewei; Schlatter, Dan; Kennedy, Peter; Linda L Kinkel; Kistler, H. Corby; Nguyen, Nhu; Bates, Scott T

    2015-01-01

    Next generation fungal amplicon sequencing is being used with increasing frequency to study fungal diversity in various ecosystems; however, the influence of sample preparation on the characterization of fungal community is poorly understood. We investigated the effects of four procedural modifications to library preparation for high-throughput sequencing (HTS). The following treatments were considered: 1) the amount of soil used in DNA extraction, 2) the inclusion of additional steps (freeze...

  16. Development of automated measurement apparatus for the packaged sample in U8-type vessel and its application for the measurement of radioactive materials in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant suffered major damage from the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake and subsequent tsunami on March 11, 2011 and released large amounts of radioactive materials. Measuring the radioactivity of many samples is necessary to investigate behavior of radioactive materials from the Nuclear Power Plant and contamination in the environment. For measuring these samples automatically, we developed an automated measurement apparatus. The apparatus is composed of a rotating table for placement of samples, a hand for moving samples, a movable lead shield for covering the detector, and a disposal container for samples after measurement. A high-purity Germanium radiation detector of horizontal type is used for gamma-ray spectrometry. The apparatus is able to measure successively 14 packaged samples in U8-type vessel. Series of operations is controlled by a software which is based on LabVIEW (manufactured by National Instruments, Co), and a sinking digital output module (NI9477). We will give a presentation about the results of the performance evaluation using environmental samples. (author)

  17. Inverse supercritical fluid extraction as a sample preparation method for the analysis of the nanoparticle content in sunscreen agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, David; Cattaneo, Stefano; Meier, Florian; Welz, Roland; de Vries, Tjerk; Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Antonio, Diana C; Cascio, Claudia; Calzolai, Luigi; Gilliland, Douglas; de Mello, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the use of inverse supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) extraction as a novel method of sample preparation for the analysis of complex nanoparticle-containing samples, in our case a model sunscreen agent with titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The sample was prepared for analysis in a simplified process using a lab scale supercritical fluid extraction system. The residual material was easily dispersed in an aqueous solution and analyzed by Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) hyphenated with UV- and Multi-Angle Light Scattering detection. The obtained results allowed an unambiguous determination of the presence of nanoparticles within the sample, with almost no background from the matrix itself, and showed that the size distribution of the nanoparticles is essentially maintained. These results are especially relevant in view of recently introduced regulatory requirements concerning the labeling of nanoparticle-containing products. The novel sample preparation method is potentially applicable to commercial sunscreens or other emulsion-based cosmetic products and has important ecological advantages over currently used sample preparation techniques involving organic solvents. PMID:26931426

  18. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) Sample Preparation of Si(1-x)Gex in c-Plane Sapphire Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Choi, Sang H.; Bae, Hyung-Bin; Lee, Tae Woo

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration-invented X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods, including the total defect density measurement method and the spatial wafer mapping method, have confirmed super hetero epitaxy growth for rhombohedral single crystalline silicon germanium (Si1-xGex) on a c-plane sapphire substrate. However, the XRD method cannot observe the surface morphology or roughness because of the method s limited resolution. Therefore the authors used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with samples prepared in two ways, the focused ion beam (FIB) method and the tripod method to study the structure between Si1-xGex and sapphire substrate and Si1?xGex itself. The sample preparation for TEM should be as fast as possible so that the sample should contain few or no artifacts induced by the preparation. The standard sample preparation method of mechanical polishing often requires a relatively long ion milling time (several hours), which increases the probability of inducing defects into the sample. The TEM sampling of the Si1-xGex on sapphire is also difficult because of the sapphire s high hardness and mechanical instability. The FIB method and the tripod method eliminate both problems when performing a cross-section TEM sampling of Si1-xGex on c-plane sapphire, which shows the surface morphology, the interface between film and substrate, and the crystal structure of the film. This paper explains the FIB sampling method and the tripod sampling method, and why sampling Si1-xGex, on a sapphire substrate with TEM, is necessary.

  19. State of the art of environmentally friendly sample preparation approaches for determination of PBDEs and metabolites in environmental and biological samples: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Paula; Lana, Nerina B; Ríos, Juan M; García-Reyes, Juan F; Altamirano, Jorgelina C

    2016-01-28

    Green chemistry principles for developing methodologies have gained attention in analytical chemistry in recent decades. A growing number of analytical techniques have been proposed for determination of organic persistent pollutants in environmental and biological samples. In this light, the current review aims to present state-of-the-art sample preparation approaches based on green analytical principles proposed for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and metabolites (OH-PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs) in environmental and biological samples. Approaches to lower the solvent consumption and accelerate the extraction, such as pressurized liquid extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, and ultrasound-assisted extraction, are discussed in this review. Special attention is paid to miniaturized sample preparation methodologies and strategies proposed to reduce organic solvent consumption. Additionally, extraction techniques based on alternative solvents (surfactants, supercritical fluids, or ionic liquids) are also commented in this work, even though these are scarcely used for determination of PBDEs. In addition to liquid-based extraction techniques, solid-based analytical techniques are also addressed. The development of greener, faster and simpler sample preparation approaches has increased in recent years (2003-2013). Among green extraction techniques, those based on the liquid phase predominate over those based on the solid phase (71% vs. 29%, respectively). For solid samples, solvent assisted extraction techniques are preferred for leaching of PBDEs, and liquid phase microextraction techniques are mostly used for liquid samples. Likewise, green characteristics of the instrumental analysis used after the extraction and clean-up steps are briefly discussed. PMID:26755134

  20. A timer inventory based upon manual and automated analysis of ERTS-1 and supporting aircraft data using multistage probability sampling. [Plumas National Forest, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J. D.; Gialdini, M.; Jaakkola, S.

    1974-01-01

    A quasi-operational study demonstrating that a timber inventory based on manual and automated analysis of ERTS-1, supporting aircraft data and ground data was made using multistage sampling techniques. The inventory proved to be a timely, cost effective alternative to conventional timber inventory techniques. The timber volume on the Quincy Ranger District of the Plumas National Forest was estimated to be 2.44 billion board feet with a sampling error of 8.2 percent. Costs per acre for the inventory procedure at 1.1 cent/acre compared favorably with the costs of a conventional inventory at 25 cents/acre. A point-by-point comparison of CALSCAN-classified ERTS data with human-interpreted low altitude photo plots indicated no significant differences in the overall classification accuracies.

  1. Remote monitoring field trial. Application to automated air sampling. Report on Task FIN-E935 of the Finnish Support Programme to IAEA Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automated air sampling station has recently been developed by Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK). The station is furnished with equipment that allows comprehensive remote monitoring of the station and the data. Under the Finnish Support Programme to IAEA Safeguards, STUK and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) established a field trial to demonstrate the use of remote monitoring technologies. STUK provided means for real-lime radiation monitoring and sample authentication whereas SNL delivered means for authenticated surveillance of the equipment and its location. The field trial showed that remote monitoring can be carried out using simple means although advanced facilities are needed for comprehensive surveillance. Authenticated measurement data could be reliably transferred from the monitoring site to the headquarters without the presence of authorized personnel in the monitoring site. The operation of the station and the remote monitoring system were reliable. (orig.)

  2. Multi-element determination of Cu, Fe, Ni and Zn content in vegetable oils samples by high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry and microemulsion sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Luana S; Barbosa, José T P; Fernandes, Andréa P; Lemos, Valfredo A; Santos, Walter N L Dos; Korn, Maria Graças A; Teixeira, Leonardo S G

    2011-07-15

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the microemulsification as sample preparation procedure for determination of Cu, Fe, Ni and Zn in vegetable oils samples by High-Resolution Continuum Source Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS). Microemulsions were prepared by mixing samples with propan-1-ol and aqueous acid solution, which allowed the use of inorganic aqueous standards for the calibration. To a sample mass of 0.5g, 100μL of hydrochloric acid and propan-1-ol were added and the resulting mixture diluted to a final volume of 10mL. The sample was manually shaken resulting in a visually homogeneous system. The main lines were selected for all studied metals and the detection limits (3σ, n=10) were 0.12, 0.62, 0.58 and 0.12mgkg(-1) for Cu, Fe, Ni and Zn, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) ranged from 5% to 11 % in samples spiked with 0.25 and 1.5μgmL(-1) of each metal, respectively. Recoveries varied from 89% to 102%. The proposed method was applied to the determination of Cu, Fe, Ni and Zn in soybean, olive and sunflower oils. PMID:23140735

  3. Reproducibility of NMR Analysis of Urine Samples: Impact of Sample Preparation, Storage Conditions, and Animal Health Status

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Schreier; Werner Kremer; Fritz Huber; Sindy Neumann; Philipp Pagel; Kai Lienemann; Sabine Pestel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Spectroscopic analysis of urine samples from laboratory animals can be used to predict the efficacy and side effects of drugs. This employs methods combining 1H NMR spectroscopy with quantification of biomarkers or with multivariate data analysis. The most critical steps in data evaluation are analytical reproducibility of NMR data (collection, storage, and processing) and the health status of the animals, which may influence urine pH and osmolarity. Methods. We treated rats wit...

  4. Efficient DNP NMR of membrane proteins: sample preparation protocols, sensitivity, and radical location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shu Y; Lee, Myungwoon; Wang, Tuo; Sergeyev, Ivan V; Hong, Mei

    2016-03-01

    Although dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has dramatically enhanced solid-state NMR spectral sensitivities of many synthetic materials and some biological macromolecules, recent studies of membrane-protein DNP using exogenously doped paramagnetic radicals as polarizing agents have reported varied and sometimes surprisingly limited enhancement factors. This motivated us to carry out a systematic evaluation of sample preparation protocols for optimizing the sensitivity of DNP NMR spectra of membrane-bound peptides and proteins at cryogenic temperatures of ~110 K. We show that mixing the radical with the membrane by direct titration instead of centrifugation gives a significant boost to DNP enhancement. We quantify the relative sensitivity enhancement between AMUPol and TOTAPOL, two commonly used radicals, and between deuterated and protonated lipid membranes. AMUPol shows ~fourfold higher sensitivity enhancement than TOTAPOL, while deuterated lipid membrane does not give net higher sensitivity for the membrane peptides than protonated membrane. Overall, a ~100 fold enhancement between the microwave-on and microwave-off spectra can be achieved on lipid-rich membranes containing conformationally disordered peptides, and absolute sensitivity gains of 105-160 can be obtained between low-temperature DNP spectra and high-temperature non-DNP spectra. We also measured the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of lipid signals by TOTAPOL and AMUPol, to determine the depths of these two radicals in the lipid bilayer. Our data indicate a bimodal distribution of both radicals, a surface-bound fraction and a membrane-bound fraction where the nitroxides lie at ~10 Å from the membrane surface. TOTAPOL appears to have a higher membrane-embedded fraction than AMUPol. These results should be useful for membrane-protein solid-state NMR studies under DNP conditions and provide insights into how biradicals interact with phospholipid membranes. PMID:26873390

  5. An Integrated Solution-Based Rapid Sample Preparation Procedure for the Analysis of N-Glycans From Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aich, Udayanath; Liu, Aston; Lakbub, Jude; Mozdzanowski, Jacek; Byrne, Michael; Shah, Nilesh; Galosy, Sybille; Patel, Pramthesh; Bam, Narendra

    2016-03-01

    Consistent glycosylation in therapeutic monoclonal antibodies is a major concern in the biopharmaceutical industry as it impacts the drug's safety and efficacy and manufacturing processes. Large numbers of samples are created for the analysis of glycans during various stages of recombinant proteins drug development. Profiling and quantifying protein N-glycosylation is important but extremely challenging due to its microheterogeneity and more importantly the limitations of existing time-consuming sample preparation methods. Thus, a quantitative method with fast sample preparation is crucial for understanding, controlling, and modifying the glycoform variance in therapeutic monoclonal antibody development. Presented here is a rapid and highly quantitative method for the analysis of N-glycans from monoclonal antibodies. The method comprises a simple and fast solution-based sample preparation method that uses nontoxic reducing reagents for direct labeling of N-glycans. The complete work flow for the preparation of fluorescently labeled N-glycans takes a total of 3 h with less than 30 min needed for the release of N-glycans from monoclonal antibody samples. PMID:26886304

  6. Challenges of sample preparation for cross sectional EBSD analysis of electrodeposited nickel films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimadadi, Hossein; Pantleon, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Thorough microstructure and crystallographic orientation analysis of thin films by means of electron backscatter diffraction requires cross section preparation of the film-substrate compound. During careful preparation, changes of the rather non-stable as-deposited microstructure must be avoided...

  7. Application of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for soil analysis: a novel procedure for sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid, sensitive and reliable LA–ICP–MS method for simultaneous determination of micro and macro elements in soils and sediments was developed and optimized. Certified reference materials available in powder form (IAEA–SOIL–5, IAEA–SOIL–7, IAEA–SL–1, IAEA–SL–3 and STSD–3) were used for the optimization and validation of the sample preparation step and LA–ICP–MS analysis. Three types of soil pellets were prepared from each CRM: (i) original soil; (ii) soil, mixed with boric acid in ratio 1:5; and (iii) pellets, prepared by mixing the soil successively in hexane and dichloromethane and subjected to LA–ICP–MS measurement. The signal of the matrix elements was reduced by introducing the rejection parameter (RPa) to enable the high–mass cut off. Best accuracy and precision were obtained with the pellets, prepared in organic solvents. This approach can be recommended for sample preparation of soils and sediments for LA–ICP–MS analysis. Key words: LA–ICP–MS, pellet preparation, calibration, soil analysis

  8. Automation of the radiosynthesis and purification procedures for [18F]Fluspidine preparation, a new radiotracer for clinical investigations in PET imaging of σ1 receptors in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiosynthesis of [18F]Fluspidine, a potent σ1 receptor imaging probe for pre-clinical/clinical studies, was implemented on a TRACERlabTM FX F-N synthesizer. [18F]2 was synthesized in 15 min at 85 °C starting from its tosylate precursor. Purification via semi-preparative RP-HPLC was investigated using different columns and eluent compositions and was most successful on a polar RP phase with acetonitrile/water buffered with NH4OAc. After solid phase extraction, [18F]Fluspidine was formulated and produced within 59±4 min with an overall radiochemical yield of 37±8%, a radiochemical purity of 99.3±0.5% and high specific activity (176.6±52.0 GBq/µmol). - Highlights: • [18F]Fluspidine is a promising radiotracer for PET imaging of sigma1 receptors. • A fully automated CGMP-oriented radiosynthesis of [18F]Fluspidine is described. • The purification was investigated using different semi-preparative HPLC systems. • [18F]Fluspidine was produced within 59±4 min with a radiochemical yield of 37±8%

  9. Sample preparation and direct electrospray ionization on a tip column for rapid mass spectrometry analysis of complex samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yun-Qing; You, Jin-Qing; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2012-10-01

    A handheld pipette tip column electrospray ionization source (PTC-ESI source) was developed for rapid mass spectrometry analysis at ambient pressure. The PTC-ESI source was made up of three main component parts including a micro DC high voltage (HV) power supply, a micropipette and a disposable micropipette tip filled with a plug of adsorbent. A DC high voltage was applied to the sharp point of the micropipette tip column to induce electrospray ionization. The PTC-ESI source was successfully used for direct analysis of basic organic compounds, organic acids and peptides in a simple matrix. In the case of complex samples, micro-extraction based on the adsorbent phase filled in the pipette tip was used to remove impurities and concentrate target analytes prior to ionization. The eluting solution was not pipetted out, but directly dispersed in the form of electrospray from the pipette tip for ionization. The effectiveness of the PTC-ESI source has been further demonstrated by fast analysis of therapeutic compounds and endogenous bioactive chemicals in complex biological samples. PMID:22898704

  10. Comparison of QuEChERS sample preparation methods for the analysis of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article describes the comparison of different versions of an easy, rapid, and low-cost sample preparation approach for the determination of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables by concurrent use of gas and liquid chromatography (GC and LC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) for detection....

  11. Sludge batch 9 (SB9) accepance evaluation: Radionuclide concentrations in tank 51 SB9 qualification sample prepared at SRNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Diprete, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pareizs, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB9 material is currently in Tank 51 and has been washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF processing and is currently being processed as Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB9 Washed Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from a three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-15-81) taken on July 23, 2015. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under the direction of Savannah River Remediation (SRR) it was then adjusted per the Tank Farm washing strategy as of October 20, 2015. This final slurry now has a compositioniv expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40.

  12. Sludge batch 9 (SB9) acceptance evaluation. Radionuclide concentrations in tank 51 SB9 qualification sample prepared at SRNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Diprete, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Pareizs, J. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2016-02-10

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB9 material is currently in Tank 51 and has been washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF processing and is currently being processed as Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB9 Washed Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from a three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-15-81) taken on July 23, 2015. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under the direction of Savannah River Remediation (SRR) it was then adjusted per the Tank Farm washing strategy as of October 20, 2015. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40.

  13. Sludge batch 9 (SB9) accepance evaluation: Radionuclide concentrations in tank 51 SB9 qualification sample prepared at SRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB9 material is currently in Tank 51 and has been washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF processing and is currently being processed as Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB9 Washed Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from a three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-15-81) taken on July 23, 2015. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under the direction of Savannah River Remediation (SRR) it was then adjusted per the Tank Farm washing strategy as of October 20, 2015. This final slurry now has a compositioniv expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40.

  14. Sludge batch 9 (SB9) acceptance evaluation. Radionuclide concentrations in tank 51 SB9 qualification sample prepared at SRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB9 material is currently in Tank 51 and has been washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF processing and is currently being processed as Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB9 Washed Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from a three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-15-81) taken on July 23, 2015. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under the direction of Savannah River Remediation (SRR) it was then adjusted per the Tank Farm washing strategy as of October 20, 2015. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40.

  15. A novel sample preparation method of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry for polystyrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Zhang; Zhen Wen Zhao; Lei Xiong; Bin Xin; Wei Hua Hu; Shao Xiang Xiong

    2007-01-01

    A novel sample preparation method of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for polystyrene was reported.Compared to the conventional dried-droplet method, the efficiency of ionization and signal intensity of mass spectra were improved.The mechanism was also analyzed.

  16. Further development of the absorption method for preparing CO2 samples for radiocarbon analysis by liquid scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CO2 absorption method for preparing samples for radiocarbon analysis by liquid scintillation counting has been successfully employed by several laboratories over many years. The main advantage of the method is its simplicity. Although the method allows for only relatively small sample sizes, implying relatively low figures of merit, adequate accuracy can be attained for a conventional dating limit up to 37 000 years - more than adequate for hydrological applications. The method reported by Aravena, Qureshi et al., and further developed by Nair et al., involves bubbling the CO2 sample gas through a liquid cocktail containing the scintillator and the alkaline absorber to the point of saturation. It relies on maintaining constant conditions to achieve reproducibility. This process ensures that a maximum amount of sample material is loaded into the cocktail. The sample is then transferred to the counting vial. We report here on further improvements which have considerably simplified the preparation method and have improved its accuracy. The CO2 sample gas is expanded from the purification line to standard pressure (610 torr) into a 1 litre measuring volume which is then isolated. 10 ml of Carbo Sorbreg E is pipetted into a counting vial which is attached to the system though a flexible connection. The vial is briefly pumped to remove air. The CO2 sample is then quantitatively frozen into a small trap and pumped to high vacuum to remove residual non-condensable gas. The low-volume (∼60 ml) section of the system is isolated and the CO2 allowed to sublime whilst the vial is shaken and cooled in a water bath. Absorption proceeds to a final pressure of some 40 torr. The counting vial is removed from the vacuum system, 10 ml Permafluorreg E+ added, capped and shaken well before counting. The absorption is not taken to saturation, which sacrifices some sensitivity. The advantage is that it allows for the amount of sample gas to be measured accurately. The pressure in

  17. Sample preparation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis extracts for nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinniel, Denise K; Fenton, Robert J; Halouska, Steven; Powers, Robert; Barletta, Raul G

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major cause of mortality in human beings on a global scale. The emergence of both multi- (MDR) and extensively-(XDR) drug-resistant strains threatens to derail current disease control efforts. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop drugs and vaccines that are more effective than those currently available. The genome of M. tuberculosis has been known for more than 10 years, yet there are important gaps in our knowledge of gene function and essentiality. Many studies have since used gene expression analysis at both the transcriptomic and proteomic levels to determine the effects of drugs, oxidants, and growth conditions on the global patterns of gene expression. Ultimately, the final response of these changes is reflected in the metabolic composition of the bacterium including a few thousand small molecular weight chemicals. Comparing the metabolic profiles of wild type and mutant strains, either untreated or treated with a particular drug, can effectively allow target identification and may lead to the development of novel inhibitors with anti-tubercular activity. Likewise, the effects of two or more conditions on the metabolome can also be assessed. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful technology that is used to identify and quantify metabolic intermediates. In this protocol, procedures for the preparation of M. tuberculosis cell extracts for NMR metabolomic analysis are described. Cell cultures are grown under appropriate conditions and required Biosafety Level 3 containment, harvested, and subjected to mechanical lysis while maintaining cold temperatures to maximize preservation of metabolites. Cell lysates are recovered, filtered sterilized, and stored at ultra-low temperatures. Aliquots from these cell extracts are plated on Middlebrook 7H9 agar for colony-forming units to verify absence of viable cells. Upon two months of incubation at 37 °C, if no viable colonies are observed, samples are removed from the

  18. Phase analysis of aluminium modified GeSbTe bulk prepared from XRD of samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Sharanjit; Singh, D.; Kumar, S.; Thangaraj, R.

    2016-05-01

    Various compositions of Aluminium modified GST as Alx(Ge2Sb2Te5)1-x x= 0, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25, 0.30 are prepared to study as a phase change material. Bulk prepared is studied with XRD scans for various phases formed. Phases other than Ge2Sb2Te5 do come in but dominated one is Ge2Sb2Te5 hexagonal phase.

  19. Thorium in the workplace: The preparation and validation of comparison samples for a European-based measurement comparison project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quality of any comparison exercise depends critically on the quality, accuracy and fitness for purpose of the comparison samples. The comparisons were designed to move progressively from the testing of the analysis capabilities for relatively simple, aqueous solutions through to the more complex natural matrix materials encountered in the workplace. In each case, it was imperative that the comparison samples were prepared and validated in such a way as to ensure traceability of their activity values to national and international standards of radioactivity, to enable a reasonable estimate to be made of the uncertainty on those values and to ensure homogeneity both within and between samples. The processes involved are discussed. (author)

  20. Attempt at in-air PIXE analysis of spot samples on a filter-tape mounted in an automated beta-ray absorption mass monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We attempted in-air-PIXE analysis of SPM using spot samples on a filter-tape mounted in an automated beta-ray absorption mass monitor. Al, Si, S, Fe and Zn, etc., which are of interest for identifying the behavior and characteristics of SPM, were detected on the SPM spot samples on a glass-fiber filter-tape, but the peaks of these elements were nearly identical to those of blank glass-fiber filter-tape. As such, it was difficult to detect elements present in SPM from the X-ray spectra of the spot samples. On the other hand, in the case of a PTFE membrane filter-tape, the S peak was distinct and the Fe peak was also clear, and peaks for elements Al, Mn and Zn, etc., were also confirmed. Consequently, if a method for determining quantity is established, direct multi-elemental analysis by in-air-PIXE of high time-resolution SPM spot samples collected on a PTFE membrane filter-tape mounted in a SPM monitor will be possible. (author)

  1. Simple semi-automated portable capillary electrophoresis instrument with contactless conductivity detection for the determination of β-agonists in pharmaceutical and pig-feed samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Anh Huong; Pham, Thi Ngoc Mai; Doan, Thi Tuoi; Ta, Thi Thao; Sáiz, Jorge; Nguyen, Thi Quynh Hoa; Hauser, Peter C; Mai, Thanh Duc

    2014-09-19

    An inexpensive, robust and easy to use portable capillary electrophoresis instrument with miniaturized high-voltage capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection was developed. The system utilizes pneumatic operation to manipulate the solutions for all flushing steps. The different operations, i.e. capillary flushing, interface rinsing, and electrophoretic separation, are easily activated by turning an electronic switch. To allow the analysis of samples with limited available volume, and to render the construction less complicated compared to a computer-controlled counterpart, sample injection is carried out hydrodynamically directly from the sample vial into the capillary by manual syphoning. The system is a well performing solution where the financial means for the highly expensive commercial instruments are not available and where the in-house construction of a sophisticated automated instrument is not possible due to limited mechanical and electronic workshop facilities and software programming expertise. For demonstration, the system was employed successfully for the determination of some β-agonists, namely salbutamol, metoprolol and ractopamine down to 0.7ppm in pharmaceutical and pig-feed sample matrices in Vietnam. PMID:25115456

  2. Powder Handling Device for X-ray Diffraction Analysis with Minimal Sample Preparation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project consists of developing a Vibrating Sample Holder (VSH) for planetary X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) instruments. The principle of this novel sample handling...

  3. Design and microfabrication of new automatic human blood sample collection and preparation devices

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Minh Nhut

    2015-01-01

    For self-sampling or collection of blood by health personal related to point-ofcare diagnostics in health rooms, it may often be necessary to perform automatic collection of blood samples. The most important operation that needs to be done when handling whole blood is to be able to combine automatic sample collection with optimal mixing of anticoagulation liquid and weak xatives. In particular before doing any transport of a sample or point-of-care nucleic acid diagnostics (PO...

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Heavy Metals in Water Based on LIBS with an Automatic Device for Sample Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li; Zhao, Nanjing; Liu, Wenqing; Meng, Deshuo; Fang, Li; Wang, Yin; Yu, Yang; Ma, Mingjun

    2015-08-01

    Heavy metals in water can be deposited on graphite flakes, which can be used as an enrichment method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and is studied in this paper. The graphite samples were prepared with an automatic device, which was composed of a loading and unloading module, a quantitatively adding solution module, a rapid heating and drying module and a precise rotating module. The experimental results showed that the sample preparation methods had no significant effect on sample distribution and the LIBS signal accumulated in 20 pulses was stable and repeatable. With an increasing amount of the sample solution on the graphite flake, the peak intensity at Cu I 324.75 nm accorded with the exponential function with a correlation coefficient of 0.9963 and the background intensity remained unchanged. The limit of detection (LOD) was calculated through linear fitting of the peak intensity versus the concentration. The LOD decreased rapidly with an increasing amount of sample solution until the amount exceeded 20 mL and the correlation coefficient of exponential function fitting was 0.991. The LOD of Pb, Ni, Cd, Cr and Zn after evaporating different amounts of sample solution on the graphite flakes was measured and the variation tendency of their LOD with sample solution amounts was similar to the tendency for Cu. The experimental data and conclusions could provide a reference for automatic sample preparation and heavy metal in situ detection. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 60908018), National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2013AA065502) and Anhui Province Outstanding Youth Science Fund of China (No. 1108085J19)

  5. Efficient lasing action from Rhodamine-110 (Rh-110) impregnated sol-gel silica samples prepared by dip method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Aparna V. [Department of Physics, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Nathalal Parikh Marg, Mumbai - 400 019 (India); Kumar, Uday, E-mail: udayphy@yahoo.co.i [Department of Physics, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Nathalal Parikh Marg, Mumbai - 400 019 (India)

    2010-05-15

    Rhodamine-110/sol-gel samples are prepared by sol-gel technique using dip method. Concentration dependent photophysical studies of these samples have indicated about the least possibility of aggregate formation. The lasing action of Rh-110 in silica samples is studied as a function of dye concentration. An efficient laser emission is observed when the samples are transversely pumped at 337.1 nm and 1.5 Hz repetition rate using a nitrogen laser (400 muJ energy/pulse and 4 ns pulse duration). The maximum of 166% laser efficiency of dye doped sol-gel samples compared to Rhodamine-6G (Rh-6G) in methanol is achieved. The photostability is also measured by using N{sub 2} laser at 1 Hz and it is found nearly 165 pulses. The possible reasons for the photodegradation of the dye molecules are discussed in detail.

  6. Comparison of pre-analytical FFPE sample preparation methods and their impact on massively parallel sequencing in routine diagnostics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Heydt

    Full Text Available Over the last years, massively parallel sequencing has rapidly evolved and has now transitioned into molecular pathology routine laboratories. It is an attractive platform for analysing multiple genes at the same time with very little input material. Therefore, the need for high quality DNA obtained from automated DNA extraction systems has increased, especially to those laboratories which are dealing with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE material and high sample throughput. This study evaluated five automated FFPE DNA extraction systems as well as five DNA quantification systems using the three most common techniques, UV spectrophotometry, fluorescent dye-based quantification and quantitative PCR, on 26 FFPE tissue samples. Additionally, the effects on downstream applications were analysed to find the most suitable pre-analytical methods for massively parallel sequencing in routine diagnostics. The results revealed that the Maxwell 16 from Promega (Mannheim, Germany seems to be the superior system for DNA extraction from FFPE material. The extracts had a 1.3-24.6-fold higher DNA concentration in comparison to the other extraction systems, a higher quality and were most suitable for downstream applications. The comparison of the five quantification methods showed intermethod variations but all methods could be used to estimate the right amount for PCR amplification and for massively parallel sequencing. Interestingly, the best results in massively parallel sequencing were obtained with a DNA input of 15 ng determined by the NanoDrop 2000c spectrophotometer (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA, USA. No difference could be detected in mutation analysis based on the results of the quantification methods. These findings emphasise, that it is particularly important to choose the most reliable and constant DNA extraction system, especially when using small biopsies and low elution volumes, and that all common DNA quantification techniques can

  7. Sludge Batch 7 Acceptance Evaluation: Radionuclide Concentrations In Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample Prepared At SRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Seven (SB7) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB7 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB6. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter qualification sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-10-125) received on September 18, 2010. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. With consultation from the Liquid Waste Organization, the qualification sample was then modified by several washes and decants, which included addition of Pu from H Canyon and sodium nitrite per the Tank Farm corrosion control program. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40. Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task I.2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task III.2.) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB7 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides

  8. Automated large scale parameter extraction of road-side trees sampled by a laser mobile mapping system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindenbergh, R.C.; Berthold, D.; Sirmacek, B.; Herrero-Huerta, M.; Wang, J.; Ebersbach, D.

    2015-01-01

    In urbanized Western Europe trees are considered an important component of the built-up environment. This also means that there is an increasing demand for tree inventories. Laser mobile mapping systems provide an efficient and accurate way to sample the 3D road surrounding including notable roadsid

  9. Automated determination of nitrate plus nitrite in aqueous samples with flow injection analysis using vanadium (III) chloride as reductant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu; Lin, Kunning; Chen, Nengwang; Yuan, Dongxing; Ma, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Determination of nitrate in aqueous samples is an important analytical objective for environmental monitoring and assessment. Here we report the first automatic flow injection analysis (FIA) of nitrate (plus nitrite) using VCl3 as reductant instead of the well-known but toxic cadmium column for reducing nitrate to nitrite. The reduced nitrate plus the nitrite originally present in the sample react with the Griess reagent (sulfanilamide and N-1-naphthylethylenediamine dihydrochloride) under acidic condition. The resulting pink azo dye can be detected at 540 nm. The Griess reagent and VCl3 are used as a single mixed reagent solution to simplify the system. The various parameters of the FIA procedure including reagent composition, temperature, volume of the injection loop, and flow rate were carefully investigated and optimized via univariate experimental design. Under the optimized conditions, the linear range and detection limit of this method are 0-100 µM (R(2)=0.9995) and 0.1 µM, respectively. The targeted analytical range can be easily extended to higher concentrations by selecting alternative detection wavelengths or increasing flow rate. The FIA system provides a sample throughput of 20 h(-1), which is much higher than that of previously reported manual methods based on the same chemistry. National reference solutions and different kinds of aqueous samples were analyzed with our method as well as the cadmium column reduction method. The results from our method agree well with both the certified value and the results from the cadmium column reduction method (no significant difference with P=0.95). The spiked recovery varies from 89% to 108% for samples with different matrices, showing insignificant matrix interference in this method. PMID:26695325

  10. Optimization of crude enzyme preparation methods for analysis of glutamine synthetase activity in phytoplankton and field samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yujue; WANG Dazhi; HONG Huasheng

    2009-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is an important enzyme involved in nitrogen assimilation and metabolism in marine phytoplankton. However, little work has been done in situ due to the limitation of crude enzyme preparation methods. In this study, three enzyme preparation methods, high-speed centrifugation (HC, <10 000 g), ultracentrifugation (UC, 70 000 g), and ultrafiltration (UF) with 100 kμ, molecular weight cutoff, were compared using two diatom species (Asterionellopsis glacialis and Thalassiosira weissflogii), and two dinoflagellate species (Alexandrium catenella and Prorocentrum donghaiense) as experimental materials together with field samples collected from Xiamen Harbor, China. The results showed that HC is the best method to prepare crude enzymes for glutamine synthetase activity (GSA) in diatom species and diatom-dominant samples, while UF is the best method to extract GS from dinoflagellate species and dinoflagellate-dominant samples. For the HC method, the optimal centrifugal speed and time were 10 000 g and 35 min, respectively, and under these conditions, the highest GSA was obtained in all samples. This study indicates that both methods (HC and UF) overcome the limitation of centrifugal speed and could be applied to in situ GSA analysis, especially at sea.

  11. Automated preparation method for colloidal crystal arrays of monodisperse and binary colloid mixtures by contact printing with a pintool plotter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkert, Klaus; Neumann, Thomas; Wang, Jianjun; Jonas, Ulrich; Knoll, Wolfgang; Ottleben, Holger

    2007-03-13

    Photonic crystals and photonic band gap materials with periodic variation of the dielectric constant in the submicrometer range exhibit unique optical properties such as opalescence, optical stop bands, and photonic band gaps. As such, they represent attractive materials for the active elements in sensor arrays. Colloidal crystals, which are 3D gratings leading to Bragg diffraction, are one potential precursor of such optical materials. They have gained particular interest in many technological areas as a result of their specific properties and ease of fabrication. Although basic techniques for the preparation of regular patterns of colloidal crystals on structured substrates by self-assembly of mesoscopic particles are known, the efficient fabrication of colloidal crystal arrays by simple contact printing has not yet been reported. In this article, we present a spotting technique used to produce a microarray comprising up to 9600 single addressable sensor fields of colloidal crystal structures with dimensions down to 100 mum on a microfabricated substrate in different formats. Both monodisperse colloidal crystals and binary colloidal crystal systems were prepared by contact printing of polystyrene particles in aqueous suspension. The array morphology was characterized by optical light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, which revealed regularly ordered crystalline structures for both systems. In the case of binary crystals, the influence of the concentration ratio of the large and small particles in the printing suspension on the obtained crystal structure was investigated. The optical properties of the colloidal crystal arrays were characterized by reflection spectroscopy. To examine the stop bands of the colloidal crystal arrays in a high-throughput fashion, an optical setup based on a CCD camera was realized that allowed the simultaneous readout of all of the reflection spectra of several thousand sensor fields per array in parallel. In agreement with

  12. A Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay and Sample Preparation Procedure for Sensitive Detection of Xanthomonas fragariae in Strawberry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hehe Wang

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas fragariae is a bacterium that causes angular leaf spot of strawberry. Asymptomatic infection is common and contributes to the difficulties in disease management. The aim of this study was to develop a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay as an efficient method for detection of asymptomatic infections of X. fragariae. In addition, a new method of sample preparation was developed that allows sampling of a larger amount of plant tissue, hence increasing the detection rate in real-life samples. The sample preparation procedure includes an overnight incubation of strawberry tissues in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, followed by a quick sample concentration and a boiling step to extract DNA for amplification. The detection limit of the LAMP assay was approximately 2×10(3 CFU/mL for pure bacteria culture and 300 CFU/mL for bacteria spiked strawberry leaf and petiole samples. LAMP provided a 2-3 fold lower detection limit than the standard qPCR assay but was faster, and more user-friendly. The LAMP assay should serve as a rapid, sensitive and cost-effective tool for detecting asymptomatic infections of X. fragariae in strawberry nursery stock and contribute to improved disease management.

  13. Effort versus Reward: Preparing Samples for Fungal Community Characterization in High-Throughput Sequencing Surveys of Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zewei; Schlatter, Dan; Kennedy, Peter; Kinkel, Linda L; Kistler, H Corby; Nguyen, Nhu; Bates, Scott T

    2015-01-01

    Next generation fungal amplicon sequencing is being used with increasing frequency to study fungal diversity in various ecosystems; however, the influence of sample preparation on the characterization of fungal community is poorly understood. We investigated the effects of four procedural modifications to library preparation for high-throughput sequencing (HTS). The following treatments were considered: 1) the amount of soil used in DNA extraction, 2) the inclusion of additional steps (freeze/thaw cycles, sonication, or hot water bath incubation) in the extraction procedure, 3) the amount of DNA template used in PCR, and 4) the effect of sample pooling, either physically or computationally. Soils from two different ecosystems in Minnesota, USA, one prairie and one forest site, were used to assess the generality of our results. The first three treatments did not significantly influence observed fungal OTU richness or community structure at either site. Physical pooling captured more OTU richness compared to individual samples, but total OTU richness at each site was highest when individual samples were computationally combined. We conclude that standard extraction kit protocols are well optimized for fungal HTS surveys, but because sample pooling can significantly influence OTU richness estimates, it is important to carefully consider the study aims when planning sampling procedures. PMID:25974078

  14. Effort versus Reward: Preparing Samples for Fungal Community Characterization in High-Throughput Sequencing Surveys of Soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewei Song

    Full Text Available Next generation fungal amplicon sequencing is being used with increasing frequency to study fungal diversity in various ecosystems; however, the influence of sample preparation on the characterization of fungal community is poorly understood. We investigated the effects of four procedural modifications to library preparation for high-throughput sequencing (HTS. The following treatments were considered: 1 the amount of soil used in DNA extraction, 2 the inclusion of additional steps (freeze/thaw cycles, sonication, or hot water bath incubation in the extraction procedure, 3 the amount of DNA template used in PCR, and 4 the effect of sample pooling, either physically or computationally. Soils from two different ecosystems in Minnesota, USA, one prairie and one forest site, were used to assess the generality of our results. The first three treatments did not significantly influence observed fungal OTU richness or community structure at either site. Physical pooling captured more OTU richness compared to individual samples, but total OTU richness at each site was highest when individual samples were computationally combined. We conclude that standard extraction kit protocols are well optimized for fungal HTS surveys, but because sample pooling can significantly influence OTU richness estimates, it is important to carefully consider the study aims when planning sampling procedures.

  15. Pre-separation of biological samples using of preparative divergent flow isoelectric focusing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vykydalová, Marie; Moravcová, Dana; Kahle, Vladislav; Šlais, Karel

    Warsaw, 2009. s. 83. [International Congress of Young Chemists. 14.10.2009-18.10.2009, Warsaw] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00310701; GA MŠk LC06023 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : preparative divergent flow isoelectric focusing * extract * wheat flour Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  16. Preparation of thin gadolinium samples via electrodeposition for excitation function studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preparation method for gadolinium targets with a thickness up to 4 mg/cm2 on aluminum supports from aqueous electrolytes was developed. These electrodeposited adhesive and mechanically stable natGd layers were used to measure excitation functions of Gd + p nuclear reactions relevant to the production of medically important 152Tb (PET) and 155Tb (SPECT) radioisotopes. (author)

  17. Comparison of Chlorhexidine and Tincture of Iodine for Skin Antisepsis in Preparation for Blood Sample Collection

    OpenAIRE

    Barenfanger, Joan; Drake, Cheryl; Lawhorn, Jerry; Verhulst, Steven J.

    2004-01-01

    Rates of contamination of blood cultures obtained when skin was prepared with iodine tincture versus chlorhexidine were compared. For iodine tincture, the contamination rate was 2.7%; for chlorhexidine, it was 3.1%. The 0.41% difference is not statistically significant. Chlorhexidine has comparable effectiveness and is safer, cheaper, and preferred by staff, so it is an alternative to iodine tincture.

  18. Sample preparation module for bacterial lysis and isolation of DNA from human urine

    OpenAIRE

    Kulinski, M. Dominika; Mahalanabis, Madhumita; Gillers, Sara; Zhang, Jane Y.; Singh, Satish; Klapperich, Catherine M.

    2009-01-01

    Silica impregnated polymer monolithic columns may provide a simple method for lysing and extracting DNA from bacteria inside of microfluidic chips. Here we use Escherichia coli as a test organism for a point of care thermoplastic microfluidic module designed to take in a urine sample, mix it with lysis buffer, and perform a hybrid chemical/mechanical lysis and solid phase extraction of nucleic acids from the sample. To demonstrate proof-of-concept, we doped human hematuric urine samples with ...

  19. Sampling and preparation of air pollutants at the Coal Paiton Power Plant area Probolinggo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampling has been conducted on April 8 th to 18 th, 2012 at the plant area of Paiton Coal Power Plant using e-sampler for particulated matter PM-2,5 and PM-10, high volume air sampler for total suspended particulate (TSP) at the three sampling locations as the representative pollution. Filter before and after sampling was weighed and extremely guarded contamination. Air filters stored in desiccator filter for 24 hours. Determination of concentration of ambient air pollutants conducted by gravimetric method derived from a reduction in weight the samples on the filter PM-2,5; PM-10 and TSP to the weight of the empty filter. (author)

  20. Optimizing Frozen Sample Preparation for Laser Microdissection: Assessment of CryoJane Tape-Transfer System®.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena G Golubeva

    Full Text Available Laser microdissection is an invaluable tool in medical research that facilitates collecting specific cell populations for molecular analysis. Diversity of research targets (e.g., cancerous and precancerous lesions in clinical and animal research, cell pellets, rodent embryos, etc. and varied scientific objectives, however, present challenges toward establishing standard laser microdissection protocols. Sample preparation is crucial for quality RNA, DNA and protein retrieval, where it often determines the feasibility of a laser microdissection project. The majority of microdissection studies in clinical and animal model research are conducted on frozen tissues containing native nucleic acids, unmodified by fixation. However, the variable morphological quality of frozen sections from tissues containing fat, collagen or delicate cell structures can limit or prevent successful harvest of the desired cell population via laser dissection. The CryoJane Tape-Transfer System®, a commercial device that improves cryosectioning outcomes on glass slides has been reported superior for slide preparation and isolation of high quality osteocyte RNA (frozen bone during laser dissection. Considering the reported advantages of CryoJane for laser dissection on glass slides, we asked whether the system could also work with the plastic membrane slides used by UV laser based microdissection instruments, as these are better suited for collection of larger target areas. In an attempt to optimize laser microdissection slide preparation for tissues of different RNA stability and cryosectioning difficulty, we evaluated the CryoJane system for use with both glass (laser capture microdissection and membrane (laser cutting microdissection slides. We have established a sample preparation protocol for glass and membrane slides including manual coating of membrane slides with CryoJane solutions, cryosectioning, slide staining and dissection procedure, lysis and RNA extraction

  1. Evaluation of oxidation techniques for preparing bioassay and environmental samples for liquid scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In environmental and biological monitoring for carbon-14 and tritium, the presence of color and chemical quenching agents in the samples can degrade the efficiency of liquid scintillation counting. A series of experiments was performed to evaluate the usefulness, under routine conditions, of first oxidizing the samples to improve the counting by removing the color and quenching agents. The scintillation counter was calibrated for the effects of quenching agents on its counting efficiency. Oxidizing apparatus was tested for its ability to accurately recover the 14C and 3H in the samples. Scintillation counting efficiences were compared for a variety of oxidized and unoxidized environmental and bioassay samples. The overall conclusion was that, for routine counting, oxidation of such samples is advantageous when they are highly quenched or in solid form

  2. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions in Cancer Cell Lines and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigbeder, Alice; Vélot, Lauriane; James, D Andrew; Bisson, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    A precisely controlled network of protein-protein interactions constitutes the basis for functional signaling pathways. This equilibrium is more often than not disrupted in cancer cells, by the aberrant expression or activation of oncogenic proteins. Therefore, the analysis of protein interaction networks in cancer cells has become crucial to expand our comprehension of the molecular underpinnings of tumor formation and progression. This protocol describes a sample preparation method for the analysis of signaling complexes by mass spectrometry (MS), following the affinity purification of a protein of interest from a cancer cell line or a solid tumor. In particular, we provide a spin tip-based protease digestion procedure that offers a more rapid and controlled alternative to other gel-based and gel-free methods. This sample preparation protocol represents a useful strategy to identify protein interactions and to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms that contribute to a given cancer phenotype. PMID:27581032

  3. Evaluation of the RapidHIT™ 200, an automated human identification system for STR analysis of single source samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Mitchell; Wendt, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The RapidHIT™ 200 Human Identification System was evaluated to determine its suitability for STR analysis of single source buccal swabs. Overall, the RapidHIT™ 200 performed as well as our traditional capillary electrophoresis based method in producing useable profile information on a first-pass basis. General observations included 100% concordance with known profile information, consistent instrument performance after two weeks of buccal swab storage, and an absence of contamination in negative controls. When data analysis was performed by the instrument software, 95.3% of the 85 samples in the reproducibility study gave full profiles. Including the 81 full profiles, a total of 2682 alleles were correctly called by the instrument software, or 98.6% of 2720 possible alleles tested. Profile information was generated from as little as 10,000 nucleated cells, with swab collection technique being a major contributing factor to profile quality. The average peak-height-ratio for heterozygote profiles (81%) was comparable to conventional STR analysis, and while a high analytical threshold was required when offline profile analysis was performed (800 RFU), it was proportionally consistent with traditional methods. Stochastic sampling effects were evaluated, and a manageable approach to address limits of detection for homozygote profiles is provided. These results support consideration of the RapidHIT™ 200 as an acceptable alternative to conventional, laboratory based STR analysis for the testing of single source buccal samples, with review of profile information as a requirement until an expert software system is incorporated, and when proper developmental and internal validation studies have been completed. PMID:25286443

  4. Comparison of blood plasma sample preparation methods for combined LC-MS lipidomics and metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Rainey E; Ducrocq, Antoine J; McDougall, Danielle J; Garrett, Timothy J; Yost, Richard A

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this research was to find the most comprehensive lipid extraction of blood plasma, while also providing adequate aqueous preparation for metabolite analysis. Comparisons have been made previously of the Folch, Bligh-Dyer, and Matyash lipid extractions; furthermore, this paper provides an additional comparison of a phospholipid removal plate for analysis. This plate was used for lipid extraction rather than its intended use in lipid removal for polar analysis, and it proves to be robust for targeted lipid analysis. Folch and Matyash provided reproducible recovery over a range of lipid classes, however the Matyash aqueous layer compared well to a typical methanol preparation for polar metabolite analysis. Thus, the Matyash method is the best choice for an untargeted biphasic extraction for metabolomics and lipidomics in blood plasma. PMID:26343017

  5. Sample preparation for an optimized extraction of localized metabolites in lichens: Application to Pseudevernia furfuracea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaty, Sarah; Letertre, Marine; Dang, Huyen Duong; Jungnickel, Harald; Laux, Peter; Luch, Andreas; Carrié, Daniel; Merdrignac-Conanec, Odile; Bazureau, Jean-Pierre; Gauffre, Fabienne; Tomasi, Sophie; Paquin, Ludovic

    2016-04-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms known for producing unique secondary metabolites with attractive cosmetic and pharmacological properties. In this paper, we investigated three standard methods of preparation of Pseudevernia furfuracea (blender grinding, ball milling, pestle and mortar). The materials obtained were characterized by electronic microscopy, nitrogen adsorption and compared from the point of view of extraction. Their microscopic structure is related to extraction efficiency. In addition, it is shown using thalline reactions and mass spectrometry mapping (TOF-SIMS) that these metabolites are not evenly distributed throughout the organism. Particularly, atranorin (a secondary metabolite of interest) is mainly present in the cortex of P. furfuracea. Finally, using microwave assisted extraction (MAE) we obtained evidence that an appropriate preparation can increase the extraction efficiency of atranorin by a factor of five. PMID:26838439

  6. Preparation of 183,184Re samples for modelling a rapid gas phase chemistry of Nielsbohrium (Ns), element 107

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical gas phase reactions of the heavier group 7 elements in the system O2/H2O are presumably best suited for a separation of Nielsbohrium from the lighter transactinides. We expect a higher reaction velocity using the more reactive gas system O3/H2O2. For the experimental verification of this idea we prepared 183Re/184Re samples for thermochromatography experiments with both gas systems. (author) 8 refs

  7. Variation in ebmental quantification by X-ray fluorescence analysis in crystalline materials when applying pressure in sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work making use of the diffraction and fluorescence techniques its were determined the presence of elements in a known compound ZrSiO4 under different pressure conditions. At preparing the samples it were applied different pressures from 1600 until 350 k N/m2 and it is detected the apparent variations in concentration in the Zr and Si elements. (Author)

  8. The beauty of being (label)-free: sample preparation methods for SWATH-MS and next-generation targeted proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Jakob Vowinckel; Floriana Capuano; Kate Campbell; Deery, Michael J.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Markus Ralser

    2013-01-01

    The combination of qualitative analysis with label-free quantification has greatly facilitated the throughput and flexibility of novel proteomic techniques. However, such methods rely heavily on robust and reproducible sample preparation procedures. Here, we benchmark a selection of in gel, on filter, and in solution digestion workflows for their application in label-free proteomics. Each procedure was associated with differing advantages and disadvantages. The in gel methods interrogated wer...

  9. Optimized sample preparation for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of soluble proteins from chicken bursa of Fabricius

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Xiaojuan; Zhang Xin; Zhou Jiyong; Wu Yongping; Jiang Xuetao; Shi Lixue; Yin Wei; Wang Junhua

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) is a powerful method to study protein expression and function in living organisms and diseases. This technique, however, has not been applied to avian bursa of Fabricius (BF), a central immune organ. Here, optimized 2-DE sample preparation methodologies were constructed for the chicken BF tissue. Using the optimized protocol, we performed further 2-DE analysis on a soluble protein extract from the BF of chickens infected with viru...

  10. Reduction of the nitro group during sample preparation may cause underestimation of the nitration level in 3-nitrotyrosine immunoblotting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderling, Ann-Sofi; Hultman, Lena; Delbro, Dick;

    2007-01-01

    inflammatory stimulated rat abdominal, liver and lung tissue homogenates caused no immunoreactivity, in contrast to a polyclonal nitrotyrosine antibody applied in fixed and non-fixed tissues. Western blot studies using both mono- and polyclonal antibodies showed a temperature- and heme group...... detected by anti-NO(2)Tyr antibodies. Western blot analysis may therefore underestimate the level of tissue nitration, and factors causing a reduction of NO(2)Tyr during sample preparation might conceal the actual nitration of proteins....

  11. Comparative investigation of sample preparation techniques for atomic-absorption determination of copper, nickel, cadmium in wood flour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative study of two methods of sample preparation (acid decomposition and dry calculation) for atomic-absorption content of copper, nickel and cadmium in wood flour, has been conducted. It is shown that for a certain content of copper and nickel (from 6 to 40 μg/g) it is recommended that the method of dry calcination is used, for cadmium determination (its content being 1-2 μg/g) both methods are applicable

  12. Preparation of quality control samples for its use in the radioimmunoassay de T3, T4 and TSH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of quality control samples is necessary to evaluate, in a very simple way, the quality of the assays in the radioimmunoanalysis, since allows to settle down a quality control intra and inter analysis. In this work the methodology used for the preparation of these samples with low, media and high concentration for hormones related with the thyroid is shown, being obtained the following concentrations: 50, 200 and 500 ng/dl for T3; 5.6, 7.8 and 14.4 μ g/dl for T4 and 5.4, 13.4 and >50 μ U I/ml for TSH. (Author)

  13. Bead-releasing agents used in the preparation of solid samples as beads for WD-XRF measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Gazulla Barreda, María Fernanda; Barba Juan, Antonio; Orduña, Mónica; Rodrigo, Marta

    2008-01-01

    A study has been undertaken of bead-releasing agents that are widely used in preparing solid samples as fused beads for wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF)spectrometry measurement. The following bead-releasing agents were studied: NaI, LiBr, NH4I, and LiI. Each was incorporated in different quantities, as a solid and/or in an aqueous solution, together with a flux, into samples of ceramic raw materials. Release agent interference in the WD-XRF measurement was analyse...

  14. Large-scale calcium metal sample preparation for 41Ca isotope enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments are underway at Argonne National Laboratory to measure the 41Ca radioisotope concentration (T1/2 = 100 000 years) in natural samples of terrestrial origin by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Since the concentration of 41Ca in these samples is expected to be very low, enrichment with a Calutron Isotope Separator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is being used. This separator requires rather large quantities of high-purity Ca metal (typically 100 g/loading) as source material. Details of the methods of obtaining these metallic samples from various materials will be presented. (orig.)

  15. Powder Handling Device for X-ray Diffraction Analysis with Minimal Sample Preparation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project consists in developing a Vibrating Powder Handling System for planetary X-Ray Diffraction instruments. The principle of this novel sample handling...

  16. Lead biomonitoring in different organs of lead intoxicated rats employing GF AAS and different sample preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Rafael Arromba; Sabarense, Céphora Maria; Prado, Gustavo L P; Metze, Konradin; Cadore, Solange

    2013-01-30

    An analytical procedure was developed for the determination of lead in different tissues from Wistar Hanover rats, previously intoxicated with lead acetate during a toxicological study. About 25 mg of dried sample (bone, liver, kidney, heart, lung and spleen) were mixed with 8.0 mL of 7.00 mol L(-1) nitric acid and digested using microwave radiation in closed vessel. Except for the bone samples, the other tissues could also be analyzed after alkaline solubilization with TMAH. All the digested or solubilized samples were analyzed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Good accuracy and precision were attained when analyzing reference standard materials (for bone, liver and kidney) and also from addition to recovery experiments (for heart, lung and spleen tissues). The method was applied to samples from nine animals and the results suggested that there is a profile for lead bioaccumulation in these animals, which seemed to adapt themselves to continuous lead exposure. PMID:23597893

  17. Rapid screening and analysis of alpha- and gamma-emitting radionuclides in liquids using a single sample preparation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Bahman; Henitz, James B; Carter, Jennifer A

    2011-02-01

    A multifaceted radiochemical testing procedure has been developed to analyze a large number of liquid samples and measure a wide range of radionuclides in a short period of time. This method involves a single, unique and fast sample preparation procedure and allows sequential/concurrent determination of analytes with accuracy and precision. The same prepared sample can be selectively analyzed by gross alpha counting, gamma-ray spectroscopy, and alpha spectroscopy. This method is especially attractive in radiological emergency events where analytical data will be needed urgently as a basis for protective action. Given the simplicity and rapidity of the method, it may be suitable for field portable laboratories, which could save time and the cost associated with the transit of samples to a fixed laboratory. A 100 mL aliquot of sample was spiked with ¹³³Ba and ⁵⁹Fe tracers and subjected to a chemical separation procedure using a combined BaSO4 and Fe(OH)3 co-precipitation scheme. Then, the gross alpha-particle activity of the prepared sample was measured with a low-background gas-proportional counter, followed by the analysis of its photon-emitters using a gamma-ray spectroscopy system with high-purity intrinsic Ge detectors. Gamma-ray determination of ¹³³Ba and ⁵⁹Fe tracers was used to assess the chemical recoveries of BaSO4 and Fe(OH)3 fractions, respectively. Selectivity of the radionuclides for co-precipitation with either BaSO4 or Fe(OH)3 components was also investigated. Alpha mass-efficiency curves were derived using ²³⁰Th and ²⁴¹Am standards as alpha-calibration sources. Various mixtures of radionuclides, including ⁵⁴Mn, ⁵⁷Co, ⁶⁰Co, ⁸⁵Sr, ⁸⁸Y, ¹⁰⁹Cd, ¹¹³Sn, ¹³⁷Cs, ¹³⁹Ce, ²⁰³Hg, ²⁰⁹Po, ²²⁶Ra, ²²⁸Ra, ²³⁰Th, ²⁴¹Am, and natural uranium were used in this study. Most were quantitatively assayed with high chemical recoveries. Alpha-isotope identification and assessment of the prepared

  18. Sample preparation of sewage sludge and soil samples for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons based on one-pot microwave-assisted saponification and extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, M Teresa; Pensado, Luis; Casais, M Carmen; Mejuto, M Carmen; Cela, Rafael

    2007-04-01

    A microwave-assisted sample preparation (MASP) procedure was developed for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge and soil samples. The procedure involved the simultaneous microwave-assisted extraction of PAHs with n-hexane and the hydrolysis of samples with methanolic potassium hydroxide. Because of the complex nature of the samples, the extracts were submitted to further cleaning with silica and Florisil solid-phase extraction cartridges connected in series. Naphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[e]pyrene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, dibenz[a,h]anthracene, benzo[g,h,i]perylene, and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, were considered in the study. Quantification limits obtained for all of these compounds (between 0.4 and 14.8 microg kg(-1) dry mass) were well below of the limits recommended in the USA and EU. Overall recovery values ranged from 60 to 100%, with most losses being due to evaporation in the solvent exchange stages of the procedure, although excellent extraction recoveries were obtained. Validation of the accuracy was carried out with BCR-088 (sewage sludge) and BCR-524 (contaminated industrial soil) reference materials. PMID:17268774

  19. Sample preparation of sewage sludge and soil samples for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons based on one-pot microwave-assisted saponification and extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, M.T.; Pensado, Luis; Casais, M.C.; Mejuto, M.C.; Cela, Rafael [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Dpto. Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia. Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2007-04-15

    A microwave-assisted sample preparation (MASP) procedure was developed for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge and soil samples. The procedure involved the simultaneous microwave-assisted extraction of PAHs with n-hexane and the hydrolysis of samples with methanolic potassium hydroxide. Because of the complex nature of the samples, the extracts were submitted to further cleaning with silica and Florisil solid-phase extraction cartridges connected in series. Naphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[e]pyrene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, dibenz[a,h]anthracene, benzo[g,h,i]perylene, and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, were considered in the study. Quantification limits obtained for all of these compounds (between 0.4 and 14.8 {mu}g kg{sup -1} dry mass) were well below of the limits recommended in the USA and EU. Overall recovery values ranged from 60 to 100%, with most losses being due to evaporation in the solvent exchange stages of the procedure, although excellent extraction recoveries were obtained. Validation of the accuracy was carried out with BCR-088 (sewage sludge) and BCR-524 (contaminated industrial soil) reference materials. (orig.)

  20. Sample preparation and biomass determination of SRF model mixture using cryogenic milling and the adapted balance method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnöller, Johannes, E-mail: johannes.schnoeller@chello.at; Aschenbrenner, Philipp; Hahn, Manuel; Fellner, Johann; Rechberger, Helmut

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • An alternative sample comminution procedure for SRF is tested. • Proof of principle is shown on a SRF model mixture. • The biogenic content of the SRF is analyzed with the adapted balance method. • The novel method combines combustion analysis and a data reconciliation algorithm. • Factors for the variance of the analysis results are statistically quantified. - Abstract: The biogenic fraction of a simple solid recovered fuel (SRF) mixture (80 wt% printer paper/20 wt% high density polyethylene) is analyzed with the in-house developed adapted balance method (aBM). This fairly new approach is a combination of combustion elemental analysis (CHNS) and a data reconciliation algorithm based on successive linearisation for evaluation of the analysis results. This method shows a great potential as an alternative way to determine the biomass content in SRF. However, the employed analytical technique (CHNS elemental analysis) restricts the probed sample mass to low amounts in the range of a few hundred milligrams. This requires sample comminution to small grain sizes (<200 μm) to generate representative SRF specimen. This is not easily accomplished for certain material mixtures (e.g. SRF with rubber content) by conventional means of sample size reduction. This paper presents a proof of principle investigation of the sample preparation and analysis of an SRF model mixture with the use of cryogenic impact milling (final sample comminution) and the adapted balance method (determination of biomass content). The so derived sample preparation methodology (cutting mills and cryogenic impact milling) shows a better performance in accuracy and precision for the determination of the biomass content than one solely based on cutting mills. The results for the determination of the biogenic fraction are within 1–5% of the data obtained by the reference methods, selective dissolution method (SDM) and {sup 14}C-method ({sup 14}C-M)